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Sample records for susceptibility contrast magnetic

  1. Perfusion imaging with magnetic-susceptibility contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, B.R.; Belliveau, J.W.; Betteridge, D.; Cohen, M.S.; Weisskoff, R.M.; Vevea, J.M.; Rzedzian, R.P.; Brady, T.J.

    1989-01-01

    In animal models, transient signal los on T2-weighted images has been well documented following intravenous injection of high-magnetic-susceptibility contrast agents that are compartmentalized within the brain intravascular space. These signal changes have been correlated with physiologic parameters, such as blood flow and volume. The advent of whole-body single-shot imaging capability, coupled with the approval of paramagnetic contrasts agents for human use, has enabled the authors to demonstrate susceptibility contrast in the human brain, allowing for generation of functional images. With use of a 1.5-T imaging system gradient-echo images (TE = 60 msec) were acquired in 75 msec. Sequential single-sections images were sampled every 1 second following bolus administration of 0.1 mmol/kg of Gd-DTPA

  2. Magnetic susceptibility imaging with a nonionic contrast agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cacheris, W.; Rocklage, S.M.; Quay, S.; Dow, W.; Love, D.; Worah, D.; Lim, K.

    1988-01-01

    The magnetic susceptibility mechanism for MR imaging contrast enhancement has the advantage of providing useful information, such as cerebral blood flow, without crossing the blood-brain barrier. In this paper the authors report the use of a highly effective, relatively nontoxic chelate as a magnetic susceptibility agent. Dy-DTPA-bis(methylamide) (Dy-DTPA-BMA) has an extremely low acute toxicity (LD-50, intravenous, mice ∼ 40 mmol/kg). Doses of 1 mmol/kg and 2 mmol/kg Dy-DTPA-BMA lowered the initial signal intensity 63% to 57%, respectively. The utility of this technique in detecting areas of reduced blood flow within the brain was demonstrated by imaging a rabbit with a cerebral perfusion deficit

  3. Dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging in neuropsychiatry: present utility and future promise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renshaw, P.F.; Levin, J.M.; Kaufman, M.J.; Ross, M.H.; Lewis, R.F.; Harris, G.J.

    1997-01-01

    Dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (DSC MRI) provides a noninvasive means to create high resolution maps of the regional distribution of cerebral blood volume (CBV). Most DSC MRI studies conducted to date have focused on the evaluation of patients with cerebral neoplasms, ischemia or infarction, and epilepsy. However, preliminary work suggests that DSC MRI may also provide clinically important information for the evaluation of patients with neuropsychiatric disorders, especially dementia and schizophrenia. Additionally, with appropriate modification, DSC MRI may be used to reliably evaluate the effects of pharmacological challenges on cerebral hemodynamics. As pharmacotherapy is an important component in the treatment of a range of psychiatric disorders, the dynamic assessment of changes in cerebral perfusion associated with drug administration may ultimately lead to the development of ''brain function tests'' for a wide range of disorders. (orig.)

  4. Malignancy assessment of brain tumours with magnetic resonance spectroscopy and dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI

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    Fayed, Nicolas; Davila, Jorge; Medrano, Jaime [Diagnostic Radiology Department, Clinica Quiron, Zaragoza (Spain); Olmos, Salvador [Instituto de Investigacion en Ingenieria de Aragon, Zaragoza (Spain)], E-mail: olmos@unizar.es

    2008-09-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the most common and well-established imaging modality for evaluation of intracerebral neoplasms, but there are still some incompletely solved challenges, such as reliable distinction between high- and low-grade tumours, exact delineation of tumour extension, and discrimination between recurrent tumour and radiation necrosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the contribution of two MRI techniques to non-invasively estimate brain tumour grade. Twenty-four patients referred to MRI examination were analyzed and diagnosed with single intra-axial brain tumour. Lastly, histopathological analysis was performed to verify tumour type. Ten patients presented low-grade gliomas, while the remaining patients showed high-grade tumours, including glioblastomas in eight cases, isolated metastases in four patients and two cases with anaplastic gliomas. MRI examinations were performed on a 1.5-T scanner (Signa, General Electric). The acquisition protocol included the following sequences: saggital T1-weighted localizer, axial T1- and T2-weighted MRI, single-voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) MRI and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MRI. MRS data was analyzed with standard software provided by the scanner manufacturer. The metabolite ratio with the largest significant difference between tumour grades was the choline/creatine (Ch/Cr) ratio with elevated values in high-grade gliomas and metastases. A Ch/Cr ratio equal or larger than 1.55 predicted malignancy grade with 92% sensitivity and 80% specificity. The area under the ROC curve was 0.92 (CI: 95%; 0.81-1). Regarding to perfusion parameters, relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) maps were estimated from the MR signal intensity time series during bolus passage with two commercial software packages. Two different regions of interest (ROI) were used to evaluate rCBV: lesion centre and perilesional region. All rCBV values were normalized to CBV in a

  5. Malignancy assessment of brain tumours with magnetic resonance spectroscopy and dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayed, Nicolas; Davila, Jorge; Medrano, Jaime; Olmos, Salvador

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the most common and well-established imaging modality for evaluation of intracerebral neoplasms, but there are still some incompletely solved challenges, such as reliable distinction between high- and low-grade tumours, exact delineation of tumour extension, and discrimination between recurrent tumour and radiation necrosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the contribution of two MRI techniques to non-invasively estimate brain tumour grade. Twenty-four patients referred to MRI examination were analyzed and diagnosed with single intra-axial brain tumour. Lastly, histopathological analysis was performed to verify tumour type. Ten patients presented low-grade gliomas, while the remaining patients showed high-grade tumours, including glioblastomas in eight cases, isolated metastases in four patients and two cases with anaplastic gliomas. MRI examinations were performed on a 1.5-T scanner (Signa, General Electric). The acquisition protocol included the following sequences: saggital T1-weighted localizer, axial T1- and T2-weighted MRI, single-voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) MRI and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MRI. MRS data was analyzed with standard software provided by the scanner manufacturer. The metabolite ratio with the largest significant difference between tumour grades was the choline/creatine (Ch/Cr) ratio with elevated values in high-grade gliomas and metastases. A Ch/Cr ratio equal or larger than 1.55 predicted malignancy grade with 92% sensitivity and 80% specificity. The area under the ROC curve was 0.92 (CI: 95%; 0.81-1). Regarding to perfusion parameters, relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) maps were estimated from the MR signal intensity time series during bolus passage with two commercial software packages. Two different regions of interest (ROI) were used to evaluate rCBV: lesion centre and perilesional region. All rCBV values were normalized to CBV in a

  6. Neural - levelset shape detection segmentation of brain tumors in dynamic susceptibility contrast enhanced and diffusion weighted magnetic resonance images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayakumar, C.; Bhargava, Sunil; Gharpure, Damayanti Chandrashekhar

    2008-01-01

    A novel Neuro - level set shape detection algorithm is proposed and evaluated for segmentation and grading of brain tumours. The algorithm evaluates vascular and cellular information provided by dynamic contrast susceptibility magnetic resonance images and apparent diffusion coefficient maps. The proposed neural shape detection algorithm is based on the levels at algorithm (shape detection algorithm) and utilizes a neural block to provide the speed image for the level set methods. In this study, two different architectures of level set method have been implemented and their results are compared. The results show that the proposed Neuro-shape detection performs better in differentiating the tumor, edema, necrosis in reconstructed images of perfusion and diffusion weighted magnetic resonance images. (author)

  7. Advantages of frequency-domain modeling in dynamic-susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance cerebral blood flow quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jean J; Smith, Michael R; Frayne, Richard

    2005-03-01

    In dynamic-susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance perfusion imaging, the cerebral blood flow (CBF) is estimated from the tissue residue function obtained through deconvolution of the contrast concentration functions. However, the reliability of CBF estimates obtained by deconvolution is sensitive to various distortions including high-frequency noise amplification. The frequency-domain Fourier transform-based and the time-domain singular-value decomposition-based (SVD) algorithms both have biases introduced into their CBF estimates when noise stability criteria are applied or when contrast recirculation is present. The recovery of the desired signal components from amid these distortions by modeling the residue function in the frequency domain is demonstrated. The basic advantages and applicability of the frequency-domain modeling concept are explored through a simple frequency-domain Lorentzian model (FDLM); with results compared to standard SVD-based approaches. The performance of the FDLM method is model dependent, well representing residue functions in the exponential family while less accurately representing other functions. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Susceptibility-Weighted Imaging Lesion and Contrast Enhancement May Represent Infectious Intracranial Aneurysm in Infective Endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sung-Min; Rice, Cory; Marquardt, Robert J; Zhang, Lucy Q; Khoury, Jean; Thatikunta, Prateek; Buletko, Andrew B; Hardman, Julian; Uchino, Ken; Wisco, Dolora

    2017-01-01

    Infectious intracranial aneurysm (IIA) can complicate infective endocarditis (IE). We aimed to describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics of IIA. We reviewed IIAs among 116 consecutive patients with active IE by conducting a neurological evaluation at a single tertiary referral center from January 2015 to July 2016. MRIs and digital cerebral angiograms (DSA) were reviewed to identify MRI characteristics of IIAs. MRI susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) was performed to collect data on cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) and sulcal SWI lesions. Out of 116 persons, 74 (63.8%) underwent DSA. IIAs were identified in 13 (17.6% of DSA, 11.2% of entire cohort) and 10 patients with aneurysms underwent MRI with SWI sequence. Nine (90%) out of 10 persons with IIAs had CMB >5 mm or sulcal lesions in SWI (9 in sulci, 6 in parenchyma, and 5 in both). Five out of 8 persons who underwent MRI brain with contrast had enhancement within the SWI lesions. In a multivariate logistic regression analysis, both sulcal SWI lesions (p < 0.001, OR 69, 95% CI 7.8-610) and contrast enhancement (p = 0.007, OR 16.5, 95% CI 2.3-121) were found to be significant predictors of the presence of IIAs. In the individuals with IE who underwent DSA and MRI, we found that neuroimaging characteristics, such as sulcal SWI lesion with or without contrast enhancement, are associated with the presence of IIA. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Chronologic Evaluation of Cerebral Hemodynamics by Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging After Indirect Bypass Surgery for Moyamoya Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Yosuke; Tanaka, Yoji; Momose, Toshiya; Yamashina, Motoshige; Sato, Akihito; Wakabayashi, Shinichi; Maehara, Taketoshi; Nariai, Tadashi

    2017-12-01

    Although indirect bypass surgery is an effective treatment option for patients with ischemic-onset moyamoya disease (MMD), the time point after surgery at which the patient's hemodynamic status starts to improve and the time point at which the improvement reaches a maximum have not been known. The objective of the present study is to evaluate the hemodynamic status time course after indirect bypass surgery for MMD, using dynamic susceptibility contrast-magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI). We retrospectively analyzed the cases of 25 patients with MMD (37 sides; mean age, 14.7 years; range, 3-36 years) who underwent indirect bypass surgery and repeated DSC-MRI measurement within 6 months after the operation. The difference in the mean transit time (MTT) between the target regions and the control region (cerebellum) was termed the MTT delay, and we measured the MTT delay's chronologic changes after surgery. The postoperative MTT delay was 1.81 ± 1.16 seconds within 1 week after surgery, 1.57 ± 1.01 at weeks 1-2, 1.55 ± 0.68 at weeks 2-4, 1.32 ± 0.68 at months 1-2, 0.95 ± 0.32 at months 2-3, and 0.77 ± 0.33 at months 3-6. Compared with the preoperative value (2.11 ± 0.98 seconds), the MTT delay decreased significantly from 2 to 4 weeks after surgery (P surgery began soon after surgery and gradually reached a maximum at 3 months after surgery. DSC-MRI detected small changes in hemodynamic improvement, which are suspected to be caused by the initiation of angiogenesis and arteriogenesis in the early postoperative period. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping: Contrast Mechanisms and Clinical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunlei; Wei, Hongjiang; Gong, Nan-Jie; Cronin, Matthew; Dibb, Russel; Decker, Kyle

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) is a recently developed MRI technique for quantifying the spatial distribution of magnetic susceptibility within biological tissues. It first uses the frequency shift in the MRI signal to map the magnetic field profile within the tissue. The resulting field map is then used to determine the spatial distribution of the underlying magnetic susceptibility by solving an inverse problem. The solution is achieved by deconvolving the field map with a dipole field, under the assumption that the magnetic field is a result of the superposition of the dipole fields generated by all voxels and that each voxel has its unique magnetic susceptibility. QSM provides improved contrast to noise ratio for certain tissues and structures compared to its magnitude counterpart. More importantly, magnetic susceptibility is a direct reflection of the molecular composition and cellular architecture of the tissue. Consequently, by quantifying magnetic susceptibility, QSM is becoming a quantitative imaging approach for characterizing normal and pathological tissue properties. This article reviews the mechanism generating susceptibility contrast within tissues and some associated applications. PMID:26844301

  11. Can Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging Replace Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography in the Diagnosis of Patients with Alzheimer's Disease? A Pilot Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavallin, L.; Danielsson, R.; Oeksengard, A.R.; Wahlund, L.O.; Julin, P.; Frank, A.; Engman, E.L.; Svensson, L.; Kristoffersen Wiberg, M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To compare single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a cohort of patients examined for suspected dementia, including patients with no objective cognitive impairment (control group), mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Material and Methods: Twenty-four patients, eight with AD, 10 with MCI, and six controls were investigated with SPECT using 99m Tc-hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime (HMPAO) and dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) with gadobutrol. Three observers performed a visual interpretation of the SPECT and MR images using a four-point visual scale. Results: SPECT was superior to DSC-MRI in differentiating normal from pathological. All three observers showed statistically significant results in discriminating between the control group, AD, and MCI by SPECT, with a P value of 0.0006, 0.04, and 0.01 for each observer. The statistical results were not significant for MR (P values 0.8, 0.1, and 0.2, respectively). Conclusion: DSC-MRI could not replace SPECT in the diagnosis of patients with Alzheimer's disease. Several patient- and method-related improvements should be made before this method can be recommended for clinical practice

  12. Can Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging Replace Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography in the Diagnosis of Patients with Alzheimer's Disease? A Pilot Study

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    Cavallin, L.; Danielsson, R.; Oeksengard, A.R.; Wahlund, L.O.; Julin, P.; Frank, A.; Engman, E.L.; Svensson, L.; Kristoffersen Wiberg, M. [Karolinska Univ. Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden). Div. of Radiology

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To compare single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a cohort of patients examined for suspected dementia, including patients with no objective cognitive impairment (control group), mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Material and Methods: Twenty-four patients, eight with AD, 10 with MCI, and six controls were investigated with SPECT using {sup 99m}Tc-hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime (HMPAO) and dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) with gadobutrol. Three observers performed a visual interpretation of the SPECT and MR images using a four-point visual scale. Results: SPECT was superior to DSC-MRI in differentiating normal from pathological. All three observers showed statistically significant results in discriminating between the control group, AD, and MCI by SPECT, with a P value of 0.0006, 0.04, and 0.01 for each observer. The statistical results were not significant for MR (P values 0.8, 0.1, and 0.2, respectively). Conclusion: DSC-MRI could not replace SPECT in the diagnosis of patients with Alzheimer's disease. Several patient- and method-related improvements should be made before this method can be recommended for clinical practice.

  13. Autoregressive moving average (ARMA) model applied to quantification of cerebral blood flow using dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murase, Kenya; Yamazaki, Youichi; Shinohara, Masaaki

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of the autoregressive moving average (ARMA) model for quantification of cerebral blood flow (CBF) with dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) in comparison with deconvolution analysis based on singular value decomposition (DA-SVD). Using computer simulations, we generated a time-dependent concentration of the contrast agent in the volume of interest (VOI) from the arterial input function (AIF) modeled as a gamma-variate function under various CBFs, cerebral blood volumes and signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) for three different types of residue function (exponential, triangular, and box-shaped). We also considered the effects of delay and dispersion in AIF. The ARMA model and DA-SVD were used to estimate CBF values from the simulated concentration-time curves in the VOI and AIFs, and the estimated values were compared with the assumed values. We found that the CBF value estimated by the ARMA model was more sensitive to the SNR and the delay in AIF than that obtained by DA-SVD. Although the ARMA model considerably overestimated CBF at low SNRs, it estimated the CBF more accurately than did DA-SVD at high SNRs for the exponential or triangular residue function. We believe this study will contribute to an understanding of the usefulness and limitations of the ARMA model when applied to quantification of CBF with DSC-MRI. (author)

  14. Voxel-Based Correlation between Coregistered Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography and Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Subjects with Suspected Alzheimer Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavallin, L.; Axelsson, R.; Wahlund, L.O.; Oeksengard, A.R.; Svensson, L.; Juhlin, P.; Wiberg, M. Kristoffersen; Frank, A.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Current diagnosis of Alzheimer disease is made by clinical, neuropsychologic, and neuroimaging assessments. Neuroimaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) could be valuable in the differential diagnosis of Alzheimer disease, as well as in assessing prognosis. Purpose: To compare SPECT and MRI in a cohort of patients examined for suspected dementia, including patients with no objective cognitive impairment (control group), mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and Alzheimer disease (AD). Material and Methods: 24 patients, eight with AD, 10 with MCI, and six controls, were investigated with SPECT using 99m Tc-hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime (HMPAO, Ceretec; GE Healthcare Ltd., Little Chalsont UK) and dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) with a contrast-enhancing gadobutrol formula (Gadovist; Bayer Schering Pharma, Berlin, Germany). Voxel-based correlation between coregistered SPECT and DSC-MR images was calculated. Region-of-interest (ROI) analyses were then performed in 24 different brain areas using brain registration and analysis of SPECT studies (BRASS; Nuclear Diagnostics AB, Stockholm (SE)) on both SPECT and DSC-MRI. Results: Voxel-based correlation between coregistered SPECT and DSC-MR showed a high correlation, with a mean correlation coefficient of 0.94. ROI analyses of 24 regions showed significant differences between the control group and AD patients in 10 regions using SPECT and five regions in DSC-MR. Conclusion: SPECT remains superior to DSC-MRI in differentiating normal from pathological perfusion, and DSC-MRI could not replace SPECT in the diagnosis of patients with Alzheimer disease

  15. Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast Perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging Demonstrates Reduced Periventricular Cerebral Blood Flow in Dogs with Ventriculomegaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin J. Schmidt

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The nature of ventriculomegaly in dogs is still a matter of debate. Signs of increased intraventricular pressure and atrophy of the cerebral white matter have been found in dogs with ventriculomegaly, which would imply increased intraventricular pressure and, therefore, a pathological condition, i.e., to some extent. Reduced periventricular blood flow was found in people with high elevated intraventricular pressure. The aim of this study was to compare periventricular brain perfusion in dogs with and without ventriculomegaly using perfusion weighted-magnetic-resonance-imaging to clarify as to whether ventriculomegaly might be associated with an increase in intraventricular pressure. Perfusion was measured in 32 Cavalier King Charles spaniels (CKCS with ventriculomegaly, 10 CKCSs were examined as a control group. Cerebral blood flow (CBF was measured using free-hand regions of interest (ROI in five brain regions: periventricular white matter, caudate nucleus, parietal cortex, hippocampus, and thalamus. CBF was significantly lower in the periventricular white matter of the dogs with ventriculomegaly (p = 0.0029 but not in the other ROIs. Reduction of periventricular CBF might imply increase of intraventricular pressure in ventriculomegaly.

  16. Magnetic susceptibility of curium pnictides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nave, S.E.; Huray, P.G.; Peterson, J.R.; Damien, D.A.; Haire, R.G.

    1981-09-01

    The magnetic susceptibility of microgram quantities of 248 CmP and 248 CmSb has been determined with the use of a SQUID micromagnetic susceptometer over the temperature range 4.2 to 340 K and in the applied magnetic field range of 0.45 to 1600 G. The fcc (NaCl-type) samples yield magnetic transitions at 73K and 162 K for the phosphide and antimonide, respectively. Together with published magnetic data for CmN and CmAs, these results indicate spatially extended exchange interactions between the relatively localized 5f electrons of the metallic actinide atoms

  17. Kinetic analysis of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in the liver of body-temperature-controlled mice using dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging and an empirical mathematical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murase, Kenya; Assanai, Purapan; Takata, Hiroshige; Matsumoto, Nozomi; Saito, Shigeyoshi; Nishiura, Motoko

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a method for analyzing the kinetic behavior of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) in the murine liver under control of body temperature using dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) and an empirical mathematical model (EMM). First, we investigated the influence of body temperature on the kinetic behavior of SPIONs in the liver by controlling body temperature using our temperature-control system. Second, we investigated the kinetic behavior of SPIONs in the liver when mice were injected with various doses of GdCl3, while keeping the body temperature at 36°C. Finally, we investigated it when mice were injected with various doses of zymosan, while keeping the body temperature at 36°C. We also investigated the effect of these substances on the number of Kupffer cells by immunohistochemical analysis using the specific surface antigen of Kupffer cells (CD68). To quantify the kinetic behavior of SPIONs in the liver, we calculated the upper limit of the relative enhancement (A), the rates of early contrast uptake (α) and washout or late contrast uptake (β), the parameter related to the slope of early uptake (q), the area under the curve (AUC), the maximum change of transverse relaxation rate (ΔR2) (ΔR2(max)), the time to ΔR2(max) (Tmax), and ΔR2 at the last time point (ΔR2(last)) from the time courses of ΔR2 using the EMM. The β and Tmax values significantly decreased and increased, respectively, with decreasing body temperature, suggesting that the phagocytic activity of Kupffer cells is significantly affected by body temperature. The AUC, ΔR2(max), and ΔR2(last) values decreased significantly with increasing dose of GdCl3, which was consistent with the change in the number of CD68-positive cells. They increased with increasing dose of zymosan, which was also consistent with the change in the number of CD68-positive cells. These results suggest that AUC, ΔR2(max), and ΔR2

  18. Comparison of MR imaging after administration of dysprosium-based magnetic-susceptibility contrast media with diffusion-weighted MR imaging in evaluation of regional cerebral ischemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moseley, M.E.; Kucharczyk, J.; Kurhanewicz, J.; Mintorovitch, J.; Cohen, Y.; Rocklage, S.; Quay, S.C.; Norman, D.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on a study to establish whether a nonionic T2-shortening contrast agent, Dy-DTPA-bis(methylamide) (Dy-DTPA-BMA), would facilitate early detection of stroke-induced cerebral perfusion deficits. The sensitivity of susceptibility-enhanced MR imaging was compared with that of diffusion-weighted MR imaging in the same cats subjected to unilateral occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCA). A 2-T unit, equipped with self-shielded gradient coils (± 20 G/cm, 15-cm bore size), was used in conjunction with an 8.5-cm inner diameter low-pass bird cage proton imaging coil. Diffusion-weighted images displayed increased signal intensity in the ischemic MCA territory less than 1 hour after occlusion, whereas T2-weighted MR images without contrast enhancement usually failed to depict injury for 2--3 hours after toke. With contrast administration (0.5 mmoles/kg of Dy-DTPA-BMA), however, T2-weighted images revealed perfusion deficits (hyperintensity) within 1 hour after MCA occlusion, and these corresponded to the anatomic regions of ischemic injury shown on diffusion-weighted MR images

  19. Whole tissue AC susceptibility after superparamagnetic iron oxide contrast agent administration in a rat model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazaro, Francisco Jose; Gutierrez, Lucia; Rosa Abadia, Ana; Soledad Romero, Maria; Lopez, Antonio; Jesus Munoz, Maria

    2007-01-01

    A magnetic AC susceptibility characterisation of rat tissues after intravenous administration of superparamagnetic iron oxide (Endorem ( R)), at the same dose as established for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) contrast enhancement in humans, has been carried out. The measurements reveal the presence of the contrast agent as well as that of physiological ferritin in liver and spleen while no traces have been magnetically detected in heart and kidney. This preliminary work opens suggestive possibilities for future biodistribution studies of any type of magnetic carriers

  20. Magnetic susceptibility of functional groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herr, T.; Ferraro, M.B.; Contreras, R.H.

    1990-01-01

    Proceeding with a series of works where new criteria are applied to the the calculation of the contribution of molecular fragments to certain properties, results are presented for a group of 1-X-benzenes and 1-X-naphtalenes for the magnetic susceptibility constant. Both the diamagnetic and paramagnetic parts are taken into account. To reduce the problems associated with the Gauge dependence originated in the approximations made, Gauge independent atomic orbitals (GIAO) orbitals are used in the atomic orbital basis. Results are discussed in terms of functional groups. (Author). 17 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  1. Pulse sequences for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graves, Martin J.

    2007-01-01

    The theory and application of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) pulse sequences following the administration of an exogenous contrast agent are discussed. Pulse sequences are categorised according to the contrast agent mechanism: changes in proton density, relaxivity, magnetic susceptibility and resonant frequency shift. Applications in morphological imaging, magnetic resonance angiography, dynamic imaging and cell labelling are described. The importance of optimising the pulse sequence for each application is emphasised

  2. Magnetic susceptibility of semiconductor melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutvitskij, V.A.; Shurygin, P.M.

    1975-01-01

    The temperature dependences chi of various alloys confirm the existence of cluster formations in molten semiconductors, the stability of these formations in melts being considerably affected by the anion nature. The concentrational dependences of the magnetic susceptibility for all the investigated systems exhibit the diamagnetism maxima corresponding to the compound compositions. Heating the melt causes ''smearing'' the maxima, which is related with the cluster structure dissociation. The existence of the maxima concentrational dependence chi corresponding to BiTe and BiSe is found in the isotherms. The non-linear dependence of chi on the composition shows the absence of a single-valued relation between the phase diagram and the chi-diagram for melts

  3. Magnetic susceptibility characterisation of superparamagnetic microspheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grob, David Tim; Wise, Naomi; Oduwole, Olayinka; Sheard, Steve

    2018-04-01

    The separation of magnetic materials in microsystems using magnetophoresis has increased in popularity. The wide variety and availability of magnetic beads has fuelled this drive. It is important to know the magnetic characteristics of the microspheres in order to accurately use them in separation processes integrated on a lab-on-a-chip device. To investigate the magnetic susceptibility of magnetic microspheres, the magnetic responsiveness of three types of Dynabeads microspheres were tested using two different approaches. The magnetophoretic mobility of individual microspheres is studied using a particle tracking system and the magnetization of each type of Dynabeads microsphere is measured using SQUID relaxometry. The magnetic beads' susceptibility is obtained at four different applied magnetic fields in the range of 38-70 mT for both the mobility and SQUID measurements. The susceptibility values in both approaches show a consistent magnetic field dependence.

  4. Combined use of susceptibility weighted magnetic resonance imaging sequences and dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion weighted imaging to improve the accuracy of the differential diagnosis of recurrence and radionecrosis in high-grade glioma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Hyung; Yun, Tae Jin; Park, Chul-Kee; Kim, Tae Min; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Sohn, Chul-Ho; Won, Jae Kyung; Park, Sung-Hye; Kim, Il Han; Choi, Seung Hong

    2017-03-21

    Purpose was to assess predictive power for overall survival (OS) and diagnostic performance of combination of susceptibility-weighted MRI sequences (SWMRI) and dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) for differentiation of recurrence and radionecrosis in high-grade glioma (HGG). We enrolled 51 patients who underwent radiation therapy or gamma knife surgeryfollowed by resection for HGG and who developed new measurable enhancement more than six months after complete response. The lesions were confirmed as recurrence (n = 32) or radionecrosis (n = 19). The mean and each percentile value from cumulative histograms of normalized CBV (nCBV) and proportion of dark signal intensity on SWMRI (proSWMRI, %) within enhancement were compared. Multivariate regression was performed for the best differentiator. The cutoff value of best predictor from ROC analysis was evaluated. OS was determined with Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test. Recurrence showed significantly lower proSWMRI and higher mean nCBV and 90th percentile nCBV (nCBV90) than radionecrosis. Regression analysis revealed both nCBV90 and proSWMRI were independent differentiators. Combination of nCBV90 and proSWMRI achieved 71.9% sensitivity (23/32), 100% specificity (19/19) and 82.3% accuracy (42/51) using best cut-off values (nCBV90 > 2.07 and proSWMRI≤15.76%) from ROC analysis. In subgroup analysis, radionecrosis with nCBV > 2.07 (n = 5) showed obvious hemorrhage (proSWMRI > 32.9%). Patients with nCBV90 > 2.07 and proSWMRI≤15.76% had significantly shorter OS. In conclusion, compared with DSC PWI alone, combination of SWMRI and DSC PWI have potential to be prognosticator for OS and lower false positive rate in differentiation of recurrence and radionecrosis in HGG who develop new measurable enhancement more than six months after complete response.

  5. Possible origins of the susceptibility contrast in the brain. Presidential award proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukunaga, Masaki; Li, T.Q.; Lee, J.; Matsuura, Eiji; Gelderen, P.V.; Zwart, J.A. de; Merkle, H.; Duyn, J.H.

    2011-01-01

    The magnetic susceptibility contrast derived from high resolution T 2 *-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging at ultra high field strength has been used to reveal laminar contrast in the gray matter (GM) and fiber bundle-like structure in the white matter (WM) of the human brain. This contrast has been attributed to subtle variations in the magnetic properties of brain tissue, which possibly reflect varying iron and myelin content and haemoglobin in the microvasculature. To investigate the origin of this contrast, MRI data from postmortem brain samples were compared with histological staining for iron and myelin. The laminar susceptibility variations in GM strongly correlate with local iron content, which generally co-localized with myelin. On the other hand, fiber bundles in white matter, shows strong susceptibility contrast in the absence of iron while myelin is high. The results suggest that iron contributes significantly to susceptibility contrast across the cortical GM, but myelin is the dominant source of susceptibility in WM bundles. (author)

  6. Accuracy of magnetic resonance based susceptibility measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdevig, Hannah E.; Russek, Stephen E.; Carnicka, Slavka; Stupic, Karl F.; Keenan, Kathryn E.

    2017-05-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is increasingly used to map the magnetic susceptibility of tissue to identify cerebral microbleeds associated with traumatic brain injury and pathological iron deposits associated with neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease. Accurate measurements of susceptibility are important for determining oxygen and iron content in blood vessels and brain tissue for use in noninvasive clinical diagnosis and treatment assessments. Induced magnetic fields with amplitude on the order of 100 nT, can be detected using MRI phase images. The induced field distributions can then be inverted to obtain quantitative susceptibility maps. The focus of this research was to determine the accuracy of MRI-based susceptibility measurements using simple phantom geometries and to compare the susceptibility measurements with magnetometry measurements where SI-traceable standards are available. The susceptibilities of paramagnetic salt solutions in cylindrical containers were measured as a function of orientation relative to the static MRI field. The observed induced fields as a function of orientation of the cylinder were in good agreement with simple models. The MRI susceptibility measurements were compared with SQUID magnetometry using NIST-traceable standards. MRI can accurately measure relative magnetic susceptibilities while SQUID magnetometry measures absolute magnetic susceptibility. Given the accuracy of moment measurements of tissue mimicking samples, and the need to look at small differences in tissue properties, the use of existing NIST standard reference materials to calibrate MRI reference structures is problematic and better reference materials are required.

  7. Materials with low DC magnetic susceptibility for sensitive magnetic measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khatiwada, R; Kendrick, R; Khosravi, M; Peters, M; Smith, E; Snow, W M; Dennis, L

    2016-01-01

    Materials with very low DC magnetic susceptibility have many scientific applications. To our knowledge however, relatively little research has been conducted with the goal to produce a totally nonmagnetic material. This phrase in our case means after spatially averaging over macroscopic volumes, it possesses an average zero DC magnetic susceptibility. We report measurements of the DC magnetic susceptibility of three different types of nonmagnetic materials at room temperature: (I) solutions of paramagnetic salts and diamagnetic liquids, (II) liquid gallium–indium alloys and (III) pressed powder mixtures of tungsten and bismuth. The lowest measured magnetic susceptibility among these candidate materials is in the order of 10 −9 cgs volume susceptibility units, about two orders of magnitude smaller than distilled water. In all cases, the measured concentration dependence of the magnetic susceptibility is consistent with that expected for the weighted sum of the susceptibilities of the separate components within experimental error. These results verify the well-known Wiedemann additivity law for the magnetic susceptibility of inert mixtures of materials and thereby realize the ability to produce materials with small but tunable magnetic susceptibility. For our particular scientific application, we are also looking for materials with the largest possible number of neutrons and protons per unit volume. The gallium–indium alloys fabricated and measured in this work possess to our knowledge the smallest ratio of volume magnetic susceptibility to nucleon number density per unit volume for a room temperature liquid, and the tungsten-bismuth pressed powder mixtures possess to our knowledge the smallest ratio of volume magnetic susceptibility to nucleon number density per unit volume for a room temperature solid. This ratio is a figure of merit for a certain class of precision experiments that search for possible exotic spin-dependent forces of Nature. (paper)

  8. Absolute method of measuring magnetic susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, A.; Senftle, F.E.

    1959-01-01

    An absolute method of standardization and measurement of the magnetic susceptibility of small samples is presented which can be applied to most techniques based on the Faraday method. The fact that the susceptibility is a function of the area under the curve of sample displacement versus distance of the magnet from the sample, offers a simple method of measuring the susceptibility without recourse to a standard sample. Typical results on a few substances are compared with reported values, and an error of less than 2% can be achieved. ?? 1959 The American Institute of Physics.

  9. High-field, high-resolution, susceptibility-weighted magnetic resonance imaging: improved image quality by addition of contrast agent and higher field strength in patients with brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinker, K.; Noebauer-Huhmann, I.M.; Szomolanyi, P.; Weber, M.; Grabner, G.; Trattnig, S.; Stavrou, I.; Knosp, E.; Hoeftberger, R.; Stadlbauer, A.

    2008-01-01

    To demonstrate intratumoral susceptibility effects in malignant brain tumors and to assess visualization of susceptibility effects before and after administration of the paramagnetic contrast agent MultiHance (gadobenate dimeglumine; Bracco Imaging), an agent known to have high relaxivity, with respect to susceptibility effects, image quality, and reduction of scan time. Included in the study were 19 patients with malignant brain tumors who underwent high-resolution, susceptibility-weighted (SW) MR imaging at 3 T before and after administration of contrast agent. In all patients, Multihance was administered intravenously as a bolus (0.1 mmol/kg body weight). MR images were individually evaluated by two radiologists with previous experience in the evaluation of pre- and postcontrast 3-T SW MR images with respect to susceptibility effects, image quality, and reduction of scan time. In the 19 patients 21 tumors were diagnosed, of which 18 demonstrated intralesional susceptibility effects both in pre- and postcontrast SW images, and 19 demonstrated contrast enhancement in both SW images and T1-weighted spin-echo MR images. Conspicuity of susceptibility effects and image quality were improved in postcontrast images compared with precontrast images and the scan time was also reduced due to decreased TE values from 9 min (precontrast) to 7 min (postcontrast). The intravenous administration of MultiHance, an agent with high relaxivity, allowed a reduction of scan time from 9 min to 7 min while preserving excellent susceptibility effects and image quality in SW images obtained at 3 T. Contrast enhancement and intralesional susceptibility effects can be assessed in one sequence. (orig.)

  10. Out-of-phase magnetic susceptibility and environmental magnetism

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrouda, F.; Chadima, Martin; Ježek, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 18 (2016), EGU2016-6808 ISSN 1607-7962. [European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2016. 17.04.2016-22.04.2016, Vienna] Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : paleomagnetism * magnetic susceptibility * environmental magnetism Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography http://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EGU2016/EGU2016-6808.pdf

  11. Magnetic susceptibilities of integrable quantum ladders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Soo A; Lee, K.

    2001-01-01

    As an extension of previous studies, we consider the magnetic susceptibilities of a coupled spin chain model at low temperature and of a more realistic model at low temperature and of a more realistic model having a t-J ladder structure at zero temperature. The magnetic susceptibilities for both models are obtained numerically when the coupling constant is greater than its critical value. In this region, the ladders behave as a single chain for H c and as two independent chains for H>H c , showing a divergence at H c . This divergence is expected to smear out at a finite temperature

  12. Susceptibility effects in nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziener, Christian Herbert

    2008-01-01

    The properties of dephasing and the resulting relaxation of the magnetization are the basic principle on which all magnetic resonance imaging methods are based. The signal obtained from the gyrating spins is essentially determined by the properties of the considered tissue. Especially the susceptibility differences caused by magnetized materials (for example, deoxygenated blood, BOLD-effect) or magnetic nanoparticles are becoming more important for biomedical imaging. In the present work, the influence of such field inhomogeneities on the NMR-signal is analyzed. (orig.)

