WorldWideScience

Sample records for susceptibility thermometry called

  1. Thermometry in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prerna Batra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate measurement of temperature is important for detection of fever and hypothermia in pediatric patients. Ideal temperature-measurement technique should be safe, easy, noninvasive, cost effective, time efficient, and should precisely reflect core body temperature. Pulmonary artery is the closest to hypothalamus and best reflects the core temperature. Other sites used are distal esophagus, urinary bladder and nasopharynx. All these methods are invasive and difficult to use in clinical practice. Amongst the noninvasive methods, rectal thermometry is considered to be the closest to core temperature, but it has its own drawbacks. With the current evidence available, tympanic artery thermometry for children more than 2 years of age and temporal artery thermometry in all age groups are taking precedence over other methods.

  2. Whispering Gallery Mode Thermometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbellini, Simone; Ramella, Chiara; Yu, Lili; Pirola, Marco; Fernicola, Vito

    2016-10-29

    This paper presents a state-of-the-art whispering gallery mode (WGM) thermometer system, which could replace platinum resistance thermometers currently used in many industrial applications, thus overcoming some of their well-known limitations and their potential for providing lower measurement uncertainty. The temperature-sensing element is a sapphire-crystal-based whispering gallery mode resonator with the main resonant modes between 10 GHz and 20 GHz. In particular, it was found that the WGM around 13.6 GHz maximizes measurement performance, affording sub-millikelvin resolution and temperature stability of better than 1 mK at 0 °C. The thermometer system was made portable and low-cost by developing an ad hoc interrogation system (hardware and software) able to achieve an accuracy in the order of a few parts in 10⁸ in the determination of resonance frequencies. Herein we report the experimental assessment of the measurement stability, repeatability and resolution, and the calibration of the thermometer in the temperature range from -74 °C to 85 °C. The combined standard uncertainty for a single temperature calibration point is found to be within 5 mK (i.e., comparable with state-of-the-art for industrial thermometry), and is mainly due to the employed calibration setup. The uncertainty contribution of the WGM thermometer alone is within a millikelvin.

  3. Whispering Gallery Mode Thermometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Corbellini

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a state-of-the-art whispering gallery mode (WGM thermometer system, which could replace platinum resistance thermometers currently used in many industrial applications, thus overcoming some of their well-known limitations and their potential for providing lower measurement uncertainty. The temperature-sensing element is a sapphire-crystal-based whispering gallery mode resonator with the main resonant modes between 10 GHz and 20 GHz. In particular, it was found that the WGM around 13.6 GHz maximizes measurement performance, affording sub-millikelvin resolution and temperature stability of better than 1 mK at 0 °C. The thermometer system was made portable and low-cost by developing an ad hoc interrogation system (hardware and software able to achieve an accuracy in the order of a few parts in 109 in the determination of resonance frequencies. Herein we report the experimental assessment of the measurement stability, repeatability and resolution, and the calibration of the thermometer in the temperature range from −74 °C to 85 °C. The combined standard uncertainty for a single temperature calibration point is found to be within 5 mK (i.e., comparable with state-of-the-art for industrial thermometry, and is mainly due to the employed calibration setup. The uncertainty contribution of the WGM thermometer alone is within a millikelvin.

  4. Fiber Bragg Grating Based Thermometry

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmed, Zeeshan; Guthrie, William; Quintavalle, John

    2016-01-01

    In recent years there has been considerable interest in developing photonic temperature sensors such as the Fiber Bragg gratings (FBG) as an alternative to resistance thermometry. In this study we examine the thermal response of FBGs over the temperature range of 233 K to 393 K. We demonstrate, in a hermetically sealed dry Argon environment, that FBG devices show a quadratic dependence on temperature with expanded uncertainties (k = 2) of ~500 mK. Our measurements indicate that the combined measurement uncertainty is dominated by uncertainty in determining the peak center fitting and by thermal aging of polyimide coated fibers.

  5. Optimal quantum thermometry by dephasing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Dong; Xu, Chunling; Wang, An Min

    2017-06-01

    Decoherence often happens in the quantum world. We try to utilize quantum dephasing to build an optimal thermometry. By calculating the Cramér-Rao bound, we prove that the Ramsey measurement is the optimal way to measure the temperature for uncorrelated probe particles. Using the optimal measurement, the metrological equivalence of product and maximally entangled state of initial quantum probes always holds. Contrary to frequency estimation, the optimal temperature estimation can be obtained in the case ν 1. For the general Zeno regime (ν =2), uncorrelated product states are the optimal choice in typical Ramsey spectroscopy setup. In order to improve the resolution of temperature, one should reduce the characteristic time of dephasing factor γ (t)∝ t^2, and the power ν new way to measure non-Markovian effect.

  6. High Repetition Rate Thermometry System And Method

    KAUST Repository

    Chrystie, Robin

    2015-05-14

    A system and method for rapid thermometry using intrapulse spectroscopy can include a laser for propagating pulses of electromagnetic radiation to a region. Each of the pulses can be chirped. The pulses from the region can be detected. An intrapulse absorbance spectrum can be determined from the pulses. An instantaneous temperature of the region based on the intrapulse absorbance spectrum can be determined.

  7. CT-based thermometry: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fani, F; Schena, E; Saccomandi, P; Silvestri, S

    2014-06-01

    The dependence of computed tomography (CT) values on temperature has been pointed out by several authors since the late 1970s. They emphasised the importance of this phenomenon on the calibration process with water equivalent phantoms of the CT scanners. Few years later the potential of CT thermometry for non-invasive temperature mapping during thermal procedures was investigated. The interest on the employment of this technique during thermal treatments has been recently renewed with the improvement of modern CT scanner performances and with the increased popularity of minimally invasive thermal techniques for cancer treatment. A good thermometry allows avoiding unintended damage of the healthy tissues during the procedure by providing a detailed tissue temperature distribution; therefore, it is recommended in order to achieve good effectiveness of the thermal treatment. Researchers have been working on this issue for more than four decades and different non-invasive solutions have been proposed, i.e., microwave thermal imaging, infrared (IR)-, ultrasound-, magnetic-resonance (MR)-, and CT-based thermometry. This review aims to summarise the essential physics and the currently available data on CT-based thermometry and to elucidate the potential use of this technique during thermal procedures. Background information on measuring principle, an investigation of the performances achieved by this technique and the thermal sensitivity of the CT-number of different organs are provided and discussed.

  8. Influence of geometric and material properties on artifacts generated by interventional MRI devices: Relevance to PRF-shift thermometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatebe, Ken; Ramsay, Elizabeth; Mougenot, Charles; Kazem, Mohammad; Peikari, Hamed; Bronskill, Michael; Chopra, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is capable of providing valuable real-time feedback during medical procedures, partly due to the excellent soft-tissue contrast available. Several technical hurdles still exist to seamless integration of medical devices with MRI due to incompatibility of most conventional devices with this imaging modality. In this study, the effect of local perturbations in the magnetic field caused by the magnetization of medical devices was examined using finite element analysis modeling. As an example, the influence of the geometric and material characteristics of a transurethral high-intensity ultrasound applicator on temperature measurements using proton resonance frequency (PRF)-shift thermometry was investigated. The effect of local perturbations in the magnetic field, caused by the magnetization of medical device components, was examined using finite element analysis modeling. The thermometry artifact generated by a transurethral ultrasound applicator was simulated, and these results were validated against analytic models and scans of an applicator in a phantom. Several parameters were then varied to identify which most strongly impacted the level of simulated thermometry artifact, which varies as the applicator moves over the course of an ablative high-intensity ultrasound treatment. Key design parameters identified as having a strong influence on the magnitude of thermometry artifact included the susceptibility of materials and their volume. The location of components was also important, particularly when positioned to maximize symmetry of the device. Finally, the location of component edges and the inclination of the device relative to the magnetic field were also found to be important factors. Previous design strategies to minimize thermometry artifact were validated, and novel design strategies were identified that substantially reduce PRF-shift thermometry artifacts for a variety of device orientations. These new strategies are being

  9. Influence of geometric and material properties on artifacts generated by interventional MRI devices: Relevance to PRF-shift thermometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatebe, Ken, E-mail: Ken.Tatebe@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, 5323 Harry Hines Boulevard, Dallas, Texas 75390 (United States); Ramsay, Elizabeth; Kazem, Mohammad; Peikari, Hamed [Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N3M5 (Canada); Mougenot, Charles [Philips Healthcare, 281 Hillmount Road, Markham, Ontario L6C 2S3 (Canada); Bronskill, Michael [Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N3M5, Canada and Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G2M9 (Canada); Chopra, Rajiv [Department of Radiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, 5323 Harry Hines Boulevard, Dallas, Texas 75390 (United States); Advanced Imaging Research Center, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, 5323 Harry Hines Boulevard, Dallas, Texas 75390 (United States); Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N3M5 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G2M9 (Canada)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is capable of providing valuable real-time feedback during medical procedures, partly due to the excellent soft-tissue contrast available. Several technical hurdles still exist to seamless integration of medical devices with MRI due to incompatibility of most conventional devices with this imaging modality. In this study, the effect of local perturbations in the magnetic field caused by the magnetization of medical devices was examined using finite element analysis modeling. As an example, the influence of the geometric and material characteristics of a transurethral high-intensity ultrasound applicator on temperature measurements using proton resonance frequency (PRF)-shift thermometry was investigated. Methods: The effect of local perturbations in the magnetic field, caused by the magnetization of medical device components, was examined using finite element analysis modeling. The thermometry artifact generated by a transurethral ultrasound applicator was simulated, and these results were validated against analytic models and scans of an applicator in a phantom. Several parameters were then varied to identify which most strongly impacted the level of simulated thermometry artifact, which varies as the applicator moves over the course of an ablative high-intensity ultrasound treatment. Results: Key design parameters identified as having a strong influence on the magnitude of thermometry artifact included the susceptibility of materials and their volume. The location of components was also important, particularly when positioned to maximize symmetry of the device. Finally, the location of component edges and the inclination of the device relative to the magnetic field were also found to be important factors. Conclusions: Previous design strategies to minimize thermometry artifact were validated, and novel design strategies were identified that substantially reduce PRF-shift thermometry artifacts for a variety of device

  10. Passive Acoustic Thermometry Using Low-Frequency Deep Water Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    design of future cabled or autonomous ocean observatory systems for passive ocean monitoring. WORK COMPLETED Deep oceans play a major role in...1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Passive Acoustic Thermometry Using Low-Frequency Deep ...thermometry using Cross-correlation processing of deep water ambient noise. OBJECTIVE Our previous research effort has demonstrated that coherent

  11. Metal-organic frameworks for luminescence thermometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yuanjing; Zhu, Fengliang; Chen, Banglin; Qian, Guodong

    2015-05-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) hold great promise for developing various types of luminescent sensors due to their remarkable structural diversity and tunable luminescence properties. In the last few years, utilizing luminescent MOFs to explore temperature sensing has gained intense attention. In this feature article, after the general description of luminescence thermometry, we have summarized the recent progress made in luminescent MOF thermometers, with particular emphasis on the dual-emitting MOFs that effectively illustrate the self-referencing temperature measurement based on the intensity ratios of two separate transitions.

  12. Ultrasound thermometry in transparent and opaque fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fife, S.; Andereck, C.D. [Department of Physics, Ohio State University, 43210, Columbus, OH (United States); Rahal, S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Batna, Batna (Algeria)

    2003-08-01

    We have exploited the temperature dependence of sound velocity to measure the thermal fields in transparent and opaque fluids. A chamber containing glycerol undergoing Rayleigh-Benard convection was probed with an ultrasound transducer operating in the pulse-echo mode. The times-of-flight for the ultrasound pulse to traverse the fluid at several transducer locations were converted into a temperature profile that is in qualitative agreement with simultaneous thermochromic liquid crystal visualization of the flow pattern. Temperature profiles in a mercury-filled stainless steel chamber have also been obtained, both for quiescent and turbulent flows, thereby validating the ultrasound thermometry concept for opaque fluids as well. (orig.)

  13. CARIAA Call - Call Document

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    CARIAA

    2013-02-19

    Feb 19, 2013 ... Canada's International Development Research Centre (IDRC) is pleased to announce a call for concept notes as part of the Collaborative Adaptation Research Initiative in Africa and Asia (CARIAA) program. Funded by IDRC and the United Kingdom's Department for International Development (DFID), ...

  14. MR thermometry for monitoring tumor ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senneville, Baudouin D. de; Quesson, Bruno; Dragonu, Iulius; Moonen, Chrit T.W. [CNRS/Universite Bordeaux 2, Laboratory for Molecular and Functional Imaging: From Physiology to Therapy, Bordeaux (France); Mougenot, Charles [CNRS/Universite Bordeaux 2, Laboratory for Molecular and Functional Imaging: From Physiology to Therapy, Bordeaux (France); Philips Systemes Medicaux, Suresnes (France); Grenier, Nicolas [CNRS/Universite Bordeaux 2, Laboratory for Molecular and Functional Imaging: From Physiology to Therapy, Bordeaux (France); Service de Radiologie-CHU Pellegrin, Bordeaux (France)

    2007-09-15

    Local thermal therapies are increasingly used in the clinic for tissue ablation. During energy deposition, the actual tissue temperature is difficult to estimate since physiological processes may modify local heat conduction and energy absorption. Blood flow may increase during temperature increase and thus change heat conduction. In order to improve the therapeutic efficiency and the safety of the intervention, mapping of temperature and thermal dose appear to offer the best strategy to optimize such interventions and to provide therapy endpoints. MRI can be used to monitor local temperature changes during thermal therapies. On-line availability of dynamic temperature mapping allows prediction of tissue death during the intervention based on semi-empirical thermal dose calculations. Much progress has been made recently in MR thermometry research, and some applications are appearing in the clinic. In this paper, the principles of MRI temperature mapping are described with special emphasis on methods employing the temperature dependency of the water proton resonance frequency. Then, the prospects and requirements for widespread applications of MR thermometry in the clinic are evaluated. (orig.)

  15. Comparison of non-contact infrared thermometry and rectal thermometry in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutt, Kelly R; Levy, Julie K; Tucker, Sylvia J

    2016-10-01

    Body temperature is commonly used for assessing health and identifying infectious diseases in cats. Rectal thermometry, the most commonly used method, is stressful, invasive and time consuming. Non-contact infrared thermometry (NIRT) has been used with mixed success to measure temperature in humans and other species. The purpose of this study was to determine if NIRT measurements were comparable to rectal temperature measurements or, if not highly correlated, could at least identify cats in the hypothermic or hyperthermic range in need of further evaluation. From a total of six NIRT devices and 15 anatomic sites, three devices and three sites (pinna, gingiva and perineum) with the highest correlation to rectal temperature were selected for further study. Measurements were made in 188 adult cats housed indoors at animal shelters, veterinary clinics and private homes across a wide range of body temperatures and compared with rectal temperatures. Bland-Altman analysis revealed poor agreement between NIRT and rectal thermometry. The mean NIRT measurements ranged from 0.7-1.3°C below the mean rectal measurements, but the effect was not consistent; NIRT measurements tended to exceed rectal measurements in hypothermic cats and fall below rectal measurements in normothermic and hyperthermic cats. The accuracy of temperature measurements using NIRT devices is not reliable for clinical use in cats. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. MR safety: fast T₁ thermometry of the RF-induced heating of medical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gensler, D; Fidler, F; Ehses, P; Warmuth, M; Reiter, T; Düring, M; Ritter, O; Ladd, M E; Quick, H H; Jakob, P M; Bauer, W R; Nordbeck, P

    2012-11-01

    Determining the MR compatibility of medical implants and devices is becoming increasingly relevant. In most cases, the heating of conductive implants due to radiefrequency (RF) excitation pulses is measured by fluoroptic temperature sensors in relevant tests for approval. Another common method to determine these heating effects is MR thermometry using the proton resonance frequency. This method gives good results in homogeneous phantoms. However in many cases, technical shortcomings such as susceptibility artifacts prohibit exact proton resonance frequency thermometry near medical implants. Therefore, this work aimed at developing a fast T₁-based method which allows controlled MR-related heating of a medical implant while simultaneously quantifying the spatial and temporal temperature distribution. To this end, an inversion recovery snapshot Fast Low-Angle Shot (FLASH) sequence was modified with additional off-resonant heating pulses. With an accelerated imaging method and a sliding-window technique, every 7.6 s a new temperature map could be generated with a spatial in-plane resolution of 2 mm. The temperature deviation from calculated temperature values to reference fluoroptic probe was found to be smaller than 1 K. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Tuned-circuit Johnson noise thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, M. J.; Blalock, T. V.; Shepard, R. L.

    Three tuned circuits that can be used in Johnson noise thermometry have been analyzed; series resistance-inductance-capacitance (RLC), parallel RLC, and transformer coupled. Tuned circuits allow the temperature of the sensor to be determined by a single noise voltage, which is ideally independent of the resistance of the sensor, thereby reducing the complexity of temperature-measuring systems for space applications. Direct-coupled and transformer-coupled tuned circuits may offer advantage to the SP-100 system designer interfacing with data systems. A study was performed to establish whether the advantages of the ideal tuned circuits would be obtained with real, lossy inductive components and would provide a measurement system independent of aging and temperature effects on sensor resistance. Theoretical mean-squared output voltage dependence on sensor temperature and resistance, output capacitor value, and inductor temperature and resistance are derived for the series and parallel RLC cases. It is shown for tuned circuits using lossless inductors that the mean squared voltage is kT sub R/C, where T sub R is the sensor temperature and C is the capacitance of the capacitor. For lossy inductors and transformers, the mean-squared capacitor voltage is a function of sensor resistance, which may change in an unknown manner during an extended mission.

  18. Ultrasonic thermometry simulation in a random fluctuating medium: Evidence of the acoustic signature of a one-percent temperature difference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaso, M; Moysan, J; Benjeddou, S; Massacret, N; Ploix, M A; Komatitsch, D; Lhuillier, C

    2016-05-01

    We study the development potential of ultrasonic thermometry in a liquid fluctuating sodium environment similar to that present in a Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor, and thus investigate if and how ultrasonic thermometry could be used to monitor the sodium flow at the outlet of the reactor core. In particular we study if small temperature variations in the sodium flow of e.g. about 1% of the sodium temperature, i.e., about 5°C, can have a reliably-measurable acoustic signature. Since to our knowledge no experimental setups are available for such a study, and considering the practical difficulties of experimentation in sodium, we resort to a numerical technique for full wave propagation called the spectral-element method, which is a highly accurate finite-element method owing to the high-degree basis functions it uses. We obtain clear time-of-flight variations in the case of a small temperature difference of one percent in the case of a static temperature gradient as well as in the presence of a random fluctuation of the temperature field in the turbulent flow. The numerical simulations underline the potential of ultrasonic thermometry in such a context. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Phase Detection aided Thermometry for Two-Phase Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeyama, Mao; Kunugi, Tomoaki; Kawara, Zensaku; Yokomine, Takehiko

    2017-11-01

    Since temperature and void fraction (or phase fraction) are important parameters to characterize and grasp multiphase flow behaviors, various methods have been developed and applied to. However, these multi-phase flow parameters cannot be measured at the same time and position because they need the individual sensor. A new thermometry to detect the phase for two-phase flow and simultaneously measure the liquid/gas temperature with a miniature thermocouple with high temporal-spatial resolutions is developed; this method was named as a phase detection aided thermometry (PDaT). The principle of PDaT is that a miniature (φ25 μm) thermocouple with 10 kHz of the sampling rate is used not only as a thermometer with the high temporal-spatial resolution, but also as an electrical conductance probe as a phase detector. The results of the proof of principle experiments will be presented.

  20. Josephson noise thermometry with high temperature superconducting devices

    CERN Document Server

    Peden, D A

    2000-01-01

    High Temperature Superconducting devices for absolute Noise Thermometry are under development for the measurement of temperature in the 10-50 K range. This Thesis is concerned with two complementary methods which have been developed in parallel. The first technique, Josephson Linewidth Thermometry, uses a HTS Josephson junction shunted by a low resistance noble metal resistor. The conversion of thermal voltage fluctuations via the ac Josephson effect results in thermal broadening of the Josephson oscillation linewidth. Single and double junction HTS R-SQUIDs have been fabricated where a shunt resistance approx 25 mu OMEGA has been achieved. In the double junction R-SQUIDs, where the voltage across the terminals is modulated at the Josephson heterodyne frequency, the first reported observations of Josephson heterodyne oscillations in HTS R-SQUIDs have been made and the linearity of the voltage-frequency relationship established. The second approach, known as the Quantum Roulette Noise Thermometer, uses the the...

  1. Enhancement of low-temperature thermometry by strong coupling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Correa, Luis A.; Perarnau-Llobet, Marti; Hovhannisyan, Karen V.

    2017-01-01

    We consider the problem of estimating the temperature T of a very cold equilibrium sample. The temperature estimates are drawn from measurements performed on a quantum Brownian probe strongly coupled to it. We model this scenario by resorting to the canonical Caldeira-Leggett Hamiltonian and find......-sample coupling may be engineered to further improve thermometric performance. These observations may find applications in practical nanoscale thermometry at low temperatures-a regime which is particularly relevant to quantum technologies....... analytically the exact stationary state of the probe for arbitrary coupling strength. In general, the probe does not reach thermal equilibrium with the sample, due to their nonperturbative interaction. We argue that this is advantageous for low-temperature thermometry, as we show in our model that (i...

  2. Temperature mapping of operating nanoscale devices by scanning probe thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menges, Fabian; Mensch, Philipp; Schmid, Heinz; Riel, Heike; Stemmer, Andreas; Gotsmann, Bernd

    2016-03-01

    Imaging temperature fields at the nanoscale is a central challenge in various areas of science and technology. Nanoscopic hotspots, such as those observed in integrated circuits or plasmonic nanostructures, can be used to modify the local properties of matter, govern physical processes, activate chemical reactions and trigger biological mechanisms in living organisms. The development of high-resolution thermometry techniques is essential for understanding local thermal non-equilibrium processes during the operation of numerous nanoscale devices. Here we present a technique to map temperature fields using a scanning thermal microscope. Our method permits the elimination of tip-sample contact-related artefacts, a major hurdle that so far has limited the use of scanning probe microscopy for nanoscale thermometry. We map local Peltier effects at the metal-semiconductor contacts to an indium arsenide nanowire and self-heating of a metal interconnect with 7 mK and sub-10 nm spatial temperature resolution.

  3. Global and local thermometry schemes in coupled quantum systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Steve; Mehboudi, Mohammad; De Chiara, Gabriele; Paternostro, Mauro

    2017-10-01

    We study the ultimate bounds on the estimation of temperature for an interacting quantum system. We consider two coupled bosonic modes that are assumed to be thermal and using quantum estimation theory establish the role the Hamiltonian parameters play in thermometry. We show that in the case of a conserved particle number the interaction between the modes leads to a decrease in the overall sensitivity to temperature, while interestingly, if particle exchange is allowed with the thermal bath the converse is true. We explain this dichotomy by examining the energy spectra. Finally, we devise experimentally implementable thermometry schemes that rely only on locally accessible information from the total system, showing that almost Heisenberg limited precision can still be achieved, and we address the (im)possibility for multiparameter estimation in the system.

  4. Shot Noise Thermometry for Thermal Characterization of Templated Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Sayer, Robert A; Kim, Sunkook; Franklin, Aaron D; Mohammadi, Saeed; Fisher, Timothy

    2010-01-01

    A carbon nanotube (CNT) thermometer that operates on the principles of electrical shot noise is reported. Shot noise thermometry is a self-calibrating measurement technique that relates statistical fluctuations in dc current across a device to temperature. A structure consisting of vertical, top, and bottom-contacted single-walled carbon nanotubes in a porous anodic alumina template was fabricated and used to measure shot noise. Frequencies between 60 and 100 kHz were observed to preclude sig...

  5. MR thermometry in fat-containing tissues for MR-guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baron, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the research was to improve and apply MR thermometry techniques in fat -containing tissues. These thermometry methods were researched with the aim of applying them for MR-HIFU treatment of breast and liver tumors. The first study demonstrated the sensitivity of proton resonance frequency

  6. EMERGENCY CALLS

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    IN URGENT NEED OF A DOCTOR GENEVA EMERGENCY SERVICES GENEVA AND VAUD 144 FIRE BRIGADE 118 POLICE 117 CERN FIREMEN 767-44-44 ANTI-POISONS CENTRE Open 24h/24h 01-251-51-51 Patient not fit to be moved, call family doctor, or: GP AT HOME, open 24h/24h 748-49-50 Association Of Geneva Doctors Emergency Doctors at home 07h-23h 322 20 20 Patient fit to be moved: HOPITAL CANTONAL CENTRAL 24 Micheli-du-Crest 372-33-11 ou 382-33-11 EMERGENCIES 382-33-11 ou 372-33-11 CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 6 rue Willy-Donzé 372-33-11 MATERNITY 32 bvd.de la Cluse 382-68-16 ou 382-33-11 OPHTHALMOLOGY 22 Alcide Jentzer 382-33-11 ou 372-33-11 MEDICAL CENTRE CORNAVIN 1-3 rue du Jura 345 45 50 HOPITAL DE LA TOUR Meyrin EMERGENCIES 719-61-11 URGENCES PEDIATRIQUES 719-61-00 LA TOUR MEDICAL CENTRE 719-74-00 European Emergency Call 112 FRANCE EMERGENCY SERVICES 15 FIRE BRIGADE 18 POLICE 17 CERN FIREMEN AT HOME 00-41-22-767-44-44 ANTI-POISONS CENTRE Open 24h/24h 04-72-11-69-11 All doctors ...

  7. Nanometre-scale thermometry in a living cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucsko, G.; Maurer, P. C.; Yao, N. Y.; Kubo, M.; Noh, H. J.; Lo, P. K.; Park, H.; Lukin, M. D.

    2013-08-01

    Sensitive probing of temperature variations on nanometre scales is an outstanding challenge in many areas of modern science and technology. In particular, a thermometer capable of subdegree temperature resolution over a large range of temperatures as well as integration within a living system could provide a powerful new tool in many areas of biological, physical and chemical research. Possibilities range from the temperature-induced control of gene expression and tumour metabolism to the cell-selective treatment of disease and the study of heat dissipation in integrated circuits. By combining local light-induced heat sources with sensitive nanoscale thermometry, it may also be possible to engineer biological processes at the subcellular level. Here we demonstrate a new approach to nanoscale thermometry that uses coherent manipulation of the electronic spin associated with nitrogen-vacancy colour centres in diamond. Our technique makes it possible to detect temperature variations as small as 1.8 mK (a sensitivity of 9 mK Hz-1/2) in an ultrapure bulk diamond sample. Using nitrogen-vacancy centres in diamond nanocrystals (nanodiamonds), we directly measure the local thermal environment on length scales as short as 200 nanometres. Finally, by introducing both nanodiamonds and gold nanoparticles into a single human embryonic fibroblast, we demonstrate temperature-gradient control and mapping at the subcellular level, enabling unique potential applications in life sciences.

  8. Fiber Optic Based Thermometry System for Superconducting RF Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kochergin, Vladimir [Microxact Inc.

    2013-05-06

    Thermometry is recognized as the best technique to identify and characterize losses in SRF cavities. The most widely used and reliable apparatus for temperature mapping at cryogenic temperatures is based on carbon resistors (RTDs). The use of this technology on multi-cell cavities is inconvenient due to the very large number of sensors required to obtain sufficient spatial resolution. Recent developments make feasible the use of multiplexible fiber optic sensors for highly distributed temperature measurements. However, sensitivity of multiplexible cryogenic temperature sensors was found extending only to 12K at best and thus was not sufficient for SRF cavity thermometry. During the course of the project the team of MicroXact, JLab and Virginia Tech developed and demonstrated the multiplexible fiber optic sensor with adequate response below 20K. The demonstrated temperature resolution is by at least a factor of 60 better than that of the best multiplexible fiber optic temperature sensors reported to date. The clear path toward at least 10times better temperature resolution is shown. The first to date temperature distribution measurements with ~2.5mm spatial resolution was done with fiber optic sensors at 2K to4K temperatures. The repeatability and accuracy of the sensors were verified only at 183K, but at this temperature both parameters significantly exceeded the state of the art. The results of this work are expected to find a wide range of applications, since the results are enabling the whole new testing capabilities, not accessible before.

  9. Clumped-isotope thermometry of magnesium carbonates in ultramafic rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    García del Real, Pablo; Maher, Kate; Kluge, Tobias; Bird, Dennis K.; Brown, Gordon E.; John, Cédric M.

    2016-11-01

    Magnesium carbonate minerals produced by reaction of H2O-CO2 with ultramafic rocks occur in a wide range of paragenetic and tectonic settings and can thus provide insights into a variety of geologic processes, including (1) deposition of ore-grade, massive-vein cryptocrystalline magnesite; (2) formation of hydrous magnesium carbonates in weathering environments; and (3) metamorphic carbonate alteration of ultramafic rocks. However, the application of traditional geochemical and isotopic methods to infer temperatures of mineralization, the nature of mineralizing fluids, and the mechanisms controlling the transformation of dissolved CO2 into magnesium carbonates in these settings is difficult because the fluids are usually not preserved. Clumped-isotope compositions of magnesium carbonates provide a means to determine primary mineralization or (re)equilibration temperature, which permits the reconstruction of geologic processes that govern magnesium carbonate formation. We first provide an evaluation of the acid fractionation correction for magnesium carbonates using synthetic magnesite and hydromagnesite, along with natural metamorphic magnesite and low-temperature hydromagnesite precipitated within a mine adit. We show that the acid fractionation correction for magnesium carbonates is virtually indistinguishable from other carbonate acid fractionation corrections given current mass spectrometer resolution and error. In addition, we employ carbonate clumped-isotope thermometry on natural magnesium carbonates from various geologic environments and tectonic settings. Cryptocrystalline magnesite vein deposits from California (Red Mountain magnesite mine), Austria (Kraubath locality), Turkey (Tutluca mine, Eskişehir district) and Iran (Derakht-Senjed deposit) exhibit broadly uniform Δ47 compositions that yield apparent clumped-isotope temperatures that average 23.7 ± 5.0 °C. Based on oxygen isotope thermometry, these clumped-isotope temperatures suggest

  10. A Novel Surface Thermometry Approach for use in Aerothermodynamic Wind Tunnel Testing Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR project is aimed at developing a novel thermometry technology with upconverting phosphors for temperature measurement in NASA's high-enthalpy wind tunnels....

  11. A Method for Eliminating Beam Steering Error for the Modulated Absorption-Emission Thermometry Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    pressure budget for cooling channels reduces pump horsepower and turbine inlet temperature DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A – Approved for public release...Beam Steering Error for the Modulated Absorption-Emission Thermometry Technique 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d...Jan 2015. PA#14562. 14. ABSTRACT Modulated absorption-emission thermometry (MAET) is a non-intrusive, radiometric technique for measuring line-of

  12. Quantum Simulation of Single-Qubit Thermometry Using Linear Optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancino, Luca; Sbroscia, Marco; Gianani, Ilaria; Roccia, Emanuele; Barbieri, Marco

    2017-03-31

    Standard thermometry employs the thermalization of a probe with the system of interest. This approach can be extended by incorporating the possibility of using the nonequilibrium states of the probe and the presence of coherence. Here, we illustrate how these concepts apply to the single-qubit thermometer introduced by Jevtic et al. [Phys. Rev. A 91, 012331 (2015)PLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.91.012331] by performing a simulation of the qubit-environment interaction in a linear-optical device. We discuss the role of the coherence and how this affects the usefulness of nonequilibrium conditions. The origin of the observed behavior is traced back to how the coherence affects the propensity to thermalization. We discuss this aspect by considering the availability function.

  13. Doppler broadening thermometry based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, C -F; Sun, Y R; Tan, Y; Kang, P; Hu, S -M

    2015-01-01

    A Doppler broadening thermometry (DBT) instrument is built based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) for precise determination of the Boltzmann constant. Compared with conventional direct absorption methods, the high-sensitivity of CRDS allows to reach a satisfied precision at lower sample pressures, which also reduces the influence due to collisions. By recording the spectrum of C$_2$H$_2$ at 787 nm, we demonstrate a statistical uncertainty of 6 ppm (part per million) in the determined linewidth values by several hours' measurement at a sample pressure of 1.5 Pa. The influence on the spectroscopy-determined temperatures has been investigated, including the "hidden" weak lines overlapped with the selected transition for DBT measurements. The reproducibility has also been examined to be better than 10 ppm, and it indicates that the instrument is feasible for DBT measurement toward a precision at the ppm level.

  14. Assessment of the hand-arm vibration syndrome: thermometry, plethysmography and the Stockholm Workshop Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Aaron; House, Ron; Manno, Michael

    2007-10-01

    The Stockholm Workshop Scale (SWS) provides a staging scheme for hand-arm vibration syndrome (HAVS) based on subjective history. Cold provocation finger thermometry and plethysmography are commonly used objective tests for the vascular component of HAVS. To examine the correlation between the cold provocation tests and SWS vascular stage. A secondary goal was to evaluate the correlation between cold provocation finger plethysmography and thermometry testing. Patients investigated for HAVS at St Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, were subjected to the same protocol including a questionnaire, clinical assessment and objective testing. Spearman correlation coefficients were calculated for the vascular tests with the SWS and for the vascular tests themselves. Logistic regression models controlled for age, smoking, use of vasoactive medications and time since last vibration exposure. One hundred and thirty-nine patients investigated for HAVS consented to participate in the study. The correlation coefficients for plethysmography (rho = 0.14) and thermometry (rho = 0.18) with the SWS were not statistically significant. Plethysmography and thermometry results were significantly correlated (rho = 0.47, P < 0.001). Logistic regression showed plethysmography and thermometry to weakly predict SWS vascular stage (OR 1.5 and 1.3, respectively). None of the potential confounders had a significant effect in the models. The results of plethysmography and thermometry did not significantly correlate with SWS vascular stage in this study. The objective tests did correlate with each other, suggesting that they are reliable measures of similar phenomena likely related to underlying vascular pathology.

  15. Spincoat-fabricated multilayer PDMS-phosphor composites for thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parajuli, Pratikshya; Allison, Stephen W.; Sabri, Firouzeh

    2017-06-01

    Phosphor thermometry offers unique advantages over traditional forms of temperature sensing. Polymer-encapsulated phosphor powders provide versatility and flexibility not achievable when using the thermographic phosphors in powder form. By encapsulating the powder in a polymeric sleeve custom devices with unique properties can be created. Here, the authors report on the design, synthesis, and characterization of the first multilayer thermographic phosphor structure. A thin layer of neat PDMS, Sylgard 184, was sandwiched between two layers of La2O2S:Eu phosphor-doped PDMS. The thicknesses ranged from 0.15 to 4 mm depending on spin speed. The temperature dependent luminescence of the structure was characterized from  -40 °C to 75 °C, in a low humidity environmental chamber. Results show suitability for thermometry in this range. In addition, for design guidance, quantitative values for thermal conductivity and stress/strain characteristics versus phosphor loading percentage and temperature were measured. Thermal conductivities ranged from 0.15 W mK-1 for the Sylgard 184 to a value between 0.3 and 0.4 W mK-1 for pure phosphor powder for temperatures from  -55 °C to 195 °C. Tensile properties for a strain of up to 1 revealed differences between the different phosphor loadings and phosphor batches. Young’s modulus for the spincoat layered materials was between 1.2 and 1.4 N mm-2 and 0.8 for drop casted samples.

  16. Call Forecasting for Inbound Call Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Vinje

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In a scenario of inbound call center customer service, the ability to forecast calls is a key element and advantage. By forecasting the correct number of calls a company can predict staffing needs, meet service level requirements, improve customer satisfaction, and benefit from many other optimizations. This project will show how elementary statistics can be used to predict calls for a specific company, forecast the rate at which calls are increasing/decreasing, and determine if the calls may stop at some point.

  17. A Wearable Thermometry for Core Body Temperature Measurement and Its Experimental Verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ming; Tamura, Toshiyo; Tang, Zunyi; Chen, Wenxi; Kanaya, Shigehiko

    2017-05-01

    A wearable thermometry for core body temperature (CBT) measurement has both healthcare and clinical applications. On the basis of the mechanism of bioheat transfer, we earlier designed and improved a wearable thermometry using the dual-heat-flux method for CBT measurement. In this study, this thermometry is examined experimentally. We studied a fast-changing CBT measurement (FCCM, 55 min, 12 subjects) inside a thermostatic chamber and performed long-term monitoring of CBT (LTM, 24 h, six subjects). When compared with a reference, the CoreTemp CM-210 by Terumo, FCCM shows 0.07 °C average difference and a 95% CI of [-0.27, 0.12] °C. LTM shows no significant difference in parameters for the inference of circadian rhythm. The FCCM and LTM both simulated scenarios in which this thermometry could be used for intensive monitoring and daily healthcare, respectively. The results suggest that because of its convenient design, this thermometry may be an ideal choice for conventional CBT measurements.

  18. Dilution Refrigerator for Nuclear Refrigeration and Cryogenic Thermometry Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Hisashi; Hata, Tohru

    2014-07-01

    This study explores the design and construction of an ultra-low temperature facility in order to realize the Provisional low-temperature scale from 0.9 mK to 1 K (PLTS-2000) in Japan, to disseminate its use through calibration services, and to study thermometry at low temperatures below 1 K. To this end, a dilution refrigerator was constructed in-house that has four sintered silver discrete heat exchangers for use as a precooling stage of a copper nuclear demagnetization stage. A melting curve thermometer attached to the mixing chamber flange could be cooled continuously to 4.0 mK using the refrigerator. The dependence of minimum temperatures on circulation rates can be explained by the calculation of Frossati's formula based on a perfect continuous counterflow heat exchanger model, assuming that the Kapitza resistance has a temperature dependence. Residual heat leakage to the mixing chamber was estimated to be around 86 nW. A nuclear demagnetization cryostat with a nuclear stage containing an effective amount of copper (51 mol in a 9 T magnetic field) is under construction, and we will presently start to work toward the realization of the PLTS-2000. In this article, the design and performance of the dilution refrigerator are reported.

  19. A Boltzmann Constant Determination Based on Johnson Noise Thermometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers-Jacobs, N E; Pollarolo, A; Coakley, K J; Fox, A E; Rogalla, H; Tew, W L; Benz, S P

    2017-10-01

    A value for the Boltzmann constant was measured electronically using an improved version of the Johnson Noise Thermometry (JNT) system at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), USA. This system is different from prior ones, including those from the 2011 determination at NIST and both 2015 and 2017 determinations at the National Institute of Metrology (NIM), China. As in all three previous determinations, the main contribution to the combined uncertainty is the statistical uncertainty in the noise measurement, which is mitigated by accumulating and integrating many weeks of cross-correlated measured data. The second major uncertainty contribution also still results from variations in the frequency response of the ratio of the measured spectral noise of the two noise sources, the sense resistor at the triple-point of water and the superconducting quantum voltage noise source. In this paper, we briefly describe the major differences between our JNT system and previous systems, in particular the input circuit and approach we used to match the frequency responses of the two noise sources. After analyzing and integrating 49 days of accumulated data, we determined a value: k = 1.380 642 9(69)×10-23 J/K with a relative standard uncertainty of 5.0×10-6 and relative offset -4.05×10-6 from the CODATA 2014 recommended value.

  20. Low-Resolution Raman-Spectroscopy Combustion Thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Quang-Viet; Kojima, Jun

    2008-01-01

    A method of optical thermometry, now undergoing development, involves low-resolution measurement of the spectrum of spontaneous Raman scattering (SRS) from N2 and O2 molecules. The method is especially suitable for measuring temperatures in high pressure combustion environments that contain N2, O2, or N2/O2 mixtures (including air). Methods based on SRS (in which scattered light is shifted in wavelength by amounts that depend on vibrational and rotational energy levels of laser-illuminated molecules) have been popular means of probing flames because they are almost the only methods that provide spatially and temporally resolved concentrations and temperatures of multiple molecular species in turbulent combustion. The present SRS-based method differs from prior SRS-based methods that have various drawbacks, a description of which would exceed the scope of this article. Two main differences between this and prior SRS-based methods are that it involves analysis in the frequency (equivalently, wavelength) domain, in contradistinction to analysis in the intensity domain in prior methods; and it involves low-resolution measurement of what amounts to predominantly the rotational Raman spectra of N2 and O2, in contradistinction to higher-resolution measurement of the vibrational Raman spectrum of N2 only in prior methods.

  1. A Boltzmann constant determination based on Johnson noise thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers-Jacobs, N. E.; Pollarolo, A.; Coakley, K. J.; Fox, A. E.; Rogalla, H.; Tew, W. L.; Benz, S. P.

    2017-10-01

    A value for the Boltzmann constant was measured electronically using an improved version of the Johnson Noise Thermometry (JNT) system at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), USA. This system is different from prior ones, including those from the 2011 determination at NIST and both 2015 and 2017 determinations at the National Institute of Metrology (NIM), China. As in all three previous determinations, the main contribution to the combined uncertainty is the statistical uncertainty in the noise measurement, which is mitigated by accumulating and integrating many weeks of cross-correlated measured data. The second major uncertainty contribution also still results from variations in the frequency response of the ratio of the measured spectral noise of the two noise sources, the sense resistor at the triple-point of water and the superconducting quantum voltage noise source. In this paper, we briefly describe the major differences between our JNT system and previous systems, in particular the input circuit and approach we used to match the frequency responses of the two noise sources. After analyzing and integrating 50 d of accumulated data, we determined a value: k~=1.380 642 9(69)× {{10}-23} J K-1 with a relative standard uncertainty of 5.0× {{10}-6} and relative offset -4.05× {{10}-6} from the CODATA 2014 recommended value.

  2. Cavity-ring-down Doppler-broadening primary thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotti, Riccardo; Moretti, Luigi; Gatti, Davide; Castrillo, Antonio; Galzerano, Gianluca; Laporta, Paolo; Gianfrani, Livio; Marangoni, Marco

    2018-01-01

    A step forward in Doppler-broadening thermometry is demonstrated using a comb-assisted cavity-ring-down spectroscopic approach applied to an isolated near-infrared line of carbon dioxide at thermodynamic equilibrium. Specifically, the line-shape of the Pe(12 ) line of the (30012 )←(00001 ) band of C O2 at 1.578 µm is accurately measured and its Doppler width extracted from a refined multispectrum fitting procedure accounting for the speed dependence of the relaxation rates, which were found to play a role even at the very low pressures explored, from 1 to 7 Pa. The thermodynamic gas temperature is retrieved with relative uncertainties of 8 ×10-6 (type A) and 11 ×10-6 (type B), which ranks the system at the first place among optical methods. Thanks to a measurement time of only ≈5 h , the technique represents a promising pathway toward the optical determination of the thermodynamic temperature with a global uncertainty at the 10-6 level.

  3. Update on Ultrasonic Thermometry Development at Idaho National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshua Daw; Joy Rempe; John Crepeau

    2012-07-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has initiated an effort to evaluate the viability of using ultrasonic thermometry technology as an improved sensor for detecting temperature during irradiation testing of advanced fuels proposed within the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCR&D) program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (US DOE). Ultrasonic thermometers (UTs) work on the principle that the speed at which sound travels through a material (acoustic velocity) is dependent on the temperature of the material. UTs have several advantages over other types of temperature sensors . UTs can be made very small, as the sensor consists only of a small diameter rod which may or may not require a sheath. Measurements may be made up to very high temperature (near the melting point of the sensor material) and, as no electrical insulation is required, shunting effects observed in traditional high temperature thermocouple applications are avoided. Most attractive, however, is the ability to introduce multiple acoustic discontinuities into the sensor, as this enables temperature profiling with a single sensor. The current paper presents initial results from FCR&D UT development efforts. These developments include improved methods for fabricating magnetostrictive transducers and joining them to waveguides, characterization of candidate sensor materials appropriate for use in FCR&D fuels irradiations (both ceramic fuels in inert gas and sodium bonded metallic fuels), enhanced signal processing techniques, and tests to determine potential accuracy and resolution.

  4. Evaluation of Infrared Thermometry in Cynomolgus Macaques (Macaca fascicularis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laffins, Michael M; Mellal, Nacera; Almlie, Cynthia L; Regalia, Douglas E

    2017-01-01

    Recording an accurate body temperature is important to assess an animal's health status. We compared temperature data from sedated cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) to evaluate differences between rectal, infrared (inguinal and chest), and implanted telemetry techniques with the objective of demonstrating the diagnostic equivalence of the infrared device with other approaches. Infrared thermometer readings are instantaneous and require no contact with the animal. Body temperature data were obtained from 205 (137 male, 68 female) cynomolgus macaques under ketamine (10 mg/kg IM) sedation over a 3-mo period during scheduled physical examinations. Infrared measurements were taken 5 cm from the chest and inguinal areas. We evaluated 10 (9 functional devices) sedated cynomolgus macaques (5 male, 5 female) implanted with telemetry units in a muscular pouch between the internal and external abdominal oblique muscles. We determined that the mean body temperature acquired by using telemetry did not differ from either the mean of inguinal and chest infrared measurements but did differ from the mean of temperature obtained rectally. In addition, the mean rectal temperature differed from the mean of the inguinal reading but not the mean of the chest temperature. The results confirm our hypothesis that the infrared thermometer can be used to replace standard rectal thermometry. PMID:28905720

  5. Self-Protected Thermometry with Infrared Photons and Defect Spins in Silicon Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yu; Wang, Junfeng; Zhang, Xiaoming; Li, Ke; Cai, Jianming; Gao, Weibo

    2017-10-01

    Quantum sensors with solid-state spins have attracted considerable interest due to their advantages in high sensitivity and high spatial resolution. The robustness against environmental noise is a critical requirement for solid-state spin sensors. In this paper, we present a self-protected infrared high-sensitivity thermometry based on spin defects in silicon carbide. Based on the conclusion that the Ramsey oscillations of the spin sensor are robust against magnetic noise due to a self-protected mechanism from the intrinsic transverse strain of the defect, we experimentally demonstrate the Ramsey-based thermometry. The self-protected infrared silicon-carbide thermometry may provide a promising platform for high sensitivity and high-spatial-resolution temperature sensing in a practical noisy environment, especially in biological systems and microelectronics systems.

  6. Report of the EMI Testing of the Johnson Noise Thermometry System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britton Jr., Charles L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Roberts, Michael [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-06-01

    This report summarizes the Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) testing of the Johnson Noise Thermometry System developed at ORNL. The EMI performance is very important for Johnson Noise Thermometry because it requires accurate measurement of a very small noise signal that is amplified 10,000 times. Any interference in the form on pickup from external signal sources from such as fluorescent lighting ballasts, motors, etc. can skew the measurement. Testing is therefore very important in determining the effects of these external noise sources. Results from testing in several environments with various sources of EMI are presented here.

  7. Doppler Broadening Thermometry Based on Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shui-Ming; Cheng, Cunfeng; Wang, Jin; Tan, Yan; Sun, Yu Robert; Liu, An-Wen; Zhang, Jin-Tao

    2014-06-01

    A Doppler broadening thermometry is implemented using a laser-locked cavity ring-down spectrometer [1,2] combined with a temperature-stabilized sample cell. The temperature fluctuation of the gas sample cell is kept below 1 mK for hours. The probing laser is frequency locked at a longitudinal mode of a Fabry-Pérot interferometer made of ultra-low-expansion glass, and the spectral scan is implemented by scanning the sideband produced by an electro-optic modulator. As a result, a kHz precision has been maintained during the measurement of the spectrum of 10 GHz wide. A ro-vibrational line of C_2H_2 is measured at sample pressures of a few Pa. Using a pair of mirrors with a reflectivity of 0.99997 at 787 nm, we are able to detect absorption line profiles with a signal-to-noise ratio of 10^5. Fitting of the recorded spectra allows us to determine the Doppler width with a statistical uncertainty of 10 ppm. Further improvements on the experimental reproducibility and investigations on the collision effects will probably lead to an optical determination of the Boltzmann constant with an uncertainty of a few ppm. H. Pan, C.-F. Cheng, Y. R. Sun, B. Gao, A.-W. Liu, S.-M. Hu, ``Laser-locked, continuously tunable high resolution cavity ring-down spectrometer," Rev. Sci. Instrum. 82, 103110 (2011) Y. R. Sun, H. Pan, C.-F. Cheng, A.-W. Liu, J.-T. Zhang, S.-M. Hu, ``Application of cavity ring-down spectroscopy to the Boltzmann constant determination," Opt. Express, 19, 19993 (2011)

  8. Doppler Broadening Thermometry Based on Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin; Sun, Yu Robert; Cheng, Cunfeng; Tao, Lei-Gang; Tan, Yan; Kang, Peng; Liu, An-Wen; Hu, Shui-Ming

    2016-06-01

    A Doppler broadening thermometry (DBT) instrument is implemented based on a laser-locked cavity ring-down spectrometer. [1,2] It can be used to determine the Boltzmann constant by measuring the Doppler width of a molecular ro-vibrational transition in the near infrared. Compared with conventional direct absorption methods, the high-sensitivity of CRDS allows to reach satisfied precision at lower sample pressures, which reduces the influence due to collisions. By measuring the ro-vibrational transition of C_2H_2 at 787 nm, we demonstrate a statistical uncertainty of 6 ppm (part per million) in the determined linewidth by several hours' measurement at a sample pressure of 1.5 Pa. [3] However, the complicity in the spectrum of a polyatomic molecule induces potential systematic influence on the line profile due to nearby ``hidden'' lines from weak bands or minor isotopologues. Recently, the instrument has been upgraded in both sensitivity and frequency accuracy. A narrow-band fiber laser frequency-locked to a frequency comb is applied, and overtone transitions at 1.56 μm of the 12C16O molecule are used in the CRDS-DBT measurements. The simplicity of the spectrum of the diatomic CO molecule eliminates the potential influence from ``hidden'' lines. Our preliminary measurements and analysis show that it is feasible to pursue a DBT measurement toward the 1 ppm precision. H. Pan, et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 82, 103110 (2011) Y. R. Sun, et al., Opt. Expr., 19, 19993 (2011) C.-F. Cheng, et al., Metrologia, 52, S385 (2015)

  9. A new technique for direct traceability of contact thermometry Co-C eutectic cells to the ITS-90

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Failleau, G.; Deuzé, T.; Bourson, F.; Briaudeau, S.; Sadli, M. [Laboratoire Commun de Métrologie LNE-Cnam, 61 rue du Landy 93210 La Plaine Saint Denis (France)

    2013-09-11

    The eutectic Co-C melting point is a promising system to serve as a thermometric fixed-point in the temperature range above 1084.62 °C (copper freezing point). During the last decade, LNE-Cnam has developed and characterized some fixed-point devices, based on eutectic Co-C alloy, for applications to contact and radiation thermometry. Above 962 °C, the ITS-90 is realized by radiation thermometry by the extrapolation from a Ag, Au or Cu fixed point using the Planck law for radiation. So the only way for assigning a temperature in the scale to a Co-C cell (∼1324 °C) is by radiation thermometry. An indirect method is commonly used to assign a temperature to a high-temperature fixed point (HTFP) cell designed for contact thermometry is to fill a pyrometric cell with the same mixture as the contact thermometry cell. In this case, the temperature assigned to the pyrometric cell is attributed to the contact cell. This paper describes a direct method allowing the determination of the melting temperature realized by a 'contact thermometry' Co-C cell by comparison to a 'radiation thermometry' Co-C cell whose melting temperature was assigned in accordance to the scale by extrapolation from the Cu point. In addition, the same Co-C cell is studied with a standard Pt/Pd thermocouple.

  10. MRI assisted thermometry for regional hyperthermia and interstitial laser thermotherapy; MRT-gestuetzte Thermometrie in der regionalen Tiefenhyperthermie und interstitiellen Laserthermotherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peller, M.; Reinl, H.; Reiser, M.F. [Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie, Klinikum Grosshadern der Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Muacevic, A. [Neurochirurgische Klinik und Poliklinik, Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Sroka, R. [Laserforschungslabor der Urologischen Klinik, Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Abdel-Rahman, S.; Issels, R. [Inst. fuer Molekulare Immunologie, GSF-Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit Neuherberg, Muenchen (Germany); Medizinische Klinik, III, Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians Univ. Muenchen (Germany)

    2004-04-01

    Purpose. To demonstrate the potential of quantitative MRI-assisted thermometry for the treatment of tumor patients with regional hyperthermia (RHT) and interstitial laser thermotherapy (ILTT). Methods. Two patients and seven tissue samples were investigated using theT1-relaxation time and the chemical shift of the proton resonance frequency (PRF) as temperature sensitive MRI-parameters at 0.2 and 1.5 T. Thermotherapy was applied using either a dedicated MRI-hyperthermia hybrid system or a temperature controlled laser with 830 nm. Results. Both patients were treated successfully showing clinical benefit. T1 and PRF are depending on the applied thermotherapy method and on the MR-system suitable for MRI-assisted thermometry. The clinical application based on phantom results is not necessarily adequate. (orig.) [German] Fragestellung. Die Untersuchungen zeigen die Moeglichkeiten einer quantitativen MR-getuetzten Thermometrie bei der Behandlung von Tumorpatienten mit regionaler Tiefenhyperthermie (RHT) und interstitieller Laserthermotherapie (ILTT). Methodik. Bei 2 Tumorpatienten und 7 Gewebeproben wurden die chemische Verschiebung der Protonenresonanzfrequenz und die T1-Relaxationszeit als temperaturempfindliche MR-Parameter bei 0,2 bzw. 1,5 T untersucht. Die Thermotherapie erfolgte dabei mit einem speziellen MRT-Hyperthermie-Hybridsystem (RHT) bzw. einem temperaturgesteuerten Diodenlaser bei 830 nm (ILTT). Ergebnisse. Beide Patienten konnten klinisch erfolgreich behandelt werden. Die gewaehlten temperatursensitiven MR-Parameter sind, abhaengig vom therapeutischen Ansatz und den Eigenschaften des jeweiligen MR-Systems, fuer eine klinische MR-gestuetzte Thermometrie geeignet. Eine direkte Uebertragung der Ergebnisse aus Phantommessungen ist nicht ohne Einschraenkung moeglich. (orig.)

  11. Using radiation thermography and thermometry to evaluate crop water stress in soybean and cotton

    Science.gov (United States)

    The use of digital infrared thermography and thermometry to investigate unapparent but important field conditions (poor drainage, non-uniform irrigation, soil variability, or biotic infestations) offers a producer improved management tools to avoid yield declines or to deal with variability in crop ...

  12. Acquisition of 3D temperature distributions in fluid flow using proton resonance frequency thermometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchenberg, Waltraud B; Wassermann, Florian; Grundmann, Sven; Jung, Bernd; Simpson, Robin

    2016-07-01

    Proton resonance frequency thermometry is well established for monitoring small temperature changes in tissue. Application of the technique to the measurement of complex temperature distributions within fluid flow is of great interest to the engineering community and could also have medical applications. This work presents an experimental approach to reliably measure three-dimensional (3D) temperature fields in fluid flow using proton resonance frequency thermometry. A velocity-compensated three-dimensional gradient echo sequence was used. A flexible pumping system was attached to an MR compatible double pipe heat exchanger. The temperature of two separate flow circuits could be adjusted to produce various three-dimensional spatial temperature distributions within the fluid flow. Validation was performed using MR compatible temperature probes in a uniformly heated flow. A comparative study was conducted with thermocouples in the presence of a spatially varying temperature distribution. In uniformly heated flow, temperature changes were accurately measured to within 0.5 K using proton resonance frequency thermometry, while spatially varying temperature changes measured with MR showed good qualitative agreement with pointwise measurements using thermocouples. Proton resonance frequency thermometry can be used in a variety of complex flow situations to address medical as well as engineering questions. This work makes it possible to gain new insights into fundamental heat transfer phenomena. Magn Reson Med 76:145-155, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Noninvasive MRI thermometry with the proton resonance frequency (PRF) method: in vivo results in human muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Poorter, J; De Wagter, C; De Deene, Y

    1995-01-01

    The noninvasive thermometry method is based on the temperature dependence of the proton resonance frequency (PRF). High-quality temperature images can be obtained from phase information of standard gradient-echo sequences with an accuracy of 0.2 degrees C in phantoms. This work was focused...