  13. Magnetic susceptibility measurements on Bi - Sn alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mustaffa bin Haji Abdullah

    1985-01-01

    Magnetic susceptibility measurements on eight samples of tin-rich and three samples of bismuth-rich Bi-Sn alloys were made from 85K to 300K by Faraday's method. The susceptibilities of the eight tin-rich samples are positive and greater than the susceptibility of pure tin. The values are approximately constant at low temperatures but decreasing a little bit with increasing temperature. This result is interpreted as due to the predominant contribution of the Pauli spin paramagnetic susceptibility. A small decrease in susceptibility with temperature is interpreted as due to the effect of the second order term in the expression for spin paramagnetic susceptibility. The fluctuation of the susceptibility for alloys of different composition is interpreted as due to the effect of the density of states at the Fermi levels. The three samples of bismuth-rich alloys show a transition to diamagnetic property, where the diamagnetism is increased with temperature. This result is predominant and due to the diamagnetic contribution from the ions. The increase in susceptibility with temperature is interpreted as due to an increase in the effective radii of the ions due to thermal expansion. (author)

  14. Magnetic susceptibility measurement using 3D NMR

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Marcon, P.; Bartušek, Karel; Kořínek, Radim

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 24, Suppl. 1 (2011), s. 381-382 ISSN 0968-5243. [ESMRMB 2011 Congress. 06.10.2011-08.10.2011, Leipzig] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP102/11/0318 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : MRI * artifact correction * magnetic susceptibility * gradient echo Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  15. Real-time and quantitative isotropic spatial resolution susceptibility imaging for magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pi, Shiqiang; Liu, Wenzhong; Jiang, Tao

    2018-03-01

    The magnetic transparency of biological tissue allows the magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) to be a promising functional sensor and contrast agent. The complex susceptibility of MNPs, strongly influenced by particle concentration, excitation magnetic field and their surrounding microenvironment, provides significant implications for biomedical applications. Therefore, magnetic susceptibility imaging of high spatial resolution will give more detailed information during the process of MNP-aided diagnosis and therapy. In this study, we present a novel spatial magnetic susceptibility extraction method for MNPs under a gradient magnetic field, a low-frequency drive magnetic field, and a weak strength high-frequency magnetic field. Based on this novel method, a magnetic particle susceptibility imaging (MPSI) of millimeter-level spatial resolution (<3 mm) was achieved using our homemade imaging system. Corroborated by the experimental results, the MPSI shows real-time (1 s per frame acquisition) and quantitative abilities, and isotropic high resolution.

  16. Contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karadjian, V.

    1987-01-01

    The origine of nuclear magnetic resonance signal is reminded and different ways for contrast enhancement in magnetic resonance imaging are presented, especially, modifications of tissus relaxation times. Investigations have focused on development of agents incorporating either paramagnetic ions or stable free radicals. Pharmacological and toxicological aspects are developed. The diagnostic potential of these substances is illustrated by the example of gadolinium complexes [fr

  17. Contrast Agent in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vu-Quang, Hieu

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles have been employed as contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in order to improve sensitivity and accuracy in diagnosis. In addition, these contrast agents are potentially combined with other therapeutic compounds or near infrared bio-imaging (NIR) fluorophores to obtain...... theranostic or dual imaging purposes, respectively. There were two main types of MRI contrast agent that were synthesized during this PhD project including fluorine containing nanoparticles and magnetic nanoparticles. In regard of fluorine containing nanoparticles, there were two types contrast agent...... cancer cells for cancer diagnosis in MRI. F127-Folate coated SPION were stable in various types of suspension medium for over six months. They could specifically target folate receptor of cancer cells in vitro and in vivo thus enhancing the contrast in MRI T2/T2* weighted images. These are preliminary...

  18. Magnetic susceptibility measurement using 2D magnetic resonance imaging

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Marcon, P.; Bartušek, Karel; Burdkova, M.; Dokoupil, Zdeněk

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 10 (2011), 105702:1-8 ISSN 0957-0233 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP102/11/0318; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : magnetic flux density * magnetic susceptibility * MRI * MR signal * reaction field Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.494, year: 2011

  19. Finite perturbation studies of magnetic susceptibility and shielding with GIAO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaucer, M.; Pumpernik, D.; Hladnik, M.; Azman, A.

    1977-01-01

    The magnetic susceptibility tensor and proton and fluorine magnetic shielding tensors are calculated for F 2 and (FHF) - using an ab initio finite perturbation method with gauge-invariant atomic orbitals (GIAO). The discussion of the basis set deficiency shows that the calculated values for the susceptibilities are reliable. Simple additivity (Pascal rule) for the susceptibility is confirmed. (orig.) [de

  20. Human cerebral blood volume measurements using dynamic contrast enhancement in comparison to dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artzi, Moran [Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Functional Brain Center, The Wohl Institute for Advanced Imaging, Tel Aviv (Israel); Tel Aviv University, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv (Israel); Liberman, Gilad; Vitinshtein, Faina; Aizenstein, Orna [Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Functional Brain Center, The Wohl Institute for Advanced Imaging, Tel Aviv (Israel); Nadav, Guy [Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Functional Brain Center, The Wohl Institute for Advanced Imaging, Tel Aviv (Israel); Tel Aviv University, Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv (Israel); Blumenthal, Deborah T.; Bokstein, Felix [Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Neuro-Oncology Service, Tel Aviv (Israel); Bashat, Dafna Ben [Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Functional Brain Center, The Wohl Institute for Advanced Imaging, Tel Aviv (Israel); Tel Aviv University, Sackler Faculty of Medicine and Sagol School of Neuroscience, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2015-07-15

    Cerebral blood volume (CBV) is an important parameter for the assessment of brain tumors, usually obtained using dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) MRI. However, this method often suffers from low spatial resolution and high sensitivity to susceptibility artifacts and usually does not take into account the effect of tissue permeability. The plasma volume (v{sub p}) can also be extracted from dynamic contrast enhancement (DCE) MRI. The aim of this study was to investigate whether DCE can be used for the measurement of cerebral blood volume in place of DSC for the assessment of patients with brain tumors. Twenty-eight subjects (17 healthy subjects and 11 patients with glioblastoma) were scanned using DCE and DSC. v{sub p} and CBV values were measured and compared in different brain components in healthy subjects and in the tumor area in patients. Significant high correlations were detected between v{sub p} and CBV in healthy subjects in the different brain components; white matter, gray matter, and arteries, correlating with the known increased tissue vascularity, and within the tumor area in patients. This work proposes the use of DCE as an alternative method to DSC for the assessment of blood volume, given the advantages of its higher spatial resolution, its lower sensitivity to susceptibility artifacts, and its ability to provide additional information regarding tissue permeability. (orig.)

  1. Magnetic susceptibility of YbN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Y.; Bowen, S.P.; Koelling, D.D.; Monnier, R.

    1991-01-01

    Applying the Zwicknagl, Zevin, and Fulde (ZZF) approximation for the spectral densities of the occupied and empty f states resulting from a degenerate-Anderson-impurity model, which incorporates crystal fields, we compute the low-temperature magnetic susceptibility of YbN. The model, in which each crystal-field level couples to the band states with its own hybridization function, has previously been successfully applied without the ZZF approximation to explain the specific-heat structure at low temperatures. The ZZF approximation removes the spurious zero-temperature behavior of the parent noncrossing approximation for the susceptibility. Surprisingly, even at the low crystal-field degeneracy (N=2) of YbN, the Shiba relation is very nearly satisfied. The appropriate experimental impurity susceptibility for comparison is extracted from the measurement by removing an empirical exchange interaction. The resultant Kondo temperature (T 0 =8.49 K) is consistent with previous specific-heat estimates (10--11 K), and the agreement with experiment is good

  2. Acoustic investigation of magnetic susceptibility of liquid metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tekuchev, V.V.; Barashkov, B.I.; Ivanova, I.V.; Rygalov, L.N.

    2008-01-01

    An acoustic method is proposed for studying the specific magnetic susceptibility of metal melts. For the first time, magnetic susceptibilities of francium, beryllium, scandium, yttrium, vanadium, niobium, rhenium, palladium, and platinum in the liquid phase at their melting points, as well as temperature dependences of magnetic susceptibilities of cesium, yttrium, and vanadium over the temperature range from melting points to boiling points have been estimated [ru

  3. Assessment of cerebral perfusion with dynamic susceptibility contrast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Kiyohiko; Naito, Isao; Nozokido, Takeshi; Sato, Takaaki; Takatama, Shin; Kimura, Tokunori

    2004-01-01

    Accurate measurements of arterial input function (AIF) are indispensable for the quantification of perfusion parameters such as mean transit time (MTT), cerebral blood volume (CBV), and cerebral blood flow (CBF). Quantification trials of cerebral perfusion using the disconsolation method with dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI (DSC-MRI) have been reported on. Accurately measuring AIF with DSC-MRI is difficult due to non-linearity and the limited dynamic range between ΔR 2 * and the concentration of contrast media. In this study, we assessed simple methods while using various parameters calculated by the tissue time intensity curve without measuring AIF. The parameters used were appearance time of contrast media (AT), 1'st moment (MT1), the full width at half maximum (FWHM), and up slope at maximum gradient (US). Difference of the appearance time (delta AT) and the CBFratio between the regions in question and the contralateral regions obtained by MT1, FWHM and US were assessed in 38 stroke patients. The CBF calculated by the linear scaling method using the signal of the ASL (ASL, CBF) was used as the standard for a correlation study. The delta AT in patients with middle cerebral artery occlusions supplied by retrograde flow indicated a significantly greater value as compared to patients with other lesions with antegrade flow. US CBF indicated the best correlation among the three CBFs obtained by MT1, FWHM and US. Both the ASL CBFratio and the US CBFratio correlated with delta AT, with the ASL CBFratio being predominant. The CBVratio-CBFratio map showed that the CBVratio tended to decrease when the CBFratio decreased. The map is useful in clinical analysis of cerebral perfusion due to its simplicity and ability to alleviate AIF dependent errors. The validity of the proposed method still needs to be examined by comparing it to the deconvolution method with DSC-MRI, since DSC-MRI can correct the effect of AIF. It might also be compared to Xenon CT, which is less

  4. Method of magnetic susceptibility mapping of drilled cores. Experimental measurements for geologic structures determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delrive, C.

    1993-01-01

    The evaluation of the safety of a deep geologic repository for dangerous materials requires the knowledge of the interstitial system of the surrounding host rock. A method is proposed for the determination of geologic structures (in particular fractures) from the magnetic susceptibility mapping of drilled cores. The feasibility of the method has been demonstrated using a SQUID magneto-gradient meter. A measurement tool using a new magnetic susceptibility captor and a testing bench have been developed. This tool allows the measurement of rocks with a magnetic susceptibility greater than 10 -5 SI units and can generate magnetic susceptibility maps with 4 x 4 mm 2 pixels. A magnetic visibility criterion has been defined which allows to foresee if a structure is visible or not. According to the measurements done, it is shown that any centimeter-scale structure with a sufficient magnetic contrast (20%) with respect to the matrix is visible. Therefore, the dip and the orientation of such structure can be determined with a 3 degree and a 5 degree precision, respectively. The position of the structure along the core axis is known with a 4 mm precision. On the other hand, about half of the magnetic contrasts observed do not correspond to the visual analyses and can be explained by very small variations of the mineralogic composition. This last point offers some interesting ways for future research using magnetic susceptibility mapping. (J.S.). 31 refs., 90 figs., 18 tabs., 2 photos., 6 appends

  5. MRI contrast enhancement using Magnetic Carbon Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Rakesh P.; Kangasniemi, Kim; Takahashi, Masaya; Mohanty, Samarendra K.; Koymen, Ali R.; Department of Physics, University of Texas at Arlington Team; University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center Team

    2014-03-01

    In recent years, nanotechnology has become one of the most exciting forefront fields in cancer diagnosis and therapeutics such as drug delivery, thermal therapy and detection of cancer. Here, we report development of core (Fe)-shell (carbon) nanoparticles with enhanced magnetic properties for contrast enhancement in MRI imaging. These new classes of magnetic carbon nanoparticles (MCNPs) are synthesized using a bottom-up approach in various organic solvents, using the electric plasma discharge generated in the cavitation field of an ultrasonic horn. Gradient echo MRI images of well-dispersed MCNP-solutions (in tube) were acquired. For T2 measurements, a multi echo spin echo sequence was performed. From the slope of the 1/T2 versus concentration plot, the R2 value for different CMCNP-samples was measured. Since MCNPs were found to be extremely non-reactive, and highly absorbing in NIR regime, development of carbon-based MRI contrast enhancement will allow its simultaneous use in biomedical applications. We aim to localize the MCNPs in targeted tissue regions by external DC magnetic field, followed by MRI imaging and subsequent photothermal therapy.

  6. Magnetic susceptibility in the edged topological disordered nanoscopic cylinder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faizabadi, Edris; Omidi, Mahboubeh

    2011-01-01

    The effects of edged topological disorder on magnetic susceptibility are investigated in a nanoscopic cylinder threaded by a magnetic flux. Persistent current versus even or odd number of electrons shows different signs in ordered and disordered cylinders and also in short or long ones. In addition, temperature-averaged susceptibility has only diamagnetic signs in strong regimes and it is associated with paramagnetic signs in ordered and weak disordered ones. Besides, in an edged topological disordered cylinder, the temperature-averaged susceptibility decreases by raising the temperature somewhat and then increasing initiates and finally at high temperature tends to zero as the ordered one. - Research highlights: → Magnetic susceptibility in one-dimensional topological disordered quantum ring. → Edged topological disorder effect on magnetic susceptibility in nanoscopic cylinder. → Edged topological disorder effect on temperature-averaged susceptibility in cylinder.

  7. Inflationary susceptibilities, duality and large-scale magnetic fields generation

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    We investigate what can be said about the interaction of scalar fields with Abelian gauge fields during a quasi-de Sitter phase of expansion and under the assumption that the electric and the magnetic susceptibilities do not coincide. The duality symmetry, transforming the magnetic susceptibility into the inverse of the electric susceptibility, exchanges the magnetic and electric power spectra. The mismatch between the two susceptibilities determines an effective refractive index affecting the evolution of the canonical fields. The constraints imposed by the duration of the inflationary phase and by the magnetogenesis requirements pin down the rate of variation of the susceptibilities that is consistent with the observations of the magnetic field strength over astrophysical and cosmological scales but avoids back-reaction problems. The parameter space of this magnetogenesis scenario is wider than in the case when the susceptibilities are equal, as it happens when the inflaton or some other spectator field is ...

  8. The magnetic susceptibility of soils in Krakow, southern Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojas, Anna

    2017-06-01

    Studies into the magnetic susceptibility have been used to assess the soils contamination in the Krakow area. The results of topsoil (over a 2 × 2 km grid), subsoil (37 shallow holes) and soil samples (112) measurements were presented as maps of soil magnetic susceptibility (both volume and mass) illustrating the distribution of parameters in topsoil horizon (0-10 cm) and differential magnetic susceptibility maps between topsoil horizon and subsoil (40-60 cm). All evidence leads to the finding that the highest values of magnetic susceptibility of soil are found exclusively in industrial areas. Taking into consideration the type of land use, the high median value (89.8 × 10-8 m3kg-1) was obtained for samples of cultivated soils and is likely to be connected with occurrence of fertile soil (chernozem). Moreover, enrichment of soils with Pb and Zn accompanies magnetic susceptibility anomalies in the vicinity of the high roads and in the steelworks area, respectively.

  9. Magnetic susceptibility of 244Cm metal and 249Cf metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, D.K.; Parsons, T.C.; Edelstein, N.; Noe, M.; Peterson, J.R.

    1975-07-01

    The first magnetic susceptibility measurements made on the expanded fcc phase of 249 Cf metal are reported. Further measurements are needed on other Cf metal phases. Another measurement of the magnetic susceptibility of 244 Cm metal in a limited temperature range has been reported. The result does not agree with previously reported values. Further work is continuing on the synthesis of 244 Cm metal and 248 Cm metal and magnetic measurements on these samples. (auth)

  10. High-frequency, transient magnetic susceptibility of ferroelectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, Craig A.

    1996-10-01

    A significant high-frequency magnetic susceptibility was measured both in weakly polarized and nonpolarized samples of barium titanate, lead zirconate titanate, and carnauba wax. Magnetic susceptibility measurements were made from 10 to 500 MHz using a thin film permeameter at room temperature; initial susceptibilities ranged from 0.1 to 2.5. These values are larger than expected for paramagnets and smaller than expected for ferromagnets. It was found that the magnetic susceptibility decreases rapidly with exposure to the exciting field. The origin of the magnetic susceptibility is thought to originate with the applied time varying electric field associated with the susceptibility measurements. An electric field acts to rotate an electric dipole, creating a magnetic quadrupole if the two moments are balanced, and a net magnetic dipole moment if imbalanced. It is thought that local electrostatic fields created at ferroelectric domain discontinuities associated with grain boundaries create an imbalance in the anion rotation that results in a net, measurable, magnetic moment. The origin of the magnetic aftereffect may be due to the local heating of the material through the moving charges associated with the magnetic moment.

  11. Discrimination between glioma grades II and III in suspected low-grade gliomas using dynamic contrast-enhanced and dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion MR imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falk, Anna; Fahlström, Markus; Rostrup, Egill

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used in the pre-operative assessment of brain tumours. The aim of this prospective study was to identify the perfusion parameters from dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) and dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) perfusion imaging...... written informed consent in this review board-approved study. Regions of interests (ROIs) in tumour area were delineated on FLAIR images co-registered to DCE and DSC, respectively, in 25 patients with histopathological grade II (n = 18) and III (n = 7) gliomas. Statistical analysis of differences between...

  12. Features of magnetic susceptibility and inhomogeneous magnetic state in La-Sr manganites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dovgij, V.T.; Linnik, A.I.; Kamenev, V.I.; Prokopenko, V.K.; Mikhajlov, V.I.; Khokhlov, V.A.; Kadontseva, A.M.; Linnik, T.A.; Davydejko, N.V.; Turchenko, V.A.

    2007-01-01

    Anomalous magnetic susceptibility has been observed in mono- and polycrystalline (ceramic) samples of La-Sr manganites. The oscillations of the magnetic susceptibility observed for monocrystal samples in the vicinity of the Curie temperature (and in the paramagnetic region) are explained by the existence of magnetic clusters. The appearance of susceptibility oscillations in ceramic samples is attributed to the formation of magnetic clusters, which may occur both in grains (at the interface between ferro- and antiferromagnetic phases) and at the grain boundaries [ru

  13. Smart Contrast Agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, Célia S; Tóth, Éva

    2016-01-01

    By visualizing bioactive molecules or biological parameters in vivo, molecular imaging is searching for information at the molecular level in living organisms. In addition to contributing to earlier and more personalized diagnosis in medicine, it also helps understand and rationalize the molecular factors underlying physiological and pathological processes. In magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), complexes of paramagnetic metal ions, mostly lanthanides, are commonly used to enhance the intrinsic image contrast. They rely either on the relaxation effect of these metal chelates (T(1) agents), or on the phenomenon of paramagnetic chemical exchange saturation transfer (PARACEST agents). In both cases, responsive molecular magnetic resonance imaging probes can be designed to report on various biomarkers of biological interest. In this context, we review recent work in the literature and from our group on responsive T(1) and PARACEST MRI agents for the detection of biogenic metal ions (such as calcium or zinc), enzymatic activities, or neurotransmitter release. These examples illustrate the general strategies that can be applied to create molecular imaging agents with an MRI detectable response to biologically relevant parameters.

  14. Magnetic resonance perfusion imaging without contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martirosian, Petros; Graf, Hansjoerg; Schick, Fritz; Boss, Andreas; Schraml, Christina; Schwenzer, Nina F.; Claussen, Claus D.

    2010-01-01

    Principles of magnetic resonance imaging techniques providing perfusion-related contrast weighting without administration of contrast media are reported and analysed systematically. Especially common approaches to arterial spin labelling (ASL) perfusion imaging allowing quantitative assessment of specific perfusion rates are described in detail. The potential of ASL for perfusion imaging was tested in several types of tissue. After a systematic comparison of technical aspects of continuous and pulsed ASL techniques the standard kinetic model and tissue properties of influence to quantitative measurements of perfusion are reported. For the applications demonstrated in this paper a flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) ASL perfusion preparation approach followed by true fast imaging with steady precession (true FISP) data recording was developed and implemented on whole-body scanners operating at 0.2, 1.5 and 3 T for quantitative perfusion measurement in various types of tissue. ASL imaging provides a non-invasive tool for assessment of tissue perfusion rates in vivo. Images recorded from kidney, lung, brain, salivary gland and thyroid gland provide a spatial resolution of a few millimetres and sufficient signal to noise ratio in perfusion maps after 2-5 min of examination time. Newly developed ASL techniques provide especially high image quality and quantitative perfusion maps in tissues with relatively high perfusion rates (as also present in many tumours). Averaging of acquisitions and image subtraction procedures are mandatory, leading to the necessity of synchronization of data recording to breathing in abdominal and thoracic organs. (orig.)

  15. Effect of centrifugation on dynamic susceptibility of magnetic fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pshenichnikov, Alexander; Lebedev, Alexander; Lakhtina, Ekaterina; Kuznetsov, Andrey

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Six samples of magnetic fluid were obtained by centrifuging two base ferrocolloids. • Aggregates in magnetic fluids are main reason of dynamic susceptibility dispersion. • Centrifugation is an effective way of changing the dynamic susceptibility. - Abstract: The dispersive composition, dynamic susceptibility and spectrum of times of magnetization relaxation for six samples of magnetic fluid obtained by centrifuging two base colloidal solutions of the magnetite in kerosene was investigated experimentally. The base solutions differed by the concentration of the magnetic phase and the width of the particle size distribution. The procedure of cluster analysis allowing one to estimate the characteristic sizes of aggregates with uncompensated magnetic moments was described. The results of the magnetogranulometric and cluster analyses were discussed. It was shown that centrifugation has a strong effect on the physical properties of the separated fractions, which is related to the spatial redistribution of particles and multi-particle aggregates. The presence of aggregates in magnetic fluids is interpreted as the main reason of low-frequency (0.1–10 kHz) dispersion of the dynamic susceptibility. The obtained results count in favor of using centrifugation as an effective means of changing the dynamic susceptibility over wide limits and obtaining fluids with the specified type of susceptibility dispersion.

  16. Effect of centrifugation on dynamic susceptibility of magnetic fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pshenichnikov, Alexander, E-mail: pshenichnikov@icmm.ru; Lebedev, Alexander; Lakhtina, Ekaterina; Kuznetsov, Andrey

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Six samples of magnetic fluid were obtained by centrifuging two base ferrocolloids. • Aggregates in magnetic fluids are main reason of dynamic susceptibility dispersion. • Centrifugation is an effective way of changing the dynamic susceptibility. - Abstract: The dispersive composition, dynamic susceptibility and spectrum of times of magnetization relaxation for six samples of magnetic fluid obtained by centrifuging two base colloidal solutions of the magnetite in kerosene was investigated experimentally. The base solutions differed by the concentration of the magnetic phase and the width of the particle size distribution. The procedure of cluster analysis allowing one to estimate the characteristic sizes of aggregates with uncompensated magnetic moments was described. The results of the magnetogranulometric and cluster analyses were discussed. It was shown that centrifugation has a strong effect on the physical properties of the separated fractions, which is related to the spatial redistribution of particles and multi-particle aggregates. The presence of aggregates in magnetic fluids is interpreted as the main reason of low-frequency (0.1–10 kHz) dispersion of the dynamic susceptibility. The obtained results count in favor of using centrifugation as an effective means of changing the dynamic susceptibility over wide limits and obtaining fluids with the specified type of susceptibility dispersion.

  17. Soil magnetic susceptibility as indicator of radioactive contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curda, S.

    2006-01-01

    Measurement of magnetic susceptibility is a method, which is used in many areas of research. The locality Ak-Tjuz is typical example of old ecological load. One of the negative effects represents radioactive contamination. This situation is caused by environmental disaster in 1964. For useful reparation it is really necessary to determinate the surface range of contamination. And measurement of the magnetic susceptibility could be the suitable method for that kind of monitoring. (author)

  18. Confined Brownian motion of individual magnetic nanoparticles on a chip: Characterization of magnetic susceptibility.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ommering, K.; Nieuwenhuis, J.H.; IJzendoorn, van L.J.; Koopmans, B.; Prins, M.W.J.

    2006-01-01

    An increasing number of biomedical applications requires detailed knowledge of the magnetic susceptibility of individual particles. With conventional techniques it is very difficult to analyze individual particles smaller than 1 µm. The authors demonstrate how the susceptibility of individual

  19. Magnetic susceptibility of transition metal alloys with a hcp structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkenshtejn, N.V.; Galoshina, Eh.V.; Gorina, N.B.; Korenovskij, N.L.; Polyakova, V.P.; Savitskij, E.M.

    1978-01-01

    The angular dependence of the magnetic susceptibility of single crystals of Ru-Nb, Re-W and Os-Re alloys is investigated in the region of the hexagonal closely packed structure. The spin susceptibility is estimated on the basis of available data on the electron specific heat. The principal values of the orbital component of the susceptibility are determined under the assumption of isotopy of the spin contribution to the susceptibility. In Ru-Nb alloys the magnitudes of the orbital contributions and the susceptibility anisotropy are found to increase; in Re-W the spin contribution is noticeably greater whereas the orbital susceptibility is smaller, as is the anistropy. In the Os-Re alloy the orbital contributions increase and the susceptibility anisotropy is constant. It is suggested that the addition of the second component changes the overlapping of the d-electron wave functions

  20. Topical contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance dacryocystography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Sugimura, Kazuro; Hirota, Shozo

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of magnetic resonance dacryocystography (MRD) with topical administration of normal saline solution and diluted Gd-DTPA solution for the assessment of lacrimal outflow disorders. Two T2-weighted sequences and two T1-weighted sequences were evaluated in this study. The 1:100 diluted Gd solution was prepared by diluting Gd-DTPA (Magnevist) with normal saline solution. A phantom study using tube phantoms of various diameters filled with normal saline solution and 1:100 diluted Gd solution was performed. A preliminary study was performed in ten normal volunteers Eighteen patients with lacrimal outflow disorders underwent clinical MRD, and 14 also underwent conventional dacryocystography (CDG). MRD images were evaluated and compared with clinical symptoms and CDG images. In all sequences, MRD could visualize the full length of 0.7 to 1.7 mm diameter tube phantoms and could show all of the normal lacrimal sacs and nasolacrimal ducts. In the clinical study, MRD findings were compatible with the symptoms in 14 patients but were not compatible with CDG findings in half of the cases. Topical contrast-enhanced MRD provided a simple, non-invasive means of obtaining detailed morphological and functional information on the lacrimal drainage apparatus. (author)

  1. Effect of structural transition on magnetic susceptibility of tantalum carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipatnikov, V.N.; Gusev, A.I.; Rempel', A.A.; Shvejkin, G.P.

    1987-01-01

    Ordering of carbon atoms and vacancies in nonmetal sublattice of TaC y is investigated for the first time by methods of magnetic susceptibility and structural neutron diffraction analysis. Measurements of magnetic susceptibility were conducted on high-sensitive magnetic scales in temperature interval of 300 - 1300 K with holding at each temperature up to the establishment of constant, nonchanging in the course of time value of susceptibility x. When investigating x-hardened tantalum carbide within the interval of TaC 0.82 - TaC 0.85 compositions under the conditions of slow heating, it was observed nonrecorded earlier irreversible decrease of susceptibility at temperature of 960 - 1000 K. With further temperature increase T>T tr it was observed at first even and than uneven increase of x value at a temperature of T tr equal to 1090, 1130 and 1150 K for TaC 0.82 , TaC 0.83 and TaC 0.85 respectively. The measuring of magnetic susceptibility of the same samples at temperature decrease reveals the presence of susceptibility temperature hysteresis in the interval of 1070 - 1090, 1100 - 1130 and 1120 - 1150 for TaC 0.82 , TaC 0.83 and TaC 0.85 . Reversible susceptibility jump corresponding to the temperature hysteresis range at dependences of x(T), is connected with equilibrium structural phase transition of order-disorder

  2. Nature of the magnetic susceptibility of dysprosium. Paramagnetic susceptibility of dysprosium - yttrium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demidov, V.G.; Levitin, R.Z.; Chistyakov, O.D.

    1976-01-01

    The paramagnetic susceptibility of single crystals of dysprosium-yttirum alloys is measured in the basal plane and along the hexagonal axis. It is shown that the susceptibility of the alloys obeys the Curie-Weiss law, the effective magnetic moments allong the different directions being the same and the paramagnetic Curie temperatures being different. The difference between the paramagnetic Curie temperatures in the basal plane and along the hexagonal axis is independent of the dysprosium concentration in the alloy. As a comparison with the theoretical models of magnetic anisotropy shows, this is an indication that the magnetic anisotropy of dysprosium - yttrium alloys is of a single-ion nature

  3. Definition of a magnetic susceptibility of conglomerates with magnetite particles. Particularities of defining single particle susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandulyak, A. A.; Sandulyak, A. V.; Ershova, V.; Pamme, N.; Ngmasom, B.; Iles, A.

    2017-11-01

    Data of a magnetic susceptibility of ferro-and the ferrimagnetic particles of many technogenic, natural, special media are especially demanded for the solution of various tasks connected with purposeful magnetic impact on these particles. One of productive approaches to definition of a magnetic susceptibility χ of these particles consists in receiving experimental data of a susceptibility of disperse samples 〈 χ 〉 with a disperse phase of these particles. The paper expounds and analyses the results of experiments on defining (by Faraday method in a magnetic field with intensity H = 90-730 kA/m) the magnetic susceptibility 〈 χ 〉 of disperse samples (conglomerates) with a given volume ratio γ of magnetite particles (γ = 0.0065-0.25). The corresponding families of concentration and field dependences are provided alongside with discussing the applicability of linear and exponential functions to describe these dependences. We consider the possibility of defining single particles susceptibility χ (with simultaneous obtaining field dependence of this susceptibility) by the commonly used relation χ = 〈 χ 〉 /γ both at relatively small (preferable for accuracy reasons) values γ - to γ = 0.02…0.025, as well as at increased values γ - up to γ = 0.25. The data χ are provided depending on H and correlating with known data at H matter magnetic susceptibility χm (for the case when the particles are traditionally likened to balls with the characteristic for them demagnetising factor equalling 1/3) complies with the anticipated inverse function χm ∼ 1/H in the studied area H (where magnetization M expressed as M = χH reaches saturation M = Const).

  4. Magnetic Susceptibilities as they appeared to me - An Amperian approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van den Bosch, A.

    2008-08-15

    Starting from scratch, the book narrates a systematic story of the basic ideas you need for understanding quasi static magnetic susceptibilities. The story leans on the authors 25 year experience measuring susceptibilities following the Faraday technique (related with solid state physics, radiation effects, materials and magneto chemistry). The base of magnetism, the current-current interaction, is the linkage between the topics treated. The number of mathematical equations are reduced to a minimum and can be skipped without losing the thread of the story. The story is positive towards the sound bases of magnetism. However, room is left for the interpretation of measuring data. As the word susceptibility covers different meanings, the story answers for different situations the question: what is susceptible to what for creating what?

  5. Magnetic Susceptibilities as they appeared to me - An Amperian approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van den Bosch, A.

    2008-01-01

    Starting from scratch, the book narrates a systematic story of the basic ideas you need for understanding quasi static magnetic susceptibilities. The story leans on the authors 25 year experience measuring susceptibilities following the Faraday technique (related with solid state physics, radiation effects, materials and magneto chemistry). The base of magnetism, the current-current interaction, is the linkage between the topics treated. The number of mathematical equations are reduced to a minimum and can be skipped without losing the thread of the story. The story is positive towards the sound bases of magnetism. However, room is left for the interpretation of measuring data. As the word susceptibility covers different meanings, the story answers for different situations the question: what is susceptible to what for creating what?

  6. Enhancing contrast of magnetic resonance imaging in patients with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DTPA), a recent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent, in hepatobiliary system of patients with liver cirrhosis. Methods: Liver cirrhosis patients that underwent contrast MRI examination at Renai Hospital, Taipei City, Taiwan were ...

  7. NON-CONTRAST MAGNETIC RESONANCE UROGRAPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arpita C

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Magnetic Resonance (MR urography with its optimal contrast resolution and lack of ionizing radiation provides a comprehensive examination of the entire urinary tract noninvasively. MR urography is clinically useful in the evaluation of suspected urinary tract obstruction, haematuria, congenital anomalies, and surgically altered anatomy. It is particularly useful in cases of where there is contraindication of ionizing radiation and in paediatric and pregnant patients. The common MR urographic techniques are: Static-fluid MR urography and excretory MR urography. Static-fluid MR urography uses of heavily T2-weighted sequences to image the urinary tract as a static collection of fluid, can be repeated sequentially (Cine MR urography to better demonstrate the ureters in their entirety and to confirm the presence of fixed stenoses. Excretory MR urography is performed during the excretory phase of enhancement after the intravenous administration of gadolinium-based contrast material; thus, the patient must have sufficient renal function to allow the excretion. Static-fluid and excretory MR urography can be combined with conventional MR imaging for comprehensive evaluation of the urinary tract. The limitations are limited availability, high cost, relatively long examination time, low spatial resolution compared to IVU (Intravenous Urogram and CT Urography; sensitivity to motion (breathing and ureteral peristalsis inherent contraindications like patients with pacemakers, claustrophobia, and relative insensitivity for calcification and ureteric calculi. In this article, an attempt has been made to demonstrate the potential of static-fluid MRU to demonstrate a spectrum of urologic pathology involving the kidneys, ureters, and bladder while discussing the limitations. METHODS Thirty patients with urinary tract abnormalities were evaluated with MR urography performed between May 2014 to April 2016 using routine MR sequences and

  8. Factors influencing fast low angle positive contrast steady-state free precession (FLAPS) magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dharmakumar, Rohan; Koktzoglou, Ioannis; Li Debiao

    2007-01-01

    The presence of susceptibility-shifting media can lead to signal voids in magnetic resonance images. While signal voids have been traditionally used to detect such magnetic perturbers, selective magnetic resonance imaging of off-resonant spins surrounding susceptibility-shifted media allows for them to be visualized as hyper-intense (positive contrast) regions. These positive contrast methods can potentially improve the detection conspicuity of magnetic perturbers against regions that appear dark due to the absence of protons, such as air. Recently, a fast low angle positive contrast steady-state free precession (FLAPS) technique has been proposed as a positive contrast imaging method. This work systematically evaluates the contrast characteristics and acquisition strategies of FLAPS-based imaging from the standpoint of imaging parameters and physical properties of the magnetic perturbers. Results show that scan parameters (T R , flip angle, B 0 ), physical properties of the perturber (size and concentration of shift reagent) and the ratio of the relaxation constants (T 1 /T 2 ) of the medium are significant factors influencing the FLAPS-based positive contrast

  9. Mapping Magnetic Susceptibility Anisotropies of White Matter in vivo in the Human Brain at 7 Tesla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xu; Vikram, Deepti S; Lim, Issel Anne L; Jones, Craig K; Farrell, Jonathan A.D.; van Zijl, Peter C. M.

    2012-01-01

    High-resolution magnetic resonance phase- or frequency- shift images acquired at high field show contrast related to magnetic susceptibility differences between tissues. Such contrast varies with the orientation of the organ in the field, but the development of quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) has made it possible to reproducibly image the intrinsic tissue susceptibility contrast. However, recent studies indicate that magnetic susceptibility is anisotropic in brain white matter and, as such, needs to be described by a symmetric second-rank tensor (χ¯¯). To fully determine the elements of this tensor, it would be necessary to acquire frequency data at six or more orientations. Assuming cylindrical symmetry of the susceptibility tensor in myelinated white matter fibers, we propose a simplified method to reconstruct the susceptibility tensor in terms of a mean magnetic susceptibility, MMS = (χ∥ + 2χ⊥)/3 and a magnetic susceptibility anisotropy, MSA = χ∥ − χ⊥, where χ∥ and χ⊥ are susceptibility parallel and perpendicular to the white matter fiber direction, respectively. Computer simulations show that with a practical head rotation angle of around 20°–30°, four head orientations suffice to reproducibly reconstruct the tensor with good accuracy. We tested this approach on whole brain 1×1×1 mm3 frequency data acquired from five healthy subjects at 7 T. The frequency information from phase images collected at four head orientations was combined with the fiber direction information extracted from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to map the white matter susceptibility tensor. The MMS and MSA were quantified for regions in several large white matter fiber structures, including the corona radiata, posterior thalamic radiation and corpus callosum. MMS ranged from −0.037 to −0.053 ppm (referenced to CSF being about zero). MSA values could be quantified without the need for a reference and ranged between 0.004 and 0.029 ppm, in line with

  10. Study of the magnetic susceptibilities of some plutonium derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raphael, G.

    1969-06-01

    We present a detailed description of an automatic recording apparatus for magnetic susceptibility measurement of radioactive samples in the temperature range 4 K - 1200 K. We have measured the magnetic susceptibility of various plutonium compounds: - PuO 2 , Pu 2 O 3 , PuO 2-x , - PuS, Pu 2 S 3 , Pu 3 S 4 , (U x Pu 1-x )S - PuN - PuC 1-x (N,O,H,vacancy), Pu 2 C 3 , (U 0.85 Pu 0.15 )C. The curves of susceptibilities versus temperature show many magnetic transitions. The interpretation of these results shows the existence of magnetic moments carried by the 5 f electrons and localized on the metallic sites as well as the great influence of the 'crystal field' in all these compounds. (author) [fr

  11. Quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM): Decoding MRI data for a tissue magnetic biomarker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Liu, Tian

    2015-01-01

    In MRI, the main magnetic field polarizes the electron cloud of a molecule, generating a chemical shift for observer protons within the molecule and a magnetic susceptibility inhomogeneity field for observer protons outside the molecule. The number of water protons surrounding a molecule for detecting its magnetic susceptibility is vastly greater than the number of protons within the molecule for detecting its chemical shift. However, the study of tissue magnetic susceptibility has been hindered by poor molecular specificities of hitherto used methods based on MRI signal phase and T2* contrast, which depend convolutedly on surrounding susceptibility sources. Deconvolution of the MRI signal phase can determine tissue susceptibility but is challenged by the lack of MRI signal in the background and by the zeroes in the dipole kernel. Recently, physically meaningful regularizations, including the Bayesian approach, have been developed to enable accurate quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) for studying iron distribution, metabolic oxygen consumption, blood degradation, calcification, demyelination, and other pathophysiological susceptibility changes, as well as contrast agent biodistribution in MRI. This paper attempts to summarize the basic physical concepts and essential algorithmic steps in QSM, to describe clinical and technical issues under active development, and to provide references, codes, and testing data for readers interested in QSM. Magn Reson Med 73:82–101, 2015. © 2014 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society of Medicine in Resonance. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. PMID:25044035

  12. Initial magnetic susceptibility of the diluted magnetopolymer elastic composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borin, D.Yu.; Odenbach, S.

    2017-01-01

    In this work diluted magnetopolymer elastic composites based on magnetic microparticles are experimentally studied. Considered samples have varied concentration of the magnetic powder and different structural anisotropy. Experimental data on magnetic properties are accomplished by microstructural observations performed using X-Ray tomography. Influence of the particles amount and structuring effects on the initial magnetic susceptibility of the composites as well as the applicability of the Maxwell-Garnett approximation, which is widely used in considerations of magnetopolymer elastic composites, are evaluated. It is demonstrated that the approximation works well for diluted samples containing randomly distributed magnetic particles and for the diluted samples with chain-like structures oriented perpendicular to an externally applied field, while it fails to predict the susceptibility of the samples with structures oriented parallel to the field. Moreover, it is shown, that variation of the chains morphology does not significantly change the composite initial magnetic susceptibility. - Highlights: • The Maxwell-Garnet prediction works well for the diluted isotropic composites. • The Maxwell-Garnet prediction can be used for composites with structures oriented perpendicular to an applied field. • Chains oriented parallel to an applied field significantly increase the composite initial magnetic susceptibility. • The number and thickness of chains is not of the highest importance for the diluted composites. • The crucial reason of the observed effect is expected to be the demagnetisation factor of the chains.

  13. Clay mineralogy and magnetic susceptibility of Oxisols in geomorphic surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia Arantes Camargo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Studies analyzing the variability of clay minerals and magnetic susceptibility provide data for the delineation of site-specific management areas since many of their attributes are important to agronomy and the environment. This study aimed to evaluate the spatial variability of clay minerals, magnetic susceptibility, adsorbed phosphorus and physical attributes in Oxisols of sandstones in different geomorphic surfaces. For that purpose, soil samples were collected every 25 m along a transect located within the area where the geomorphic surfaces were identified and mapped. The transect occupied the central portion of 500 ha, where it was also sampled for density purposes with one sample per six hectares. Soil samples were collected at a depth of 0.0-0.2 m. The results of the physical, chemical, mineralogical and magnetic susceptibility analyses were subjected to statistical and geostatistical analyses. The nature of the clay minerals and magnetic susceptibility was dependent on the variation of the soil parent material. High values of magnetic susceptibility were associated with the presence of maghemite and magnetite of coarse size. The spatial variability of crystallinity and the content of Fe oxides, as well as magnetic susceptibility, were dependent on the age of the geomorphic surfaces. The youngest surface had greater spatial variability of these attributes. The iron (goethite and hematite and aluminum (gibbsite oxides in the youngest geomorphic surface influenced the low values of soil density and high values of total pore volume, micropores and P adsorption. The characterization of the spatial variability of Fe oxides and susceptibility allowed for the delineation of homogeneous areas.

  14. Low-temperature susceptibility of concentrated magnetic fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pshenichnikov, Alexander F.; Lebedev, Alexander V.

    2004-09-01

    The initial susceptibility of concentrated magnetic fluids (ferrocolloids) has been experimentally investigated at low temperatures. The results obtained indicate that the interparticle dipole-dipole interactions can increase the susceptibility by several times as compared to the Langevin value. It is shown that good agreement between recent theoretical models and experimental observations can be achieved by introducing a correction for coefficients in the series expansion of susceptibility in powers of density and aggregation parameter. A modified equation for equilibrium susceptibility is offered to sum over corrections made by Kalikmanov (Statistical Physics of Fluids, Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 2001) and by B. Huke and M. Lücke (Phys. Rev. E 67, 051403, 2003). The equation gives good quantitative agreement with the experimental data in the wide range of temperature and magnetic particles concentration. It has been found that in some cases the magnetic fluid solidification occurs at temperature several tens of kelvins higher than the crystallization temperature of the carrier liquid. The solidification temperature of magnetic fluids is independent of particle concentration (i.e., magneto-dipole interparticle interactions) and dependent on the surfactant type and carrier liquid. This finding allows us to suggest that molecular interactions and generation of some large-scale structure from colloidal particles in magnetic fluids are responsible for magnetic fluid solidification. If the magnetic fluid contains the particles with the Brownian relaxation mechanism of the magnetic moment, the solidification manifests itself as the peak on the "susceptibility-temperature" curve. This fact proves the dynamic nature of the observed peak: it arises from blocking the Brownian mechanism of the magnetization relaxation.

  15. High temperature magnetic susceptibility of the Nb-H system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welter, J.-M.

    1983-01-01

    The magnetic susceptibility chi(T,x) of various NbHsub(x) specimens with 0 - 5 to 1.25 x 10 - 5 cm 3 g - 1 in this hydrogen concentration range and exhibits a marked break at x approximately 0.6. An estimate of the Pauli paramagnetic spin susceptibility chisub(P) for the two limiting concentrations allowed the evaluation of the orbital paramagnetic susceptibility chisub(O). For x = 0 and x approximately 0.8 the values of chisub(P) are 1.05 x 10 - 5 cm 3 g - 1 and 0.39 x 10 - 5 cm 3 g - 1 respectively and the values of chisub(O) are 1.73 x 10 - 5 cm 3 g - 1 and 1.08 x 10 - 5 cm 3 g - 1 respectively. The magnetic susceptibility decreases by approximately 10% on going from the concentrated solid solution to the monohydride. (Auth.)

  16. Perfusion MRI of brain tumours: a comparative study of pseudo-continuous arterial spin labelling and dynamic susceptibility contrast imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaernum, Hanna; Steffensen, Elena G.; Simonsen, Carsten Wiberg; Jensen, Finn Taagehoej [Aalborg Hospital/Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Aalborg (Denmark); Knutsson, Linda [Lund University, Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Lund (Sweden); Fruend, Ernst-Torben [Aalborg Hospital/Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Aalborg (Denmark); GE Healthcare - Applied Science Lab Europe, Aalborg (Denmark); Lundbye-Christensen, Soeren [Aalborg Hospital/Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Cardiology, Center for Cardiovascular Research, Aalborg (Denmark); Shankaranarayanan, Ajit [Global Applied Science Lab, GE Healthcare, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Alsop, David C. [Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Larsson, Elna-Marie [Aalborg Hospital/Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Aalborg (Denmark); Uppsala University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2010-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to compare the non-invasive 3D pseudo-continuous arterial spin labelling (PC ASL) technique with the clinically established dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) for evaluation of brain tumours. A prospective study of 28 patients with contrast-enhancing brain tumours was performed at 3 T using DSC-MRI and PC ASL with whole-brain coverage. The visual qualitative evaluation of signal enhancement in tumour was scored from 0 to 3 (0 = no signal enhancement compared with white matter, 3 = pronounced signal enhancement with equal or higher signal intensity than in grey matter/basal ganglia). The extent of susceptibility artefacts in the tumour was scored from 0 to 2 (0 = no susceptibility artefacts and 2 = extensive susceptibility artefacts (maximum diameter > 2 cm)). A quantitative analysis was performed with normalised tumour blood flow values (ASL nTBF, DSC nTBF): mean value for region of interest (ROI) in an area with maximum signal enhancement/the mean value for ROIs in cerebellum. There was no difference in total visual score for signal enhancement between PC ASL and DSC relative cerebral blood flow (p = 0.12). ASL had a lower susceptibility-artefact score than DSC-MRI (p = 0.03). There was good correlation between DSC nTBF and ASL nTBF values with a correlation coefficient of 0.82. PC ASL is an alternative to DSC-MRI for the evaluation of perfusion in brain tumours. The method has fewer susceptibility artefacts than DSC-MRI and can be used in patients with renal failure because no contrast injection is needed. (orig.)

  17. AC susceptibility enhancement studies in magnetic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, S.; Ranganathan, R.; Chakravarti, A.; Sil, S.

    2001-01-01

    Enhancement of AC susceptibility has been observed for typical ferromagnets (Gd), reentrant spin glasses like (Fe 1.5 Mn 1.5 Si) and canted spin systems (Ce(Fe 0.96 Al 0.04 ) 2 ). The data have been interpreted with the help of a simulation model based on dry friction-like pinning of domain walls for systems having ferromagnetic domain structures. A strong pinning mechanism appears in the reentrant spin glass like and canted spin systems at low temperatures in addition to the intrinsic one in the ferromagnetic phase. The temperature variation of the pinning potential has been given qualitatively for the reentrant spin glass like systems

  18. Contrasts agents in magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnet, P.A.; Fernandez, J.P.; Milhavet, J.C.; Chapat, J.P.; Almes, C.; Bruel, J.M.; Rouanet, J.P.; Lamarque, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    Changing different parameters involved in imaging procedures, paramagnetic substances provide contrast enhancement in MRI. Contrast agents presently studied in animals and clinical trials, are either salts or complexes of mineral ions either nitroxide stable free radicals. Their development should extend the possibilities of tissular characterization and fonctional or metabolic evaluation of the MRI [fr

  19. Magnetic susceptibility measuring probe utilizing a compensation coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnet, Jean; Fournet, Julien.

    1978-01-01

    This invention concerns a magnetic susceptibility measuring probe. It is used, inter alia, in logging, to wit continuous logging of the magnetic susceptibility of the ground throughout the length of a bore hole. The purpose of this invention is to increase the sensitivity of this type of probe by creating a side focusing effect . To this end, it provides for the use of a compensation winding, coaxial with the measurement winding and arranged symmetrically to the latter with respect to the centre of the induction windings [fr

  20. Crystal structure and magnetic susceptibility of UOSe single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaczorowski, D.; Muenster Univ.; Poettgen, R.; Jeitschko, W.; Gajek, Z.; Zygmunt, A.

    1993-01-01

    The crystal structure and magnetic susceptibility behaviour of UOSe single crystals have been studied. UOSe crystalizes in the tetragonal PbFC1-type structure (space group P4/nmm) with the lattice parameters: a = 390.38(5) pm and c = 698.05(9) pm. It orders antiferromagnetically at T N =100±2 K and exhibits a very strong anisotropy in the susceptibility vs temperature variation. The magnetic and thermodynamic properties of UOSe are successfully interpreted in the framework of a perturbative ab initio crystal field approach. (Author)

  1. Crystal structure and magnetic susceptibility of UOSe single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaczorowski, D. (Polish Academy of Sciences, Wroclaw (Poland). Inst. for Low Temperature and Structure Research Muenster Univ. (Germany). Anorganisch-Chemisches Inst.); Poettgen, R.; Jeitschko, W. (Muenster Univ. (Germany). Anorganisch-Chemisches Inst.); Gajek, Z.; Zygmunt, A. (Polish Academy of Sciences, Wroclaw (Poland). Inst. for Low Temperature and Structure Research)

    1993-01-01

    The crystal structure and magnetic susceptibility behaviour of UOSe single crystals have been studied. UOSe crystalizes in the tetragonal PbFC1-type structure (space group P4/nmm) with the lattice parameters: a = 390.38(5) pm and c = 698.05(9) pm. It orders antiferromagnetically at T[sub N]=100[+-]2 K and exhibits a very strong anisotropy in the susceptibility vs temperature variation. The magnetic and thermodynamic properties of UOSe are successfully interpreted in the framework of a perturbative ab initio crystal field approach. (Author).

  2. Effect of centrifugation on dynamic susceptibility of magnetic fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pshenichnikov, Alexander; Lebedev, Alexander; Lakhtina, Ekaterina; Kuznetsov, Andrey

    2017-06-01

    The dispersive composition, dynamic susceptibility and spectrum of times of magnetization relaxation for six samples of magnetic fluid obtained by centrifuging two base colloidal solutions of the magnetite in kerosene was investigated experimentally. The base solutions differed by the concentration of the magnetic phase and the width of the particle size distribution. The procedure of cluster analysis allowing one to estimate the characteristic sizes of aggregates with uncompensated magnetic moments was described. The results of the magnetogranulometric and cluster analyses were discussed. It was shown that centrifugation has a strong effect on the physical properties of the separated fractions, which is related to the spatial redistribution of particles and multi-particle aggregates. The presence of aggregates in magnetic fluids is interpreted as the main reason of low-frequency (0.1-10 kHz) dispersion of the dynamic susceptibility. The obtained results count in favor of using centrifugation as an effective means of changing the dynamic susceptibility over wide limits and obtaining fluids with the specified type of susceptibility dispersion.

  3. Magnetic susceptibility of multiferroics and chemical ordering

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Maryško, Miroslav; Laguta, Valentyn; Raevski, I. P.; Kuzian, R. O.; Olekhnovich, N.M.; Pushkarev, A.V.; Radyush, Yu.V.; Raevskaya, S. I.; Titov, V.V.; Kubrin, S.P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 5 (2017), s. 1-6, č. článku 056409. ISSN 2158-3226 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-11473S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : multiferroic * spin glass * antiferromagnetic * ferroelectrics Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 1.568, year: 2016

  4. Magnetic irreversibility in granular superconductors: ac susceptibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, F.; Obradors, X.; Fontcuberta, J.; Vallet, M.; Gonzalez-Calbet, J.

    1991-01-01

    Ac susceptibility measurements of a ceramic weak-coupled superconductor in very low ac fields (2mG, 111Hz) are reported. We present evidence for the observation of the magnetic irreversibility following a ZFC-FC thermal cycling by means of ac susceptibilty measurements. It is shown that this technique also reflect local magnetic field effects in granular superconductors, as previously suggested in microwave surface resistance and I-V characteristics. (orig.)

  5. The use of magnetic susceptibility measurements to determine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research work presents a study on the application of magnetic susceptibility measurements and geochemical analysis for mapping or assessing heavy metal pollution in the agricultural soil in road proximity. The research work was also done to check any runoff of heavy metals pollution to the Owabi dam which serves ...

  6. Role of magnetic susceptibility weighted imaging in evaluation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) is a new method in MR imaging. SWI detects the signal loss created by disturbance of a homogeneous magnetic field; these disturbances can be caused by paramagnetic, ferromagnetic, or diamagnetic substances. There are many neurologic conditions that can benefit ...

  7. Susceptibility and magnetization of a random Ising model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, D; Srivastava, V [Roorkee Univ. (India). Dept. of Physics

    1977-08-01

    The susceptibility of a bond disordered Ising model is calculated by configurationally averaging an Ornstein-Zernike type of equation for the two spin correlation function. The equation for the correlation function is derived using a diagrammatic method due to Englert. The averaging is performed using bond CPA. The magnetization is also calculated by averaging in a similar manner a linearised molecular field equation.

  8. Automatic magnetic susceptibility measurements between 4 K and 1200 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raphael, G.

    1969-01-01

    We give a detailed description of a Faraday magnetic susceptibility balance which operates from 4 K to 1200 K. Some preliminary results on platinum and tantalum illustrate the precision and the sensitivity of the measurements. The apparatus has been designed for measurements on the plutonium compounds which present severe health hazards. (author) [fr

  9. Variable Temperature Equipment for a Commercial Magnetic Susceptibility Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotz, Albert

    2008-01-01

    Variable temperature equipment for the magnetic susceptibility balance MSB-MK1 of Sherwood Scientific, Ltd., is described. The sample temperature is controlled with streaming air heated by water in a heat exchanger. Whereas the balance as sold commercially can be used only for room temperature measurements, the setup we designed extends the…

  10. Spectroscopic AC susceptibility imaging (sASI) of magnetic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ficko, Bradley W.; Nadar, Priyanka M.; Diamond, Solomon G.

    2015-01-01

    This study demonstrates a method for alternating current (AC) susceptibility imaging (ASI) of magnetic nanoparticles (mNPs) using low cost instrumentation. The ASI method uses AC magnetic susceptibility measurements to create tomographic images using an array of drive coils, compensation coils and fluxgate magnetometers. Using a spectroscopic approach in conjunction with ASI, a series of tomographic images can be created for each frequency measurement set and is termed sASI. The advantage of sASI is that mNPs can be simultaneously characterized and imaged in a biological medium. System calibration was performed by fitting the in-phase and out-of-phase susceptibility measurements of an mNP sample with a hydrodynamic diameter of 100 nm to a Brownian relaxation model (R 2 =0.96). Samples of mNPs with core diameters of 10 and 40 nm and a sample of 100 nm hydrodynamic diameter were prepared in 0.5 ml tubes. Three mNP samples were arranged in a randomized array and then scanned using sASI with six frequencies between 425 and 925 Hz. The sASI scans showed the location and quantity of the mNP samples (R 2 =0.97). Biological compatibility of the sASI method was demonstrated by scanning mNPs that were injected into a pork sausage. The mNP response in the biological medium was found to correlate with a calibration sample (R 2 =0.97, p<0.001). These results demonstrate the concept of ASI and advantages of sASI. - Highlights: • Development of an AC susceptibility imaging model. • Comparison of AC susceptibility imaging (ASI) and susceptibility magnitude imaging (SMI). • Demonstration of ASI and spectroscopic ASI (sASI) using three different magnetic nanoparticle types. • SASI scan separation of three different magnetic nanoparticles samples using 5 spectroscopic frequencies. • Demonstration of biological feasibility of sASI

  11. A theoretical framework for determining cerebral vascular function and heterogeneity from dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digernes, Ingrid; Bjørnerud, Atle; Vatnehol, Svein Are S; Løvland, Grete; Courivaud, Frédéric; Vik-Mo, Einar; Meling, Torstein R; Emblem, Kyrre E

    2017-06-01

    Mapping the complex heterogeneity of vascular tissue in the brain is important for understanding cerebrovascular disease. In this translational study, we build on previous work using vessel architectural imaging (VAI) and present a theoretical framework for determining cerebral vascular function and heterogeneity from dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Our tissue model covers realistic structural architectures for vessel branching and orientations, as well as a range of hemodynamic scenarios for blood flow, capillary transit times and oxygenation. In a typical image voxel, our findings show that the apparent MRI relaxation rates are independent of the mean vessel orientation and that the vortex area, a VAI-based parameter, is determined by the relative oxygen saturation level and the vessel branching of the tissue. Finally, in both simulated and patient data, we show that the relative distributions of the vortex area parameter as a function of capillary transit times show unique characteristics in normal-appearing white and gray matter tissue, whereas tumour-voxels in comparison display a heterogeneous distribution. Collectively, our study presents a comprehensive framework that may serve as a roadmap for in vivo and per-voxel determination of vascular status and heterogeneity in cerebral tissue.

  12. Determination of arterial input function in dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI using group independent component analysis technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.; Liu, H.-L.; Yang Yihong; Hsu, Y.-Y.; Chuang, K.-S.

    2006-01-01

    Quantification of cerebral blood flow (CBF) with dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) requires the determination of the arterial input function (AIF). The segmentation of surrounding tissue by manual selection is error-prone due to the partial volume artifacts. Independent component analysis (ICA) has the advantage in automatically decomposing the signals into interpretable components. Recently group ICA technique has been applied to fMRI study and showed reduced variance caused by motion artifact and noise. In this work, we investigated the feasibility and efficacy of the use of group ICA technique to extract the AIF. Both simulated and in vivo data were analyzed in this study. The simulation data of eight phantoms were generated using randomized lesion locations and time activity curves. The clinical data were obtained from spin-echo EPI MR scans performed in seven normal subjects. Group ICA technique was applied to analyze data through concatenating across seven subjects. The AIFs were calculated from the weighted average of the signals in the region selected by ICA. Preliminary results of this study showed that group ICA technique could not extract accurate AIF information from regions around the vessel. The mismatched location of vessels within the group reduced the benefits of group study

  13. Dynamic magnetic susceptibility of systems with long-range magnetic order

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vannette, Matthew Dano

    2009-01-01

    The utility of the TDR as an instrument in the study of magnetically ordered materials has been expanded beyond the simple demonstration purposes. Results of static applied magnetic field dependent measurements of the dynamic magnetic susceptibility, ?, of various ferromagnetic (FM) and antiferromagnetic (AFM) materials showing a range of transition temperatures (1-800 K) are presented. Data was collected primarily with a tunnel diode resonator (TDR) at different radio-frequencies (∼10-30 MHz). In the vicinity of TC local moment ferromagnets show a very sharp, narrow peak in ? which is suppressed in amplitude and shifted to higher temperatures as the static bias field is increased. Unexpectedly, critical scaling analysis fails for these data. It is seen that these data are frequency dependent, however there is no simple method whereby measurement frequency can be changed in a controllable fashion. In contrast, itinerant ferromagnets show a broad maximum in ? well below TC which is suppressed and shifts to lower temperatures as the dc bias field is increased. The data on itinerant ferromagnets is fitted to a semi-phenomenological model that suggests the sample response is dominated by the uncompensated minority spins in the conduction band. Concluding remarks suggest possible scenarios to achieve frequency resolved data using the TDR as well as other fields in which the apparatus may be exploited.

  14. Susceptibility contrast imaging of CO2-induced changes in the blood volume of the human brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostrup, Egill; Larsson, H B; Toft, P B

    1996-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate changes in the regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) in human subjects during rest and hypercapnia by MR imaging, and to compare the results from contrast-enhanced and noncontrast-enhanced susceptibility-weighted imaging. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Five healthy volunteers (aged...... in cerebral hemodynamics than noncontrast-enhanced imaging. The results of the deconvolution analysis suggested that perfusion calculation by conventional tracer kinetic methods may be impracticable because of nonlinear effects in contrast-enhanced MR imaging....

  15. Magnetic susceptibility of molecular carbon: nanotubes and fullerite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez, A P; Haddon, R C; Zhou, O; Fleming, R M; Zhang, J; McClure, S M; Smalley, R E [AT T Bell Laboratories, Murray Hill, NJ (United States)

    1994-07-01

    Elemental carbon can be synthesized in a variety of geometrical forms, from three-dimensional extended structures (diamond) to finite molecules (C[sub 60] fullerite). Results are presented here on the magnetic susceptibility of the least well-understood members of this family, nanotubes and C[sub 60] fullerite. (1) Nanotubes represent the cylindrical form of carbon, intermediate between graphite and fullerite. They are found to have significantly larger orientation-averaged susceptibility, on a per carbon basis, than any other form of elemental carbon. This susceptibility implies an average band structure among nanotubes similar to that of graphite. (2) High-resolution magnetic susceptibility data on C[sub 60] fullerite near the molecular orientational-ordering transition at 259 K show a sharp jump corresponding to 2.5 centimeter-gram-second parts per million per mole of C[sub 60]. This jump directly demonstrates the effect of an intermolecular cooperative transition on an intramolecular electronic property, where the susceptibility jump may be ascribed to a change in the shape of the molecule due to lattice forces.

  16. Magnetic susceptibility in the deep layers of the primary motor cortex in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Costagli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS is a progressive neurological disorder that entails degeneration of both upper and lower motor neurons. The primary motor cortex (M1 in patients with upper motor neuron (UMN impairment is pronouncedly hypointense in Magnetic Resonance (MR T2* contrast. In the present study, 3D gradient-recalled multi-echo sequences were used on a 7 Tesla MR system to acquire T2*-weighted images targeting M1 at high spatial resolution. MR raw data were used for Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping (QSM. Measures of magnetic susceptibility correlated with the expected concentration of non-heme iron in different regions of the cerebral cortex in healthy subjects. In ALS patients, significant increases in magnetic susceptibility co-localized with the T2* hypointensity observed in the middle and deep layers of M1. The magnetic susceptibility, hence iron concentration, of the deep cortical layers of patients' M1 subregions corresponding to Penfield's areas of the hand and foot in both hemispheres significantly correlated with the clinical scores of UMN impairment of the corresponding limbs. QSM therefore reflects the presence of iron deposits related to neuroinflammatory reaction and cortical microgliosis, and might prove useful in estimating M1 iron concentration, as a possible radiological sign of severe UMN burden in ALS patients.

  17. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Enterography and Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasonography in Crohn's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilkens, Rune; Peters, David A; Nielsen, Agnete Hedemann

    2017-01-01

    Purpose e Cross-sectional imaging methods are important for objective evaluationof small intestinal inflammationinCrohn'sdisease(CD).The primary aim was to compare relative parameters of intestinal perfusion between contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic...

  18. Susceptibility contrast imaging of CO2-induced changes in the blood volume of the human brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostrup, Egill; Larsson, H B; Toft, P B

    1996-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate changes in the regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) in human subjects during rest and hypercapnia by MR imaging, and to compare the results from contrast-enhanced and noncontrast-enhanced susceptibility-weighted imaging. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Five healthy volunteers (aged...

  19. Contrasting patterns of coral bleaching susceptibility in 2010 suggest an adaptive response to thermal stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guest, James R; Baird, Andrew H; Maynard, Jeffrey A; Muttaqin, Efin; Edwards, Alasdair J; Campbell, Stuart J; Yewdall, Katie; Affendi, Yang Amri; Chou, Loke Ming

    2012-01-01

    Coral bleaching events vary in severity, however, to date, the hierarchy of susceptibility to bleaching among coral taxa has been consistent over a broad geographic range and among bleaching episodes. Here we examine the extent of spatial and temporal variation in thermal tolerance among scleractinian coral taxa and between locations during the 2010 thermally induced, large-scale bleaching event in South East Asia. Surveys to estimate the bleaching and mortality indices of coral genera were carried out at three locations with contrasting thermal and bleaching histories. Despite the magnitude of thermal stress being similar among locations in 2010, there was a remarkable contrast in the patterns of bleaching susceptibility. Comparisons of bleaching susceptibility within coral taxa and among locations revealed no significant differences between locations with similar thermal histories, but significant differences between locations with contrasting thermal histories (Friedman = 34.97; pBleaching was much less severe at locations that bleached during 1998, that had greater historical temperature variability and lower rates of warming. Remarkably, Acropora and Pocillopora, taxa that are typically highly susceptible, although among the most susceptible in Pulau Weh (Sumatra, Indonesia) where respectively, 94% and 87% of colonies died, were among the least susceptible in Singapore, where only 5% and 12% of colonies died. The pattern of susceptibility among coral genera documented here is unprecedented. A parsimonious explanation for these results is that coral populations that bleached during the last major warming event in 1998 have adapted and/or acclimatised to thermal stress. These data also lend support to the hypothesis that corals in regions subject to more variable temperature regimes are more resistant to thermal stress than those in less variable environments.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents: Overview and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Guoping; Robinson, Leslie; Hogg, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive clinical imaging modality, which has become widely used in the diagnosis and/or staging of human diseases around the world. Some MRI examinations include the use of contrast agents. The categorizations of currently available contrast agents have been described according to their effect on the image, magnetic behavior and biodistribution in the body, respectively. In this field, superparamagnetic iron oxide particles and soluble paramagnetic metal chelates are two main classes of contrast agents for MRI. This review outlines the research and development of MRI contrast agents. In future, the ideal MRI contrast agent will be focused on the neutral tissue- or organ-targeting materials with high relaxivity and specificity, low toxicity and side effects, suitable long intravascular duration and excretion time, high contrast enhancement with low dose in vivo, and with minimal cost

  1. Magnetic susceptibility: a proxy method of estimating increased pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kluciarova, D.; Gregorova, D.; Tunyi, I.

    2004-01-01

    A need for rapid and inexpensive (proxy) methods of outlining areas exposed to increased pollution by atmospheric particulates of industrial origin caused scientists in various fields to use and validate different non-traditional (or non-chemical) techniques. Among them, soil magnetometry seems to be a suitable tool. This method is based on the knowledge that ferrimagnetic particles, namely magnetite, are produced from pyrite during combustion of fossil fuel. Besides the combustion processes, magnetic particles can also originate from road traffic, for example, or can be included in various waste-water outlets. In our study we examine the magnetic susceptibility as a convenient measure of determining the concentration of (ferri) magnetic minerals by rapid and non-destructive means. We used for measure KLY-2 Kappabridge. Concentration of ferrimagnetic minerals in different soils is linked to pollution sources. Higher χ values were observed in soils on the territory in Istebne (47383x10 -6 SI ). The susceptibility anomaly may be caused by particular geological circumstances and can be related to high content of ferromagnetic minerals in the host rocks. Positive correlation of magnetic susceptibility are conditioned by industrial contamination mainly by metal working factories and by traffic. The proposed method can be successfully applied in determining heavy metal pollution of soils on the city territories. (authors)

  2. Magnetic iron oxide for contrast-enhanced MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fahlvik, A.K.

    1991-05-01

    The main objective of this experimental work has been to study the biological fate and the contrast enhancing potential of a model preparation of magnetic iron oxide (MSM) after intravenous injection to rodents. This was achieved by: Studying in vitro contrast efficacy of various magnetic iron oxide preparations by relaxation analysis. Studying in vivo contrast efficacy of MSM by relaxation analysis and NMR imaging. Studying the biodistribution and bioelimination of MSM in independent experiments using relaxation analysis, radioactivity studies and histological techniques. Studying interactions of MSM with target cells and target organelles using ex vivo techniques. Based on the presented experimental study, the MSM model preparation of magnetic iron oxide seems to fulfill basic requirements of NMR contrast agents: efficient proton relaxation, specific in vivo distribution, and biological tolerance. 177 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  3. The use of magnetic susceptibility as a forensic search tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pringle, Jamie K; Giubertoni, Matteo; Cassidy, Nigel J; Wisniewski, Kristopher D; Hansen, James D; Linford, Neil T; Daniels, Rebecca M

    2015-01-01

    There are various techniques available for forensic search teams to employ to successfully detect a buried object. Near-surface geophysical search methods have been dominated by ground penetrating radar but recently other techniques, such as electrical resistivity, have become more common. This paper discusses magnetic susceptibility as a simple surface search tool illustrated by various research studies. These suggest magnetic susceptibility to be a relatively low cost, quick and effective tool, compared to other geophysical methods, to determine disturbed ground above buried objects and burnt surface remains in a variety of soil types. Further research should collect datasets over objects of known burial ages for comparison purposes and used in forensic search cases to validate the technique. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Quantitative interpretation of the magnetic susceptibility frequency dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustra, Andrea; Mendonça, Carlos A.; Leite, Aruã; Jovane, Luigi; Trindade, Ricardo I. F.

    2018-05-01

    Low-field mass-specific magnetic susceptibility (MS) measurements using multifrequency alternating fields are commonly used to evaluate concentration of ferrimagnetic particles in the transition of superparamagnetic (SP) to stable single domain (SSD). In classical palaeomagnetic analyses, this measurement serves as a preliminary assessment of rock samples providing rapid, non-destructive, economical and easy information of magnetic properties. The SP-SSD transition is relevant in environmental studies because it has been associated with several geological and biogeochemical processes affecting magnetic mineralogy. MS is a complex function of mineral-type and grain-size distribution, as well as measuring parameters such as external field magnitude and frequency. In this work, we propose a new technique to obtain quantitative information on grain-size variations of magnetic particles in the SP-SSD transition by inverting frequency-dependent susceptibility. We introduce a descriptive parameter named as `limiting frequency effect' that provides an accurate estimation of MS loss with frequency. Numerical simulations show the methodology capability in providing data fitting and model parameters in many practical situations. Real-data applications with magnetite nanoparticles and core samples from sediments of Poggio le Guaine section of Umbria-Marche Basin (Italy) provide additional information not clearly recognized when interpreting cruder MS data. Caution is needed when interpreting frequency dependence in terms of single relaxation processes, which are not universally applicable and depend upon the nature of magnetic mineral in the material. Nevertheless, the proposed technique is a promising tool for SP-SSD content analyses.

  5. Geochemical normalization of magnetic susceptibility for investigation of floodplain sediments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Faměra, Martin; Matys Grygar, Tomáš; Elznicová, J.; Grison, Hana

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 77, č. 5 (2018), č. článku 189. ISSN 1866-6280 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-00340S Institutional support: RVO:61388980 ; RVO:67985530 Keywords : Background functions * Geochemical normalization * Mass-specific magnetic susceptibility * Post-depositional processes * Provenance Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry OBOR OECD: Environmental sciences (social aspects to be 5.7); Geology (GFU-E) Impact factor: 1.569, year: 2016

  6. Magnetic susceptibilities of bynary non-electrolyte mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caceres, P.; Acevedo, I.L.; Postigo, M.A.; Kartz, M.

    1987-01-01

    Molar magnetic susceptibilities are determined by the Goy method for the following two systems: 1-propanol + methyl acetate and 2-propanol + methyl acetate at 298 K where the three molecules are polar and the alcohol molecules are associated in their pure state. Excess diamagnetic susceptibilties are calculated to obtain information about possible interactions. Diamagnetic suscetibilities were related with molecular polarizabilities by Boyer-Donzelot's equation and compared with experimental results. (author) [pt

  7. Contrasting Patterns of Coral Bleaching Susceptibility in 2010 Suggest an Adaptive Response to Thermal Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guest, James R.; Baird, Andrew H.; Maynard, Jeffrey A.; Muttaqin, Efin; Edwards, Alasdair J.; Campbell, Stuart J.; Yewdall, Katie; Affendi, Yang Amri; Chou, Loke Ming

    2012-01-01

    Background Coral bleaching events vary in severity, however, to date, the hierarchy of susceptibility to bleaching among coral taxa has been consistent over a broad geographic range and among bleaching episodes. Here we examine the extent of spatial and temporal variation in thermal tolerance among scleractinian coral taxa and between locations during the 2010 thermally induced, large-scale bleaching event in South East Asia. Methodology/Principal Findings Surveys to estimate the bleaching and mortality indices of coral genera were carried out at three locations with contrasting thermal and bleaching histories. Despite the magnitude of thermal stress being similar among locations in 2010, there was a remarkable contrast in the patterns of bleaching susceptibility. Comparisons of bleaching susceptibility within coral taxa and among locations revealed no significant differences between locations with similar thermal histories, but significant differences between locations with contrasting thermal histories (Friedman = 34.97; pSingapore, where only 5% and 12% of colonies died. Conclusions/Significance The pattern of susceptibility among coral genera documented here is unprecedented. A parsimonious explanation for these results is that coral populations that bleached during the last major warming event in 1998 have adapted and/or acclimatised to thermal stress. These data also lend support to the hypothesis that corals in regions subject to more variable temperature regimes are more resistant to thermal stress than those in less variable environments. PMID:22428027

  8. Brain magnetic resonance imaging with contrast dependent on blood oxygenation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, S.; Lee, T.M.; Kay, A.R.; Tank, D.W.

    1990-01-01

    Paramagnetic deoxyhemoglobin in venous blood is a naturally occurring contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). By accentuating the effects of this agent through the use of gradient-echo techniques in high yields, the authors demonstrate in vivo images of brain microvasculature with image contrast reflecting the blood oxygen level. This blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast follows blood oxygen changes induced by anesthetics, by insulin-induced hypoglycemia, and by inhaled gas mixtures that alter metabolic demand or blood flow. The results suggest that BOLD contrast can be used to provide in vivo real-time maps of blood oxygenation in the brain under normal physiological conditions. BOLD contrast adds an additional feature to magnetic resonance imaging and complement other techniques that are attempting to provide position emission tomography-like measurements related to regional neural activity

  9. Comparison of Magnetic Susceptibility Tensor and Diffusion Tensor of the Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Liu, Chunlei

    2013-10-01

    Susceptibility tensor imaging (STI) provides a novel approach for noninvasive assessment of the white matter pathways of the brain. Using mouse brain ex vivo , we compared STI with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), in terms of tensor values, principal tensor values, anisotropy values, and tensor orientations. Despite the completely different biophysical underpinnings, magnetic susceptibility tensors and diffusion tensors show many similarities in the tensor and principal tensor images, for example, the tensors perpendicular to the fiber direction have the highest gray-white matter contrast, and the largest principal tensor is along the fiber direction. Comparison to DTI fractional anisotropy, the susceptibility anisotropy provides much higher sensitivity to the chemical composition of the white matter, especially myelin. The high sensitivity can be further enhanced with the perfusion of ProHance, a gadolinium-based contrast agent. Regarding the tensor orientations, the direction of the largest principal susceptibility tensor agrees with that of diffusion tensors in major white matter fiber bundles. The STI fiber tractography can reconstruct the fiber pathways for the whole corpus callosum and for white matter fiber bundles that are in close contact but in different orientations. There are some differences between susceptibility and diffusion tensor orientations, which are likely due to the limitations in the current STI reconstruction. With the development of more accurate reconstruction methods, STI holds the promise for probing the white matter micro-architectures with more anatomical details and higher chemical sensitivity.

  10. Magnetic susceptibility of sodium disilicate glasses containing PuO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldred, A.T.

    1979-01-01

    A solubility limit of approx. 6 mol % PuO 2 in sodium disilicate (Na 2 O.2SiO 2 ) glass has been determined. Magnetic susceptibility measurements on these glasses yield approximate Curie-Weiss behavior, in contrast to the temperature-independent susceptibility of crystalline PuO 2 . This result is interpreted to indicate that the local site symmetry around the Pu ion in the sodium disilicate glass is much different than in crystalline PuO 2 . The effective paramagnetic moments determined from the temperature dependence of the susceptibility are found to be consistent with calculated free-ion values based on the most likely 5f electron configurations

  11. The intrusive complexof the Island of Giglio: geomagnetic characteristics of plutonic facies with low susceptibility contrast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Cavallini

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Two main plutonic facies characterize the intrusive complex of the Island of Giglio, and the trend of their contact at depth has been modelled using a 2D½ analysis based on a detailed geomagnetic survey in order to verify the geological hypothesis of the subsurface geometry of this contact. The magnetic anomaly connected with the discontinuity is quite low, due to the small difference between the magnetic susceptibilities of the two granitic facies. Development of this model of inversion of the magnetic field, which is in good agreement with the geological interpretation, was made possible by: 1 accurate control of the geomagnetic time variations and consequent temporal reduction, 2 a very low level of the artificial magnetic noise, 3 high density of the magnetic survey, 4 detailed knowledge of the mapped geologic contact between facies and of their petrologic characteristics, and 5 direct local measurements of the magnetic susceptibilities of the key lithologies. The model shows the trends of the geological contact, as projected in three E-W sections, that dips eastward in the range between 210 and 540, supporting the geologic hypothesis that the Pietrabona facies represents an external shell of the shallowly emplaced Giglio monzogranite intrusion.