  14. 3D MR thermometry of frozen tissue: Feasibility and accuracy during cryoablation at 3T

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overduin, C.G.; Futterer, J.J.; Scheenen, T.W.J.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess the feasibility and accuracy of 3D ultrashort echo time (UTE) magnetic resonance (MR) thermometry of frozen tissue during cryoablation on a clinical 3T MR system. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ex vivo porcine muscle specimens (n = 4) were imaged during two cycles of 10:3 minutes

  15. A fast referenceless PRFS-based MR thermometry by phase finite difference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Chao; Shen, Huan; He, Mengyue; Tie, Changjun; Chung, Yiu-Cho; Liu, Xin

    2013-08-01

    Proton resonance frequency shift-based MR thermometry is a promising temperature monitoring approach for thermotherapy but its accuracy is vulnerable to inter-scan motion. Model-based referenceless thermometry has been proposed to address this problem but phase unwrapping is usually needed before the model fitting process. In this paper, a referenceless MR thermometry method using phase finite difference that avoids the time consuming phase unwrapping procedure is proposed. Unlike the previously proposed phase gradient technique, the use of finite difference in the new method reduces the fitting error resulting from the ringing artifacts associated with phase discontinuity in the calculation of the phase gradient image. The new method takes into account the values at the perimeter of the region of interest because of their direct relevance to the extrapolated baseline phase of the region of interest (where temperature increase takes place). In simulation study, in vivo and ex vivo experiments, the new method has a root-mean-square temperature error of 0.35 °C, 1.02 °C and 1.73 °C compared to 0.83 °C, 2.81 °C, and 3.76 °C from the phase gradient method, respectively. The method also demonstrated a slightly higher, albeit small, temperature accuracy than the original referenceless MR thermometry method. The proposed method is computationally efficient (∼0.1 s per image), making it very suitable for the real time temperature monitoring.

  16. Radiation thermometry at NIST: An update of services and research activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillard, G. Barry

    1989-01-01

    An overview of activities at the National Institute of Standards and Terminology (NIST) in radiation thermometry and related temperature scale research is presented. An expansion of calibration services for pyrometers will be described as well as efforts to develop calibration services for blackbody simulators. Research relevant to the realization of the new international temperature scale (ITS 90) will be discussed.

  17. Feasibility of computed tomography based thermometry during interstitial laser heating in bovine liver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pandeya, G. D.; Klaessens, J. H. G. M.; Greuter, M. J. W.; Schmidt, B.; Flohr, T.; van Hillegersberg, R.; Oudkerk, M.

    To assess the feasibility of computed tomography (CT) based thermometry during interstitial laser heating in the bovine liver. Four freshly exercised cylindrical blocks of bovine tissue were heated using a continuous laser of Nd:YAG (wavelength: 1064 nm, active length: 30 mm, power: 10-30 W). All

  18. Pure-rotational H2 thermometry by ultrabroadband coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Trevor L.; Bohlin, Alexis; Patterson, Brian D.; Kliewer, Christopher J.

    2017-06-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) is a sensitive technique for probing highly luminous flames in combustion applications to determine temperatures and species concentrations. CARS thermometry has been demonstrated for the vibrational Q-branch and pure-rotational S-branch of several small molecules. Practical advantages of pure-rotational CARS, such as multi-species detection, reduction of coherent line mixing and collisional narrowing even at high pressures, and the potential for more precise thermometry, have motivated experimental and theoretical advances in S-branch CARS of nitrogen (N2), for example, which is a dominant species in air-fed combustion processes. Although hydrogen (H2) is of interest given its prevalence as a reactant and product in many gas-phase reactions, laser bandwidth limitations have precluded the extension of CARS thermometry to the H2 S-branch. We demonstrate H2 thermometry using hybrid femtosecond/picosecond pure-rotational CARS, in which a broadband pump/Stokes pulse enables simultaneous excitation of the set of H2 S-branch transitions populated at flame temperatures over the spectral region of 0-2200 cm-1. We present a pure-rotational H2 CARS spectral model for data fitting and compare extracted temperatures to those from simultaneously collected N2 spectra in two systems of study: a heated flow and a diffusion flame on a Wolfhard-Parker slot burner. From 300 to 650 K in the heated flow, the H2 and N2 CARS extracted temperatures are, on average, within 2% of the set temperature. For flame measurements, the fitted H2 and N2 temperatures are, on average, within 5% of each other from 300 to 1600 K. Our results confirm the viability of pure-rotational H2 CARS thermometry for probing combustion reactions.

  19. Noncontact surface thermometry for microsystems: LDRD final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abel, Mark (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Beecham, Thomas (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Graham, Samuel (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Kearney, Sean Patrick; Serrano, Justin Raymond; Phinney, Leslie Mary

    2006-10-01

    We describe a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) effort to develop and apply laser-based thermometry diagnostics for obtaining spatially resolved temperature maps on working microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). The goal of the effort was to cultivate diagnostic approaches that could adequately resolve the extremely fine MEMS device features, required no modifications to MEMS device design, and which did not perturb the delicate operation of these extremely small devices. Two optical diagnostics were used in this study: microscale Raman spectroscopy and microscale thermoreflectance. Both methods use a low-energy, nonperturbing probe laser beam, whose arbitrary wavelength can be selected for a diffraction-limited focus that meets the need for micron-scale spatial resolution. Raman is exploited most frequently, as this technique provides a simple and unambiguous measure of the absolute device temperature for most any MEMS semiconductor or insulator material under steady state operation. Temperatures are obtained from the spectral position and width of readily isolated peaks in the measured Raman spectra with a maximum uncertainty near {+-}10 K and a spatial resolution of about 1 micron. Application of the Raman technique is demonstrated for V-shaped and flexure-style polycrystalline silicon electrothermal actuators, and for a GaN high-electron-mobility transistor. The potential of the Raman technique for simultaneous measurement of temperature and in-plane stress in silicon MEMS is also demonstrated and future Raman-variant diagnostics for ultra spatio-temporal resolution probing are discussed. Microscale thermoreflectance has been developed as a complement for the primary Raman diagnostic. Thermoreflectance exploits the small-but-measurable temperature dependence of surface optical reflectivity for diagnostic purposes. The temperature-dependent reflectance behavior of bulk silicon, SUMMiT-V polycrystalline silicon films and metal surfaces is

  20. Ultrasonic Thermometry for In-Pile Temperature Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.E. Daw; J.L. Rempe; S.C. Wilkins

    2002-11-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory has recently initiated a new effort to evaluate the viability of using ultrasonic thermometry technology as an improved sensor for detecting temperature during irradiation testing. Ultrasonic thermometers (UTs) work on the principle that the speed at which sound travels through a material (acoustic velocity) is dependant on the temperature of the material. By introducing an acoustic pulse to the sensor and measuring the time delay of echoes, temperature may be derived. UTs have several advantages over other sensor types. UTs can be made very small, as the sensor consists only of a small diameter rod which may or may not require a sheath. Measurements may be made near the melting point of the sensor material, as no electrical insulation is required; and shunting effects are avoided. Most attractive, however, is the ability to introduce acoustic discontinuities to the sensor, as this enables temperature measurements at several points along the sensor length (allowing temperature profiling with a single sensor). A typical multi-sensor UT system, with key components identified, is shown in Figure 1. As indicated in this figure, a narrow ultrasonic pulse is generated in a magnetostrictive rod by an excitation coil. The ultrasonic pulse propagates to the sensor wire, where a fraction of the pulse energy is reflected at each discontinuity (notches or diameter change). Each reflected pulse is received by the excitation coil, transformed into an electrical signal, amplified and evaluated in a start/stop counter system. The time interval between two adjacent echoes is evaluated and compared to a calibration curve to give the average temperature in the corresponding sensor segment. When a number of notches are available on the wire sensor, the various measurements give access to a temperature profile along the probe. UTs have been used successfully for several applications; however, several problems have limited the success of these sensors. For

  1. MR thermometry for laser-induced thermotherapy at 1.5 tesla; MR-Thermometrie bei 1,5 Tesla zur thermischen Ablation mittels laserinduzierter Thermotherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meister, D.; Huebner, F.; Mack, M.; Vogl, T.J. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie

    2007-05-15

    Purpose: Evaluation of thermometry with fast MR sequences for laser-induced interstitial laser therapy (LITT) and verification of the thermometric results with a fiber-optic thermometer. Method and Materials: In vitro experiments were conducted using an agarose gel mixture and pig liver lobes. MR-guided LITT was performed using a laser power between 3 and 15?watts. Thermometry was performed using longitudinal relaxation time T1 and proton resonance frequency shift (PRF) methods under acquisition of amplitude and phase shift images. PRF was measured with a fast spoiled GRE sequence. Four different sequences were used for T1 thermometry: gradient echo (GE), TrueFISP (TRUFI), Saturation Recovery Turbo-FLASH (SRTF) and Inversion Recovery Turbo-FLASH (IRTF) sequences. The temperature was controlled using a fiber-optic Luxtron device and correlated with the MR temperature. The range of applied and monitored temperatures exceeded 80 degrees Celsius. Results: The temperature dependence showed a good linear relationship up to 60 degrees Celsius. Calibration experiments for the T1 method delivered coefficients of determination from 0.977 to 0.997 for agarose and from 0.958 to 0.995 for the pig liver samples. The IRTF sequence had the highest temperature sensitivity (agarose 0.99, liver 1.19). During LITT the TRUE-FISP sequence exhibited a strong nonlinear relationship. R{sup 2} of this sequence was 0.809 in the agarose experiments. The average temperature errors when heated up to 80 degrees Celsius were 3.86 - 11.38 degrees Celsius for Agarose gel and 5.7 - 12.16 degrees Celsius for the liver tissue. SRTF and IRTF sequences exhibited the most linear relationship with temperature but were more dependent on tissue differences. (orig.)

  2. In-vitro evaluation of MR-thermometry for laser-induced thermotherapy; In-vitro-Evaluierung der MR-Thermometrie zum Einsatz der laserinduzierten Thermotherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogl, T.J.; Mack, M.G.; Hirsch, H.H.; Mueller, P.; Weinhold, N.; Wust, P.; Felix, R. [Strahlenklinik und Poliklinik, Virchow-Kliniken der Humboldt-Univ. zu Berlin (Germany); Philipp, C.; Roggan, A. [Laser- und Medizin Technologie GmbH, Freie Univ. Berlin (Germany)

    1997-12-01

    Purpose: To optimize the MR sequences parameter for monitoring hyperthermic effects in the tissue during laser induced thermotherapy (LITT). Material and methods: Experimental studies were performed for the evaluation of MR-thermometry using a contrast-agent-water solution and a pig-liver. A T{sub 1}-weighted TurboFLASH sequence and a FLASH-3D sequence were used. The turboFLASH sequence was used with various T{sub 1} settings (between 100 and 1250 ms). MR findings were correlated with temperature measurements using a fluoride optical temperature measuring system in a distance of 1, 2, and 5 cm from the laser applicator. Results: Using the contrast-agent-water solution demonstrated the temperature sensitivity of both sequences. In vitro evaluations using pig liver demonstrated a near linear increase of signal versus increasing tissue temperatures in a distance of 1 cm to the tip of the laser applicator. Optimal visualization of the temperature effects was obtained using a T{sub 1} between 100 ms and 400 ms. Using the FLASH-2D sequence a signal loss was documented at a T{sub R} of 110 ms. Conclusion: MR-thermometry using sequentially TurboFLASH and FLASH-2D sequences allowed a non-invasive monitoring of the laser induced temperature changes. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel: Evaluierung der Parameter zur MR-Thermometrie fuer die Visualisierung des Temperaturanstieges im Gewebe bei der laserinduzierten Thermotherapie (LITT). Methoden: Es wurden an zwei Modellreihen unter Einsatz von Kontrastmittelloesungen und in vitro an tierischem Lebergewebe (Schweineleber) MR-thermometrische Messungen waehrend der Laserapplikation mit einer T{sub 1}-gewichteten, thermosensitiven Turbo-FLASH- und FLASH-2D-Sequenz durchgefuehrt, wobei die Inversionszeit der Turbo-FLASH-Sequenz variiert wurde. Temperaturmessungen erfolgten waehrend der Laserung in einem Abstand von 1, 2 und 5 cm zum Applikator. Ergebnisse: Die Tests mit Kontrastmittelloesungen zeigten die Temperatursensitivitaet beider

  3. Zero-Heat-Flux Thermometry for Non-Invasive Measurement of Core Body Temperature in Pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guschlbauer, Maria; Maul, Alexandra C; Yan, Xiaowei; Herff, Holger; Annecke, Thorsten; Sterner-Kock, Anja; Böttiger, Bernd W; Schroeder, Daniel C

    2016-01-01

    Hypothermia is a severe, unpleasant side effect during general anesthesia. Thus, temperature surveillance is a prerequisite in general anesthesia settings during experimental surgeries. The gold standard to measure the core body temperature (Tcore) is placement of a Swan-Ganz catheter in the pulmonary artery, which is a highly invasive procedure. Therefore, Tcore is commonly examined in the urine bladder and rectum. However, these procedures are known for their inaccuracy and delayed record of temperatures. Zero-heat-flux (ZHF) thermometry is an alternative, non-invasive method quantifying Tcore in human patients by applying a thermosensoric patch to the lateral forehead. Since the porcine cranial anatomy is different to the human's, the optimal location of the patch remains unclear to date. The aim was to compare three different patch locations of ZHF thermometry in a porcine hypothermia model. Hypothermia (33.0 °C Tcore) was conducted in 11 anesthetized female pigs (26-30 kg). Tcore was measured continuously by an invasive Swan-Ganz catheter in the pulmonary artery (Tpulm). A ZHF thermometry device was mounted on three different defined locations. The smallest average difference between Tpulm and TZHF during stable temperatures was 0.21 ± 0.16 °C at location A, where the patch was placed directly behind the eye. Also during rapidly changing temperatures location A showed the smallest bias with 0.48 ± 0.29 °C. Location A provided the most reliable data for Tcore. Therefore, the ZHF thermometry patch should be placed directly behind the left temporal corner of the eye to provide a non-invasive method for accurate measurement of Tcore in pigs.

  4. Impact of input field characteristics on vibrational femtosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering thermometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chao-Bo; He, Ping; Escofet-Martin, David; Peng, Jiang-Bo; Fan, Rong-Wei; Yu, Xin; Dunn-Rankin, Derek

    2018-01-10

    In this paper, three ultrashort-pulse coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) thermometry approaches are summarized with a theoretical time-domain model. The difference between the approaches can be attributed to variations in the input field characteristics of the time-domain model. That is, all three approaches of ultrashort-pulse (CARS) thermometry can be simulated with the unified model by only changing the input fields features. As a specific example, the hybrid femtosecond/picosecond CARS is assessed for its use in combustion flow diagnostics; thus, the examination of the input field has an impact on thermometry focuses on vibrational hybrid femtosecond/picosecond CARS. Beginning with the general model of ultrashort-pulse CARS, the spectra with different input field parameters are simulated. To analyze the temperature measurement error brought by the input field impacts, the spectra are fitted and compared to fits, with the model neglecting the influence introduced by the input fields. The results demonstrate that, however the input pulses are depicted, temperature errors still would be introduced during an experiment. With proper field characterization, however, the significance of the error can be reduced.

  5. [MRI-assisted thermometry for regional hyperthermia and interstitial laser thermotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peller, M; Muacevic, A; Reinl, H; Sroka, R; Abdel-Rahman, S; Issels, R; Reiser, M F

    2004-04-01

    To demonstrate the potential of quantitative MRI-assisted thermometry for the treatment of tumor patients with regional hyperthermia (RHT) and interstitial laser thermotherapy (ILTT). Two patients and seven tissue samples were investigated using the T1-relaxation time and the chemical shift of the proton resonance frequency (PRF) as temperature sensitive MRI-parameters at 0.2 and 1.5 T. Thermotherapy was applied using either a dedicated MRI-hyperthermia hybrid system or a temperature controlled laser with 830 nm. Both patients were treated successfully showing clinical benefit. T1 and PRF are depending on the applied thermotherapy method and on the MR-system suitable for MRI-assisted thermometry. The clinical application based on phantom results is not necessarily adequate. Clinical application and phantom experiments of RHT and ILTT show the potential of MRI-assisted thermometry for further improvement of both minimal invasive thermotherapy methods. Further investigations concerning optimization of the MRI-techniques, the influence of perfusion or the determination of threshold values are necessary.

  6. Feasibility of computed tomography based thermometry during interstitial laser heating in bovine liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandeya, G.D. [University of Groningen, Department of Radiology, UMC Groningen, Hanzeplein 1, PO Box 30001, Groningen (Netherlands); Siemens AG, H IM CT PLM-E PA, Forchheim (Germany); Klaessens, J.H.G.M. [UMC Utrecht, Department of Medical Technology and Clinical Physics, Utrecht (Netherlands); Greuter, M.J.W.; Oudkerk, M. [University of Groningen, Department of Radiology, UMC Groningen, Hanzeplein 1, PO Box 30001, Groningen (Netherlands); Schmidt, B.; Flohr, T. [Siemens AG, H IM CT PLM-E PA, Forchheim (Germany); Hillegersberg, R. van [UMC Utrecht, Department of Surgical Oncology, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2011-08-15

    To assess the feasibility of computed tomography (CT) based thermometry during interstitial laser heating in the bovine liver. Four freshly exercised cylindrical blocks of bovine tissue were heated using a continuous laser of Nd:YAG (wavelength: 1064 nm, active length: 30 mm, power: 10-30 W). All tissues were imaged at least once before and 7 times during laser heating using CT and temperatures were simultaneously measured with 5 calibrated thermal sensors. The dependency of the average CT numbers as a function of temperature was analysed with regression analysis and a CT thermal sensitivity was derived. During laser heating, the growing hypodense area was observed around the laser source and that area showed an increase as a function of time. The formation of hypodense area was caused by declining in CT numbers at increasing temperatures. The regression analysis showed an inverse linear dependency between temperature and average CT number with -0.65 {+-} 0.048 HU/ C (R{sup 2} = 0.75) for the range of 18-85 C in bovine liver. The non-invasive CT based thermometry during interstitial laser heating is feasible in the bovine liver. CT based thermometry could be further developed and may be of potential use during clinical LITT of the liver. (orig.)

  7. Fast Referenceless PRF Thermometry Using Spatially Saturated, Spatial-spectrally Excited Flyback EPI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrook, Andrew B.; Kaye, Elena; Santos, Juan M.; Rieke, Viola; Pauly, Kim Butts

    2009-04-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a promising technique for noninvasive treatment of liver tumors. To safely monitor HIFU, accurate temperature measurements must be acquired. However, respiratory motion impairs the performance of conventional MR-guided PRF-thermometry sequences, leading to inaccurate temperature measurements and locations. We developed an MR imaging system to minimize these with the following key elements: imaging at 3.62 frames/sec and utilizing real-time referenceless thermometry processing. A spatially saturated, spectral-spatially excited flyback echo planar readout pulse sequence that allows rapid temperature acquisition was developed. The spatial-spectral pulse ignores lipids, and other off-resonance effects are mitigated with linear delays of the EPI readout. The saturation pulse restricts the field of view in the phase encode direction, allowing for increased resolution without aliasing. The pulse sequence was constructed in RTHawk, a real time MR environment, and tested by creating lesions in a phantom using the ExAblate 2000 (Insightec, Haifa, Israel). The experiment was performed when the transducer and phantom were stationary and when both were manually moved back and forth to simulate respiratory motion. Both lesions mainly followed the same shape, and the lesion appeared as a round growing spot during motion. The real-time sequence in conjunction with referenceless thermometry is promising for HIFU in the presence of motion.

  8. Call Center Capacity Planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Thomas Bang

    The main topics of the thesis are theoretical and applied queueing theory within a call center setting. Call centers have in recent years become the main means of communication between customers and companies, and between citizens and public institutions. The extensively computerized infrastructu...

  9. Call 1 FAQ (ENG)

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Francine Sinzinkayo

    What is your definition of “improvement” in this Call for proposals? “Improvement” as used in this call implies all innovations that may be applied by research teams to ... perform their expected roles and to participate in the overall coordination of partnership activities (including monitoring, reporting, communication, etc.).

  10. Callings and Organizational Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elangovan, A. R.; Pinder, Craig C.; McLean, Murdith

    2010-01-01

    Current literature on careers, social identity and meaning in work tends to understate the multiplicity, historical significance, and nuances of the concept of calling(s). In this article, we trace the evolution of the concept from its religious roots into secular realms and develop a typology of interpretations using occupation and religious…

  11. Dimensioning large call centers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.C. Borst (Sem); A. Mandelbaum; M.I. Reiman

    2000-01-01

    textabstractWe develop a framework for asymptotic optimization of a queueing system. The motivation is the staffing problem of call centers with 100's of agents (or more). Such a call center is modeled as an M/M/N queue, where the number of agents~$N$ is large. Within our framework, we determine the

  12. CALL FOR PROPOSALS

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Charles

    CALL FOR PROPOSALS. Research Project on: Gender and Enterprise Development in Africa: A Cross-Country Comparative Study. The Institute of Statistical, Social and Economic Research ... calling for research proposals from researchers based in Kenya, Uganda, Mozambique or ... For example, many more women work.

  13. Call 1 FAQ (ENG)

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Francine Sinzinkayo

    What is your definition of “improvement” in this Call for proposals? “Improvement” as used in this call implies all innovations that may be applied by research teams to develop a vaccine that is superior to a current one. Examples of improvement are better adjuvant, vaccine delivery systems or formulations that present ...

  14. Crystal morphology change by magnetic susceptibility force

    OpenAIRE

    Katsuki, Aiko; Aibara, Shigeo; Tanimoto, Yoshifumi

    2006-01-01

    We found a change in morphology when lysozyme crystals were grown in a magnetic field. The phenomenon was caused by the magnetic force derived from the magnetic susceptibility gradient. We propose that this force should be called the “magnetic susceptibility force".

  15. Assessing call centers’ success:

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesham A. Baraka

    2013-07-01

    This paper introduces a model to evaluate the performance of call centers based on the Delone and McLean Information Systems success model. A number of indicators are identified to track the call center’s performance. Mapping of the proposed indicators to the six dimensions of the D&M model is presented. A Weighted Call Center Performance Index is proposed to assess the call center performance; the index is used to analyze the effect of the identified indicators. Policy-Weighted approach was used to assume the weights with an analysis of different weights for each dimension. The analysis of the different weights cases gave priority to the User satisfaction and net Benefits dimension as the two outcomes from the system. For the input dimensions, higher priority was given to the system quality and the service quality dimension. Call centers decision makers can use the tool to tune the different weights in order to reach the objectives set by the organization. Multiple linear regression analysis was used in order to provide a linear formula for the User Satisfaction dimension and the Net Benefits dimension in order to be able to forecast the values for these two dimensions as function of the other dimensions

  16. Enhanced nurse call systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-04-01

    This Evaluation focuses on high-end computerized nurse call systems--what we call enhanced systems. These are highly flexible systems that incorporate microprocessor and communications technologies to expand the capabilities of the nurse call function. Enhanced systems, which vary in configuration from one installation to the next, typically consist of a basic system that provides standard nurse call functionality and a combination of additional enhancements that provide the added functionality the facility desires. In this study, we examine the features that distinguish enhanced nurse call systems from nonenhanced systems, focusing on their application and benefit to healthcare facilities. We evaluated seven systems to determine how well they help (1) improve patient care, as well as increase satisfaction with the care provided, and (2) improve caregiver efficiency, as well as increase satisfaction with the work environment. We found that all systems meet these objectives, but not all systems perform equally well for all implementations. Our ratings will help facilities identify those systems that offer the most effective features for their intended use. The study also includes a Technology Management Guide to help readers (1) determine whether they'll benefit from the capabilities offered by enhanced systems and (2) target a system for purchase and equip the system for optimum performance and cost-effective operation.

  17. Implementation of foot thermometry plus mHealth to prevent diabetic foot ulcers: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazo-Porras, Maria; Bernabe-Ortiz, Antonio; Sacksteder, Katherine A; Gilman, Robert H; Malaga, German; Armstrong, David G; Miranda, J Jaime

    2016-04-19

    Diabetic foot neuropathy (DFN) is one of the most important complications of diabetes mellitus; its early diagnosis and intervention can prevent foot ulcers and the need for amputation. Thermometry, measuring the temperature of the feet, is a promising emerging modality for diabetic foot ulcer prevention. However, patient compliance with at-home monitoring is concerning. Delivering messages to remind patients to perform thermometry and foot care might be helpful to guarantee regular foot monitoring. This trial was designed to compare the incidence of diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) between participants who receive thermometry alone and those who receive thermometry as well as mHealth (SMS and voice messaging) over a year-long study period. This is an evaluator-blinded, randomized, 12-month trial. Individuals with a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus, aged between 18-80 years, having a present dorsalis pedis pulse in both feet, are in risk group 2 or 3 using the diabetic foot risk classification system (as specified by the International Working Group on the Diabetic Foot), have an operating cell phone or a caregiver with an operating cell phone, and have the ability to provide informed consent will be eligible to participate in the study. Recruitment will be performed in diabetes outpatient clinics at two Ministry of Health tertiary hospitals in Lima, Peru. participants in both groups will receive education about foot care at the beginning of the study and they will be provided with a thermometry device (TempStat™). TempStat™ is a tool that captures a thermal image of the feet, which, depending on the temperature of the feet, shows different colors. In this study, if a participant notes a single yellow image or variance between one foot and the contralateral foot, they will be prompted to notify a nurse to evaluate their activity within the previous 2 weeks and make appropriate recommendations. In addition to thermometry, participants in the intervention arm

  18. An improved electronic determination of the Boltzmann constant by Johnson noise thermometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Jifeng; Benz, Samuel P; Coakley, Kevin; Rogalla, Horst; Tew, Weston L; White, Rod; Zhou, Kunli; Zhou, Zhenyu

    2017-08-01

    Recent measurements using acoustic gas thermometry have determined the value of the Boltzmann constant, k , with a relative uncertainty less than 1 × 10 -6 . These results have been supported by a measurement with a relative uncertainty of 1.9 × 10 -6 made with dielectric-constant gas thermometry. Together, the measurements meet the requirements of the International Committee for Weights and Measures and enable them to proceed with the redefinition of the kelvin in 2018. In further support, we provide a new determination of k using a purely electronic approach, Johnson noise thermometry, in which the thermal noise power generated by a sensing resistor immersed in a triple-point-of-water cell is compared to the noise power of a quantum-accurate pseudo-random noise waveform of nominally equal noise power. The experimental setup differs from that of the 2015 determination in several respects: a 100 Ω resistor is used as the thermal noise source, identical thin coaxial cables made of solid beryllium-copper conductors and foam dielectrics are used to connect the thermal and quantum-accurate noise sources to the correlator so as to minimize the temperature and frequency sensitivity of the impedances in the connecting leads, and no trimming capacitors or inductors are inserted into the connecting leads. The combination of reduced uncertainty due to spectral mismatches in the connecting leads and reduced statistical uncertainty due to a longer integration period of 100 d results in an improved determination of k = 1.380 649 7(37) × 10 -23 J K -1 with a relative standard uncertainty of 2.7 × 10 -6 and a relative offset of 0.89 × 10 -6 from the CODATA 2014 recommended value. The most significant terms in the uncertainty budget, the statistical uncertainty and the spectral-mismatch uncertainty, are uncorrelated with the corresponding uncertainties in the 2015 measurements.

  19. Measurement of body temperature in normothermic and febrile rats: Limitations of using rectal thermometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dangarembizi, Rachael; Erlwanger, Kennedy H; Mitchell, Duncan; Hetem, Robyn S; Madziva, Michael T; Harden, Lois M

    2017-10-01

    Stress-induced hyperthermia following rectal thermometry is reported in normothermic rats, but appears to be muted or even absent in febrile rats. We therefore investigated whether the use of rectal thermometry affects the accuracy of temperature responses recorded in normothermic and febrile rats. Using intra-abdominally implanted temperature-sensitive radiotelemeters we measured the temperature response to rectal temperature measurement in male Sprague Dawley rats (~200g) injected subcutaneously with Brewer's yeast (20ml/kg of a 20% Brewer's yeast solution=4000mg/kg) or saline (20ml/kg of 0.9% saline). Rats had been pre-exposed to, or were naive to rectal temperature measurement before the injection. The first rectal temperature measurement was taken in the plateau phase of the fever (18h after injection) and at hourly intervals thereafter. In normothermic rats, rectal temperature measurement was associated with an increase in abdominal temperature (0.66±0.27°C) that had a rapid onset (5-10min), peaked at 15-20min and lasted for 35-50min. The hyperthermic response to rectal temperature measurement was absent in febrile rats. Exposure to rectal temperature measurement on two previous occasions did not reduce the hyperthermia. There was a significant positive linear association between temperatures recorded using the two methods, but the agreement interval identified that rectal temperature measured with a thermocouple probe could either be 0.7°C greater or 0.5°C lower than abdominal temperature measured with radiotelemeter. Thus, due to stress-induced hyperthermia, rectal thermometry does not ensure accurate recording of body temperature in short-spaced, intermittent intervals in normothermic and febrile rats. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Adrenal metastases: CT-guided and MR-thermometry-controlled laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogl, Thomas J.; Lehnert, Thomas; Eichler, Katrin; Proschek, Dirk; Floeter, Julius; Mack, Martin G. [Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital of Frankfurt, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2007-08-15

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the feasibility, safety and effectiveness of CT-guided and MR-thermometry-controlled laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy (LITT) in adrenal metastases. Nine patients (seven male, two female; average age 65.0 years; range 58.7-75.0 years) with nine unilateral adrenal metastases (mean diameter 4.3 cm) from primaries comprising colorectal carcinoma (n = 5), renal cell carcinoma (n = 1), oesophageal carcinoma (n = 1), carcinoid (n = 1), and hepatocellular carcinoma (n = 1) underwent CT-guided, MR-thermometry-controlled LITT using a 0.5 T MR unit. LITT was performed with an internally irrigated power laser application system with an Nd:YAG laser. A thermosensitive, fast low-angle shot 2D sequence was used for real-time monitoring. Follow-up studies were performed at 24 h and 3 months and, thereafter, at 6-month intervals (median 14 months). All patients tolerated the procedure well under local anaesthesia. No complications occurred. Average number of laser applicators per tumour: 1.9 (range 1-4); mean applied laser energy 33 kJ (range 15.3-94.6 kJ), mean diameter of the laser-induced coagulation necrosis 4.5 cm (range 2.5-7.5 cm). Complete ablation was achieved in seven lesions, verified by MR imaging; progression was detected in two lesions in the follow-up. The preliminary results suggest that CT-guided, MR-thermometry-controlled LITT is a safe, minimally invasive and promising procedure for treating adrenal metastases. (orig.)

  1. Adrenal metastases: CT-guided and MR-thermometry-controlled laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogl, Thomas J; Lehnert, Thomas; Eichler, Katrin; Proschek, Dirk; Flöter, Julius; Mack, Martin G

    2007-08-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the feasibility, safety and effectiveness of CT-guided and MR-thermometry-controlled laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy (LITT) in adrenal metastases. Nine patients (seven male, two female; average age 65.0 years; range 58.7-75.0 years) with nine unilateral adrenal metastases (mean diameter 4.3 cm) from primaries comprising colorectal carcinoma (n = 5), renal cell carcinoma (n = 1), oesophageal carcinoma (n = 1), carcinoid (n = 1), and hepatocellular carcinoma (n = 1) underwent CT-guided, MR-thermometry-controlled LITT using a 0.5 T MR unit. LITT was performed with an internally irrigated power laser application system with an Nd:YAG laser. A thermosensitive, fast low-angle shot 2D sequence was used for real-time monitoring. Follow-up studies were performed at 24 h and 3 months and, thereafter, at 6-month intervals (median 14 months). All patients tolerated the procedure well under local anaesthesia. No complications occurred. Average number of laser applicators per tumour: 1.9 (range 1-4); mean applied laser energy 33 kJ (range 15.3-94.6 kJ), mean diameter of the laser-induced coagulation necrosis 4.5 cm (range 2.5-7.5 cm). Complete ablation was achieved in seven lesions, verified by MR imaging; progression was detected in two lesions in the follow-up. The preliminary results suggest that CT-guided, MR-thermometry-controlled LITT is a safe, minimally invasive and promising procedure for treating adrenal metastases.

  2. A flat flame burner for the calibration of laser thermometry techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartung, G.; Hult, J.; Kaminski, C. F.

    2006-09-01

    The design and experimental characterization of a burner is described, which has favourable characteristics for the accurate calibration of a range of optical thermometry techniques. The burner supports stable laminar flames and combines many of the advantages of several widely used burner designs without their disadvantages. It permits the application of point measurement techniques, line-of-sight techniques and planar imaging techniques; trace species, such as metal atoms, can be easily introduced into the flame. The implementation of the burner is described, followed by the presentation of data obtained from coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) measurements and numerical simulations. Spatially resolved measurements were performed over the entire flame profile at three different stoichiometries and factors causing systematic and random errors are described in detail. Measurement errors on mean temperatures were determined to be less than 1%. The shot-to-shot measurement precision was determined to be 3.5-4.0% (FWHM of temperature probability density function). The burner design together with the data presented in this paper can be used for the validation and calibration, respectively, of a variety of combustion thermometry techniques. Complete details of the burner design together with the obtained temperature data will be provided on the World Wide Web. Other researchers intending to validate and calibrate their own laser-based thermometry techniques will be able to cost-effectively reconstruct this burner and adopt the characterization presented here, thus being able to apply it without the need of their own basic validation. The authors are confident that a reconstructed burner, which is applied under the same conditions, will yield the same high level of accuracy and precision as that presented in this paper.

  3. All-Optical Nanoscale Thermometry using Silicon-Vacancy Centers in Diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Christian; Evans, Ruffin; Sipahigil, Alp; Bhaskar, Mihir; Sukachev, Denis; Lukin, Mikhail

    2017-04-01

    Accurate thermometry at the nanoscale is a difficult challenge, but building such a thermometer would be a powerful tool for discovering and understanding new processes in biology, chemistry and physics. Applications include cell-selective treatment of disease, engineering of more efficient integrated circuits, or even the development of new chemical and biological reactions. In this work, we study how the bulk properties of the Silicon Vacancy center (SiV) in diamond depend on temperature, and use them to measure temperature with 100mK accuracy. Using SiVs in 200 nm nanodiamonds, we measure the temperature with 100 nm spatial resolution over a 10 μm area.

  4. Integrated electronic transport and thermometry at milliKelvin temperatures and in strong magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samkharadze, N; Kumar, A; Manfra, M J; Pfeiffer, L N; West, K W; Csáthy, G A

    2011-05-01

    We fabricated a He-3 immersion cell for transport measurements of semiconductor nanostructures at ultra low temperatures and in strong magnetic fields. We have a new scheme of field-independent thermometry based on quartz tuning fork Helium-3 viscometry which monitors the local temperature of the sample's environment in real time. The operation and measurement circuitry of the quartz viscometer is described in detail. We provide evidence that the temperature of two-dimensional electron gas confined to a GaAs quantum well follows the temperature of the quartz viscometer down to 4 mK.

  5. Modified FIR thermometry for surface temperature sensing by using high power laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ran; Zhang, Xinlu; Zhang, Zhilin; Zhong, Hujiang; Chen, Yujin; Zhao, Enming; Vasilescu, Steven; Liu, Lu

    2017-01-23

    The FIR (fluorescence intensity ratio) technique for optical thermometry has attracted considerable attention over recent years due to its high sensitivity and high spatial resolution. However, it is thought that a heating effect induced by incident light may lead to temperature overestimations, which in turn impedes the reliability of this technique for applications which require high levels of accuracy. To further improve the FIR technique, this paper presents a modified calibration expression, which is suitable for surface temperature sensing, based on the temperature distribution (calculated through COMSOL software). In addition, this modified method is verified by the experimental data.

  6. Practical thermometry and thermalization at sub-1 K temperatures using commercial surface-mount components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beev, Nikolai; Kiviranta, Mikko

    2014-11-01

    Thermometry and heat sinking are important aspects of cryogenic engineering. We have carried out experiments to determine the usefulness of commercial surface-mount resistors, resistor arrays and capacitors as temperature sensors and electrically isolated heat conductors. Our investigations were motivated by the need for easy thermal diagnostics and management of heat dissipation in experimental setups operating at sub-kelvin temperatures in dilution refrigerators. In this work we also present a simple and robust resistance-to-voltage converter circuit with low excitation power.

  7. An InGaAlAs-InGaAs two-color photodetector for ratio thermometry

    OpenAIRE

    X. Zhou; Hobbs, M.J.; White, B.S.; David, J.P.R.; Willmott, J.R.; Tan, C. H.

    2014-01-01

    We report the evaluation of a molecular-beam epitaxy grown two-color photodetector for radiation thermometry. This two-color photodetector consists of two p+in+ diodes, an In0.53Ga0.25Al0.22As (hereafter InGaAlAs) p+in+ diode, which has a cutoff wavelength of 1180 nm, and an In0.53Ga0.47As (hereafter InGaAs) p+in+ diode with a cutoff wavelength of 1700 nm. Our simple monolithic integrated two-color photodetector achieved comparable output signal and signal-to-noise (SNR) ratio to that of a co...

  8. Survey of literature on convective heat transfer coefficients and recovery factors for high atmosphere thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, S.

    1973-01-01

    Heat transfer phenomena of rarefied gas flows is discussed based on a literature survey of analytical and experimental rarefied gas dynamics. Subsonic flows are emphasized for the purposes of meteorological thermometry in the high atmosphere. The heat transfer coefficients for three basic geometries are given in the regimes of free molecular flow, transition flow, slip flow, and continuum flow. Different types of heat phenomena, and the analysis of theoretical and experimental data are presented. The uncertainties calculated from the interpolation rule compared with the available experimental data are discussed. The recovery factor for each geometry in subsonic rarefied flows is also given.

  9. Real-time RNN-based acoustic thermometry with feedback control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Stephen J.; Nam, Joana H.; Fan, Liexiang; Brunke, Shelby S.; Sekins, K. Michael

    2017-03-01

    A major obstacle to the widespread adoption of HIFU therapy is the development of a suitable method of monitoring the a blation therapy in real-time. While MR-thermometry has emerged as a promising method for HIFU therapy monitoring, acoustic guidance has continuously been sought for reasons of cost and practicality. We have previously demonstrated the potential of acoustic thermometry, by using a recurrent neural network (RNN) to estimate changes in tissue temperature during HIFU ablation therapies. A limitation of this method is that an excessive therapeutic dose can cause multiple, non-linear changes within the ultrasound data, resulting in unreliable temperature estimates from the RNN. Accordingly, we propose a revised method of dosing wherein closed loop feedback is used to provide a controlled and specific dose; not only to ensure an efficacious lesion, but also to preserve the integrity of the ultrasound image, thereby producing accurate temperature estimates from the RNN. This investigation of controlling the thermal dose using feedback was performed on ex vivo bovine liver. The acoustic parameters used as inputs to the RNN were: changes in integrated backscatter intensity, thermal strain, and decorrelation. The therapeutic dose was delivered using a 1.1 MHz, 2D-array HIFU transducer transmitting at regular intervals during a 40-second dose. Interleaved between these regular HIFU dose intervals, volumetric ultrasound images were acquired on a Siemens ACUSON SC2000, with a 4Zlc probe. Feedback was introduced to the system by varying the HIFU duty cycle, in order to minimize the difference between a desired temperature curve (assigned a priori) and the estimated focal temperature values. Two methods were used for obtaining the focal temperature: the first was direct measurement using a 75-micron copper-constantan thermocouple embedded within the liver sample, and the second was temperature estimation as calculated from the RNN-based output temperatures

  10. Two-dimensional thermometry by using neutron resonance absorption spectrometer DOG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamiyama, T.; Noda, H.; Kiyanagi, Y. [Department of Quantum Energy Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan); Ikeda, S. [Institute of Materials Structure Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2001-03-01

    We applied the neutron resonance absorption spectroscopy to thermometry of a bulk object. The measurement was done by using the neutron resonance absorption spectrometer, DOG, installed at KENS, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization Neutron Source, which enables us to investigate effective temperature of a particular element by analyzing line width of resonance absorption spectrum. The effective temperature becomes consistence with the sample temperature above room temperature. For the analysis we applied the computed tomography method to reconstruct the temperature distribution on the object cross section. The results and the calculated distribution by the heat conducting equation are well agreed on the temperature difference inside the object. (author)

  11. Three-dimensional radiation thermometer combining near-infrared passband thermometry with optical fiber bundle tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xiong; Zhang, Zhimin; Chen, Qi

    2013-09-01

    We report an implementation of a three-dimensional (3D) middle-temperature (500-1500 kelvin) radiation thermometer, which combines a near-infrared passband (1-3 micron) thermometry with an optical fiber bundle tomography (OFBT). To improve the probe precision, we calibrate the digital output of each OFB unit vs. the passband radiant intensity of the blackbody. Furthermore a digital signal processor (DSP) based system is built to accomplish the emission signal processing and the tomographic computation with which the calculation speed can be improved. A temperature probe experiment of the flame of a candle has testified the feasibility of the OFBT-based 3D thermometer.

  12. Call Me Sisyphus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    Gordon MacKenzie (au- thor of Orbiting the Giant Hairball: A Corporate Fool’s Guide to Surviving with Grace) calls a “plum tree structure” and looked at...ghting.” Editor’s note: In Greek mythology , Sisyphus was condemned to an eternity of punishment in Hades that consisted of rolling a huge boulder to

  13. CALLING AQUARIUM LOVERS...

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    CERN's anemones will soon be orphans. We are looking for someone willing to look after the aquarium in the main building, for one year. If you are interested, or if you would like more information, please call 73830. (The anemones living in the aquarium thank you in anticipation.)

  14. Post-call delirium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rush, Raphael

    2016-12-01

    Although frequently diagnosed in hospital in-patients, delirium is often recognised but under-reported in the housestaff population. It is estimated that more than 90% of housestaff will experience regular episodes of post-call delirium. This paper identifies diagnostic criteria and discusses approaches to treatment. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  15. A call for surveys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernstein, Philip A.; Jensen, Christian S.; Tan, Kian-Lee

    2012-01-01

    The database field is experiencing an increasing need for survey papers. We call on more researchers to set aside time for this important writing activity. The database field is growing in population, scope of topics covered, and the number of papers published. Each year, thousands of new papers ...

  16. CIFSRF 2015 Call Document

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    wmanchur

    2015-02-02

    Feb 2, 2015 ... Cross-cutting priorities. All proposals seeking funds from this call shall clearly speak to the three CIFSRF cross-cutting priorities: a. Gender equality. Proposals need to demonstrate how the project will include women as important players in the scaling up of innovations, as well as key clients and end users.

  17. Flight calls and orientation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ole Næsbye; Andersen, Bent Bach; Kropp, Wibke

    2008-01-01

    flight calls was simulated by sequential computer controlled activation of five loudspeakers placed in a linear array perpendicular to the bird's migration course. The bird responded to this stimulation by changing its migratory course in the direction of that of the ‘flying conspecifics' but after about...... 30 minutes it drifted back to its original migration course. The results suggest that songbirds migrating alone at night can use the flight calls from conspecifics as additional cues for orientation and that they may compare this information with other cues to decide what course to keep.......  In a pilot experiment a European Robin, Erithacus rubecula, expressing migratory restlessness with a stable orientation, was video filmed in the dark with an infrared camera and its directional migratory activity was recorded. The flight overhead of migrating conspecifics uttering nocturnal...

  18. A Call for Justice

    OpenAIRE

    Brahmachari, Debahuti

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A new development can be identified within the civil society in Malaysia. A development that has resulted in a general call for justice, voiced through coalition groups that cut across categories of affiliation. This development is triggered by an increasing inculcation of Islamic values into the political system, which has interfered with the understanding of Malaysia as a country that can provide a framework for coexistence within a multicultural society. This thesis seeks ...

  19. Multimodality and CALL

    OpenAIRE

    Guichon, Nicolas; Cohen, Cathy

    2016-01-01

    International audience; This chapter explores the issues pertaining to multimodality, which has always been considered as a defining characteristic of CALL (Chapelle 2009). The chapter begins by critically examining the various definitions of multimodality, especially in the field of second language acquisition and cognitive psychology and explores the distinction between mode, modality and channel. With reference to specific studies conducted in the field, we then investigate the potential o...

  20. Identification of controlled-complexity thermal therapy models derived from magnetic resonance thermometry images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Niu

    Full Text Available Medical imaging provides information valuable in diagnosis, planning, and control of therapies. In this paper, we develop a method that uses a specific type of imaging--the magnetic resonance thermometry--to identify accurate and computationally efficient site and patient-specific computer models for thermal therapies, such as focused ultrasound surgery, hyperthermia, and thermally triggered targeted drug delivery. The developed method uses a sequence of acquired MR thermometry images to identify a treatment model describing the deposition and dissipation of thermal energy in tissues. The proper orthogonal decomposition of thermal images is first used to identify a set of empirical eigenfunctions, which captures spatial correlations in the thermal response of tissues. Using the reduced subset of eigenfunction as a functional basis, low-dimensional thermal response and the ultrasound specific absorption rate models are then identified. Once identified, the treatment models can be used to plan, optimize, and control the treatment. The developed approach is validated experimentally using the results of MR thermal imaging of a tissue phantom during focused ultrasound sonication. The validation demonstrates that our approach produces accurate low-dimensional treatment models and provides a convenient tool for balancing the accuracy of model predictions and the computational complexity of the treatment models.

  1. Use of the finite-element method for a dielectric-constant gas-thermometry experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandt, T.; Gaiser, C.; Fellmuth, B.; Haft, N.; Thiele-Krivoi, B.; Kuhn, A.

    2013-09-01

    The finite-element method is a well-established computational methodology for the numerical treatment of partial differential equations. It is primarily used for solving problems in applied engineering and science. In previous publications, we have shown that the method is suitable to solve problems in temperature metrology, for instance to predict temperature profiles and thermal equilibration processes in complex measurement setups. In this paper, the method is used for a primary thermometry experiment, namely dielectric-constant gas thermometry. Within the framework of an international project directed to the new definition of the base unit kelvin, measurements were performed at the triple point of water in order to determine the Boltzmann constant k. The finite-element method was used for the data evaluation in different ways: calculation of the effective compressibility of the measuring capacitor by describing the deformation of its electrodes under the influence of the pressure of the gas, the dielectric constant of which has to be determined; calculation of resonance frequencies for the determination of the elastic constants of the electrode material by resonant ultrasound spectroscopy; electrostatic simulations for calculating capacitance values; estimation of uncertainty components, which allowed to draw conclusions concerning the future reduction of uncertainty components.

  2. Evaluation of radiofrequency safety by high temperature resolution MR thermometry using a paramagnetic lanthanide complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharmadhikari, Shalmali; James, Judy R; Nyenhuis, John; Bansal, Navin

    2016-05-01

    The current practice of calculating the specific absorption rate (SAR) relies on local temperature measurements made using temperature probes. For an accurate SAR measurement, a temperature imaging method that provides high temperature sensitivity is desirable, because acceptable levels of SAR produce small temperature changes. MR thermometry using paramagnetic lanthanide complexes can be used to obtain absolute temperature measurements with sub-degree temperature and sub-millimeter spatial resolution. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a high temperature resolution MR technique to determine SAR. MR thermometry using a paramagnetic lanthanide complex thulium 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetrakis (methylene phosphonate) (TmDOTP(5-)), which has an almost 10(2) times stronger chemical shift temperature dependence than water, was used to develop a novel method for SAR measurement. Three-dimensional temperature and SAR images were calculated using MR images acquired with a conventional gradient recalled echo sequence and SAR-intensive T1ρ sequence. Effects of the presence of conducting wire and increasing T1ρ spin-lock pulse duration were also examined. SAR distribution could be visualized clearly and surges associated with conducting wires and increasing pulse duration were identified clearly in the computed high spatial resolution SAR images. A novel method with high temperature sensitivity is proposed as a tool to evaluate radiofrequency safety in MRI. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Magnetic resonance-based thermometry during laser ablation on ex-vivo swine pancreas and liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegretti, G; Saccomandi, P; Giurazza, F; Caponero, M A; Frauenfelder, G; Di Matteo, F M; Beomonte Zobel, B; Silvestri, S; Schena, E

    2015-07-01

    Laser Ablation (LA) is a minimally-invasive procedure for tumor treatment. LA outcomes depend on the heat distribution inside tissues and require accurate temperature measurement during the procedure. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows a non-invasive and three-dimensional thermometry of the organ undergoing LA. In this study, the temperature distribution within two swine pancreases and three swine livers undergoing LA (Nd:YAG, power: 2 W, treatment time: 4 min) was monitored by a 1.5-T MR scanner, utilizing two T1-weighted sequences (IRTF and SRTF). The signal intensity in four regions of interest, placed at different distances from the laser applicator, was related to temperature variations monitored in the same regions by twelve fiber Bragg grating sensors. The relationship between the signal intensity and temperature increase was calculated to obtain the calibration curve and to evaluate accuracy, sensibility and precision of each sequence. This is the first study of MR-based thermometry during LA on pancreas. More specifically, the IRTF sequence provides the highest temperature sensitivity in both liver (1.8 ± 0.2 °C(-1)) and pancreas (1.8 ± 0.5 °C(-1)) and the lowest precision and accuracy. SRTF sequence on pancreas presents the highest accuracy and precision (MODSFRT = -0.1 °C and LOASFRT = [-2.3; 2.1] °C). Copyright © 2015 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Femtosecond Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Gas Phase Thermometry at 5 kHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fineman, Claresta; Lucht, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the thermal instabilities occurring in turbulent combustion, such as in modern gas turbine combustors, is critical for more reliable and fuel-efficient operation. Non-intrusive laser based spectroscopy methods have been documented as the techniques of choice for turbulent combustion diagnostics. Specifically, femtosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (fs-CARS) thermometry has been established for temporal resolution of turbulent fluctuations in flame structure and provides accurate measurements across a wide range of temperatures. Experiments performed to date include 5 kHz pure vibrational N2 chirped probe-pulse fs-CARS thermometry on non-premixed hydrogen jet diffusion flames, methane jet diffusion flames, and the DLR gas turbine model combustor (GTMC). The fs-CARS signal generation process requires precise spatial and temporal overlap of tightly focused pulsed laser beams of less than 100 fs pulse duration. Here, signal loss due to beam steering, pressure fluctuations, or shear layer density gradients can become a problem. The effect of such interferences has been investigated using high velocity flow of compressed nitrogen gas from a converging-diverging nozzle. Resulting changes in fs-CARS spectra have been studied. Funding for this work was provided by the U.S. Department of Energy, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences.

  5. Temperature Mapping of Air Film-Cooled Thermal Barrier Coated Surfaces Using Phosphor Thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.

    2016-01-01

    While the effects of thermal barrier coating (TBC) thermal protection and air film cooling effectiveness for jet engine components are usually studied separately, their contributions to combined cooling effectiveness are interdependent and are not simply additive. Therefore, combined cooling effectiveness must be measured to achieve an optimum balance between TBC thermal protection and air film cooling. Phosphor thermometry offers several advantages for mapping temperatures of air film cooled surfaces. While infrared thermography has been typically applied to study air film cooling effectiveness, temperature accuracy depends on knowing surface emissivity (which may change) and correcting for effects of reflected radiation. Because decay time-based full-field phosphor thermometry is relatively immune to these effects, it can be applied advantageously to temperature mapping of air film-cooled TBC-coated surfaces. In this presentation, an overview will be given of efforts at NASA Glenn Research Center to perform temperature mapping of air film-cooled TBC-coated surfaces in a burner rig test environment. The effects of thermal background radiation and flame chemiluminescence on the measurements are investigated, and the strengths and limitations of this method for studying air film cooling effectiveness are discussed.

  6. Monitoring temperatures in coal conversion and combustion processes via ultrasound. [Ultrasonic thermometry proposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopalsami, N.; Raptis, A. C.; Mulcahey, T. P.

    1980-02-01

    A study of the state-of-the-art of instrumentation for monitoring temperatures in coal conversion and combustion systems has been carried out. The instrumentation types studied include Thermocouples, Radiation Pyrometers, and Acoustical Thermometers. The capabilities and limitations of each type are reviewed. The study determined that ultrasonic thermometry has the potential of providing viable instrumentation. Consequently, a feasibility study of the ultrasonic thermometry was undertaken. A mathematical model of a pulse-echo ultrasonic temperature measurement system is developed using linear system theory. The mathematical model lends itself to the adaptation of generalized correlation techniques for the estimation of propagation delays. Computer simulations are made to test the efficacy of the signal processing techniques for noise-free as well as noisy signals. Based on the theoretical study, acoustic techniques to measure temperature in reactors and combustors are feasible. To experimentally verify the technique it is needed (a) to test the available sensor materials at high temperatures under erosive and corrosive conditions and (b) upon the selection of the appropriate sensor material to validate the proposed signal processing technique. The base for the applicability of this technique will be the frequency of operation, which will determine the length of the sensor and the noise background at the frequency of interest. It is, however, believed that the proposed technique will provide reliable estimates under the noise background.

  7. Experimental assessment of CT-based thermometry during laser ablation of porcine pancreas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schena, E.; Saccomandi, P.; Giurazza, F.; Caponero, M. A.; Mortato, L.; Di Matteo, F. M.; Panzera, F.; Del Vescovo, R.; Beomonte Zobel, B.; Silvestri, S.

    2013-08-01

    Laser interstitial thermotherapy (LITT) is employed to destroy tumors in organs, and its outcome strongly depends on the temperature distribution inside the treated tissue. The recent introduction of computed tomography (CT) scan thermometry, based on the CT number dependence of the tissue with temperature, overcomes the invasiveness of other techniques used to monitor temperature during LITT. The averaged CT number (ROI = 0.02 cm2) of an ex vivo swine pancreas is monitored during LITT (Nd:YAG laser power of 3 W, treatment time: 120 s) at different distances from the applicator (from 4 to 30 mm). The averaged CT number shows a clear decrease during treatment: it is highest at 4 mm from the applicator (mean variation in the whole treatment of -0.256 HU s-1) and negligible at 30 mm, since the highest temperature increase is present close to the applicator (i.e., 45 °C at 4 mm and 25 °C at 6 mm). To obtain the relationship between CT numbers and pancreas temperature, the reference temperature was measured by 12 fiber Bragg grating sensors. The CT number decreases as a function of temperature, showing a nonlinear trend with a mean thermal sensitivity of -0.50 HU °C-1. Results here reported are the first assessment of pancreatic CT number dependence on temperature, at the best of our knowledge. Findings can be useful to further investigate CT scan thermometry during LITT on the pancreas.