  12. Value of dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion MRI in the acute phase of transient global amnesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Förster

    Full Text Available Transient global amnesia (TGA is a transitory, short-lasting neurological disorder characterized by a sudden onset of antero- and retrograde amnesia. Perfusion abnormalities in TGA have been evaluated mainly by use of positron emission tomography (PET or single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT. In the present study we explore the value of dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion-weighted MRI (PWI in TGA in the acute phase.From a MRI report database we identified TGA patients who underwent MRI including PWI in the acute phase and compared these to control subjects. Quantitative perfusion maps (cerebral blood flow (CBF and volume (CBV were generated and analyzed by use of Signal Processing In NMR-Software (SPIN. CBF and CBV values in subcortical brain regions were assessed by use of VOI created in FIRST, a model-based segmentation tool in the Oxford Centre for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain (FMRIB Software Library (FSL.Five TGA patients were included (2 men, 3 women. On PWI, no relevant perfusion alterations were found by visual inspection in TGA patients. Group comparisons for possible differences between TGA patients and control subjects showed significant lower rCBF values bilaterally in the hippocampus, in the left thalamus and globus pallidus as well as bilaterally in the putamen and the left caudate nucleus. Correspondingly, significant lower rCBV values were observed bilaterally in the hippocampus and the putamen as well as in the left caudate nucleus. Group comparisons for possible side differences in rCBF and rCBV values in TGA patients revealed a significant lower rCBV value in the left caudate nucleus.Mere visual inspection of PWI is not sufficient for the assessment of perfusion changes in TGA in the acute phase. Group comparisons with healthy control subjects might be useful to detect subtle perfusion changes on PWI in TGA patients. However, this should be confirmed in larger data sets and serial PWI

  13. Application of dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced perfusion in temporal lobe epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xing, Wu; Wang, Xiaoyi; Xie, Fangfang; Liao, Weihua [Dept. of Radiology, Xiangya Hospital of Central South Univ., Changsha (China)], e-mail: doctoring@sina.com

    2013-02-15

    Background: Accurately locatithe epileptogenic focus in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is important in clinical practice. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron-emission tomography (PET) have been widely used in the lateralization of TLE, but both have limitations. Magnetic resonance perfusion imaging can accurately and reliably reflect differences in cerebral blood flow and volume. Purpose: To investigate the diagnostic value of dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced (DSC) perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the lateralization of the epileptogenic focus in TLE. Material and Methods: Conventional MRI and DSC-MRI scanning was performed in 20 interictal cases of TLE and 20 healthy volunteers. The relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) and relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF) of the bilateral mesial temporal lobes of the TLE cases and healthy control groups were calculated. The differences in the perfusion asymmetry indices (AIs), derived from the rCBV and rCBF of the bilateral mesial temporal lobes, were pared between the two groups. Results: In the control group, there were no statistically significant differences between the left and right sides in terms of rCBV (left 1.55 {+-} 0.32, right 1.57 {+-} 0.28) or rCBF (left 99.00 {+-} 24.61, right 100.38 {+-} 23.46) of the bilateral mesial temporal lobes. However, in the case group the ipsilateral rCBV and rCBF values (1.75 {+-} 0.64 and 96.35 {+-} 22.63, respectively) were markedly lower than those of the contralateral side (2.01 {+-} 0.79 and 108.56 {+-} 26.92; P < 0.05). Both the AI of the rCBV (AIrCBV; 13.03 {+-} 10.33) and the AI of the rCBF (AIrCBF; 11.24 {+-} 8.70) of the case group were significantly higher than that of the control group (AIrCBV 5.55 {+-} 3.74, AIrCBF 5.12 {+-} 3.48; P < 0.05). The epileptogenic foci of nine patients were correctly lateralized using the 95th percentile of the AIrCBV and AIrCBF of the control group as the normal upper limits. Conclusion: In

  14. Application of dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced perfusion in temporal lobe epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing, Wu; Wang, Xiaoyi; Xie, Fangfang; Liao, Weihua

    2013-01-01

    Background: Accurately locatithe epileptogenic focus in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is important in clinical practice. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron-emission tomography (PET) have been widely used in the lateralization of TLE, but both have limitations. Magnetic resonance perfusion imaging can accurately and reliably reflect differences in cerebral blood flow and volume. Purpose: To investigate the diagnostic value of dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced (DSC) perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the lateralization of the epileptogenic focus in TLE. Material and Methods: Conventional MRI and DSC-MRI scanning was performed in 20 interictal cases of TLE and 20 healthy volunteers. The relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) and relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF) of the bilateral mesial temporal lobes of the TLE cases and healthy control groups were calculated. The differences in the perfusion asymmetry indices (AIs), derived from the rCBV and rCBF of the bilateral mesial temporal lobes, were pared between the two groups. Results: In the control group, there were no statistically significant differences between the left and right sides in terms of rCBV (left 1.55 ± 0.32, right 1.57 ± 0.28) or rCBF (left 99.00 ± 24.61, right 100.38 ± 23.46) of the bilateral mesial temporal lobes. However, in the case group the ipsilateral rCBV and rCBF values (1.75 ± 0.64 and 96.35 ± 22.63, respectively) were markedly lower than those of the contralateral side (2.01 ± 0.79 and 108.56 ± 26.92; P < 0.05). Both the AI of the rCBV (AIrCBV; 13.03 ± 10.33) and the AI of the rCBF (AIrCBF; 11.24 ± 8.70) of the case group were significantly higher than that of the control group (AIrCBV 5.55 ± 3.74, AIrCBF 5.12 ± 3.48; P < 0.05). The epileptogenic foci of nine patients were correctly lateralized using the 95th percentile of the AIrCBV and AIrCBF of the control group as the normal upper limits. Conclusion: In patients with TLE interictal

  15. Pseudo-extravasation rate constant of dynamic susceptibility contrast-MRI determined from pharmacokinetic first principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Varallyay, Csanad G; Gahramanov, Seymur; Fu, Rongwei; Rooney, William D; Neuwelt, Edward A

    2017-11-01

    Dynamic susceptibility contrast-magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) is widely used to obtain informative perfusion imaging biomarkers, such as the relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV). The related post-processing software packages for DSC-MRI are available from major MRI instrument manufacturers and third-party vendors. One unique aspect of DSC-MRI with low-molecular-weight gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast reagent (CR) is that CR molecules leak into the interstitium space and therefore confound the DSC signal detected. Several approaches to correct this leakage effect have been proposed throughout the years. Amongst the most popular is the Boxerman-Schmainda-Weisskoff (BSW) K 2 leakage correction approach, in which the K 2 pseudo-first-order rate constant quantifies the leakage. In this work, we propose a new method for the BSW leakage correction approach. Based on the pharmacokinetic interpretation of the data, the commonly adopted R 2 * expression accounting for contributions from both intravascular and extravasating CR components is transformed using a method mathematically similar to Gjedde-Patlak linearization. Then, the leakage rate constant (K L ) can be determined as the slope of the linear portion of a plot of the transformed data. Using the DSC data of high-molecular-weight (~750 kDa), iron-based, intravascular Ferumoxytol (FeO), the pharmacokinetic interpretation of the new paradigm is empirically validated. The primary objective of this work is to empirically demonstrate that a linear portion often exists in the graph of the transformed data. This linear portion provides a clear definition of the Gd CR pseudo-leakage rate constant, which equals the slope derived from the linear segment. A secondary objective is to demonstrate that transformed points from the initial transient period during the CR wash-in often deviate from the linear trend of the linearized graph. The inclusion of these points will have a negative impact on the accuracy of the leakage

  16. Susceptibility contrast imaging of CO2-induced changes in the blood volume of the human brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostrup, Egill; Larsson, H B; Toft, P B

    1996-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate changes in the regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) in human subjects during rest and hypercapnia by MR imaging, and to compare the results from contrast-enhanced and noncontrast-enhanced susceptibility-weighted imaging. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Five healthy volunteers (aged...... to be in accordance with results obtained by other methods. Noncontrast functional MR (fMR) imaging showed signal increases in gray matter, but also inconsistent changes in some white matter regions. CONCLUSION: In this experiment, contrast-enhanced imaging seemed to show a somewhat higher sensitivity towards changes...

  17. Ising model on tangled chain - 2: Magnetization and susceptibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mejdani, R.

    1993-05-01

    In the preceding paper we have considered an Ising model defined on tangled chain to study the behaviour of the free energy and entropy, particularly in the zero-field and zero-temperature limit. In this paper, following the main line and basing on some results of the previous work, we shall study in the ''language'' of state configurations the behaviour of the magnetization and the susceptibility for different conditions of the model, to understand better the competition between the ferromagnetic bonds along the chain and the antiferromagnetic additional bonds across the chain. Particularly interesting is the behaviour of the susceptibility in the zero-field and zero-temperature limit. Exact solutions for the magnetization and susceptibility, generated by analytical calculations and iterative algorithms, are described. The additional bonds, introduced as a form of perfectly disorder, indicate a particular effect on the spin correlation. We found that the condition J=-J' between the ferromagnetic interaction J along the chain and the antiferromagnetic interaction J' across the chain is somewhat as a ''transition-region'' condition for this behaviour. (author). 16 refs, 14 figs

  18. Evaluating the Effects of Magnetic Susceptibility in UXO Discrimination Problems (SERDP SEED Project UX-1285)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pasion, Leonard R; Billings, Stephen D; Oldenburg, Douglas W; Sinex, David; Li, Yaoguo

    2003-01-01

    Using numerical simulations based on magnetic susceptibility properties observed at Kaho'olawe, Hawaii, we have examined the effect of magnetic soil on static magnetic method and time-domain electromagnetic (TEM...

  19. Electric susceptibility of a magnetized plasma under electromagnetically induced transparency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamori, E

    2011-01-01

    This study derives the electric susceptibility tensor of a cold magnetized plasma under electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) regime (Litvak and Tokman 2002 Phys. Rev. Lett. 88 095003, Shvets and Wurtele 2002 Phys. Rev. Lett. 89 115003) in which an intense right-hand circularly polarized pump wave is injected parallel to the background magnetic field. A dispersion relation of the wave in the electron cyclotron frequency range for an arbitrary propagation angle is obtained from this susceptibility tensor. In the case of purely parallel propagation of the probe wave, the dispersion relation obtained by Litvak, Shvets and others is recaptured. A new finding is that a stop band emerges between left-hand cutoff and upper hybrid frequencies, in which originally an extraordinary-mode (X) branch exists, in the case of perpendicular propagation to the background magnetic field under the EIT. The bandwidth of the stop band expands as the pump wave is intensified. For the situation of launching the probe wave from the high-field side in a tokamak, the accessibility of the probe wave to the region where the EIT effect appears is investigated. The EIT region which is a resonance layer created by the EIT is accessible to the probe wave, indicating the possibility of the application of EIT to control the spatial position of wave power deposition.

  20. Magnetic susceptibility and magnetization studies of some commercial austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collings, E.W.

    1979-01-01

    Results of magnetic susceptibility measurements using the Curie magnetic force technique are reported for six AISI 300-series alloys 310S, 304, 304L, 304N, 316, 316L as well as AWS 330 weld metal and Inconel 625. The temperature ranged from 5 to 416 0 K. Magnetization measurements over the temperature range 3 to 297 0 K, performed using a vibrating-sample magnetometer, are also reported. Alloy compositions and sample preparation procedures are discussed and numerical results of the study are presented. Magnetic characteristics of the four principal types of austenitic stainless steels studied are summarized

  1. Recent advances in contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meaney, J.F.M.; Goyen, M.

    2007-01-01

    Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) provides a means of visualizing vascular structures noninvasively and is increasingly replacing conventional X-ray angiography in routine use. Contrast-enhanced MRA (CE-MRA), in which gadolinium contrast agents are used to shorten the T1 relaxation, offers increased resolution and higher signal-to-noise ratio compared with earlier flow-dependent [time-of-flight (TOF) or phase-contrast (PC)] techniques. Currently available contrast agents differ in their ability to lower T1 values, and hence the choice of contrast agent is an important consideration in the successful use of CE-MRA. Gadofosveset trisodium (Vasovist, Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Berlin, Germany) is the first of a new class of intravascular contrast agents. This agent is extensively (approximately 85%) and reversibly bound to human serum albumin and is retained within the vasculature thus allowing steady-state imaging to be perform-ed. An additional benefit is that gado0fosveset offers higher relaxivity compared with other contrast agents, thus giving a lower blood T1 values which also makes it ideal for first-pass imaging. Clinical trials have consistently shown that gadofosveset enhanced MRA is more sensitive, specific and accurate than time-of-flight MRA, gives fewer uninterpretable scans and affords greater diagnostic confidence. Intravascular contrast agents such as gadofosveset, therefore, offer the potential for improved vascular imaging. (orig.)

  2. Magnetic susceptibility, nanorheology, and magnetoviscosity of magnetic nanoparticles in viscoelastic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilg, Patrick; Evangelopoulos, Apostolos E. A. S.

    2018-03-01

    While magnetic nanoparticles suspended in Newtonian solvents (ferrofluids) have been intensively studied in recent years, the effects of viscoelasticity of the surrounding medium on the nanoparticle dynamics are much less understood. Here we investigate a mesoscopic model for the orientational dynamics of isolated magnetic nanoparticles subject to external fields, viscous and viscoelastic friction, as well as the corresponding random torques. We solve the model analytically in the overdamped limit for weak viscoelasticity. By comparison to Brownian dynamics simulations we establish the limits of validity of the analytical solution. We find that viscoelasticity not only slows down the magnetization relaxation, shifts the peak of the imaginary magnetic susceptibility χ″ to lower frequencies, and increases the magnetoviscosity but also leads to nonexponential relaxation and a broadening of χ″. The model we study also allows us to test a recent proposal for using magnetic susceptibility measurements as a nanorheological tool using a variant of the Germant-DiMarzio-Bishop relation. We find for the present model and certain parameter ranges that the relation of the magnetic susceptibility to the shear modulus is satisfied to a good approximation.

  3. The clinical use of contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bydder, G.M.

    1987-01-01

    Interest in the use of external agents to increase tissue contrasts has come from many sources dating back to the earliest work in NMR, to animal studies and to the widespread use of contrast agents in conventional radiological practice. The first clinical magnetic resonance images were published in 1980 and in the following year a brief account of the use of the paramagnetic agents in human volunteers was established. It was apparent relatively early in the development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that a high level of soft tissue contrast was available de novo and the need for externally administered agents might therefore be small. This observation was tempered by the fact that separation of tumour from oedema was frequently better with contrast enhanced CT X-ray than with unenhanced MRI and that of a contrast agent might therefore be needed for MRI. At the end of 1983 the first parenteral agent gadoliminum diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) was used in volunteers and clinical studies began in 1984. At the present time only molecular O/sub 2/, oral iron compounds and Gd-DTPA are in clinical use although there are a number of other agents which have been used in animals and some of these may become available for clinical use in the foreseeable future

  4. Upgrading of magnetic susceptibility of conodont sample residues before magnetic separation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Carls, P.; Slavík, Ladislav

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 2 (2005), s. 171-172 ISSN 0024-1164. [Lethaia Seminar. Oslo , 15.06.2005] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KSK6005114 Keywords : magnetic susceptibility * heavy liquids * conodont concentration Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 1.562, year: 2005

  5. Magnetic susceptibility as a simple tracer for fluvial sediment source ascription during storm events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowntree, Kate M; van der Waal, Bennie W; Pulley, Simon

    2017-06-01

    ) coincided with the flood peak. Low X lf values indicated that mudstones in the lower catchment soils dominated the sediment load throughout the entire event. Sediment tracing using a single property (X lf) was thus used effectively to study changing sediment sources both between and during a flood event in a catchment with strongly contrasting magnetic signatures in different areas. The results support the use of magnetic susceptibility as a simple and cheap tool to determine sediment provenance that can be used to guide catchment restoration in similar environments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Microcomputer simulation of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging contrasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Bihan, D.

    1985-01-01

    The high information content of magnetic resonance images is due to the multiplicity of its parameters. However, this advantage introduces a difficulty in the interpretation of the contrast: an image is strongly modified according to the visualised parameters. The author proposes a micro-computer simulation program. After recalling the main intrinsic and extrinsic parameters, he shows how the program works and its interest as a pedagogic tool and as an aid for contrast optimisation of images as a function of the suspected pathology [fr

  7. Magnetization, magnetic susceptibility, effective magnetic moment of Fe3+ ions in Bi25FeO39 ferrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zatsiupa, A.A.; Bashkirov, L.A.; Troyanchuk, I.O.; Petrov, G.S.; Galyas, A.I.; Lobanovsky, L.S.; Truhanov, S.V.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic susceptibility for ferrite Bi 25 FeO 39 is measured at 5–950 K in the magnetic field of 0.86 T. It is shown that Bi 25 FeO 39 is paramagnetic in the temperature range 5−950 K. The saturation magnetization is equal to 5.04μ B per formula unit at 5 K in a magnetic field of 10 T. It is found that at 5−300 K the effective magnetic moment of Fe 3+ ions in Bi 25 FeO 39 is equal to 5.82μ B . - Graphical abstract: The dependence of the magnetization (n, μ B ) on the magnetic field for one formula unit of Bi 25 FeO 39 at 5 K. - Highlights: • Magnetic susceptibility for Bi 25 FeO 39 is measured at 5–950 K in the magnetic field of 0.86 T. • It is shown that Bi 25 FeO 39 is paramagnetic in the temperature range 5−950 K. • The saturation magnetization is equal to 5.04μ B per formula unit at 5 K in a magnetic field of 10 T

  8. Magnetic susceptibilities and thermal expansion of artificial graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornuault, P.; Herpin, A.; Hering, H.; Seguin, M.; Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, Saclay

    1960-01-01

    Starting from measurements of the magnetic susceptibility made in the two principal directions of a graphite bar, the distribution function of the normals to the carbon planes in the crystallites has been evaluated. The effect of different variation in the manufacturing process on this crystalline anisotropy has been studied. From this crystalline anisotropy we have calculated the thermal expansion coefficient possessed by a compact mass of crystallites having exactly the same orientational anisotropy as the porous body consideration. The difference between this and the observed expansion coefficient leads to the determination of the expansion of the non-graphitic part of the mass which turns out to have a negative value and is also anisotropic. We have attempted to draw some conclusions from this result. (author) [fr

  9. Magnetic susceptibility and magnetic resonance measurements of the moisture content and hydration condition of a magnetic mixture material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukada, K.; Kusaka, T.; Saari, M. M.; Takagi, R.; Sakai, K.; Kiwa, T.; Bito, Y.

    2014-01-01

    We developed a magnetic measurement method to measure the moisture content and hydration condition of mortar as a magnetic mixture material. Mortar is a mixture of Portland cement, sand, and water, and these materials exhibit different magnetic properties. The magnetization–magnetic field curves of these components and of mortars with different moisture contents were measured, using a specially developed high-temperature-superconductor superconducting quantum interference device. Using the differences in magnetic characteristics, the moisture content of mortar was measured at the ferromagnetic saturation region over 250 mT. A correlation between magnetic susceptibility and moisture content was successfully established. After Portland cement and water are mixed, hydration begins. At the early stage of the hydration/gel, magnetization strength increased over time. To investigate the magnetization change, we measured the distribution between bound and free water in the mortar in the early stage by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The MRI results suggest that the amount of free water in mortar correlates with the change in magnetic susceptibility

  10. Quantitative susceptibility mapping across two clinical field strengths: Contrast-to-noise ratio enhancement at 1.5T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ippoliti, Matteo; Adams, Lisa C; Winfried, Brenner; Hamm, Bernd; Spincemaille, Pascal; Wang, Yi; Makowski, Marcus R

    2018-04-16

    Quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) is an MRI postprocessing technique that allows quantification of the spatial distribution of tissue magnetic susceptibility in vivo. Contributing sources include iron, blood products, calcium, myelin, and lipid content. To evaluate the reproducibility and consistency of QSM across clinical field strengths of 1.5T and 3T and to optimize the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) at 1.5T through bandwidth tuning. Prospective. Sixteen healthy volunteers (10 men, 6 women; age range 24-37; mean age 27.8 ± 3.2 years). 1.5T and 3T systems from the same vendor. Four spoiled gradient echo (SPGR) sequences were designed with different acquisition bandwidths. QSM reconstruction was achieved through a nonlinear morphology-enabled dipole inversion (MEDI) algorithm employing L1 regularization. CNR was calculated in seven regions of interest (ROIs), while reproducibility and consistency of QSM measurements were evaluated through voxel-based and region-specific linear correlation analyses and Bland-Altman plots. Interclass correlation, Wilcoxon rank sum test, linear regression analysis, Bland-Altman analysis, Welch's t-test. CNR analysis showed a statistically significant (P limits of agreement from -18.7 to 25.8 ppb) in the ROI-based analysis, while the correlation was found to be good for the voxel-based analysis of averaged maps (R ≥ 0.90, widest limits of agreement from -9.3 to 9.1 ppb). CNR of QSM images reconstructed from 1.5T acquisitions can be enhanced through bandwidth tuning. MEDI-based QSM reconstruction demonstrated to be reproducible and consistent both across field strengths (1.5T and 3T) and bandwidth variation. 1 Technical Efficacy: Stage 1 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2018. © 2018 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  11. Modified thermogravimetric apparatus to measure magnetic susceptibility on-line during annealing of metastable ferromagnetic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luciani, G.; Constantini, A.; Branda, F.; Ausanio, G.; Hison, C.; Iannotti, V.; Luponio, C.; Lanotte, L.

    2004-01-01

    The insertion of proper coils to generate a magnetic field, with controlled gradient, in a standard thermogravimetric apparatus is shown to be a valid solution to measure on-line, upon heat treatment, the magnetic susceptibility in ribbon shaped samples of a metastable ferromagnetic material. The method is very useful to individuate the annealing conditions that optimise soft or hard magnetic properties without using separate apparatuses for heat treatment, control of the structural phase transition and characterization of magnetic susceptibility

  12. Combined value of susceptibility weighted imaging and dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast-enhanced MR perfusion-weighted imaging in brain astrocytoma grading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaochun; Zhang Hui; Qin Jiangbo; Wang Le; Wu Xiaofeng

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess the value of combination of susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) and dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast-enhanced (DSC) perfusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in astrocytoma grading. Methods: SWI and DSC scans were performed in 82 patients with pathologically confirmed astrocytoma. The patient group consisted of grade Ⅱ (15), grade Ⅲ (10), and grade Ⅳ (57). The intratumoral susceptibility signal intensity (ITSS) and relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) max were used to determine the grade of astrocytomas by Kruskal Wallis test, Welch test, Spearman correlation coefficients, Pearson correlation coefficients, and receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC)statistic methods. Results: There were no ITSS in 14 cases of low-grade astrocytomas, the degree of ITSS were grade 1 to 3 in anaplastic astrocytomas, the degree of ITSS were grade 3 in all of the glioblastomas, the degree of ITSS were significant difference in all grades (H=71.96, P<0.01). rCBV max in grade Ⅱ, grade Ⅲ and grade Ⅳ astrocytomas were 1.26 ± 0.42, 3.59 ± 2.09 and 8.34 ± 1.16 respectively, rCBV max were significant difference in all grades (F'=681.72, P<0.01). ITSS showed significant correlation with rCBV max (r=0.72, P<0.01) and tumor grades (r=0.89, P<0.01), and rCBV and tumor grades showed significant correlation (r=0.78, P<0.01). Area under the ROC curve application SWI, DSC, SWI and DSC in differentiation of the grade Ⅱ and grade Ⅲ astrocytomas were 0.99, 0.93, 1.00, differentiate grade Ⅲ from grade Ⅳ were 0.70, 0.94, 0.94, and differentiate high-grade from low-grade astrocytomas were 1.00, 0.99, 1.00. Conclusions: ITSS is helpful to determine the grade of astrocytomas. The use of SWI in combination with DSC may improve the diagnostic accuracy of astrocytoma grading. (authors)

  13. Anisotropy of susceptibility in rocks that are magnetically non-linear even in weak fields

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chadima, Martin; Ježek, J.; Hrouda, F.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 19, EGU General Assembly 2017 (2017) ISSN 1029-7006. [European Geosciences Union General Assembly. 23.04.2017-28.04.2017, Vienna] Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility * field-dependent susceptibility * second-rank tensor Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography http://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EGU2017/EGU2017-7210-1.pdf

  14. Limits of out-of-phase susceptibility in magnetic granulometry of rocks and soils

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrouda, F.; Pokorný, J.; Chadima, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 2 (2015), s. 294-308 ISSN 0039-3169 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : out-of-phase susceptibility * frequency-dependent susceptibility measurement accuracy * environmetal magnetism * loess * soil * paleoclimatic reconstruction Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism , Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 0.818, year: 2015

  15. Development of a magnetic nanoparticle susceptibility magnitude imaging array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ficko, Bradley W; Nadar, Priyanka M; Hoopes, P Jack; Diamond, Solomon G

    2014-01-01

    There are several emerging diagnostic and therapeutic applications of magnetic nanoparticles (mNPs) in medicine. This study examines the potential for developing an mNP imager that meets these emerging clinical needs with a low cost imaging solution that uses arrays of digitally controlled drive coils in a multiple-frequency, continuous-wave operating mode and compensated fluxgate magnetometers. The design approach is described and a mathematical model is developed to support measurement and imaging. A prototype is used to demonstrate active compensation of up to 185 times the primary applied magnetic field, depth sensitivity up to 2.5 cm (p < 0.01), and linearity over five dilutions (R 2  > 0.98, p < 0.001). System frequency responses show distinguishable readouts for iron oxide mNPs with single magnetic domain core diameters of 10 and 40 nm, and multi-domain mNPs with a hydrodynamic diameter of 100 nm. Tomographic images show a contrast-to-noise ratio of 23 for 0.5 ml of 12.5 mg Fe ml −1  mNPs at 1 cm depth. A demonstration involving the injection of mNPs into pork sausage shows the potential for use in biological systems. These results indicate that the proposed mNP imaging approach can potentially be extended to a larger array system with higher-resolution. (paper)

  16. Macromolecular and dendrimer-based magnetic resonance contrast agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bumb, Ambika; Brechbiel, Martin W. (Radiation Oncology Branch, National Cancer Inst., National Inst. of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)), e-mail: pchoyke@mail.nih.gov; Choyke, Peter (Molecular Imaging Program, National Cancer Inst., National Inst. of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States))

    2010-09-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful imaging modality that can provide an assessment of function or molecular expression in tandem with anatomic detail. Over the last 20-25 years, a number of gadolinium-based MR contrast agents have been developed to enhance signal by altering proton relaxation properties. This review explores a range of these agents from small molecule chelates, such as Gd-DTPA and Gd-DOTA, to macromolecular structures composed of albumin, polylysine, polysaccharides (dextran, inulin, starch), poly(ethylene glycol), copolymers of cystamine and cystine with GD-DTPA, and various dendritic structures based on polyamidoamine and polylysine (Gadomers). The synthesis, structure, biodistribution, and targeting of dendrimer-based MR contrast agents are also discussed

  17. A smart magnetic resonance contrast agent for selective copper sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Que, Emily L; Chang, Christopher J

    2006-12-20

    We describe the synthesis and properties of Copper-Gad-1 (CG1), a new type of smart magnetic resonance (MR) sensor for selective detection of copper. CG1 is composed of a gadolinium contrast agent core tethered to copper-selective recognition motif. Cu2+-induced modulation of inner-sphere water access to the Gd3+ center provides a sensing mechanism for reporting Cu2+ levels by reading out changes in longitudinal proton relaxivity values. CG1 features good selectivity for Cu2+ over abundant biological cations and a 41% increase in relaxivity upon Cu2+ binding and is capable of detecting micromolar changes in Cu2+ concentrations in aqueous media.

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents: A Review of Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Sahraei

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available  Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI contrast agents most commonly agents used in diagnosing different diseases. Several agents have been ever introduced with different peculiar characteristics. They vary in potency, adverse reaction and other specification, so it is important to select the proper agent in different situations. We conducted a systematic literature search in MEDLINE/PUBMED, Web of Science (ISI, Scopus,Google Scholar by using keywords "gadolinium" and "MRI contrast Medias", "Gadofosvest", "Gadobenate" and "Gadoxetate". The most frequent contrast media agents made based on gadolinium (Gd. These are divided into two categories based on the structure of their chelating parts, linear agents and macrocyclic agents. All characteristics of contrast media factors, including efficiency, kinetic properties, stability, side effects and the rate of resolution are directly related to the structure of chelating part of that formulation.In vitro data has shown that the macrocyclic compounds are the most stable Gd-CA as they do not bind to serum proteins, they all possess similar and relatively low relaxivity and the prevalence of Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis (NSF has decreased by increasing the use of macrocyclic agents in recent years. No cases of NSF have been recorded after the administration of any of the high-relaxivity protein interacting agents, the vascular imaging agent gadofosveset trisodium (Ablavar, the hepatic imaging agent gadoxetate meglumine (Eovist, and the multipurpose agent gadobenate dimeglumine (MultiHance. In pregnancy and lactating women, stable macrocyclic agent is recommended.

  19. Effects of phase constitution of Zr-Nb alloys on their magnetic susceptibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Naoyuki; Tanaka, Yuko; Suyalatu; Kondo, Ryota; Doi, Hisashi; Tsutsumi, Yusuke; Hanawa, Takao

    2009-01-01

    The magnetic susceptibilities and microstructures of Zr-Nb binary alloys were investigated to develop a new metallic biomaterial with a low magnetic susceptibility for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The magnetic susceptibility was measured with a magnetic susceptibility balance, and the microstructure was evaluated with an X-ray diffractometer (XRD), an optical microscope (OM), and a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Zr-Nb alloys as-cast showed a minimum value of magnetic susceptibility between 3 and 9 mass% Nb, and the value abruptly increased up to 20 mass% Nb, followed by a gradual increase with the increase of the Nb content. XRD, OM, and TEM revealed that the minimum value of the susceptibility was closely related to the appearance of the athermal ω phase in the β phase. Since the magnetic susceptibility of Zr-3Nb alloy consisting of an α' phase was as low as that of Zr-9Nb alloy consisting of the β and ω phases, that of the ω phase was lower than that of the α' and β phases. When Zr-16Nb alloy was heat-treated, the isothermal ω phase appeared, and, simultaneously, the magnetic susceptibility decreased. Therefore, the ω phase contributes to the decrease of the magnetic susceptibility, independently of the formation process of the ω phase. The magnetic susceptibility of the Zr-3Nb alloy as-cast was almost one-third that of Ti-6Al-4V alloy, which is commonly used for medical implant devices. Zr-Nb alloys are useful for medical devices used under MRI. (author)

  20. Cerebral Hemodynamics in a Healthy Population Measured by Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast MR Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helenius, J.; Soinne, L.; Tatlisumak, T.; Kaste, M.; Aronen, H.J.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To establish reference data and to study age-dependency for cerebral perfusion in various regions of the brain in a healthy population. Material and Methods: Eighty healthy subjects of both genders from 22 to 85 years of age were studied with spin echo echo-planar dynamic susceptibility contrast MR imaging (DSC MRI) at 1.5 T. Cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebral blood flow (CBF), and contrast agent mean transit time (MTT) were calculated bilaterally for 20 distinct neuro anatomic structures. Results: In gray matter, the following values were found (mean ± SD): CBV (4.6 ± 1.0 ml/100 g), CBF (94.2 ± 23.0 ml/100 g/min), and MTT (3.0 ± 0.6 s), and in white matter: CBV (1.3 ± 0.4 ml/100 g), CBF (19.6 ± 5.8 ml/100 g/min), and MTT (4.3 ± 0.7 s). The perfusion parameters did not change with age, except for a tendency to an increase in gray matter MTT and CBV. Males exhibited higher MTT and CBV than females. No hemispheric difference was found in either gender. Conclusion: Cerebral hemodynamics can be assessed with DSC MRI. Age itself seems to have only a marginal effect on cerebral perfusion in healthy population

  1. Cerebral Hemodynamics in a Healthy Population Measured by Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast MR Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helenius, J.; Soinne, L.; Tatlisumak, T.; Kaste, M. [Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital (Finland). Dept. of Neurology; Perkioe, J.; Salonen, O.; Savolainen, S. [Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital (Finland). Dept. of Radiology; Oestergaard, L. [Aarhus Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Neuroradiology; Carano, R.A.D. [Synarc Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States); Aronen, H.J. [Helsinki Brain Research Center (Finland). Functional Brain Imaging Unit

    2003-09-01

    Purpose: To establish reference data and to study age-dependency for cerebral perfusion in various regions of the brain in a healthy population. Material and Methods: Eighty healthy subjects of both genders from 22 to 85 years of age were studied with spin echo echo-planar dynamic susceptibility contrast MR imaging (DSC MRI) at 1.5 T. Cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebral blood flow (CBF), and contrast agent mean transit time (MTT) were calculated bilaterally for 20 distinct neuro anatomic structures. Results: In gray matter, the following values were found (mean {+-} SD): CBV (4.6 {+-} 1.0 ml/100 g), CBF (94.2 {+-} 23.0 ml/100 g/min), and MTT (3.0 {+-} 0.6 s), and in white matter: CBV (1.3 {+-} 0.4 ml/100 g), CBF (19.6 {+-} 5.8 ml/100 g/min), and MTT (4.3 {+-} 0.7 s). The perfusion parameters did not change with age, except for a tendency to an increase in gray matter MTT and CBV. Males exhibited higher MTT and CBV than females. No hemispheric difference was found in either gender. Conclusion: Cerebral hemodynamics can be assessed with DSC MRI. Age itself seems to have only a marginal effect on cerebral perfusion in healthy population.

  2. Geophysical monitoring of simulated graves with resistivity, magnetic susceptibility, conductivity and GPR in Colombia, South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Carlos Martin; Pringle, Jamie K; Saumett, Miguel; Evans, Gethin T

    2016-04-01

    In most Latin American countries there are significant numbers of both missing people and forced disappearances, ∼71,000 Colombia alone. Successful detection of buried human remains by forensic search teams can be difficult in varying terrain and climates. Three clandestine burials were simulated at two different depths commonly encountered in Latin America. In order to gain critical knowledge of optimum geophysical detection techniques, burials were monitored using: ground penetrating radar, magnetic susceptibility, bulk ground conductivity and electrical resistivity up to twenty-two months post-burial. Radar survey results showed good detection of modern 1/2 clothed pig cadavers throughout the survey period on 2D profiles, with the 250MHz antennae judged optimal. Both skeletonised and decapitated and burnt human remains were poorly imaged on 2D profiles with loss in signal continuity observed throughout the survey period. Horizontal radar time slices showed good anomalies observed over targets, but these decreased in amplitude over the post-burial time. These were judged due to detecting disturbed grave soil rather than just the buried targets. Magnetic susceptibility and electrical resistivity were successful at target detection in contrast to bulk ground conductivity surveys which were unsuccessful. Deeper burials were all harder to image than shallower ones. Forensic geophysical surveys should be undertaken at suspected burial sites. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Contrast agents for tumor diagnosis in magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goto, Rensuke; Doi, Hisayoshi; Okada, Shoji [University of Shizuoka (Japan). School of Pharmaceutical Science; Yano, Masayuki; Katano, Susumu; Nakajima, Nobuaki

    1992-01-01

    In order to develop contrast agents for tumor diagnosis in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we investigated the effects of several gadolinium complexes on T{sub 1} relaxation time of proton in some tissues of Ehrlich solid tumor-bearing mice. L-Aspartic acid, L-glutamic acid, DL-homocysteine, L-glutamyl-glutamic acid, glutathione, sperimidine and ethylenediaminetetrakis (methylenephosphate) (EDTMP) were used as ligands for Gd{sup 3+}. Since each Gd-complex could not be purified except Gd-EDTMP, the mixture of GdCl{sub 3} and a ligand was administered intravenously. Among the compounds tested, the mixture of aspartic acid, glutathione or spermidine with GdCl{sub 3} showed almost the same or above reduction of T{sub 1} relaxation times in the tumor tissue compared with Gd-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) which is used clinically. Furthermore, the contrast-enhancing effect of the three mixtures in the tumor was observed by in vivo T{sub 1}-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. The in vivo tissue distribution using radioactive {sup 153}Gd{sup 3+} showed that these mixtures mentioned above were also taken up more highly in the tumor than {sup 153}GdCl{sub 3} itself and {sup 153}Gd-DTPA, suggesting the formation of Gd-complexes. However, the overall tissue distribution of the mixtures was similar to that of {sup 153}GdCl{sub 3} because the Gd-complexes were not purified. Gd-EDTMP exhibited the almost same effects with Gd-DTPA as a contrast agent. (author).