  8. Optically trapped nanodiamonds with nitrogen-vacancy center spins for scanning magnetometry and thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman, Benjamin J.; Horowitz, Viva R.; Andrich, Paolo; Christle, David J.; Toyli, David M.; Cleland, Andrew N.; Awschalom, David D.

    2013-03-01

    Nanodiamonds with nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers are a versatile sensing platform that combines the optically addressable atom-like properties of embedded NV centers, which are sensitive to electromagnetic fields and temperature, with the physical size and mobility necessary for nanometer-scale spatial resolution. We constructed an optical tweezers apparatus that accomplishes position control of nanodiamonds in solution within a microfluidic circuit and enables simultaneous optical measurement and microwave manipulation of the NV centers' ground-state spins. We observe nanodiamond fluorescence and trapping stability over many hours, and infer high d.c. magnetic field and temperature sensitivities from measured spin resonance spectra. Scanning the position of the trapped nanodiamonds enables us to map the magnetic field of current-carrying wires and magnetic nanostructures, and perform thermometry in liquid. This work provides an approach to three-dimensional spin-based scanning probe magnetometry and thermometry in fluids for applications in the biological and physical sciences. This work was supported by AFOSR and DARPA.

  9. Measurement of Two-Phase Flow and Heat Transfer Parameters using Infrared Thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Hoon; Kommer, Eric; Dessiatoun, Serguei; Kim, Jungho

    2012-01-01

    A novel technique to measure heat transfer and liquid film thickness distributions over relatively large areas for two-phase flow and heat transfer phenomena using infrared (IR)thermometry is described. IR thermometry is an established technology that can be used to measure temperatures when optical access to the surface is available in the wavelengths of interest. In this work, a midwave IR camera (3.6-5.1 microns) is used to determine the temperature distribution within a multilayer consisting of a silicon substrate coated with a thin insulator. Since silicon is largely transparent to IR radiation, the temperature of the inner and outer walls of the multilayer can be measured by coating selected areas with a thin, IR opaque film. If the fluid used is also partially transparent to IR, the flow can be visualized and the liquid film thickness can be measured. The theoretical basis for the technique is given along with a description of the test apparatus and data reduction procedure. The technique is demonstrated by determining the heat transfer coefficient distributions produced by droplet evaporation and flow boiling heat transfer.

  10. MR guidance and thermometry of percutaneous laser disc decompression in open MRI: an initial clinical investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streitparth, Florian; Walter, Thula; Bucourt, Maximilian de; Freyhardt, Patrick; Maurer, Martin; Renz, Diane; Gebauer, Bernhard; Hamm, Bernd; Teichgraeber, Ulf K.M. [Charite, Humboldt-University Medical School, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Hartwig, Tony; Putzier, Michael; Strube, Patrick [Charite, Humboldt-University, Center for Musculoskeletal Surgery, Berlin (Germany); Bretschneider, Tina [University of Magdeburg, Department of Radiology, Magdeburg (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    To assess the feasibility, safety and efficacy of real-time MR guidance and thermometry of percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD). Twenty-four discs in 22 patients with chronic low-back and radicular pain were treated by PLDD using open 1.0-T magnetic-resonance imaging (MRI). A fluoroscopic proton-density-weighted turbo spin-echo (PDw TSE) sequence was used to position the laser fibre. Non-spoiled gradient-echo (GRE) sequences were employed for real-time thermal monitoring based on proton resonance frequency (PRF). Radicular pain was assessed over 6 months with a numerical rating scale (NRS). PLDD was technically successful in all cases, with adequate image quality for laser positioning. The PRF-based real-time temperature monitoring was found to be feasible in practice. After 6 months, 21 % reported complete remission of radicular pain, 63 % at least great pain relief and 74 % at least mild relief. We found a significant decrease in the NRS score between the pre-intervention and the 6-month follow-up assessment (P < 0.001). No major complications occurred; the single adverse event recorded, moderate motor impairment, resolved. Real-time MR guidance and PRF-based thermometry of PLDD in the lumbar spine under open 1.0-T MRI appears feasible, safe and effective and may pave the way to more precise operating procedures. (orig.)

  11. Coordinated U-Pb geochronology, trace element, Ti-in-zircon thermometry and microstructural analysis of Apollo zircons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, Carolyn A.; McKeegan, Kevin D.; Moser, Desmond E.

    2017-04-01

    We present the results of a coordinated SIMS U-Pb, trace element, Ti-in-zircon thermometry, and microstructural study of 155 lunar zircons separated from Apollo 14, 15, and 17 breccia and soil samples that help resolve discrepancies between the zircon data, the lunar whole rock history and lunar magma ocean crystallization models. The majority of lunar grains are detrital fragments, some nearly 1 mm in length, of large parent crystals suggesting that they crystallized in highly enriched KREEP magmas. The zircon age distributions for all three landing sites exhibit an abundance of ages at ∼4.33 Ga, however they differ in that only Apollo 14 samples have a population of zircons with ages between 4.1 and 3.9 Ga. These younger grains comprise only 10% of all dated lunar zircons and are usually small and highly shocked making them more susceptible to Pb-loss. These observations suggest that the majority of zircons crystallized before 4.1 Ga and that KREEP magmatism had predominantly ceased by this time. We also observed that trace element analyses are easily affected by contributions from inclusions (typically injected impact melt) within SIMS analyses spots. After filtering for these effects, rare-earth element (REE) abundances of pristine zircon are consistent with one pattern characterized by a negative Eu anomaly and no positive Ce anomaly, implying that the zircons formed in a reducing environment. This inference is consistent with crystallization temperatures based on measured Ti concentrations and new estimates of oxide activities which imply temperatures ranging between 958 ± 57 and 1321 ± 100 °C, suggesting that zircon parent magmas were anhydrous. Together, the lunar zircon ages and trace elements are consistent with a ⩽300 My duration of KREEP magmatism under anhydrous, reducing conditions. We also report two granular texture zircons that contain baddeleyite cores, which both yield 207Pb-206Pb ages of 4.33 Ga. These grains are our best constraints on

  12. To be called upon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kublitz, Anja

    2015-01-01

    of the responses to the Arab spring among Danish Muslims, this paper will offer some preliminary reflections on how we can understand ‘the mass’ and an ‘intimacy of the mass’ when the mass is no longer a crowd. According to Marx the mass grows quantitatively from the local to the global, but what happens......When Danish Muslims explain what made them decide to travel to the Middle East and take up arms in the wake of the Arab Spring, they say that they were called upon. Displayed on videos on social media, women and sometimes children begged them to come to their rescue. In light of some...

  13. An Island Called Cuba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Stubbs

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Review of: An Island Called Home: Returning to Jewish Cuba. Ruth Behar, photographs by Humberto Mayol. New Brunswick NJ: Rutgers University Press, 2007. xiii + 297 pp. (Cloth US$ 29.95 Fidel Castro: My Life: A Spoken Autobiography. Fidel Castro & Ignacio Ramonet. New York: Scribner/Simon & Schuster, 2008. vii + 724 pp. (Paper US$ 22.00, e-book US$ 14.99 Cuba: What Everyone Needs to Know. Julia E. Sweig. New York: Oxford University Press, 2009. xiv + 279 pp. (Paper US$ 16.95 [First paragraph] These three ostensibly very different books tell a compelling story of each author’s approach, as much as the subject matter itself. Fidel Castro: My Life: A Spoken Autobiography is based on a series of long interviews granted by the then-president of Cuba, Fidel Castro, to Spanish-Franco journalist Ignacio Ramonet. Cuba: What Everyone Needs to Know, by U.S. political analyst Julia Sweig, is one of a set country series, and, like Ramonet’s, presented in question/answer format. An Island Called Home: Returning to Jewish Cuba, with a narrative by Cuban-American anthropologist Ruth Behar and photographs by Cuban photographer Humberto Mayol, is a retrospective/introspective account of the Jewish presence in Cuba. While from Ramonet and Sweig we learn much about the revolutionary project, Behar and Mayol convey the lived experience of the small Jewish community against that backdrop.

  14. CALL FOR PARTICIPATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Jimenez M.

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available TRIPLE HELIX VII 7TH BIENNIAL INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON UNIVERSITY, INDUSTRY AND GOVERNMENT LINKAGES “THE ROLE OF TRIPLE HELIX IN THE GLOBAL AGENDA FOR INNOVATION, COMPETITIVENESS AND SUSTAINABILITY” UNIVERSITY OF STRATHCLYDE, GLASGOW, SCOTLAND 17-19 JUNE 2009 CALL FOR PARTICIPATION CLOSING DATE FOR ABSTRACT SUBMISSION – 14 NOVEMBER 2008 Triple Helix VII is an important occasion offering a major platform for the exchange of ideas and experiences - academics will share their insights into the dynamics of collaboration; business and industry will review their plans and indicate future directions; and for government decision makers, will explore new avenues for supporting developments, analysing innovation frameworks and their impact on national and regional economies. A Call for Papers is attached, and further details can be obtained from the Triple Helix VII website: http://www.triple-helix-7.org. We hope the Conference will be of interest to you and look forward to seeing you in Glasgow next year taking part in the Triple Helix VII proceedings. Sheila Forbes Conference Administrator Triple Helix VII

  15. MEDICAL SERVICE - URGENT CALLS

    CERN Document Server

    Service Médical

    2000-01-01

    IN URGENT NEED OF A DOCTOR GENEVA: EMERGENCY SERVICES GENEVA AND VAUD 144 FIRE BRIGADE 118 POLICE 117 CERN FIREMEN 767-44-44 ANTI-POISONS CENTRE Open 24h/24h 01-251-51-51 Patient not fit to be moved, call family doctor, or: GP AT HOME: Open 24h/24h 748-49-50 AMG- Association Of Geneva Doctors: Emergency Doctors at home 07h-23h 322 20 20 Patient fit to be moved: HOPITAL CANTONAL CENTRAL 24 Micheli-du-Crest 372-33-11 ou 382-33-11 EMERGENCIES 382-33-11 ou 372-33-11 CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 6 rue Willy-Donzé 372-33-11 MATERNITY 32 bvd.de la Cluse 382-68-16 ou 382-33-11 OPHTHALMOLOGY 22 Alcide Jentzer 382-33-11 ou 372-33-11 MEDICAL CENTRE CORNAVIN 1-3 rue du Jura 345 45 50 HOPITAL DE LA TOUR Meyrin 719-61-11 EMERGENCIES 719-61-11 CHILDREN'S EMERGENCIES 719-61-00 LA TOUR MEDICAL CENTRE 719-74-00 European Emergency Call 112   FRANCE: EMERGENCY SERVICES 15 FIRE BRIGADE 18 POLICE 17 CERN FIREMEN AT HOME 00-41-22-767-44-44 ...

  16. Call for volunteers

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    CERN is calling for volunteers from all members of the Laboratory for organizing the two exceptional Open days.CERN is calling for volunteers from all members of the Laboratory’s personnel to help with the organisation of these two exceptional Open Days, for the visits of CERN personnel and their families on the Saturday and above all for the major public Open Day on the Sunday. As for the 50th anniversary in 2004, the success of the Open Days will depend on a large number of volunteers. All those working for CERN as well as retired members of the personnel can contribute to making this event a success. Many guides will be needed at the LHC points, for the activities at the surface and to man the reception and information points. The aim of these major Open Days is to give the local populations the opportunity to discover the fruits of almost 20 years of work carried out at CERN. We are hoping for some 2000 volunteers for the two Open Days, on the Saturday from 9 a.m. to ...

  17. Primary thermometry triad at 6 mK in mesoscopic circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iftikhar, Z.; Anthore, A.; Jezouin, S.; Parmentier, F. D.; Jin, Y.; Cavanna, A.; Ouerghi, A.; Gennser, U.; Pierre, F.

    2016-09-01

    Quantum physics emerge and develop as temperature is reduced. Although mesoscopic electrical circuits constitute an outstanding platform to explore quantum behaviour, the challenge in cooling the electrons impedes their potential. The strong coupling of such micrometre-scale devices with the measurement lines, combined with the weak coupling to the substrate, makes them extremely difficult to thermalize below 10 mK and imposes in situ thermometers. Here we demonstrate electronic quantum transport at 6 mK in micrometre-scale mesoscopic circuits. The thermometry methods are established by the comparison of three in situ primary thermometers, each involving a different underlying physics. The employed combination of quantum shot noise, quantum back action of a resistive circuit and conductance oscillations of a single-electron transistor covers a remarkably broad spectrum of mesoscopic phenomena. The experiment, performed in vacuum using a standard cryogen-free dilution refrigerator, paves the way towards the sub-millikelvin range with additional thermalization and refrigeration techniques.

  18. Tethering Luminescent Thermometry and Plasmonics: Light Manipulation to Assess Real-Time Thermal Flow in Nanoarchitectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brites, Carlos D S; Fuertes, Maria Cecilia; Angelomé, Paula C; Martínez, Eduardo D; Lima, Patrícia P; Soler-Illia, Galo J A A; Carlos, Luís D

    2017-08-09

    The past decade has seen significant progresses in the ability to fabricate new mesoporous thin films with highly controlled pore systems and emerging applications in sensing, electrical and thermal isolation, microfluidics, solar cells engineering, energy storage, and catalysis. Heat management at the micro- and nanoscale is a key issue in most of these applications, requiring a complete thermal characterization of the films that is commonly performed using electrical methods. Here, plasmonic-induced heating (through Au NPs) is combined with Tb(3+)/Eu(3+) luminescence thermometry to measure the thermal conductivity of silica and titania mesoporous nanolayers. This innovative method yields values in accord with those measured by the evasive and destructive conventional 3ω-electrical method, simultaneously overcoming their main limitations, for example, a mandatory deposition of additional isolating and metal layers over the films and the previous knowledge of the thermal contact resistance between the heating and the mesoporous layers.

  19. Referenceless PRF thermometry with multi-echo processing to monitor prostate ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieke, Viola; Kinsey, Adam M.; Nau, William H.; Diederich, Chris J.; Sommer, Graham; Pauly, Kim Butts

    2007-05-01

    Referenceless proton resonance frequency (PRF) shift thermometry provides a means to measure temperature changes during minimally invasive thermotherapy that is inherently robust to motion and tissue displacement. An extension to the referenceless method allows temperature estimation in the presence of phase discontinuities that occur at water/fat interfaces between prostate and periprostatic fat. Three images at different echo times are acquired and binary water and fat maps are generated from a Dixon reconstruction. For the background phase estimation, water and fat regions are treated separately and the phase offset between the two tissue types is determined. Here we present a new pulse sequence to acquire the necessary three images, which allows for temperature monitoring of the prostate with increased temporal resolution, optimal temperature resolution with respect to heating pattern of transurethral US applicators, and provides high resolution anatomical images. The method is demonstrated during in vivo thermal ablation of canine prostate.

  20. Infrared Skin Thermometry: Validating and Comparing Techniques to Detect Periwound Skin Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mufti, Asfandyar; Somayaji, Ranjani; Coutts, Patricia; Sibbald, R Gary

    2018-01-01

    Diagnosis of wound infection can be challenging because it relies on a combination of clinical signs and symptoms that are often nonspecific. Increased periwound cutaneous temperature is a classic sign of deep and surrounding wound infection, and its quantitative measurement is one of the most reliable and valid clinical signs of deep and surrounding skin infection at the bedside. Skin surface temperature differences may be detected using commercially available noncontact infrared thermometers. However, techniques to detect temperature using noncontact infrared thermometers vary, and no studies have evaluated these methods. Two such measurement techniques include the "4-point" and "whole-wound" scanning methods. This study assessed the ability of different infrared thermometers using the aforementioned techniques to detect clinically meaningful differences in periwound cutaneous temperatures used in the diagnosis of wound infection. A prospective cohort study was conducted from 2015 to 2016 of consenting adult patients 18 years or older with an open wound attending a regional wound care clinic. One hundred patients with wounds underwent surface temperature measurement. Infection was not a specific inclusion criterion as the primary objective was to conduct a comparative assessment of infrared thermometry devices. Demographic data (age, height, weight, gender, and ethnicity) were also collected. Each wound was measured using 4 different noncontact infrared thermometers: Exergen DermaTemp 1001 (Exergen Corporation, Watertown, Massachusetts), Mastercraft Digital Temperature Reader (Mastercraft, Toronto, Ontario, Canada), Mastercool MSC52224-A (Mastercool Inc, Randolph, New Jersey), and Etekcity ETC-8250 Temperature Heat Pen (Etekcity, Anaheim, California). Data analysis was based on a comparison of 4 periwound skin surface temperature measurement differences (ΔT in degrees Fahrenheit) between the wound site and an equivalent contralateral control site. The primary

  1. SQUID-based current sensing noise thermometry for quantum resistors at dilution refrigerator temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinbaum, Ethan; Shingla, Vidhi; Csáthy, G. A.

    2017-03-01

    We present a dc Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID)-based current amplifier with an estimated input referred noise of only 2.3 fA/√{Hz}. Because of such a low amplifier noise, the circuit is useful for Johnson noise thermometry of quantum resistors in the kΩ range down to mK temperatures. In particular, we demonstrate that our circuit does not contribute appreciable noise to the Johnson noise of a 3.25 kΩ resistor down to 16 mK. Our circuit is a useful alternative to the commonly used High Electron Mobility Transistor-based amplifiers, but in contrast to the latter, it offers a much reduced 1/f noise. In comparison to SQUIDs interfaced with cryogenic current comparators, our circuit has similar low noise levels, but it is easier to build and to shield from magnetic pickup.

  2. Calibration of Thermocouples and Infrared Radiation Thermometers by Comparison to Radiation Thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, M. J.; Zarco, M.; Campo, D. Del

    2011-01-01

    The National Metrology Institute of Spain (CEM) has designed, characterized, and set-up its new system to calibrate thermocouples and infrared radiation thermometers up to 1600 °C by comparison to radiation thermometry. This system is based on a MoSi2 three-zone furnace with a graphite blackbody comparator. Two interchangeable alumina tubes with different structures are used for thermocouples and radiation thermometer calibrations. The reference temperature of the calibration is determined by a standard radiation thermometer. Normally, this is used at CEM to disseminate the International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90) in the radiation range, and it refers to the Cu fixed point. Several noble metal thermocouples and infrared radiation thermometers with a central wavelength near 900 nm have been calibrated, and their uncertainty budgets have been obtained.

  3. Nano-Kelvin thermometry and temperature control: beyond the thermal noise limit

    CERN Document Server

    Weng, Wenle; Stace, Thomas M; Campbell, Geoff; Baynes, Fred N; Luiten, Andre N

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate thermometry with a resolution of 80 $\\mathrm{nK} / \\sqrt{\\mathrm{Hz}}$ using an isotropic crystalline whispering-gallery mode resonator based on a dichroic dual-mode technique. We simultaneously excite two modes that have a mode frequency ratio very close to two ($\\pm0.3$ppm). The wavelength- and temperature-dependence of the refractive index means that the frequency difference between these modes is an ultra-sensitive proxy of the resonator temperature. This approach to temperature sensing automatically suppresses sensitivity to thermal expansion and vibrationally induced changes of the resonator. We also demonstrate active suppression of temperature fluctuations in the resonator by controlling the intensity of the driving laser. The residual temperature fluctuations are shown to be below the limits set by fundamental thermodynamic fluctuations of the resonator material.

  4. Pyroxene thermometry of rhyolite lavas of the Bruneau-Jarbidge eruptive center, Central Snake River Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cathey, Henrietta E.; Nash, Barbara P.

    2009-11-01

    The Bruneau-Jarbidge eruptive center of the central Snake River Plain in southern Idaho, USA produced multiple rhyolite lava flows with volumes of consanguinity of such reservoirs to those that supplied the polymodal Cougar Point Tuff. Pyroxene thermometry results obtained using QUILF equilibria yield pre-eruptive magma temperatures of 905 to 980 °C, and individual modes consistently record higher Ca content and higher temperatures than pyroxenes with equivalent Fe-Mg ratios in the preceding Cougar Point Tuff. As is the case with the Cougar Point Tuff, evidence for up-temperature zonation within single crystals that would be consistent with recycling of sub- or near-solidus material from antecedent magma reservoirs by rapid reheating is extremely rare. Also, the absence of intra-crystal zonation, particularly at crystal rims, is not easily reconciled with cannibalization of caldera fill that subsided into pre-eruptive reservoirs. The textural, compositional and thermometric results rather are consistent with minor re-equilibration to higher temperatures of the unerupted crystalline residue from the explosive phase of volcanism, or perhaps with newly generated magmas from source materials very similar to those for the Cougar Point Tuff. Collectively, the data suggest that most of the pyroxene compositional diversity that is represented by the tuffs and lavas was produced early in the history of the eruptive center and that compositions across this range were preserved or duplicated through much of its lifetime. Mineral compositions and thermometry of the multiple lavas suggest that unerupted magmas residual to the explosive phase of volcanism may have been stored at sustained, high temperatures subsequent to the explosive phase of volcanism. If so, such persistent high temperatures and large eruptive magma volumes likewise require an abundant and persistent supply of basalt magmas to the lower and/or mid-crust, consistent with the tectonic setting of a continental

  5. Hydrogen CARS thermometry in H2-N2 mixtures at high pressure and medium temperatures: influence of linewidths models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussong, J.; Stricker, W.; Bruet, X.; Joubert, P.; Bonamy, J.; Robert, D.; Michaut, X.; Gabard, T.; Berger, H.

    In order to improve the accuracy of H2 CARS thermometry, H2 Q-branch CARS spectra have been recorded for various H2-N2 mixtures in a high-pressure cell at different pressures and temperatures (up to 40 bar and 875 K). Due to the low spectral resolution of broadband CARS experiments, the relevant spectral lineshape factor is the linewidth ratio Γ(Q(3))/Γ(Q(1)), since Q(1) and Q(3) are the most intense lines of the Q-branch spectrum in this temperature range. For the first time, the speed-inhomogeneous effects are accounted for in the simulation of the CARS profiles. The evaluated temperatures are in good agreement with reference values obtained by thermocouples. The specific role on the accuracy of H2 CARS thermometry of the speed inhomogeneity is carefully analyzed, in connection with the influence of the nitrogen concentration.

  6. Introduction of the use of thermography and thermometry in the diagnosis of uveitis in horses: a pilot project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushton, J O; Tichy, A; Nell, B

    2015-01-01

    Aims and objectives To date assessment of changes in ocular temperature, as a hallmark of uveitis in horses has not been determined. Therefore the aim of the current study was to determine whether ocular temperature is increased in acute uveitic eyes compared with non-uveitic eyes, and to compare an affordable thermometry device with a thermography device. Material and methods Ocular temperatures of both eyes of five horses with acute unilateral uveitis and 10 normal horses were measured using thermometry and thermography. Presence and absence of acute uveitis were diagnosed through a complete ophthalmological examination. Ambient temperature and core body temperature were also recorded. Results The difference in temperatures between uveitic eyes and non-uveitic eyes was marked but not statistically significant (mean thermography temperature 34.0°C sd±1.6°C and 32.7°C sd±2.4°C, respectively v mean thermometry temperature 34.0°C sd±1.9°C and 31.6°C sd±3.1°C, respectively). No influence of core body temperature on either method was detected. Thermography was less influenced by ambient temperature than was thermometry. Conclusion In conclusion uveitic eyes are not significantly warmer than non-uveitic eyes. Despite the lack of significance, a tendency towards increased ocular temperature in uveitic eyes, compared with non-uveitic eyes was noted. Therefore more research on this topic is warranted. PMID:26392900

  7. Behavior based adaptive call predictor

    OpenAIRE

    Phithakkitnukoon, Santi; Dantu, Ram; Claxton, Rob; Eagle, Nathan

    2011-01-01

    Predicting future calls can be the next advanced feature of the next-generation telecommunication networks as the service providers are looking to offer new services to their customers. Call prediction can be useful to many applications such as planning daily schedules, avoiding unwanted communications (e.g. voice spam), and resource planning in call centers. Predicting calls is a very challenging task. We believe that this is an emerging area of research in ambient intelligence where the ele...

  8. Model-based PRFS thermometry using fat as the internal reference and the extended Prony algorithm for model fitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xinyi; Li, Cheng; Ying, Kui; Weng, Dehe; Qin, Wen; Li, Kuncheng

    2010-04-01

    A model-based proton resonance frequency shift (PRFS) thermometry method was developed to significantly reduce the temperature quantification errors encountered in the conventional phase mapping method and the spatiotemporal limitations of the spectroscopic thermometry method. Spectral data acquired using multi-echo gradient echo (GRE) is fit into a two-component signal model containing temperature information and fat is used as the internal reference. The noniterative extended Prony algorithm is used for the signal fitting and frequency estimate. Monte Carlo simulations demonstrate the advantages of the method for optimal water-fat separation and temperature estimation accuracy. Phantom experiments demonstrate that the model-based method effectively reduces the interscan motion effects and frequency disturbances due to the main field drift. The thermometry result of ex vivo goose liver experiment with high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) heating was also presented in the paper to indicate the feasibility of the model-based method in real tissue. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Verification of MR thermometry via in-vivo intralesional fluoroptic temperature measurement for laser-induced thermotherapy of liver metastases; Verifizierung der MR-Thermometrie mittels in vivo intralaesionaler, fluoroptischer Temperaturmessung fuer die laserinduzierte Thermotherapie von Lebermetastasen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogl, T.J.; Weinhold, N.; Mack, M.G.; Mueller, P.K.; Scholz, W.R.; Straub, R.; Felix, R. [Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (Germany). Strahlenklinik und Poliklinik; Roggan, A. [Laser- und Medizin-Technologie gGmbH, Berlin (Germany)

    1998-08-01

    To evaluate the correlation of MR-measured changes of signal intensity and invasive fluoroptic temperature measurements during MR-guided LITT of liver metastases. Results: In both sequences a gradually increasing signal loss could be documented during laser application which proved to be reversible after cessation of energy deposition. The percentage of decrease in signal intensity correlated directly with the measured increase of temperature. Invasive fluoroptical evaluation of temperature distribution after 10 min exposure time showed at 5 mm distance from the applicator an increase of temperature of 35 C, in 1O mm distance a mean increase of 9 C{+-}1.7, in 15 mm a mean increase of 7 C{+-}1.6 and in 20 mm a mean increase of 3 C{+-}0.5. This is evidence of thermal tissue damage up to 3 cm in diameter with laser monoapplication. The qualitative evaluation revealed a reproducible correlation of the extent of signal loss around the applicator and the finally induced degree of necrosis. Conclusion: Invasive fluoroptical temperature measurements prove the diagnostic reliability of MR thermometry for the online monitoring of LITT of liver metastases. (orig.) [Deutsch] Verifizierung der MR-Thermometrie mittels invasiver fluoroptischer, intralaesionaler Temperaturmessung fuer die laserinduzierte Thermotherapie von Lebermetastasen. Ergebnisse: Beide MR-Thermometrie-Sequenzen konnten einen zunehmenden Signalverlust um den Applikator waehrend der Laserapplikation dokumentieren, reversibel nach Ende der Energiezufuhr. Die invasive fluoroptische Temperaturmessung nach einer Expositionsdauer von 10 min zeigte in 5 mm Entfernung vom Applikator den hoechsten mittleren Temperaturanstieg ({Delta}T) von 35 C, in 10 mm Distanz war {Delta}T= 9 C{+-}1,7, in 15 mm Distanz 7 C{+-}1,6 und in 20 mm Distanz 3 C{+-}0,5. Die prozentuale Signalintensitaetsabnahme korrelierte mit dem gemessenen Temperaturanstieg. Diese Resultate bestaetigten die Ausdehnung der thermischen Gewebeschaedigung von

  10. Call Centre- Computer Telephone Integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dražen Kovačević

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Call centre largely came into being as a result of consumerneeds converging with enabling technology- and by the companiesrecognising the revenue opportunities generated by meetingthose needs thereby increasing customer satisfaction. Regardlessof the specific application or activity of a Call centre, customersatisfaction with the interaction is critical to the revenuegenerated or protected by the Call centre. Physical(v, Call centreset up is a place that includes computer, telephone and supervisorstation. Call centre can be available 24 hours a day - whenthe customer wants to make a purchase, needs information, orsimply wishes to register a complaint.

  11. Comparison of Zircon (Ti) Thermometry and Typology of the Cappadocian Ignimbrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin, Lutfiye; Aydar, Erkan; Schmitt, Axel K.; Çubukçu, H. Evren

    2014-05-01

    The typological study of zircons is a valuable, convenient, reliable and economical tool since this mineral is highly resistant to alteration and post-magmatic heating. The zircon morphology yields information on temperature and the chemistry of magma hence can be a perfect indicator of the origin of material (e.g., crustal, hybrid or mantle). Zircon typology method has been applied to 8 different ignimbrite successions (Kavak-9.3 Ma, Zelve-9.2 Ma, Sarimadentepe-8.4 Ma, Sofular-8.2 Ma, Cemilkoy-7.2 Ma, Tahar-6.1 Ma, Gordeles-6.4 Ma, Kizilkaya-5.2 Ma) of Miocene-Pliocene in Central Anatolian Volcanic Province. The growth of the pyramidal and prismal faces of zircon crystals, extracted from pumices of each ignimbrite, has been examined and plot onto typology diagram. The temperature index (I.T.), which depends on the relative change of the (110) and (100) prismal faces and alkaline index (I.A.), which depends on the change of the (211) and (301) pyramidal faces, are determined. Typological Evolution Trend (T.E.T) which is used for granitoid classification, is drawn based on estimated I.T. and I.A.. Furthermore, Ti-thermometry of zircons has been applied in order to estimate the emplacement temperatures of the magmatic rocks. For that purpose, Ti concentrations of zircons and host rocks are determined. Zircon evolution temperatures and zircon saturation temperatures are calculated according to Ferry and Watson (2007) and Watson and Harrison (1983). Obtained zircon geothermometry data have been correlated with the zircon typology data. Zircon evolution temperature estimated from zircon crystals are 741oC ( Tmin=-30oC and Tmax=16oC) for Kavak, 749oC (Tmin=-31oC and Tmax=33oC) for Zelve, 811oC (Tmin=-37oC and Tmax=53 oC) for Sarimadentepe, 807oC (Tmin=-24oC and Tmax=61oC) for Sofular, 739oC (Tmin=-58oC and Tmax=42oC) for Cemilkoy, 768oC for Tahar, 806oC (Tmin=-37oC and Tmax=29oC) for Gordeles, 805oC (Tmin=-35oC and Tmax=69oC) for Gordeles-B, 765oC (Tmin=-25oC and Tmax=48

  12. Rayleigh-based, multi-element coral thermometry: A biomineralization approach to developing climate proxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaetani, G.A.; Cohen, A.L.; Wang, Z.; Crusius, J.

    2011-01-01

    This study presents a new approach to coral thermometry that deconvolves the influence of water temperature on skeleton composition from that of “vital effects”, and has the potential to provide estimates of growth temperatures that are accurate to within a few tenths of a degree Celsius from both tropical and cold-water corals. Our results provide support for a physico-chemical model of coral biomineralization, and imply that Mg2+ substitutes directly for Ca2+ in biogenic aragonite. Recent studies have identified Rayleigh fractionation as an important influence on the elemental composition of coral skeletons. Daily, seasonal and interannual variations in the amount of aragonite precipitated by corals from each “batch” of calcifying fluid can explain why the temperature dependencies of elemental ratios in coral skeleton differ from those of abiogenic aragonites, and are highly variable among individual corals. On the basis of this new insight into the origin of “vital effects” in coral skeleton, we developed a Rayleigh-based, multi-element approach to coral thermometry. Temperature is resolved from the Rayleigh fractionation signal by combining information from multiple element ratios (e.g., Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca, Ba/Ca) to produce a mathematically over-constrained system of Rayleigh equations. Unlike conventional coral thermometers, this approach does not rely on an initial calibration of coral skeletal composition to an instrumental temperature record. Rather, considering coral skeletogenesis as a biologically mediated, physico-chemical process provides a means to extract temperature information from the skeleton composition using the Rayleigh equation and a set of experimentally determined partition coefficients. Because this approach is based on a quantitative understanding of the mechanism that produces the “vital effect” it should be possible to apply it both across scleractinian species and to corals growing in vastly different environments. Where

  13. Method for analyzing passive silicon carbide thermometry with a continuous dilatometer to determine irradiation temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, Anne A., E-mail: campbellaa@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Porter, Wallace D.; Katoh, Yutai [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Snead, Lance L. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Highlights: • Annealing of SiC via continuous dilatometry to determine irradiation temperature. • Wrote a program to analyze dilatometry results to determine irradiation temperature. • Dilatometry results are consistent with results from a historical technique. • Computer program was written in an open-source language and is available for others. - Abstract: Silicon carbide is used as a passive post-irradiation temperature monitor because the irradiation defects will anneal out above the irradiation temperature. The irradiation temperature is determined by measuring a property change after isochronal annealing, i.e., lattice spacing, dimensions, electrical resistivity, thermal diffusivity, or bulk density. However, such methods are time-consuming since the steps involved must be performed in a serial manner. This work presents the use of thermal expansion from continuous dilatometry to calculate the SiC irradiation temperature, which is an automated process requiring minimal setup time. Analysis software was written that performs the calculations to obtain the irradiation temperature and removes possible user-introduced error while standardizing the analysis. This method has been compared to an electrical resistivity and isochronal annealing investigation, and the results revealed agreement of the calculated temperatures. These results show that dilatometry is a reliable and less time-intensive process for determining irradiation temperature from passive SiC thermometry.

  14. Measurement of the Boltzmann constant by Johnson noise thermometry using a superconducting integrated circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urano, C.; Yamazawa, K.; Kaneko, N.-H.

    2017-12-01

    We report on our measurement of the Boltzmann constant by Johnson noise thermometry (JNT) using an integrated quantum voltage noise source (IQVNS) that is fully implemented with superconducting integrated circuit technology. The IQVNS generates calculable pseudo white noise voltages to calibrate the JNT system. The thermal noise of a sensing resistor placed at the temperature of the triple point of water was measured precisely by the IQVNS-based JNT. We accumulated data of more than 429 200 s in total (over 6 d) and used the Akaike information criterion to estimate the fitting frequency range for the quadratic model to calculate the Boltzmann constant. Upon detailed evaluation of the uncertainty components, the experimentally obtained Boltzmann constant was k=1.380 6436× {{10}-23} J K-1 with a relative combined uncertainty of 10.22× {{10}-6} . The value of k is relatively -3.56× {{10}-6} lower than the CODATA 2014 value (Mohr et al 2016 Rev. Mod. Phys. 88 035009).

  15. Development of High-Temperature Blackbodies and Furnaces for Radiation Thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khlevnoy, B. B.; Samoylov, M. L.; Grigoryeva, I. A.; Ibragimov, N. A.; Shapoval, V. I.; Puzanov, A. V.; Ogarev, S. A.

    2011-08-01

    Two high-temperature blackbodies were developed and tested. The first one is a graphite blackbody with a maximum temperature of 2000 °C, an opening of 40 mm, and an emissivity of 0.995. It is intended for the routine calibration of pyrometers. The second one is a small version of a pyrolytic graphite (PG) blackbody with a cavity diameter of 15 mm, an opening of 10 mm, and an emissivity of 0.9996. The blackbody has two options with maximum temperatures of 2500 °C and 3000 °C, respectively. With these, the list of high-temperature blackbodies developed at VNIIOFI consists of five PG types and one graphite type, which can be used in radiation thermometry as precision Planckian sources or furnaces for fixed-point applications. The article also describes modifications to the PG furnace, where PG heater rings are replaced partly or totally by graphite elements. Such modifications extend the lifetime of the heater, reduce the cost for some applications and, for some cases, improve the temperature uniformity.

  16. Nonradiation Cellular Thermometry Based on Interfacial Thermally Induced Phase Transformation in Polymer Coating of Optical Microfiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yunyun; Guo, Tuan; Tian, Zhuang; Yu, Bo; Ding, Mingfei; Li, Xiangping; Guan, Bai-Ou

    2017-03-15

    A nonradiation approach based on thermoresponsive polymer coated silica microfibers has been developed. A highly thermoresponsive and biocompatible poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAM) was surface functionlized to conjugate to the tapered silica microfiber with waist diameter of 7.5 μm. The interfacial phase transtition of coating triggered by the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) causes a drastic molecular morphological change in the body temperature range of 35-42 °C. This surface morphological change strongly modulates optical path difference between the higher order and the fundamental mode propagating in the microfiber because of the evanescent-field interaction and, therefore, shifts the intermodal interference fringe. Owing to the nonradiation-based nature, the thermoresponsive polymer coated microfiber enables an improved thermal sensitivity of 18.74 nm/°C and, hence, a high-temperature resolution of millidegree. Furthermore, the micrometer-sized footprint enables its easy implantation in human organs for cellular thermometry and for the potential of in vivo applications.

  17. Nanoparticle-mediated radiofrequency capacitive hyperthermia: A phantom study with magnetic resonance thermometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki Soo; Lee, Soo Yeol

    2015-01-01

    In hyperthermia, focusing heat generation on tumour tissues and precisely monitoring the temperature around the tumour region is important. To focus heat generation in radiofrequency (RF) capacitive heating, magnetic nanoparticles suspended in sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) solution were used, based on the hypothesis that the nanoparticle suspension would elevate electrical conductivity and RF current density at the nanoparticle-populated region. A tissue-mimicking phantom with compartments with and without nanoparticles was made for RF capacitive heating experiments. An FDTD model of the phantom was developed to simulate temperature increases at the phantom. To monitor temperature inside the phantom, MR thermometry was performed intermittently during RF heating inside a 3Tesla MRI magnet bore. FDTD simulation on the phantom model was performed in two steps: electromagnetic simulation to compute specific absorption rate and thermal simulation to compute temperature changes. Experimental temperature maps were similar to simulated temperature maps, demonstrating that nanoparticle-populated regions drew more heat than background regions. Nanoparticle-mediated RF heating could mitigate concerns about normal tissue death during RF capacitive hyperthermia.

  18. Ternary feldspar thermometry of Paleoproterozoic granulites from In-Ouzzal terrane (Western Hoggar, southern Algeria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benbatta, A.; Bendaoud, A.; Cenki-Tok, B.; Adjerid, Z.; Lacène, K.; Ouzegane, K.

    2017-03-01

    The In Ouzzal terrane in western Hoggar (Southern Algeria) preserves evidence of ultrahigh temperature (UHT) crustal metamorphism. It consists in Archean crustal units, composed of orthogneissic domes and greenstone belts, strongly remobilized during the Paleoproterozoic orogeny which was recognized as an UHT event (peak T > 1000 °C and P ≈ 9-12 kbar). This metamorphism was essentially defined locally in Al-Mg granulites, Al-Fe granulites and quartzites outcropping in the Northern part of the In Ouzzal terrane (IOT). In order to test and verify the regional spread of the UHT metamorphism in this terrane, ternary feldspar thermometry on varied rock types (Metanorite, Granulite Al-Mg and Orthogneiss) and samples that crop out in different zones of the In Ouzzal terrane. These rocks contain either perthitic, antiperthitic or mesoperthitic parageneses. Ternary feldspars used in this study have clearly a metamorphic origin. The obtained results combined with previous works show that this UHT metamorphism (>900 °C) affected the whole In Ouzzal crustal block. This is of major importance as for future discussion on the geodynamic context responsible for this regional UHT metamorphism.

  19. Measurement of solid-state optical refrigeration by two-band differential luminescence thermometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hehlen, Markus P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Epstein, Richard I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Patterson, Wendy M [UNM; Sheik - Bahae, Mansoor [UNM; Seletskiy, D V [UNM

    2009-01-01

    We present a non-contact spectroscopic teclmique for the measurement of laser-induced temperature changes in solids. Two-band differential luminescence thermometry (TBDLT) achieves a sensitivity of {approx}7 mK and enables precise measurement of the net quantum efficiency of optical refrigerator materials. TBDLT detects internal temperature changes by decoupling surface and bulk heating effects via time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy. Several Yb{sup 3+}-doped fluorozirconate (ZBLANI) glasses fabricated from precursors of varying purity and by different processes are analyzed in detail. A net quantum efficiency of 97.39% at 238 K (at a pump wavelength of 1020.5 nm) is found for a ZBLANI:1%Yb{sup 3+} laser-cooling sample produced from metal fluoride precursors that were purified by chelate-assisted solvent extraction and dried in hydrofluoric gas. In comparison, a ZBLANI:1%Yb{sup 3+} sample produced from commercial-grade metal fluoride precursors showed pronounced laser-induced heating that is indicative of a substantially higher impurity concentration. TBDLT enables rapid and sensitive benchmarking of laser-cooling materials and provides critical feedback to the development and optimization of high-performance optical cryocooler materials.

  20. Validation of MR thermometry: method for temperature probe sensor registration accuracy in head and neck phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasek, Matthew R; Pellicer, Ruben; Hofstetter, Lorne W; Numan, Wouter C M; Bakker, Jurriaan F; Kotek, Gyula; Togni, Paolo; Verhaart, René F; Fiveland, Eric W; Houston, Gavin C; van Rhoon, Gerard C; Paulides, Margarethus Marius; Yeo, Desmond Teck Beng

    2014-03-01

    Magnetic resonance thermometry (MRT) is an attractive means to non-invasively monitor in vivo temperature during head and neck hyperthermia treatments because it can provide multi-dimensional temperature information with high spatial resolution over large regions of interest. However, validation of MRT measurements in a head and neck clinical set-up is crucial to ensure the temperature maps are accurate. Here we demonstrate a unique approach for temperature probe sensor localisation in head and neck hyperthermia test phantoms. We characterise the proton resonance frequency shift temperature coefficient and validate MRT measurements in an oil-gel phantom by applying a combination of MR imaging and 3D spline fitting for accurate probe localisation. We also investigate how uncertainties in both the probe localisation and the proton resonance frequency shift (PRFS) thermal coefficient affect the registration of fibre-optic reference temperature probe and MRT readings. The method provides a two-fold advantage of sensor localisation and PRFS thermal coefficient calibration. We provide experimental data for two distinct head and neck phantoms showing the significance of this method as it mitigates temperature probe localisation errors and thereby increases accuracy of MRT validation results. The techniques presented here may be used to simplify calibration experiments that use an interstitial heating device, or any heating method that provides rapid and spatially localised heat distributions. Overall, the experimental verification of the data registration and PRFS thermal coefficient calibration technique provides a useful benchmarking method to maximise MRT accuracy in any similar context.

  1. Thermometry of levitated nanoparticles in a hybrid electro-optical trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranas, E. B.; Fonseca, P. Z. G.; Barker, P. F.; Monteiro, T. S.

    2017-03-01

    There have been recent rapid developments in stable trapping of levitated nanoparticles in high vacuum. Cooling of nanoparticles, from phonon occupancies of 107 down to ≃ 100{--}1000 phonons, have already been achieved by several groups. Prospects for quantum ground-state cooling seem extremely promising. Cavity-cooling without added stabilisation by feedback cooling remains challenging, but trapping at high vacuum in a cavity is now possible through the addition of a Paul trap. However, the Paul trap has been found to qualitatively modify the cavity output spectrum, with the latter acquiring an atypical ‘split-sideband’ structure, of different form from the displacement spectrum, and which depends on N, the optical well at which the particle localises. In the present work we investigate the N-dependence of the dynamics, in particular with respect to thermometry: we show that in strong cooling regions N≳ 100, the temperature may still be reliably inferred from the cavity output spectra. We also explain the N-dependence of the mechanical frequencies and optomechanical coupling showing that these may be accurately estimated. We present a simple ‘fast-cavity’ model for the cavity output and test all our findings against full numerical solutions of the nonlinear stochastic equations of motion for the system.

  2. In and ex-vivo Myocardial Tissue Temperature Monitoring by Combined Infrared and Ultrasonic Thermometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engrand, C.; Laux, D.; Ferrandis, J.-Y.; Sinquet, J.-C.; Demaria, R.; Le Clézio, E.

    The success of cardiac surgery essentially depends on tissue preservation during intervention. Consequently a hypothermic cardio-plegia is applied in order to avoid ischemia. However, myocardial temperature is not monitored during operation. The aim of this study is then to find a relevant and simple method for myocardial global temperature estimation in real time using both ultrasounds and infra-red thermography. In order to quantify the sensitivity of ultrasonic velocity to temperature, a 2.25 MHz ultrasonic probe was used for ex-vivo tests. Pig myocards (n=25) were placed in a thermostatically-controlled water bath and measurements of the ultrasound velocity were realized from 10 to 30 ˚C. The results of this study indicate that the specificity and sensitivity of the ultrasonic echo delay induced by the modification of temperature can be exploited for in-depth thermometry. In parallel, for TIR experiments, a bolometer was used to detect the myocardium surface thermal evolution during in-vivo pig heart experiments. Hypothermic cardioplegic solutions were injected and infra-red surface imaging was performed during one hour. In the near futur, the correlation of the ultrasound and the infrared measurements should allow the real time estimation of the global temperature of the heart. The final objective being to realize in vivo measurements on human hearts, this information may have a very high importance in terms of per-operation inspection as well as decision making process during medical interventions.

  3. Noninvasive fluence rate mapping in living tissues using magnetic resonance thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreurs, Tom J. L.; van Gorkum, Robbert; Zhang, Xu U.; Faber, Dirk J.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Nicolay, Klaas; Strijkers, Gustav J.

    2017-03-01

    A noninvasive method is introduced for quantification and visualization of fluence rate in light-irradiated biological tissues. The method is based on magnetic resonance thermometry (MRT) measurements of tissue temperature changes resulting from absorption of light. From the spatial-temporal temperature data, the generated heat is calculated. Finally, fluence rate maps are reconstructed by dividing the heat data by the tissue absorption coefficient. Simulations were performed using virtual MRT datasets based on analytically described fluence rate distributions, which could be accurately reconstructed by the method. Next, the approach was tested in gel phantoms. Resulting fluence rate maps matched well with theoretical predictions in a nonscattering phantom (R2=0.93). Experimental validation was further obtained in a scattering phantom, by comparing fluence rates to invasive fluence rate probe measurements along and perpendicular to the optical axis (R2≥0.71 for both cases). Finally, our technique was applied in vivo in a mouse tumor model. The resulting fluence rates matched invasive probe measurements (Pearson's ρ=0.90, p=0.0026). The method may be applied to investigate the relation between light dose and biological response in light-based treatments, such as photodynamic therapy. It may also be useful for experimental validation of light transport models.

  4. Stability analysis of fractional-order generalized chaotic susceptible ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the spread and control of infectious diseases. In a given model, a person contracting the disease and then becoming immune to future infection after recovery is called susceptible– infected–recovered (SIR). .... of susceptible, k is the carrying capacity of susceptible, a is the saturation factor that mea- sures the inhibitory effect ...

  5. CARIAA Call - Frequently Asked Questions

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC CRDI

    2013-03-28

    Mar 28, 2013 ... The call states that CARIAA will also collaborate with the consortia on programmatic functions that support the program as a whole, including communication, outreach and engagement, knowledge management, and monitoring and evaluation. What kind of activities are envisaged? 48). The call states that ...

  6. The difficult medical emergency call

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Thea Palsgaard; Kjærulff, Thora Majlund; Viereck, Søren

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pre-hospital emergency care requires proper categorization of emergency calls and assessment of emergency priority levels by the medical dispatchers. We investigated predictors for emergency call categorization as "unclear problem" in contrast to "symptom-specific" categories and the ...

  7. The difficult medical emergency call

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Thea Palsgaard; Kjærulff, Thora Majlund; Viereck, Søren

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pre-hospital emergency care requires proper categorization of emergency calls and assessment of emergency priority levels by the medical dispatchers. We investigated predictors for emergency call categorization as "unclear problem" in contrast to "symptom-specific" categories...... and the effect of categorization on mortality. METHODS: Register-based study in a 2-year period based on emergency call data from the emergency medical dispatch center in Copenhagen combined with nationwide register data. Logistic regression analysis (N = 78,040 individuals) was used for identification...

  8. Combined passive acoustic mapping and magnetic resonance thermometry for monitoring phase-shift nanoemulsion enhanced focused ultrasound therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crake, Calum; Meral, F. Can; Burgess, Mark T.; Papademetriou, Iason T.; McDannold, Nathan J.; Porter, Tyrone M.

    2017-08-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) has the potential to enable precise, image-guided noninvasive surgery for the treatment of cancer in which tumors are identified and destroyed in a single integrated procedure. However, success of the method in highly vascular organs has been limited due to heat losses to perfusion, requiring development of techniques to locally enhance energy absorption and heating. In addition, FUS procedures are conventionally monitored using MRI, which provides excellent anatomical images and can map temperature, but is not capable of capturing the full gamut of available data such as the acoustic emissions generated during this inherently acoustically-driven procedure. Here, we employed phase-shift nanoemulsions (PSNE) embedded in tissue phantoms to promote cavitation and hence temperature rise induced by FUS. In addition, we incorporated passive acoustic mapping (PAM) alongside simultaneous MR thermometry in order to visualize both acoustic emissions and temperature rise, within the bore of a full scale clinical MRI scanner. Focal cavitation of PSNE could be resolved using PAM and resulted in accelerated heating and increased the maximum elevated temperature measured via MR thermometry compared to experiments without nanoemulsions. Over time, the simultaneously acquired acoustic and temperature maps show translation of the focus of activity towards the FUS transducer, and the magnitude of the increase in cavitation and focal shift both increased with nanoemulsion concentration. PAM results were well correlated with MRI thermometry and demonstrated greater sensitivity, with the ability to detect cavitation before enhanced heating was observed. The results suggest that PSNE could be beneficial for enhancement of thermal focused ultrasound therapies and that PAM could be a critical tool for monitoring this process.

  9. Application of structured illumination to gas phase thermometry using thermographic phosphor particles: a study for averaged imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zentgraf, Florian; Stephan, Michael; Berrocal, Edouard; Albert, Barbara; Böhm, Benjamin; Dreizler, Andreas

    2017-07-01

    Structured laser illumination planar imaging (SLIPI) is combined with gas phase thermometry measurements using thermographic phosphor (TGP) particles. The technique is applied to a heated jet surrounded by a coflow which is operated at ambient temperature. The respective air flows are seeded with a powder of BaMgAl10O17:Eu2+ (BAM) which is used as temperature-sensitive gas phase tracer. Upon pulsed excitation in the ultraviolet spectral range, the temperature is extracted based on the two-color ratio method combined with SLIPI. The main advantage of applying the SLIPI approach to phosphor thermometry is the reduction of particle-to-particle multiple light scattering and diffuse wall reflections, yielding a more robust calibration procedure as well as improving the measurement accuracy, precision, and sensitivity. For demonstration, this paper focuses on sample-averaged measurements of temperature fields in a jet-in-coflow configuration. Using the conventional approach, which in contrast to SLIPI is based on imaging with an unmodulated laser light sheet, we show that for the present setup typically 40% of the recorded signal is affected by the contribution of multiply scattered photons. At locations close to walls even up to 75% of the apparent signal is due to diffuse reflection and wall luminescence of BAM sticking at the surface. Those contributions lead to erroneous temperature fields. Using SLIPI, an unbiased two-color ratio field is recovered allowing for two-dimensional mean temperature reconstructions which exhibit a more realistic physical behavior. This is in contrast to results deduced by the conventional approach. Furthermore, using the SLIPI approach it is shown that the temperature sensitivity is enhanced by a factor of up to 2 at 270 °C. Finally, an outlook towards instantaneous SLIPI phosphorescence thermometry is provided.

  10. Magnetic Resonance–Guided High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Hyperthermia for Recurrent Rectal Cancer: MR Thermometry Evaluation and Preclinical Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, William, E-mail: William.Chu@sunnybrook.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre and the University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Staruch, Robert M. [Clinical Sites Research Program, Philips Research, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States); Pichardo, Samuel [Thunder Bay Regional Research Institute, Thunder Bay, Ontario (Canada); Physics and Electrical Engineering, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario (Canada); Tillander, Matti; Köhler, Max O. [MR Therapy, Philips Healthcare, Vantaa (Finland); Huang, Yuexi [Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ylihautala, Mika [MR Therapy, Philips Healthcare, Vantaa (Finland); McGuffin, Merrylee [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre and the University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Czarnota, Gregory [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre and the University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Hynynen, Kullervo [Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of magnetic resonance–guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) mild hyperthermia in deep tissue targets for enhancing radiation therapy and chemotherapy in the context of recurrent rectal cancer. A preclinical study was performed to evaluate the safety and performance of MR-HIFU mild hyperthermia. A prospective imaging study was performed in volunteers with rectal cancer to evaluate MR thermometry quality near the rectum and accessibility of rectal tumors using MR-HIFU. Methods and Materials: Mild hyperthermia was performed in pig thigh (9 sonications, 6 pigs) using a clinical MR-HIFU system. Targets near the rectal wall and deep thigh were evaluated. Thermal maps obtained in 6 planes every 3.2 seconds were used to control sonications in 18-mm diameter treatment regions at temperatures of 42°C to 42.5°C for 10 to 60 minutes. Volunteer imaging-only studies to assess the quality of MR thermometry (without heating) were approved by the institutional research ethics board. Anatomic and MR thermometry images were acquired in consenting volunteers with rectal cancer. In 3 of 6 study participants, rectal filling with saline was used to reduce motion-related MR thermometry artifacts near the tumor. Results: In pigs, mean target temperature matched the desired hyperthermia temperature within 0.2°C; temporal standard deviation ≤0.5°C. With optimized control thresholds, no undesired tissue damage was observed. In human volunteers, MR temperature measurements had adequate precision and stability, especially when rectal filling was used to reduce bowel motion. Conclusions: In pigs, MR-HIFU can safely deliver mild hyperthermia (41°C-43°C) to a targeted volume for 30 minutes. In humans, careful patient selection and preparation will enable adequate targeting for recurrent rectal cancers and sufficient MR temperature mapping stability to control mild hyperthermia. These results enable human trials of MR-HIFU hyperthermia.

  11. Sampling strategies for subsampled segmented EPI PRF thermometry in MR guided high intensity focused ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odéen, Henrik, E-mail: h.odeen@gmail.com; Diakite, Mahamadou [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84108 and Department of Radiology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84108 (United States); Todd, Nick; Minalga, Emilee; Payne, Allison; Parker, Dennis L. [Department of Radiology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84108 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: To investigate k-space subsampling strategies to achieve fast, large field-of-view (FOV) temperature monitoring using segmented echo planar imaging (EPI) proton resonance frequency shift thermometry for MR guided high intensity focused ultrasound (MRgHIFU) applications. Methods: Five different k-space sampling approaches were investigated, varying sample spacing (equally vs nonequally spaced within the echo train), sampling density (variable sampling density in zero, one, and two dimensions), and utilizing sequential or centric sampling. Three of the schemes utilized sequential sampling with the sampling density varied in zero, one, and two dimensions, to investigate sampling the k-space center more frequently. Two of the schemes utilized centric sampling to acquire the k-space center with a longer echo time for improved phase measurements, and vary the sampling density in zero and two dimensions, respectively. Phantom experiments and a theoretical point spread function analysis were performed to investigate their performance. Variable density sampling in zero and two dimensions was also implemented in a non-EPI GRE pulse sequence for comparison. All subsampled data were reconstructed with a previously described temporally constrained reconstruction (TCR) algorithm. Results: The accuracy of each sampling strategy in measuring the temperature rise in the HIFU focal spot was measured in terms of the root-mean-square-error (RMSE) compared to fully sampled “truth.” For the schemes utilizing sequential sampling, the accuracy was found to improve with the dimensionality of the variable density sampling, giving values of 0.65 °C, 0.49 °C, and 0.35 °C for density variation in zero, one, and two dimensions, respectively. The schemes utilizing centric sampling were found to underestimate the temperature rise, with RMSE values of 1.05 °C and 1.31 °C, for variable density sampling in zero and two dimensions, respectively. Similar subsampling schemes

  12. Estimates of Eastern Equatorial Pacific Sea Surface Temperatures During the Pliocene From Carbonate 'Clumped Isotope' Thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiagarajan, N.; Tripati, A.; Eiler, J.