  4. Mean magnetic susceptibility regularized susceptibility tensor imaging (MMSR-STI) for estimating orientations of white matter fibers in human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xu; van Zijl, Peter C M

    2014-09-01

    An increasing number of studies show that magnetic susceptibility in white matter fibers is anisotropic and may be described by a tensor. However, the limited head rotation possible for in vivo human studies leads to an ill-conditioned inverse problem in susceptibility tensor imaging (STI). Here we suggest the combined use of limiting the susceptibility anisotropy to white matter and imposing morphology constraints on the mean magnetic susceptibility (MMS) for regularizing the STI inverse problem. The proposed MMS regularized STI (MMSR-STI) method was tested using computer simulations and in vivo human data collected at 3T. The fiber orientation estimated from both the STI and MMSR-STI methods was compared to that from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Computer simulations show that the MMSR-STI method provides a more accurate estimation of the susceptibility tensor than the conventional STI approach. Similarly, in vivo data show that use of the MMSR-STI method leads to a smaller difference between the fiber orientation estimated from STI and DTI for most selected white matter fibers. The proposed regularization strategy for STI can improve estimation of the susceptibility tensor in white matter. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Image fusion for dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leach Martin O

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multivariate imaging techniques such as dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI have been shown to provide valuable information for medical diagnosis. Even though these techniques provide new information, integrating and evaluating the much wider range of information is a challenging task for the human observer. This task may be assisted with the use of image fusion algorithms. Methods In this paper, image fusion based on Kernel Principal Component Analysis (KPCA is proposed for the first time. It is demonstrated that a priori knowledge about the data domain can be easily incorporated into the parametrisation of the KPCA, leading to task-oriented visualisations of the multivariate data. The results of the fusion process are compared with those of the well-known and established standard linear Principal Component Analysis (PCA by means of temporal sequences of 3D MRI volumes from six patients who took part in a breast cancer screening study. Results The PCA and KPCA algorithms are able to integrate information from a sequence of MRI volumes into informative gray value or colour images. By incorporating a priori knowledge, the fusion process can be automated and optimised in order to visualise suspicious lesions with high contrast to normal tissue. Conclusion Our machine learning based image fusion approach maps the full signal space of a temporal DCE-MRI sequence to a single meaningful visualisation with good tissue/lesion contrast and thus supports the radiologist during manual image evaluation.

  6. Quantum renormalizations in anisotropic multisublattice magnets and the modification of magnetic susceptibility under irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Val'kov, V. V.; Shustin, M. S.

    2015-11-01

    The dispersion equation of a strongly anisotropic one-dimensional magnet catena-[FeII(ClO4)2{FeIII(bpca)2}]ClO4 containing alternating high-spin (HS) ( S = 2) and low-spin (LS) ( S = 1/2) iron ions is obtained by the diagram technique for Hubbard operators. The analysis of this equation yields six branches in the excitation spectrum of this magnet. It is important that the crystal field for ions with spin S = 2 is described by the Hamiltonian of single-ion easy-plane anisotropy, whose orientation is changed by 90° when passing from one HS iron ion to another. The U( N) transformation technique in the atomic representation is applied to diagonalize a single-ion Hamiltonian with a large number of levels. It is shown that the modulation of the orientation of easy magnetization planes leads to a model of a ferrimagnet with easy-axis anisotropy and to the formation of energy spectrum with a large gap. For HS iron ions, a decrease in the mean value of the spin projection due to quantum fluctuations is calculated. The analysis of the specific features of the spectrum of elementary excitations allows one to establish a correspondence to a generalized Ising model for which the magnetic susceptibility is calculated in a wide range of temperatures by the transfer-matrix method. The introduction of a statistical ensemble that takes into account the presence of chains of different lengths and the presence of iron ions with different spins allows one to describe the experimentally observed modification of the magnetic susceptibility of the magnet under optical irradiation.

  7. Magnetic susceptibility, specific heat and magnetic structure of CuNi2(PO4)2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escobal, Jaione; Pizarro, Jose L.; Mesa, Jose L.; Larranaga, Aitor; Fernandez, Jesus Rodriguez; Arriortua, Maria I.; Rojo, Teofilo

    2006-01-01

    The CuNi 2 (PO 4 ) 2 phosphate has been synthesized by the ceramic method at 800 deg. C in air. The crystal structure consists of a three-dimensional skeleton constructed from MO 4 (M II =Cu and Ni) planar squares and M 2 O 8 dimers with square pyramidal geometry, which are interconnected by (PO 4 ) 3- oxoanions with tetrahedral geometry. The magnetic behavior has been studied on powdered sample by using susceptibility, specific heat and neutron diffraction data. The bimetallic copper(II)-nickel(II) orthophosphate exhibits a three-dimensional magnetic ordering at, approximately, 29.8 K. However, its complex crystal structure hampers any parametrization of the J-exchange parameter. The specific heat measurements exhibit a three-dimensional magnetic ordering (λ-type) peak at 29.5 K. The magnetic structure of this phosphate shows ferromagnetic interactions inside the Ni 2 O 8 dimers, whereas the sublattice of Cu(II) ions presents antiferromagnetic couplings along the y-axis. The change of the sign in the magnetic unit-cell, due to the [1/2, 0, 1/2] propagation vector determines a purely antiferromagnetic structure. - Graphical abstract: Magnetic structure of CuNi2(PO4)2

  8. Is correction necessary when clinically determining quantitative cerebral perfusion parameters from multi-slice dynamic susceptibility contrast MR studies?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salluzzi, M; Frayne, R; Smith, M R

    2006-01-01

    Several groups have modified the standard singular value decomposition (SVD) algorithm to produce delay-insensitive cerebral blood flow (CBF) estimates from dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) perfusion studies. However, new dependences of CBF estimates on bolus arrival times and slice position in multi-slice studies have been recently recognized. These conflicting findings can be reconciled by accounting for several experimental and algorithmic factors. Using simulation and clinical studies, the non-simultaneous measurement of arterial and tissue concentration curves (relative slice position) in a multi-slice study is shown to affect time-related perfusion parameters, e.g. arterial-tissue-delay measurements. However, the current clinical impact of relative slice position on amplitude-related perfusion parameters, e.g. CBF, can be expected to be small unless any of the following conditions are present individually or in combination: (a) high concentration curve signal-to-noise ratios, (b) small tissue mean transit times, (c) narrow arterial input functions or (d) low temporal resolution of the DSC image sequence. Recent improvements in magnetic resonance (MR) technology can easily be expected to lead to scenarios where these effects become increasingly important sources of inaccuracy for all perfusion parameter estimates. We show that using Fourier interpolated (high temporal resolution) residue functions reduces the systematic error of the perfusion parameters obtained from multi-slice studies

  9. Dual Contrast - Magnetic Resonance Fingerprinting (DC-MRF): A Platform for Simultaneous Quantification of Multiple MRI Contrast Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Christian E; Donnola, Shannon B; Jiang, Yun; Batesole, Joshua; Darrah, Rebecca; Drumm, Mitchell L; Brady-Kalnay, Susann M; Steinmetz, Nicole F; Yu, Xin; Griswold, Mark A; Flask, Chris A

    2017-08-16

    Injectable Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) contrast agents have been widely used to provide critical assessments of disease for both clinical and basic science imaging research studies. The scope of available MRI contrast agents has expanded over the years with the emergence of molecular imaging contrast agents specifically targeted to biological markers. Unfortunately, synergistic application of more than a single molecular contrast agent has been limited by MRI's ability to only dynamically measure a single agent at a time. In this study, a new Dual Contrast - Magnetic Resonance Fingerprinting (DC - MRF) methodology is described that can detect and independently quantify the local concentration of multiple MRI contrast agents following simultaneous administration. This "multi-color" MRI methodology provides the opportunity to monitor multiple molecular species simultaneously and provides a practical, quantitative imaging framework for the eventual clinical translation of molecular imaging contrast agents.

  10. Characterizing the magnetic susceptibility tensor of lanthanide-containing polymethylated-DOTA complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strickland, Madeleine [National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics, Biochemistry and Biophysics Center, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (United States); Schwieters, Charles D. [National Institutes of Health, Office of Intramural Research, Center for Information Technology (United States); Göbl, Christoph [Technische Universität München, Department of Chemistry (Germany); Opina, Ana C. L. [National Institutes of Health, Imaging Probe Development Center, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (United States); Strub, Marie-Paule [National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics, Biochemistry and Biophysics Center, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (United States); Swenson, Rolf E.; Vasalatiy, Olga [National Institutes of Health, Imaging Probe Development Center, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (United States); Tjandra, Nico, E-mail: tjandran@nhlbi.nih.gov [National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics, Biochemistry and Biophysics Center, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Lanthanide complexes based on the DOTA (1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid) cage are commonly used as phase contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging, but can also be utilized in structural NMR applications due to their ability to induce either paramagnetic relaxation enhancement or a pseudocontact shift (PCS) depending on the choice of the lanthanide. The size and sign of the PCS for any given atom is determined by its coordinates relative to the metal center, and the characteristics of the lanthanide’s magnetic susceptibility tensor. Using a polymethylated DOTA tag (Ln-M8-SPy) conjugated to ubiquitin, we calculated the position of the metal center and characterized the susceptibility tensor for a number of lanthanides (dysprosium, thulium, and ytterbium) under a range of pH and temperature conditions. We found that there was a difference in temperature sensitivity for each of the complexes studied, which depended on the size of the lanthanide ion as well as the isomeric state of the cage. Using {sup 17}O-NMR, we confirmed that the temperature sensitivity of the compounds was enhanced by the presence of an apically bound water molecule. Since amide-containing lanthanide complexes are known to be pH sensitive and can be used as probes of physiological pH, we also investigated the effect of pH on the Ln-M8-SPy susceptibility tensor, but we found that the changes in this pH range (5.0–7.4) were not significant.

  11. Characterizing the magnetic susceptibility tensor of lanthanide-containing polymethylated-DOTA complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strickland, Madeleine; Schwieters, Charles D.; Göbl, Christoph; Opina, Ana C. L.; Strub, Marie-Paule; Swenson, Rolf E.; Vasalatiy, Olga; Tjandra, Nico

    2016-01-01

    Lanthanide complexes based on the DOTA (1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid) cage are commonly used as phase contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging, but can also be utilized in structural NMR applications due to their ability to induce either paramagnetic relaxation enhancement or a pseudocontact shift (PCS) depending on the choice of the lanthanide. The size and sign of the PCS for any given atom is determined by its coordinates relative to the metal center, and the characteristics of the lanthanide’s magnetic susceptibility tensor. Using a polymethylated DOTA tag (Ln-M8-SPy) conjugated to ubiquitin, we calculated the position of the metal center and characterized the susceptibility tensor for a number of lanthanides (dysprosium, thulium, and ytterbium) under a range of pH and temperature conditions. We found that there was a difference in temperature sensitivity for each of the complexes studied, which depended on the size of the lanthanide ion as well as the isomeric state of the cage. Using "1"7O-NMR, we confirmed that the temperature sensitivity of the compounds was enhanced by the presence of an apically bound water molecule. Since amide-containing lanthanide complexes are known to be pH sensitive and can be used as probes of physiological pH, we also investigated the effect of pH on the Ln-M8-SPy susceptibility tensor, but we found that the changes in this pH range (5.0–7.4) were not significant.

  12. Molecular engineering of lanthanide ion chelating phospholipids generating assemblies with a switched magnetic susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isabettini, Stéphane; Massabni, Sarah; Hodzic, Arnel; Durovic, Dzana; Kohlbrecher, Joachim; Ishikawa, Takashi; Fischer, Peter; Windhab, Erich J; Walde, Peter; Kuster, Simon

    2017-08-09

    Lanthanide ion (Ln 3+ ) chelating amphiphiles are powerful molecules for tailoring the magnetic response of polymolecular assemblies. Mixtures of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) and 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-ethanolamine-diethylene triaminepentaacetate (DMPE-DTPA) complexed to Ln 3+ deliver highly magnetically responsive bicelles. Their magnetic properties are readily tuned by changing the bicellar size or the magnetic susceptibility Δχ of the bilayer lipids. The former technique is intrinsically bound to the region of the phase diagram guarantying the formation of bicelles. Methods aiming towards manipulating the Δχ of the bilayer are comparatively more robust, flexible and lacking. Herein, we synthesized a new Ln 3+ chelating phospholipid using glutamic acid as a backbone: DMPE-Glu-DTPA. The chelate polyhedron was specifically engineered to alter the Δχ, whilst remaining geometrically similar to DMPE-DTPA. Planar asymmetric assemblies hundreds of nanometers in size were achieved presenting unprecedented magnetic alignments. The DMPE-Glu-DTPA/Ln 3+ complex switched the Δχ, achieving perpendicular alignment of assemblies containing Dy 3+ and parallel alignment of those containing Tm 3+ . Moreover, samples with chelated Yb 3+ were more alignable than the Tm 3+ chelating counterparts. Such a possibility has never been demonstrated for planar Ln 3+ chelating polymolecular assemblies. The physico-chemical properties of these novel assemblies were further studied by monitoring the alignment behavior at different temperatures and by including 16 mol% of cholesterol (Chol-OH) in the phospholipid bilayer. The DMPE-Glu-DTPA/Ln 3+ complex and the resulting assemblies are promising candidates for applications in numerous fields including pharmaceutical technologies, structural characterization of membrane biomolecules by NMR spectroscopy, as contrasting agents for magnetic resonance imaging, and for the development of smart optical gels.

  13. Temperature dependence of magnetic susceptibility in the vicinity of martensitic transformation in ferromagnetic shape memory alloys

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zablotskyy, Vitaliy A.; Pérez-Landazábal, J.I.; Recarte, V.; Gómez-Polo, C.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 31 (2010), 316004/1-316004/7 ISSN 0953-8984 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : shape memory alloys * magnetic susceptibility * martensitic transition * magnetic domains Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.332, year: 2010

  14. Complex magnetic susceptibility setup for spectroscopy in the extremely low-frequency range

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, B.W.M.; Bakelaar, I.A.; Klokkenburg, M.; Erne, B.H.

    2008-01-01

    A sensitive balanced differential transformer was built to measure complex initial parallel magnetic susceptibility spectra in the 0.01–1000 Hz range. The alternating magnetic field can be chosen sufficiently weak that the magnetic structure of the samples is only slightly perturbed and the low

  15. Structural properties and magnetic susceptibility of iron-intercalated titanium ditelluride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pleshchev, V.G.; Titov, A.N.; Titova, S.G.; Kuranov, A.V.

    1997-01-01

    Structural peculiarities and magnetic susceptibility of titanium ditelluride, intercalated by iron, are studied. It is established that the basic motive of crystal structure by intercalation is preserved and the iron atoms are locates in the van der Waals gaps in positions with octahedral coordination. It is shown that the magnetic susceptibility of the Fe 0.25 TiT 2 sample increases approximately by 20 times. The magnetic susceptibility for the Fe 0.33 TiTe 2 samples becomes even much higher

  16. Magnetic susceptibility of free charge carriers in bismuth tellurides (Bi2Te3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guha Thakurta, S.R.; Dutta, A.K.

    1977-01-01

    Principal magnetic susceptibilities of both p- and n-type Bi 2 Te 3 crystals have been measured over the range of temperature 90 deg K to 650 deg K. The observed susceptibilities are diamagnetic and temperature dependent. This temperature dependence has been attributed to the contribution of the free charge carriers to the susceptibilities. From the observed susceptibilities the carrier-susceptibilities have been separately obtained which are found to be paramagnetic. From the total carrier-susceptibilities, the susceptibilities of the carriers which are thermally liberated in the intrinsic region have been separated. From an analysis of the carrier-susceptibilities the band gap and its temperature coefficient have been found out and these compare favourably with those obtained from electrical measurements. (author)

  17. Photo-magnetic imaging: resolving optical contrast at MRI resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Yuting; Thayer, David; Luk, Alex L; Gulsen, Gultekin; Gao Hao

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we establish the mathematical framework of a novel imaging technique, namely photo-magnetic imaging (PMI). PMI uses a laser to illuminate biological tissues and measure the induced temperature variations using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). PMI overcomes the limitation of conventional optical imaging and allows imaging of the optical contrast at MRI spatial resolution. The image reconstruction for PMI, using a finite-element-based algorithm with an iterative approach, is presented in this paper. The quantitative accuracy of PMI is investigated for various inclusion sizes, depths and absorption values. Then, a comparison between conventional diffuse optical tomography (DOT) and PMI is carried out to illustrate the superior performance of PMI. An example is presented showing that two 2 mm diameter inclusions embedded 4.5 mm deep and located side by side in a 25 mm diameter circular geometry medium are recovered as a single 6 mm diameter object with DOT. However, these two objects are not only effectively resolved with PMI, but their true concentrations are also recovered successfully. (paper)

  18. Association of dynamic susceptibility contrast enhanced MR Perfusion parameters with prognosis in elderly patients with glioblastomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jabehdar Maralani, Pejman [University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, Toronto, ON (Canada); Melhem, Elias R.; Herskovits, Edward H. [University of Maryland Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Wang, Sumei; Voluck, Matthew R.; Learned, Kim O.; Mohan, Suyash [Perelman School of Medicine at University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Kim, Sang Joon [University of Ulsan Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); O' Rourke, Donald M. [Perelman School of Medicine at University of Pennsylvania, Department of Surgery, Division of Neurosurgery, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-09-15

    We aimed to evaluate the prognostic value of dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) MR perfusion in elderly patients with glioblastomas (GBM). Thirty five patients aged ≥65 and 35 aged <65 years old, (referred to as elderly and younger, respectively) were included in this retrospective study. The median relative cerebral volume (rCBV) from the enhancing region (rCBV{sub ER-Med}) and immediate peritumoral region (rCBV{sub IPR-Med}) and maximum rCBV from the enhancing region of the tumor (rCBV{sub ER-Max}) were compared and correlated with survival data. Analysis was repeated after rCBVs were dichotomized into high and low values and after excluding elderly patients who did not receive postoperative chemoradiation (34.3 %). Kaplan-Meyer survival curves and parametric and semi-parametric regression tests were used for analysis. All rCBV parameters were higher in elderly compared to younger patients (p < 0.05). After adjustment for age, none were independently associated with shorter survival (p > 0.05). After rCBV dichotomization into high and low values, high rCBV in elderly was independently associated with shorter survival compared to low rCBV in elderly, or any rCBV in younger patients (p < 0.05). rCBV can be an imaging biomarker to identify a subgroup of GBM patients in the elderly with worse prognosis compared to others. (orig.)

  19. Spatial distribution of topsoil magnetic susceptibility in Sawahlunto City, West Sumatera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afdal; Wahyuni, E. S.

    2018-03-01

    A research to determine the spatial distribution of top soil magnetic suceptibility at Sawahlunto City, West Sumatra has been conducted. The top soil samples were taken at four locations ie the downtown area, the steam power plant area, the agricultural area, and coal mine area. At each location, the soil samples were taken at 10 points at a depth of 20 cm. Magnetic susceptibility were measured using Bartington MS2B Magnetic Susceptibility Meter. The topsoil samples from Sawahlunto city have relatively low average value of the magnetic susceptibility that is 67.0×10-8 m3/kg. The magnetic susceptibility of topsoil samples from downtown area have the average and the highest value of magnetic susceptibility (100.6×10-8 and 259.9×10-8 m3/kg), and followed by sample from the steam power plant area (98.4×10-8 and 258.0×10-8 m3/kg), the agricultural area (56.2×10-8 and 83.7×10-8 m3/kg), and coal mine area (12.9×10-8 and 26.8×10-8 m3/kg). Soil samples from the steam power plant area have the widest range of magnetic susceptibility value range from 0.3 × 10-8 to 258.0 × 10-8 m3/kg.

  20. Metal-oxo containing polymer nanobeads as potential contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pablico, Michele Huelar

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has greatly revolutionized the way diseases are detected and treated, as it is a non-invasive imaging modality solely based on the interaction of radiowaves and hydrogen nuclei in the presence of an external magnetic field. It is widely used today for the diagnosis of diseases as it offers an efficient method of mapping structure and function of soft tissues in the body. Most MRI examinations utilize paramagnetic materials known as contrast agents, which enhance the MR signal by decreasing the longitudinal (T1) and transverse (T2) relaxation times of the surrounding water protons in biological systems. This results into increased signal intensity differences thereby allowing better interpretation and analysis of pathological tissues. Contrast agents function by lowering the T1 or lowering the T2, resulting into bright and dark contrasts, respectively. The most common MRI contrast agents that are in clinical use today are gadolinium chelates and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, both of which have their own advantages in terms of contrast enhancement properties. In the past few years, however, there has been interest in utilizing metal-containing clusters for MRI contrast enhancement as these materials bridge the gap between the constrained structure and magnetic properties of the gadolinium chelates with the superparamagnetic behavior of the iron oxide nanoparticles. Recently, metallic clusters containing Mn and Fe metal centers have received increased attention mainly because of their potential for high spin states and benign nature. In the quest to further develop novel imaging agents, this research has focused on investigating the use of metal-oxo clusters as potential contrast agents for MRI. The primary goal of this project is to identify clusters that meet the following criteria: high paramagnetic susceptibility, water-soluble, stable, cheap, contain environmentally benign metals, and easily derivatized. This work is

  1. Fully automated measurement of anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility using 3D rotator

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Studýnka, J.; Chadima, Martin; Suza, P.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 629, 26 August (2014), s. 6-13 ISSN 0040-1951 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : AMS * Kappabridge * susceptibility tensor Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 2.872, year: 2014

  2. Critical behavior of the magnetic susceptibility of the uniaxial ferromagnet LiHoF4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beauvillain, P.; Renard, J. P.; Laursen, Ib

    1978-01-01

    The magnetic susceptibility of two LiHoF4 single crystals has been measured in the range 1.2-4.2 K. Ferromagnetic order occurs at Tc=1.527 K. Above 2.5 K, the susceptibilities parallel and perpendicular to the fourfold c axis are well interpreted by the molecular-field approximation, taking...

  3. Effect of tensile stress on the 3D reversible and irreversible differential magnetic susceptibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao, Weihua; Atherton, David L.

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic hysteresis loops in three orthogonal directions are measured for a line pipe steel sample while the external magnetic field is applied in a direction perpendicular to the tensile stress direction. The total magnetization vector is calculated. This tends to the stress direction when tensile stress is applied. The reversible and irreversible differential magnetic susceptibilities are derived. It is found that the susceptibilities in all three directions are enhanced with increasing tensile stress, although the increase in the stress direction is much larger than in the other directions. [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  4. Translation balance for measuring magnetic susceptibilities at high or low temperatures (1962)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaise, A.; Peuch, M.A.

    1962-01-01

    A translation balance is described for the measurement of the magnetic susceptibilities of liquids or solids in the temperature range from 1.7 to 1400 deg. K. Measurements are made within a magnetic field adjustable from 3400 to 16000 oersteds, in any desired atmosphere. Susceptibilities between 10 -8 and 10 -4 u.e.m. C.G.S., can be measured. (authors) [fr

  5. Magnetic susceptibility measurements of boring cores obtained from regional hydrological study project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Ken

    2010-02-01

    We measured the magnetic susceptibility of boring cores obtained from the Regional Hydrological Study Project to interpret the aeromagnetic survey data which was carried out in Tono area with about 40km square surrounding Tono Geoscience Center. The result of measurements indicates that the magnetic susceptibility of the Toki Granite is not distributed uniformly and the maximum value becomes two orders in magnitude larger than its minimum value. (author)

  6. Calculation of the magnetic susceptibilities of transition metal monocarbides, mononitrides and monoxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eibler, R.; Neckel, A.

    1975-01-01

    Results of Augmented Plane Wave (APW) band structure calculations are used to determine the magnetic susceptibilities of some transition metal monocarbides, mononitrides and monoxides (TiC, TiN, TiO, VC, VN, VO, NbC, NbN) assuming stoichiometric composition. Contributions to the susceptibility arising from the orbital para- and diamagnetism and the spin paramagnetism are determined separately. The orbital susceptibility terms are calculated by means of the model of Kubo and Obata. The calculated susceptibilities are compared with measured values. The approximations in the calculation of the orbital susceptibility terms are discussed especially with regard to the agreement between calculated and measured susceptibilities for the individual compounds. Similar calculations are performed for the susceptibilities of non-stoichiometric VCsub(x)-phase, for which APR-Virtual Crystal Approximation (VCA) band structure calculations are available. (author)

  7. Magnetic hysteresis and complex susceptibility as measures of ac losses in a multifilamentary NbTi superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldfarb, R.B.; Clark, A.F.

    1985-01-01

    Magnetization and ac susceptibility of a standard NbTi superconductor were measured as a function of longitudinal dc magnetic field. The ac-field-amplitude and frequency dependences of the complex susceptibility are examined. The magnetization is related to the susceptibility by means of a theoretical derivation based on the field dependence of the critical current density. Hysteresis losses, obtained directly from dc hysteresis loops and derived theoretically from ac susceptibility and critical current density, were in reasonable agreement

  8. Assessment of brain metastases by means of dynamic susceptibility contrast enhanced MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knopp, M.; Wenz, F.; Debus, J.; Hentrich, H.R.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: To assess if pre therapeutic measurements of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and volume (rCVB) are able to predict the response of brain metastases to radiation therapy and to assess the influence of radiosurgery on rCBF and rCBV on brain metastases and normal surrounding tissue. We examined 25 patients with brain metastases prior to high dose radiosurgery with conventional T1 and T2 weighted MRI and dynamic susceptibility contrast enhanced MRI (DSC MRI). For DSC MRI 55 T2*w GE images of two sections were acquired after bolus administration of 0.1 mmol/kg gadoteridol (ProHance) for the simultaneous measurement of brain feeding arteries and brain tissue. This allowed an absolute quantification of rCBF and rCBV. Follow-up examinations were performed 6 weeks and 3 months after radiotherapy and the acquired perfusion data were related to a 3 point scale of treatment outcome. Radiosurgery was performed by a linear accelerator with a 80% isodose of 18-20 Gv. For treatment planning the heads of the patients were immobilized by a cask mask to avoid head movement. DSC MRI was able to assess perfusion data in all patients. Higher pre therapeutic rCBV seems to predict a poor treatment outcome. After radiosurgery patients with tumor remission and stable disease presented a decrease of rCBV over time regardless of temporary tumor volume increase. Patients with tumor progression at the 3 month followup presented an increase of rCBV. Effects on normal surrounding tissue could not be observed. DSC MRI using Gadoteridol allows the non-invasive assessment of rCBV and rCBF of brain metastases and its changes due to radiosurgery. The method may also be able to predict treatment outcome. Furthermore radiofrequency effects on surrounding unaffected tissue can be monitored. Copyright (2002) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  9. STrategically Acquired Gradient Echo (STAGE) imaging, part I: Creating enhanced T1 contrast and standardized susceptibility weighted imaging and quantitative susceptibility mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yongsheng; Liu, Saifeng; Wang, Yu; Kang, Yan; Haacke, E Mark

    2018-02-01

    To provide whole brain grey matter (GM) to white matter (WM) contrast enhanced T1W (T1WE) images, multi-echo quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM), proton density (PD) weighted images, T1 maps, PD maps, susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI), and R2* maps with minimal misregistration in scanning times creating enhanced GM/WM contrast (the T1WE). The proposed T1WE image was created from a combination of the proton density weighted (6°, PDW) and T1W (24°) images and corrected for RF transmit field variations. Prior to the QSM calculation, a multi-echo phase unwrapping strategy was implemented using the unwrapped short echo to unwrap the longer echo to speed up computation. R2* maps were used to mask deep grey matter and veins during the iterative QSM calculation. A weighted-average sum of susceptibility maps was generated to increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). The proposed T1WE image has a significantly improved CNR both for WM to deep GM and WM to cortical GM compared to the acquired T1W image (the first echo of 24° scan) and the T1MPRAGE image. The weighted-average susceptibility maps have 80±26%, 55±22%, 108±33% SNR increases across the ten subjects compared to the single echo result of 17.5ms for the putamen, caudate nucleus, and globus pallidus, respectively. STAGE imaging offers the potential to create a standardized brain imaging protocol providing four pieces of quantitative tissue property information and multiple types of qualitative information in just 5min. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Static magnetic susceptibility of radiopaque NiTiPt and NiTiEr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chovan, Drahomír; Gandhi, Abbasi; Butler, James; Tofail, Syed A. M.

    2018-04-01

    Magnetic properties of metallic alloys used in biomedical industry are important for the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). If the alloys were to be used for long term implants or as guiding devices, safety of the patient as well as the medical staff has to be ensured. Strong response to the external magnetic field can cause mechanical damage to the patients body. In this paper we present magnetic susceptibility of nickel rich, ternary NiTiPt and NiTiEr to static magnetic field. We show that the magnetic susceptibility of these radiopaque alloys has values in low paramagnetic region comparable to the binary nickel-titanium. Furthermore, we studied the effect of the thermal and mechanical treatments on magnetic properties. Despite deviation from linear M (H) treated samples spanning small region around H = 0 , the linearity of the M (H) and χ =d M /d H values suggest that these ternary alloys are safe to use under MRI conditions.

  11. Quantification of regional cerebral blood flow and volume with dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rempp, K A; Brix, G; Wenz, F; Becker, C R; Gückel, F; Lorenz, W J

    1994-12-01

    Quantification of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and volume (rCBV) with dynamic magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. After bolus administration of a paramagnetic contrast medium, rapid T2*-weighted gradient-echo images of two sections were acquired for the simultaneous creation of concentration-time curves in the brain-feeding arteries and in brain tissue. Absolute rCBF and rCBV values were determined for gray and white brain matter in 12 subjects with use of principles of the indicator dilution theory. The mean rCBF value in gray matter was 69.7 mL/min +/- 29.7 per 100 g tissue and in white matter, 33.6 mL/min +/- 11.5 per 100 g tissue; the average rCBV was 8.0 mL +/- 3.1 per 100 g tissue and 4.2 mL +/- 1.0 per 100 g tissue, respectively. An age-related decrease in rCBF and rCBV for gray and white matter was observed. Preliminary data demonstrate that the proposed technique allows the quantification of rCBF and rCBV. Although the results are in good agreement with data from positron emission tomography studies, further evaluation is needed to establish the validity of method.

  12. Magnetic susceptibility as a method of investigation of short-range order in strongly nonstoichiometric carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazarova, S.Z.; Gusev, A.I.

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic susceptibility in disordered and ordered carbides of transition metals (M = Ti, Zr, Hf, Nb, Ta) was studied, the results are generalized. It was ascertained that the change in carbide susceptibility induced by deviation from stoichiometry stems from specific features of electronic spectra of the compounds. The use of magnetic susceptibility for determining structural disorder-order transitions is discussed. It is shown that change in the contribution made by orbital paramagnetism, resulting from short-range order formation, is the reason of decrease in susceptibility of nonstoichiometric carbides during the ordering. Experimentally obtained data on susceptibility permitted evaluating short- and far-range order parameters in NbC y , TaC y , TiC y and HfC y carbides [ru

  13. Surveying the anthropogenic impact of the Moldau river sediments and nearby soils using magnetic susceptibility

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Knab, M.; Hoffmann, V.; Petrovský, Eduard; Kapička, Aleš; Jordanova, N.; Appel, E.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 4 (2006), s. 527-535 ISSN 0943-0105 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3012916 Keywords : Moldau river sediments * magnetic susceptibility * anthropogenic impact Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 0.610, year: 2006

  14. Moessbauer and magnetic susceptibility measurements on M-type hexagonal Ba - ferrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipka, J.; Gruskova, A.; Sitek, J.; Miglierini, M.; Groene, R.; Hucl, M.; Toth, I.; Orlicky, O.

    1990-01-01

    Samples of stoichiometric BaFe 12 O 19 and Co, Ti substituted barium ferrite were prepared by chemical wet method. Moessbauer spectroscopy, magnetic susceptibility measurements, X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy were conducted to examine the mechanism of formation. The observed magnetic characteristics and electron scanning microscopy show that single domain coprecipitated powders were formed. (orig.)

  15. Disk-cylinder method for using NMR to measure magnetic susceptibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnham, A.K.

    1978-01-01

    The sphere-cylinder method of using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to measure the magnetic susceptibility of diamagnetic and paramagnetic materials has been generalized to the disk-cylinder method. A two-fold increase in sensitivity was obtained. Accuracies of 0.1% of the diamagnetism of water should be readily obtainable

  16. Toward fully automated processing of dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion MRI for acute ischemic cerebral stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinsuh; Leira, Enrique C; Callison, Richard C; Ludwig, Bryan; Moritani, Toshio; Magnotta, Vincent A; Madsen, Mark T

    2010-05-01

    We developed fully automated software for dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) MR perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) to efficiently and reliably derive critical hemodynamic information for acute stroke treatment decisions. Brain MR PWI was performed in 80 consecutive patients with acute nonlacunar ischemic stroke within 24h after onset of symptom from January 2008 to August 2009. These studies were automatically processed to generate hemodynamic parameters that included cerebral blood flow and cerebral blood volume, and the mean transit time (MTT). To develop reliable software for PWI analysis, we used computationally robust algorithms including the piecewise continuous regression method to determine bolus arrival time (BAT), log-linear curve fitting, arrival time independent deconvolution method and sophisticated motion correction methods. An optimal arterial input function (AIF) search algorithm using a new artery-likelihood metric was also developed. Anatomical locations of the automatically determined AIF were reviewed and validated. The automatically computed BAT values were statistically compared with estimated BAT by a single observer. In addition, gamma-variate curve-fitting errors of AIF and inter-subject variability of AIFs were analyzed. Lastly, two observes independently assessed the quality and area of hypoperfusion mismatched with restricted diffusion area from motion corrected MTT maps and compared that with time-to-peak (TTP) maps using the standard approach. The AIF was identified within an arterial branch and enhanced areas of perfusion deficit were visualized in all evaluated cases. Total processing time was 10.9+/-2.5s (mean+/-s.d.) without motion correction and 267+/-80s (mean+/-s.d.) with motion correction on a standard personal computer. The MTT map produced with our software adequately estimated brain areas with perfusion deficit and was significantly less affected by random noise of the PWI when compared with the TTP map. Results of image

  17. 3D and 4D magnetic susceptibility tomography based on complex MR images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zikuan; Calhoun, Vince D

    2014-11-11

    Magnetic susceptibility is the physical property for T2*-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (T2*MRI). The invention relates to methods for reconstructing an internal distribution (3D map) of magnetic susceptibility values, .chi. (x,y,z), of an object, from 3D T2*MRI phase images, by using Computed Inverse Magnetic Resonance Imaging (CIMRI) tomography. The CIMRI technique solves the inverse problem of the 3D convolution by executing a 3D Total Variation (TV) regularized iterative convolution scheme, using a split Bregman iteration algorithm. The reconstruction of .chi. (x,y,z) can be designed for low-pass, band-pass, and high-pass features by using a convolution kernel that is modified from the standard dipole kernel. Multiple reconstructions can be implemented in parallel, and averaging the reconstructions can suppress noise. 4D dynamic magnetic susceptibility tomography can be implemented by reconstructing a 3D susceptibility volume from a 3D phase volume by performing 3D CIMRI magnetic susceptibility tomography at each snapshot time.

  18. Magnetic susceptibility measurement of solid oxygen at pressures up to 3.3 GPa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mito, M., E-mail: mitoh@tobata.isc.kyutech.ac.jp; Yamaguchi, S.; Tsuruda, H.; Deguchi, H. [Faculty of Engineering, Kyushu Institute of Technology, Kitakyushu 804-8550 (Japan); Ishizuka, M. [Renovation Center of Instruments for Science Education and Technology, Osaka University, Toyonaka 560-8531 (Japan)

    2014-01-07

    The magnetic susceptibility of solid oxygen had long been observed only in the restricted pressure region below 0.8 GPa. We succeeded in extending the pressure region up to 3.3 GPa by clamping condensed oxygen in the sample chamber of a miniature diamond anvil cell and measuring the dc magnetic susceptibility using a superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer. In this experiment, the well-known α–β and β–γ transitions are observed in the phase diagram, suggesting consistency with the previous results of X-ray and Raman studies. In addition, a new magnetic anomaly is observed in the β phase.

  19. Estimating susceptibility and magnetization within the Earth's continental crust: Petrophysical and Satellite approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purucker, M. E.; McEnroe, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    Magnetic models (Xchaos) made from Champ and Orsted data are used to place constraints on the average magnetic susceptibility and its variability in the continental crust. Estimates of magnetic crustal thickness are made in a two-step process. The first step uses a recent seismic model (Crust1.0) to estimate the thickness of crystalline crust above the Moho, modified in the Andes and the Himalayas to account for the non-magnetic lower crust there. The second step calculates the magnetic field expected from such a layer of crystalline rock assuming the magnetization is solely induced in the earth's main field by rock of constant magnetic susceptibility, and modifies the starting crustal thickness to bring it into agreement with the Xchaos model. This global model removes spherical harmonic degrees less than 15 to account for the core field mask. We restrict our attention to the continental crust, in particular to Australia, western North America, and Scandinavia. Petrophysical and petrological data from Scandinavian rocks that have been deep in the crust help place limits on susceptibility values. Our simulations use two susceptibilities, 0.02 and 0.04 SI. The mean crystalline crustal thickness from the seismic model is 42 and 37 km in western North America and Australia, respectively, and the modification with the magnetic data makes little change to the mean crustal thickness, irrespective of whether the susceptibility is 0.02 or 0.04 SI. However, the modification with the magnetic data does make a significant difference to the standard deviation of the crustal thickness, increasing it by a factor of two in the case of a susceptibility of 0.04, and by a factor of four in the case of a susceptibility of 0.02. The changes to the standard deviation of the crustal thickness are also evident in the Scandinavian data, but the mean crystalline crustal thickness of 45 km is significantly larger than that found from either magnetic model (33 and 30 km). The differences

  20. Dual transcriptomics of virus-host interactions: comparing two Pacific oyster families presenting contrasted susceptibility to ostreid herpesvirus 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segarra, Amélie; Mauduit, Florian; Faury, Nicole; Trancart, Suzanne; Dégremont, Lionel; Tourbiez, Delphine; Haffner, Philippe; Barbosa-Solomieu, Valérie; Pépin, Jean-François; Travers, Marie-Agnès; Renault, Tristan

    2014-07-09

    Massive mortality outbreaks affecting Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) spat in various countries have been associated with the detection of a herpesvirus called ostreid herpesvirus type 1 (OsHV-1). However, few studies have been performed to understand and follow viral gene expression, as it has been done in vertebrate herpesviruses. In this work, experimental infection trials of C. gigas spat with OsHV-1 were conducted in order to test the susceptibility of several bi-parental oyster families to this virus and to analyze host-pathogen interactions using in vivo transcriptomic approaches. The divergent response of these oyster families in terms of mortality confirmed that susceptibility to OsHV-1 infection has a significant genetic component. Two families with contrasted survival rates were selected. A total of 39 viral genes and five host genes were monitored by real-time PCR. Initial results provided information on (i) the virus cycle of OsHV-1 based on the kinetics of viral DNA replication and transcription and (ii) host defense mechanisms against the virus. In the two selected families, the detected amounts of viral DNA and RNA were significantly different. This result suggests that Pacific oysters are genetically diverse in terms of their susceptibility to OsHV-1 infection. This contrasted susceptibility was associated with dissimilar host gene expression profiles. Moreover, the present study showed a positive correlation between viral DNA amounts and the level of expression of selected oyster genes.