    2007-12-01

    fine fraction of 5.6 Ma sediments show calcification temperatures of 20.4°C ± 2.3°C and seawater δ18O values of -1.4‰ ± 0.6‰. G. sacculifer (with sac) and mixed coccoliths from 1.4 Ma sediments yield calcification temperatures of 22.3°C ± 2.5°C and seawater δ18O values of 1.7‰ ± 0.7‰, and 19.4°C ± 1.8°C and seawater δ18O values of 0.4‰ ± 0.5‰, respectively. Our preliminary findings are consistent with the 'dynamical ocean thermostat' model. [1] Clement, A., et al., 1996, An Ocean Dynamical Thermostat, J. of Clim., 9, 2190-2196. [2] Cane, M., et al., 1997, Twentieth-Century Sea Surface Temperature Trends, Science, 957-960. [3] Fedorov, A., et al., 2006, The Pliocene Paradox (Mechanisms for a permanent El Nino), Science, 312, 1437-1443. [4] Rickaby, R. and Halloran, P., 2005, Cool La Nina during the warmth of the Pliocene?, Science, 307, 1948-1953. [5] Wara, M., et al. ,2005, Permanent El Nino-like conditions during the Pliocene Warm Period, Science, 309, 758-761. [6] Ghosh, P., et al., 2006, 13C-18O bonds in carbonate minerals: A new kind of paleothermometer, GCA, 70, 1439-1456. [7] Eiler, J. and Tripati, A., 2007, 'Clumped isotope' thermometry in benthic foraminifera and ostracods: A novel tool for reconstructing deep-ocean temperatures. Fall AGU. [8] Tripati, A., et al. 2007, 'Carbonate `clumped isotope' thermometry in planktonic foraminifera and coccoliths. Fall AGU.

  13. Sampling strategies for subsampled segmented EPI PRF thermometry in MR guided high intensity focused ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odéen, Henrik; Todd, Nick; Diakite, Mahamadou; Minalga, Emilee; Payne, Allison; Parker, Dennis L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate k-space subsampling strategies to achieve fast, large field-of-view (FOV) temperature monitoring using segmented echo planar imaging (EPI) proton resonance frequency shift thermometry for MR guided high intensity focused ultrasound (MRgHIFU) applications. Methods: Five different k-space sampling approaches were investigated, varying sample spacing (equally vs nonequally spaced within the echo train), sampling density (variable sampling density in zero, one, and two dimensions), and utilizing sequential or centric sampling. Three of the schemes utilized sequential sampling with the sampling density varied in zero, one, and two dimensions, to investigate sampling the k-space center more frequently. Two of the schemes utilized centric sampling to acquire the k-space center with a longer echo time for improved phase measurements, and vary the sampling density in zero and two dimensions, respectively. Phantom experiments and a theoretical point spread function analysis were performed to investigate their performance. Variable density sampling in zero and two dimensions was also implemented in a non-EPI GRE pulse sequence for comparison. All subsampled data were reconstructed with a previously described temporally constrained reconstruction (TCR) algorithm. Results: The accuracy of each sampling strategy in measuring the temperature rise in the HIFU focal spot was measured in terms of the root-mean-square-error (RMSE) compared to fully sampled “truth.” For the schemes utilizing sequential sampling, the accuracy was found to improve with the dimensionality of the variable density sampling, giving values of 0.65 °C, 0.49 °C, and 0.35 °C for density variation in zero, one, and two dimensions, respectively. The schemes utilizing centric sampling were found to underestimate the temperature rise, with RMSE values of 1.05 °C and 1.31 °C, for variable density sampling in zero and two dimensions, respectively. Similar subsampling schemes

  14. Spectral model selection in the electronic measurement of the Boltzmann constant by Johnson noise thermometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coakley, Kevin J; Qu, Jifeng

    2017-04-01

    In the electronic measurement of the Boltzmann constant based on Johnson noise thermometry, the ratio of the power spectral densities of thermal noise across a resistor at the triple point of water, and pseudo-random noise synthetically generated by a quantum-accurate voltage-noise source is constant to within 1 part in a billion for frequencies up to 1 GHz. Given knowledge of this ratio, and the values of other parameters that are known or measured, one can determine the Boltzmann constant. Due, in part, to mismatch between transmission lines, the experimental ratio spectrum varies with frequency. We model this spectrum as an even polynomial function of frequency where the constant term in the polynomial determines the Boltzmann constant. When determining this constant (offset) from experimental data, the assumed complexity of the ratio spectrum model and the maximum frequency analyzed (fitting bandwidth) dramatically affects results. Here, we select the complexity of the model by cross-validation - a data-driven statistical learning method. For each of many fitting bandwidths, we determine the component of uncertainty of the offset term that accounts for random and systematic effects associated with imperfect knowledge of model complexity. We select the fitting bandwidth that minimizes this uncertainty. In the most recent measurement of the Boltzmann constant, results were determined, in part, by application of an earlier version of the method described here. Here, we extend the earlier analysis by considering a broader range of fitting bandwidths and quantify an additional component of uncertainty that accounts for imperfect performance of our fitting bandwidth selection method. For idealized simulated data with additive noise similar to experimental data, our method correctly selects the true complexity of the ratio spectrum model for all cases considered. A new analysis of data from the recent experiment yields evidence for a temporal trend in the offset

  15. Reconstruction of limnology and microbialite formation conditions from carbonate clumped isotope thermometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petryshyn, V A; Lim, D; Laval, B L; Brady, A; Slater, G; Tripati, A K

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative tools for deciphering the environment of microbialite formation are relatively limited. For example, the oxygen isotope carbonate-water geothermometer requires assumptions about the isotopic composition of the water of formation. We explored the utility of using 'clumped' isotope thermometry as a tool to study the temperatures of microbialite formation. We studied microbialites recovered from water depths of 10-55 m in Pavilion Lake, and 10-25 m in Kelly Lake, spanning the thermocline in both lakes. We determined the temperature of carbonate growth and the (18)O/(16)O ratio of the waters that microbialites grew in. Results were then compared to current limnological data from the lakes to reconstruct the history of microbialite formation. Modern microbialites collected at shallow depths (11.7 m) in both lakes yield clumped isotope-based temperatures of formation that are within error of summer water temperatures, suggesting that clumped isotope analyses may be used to reconstruct past climates and to probe the environments in which microbialites formed. The deepest microbialites (21.7-55 m) were recovered from below the present-day thermoclines in both lakes and yield radioisotope ages indicating they primarily formed earlier in the Holocene. During this time, pollen data and our reconstructed water (18)O/(16)O ratios indicate a period of aridity, with lower lake levels. At present, there is a close association between both photosynthetic and heterotrophic communities, and carbonate precipitation/microbialite formation, with biosignatures of photosynthetic influences on carbonate detected in microbialites from the photic zone and above the thermocline (i.e., depths of generally <20 m). Given the deeper microbialites are receiving <1% of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), it is likely these microbialites primarily formed when lower lake levels resulted in microbialites being located higher in the photic zone, in warm surface waters. © 2014 John

  16. Non-linear mixing effects on mass-47 CO2 clumped isotope thermometry: Patterns and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defliese, William F; Lohmann, Kyger C

    2015-05-15

    Mass-47 CO(2) clumped isotope thermometry requires relatively large (~20 mg) samples of carbonate minerals due to detection limits and shot noise in gas source isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). However, it is unreasonable to assume that natural geologic materials are homogenous on the scale required for sampling. We show that sample heterogeneities can cause offsets from equilibrium Δ(47) values that are controlled solely by end member mixing and are independent of equilibrium temperatures. A numerical model was built to simulate and quantify the effects of end member mixing on Δ(47). The model was run in multiple possible configurations to produce a dataset of mixing effects. We verified that the model accurately simulated real phenomena by comparing two artificial laboratory mixtures measured using IRMS to model output. Mixing effects were found to be dependent on end member isotopic composition in δ(13)C and δ(18)O values, and independent of end member Δ(47) values. Both positive and negative offsets from equilibrium Δ(47) can occur, and the sign is dependent on the interaction between end member isotopic compositions. The overall magnitude of mixing offsets is controlled by the amount of variability within a sample; the larger the disparity between end member compositions, the larger the mixing offset. Samples varying by less than 2 ‰ in both δ(13)C and δ(18)O values have mixing offsets below current IRMS detection limits. We recommend the use of isotopic subsampling for δ(13)C and δ(18)O values to determine sample heterogeneity, and to evaluate any potential mixing effects in samples suspected of being heterogonous. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. New measurement of the Boltzmann constant k by acoustic thermometry of helium-4 gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitre, L.; Sparasci, F.; Risegari, L.; Guianvarc'h, C.; Martin, C.; Himbert, M. E.; Plimmer, M. D.; Allard, A.; Marty, B.; Giuliano Albo, P. A.; Gao, B.; Moldover, M. R.; Mehl, J. B.

    2017-12-01

    The SI unit of temperature will soon be redefined in terms of a fixed value of the Boltzmann constant k derived from an ensemble of measurements worldwide. We report on a new determination of k using acoustic thermometry of helium-4 gas in a 3 l volume quasi-spherical resonator. The method is based on the accurate determination of acoustic and microwave resonances to measure the speed of sound at different pressures. We find for the universal gas constant R  =  8.314 4614(50) J·mol-1·K-1. Using the current best available value of the Avogadro constant, we obtain k  =  1.380 648 78(83)  ×  10-23 J·K-1 with u(k)/k  =  0.60  ×  10-6, where the uncertainty u is one standard uncertainty corresponding to a 68% confidence level. This value is consistent with our previous determinations and with that of the 2014 CODATA adjustment of the fundamental constants (Mohr et al 2016 Rev. Mod. Phys. 88 035009), within the standard uncertainties. We combined the present values of k and u(k) with earlier values that were measured at LNE. Assuming the maximum possible correlations between the measurements, (k present/〈k〉  -  1)  =  0.07  ×  10-6 and the combined u r (k) is reduced to 0.56  ×  10-6. Assuming minimum correlations, (k present/〈k〉  -  1)  =  0.10  ×  10-6 and the combined u r (k) is reduced to 0.48  ×  10-6.

  18. Methodology of hot nucleus calorimetry and thermometry produced by nuclear reactions around Fermi energies; Methodologie de la calorimetrie et de la thermometrie des noyaux chauds formes lors de collisions nucleaires aux energies de Fermi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vient, E

    2006-12-15

    This work deals with the calorimetry and thermometry of hot nuclei produced in collisions Xe + Sn between 25 and 100 MeV/u. The apparatus for hot nucleus physical characterization is the 4{pi} detector array Indra. This study was made by using the event generators Gemini, Simon and Hipse and a data-processing filter simulating the complete operation of the multi-detector. The first chapter presents the different ways of producing hot nuclei. In the second and third chapters, the author presents a critical methodological study of calorimetry and thermometry applied to hot nuclei, different methods are reviewed, their accuracy and application range are assessed. All the calorimetry methods rely on the assumption that we are able to discriminate decay products of the hot nucleus from evaporated particles. In the fourth chapter, the author gives some ways of improving calorimetry characterization of the hot nucleus. An alternative method of calorimetry is proposed in the fifth chapter, this method is based on the experimental determination of an evaporation probability that is deduced from the physical characteristics of the particles present in a restricted domain of the space of velocities.

  19. Quantifying uncertainty in genotype calls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Benilton S; Louis, Thomas A; Irizarry, Rafael A

    2010-01-15

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are used to discover genes underlying complex, heritable disorders for which less powerful study designs have failed in the past. The number of GWAS has skyrocketed recently with findings reported in top journals and the mainstream media. Microarrays are the genotype calling technology of choice in GWAS as they permit exploration of more than a million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) simultaneously. The starting point for the statistical analyses used by GWAS to determine association between loci and disease is making genotype calls (AA, AB or BB). However, the raw data, microarray probe intensities, are heavily processed before arriving at these calls. Various sophisticated statistical procedures have been proposed for transforming raw data into genotype calls. We find that variability in microarray output quality across different SNPs, different arrays and different sample batches have substantial influence on the accuracy of genotype calls made by existing algorithms. Failure to account for these sources of variability can adversely affect the quality of findings reported by the GWAS. We developed a method based on an enhanced version of the multi-level model used by CRLMM version 1. Two key differences are that we now account for variability across batches and improve the call-specific assessment of each call. The new model permits the development of quality metrics for SNPs, samples and batches of samples. Using three independent datasets, we demonstrate that the CRLMM version 2 outperforms CRLMM version 1 and the algorithm provided by Affymetrix, Birdseed. The main advantage of the new approach is that it enables the identification of low-quality SNPs, samples and batches. Software implementing of the method described in this article is available as free and open source code in the crlmm R/BioConductor package. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  20. Susceptibility to malignant hyperthermia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snoeck, Marcus Matheus Johannes

    2004-01-01

    In this thesis the author studied the diagnostic procedures for susceptibility to malignant hyperthermia (MH), with special emphasis upon refining the biological diagnostic test and improving protocols and guidelines for investigation of MH susceptibility. MH is a pharmacogenetic disease of skeletal

  1. Thermography and thermometry in the assessment of diabetic neuropathic foot: a case for furthering the role of thermal techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharara, M; Cobb, J E; Claremont, D J

    2006-12-01

    There are currently 3 established techniques employed routinely to determine the risk of foot ulceration in the patient with diabetes mellitus. These are the assessment of circulation, neuropathy, and foot pressure. These assessments are widely used clinically as well as in the research domain with an aim to prevent the onset of foot ulceration. Routine neuropathic evaluation includes the assessment of sensory loss in the plantar skin of the foot using both the Semmes Weinstein monofilament and the biothesiometer. Thermological measurements of the foot to assess responses to thermal stimuli and cutaneous thermal discrimination threshold are relatively uncommon. Indeed, there remains uncertainty regarding the importance of thermal changes in the development of foot ulcers. Applications of thermography and thermometry in lower extremity wounds, vascular complications, and neuropathic complications have progressed as a result of improved imaging software and transducer technology. However, the uncertainty associated with the specific thermal modality, the costs, and processing times render its adaptation to the clinic. Therefore, wider adoption of thermological measurements has been limited. This article reviews thermal measurement techniques specific to diabetic foot such as electrical contact thermometry, cutaneous thermal discrimination thresholds, infrared thermography, and liquid crystal thermography.

  2. Vesicoureteral reflux in young children: a study of radiometric thermometry as detection modality using an ex vivo porcine model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Svein; Klemetsen, Øystein; Birkelund, Yngve

    2012-09-01

    Microwave radiometry is evaluated for renal thermometry tailored to detect the pediatric condition of vesicoureteral urine reflux (VUR) from the bladder through the ureter into the kidney. Prior to a potential reflux event, the urine is heated within the bladder by an external body contacting a hyperthermia applicator to generate a fluidic contrast temperature relative to normal body temperature. A single band, miniaturized radiometer (operating at 3.5 GHz) is connected to an electromagnetic-interference-shielded and suction-coupled elliptical antenna to receive thermal radiation from an ex vivo porcine phantom model. Brightness (radiometric) and fiberoptic temperature data are recorded for varying urine phantom reflux volumes (20-40 mL) and contrast temperatures ranging from 2 to 10 °C within the kidney phantom. The kidney phantom itself is located at 40 mm depth (skin-to-kidney center distance) and surrounded by the porcine phantom. Radiometric step responses to injection of urine simulant by a syringe are shown to be highly correlated with in situ kidney temperatures measured by fiberoptic probes. Statistically, the performance of the VUR detecting scheme is evaluated by error probabilities of making a wrong decision. Laboratory testing of the radiometric system supports the feasibility of passive non-invasive kidney thermometry for the detection of VUR classified within the two highest grades

  3. The Wireless Nursing Call System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Casper Bruun

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses a research project in which social scientists were involved both as analysts and supporters during a pilot with a new wireless nursing call system. The case thus exemplifies an attempt to participate in developing dependable health care systems and offers insight into the cha......This paper discusses a research project in which social scientists were involved both as analysts and supporters during a pilot with a new wireless nursing call system. The case thus exemplifies an attempt to participate in developing dependable health care systems and offers insight...

  4. Quality of MR thermometry during palliative MR-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) treatment of bone metastases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lam, Mie K; Huisman, Merel; Nijenhuis, Robbert J; van den Bosch, Maurice; Viergever, Max A; Moonen, Chrit Tw; Bartels, LW

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Magnetic resonance (MR)-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound has emerged as a clinical option for palliative treatment of painful bone metastases, with MR thermometry (MRT) used for treatment monitoring. In this study, the general image quality of the MRT was assessed in terms of

  5. CALL and the Speaking Skill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Robert

    1996-01-01

    Using common technologies listed in the conversation class, the article suggests a computer-aided language learning (CALL) speaking methodology that is interaction rather than machine centered and outlines ways to ensure the success of speaking activities at the computer. (31 references) (Author/CK)

  6. Calling to Nursing: Concept Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, Christie

    The aims of this article are (a) to analyze the concept of a calling as it relates nursing and (b) to develop a definition of calling to nursing with the detail and clarity needed to guide reliable and valid research. The classic steps described by Walker and Avant are used for the analysis. Literature from several disciplines is reviewed including vocational psychology, Christian career counseling, sociology, organizational management, and nursing. The analysis provides an operational definition of a calling to nursing and establishes 3 defining attributes of the concept: (a) a passionate intrinsic motivation or desire (perhaps with a religious component), (b) an aspiration to engage in nursing practice, as a means of fulfilling one's purpose in life, and (c) the desire to help others as one's purpose in life. Antecedents to the concept are personal introspection and cognitive awareness. Positive consequences to the concept are improved work meaningfulness, work engagement, career commitment, personal well-being, and satisfaction. Negative consequences of having a calling might include willingness to sacrifice well-being for work and problems with work-life balance. Following the concept analysis, philosophical assumptions, contextual factors, interdisciplinary work, research opportunities, and practice implications are discussed.

  7. An Evaluation Framework for CALL

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurry, Benjamin L.; Williams, David Dwayne; Rich, Peter J.; Hartshorn, K. James

    2016-01-01

    Searching prestigious Computer-assisted Language Learning (CALL) journals for references to key publications and authors in the field of evaluation yields a short list. The "American Journal of Evaluation"--the flagship journal of the American Evaluation Association--is only cited once in both the "CALICO Journal and Language…

  8. Clumped isotope thermometry of calcite and dolomite in a contact metamorphic environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Max K.; Eiler, John M.; Nabelek, Peter I.

    2017-01-01

    bulk δ13C and δ18O dolomite-calcite thermometry. These isotopic exchange thermometers are largely consistent with peak temperatures in all samples within 4 km of the contact, indicating that metamorphic recrystallization can occur even in samples too low-grade to produce growth of conventional metamorphic index minerals (i.e., talc and tremolite). Altogether, this work demonstrates the potential of these methods to quantify the conditions of metamorphism at sub-greenschist facies.

  9. The Thermal Evolution of the Galapagos Mantle Plume: Insights from Al-in-Olivine Thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trela, J.; Gazel, E.; Sobolev, A. V.; Class, C.; Bizimis, M.; Jicha, B. R.; Batanova, V. G.; Denyer, P.

    2016-12-01

    The mantle plume hypothesis is widely accepted for the formation of large igneous provinces (LIP) and many ocean island basalts (OIB). Petrologic models support a mantle plume origin by indicating high mantle temperatures (>1500 °C) for some plume-melts relative to melts generated at ambient mid ocean ridge conditions (1350 °C). Mantle plumes forming LIPs and OIBs provide our primary source of information on the geochemical and lithological heterogeneity of the lower mantle. The Galapagos hotspot represents one of the most thermally and geochemically heterogeneous plumes on the planet, sustaining long-lived isotopic and lithological heterogeneity over its 90 Ma evolution. Previous petrologic studies showed that the Galapagos plume secularly cooled over time and that the decrease in the plume's temperature correlates with an increase in a recycled (pyroxenite) component. We used Al-in-olivine thermometry to show that maximum olivine crystallization temperatures confirm secular cooling of the Galapagos plume. Olivines from the early melting stages of the plume at 90 Ma (Caribbean LIP) record the highest crystallization temperatures (1600 °C). Olivines from the current archipelago record the lowest temperatures of only 1300 °C. The largest decrease in temperature occurred between 90 and 70 Ma ( 200 °C decrease) and coincides with the plume head-tail transition. Olivines from the 60-90 Ma-old accreted Galapagos-tracks in Costa Rica and Panama record higher Ni, Fe/Mn, and lower Ca contents than those from the present-day archipelago, indicating a higher abundance of pyroxenite (recycled oceanic crust) entrained in parts of the plume head that melted to form the Caribbean LIP. However, the Galapagos plume was pyroxenite-rich for 40 Ma thus pyroxenite-entrainment goes beyond the plume-tail transition. Our results suggest that hotter regions of the Galapagos plume entrained larger amounts of dense, recycled components due to their greater buoyancy; however, this

  10. impact of queuing on call c queuing on call c queuing on call ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    work resource reduces the probability that a call arriving at the base sta formance evaluation plays an important role in modelling and network resource. network resource. This objective is achieved by an accurate traffic characte. This objective is achieved by an accurate traffic characte rformance metrics in terms of traffic ...

  11. Calle y Saberes en Movimiento

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Daniela Aguirre Aguilar

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available En México el rezago, el ausentismo, la deserción escolar, el trabajo a temprana edad y el inicio de una vida en la calle, en repetidas ocasiones son consecuencia de un núcleo familiar desarticulado o de una débil relación intrafamiliar, así como de una condición socioeconómica en desventaja. Ante esta problemática, la Secretaría de Educación Pública, instancia gubernamental encargada de garantizar una educación de calidad para la población, trabaja coordinadamente con organizaciones de la sociedad civil e instancias públicas, para la reintegración a los espacios educativos de los niños, niñas y jóvenes en situación de calle.

  12. Calle y Saberes en Movimiento

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Daniela Aguirre Aguilar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available En México el rezago, el ausentismo, la deserción escolar, el trabajo a temprana edad y el inicio de una vida en la calle, en repetidas ocasiones son consecuencia de un núcleo familiar desarticulado o de una débil relación intrafamiliar, así como de una condición socioeconómica en desventaja. Ante esta problemática, la Secretaría de Educación Pública, instancia gubernamental encargada de garantizar una educación de calidad para la población, trabaja coordinadamente con organizaciones de la sociedad civil e instancias públicas, para la reintegración a los espacios educativos de los niños, niñas y jóvenes en situación de calle.

  13. Armed calling for sur plus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa Limberto Leite

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The most recent work by researcher José Luiz Aidar Prado, Convocações biopolíticas dos dispositivos comunicacionais (freely translated as Biopolitic convoking of communicational dispositives puts the reader straight in the face of the calling to enter circulating discourses. They are directed to all subjects and also accomodate the discourses with urgence for consumption. 

  14. Ultrasound call detection in capybara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selene S.C. Nogueira

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The vocal repertoire of some animal species has been considered a non-invasive tool to predict distress reactivity. In rats ultrasound emissions were reported as distress indicator. Capybaras[ vocal repertoire was reported recently and seems to have ultrasound calls, but this has not yet been confirmed. Thus, in order to check if a poor state of welfare was linked to ultrasound calls in the capybara vocal repertoire, the aim of this study was to track the presence of ultrasound emissions in 11 animals under three conditions: 1 unrestrained; 2 intermediately restrained, and 3 highly restrained. The ultrasound track identified frequencies in the range of 31.8±3.5 kHz in adults and 33.2±8.5 kHz in juveniles. These ultrasound frequencies occurred only when animals were highly restrained, physically restrained or injured during handling. We concluded that these calls with ultrasound components are related to pain and restraint because they did not occur when animals were free of restraint. Thus we suggest that this vocalization may be used as an additional tool to assess capybaras[ welfare.

  15. 78 FR 76257 - Rural Call Completion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-17

    ... such service offers the capability to place calls to or receive calls from the PSTN. 6. In addition... traffic in response to continued complaints about rural call completion issues from rural associations... Project offering providers the opportunity to test call completion issues identified on calls destined to...

  16. Reduction of the thermal conductivity in free-standing silicon nano-membranes investigated by non-invasive Raman thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez-Ángel, E.; Reparaz, J. S.; Gomis-Bresco, J.; Wagner, M. R.; Cuffe, J.; Graczykowski, B.; Shchepetov, A.; Jiang, H.; Prunnila, M.; Ahopelto, J.; Alzina, F.; Sotomayor Torres, C. M.

    2014-01-01

    We report on the reduction of the thermal conductivity in ultra-thin suspended Si membranes with high crystalline quality. A series of membranes with thicknesses ranging from 9 nm to 1.5 μm was investigated using Raman thermometry, a novel contactless technique for thermal conductivity determination. A systematic decrease in the thermal conductivity was observed as reducing the thickness, which is explained using the Fuchs-Sondheimer model through the influence of phonon boundary scattering at the surfaces. The thermal conductivity of the thinnest membrane with d = 9 nm resulted in (9 ± 2) W/mK, thus approaching the amorphous limit but still maintaining a high crystalline quality.

  17. Reduction of the thermal conductivity in free-standing silicon nano-membranes investigated by non-invasive Raman thermometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Chávez-Ángel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on the reduction of the thermal conductivity in ultra-thin suspended Si membranes with high crystalline quality. A series of membranes with thicknesses ranging from 9 nm to 1.5 μm was investigated using Raman thermometry, a novel contactless technique for thermal conductivity determination. A systematic decrease in the thermal conductivity was observed as reducing the thickness, which is explained using the Fuchs-Sondheimer model through the influence of phonon boundary scattering at the surfaces. The thermal conductivity of the thinnest membrane with d = 9 nm resulted in (9 ± 2 W/mK, thus approaching the amorphous limit but still maintaining a high crystalline quality.

  18. Fiber-optic thermometry using thermal radiation from Tm end doped SiO2 fiber sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Kentaro; Katsumata, Toru; Komuro, Shuji; Aizawa, Hiroaki

    2014-04-01

    Fiber-optic thermometry based on temperature dependence of thermal radiation from Tm(3+) ions was studied using Tm end doped SiO2 fiber sensor. Visible light radiation peaks due to f-f transition of Tm(3+) ion were clearly observed at λ = 690 and 790 nm from Tm end doped SiO2 fibers sensor at the temperature above 600 °C. Thermal radiation peaks are assigned with f-f transition of Tm(3+) ion, (1)D2-(3)H6, and (1)G4-(3)H6. Peak intensity of thermal radiation from Tm(3+) ion increases with temperature. Intensity ratio of thermal radiation peaks at λ = 690 nm against that at λ = 790 nm, I790/690, is suitable for the temperature measurement above 750 °C. Two-dimensional temperature distribution in a flame is successfully evaluated by Tm end doped SiO2 fiber sensor.

  19. Re-evaluation of temperature of replacement dolomitization in the Triassic Latemar platform with clumped isotope thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Inigo Andreas; Rodriguez-Blanco, Juan D.; Storck, Julian-Christopher; Benning, Liane G.; Wilson, Edith N.; Brack, Peter; Bernasconi, Stefano M.

    2017-04-01

    The Triassic Latemar platform shows different types of dolomitization styles including features such as dolomitized zones around basaltic dykes and patchy reddish or greyish dolomitization features in the central part of the platform. The processes leading to this partial dolomitization are still debated. Different geochemical tools were applied to determine the formation temperature of the patchy dolomite phases, thereby microthermometry on fluid inclusions and clumped isotope thermometry revealed significantly different temperature ranges (100 to 200 °C vs. 40 to 80 °C, from Wilson et al., 1990 and Ferry et al., 2011, respectively). We re-evaluated the origin of these patchy dolomites at Latemar using a new dolomite-specific clumped isotope temperature calibration based on dolomites synthetized in the laboratory at different temperatures. We directly compare the clumped isotope temperatures of patchy dolomites from Latemar with those obtained on the same samples by fluid inclusion microthermometry. With the new dolomite specific clumped isotope temperature calibration it is possible to determine more precisely the dolomite formation temperature and the oxygen isotope composition of the fluid source. Both are critical parameters for better constraining the origin of different dolomite fabrics on the Earth's surface and in ancient sediments. E.N. Wilson, L.A. Hardie and O.M. Phillips, 1990. Dolomitization front geometry, fluid flow patterns, and the origin of massive dolomite: the Triassic Latemar buildup, northern Italy. American Journal of Science 290, 741-796. J.M. Ferry, B.H. Passey, C. Vasconcelos and J.M. Eiler, 2011. Formation of dolomite at 40-80 °C in the Latemar carbonate buildup, Dolomites, Italy, from clumped isotope thermometry. Geology 39, 571-574.

  20. Counselling framework for moderate-penetrance cancer-susceptibility mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Tung, Nadine; Domchek, Susan M.; Stadler, Zsofia; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Couch, Fergus; Garber, Judy E.; Offit, Kenneth; Robson, Mark E.

    2016-01-01

    The use of multigene panels for the assessment of cancer susceptibility is expanding rapidly in clinical practice, particularly in the USA, despite concerns regarding the uncertain clinical validity for some gene variants and the uncertain clinical utility of most multigene panels. So-called ?moderate-penetrance? gene mutations associated with cancer susceptibility are identified in approximately 2?5% of individuals referred for clinical testing; some of these mutations are potentially action...

  1. A methodology for identifying thermographic phosphors suitable for high-temperature gas thermometry: application to Ce3+ and Pr3+ doped oxide hosts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkowski, Dustin; Rothamer, David A.

    2017-08-01

    A methodology is presented that utilizes configurational coordinate diagrams in combination with energy level diagrams to select new potential thermographic phosphors for high-temperature gas thermometry applications. Oxide hosts doped with trivalent ions were investigated, and based on the analysis Ce3+ doped ortho-phosphates (GdPO4, LuPO4, YPO4) were selected for testing. All three phosphors had high measured quenching temperatures (T_{50} > 800 K), partially validating the methodology used. Additionally, the quenching temperature for Ce:GdPO4 of T_{50} = 1000 K was more than 150 {K} larger than previously seen for trivalent ions doped in oxide hosts. The encouraging results demonstrate that this analysis may be applied to aid in finding thermographic phosphors for gas thermometry at combustion relevant temperatures.

  2. Genetic susceptibility of periodontitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laine, M.L.; Crielaard, W.; Loos, B.G.

    2012-01-01

    In this systematic review, we explore and summarize the peer-reviewed literature on putative genetic risk factors for susceptibility to aggressive and chronic periodontitis. A comprehensive literature search on the PubMed database was performed using the keywords ‘periodontitis’ or ‘periodontal

  3. Fourie susceptible.pmd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Adipala Ekwamu

    a number of cultivars exhibited field resistance to halo blight and bacterial brown spot, all cultivars were more or less susceptible to .... Cerillos. Alubia. I. 91. 57. Kranskop. Red speckled sugar. II. 97. 63. OPS-RS1. Red speckled sugar. II. 96. 63. OPS-RS2. Red speckled sugar. I. 100. 61. OPS-RS3. Red speckled sugar. II. 97.

  4. Hybrid approaches to magnetic resonance thermometry using the proton resonance frequency shift and the spin-lattice relaxation time T1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diakite, Mahamadou

    Minimally invasive thermal therapy under Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) guidance is becoming popular with several applications in the process of getting FDA approval. The ability to determine in near real-time the temperature map of a tumor and its surrounding tissue makes MR thermometry very attractive and well suited for thermal treatment. The proton resonance frequency shift (PRF) is currently the gold standard method for temperature monitoring using MRI. However, its incapacity to measure temperature in fatty tissue limits the scope of its applicability. The spin lattice relaxation time T1, on the other hand, has shown good temperature sensitivity and works well in all types of tissues. In this dissertation, we have addressed a number of challenges currently affecting MRI thermometry. A non-CPMG Turbo Spin Echo (TSE) sequence has been implemented to monitor the temperature rise due to the high RF power deposition inherent to this sequence at high field (3T and higher). This new implementation allows TSE sequences to be used safely without altering their high contrast properties which make them appealing in clinical settings. Tissue damage assessment during thermal therapy is critical for the safety of the patient. We have developed a new hybrid PRF-T1 sequence that has the capability to provide simultaneously in near real-time the temperature map and T1 information, which is a good indication of the state of the tissue. The simplicity and the real-time capability of the newly developed sequence make it an ideal tool for tissue damage assessment. Temperature monitoring during thermal therapy in organs with large fat content have been hindered by the lack of an MRI thermometry method that can provide simultaneous temperature in fat and aqueous tissue. A new sequence and acquisition scheme have been developed to address this issue. In sum, this dissertation proposed several pulse sequence implementation techniques and an acquisition scheme to overcome some of

  5. Active Thermometry Based DS18B20 Temperature Sensor Network for Offshore Pipeline Scour Monitoring Using K-Means Clustering Algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Xuefeng; Li, Weijie; Zhou, Lei; Song, Gang-Bing; Ba, Qin; Ou, Jinping

    2013-01-01

    This work presents an offshore pipeline scour monitoring sensor network system based on active thermometry. The system consists of thermal cables, data acquisition unit, and data processing unit. As the thermal cables emit heats, the distributed DS18B20 digital temperature sensors record temperature information over time. The scour-induced exposure and free spanning can be identified by analyzing the temperature curves. Pipeline exposure and free-spanning experiments were carried out in labor...

  6. Lanthanides post-functionalized nanocrystalline metal-organic frameworks for tunable white-light emission and orthogonal multi-readout thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, You; Yan, Bing

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate tunable white-light emission and multi-readout thermometry in two respective nanocrystalline luminescent metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), which are prepared via postsynthetic functionalization with lanthanide cations of a robust UiO type MOF bearing the 2,2'-bipyridyl moiety (UiO-67-bpydc, 1). The white-light emitting framework Eu3+@1 can be conveniently applied as a thin film onto a commercial UV-LED chip for practical white lighting applications. The multi-readout orthogonal thermometry is illustrated in relation to the emission intensity ratio as well as the decay time and luminescence color of Eu3+/Tb3+@1 nanocrystals. This work highlights the opportunity for designing white-light emitters and nanothermometers based on lanthanide functionalized MOFs.We demonstrate tunable white-light emission and multi-readout thermometry in two respective nanocrystalline luminescent metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), which are prepared via postsynthetic functionalization with lanthanide cations of a robust UiO type MOF bearing the 2,2'-bipyridyl moiety (UiO-67-bpydc, 1). The white-light emitting framework Eu3+@1 can be conveniently applied as a thin film onto a commercial UV-LED chip for practical white lighting applications. The multi-readout orthogonal thermometry is illustrated in relation to the emission intensity ratio as well as the decay time and luminescence color of Eu3+/Tb3+@1 nanocrystals. This work highlights the opportunity for designing white-light emitters and nanothermometers based on lanthanide functionalized MOFs. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr06873d

  7. 78 FR 76218 - Rural Call Completion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-17

    ..., to the extent such service offers the capability to place calls to or receive calls from the PSTN. 6... restricting telephone traffic in response to continued complaints about rural call completion issues from.... In August 2013, ATIS and NECA announced a voluntary Joint National Call Testing Project offering...

  8. 47 CFR 2.302 - Call signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Call signs. 2.302 Section 2.302... RULES AND REGULATIONS Call Signs and Other Forms of Identifying Radio Transmissions § 2.302 Call signs. The table which follows indicates the composition and blocks of international call signs available for...

  9. MR thermometry analysis program for laser- or high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU)-induced heating at a clinical MR scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Ju; Jeong, Ki Young; Oh, Seung Jae; Park, Eun Hae; Lee, Young Han; Suh, Jin Suck [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae Hong [National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    Magnetic resonance (MR) thermometry is a noninvasive method for monitoring local temperature change during thermal therapy. In this study, a MR temperature analysis program was established for a laser with gold nanorods (GNRs) and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU)-induced heating MR thermometry. The MR temperature map was reconstructed using the water proton resonance frequency (PRF) method. The temperature-sensitive phase difference was acquired by using complex number subtraction instead of direct phase subtraction in order to avoid another phase unwrapping process. A temperature map-analyzing program was developed and implemented in IDL (Interactive Data Language) for effective temperature monitoring. This one program was applied to two different heating devices at a clinical MR scanner. All images were acquired with the fast spoiled gradient echo (fSPGR) pulse sequence on a 3.0 T GE Discovery MR750 scanner with an 8-channel knee array coil or with a home-built small surface coil. The analyzed temperature values were confirmed by using values simultaneously measured with an optical temperature probe (R{sup 2} = 0.996). The temperature change in small samples induced by a laser or by HIFU was analyzed by using a raw data, that consisted of complex numbers. This study shows that our MR thermometry analysis program can be used for thermal therapy study with a laser or HIFU at a clinical MR scanner. It can also be applied to temperature monitoring for any other thermal therapy based on the PRF method.

  10. Entanglement susceptibility: area laws and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanardi, Paolo; Campos Venuti, Lorenzo

    2013-04-01

    Generic quantum states in the Hilbert space of a many-body system are nearly maximally entangled whereas low-energy physical states are not; the so-called area laws for quantum entanglement are widespread. In this paper we introduce the novel concept of entanglement susceptibility by expanding the 2-Rényi entropy in the boundary couplings. We show how this concept leads to the emergence of area laws for bi-partite quantum entanglement in systems ruled by local gapped Hamiltonians. Entanglement susceptibility also captures quantitatively which violations one should expect when the system becomes gapless. We also discuss an exact series expansion of the 2-Rényi entanglement entropy in terms of connected correlation functions of a boundary term. This is obtained by identifying Rényi entropy with ground state fidelity in a doubled and twisted theory.

  11. Genetic Susceptibility to Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanja Kovacic

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a complex multifocal arterial disease involving interactions of multiple genetic and environmental factors. Advances in techniques of molecular genetics have revealed that genetic ground significantly influences susceptibility to atherosclerotic vascular diseases. Besides further investigations of monogenetic diseases, candidate genes, genetic polymorphisms, and susceptibility loci associated with atherosclerotic diseases have been identified in recent years, and their number is rapidly increasing. This paper discusses main genetic investigations fields associated with human atherosclerotic vascular diseases. The paper concludes with a discussion of the directions and implications of future genetic research in arteriosclerosis with an emphasis on prospective prediction from an early age of individuals who are predisposed to develop premature atherosclerosis as well as to facilitate the discovery of novel drug targets.

  12. Marijuana Usage and Hypnotic Susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzini, Louis R.; McDonald, Roy D.

    1973-01-01

    Anonymous self-reported drug usage data and hypnotic susceptibility scores were obtained from 282 college students. Frequent marijuana users (more than 10 times) showed greater susceptibility to hypnosis than nonusers. (Author)

  13. Molecular analysis of Arabidopsis susceptibility to oomycete pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ludwig, N.R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/412352818

    2016-01-01

    Plants are under constant attack by pathogens, but successful infections are more exception than rule. Plants use their defense system to fend off many attackers. On the other hand, they also contain so-called susceptibility genes (S genes), that facilitate or support the infection process.

  14. Indico CONFERENCE: Define the Call for Abstracts

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Ferreira, Pedro

    2017-01-01

    In this tutorial, you will learn how to define and open a call for abstracts. When defining a call for abstracts, you will be able to define settings related to the type of questions asked during a review of an abstract, select the users who will review the abstracts, decide when to open the call for abstracts, and more.

  15. HOW TO CALL THE CERN FIRE BRIGADE

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The telephone numbers of the CERN Fire Brigade are: 74444 for emergency calls 74848 for other calls Note The number 112 will stay in use for emergency calls from 'wired' telephones, however, from mobile phones it leads to non-CERN emergency services.

  16. How to call the Fire Brigade

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The telephone numbers for the CERN Fire Brigade are: 74444 for emergency calls 74848 for other calls Note The number 112 will stay in use for emergency calls from "wired" telephones, however, from mobile phones it leads to non-CERN emergency services.

  17. HOW TO CALL THE CERN FIRE BRIGADE

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The telephone numbers of the CERN Fire Brigade are: 74444 for emergency calls 74848 for other calls Note The number 112 will stay in use for emergency calls from 'wired' telephones, however, from mobile phones it leads to non-CERN emergency services.  

  18. Do market participants learn from conference calls?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofsen, E.; Verbeeten, F.; Mertens, G.

    2014-01-01

    We examine whether market participants learn from the information that is disseminated during the Q-and-A section of conference calls. Specifically, we investigate whether stock prices react to information on intangible assets provided during conference calls, and whether conference calls

  19. HOW TO CALL THE CERN FIRE BRIGADE

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The telephone numbers of the CERN Fire Brigade are: 74444 for emergency calls 74848 for other calls Note: the number 112 will stay in use for emergency calls from 'wired' telephones, however, from mobile phones it leads to non-CERN emergency services.

  20. HOW TO CALL THE CERN FIRE BRIGADE

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The telephone numbers of the CERN Fire Brigade are: 74444 for emergency calls 74848 for other calls Note The number 112 will stay in use for emergency calls from 'wired' telephones, however, from mobile phones it leads to non-CERN emergency services.

  1. ICALL's Relevance to CALL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Monica

    2017-01-01

    The term Intelligent Computer Assisted Language Learning (ICALL) covers many different aspects of CALL that add something extra to a CALL resource. This could be with the use of computational linguistics or Artificial Intelligence (AI). ICALL tends to be not very well understood within the CALL community. There may also be the slight fear factor…

  2. A thermal monitoring sheet with low influence from adjacent waterbolus for tissue surface thermometry during clinical hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunachalam, Kavitha; Maccarini, Paolo F; Stauffer, Paul R

    2008-10-01

    This paper presents a complete thermal analysis of a novel conformal surface thermometer design with directional sensitivity for real-time temperature monitoring during hyperthermia treatments of large superficial cancer. The thermal monitoring sheet (TMS) discussed in this paper consists of a 2-D array of fiberoptic sensors embedded between two layers of flexible, low-loss, and thermally conductive printed circuit board (PCB) film. Heat transfer across all interfaces from the tissue surface through multiple layers of insulating dielectrics surrounding the small buried temperature sensor and into an adjacent temperature-regulated water coupling bolus was studied using 3-D thermal simulation software. Theoretical analyses were carried out to identify the most effective differential TMS probe configuration possible with commercially available flexible PCB materials and to compare their thermal responses with omnidirectional probes commonly used in clinical hyperthermia. A TMS sensor design that employs 0.0508-mm Kapton MTB and 0.2032-mm Kapton HN flexible polyimide films is proposed for tissue surface thermometry with low influence from the adjacent waterbolus. Comparison of the thermal simulations with clinical probes indicates the new differential TMS probe design to outperform in terms of both transient response and steady-state accuracy in selectively reading the tissue surface temperature, while decreasing the overall thermal barrier of the probe between the coupling waterbolus and tissue surface.

  3. Long-Term Stability Evaluation of a Sn-Doped Ni-C Eutectic Cell Suitable for Radiation Thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, R. N.; Machin, G.

    2017-07-01

    Metal carbon eutectic cells (high-temperature fixed points, HTFPs) (Machin in AIP Conf Proc 1552:305, 2013) are being considered for use as reliable high-temperature references for non-contact thermometry above the copper point (1084.62°C). Recent studies have demonstrated the concept of using doped metal carbon eutectic cells as artefacts suitable for temperature scale comparisons (Teixeira et al. in AIP Conf Proc 1552:363, 2013; Teixeira et al. in Int J Thermophys 35:467-474, 2014; Machin et al. in Int J Thermophys 36:327-335, 2015). When using such artefacts, the participating institutes do not know the realization temperature of the doped HTFP cell, because it has been modified by the addition of a selected dopant at a definite concentration. The use of such fixed points can critically evaluate the real measurement capability of the institutes in any comparison. The pyrometry laboratory of Inmetro developed a set of doped Ni-C eutectic cells in 2012 and 2013. This paper describes the long-term stability of a Sn-doped Ni-C cell constructed in 2012, which accumulated more than 220 h above 1300°C amounting to more than 50 cycles of melts and freezes. The cell remained stable, well within the measurement uncertainty, throughout the evaluation period demonstrating the utility of such cells for scale comparison purposes.

  4. Cooling Effectiveness Measurements for Air Film Cooling of Thermal Barrier Coated Surfaces in a Burner Rig Environment Using Phosphor Thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Shyam, Vikram; Wroblewski, Adam C.; Zhu, Dongming; Cuy, Michael D.; Wolfe, Douglas E.

    2016-01-01

    While the effects of thermal barrier coating (TBC) thermal protection and air film cooling effectiveness are usually studied separately, their contributions to combined cooling effectiveness are interdependent and are not simply additive. Therefore, combined cooling effectiveness must be measured to achieve an optimum balance between TBC thermal protection and air film cooling. In this investigation, surface temperature mapping was performed using recently developed Cr-doped GdAlO3 phosphor thermometry. Measurements were performed in the NASA GRC Mach 0.3 burner rig on a TBC-coated plate using a scaled up cooling hole geometry where both the mainstream hot gas temperature and the blowing ratio were varied. Procedures for surface temperature and cooling effectiveness mapping of the air film-cooled TBC-coated surface are described. Applications are also shown for an engine component in both the burner rig test environment as well as an engine afterburner environment. The effects of thermal background radiation and flame chemiluminescence on the measurements are investigated, and advantages of this method over infrared thermography as well as the limitations of this method for studying air film cooling are discussed.

  5. Effects of moderate pump and Stokes chirp on chirped-probe pulse femtosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering thermometry

    KAUST Repository

    Gu, Mingming

    2018-01-08

    The effects of moderate levels of chirp in the pump and Stokes pulses on chirped-probe-pulse femtosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CPP fs CARS) were investigated. The frequency chirp in the pump and Stokes pulses was introduced by placing SF11 glass disks with thicknesses of 10 mm or 20 mm in the optical path for these beams. The magnitude of the chirp in the probe beam was much greater and was induced by placing a 30-cm rod of SF10 glass in the beam path. The temperature measurements were performed in hydrogen/air non-premixed flames stabilized on a Hencken burner at equivalence ratios of 0.3, 0.5, 0.7, and 1.0. We performed measurements with no disks in pump and Stokes beam paths, and then with disks of 10 mm and 20 mm placed in both beam paths. The spectrum of the nonresonant background four-wave mixing signal narrowed considerably with increasing pump and Stokes chirp, while the resonant CARS signal was relatively unaffected. Consequently, the interference of the nonresonant background with the resonant CARS signal in the frequency-spread dephasing region of the spectrum was minimized. The increased rate of decay of the resonant CARS signal with increasing temperature was thus readily apparent. We have started to analyze the CPP fs CARS thermometry data and initial results indicate improved accuracy and precision are obtained due to moderate chirp in the pump and Stokes laser pulses.

  6. Ultra-high resolution steady-state micro-thermometry using a bipolar direct current reversal technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jason Yingzhi; Wu, Wei; Pettes, Michael Thompson

    2016-09-01

    The suspended micro-thermometry measurement technique is one of the most prominent methods for probing the in-plane thermal conductance of low dimensional materials, where a suspended microdevice containing two built-in platinum resistors that serve as both heater and thermometer is used to measure the temperature and heat flow across a sample. The presence of temperature fluctuations in the sample chamber and background thermal conductance through the device, residual gases, and radiation are dominant sources of error when the sample thermal conductance is comparable to or smaller than the background thermal conductance, on the order of 300 pW/K at room temperature. In this work, we present a high resolution thermal conductance measurement scheme in which a bipolar direct current reversal technique is adopted to replace the lock-in technique. We have demonstrated temperature resolution of 1.0-2.6 mK and thermal conductance resolution of 1.7-26 pW/K over a temperature range of 30-375 K. The background thermal conductance of the suspended microdevice is determined accurately by our method and allows for straightforward isolation of this parasitic signal. This simple and high-throughput measurement technique yields an order of magnitude improvement in resolution over similarly configured lock-in amplifier techniques, allowing for more accurate investigation of fundamental phonon transport mechanisms in individual nanomaterials.

  7. Magnetic resonance thermometry at 7T for real-time monitoring and correction of ultrasound induced mild hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fite, Brett Z; Liu, Yu; Kruse, Dustin E; Caskey, Charles F; Walton, Jeffrey H; Lai, Chun-Yen; Mahakian, Lisa M; Larrat, Benoit; Dumont, Erik; Ferrara, Katherine W

    2012-01-01

    While Magnetic Resonance Thermometry (MRT) has been extensively utilized for non-invasive temperature measurement, there is limited data on the use of high field (≥7T) scanners for this purpose. MR-guided Focused Ultrasound (MRgFUS) is a promising non-invasive method for localized hyperthermia and drug delivery. MRT based on the temperature sensitivity of the proton resonance frequency (PRF) has been implemented in both a tissue phantom and in vivo in a mouse Met-1 tumor model, using partial parallel imaging (PPI) to speed acquisition. An MRgFUS system capable of delivering a controlled 3D acoustic dose during real time MRT with proportional, integral, and derivative (PID) feedback control was developed and validated. Real-time MRT was validated in a tofu phantom with fluoroptic temperature measurements, and acoustic heating simulations were in good agreement with MR temperature maps. In an in vivo Met-1 mouse tumor, the real-time PID feedback control is capable of maintaining the desired temperature with high accuracy. We found that real time MR control of hyperthermia is feasible at high field, and k-space based PPI techniques may be implemented for increasing temporal resolution while maintaining temperature accuracy on the order of 1°C.

  8. Bonobos extract meaning from call sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zanna Clay

    Full Text Available Studies on language-trained bonobos have revealed their remarkable abilities in representational and communication tasks. Surprisingly, however, corresponding research into their natural communication has largely been neglected. We address this issue with a first playback study on the natural vocal behaviour of bonobos. Bonobos produce five acoustically distinct call types when finding food, which they regularly mix together into longer call sequences. We found that individual call types were relatively poor indicators of food quality, while context specificity was much greater at the call sequence level. We therefore investigated whether receivers could extract meaning about the quality of food encountered by the caller by integrating across different call sequences. We first trained four captive individuals to find two types of foods, kiwi (preferred and apples (less preferred at two different locations. We then conducted naturalistic playback experiments during which we broadcasted sequences of four calls, originally produced by a familiar individual responding to either kiwi or apples. All sequences contained the same number of calls but varied in the composition of call types. Following playbacks, we found that subjects devoted significantly more search effort to the field indicated by the call sequence. Rather than attending to individual calls, bonobos attended to the entire sequences to make inferences about the food encountered by a caller. These results provide the first empirical evidence that bonobos are able to extract information about external events by attending to vocal sequences of other individuals and highlight the importance of call combinations in their natural communication system.

  9. Magnetic susceptibilities of minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblum, Sam; Brownfield, I.K.

    2000-01-01

    Magnetic separation of minerals is a topic that is seldom reported in the literature for two reasons. First, separation data generally are byproducts of other projects; and second, this study requires a large amount of patience and is unusually tedious. Indeed, we suspect that most minerals probably are never investigated for this property. These data are timesaving for mineralogists who concentrate mono-mineralic fractions for chemical analysis, age dating, and for other purposes. The data can certainly be used in the ore-beneficiation industries. In some instances, magnetic-susceptibility data may help in mineral identification, where other information is insufficient. In past studies of magnetic separation of minerals, (Gaudin and Spedden, 1943; Tille and Kirkpatrick, 1956; Rosenblum, 1958; Rubinstein and others, 1958; Flinter, 1959; Hess, 1959; Baker, 1962; Meric and Peyre, 1963; Rojas and others, 1965; and Duchesne, 1966), the emphasis has been on the ferromagnetic and paramagnetic ranges of extraction. For readers interested in the history of magnetic separation of minerals, Krumbein and Pettijohn (1938, p. 344-346) indicated nine references back to 1848. The primary purpose of this paper is to report the magnetic-susceptibility data on as many minerals as possible, similar to tables of hardness, specific gravity, refractive indices, and other basic physical properties of minerals. A secondary purpose is to demonstrate that the total and best extraction ranges are influenced by the chemistry of the minerals. The following notes are offered to help avoid problems in separating a desired mineral concentrate from mixtures of mineral grains.

  10. Alcohol increases hypnotic susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semmens-Wheeler, Rebecca; Dienes, Zoltán; Duka, Theodora

    2013-09-01

    One approach to hypnosis suggests that for hypnotic experience to occur frontal lobe activity must be attenuated. For example, cold control theory posits that a lack of awareness of intentions is responsible for the experience of involuntariness and/or the subjective reality of hypnotic suggestions. The mid-dorso-lateral prefrontal cortex and the ACC are candidate regions for such awareness. Alcohol impairs frontal lobe executive function. This study examined whether alcohol affects hypnotisability. We administered 0.8 mg/kg of alcohol or a placebo to 32 medium susceptible participants. They were subsequently hypnotised and given hypnotic suggestions. All participants believed they had received some alcohol. Participants in the alcohol condition were more susceptible to hypnotic suggestions than participants in the placebo condition. Impaired frontal lobe activity facilitates hypnotic responding, which supports theories postulating that attenuation of executive function facilitates hypnotic response, and contradicts theories postulating that hypnotic response involves enhanced inhibitory, attentional or other executive function. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Experimental investigation of thermal effects in HIFU-based external valvuloplasty with a non-spherical transducer, using high-resolution MR thermometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrusca, Lorena; Salomir, Rares; Milleret, Rene; Pichot, Olivier; Rata, Mihaela; Chapelon, Jean-Yves [Inserm, U556, and Universite de Lyon, Lyon, F-69003 (France); Cotton, Francois [Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Lyon, F-69003 (France)], E-mail: lorena.petrusca@inserm.fr

    2009-09-07

    Real-time image-guided extracorporeal high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has been suggested for minimally invasive treatment of valvular dysfunction in the saphenous vein. Local application of heat on the perimeter of the valve zone was previously reported to induce a partial shrinkage of the collagen, which may correct valvular function. In our study, a novel MR compatible HIFU device has been investigated. This device is based on a non-spherical geometry, with two active elements that create a focusing line which is orthogonal to the beam main axis, aiming to cover the valve longitudinally. The prototype performance was characterized by electro-acoustical measurements of the pressure field and by high-resolution MR thermometry. Pressure and thermal fields were found in good agreement with the theoretical predictions. To investigate the therapeutic potential, fresh samples of excised human veins were filled with an agarose gel, embedded in porcine muscle and exposed to HIFU. The power level applied during a fixed duration of 30 s was varied such that the absolute temperature at focus ranged between 52 deg. C and 83 deg. C. Targeting was achieved under MR guidance using a MR compatible XZ positioning system. A dedicated waterproof miniature loop coil was specifically built to achieve high-resolution MRI image-based targeting (0.25 mm x 0.25 mm x 3 mm voxel) and thermometry (0.4 mm x 0.4 mm x 4 mm voxel). The vein wall was clearly identified on MR images before and after HIFU treatment. The thermal buildup created by the non-spherical transducer could be characterized from MR thermometry data. Shrinkage of the vein wall (above 65 deg. C) was determined by absolute temperature and was not a cumulative thermal dose effect.

  12. Graphene susceptibility in Holstein model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mousavi, Hamze, E-mail: hamze.mousavi@gmail.co [Department of Physics, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nano Science and Nano Technology Research Center, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-06-15

    We study the effects of the electron-phonon interaction on the temperature dependence of the orbital magnetic susceptibility of monolayer graphene. We use the linear response theory and Green's function formalism within the Holstein Hamiltonian model. The results show that the effects of the electron-phonon interaction on the susceptibility of graphene sheet have different behaviors in two temperature regions. In the low temperature region, susceptibility increases when the electron-phonon coupling strength increases. On the other hand, the susceptibility reduces with increasing the electron-phonon coupling strength in the high temperature region. - Highlights: Effect of electron-phonon interaction on the susceptibility of graphene is studied. Linear response theory and Green's function technique in Holstein model are used. Effect of electron-phonon on susceptibility has different behaviors in two temperature regions.

  13. Topological susceptibility from slabs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bietenholz, Wolfgang [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, A.P. 70-543, Distrito Federal, C.P. 04510 (Mexico); Forcrand, Philippe de [Institute for Theoretical Physics, ETH Zürich,CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland); CERN, Physics Department, TH Unit, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Gerber, Urs [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, A.P. 70-543, Distrito Federal, C.P. 04510 (Mexico); Instituto de Física y Matemáticas, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo,Edificio C-3, Apdo. Postal 2-82, Morelia, Michoacán, C.P. 58040 (Mexico)

    2015-12-14

    In quantum field theories with topological sectors, a non-perturbative quantity of interest is the topological susceptibility χ{sub t}. In principle it seems straightforward to measure χ{sub t} by means of Monte Carlo simulations. However, for local update algorithms and fine lattice spacings, this tends to be difficult, since the Monte Carlo history rarely changes the topological sector. Here we test a method to measure χ{sub t} even if data from only one sector are available. It is based on the topological charges in sub-volumes, which we denote as slabs. Assuming a Gaussian distribution of these charges, this method enables the evaluation of χ{sub t}, as we demonstrate with numerical results for non-linear σ-models.

  14. Topological Susceptibility from Slabs

    CERN Document Server

    Bietenholz, Wolfgang; Gerber, Urs

    2015-01-01

    In quantum field theories with topological sectors, a non-perturbative quantity of interest is the topological susceptibility chi_t. In principle it seems straightforward to measure chi_t by means of Monte Carlo simulations. However, for local update algorithms and fine lattice spacings, this tends to be difficult, since the Monte Carlo history rarely changes the topological sector. Here we test a method to measure chi_t even if data from only one sector are available. It is based on the topological charges in sub-volumes, which we denote as slabs. Assuming a Gaussian distribution of these charges, this method enables the evaluation of chi_t, as we demonstrate with numerical results for non-linear sigma-models.

  15. The Accuracy of Mean-Field Approximation for Susceptible-Infected-Susceptible Epidemic Spreading

    CERN Document Server

    Qu, Bo

    2016-01-01

    The epidemic spreading has been studied for years by applying the mean-field approach in both homogeneous case, where each node may get infected by an infected neighbor with the same rate, and heterogeneous case, where the infection rates between different pairs of nodes are different. Researchers have discussed whether the mean-field approaches could accurately describe the epidemic spreading for the homogeneous cases but not for the heterogeneous cases. In this paper, we explore under what conditions the mean-field approach could perform well when the infection rates are heterogeneous. In particular, we employ the Susceptible-Infected-Susceptible (SIS) model and compare the average fraction of infected nodes in the metastable state obtained by the continuous-time simulation and the mean-field approximation. We concentrate on an individual-based mean-field approximation called the N-intertwined Mean Field Approximation (NIMFA), which is an advanced approach considered the underlying network topology. Moreove...

  16. Educación de calle

    OpenAIRE

    Aguado Alonso, Carmen María

    2014-01-01

    Los cambios que está sufriendo nuestra sociedad generan nuevas realidades sociales y nuevos métodos de socialización modificando nuestro entorno. Uno de los principales lugares donde ocurre esto es en la calle. La Calle tiene un potencial educativo muy valioso. En ocasiones puede ser utilizado para “des - educar”, olvidado por instituciones sociales, políticas y educativas. Es importante que la Calle se convierta en un espacio de socialización educativa. La Calle tiene un pa...

  17. Call Duration Characteristics based on Customers Location

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Žvinys Karolis

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays a lot of different researches are performed based on call duration distributions (CDD analysis. However, the majority of studies are linked with social relationships between the people. Therefore the scarcity of information, how the call duration is associated with a user's location, is appreciable. The goal of this paper is to reveal the ties between user's voice call duration and the location of call. For this reason we analyzed more than 5 million calls from real mobile network, which were made over the base stations located in rural areas, roads, small towns, business and entertainment centers, residential districts. According to these site types CDD’s and characteristic features for call durations are given and discussed. Submitted analysis presents the users habits and behavior as a group (not an individual. The research showed that CDD’s of customers being them in different locations are not equal. It has been found that users at entertainment, business centers are tend to talk much shortly, than people being at home. Even more CDD can be distorted strongly, when machinery calls are evaluated. Hence to apply a common CDD for a whole network it is not recommended. The study also deals with specific parameters of call duration for distinguished user groups, the influence of network technology for call duration is considered.

  18. Time series modeling of daily abandoned calls in a call centre ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Models for evaluating and predicting the short periodic time series in daily abandoned calls in a call center are developed. Abandonment of calls due to impatient is an identified problem among most call centers. The two competing models were derived using Fourier series and the Box and Jenkins modeling approaches.

  19. Assessment of brain core temperature using MR DWI-thermometry in Alzheimer disease patients compared to healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparacia, Gianvincenzo; Sakai, Koji; Yamada, Kei; Giordano, Giovanna; Coppola, Rosalia; Midiri, Massimo; Grimaldi, Luigi Maria

    2017-04-01

    To assess the brain core temperature of Alzheimer disease (AD) patients in comparison with healthy volunteers using diffusion-weighted thermometry. Fourteen AD patients (3 men, 11 women; age range 60-81 years, mean age 73.8 ± 6.1 years) and 14 healthy volunteers, age and sex-matched (mean age 70.1 ± 6.9 years; range 62-84 years; 5 men, 9 women) underwent MR examination between February 2014 and March 2016. MR imaging studies were performed with a 1.5-T MR scanner. Brain core temperature (T: °C) was calculated using the following equation from the diffusion coefficient (D) in the lateral ventricular (LV) cerebrospinal fluid: T = 2256.74/ln (4.39221/D) - 273.15 using a standard DWI single-shot echo-planar pulse sequence (b value 1000 s/mm 2 ). Statistical analysis was performed using a nonparametric Wilcoxon rank-sum test to compare the patient and control groups regarding LV temperatures. There was no significant difference (P = 0.1937) in LV temperature between patients (mean 37.9 ± 1.1 °C, range 35.8-39.2 °C) and control group (38.7 ± 1.4 °C, range 36.9-42.7 °C). Brain core temperature in AD patients showed no significant alterations compared to healthy volunteers.

  20. 76 FR 17934 - Infrastructure Protection Data Call

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-31

    ... infrastructure and key resources (CIKR). At DHS, this responsibility is managed by IP within NPPD. Beginning in...: Infrastructure Protection Data Call. OMB Number: 1670-NEW. Frequency: On occasion. Affected Public: Federal... SECURITY Infrastructure Protection Data Call AGENCY: National Protection and Programs Directorate, DHS...

  1. Answering the "Call of the Mountain"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chaves Villegas, Martha

    2016-01-01

    In response to the age of the ‘anthropocene,’ as some authors are calling this epoch in which one single species is disrupting major natural systems (Steffen et al 2011), there are calls for more radical, learning-based sustainability that generates deep transformations in individuals

  2. Kindness Curbs Kids' Name-Calling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxon, Rebekah

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the impact of name-calling towards the student's academic performance and emotions and cites some measures on how should teachers address this problem in order to facilitate effective learning among students. Psychologists recognize that name-calling and other forms of verbal bullying and harassment are more…

  3. 17 CFR 31.18 - Margin calls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Margin calls. 31.18 Section 31....18 Margin calls. (a) No leverage transaction merchant shall liquidate a leverage contract because of a margin deficiency without effecting personal contact with the leverage customer. If a leverage...

  4. Help Options in CALL: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas-Claros, Monica S.; Gruba, Paul A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper is a systematic review of research investigating help options in the different language skills in computer-assisted language learning (CALL). In this review, emerging themes along with is-sues affecting help option research are identified and discussed. We argue that help options in CALL are application resources that do not only seem…

  5. Monitoring method call sequences using annotations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Nobakht (Behrooz); F.S. de Boer (Frank); M.M. Bonsangue (Marcello); C.P.T. de Gouw (Stijn); M.M. Jaghouri (MohammadMahdi)

    2014-01-01

    htmlabstractIn this paper we introduce JMSeq, a Java-based tool for monitoring sequences of method calls. JMSeq provides a simple but expressive language to specify the observables of a Java program in terms of sequences of possibly nested method calls. Similar to many monitoring-oriented

  6. 78 FR 21891 - Rural Call Completion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-12

    ... one of two proposed safe harbor provisions. We also propose to prohibit both originating and... these proposed rules, particularly for originating providers whose call-routing practices do not appear... in presentations at the Commission's October 18, 2011 workshop on rural call routing and termination...

  7. Call Admission Control in Mobile Cellular Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Sanchita

    2013-01-01

    Call Admission Control (CAC) and Dynamic Channel Assignments (DCA) are important decision-making problems in mobile cellular communication systems. Current research in mobile communication considers them as two independent problems, although the former greatly depends on the resulting free channels obtained as the outcome of the latter. This book provides a solution to the CAC problem, considering DCA as an integral part of decision-making for call admission. Further, current technical resources ignore movement issues of mobile stations and fluctuation in network load (incoming calls) in the control strategy used for call admission. In addition, the present techniques on call admission offers solution globally for the entire network, instead of considering the cells independently.      CAC here has been formulated by two alternative approaches. The first approach aimed at handling the uncertainty in the CAC problem by employing fuzzy comparators.  The second approach is concerned with formulation of CAC ...

  8. Source levels of foraging humpback whale calls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournet, Michelle E H; Matthews, Leanna P; Gabriele, Christine M; Mellinger, David K; Klinck, Holger

    2018-02-01

    Humpback whales produce a wide range of low- to mid-frequency vocalizations throughout their migratory range. Non-song "calls" dominate this species' vocal repertoire while on high-latitude foraging grounds. The source levels of 426 humpback whale calls in four vocal classes were estimated using a four-element planar array deployed in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve, Southeast Alaska. There was no significant difference in source levels between humpback whale vocal classes. The mean call source level was 137 dB RMS re 1 μPa @ 1 m in the bandwidth of the call (range 113-157 dB RMS re 1 μPa @ 1 m), where bandwidth is defined as the frequency range from the lowest to the highest frequency component of the call. These values represent a robust estimate of humpback whale source levels on foraging grounds and should append earlier estimates.

  9. Call Cultures in Orang-Utans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wich, Serge A.; Nater, Alexander; Arora, Natasha; Bastian, Meredith L.; Meulman, Ellen; Morrogh-Bernard, Helen C.; Atmoko, S. Suci Utami; Pamungkas, Joko; Perwitasari-Farajallah, Dyah; Hardus, Madeleine E.; van Noordwijk, Maria; van Schaik, Carel P.

    2012-01-01

    Background Several studies suggested great ape cultures, arguing that human cumulative culture presumably evolved from such a foundation. These focused on conspicuous behaviours, and showed rich geographic variation, which could not be attributed to known ecological or genetic differences. Although geographic variation within call types (accents) has previously been reported for orang-utans and other primate species, we examine geographic variation in the presence/absence of discrete call types (dialects). Because orang-utans have been shown to have geographic variation that is not completely explicable by genetic or ecological factors we hypothesized that this will be similar in the call domain and predict that discrete call type variation between populations will be found. Methodology/Principal Findings We examined long-term behavioural data from five orang-utan populations and collected fecal samples for genetic analyses. We show that there is geographic variation in the presence of discrete types of calls. In exactly the same behavioural context (nest building and infant retrieval), individuals in different wild populations customarily emit either qualitatively different calls or calls in some but not in others. By comparing patterns in call-type and genetic similarity, we suggest that the observed variation is not likely to be explained by genetic or ecological differences. Conclusion/Significance These results are consistent with the potential presence of ‘call cultures’ and suggest that wild orang-utans possess the ability to invent arbitrary calls, which spread through social learning. These findings differ substantially from those that have been reported for primates before. First, the results reported here are on dialect and not on accent. Second, this study presents cases of production learning whereas most primate studies on vocal learning were cases of contextual learning. We conclude with speculating on how these findings might assist in bridging

  10. Call cultures in orang-utans?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serge A Wich

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several studies suggested great ape cultures, arguing that human cumulative culture presumably evolved from such a foundation. These focused on conspicuous behaviours, and showed rich geographic variation, which could not be attributed to known ecological or genetic differences. Although geographic variation within call types (accents has previously been reported for orang-utans and other primate species, we examine geographic variation in the presence/absence of discrete call types (dialects. Because orang-utans have been shown to have geographic variation that is not completely explicable by genetic or ecological factors we hypothesized that this will be similar in the call domain and predict that discrete call type variation between populations will be found. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We examined long-term behavioural data from five orang-utan populations and collected fecal samples for genetic analyses. We show that there is geographic variation in the presence of discrete types of calls. In exactly the same behavioural context (nest building and infant retrieval, individuals in different wild populations customarily emit either qualitatively different calls or calls in some but not in others. By comparing patterns in call-type and genetic similarity, we suggest that the observed variation is not likely to be explained by genetic or ecological differences. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These results are consistent with the potential presence of 'call cultures' and suggest that wild orang-utans possess the ability to invent arbitrary calls, which spread through social learning. These findings differ substantially from those that have been reported for primates before. First, the results reported here are on dialect and not on accent. Second, this study presents cases of production learning whereas most primate studies on vocal learning were cases of contextual learning. We conclude with speculating on how these findings might

  11. Microwave susceptibility experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McConaghy, C.

    1984-05-29

    In certain experimental environments, systems can be affected or damaged by microwave pulses. I have conducted tests at LLNL to understand the phenomenology of microwave susceptibility of system components and subsystem components. To date, my experiments have concentrated on bipolar transistors, similar to what might be used in discrete analog circuits, and on CMOS RAM chips, which might be used in a computer memory system. I observed a decrease in failure energies for both the transistor and the integrated curcuit as I shortened the microwave pulse width. An S band (2.86 GHz) transmit/receive (T/R) tube has also been tested both at S band and at X band (8.16 GHz). The S band pulse had limitations in rise-time from zero power, which had an effect on the amount of power that could be transmitted through the T/R tube, as much as 0.7% of the incident power passed through the tube. All tests were conducted in closed-waveguide or coax test-fixtures, in contrast to the anechoic chambers utilized by other experimenters. I have used both S band and X band Klystron generators. For very high power (greater than 1 MW), I used an additional pulse-compression cavity at S band. Other subsystem components such as an X band mixer and an X band T/R tube will be tested in the future. 8 references.

  12. [Antimicrobial susceptibility cumulative reports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canut-Blasco, Andrés; Calvo, Jorge; Rodríguez-Díaz, Juan Carlos; Martínez-Martínez, Luis

    2016-10-01

    Cumulative reports on antimicrobial susceptibility tests data are important for selecting empirical treatments, as an educational tool in programs on antimicrobial use, and for establishing breakpoints defining clinical categories. These reports should be based on data validated by clinical microbiologists using diagnostic samples (not surveillance samples). In order to avoid a bias derived from including several isolates obtained from the same patient, it is recommended that, for a defined period, only the first isolate is counted. A minimal number of isolates per species should be presented: a figure of >=30 isolates is statistically acceptable. The report is usually presented in a table format where, for each cell, information on clinically relevant microorganisms-antimicrobial agents is presented. Depending on particular needs, multiple tables showing data related to patients, samples, services or special pathogens can be prepared. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  13. PRFS-based MR thermometry versus an alternative T1 magnitude method--comparative performance predicting thermally induced necrosis in hepatic tumor ablation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Rosenberg

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare the accuracy of a semi-quantitative proton resonance frequency shift (PRFS thermal mapping interface and an alternative qualitative T1 thermometry model in predicting tissue necrosis in an established routine setting of MRI-guided laser ablation in the human liver. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 34 cases of PRFS-guided (GRE laser ablation were retrospectively matched with 34 cases from an earlier patient population of 73 individuals being monitored through T1 magnitude image evaluation (FLASH 2D. The model-specific real-time estimation of necrotizing thermal impact (above 54 °C zone and T1 signal loss, respectively was correlated in size with the resulting necrosis as shown by lack of enhancement on the first-day contrast exam (T1. Matched groups were compared using the Mann-Whitney test. RESULTS: Online PRFS guidance was available in 33 of 34 cases. Positive size correlation between calculated impact zone and contrast defect at first day was evident in both groups (p 0.28 between the two groups. CONCLUSION: PRFS thermometry is feasible in a clinical setting of thermal hepatic tumor ablation. As an interference-free MR-tool for online therapy monitoring its accuracy to predict tissue necrosis is superior to a competing model of thermally induced alteration of the T1 magnitude signal.

  14. Design, Construction, and Initial Test of High Spatial Resolution Thermometry Arrays for Detection of Surface Temperature Profiles on SRF Cavities in Super Fluid Helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ari Palczewski, Rongli Geng, Grigory Eremeev

    2011-07-01

    We designed and built two high resolution (0.6-0.55mm special resolution [1.1-1.2mm separation]) thermometry arrays prototypes out of the Allen Bradley 90-120 ohm 1/8 watt resistor to measure surface temperature profiles on SRF cavities. One array was designed to be physically flexible and conform to any location on a SRF cavity; the other was modeled after the common G-10/stycast 2850 thermometer and designed to fit on the equator of an ILC (Tesla 1.3GHz) SRF cavity. We will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each array and their construction. In addition we will present a case study of the arrays performance on a real SRF cavity TB9NR001. TB9NR001 presented a unique opportunity to test the performance of each array as it contained a dual (4mm separation) cat eye defect which conventional methods such as OST (Oscillating Superleak second-sound Transducers) and full coverage thermometry mapping were unable to distinguish between. We will discuss the new arrays ability to distinguish between the two defects and their preheating performance.

  15. External GSM phone calls now made simpler

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    On 2 July, the IT/CS Telecom Service introduced a new service making external calls from CERN GSM phones easier. A specific prefix is no longer needed for calls outside CERN. External calls from CERN GSM phones are to be simplified. It is no longer necessary to use a special prefix to call an external number from the CERN GSM network.The Telecom Section of the IT/CS Group is introducing a new system that will make life easier for GSM users. It is no longer necessary to use a special prefix (333) to call an external number from the CERN GSM network. Simply dial the number directly like any other Swiss GSM customer. CERN currently has its own private GSM network with the Swiss mobile operator, Sunrise, covering the whole of Switzerland. This network was initially intended exclusively for calls between CERN numbers (replacing the old beeper system). A special system was later introduced for external calls, allowing them to pass thr...

  16. Attitude of Farmers towards Kisan Call Centres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shely Mary Koshy

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to measure the attitude of farmers in Kerala, India towards Kisan Call Centre (KCC. Kisan Call Centre provides free agricultural advisory services to every citizen involved in agriculture through a toll free number. One hundred and fifty farmers who have utilized the Kisan Call Centre service were selected from the database of KCC. The results showed that the respondents had moderately favourable attitude towards KCC followed by highly favourable attitude. The variables digital divide, temporal awareness on KCC, satisfaction towards KCC and utilization of KCC were found to have a positive correlation with the attitude of respondents towards KCC.

  17. Mourning Dove Call-count Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Mourning Dove (Zenaida macroura) Call-Count Survey was developed to provide an index to population size and to detect annual changes in mourning dove breeding...

  18. Evaluating erroneous offside calls in soccer

    OpenAIRE

    H?ttermann, Stefanie; No?l, Benjamin; Memmert, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    The ability to simultaneously attend to multiple objects declines with increases in the visual angle separating distant objects. We explored whether these laboratory-measured limits on visual attentional spread generalize to a real life context: offside calls by soccer assistant referees. We coded all offside calls from a full year of first division German soccer matches. By determining the x-y coordinates of the relevant players and assistant referee on the soccer field we were able to calcu...

  19. [Antimicrobial susceptibility in Chile 2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifuentes-D, Marcela; Silva, Francisco; García, Patricia; Bello, Helia; Briceño, Isabel; Calvo-A, Mario; Labarca, Jaime

    2014-04-01

    Bacteria antimicrobial resistance is an uncontrolled public health problem that progressively increases its magnitude and complexity. The Grupo Colaborativo de Resistencia, formed by a join of experts that represent 39 Chilean health institutions has been concerned with bacteria antimicrobial susceptibility in our country since 2008. In this document we present in vitro bacterial susceptibility accumulated during year 2012 belonging to 28 national health institutions that represent about 36% of hospital discharges in Chile. We consider of major importance to report periodically bacteria susceptibility so to keep the medical community updated to achieve target the empirical antimicrobial therapies and the control measures and prevention of the dissemination of multiresistant strains.

  20. Partition Decomposition for Roll Call Data

    CERN Document Server

    Leibon, Greg; Rockmore, Daniel N; Savell, Robert

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we bring to bear some new tools from statistical learning on the analysis of roll call data. We present a new data-driven model for roll call voting that is geometric in nature. We construct the model by adapting the "Partition Decoupling Method," an unsupervised learning technique originally developed for the analysis of families of time series, to produce a multiscale geometric description of a weighted network associated to a set of roll call votes. Central to this approach is the quantitative notion of a "motivation," a cluster-based and learned basis element that serves as a building block in the representation of roll call data. Motivations enable the formulation of a quantitative description of ideology and their data-dependent nature makes possible a quantitative analysis of the evolution of ideological factors. This approach is generally applicable to roll call data and we apply it in particular to the historical roll call voting of the U.S. House and Senate. This methodology provides a...

  1. On ultrahigh temperature crustal metamorphism: Phase equilibria, trace element thermometry, bulk composition, heat sources, timescales and tectonic settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David E. Kelsey

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Ultrahigh temperature (UHT metamorphism is the most thermally extreme form of regional crustal metamorphism, with temperatures exceeding 900 °C. UHT crustal metamorphism is recognised in more than 50 localities globally in the metamorphic rock record and is accepted as ‘normal’ in the spectrum of regional crustal processes. UHT metamorphism is typically identified on the basis of diagnostic mineral assemblages such as sapphirine + quartz, orthopyroxene + sillimanite ± quartz and osumilite in Mg–Al-rich rock compositions, now usually coupled with pseudosection-based thermobarometry using internally-consistent thermodynamic data sets and/or Al-in-Orthopyroxene and ternary feldspar thermobarometry. Significant progress in the understanding of regional UHT metamorphism in recent years includes: (1 development of a ferric iron activity–composition thermodynamic model for sapphirine, allowing phase diagram calculations for oxidised rock compositions; (2 quantification of UHT conditions via trace element thermometry, with Zr-in-rutile more commonly recording higher temperatures than Ti-in-zircon. Rutile is likely to be stable at peak UHT conditions whereas zircon may only grow as UHT rocks are cooling. In addition, the extent to which Zr diffuses out of rutile is controlled by chemical communication with zircon; (3 more fully recognising and utilising temperature-dependent thermal properties of the crust, and the possible range of heat sources causing metamorphism in geodynamic modelling studies; (4 recognising that crust partially melted either in a previous event or earlier in a long-duration event has greater capacity than fertile, unmelted crust to achieve UHT conditions due to the heat energy consumed by partial melting reactions; (5 more strongly linking U–Pb geochronological data from zircon and monazite to P–T points or path segments through using Y + REE partitioning between accessory and major phases, as well as phase

  2. pso.ATION AND ANTIMICROBIAL SUSCEPTIBILITY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    isolates vere made using standard methods, Antibiotic susceptibility tests against commonly prescribed ... Acute otitis media is rapid with short .... sensitivity tests. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests: The antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of major Gram positive and negative bacterial isolates obtained from clinical specimens.

  3. Hypnotic susceptibility and dream characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamore, N; Barrett, D

    1989-11-01

    This study examined the relationship of hypnotic susceptibility to a variety of dream characteristics and types of dream content. A Dream Questionnaire was constructed synthesizing Gibson's dream inventory and Hilgard's theoretical conceptions of hypnosis. Employing the Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility and the Field Inventory for evaluating hypnotic response, several dream dimensions correlated significantly with hypnotizability. For subjects as a whole, the strongest correlates were the frequency of dreams which they believed to be precognitive and out-of-body dreams. Ability to dream on a chosen topic also correlated significantly with hypnotic susceptibility for both genders. For females only, there was a negative correlation of hypnotic susceptibility to flying dreams. Absorption correlated positively with dream recall, ability to dream on a chosen topic, reports of conflict resolution in dreams, creative ideas occurring in dreams, amount of color in dreams, pleasantness of dreams, bizarreness of dreams, flying dreams and precognitive dreams.

  4. Ancestral susceptibility to colorectal cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Huhn, S.; Pardini, Barbara; Naccarati, Alessio; Vodička, Pavel (ed.); Hemminki, K.; Försti, A.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 2 (2012), s. 197-204 ISSN 0267-8357 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/07/1430; GA ČR GAP304/10/1286 Grant - others:EU FP7(XE) HEALTH-F4-2007-200767 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : cancer susceptibility * molecular epidemiology * genetic susceptibility Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.500, year: 2012

  5. Hourly associations between heat and ambulance calls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yuming

    2017-01-01

    The response speed of ambulance calls is very crucial to rescue patients suffering immediately life threatening conditions. The serious health outcomes might be caused by exposing to extreme heat only several hours before. However, limited evidence is available on this topic. This study aims to examine the hourly association between heat and ambulance calls, to improve the ambulance services and to better protect health. Hourly data on ambulance calls for non-accidental causes, temperature and air pollutants (PM10, NO2, and O3) were collected from Brisbane, Australia, during 2001 and 2007. A time-stratified case-crossover design was used to examine the associations between hourly ambulance calls and temperature during warm season (Nov, Dec, Jan, Feb, and Mar), while adjusting for potential confounders. Stratified analyses were performed for sex and age groups. Ambulance calls peaked at 10am for all groups, except those aged 27 °C) increase the demands of ambulance. This information is helpful to increase the efficiency of ambulance service then save lives, for example, preparing more ambulance before appearance of extremely hot temperature in combination with weather forecast. Also, people should better arrange their time for outdoor activities to avoid exposing to extreme hot temperatures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Automated detection of Antarctic blue whale calls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socheleau, Francois-Xavier; Leroy, Emmanuelle; Pecci, Andres Carvallo; Samaran, Flore; Bonnel, Julien; Royer, Jean-Yves

    2015-11-01

    This paper addresses the problem of automated detection of Z-calls emitted by Antarctic blue whales (B. m. intermedia). The proposed solution is based on a subspace detector of sigmoidal-frequency signals with unknown time-varying amplitude. This detection strategy takes into account frequency variations of blue whale calls as well as the presence of other transient sounds that can interfere with Z-calls (such as airguns or other whale calls). The proposed method has been tested on more than 105 h of acoustic data containing about 2200 Z-calls (as found by an experienced human operator). This method is shown to have a correct-detection rate of up to more than 15% better than the extensible bioacoustic tool package, a spectrogram-based correlation detector commonly used to study blue whales. Because the proposed method relies on subspace detection, it does not suffer from some drawbacks of correlation-based detectors. In particular, it does not require the choice of an a priori fixed and subjective template. The analytic expression of the detection performance is also derived, which provides crucial information for higher level analyses such as animal density estimation from acoustic data. Finally, the detection threshold automatically adapts to the soundscape in order not to violate a user-specified false alarm rate.

  7. Study of the functional state of peripheral vessels in fingers of rheumatological patients by means of laser Doppler flowmetry and cutaneous thermometry measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zherebtsova, Angelina I.; Zherebtsov, Evgeny A.; Dunaev, Andrey V.; Podmasteryev, Konstantin V.; Pilipenko, Olga V.; Krupatkin, Alexander I.; Khakhicheva, Lyudmila S.; Muradyan, Vadim F.

    2016-04-01

    Vasospastic disorders are a common class of rheumatic disease. These include syndromes such as vegetative dystonia, Raynaud's syndrome, vibration disease and rheumatoid arthritis among others. The aim of this work is to develop an original method of diagnosing the functional state of peripheral vessels of the fingers, based on the simultaneous recording of LDF- and thermograms during the occlusion test, for determining vascular disorders of rheumatological patients. A diagnostic method was developed for assessing the functional state of the peripheral vessels of fingers, based on carrying out occlusion test in a thermally stabilized environment, with simultaneous recording of signals of laser Doppler flowmetry and skin thermometry. To verify the diagnostic value of the proposed method, a series of experiments were carried out on 41 rheumatological patients: 5 male and 36 females (average age 56.0+/-12.2 years). The most common diagnoses in the patient group were rheumatoid arthritis, arthrosis, gout and systemic lupus erythematosus. The laser analyser of blood microcirculation "LAKK-02" (SPE "LAZMA" Ltd, Russia) and a custom developed multi-channel thermometry device for low inertia thermometry were used for experimental measurements. The measurements of cutaneous temperature and the index of microcirculation were performed on the distal phalanx of the third finger of the right hand. Occlusion tests were performed with water baths at 25 and 42 °C and a tonometer cuff with a pressure of 200-220 mmHg for 3 min on the upper arm. The results of experimental studies are presented and interpreted. These data indicate a violation of the blood supply regulation in the form of a pronounced tendency towards microvascular vasoconstriction in the fingers. Thus, the response displaying a tendency toward angiospasm among patients in the rheumatological diseases profile group was observed mainly in the most severe cases (49 % of this group). The prospects of the developed

  8. A simple method for determining the coagulation threshold temperature of transparent tissue-mimicking thermal therapy gel phantoms: Validated by magnetic resonance imaging thermometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodin, N Patrik; Partanen, Ari; Asp, Patrik; Branch, Craig A; Guha, Chandan; Tomé, Wolfgang A

    2016-03-01

    Tissue-mimicking thermal therapy phantoms that coagulate at specific temperatures are valuable tools for developing and evaluating treatment strategies related to thermal therapy. Here, the authors propose a simple and efficient method for determining the coagulation threshold temperature of transparent thermal therapy gel phantoms. The authors used a previously published gel phantom recipe with 2% (w/v) of bovine serum albumin as the temperature-sensitive protein. Using the programmable heating settings of a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) machine, the authors heated 50 μl gel samples to various temperatures for 3 min and then imaged them using the BioRad Gel Doc system to determine the coagulation temperature using an opacity quantification method. The estimated coagulation temperatures were then validated for gel phantoms prepared with different pH levels using high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) heating and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) thermometry methods on a clinical MR-HIFU system. The PCR heating method produced consistent and reproducible coagulation of gel samples in precise correlation with the set incubation temperatures. The resulting coagulation threshold temperatures for gel phantoms of varying pH levels were found to be 44.1 ± 0.1, 53.4 ± 0.9, and 60.3 ± 0.9 °C for pH levels of 4.25, 4.50, and 4.75, respectively. This corresponded well with the coagulation threshold temperatures determined by MR-thermometry, with coagulation defined as a 95% decrease in T2 relaxation time, which were estimated at 53.6 ± 1.9 and 62.9 ± 2.4 °C for a pH of 4.50 and 4.75, respectively. The opacity quantification method provides a fast and reproducible estimate of the coagulation threshold temperature of transparent temperature-sensitive gel phantoms. The temperatures determined using this method were well within the range of temperatures estimated using MR-thermometry. Due to the specific heating capabilities of the PCR machine, and the robust

  9. Soft calls and broadcast calls in the corncrake as adaptations to short and long range communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ręk, Paweł

    2013-10-01

    Because birds' acoustic signals function in antagonistic interactions between males and in female attraction, a majority of vocalisations are loud. In contrast, some birds, additionally produce soft vocalisations in escalated agonistic and sexual contexts. Nevertheless, the relationship between the acoustic parameters of such signals and their function is not clear. Here I investigate the sound transmission degradation properties of soft and broadcast (loud) calls in the corncrake using calls with natural and changed amplitude. I show that, if played at the same amplitude, the maximum limit for communication distance with soft calls was significantly shorter than that of broadcast calls, indicating that frequency structure is important in determining the range of both signals independently of their amplitude. At the same time, the values of excess attenuation were lower for soft calls than for broadcast calls at most distances, which suggests that the short transmission of soft calls is achieved mostly due to their low and narrow frequency ranges, promoting their masking by ambient noise. Finally, contrary to soft calls, changes in the energy of tails of echoes in broadcast calls were associated with the distance of propagation, which might be useful in assessing the distance to senders. I suggest that the acoustic structure of soft vocalisations can be used to limit the range of the signal, which might be helpful in eavesdropping avoidance, whereas broadcast calls are designed for long-range transmission. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Echolocation calls and communication calls are controlled differentially in the brainstem of the bat Phyllostomus discolor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schuller Gerd

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Echolocating bats emit vocalizations that can be classified either as echolocation calls or communication calls. Neural control of both types of calls must govern the same pool of motoneurons responsible for vocalizations. Electrical microstimulation in the periaqueductal gray matter (PAG elicits both communication and echolocation calls, whereas stimulation of the paralemniscal area (PLA induces only echolocation calls. In both the PAG and the PLA, the current thresholds for triggering natural vocalizations do not habituate to stimuli and remain low even for long stimulation periods, indicating that these structures have relative direct access to the final common pathway for vocalization. This study intended to clarify whether echolocation calls and communication calls are controlled differentially below the level of the PAG via separate vocal pathways before converging on the motoneurons used in vocalization. Results Both structures were probed simultaneously in a single experimental approach. Two stimulation electrodes were chronically implanted within the PAG in order to elicit either echolocation or communication calls. Blockade of the ipsilateral PLA site with iontophoretically application of the glutamate antagonist kynurenic acid did not impede either echolocation or communication calls elicited from the PAG. However, blockade of the contralateral PLA suppresses PAG-elicited echolocation calls but not communication calls. In both cases the blockade was reversible. Conclusion The neural control of echolocation and communication calls seems to be differentially organized below the level of the PAG. The PLA is an essential functional unit for echolocation call control before the descending pathways share again the final common pathway for vocalization.

  11. In vivo noninvasive thermometry for hyperthermia applications using the MRI-based proton-resonance-frequency method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Poorter, J.; De Deene, Y.; Achten, E. [Ghent University (Belgium). Dept. of Magnetic Resonance; De Wagter, C. [Ghent Rijksuniversiteit (Belgium). Kliniek voor Radiotherapie en Kerngeneeskunde; Thomsen, C. [Hvidovre Univ. (Denmark); Staahlberg, F. [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Radiation Physics

    1995-12-01

    The lack of noninvasive temperature monitoring is seriously limiting hyperthermia treatment of deep-seated tumors. MRI methods exploit the temperature dependence of a physical property whose spatial distribution can be visualized. The Proton Resonance Frequency (PRF) as physical property was examined because phantom studies prove the high accuracy that can be obtained using this parameter. Thermal experiments were performed in human lower legs. The results show that in muscle tissue the three-dimensional temperature distribution can be evaluated with a mean spatial distribution of 2 millimetres, a temporal resolution of 2 minutes and an accuracy of about 1 degree Celsius. However, it is not possible to retrieve the temperature distribution in fat tissue using the PRF-method due to the predominance of susceptibility effects in fat. The susceptibility effects are a consequence of the temperature dependence of the susceptibility constants. Experimental data on these dependencies were obtained and the magnitude of these effects was modelled for some specific configurations. The susceptibility effects in muscle tissue can be neglected when precautions are made. The PRF method is an attractive tool to study time-varying temperature changes in muscle tissue.

  12. Thermal and pump power effect in SrMoO4:Er3+-Yb3+ phosphor for thermometry and optical heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soni, Abhishek Kumar; Rai, Vineet Kumar

    2017-01-01

    The pump power and temperature dependence study in the Er3+-Yb3+ codoped SrMoO4 phosphors for the green UC emission bands has been investigated by using two NIR (980 nm and 808 nm) laser radiation. The thermometric behaviour of the codoped phosphor operated in the 300-543 K gives maximum sensitivity ∼25.5 × 10-3 K-1 for 980 nm excitation whereas, for 808 nm excitation the maximum sensitivity is ∼21.5 × 10-3 K-1 over 300-465 K. The optical heating study upon two NIR laser radiations has also been performed. The experimental observations made in this article may be of significant interest for thermometry and optical heating.

  13. Call for Implementation Research Proposals: Health Information ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Chaitali Sinha

    2017-04-10

    Apr 10, 2017 ... Introduction. Canada's International Development Research Centre (IDRC) is pleased to announce a call for implementation research proposals to contribute to national and regional efforts to improve health systems responsiveness in West Africa (WA). Two separate but complementary thematic areas of ...

  14. Inhibitors of calling behavior of Plodia interpunctella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirashima, Akinori; Shigeta, Yoko; Eiraku, Tomohiko; Kuwano, Eiichi

    2003-01-01

    Some octopamine agonists were found to suppress the calling behavior of the stored product Indian meal moth, Plodia interpunctella. Compounds were screened using a calling behavior bioassay using female P. interpunctella. Four active derivatives, with inhibitory activity at the nanomolar range, were identified in order of decreasing activity: 2-(1-phenylethylamino)-2-oxazoline > 2-(2-ethyl,6-methylanilino)oxazolidine > 2-(2-methyl benzylamino)-2-thiazoline > 2-(2,6-diethylanilino)thiazolidine. Three-dimensional pharmacophore hypotheses were built from a set of 15 compounds. Among the ten common-featured models generated by the program Catalyst/HipHop, a hypothesis including a hydrogen-bond acceptor lipid, a hydrophobic aromatic and two hydrophobic aliphatic features was considered to be essential for inhibitory activity in the calling behavior. Active compounds mapped well onto all the hydrogen-bond acceptor lipid, hydrophobic aromatic and hydrophobic aliphatic features of the hypothesis. On the other hand, less active compounds were shown not to achieve the energetically favorable conformation that is found in the active molecules in order to fit the 3D common-feature pharmacophore models. The present studies demonstrate that inhibition of calling behavior is via an octopamine receptor.

  15. Inhibitors of calling behavior of Plodia interpunctella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinori Hirashima

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Some octopamine agonists were found to suppress the calling behavior of the stored product Indian meal moth, Plodia interpunctella. Compounds were screened using a calling behavior bioassay using female P. interpunctella. Four active derivatives, with inhibitory activity at the nanomolar range, were identified in order of decreasing activity: 2-(1-phenylethylamino-2-oxazoline > 2-(2-ethyl,6-methylanilinooxazolidine > 2-(2-methyl benzylamino-2-thiazoline > 2-(2,6-diethylanilinothiazolidine. Three-dimensional pharmacophore hypotheses were built from a set of 15 compounds. Among the ten common-featured models generated by the program Catalyst/HipHop, a hypothesis including a hydrogen-bond acceptor lipid, a hydrophobic aromatic and two hydrophobic aliphatic features was considered to be essential for inhibitory activity in the calling behavior. Active compounds mapped well onto all the hydrogen-bond acceptor lipid, hydrophobic aromatic and hydrophobic aliphatic features of the hypothesis. On the other hand, less active compounds were shown not to achieve the energetically favorable conformation that is found in the active molecules in order to fit the 3D common-feature pharmacophore models. The present studies demonstrate that inhibition of calling behavior is via an octopamine receptor.

  16. Make a 21st century phone call

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Want to avoid roaming charges? Click to call anyone at CERN? How about merging your CERN landline with your existing smartphone? That's all easily done with Lync, CERN's new opt-in service that can take your calls to the next level.   The Lync application on Windows (left) and iPhone (right). Lync unites CERN's traditional telephone service with the digital sphere. "Lync gives you the gift of mobility, by letting you access your CERN landline on the go," explains Pawel Grzywaczewski, service manager of the Lync system. "Once you've registered your CERN telephone with the service, you can run the Lync application and make calls from a range of supported devices. No matter where you are in the world - be it simply out to lunch or off at an international conference - you can make a CERN call as though you were in the office. All you need is an Internet connection!" Following a recent upgrade, CERN's Lync service now has...

  17. Optimization of Overflow Policies in Call Centers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koole, G.M.; Nielsen, B.F.; Nielsen, T.B.

    2015-01-01

    We examine how overflow policies in a multi-skill call center should be designed to accommodate performance measures that depend on waiting time percentiles such as service level. This is done using a discrete Markovian approximation of the waiting time of the first customers waiting in line...... and customers are treated in a FCFS order....

  18. Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL) Software: Evaluation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluating the nature and extent of the influence of Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL) on the quality of language learning is highly problematic. This is owing to the number and complexity of interacting variables involved in setting the items for teaching and learning languages. This paper identified and ...

  19. Reflections … they called it 'restructuring'[1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HMPG, and indeed publishing globally) was financial,[4] reflecting tough economic times and declining revenues from advertising. JA found herself accepting so-called 'native' advertising (the practice ... online, a change that has been welcomed by CPD participants) and with CME. Merged with SAMJ, the print CME carries ...

  20. Calling, is there anything special about it?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-07-15

    Jul 15, 2016 ... Christian frequently meant a break from family and a previous way of life. The decision to follow. Christ made the Christians outsiders to many facets of society, ..... reflected on these 'quantum changes in Christian ministry' and leadership. In a sense, this implies that the calling of a pastor has to be.

  1. Educational Use of Databases in CALL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudoin, Martin

    2004-01-01

    This article presents the idea that databases are very useful tools for teaching languages over the Internet. Databases in Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL) are commonly used in three ways: for reference sources such as dictionaries, in the management of large websites, and for data processing such as language tests and learners'…

  2. School-Turnaround Call Points Up Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gewertz, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. secretary of education's call to "turn around" the nation's 5,000 worst-performing schools has found a warm welcome among educators and policymakers who see that focus as long overdue. But it has also sparked debate about how--and whether--such an enormous leadership and management challenge can be accomplished. Secretary of…

  3. Don't Call it Poetry

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    denise

    The IPJP is a joint project of Rhodes University in South Africa and Edith Cowan University in Australia. This document is subject to copyright and may not be reproduced in whole or in part via any medium (print, electronic or otherwise) without the express permission of the publishers. Invited Paper. Don't Call it Poetry.

  4. The function of migratory bird calls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reichl, Thomas; Andersen, Bent Bach; Larsen, Ole Næsbye

    migration and to stimulate migratory restlessness in conspecifics. We wished to test if conspecific flight calls influence the flight direction of a nocturnal migrant, the European Robin (Erithacus rubecula), i.e. if flight calls help migrants keeping course. Wild caught birds showing migratory restlessness...... the experimental bird could be activated successively to simulate a migrating Robin cruising E-W, W-E, S-N or N-S at a chosen height (mostly about 40 m), at 10 m/s and emitting Robin flight calls of 80 dB(A) at 1 m. The simulated flight of a "ding" sound served as a control. During an experiment the bird was first...... allowed to settle and express migratory restlessness for at least 30 minutes. Secondly, the flight simulation axis (e.g. E-W or N-S) with the largest angle relative to the bird's migration course was chosen and "flights" of simulated calling conspecifics or the "ding" sound along this axis continued...

  5. A History of Commitment in CALL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamieson, Joan

    The evolution of computer-assisted language learning (CALL) is examined, focusing on what has changed and what has not changed much during that time. A variety of changes are noted: the development of multimedia capabilities, color, animation, and technical improvement of audio and video quality; availability of databases, better fit between…

  6. Web-Based CALL to Listening Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Mei; Zhang, Ruiming

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated effectiveness of Web-based CALL on listening comprehension. Both students' academic performance and attitudes were examined. T-tests were used to analyze the results of students' academic performance. Descriptive statistics interpreted students' attitudes toward this learning. Students' participation was also recorded.…

  7. Bridging CALL & HCI: Input from Participatory Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas-Claros, Monica S.; Gruba, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    Participatory design (PD), or the collaboration between software engineers and end users throughout the design process, may help improve CALL design practices. In this case study, four ESL learners, a software designer, and a language teacher created and evaluated a series of paper prototypes concerning help options in computer-based second…

  8. The TATL Framework for CALL Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni Chiaráin, Neasa; Ni Chasaide, Ailbhe

    2015-01-01

    The Theory Actions Technology Learner context (TATL) framework provides an initial analysis tool to guide Computer-Assisted Language Learning (CALL) development. It entails joint consideration of four key factors that need to be considered prior and during development activities: (1) the underlying pedagogical theory; (2) the learning tasks…

  9. Calling on Students without Fear and Loathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Terry

    1989-01-01

    One teacher adopted a language teacher's method of calling on students without causing embarrassment by moving quickly from one student to the next, not penalizing students who were unable to respond, praising freely, and using humor. The technique encourages participation and self-confidence. (MSE)

  10. Susceptibility Genes in Thyroid Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiyuki Ban

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD are complex diseases which are caused by an interaction between susceptibility genes and environmental triggers. Genetic susceptibility in combination with external factors (e.g. dietary iodine is believed to initiate the autoimmune response to thyroid antigens. Abundant epidemiological data, including family and twin studies, point to a strong genetic influence on the development of AITD. Various techniques have been employed to identify the genes contributing to the etiology of AITD, including candidate gene analysis and whole genome screening. These studies have enabled the identification of several loci (genetic regions that are linked with AITD, and in some of these loci, putative AITD susceptibility genes have been identified. Some of these genes/loci are unique to Graves' disease (GD and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT and some are common to both the diseases, indicating that there is a shared genetic susceptibility to GD and HT. The putative GD and HT susceptibility genes include both immune modifying genes (e.g. HLA, CTLA-4 and thyroid specific genes (e.g. TSHR, Tg. Most likely, these loci interact and their interactions may influence disease phenotype and severity.

  11. Long-distance calls in Neotropical primates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilmar A.G. Oliveira

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Long-distance calls are widespread among primates. Several studies concentrate on such calls in just one or in few species, while few studies have treated more general trends within the order. The common features that usually characterize these vocalizations are related to long-distance propagation of sounds. The proposed functions of primate long-distance calls can be divided into extragroup and intragroup ones. Extragroup functions relate to mate defense, mate attraction or resource defense, while intragroup functions involve group coordination or alarm. Among Neotropical primates, several species perform long-distance calls that seem more related to intragroup coordination, markedly in atelines. Callitrichids present long-distance calls that are employed both in intragroup coordination and intergroup contests or spacing. Examples of extragroup directed long-distance calls are the duets of titi monkeys and the roars and barks of howler monkeys. Considerable complexity and gradation exist in the long-distance call repertoires of some Neotropical primates, and female long-distance calls are probably more important in non-duetting species than usually thought. Future research must focus on larger trends in the evolution of primate long-distance calls, including the phylogeny of calling repertoires and the relationships between form and function in these signals.Chamados de longo alcance são comuns em primatas. Muitas pesquisas enfocaram tais vocalizações em uma única ou em poucas espécies, enquanto poucos estudos lidaram com padrões mais gerais dentro da ordem. As características comuns que geralmente distinguem estas vocalizações são relacionadas com a transmissão de sons a longa distância. As funções propostas para estas vocalizações podem ser divididas entre intragrupais e extragrupais. Funções extragrupais se relacionam com a defesa e atração de parceiros sexuais ou com a defesa de recursos, enquanto as fun

  12. Peer support telephone calls for improving health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Jeremy; Caramlau, Isabela O; Lindenmeyer, Antje; Williams, Susan M

    2008-10-08

    Peer support telephone calls have been used for a wide range of health-related concerns. However, little is known about their effects. To assess the effects of peer support telephone calls in terms of physical (e.g. blood pressure), psychological (e.g. depressive symptoms), and behavioural health outcomes (e.g. uptake of mammography) and other outcomes. We searched: The Cochrane Library databases (CENTRAL, DARE, CDSR) (issue 4 2007); MEDLINE (OVID) (January 1966 to December 2007); EMBASE (OVID) (January 1985 to December 2007); CINAHL (Athens) (January 1966 to December 2007), trials registers and reference lists of articles, with no language restrictions. Randomised controlled trials of peer support interventions delivered by telephone call. Two review authors independently extracted data. We present results narratively and in tabular format. Meta-analysis was not possible due to heterogeneity between studies. We included seven studies involving 2492 participants.Peer support telephone calls were associated with an increase in mammography screening, with 49% of women in the intervention group and 34% of women in the control group receiving a mammogram since the start of the intervention (P peer telephone support calls were found to maintain mammography screening uptake for baseline adherent women (P = 0.029).Peer support telephone calls for post myocardial infarction patients were associated at six months with a change in diet in the intervention and usual care groups of 54% and 44% respectively (P = 0.03). In another study for post myocardial infarction patients there were no significant differences between groups for self-efficacy, health status and mental health outcomes.Peer support telephone calls were associated with greater continuation of breastfeeding in mothers at 3 months post partum (P = 0.01).Peer support telephone calls were associated with reduced depressive symptoms in mothers with postnatal depression (Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS

  13. Calling behaviour under climate change: geographical and seasonal variation of calling temperatures in ectotherms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llusia, Diego; Márquez, Rafael; Beltrán, Juan F; Benítez, Maribel; do Amaral, José P

    2013-09-01

    Calling behaviour is strongly temperature-dependent and critical for sexual selection and reproduction in a variety of ectothermic taxa, including anuran amphibians, which are the most globally threatened vertebrates. However, few studies have explored how species respond to distinct thermal environments at time of displaying calling behaviour, and thus it is still unknown whether ongoing climate change might compromise the performance of calling activity in ectotherms. Here, we used new audio-trapping techniques (automated sound recording and detection systems) between 2006 and 2009 to examine annual calling temperatures of five temperate anurans and their patterns of geographical and seasonal variation at the thermal extremes of species ranges, providing insights into the thermal breadths of calling activity of species, and the mechanisms that enable ectotherms to adjust to changing thermal environments. All species showed wide thermal breadths during calling behaviour (above 15 °C) and increases in calling temperatures in extremely warm populations and seasons. Thereby, calling temperatures differed both geographically and seasonally, both in terrestrial and aquatic species, and were 8-22 °C below the specific upper critical thermal limits (CTmax ) and strongly associated with the potential temperatures of each thermal environment (operative temperatures during the potential period of breeding). This suggests that calling behaviour in ectotherms may take place at population-specific thermal ranges, diverging when species are subjected to distinct thermal environments, and might imply plasticity of thermal adjustment mechanisms (seasonal and developmental acclimation) that supply species with means of coping with climate change. Furthermore, the thermal thresholds of calling at the onset of the breeding season were dissimilar between conspecific populations, suggesting that other factors besides temperature are needed to trigger the onset of reproduction. Our

  14. Inherited susceptibility and radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Little, J.B. [Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States)

    1997-03-01

    There is continuing concern that some people in the general population may have genetic makeups that place them at particularly high risk for radiation-induced cancer. The existence of such a susceptible subpopulation would have obvious implications for the estimation of risks of radiation exposure. Although it has been long known that familial aggregations of cancer do sometimes occur, recent evidence suggests that a general genetic predisposition to cancer does not exist; most cancers occur sporadically. On the other hand, nearly 10% of the known Mendelian genetic disorders are associated with cancer. A number of these involve a familial predisposition to cancer, and some are characterized by an enhanced susceptibility to the induction of cancer by various physical and chemical carcinogens, including ionizing radiation. Such increased susceptibility will depend on several factors including the frequency of the susceptibility gene in the population and its penetrance, the strength of the predisposition, and the degree to which the cancer incidence in susceptible individuals may be increased by the carcinogen. It is now known that these cancer-predisposing genes may be responsible not only for rare familial cancer syndromes, but also for a proportion of the common cancers. Although the currently known disorders can account for only a small fraction of all cancers, they serve as models for genetic predisposition to carcinogen-induced cancer in the general population. In the present report, the author describes current knowledge of those specific disorders that are associated with an enhanced predisposition to radiation-induced cancer, and discusses how this knowledge may bear on the susceptibility to radiation-induced cancer in the general population and estimates of the risk of radiation exposure.

  15. pitting corrosion susceptibility pitting corrosion susceptibility of aisi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    Abstract. The susceptibility of austenitic (AISI 301) stainless steel to pitting corrosion was evaluated in sodium chloride. (NaCl) solutions ... AISI 301 steel suffers from pitting corrosion in all the investigated solutions. AISI 301 steel suffers from ..... [1] Ijeomah, M.N.C. Elements of Corrosion and Protection. Theory, Auto Century ...

  16. Magnetic Susceptability Measurements in Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jason; Mallory, Kendall; Seim, Ryan

    2000-04-01

    A new undergraduate research facility in magnetic susceptability measurements on superconductors is being developed at the University of Northern Colorado. Initial data measurements of the magnetic susceptability of various superconductors will be presented. These measurements were obtained with a liquid helium/nitrogen dewar that was reassembled for use in this project. The cryostat consists of two separate dewars, the first of which contains liquid nitrogen, the second, liquid helium. The liquid nitrogen dewar is used to keep the helium bath from evaporating off too quickly. Data on the evaporation rates of the two liquids will also be presented.

  17. 47 CFR 22.921 - 911 call processing procedures; 911-only calling mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... calling mode. 22.921 Section 22.921 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON... procedures; 911-only calling mode. Mobile telephones manufactured after February 13, 2000 that are capable of operating in the analog mode described in the standard document ANSI TIA/EIA-553-A-1999 Mobile Station—Base...

  18. Cryptobia salmositica: susceptibility of infected rainbow trout, Salmo gairdneri, to environmental hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, P T; Wehnert, S D

    1986-06-01

    Using the sealed jar technique (also called residual oxygen bioassay), rainbow trout fry infected with Cryptobia salmositica were more susceptible than non-infected fish to environmental hypoxia. The Winkler technique (azide modification) was used to determine the residual dissolved oxygen in the water. Susceptibility of infected fish increased with 1) time after infection and was most evident in 3-7 wk infections, 2) the severity of anemia, and 3) increasing parasitemia. In prolonged infections, susceptibility was reduced when there were decreases in anemia and parasitemia; however, these infected fish were still more susceptible than non-infected fish. The increase in susceptibility of infected fish to hypoxia may be an important contributing factor to mortality of fish in hatcheries where there is inadequate water flow and overcrowding. The sealed jar technique is recommended in future studies on the pathogenesis of parasitic fish diseases, especially if the metabolic and/or respiratory systems are affected by the infection.

  19. BUSINESS MODELS FOR EXTENDING OF 112 EMERGENCY CALL CENTER CAPABILITIES WITH E-CALL FUNCTION INSERTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pop Dragos Paul

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The present article concerns present status of implementation in Romania and Europe of eCall service and the proposed business models regarding eCall function implementation in Romania. eCall system is used for reliable transmission in case of crush between In Vehicle System and Public Service Answering Point, via the voice channel of cellular and Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN. eCall service could be initiated automatically or manual the driver. All data presented in this article are part of researches made by authors in the Sectorial Contract Implementation study regarding eCall system, having as partners ITS Romania and Electronic Solution, with the Romanian Ministry of Communication and Information Technology as beneficiary.