  1. Anisotropy of susceptibility in rocks which are magnetically nonlinear even in low fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrouda, František; Chadima, Martin; Ježek, Josef

    2018-06-01

    Theory of the low-field anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) assumes a linear relationship between magnetization and magnetizing field, resulting in field-independent susceptibility. This is valid for diamagnetic and paramagnetic minerals by definition and also for pure magnetite, while in titanomagnetite, pyrrhotite and hematite the susceptibility may be clearly field-dependent even in low fields used in common AMS meter. Consequently, the use of the linear AMS theory is fully legitimate in the former minerals, but in principle incorrect in the latter ones. Automated measurement of susceptibility in 320 directions in variable low-fields ranging from 5 to 700 A m-1 was applied to more than 100 specimens of various pyrrhotite-bearing and titanomagnetite-bearing rocks. Data analysis showed that the anisotropic susceptibility remains well represented by an ellipsoid in the entire low-field span even though the ellipsoid increases its volume and eccentricity. The principal directions do not change their orientations with low-field in most specimens. Expressions for susceptibility as a function of field were found in the form of diagonal tensor whose elements are polynomials of low order. In a large proportion of samples, the susceptibility expressions can be further simplified to have one common skeleton polynomial.

  2. Gadolinium-based contrast agents in pediatric magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gale, Eric M.; Caravan, Peter [Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, The Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Boston, MA (United States); Rao, Anil G. [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); McDonald, Robert J. [College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States); Winfeld, Matthew [University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Fleck, Robert J. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Gee, Michael S. [MassGeneral Hospital for Children, Harvard Medical School, Division of Pediatric Imaging, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2017-05-15

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents can increase the accuracy and expediency of an MRI examination. However the benefits of a contrast-enhanced scan must be carefully weighed against the well-documented risks associated with administration of exogenous contrast media. The purpose of this review is to discuss commercially available gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) in the context of pediatric radiology. We discuss the chemistry, regulatory status, safety and clinical applications, with particular emphasis on imaging of the blood vessels, heart, hepatobiliary tree and central nervous system. We also discuss non-GBCA MRI contrast agents that are less frequently used or not commercially available. (orig.)

  3. Magnetic Susceptibility and Heavy Metals in Guano from South Sulawesi Caves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rifai, H.; Putra, R.; Fadila, M. R.; Erni, E.; Wurster, C. M.

    2018-04-01

    Measurement of some magnetic properties have been performed on vertical profile from South Sulawesi caves (Mampu and Bubau) by using low cost, rapid, sensitive and non destructive magnetic method. The aim is to attempt to use magnetic characters as a fingerprint for anthropogenic pollution in the caves. Guano samples were collected every 5 cm at a certain section of Mampu and Bubau cave, South Sulawesi, starting from surface through 300 cm in depth of mampu Cave and 30 cm of Bubau Cave. The magnetic parameters such as magnetic susceptibility and percentage frequency dependence susceptibility were measured using the Bartington MS2-MS2B instruments and supported by X-Ray Fluoroscence (XRF) to know their element composition. The results show that the samples had variations in magnetic susceptibility from 3.5 to 242.6 x 10‑8 m3/kg for Mampu Cave and from 8.6 to 106.5 x 10‑8 m3/kg for Bubau Cave and also magnetic domain. Then, the XRF results show that the caves contain several heavy metals. Magnetic and heavy metal analyses showing that the magnetic minerals in caves are lithogenic (Fe-bearing minerals) in origin and anthropogenic (Zn content) in the caves.

  4. Magnon heat capacity and magnetic susceptibility of the spin Lieb lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarmohammadi, Mohsen, E-mail: m.yarmohammadi69@gamil.com

    2016-11-01

    Using linear response theory, Heisenberg model Hamiltonian and Green's function technique, the influences of Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction (DMI), external magnetic field and next-nearest-neighbor (NNN) coupling on the density of magnon modes (DMM), the magnetic susceptibility (MS) and the magnon heat capacity (MHC) of a spin Lieb lattice, a face-centered square lattice, are investigated. The results reveal a band gap in the DMM and we witness an extension in the bandwidth and an increase in the number of van-Hove singularities as well. As a notable point, besides the magnetic nature which includes ferromagnetism in spin Lieb-based nanosystems, MS is investigated. Further, we report a Schottky anomaly in the MHC. The results show that the effects of the magnetic field on the MHC and MS have different behaviors in two temperature regions. In the low temperature region, MHC and MS increase when the magnetic field strength increases. On the other hand, the MHC and MS reduce with increasing the magnetic field strength in the high temperature region. Also comprehensive numerical modelling of the DMM, the MS and the MHC of a spin Lieb lattice yields excellent qualitative agreement with the experimental data. - Highlights: • Theoretical calculation of density of states of the spin Lieb lattice. • The investigation of the effect of external magnetic field on the magnon heat capacity and magnetic susceptibility. • The investigation of the effect of NNN coupling and the DMI strength on the magnon heat capacity and magnetic susceptibility.

  5. Contrast enhanced susceptibility weighted imaging (CE-SWI) of the mouse brain using ultrasmall superparamagnetic ironoxide particles (USPIO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamans, B.C.; Heerschap, A.; Barth, M.; Leenders, W.P.

    2006-01-01

    Susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) has been introduced as a novel approach to visualize the venous vasculature in the human brain. With SWI, small veins in the brain are depicted based on the susceptibility difference between deoxyhaemoglobin in the veins and surrounding tissue, which is further enhanced by the use of MR phase information. In this study we applied SWI in the mouse brain using an exogenous iron-based blood-pool contrast agent, with the aims of further enhancing the susceptibility effect and allowing the visualization of individual veins and arteries. Contrast enhanced (CE-) SWI of the brain was performed on healthy mice and mice carrying intracerebral glioma xenografts. This study demonstrates that detailed vascular information in the mouse brain can be obtained by using CE-SWI and is substantially enhanced compared to native SWI (i.e. without contrast agent). CE-SWI images of tumour-bearing mice were directly compared to histology, confirming that CE-SWI depicts the vessels supplying and draining the tumour. We propose that CE-SWI is a very promising tool for the characterization of tumour vasculature. (orig.)

  6. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) studies of Campanian ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    trial, paralic and shallow marine strata. It com- prises of lower ... Sillakkudi sandstone was deposited under shallow ..... Jelinek V 1978 Statistical processing of anisotropy of mag- ... reorientation of magnetic fabrics in deep-sea sediments at.

  7. RHIC susceptibility to variations in systematic magnetic harmonic errors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dell, G.F.; Peggs, S.; Pilat, F.; Satogata, T.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Wei, J.

    1994-01-01

    Results of a study to determine the sensitivity of tune to uncertainties of the systematic magnetic harmonic errors in the 8 cm dipoles of RHIC are reported. Tolerances specified to the manufacturer for tooling and fabrication can result in systematic harmonics different from the expected values. Limits on the range of systematic harmonics have been established from magnet calculations, and the impact on tune from such harmonics has been established

  8. Cerebral Hemodynamics in Patients with Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome Assessed by Susceptibility Weighted Imaging and Four-Dimensional Non-Contrast MR Angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löbel, Ulrike; Forkert, Nils Daniel; Schmitt, Peter; Dohrmann, Thorsten; Schroeder, Maria; Magnus, Tim; Kluge, Stefan; Weiler-Normann, Christina; Bi, Xiaoming; Fiehler, Jens; Sedlacik, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of patients with hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) and neurological symptoms performed during an epidemic outbreak of Escherichia coli O104:H4 in Northern Europe has previously shown pathological changes in only approximately 50% of patients. In contrast, susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) revealed a loss of venous contrast in a large number of patients. We hypothesized that this observation may be due to an increase in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and aimed to identify a plausible cause. Baseline 1.5T MRI scans of 36 patients (female, 26; male, 10; mean age, 38.2±19.3 years) were evaluated. Venous contrast was rated on standard SWI minimum intensity projections. A prototype four-dimensional (time resolved) magnetic resonance angiography (4D MRA) assessed cerebral hemodynamics by global time-to-peak (TTP), as a surrogate marker for CBF. Clinical parameters studied were hemoglobin, hematocrit, creatinine, urea levels, blood pressure, heart rate, and end-tidal CO2. SWI venous contrast was abnormally low in 33 of 36 patients. TTP ranged from 3.7 to 10.2 frames (mean, 7.9 ± 1.4). Hemoglobin at the time of MRI (n = 35) was decreased in all patients (range, 5.0 to 12.6 g/dL; mean, 8.2 ± 1.4); hematocrit (n = 33) was abnormally low in all but a single patient (range, 14.3 to 37.2%; mean, 23.7 ± 4.2). Creatinine was abnormally high in 30 of 36 patients (83%) (range, 0.8 to 9.7; mean, 3.7 ± 2.2). SWI venous contrast correlated significantly with hemoglobin (r = 0.52, P = 0.0015), hematocrit (r = 0.65, P effect of blood transfusions in patients with HUS and neurological symptoms.

  9. Magnetic susceptibility of Inconel alloys 718, 625, and 600 at cryogenic temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Ira B.; Mitchell, Michael R.; Murphy, Allan R.; Goldfarb, Ronald B.; Loughran, Robert J.

    1990-01-01

    After a hydrogen fuel bleed valve problem on the Discovery Space Shuttle was traced to the strong magnetization of Inconel 718 in the armature of the linear variable differential transformer near liquid hydrogen temperatures, the ac magnetic susceptibility of three samples of Inconel 718 of slightly different compositions, one sample of Inconel 625, and on sample of Inconel 600 were measured as a function of temperature. Inconel 718 alloys are found to exhibit a spin glass state below 16 K. Inconel 600 exhibits three different magnetic phases, the lowest-temperature state (below 6 K) being somewhat similar to that of Inconel 718. The magnetic states of the Inconel alloys and their magnetic susceptibilities appear to be strongly dependent on the exact composition of the alloy.

  10. Magnetic susceptibility of Gd/sub 3/Ga/sub 2/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hacker, H Jr; Gupta, R M [Duke Univ., Durham, N.C. (USA). Dept. of Electrical Engineering

    1976-03-01

    The magnetic susceptibility of the intermetallic compound Gd/sub 3/Ga/sub 2/ has been measured by the Faraday method over the range 8 - 300 K. The data indicate antiferromagnetic behavior below 53 K. Above 100 K, the mass susceptibility obeys the Curie-Weiss law, chisub(g)=4.45X10/sup -2//(T+23)emu/gOe. The corresponding effective moment is 8.51 Bohr magnetons.

  11. Clusters of magnetic nanoparticles as contrast agents for MRI: effect of aggregation on transverse relaxivity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dědourková, T.; Kaman, Ondřej; Veverka, Pavel; Koktan, Jakub; Veverka, Miroslav; Kuličková, Jarmila; Jirák, Zdeněk; Herynek, V.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 11 (2015), s. 5300804 ISSN 0018-9464 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-10088S; GA MPO FR-TI3/521 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : contrast agents * magnetic resonance imaging * magnetic nanoparticles * manganites * transverse relaxivity Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.277, year: 2015

  12. Indication-related dosing for magnetic resonance contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuh, W.T.C.; Parker, J.R.; Carvlin, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    This presentation reviews the issue of contrast media dosing and imaging protocols for the optimal MR imaging detection and characterization of pathology. The cumulative clinical experience gained in performing contrast-enhanced MR examinations with gadolinium chelates indicates that a dose of 0.1 mmol/kg body weight provides safe and effective enhancement of most CNS pathology. Doses lower than 0.1 mmol/kg have been shown to be inadequate for delineating all but selected types of CNS pathology, such as masses with a high lesion to background ratio on post-contrast images (acoustic neuromas) or lesions located in areas in which the normal tissue very rapidly takes up contrast agent (e. g. microadenomas in the pituitary gland). Recent clinical studies have suggested a role for high dose gadolinium administration (up to 0.3 mmol/kg) for the optimal detection and delineation of cerebral metastases or other small or poorly enhancing lesions. Differences in the histopathologic characteristics (capillary permeability, vascularity, location, size) of specific diseased tissues may require varying doses or even a different contrast agent to be used for optimal imaging results. As new MR contrast agents and new scanning techniques are introduced, the specific diagnostic question posed will likely determine the choice of pulse sequence, contrast agent and dose used. (orig.)

  13. Magnetic susceptibility of one-dimensional ferromagnetic CsFeCl3 crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuboi, T.; Chiba, M.

    1989-01-01

    The parallel and perpendicular magnetic susceptibilities of one-dimensional ferromagnetic CsFeCl 3 crystals have been calculated from magnetization measured as a function of temperature in the range 0 to 70 K by means of a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). The experimental results have been compared with data from the literature for other Cs-and Rb-containing crystals with ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic linear chains. Reliable values of the exchange and anisotropy energies can be estimated from experimental susceptibility data using theoretical g-values and the dynamical correlated-effective field approximation

  14. Gadolinium chloride as a contrast agent for imaging wood composite components by magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas L. Eberhardt; Chi-Leung So; Andrea Protti; Po-Wah So

    2009-01-01

    Although paramagnetic contrast agents have an established track record in medical uses of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), only recently has a contrast agent been used for enhancing MRI images of solid wood specimens. Expanding on this concept, wood veneers were treated with a gadolinium-based contrast agent and used in a model system comprising three-ply plywood...

  15. Susceptibility effects in nuclear magnetic resonance imaging; Suszeptibilitaetseffekte in der Kernspinresonanzbildgebung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziener, Christian Herbert

    2008-07-01

    The properties of dephasing and the resulting relaxation of the magnetization are the basic principle on which all magnetic resonance imaging methods are based. The signal obtained from the gyrating spins is essentially determined by the properties of the considered tissue. Especially the susceptibility differences caused by magnetized materials (for example, deoxygenated blood, BOLD-effect) or magnetic nanoparticles are becoming more important for biomedical imaging. In the present work, the influence of such field inhomogeneities on the NMR-signal is analyzed. (orig.)

  16. Microstructural characterisation and change in a.c. magnetic susceptibility of duplex stainless steel during spinodal decomposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, K.H., E-mail: KHLO@umac.m [Department of Electromechanical Engineering, University of Macau, Macau (China); Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Lai, J.K.L. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong)

    2010-06-15

    The microstructural changes during long-term (up to 10,000 h) spinodal decomposition in a duplex stain less steel, 7MoPLUS, have been characterised using TEM, a.c. magnetic susceptibility, X-ray diffractometry, microhardness measurement and optical microscopy. The microstructural changes and deformation microstructures of ferrite and austenite upon spinodal decomposition are characterised. The use of a.c. magnetic susceptibility to study the progress of spinodal decomposition is discussed. Above 450 {sup o}C, recent research by K.L. Weng et al. Mater. Sci. Eng. A 379 (2004) 119 has established that spinodal decomposition leads to crisscrossing of dislocations and the development of mottled contrast in the ferrite phase. The present work has shown that at 350 {sup o}C (the low-end of the spinodal range), crisscrossing of dislocations still occurs, but mottled contrast is absent. The G phase tends to be in contact with dislocations and its precipitation lags behind the occurrence of spinodal decomposition. No noticeable microstructural changes could be observed in the austenite phase in the spinodal temperature regime.

  17. Enhancing contrast of magnetic resonance imaging in patients with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    11031, Taiwan, 2Institute of Biological Chemistry, Academia Sinica, 128 Academia Road, Section 2 ... Purpose: To determine transit times for excretion of gadoxetic acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA), a recent magnetic .... evaluated by the same radiologist.

  18. Soil characterization using patterns of magnetic susceptibility versus effective radium concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Girault

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Low-field magnetic susceptibility χm and effective radium concentration ECRa, obtained from radon emanation, have been measured in the laboratory with 129 soil samples from Nepal. Samples along horizontal profiles in slope debris or terrace scarps showed rather homogeneous values of both χm and ECRa. One sample set, collected vertically on a lateritic terrace scarp, had homogeneous values of ECRa while χm increased by a factor of 1 to 10 for residual soils and topsoils. However, for a set of samples collected on three imbricated river terraces, values of ECRa, homogeneous over a given terrace, displayed a gradual increase from younger to older terraces. By contrast, χm showed more homogeneous mean values over the three terraces, with a larger dispersion, however, for the younger one. Similarly, Kathmandu sediments exhibited a large increase in ECRa from sand to clay layers, while χm increased moderately. The combination of χm and ECRa, thus, provides a novel tool to characterize quantitatively various soil groups and may be of interest to distinguish modes of alteration or deposition histories.

  19. Effect of Mahanarva fimbriolata (Hemiptera: Cercopidae) Attack on Photosynthetic Parameters of Sugarcane Genotypes of Contrasting Susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Bruno Oliveira; Chaves, Vinicius de Vicente; Tomaz, Adriano Cirino; Kuki, Kacilda Naomi; Peternelli, Luiz Alexandre; Barbosa, Márcio Henrique Pereira

    2017-12-05

    The aim of this study was to compare the effect of spittlebug Mahanarva fimbriolata Stål (Hemiptera: Cercopidae) on photosynthetic parameters of both a susceptible (SP81-3250) and a resistant (H.Kawandang) sugarcane genotype. In the first assay, the susceptibility level of genotypes to spittlebug was confirmed by comparing damage score and chlorophyll content of the plants. In the second assay, the effect of spittlebug nymphs on photosynthetic characteristics was assessed using the following parameters: Net photosynthetic rate (A), carboxylation efficiency (A/Ci), stomata conductance (gS), transpiration (E), electron transport rate (ETR), maximum quantum yield of Photosystem 2 (PSII) (FV/FM), effective quantum yield (Y(II)), photochemical quenching (Y(NPQ)), and nonphotochemical quenching (Y(NO)). Spittlebug nymphs affected the photosynthetic process of the susceptible genotype SP81-3250 by decreasing the Chl content, ETR, FV/FM, and Y(II). However, this genotype was able to maintain A probably due to its ability to maintain stomata aperture, increase the carboxylation efficiency of Rubisco, and dissipate excess energy through the xanthophyll cycle, as Y(NPQ) increased under the spittlebug attack. On the other hand, the spittlebug did not affect Chl content and FV/FM of the H.Kawandang genotype. Furthermore, H.Kawandang increased A to compensate for the sink demand by the spittlebug by increasing stomatal aperture and carboxylation efficiency and increasing efficiency of the photochemical apparatus in converting light energy into chemical products. We can conclude that the feeding habits of spittlebug nymphs have different impacts on photosynthesis of susceptible and resistant sugarcane genotypes. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Nutrient regeneration susceptibility under contrasting sedimentary conditions from the Rio de Janeiro coast, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matos, Christiene R.L.; Mendoza, Ursula; Diaz, Rut; Moreira, Manuel; Belem, Andre L.; Metzger, Edouard; Albuquerque, Ana Luiza S.

    2016-01-01

    Dissolved silicate (DSi), NH 4 + , NO 3 − and PO 4 3− susceptibility to be exchanged between sediment pore waters and overlying waters was evaluated in Jurujuba Sound (JS station) and Coroa Grande Sound (CGS station), southeastern Brazil. Sedimentary elemental (C, N and P) and isotopic (δ 13 C and δ 15 N) compositions evidenced stronger anthropogenic fertilization in JS station. Net NO 3 − influxes from overlying waters occurred, which was two orders of magnitude higher under the more fertilized condition. This condition resulted in 6–13-times higher net effluxes of NH 4 + , DSi and PO 4 3− to overlying waters. Vertical alternation between production and consumption processes in pore waters contributed for a more limited regeneration in CGS station. This was associated with diagenetic responses to sedimentary grain size variability in deeper layers and biological disturbance in upper layers. Nearly continuous production of NH 4 + , DSi and PO 4 3− in pore waters implied in intensified susceptibility to remobilization under the eutrophic condition of JS station. - Highlights: • SO 4 2− reduction was a driver for the larger nutrient regeneration susceptibilities. • NO 3 − reduction processes resulted in net NO 3 − influxes from overlying waters. • Effluxes (NH 4 + > DSi > PO 4 3− ) were accentuated under the more fertilized condition. • Fluxes were limited by alternations between consumption and production processes.

  1. Application of magnetic susceptibility as a function of temperature, field and frequency

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chadima, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 2 (2011), E03-E03 ISSN N. [Latinmag Biennial Meeting /2./. 23.11.2011-26.11.2011, Tandil] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : palaeomagnetism * magnetic susceptibility * geophysics Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography http://www. geofisica .unam.mx/LatinmagLetters/LL11-0102P/E/E03-chadima-1.pdf

  2. Magnetic nanoparticles as contrast agents for molecular imaging in medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Matthew

    2018-05-01

    For over twenty years, superparamagnetic nanoparticles have been developed for a number of medical applications ranging from bioseparations, magnetic drug targeting, hyperthermia and imaging. Recent studies have shown that they can be functionalized for in vivo biological targeting, potentially enabling nanoagents for molecular imaging and site-localized drug delivery. Here we review several imaging technologies developed using functionalized superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) as targeted molecular agents. Several imaging modalities have exploited the large induced magnetic moment of SPIONs to create local mechanical force. Magnetic force microscopy can probe nanoparticle uptake in single cells. For in vivo applications, magnetomotive modulation of primary images in ultrasound (US), photoacoustics (PA), and optical coherence tomography (OCT) can help identify very small concentrations of nanoagents while simultaneously suppressing intrinsic background signals from tissue.

  3. Low signal-to-noise FDEM in-phase data: Practical potential for magnetic susceptibility modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delefortrie, Samuël; Hanssens, Daan; De Smedt, Philippe

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, we consider the use of land-based frequency-domain electromagnetics (FDEM) for magnetic susceptibility modelling. FDEM data comprises both out-of-phase and in-phase components, which can be related to the electrical conductivity and magnetic susceptibility of the subsurface. Though applying the FDEM method to obtain information on the subsurface conductivity is well established in various domains (e.g. through the low induction number approximation of subsurface apparent conductivity), the potential for susceptibility mapping is often overlooked. Especially given a subsurface with a low magnetite and maghemite content (e.g. most sedimentary environments), it is generally assumed that susceptibility is negligible. Nonetheless, the heterogeneity of the near surface and the impact of anthropogenic disturbances on the soil can cause sufficient variation in susceptibility for it to be detectable in a repeatable way. Unfortunately, it can be challenging to study the potential for susceptibility mapping due to systematic errors, an often poor low signal-to-noise ratio, and the intricacy of correlating in-phase responses with subsurface susceptibility and conductivity. Alongside use of an accurate forward model - accounting for out-of-phase/in-phase coupling - any attempt at relating the in-phase response with subsurface susceptibility requires overcoming instrument-specific limitations that burden the real-world application of FDEM susceptibility mapping. Firstly, the often erratic and drift-sensitive nature of in-phase responses calls for relative data levelling. In addition, a correction for absolute levelling offsets may be equally necessary: ancillary (subsurface) susceptibility data can be used to assess the importance of absolute in-phase calibration though hereby accurate in-situ data is required. To allow assessing the (importance of) in-phase calibration alongside the potential of FDEM data for susceptibility modelling, we consider an experimental

  4. Multifractal magnetic susceptibility distribution models of hydrothermally altered rocks in the Needle Creek Igneous Center of the Absaroka Mountains, Wyoming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. Gettings

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic susceptibility was measured for 700 samples of drill core from thirteen drill holes in the porphyry copper-molybdenum deposit of the Stinkingwater mining district in the Absaroka Mountains, Wyoming. The magnetic susceptibility measurements, chemical analyses, and alteration class provided a database for study of magnetic susceptibility in these altered rocks. The distribution of the magnetic susceptibilities for all samples is multi-modal, with overlapping peaked distributions for samples in the propylitic and phyllic alteration class, a tail of higher susceptibilities for potassic alteration, and an approximately uniform distribution over a narrow range at the highest susceptibilities for unaltered rocks. Samples from all alteration and mineralization classes show susceptibilities across a wide range of values. Samples with secondary (supergene alteration due to oxidation or enrichment show lower susceptibilities than primary (hypogene alteration rock. Observed magnetic susceptibility variations and the monolithological character of the host rock suggest that the variations are due to varying degrees of alteration of blocks of rock between fractures that conducted hydrothermal fluids. Alteration of rock from the fractures inward progressively reduces the bulk magnetic susceptibility of the rock. The model introduced in this paper consists of a simulation of the fracture pattern and a simulation of the alteration of the rock between fractures. A multifractal model generated from multiplicative cascades with unequal ratios produces distributions statistically similar to the observed distributions. The reduction in susceptibility in the altered rocks was modelled as a diffusion process operating on the fracture distribution support. The average magnetic susceptibility was then computed for each block. For the purpose of comparing the model results with observation, the simulated magnetic susceptibilities were then averaged over the same

  5. Multifractal magnetic susceptibility distribution models of hydrothermally altered rocks in the Needle Creek Igneous Center of the Absaroka Mountains, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gettings, M.E.

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic susceptibility was measured for 700 samples of drill core from thirteen drill holes in the porphyry copper-molybdenum deposit of the Stinkingwater mining district in the Absaroka Mountains, Wyoming. The magnetic susceptibility measurements, chemical analyses, and alteration class provided a database for study of magnetic susceptibility in these altered rocks. The distribution of the magnetic susceptibilities for all samples is multi-modal, with overlapping peaked distributions for samples in the propylitic and phyllic alteration class, a tail of higher susceptibilities for potassic alteration, and an approximately uniform distribution over a narrow range at the highest susceptibilities for unaltered rocks. Samples from all alteration and mineralization classes show susceptibilities across a wide range of values. Samples with secondary (supergene) alteration due to oxidation or enrichment show lower susceptibilities than primary (hypogene) alteration rock. Observed magnetic susceptibility variations and the monolithological character of the host rock suggest that the variations are due to varying degrees of alteration of blocks of rock between fractures that conducted hydrothermal fluids. Alteration of rock from the fractures inward progressively reduces the bulk magnetic susceptibility of the rock. The model introduced in this paper consists of a simulation of the fracture pattern and a simulation of the alteration of the rock between fractures. A multifractal model generated from multiplicative cascades with unequal ratios produces distributions statistically similar to the observed distributions. The reduction in susceptibility in the altered rocks was modelled as a diffusion process operating on the fracture distribution support. The average magnetic susceptibility was then computed for each block. For the purpose of comparing the model results with observation, the simulated magnetic susceptibilities were then averaged over the same interval as the

  6. Method of magnetic susceptibility mapping of drilled cores. Experimental measurements for geologic structures determination; Methode de cartographie de susceptibilite magnetique sur carottes de forage. Mesures experimentales pour la determination de structures geologiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delrive, C

    1993-11-08

    The evaluation of the safety of a deep geologic repository for dangerous materials requires the knowledge of the interstitial system of the surrounding host rock. A method is proposed for the determination of geologic structures (in particular fractures) from the magnetic susceptibility mapping of drilled cores. The feasibility of the method has been demonstrated using a SQUID magneto-gradient meter. A measurement tool using a new magnetic susceptibility captor and a testing bench have been developed. This tool allows the measurement of rocks with a magnetic susceptibility greater than 10{sup -5} SI units and can generate magnetic susceptibility maps with 4 x 4 mm{sup 2} pixels. A magnetic visibility criterion has been defined which allows to foresee if a structure is visible or not. According to the measurements done, it is shown that any centimeter-scale structure with a sufficient magnetic contrast (20%) with respect to the matrix is visible. Therefore, the dip and the orientation of such structure can be determined with a 3 degree and a 5 degree precision, respectively. The position of the structure along the core axis is known with a 4 mm precision. On the other hand, about half of the magnetic contrasts observed do not correspond to the visual analyses and can be explained by very small variations of the mineralogic composition. This last point offers some interesting ways for future research using magnetic susceptibility mapping. (J.S.). 31 refs., 90 figs., 18 tabs., 2 photos., 6 appends.

  7. Non-contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography techniques in candidates for kidney transplantation: A comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blankholm, Anne Dorte; Ginnerup-Pedersen, Bodil; Stausbøl-Grøn, Brian; Haislund, Margit; Laustsen, Sussie; Ringgaard, Steffen

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Detailed knowledge of vessel status in potential candidates for kidney transplantation is essential for the surgeon. Contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography has previously been used intensively for assessing this, but the discovery that use of gadolinium based contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging can cause Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis in patients suffering from severe kidney disease has lead to renewed interest in non-contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography. The aim of this study was to find a non-contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography method for preoperative evaluation of the pelvic vessels prior to kidney transplantation, providing a sufficient image quality. Method: In a prospective study we consecutively included 54 patients undergoing examinations prior to kidney transplantation. The patients were examined with the following magnetic resonance angiography sequences: A 2D Time of flight (n = 54), 3D Time of flight (n = 52) patients, 3D Phase Contrast (n = 54), 3D Balanced Steady State Free Precession (n = 52) and a 2D TRiggered Angiography Non-Contrast Enhanced (TRANCE) (a Spin Echo sequence with subtraction) (n = 48). The sequences were evaluated with respect to contrast, diagnostic performance and artefact burden. Results: Evaluating contrast, 3D Phase Contrast was significantly better than 2D Time of flight (p 0.2). The 2D Time of flight was significantly better than the other sequences (p < 0.001) in all cases. The artefact score was lowest for the Phase Contrast images and significantly superior to the 2D Time of flight (p < 0.005). The 2D Time of flight was significantly better than the three other sequences (p < 0.001) in all cases. Conclusion: Non-contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography offers a safe preoperative examination for assessment of vessel status before kidney transplantation. A combination of 2D Time of flight and 3D Phase Contrast acquisitions is recommended and can be performed within a

  8. Viscosity of magnetic fluids must be modified in calculations of dynamic susceptibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebedev, A.V., E-mail: lav@icmm.ru

    2017-06-01

    The frequency dependences of dynamic susceptibility were measured for a series of magnetic fluid samples with the same dispersed composition at different temperatures. Coincidence of normalized dynamic susceptibility curves plotted for different concentrations was obtained only after introducing correction for the value of dynamic viscosity of the magnetic fluid. The value of the correction coefficient doesn’t depend on temperature and is the universal function of the hydrodynamic concentration of particles. - Highlights: • Dynamic susceptibility was measured at different temperatures and concentrations. • Coincidence of curves requires a correction of value of viscosity in calculations. • This correction is function of the hydrodynamic concentration of particles. • With this function the rotation of particles are described correctly.

  9. Contrasting dynamic spin susceptibility models and their relation to high-temperature superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuettler, H.; Norman, M.R.

    1996-01-01

    We compare the normal-state resistivities ρ and the critical temperatures T c for superconducting d x 2 -y 2 pairing due to antiferromagnetic (AF) spin fluctuation exchange in the context of two phenomenological dynamical spin susceptibility models for the cuprate high-T c materials, one based on fits to NMR data on Y-Ba-Cu-O (YBCO) proposed by Millis, Monien, and Pines (MMP) and Monthoux and Pines (MP), and the other based on fits to neutron scattering data on YBCO proposed by Radtke, Ullah, Levin, and Norman (RULN). Assuming comparable electronic bandwidths and resistivities in both models, we show that the RULN model gives a much lower d-wave T c (approx-lt 20 K) than the MMP model (with T c ∼100 K). We demonstrate that these profound differences in the T c close-quote s arise from fundamental differences in the spectral weight distributions of the two model susceptibilities at high (>100 meV) frequencies and are not primarily caused by differences in the calculational techniques employed by MP and RULN. Further neutron scattering experiments, to explore the spectral weight distribution at all wave vectors over a sufficiently large excitation energy range, will thus be of crucial importance to resolve the question whether AF spin fluctuation exchange can provide a viable mechanism to account for high-T c superconductivity. Limitations of the Migdal-Eliashberg approach in such models will be discussed. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  10. Magnetic susceptibility and electrical conductivity of metallic dental materials and their impact on MR imaging artifacts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Starčuková, Jana; Starčuk jr., Zenon; Hubálková, H.; Linetskiy, I.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 6 (2008), s. 715-723 ISSN 0109-5641 R&D Projects: GA MZd NR8110 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : metallic dental materials * dental alloys * amalgams * MR imaging * magnetic susceptibility * electric conductivity * image artifact Subject RIV: FF - HEENT, Dentistry Impact factor: 2.941, year: 2008

  11. Relationship between chemical composition and magnetic susceptibility in sediment cores from Central Indian Ocean Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pattan, J.N.; Parthiban, G.; Banakar, V.K.; Tomer, A.; Kulkarni, M.

    Three sediment cores in a north–south transect (3 degrees N to 13 degrees S) from different sediment types of the Central Indian Ocean Basin (CIOB) are studied to understand the possible relationship between magnetic susceptibility (Chi) and Al, Fe...

  12. Magnetic-susceptibility and heat-capacity measurements on PrRhSb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, S.K.; Takeya, H.; Gschneidner, K.A. Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Magnetic-susceptibility (ac and dc) and heat-capacity measurements have been carried out on the compound PrRhSb. These measurements reveal two magnetic transitions in this compound---one at about 18 K and the other around 6 K. In the dc susceptibility the 18-K transition is evident as the temperature below which a magnetic correlation sets in and the susceptibility is found to be field dependent. The lower transition manifests as a peak in the susceptibility of zero-field-cooled samples which were measured in low applied fields. The electronic-specific-heat coefficient, γ, is found to be 33 mJ/mol K 2 between 40 and 70 K after correcting for the lattice contribution taken to be the same as in its La analog. The γ value is fairly large for a Pr compound and may be indicative of moderately heavy quasiparticles. A Kondo-type interaction of the Pr 4f electrons with the conduction electrons may be responsible for high-magnetic-ordering temperatures and the moderately large γ value in this compound

  13. Specific heat and magnetic susceptibility vs long range order in V3Ga

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junod, A.; Fluekiger, R.; Treyvaud, A.; Muller, J.

    1976-01-01

    A new technique of studying the magnetic susceptibility together with the specific heat and the superconducting transition of typical A15-type compounds in different ordering states enables us to consistently isolate the spin paramagnetism. Satisfactory results are obtained for V 3 Ga and these are compared with data on V 3 Au and Nb 3 (Au-Pt). (author)

  14. Continuous Real-time Measurements of Vertical Distribution of Magnetic Susceptibility In Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovsky, E.; Hulka, Z.; Kapicka, A.; Magprox Team

    Measurements of top-soil magnetic susceptibility are used in approximative outlining polluted areas. However, one of the serious limitations of the method is discrimina- tion between top-soil layers enhanced by atmospherically deposited anthropogenic particles from those dominated by natural particles migrating from magnetically-rich basement rocks. For this purpose, measurements of vertical distribution of magnetic susceptibility along soil profiles is one of the most effective ways in estimating the effect of lithogenic contribution. Up to now, in most cases soil cores have to be mea- sured in laboratory. This method is quite time consuming and does not allow flexible decision about the suitability of the measured site for surface magnetic mapping. In our contribution we will present a new device enabling continuous real-time measure- ments of vertical distribution of magnetic susceptibility directly in field, performed in holes after soil coring. The method is fast, yielding smooth curves (6 data points per 1 mm dept), at least as sensitive as laboratory methods available until now, and at- tached notebook enables direct, on-line control of the lithogenic versus anthropogenic contributions.

  15. Soil magnetic susceptibility mapping as a pollution and provenance tool: an example from southern New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, A. P.; Ohneiser, C.; Turnbull, R. E.; Strong, D. T.; Demler, S.

    2018-02-01

    The presence or absence, degree and variation of heavy metal contamination in New Zealand soils is a matter of ongoing debate as it affects soil quality, agriculture and human health. In many instances, however, the soil heavy metal concentration data do not exist to answer these questions and the debate is ongoing. To address this, magnetic susceptibility (a common proxy for heavy metal contamination) values were measured in topsoil (0-30 cm) and subsoil (50-70 cm) at grid sites spaced at 8 km intervals across ca. 20 000 km2 of southern New Zealand. Samples were measured for both mass- and volume-specific magnetic susceptibility, with results being strongly, positively correlated. Three different methods of determining anomalies were applied to the data including the topsoil-subsoil difference method, Tukey boxplot method and geoaccumulation index method, with each method filtering out progressively more anomalies. Additional soil magnetic (hysteresis, isothermal remanence and thermomagnetic) measurements were made on a select subset of samples from anomalous sites. Magnetite is the dominant remanence carrying mineral, and magnetic susceptibility is governed by that minerals concentration in soils, rather than mineral type. All except two anomalous sites have a dominant geogenic source (cf. anthropogenic). By proxy, heavy metal contamination in southern New Zealand soils is minimal, making them relatively pristine. The provenance of the magnetic minerals in the anomalous sites can be traced back to likely sources in outcrops of igneous rocks within the same catchment, terrane or rock type: a distance of Soil provenance is a key step when mapping element or isotopic distribution, vectoring to mineralization or studying soil for agricultural suitability, water quality or environmental regulation. Measuring soil magnetic susceptibility is a useful, quick and inexpensive tool that usefully supplements soil geochemical data.