  20. What is that Thing Called Computer Science?

    OpenAIRE

    Nadya Schokosva; Irina Buskova

    2013-01-01

    XXI century society, called Knowledge Society, has a direct dependency of the software products, considered by many as the most important development of modern technology. This dependence generates the need of scientists and professionals who research and develop products that meet social demands. This article describes the computer science area as one of the most demanded professions in this reality, and in order to make it known to more people.

  1. What is that Thing Called Computer Science?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadya Schokosva

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available XXI century society, called Knowledge Society, has a direct dependency of the software products, considered by many as the most important development of modern technology. This dependence generates the need of scientists and professionals who research and develop products that meet social demands. This article describes the computer science area as one of the most demanded professions in this reality, and in order to make it known to more people.

  2. Sleep Inertia and On-Call Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-03-01

    effects of polyphasic & M.J. Colligan (Eds.), New York, and ultrashort sleep schedules. In: Why Spectrum, pp. 553-580. we nap, Evolution, Chronobiology...and Naitoh, P., Kelly, T., & Babkoff, H. (1993) Functions of Polyphasic and Ultrashort Sleep inertia, best time not to wake up? Sleep , C. Stampi Editor...UNCLASSIFIED Defense Technical Information Center Compilation Part Notice ADP010467 TITLE: Sleep Inertia and On-Call Readiness DISTRIBUTION: Approved

  3. Sophie Calle: entre imagens e palavras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annateresa Fabris

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A relação de Sophie Calle com dois textos ficcionais, de autoria de Hervé Guibert e Paul Auster, permite discutir um ponto central de sua poética: a atuação como performer, colocada por alguns críticos sob o signo do situacionismo. Como suas performances envolvem uma narrativa, foram analisados seus aspectos fotográficos e verbais, tendo como epicentro Suíte veneziana (1980. Qual o papel da fotografia nas narrativas de Calle, nas quais ela é personagem de si mesma? A fotografia é vestígio de acontecimentos reais e seu aspecto documental corrobora a neutralidade dos relatos escritos. É, ao mesmo tempo, fruto de um gesto performático, o qual, ao designar determinados fatos, converte a realidade em imagem.Sophie Calle's relation to two fictional texts, by Hervé Guibert and Paul Auster, allows us to discuss a central issue in her poetics: the acting as a performer, set by some critics under the sign of Situationism. As her performances comprise a narrative, both their verbal and photographic aspects were analyzed, taking as an epicenter the Venetian suite (1980. What role does photography play in Calle's narratives, in which she is a character of herself? Photography is a trace of real happenings and its documental aspect supports the neutrality of written reports. It is, at the same time, the result of a performative gesture, which, while designating certain facts, converts reality into image.

  4. Managing Capacity at Sparsh Call Centre

    OpenAIRE

    T. T. Niranjan; Samir K. Srivastava

    2008-01-01

    Bangalore based Sparsh Call Centre was set up as a subsidiary of the major telecom software company IP-Trinity, with ambitious plans of becoming a significant player in the booming BPO (business process outsourcing) space. Its strategy, in line with that of its parent group, was to focus on telecom related services. Sparsh began its operations in 2002 with its first client Alfa, a US based VOIP telephone service provider and had three other accounts and employed over 400 people. Financial per...

  5. [Work-family conflict in call center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghislieri, Chiara; Ricotta, Simona; Colombo, Lara

    2012-01-01

    The working environment of call centers, which have seen a significant growth in recent years, has been the subject of several studies aiming at understanding its specific dynamics, with particular attention to the possible causes of stress and discomfort. Despite the fact that the work-family conflict is considered a source of stress responsible for undermining workers' well-being, and as such has been explored in many work environments, there is still very little research specific to call centers. This study had the following aims: to explore work-family conflict perceived by call-center operators taking account of any differences related to respondents'professional and personal characteristics; to understand which demands and resources can have an impact on work-family conflict in this context. The study was carried out on a sample of 898 call center operators in a telecommunications company through the administration of a self-reporting questionnaire. Data analysis included: t-test, one-way analysis of variance, linear correlations and multiple regressions. A higher perception of work-family conflict among workers having a full-time contract was observed compared to those having part-time contracts. Multiple regression analysis identified as sources of influence on work-family conflict: emotional dissonance, uneasiness due customer dissatisfaction, workload, avoidance coping and working hours. Work-family conflict in the context studied is not particularly critical: it is in part influenced by professional and personal characteristics of respondents and primarily caused by work demands. Managerial implications are discussed, especially referred to training activities.

  6. Evaluating erroneous offside calls in soccer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Hüttermann

    Full Text Available The ability to simultaneously attend to multiple objects declines with increases in the visual angle separating distant objects. We explored whether these laboratory-measured limits on visual attentional spread generalize to a real life context: offside calls by soccer assistant referees. We coded all offside calls from a full year of first division German soccer matches. By determining the x-y coordinates of the relevant players and assistant referee on the soccer field we were able to calculate how far assistant referees had to spread their visual attention to perform well. Counterintuitively, assistant referees made fewer errors when they were farther away from the action due to an advantageous (smaller visual angle on the game action. The pattern held even when we accounted for individual differences in a laboratory-based attentional spread measure of ten of the assistant referees. Our finding that errors are linked to smaller visual angles may explain the complaints of fans in some situations: Those seated directly behind the assistant referee, further from the players, might actually have it easier to make the right call because the relevant players would form a smaller visual angle.

  7. “Computer Assisted Language Learning” (CALL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazlı Gündüz

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available This article will provide an overview of computers; an overview of the history of CALL, itspros and cons, the internet, World Wide Web, Multimedia, and research related to the uses of computers in the language classroom. Also, it also aims to provide some background for the beginnerson using the Internet in language classes today. It discusses some of the common types of Internetactivities that are being used today, what the minimum requirements are for using the Internet forlanguage learning, and some easy activities you can adapt for your classes. Some special terminology related to computers will also be used in this paper. For example, computer assisted language learning(CALL refers to the sets of instructions which need to be loaded into the computer for it to be able to work in the language classroom. It should be borne in mind that CALL does not refer to the use of acomputer by a teacher to type out a worksheet or a class list or preparing his/her own teaching alone.Hardware refers to any computer equipment used, including the computer itself, the keyboard, screen (or the monitor, the disc-drive, and the printer. Software (computer programs refers to the sets of instructions which need to be loaded into the computer for it to be able to work.

  8. Evaluating erroneous offside calls in soccer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüttermann, Stefanie; Noël, Benjamin; Memmert, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    The ability to simultaneously attend to multiple objects declines with increases in the visual angle separating distant objects. We explored whether these laboratory-measured limits on visual attentional spread generalize to a real life context: offside calls by soccer assistant referees. We coded all offside calls from a full year of first division German soccer matches. By determining the x-y coordinates of the relevant players and assistant referee on the soccer field we were able to calculate how far assistant referees had to spread their visual attention to perform well. Counterintuitively, assistant referees made fewer errors when they were farther away from the action due to an advantageous (smaller) visual angle on the game action. The pattern held even when we accounted for individual differences in a laboratory-based attentional spread measure of ten of the assistant referees. Our finding that errors are linked to smaller visual angles may explain the complaints of fans in some situations: Those seated directly behind the assistant referee, further from the players, might actually have it easier to make the right call because the relevant players would form a smaller visual angle.

  9. Research study on call centres in Malta & Gozo

    OpenAIRE

    Gatt & Partners;

    2008-01-01

    This study focuses on the Call Centre sector in Malta. A Call Centre is a centralized office used for the purpose of receiving and transmitting a large volume of requests, mainly by telephone. Types of calls are often divided into Outbound & Inbound. Inbound calls are calls that are initiated by the customer to obtain information, report a malfunction or ask for help. This is substantially different from outbound calls where the agent initiates the call to a customer mostly wit...

  10. Topological susceptibility from the overlap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Del Debbio, Luigi; Pica, Claudio

    2003-01-01

    The chiral symmetry at finite lattice spacing of Ginsparg-Wilson fermionic actions constrains the renormalization of the lattice operators; in particular, the topological susceptibility does not require any renormalization, when using a fermionic estimator to define the topological charge. Theref...

  11. Sharing programming resources between Bio* projects through remote procedure call and native call stack strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prins, Pjotr; Goto, Naohisa; Yates, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    , and languages sharing the Java Virtual Machine stack. This functionality provides strategies for sharing of software between Bio* projects, which can be exploited more often. Here, we present cross-language examples for sequence translation, and measure throughput of the different options. We compare calling...... into R through native R, RSOAP, Rserve, and RPy interfaces, with the performance of native BioPerl, Biopython, BioJava, and BioRuby implementations, and with call stack bindings to BioJava and the European Molecular Biology Open Software Suite. In general, call stack approaches outperform native Bio...

  12. Calling patterns in human communication dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhi-Qiang; Xie, Wen-Jie; Li, Ming-Xia; Podobnik, Boris; Zhou, Wei-Xing; Stanley, H Eugene

    2013-01-29

    Modern technologies not only provide a variety of communication modes (e.g., texting, cell phone conversation, and online instant messaging), but also detailed electronic traces of these communications between individuals. These electronic traces indicate that the interactions occur in temporal bursts. Here, we study intercall duration of communications of the 100,000 most active cell phone users of a Chinese mobile phone operator. We confirm that the intercall durations follow a power-law distribution with an exponential cutoff at the population level but find differences when focusing on individual users. We apply statistical tests at the individual level and find that the intercall durations follow a power-law distribution for only 3,460 individuals (3.46%). The intercall durations for the majority (73.34%) follow a Weibull distribution. We quantify individual users using three measures: out-degree, percentage of outgoing calls, and communication diversity. We find that the cell phone users with a power-law duration distribution fall into three anomalous clusters: robot-based callers, telecom fraud, and telephone sales. This information is of interest to both academics and practitioners, mobile telecom operators in particular. In contrast, the individual users with a Weibull duration distribution form the fourth cluster of ordinary cell phone users. We also discover more information about the calling patterns of these four clusters (e.g., the probability that a user will call the c(r)-th most contact and the probability distribution of burst sizes). Our findings may enable a more detailed analysis of the huge body of data contained in the logs of massive users.

  13. First Class Call Stacks: Exploring Head Reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Johnson-Freyd

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Weak-head normalization is inconsistent with functional extensionality in the call-by-name λ-calculus. We explore this problem from a new angle via the conflict between extensionality and effects. Leveraging ideas from work on the λ-calculus with control, we derive and justify alternative operational semantics and a sequence of abstract machines for performing head reduction. Head reduction avoids the problems with weak-head reduction and extensionality, while our operational semantics and associated abstract machines show us how to retain weak-head reduction's ease of implementation.

  14. Effects of noise levels and call types on the source levels of killer whale calls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Marla M; Noren, Dawn P; Emmons, Candice K

    2011-11-01

    Accurate parameter estimates relevant to the vocal behavior of marine mammals are needed to assess potential effects of anthropogenic sound exposure including how masking noise reduces the active space of sounds used for communication. Information about how these animals modify their vocal behavior in response to noise exposure is also needed for such assessment. Prior studies have reported variations in the source levels of killer whale sounds, and a more recent study reported that killer whales compensate for vessel masking noise by increasing their call amplitude. The objectives of the current study were to investigate the source levels of a variety of call types in southern resident killer whales while also considering background noise level as a likely factor related to call source level variability. The source levels of 763 discrete calls along with corresponding background noise were measured over three summer field seasons in the waters surrounding the San Juan Islands, WA. Both noise level and call type were significant factors on call source levels (1-40 kHz band, range of 135.0-175.7 dB(rms) re 1 [micro sign]Pa at 1 m). These factors should be considered in models that predict how anthropogenic masking noise reduces vocal communication space in marine mammals.

  15. Probabilistic base calling of Solexa sequencing data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iseli Christian

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Solexa/Illumina short-read ultra-high throughput DNA sequencing technology produces millions of short tags (up to 36 bases by parallel sequencing-by-synthesis of DNA colonies. The processing and statistical analysis of such high-throughput data poses new challenges; currently a fair proportion of the tags are routinely discarded due to an inability to match them to a reference sequence, thereby reducing the effective throughput of the technology. Results We propose a novel base calling algorithm using model-based clustering and probability theory to identify ambiguous bases and code them with IUPAC symbols. We also select optimal sub-tags using a score based on information content to remove uncertain bases towards the ends of the reads. Conclusion We show that the method improves genome coverage and number of usable tags as compared with Solexa's data processing pipeline by an average of 15%. An R package is provided which allows fast and accurate base calling of Solexa's fluorescence intensity files and the production of informative diagnostic plots.

  16. Reducing Susceptibility to Courtesy Stigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachleda, Catherine L; El Menzhi, Leila

    2017-04-19

    In light of the chronic shortage of health professionals willing to care for HIV/AIDS patients, and rising epidemics in many Muslim countries, this qualitative study examined susceptibility and resistance to courtesy stigma as experienced by nurses, doctors, and social workers in Morocco. Forty-nine in-depth interviews provided rich insights into the process of courtesy stigma and how it is managed, within the context of interactions with Islam, interactions within the workplace (patients, other health professionals), and interactions outside the workplace (the general public, friends, and family). Theoretically, the findings extend understanding of courtesy stigma and the dirty work literature. The findings also offer practical suggestions for the development of culturally appropriate strategies to reduce susceptibility to courtesy stigmatization. This study represents the first to explore courtesy stigma as a process experienced by health professionals providing HIV/AIDS care in an Islamic country.

  17. Antimycotics susceptibility testing of dermatophytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arsić-Arsenijević Valentina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Dermatophytes are moulds that produce infections of the skin, hair and nails of humans and animals. The most common forms among these infections are onychomycosis and tinea pedis affecting 20% of world population. These infections are usually chronic. The treatment of dermatophytoses tends to be prolonged partly because available treatments are not very effective. Antifungal drug consumption and public health expenditure are high worldwide, as well as in Serbia. For adequate therapy, it is necessary to prove infection by isolation of dermatophytes and to test the antifungal susceptibility of isolates. Susceptibility testing is important for the resistance monitoring, epidemiological research and to compare in vitro activities of new antifungal agents. The diffusion and dilution methods of susceptibility tests are used, and technical issues of importance for the proper performance and interpretation of test results are published in the document E.DEF 9.1 (EUCAST and M38-A2 (CLSI. The aim of our paper is to promptly inform the public about technical achievements in this area, as well as the new organization of laboratory for medical mycology in our country. The formation of laboratory networks coordinated by the National Reference Laboratory for the cause of mycosis need to enable interlaboratory studies and further standardization of methods for antifungal susceptibility testing of dermatophytes, reproducibility of tests and clinical correlation monitoring (MIK values and clinical outcome of dermatophytosis. The importance of the new organization is expected efficient improvement in the dermatophytosis therapy at home, better quality of patient's life and the reduction of the cost of treatment.

  18. Antibiotic susceptibility of Atopobium vaginae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verschraegen Gerda

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have indicated that a recently described anaerobic bacterium, Atopobium vaginae is associated with bacterial vaginosis (BV. Thus far the four isolates of this fastidious micro-organism were found to be highly resistant to metronidazole and susceptible for clindamycin, two antibiotics preferred for the treatment of BV. Methods Nine strains of Atopobium vaginae, four strains of Gardnerella vaginalis, two strains of Lactobacillus iners and one strain each of Bifidobacterium breve, B. longum, L. crispatus, L. gasseri and L. jensenii were tested against 15 antimicrobial agents using the Etest. Results All nine strains of A. vaginae were highly resistant to nalidixic acid and colistin while being inhibited by low concentrations of clindamycin (range: G. vaginalis strains were also susceptible for clindamycin ( 256 μg/ml but susceptible to clindamycin (0.023 – 0.125 μg/ml. Conclusion Clindamycin has higher activity against G. vaginalis and A. vaginae than metronidazole, but not all A. vaginae isolates are metronidazole resistant, as seemed to be a straightforward conclusion from previous studies on a more limited number of strains.

  19. Susceptibility of Freesia to hydrogen fluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolting, H.G.

    1973-01-01

    Freesia's are very sensitive to hydrogen-fluoride. If they are exposed for a long period to concentrations between 0.5 and 0.9 part per billion several cultivars may show a severe damage. Differences in susceptibility between the varieties appear to exist. Some varieties that were heavily injured by HF had almost no flowers and a much lower yield of corns. After fumigation during a long period with very low concentrations of HF, besides the damage characteristic for HF (necrotic leaf tips and margins) there appeared oblong brown spots and stripes between the veins, which mimic the symptoms caused by the third freesia virus, also called bladnecrose. Some of the cultivars show this effect rather generally, in others it occurs only in a few plants. It could be demonstrated with the cultivars Rose Marie and Royal Blue that the sensitivity for HF increases by the presence of bladnecrose. This points to a synergistic action of hydrogen fluoride and the bladnecrose virus.

  20. Learner Attitudes towards CALL Applications at YADIM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuhal OKAN & Pınar TORUN

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of educational technology to assist learners in their language studies has become agreat concern for scholars over the past decade. YADIM (School for Foreign Languages at ÇukurovaUniversity in Turkey has invested substantially to introduce students to computer-based languagelearning materials and to integrate technology into existing curriculum. This paper reports on attitudesof YADİM students towards the use of computer-assisted language learning (CALL and theirperceptions on CALL’s relevancy to their regular classroom work. Surveys and follow-up interviewsexplored how learners see the role of the instructor and the accessibility of the labs. The paper alsolooks at how students assess the impact of technology on their language learning process.

  1. Comprometimento organizacional de trabalhadores de call center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kely César Martins Paiva

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available RESUMOO Neste artigo, analisa-se como se apresenta o comprometimento organizacional de trabalhadores de um call center, localizado em Belo (A Horizonte (Minas Gerais, Brasil. Após o delineamento conceitual UJ do tema central, são expostos os resultados de um estudo de caso descritivo, realizado com abordagens quantitativa e qualitativa. Os dados de 399 questionários e 22 entrevistas são, respectivamente, tratados estatisticamente e submetidos à análise de conteúdo. A base de comprometimento que predominou entre esses infoproletários foi "obrigação pelo desempenho" e, em menor grau, "afetiva". Foi observado que quanto maior é o seu tempo de experiência nesse tipo de organização, menores são os níveis de comprometimento de modo geral, fatos esclarecidos, parcialmente, por meio das entrevistas.

  2. [The so-called "fox tapeworm"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, J; Ammann, R

    1990-01-01

    The so-called "fox tapeworm" (Echinococcus multilocularis), the causative agent of a severe disease in man (alveolar echinococcosis), is presently under public discussion in Switzerland. Therefore, actual information is provided on the life cycle of the parasite, epidemiology, disease in humans, symptomatology, diagnosis, therapy and prophylaxis. It is recommended that in endemic regions hunters handling foxes should wear protective gloves, dead foxes should be transported in plastic bags and wild fruits, berries and vegetables should be carefully washed and--if possible--heated to more than 70 degrees C for some minutes prior to consumption. After contact with foxes or other final hosts (dogs, cats) infected with E. multilocularis, persons should be monitored with the highly sensitive and specific Em2-ELISA for serum antibodies aiming at an early diagnosis and treatment of a potential infection.

  3. Measurements of temperature dependence of 'localized susceptibility'

    CERN Document Server

    Shiozawa, H; Ishii, H; Takayama, Y; Obu, K; Muro, T; Saitoh, Y; Matsuda, T D; Sugawara, H; Sato, H

    2003-01-01

    The magnetic susceptibility of some rare-earth compounds is estimated by measuring magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) of rare-earth 3d-4f absorption spectra. The temperature dependence of the magnetic susceptibility obtained by the MCD measurement is remarkably different from the bulk susceptibility in most samples, which is attributed to the strong site selectivity of the core MCD measurement.

  4. Variation at the serotonin transporter gene influences susceptibility to bipolar affective puerperal psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, N; Jones, I; Robertson, E; Lendon, C; Craddock, N

    2000-10-28

    Up to half of parous females with bipolar disorder (manic depression) develop an episode of severe psychiatric disturbance, usually called puerperal psychosis, within a few days of giving birth. We report significant evidence (p<0.003) that variation at the serotonin transporter gene exerts a substantial (odds ratio=4) and important (population attributable fraction=69%) influence on susceptibility to such episodes.

  5. Staffing to Maximize Profit for Call Centers with Impatient and Repeat-Calling Customers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Gong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Motivated by call center practice, we study the optimal staffing of many-server queues with impatient and repeat-calling customers. A call center is modeled as an M/M/s+M queue, which is developed to a behavioral queuing model in which customers come and go based on their satisfaction with waiting time. We explicitly take into account customer repeat behavior, which implies that satisfied customers might return and have an impact on the arrival rate. Optimality is defined as the number of agents that maximize revenues net of staffing costs, and we account for the characteristic that revenues are a direct function of staffing. Finally, we use numerical experiments to make certain comparisons with traditional models that do not consider customer repeat behavior. Furthermore, we indicate how managers might allocate staffing optimally with various customer behavior mechanisms.

  6. Sharing programming resources between Bio* projects through remote procedure call and native call stack strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prins, Pjotr; Goto, Naohisa; Yates, Andrew; Gautier, Laurent; Willis, Scooter; Fields, Christopher; Katayama, Toshiaki

    2012-01-01

    Open-source software (OSS) encourages computer programmers to reuse software components written by others. In evolutionary bioinformatics, OSS comes in a broad range of programming languages, including C/C++, Perl, Python, Ruby, Java, and R. To avoid writing the same functionality multiple times for different languages, it is possible to share components by bridging computer languages and Bio* projects, such as BioPerl, Biopython, BioRuby, BioJava, and R/Bioconductor. In this chapter, we compare the two principal approaches for sharing software between different programming languages: either by remote procedure call (RPC) or by sharing a local call stack. RPC provides a language-independent protocol over a network interface; examples are RSOAP and Rserve. The local call stack provides a between-language mapping not over the network interface, but directly in computer memory; examples are R bindings, RPy, and languages sharing the Java Virtual Machine stack. This functionality provides strategies for sharing of software between Bio* projects, which can be exploited more often. Here, we present cross-language examples for sequence translation, and measure throughput of the different options. We compare calling into R through native R, RSOAP, Rserve, and RPy interfaces, with the performance of native BioPerl, Biopython, BioJava, and BioRuby implementations, and with call stack bindings to BioJava and the European Molecular Biology Open Software Suite. In general, call stack approaches outperform native Bio* implementations and these, in turn, outperform RPC-based approaches. To test and compare strategies, we provide a downloadable BioNode image with all examples, tools, and libraries included. The BioNode image can be run on VirtualBox-supported operating systems, including Windows, OSX, and Linux.

  7. Preliminary comparison of calls of the hybridizing fur seals ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Five call types were compared: barking, guttural challenges and territorial calls emitted by adult males; the pup attraction call used by adult females and the response: ... Since many of the differences in male calls are audible to the human ear, female seals can presumably also hear these differences and we suggest that ...

  8. Linking Calling Orientations to Organizational Attachment via Organizational Instrumentality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardador, M. Teresa; Dane, Erik; Pratt, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    Despite an emerging interest in callings, researchers know little about whether calling orientations matter in the workplace. We explore the under-examined relationship between a calling orientation and employees' attachment to their organizations. Although some theory suggests that callings may be negatively related to organizational attachment,…

  9. High Temperature Fixed-Point Blackbodies Based on Metal-Carbon Eutectics for Precision Measurements in Radiometry, Photometry and Radiation Thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapritsky, V. I.; Khlevnoy, B. B.; Khromchenko, V. B.; Ogarev, S. A.; Samoylov, M. L.; Pikalev, Yu. A.

    2003-09-01

    Re-C, TiC-C and ZrC-C metal-carbon eutectics cells were developed and investigated at VNIIOFI (Russia) for use as high-temperature fixed-point blackbodies for precise measurements in radiometry, photometry and radiation thermometry. Two types of cells containing cavities with 4 mm and 10 mm diameters were designed that allow using them in radiance and irradiance modes, respectively. The melting temperatures of Re-C, TiC-C and ZrC-C were found to be 2747.5 K, 3033.8 and 3154.1 K respectively. The reproducibility of the Re-C fixed points was found to be 0.04 to 0.09 K, depending on the cell. The reproducibility of TiC-C and ZrC-C melting temperatures was 0.05 K and 0.09 K respectively. The pyrolitic-graphite blackbody BB3200pg was used as a furnace for heating eutectics. The new TiC-C and ZrC-C fixed-point cells with 16 mm cavity diameter and a new furnace BB3500MP are under development now.

  10. Radio-frequency tunnel-junction shot noise thermometry and its application to the study of thermal properties at low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung Hwan; Ha, Dong-Gwang; Song, Woon; Chong, Yonuk

    2013-03-01

    We developed a radio-frequency broadband measurement setup for shot noise thermometry in the temperature range from 0.1 K to 300 K. The noise power from a metallic tunnel junction was measured at 1 GHz with a bandwidth of 400 MHz. Very small noise signal from the tunnel junction was amplified by a cryogenic HEMT amplifier. The signal was then amplified by a room temperature amplifiers followed by a diode detector that converts the noise power into voltage output. Broadband measurement technique enables a fast measurement of RF signal. The shot noise thermometer directly measures the electron temperature and our measurement uncertainty is less than 3% in the sub-Kelvin range. Because of the small size of the tunnel junction, local measurement of the temperature on a device is possible. Since we measure the electron temperature directly, we can apply this technique to the study of thermal properties at low temperature.We suggest a method of measuring electron temperature before and after a thermal process in a chip at low temperature, which will help understanding of the thermal properties of electron-phonon system at low temperature.

  11. Multi-gradient echo MR thermometry for monitoring of the near-field area during MR-guided high intensity focused ultrasound heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Mie K; de Greef, Martijn; Bouwman, Job G; Moonen, Chrit T W; Viergever, Max A; Bartels, Lambertus W

    2015-10-07

    The multi-gradient echo MR thermometry (MGE MRT) method is proposed to use at the interface of the muscle and fat layers found in the abdominal wall, to monitor MR-HIFU heating. As MGE MRT uses fat as a reference, it is field-drift corrected. Relative temperature maps were reconstructed by subtracting absolute temperature maps. Because the absolute temperature maps are reconstructed of individual scans, MGE MRT provides the flexibility of interleaved mapping of temperature changes between two arbitrary time points. The method's performance was assessed in an ex vivo water bath experiment. An ex vivo HIFU experiment was performed to show the method's ability to monitor heating of consecutive HIFU sonications and to estimate cooling time constants, in the presence of field drift. The interleaved use between scans of a clinical protocol was demonstrated in vivo in a patient during a clinical uterine fibroid treatment. The relative temperature measurements were accurate (mean absolute error 0.3 °C) and provided excellent visualization of the heating of consecutive HIFU sonications. Maps were reconstructed of estimated cooling time constants and mean ROI values could be well explained by the applied heating pattern. Heating upon HIFU sonication and subsequent cooling could be observed in the in vivo demonstration.

  12. REMINDER: In a medical emergency call 74444

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    What happened? A CERN colleague, complaining of pains that might indicate serious heart problem, went to the ?infirmary' on the Prévessin site for medical aid. He was unaware that the ?infirmary' was in fact no such thing, but the office of the French contractors' medical practitioner, and, on top of that, it was closed. He therefore took his own car and went to the CERN Fire Station on the Meyrin Site (Building 65). The firemen and the CERN medical team took care of him and requested helicopter transport to the Geneva cantonal hospital, where he responded well to medical treatment. What do we learn from this event? You must call the CERN internal number 74444 in the event of serious and acute illness, and do not have to present yourself in person or get somebody to go with you. This number is not reserved exclusively for accident, pollution, fire etc. The Firemen can prodice professional assistance at all times as required: first aid on the spot, amulance transport and medical assistance as necessary. ...

  13. DOCSS: doctors on-call smartphone study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, M K; Nason, G J; Liddy, S; Fitzgerald, C W; Kelly, M E; Shields, C

    2014-12-01

    Smartphones have revolutionised our demands for constant access to information. The usage of smartphones in the clinical setting is becoming widespread. The aim of our study was to assess smartphone ownership and usage across a cohort of interns. A voluntary novel questionnaire was distributed to interns in two university hospitals. Details regarding smartphone ownership and usage were assessed. Likert scales were utilised for analysis. Sixty-one (74.4 %) interns responded to the survey. Sixty (98.4 %) owned a smartphone with iPhone(®) being the most popular (76.7 %). Fifty-five (91.6 %) interns have downloaded medical applications ('apps'), while 29 (52.3 %) reported paying for them. Regarding smartphone use on-call, 30 (50 %) interns agreed it aids diagnoses, 26 (43 %) agree it helped in interpreting laboratory values, 31 (51.7 %) agreed it helped in dosing of medication and 33 (55 %) agreed it was of assistance in medical emergency protocols. Forty-two (70 %), 42 (70 %) and 46 (76.7 %) interns agreed or strongly agreed smartphones have a positive influence on them in terms of levels of stress, confidence and level of knowledge, respectively. Smartphone usage is widespread among our intern cohort. The introduction of hospital applications with local guidelines would be welcomed; however, this may require informed patient consent regarding their use.

  14. From Systematic Review to Call for Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawin, Erika Metzler; Sobel, Linda L; Annan, Sandra L; Schminkey, Donna L

    2017-06-01

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a global public health and criminal justice concern with significant impacts; especially high rates are seen among rural Hispanic American (HA) communities, the fastest growing population in the United States. They experience additional barriers to care including extreme poverty, lesser education, gender norms, and language and immigration issues. A systematic literature review was conducted using Cooper's framework to identify evidence supporting associations between interventions and prevention, reduction, and elimination of IPV among rural HA women. Searches conducted on databases including CINAHL, PubMed, Medline, Women's Studies International, MedicLatina, and JSTOR used the MeSH terms Hispanic Americans (Latino/a and Hispanic), domestic violence, and intimate partner violence. Selected studies were published between January 1, 2000, and January 1, 2014. Of the 617 yielded articles, only 6 met the inclusion criteria. Of these, none closely examined rurality or provided valid and reliable measures of outcomes, instead reporting program descriptions and suggested interventions. We identify key findings to guide program, screening, and tool development. Our study identifies a gap in knowledge, research, and effective practices and issues a call for action to create evidence-based tools to prevent, reduce, and eliminate IPV in these underserved populations.

  15. McNamara calls for action now.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-05-01

    Robert McNamara outlined a 6 point global family planning (FP) program he designed to expand FP services to answer unmet need. The plan calls for Fp spending to increase to US$8 billion by 2000. For the US this would mean an increase from US$800 million to US$3.5 billion. This amount is very, very small compared to the total amount spent on official development assistance projected for Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries. It is easily within the capabilities of OECD countries to meet this goal. The plan would develop a system in which the World Bank and the UNFPA would work together with each developing country to establish population target levels. The World Bank would assume responsibility for organizing external financing and serve as a last resort source of financing. Japan must also begin to take a leadership role more in line with its economic power. Currently it spends only .32% of its GNP to aid developing countries, despite the fact that its per capita income is 20% larger than any other OECD member. This means raising spending form US$9 billion to US$14.5 billion. This could be done easily by raising it US$500 million/year and planning to increase this US$1 billion by 2000.

  16. Rare disease registries: a call to action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacaze, Paul; Millis, Nicole; Fookes, Megan; Zurynski, Yvonne; Jaffe, Adam; Bellgard, Matthew; Winship, Ingrid; McNeil, John; Bittles, Alan H

    2017-09-01

    When registries collect accurate clinical data over time, they can act as fundamental support structures for patients and their families and powerful cost-effective instruments to support clinical trials and translational research to improve quality of care, quality of life and survival. Registries are critical for rare diseases (RD) with low prevalence and propensity for variation in treatment and outcomes. Rare Voices Australia is leading a call for action to the research and clinical community to prioritise RD data collection and develop an integrated RD Registry strategy for Australia. Financial, operational and governance challenges exist for establishing and maintaining RD registries. As a multidisciplinary team whose interests converge on RD, we highlight the need for the establishment of an Australian RD Registry Alliance. This 'umbrella' organisation will: (i) bring together existing RD registries across Australia; (ii) establish National RD Registry Standards to support interoperability and cohesion across registries; (iii) develop strategies to attract sustainable funding from government and other sources to maximise the utility of existing RD registries and support the development of new RD registries. The most important role for the Alliance would be to use the RD registries for translational research to address current knowledge gaps about RD and to improve the care for the over 1.4 million Australians estimated to live with RD. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  17. Another call to increase STEM education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    2011-07-01

    As science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education becomes increasingly important, U.S. students are lagging behind other nations on international assessments, according to a recent Trends in International Mathematics and Science study. A 22 June report from the U.S. National Research Council (NRC) calls for increasing the focus on STEM education in the United States. “To make progress in improving STEM education for all students, policy makers at the national, state, and local levels should elevate science to the same level of importance as reading and mathematics,” states the report, “Successful K-12 STEM Education: Identifying Effective Approaches in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics.” It outlines several goals: expand the number of students who pursue advanced degrees and careers in STEM fields; expand the STEM-capable workforce, while also broadening the participation of women and minorities; and increase STEM literacy for all students, whether or not they pursue STEM-related careers or additional study in those areas.

  18. Mitigating Handoff Call Dropping in Wireless Cellular Networks: A Call Admission Control Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekpenyong, Moses Effiong; Udoh, Victoria Idia; Bassey, Udoma James

    2016-06-01

    Handoff management has been an important but challenging issue in the field of wireless communication. It seeks to maintain seamless connectivity of mobile users changing their points of attachment from one base station to another. This paper derives a call admission control model and establishes an optimal step-size coefficient (k) that regulates the admission probability of handoff calls. An operational CDMA network carrier was investigated through the analysis of empirical data collected over a period of 1 month, to verify the performance of the network. Our findings revealed that approximately 23 % of calls in the existing system were lost, while 40 % of the calls (on the average) were successfully admitted. A simulation of the proposed model was then carried out under ideal network conditions to study the relationship between the various network parameters and validate our claim. Simulation results showed that increasing the step-size coefficient degrades the network performance. Even at optimum step-size (k), the network could still be compromised in the presence of severe network crises, but our model was able to recover from these problems and still functions normally.

  19. Optimal temporal placement of the call in beach volleyball

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Künzell

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The call is a tactical component in beach volleyball attacks. Through the call, the setter indicates to his or her teammate an open spot in the opponent’s court. In two experimental conditions, we investigated the interval between the call and the ball-hand contact (“call shot interval”, CSI of top-level athletes. We show that the probability that a given call is followed is dependent on the duration of the CSI and the number of call options. Longer CSIs result in an increased probability that the given call will be followed, whilst increasing the call options results in a decrease in probability. On average, there is a 50% probability that the call will be followed if the call precedes the shot by 460 ms and if a single call option (“line” is expected. If the attacker has to choose between three call options (“line”, “cut”, “no-one” a 50% probability that the call will be followed is observed at an CSI of 542 ms. It did not appear that gender influenced the ability to follow a call. We recommend that in practice and in competition, players and coaches should consider the proper duration of the CSI for effective calling.

  20. GRAPHICAL USER INTERFACE WITH APPLICATIONS IN SUSCEPTIBLE-INFECTIOUS-SUSCEPTIBLE MODELS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilea, M; Turnea, M; Arotăriţei, D; Rotariu, Mariana; Popescu, Marilena

    2015-01-01

    Practical significance of understanding the dynamics and evolution of infectious diseases increases continuously in contemporary world. The mathematical study of the dynamics of infectious diseases has a long history. By incorporating statistical methods and computer-based simulations in dynamic epidemiological models, it could be possible for modeling methods and theoretical analyses to be more realistic and reliable, allowing a more detailed understanding of the rules governing epidemic spreading. To provide the basis for a disease transmission, the population of a region is often divided into various compartments, and the model governing their relation is called the compartmental model. To present all of the information available, a graphical user interface provides icons and visual indicators. The graphical interface shown in this paper is performed using the MATLAB software ver. 7.6.0. MATLAB software offers a wide range of techniques by which data can be displayed graphically. The process of data viewing involves a series of operations. To achieve it, I had to make three separate files, one for defining the mathematical model and two for the interface itself. Considering a fixed population, it is observed that the number of susceptible individuals diminishes along with an increase in the number of infectious individuals so that in about ten days the number of individuals infected and susceptible, respectively, has the same value. If the epidemic is not controlled, it will continue for an indefinite period of time. By changing the global parameters specific of the SIS model, a more rapid increase of infectious individuals is noted. Using the graphical user interface shown in this paper helps achieving a much easier interaction with the computer, simplifying the structure of complex instructions by using icons and menus, and, in particular, programs and files are much easier to organize. Some numerical simulations have been presented to illustrate theoretical

  1. Counselling framework for moderate-penetrance cancer-susceptibility mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Nadine; Domchek, Susan M; Stadler, Zsofia; Nathanson, Katherine L; Couch, Fergus; Garber, Judy E; Offit, Kenneth; Robson, Mark E

    2016-09-01

    The use of multigene panels for the assessment of cancer susceptibility is expanding rapidly in clinical practice, particularly in the USA, despite concerns regarding the uncertain clinical validity for some gene variants and the uncertain clinical utility of most multigene panels. So-called 'moderate-penetrance' gene mutations associated with cancer susceptibility are identified in approximately 2-5% of individuals referred for clinical testing; some of these mutations are potentially actionable. Nevertheless, the appropriate management of individuals harbouring such moderate-penetrance genetic variants is unclear. The cancer risks associated with mutations in moderate-penetrance genes are lower and different than those reported for high-penetrance gene mutations (such as mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2, and those associated with Lynch syndrome). The extrapolation of guidelines for the management of individuals with high-penetrance variants of cancer-susceptibility genes to the clinical care of patients with moderate-penetrance gene mutations could result in substantial harm. Thus, we provide a framework for clinical decision-making pending the development of a sufficient evidence base to document the clinical utility of the interventions for individuals with inherited moderate-penetrance gene mutations associated with an increased risk of cancer.

  2. The Role of MicroRNAs in Cancer Susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Iuliano

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs are germline variations interspersed in the human genome. These subtle changes of DNA sequence can influence the susceptibility to various pathologies including cancer. The functional meaning of SNPs is not always clear, being, the majority of them, localized in noncoding regions. The discovery of microRNAs, tiny noncoding RNAs able to bind the 3′ untranslated region (UTR of target genes and to consequently downregulate their expression, has provided a functional explanation of how some SNPs positioned in noncoding regions contribute to cancer susceptibility. In this paper we summarize the current knowledge of the effect on cancer susceptibility of SNPs included in regions related with miRNA-dependent pathways. Hereditary cancer comes up from mutations that occur in high-penetrant predisposing tumor genes. However, a considerable part of inherited cancers arises from multiple low-penetrant predisposing gene variants that influence the behavior of cancer insurgence. Despite the established significance of such polymorphic variants in cancer predisposition, sometimes their functional role remains unknown. The discovery of a new group of genes called microRNAs (miRNAs opened an avenue for the functional interpretation of polymorphisms involved in cancer predisposition.

  3. Effectiveness of the call in beach volleyball attacking play.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Künzell, Stefan; Schweikart, Florian; Köhn, Daniel; Schläppi-Lienhard, Olivia

    2014-12-09

    In beach volleyball the setter has the opportunity to give her or his hitter a "call". The call intends that the setter suggests to her or his partner where to place the attack in the opponent's court. The effectiveness of a call is still unknown. We investigated the women's and men's Swiss National Beach Volleyball Championships in 2011 and analyzed 2185 attacks. We found large differences between female and male players. While men called in only 38.4% of attacks, women used calls in 85.5% of attacks. If the male players followed a given call, 63% of the attacks were successful. The success rate of attacks without any call was 55.8% and 47.6% when the call was ignored. These differences were not significant (χ(2)(2) = 4.55, p = 0.103). In women's beach volleyball, the rate of successful attacks was 61.5% when a call was followed, 35% for attacks without a call, and 42.6% when a call was ignored. The differences were highly significant (χ(2)(2) = 23.42, p call was effective in women's beach volleyball, while its effect in men's game was unclear. Considering the quality of calls we indicate that there is a significant potential to increase the effectiveness of a call.

  4. Non-song social call bouts of migrating humpback whales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekdahl, Melinda L; Dunlop, Rebecca A; Goldizen, Anne W; Garland, Ellen C; Biassoni, Nicoletta; Miller, Patrick; Noad, Michael J

    2015-06-01

    The use of stereotyped calls within structured bouts has been described for a number of species and may increase the information potential of call repertoires. Humpback whales produce a repertoire of social calls, although little is known about the complexity or function of these calls. In this study, digital acoustic tag recordings were used to investigate social call use within bouts, the use of bouts across different social contexts, and whether particular call type combinations were favored. Call order within bouts was investigated using call transition frequencies and information theory techniques. Call bouts were defined through analysis of inter-call intervals, as any calls within 3.9 s of each other. Bouts were produced significantly more when new whales joined a group compared to groups that did not change membership, and in groups containing multiple adults escorting a female and calf compared to adult only groups. Although social calls tended to be produced in bouts, there were few repeated bout types. However, the order in which most call types were produced within bouts was non-random and dependent on the preceding call type. These bouts appear to be at least partially governed by rules for how individual components are combined.

  5. Calling under pressure: Short-finned pilot whales make social calls during deep foraging dives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Frants Havmand; Marrero Perez, Jacobo; Johnson, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Toothed whales rely on sound to echolocate prey and communicate with conspecifics, but little is known about how extreme pressure affects pneumatic sound production in deep-diving species with a limited air supply. The short-finned pilot whale (Globicephala macrorhynchus) is a highly social species...... among the deep-diving toothed whales, in which individuals socialize at the surface but leave their social group in pursuit of prey at depths of up to 1000 m. To investigate if these animals communicate acoustically at depth and test whether hydrostatic pressure affects communication signals, acoustic...... DTAGs logging sound, depth and orientation were attached to 12 pilot whales. Tagged whales produced tonal calls during deep foraging dives at depths of up to 800 m. Mean call output and duration decreased with depth despite the increased distance to conspecifics at the surface. This shows...

  6. Road Impacts on Abundance, Call Traits, and Body Size of Rainforest Frogs in Northeast Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conrad J. Hoskin

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Frogs are potentially sensitive indicators of road impacts, with studies indicating particular susceptibility to road mortality. Calling, i.e., breeding, behavior could also be affected by traffic noise. We investigated effects on frog abundance and calling behavior where a busy highway crosses rainforest stream breeding habitat in northeast Australia. Frog abundance was repeatedly surveyed along five stream transects during a summer breeding season. Abundance of two species, Litoria rheocola and Austrochaperina pluvialis, increased significantly with perpendicular distance from the road along two transects. No trends in abundance were detected for A. pluvialis on two other transects where it was common, or for Litoria serrata on one transect where abundance was sufficient for analysis. Both species with lowered abundance near the road, L. rheocola and A. pluvialis, are rare in road kill statistics along this highway, suggesting road mortality is not the cause of reduced frog abundance near the road. We postulate that lowered abundance may reflect traffic noise effects. We analyzed calls of the International Union for Conservation of Nature endangered species L. rheocola along the one stream transect on which it was common. We found significant trends in two call traits over a very fine scale: both call rate and dominant frequency were significantly higher closer to the road. Furthermore, males were significantly smaller closer to the road. These call and body size trends most likely reflect road impacts, but resolving these is complicated by correlations between traits. Potential mechanisms, effects on fitness, and management recommendations to mitigate the impacts of roads on frogs are outlined.

  7. El discurso de la calle: una mirada psicoanalitica al denominado habitante de la calle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jairo Baez

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Se presentan los resultados de investigación del proyecto: “El lugar del sujeto en condición de habitante de la calle de la localidad de Suba”. Una propuesta de investigación-intervención, dirigida por el interrogante: ¿Cómo se sitúa un sujeto frente al otro, el otro y su mismidad para llegar a la configuración de su ser, decir y hacer desde el habitar en la calle? Metodológicamente, se desarrolló un trabajo de escucha de carácter analítico, con habitantes de la calle y funcionarios de dicha localidad. El sujeto se halla inscrito en el discurso de la calle, donde, a partir de su posicionamiento ha configurado su ser, decir y hacer, así como el establecimiento del lazo social. Abstract This research paper shows the results of a project named: “The place of the subject as a street in habitant in Suba”. It is a research and intervention proposal, guided by the questions: How does a subject consider himself in relation with another subject? How does a subject and his uniqueness to come to his own being? Does it take into account their living in the street? A listening exercise using an analytical method was developed with street in habitants and officials of the above-mentioned locality. The subject is enrolled in the test, their speech sampled via a series of questions, and the subject is asked why the subject has set his being, why the subject gives these answers, as well as their establishment in the social ties in their networks.

  8. No Call for Action? Why There Is No Union (Yet in Philippine Call Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niklas Reese

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This contribution presents findings from a qualitative study which focused on young urban professionals in the Philippines who work(ed in international call centers – workplaces usually characterized by job insecurity and other forms of precarity, factory-like working conditions, and disembeddedness. Nevertheless, trade unions in these centers have not come into existence. Why collective action is not chosen by call center agents as an option to tackle the above mentioned problems – this is what the research project this article is based on tried to understand. After outlining some workrelated problems identified by Filipino call center agents, the article will focus on the strategies the agents employ to counter these problems (mainly accommodation and everyday resistance. By highlighting five objective and five subjective reasons (or reasons by circumstances and reasons by framing, we conclude that it is not repressive regulation policies, but rather the formative power and the internalization of discourses of rule within individual life strategies that are preventing the establishment of unions and other collective action structures.

  9. Effectiveness of the Call in Beach Volleyball Attacking Play

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Künzell Stefan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In beach volleyball the setter has the opportunity to give her or his hitter a “call”. The call intends that the setter suggests to her or his partner where to place the attack in the opponent’s court. The effectiveness of a call is still unknown. We investigated the women’s and men’s Swiss National Beach Volleyball Championships in 2011 and analyzed 2185 attacks. We found large differences between female and male players. While men called in only 38.4% of attacks, women used calls in 85.5% of attacks. If the male players followed a given call, 63% of the attacks were successful. The success rate of attacks without any call was 55.8% and 47.6% when the call was ignored. These differences were not significant (χ2(2 = 4.55, p = 0.103. In women’s beach volleyball, the rate of successful attacks was 61.5% when a call was followed, 35% for attacks without a call, and 42.6% when a call was ignored. The differences were highly significant (χ2(2 = 23.42, p < 0.0005. Taking into account the findings of the present study, we suggested that the call was effective in women’s beach volleyball, while its effect in men’s game was unclear. Considering the quality of calls we indicate that there is a significant potential to increase the effectiveness of a call.

  10. Genetic susceptibility to environmental toxicants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2001-01-01

    The toxicological challenges to the chemical industry have in recent years been greatly affected by the rapid innovation and development of analytical, molecular and genetic technologies. ECETOC recognises the importance of developing the technical and intellectual skill bases in academia...... and industrial based laboratories to meet the rapid development of the science base of toxicology. As the technology to determine genetic susceptibility develops, so scientist will be able to describe altered gene expression provoked by chemicals long before they are able to offer valid interpretations...... of their meaning. A potential for inadvertently raising concerns over the effect of chemicals in experimental animals or man, or even the intentional misrepresentation of results to suggest chemicals are “playing” with our genes is enormous. History has shown that some individuals and groups in society are willing...

  11. Accuracy of magnetic resonance based susceptibility measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdevig, Hannah E.; Russek, Stephen E.; Carnicka, Slavka; Stupic, Karl F.; Keenan, Kathryn E.

    2017-05-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is increasingly used to map the magnetic susceptibility of tissue to identify cerebral microbleeds associated with traumatic brain injury and pathological iron deposits associated with neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease. Accurate measurements of susceptibility are important for determining oxygen and iron content in blood vessels and brain tissue for use in noninvasive clinical diagnosis and treatment assessments. Induced magnetic fields with amplitude on the order of 100 nT, can be detected using MRI phase images. The induced field distributions can then be inverted to obtain quantitative susceptibility maps. The focus of this research was to determine the accuracy of MRI-based susceptibility measurements using simple phantom geometries and to compare the susceptibility measurements with magnetometry measurements where SI-traceable standards are available. The susceptibilities of paramagnetic salt solutions in cylindrical containers were measured as a function of orientation relative to the static MRI field. The observed induced fields as a function of orientation of the cylinder were in good agreement with simple models. The MRI susceptibility measurements were compared with SQUID magnetometry using NIST-traceable standards. MRI can accurately measure relative magnetic susceptibilities while SQUID magnetometry measures absolute magnetic susceptibility. Given the accuracy of moment measurements of tissue mimicking samples, and the need to look at small differences in tissue properties, the use of existing NIST standard reference materials to calibrate MRI reference structures is problematic and better reference materials are required.

  12. Proteochemometric modeling of HIV protease susceptibility

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lapins, Maris; Eklund, Martin; Spjuth, Ola; Prusis, Peteris; Wikberg, Jarl E S

    2008-01-01

    .... Therefore, we used proteochemometrics to model the susceptibility of HIV to protease inhibitors in current use, utilizing descriptions of the physico-chemical properties of mutated HIV proteases...

  13. ASR performance analysis of an experimental call routing system

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Modipa, T

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Call routing is an important application of Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR) technology. In this paper the authors discuss the main issues affecting the performance of a call routing system and describe the ASR component of the "Auto...

  14. Purpose, Mission, and Context: The Call for Educating Future Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chunoo, Vivechkanand; Osteen, Laura

    2016-01-01

    This chapter calls on higher education to reclaim its role in leadership education. Specifically it examines higher education's purpose, context, and mission as clarion calls to embed leadership education throughout higher education institutions and focuses on why this is important.

  15. Solid-liquid equilibrium data acquisitions for paraffin systems through thermometry and thermodynamic modeling with modified UNIFAC; Obtencao de dados de equilibrio solido-liquido para sistemas parafinicos via termometria e modelagem termodinamica com UNIFAC modificado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa Junior, Wellington; Queiroga, Renan Nobrega Gadelha; Nascimento, Mairon Antonio Hosannah do; Souza, Carlson Pereira de; Chiavone-Filho, Osvaldo [Rio Grande do Norte Univ., Natal, RN (Brazil). Programa de Pos-graduacao em Engenharia Quimica]. E-mail: wbjunior@eq.ufrn.br

    2003-07-01

    In the petroleum industry a great problem found is the formation of solids during the production, transport and the storage, which are mainly paraffins. It was mainly used the thermometry for determination of paraffin formation, or the solubility of paraffin in the other hydrocarbon solvent as function of the composition. The gas chromatography was used to determine if the system light hydrocarbon and paraffin form solid solution, applying a simplified analytical method with thermostatized filtration and glass syringe. The experimental data obtained was used with the aid of the modified UNIFAC model for representing both the liquid and solid solution phases in equilibrium. (author)

  16. Significance of Zr-in-Rutile Thermometry for Deducing the Decompression P–T Path of a Garnet–Clinopyroxene Granulite in the Moldanubian Zone of the Bohemian Massif

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Usuki, T.; Iizuka, Y.; Hirajima, T.; Svojtka, Martin; Lee, H.-Y.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 6 (2017), s. 1173-1198 ISSN 0022-3530 Grant - others:Program interní podpory projektů mezinárodní spolupráce AV ČR(CZ) M100131203 Program:Program interní podpory projektů mezinárodní spolupráce AV ČR Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : Bohemian Massif * P–T path * Zr-in-rutile thermometry * high-pressure granulite * continental collision * garnet–clinopyroxene barometry Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 3.280, year: 2016

  17. Evolution of advertisement calls in African clawed frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, Martha L; Evans, Ben J; Kelley, Darcy B

    2011-01-01

    For most frogs, advertisement calls are essential for reproductive success, conveying information on species identity, male quality, sexual state and location. While the evolutionary divergence of call characters has been examined in a number of species, the relative impacts of genetic drift or natural and sexual selection remain unclear. Insights into the evolutionary trajectory of vocal signals can be gained by examining how advertisement calls vary in a phylogenetic context. Evolution by genetic drift would be supported if more closely related species express more similar songs. Conversely, a poor correlation between evolutionary history and song expression would suggest evolution shaped by natural or sexual selection. Here, we measure seven song characters in 20 described and two undescribed species of African clawed frogs (genera Xenopus and Silurana ) and four populations of X. laevis . We identify three call types - click, burst and trill - that can be distinguished by click number, call rate and intensity modulation. A fourth type is biphasic, consisting of two of the above. Call types vary in complexity from the simplest, a click, to the most complex, a biphasic call. Maximum parsimony analysis of variation in call type suggests that the ancestral type was of intermediate complexity. Each call type evolved independently more than once and call type is typically not shared by closely related species. These results indicate that call type is homoplasious and has low phylogenetic signal. We conclude that the evolution of call type is not due to genetic drift, but is under selective pressure.

  18. Linguistics, Procedure and Technique in CALL Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torsani, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Research in CALL education has identified a series of goals and constraints for technology in language education that need to be taken into account when designing a CALL syllabus. This article presents a theoretical framework for syllabus design based on the identification of three areas of expertise within CALL: linguistic knowledge, procedural…

  19. Alarm calls of Bronze Mannikins communicate predator size to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These groups were exposed to latex terrestrial snakes and mounted aerial raptors, and their alarm calls and predator response behaviours recorded. The Bronze Mannikins were able to discriminate between predators of different sizes, and increased their calling rate and decreased the end frequency of the alarm call in ...

  20. 47 CFR 74.791 - Digital call signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Digital call signs. 74.791 Section 74.791..., AUXILIARY, SPECIAL BROADCAST AND OTHER PROGRAM DISTRIBUTIONAL SERVICES Low Power TV, TV Translator, and TV Booster Stations § 74.791 Digital call signs. (a) Digital low power stations. Call signs for digital low...

  1. Evolution of advertisement calls in African clawed frogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, Martha L.; Evans, Ben J.; Kelley, Darcy B.

    2014-01-01

    Summary For most frogs, advertisement calls are essential for reproductive success, conveying information on species identity, male quality, sexual state and location. While the evolutionary divergence of call characters has been examined in a number of species, the relative impacts of genetic drift or natural and sexual selection remain unclear. Insights into the evolutionary trajectory of vocal signals can be gained by examining how advertisement calls vary in a phylogenetic context. Evolution by genetic drift would be supported if more closely related species express more similar songs. Conversely, a poor correlation between evolutionary history and song expression would suggest evolution shaped by natural or sexual selection. Here, we measure seven song characters in 20 described and two undescribed species of African clawed frogs (genera Xenopus and Silurana) and four populations of X. laevis. We identify three call types — click, burst and trill — that can be distinguished by click number, call rate and intensity modulation. A fourth type is biphasic, consisting of two of the above. Call types vary in complexity from the simplest, a click, to the most complex, a biphasic call. Maximum parsimony analysis of variation in call type suggests that the ancestral type was of intermediate complexity. Each call type evolved independently more than once and call type is typically not shared by closely related species. These results indicate that call type is homoplasious and has low phylogenetic signal. We conclude that the evolution of call type is not due to genetic drift, but is under selective pressure. PMID:24723737

  2. The Role of Analyst Conference Calls in Capital Markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.M. Roelofsen (Erik)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractMany firms conduct a conference call with analysts shortly after the quarterly earnings announcement. In these calls, management discusses the completed quarter, and analysts can ask questions. Due to SEC requirements, conference calls in the United States are virtually always live

  3. Design considerations for CALL based upon evaluation criteria for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article presents a rubric for the evaluation of Computer-Assisted Language Learning (CALL) software based on international recommendations for effective CALL. After a brief overview of the pedagogical and implementation fundamentals of CALL, and a discussion of what should be included in a needs analysis for ...

  4. Power-law scaling of calling dynamics in zebra finches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shouwen; Maat, Andries Ter; Gahr, Manfred

    2017-08-21

    Social mammals and birds have a rich repertoire of communication calls. Some call types are uttered rarely but in specific contexts while others are produced in large numbers but are not linked to a specific context. An example for the latter is the "stack" call that zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) utter thousands of times per day in a seemingly erratic manner. We quantified this calling activity of captive zebra finches by using on-bird telemetric microphones that permitted a precise temporal resolution. We separated the calling interactions into the reactive and the self-contained calls. Despite a large dynamic range in the succession of calling events, the temporal distribution of the reactive and the self-contained callings was characterized by a power-law with exponents ranging between 2 and 3, which implies that all calls in that scale have similar dynamic patterns. As birds underwent physiological (water availability) and social (separation from the reproductive partner) changes, their calling dynamics changed. Power-law scaling provided an accurate description of these changes, such that the calling dynamics may inform about an individual's physiological and/or social situations state, even though a single "stack" call has no predetermined meaning.

  5. CALL and the Responsibilities of Teachers and Administrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jeremy F.

    2001-01-01

    Probes reasons why many teachers remain uncommitted to computer-assisted language learning (CALL) and proposes some remedies. In particular, it is argued that CALL should not be too closely associated with self-access or autonomy, and that teachers are needed to drive the CALL process. (Author/VWL)

  6. 46 CFR 169.750 - Radio call sign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radio call sign. 169.750 Section 169.750 Shipping COAST... Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment Markings § 169.750 Radio call sign. Each vessel certificated for exposed or partially protected water service must have its radio call sign permanently displayed...

  7. Short communications: Calls of three species of arthroleptid frogs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We also provide numerical information about the spectral and temporal features of the calls. The calls are compared with previously published descriptions from other parts of their distribution. A new call type is described for Leptodactylodon albiventris. Key words: Amphibia, Arthroleptidae, audiospectrograms.

  8. Design considerations for CALL based upon evaluation criteria for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... be included in a needs analysis for CALL evaluation, the rubric is presented. The author then illustrates how the evaluation criteria in the rubric can be used in the design of a new CALL system. Keywords: Software evaluation, CALL, language laboratory, MarkWrite, writing across the curriculum, software development ...

  9. Multiecho pseudo-golden angle stack of stars thermometry with high spatial and temporal resolution using k-space weighted image contrast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svedin, Bryant T; Payne, Allison; Bolster, Bradley D; Parker, Dennis L

    2017-06-22

    Implement and evaluate a 3D MRI method to measure temperature changes with high spatial and temporal resolution and large field of view. A multiecho pseudo-golden angle stack-of-stars (SOS) sequence with k-space weighted image contrast (KWIC) reconstruction was implemented to simultaneously measure multiple quantities, including temperature, initial signal magnitude M(0), transverse relaxation time ( T2*), and water/fat images. Respiration artifacts were corrected using self-navigation. KWIC artifacts were removed using a multi-baseline library. The phases of the multiple echo images were combined to improve proton resonance frequency precision. Temperature precision was tested through in vivo breast imaging (N = 5 healthy volunteers) using both coronal and sagittal orientations and with focused ultrasound (FUS) heating in a pork phantom using a breast specific MR-guided FUS system. Temperature measurement precision was significantly improved after echo combination when compared with the no echo combination case (spatial average of the standard deviation through time of 0.3-1.0 and 0.7-1.9°C, respectively). Temperature measurement accuracy during heating was comparable to a 3D seg-EPI sequence. M(0) and T2* values showed temperature dependence during heating in pork adipose tissue. A self-navigated 3D multiecho SOS sequence with dynamic KWIC reconstruction is a promising thermometry method that provides multiple temperature sensitive quantitative values. Magn Reson Med, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  10. Variable- and fixed-point blackbody sources developed at VNIIOFI for precision measurements in radiometry and thermometry within 100K-3500K temperature range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapritsky, V. I.; Khlevnoy, B. B.; Ogarev, S. A.; Privalsky, V. E.; Samoylov, M. L.; Sakharov, M. K.; Bourdakin, A. A.; Panfilov, A. S.

    2006-09-01

    The demands of modern radiation thermometry and radiometry are being satisfied by a large variety of high-precision unique BB sources (both fixed-point and variable temperature) designed for a wide range of temperature from 100 K to 3500 K. The paper contains a detailed review of low-, medium- and high-temperature precision blackbodies developed at VNIIOFI as the basis of the spectral radiance and irradiance calibration devices in the rank of National standards. The blackbodies include: 1) variable-temperature (100K..1000K) research-grade extended-area (up to 100 mm) models intended to perform radiometric calibrations by comparison with a primary standard source, as well as can be used as the sources for high-accuracy IR calibration of space-borne and other systems not requiring a vacuum environment; 2) low-temperature fixed-point blackbodies on the basis of phase transitions of pure metals such as In and Ga sources, and the metal-metal eutectics operating within the medium-temperature range (300K to 400K); these are used for pyrometric measurements, IR-radiometry, preflight and (future aspects) in-flight calibration of space borne IR instruments; 3) high-temperature wide aperture variable-temperature blackbodies (1800K to 3500K) such as BB3500MP, BB3500YY designed and fabricated, along with fixed-point cells working above the ITS-90 temperatures on the basis of phase transitions of metal-carbon eutectic alloys (Re-C, TiC-C, ZrC-C, HfC-C), which possess unique reproducibility of 0.1% or less.

  11. The So-Called 'Face on Mars'

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 13 April 2002) The Science The so called 'Face on Mars' can be seen slightly above center and to the right in this THEMIS visible image. This 3-km long knob, located near 10o N, 40o W (320o E), was first imaged by the Viking spacecraft in the 1970's and was seen by some to resemble a face carved into the rocks of Mars. Since that time the Mars Orbiter Camera on the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft has provided detailed views of this hill that clearly show that it is a normal geologic feature with slopes and ridges carved by eons of wind and downslope motion due to gravity. A similar-size hill in Phoenix, Arizona resembles a camel lying on the ground, and Phoenicians whimsically refer to it as Camelback Mountain. Like the hills and knobs of Mars, however, Camelback Mountain was carved into its unusual shape by thousands of years of erosion. The THEMIS image provides a broad perspective of the landscape in this region, showing numerous knobs and hills that have been eroded into a remarkable array of different shapes. Many of these knobs, including the 'Face', have several flat ledges partway up the hill slopes. These ledges are made of more resistant layers of rock and are the last remnants of layers that once were continuous across this entire region. Erosion has completely removed these layers in most places, leaving behind only the small isolated hills and knobs seen today. Many of the hills and ridges in this area also show unusual deposits of material that occur preferentially on the cold, north-facing slopes. It has been suggested that these deposits were 'pasted' on the slopes, with the distinct, rounded boundary on their upslope edges being the highest remaining point of this pasted-on layer. In several locations, such as in the large knob directly south of the 'Face', these deposits occur at several different heights on the hill. This observation suggests the layer once draped the entire knob and has since been removed from all but the north

  12. Calling vs Receiving Party Pays: Market Penetration and the Importance of the Call Externality

    OpenAIRE

    Majer, Tommaso; Pistollato, Michele

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we study how the access price affects the choice of the tariff regime taken by the network operators. We show that for high values of the access price, that is taken as a parameter by the firms, networks decide to charge only the callers. Otherwise, for low values of the access charge, networks charge also the receivers. Moreover, we compare market penetration and total welfare between the two price regimes. Our model suggests that, for high values of call externality, market pe...

  13. A synthetic operational account of call-by-need evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zerny, Ian; Danvy, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    We present the first operational account of call by need that connects syntactic theory and implementation practice. Syntactic theory: the storeless operational semantics using syntax rewriting to account for demand-driven computation and for caching intermediate results. Implementational practice...... is that the theory of call by need agrees with the theory of call by name, and that the practice of call by need optimizes the practice of call by name. Our operational account takes the form of three new calculi for lazy evaluation of lambda-terms and our synthesis takes the form of three lock-step equivalences...

  14. The Barbados Emergency Ambulance Service: High Frequency of Nontransported Calls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherwin E. Phillips

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. There are no published studies on the Barbados Emergency Ambulance Service and no assessment of the calls that end in nontransported individuals. We describe reasons for the nontransport of potential clients. Methods. We used the Emergency Medical Dispatch (Medical Priority Dispatch System instrument, augmented with five local call types, to collect information on types of calls. The calls were categorised under 7 headings. Correlations between call types and response time were calculated. Results. Most calls were from the category medical (54%. Nineteen (19% percent of calls were in the non-transported category. Calls from call type Cancelled accounted for most of these and this was related to response time, while Refused service was inversely related (. Conclusions. The Barbados Ambulance Service is mostly used by people with a known illness and for trauma cases. One-fifth of calls fall into a category where the ambulance is not used often due to cancellation which is related to response time. Other factors such as the use of alternative transport are also important. Further study to identify factors that contribute to the non-transported category of calls is necessary if improvements in service quality are to be made.

  15. Individual distinctiveness in call types of wild western female gorillas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Salmi

    Full Text Available Individually distinct vocalizations play an important role in animal communication, allowing call recipients to respond differentially based on caller identity. However, which of the many calls in a species' repertoire should have more acoustic variability and be more recognizable is less apparent. One proposed hypothesis is that calls used over long distances should be more distinct because visual cues are not available to identify the caller. An alternative hypothesis proposes that close calls should be more recognizable because of their importance in social interactions. To examine which hypothesis garners more support, the acoustic variation and individual distinctiveness of eight call types of six wild western gorilla (Gorilla gorilla females were investigated. Acoustic recordings of gorilla calls were collected at the Mondika Research Center (Republic of Congo. Acoustic variability was high in all gorilla calls. Similar high inter-individual variation and potential for identity coding (PIC was found for all call types. Discriminant function analyses confirmed that all call types were individually distinct (although for call types with lowest sample size - hum, grumble and scream - this result cannot be generalized, suggesting that neither the distance at which communication occurs nor the call social function alone can explain the evolution of identity signaling in western gorilla communication.

  16. Search for new breast cancer susceptibility genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oldenburg, Rogier Abel

    2008-01-01

    This thesis describes the search for new high-risk breast cancer susceptibility genes by linkage analysis. To date 20-25% of familial breast cancer is explained by mutations in the high-risk BRCA1 and BRCA2 breast cancer susceptibility genes. For the remaining families the genetic etiology is

  17. Mapping markers linked to porcine salmonellosis susceptibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galina-Pantoja, L.; Siggens, K.; Schriek, van M.G.M.; Heuven, H.C.M.

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this study was to identify pig chromosomal regions associated with susceptibility to salmonellosis. Genomic DNA from pig reference populations with differences in susceptibility to Salmonella enterica serovar Choleraesuis as quantified by spleen and liver bacterial colonization at day 7

  18. In- and Out-of-the-Money Convertible Bond Calls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bechman, Ken; Lunde, Asger; Zebedee, Allan

    2014-01-01

    Convertible bond calls typically cause significant reactions in equity prices. The empirical research largely finds negative and positive announcement effects for the in-the-money and the out-of-the-money calls respectively. However, this research has difficulty distinguishing between the two mai...... convertible bond; and the stock market's reaction is almost immediate, which is consistent with the signaling effect.......Convertible bond calls typically cause significant reactions in equity prices. The empirical research largely finds negative and positive announcement effects for the in-the-money and the out-of-the-money calls respectively. However, this research has difficulty distinguishing between the two main......-the-money call is predominantly explained by the subsequent order imbalances; and the stock market's reaction is spread over an entire trading day, which is consistent with the price pressure effect. In contrast, the announcement effect for the out-of-the-money call is driven by the size of the called...

  19. Genetic susceptibility to pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Alison P

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in both men and women in the United States. However, it has the poorest prognosis of any major tumor type, with a 5-yr survival rate of approximately 5%. Cigarette smoking, increased body mass index, heavy alcohol consumption, and a diagnosis of diabetes mellitus have all been demonstrated to increase risk of pancreatic cancer. A family history of pancreatic cancer has also been associated with increased risk suggesting inherited genetic factors also play an important role, with approximately 5-10% of pancreatic cancer patients reporting family history of pancreatic cancer. While the genetic basis for the majority of the familial clustering of pancreatic cancer remains unclear, several important pancreatic cancer genes have been identified. These consist of high penetrance genes including BRCA2 or PALB2, to more common genetic variation associated with a modest increase risk of pancreatic cancer such as genetic variation at the ABO blood group locus. Recent advances in genotyping and genetic sequencing have accelerated the rate at which novel pancreatic cancer susceptibility genes have been identified with several genes identified within the past few years. This review addresses our current understanding of the familial aggregation of pancreatic cancer, established pancreatic cancer susceptablity genes and how this knowledge informs risk assessment and screening for high-risk families. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Genetic Susceptibility to Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Alison P.

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in both men and women in the United States. However, it has the poorest prognosis of any major tumor type, with a 5-yr survival rate of approximately 5%. Cigarette smoking, increased body mass index, heavy alcohol consumption, and a diagnosis of diabetes mellitus have all been demonstrated to increase risk of pancreatic cancer. A family history of pancreatic cancer has also been associated with increased risk suggesting inherited genetic factors also play an important role, with approximately 5–10% of pancreatic cancer patients reporting family history of pancreatic cancer. While the genetic basis for the majority of the familial clustering of pancreatic cancer remains unclear, several important pancreatic cancer genes have been identified. These consist of high penetrance genes including BRCA2 or PALB2, to more common genetic variation associated with a modest increase risk of pancreatic cancer such as genetic variation at the ABO blood group locus. Recent advances in genotyping and genetic sequencing have accelerated the rate at which novel pancreatic cancer susceptibility genes have been identified with several genes identified within the past few years. This review addresses our current understanding of the familial aggregation of pancreatic cancer, established pancreatic cancer susceptablity genes and how this knowledge informs risk assessment and screening for high-risk families. PMID:22162228

  1. Economic evaluation of the differential benefits of home visits with telephone calls and telephone calls only in transitional discharge support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Frances Kam Yuet; So, Ching; Chau, June; Law, Antony Kwan Pui; Tam, Stanley Ku Fu; McGhee, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    home visits and telephone calls are two often used approaches in transitional care, but their differential economic effects are unknown. to examine the differential economic benefits of home visits with telephone calls and telephone calls only in transitional discharge support. cost-effectiveness analysis conducted alongside a randomised controlled trial (RCT). patients discharged from medical units randomly assigned to control (control, N = 210), home visits with calls (home, N = 196) and calls only (call, N = 204). cost-effectiveness analyses were conducted from the societal perspective comparing monetary benefits and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) gained. the home arm was less costly but less effective at 28 days and was dominating (less costly and more effective) at 84 days. The call arm was dominating at both 28 and 84 days. The incremental QALY for the home arm was -0.0002/0.0008 (28/84 days), and the call arm was 0.0022/0.0104 (28/84 days). When the three groups were compared, the call arm had a higher probability being cost-effective at 84 days but not at 28 days (home: 53%, call: 35% (28 days) versus home: 22%, call: 73% (84 days)) measuring against the NICE threshold of £20,000. the original RCT showed that the bundled intervention involving home visits and calls was more effective than calls only in the reduction of hospital readmissions. This study adds a cost perspective to inform policymakers that both home visits and calls only are cost-effective for transitional care support, but calls only have a higher chance of being cost-effective for a sustained period after intervention. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society.

  2. Fidelity susceptibility in the quantum Rabi model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Bo-Bo; Lv, Xiao-Chen

    2018-01-01

    Quantum criticality usually occurs in many-body systems. Recently it was shown that the quantum Rabi model, which describes a two-level atom coupled to a single model cavity field, presents quantum phase transitions from a normal phase to a superradiate phase when the ratio between the frequency of the two-level atom and the frequency of the cavity field extends to infinity. In this work, we study quantum phase transitions in the quantum Rabi model from the fidelity susceptibility perspective. We found that the fidelity susceptibility and the generalized adiabatic susceptibility present universal finite-size scaling behaviors near the quantum critical point of the Rabi model if the ratio between frequency of the two-level atom and frequency of the cavity field is finite. From the finite-size scaling analysis of the fidelity susceptibility, we found that the adiabatic dimension of the fidelity susceptibility and the generalized adiabatic susceptibility of fourth order in the Rabi model are 4 /3 and 2, respectively. Meanwhile, the correlation length critical exponent and the dynamical critical exponent in the quantum critical point of the Rabi model are found to be 3 /2 and 1 /3 , respectively. Since the fidelity susceptibility and the generalized adiabatic susceptibility are the moments of the quantum noise spectrum which are directly measurable by experiments in linear response regime, the scaling behavior of the fidelity susceptibility in the Rabi model could be tested experimentally. The simple structure of the quantum Rabi model paves the way for experimentally observing the universal scaling behavior of the fidelity susceptibility at a quantum phase transition.

  3. Acoustic structures in the alarm calls of Gunnison's prairie dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slobodchikoff, C N; Placer, J

    2006-05-01

    Acoustic structures of sound in Gunnison's prairie dog alarm calls are described, showing how these acoustic structures may encode information about three different predator species (red-tailed hawk-Buteo jamaicensis; domestic dog-Canis familaris; and coyote-Canis latrans). By dividing each alarm call into 25 equal-sized partitions and using resonant frequencies within each partition, commonly occurring acoustic structures were identified as components of alarm calls for the three predators. Although most of the acoustic structures appeared in alarm calls elicited by all three predator species, the frequency of occurrence of these acoustic structures varied among the alarm calls for the different predators, suggesting that these structures encode identifying information for each of the predators. A classification analysis of alarm calls elicited by each of the three predators showed that acoustic structures could correctly classify 67% of the calls elicited by domestic dogs, 73% of the calls elicited by coyotes, and 99% of the calls elicited by red-tailed hawks. The different distributions of acoustic structures associated with alarm calls for the three predator species suggest a duality of function, one of the design elements of language listed by Hockett [in Animal Sounds and Communication, edited by W. E. Lanyon and W. N. Tavolga (American Institute of Biological Sciences, Washington, DC, 1960), pp. 392-430].

  4. Anisotropy of the magnetic susceptibility of gallium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankey, T.

    1960-01-01

    The bulk magnetic susceptibilities of single gallium crystals and polycrystalline gallium spheres were measured at 25??C. The following anisotropic diamagnetic susceptibilities were found: a axis (-0.119??0. 001)??10-6 emu/g, b axis (-0.416??0.002)??10 -6 emu/g, and c axis (-0.229??0.001) emu/g. The susceptibility of the polycrystalline spheres, assumed to be the average value for the bulk susceptibility of gallium, was (-0.257??0.003)??10-6 emu/g at 25??C, and (-0.299??0.003)??10-6 emu/g at -196??C. The susceptibility of liquid gallium was (0.0031??0.001) ??10-6 emu/g at 30??C and 100??C. Rotational diagrams of the susceptibilities in the three orthogonal planes of the unit cell were not sinusoidal. The anisotropy in the single crystals was presumably caused by the partial overlap of Brillouin zone boundaries by the Fermi-energy surface. The large change in susceptibility associated with the change in state was attributed to the absence of effective mass influence in the liquid state. ?? 1960 The American Institute of Physics.

  5. Reducing juvenile delinquency with automated cell phone calls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burraston, Bert O; Bahr, Stephen J; Cherrington, David J

    2014-05-01

    Using a sample of 70 juvenile probationers (39 treatment and 31 controls), we evaluated the effectiveness of a rehabilitation program that combined cognitive-behavioral training and automated phone calls. The cognitive-behavioral training contained six 90-min sessions, one per week, and the phone calls occurred twice per day for the year following treatment. Recidivism was measured by whether they were rearrested and the total number of rearrests during the 1st year. To test the impact of the phone calls, those who received phone calls were divided into high and low groups depending on whether they answered more or less than half of their phone calls. Those who completed the class and answered at least half of their phone calls were less likely to have been arrested and had fewer total arrests.

  6. Modeling synchronized calling behavior of Japanese tree frogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aihara, Ikkyu

    2009-07-01

    We experimentally observed synchronized calling behavior of male Japanese tree frogs Hyla japonica; namely, while isolated single frogs called nearly periodically, a pair of interacting frogs called synchronously almost in antiphase or inphase. In this study, we propose two types of phase-oscillator models on different degrees of approximations, which can quantitatively explain the phase and frequency properties in the experiment. Moreover, it should be noted that, although the second model is obtained by fitting to the experimental data of the two synchronized states, the model can also explain the transitory dynamics in the interactive calling behavior, namely, the shift from a transient inphase state to a stable antiphase state. We also discuss the biological relevance of the estimated parameter values to calling behavior of Japanese tree frogs and the possible biological meanings of the synchronized calling behavior.

  7. Behavioural Susceptibility Theory: Professor Jane Wardle and the Role of Appetite in Genetic Risk of Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llewellyn, Clare H; Fildes, Alison

    2017-03-01

    There is considerable variability in human body weight, despite the ubiquity of the 'obesogenic' environment. Human body weight has a strong genetic basis and it has been hypothesised that genetic susceptibility to the environment explains variation in human body weight, with differences in appetite being implicated as the mediating mechanism; so-called 'behavioural susceptibility theory' (BST), first described by Professor Jane Wardle. This review summarises the evidence for the role of appetite as a mediator of genetic risk of obesity. Variation in appetitive traits is observable from infancy, drives early weight gain and is highly heritable in infancy and childhood. Obesity-related common genetic variants identified through genome-wide association studies show associations with appetitive traits, and appetite mediates part of the observed association between genetic risk and adiposity. Obesity results from an interaction between genetic susceptibility to overeating and exposure to an 'obesogenic' food environment.

  8. BBCAnalyzer: a visual approach to facilitate variant calling

    OpenAIRE

    Sandmann, S.; Graaf, A.O. de; Dugas, M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Deriving valid variant calling results from raw next-generation sequencing data is a particularly challenging task, especially with respect to clinical diagnostics and personalized medicine. However, when using classic variant calling software, the user usually obtains nothing more than a list of variants that pass the corresponding caller?s internal filters. Any expected mutations (e.g. hotspot mutations), that have not been called by the software, need to be investigated manually...

  9. naiveBayesCall: an efficient model-based base-calling algorithm for high-throughput sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Wei-Chun; Song, Yun S

    2011-03-01

    Immense amounts of raw instrument data (i.e., images of fluorescence) are currently being generated using ultra high-throughput sequencing platforms. An important computational challenge associated with this rapid advancement is to develop efficient algorithms that can extract accurate sequence information from raw data. To address this challenge, we recently introduced a novel model-based base-calling algorithm that is fully parametric and has several advantages over previously proposed methods. Our original algorithm, called BayesCall, significantly reduced the error rate, particularly in the later cycles of a sequencing run, and also produced useful base-specific quality scores with a high discrimination ability. Unfortunately, however, BayesCall is too computationally expensive to be of broad practical use. In this article, we build on our previous model-based approach to devise an efficient base-calling algorithm that is orders of magnitude faster than BayesCall, while still maintaining a comparably high level of accuracy. Our new algorithm is called naive-BayesCall, and it utilizes approximation and optimization methods to achieve scalability. We describe the performance of naiveBayesCall and demonstrate how improved base-calling accuracy may facilitate de novo assembly and SNP detection when the sequence coverage depth is low to moderate.

  10. Absolute method of measuring magnetic susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, A.; Senftle, F.E.

    1959-01-01

    An absolute method of standardization and measurement of the magnetic susceptibility of small samples is presented which can be applied to most techniques based on the Faraday method. The fact that the susceptibility is a function of the area under the curve of sample displacement versus distance of the magnet from the sample, offers a simple method of measuring the susceptibility without recourse to a standard sample. Typical results on a few substances are compared with reported values, and an error of less than 2% can be achieved. ?? 1959 The American Institute of Physics.

  11. The Influence of Judgment Calls on Meta-Analytic Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarrahi, Farid; Eisend, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that judgment calls (i.e., methodological choices made in the process of conducting a meta-analysis) have a strong influence on meta-analytic findings and question their robustness. However, prior research applies case study comparison or reanalysis of a few meta-analyses with a focus on a few selected judgment calls. These studies neglect the fact that different judgment calls are related to each other and simultaneously influence the outcomes of a meta-analysis, and that meta-analytic findings can vary due to non-judgment call differences between meta-analyses (e.g., variations of effects over time). The current study analyzes the influence of 13 judgment calls in 176 meta-analyses in marketing research by applying a multivariate, multilevel meta-meta-analysis. The analysis considers simultaneous influences from different judgment calls on meta-analytic effect sizes and controls for alternative explanations based on non-judgment call differences between meta-analyses. The findings suggest that judgment calls have only a minor influence on meta-analytic findings, whereas non-judgment call differences between meta-analyses are more likely to explain differences in meta-analytic findings. The findings support the robustness of meta-analytic results and conclusions.

  12. Expression of Emotional Arousal in Two Different Piglet Call Types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linhart, Pavel; Ratcliffe, Victoria F; Reby, David; Špinka, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Humans as well as many animal species reveal their emotional state in their voice. Vocal features show strikingly similar correlation patterns with emotional states across mammalian species, suggesting that the vocal expression of emotion follows highly conserved signalling rules. To fully understand the principles of emotional signalling in mammals it is, however, necessary to also account for any inconsistencies in the way that they are acoustically encoded. Here we investigate whether the expression of emotions differs between call types produced by the same species. We compare the acoustic structure of two common piglet calls-the scream (a distress call) and the grunt (a contact call)-across three levels of arousal in a negative situation. We find that while the central frequency of calls increases with arousal in both call types, the amplitude and tonal quality (harmonic-to-noise ratio) show contrasting patterns: as arousal increased, the intensity also increased in screams, but not in grunts, while the harmonicity increased in screams but decreased in grunts. Our results suggest that the expression of arousal depends on the function and acoustic specificity of the call type. The fact that more vocal features varied with arousal in scream calls than in grunts is consistent with the idea that distress calls have evolved to convey information about emotional arousal.

  13. Expression of Emotional Arousal in Two Different Piglet Call Types.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Linhart

    Full Text Available Humans as well as many animal species reveal their emotional state in their voice. Vocal features show strikingly similar correlation patterns with emotional states across mammalian species, suggesting that the vocal expression of emotion follows highly conserved signalling rules. To fully understand the principles of emotional signalling in mammals it is, however, necessary to also account for any inconsistencies in the way that they are acoustically encoded. Here we investigate whether the expression of emotions differs between call types produced by the same species. We compare the acoustic structure of two common piglet calls-the scream (a distress call and the grunt (a contact call-across three levels of arousal in a negative situation. We find that while the central frequency of calls increases with arousal in both call types, the amplitude and tonal quality (harmonic-to-noise ratio show contrasting patterns: as arousal increased, the intensity also increased in screams, but not in grunts, while the harmonicity increased in screams but decreased in grunts. Our results suggest that the expression of arousal depends on the function and acoustic specificity of the call type. The fact that more vocal features varied with arousal in scream calls than in grunts is consistent with the idea that distress calls have evolved to convey information about emotional arousal.

  14. Nature, timing, and origin of wet climatic periods in Arabia from geochemical (stable isotopes, noble gas thermometry, geochronology) an geomorphological data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emil, M. K.; Sultan, M.; Alharbi, T.; Albassam, A. M.; Chouinard, K.; Abuabdullah, M. M.

    2016-12-01

    An integrated approach was conducted to address the source(s), nature and timing of the wet periods in the Arabian Peninsula (AP) and in northern Africa by 1) comparing the isotopic composition of fossil groundwater to that of modern precipitation, (2) extracting recharge temperatures using noble gas concentrations, (3) Cl-36 age dating of fossil groundwater, and (4) investigating the spatial relationships between morphometric indexes (drainage density, etc.) of Cenozoic volcanic fields and paleo rainfall intensity. Groundwater samples (23) were collected from wells tapping alluvial aquifers along the Red Sea coastal plain, and from the Mega Aquifer System (upper Saq, Wajid and lower Minjur, Wasia-Biyadh, Umm Ar Radhuma formations). Findings include: (1) isotopic composition of modern precipitation over recharge areas (IAEA: δ2H: -2.18 ‰, δ18O: -1.66 ‰) is similar to that of coastal plain aquifers (δ2H: -0.9 to 0.7 ‰, δ18O: -1.47 to -0.85 ‰), but is enriched compared to fossil groundwater downgradient from recharge areas; (2) isotopic composition of fossil groundwater are progressively depleted eastwards along groundwater flow direction (δ2H; Saq:-13.2,-38.8‰, Wajid; -27.1,-42.6, -55.2‰, Minjur: -3.4, -28.1, -35.5, -35.4‰); (3) deeper Saq and Wajid aquifers exhibit isotopic compositions (d2H: -13.2 to -64.1 ‰) similar to those of the Sinai Nubian aquifer (δ2H: -18.7 to -72.9 ‰) suggesting a similar moisture source; (4) the younger Minjur, Wasia-Biyadh and Umm Ar Radhuma aquifers show less depleted compositions (δ2H: -3.4 to -35.4 ‰) and higher deuterium excess values (d-excess; 3.58 to 16.6 ‰) compared to deeper aquifers probably indicating mixing with recent meteoric precipitation and a Mediterranean moisture source; (5) Noble Gas Thermometry (NGT) for fossil aquifers provide cooler (2-6 °C) recharge temperatures compared to the Mean Annual Air Temperatures; (6) Chlorine-36 groundwater ages range from 140ka to 1000ka; (7) drainage

  15. Peak metamorphic temperatures across the Main Central thrust and through Greater Himalayan rocks in western Bhutan: preliminary insights from Raman spectroscopy of carbonaceous material thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starnes, J. K.; Long, S. P.; Gordon, S. M.; Soignard, E.

    2016-12-01

    Across the length of the Himalayan orogen, high-grade metamorphic rocks of the Greater Himalaya (GH) overlie lower-grade metasedimentary rocks of the Lesser Himalaya (LH) across the top-to-south Main Central thrust (MCT). The magnitude and structural thickness of inverted metamorphism across the MCT, as well as the peak temperatures obtained by GH rocks at different structural distances above the MCT, remain poorly estimated in much of Bhutan. Here, we utilize Raman spectroscopy of carbonaceous material thermometry to quantify peak temperatures obtained by LH and GH rocks. Nine samples of schist and quartzite were collected along the Puna Tsang Chu valley in western Bhutan, at structural distances ranging between 0.5 km below and 10.6 km above the MCT. The MCT is defined at the first appearance of gneissic banding, which also coincides with the first observed leucosomes and kyanite. Four LH samples were analyzed; samples collected at 530, 320, 300, and 170 m below the MCT yielded temperatures of 498 ± 31 °C, 519 ± 57 °C, 475 ± 37 °C, and 541 ± 36 °C, respectively. Five GH samples, collected 0.05, 3.3, 4.9, 9.0, and 10.6 km above the MCT, yielded temperatures that overlap within error (623 ± 41 °C, 646 ± 38 °C, 600 ± 47 °C, 616 ± 40 °C, and 689 ± 39 °C, respectively). These data illustrate a 125 ± 72 °C increase in peak temperature between 0.5 km below and 0.05 km above the MCT, and approximately static peak temperatures between 0.05-10.6 km above the MCT. These preliminary results bracket MCT inverted metamorphism across a <1 km-thick package of rock, which is thinner than the 5-10 km-thick sections of inverted metamorphism documented across the MCT in much of the central and western Himalaya. In addition, the temperatures above the MCT do not reveal any significant tectonometamorphic discontinuities within the lowest 10.5 km of the GH section. Additional temperature data will be collected to further analyze the trends defined by these

  16. Quality of MR thermometry during palliative MR-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) treatment of bone metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Mie K; Huisman, Merel; Nijenhuis, Robbert J; van den Bosch, Maurice Aaj; Viergever, Max A; Moonen, Chrit Tw; Bartels, Lambertus W

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR)-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound has emerged as a clinical option for palliative treatment of painful bone metastases, with MR thermometry (MRT) used for treatment monitoring. In this study, the general image quality of the MRT was assessed in terms of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and apparent temperature variation. Also, MRT artifacts were scored for their occurrence and hampering of the treatment monitoring. Analyses were performed on 224 MRT datasets retrieved from 13 treatments. The SNR was measured per voxel over time in magnitude images, in the target lesion and surrounding muscle, and was averaged per treatment. The standard deviation over time of the measured temperature per voxel in MRT images, in the muscle outside the heated region, was defined as the apparent temperature variation and was averaged per treatment. The scored MRT artifacts originated from the following sources: respiratory and non-respiratory time-varying field inhomogeneities, arterial ghosting, and patient motion by muscle contraction and by gross body movement. Distinction was made between lesion type, location, and procedural sedation and analgesic (PSA). The average SNR was highest in and around osteolytic lesions (21 in lesions, 27 in surrounding muscle, n = 4) and lowest in the upper body (9 in lesions, 16 in surrounding muscle, n = 4). The average apparent temperature variation was lowest in osteolytic lesions (1.2°C, n = 4) and the highest in the upper body (1.7°C, n = 4). Respiratory time-varying field inhomogeneity MRT artifacts occurred in 85% of the datasets and hampered treatment monitoring in 81%. Non-respiratory time-varying field inhomogeneities and arterial ghosting MRT artifacts were most frequent (94% and 95%) but occurred only locally. Patient motion artifacts were highly variable and occurred less in treatments of osteolytic lesions and using propofol and esketamine as PSA. In this study, the general image quality of

  17. Professional learning needs in using video calls identified through workshops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statton, Sarah; Jones, Ray; Thomas, Martin; North, Tracie; Endacott, Ruth; Frost, Adrian; Tighe, Dazzle; Wilson, Gail

    2016-05-10

    Most people want to die at home but only half do. Supporting patients in rural locations is challenging. Video calls such as Skype, might help but are not routinely used; we should consider learning needs to increase uptake and ensure effective use. We aimed to identify learning needs of healthcare professionals (HCPs) in using video calls to support patients (and their carers) to die at home. Face-to-face workshops were held in five Southwest England locations. Participants discussed advantages, disadvantages, scenarios for use, and the learning needs of video call users. Ideas were documented on flipcharts and discussions audio-recorded. The 116 participants included nurses, allied HCPs, doctors and previously bereaved volunteers. Lists of advantages, disadvantages, scenarios and learning needs were compiled and circulated to participants. In a subsequent online workshop, 21 participants ranked seven groups of learning needs in priority order. Most participants thought video calls could be used to advantage in many end-of-life scenarios, especially in rural areas. Seven themes, covering 59 learning needs for HCPs, were identified (in priority order): (i) confidence and technical ability in using video calls; (ii) being aware of how video calls fit into clinical practice; (iii) managing video calls; (iv) communication skills on 'camera'; (v) understanding how patients and families may be affected by video call use; (vi) presenting video calls as an option to patients and families to assess their readiness; (vii) normal professional skills that become essential for effective video calls. Although almost ubiquitous, video call software is not routinely and effectively used in British clinical practice. Supporting patients and families at end-of-life is one example where it could be used to advantage, but clinicians need to plan and practise before using it in real situations. Learning needs were identified that could be developed into learning modules and/or courses.

  18. Prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility of Extended Spectrum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lactamase (ESBL) producing gram-negative uropathogens in Sokoto, Nigeria. ... Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was determined using the modified Kirby Bauer method. Confirmation of ESBL phenotype was performed by Double-Disc Synergy Test ...

  19. antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of extended spectrum

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    JAMILU

    ABSTRACT. The emergence of resistant strains of urogenital extended spectrum beta-lactamase producing ... antimicrobial susceptibility test using CLSI recommended, WHO modified Kirby Bauer disc diffusion method. ... Keywords: Extended Spectrum Beta-lactamases, Prevalence, Gram-negative urogenital isolates,.

  20. antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of salmonella species in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Empirical treatment for enteric fevers should, therefore, be discouraged while quinolones, cefepime, carbapenem, azithromycin and third generation cephalosporins be given preference. KEY WORDS: Susceptibility, Antimicrobial, Salmonella species, Enteric fever. INTRODUCTION. In the 21st century, enteric fever in the.

  1. Human genetic susceptibility to Candida infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plantinga, T.S.; Johnson, M.D.; Scott, W.K.; Joosten, L.A.B.; Meer, J.W. van der; Perfect, J.R.; Kullberg, B.J.; Netea, M.G.

    2012-01-01

    Infections with Candida spp. have different manifestations in humans, ranging from mucosal to bloodstream and deep-seated disseminated infections. Immunocompromised patients have increased susceptibility to these types of infections, due to reduced capacity to elicit effective innate or adaptive

  2. Real-Time Optical Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredborg, Marlene; Andersen, Klaus R; Jørgensen, Erik

    2013-01-01

    Rapid antibiotic susceptibility testing is in highly demand in health-care fields as antimicrobial resistant bacterial strains emerge and spread. Here we describe an optical screening system (oCelloScope), which based on time-lapse imaging of 96 bacteria-antibiotic combinations at a time, introdu......Rapid antibiotic susceptibility testing is in highly demand in health-care fields as antimicrobial resistant bacterial strains emerge and spread. Here we describe an optical screening system (oCelloScope), which based on time-lapse imaging of 96 bacteria-antibiotic combinations at a time......, introduces real-time detection of bacterial growth and antimicrobial susceptibility, with imaging material to support the automatically generated graphs. Automated antibiotic susceptibility tests of a monoculture showed statistically significant antibiotic effect within 6 minutes and within 30 minutes...

  3. Landslide susceptibility map: from research to application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorucci, Federica; Reichenbach, Paola; Ardizzone, Francesca; Rossi, Mauro; Felicioni, Giulia; Antonini, Guendalina

    2014-05-01

    Susceptibility map is an important and essential tool in environmental planning, to evaluate landslide hazard and risk and for a correct and responsible management of the territory. Landslide susceptibility is the likelihood of a landslide occurring in an area on the basis of local terrain conditions. Can be expressed as the probability that any given region will be affected by landslides, i.e. an estimate of "where" landslides are likely to occur. In this work we present two examples of landslide susceptibility map prepared for the Umbria Region and for the Perugia Municipality. These two maps were realized following official request from the Regional and Municipal government to the Research Institute for the Hydrogeological Protection (CNR-IRPI). The susceptibility map prepared for the Umbria Region represents the development of previous agreements focused to prepare: i) a landslide inventory map that was included in the Urban Territorial Planning (PUT) and ii) a series of maps for the Regional Plan for Multi-risk Prevention. The activities carried out for the Umbria Region were focused to define and apply methods and techniques for landslide susceptibility zonation. Susceptibility maps were prepared exploiting a multivariate statistical model (linear discriminant analysis) for the five Civil Protection Alert Zones defined in the regional territory. The five resulting maps were tested and validated using the spatial distribution of recent landslide events that occurred in the region. The susceptibility map for the Perugia Municipality was prepared to be integrated as one of the cartographic product in the Municipal development plan (PRG - Piano Regolatore Generale) as required by the existing legislation. At strategic level, one of the main objectives of the PRG, is to establish a framework of knowledge and legal aspects for the management of geo-hydrological risk. At national level most of the susceptibility maps prepared for the PRG, were and still are obtained

  4. Call Centres in Denmark 2004 - Strategy, HR Practices & Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ole H.; El-Salanti, Nadia

    This survey is the first scientifically based benchmarking study of the Danish call centre industry. The main results from the study are based on answers from 128 call centres, which correspond to a response rate of 65%. The Danish study is part of a global project coordinated by researchers...

  5. Implications of Research on Human Memory for CALL Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forester, Lee

    2002-01-01

    Offers a brief overview of what is generally accepted about how human memory works as it applied to computer assisted language learning (CALL). Discusses a number of interactions from various CALL products in light of the research summarized. (Author/VWL)

  6. Calls to Teen Line: Representative Concerns of Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Kathryn E.; Schondel, Connie K.; Ivoska, William J.; Marlowe, Alison L.; Manke-Mitchell, Laurie

    1998-01-01

    Study examines whether the concerns of teenagers calling a peer listening service are representative of the concerns of teenagers in the area served. Results indicate that students' biggest concerns involve family problems, peer relationships, self-esteem, and school problems. Concludes that calls to the teen line are representative. (Author/GCP)

  7. Calling songs of some South African cicadas (Homoptera: Cicadidae)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1987-07-13

    Jul 13, 1987 ... The spectral and temporal characters of the calls of 12 species of cicada are illustrated and described. Variation within populations of conspecifics appears to be greater in temporal than in spectral properties. Conspecific calls recorded at widely separated localities have essentially the sarne characteristics.

  8. Called to Do Meaningful Work: A Blessing or a Curse?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vuuren, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Two groups of people are particularly inclined to mention a calling when talking about their work motivation: those who are spiritual (because the concept of calling originated in the religious realm) and those in serving occupations (such as hospitals, schools, and nongovernmental organizations). Because Christian professors are in both groups,…

  9. 47 CFR 25.284 - Emergency Call Center Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... mobile satellite service to end-user customers (part 25, subparts A-D) must provide Emergency Call Center... Emergency Call Center service for such terminals. (b) Beginning February 11, 2005, each mobile satellite... following October 15, mobile satellite service carriers providing service in the 1.6/2.4 GHz and 2 GHz bands...

  10. Advertisement calls of Bolivian species of Scinax (Amphibia, Anura, Hylidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riva, de la Ignacio; Márquez, Rafael; Bosch, Jaime

    1994-01-01

    The advertisement calls of eight Bolivian species of Scinax are described including information on the calling behaviour of each species. A characteristic audiospectrogram and oscillogram are presented for each species, as well as numerical information about the spectral and temporal features of the

  11. The advertisement call, breeding biology, description of the tadpole ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Males of Bufo dombensis were observed calling late at night at Ongongo Waterfall in north-western Namibia. The analyzed advertisement calls differ distinctly from those of B. vertebralis, B. hoeschi and B. fenoulheti, indicating that all these taxa are separate valid species. Tadpoles raised from a breeding pair found at ...

  12. Advertisement call and tadpole morphology of the clutch-guarding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We provide the first descriptions of the tadpole and advertisement call of Mantidactylus argenteus. Calls consist of 6–15 short and rather melodious notes, with a dominant frequency at 4100–4400 Hz and are emitted from arboreal positions during the day. The larva is an Orton type IV tadpole, with oval body shape and ...

  13. Phylogenetic relationships and call structure in four African bufonid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Phylogenetic relationships and call structure in four African bufonid species. ... The evolution of advertisement call structure in these species is discussed in relation to this phylogeny. ... The phylogeny derived from allozyme data agrees with evidence on albumin immunological distance, karyotype and morphology.

  14. Dialogue Management for an Automated Multilingual Call Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    centers, but do so in a manner that is maximally responsive to the customer . This practically eliminates all prompt or menu based voice response systems...a customer call: identifying the customer (based on a sample customer database) and determining the reason the customer is calling (based on a subset

  15. How can I help you? User instructions in telephone calls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steehouder, M.F.; Hartman, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    We a small corpus of instructions given in phone calls to customers who need support for programming their universal remote control, to make it suitable for their particular TV set VCR, Audio, etc. Typically, in these calls the operator or 'agent' coaches the client while the client is performing

  16. A SIMULATION MODEL FOR EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES CALL CENTERS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Buuren (Martin); G.J. Kommer (Geert Jan); R.D. van der Mei (Rob); S. Bhulai (Sandjai); L. Yilmaz; W.K.V. Chan; I. Moon; T.M.K. Roeder; C. Macal; M.D. Rosetti

    2015-01-01

    htmlabstractIn pre-hospital health care the call center plays an important role in the coordination of emergency medical services (EMS). An EMS call center handles inbound requests for EMS and dispatches an ambulance if necessary. The time needed for triage and dispatch is part of the total response

  17. A simulation model for emergency medical services call centers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Buuren, M.; Kommer, G.J.; van der Mei, R.D.; Bhulai, S.

    2015-01-01

    In pre-hospital health care the call center plays an important role in the coordination of emergency medical services (EMS). An EMS call center handles inbound requests for EMS and dispatches an ambulance if necessary. The time needed for triage and dispatch is part of the total response time to the

  18. Sustainability in CALL Learning Environments: A Systemic Functional Grammar Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Peter

    2014-01-01

    This research aims to define a sustainable resource in Computer-Assisted Language Learning (CALL). In order for a CALL resource to be sustainable it must work within existing educational curricula. This feature is a necessary prerequisite of sustainability because, despite the potential for educational change that digitalization has offered since…

  19. AI in CALL--Artificially Inflated or Almost Imminent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Mathias

    2008-01-01

    The application of techniques from artificial intelligence (AI) to CALL has commonly been referred to as intelligent CALL (ICALL). ICALL is only slightly older than the "CALICO Journal", and this paper looks back at a quarter century of published research mainly in North America and by North American scholars. This "inventory…

  20. Environmental constraints and call evolution in torrent-dwelling frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goutte, Sandra; Dubois, Alain; Howard, Samuel D; Marquez, Rafael; Rowley, Jodi J L; Dehling, J Maximilian; Grandcolas, Philippe; Rongchuan, Xiong; Legendre, Frédéric

    2016-04-01

    Although acoustic signals are important for communication in many taxa, signal propagation is affected by environmental properties. Strong environmental constraints should drive call evolution, favoring signals with greater transmission distance and content integrity in a given calling habitat. Yet, few empirical studies have verified this prediction, possibly due to a shortcoming in habitat characterization, which is often too broad. Here we assess the potential impact of environmental constraints on the evolution of advertisement call in four groups of torrent-dwelling frogs in the family Ranidae. We reconstruct the evolution of calling site preferences, both broadly categorized and at a finer scale, onto a phylogenetic tree for 148 species with five markers (∼3600 bp). We test models of evolution for six call traits for 79 species with regard to the reconstructed history of calling site preferences and estimate their ancestral states. We find that in spite of existing morphological constraints, vocalizations of torrent-dwelling species are most probably constrained by the acoustic specificities of torrent habitats and particularly their high level of ambient noise. We also show that a fine-scale characterization of calling sites allows a better perception of the impact of environmental constraints on call evolution. © 2016 The Author(s). Evolution © 2016 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  1. A simulation model for emergency medical services call centers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Buuren (Martin); G.J. Kommer (Geert Jan); R.D. van der Mei (Rob); S. Bhulai (Sandjai)

    2015-01-01

    htmlabstractIn pre-hospital health care the call center plays an important role in the coordination of emergency medical services (EMS). An EMS call center handles inbound requests for EMS and dispatches an ambulance if necessary. The time needed for triage and dispatch is part of the total response

  2. Steven MacCall: Winner of LJ's 2010 Teaching Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, John N., III

    2010-01-01

    This article profiles Steven L. MacCall, winner of "Library Journal's" 2010 Teaching Award. An associate professor at the School of Library and Information Studies (SLIS) at the University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, MacCall was nominated by Kathie Popadin, known as "Kpop" to the members of her cohort in the online MLIS program at SLIS. Sixteen of…

  3. 76 FR 43688 - Committee Meeting via Conference Call

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Administration for Children and Families Committee Meeting via Conference Call AGENCY..., August 16, 2011, from 1 p.m. to 2:30 pm E.S.T. This meeting, to be held via audio conference call, is...

  4. 78 FR 67956 - Rates for Interstate Inmate Calling Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-13

    ... children by facilitating contact with their parents. By reducing interstate inmate phone rates, we will... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 64 Rates for Interstate Inmate Calling Services AGENCY: Federal Communications...) adopts rule changes to bring high interstate inmate calling service (ICS) rates into compliance with the...

  5. Called to do meaningful work : A blessing or a curse?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vuuren, Hubrecht A.

    2017-01-01

    Two groups of people are particularly inclined to mention a calling when talking about their work motivation: those who are spiritual (because the concept of calling originated in the religious realm) and those in serving occupations (such as hospitals, schools, and nongovernmental organizations).

  6. Semantics-directed implementation of method-call interception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Lämmel (Ralf); C. Stenzel

    2003-01-01

    textabstractWe describe a form of method-call interception (MCI) that allows the programmer to superimpose extra functionality onto method calls at run-time. We provide a reference semantics and a reference implementation for corresponding language constructs. The setup applies to class-based,

  7. Impact of Using CALL on Iranian EFL Learners' Vocabulary Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunus, Melor Md; Salehi, Hadi; Amini, Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL) integration in EFL contexts has intensified noticeably in recent years. This integration might be in different ways and for different purposes such as vocabulary acquisition, grammar learning, phonology, writing skills, etc. More explicitly, this study is an attempt to explore the effect of using CALL on…

  8. Prompting in CALL: A Longitudinal Study of Learner Uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heift, Trude

    2010-01-01

    This research presents a longitudinal study of learner uptake in a computer-assisted language learning (CALL) environment. Over the course of 3 semesters, 10 second language learners of German at a Canadian university used an online, parser-based CALL program that, for the purpose of this research, provided 2 different types of feedback of varying…

  9. Evaluation of Static JavaScript Call Graph Algorithms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.-J. Dijkstra (Jorryt-Jan)

    2014-01-01

    htmlabstractThis thesis consists of a replication study in which two algorithms to compute JavaScript call graphs have been implemented and evaluated. Existing IDE support for JavaScript is hampered due to the dynamic nature of the language. Previous studies partially solve call graph computation

  10. Evidence That Calls-Based and Mobility Networks Are Isomorphic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Coscia

    Full Text Available Social relations involve both face-to-face interaction as well as telecommunications. We can observe the geography of phone calls and of the mobility of cell phones in space. These two phenomena can be described as networks of connections between different points in space. We use a dataset that includes billions of phone calls made in Colombia during a six-month period. We draw the two networks and find that the call-based network resembles a higher order aggregation of the mobility network and that both are isomorphic except for a higher spatial decay coefficient of the mobility network relative to the call-based network: when we discount distance effects on the call connections with the same decay observed for mobility connections, the two networks are virtually indistinguishable.

  11. Call Admission Scheme for Multidimensional Traffic Assuming Finite Handoff User

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Baitul Al Sadi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Usually, the number of users within a cell in a mobile cellular network is considered infinite; hence, M/M/n/k model is appropriate for new originated traffic, but the number of ongoing calls around a cell is always finite. Hence, the traffic model of handoff call will be M/M/n/k/N. In this paper, a K-dimensional traffic model of a mobile cellular network is proposed using the combination of limited and unlimited users case. A new call admission scheme (CAS is proposed based on both thinning scheme and fading condition. The fading condition of the wireless channel access to a handoff call is prioritized compared to newly originated calls.

  12. Frequency synchronization of blue whale calls near Pioneer Seamount.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Michael D; Garfield, Newell; Bland, Roger W

    2010-07-01

    Vocalizations of blue whales were recorded with a cabled hydrophone array at Pioneer Seamount, 50 miles off the California coast. Most calls occurred in repeated sequences of two-call pairs (A, then B). The B call is a frequency-modulated tone highly repeatable in form and pitch. A model of this sound is described which permits detecting very small frequency shifts. B calls are found to be aligned in frequency to about one part in 180. This requires very fine pitch discrimination and control over calling frequency, and suggests that synchronizing to a common frequency pattern carries some adaptive advantage. Some possibilities for acoustic sensing by whales requiring this fine frequency resolution are discussed.

  13. Investigating CALL in the Classroom: Situational Variables to Consider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darlene Liutkus

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A new paradigm in second language pedagogy has Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL playing a significant role. Much of the literature to-date claims that CALL can have a positive impact on students’ second language acquisition (SLA. Mixed method of research produces data to investigate if CALL positively affects student language proficiency, motivation and autonomy. Classroom observation of participants in their natural environment is a qualitative technique used but has situational variables that could skew results if not structured. A questionnaire is a quantitative tool that can offer insight regarding participants’ perception of performance but can contradict what the researcher has observed. This paper will take an in-depth look at variables such as: instructor’s pedagogical application; blending CALL into the curriculum; types of CALL implemented; feedback received and their implications for design of the data collection tools

  14. [Bioacoustic of the advertisement call of Ceratophrys cranwelli (Anura: Ceratophryidae)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valetti, Julián Alonso; Salas, Nancy Edith; Martino, Adolfo Ludovico

    2013-03-01

    The advertisement call plays an important role in the life history of anuran amphibians, mainly during the breeding season. Call features represent an important character to discriminate species, and sound emissions are very effective to assure or reinforce genetic incompatibility, especially in the case of sibling species. Since frogs are ectotherms, acoustic properties of their calls will vary with temperature. In this study, we described the advertisement call of C. cranwelli, quantifying the temperature effect on its components. The acoustic emissions were recorded during 2007 using a DAT record Sony TCD-100 with stereo microphone ECM-MS907 Sony and tape TDK DAT-RGX 60. As males emit their calls floating in temporary ponds, water temperatures were registered after recording the advertisement calls with a digital thermometer TES 1300+/-0.1 degreeC. Altogether, 54 calls from 18 males were analyzed. The temporal variables of each advertisement call were measured using oscillograms and sonograms and the analyses of dominant frequency were performed using a spectrogram. Multiple correlation analysis was used to identify the temperature-dependent acoustic variables and the temperature effect on these variables was quantified using linear regression models. The advertisement call of C. cranwelli consists of a single pulse group. Call duration, Pulse duration and Pulse interval decreased with the temperature, whereas the Pulse rate increased with temperature. The temperature-dependent variables were standardized at 25 degreeC according to the linear regression model obtained. The acoustic variables that were correlated with the temperature are the variables which emissions depend on laryngeal muscles and the temperature constraints the contractile properties of muscles. Our results indicated that temperature explains an important fraction of the variability in some acoustic variables (79% in the Pulse rate), and demonstrated the importance of considering the effect of

  15. Leveraging management information in improving call centre productivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manthisana Mosese

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The availability and efficient use of management information is one of the key strategic levers in driving growth and competitiveness for companies. Management information facilitates vital decision making that assists organisations in improving their competitiveness. For call centre operations, competitiveness entails improving productivity and customer service, and management information is essential in this endeavour.Objectives: This research explored the use of management information and its impact on two fundamental functions namely, improving productivity without compromising the quality of service, in the call centre of a well-known South African fashion retailer, Edcon. Following the implementation of the call centre technology project the research set out to determine how Edcon can transform their call centre to improve productivity and customer service through effective utilisation of their management information. Method: Internal documents and reports were analysed to provide the basis of evaluation between the measures of productivity prior to and post the implementation of a technology project at Edcon’s call centre. Semi-structured in-depth and group interviews were conducted to establish the importance and use of management information in improving productivity and customer service. Results: The results indicated that the availability of management information has indeed contributed to improved efficiency at the Edcon call centre. Although literature claims that there is a correlation between a call centre technology upgrade and improvement in performance, evident in the return on investment being realised within a year or two of implementation, it fell beyond the scope of this study to investigate the return on investment for Edcon’s call centre. Conclusion: Although Edcon has begun realising benefits in improved productivity in their call centre from their available management information, information will

  16. Diagnostic Value of Direct Antibiotic Susceptibility Test for Faster BacterialSusceptibility Reporting in Bacteremia

    OpenAIRE

    Rebriarina Hapsari; Vincentia Rizke Ciptaningtyas; Masfiyah Masfiyah

    2012-01-01

    Background: Rapid and accurate information on susceptibility of bacteria causing bacteraemia is very helpful in sepsis management. Blood culture is the gold standard for bacteraemia diagnosis. Standard antibiotic susceptibility testing needs at least three days for completion while direct method can give the result a day earlier. The aim of this study was to investigate the diagnostic value of direct antibiotic susceptibility testing in blood culture. Methods: Bloods from positive BACTEC b...