  16. Contrasting the magnetic response between magnetic-glass and reentrant spin-glass

    OpenAIRE

    Roy, S. B.; Chattopadhyay, M. K.

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic-glass is a recently identified phenomenon in various classes of magnetic systems undergoing a first order magnetic phase transition. We shall highlight here a few experimentally determined characteristics of magnetic-glass and the relevant set of experiments, which will enable to distinguish a magnetic-glass unequivocally from the well known phenomena of spin-glass and reentrant spin-glass.

  17. Review of magnetic susceptibility logging and its application to uranium exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, D.C.; Scott, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    Borehole measurement of magnetic susceptibility can show anomalies associated with mineralization or alteration. The detection of small anomalies is necessary, so efforts have been made in recent years to improve the sensitivity and the stability of magnetic susceptibility logging tools. Typical tools contain a single coil constructed as a solenoid wound on ferrite rods about 30cm long. The coil is heated to a constant temperature to reduce drift, and careful design is necessary to optimize temperature control and to maximize sensitivity. Measurements of coil resistance and inductance, which indicate conductivity and susceptibility, are made using a Maxwell bridge circuit. Circuit analysis shows that conductivity measurements are difficult and that stringent requirements are placed on phase stability of measurement circuitry. Corrections to the observed log are necessary to account for borehole size. The response of the tool to a thin zones of anomalous susceptibility is double peaked and a set of curves has been developed for interpretation. Calibrations of the tools are made by measuring the tool's response in models of known susceptibility

  18. The complex initial reluctivity, permeability and susceptibility spectra of magnetic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, N. C.

    2015-03-01

    The HF complex permeability spectrum of a magnetic material is deduced from the measured impedance spectrum, which is then normalized to a series permeability spectrum. However, this series permeability spectrum has previously been shown to correspond to a parallel magnetic circuit, which is not appropriate. Some of the implications of this truth are examined. This electric/magnetic duality has frustrated efforts to interpret the shape of the complex magnetic permeability spectra of materials, and has hindered the application of impedance spectroscopy to magnetic materials. In the presence of magnetic loss, the relationship between the relative magnetic permeability and the magnetic susceptibility is called into question. The use of reluctivity spectra for expressing magnetic material properties is advocated. The relative loss factor, tanδm/μi is shown to be an approximation for the imaginary part of the reluctivity. A single relaxation model for the initial reluctivity spectra of magnetic materials is presented, and its principles are applied to measurements of a high permeability ferrite. The results are presented as contour plots of the spectra as a function of temperature.

  19. AC susceptibility as a tool to probe the dipolar interaction in magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landi, Gabriel T., E-mail: gtlandi@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do ABC, 09210-580 Santo André (Brazil); Arantes, Fabiana R. [Universidade Federal do ABC, 09210-580 Santo André (Brazil); Cornejo, Daniel R. [Instituto de Física da Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo 05508-090 (Brazil); Bakuzis, Andris F. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Goiás, 74690-900 Goiânia-GO (Brazil); Andreu, Irene; Natividad, Eva [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón (ICMA), CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza 50018 (Spain)

    2017-01-01

    The dipolar interaction is known to substantially affect the properties of magnetic nanoparticles. This is particularly important when the particles are kept in a fluid suspension or packed within nano-carriers. In addition to its usual long-range nature, in these cases the dipolar interaction may also induce the formation of clusters of particles, thereby strongly modifying their magnetic anisotropies. In this paper we show how AC susceptibility may be used to obtain information regarding the influence of the dipolar interaction in a sample. We develop a model which includes both aspects of the dipolar interaction and may be fitted directly to the susceptibility data. The usual long-range nature of the interaction is implemented using a mean-field approximation, whereas the particle-particle aggregation is modeled using a distribution of anisotropy constants. The model is then applied to two samples studied at different concentrations. One consists of spherical magnetite nanoparticles dispersed in oil and the other of cubic magnetite nanoparticles embedded on polymeric nanospheres. We also introduce a simple technique to address the presence of the dipolar interaction in a given sample, based on the height of the AC susceptibility peaks for different driving frequencies. - Highlights: We discuss the importance of the dipolar interaction in magnetic nanoparticle samples. It is shown that AC susceptibility may be used to estimate the extent of this interaction. We develop a model that accounts for particle aggregation. The theoretical model is then fitted to distinct magnetite samples.

  20. Utility decay rates of T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging contrast based on redox-sensitive paramagnetic nitroxyl contrast agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Ken-ichiro

    2009-01-01

    The availability and applicability of the combination of paramagnetic nitroxyl contrast agent and T 1 -weighted gradient echo (GE)-based dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurement for redox imaging are described. The time courses of T 1 -weighted GE MRI signal intensities according to first-order paramagnetic loss of a nitroxyl contrast agent were simulated for several experimental conditions. The apparent decay rate calculated based on decreasing T 1 -weighted MRI contrast (k MRI ) can show an approximate value of the original decay rate (k true ) discretionarily given for simulation with suitable experimental parameters. The difference between k MRI and k true can be sufficiently small under T 1 -weighted spoiled gradient echo (SPGR) scan conditions (repetition time=75 ms, echo time=3 ms, and flip angle=45deg), with a conventional redox-sensitive nitroxyl contrast agent, such as 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6,-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl (TEMPOL) and/or 3-carbamoyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidine-N-oxyl (carbamoyl-PROXYL), and with intravenous (i.v.) doses of below 1.5 γmol/g body weight (b.w.) for mice. The results of this simulation suggest that the k MRI of nitroxyl contrast agents can be the primary index of redox status under biological conditions. (author)

  1. Integrated geophysical characterisation of Sunyani municipal solid waste disposal site using magnetic gradiometry, magnetic susceptibility survey and electrical resistivity tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appiah, Isaac; Wemegah, David Dotse; Asare, Van-Dycke Sarpong; Danuor, Sylvester K.; Forson, Eric Dominic

    2018-06-01

    Non-invasive geophysical investigation using magnetic gradiometry, magnetic susceptibility survey and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) was carried out on the Sunyani Municipal Assembly (SMA) solid waste disposal (SWD) site. The study was aimed at delineating the physical boundaries and the area extent of the waste deposit, mapping the distribution of the waste at the site, detecting and delineating zones of leachate contamination and its preferential migration pathways beneath the waste deposit and its surroundings. The results of both magnetic susceptibility and gradiometric methods displayed in anomaly maps clearly delineated the physical boundaries of the waste deposit with an approximate area extent of 82,650 m2 that are characterised by high magnetic susceptibilities between 426 × 10-5 SI and 9890 × 10-5 SI. They also revealed high magnetic anomalies erratically distributed within the waste deposit attributable to its heterogeneous and uncontrolled nature. The high magnetic anomalies outside the designated waste boundaries were also attributed to indiscriminate deposition of the waste. Similarly, the ERT sections delineated and characterised zones of leachate contamination beneath the waste body and its close surroundings as well as pathways for leachate migration with low resistivity signatures up to 43.9 Ωm. In spite of the successes reported herein using the ERT, this research also revealed that the ERT is less effective in estimating the thickness of the waste deposit in unlined SWD sites due to leachate infiltration into the ground beneath it that masks the resistivities of the top level ground and makes it indistinguishable from the waste body.

  2. Magnetic relaxation phenomena in the chiral magnet Fe1 -xCoxSi : An ac susceptibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannenberg, L. J.; Lefering, A. J. E.; Kakurai, K.; Onose, Y.; Endoh, Y.; Tokura, Y.; Pappas, C.

    2016-10-01

    We present a systematic study of the ac susceptibility of the chiral magnet Fe1 -xCoxSi with x =0.30 covering four orders of magnitude in frequencies from 0.1 Hz to 1 kHz, with particular emphasis to the pronounced history dependence. Characteristic relaxation times ranging from a few milliseconds to tens of seconds are observed around the skyrmion lattice A phase, the helical-to-conical transition and in a region above TC. The distribution of relaxation frequencies around the A phase is broad, asymmetric, and originates from multiple coexisting relaxation processes. The pronounced dependence of the magnetic phase diagram on the magnetic history and cooling rates as well as the asymmetric frequency dependence and slow dynamics suggest more complicated physical phenomena in Fe0.7Co0.3Si than in other chiral magnets.

  3. Identification of Heavy Metal Pollution Derived From Traffic in Roadside Soil Using Magnetic Susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Pingguo; Ge, Jing; Yang, Miao

    2017-06-01

    The study integrates surface and vertical distribution of magnetic susceptibility and heavy metal contents (Pb, Cu, Zn and Fe) to characterize the signature of vehicle pollutants in roadside soils at Linfen city, China. Sites with reforestation and without vegetation cover were investigated. The results showed that magnetic susceptibility and heavy metal contents were higher at the roadside without trees than in the reforest belt. The variations of magnetic susceptibility and heavy metal contents decreased both with distance and with depth. The maximum value was observed at 5-10 m away from the roadside edge. The vertical distribution in soil revealed accumulation of pollutants in 0-5 cm topsoils. The average contents were higher than the background values and in the order Fe (107.21 g kg -1 ), Zn (99.72 mg kg -1 ), Pb (90.99 mg kg -1 ), Cu (36.14 mg kg -1 ). Coarse multi domain grains were identified as the dominating magnetic particles. Multivariate statistical and SEM/EDX analyses suggested that the heavy metals derived from traffic sources. Trees act as efficient receptors and green barrier, which can reduce vehicle derived pollution.

  4. Evaluation of sclerosis in Modic changes of the spine using susceptibility-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Böker, Sarah M., E-mail: Sarah-maria.boeker@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Bender, Yvonne Y., E-mail: Yi-na.bender@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Adams, Lisa C., E-mail: Lisa.adams@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Fallenberg, Eva M., E-mail: Eva.fallenberg@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Wagner, Moritz, E-mail: Moritz.wagner@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Hamm, Bernd, E-mail: Bernd.hamm@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Makowski, Marcus R., E-mail: Marcus.makowski@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin (Germany)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • SWMR allows a reliable detection of sclerosis in Modic changes. • SWI has a better accuracy for detection of sclerosis in Modic changes than T1/T2w MR. • By applying SWMR the use of additional CT/radiography can be minimized. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic performance of susceptibility-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (SWMR) for the differentiation of sclerotic and non-sclerotic Modic changes (MC) of the spine compared to computed tomography (CT) and radiographs. Materials and methods: The Institutional Ethics-Review-Board approved this prospective study in advance. Written consent was obtained from all subjects. SWMR and standard T1/T2 MR of the cervical (n = 21) and/or lumbar spine (n = 34) were performed in 54 patients. 21 patients served as control. 18 patients were evaluated with CT; in all other patients radiographs were available. 67 Modic changes were identified on T1/T2 MR. On SWMR changes were classified as sclerotic and non-sclerotic based on signal intensity measurements. The sensitivity and specificity of SWMR and T1/T2 MR for differentiating between sclerotic and non-sclerotic Modic changes were determined with CT and radiographs as reference standard. Results: On SWMR, signal measurements between sclerotic and non-sclerotic Modic changes differed significantly (p < 0.01). On T1- and T2-weighted MR no significant difference (p > 0.05) was measured. On SWMR, a reliable differentiation between sclerotic and non-sclerotic Modic changes could be achieved, with a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 95%. In contrast, the combination of T1-/T2-weighted MR yielded a significantly lower sensitivity to detect sclerosis (20%). Conclusion: SWMR allows a reliable detection of sclerosis in Modic changes with a higher accuracy compared to standard spine MR sequences, using radiographs and CT as reference standard.

  5. Paradoxical perfusion metrics of high-grade gliomas with an oligodendroglioma component: quantitative analysis of dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunwoo, Leonard; Park, Sun-Won [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul Metropolitan Government - Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Seung Hong [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University, Center for Nanoparticle Research, Institute for Basic Science, and School of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Roh-Eul; Kang, Koung Mi; Yun, Tae Jin; Kim, Ji-hoon; Sohn, Chul-Ho [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Min; Lee, Se-Hoon [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Chul-Kee [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Won, Jae-Kyung; Park, Sung-Hye [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Pathology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Il Han [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    The aim of this study is to investigate perfusion characteristics of glioblastoma with an oligodendroglioma component (GBMO) compared with conventional glioblastoma (GBM) using dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) perfusion magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and microvessel density (MVD). The study was approved by the institutional review board. Newly diagnosed high-grade glioma patients were enrolled (n = 72; 20 GBMs, 14 GBMOs, 19 anaplastic astrocytomas (AAs), 13 anaplastic oligodendrogliomas (AOs), and six anaplastic oligoastrocytomas (AOAs)). All participants underwent preoperative MR imaging including DSC perfusion MR imaging. Normalized cerebral blood volume (nCBV) values were analyzed using a histogram approach. Histogram parameters were subsequently compared across each tumor subtype and grade. MVD was quantified by immunohistochemistry staining and correlated with perfusion parameters. Progression-free survival (PFS) was assessed according to the tumor subtype. GBMO displayed significantly reduced nCBV values compared with GBM, whereas grade III tumors with oligodendroglial components (AO and AOA) exhibited significantly increased nCBV values compared with AA (p < 0.001). MVD analyses revealed the same pattern as nCBV results. In addition, a positive correlation between MVD and nCBV values was noted (r = 0.633, p < 0.001). Patients with oligodendroglial tumors exhibited significantly increased PFS compared with patients with pure astrocytomas in each grade. In contrast to grade III tumors, the presence of oligodendroglial components in grade IV tumors resulted in paradoxically reduced perfusion metrics and MVD. In addition, patients with GBMO exhibited a better clinical outcome compared with patients with GBM. (orig.)

  6. Perfusion magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy of cerebral gliomas showing imperceptible contrast enhancement on conventional magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batra, A.; Tripathi, R.P.; Singh, A.K.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper was to evaluate the utility of perfusion MRI in cerebral gliomas showing imperceptible contrast enhancement on conventional MRI, and to evaluate the relationships of perfusion MRI and magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopic results in these tumours. Twenty-two patients with histopathologically proven cerebral gliomas and showing insignificant contrast enhancement on conventional MR were included in the present study. All patients underwent perfusion MRI and MR spectroscopy on a 1.5-T MR system. Significant differences of the relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) values and the choline : creatine ratios were noted between low-grade and anaplastic gliomas (P < 0.01). Good correlation was found between the rCBV values and the choline : creatine values (y = 0. 532x + 1.5643; r = 0.67). Perfusion MRI can be a useful tool in assessing the histopathological grade of non-contrast-enhancing cerebral gliomas. Along with MR spectroscopic imaging it can serve as an important technique for preoperative characterization of such gliomas, so that accurate targeting by stereotactic biopsies is possible. Copyright (2004) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  7. Scaling of the susceptibility vs. magnetic-field sweep rate in Fe8 molecular magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordi, M.; Hernandez-Mínguez, A.; Hernandez, J. M.; Tejada, J.; Stroobants, S.; Vanacken, J.; Moshchalkov, V. V.

    2004-12-01

    The dependence of the magnetization reversal on the sweep rate of the applied magnetic field has been studied for single crystals of Fe8 magnetic molecules. Our experiments have been conducted at temperatures below 1 K and sweep rates of the magnetic field between 103 T/s to 104 T/s. The systematic shift of the values of the magnetic field at which the magnetization reversal occurs, indicates that this reversal process is not governed by the Landau-Zener transition model. Our data can be explained in terms of the superradiance emission model proposed by Chudnovsky and Garanin (Phys. Rev. Lett. 89 (2002) 157201).

  8. Studies on polyaspartamide gadolinium complexes as potential magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Guoping; Liu Maili; Li Liyun

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: A series of polyaspartamide gadolinium complexes containing pyridoxamine groups were studied as the potential magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents for liver enhancement. Methods: These polyaspartamide gadolinium complexes were prepared and evaluated by relaxivity, acute toxicity studies and magnetic resonance imaging of the liver in rats. Results: These polyaspartamide gadolinium complexes have higher relaxation effectiveness than that of the clinically used gadolinium diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid and possess the low intravenous acute toxicities to Institute for Cancer Research (ICR) mice. Magnetic resonance imaging of the liver in rats indicated that they greatly enhance the contrast of magnetic resonance images and provide prolonged intravascular duration in the liver. Conclusion: These results indicated that the polyaspartamide gadolinium complexes containing pyridoxamine groups could be considered as the appropriate MRI contrast agents for liver enhancement

  9. Susceptibility tensor imaging (STI) of the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Liu, Chunlei; Duong, Timothy Q; van Zijl, Peter C M; Li, Xu

    2017-04-01

    Susceptibility tensor imaging (STI) is a recently developed MRI technique that allows quantitative determination of orientation-independent magnetic susceptibility parameters from the dependence of gradient echo signal phase on the orientation of biological tissues with respect to the main magnetic field. By modeling the magnetic susceptibility of each voxel as a symmetric rank-2 tensor, individual magnetic susceptibility tensor elements as well as the mean magnetic susceptibility and magnetic susceptibility anisotropy can be determined for brain tissues that would still show orientation dependence after conventional scalar-based quantitative susceptibility mapping to remove such dependence. Similar to diffusion tensor imaging, STI allows mapping of brain white matter fiber orientations and reconstruction of 3D white matter pathways using the principal eigenvectors of the susceptibility tensor. In contrast to diffusion anisotropy, the main determinant factor of the susceptibility anisotropy in brain white matter is myelin. Another unique feature of the susceptibility anisotropy of white matter is its sensitivity to gadolinium-based contrast agents. Mechanistically, MRI-observed susceptibility anisotropy is mainly attributed to the highly ordered lipid molecules in the myelin sheath. STI provides a consistent interpretation of the dependence of phase and susceptibility on orientation at multiple scales. This article reviews the key experimental findings and physical theories that led to the development of STI, its practical implementations, and its applications for brain research. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Susceptibility Tensor Imaging (STI) of the Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Liu, Chunlei; Duong, Timothy Q.; van Zijl, Peter C.M.; Li, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Susceptibility tensor imaging (STI) is a recently developed MRI technique that allows quantitative determination of orientation-independent magnetic susceptibility parameters from the dependence of gradient echo signal phase on the orientation of biological tissues with respect to the main magnetic field. By modeling the magnetic susceptibility of each voxel as a symmetric rank-2 tensor, individual magnetic susceptibility tensor elements as well as the mean magnetic susceptibility (MMS) and magnetic susceptibility anisotropy (MSA) can be determined for brain tissues that would still show orientation dependence after conventional scalar-based quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) to remove such dependence. Similar to diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), STI allows mapping of brain white matter fiber orientations and reconstruction of 3D white matter pathways using the principal eigenvectors of the susceptibility tensor. In contrast to diffusion anisotropy, the main determinant factor of susceptibility anisotropy in brain white matter is myelin. Another unique feature of susceptibility anisotropy of white matter is its sensitivity to gadolinium-based contrast agents. Mechanistically, MRI-observed susceptibility anisotropy is mainly attributed to the highly ordered lipid molecules in myelin sheath. STI provides a consistent interpretation of the dependence of phase and susceptibility on orientation at multiple scales. This article reviews the key experimental findings and physical theories that led to the development of STI, its practical implementations, and its applications for brain research. PMID:27120169

  11. Carboxylated magnetic nanoparticles as MRI contrast agents: Relaxation measurements at different field strengths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jedlovszky-Hajdu, Angela, E-mail: angela.hajdu@net.sote.hu [Laboratory of Nanochemistry, Department of Biophysics and Radiation Biology, Semmelweis University, Nagyvarad Sq 4, H-1089 Budapest (Hungary); Tombacz, Etelka, E-mail: tombacz@chem.u-szeged.hu [Department of Physical Chemistry and Material Science, University of Szeged, Aradi Vt. Sq 1, Szeged 6720 (Hungary); Banyai, Istvan, E-mail: banyai.istvan@science.unideb.hu [Department of Colloid and Environmental Chemistry, University of Debrecen (Hungary); Babos, Magor, E-mail: babosmagor@yahoo.com [Euromedic Diagnostics Szeged Ltd., Semmelweis St 6, Szeged 6720 (Hungary); Palko, Andras, E-mail: palko@radio.szote.u-szeged.hu [Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, University of Szeged (Hungary)

    2012-09-15

    At the moment the biomedical applications of magnetic fluids are the subject of intensive scientific interest. In the present work, magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) were synthesized and stabilized in aqueous medium with different carboxylic compounds (citric acid (CA), polyacrylic acid (PAA), and sodium oleate (NaOA)), in order to prepare well stabilized magnetic fluids (MFs). The magnetic nanoparticles can be used in the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as contrast agents. Magnetic resonance relaxation measurements of the above MFs were performed at different field strengths (i.e., 0.47, 1.5 and 9.4 T) to reveal the field strength dependence of their magnetic responses, and to compare them with that of ferucarbotran, a well-known superparamagnetic contrast agent. The measurements showed characteristic differences between the tested magnetic fluids stabilized by carboxylic compounds and ferucarbotran. It is worthy of note that our magnetic fluids have the highest r2 relaxivities at the field strength of 1.5 T, where the most of the MRI works in worldwide. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic resonance relaxation measurements were done at different field strengths. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results show characteristic differences between the tested carboxylated MFs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer r1 and r2 relaxivities depend on the thickness of the protecting layer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MFs have high r2/r1 ratios at each magnetic field.

  12. Atom-vacancy ordering and magnetic susceptibility of nonstoichiometric hafnium carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gusev, A.I.; Zyryanova, A.N.

    1999-01-01

    Experimental results on magnetic susceptibility of nonstoichiometric hafnium carbide HfC y (0.6 0.71 , HfC 0.78 and HfC 0.83 in the range of 870-930 K the anomalies are revealed which are associated with superstructure short-range ordering in a non-metallics sublattice. It is shown that a short-range order in HfC 0.71 and HfC 0.78 carbides corresponds to Hf 3 C 2 ordered phase, and in HfC 0.83 carbide - to Hf 6 C 5 ordered phase. HfC 0.78 carbide is found to possesses zero magnetic susceptibility in temperature range 910-980 K [ru

  13. Magnetic susceptibility of CoFeBSiNb alloys in liquid state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidorov, V., E-mail: vesidor@mail.ru [Ural State Pedagogical University, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Hosko, J. [Institute of Physics SAS, Bratislava (Slovakia); Mikhailov, V.; Rozkov, I.; Uporova, N. [Ural State Pedagogical University, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Svec, P.; Janickovic, D.; Matko, I.; Svec Sr, P. [Institute of Physics SAS, Bratislava (Slovakia); Malyshev, L. [Ural Federal University, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2014-03-15

    The influence of small additions of gallium and antimony on magnetic susceptibility of the bulk glass forming Co{sub 47}Fe{sub 20.9}B{sub 21.2}Si{sub 4.6}Nb{sub 6.3} alloy was studied in a wide temperature range up to 1830 K by the Faraday’s method. The undercooling for all the samples was measured experimentally. Both Ga and Sb additions were found to increase liquidus and solidification temperatures. However, gallium atoms strengthen interatomic interaction in the melts, whereas antimony atoms reduce it. - Highlights: • Bulk metallic glasses from CoFeBSiNb-based alloys were produced as in situ composites. • Magnetic susceptibility of these alloys was measured in a wide temperature range including liquid state. • Undercooling of these melts was measured experimentally. • Ga additions strengthen interatomic interaction in BMG melts, whereas Sb atoms reduce it.

  14. The ground state magnetic moment and susceptibility of a two electron Gaussian quantum dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boda, Aalu; Chatterjee, Ashok

    2018-04-01

    The problem of two interacting electrons moving in a two-dimensional semiconductor quantum dot with Gaussian confinement under the influence of an external magnetic field is studied by using a method of numerical diagonalization of the Hamiltonian matrix with in the effective-mass approximation. The energy spectrum is calculated as a function of the magnetic field. We find the ground state magnetic moment and the magnetic susceptibility show zero temperature diamagnetic peaks due to exchange induced singlet-triplet oscillations. The position and the number of these peaks depend on the size of the quantum dot and also strength of the electro-electron interaction. The theory is applied to a GaAs quantum dot.

  15. The influence of molecular order and microstructure on the R2* and the magnetic susceptibility tensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisnieff, Cynthia; Liu, Tian; Wang, Yi; Spincemaille, Pascal

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we demonstrate that in the presence of ordered sub-voxel structure such as tubular organization, biomaterials with molecular isotropy exhibits only apparent R2* anisotropy, while biomaterials with molecular anisotropy exhibit both apparent R2* and susceptibility anisotropy by means of susceptibility tensor imaging (STI). To this end, R2* and STI from gradient echo magnitude and phase data were examined in phantoms made from carbon fiber and Gadolinium (Gd) solutions with and without intrinsic molecular order and sub-voxel structure as well as in the in vivo brain. Confidence in the tensor reconstructions was evaluated with a wild bootstrap analysis. Carbon fiber showed both apparent anisotropy in R2* and anisotropy in STI, while the Gd filled capillary tubes only showed apparent anisotropy on R2*. Similarly, white matter showed anisotropic R2* and magnetic susceptibility with higher confidence, while the cerebral veins displayed only strong apparent R2* tensor anisotropy. Ordered sub-voxel tissue microstructure leads to apparent R2* anisotropy, which can be found in both white matter tracts and cerebral veins. However, additional molecular anisotropy is required for magnetic susceptibility anisotropy, which can be found in white matter tracts but not in cerebral veins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Ab initio quantum chemical calculation as a tool of evaluating diamagnetic susceptibility of magnetically levitating substances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, Y [Department of Mathematical and Life Sciences, Graduate School of Science, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Tanimoto, Y [Faculty of Pharmacy, Osaka Ohtani University, Nishikiorikita, Tondabayashi 584-8540 (Japan)], E-mail: fuji0710@sci.hiroshima-u.ac.jp

    2009-03-01

    On magnetic force evaluation necessary for magnetically levitated diamagnetic substances, isotropic diamagnetic susceptibility estimation by the ab initio quantum chemical calculation using Gaussian03W was verified for more than 300 molecules in a viewpoint of the accuracy in the absolute value and the calculation level affording good cost performance. From comparison, the method of B3PW91 / 6-311+G(d,p) was found to give the adequate absolute value by the relation of (observed) = (1.03 {+-} 0.005) x (calculated) - (1.22 {+-} 0.60) x 10{sup -6} in a unit of cm{sup 3} mol{sup -1} and good cost performance.

  17. Ab initio quantum chemical calculation as a tool of evaluating diamagnetic susceptibility of magnetically levitating substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Y; Tanimoto, Y

    2009-01-01

    On magnetic force evaluation necessary for magnetically levitated diamagnetic substances, isotropic diamagnetic susceptibility estimation by the ab initio quantum chemical calculation using Gaussian03W was verified for more than 300 molecules in a viewpoint of the accuracy in the absolute value and the calculation level affording good cost performance. From comparison, the method of B3PW91 / 6-311+G(d,p) was found to give the adequate absolute value by the relation of (observed) = (1.03 ± 0.005) x (calculated) - (1.22 ± 0.60) x 10 -6 in a unit of cm 3 mol -1 and good cost performance.

  18. Synthesis and evaluation of nanoglobule-cystamine-(Gd-DO3A, a biodegradable nanosized magnetic resonance contrast agent for dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance urography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongzuo Xu

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Rongzuo Xu1, Todd Lyle Kaneshiro1, Eun-Kee Jeong2, Dennis L Parker2, Zheng-Rong Lu31Department of Pharmaceutics and Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA; 2Department of Radiology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA; 3Department of Biomedical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USAAbstract: Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging has been recently shown to be effective for diagnostic urography. High-resolution urographic images can be acquired with T1 contrast agents for the kidney and urinary tract with minimal noise in the abdomen. Currently, clinical contrast agents are low molecular weight agents and can rapidly extravasate from blood circulation, leading to slow contrast agent elimination through kidney and consequently providing limited contrast enhancement in urinary tract. In this study, a new biodegradable macromolecular contrast agent, nanoglobule-G4-cystamine-(Gd-DO3A, was prepared by conjugating Gd-DO3A chelates on the surface of a generation 4 nanoglobule, poly-l-lysine octa(3-aminopropylsilsesquioxane dendrimer, via a disulfide spacer, where the carrier had a precisely defined nanosize that is far smaller than the renal filtration threshold. The in vivo contrast enhancement and dynamic imaging of the urinary tract of the agent was evaluated in nude mice using a low molecular weight agent Gd(DTPA-BMA as a control. The agent eliminated rapidly from blood circulation and accumulated more abundantly in urinary tract than Gd(DTPA-BMA. The fast elimination kinetics is ideal for functional evaluation of the kidneys. The morphology of the kidneys and urinary tract was better visualized by the biodegradable nanoglobular contrast agent than Gd(DTPA-BMA. The agent also resulted in low liver contrast enhancement, indicating low nonspecific tissue deposition. These features render the G4 nanoglobule-cystamine-(Gd-DO3A conjugate a promising contrast agent for magnetic

  19. Magnetic susceptibility correlation of km-thick Eifelian–Frasnian sections (Ardennes and Moravia)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Boulvain, F.; da Silva, A.C.; Mabille, C.; Hladil, Jindřich; Geršl, M.; Koptíková, Leona; Schnabl, Petr

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 4 (2010), s. 309-318 ISSN 1374-8505 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300130702; GA AV ČR IAAX00130702 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : Devonian limestone * magnetic susceptibility * Moravian Karst * Ardennes Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 0.645, year: 2010 http://popups.ulg.ac.be/Geol/docannexe.php?id=3181

  20. Magnetic viscosity, susceptibility and fluctuation fields in sintered NdFeB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomka, G.J.; Bissell, P.R.; O'Grady, K.; Chantrell, R.W.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic viscosity and irreversible susceptibility of a sample of anisotropic sintered NdFeB have been measured using a vibrating sample magnetometer. The fluctuation field as a function of local field is found to decrease with increasing demagnetizing field with a dip at the coercivity. This behavior is compared with an existing computer model based on a non-interacting system of fine, uniaxial, randomly oriented particles

  1. Outlining precision boundaries among areas with different variability standards using magnetic susceptibility and geomorphic surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Matias,Sammy S. R.; Marques Júnior,José; Siqueira,Diego S.; Pereira,Gener T.

    2014-01-01

    There is an increasing demand for detailed maps that represent in a simplified way the knowledge of the variability of a particular area or region maps. The objective was to outline precision boundaries among areas with different accuracy variability standards using magnetic susceptibility and geomorphic surfaces. The study was conducted in an area of 110 ha, which identified three compartment landscapes based on the geomorphic surfaces model. To determinate pH, organic matter, phosphorus, po...

  2. Differentiating between Central Nervous System Lymphoma and High-grade Glioma Using Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast and Dynamic Contrast-enhanced MR Imaging with Histogram Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murayama, Kazuhiro; Nishiyama, Yuya; Hirose, Yuichi; Abe, Masato; Ohyu, Shigeharu; Ninomiya, Ayako; Fukuba, Takashi; Katada, Kazuhiro; Toyama, Hiroshi

    2018-01-10

    We evaluated the diagnostic performance of histogram analysis of data from a combination of dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC)-MRI and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI for quantitative differentiation between central nervous system lymphoma (CNSL) and high-grade glioma (HGG), with the aim of identifying useful perfusion parameters as objective radiological markers for differentiating between them. Eight lesions with CNSLs and 15 with HGGs who underwent MRI examination, including DCE and DSC-MRI, were enrolled in our retrospective study. DSC-MRI provides a corrected cerebral blood volume (cCBV), and DCE-MRI provides a volume transfer coefficient (K trans ) for transfer from plasma to the extravascular extracellular space. K trans and cCBV were measured from a round region-of-interest in the slice of maximum size on the contrast-enhanced lesion. The differences in t values between CNSL and HGG for determining the most appropriate percentile of K trans and cCBV were investigated. The differences in K trans , cCBV, and K trans /cCBV between CNSL and HGG were investigated using histogram analysis. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis of K trans , cCBV, and K trans /cCBV ratio was performed. The 30 th percentile (C30) in K trans and 80 th percentile (C80) in cCBV were the most appropriate percentiles for distinguishing between CNSL and HGG from the differences in t values. CNSL showed significantly lower C80 cCBV, significantly higher C30 K trans , and significantly higher C30 K trans /C80 cCBV than those of HGG. In ROC analysis, C30 K trans /C80 cCBV had the best discriminative value for differentiating between CNSL and HGG as compared to C30 K trans or C80 cCBV. The combination of K trans by DCE-MRI and cCBV by DSC-MRI was found to reveal the characteristics of vascularity and permeability of a lesion more precisely than either K trans or cCBV alone. Histogram analysis of these vascular microenvironments enabled quantitative differentiation between

  3. Confident Diagnosis of Bronchobiliary Fistula Using Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Cholangiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karabulut, Nevzat; Cakmak, Vefa; Kiter, Go ksel [Pamukkale University Medical Center, Denizli (Turkmenistan)

    2010-08-15

    We report the utility of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC) using gadoxetic acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA) in the diagnosis of bronchobiliary fistula associated with liver hydatid cyst. Contrast-enhanced MRC clearly delineated the leakage of contrast agent from the biliary duct and its communication with the bronchial tree. Providing functional information about physiologic or pathologic biliary flow in addition to the display of biliary anatomy, contrast enhanced MRC stands as a robust technique in confidently detecting bronchobiliary fistula and bile leaks

  4. Magnetic properties of natural pyrrhotite Part I : Behaviour of initial susceptibility and saturation-magnetization-related rock-magnetic parameters in a grain-size dependent framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekkers, M.J.

    1988-01-01

    The grain-size dependence of the initial susceptibility, saturation magnetization, saturation remanence , coercive force, remanent coercive force and remanent acquisition coercive force, is reported for four natural pyrrhotites in a grain-size range from 250 µm down to <5 µm.

  5. Cerebral Hemodynamics in Patients with Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome Assessed by Susceptibility Weighted Imaging and Four-Dimensional Non-Contrast MR Angiography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Löbel

    Full Text Available Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of patients with hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS and neurological symptoms performed during an epidemic outbreak of Escherichia coli O104:H4 in Northern Europe has previously shown pathological changes in only approximately 50% of patients. In contrast, susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI revealed a loss of venous contrast in a large number of patients. We hypothesized that this observation may be due to an increase in cerebral blood flow (CBF and aimed to identify a plausible cause.Baseline 1.5T MRI scans of 36 patients (female, 26; male, 10; mean age, 38.2±19.3 years were evaluated. Venous contrast was rated on standard SWI minimum intensity projections. A prototype four-dimensional (time resolved magnetic resonance angiography (4D MRA assessed cerebral hemodynamics by global time-to-peak (TTP, as a surrogate marker for CBF. Clinical parameters studied were hemoglobin, hematocrit, creatinine, urea levels, blood pressure, heart rate, and end-tidal CO2.SWI venous contrast was abnormally low in 33 of 36 patients. TTP ranged from 3.7 to 10.2 frames (mean, 7.9 ± 1.4. Hemoglobin at the time of MRI (n = 35 was decreased in all patients (range, 5.0 to 12.6 g/dL; mean, 8.2 ± 1.4; hematocrit (n = 33 was abnormally low in all but a single patient (range, 14.3 to 37.2%; mean, 23.7 ± 4.2. Creatinine was abnormally high in 30 of 36 patients (83% (range, 0.8 to 9.7; mean, 3.7 ± 2.2. SWI venous contrast correlated significantly with hemoglobin (r = 0.52, P = 0.0015, hematocrit (r = 0.65, P < 0.001, and TTP (r = 0.35, P = 0.036. No correlation of SWI with blood pressure, heart rate, end-tidal CO2, creatinine, and urea level was observed. Findings suggest that the loss of venous contrast is related to an increase in CBF secondary to severe anemia related to HUS. SWI contrast of patients with pathological conventional MRI findings was significantly lower compared to patients with normal MRI (mean SWI score, 1

  6. Detection of microcalcifications by characteristic magnetic susceptibility effects using MR phase image cross-correlation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baheza, Richard A. [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Institute of Imaging Science, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-2310 (United States); Welch, E. Brian [Institute of Imaging Science and Departments of Radiology and Radiological Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-2310 (United States); Gochberg, Daniel F. [Institute of Imaging Science and Departments of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, and Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-2310 (United States); Sanders, Melinda [Department of Pathology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-2310 (United States); Harvey, Sara [Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-2310 (United States); Gore, John C. [Institute of Imaging Science and Departments of Biomedical Engineering, Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Physics and Astronomy, and Molecular Physiology and Biophysics, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-2310 (United States); Yankeelov, Thomas E., E-mail: thomas.yankeelov@vanderbilt.edu [Institute of Imaging Science and Departments of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Biomedical Engineering, Physics and Astronomy, and Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-2310 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a new method for detecting calcium deposits using their characteristic magnetic susceptibility effects on magnetic resonance (MR) images at high fields and demonstrate its potential in practice for detecting breast microcalcifications. Methods: Characteristic dipole signatures of calcium deposits were detected in magnetic resonance phase images by computing the cross-correlation between the acquired data and a library of templates containing simulated phase patterns of spherical deposits. The influence of signal-to-noise ratio and various other MR parameters on the results were assessed using simulations and validated experimentally. The method was tested experimentally for detection of calcium fragments within gel phantoms and calcium-like inhomogeneities within chicken tissue at 7 T with optimized MR acquisition parameters. The method was also evaluated for detection of simulated microcalcifications, modeled from biopsy samples of malignant breast cancer, inserted in silico into breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRIs) of healthy subjects at 7 T. For both assessments of calcium fragments in phantoms and biopsy-based simulated microcalcifications in breast MRIs, receiver operator characteristic curve analyses were performed to determine the cross-correlation index cutoff, for achieving optimal sensitivity and specificity, and the area under the curve (AUC), for measuring the method’s performance. Results: The method detected calcium fragments with sizes of 0.14–0.79 mm, 1 mm calcium-like deposits, and simulated microcalcifications with sizes of 0.4–1.0 mm in images with voxel sizes between (0.2 mm){sup 3} and (0.6 mm){sup 3}. In images acquired at 7 T with voxel sizes of (0.2 mm){sup 3}–(0.4 mm){sup 3}, calcium fragments (size 0.3–0.4 mm) were detected with a sensitivity, specificity, and AUC of 78%–90%, 51%–68%, and 0.77%–0.88%, respectively. In images acquired with a human 7 T scanner, acquisition times below 12

  7. Magnetic resonance tomography for focal lesions in the liver using the para-magnetic contrast medium gadolinium DTPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamm, B.; Roemer, T.; Felix, R.; Wolf, K.J.; Klinikum Charlottenburg, Berlin

    1986-01-01

    The use of the para-magnetic contrast medium gadolinium DTPA for magnetic resonance tomography of focal lesions in the liver was investigated in 31 patients. Two dosage schedules of the contrast medium (0.1 and 0.2 mmol/kg body weight) were used with field strengths of 0.35 and 0.5 Tesla. Using T 1 sequences, gadolinium DTPA showed increased signal intensity in the liver and in tumours, but this was significantly more marked in the tumour. On T 1 spin-echo sequences, previously iso-intense lesions became visible after administration of contrast. On the other hand, contrast-enhanced lesions were less well seen on inversion recovery sequences because of a reduction in the contrast between tumour and liver tissue. The contrast between tumour and liver tissue was not improved by gadolinium DTPA in comparison with precontrast inversion recovery sequences and T 2 spin-echo sequences. The perfusion of intra-hepatic tumours could be elucidated by magnetic resonance tomography after the administration of gadolinium DTPA. (orig.) [de

  8. Simultaneous determination of arterial input function of the internal carotid and middle cerebral arteries for dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholdei, R.; Wenz, F.; Fuss, M.; Essig, M.; Knopp, M.V.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: The determination of the arterial input function (AIF) is necessary for absolute quantification of the regional cerebral blood volume and blood flow using dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI. The suitability of different vessels (ICA-internal carotid artery, MCA-middle cerebral artery) for AIF determination was compared in this study. Methods: A standard 1.5 T MR system and a simultaneous dual FLASH sequence (TR/TE1/TE2/α=32/15/25/10 ) were used to follow a bolus of contrast agent. Slice I was chosen to cut the ICA perpendicularly. Slice II included the MCA. Seventeen data sets from ten subjects were evaluated. Results: The number of AIF-relevant pixels, the area under the AIF and the maximum concentration were all lower when the AIF was determined from the MCA compared to the ICA. Additionally, the mean transit time (MTT) and the time to maximum concentration (TTM) were longer in the MCA, complicating the computerized identification of AIF-relevant pixels. Data from one subject, who was examined five times, demonstrated that the intraindividual variance of the measured parameters was markedly lower than the interpersonal variance. Conclusions: It appears to be advantageous to measure the AIF in the ICA rather than the MCA. (orig.) [de

  9. Tensor of effective susceptibility in random magnetic composites: Application to two-dimensional and three-dimensional cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posnansky, Oleg P.