  17. Contact calls of common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus): influence of age of caller on antiphonal calling and other vocal responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H-C; Kaplan, G; Rogers, L J

    2009-02-01

    Marmosets, as do many other primates, live in forest environments, are group living and constantly at risk of predation. Retaining contact with one another is therefore a matter of survival. We ask here whether their contact calls (phee and twitter vocalizations) are in some way ordered acoustically by sex or age and whether the calls of older marmosets elicit different responses than those of younger marmosets. In our study, marmosets (2-14 years) were visually isolated from conspecifics and the vocal responses to each isolated caller by other marmosets in the colony were recorded. Vocal responses to phee calls largely consisted of phee calls and, less commonly, twitter calls. No differences between the responses to calls by males and females were apparent. However, we found a strong positive and significant correlation between the caller's age and the percentage of its phee calls receiving a phee response, and a significant negative correlation between the caller's age and the percentage of its phee calls receiving a twitter response. The older the marmoset, the more antiphonal calling occurred. Two-syllable phee calls were emitted more often by older marmosets (10-14 years) than by younger ones (2-6 years). Hence, we have found age-dependent differences in phee-call production and a consistent change in the response received across the adult life-span. This age-dependent effect was independent of kinship relations. This is the first evidence that marmosets distinguish age by vocal parameters alone and make social decisions based on age. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. An integrated mass wasting susceptibility assesment by geographical information systems and remote sensing applications: Example from North Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akgün, Aykut

    2016-04-01

    The Northern part of Turkey have been suffering from both landslides and snow avalanches due to the steep topography and climatological characteristics triggering the processes. In order to manage these natural hazard phenomenons, regional hazards assessments are both crucial and essential for the region. In this context, an integrated hazard assesment including landslide and snow avalanche was carried out for a selected area at North Turkey. Caykara (Trabzon) district was one of the most suitable areas for such a purpose, because several landslide and snow avalanche cases occured in the area during the last two decades. To inspect the landslide and snow avalanche susceptibility of the area, geographical information systems and remote sensing based assessments were applied to the area. To produce a landslide susceptibility map, logistic regression model was used by using lithological, topographical and environmental data set. To obtain a snow avalanche susceptibility map, topograhical data such as slope gradient, slope aspect and slope curvature, environmental data such as normaliazed vegetation index (NDVI), snow accumlation areas and landcover were taken into account, and these data set were analyzed by a 2D modelling tool, called as CONEFALL. By obtaining the landslide and snow avalanche susceptibility maps, five susceptibility classes from very low to very high were differentiated in the area. The both susceptibility maps were also verified by the actual field data as well, and it was determined that the obtained maps were successful. Then, the both susceptibility maps were overlaid, and finally an integrated mass wasting susceptibility map was created. In this final map, total susceptible areas to both landslide and snow avalanche occurrence were determined. The final susceptibility map is believed and expected to be used by the govermental and local authorities as a decision makers to mitigate the landslide and snow avalanche based hazards in the area.

  19. Calling behavior of blue and fin whales off California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleson, Erin Marie

    Passive acoustic monitoring is an effective means for evaluating cetacean presence in remote regions and over long time periods, and may become an important component of cetacean abundance surveys. To use passive acoustic recordings for abundance estimation, an understanding of the behavioral ecology of cetacean calling is crucial. In this dissertation, I develop a better understanding of how blue (Balaenoptera musculus) and fin (B. physalus ) whales use sound with the goal of evaluating passive acoustic techniques for studying their populations. Both blue and fin whales produce several different call types, though the behavioral and environmental context of these calls have not been widely investigated. To better understand how calling is used by these whales off California I have employed both new technologies and traditional techniques, including acoustic recording tags, continuous long-term autonomous acoustic recordings, and simultaneous shipboard acoustic and visual surveys. The outcome of these investigations has led to several conclusions. The production of blue whale calls varies with sex, behavior, season, location, and time of day. Each blue whale call type has a distinct behavioral context, including a male-only bias in the production of song, a call type thought to function in reproduction, and the production of some calls by both sexes. Long-term acoustic records, when interpreted using all call types, provide a more accurate measure of the local seasonal presence of whales, and how they use the region annually, seasonally and daily. The relative occurrence of different call types may indicate prime foraging habitat and the presence of different segments of the population. The proportion of animals heard calling changes seasonally and geographically relative to the number seen, indicating the calibration of acoustic and visual surveys is complex and requires further study on the motivations behind call production and the behavior of calling whales

  20. Acoustic classification of alarm calls by vervet monkeys (Cercopithecus aethiops) and humans (Homo sapiens): I. Natural calls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owren, M J

    1990-03-01

    A 2-choice, operant-conditioning-based classification procedure was developed in which vervet monkeys (Cercopithecus aethiops) categorized species-typical snake and eagle alarm calls recorded from individually identified free-ranging animals. After preliminary training with a pair of calls from a single animal, 2 vervets were tested with novel exemplars produced by a variety of callers. Experiment 1 combined testing with continued training in routine classification of 14 new calls. In Experiment 2, the subjects were tested with 48 novel calls in rapid succession. Human (Homo sapiens) control subjects participated in the first study without extended preliminary training. Monkey and human subjects both showed immediate transfer to classification of unfamiliar alarm calls, despite variations both in voice characteristics and reproduction quality.

  1. Models for Call Acceptance Based on Handoff Guarantees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attahiru Sule Alfa

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Call admission control (CAC is important for cellular wireless networks to provide quality-of-service (QoS requirements to users. Static and adaptive CAC schemes, respectively, make unrealistic assumptions about the distributions of the handoff call arrival process and the number of users in a cell. Handoff arrivals are usually assumed to follow Poisson process in static CAC schemes for Poisson new call arrivals and exponentially distributed call holding and cell residence times. We use a simple proof to show that this assumption of Poisson handoff arrival process is not justified for a two-cell wireless network. In general, we find that the handoff process can be captured by a two-dimensional Markov chain. We propose a novel adaptive CAC scheme for the two-cell system which accepts a new call if it can guarantee, with a certain probability, that a user's call will be maintained irrespective of its (his/her movement in the system. Then, we extend this adaptive scheme for multiple-cell network. We develop another variant of this adaptive scheme which we call fractional adaptive scheme. Both the adaptive and fractional adaptive schemes are found to outperform the guard channel scheme in controlling the handoff failure probability in a cellular wireless network.

  2. The association between advertising and calls to a tobacco quitline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosbaek, Craig H; Austin, Donald F; Stark, Michael J; Lambert, Lori C

    2007-12-01

    This study assessed the cost effectiveness of different types of television and radio advertisements and the time of day in which advertisements were placed in generating calls to the Oregon tobacco quitline. Cost effectiveness was measured by cost per call, calculated as the cost of advertising divided by the number of quitline calls generated by that advertising. Advertising was bought in one-week or two-week blocks and included 27 daytime television buys, 22 evening television buys and 31 radio buys. Cost effectiveness varied widely by medium, time of day and advertisement used. Daytime television was seven times more cost effective than evening television and also more cost effective than radio. The most effective advertisements at generating quitline calls were real life testimonials by people who lost family members to tobacco and advertisements that deal practically with how to quit. Placement of television advertisements during the day versus the evening can increase an advertisement's effectiveness in generating calls to a quitline. Some advertising messages were more effective than others in generating calls to a quitline. Quitline providers can apply findings from previous research when planning media campaigns. In addition, call volume should be monitored in order to assess the cost effectiveness of different strategies to promote use of the quitline.

  3. Can a gray seal (Halichoerus grypus) generalize call classes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansbury, Amanda L; de Freitas, Mafalda; Wu, Gi-Mick; Janik, Vincent M

    2015-11-01

    Past researchers have found that gray seals (Halichoerus grypus) are capable of classifying vocal signals by call type using a trained set, but were unable to generalize to novel exemplars (Shapiro, Slater, & Janik, 2004). Given the importance of auditory categorization in communication, it would be surprising if the animals were unable to generalize acoustically similar calls into classes. Here, we trained a juvenile gray seal to discriminate novel calls into 2 classes, "growls" and "moans," by vocally matching call types (i.e., the seal moaned when played a moan and growled when played a growl). Our method differed from the previous study as we trained the animal using a comparatively large set of exemplars with standardized durations, consisting of both the seal's own calls and those of 2 other seals. The seal successfully discriminated growls and moans for both her own (94% correct choices) and the other seals' (87% correct choices) calls. We used a generalized linear model (GLM) and found that the seal's performance significantly improved across test sessions, and that accuracy was higher during the first presentation of a sound from her own repertoire but decreased after multiple exposures. This pattern was not found for calls from unknown seals. Factor analysis for mixed data (FAMD) identified acoustic parameters that could be used to discriminate between call types and individuals. Growls and moans differed in noise, duration and frequency parameters, whereas individuals differed only in frequency. These data suggest that the seal could have gained information about both call type and caller identity using frequency cues. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. Frogs Call at a Higher Pitch in Traffic Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten M. Parris

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Male frogs call to attract females for mating and to defend territories from rival males. Female frogs of some species prefer lower-pitched calls, which indicate larger, more experienced males. Acoustic interference occurs when background noise reduces the active distance or the distance over which an acoustic signal can be detected. Birds are known to call at a higher pitch or frequency in urban noise, decreasing acoustic interference from low-frequency noise. Using Bayesian linear regression, we investigated the effect of traffic noise on the pitch of advertisement calls in two species of frogs, the southern brown tree frog (Litoria ewingii and the common eastern froglet (Crinia signifera. We found evidence that L. ewingii calls at a higher pitch in traffic noise, with an average increase in dominant frequency of 4.1 Hz/dB of traffic noise, and a total effect size of 123 Hz. This frequency shift is smaller than that observed in birds, but is still large enough to be detected by conspecific frogs and confer a significant benefit to the caller. Mathematical modelling predicted a 24% increase in the active distance of a L. ewingii call in traffic noise with a frequency shift of this size. Crinia signifera may also call at a higher pitch in traffic noise, but more data are required to be confident of this effect. Because frog calls are innate rather than learned, the frequency shift demonstrated by L. ewingii may represent an evolutionary adaptation to noisy conditions. The phenomenon of frogs calling at a higher pitch in traffic noise could therefore constitute an intriguing trade-off between audibility and attractiveness to potential mates.

  5. Well Being and Job Satisfaction Among Call Centre Agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiegman, Inger Marie; Mathiesen, Karen; Møller, Niels

    2004-01-01

    satisfaction. The survey reveals a need for improving working conditions and for development of the work as such in call centres. The survey suggests that the agents both want to participate in the process of development and that they can contribute to the process in a competent way. In the project as part......A survey among 774 agents in four large Danish companies in house call centres shows that working in a call center is stressfull. Lack of control and autonomy, lack of potentiality and challenges, conflict between qualitative and quantitative demands and monitoring all have an adverse effect on job...

  6. The experience of work in a call centre environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanet Hauptfleisch

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available This qualitative research study explored the work experience in a call centre environment in an information technology call centre based in South Africa, which service foreign customers exclusively. Three data collection methods were used, namely narratives, in-depth interviews with call centre consultants, and observation. Following a grounded theory approach, four themes were elicited, namely the perceptions of team members, uncertainty created by a constantly changing environment, perceived distances due to management practices, and depersonalisation experienced while actually dealing with customers. In addition to this, the reported impact of these themes on work performance was explored and compared to existing research.

  7. An empirical analysis of the corporate call decision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Murray Dean

    1998-12-01

    In this thesis we provide insights into the behavior of financial managers of utility companies by studying their decisions to redeem callable preferred shares. In particular, we investigate whether or not an option pricing based model of the call decision, with managers who maximize shareholder value, does a better job of explaining callable preferred share prices and call decisions than do other models of the decision. In order to perform these tests, we extend an empirical technique introduced by Rust (1987) to include the use of information from preferred share prices in addition to the call decisions. The model we develop to value the option embedded in a callable preferred share differs from standard models in two ways. First, as suggested in Kraus (1983), we explicitly account for transaction costs associated with a redemption. Second, we account for state variables that are observed by the decision makers but not by the preferred shareholders. We interpret these unobservable state variables as the benefits and costs associated with a change in capital structure that can accompany a call decision. When we add this variable, our empirical model changes from one which predicts exactly when a share should be called to one which predicts the probability of a call as the function of the observable state. These two modifications of the standard model result in predictions of calls, and therefore of callable preferred share prices, that are consistent with several previously unexplained features of the data; we show that the predictive power of the model is improved in a statistical sense by adding these features to the model. The pricing and call probability functions from our model do a good job of describing call decisions and preferred share prices for several utilities. Using data from shares of the Pacific Gas and Electric Co. (PGE) we obtain reasonable estimates for the transaction costs associated with a call. Using a formal empirical test, we are able to

  8. Adolescent neurobiological susceptibility to social context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta A. Schriber

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Adolescence has been characterized as a period of heightened sensitivity to social contexts. However, adolescents vary in how their social contexts affect them. According to neurobiological susceptibility models, endogenous, biological factors confer some individuals, relative to others, with greater susceptibility to environmental influences, whereby more susceptible individuals fare the best or worst of all individuals, depending on the environment encountered (e.g., high vs. low parental warmth. Until recently, research guided by these theoretical frameworks has not incorporated direct measures of brain structure or function to index this sensitivity. Drawing on prevailing models of adolescent neurodevelopment and a growing number of neuroimaging studies on the interrelations among social contexts, the brain, and developmental outcomes, we review research that supports the idea of adolescent neurobiological susceptibility to social context for understanding why and how adolescents differ in development and well-being. We propose that adolescent development is shaped by brain-based individual differences in sensitivity to social contexts – be they positive or negative – such as those created through relationships with parents/caregivers and peers. Ultimately, we recommend that future research measure brain function and structure to operationalize susceptibility factors that moderate the influence of social contexts on developmental outcomes.

  9. Adolescent Neurobiological Susceptibility to Social Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schriber, Roberta A.; Guyer, Amanda E.

    2016-01-01

    Adolescence has been characterized as a period of heightened sensitivity to social contexts. However, adolescents vary in how their social contexts affect them. According to neurobiological susceptibility models, endogenous, biological factors confer some individuals, relative to others, with greater susceptibility to environmental influences, whereby more susceptible individuals fare the best or worst of all individuals, depending on the environment they encounter (e.g., high vs. low parental warmth). Until recently, research guided by these theoretical frameworks has not incorporated direct measures of brain structure or function to index this sensitivity. Drawing on prevailing models of adolescent neurodevelopment and a growing number of neuroimaging studies on the interrelations among social contexts, the brain, and developmental outcomes, we review research that supports the idea of adolescent neurobiological susceptibility to social context for understanding why and how adolescents differ in development and well-being. We propose that adolescent development is shaped in part by brain-based individual differences in sensitivity to social contexts – be they positive or negative – such as those created through relationships with parents/caregivers and peers. As such, we recommend that future research measure brain function and structure to operationalize susceptibility factors that moderate the influence of social contexts on developmental outcomes. PMID:26773514

  10. Susceptible-infected-susceptible epidemics on the complete graph and the star graph : Exact analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cator, E.A.; Van Mieghem, P.

    2013-01-01

    Since mean-field approximations for susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) epidemics do not always predict the correct scaling of the epidemic threshold of the SIS metastable regime, we propose two novel approaches: (a) an ?-SIS generalized model and (b) a modified SIS model that prevents the

  11. 47 CFR 90.241 - Radio call box operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... transmitter can be only manually reactivated. (9) Frequency selection must be made with regard to reception of... effective radiated power (ERP). (3) The height of a call box antenna may not exceed 6.1 meters (20 feet...

  12. Anuran Call Survey Summary 2006 Canaan Valley National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Anuran call surveys were conducted at Canaan Valley National Wildlife Refuge in April-June 2006 using the protocol developed by the North American Amphibian...

  13. Call for expressions of interest: Strengthening engineering research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    cgu

    2017-10-30

    accreditation organizations, companies, chambers of commerce, technology intermediaries, international engineering organizations). • The organization or consortium must have expertise in fields ... E. Timelines (updated October 30, 2017). August 14, 2017: Call for expressions of interest launched. September 24, 2017: ...

  14. Taxonomic and phylogenetic utility of variation in advertising calls of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Taxonomic and phylogenetic utility of variation in advertising calls of francolins and spurfowls (Galliformes: Phasianidae). Tshifhiwa G. Mandiwana-Neudani, Rauri C.K. Bowie, Martine Hausberger, Laurence Henry, Timothy M. Crowe ...

  15. Nuthatches eavesdrop on variations in heterospecific chickadee mobbing alarm calls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templeton, Christopher N.; Greene, Erick

    2007-01-01

    Many animals recognize the alarm calls produced by other species, but the amount of information they glean from these eavesdropped signals is unknown. We previously showed that black-capped chickadees (Poecile atricapillus) have a sophisticated alarm call system in which they encode complex information about the size and risk of potential predators in variations of a single type of mobbing alarm call. Here we show experimentally that red-breasted nuthatches (Sitta canadensis) respond appropriately to subtle variations of these heterospecific “chick-a-dee” alarm calls, thereby evidencing that they have gained important information about potential predators in their environment. This study demonstrates a previously unsuspected level of discrimination in intertaxon eavesdropping. PMID:17372225

  16. 'Loneliness Epidemic' Called a Major Public Health Threat

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_167643.html 'Loneliness Epidemic' Called a Major Public Health Threat Social ... 7, 2017 MONDAY, Aug. 7, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Loneliness may be more hazardous to your health than ...

  17. CEE/CA: Report calls for decriminalization of sex work

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Betteridge, Glenn

    2006-01-01

    In December 2005, the Central and Eastern European Harm Reduction Network (CEEHRN) released a report calling for the decriminalization of sex work in the 27 countries of Central and Eastern Europe and Central Asia...

  18. Using direct mail to prompt smokers to call a quitline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Richard J; Carlin-Menter, Shannon M; Celestino, Paula B; Bax, Patricia; Brown, Anthony; Cummings, K Michael; Bauer, Joseph E

    2008-07-01

    Telephone quitlines efficiently deliver cessation services, but few smokers use them. This article describes an unsolicited direct mail campaign designed to increase calls to the New York State Smokers' Quitline. Two post-cards advertising the quitline and the availability of free nicotine patches were sent to 77,527 smoker households between August and October 2005. One postcard emphasized the effectiveness of the nicotine patch, whereas the other contrasted the risks of smoking and patch use. Response was evaluated using geographically linked calls to the quitline 15 days before and after each mailing. The postcard campaign increased call volume by 36%, with no difference between the two postcard versions. Those who reported calling the quitline in response to a mailing were more likely to request nicotine patches (91% versus 82%, p promotional tools used by quitlines.

  19. A new stratification of mourning dove call-count routes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankenship, L.H.; Humphrey, A.B.; MacDonald, D.

    1971-01-01

    The mourning dove (Zenaidura macroura) call-count survey is a nationwide audio-census of breeding mourning doves. Recent analyses of the call-count routes have utilized a stratification based upon physiographic regions of the United States. An analysis of 5 years of call-count data, based upon stratification using potential natural vegetation, has demonstrated that this uew stratification results in strata with greater homogeneity than the physiographic strata, provides lower error variance, and hence generates greatet precision in the analysis without an increase in call-count routes. Error variance was reduced approximately 30 percent for the contiguous United States. This indicates that future analysis based upon the new stratification will result in an increased ability to detect significant year-to-year changes.

  20. On-call emergency workload of a general surgical team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jawaid Masood

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To examine the on-call emergency workload of a general surgical team at a tertiary care teaching hospital to guide planning and provision of better surgical services. Patients and Methods: During six months period from August to January 2007; all emergency calls attended by general surgical team of Surgical Unit II in Accident and Emergency department (A and E and in other units of Civil, Hospital Karachi, Pakistan were prospectively recorded. Data recorded includes timing of call, diagnosis, operation performed and outcome apart from demography. Results: Total 456 patients (326 males and 130 females were attended by on-call general surgery team during 30 emergency days. Most of the calls, 191 (41.9% were received from 8 am to 5 pm. 224 (49.1% calls were of abdominal pain, with acute appendicitis being the most common specific pathology in 41 (9.0% patients. Total 73 (16.0% calls were received for trauma. Total 131 (28.7% patients were admitted in the surgical unit for urgent operation or observation while 212 (46.5% patients were discharged from A and E. 92 (20.1% patients were referred to other units with medical referral accounts for 45 (9.8% patients. Total 104 (22.8% emergency surgeries were done and the most common procedure performed was appendicectomy in 34 (32.7% patients. Conclusion: Major workload of on-call surgical emergency team is dealing with the acute conditions of abdomen. However, significant proportion of patients are suffering from other conditions including trauma that require a holistic approach to care and a wide range of skills and experience. These results have important implications in future healthcare planning and for the better training of general surgical residents.

  1. The Call to Excellence--No Room for Complacency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosher, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    The call of the nurse is to promote, protect, and support health in all areas of life. Christian nurses are further called to imitate Jesus Christ. Yet, complacency is a common attitude among nurses. With new national standards of collecting and publicly reporting patient perceptions of care, positive nursing attitudes and excellent care are imperative to successful outcomes. What does it mean to seek professional excellence?

  2. 29 CFR 778.221 - “Call-back” pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false âCall-backâ pay. 778.221 Section 778.221 Labor Regulations...Regular Rateâ Payments Not for Hours Worked § 778.221 “Call-back” pay. (a) General. In the interest of... payments consist of a specified number of hours' pay at the applicable straight time or overtime rates...

  3. Server Level Analysis of Network Operation Utilizing System Call Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-25

    information thus failing to perform reliable detection. Kruegel at al. [9] suggests using arguments of the file management system calls which represent... managed various windows components and performed other activity trivial for an advanced user. None of the monitored processes caused false positive...391-403, 2004. [9] C. Kruegel, D. Mutz, F. Valeur and G. Vigna. “On the Detection of Anomalous System Call Arguments”. ESORICS, Oct. 2003. [10] M

  4. Non-linguistic analysis of call center conversations

    CERN Document Server

    Kopparapu, Sunil Kumar

    2014-01-01

    The book focuses on the part of the audio conversation not related to language such as speaking rate (in terms of number of syllables per unit time) and emotion centric features. This text examines using non-linguistics features to infer information from phone calls to call centers. The author analyzes 'how' the conversation happens and not 'what' the conversation is about by audio signal processing and analysis.

  5. Genotype and SNP calling from next-generation sequencing data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus; Paul, Joshua S.; Albrechtsen, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Meaningful analysis of next-generation sequencing (NGS) data, which are produced extensively by genetics and genomics studies, relies crucially on the accurate calling of SNPs and genotypes. Recently developed statistical methods both improve and quantify the considerable uncertainty associated w...... with genotype calling, and will especially benefit the growing number of studies using low- to medium-coverage data. We review these methods and provide a guide for their use in NGS studies....

  6. Base-calling for next-generation sequencing platforms

    OpenAIRE

    Ledergerber, Christian; Dessimoz, Christophe

    2011-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing platforms are dramatically reducing the cost of DNA sequencing. With these technologies, bases are inferred from light intensity signals, a process commonly referred to as base-calling. Thus, understanding and improving the quality of sequence data generated using these approaches are of high interest. Recently, a number of papers have characterized the biases associated with base-calling and proposed methodological improvements. In this review, we summarize recent ...

  7. Environmental Influences On Diel Calling Behavior In Baleen Whales

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    first use of real-time detection and reporting of marine mammal calls from autonomous underwater vehicles to adaptively plan research activities. 3...eastern tropical Pacific. Animal Behaviour 69:951–958. Wiggins, S. M., E. M. Oleson, M. A. Mcdonald, and J. A. Hildebrand. 2005. Blue whale...Balaenoptera musculus) diel call patterns offshore of Southern California. Aquatic Mammals 31:161–168. PUBLICATIONS Baumgartner, M.F., D.M

  8. Responses of squirrel monkeys to their experimentally modified mobbing calls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtel, Claudia; Hammerschmidt, Kurt

    2003-05-01

    Previous acoustic analyses suggested emotion-correlated changes in the acoustic structure of squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus) vocalizations. Specifically, calls given in aversive contexts were characterized by an upward shift in frequencies, often accompanied by an increase in amplitude. In order to test whether changes in frequencies or amplitude are indeed relevant for conspecific listeners, playback experiments were conducted in which either frequencies or amplitude of mobbing calls were modified. Latency and first orienting response were measured in playback experiments with six adult squirrel monkeys. After broadcasting yaps with increased frequencies or amplitude, squirrel monkeys showed a longer orienting response towards the speaker than after the corresponding control stimuli. Furthermore, after broadcasting yaps with decreased frequencies or amplitude, squirrel monkeys showed a shorter orienting response towards the speaker than after the corresponding manipulated calls with higher frequencies or amplitude. These results suggest that changes in frequencies or amplitude were perceived by squirrel monkeys, indicating that the relationship between call structure and the underlying affective state of the caller agreed with the listener's assessment of the calls. However, a simultaneous increase in frequencies and amplitude did not lead to an enhanced response, compared to each single parameter. Thus, from the receiver's perspective, both call parameters may mutually replace each other.

  9. Seasonal and diurnal calling patterns of Ross and leopards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Tracey L.; Rowney, Gayle A.; Ciaglia, Michaela B.; Cato, Douglas H.

    2005-09-01

    The temporal calling patterns of two Antarctic pack ice seals, the leopard and Ross seal, were examined. This included seasonal onset and decline of calling (coinciding with their breeding season) as well as diurnal changes. Understanding of calling behavior has important implications for acoustic surveying, since this allows the number of calls to be related to an index of the number of animals present and to estimate abundance. The monthly changes in diurnal calling and haul-out patterns (measured via satellite telemetry) were compared. Underwater acoustic recordings were made between 14 October 2003 and 10 January 2004 off Mawson, Eastern Antarctica (660 44.243S and 690 48.748E). Recordings were made using an Acoustics Recording Package (ARP by Dr. John Hildebrand, Scripps Institute of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA) which is designed to sit on the seafloor and passively record acoustic signals. The package was deployed at a depth of 1320.7 m. The sampling rate was 500 Hz and the effective bandwidth from 10 to 250 Hz, covering the bandwidth of only the low-frequency calls of the Ross and leopard seal.

  10. Neurocognitive effects following an overnight call shift on faculty anesthesiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, L C; Mahoney, J J; Raty, S R; Ortiz, J; Apodaca, S; De La Garza, R

    2013-09-01

    The impact of sleep deprivation on neurocognitive performance is a significant concern to both the health of patients and to the physicians caring for them, as demonstrated by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education enforced resident work hours. This study examined the effects of an overnight call at a level 1 trauma hospital on neurocognitive performance of faculty anesthesiologists. Eleven faculty anesthesiologists completed a series of computerized tests that were designed to evaluate different areas of neurocognition, such as working memory, verbal learning, and concentration. The anesthesiologists completed the tests following an overnight call in the morning at 6:30 and again following a normal night's rest at 6:30 on a different date. Within-subjects, repeated measures analysis of variance revealed a significant difference on post-call vs. control performance on measures of learning and memory (P = 0.04). However, there were no significant differences on performance on measures of working memory or sustained attention and vigilance. Pre-call vs. control performances were also evaluated, but no significant differences were detected. Following a night call shift, performance on learning and memory was significantly reduced. Other areas were not significantly affected, which may have been due to certain possibilities, such as practice effect or variability in the call shifts. The real-world relevance of the decline in performance on these measures remains unclear. © 2013 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. In situ sulfur isotope analysis of sulfide minerals by SIMS: Precision and accuracy, with application to thermometry of ~3.5Ga Pilbara cherts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozdon, R.; Kita, N.T.; Huberty, J.M.; Fournelle, J.H.; Johnson, C.A.; Valley, J.W.

    2010-01-01

    precision of δ34S in sphalerite, and the best results were achieved by either reducing the depth of the analysis pits using a Köhler illuminated primary beam, or by lowering the total impact energy from 20 keV to 13 keV. The resulting grain-to-grain precision in δ34S improves from ± 1.7‰ to better than 0.6‰ (2SD) in both procedures. With careful use of appropriate analytical conditions, the accuracy of SIMS analysis for δ34S approaches ± 0.3‰ (2SD) for chalcopyrite, pyrite and pyrrhotite and ± 0.6‰ for sphalerite. Measurements of δ34S in sub-20 µm grains of pyrite and sphalerite in ∼ 3.5 Ga cherts from the Pilbara craton, Western Australia show that this analytical technique is suitable for in situ sulfur isotope thermometry with ± 50 °C accuracy in appropriate samples, however, sulfides are not isotopically equilibrated in analyzed samples.

  12. Fidelity susceptibility as holographic PV-criticality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Momeni, Davood, E-mail: davoodmomeni78@gmail.com [Eurasian International Center for Theoretical Physics and Department of General & Theoretical Physics, Eurasian National University, Astana 010008 (Kazakhstan); Faizal, Mir, E-mail: mirfaizalmir@googlemail.com [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, Alberta T1K 3M4 (Canada); Irving K. Barber School of Arts and Sciences, University of British Columbia – Okanagan, 3333 University Way, Kelowna, British Columbia V1V 1V7 (Canada); Myrzakulov, Kairat, E-mail: kairatmyrzakul@gmail.com [Eurasian International Center for Theoretical Physics and Department of General & Theoretical Physics, Eurasian National University, Astana 010008 (Kazakhstan); Myrzakulov, Ratbay, E-mail: rmyrzakulov@gmail.com [Eurasian International Center for Theoretical Physics and Department of General & Theoretical Physics, Eurasian National University, Astana 010008 (Kazakhstan)

    2017-02-10

    It is well known that entropy can be used to holographically establish a connection among geometry, thermodynamics and information theory. In this paper, we will use complexity to holographically establish a connection among geometry, thermodynamics and information theory. Thus, we will analyze the relation among holographic complexity, fidelity susceptibility, and thermodynamics in extended phase space. We will demonstrate that fidelity susceptibility (which is the informational complexity dual to a maximum volume in AdS) can be related to the thermodynamical volume (which is conjugate to the cosmological constant in the extended thermodynamic phase space). Thus, this letter establishes a relation among geometry, thermodynamics, and information theory, using complexity.

  13. Middle Prut plain's erosion susceptibility evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tudor CASTRAVEȚ

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The given article is dedicated to Middle Prut Plain’s erosion susceptibility evaluation  using factorial analysis and methodology of principal component analysis implemented byGeographical Informational System GRASS. Susceptibility evaluation is executed in a qualitative mode, and the results have preliminary character, for further quantitative andmore precise study. This type of natural hazards analysis offers information on probable localization and severity of erosion phenomena, as well as their manifestation probabilityin a given place.

  14. The Aging Kidney: Increased Susceptibility to Nephrotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinhui Wang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Three decades have passed since a series of studies indicated that the aging kidney was characterized by increased susceptibility to nephrotoxic injury. Data from these experimental models is strengthened by clinical data demonstrating that the aging population has an increased incidence and severity of acute kidney injury (AKI. Since then a number of studies have focused on age-dependent alterations in pathways that predispose the kidney to acute insult. This review will focus on the mechanisms that are altered by aging in the kidney that may increase susceptibility to injury, including hemodynamics, oxidative stress, apoptosis, autophagy, inflammation and decreased repair.

  15. Absolute MR thermometry using nanocarriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deckers, Roel; Sprinkhuizen, Sara M; Crielaard, Bart J; Ippel, Johannes H; Boelens, Rolf; Bakker, Chris J G; Storm, Gert; Lammers, Twan; Bartels, Lambertus W

    2014-01-01

    Accurate time-resolved temperature mapping is crucial for the safe use of hyperthermia-mediated drug delivery. We here propose a magnetic resonance imaging temperature mapping method in which drug delivery systems serve not only to improve tumor targeting, but also as an accurate and absolute

  16. Sleep Quality of Call Handlers Employed in International Call Centers in National Capital Region of Delhi, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JD Raja

    2016-10-01

    suspicion of insomnia or suspected insomnia; the rest had no sleep problem. Smoking, poor social support, heavy workload, lack of relaxation facility at office, and prolonged travel time to office were independent predictors of sleep quality (p<0.05. Conclusion: Call handlers have to compromise upon their sleep owing to the contemporary work settings in call centers. Safeguarding their health becomes an occupational health challenge to public health specialists.

  17. Conduits to care: call lights and patients’ perceptions of communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montie M

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Mary Montie,1 Clayton Shuman,1 Jose Galinato,1 Lance Patak,2 Christine A Anderson,1 Marita G Titler1 1Department of Systems, Populations, and Leadership, School of Nursing, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, 2Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Seattle Children’s Hospital, Seattle, WA, USA Background: Call light systems remain the primary means of hospitalized patients to initiate communication with their health care providers. Although there is vast amounts of literature discussing patient communication with their health care providers, few studies have explored patients’ perceptions concerning call light use and communication. The specific aim of this study was to solicit patients’ perceptions regarding their call light use and communication with nursing staff. Methods: Patients invited to this study met the following inclusion criteria: proficient in English, been hospitalized for at least 24 hours, aged ≥21 years, and able to communicate verbally (eg, not intubated. Thirty participants provided written informed consent, were enrolled in the study, and completed interviews. Results: Using qualitative descriptive methods, five major themes emerged from patients’ perceptions (namely; establishing connectivity, participant safety concerns, no separation: health care and the call light device, issues with the current call light, and participants’ perceptions of “nurse work”. Multiple minor themes supported these major themes. Data analysis utilized the constant comparative methods of Glaser and Strauss. Discussion: Findings from this study extend the knowledge of patients’ understanding of not only why inconsistencies occur between the call light and their nurses, but also why the call light is more than merely a device to initiate communication; rather, it is a direct conduit to their health care and its delivery. Keywords: nurse–patient communication, medical technology, quality of care, qualitative research

  18. Missing call bias in high-throughput genotyping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Rong

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The advent of high-throughput and cost-effective genotyping platforms made genome-wide association (GWA studies a reality. While the primary focus has been invested upon the improvement of reducing genotyping error, the problems associated with missing calls are largely overlooked. Results To probe into the effect of missing calls on GWAs, we demonstrated experimentally the prevalence and severity of the problem of missing call bias (MCB in four genotyping technologies (Affymetrix 500 K SNP array, SNPstream, TaqMan, and Illumina Beadlab. Subsequently, we showed theoretically that MCB leads to biased conclusions in the subsequent analyses, including estimation of allele/genotype frequencies, the measurement of HWE and association tests under various modes of inheritance relationships. We showed that MCB usually leads to power loss in association tests, and such power change is greater than what could be achieved by equivalent reduction of sample size unbiasedly. We also compared the bias in allele frequency estimation and in association tests introduced by MCB with those by genotyping errors. Our results illustrated that in most cases, the bias can be greatly reduced by increasing the call-rate at the cost of genotyping error rate. Conclusion The commonly used 'no-call' procedure for the observations of borderline quality should be modified. If the objective is to minimize the bias, the cut-off for call-rate and that for genotyping error rate should be properly coupled in GWA. We suggested that the ongoing QC cut-off for call-rate should be increased, while the cut-off for genotyping error rate can be reduced properly.

  19. Referential alarm calling behaviour in New World primates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane CÄSAR, Klaus ZUBERBÜHLER

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available There is relatively good evidence that non-human primates can communicate about objects and events in their environment in ways that allow recipients to draw inferences about the nature of the event experienced by the signaller. In some species, there is also evidence that the basic semantic units are not individual calls, but call sequences and the combinations generated by them. These two findings are relevant to theories pertaining to the origins of human language because of the resemblances of these phenomena with linguistic reference and syntactic organisation. Until recently, however, most research efforts on the primate origins of human language have involved Old World species with comparatively few systematic studies on New World monkeys, which has prevented insights into the deeper phylogenetic roots and evolutionary origins of language-relevant capacities. To address this, we review the older primate literature and very recent evidence for functionally referential communication and call combinations in New World primates. Within the existing literature there is ample evidence in both Callitrichids and Cebids for acoustically distinct call variants given to external disturbances that are accompanied by distinct behavioural responses. A general pattern is that one call type is typically produced in response to a wide range of general disturbances, often on the ground but also including inter-group encounters, while another call type is produced in response to a much narrower range of aerial threats. This pattern is already described for Old World monkeys and Prosimians, suggesting an early evolutionary origin. Second, recent work with black-fronted titi monkeys has produced evidence for different alarm call sequences consisting of acoustically distinct call types. These sequences appear to encode several aspects of the predation event simultaneously, notably predator type and location. Since meaningful call sequences have already been

  20. Genetics of Asthma Susceptibility and Severity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slager, Rebecca E.; Hawkins, Gregory A.; Li, Xingnan; Postma, Dirkje S.; Meyers, Deborah A.; Bleecker, Eugene R.

    This article summarizes major findings in genome-wide studies of asthma susceptibility and severity. Two large meta-analyses identified four chromosomal regions which were consistently associated with development of asthma. Genes that are associated with asthma subphenotypes such as lung function,

  1. Nutrition affects insect susceptibility to Bt toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deans, Carrie A.; Behmer, Spencer T.; Tessnow, Ashley E.; Tamez-Guerra, Patricia; Pusztai-Carey, Marianne; Sword, Gregory A.

    2017-01-01

    Pesticide resistance represents a major challenge to global food production. The spread of resistance alleles is the primary explanation for observations of reduced pesticide efficacy over time, but the potential for gene-by-environment interactions (plasticity) to mediate susceptibility has largely been overlooked. Here we show that nutrition is an environmental factor that affects susceptibility to Bt toxins. Protein and carbohydrates are two key macronutrients for insect herbivores, and the polyphagous pest Helicoverpa zea self-selects and performs best on diets that are protein-biased relative to carbohydrates. Despite this, most Bt bioassays employ carbohydrate-biased rearing diets. This study explored the effect of diet protein-carbohydrate content on H. zea susceptibility to Cry1Ac, a common Bt endotoxin. We detected a 100-fold increase in LC50 for larvae on optimal versus carbohydrate-biased diets, and significant diet-mediated variation in survival and performance when challenged with Cry1Ac. Our results suggest that Bt resistance bioassays that use ecologically- and physiologically-mismatched diets over-estimate susceptibility and under-estimate resistance.

  2. Climate change and corn susceptibility to mycotoxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maize is an essential part of the world’s grain supply, but climate change has the potential to increase maize susceptibility to mycotoxigenic fungal pathogens and reduce food security and safety. While rising atmospheric [CO2] is a driving force of climate change, our understanding of how elevated ...

  3. Why do Individuals Differ in Viral Susceptibility?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluijs, van L.; Pijlman, G.P.; Kammenga, J.E.

    2017-01-01

    Viral susceptibility and disease progression is determined by host genetic variation that underlies individual differences. Genetic polymorphisms that affect the phenotype upon infection have been well-studied for only a few viruses, such as HIV-1 and Hepatitis C virus. However, even for

  4. antimicrobial susceptibility and plasmids from escherichia coli

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2001-10-02

    Oct 2, 2001 ... 78 No. IO October 200]. ANTIMICROBIAL SUSCEPTIBILITY AND PLASMIDS FROM ESCHERICHIA COLI ISOLATED FROM RATS. FM. Gakuya, BVM, MSc, Field Veterinarian, Kenya Wildlife Services, M.N. Kyule, BVM, ... Request for reprints to: Dr FM. ... profile index (API) 20E strips (Bio Merieux, Marcy~l?

  5. Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of Salmonella typhi and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to determine antimicrobial susceptibility testing patterns of Candida Albicans and Salmonella typhi isolates. Fifteen isolates of each microorganism were collected from three hospitals located in Dar es Salaam region within a 3-month period in the year 2005. Candida Albicans and Salmonella typhi ...

  6. Incidence and antibiotic susceptibility pattern of Staphylococcus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Incidence and antibiotic susceptibility pattern of Staphylococcus aureus amongst patients with urinary tract infection (UTI) in UBTH Benin City, Nigeria. ... (4.4%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (2.0%) and Candida albican (1.0%). No growth was recorded in 46.6% of cultures. The occurrence of S. aureus was found to be ...

  7. Short Communication Antibiotic Susceptibility Pattern and Beta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The multiple drug resistance as evident in high MICs of the antibiotics tested could probably be due to abuse/misuse of antibiotics resulting in recurrence of furuncles in the patients. Keywords: Antibiotic susceptibility, β-lactamase, Recurrent furunculosis, Staphylococcus aureus. Received 08 August 2011/ Accepted 30 ...

  8. Prevalence and susceptibility pattern of methicillinresistant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Also, recent reports describe methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) carriage in persons in the community. The study investigated its prevalence in urine of healthy women and its susceptibility pattern to other antibiotics. Urine samples collected from healthy women volunteers in Zaria were cultured and screened for S.

  9. Landslide susceptibility analysis using Probabilistic Certainty Factor ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper reports the use of a GIS based Probabilistic Certainty Factor method to assess the geo-environmental factors that contribute to landslide susceptibility in Tevankarai Ar sub-watershed,. Kodaikkanal. Landslide occurrences are a common phenomenon in the Tevankarai Ar sub-watershed,. Kodaikkanal owing to ...

  10. Estimation of bonding nature using diamagnetic susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomiyasu, Keisuke; Sato, Toyoto; Orimo, Shin-ichi

    2015-05-21

    A chemical bond includes both covalent and ionic characteristics. We develop an experimental method to estimate the degree of each contribution based on magnetic susceptibility measurements, in which Pascal's scheme for Larmor diamagnetism is combined with electronegativity. The applicability to metal hydrides is also shown.

  11. acetyltransferases: Influence on Lung Cancer Susceptibility

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lung cancer remains a major health challenge in the world. It is the commonest cause of cancer mortality in men, it has been suggested that genetic susceptibility may contribute to the major risk factor, with increasing prevalence of smoking. Lung cancer has reached epidemic proportions in India. Recently indoor air ...

  12. Susceptibility Pattern of Nasopharyngeal Isolates of Streptococcus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aims: To determine the rate of nasopharyngeal colonization of Streptococcus pneumoniae among nursery school children in Enugu urban and to determine their antibiotic susceptibility pattern particularly the penicillin resistant strains. Methods: Specimens were collected from the nasopharynx of 385 apparently healthy ...

  13. Susceptibility of pathogenic and nonpathogenic Naegleria ssp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whiteman, L.Y.

    1988-01-01

    The susceptibility of four species of Naegleria amoebae to complement-mediated lysis was determined. The amoebicidal activity of normal human serum (NHS) and normal guinea pig serum (NGPS) for Naegleria amoebae was measured by an in vitro cytotoxicity assay. Release of radioactivity from amoebae labeled with {sup 3}H-uridine and visual observation with a compound microscope were used as indices of lysis. Susceptibility or resistance to complement-mediated lysis in vitro correlated with the in vivo pathogenic potential. Nonpathogenic Naegleria amoebae were lysed at a faster rate and at higher cell concentrations than were pathogenic amoebae. Electrophoretic analysis of NHS incubated with pathogenic or nonpathogenic Naegleria spp. demonstrated that amoebae activate the complement cascade resulting in the production of C3 and C5 complement cleavage products. Treatment with papain or trypsin for 1 h, but not with sialidase, increase the susceptibility of highly pathogenic, mouse-passaged N. fowleri to lysis. Treatment with actinomycin D, cycloheximide or various protease inhibitors for 4 h did not increase susceptibility to lysis. Neither a repair process involving de novo protein synthesis nor a complement-inactivating protease appear to account for the increase resistance of N. fowleri amoebae to complement-mediated lysis. A binding study with {sup 125}I radiolabeled C9 indicated that the terminal complement component does not remain stably bound to the membrane of pathogenic amoebae.

  14. Surveillance and insecticide susceptibility status of Culicine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vector control programs in Nigeria are mostly targeted towards reducing the burden of malaria with less emphasis placed on other debilitating vector borne diseases such as dengue, yellow fever and filariasis. This study assessed the indoor resting densities and insecticide susceptibility status of Culex and Aedes ...

  15. Epidemiological and antibiotic susceptibility profiles of infectious ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-09-28

    Sep 28, 2011 ... isolation rates among different age groups, educational status, gender, water drank, use of chlorine, toilet use, exposure at home to .... with intermediate susceptibility to ciprofloxacin in the majority of .... Antibiotic and bacterial strain specific distribution of resistance in bacteria isolated from patients attending.

  16. Bacteriological Quality and antimicrobial susceptibility of some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bacteriological Quality and antimicrobial susceptibility of some isolates of Well Water used for Drinking in Jimma Town, Southwest Ethiopia. ... resistance against most of the antibiotics tested. In general, the well water samples analyzed in this study were found in unacceptable condition in terms of bacteriological quality.

  17. Susceptibility to methamphetamine dependence associated with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Khyber Saify

    2015-09-26

    Sep 26, 2015 ... Susceptibility to methamphetamine dependence associated with high transcriptional activity alleles of VNTR polymorphism in the promoter region of monoamine oxidase A (MAOA). Khyber Saify, Mostafa Saadat*. Department of Biology, College of Sciences, Shiraz University, Shiraz 71454, Iran. Received ...

  18. Susceptibility of Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine anti-fungal susceptibility of Cryptococcus neoformans and. Cryptococcus gattii from environmental and clinical sources in Nairobi, Kenya. Design: Prospective study. Setting: Kenya Medical Research Institute, Mycology laboratory, Nairobi, Kenya. Subjects: A total of 123 isolates were tested for their ...

  19. Susceptibility of Some Bacterial Contaminants Recovered from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: Nine bacterial isolates recovered from various brands of commercially available cosmetics marketed in Jordan were tested for their susceptibility pattern against two paraben esters and two formaldehyde donors in addition to nine commonly used antibiotics. The biocidal effect for three preservatives was tested at ...

  20. Antimicrobial susceptibility of organisms causing community ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Demographic and clinical data were recorded and mid-stream urine (MSU) specimens were cultured. UTI pathogens were Gram-stained and identified to species level. Etest-based antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed for amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, cefixime, cefuroxime, ciprofloxacin, fosfomycin, levofloxacin, ...

  1. Antibiotic Susceptibility Pattern of Extended Spectrum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the antibiotic susceptibility pattern of various bacterial pathogens including extended spectrum betalactamase (ESBL) producers in Kano, Nigeria. Method: A total of 604 consecutive clinical samples obtained from Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital. (AKTH), Kano between January and July 2010 were ...

  2. Antimicrobial susceptibility of staphylococci species from cow ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of antibiotic susceptibility of Staphylococcus species isolated from foremilk samples. Setting: Milk was collected from five farms within a 70 km radius of Gaborone, Botswana. Subjects: Two hundred and twenty five staphylococci isolates from foremilk samples. Main outcome measures: ...

  3. Prevalence and antibiotic susceptibility pattern of methicillin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a multidrug resistant bacterium that threatens the continued effectiveness of antibiotics worldwide. The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of MRSA and its antibiotic susceptibility pattern in patients with burns and bedsore. This was a cross- sectional ...

  4. Assessment of antibiotic susceptibilities, genotypic characteristics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was designed to evaluate the antibiotic susceptibilities, genotypic characteristics and biofilm formation abilities of antibiotic-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus KACC 13236 (SAS), multiple antibiotic-resistant S. aureus CCARM 3080 (SAR), antibiotic-sensitive Salmonella Typhimurium KCCM 40253 (STS) and ...

  5. Isolation, identifications and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A cross-sectional study was conducted from November 2013 to April 2014 to isolate coagulase positive Staphylococcus (CPS) from subclinical mastitic (SCM) lactating cows, to establishing prevalence, to identify risk factors and to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of CPS isolates in and around Haramaya.

  6. Antimicrobial susceptibility in community-acquired bacterial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Bacterial isolates were obtained from adults suspected to have community-acquired pneumonia and who sought treatment at two city council clinics in Nairobi, Kenya. Susceptibility to antimicrobial agents was performed using a microdilution broth method, according to the criteria set ...

  7. Antibiotic Susceptibility of Potentially Probiotic Vaginal Lactobacilli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Ocaña

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study the antimicrobial susceptibility of six vaginal probiotic lactobacilli. Methods. The disc diffusion method in Müeller Hinton, LAPTg and MRS agars by the NCCLS (National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards procedure was performed. Due to the absence of a Lactobacillus reference strains, the results were compared to those of Staphylococcus aureus ATCC29213. Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC with 21 different antibiotics in LAPTg agar and broth was also determined. Results. LAPTg and MRS agars are suitable media to study antimicrobial susceptibility of lactobacilli. However, the NCCLS procedure needs to be standardized for this genus. The MICs have shown that all Lactobacillus strains grew at concentrations above 10 μg/mL of chloramphenicol, aztreonam, norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, streptomycin and kanamycin. Four lactobacilli were sensitive to 1 μg/mL vancomycin and all of them were resistant to 1000 μg/mL of metronidazole. Sensitivity to other antibiotics depended on each particular strain. Conclusions. The NCCLS method needs to be standardized in an appropriate medium to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility of Lactobacillus. Vaginal probiotic lactobacilli do not display uniform susceptibility to antibiotics. Resistance to high concentrations of metronidazole suggests that lactobacilli could be simultaneously used with a bacterial vaginosis treatment to restore the vaginal normal flora.

  8. Antibiotic Susceptibility of Potentially Probiotic Vaginal Lactobacilli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocaña, Virginia; Silva, Clara; Nader-Macías, María Elena

    2006-01-01

    Objective. To study the antimicrobial susceptibility of six vaginal probiotic lactobacilli. Methods. The disc diffusion method in Müeller Hinton, LAPTg and MRS agars by the NCCLS (National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards) procedure was performed. Due to the absence of a Lactobacillus reference strains, the results were compared to those of Staphylococcus aureus ATCC29213. Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) with 21 different antibiotics in LAPTg agar and broth was also determined. Results. LAPTg and MRS agars are suitable media to study antimicrobial susceptibility of lactobacilli. However, the NCCLS procedure needs to be standardized for this genus. The MICs have shown that all Lactobacillus strains grew at concentrations above 10 μg/mL of chloramphenicol, aztreonam, norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, streptomycin and kanamycin. Four lactobacilli were sensitive to 1 μg/mL vancomycin and all of them were resistant to 1000 μg/mL of metronidazole. Sensitivity to other antibiotics depended on each particular strain. Conclusions. The NCCLS method needs to be standardized in an appropriate medium to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility of Lactobacillus. Vaginal probiotic lactobacilli do not display uniform susceptibility to antibiotics. Resistance to high concentrations of metronidazole suggests that lactobacilli could be simultaneously used with a bacterial vaginosis treatment to restore the vaginal normal flora. PMID:17485797

  9. Sparse methods for Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgic, Berkin; Chatnuntawech, Itthi; Langkammer, Christian; Setsompop, Kawin

    2015-09-01

    Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping (QSM) aims to estimate the tissue susceptibility distribution that gives rise to subtle changes in the main magnetic field, which are captured by the image phase in a gradient echo (GRE) experiment. The underlying susceptibility distribution is related to the acquired tissue phase through an ill-posed linear system. To facilitate its inversion, spatial regularization that imposes sparsity or smoothness assumptions can be employed. This paper focuses on efficient algorithms for regularized QSM reconstruction. Fast solvers that enforce sparsity under Total Variation (TV) and Total Generalized Variation (TGV) constraints are developed using Alternating Direction Method of Multipliers (ADMM). Through variable splitting that permits closed-form iterations, the computation efficiency of these solvers are dramatically improved. An alternative approach to improve the conditioning of the ill-posed inversion is to acquire multiple GRE volumes at different head orientations relative to the main magnetic field. The phase information from such multi-orientation acquisition can be combined to yield exquisite susceptibility maps and obviate the need for regularized reconstruction, albeit at the cost of increased data acquisition time.

  10. Compensatory and Susceptive Responses of Cowpea Genotypes...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    turing genotypes of cowpea. Control of aphid's infestation in early maturing cowpea genotypes should not be delayed up to two weeks after infestation (28 days after planting) to avoid yield loss. Aphid infestation period for studies in susceptive response in medium to late matur- ing genotypes should go beyond 28 days after.

  11. Mapping markers linked to porcine salmonellosis susceptibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galina-Pantoja, L.; Siggens, K.; Schriek, M.G.; Heuven, H.C.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314417818

    2009-01-01

    Anim Genet. 2009 Jun 3. [Epub ahead of print] Mapping markers linked to porcine salmonellosis susceptibility. Galina-Pantoja L, Siggens K, van Schriek MG, Heuven HC. PIC/Genus, 100 Bluegrass Commons Blvd, Hendersonville, TN 37075, USA. The goal of this study was to identify pig chromosomal regions

  12. Caspofungin Etest susceptibility testing of Candida species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendrup, Maiken Cavling; Pfaller, Michael A; Schønheyder, Henrik Carl

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of caspofungin Etest and the recently revised CLSI breakpoints. A total of 497 blood isolates, of which 496 were wild-type isolates, were included. A total of 65/496 susceptible isolates (13.1%) were misclassified as intermediate (I) or re...

  13. Species identification and antifungal susceptibility pattern of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dalia Saad ElFeky

    2015-10-23

    Oct 23, 2015 ... Species identification and antifungal susceptibility pattern of Candida isolates in cases of vulvovaginal candidiasis. Dalia Saad ElFeky a,. *, Noha Mahmoud Gohar a. , Eman Ahmad El-Seidi a. ,. Mona Mahmoud Ezzat a. , Somaia Hassan AboElew b a Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, ...

  14. The current susceptibility pattern of methicillin resistant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from in-patients and out-patients at the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital (UPTH) was studied. Fifty, S. aureus organisms were isolated from routine clinical specimens such as high vaginal, wound, urethral and ear ...

  15. Prevalence And Antimicrobial Susceptibility Pattern Of Methicillin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an important nosocomial pathogen. We report the prevalence and antibiotic susceptibility pattern of MRSA in Amravati, Maharashtra state (India). A total of 150 healthcare-associated (HA) sources (doctors mobiles phone and wound/pus swabs), and 160 ...

  16. Distribution and antibiotic susceptibility pattern of methicillin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The rise of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection has become a serious health issue. The emergence of mutidrug – resistant MRSA strains compounds chemotherapy and has raised public health concern. In this preliminary study, the distribution and antimicrobial susceptibility profile of ...

  17. Prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of Staphylococcus aureus from cow's milk, nasal and environmental swabs in selected dairy farms in Morogoro, ... 28.4% (n=27) of all isolates were resistant to Oxacillin and/or Cefoxitin, and therefore classified as Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

  18. Antimicrobial susceptibility and minimal inhibitory concentration of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antibiotic susceptibility profile of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from different animal species with septic ocular surface disease. Sixteen strains of P. aeruginosa were isolated from different species of animals (dog, cat, horse, penguin and brown bear) with ocular surface ...

  19. Isolation, characterization and antibiotic susceptibility pattern of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The swab sticks were inoculated into brain-heart infusion broth, transported to the laboratory and then inoculated on mannitol salt agar. Isolates with the characteristic colonial morphology of S. aureus were then identified microscopically and characterized biochemically. The susceptibility of S. aureus isolates to seven ...

  20. Antibiotic Susceptibility Pattern of Extended Spectrum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antibiotics susceptibility tests including, ESBL screening and confirmation, were carried out by disc diffusion technique using Clinical Laboratory Standard Institute (CLSI) criteria. Results: Ten different types of bacteria genera were observed from nine different clinical samples. E. coli was the most frequently isolated bacteria ...