    2018-05-01

    The measuring of dynamic magnetic susceptibility by nuclear magnetic resonance is used for revealing information about the internal structure of various magnetoactive composites. The response of such material on the applied external static and time-varying magnetic fields encodes intrinsic dynamic correlations and depends on links between macroscopic effective susceptibility and structure on the microscopic scale. In the current work we carried out computational analysis of the frequency dependent dynamic magnetic susceptibility and demonstrated its dependence on the microscopic architectural elements while also considering Euclidean dimensionality. The proposed numerical method is efficient in the simulation of nuclear magnetic resonance experiments in two- and three-dimensional random magnetic media by choosing and modeling the influence of the concentration of components and internal hierarchical characteristics of physical parameters.

  10. In Situ Magnetic Susceptibility Variations at Two Contaminated Sites: Brandywine, MD and Bemidji, MN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Y. Y.; Kessouri, P.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Johnson, T. C.; Day-Lewis, F. D.; Johnson, C. D.; Bekins, B. A.; Slater, L. D.

    2017-12-01

    Geophysical methods are widely used monitoring tools for investigating subsurface processes. Compared to more traditional methods, they are low cost and minimally invasive. Magnetic susceptibility (MS) is a geophysical technique particularly sensitive to the presence of ferri/ ferro-magnetic particles such as iron oxides (e.g., magnetite, hematite and goethite). These oxides can be formed through microbially mediated redox reactions, inducing changes in the soil properties that can be observed by MS measurements. Monitoring MS changes over time provides indications of iron mineral transformations in the ground. These transformations are of particular interest for the characterization of contaminated sites. We acquired borehole MS measurements from two contaminated sites: Brandywine, MD and Bemidji, MN. Active remediation was applied at Brandywine, whereas natural attenuation has been geophysically monitored at Bemidji since 2011 using MS log measurements. High MS values were observed at both sites within the contaminated area only. We hypothesize that this is due to iron reducing bacteria reducing Fe-(III) to Fe-(II) and utilizing contaminants and/or amendments injected as a carbon source. At Bemidji, elevated MS readings were observed in the smear zone and correlate to the presence of magnetite. Furthermore, time-lapse MS observations at Bemidji indicate a decay in signal amplitude over time suggesting further redox transformation into less magnetic particles. For both field examples presented here, we observe variations in magnetic susceptibility within the contaminated areas that can be linked with redox reactions and mineral transformations occurring during the degradation of organic contaminants.

  11. Zn induced in-gap electronic states in La214 probed by uniform magnetic susceptibility: relevance to the suppression of superconducting T c

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, R. S.; Naqib, S. H.

    2018-02-01

    Substitution of isovalent non-magnetic defects, such as Zn, in the CuO2 plane strongly modifies the magnetic properties of strongly electron correlated hole doped cuprate superconductors. The reason for enhanced uniform magnetic susceptibility, χ, in Zn substituted cuprates is debatable. Generally the defect induced magnetic behavior has been analyzed mainly in terms of two somewhat contrasting scenarios. The first one is due to independent localized moments appearing in the vicinity of Zn arising because of the strong electronic/magnetic correlations present in the host compound and the second one is due to transfer of quasiparticle (QP) spectral weight and creation of weakly localized low-energy electronic states associated with each Zn atom in place of an in-plane Cu. If the second scenario is correct, one should expect a direct correspondence between Zn induced suppression of the superconducting transition temperature, T c, and the extent of the enhanced magnetic susceptibility at low temperature. In this case, the low-T enhancement of χ would be due to weakly localized QP states at low energy and these electronic states will be precluded from taking part in Cooper pairing. We explore this second possibility by analyzing the χ(T) data for La2-x Sr x Cu1-y Zn y O4 with different hole contents, p (=x), and Zn concentrations (y) in this paper. The results of our analysis support this scenario.

  12. Clinical role of non-contrast magnetic resonance angiography for evaluation of renal artery stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Nomitsu, Yohei; Komeda, Yosuke; Okigawa, Takashi; Urata, Joji; Miyazaki, Mitsue; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2008-01-01

    The association between a gadolinium-based contrast material and nephrogenic systemic fibrosis has been discussed. The purpose of our study was to evaluate whether non-contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) might provide sufficient information of renal artery stenosis. The non-contrast MRA of 26 patients with hypertension was retrospectively reviewed in the present study. The significant renal artery stenosis was visually evaluated by comparing non-contrast MRA with computed tomography or conventional angiographic finding. Difference of the intensities between the proximal and distal aorta was quantitatively evaluated. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of non-contrast MRA in the evaluation of the renal artery stenosis was 78%, 91%, 64% and 96%, respectively. The distal abdominal aorta showed less signal intensity than the proximal aorta by 16.9±12.2%. Non-contrast MRA is a non-invasive and effective method that allows evaluation of the renal artery stenosis. (author)

  13. Characterization of tissue magnetic susceptibility-induced distortions for MRIgRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanescu, T.; Wachowicz, K.; Jaffray, D. A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: MR image geometric integrity is one of the building blocks of MRI-guided radiotherapy. In particular, tissue magnetic susceptibility-induced effects are patient-dependent and their behavior is difficult to assess and predict. In this study, the authors investigated in detail the characteristics of susceptibility (χ) distortions in the context of MRIgRT, including the case of two common MR-linac system configurations. Methods: The magnetic field distortions were numerically simulated for several imaging parameters and anatomical sites, i.e., brain, lung, pelvis (with air pockets), and prostate. The simulation process consisted of (a) segmentation of patient CT data into susceptibility relevant anatomical volumes (i.e., soft-tissue, bone and air/lung), (b) conversion of CT data into susceptibility masks by assigning bulk χ values to the structures defined at (a), (c) numerical computations of the local magnetic fields by using a finite difference algorithm, and (d) generation of the geometric distortion maps from the magnetic field distributions. For each patient anatomy, the distortions were quantified at the interfaces of anatomical structures with significantly different χ values. The analysis was performed for two specific orientations of the external main magnetic field (B 0 ) characteristic to the MR-linac systems, specifically along the z-axis for a bore MR scanner and in the (x,y)-plane for a biplanner magnet. The magnetic field local perturbations were reported in ppm. The metrics used to quantify the geometric distortions were the maximum, mean, and range of distortions. The numerical simulation algorithm was validated using phantom data measurements. Results: Susceptibility-induced distortions were determined for both quadratic and patient specific geometries. The numerical simulations showed a good agreement with the experimental data. The measurements were acquired at 1.5 and 3 T and with an encoding gradient varying between 3 and 20 mT/m by

  14. Characterization of tissue magnetic susceptibility-induced distortions for MRIgRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanescu, T; Wachowicz, K; Jaffray, D A

    2012-12-01

    MR image geometric integrity is one of the building blocks of MRI-guided radiotherapy. In particular, tissue magnetic susceptibility-induced effects are patient-dependent and their behavior is difficult to assess and predict. In this study, the authors investigated in detail the characteristics of susceptibility (χ) distortions in the context of MRIgRT, including the case of two common MR-linac system configurations. The magnetic field distortions were numerically simulated for several imaging parameters and anatomical sites, i.e., brain, lung, pelvis (with air pockets), and prostate. The simulation process consisted of (a) segmentation of patient CT data into susceptibility relevant anatomical volumes (i.e., soft-tissue, bone and air∕lung), (b) conversion of CT data into susceptibility masks by assigning bulk χ values to the structures defined at (a), (c) numerical computations of the local magnetic fields by using a finite difference algorithm, and (d) generation of the geometric distortion maps from the magnetic field distributions. For each patient anatomy, the distortions were quantified at the interfaces of anatomical structures with significantly different χ values. The analysis was performed for two specific orientations of the external main magnetic field (B(0)) characteristic to the MR-linac systems, specifically along the z-axis for a bore MR scanner and in the (x,y)-plane for a biplanner magnet. The magnetic field local perturbations were reported in ppm. The metrics used to quantify the geometric distortions were the maximum, mean, and range of distortions. The numerical simulation algorithm was validated using phantom data measurements. Susceptibility-induced distortions were determined for both quadratic and patient specific geometries. The numerical simulations showed a good agreement with the experimental data. The measurements were acquired at 1.5 and 3 T and with an encoding gradient varying between 3 and 20 mT∕m by using an annular

  15. Magnetic Susceptibility of liquid Gd-NM (NM = Cu, Ga, Ge alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimakura Hironori

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available For rare earth alloys, the indirect interaction of RKKY is at work between rare-earth atoms. Therefore, the magnetism of them depends on the number of conduction electrons and the distance between rare-earth metals. In this work, to reveal the relationship between the number of conduction electrons and magnetic property of rare earth metal alloys, magnetic susceptibility measurements for liquid Gd-NM (NM = Cu, Ga, Ge was performed by Faraday method. As the results, it was observed that the sign of paramagnetic Curie temperature of Cu-Gd alloys are positive at all composition, while Ga-Gd and Ge-Gd alloys show negative paramagnetic Curie temperature at certain composition. Moreover, it was indicated when the alloy at certain composition shows highest melting temperature, it has the lowest paramagnetic Curie temperature.

  16. Analysis of the magnetic susceptibility well log in drill hole UE25a-5, Yucca Mountain, Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagstrum, J.T.; Daniels, J.J.; Scott, J.H.

    1980-01-01

    Magnetic susceptibility measurements have been shown to be dependent upon the magnetite content of rocks with variations in rock susceptibility arising from changes in the shape, size, composition, and quantity of the contained magnetite grains. The present study was undertaken to determine the factor(s) responsible for the variation in magnetic susceptibility measurements from borehole UE25a-5 on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The well logs and sample analyses presented in this paper form part of a larger geophysical well-logging project studying the physical properties of welded tuffs at NTS. The ash-flow sheets at NTS appear to be the products of single compositionally zoned magmas that tend, within a cooling unit, to erupt hotter, more mafic, and more crystal-rich with time. These factors, however, have little effect on the degree to which the tuffs become welded. Furthermore, zones of crystallization and alteration are superimposed upon the welded units. X-ray data show poor correspondence between the relative abundance of magnetite in a sample and the borehole magnetic susceptibility measurement associated with it. Curie balance experiments demonstrate no change in the magnetic mineralogy that could account for the susceptibility variation. Thin-section observations corroborate the x-ray data, but indicate a proportional relationship between the borehole susceptibility measurements and the grain-size distribution of magnetite. The association of magnetic susceptibility anomalies with the crystal-rich zones of the welded tuffs will aid in the identification and correlation of the eruptive sequences at NTS

  17. IDENTIFYING ANTHROPOGENIC METALLIC POLLUTANTS USING FREQUENCY DEPENDENT MAGNETIC SUSCEPTIBILITY MEASUREMENTS IN ABUJA METROPOLIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jatto S. Solomon

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Soil formed from lithological and weathering processes of parent rocks generally exhibit paramagnetic properties due to some minerals contained in the rocks and thus have significant value of magnetic susceptibility. This susceptibility arising from the influence of the parent rocks tend to mask anthropogenic grains pollutants released into the environment by human activities. Hence, it becomes difficult to identify the effect of the lithological and anthropogenic magnetic susceptibility in complex soil found in urban areas. The superparamagnetic effect of lithological soil, a single state domain and multi-domain state of anthropogenic grains can easily be investigated by frequency dependent measurements where readings between 0-2.0% indicates the absence of lithological influence, 2.0-8.0% indicates multi-domain grains or mixture of both single stage and multi-domian grains and 8.0-12% indicates the superparamagntic (SP grain from lithological origin. In this work frequency dependent measurements were carried out along 5 selected road networks within the 5 districts of Abuja phase 1. Measurements were also carried out in 379 random points at the surface and depth of 40.0cm to investigate the distribution of anthropogenic grains in Abuja metropolis using the Bartington susceptibility meter. Frequency dependent measurements along the selected road networks indicate0-3.0% immediately after the roads pavement to a distance of about 3.0m from the road, indicating that the magnetic susceptibility arise mostly form anthropogenic influence rather than lithological processes. At the distance of 3.0-8.0m, frequency dependent values of about 3.0-8.0% were recorded, indicating mixture of both superparamagnetic and multi-domain grains. Beyond the distance of 8.0m, the frequency dependent values are mostly above 8.0.0%, indicating virtually all SP grains. The spatial distribution frequency dependent surface map shows the presence of anthropogenic grains in

  18. Magnetic susceptibility and relation to initial 87Sr/86Sr for granitoids of the central Sierra Nevada, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, P.C.; Dodge, F.C.W.; Kistler, R.W.

    1991-01-01

    Measurement of the magnetic susceptibility of more than 6000 samples of granitic rock from the Mariposa 1?? by 2?? quadrangle, which crosses the central part of the Sierra Nevada batholith between 37?? and 38??N latitude, shows that magnetic susceptibility values are above 10-2 SI units in the east and central parts of the batholith and drop abruptly to less than 10-3 SI units in the western foothills. In a narrow transitional zone, intermediate values (10-3 to 10-2) prevail. Magnetic susceptibility appears to decrease slightly westward within the zones of both high and low values. Magnetic susceptibility in plutonic rocks is chiefly a function of the abundance of magnetite, which depends, in turn, on the total iron content of the rocks and their oxidation ratio. Correlations of magnetic susceptibility with initial 87Sr/86Sr suggest that oxidation ratios have been inherited from the source regions for the magmas from which the rocks crystallized. Reduction of Fe3+ to Fe2+ by organic carbon or other reducing substances may also have affected magnetic susceptibility. -from Authors

  19. Magnetic iodixanol - a novel contrast agent and its early characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arokiaraj, M C; Menesson, E; Feltin, N

    2018-02-01

    Contrast-induced nephropathy is a commonly encountered problem in clinical practice. The purpose of the study was to design and develop a novel contrast agent, which could be used to prevent contrast-induced nephropathy in the future. In total, 20-220nm magnetic nanoparticles were conjugated with iodixanol, and their radio-opacity and magnetic properties were assessed thereafter. Scanning electron microscopy pictures were acquired. Thereafter, the nanoparticles conjugate was tested in cell culture (HUVEC cells), and Quantibody ® assay was studied after cell treatment in 1:5 dilutions for 48h, compared with control. The conjugate preparation had an adequate radio-opacity. A 4mm magnetic bubble was attached to a bar magnet and the properties were studied. The magnetic bubble maintained its structural integrity in all angles including antigravity position. Scanning electron microscopy showed magnetic nanoparticles in all pictures and the particles are of 100-400nm agglomerates with primary particle sizes of roughly 20nm. 1:5 diluted particles had no effect on secretion of IL-1a, IL-1b, IL-4, IL-10, IL-13 and TNFa. Particles increased secretion of IL-8 from 24h and 48h. Secretion of IFNg was also increased when particles were added to the cells as early as 1h. Likewise, IL-6 was strongly secreted by HUVEC treated with particles from 24h incubation time. In contrast, the secretion of MCP-1 was slightly reduced on HUVEC treated with particles. There is potential for a novel iodixanol-magnetic nanoparticle conjugate to be used in cineradiography. Further investigations need to be performed to study its performance in vitro and in vivo. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Magnetic susceptibility of LaxCe1-xF3 single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paradowski, M.L.; Pacyna, A.W.; Bombik, A.; Korczak, W.; Korczak, S.Z.

    2000-01-01

    The magnetic susceptibility of La x Ce 1-x F 3 single crystals, for 0 eff and paramagnetic Curie temperature θ p have been obtained, using the Curie-Weiss law in the temperature range 100-300 K. The interconfiguration excited energy E ex , the spin-fluctuation temperature T sf , and the g-values, corresponding to three Kramers doublets in the 2 F 5/2 ground multiplet of Ce 3+ ion in La x Ce 1-x F 3 have been determined, using quantum theory of paramagnetic susceptibility. The mixed-valent and crystal field effects influence significantly the g-values. The effect of the dilution of the paramagnetic Ce 3+ ions with diamagnetic La 3+ ions is also discussed

  1. Magnetic susceptibility of oxygen adsorbed on the surface of spherical and fibrous activated carbon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyoshi Kawamura

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The magnetic susceptibilities of oxygen adsorbed on the surface of bead-shaped activated carbon and activated carbon fibers were evaluated as a function of temperature between 4.2 K and 300 K, and found to exhibit a sharp peak at around 50 K. This implies that the adsorbed oxygen molecules form an antiferromagnetic state. The relation between the susceptibility and the adsorbed mass suggest that the thickness of the adsorbed oxygen is thin enough to consider a two-dimensional structure for bead–shaped activated carbon and carbon fibers across the fiber axis but thick enough to regard it as three-dimensional along the fiber axis. The result is discussed with reference to the study on one-dimensional oxygen array.

  2. Magnetic resonance characteristics and susceptibility weighted imaging of the brain in gadolinium encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samardzic, Dejan; Thamburaj, Krishnamoorthy

    2015-01-01

    To report the brain imaging features on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in inadvertent intrathecal gadolinium administration. A 67-year-old female with gadolinium encephalopathy from inadvertent high dose intrathecal gadolinium administration during an epidural steroid injection was studied with multisequence 3T MRI. T1-weighted imaging shows pseudo-T2 appearance with diffusion of gadolinium into the brain parenchyma, olivary bodies, and membranous labyrinth. Nulling of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) signal is absent on fluid attenuation recovery (FLAIR). Susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) demonstrates features similar to subarachnoid hemorrhage. CT may demonstrate a pseudo-cerebral edema pattern given the high attenuation characteristics of gadolinium. Intrathecal gadolinium demonstrates characteristic imaging features on MRI of the brain and may mimic subarachnoid hemorrhage on susceptibility-weighted imaging. Identifying high dose gadolinium within the CSF spaces on MRI is essential to avoid diagnostic and therapeutic errors. Copyright © 2013 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  3. Influence of Radiation Damage and Isochronal Annealing on the Magnetic Susceptibility of Pu1-xAmx Alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCall, Scott K.; Fluss, Michael J.; Chung, Brandon W.; Haire, Richard G.

    2008-01-01

    Results of radiation damage in Pu and Pu 1-x Am x alloys studied with magnetic susceptibility, χ(T), and resistivity are presented. Damage accumulated at low temperatures increases χ(T) for all measured alloys, with the trend generally enhanced as the lattice expands. There is a trend towards saturation observable in the damage induced magnetic susceptibility data. that is not evident in similar damage induced resistivity data taken on the same specimen. A comparison of isochronal annealing curves measured by both resistivity and magnetic susceptibility on a 4.3 at% Ga stabilized δ-Pu specimen show that Stage I annealing, where interstitials begin to move, is largely transparent to the magnetic measurement. This indicates that interstitials have little impact on the damage induced increase in the magnetic susceptibility. The isochronal annealing curves of the Pu 1-x Am x alloys do not show distinct annealing stages as expected for alloys. However, samples near 20% Am concentration show an unexpected increase in magnetization beginning when specimens are annealed to 35 K. This behavior is also reflected in a time dependent increase in the magnetic susceptibility of damaged specimens indicative of first order kinetics. These results suggest there may be a metastable phase induced by radiation damage and annealing in Pu 1-x Am x alloys. (authors)

  4. Technical aspects of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the breast: literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leopoldino, Denise de Deus; Gracio, Tatiana Schiller; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe; Bezerra, Alexandre Sergio de Araujo; Gracio, Tatiana Schiller

    2005-01-01

    With the advances in surface coil technology and the development of new imaging protocols in addition to the increase of the use of contrast agents, contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has emerged as a promising modality for detection, diagnosis and staging of breast cancer. Despite these advances, there are some unresolved issues, including no defined standard technique for contrast-enhanced breast MRI and no standard criteria of interpretation for the evaluation of such studies. In this article, we review the literature and discuss the general requirements and recommendations for contrast agent-enhanced breast MRI, including image interpretation criteria, MR equipment, dedicated radiofrequency coils, use of paramagnetic contrast agents, fat-suppression techniques, planes of acquisition, pulse sequence specifications and artifact sources. (author)

  5. Efficacy of dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI using echo-planar imaging in differential diagnosis of breast tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshino, Ayako

    1998-01-01

    It has been shown that T1-weighted dynamic MR imaging is a useful method in differentiating malignant breast tumors from benign lesions. Invasive breast carcinomas enhance more rapidly than benign lesions such as fibroadenomas, papillomas, and proliferative fibrocystic diseases. However, significant overlap in the dynamic profile of benign and malignant lesions may occur, resulting in relatively low specificity, which is an inherent limitation of this technique. The author attempted to improve diagnostic accuracy by utilizing dynamic susceptibility contrast MR imaging (DSC-MRI) with a single-shot echo-planar imaging sequence. Twenty-two patients underwent DSC-MRI using a 1.5-T unit (Magnetom Vision, Siemens). Images were obtained before, during and after the bolus injection of 20 mL of gadopentetate dimeglumine. The signal reduction rate within the first 30 seconds (ΔRT2) was calculated by the following equation: ΔRT2 = (postcontrast signal intensity-precontrast signal intensity) /precontrast signal intensity. A rapid, strong decrease in signal intensity was observed on the first pass of the contrast material in all cases of carcinoma, whereas no or only a minimal decrease in signal intensity was observed in all but one of the benign lesions. This method seems to be more accurate than T1-weighted dynamic MR imaging in the differentiation benign and malignant breast lesions. Since DSC-MRI can be performed quickly, subsequent conventional T1-weighted imaging can provide additional information about the morphologic features of lesions, to further support the diagnosis. In conclusion, DSC-MRI seems to be a promising method for the accurate preoperative assessment of breast lesions. (author)

  6. Efficacy of dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI using echo-planar imaging in differential diagnosis of breast tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshino, Ayako [Kyorin Univ., Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1998-07-01

    It has been shown that T1-weighted dynamic MR imaging is a useful method in differentiating malignant breast tumors from benign lesions. Invasive breast carcinomas enhance more rapidly than benign lesions such as fibroadenomas, papillomas, and proliferative fibrocystic diseases. However, significant overlap in the dynamic profile of benign and malignant lesions may occur, resulting in relatively low specificity, which is an inherent limitation of this technique. The author attempted to improve diagnostic accuracy by utilizing dynamic susceptibility contrast MR imaging (DSC-MRI) with a single-shot echo-planar imaging sequence. Twenty-two patients underwent DSC-MRI using a 1.5-T unit (Magnetom Vision, Siemens). Images were obtained before, during and after the bolus injection of 20 mL of gadopentetate dimeglumine. The signal reduction rate within the first 30 seconds ({Delta}RT2) was calculated by the following equation: {Delta}RT2 (postcontrast signal intensity-precontrast signal intensity) /precontrast signal intensity. A rapid, strong decrease in signal intensity was observed on the first pass of the contrast material in all cases of carcinoma, whereas no or only a minimal decrease in signal intensity was observed in all but one of the benign lesions. This method seems to be more accurate than T1-weighted dynamic MR imaging in the differentiation benign and malignant breast lesions. Since DSC-MRI can be performed quickly, subsequent conventional T1-weighted imaging can provide additional information about the morphologic features of lesions, to further support the diagnosis. In conclusion, DSC-MRI seems to be a promising method for the accurate preoperative assessment of breast lesions. (author)

  7. Arterial spin labelling MRI for assessment of cerebral perfusion in children with moyamoya disease: comparison with dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goetti, Robert [University Children' s Hospital Zurich, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Zurich (Switzerland); University Hospital Zurich, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); O' Gorman, Ruth [University Children' s Hospital Zurich, Center for MR Research, Zurich (Switzerland); Khan, Nadia [University Children' s Hospital Zurich, Moyamoya Center, Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery, Zurich (Switzerland); Kellenberger, Christian J.; Scheer, Ianina [University Children' s Hospital Zurich, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2013-05-15

    This study seeks to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of cerebral perfusion imaging with arterial spin labelling (ASL) MR imaging in children with moyamoya disease compared to dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) imaging. Ten children (7 females; age, 9.2 {+-} 5.4 years) with moyamoya disease underwent cerebral perfusion imaging with ASL and DSC on a 3-T MRI scanner in the same session. Cerebral perfusion images were acquired with ASL (pulsed continuous 3D ASL sequence, 32 axial slices, TR = 5.5 s, TE = 25 ms, FOV = 24 cm, matrix = 128 x 128) and DSC (gradient echo EPI sequence, 35 volumes of 28 axial slices, TR = 2,000 ms, TE = 36 ms, FOV = 24 cm, matrix = 96 x 96, 0.2 ml/kg Gd-DOTA). Cerebral blood flow maps were generated. ASL and DSC images were qualitatively assessed regarding perfusion of left and right ACA, MCA, and PCA territories by two independent readers using a 3-point-Likert scale and quantitative relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was calculated. Correlation between ASL and DSC for qualitative and quantitative assessment and the accuracy of ASL for the detection of reduced perfusion per territory with DSC serving as the standard of reference were calculated. With a good interreader agreement ({kappa} = 0.62) qualitative perfusion assessment with ASL and DSC showed a strong and significant correlation ({rho} = 0.77; p < 0.001), as did quantitative rCBF (r = 0.79; p < 0.001). ASL showed a sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of 94 %, 93 %, and 93 % for the detection of reduced perfusion per territory. In children with moyamoya disease, unenhanced ASL enables the detection of reduced perfusion per vascular territory with a good accuracy compared to contrast-enhanced DSC. (orig.)

  8. Comparative study of pulsed-continuous arterial spin labeling and dynamic susceptibility contrast imaging by histogram analysis in evaluation of glial tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arisawa, Atsuko; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Tanaka, Hisashi; Takahashi, Hiroto; Matsuo, Chisato; Fujiwara, Takuya; Fujiwara, Masahiro; Fujimoto, Yasunori; Tomiyama, Noriyuki

    2018-06-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is a non-invasive perfusion technique that may be an alternative to dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) for assessment of brain tumors. To our knowledge, there have been no reports on histogram analysis of ASL. The purpose of this study was to determine whether ASL is comparable with DSC-MRI in terms of differentiating high-grade and low-grade gliomas by evaluating the histogram analysis of cerebral blood flow (CBF) in the entire tumor. Thirty-four patients with pathologically proven glioma underwent ASL and DSC-MRI. High-signal areas on contrast-enhanced T 1 -weighted images or high-intensity areas on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images were designated as the volumes of interest (VOIs). ASL-CBF, DSC-CBF, and DSC-cerebral blood volume maps were constructed and co-registered to the VOI. Perfusion histogram analyses of the whole VOI and statistical analyses were performed to compare the ASL and DSC images. There was no significant difference in the mean values for any of the histogram metrics in both of the low-grade gliomas (n = 15) and the high-grade gliomas (n = 19). Strong correlations were seen in the 75th percentile, mean, median, and standard deviation values between the ASL and DSC images. The area under the curve values tended to be greater for the DSC images than for the ASL images. DSC-MRI is superior to ASL for distinguishing high-grade from low-grade glioma. ASL could be an alternative evaluation method when DSC-MRI cannot be used, e.g., in patients with renal failure, those in whom repeated examination is required, and in children.

  9. Measuring SPIO and Gd contrast agent magnetization using 3 T MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantillon-Murphy, Pádraig; Wald, Lawrence L.; Zahn, Markus; Adalsteinsson, Elfar

    2011-01-01

    Traditional methods of measuring magnetization in magnetic fluid samples, such as vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM), are typically limited to maximum field strengths of about 1 T. This work demonstrates the ability of MRI to measure the magnetization associated with two commercial MRI contrast agents at 3 T by comparing analytical solutions to experimental imaging results for the field pattern associated with agents in cylindrical vials. The results of the VSM and fitted MRI data match closely. The method represents an improvement over VSM measurements since results are attainable at imaging field strengths. The agents investigated are Feridex, a superparamagnetic iron oxide suspension used primarily for liver imaging, and Magnevist, a paramagnetic, gadolinium-based compound used for tumors, inflammation and vascular lesions. MR imaging of the agents took place in sealed cylindrical vials in the presence of a surrounding volume of deionized water where the effects of the contrast agents had a measurable effect on the water's magnetization in the vicinity of the compartment of contrast agent. A pair of phase images were used to reconstruct a B0 fieldmap. The resultant B0 maps in the water region, corrected for shimming and container edge effects, were used to predict the agent's magnetization at 3 T. The results were compared with the results from VSM measurements up to 1.2 T and close correlation was observed. The technique should be of interest to those seeking quantification of the magnetization associated with magnetic suspensions beyond the traditional scope of VSM. The magnetization needs to be sufficiently strong (Ms≳50 Am2/kg Fe for Feridex and χm≳5 × 10−5 m3/kg Gd for Magnevist) for a measurable dipole field in the surrounding water. For this reason, the technique is mostly suitable for undiluted agents. PMID:19588450

  10. Simultaneous topographic and elemental chemical and magnetic contrast in scanning tunneling microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Volker; Preissner, Curt A; Hla, Saw-Wai; Wang, Kangkang; Rosenmann, Daniel

    2014-09-30

    A method and system for performing simultaneous topographic and elemental chemical and magnetic contrast analysis in a scanning, tunneling microscope. The method and system also includes nanofabricated coaxial multilayer tips with a nanoscale conducting apex and a programmable in-situ nanomanipulator to fabricate these tips and also to rotate tips controllably.

  11. Tumor microvascular changes in antiangiogenic treatment : Assessment by magnetic resonance contrast media of different molecular weights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turetschek, K; Preda, A; Novikov, [No Value; Brasch, RC; Weinmann, HJ; Wunderbaldinger, P; Roberts, TPL

    Purpose: To test magnetic resonance (MR) contrast media of different molecular weights (MWs) for their potential to characterize noninvasively microvascular changes in an experimental tumor treatment model. Materials and Methods: MD-MBA-435, a poorly differentiated human breast cancer cell line, was

  12. Three-dimensional magnetic resonance coronary angiography using a new blood pool contrast agent : Initial experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bedaux, WLF; Hofman, MBM; Wielopolski, PA; de Cock, CC; Hoffmann, [No Value; Oudkerk, M; de Feyter, PJ; van Rossum, AC

    2002-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this feasibility study was to assess the effect of a new blood pool contrast agent on magnetic resonance coronary angiography (MRCA) in patients suspected of having coronary artery disease. Methods: Nine patients referred for diagnostic x-ray coronary, angiography in the

  13. Data driven analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging data in breast cancer diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Twellmann, T.

    2005-01-01

    In the European Union, breast cancer is the most common type of cancer affecting women. If diagnosed in an early stage, breast cancer has an encouraging cure rate. Thus, early detection of breast cancer continues to be the key for an effective treatment. Recently, Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic

  14. Simultaneous MR quantification of hepatic fat content, fatty acid composition, transverse relaxation time and magnetic susceptibility for the diagnosis of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leporq, B; Lambert, S A; Ronot, M; Vilgrain, V; Van Beers, B E

    2017-10-01

    Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is characterized at histology by steatosis, hepatocyte ballooning and inflammatory infiltrates, with or without fibrosis. Although diamagnetic material in fibrosis and inflammation can be detected with quantitative susceptibility imaging, fatty acid composition changes in NASH relative to simple steatosis have also been reported. Therefore, our aim was to develop a single magnetic resonance (MR) acquisition and post-processing scheme for the diagnosis of steatohepatitis by the simultaneous quantification of hepatic fat content, fatty acid composition, T 2 * transverse relaxation time and magnetic susceptibility in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. MR acquisition was performed at 3.0 T using a three-dimensional, multi-echo, spoiled gradient echo sequence. Phase images were unwrapped to compute the B 0 field inhomogeneity (ΔB 0 ) map. The ΔB 0 -demodulated real part images were used for fat-water separation, T 2 * and fatty acid composition quantification. The external and internal fields were separated with the projection onto dipole field method. Susceptibility maps were obtained after dipole inversion from the internal field map with single-orientation Bayesian regularization including spatial priors. Method validation was performed in 32 patients with biopsy-proven, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease from which 12 had simple steatosis and 20 NASH. Liver fat fraction and T 2 * did not change significantly between patients with simple steatosis and NASH. In contrast, the saturated fatty acid fraction increased in patients with NASH relative to patients with simple steatosis (48 ± 2% versus 44 ± 4%; p magnetic susceptibility decreased (-0.30 ± 0.27 ppm versus 0.10 ± 0.14 ppm; p magnetic susceptibility as NASH marker was 0.91 (95% CI: 0.79-1.0). Simultaneous MR quantification of fat content, fatty acid composition, T 2 * and magnetic susceptibility is feasible in the liver. Our preliminary results

  15. Design and development of novel MRI compatible zirconium- ruthenium alloys with ultralow magnetic susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H.F.; Zhou, F.Y.; Li, L.; Zheng, Y.F.

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, novel MRI compatible zirconium-ruthenium alloys with ultralow magnetic susceptibility were developed for biomedical and therapeutic devices under MRI diagnostics environments. The results demonstrated that alloying with ruthenium into pure zirconium would significantly increase the strength and hardness properties. The corrosion resistance of zirconium-ruthenium alloys increased significantly. High cell viability could be found and healthy cell morphology observed when culturing MG 63 osteoblast-like cells and L-929 fibroblast cells with zirconium-ruthenium alloys, whereas the hemolysis rates of zirconium-ruthenium alloys are alloys and Ti-based alloys, the magnetic susceptibilities of the zirconium-ruthenium alloys (1.25 × 10−6 cm3·g−1–1.29 × 10−6 cm3·g−1 for zirconium-ruthenium alloys) are ultralow, about one-third that of Ti-based alloys (Ti–6Al–4V, ~3.5 × 10−6 cm3·g−1, CP Ti and Ti–6Al–7Nb, ~3.0 × 10−6 cm3·g−1), and one-sixth that of Co–Cr alloys (Co–Cr–Mo, ~7.7 × 10−6 cm3·g−1). Among the Zr–Ru alloy series, Zr–1Ru demonstrates enhanced mechanical properties, excellent corrosion resistance and cell viability with lowest magnetic susceptibility, and thus is the optimal Zr–Ru alloy system as therapeutic devices under MRI diagnostics environments. PMID:27090955

  16. Neutron diffraction, specific heat and magnetic susceptibility of Ni3(PO4)2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escobal, J.; Pizarro, J.L.; Mesa, J.L.; Rojo, J.M.; Bazan, B.; Arriortua, M.I.; Rojo, T.

    2005-01-01

    The Ni 3 (PO 4 ) 2 phosphate was synthesized by the ceramic method in air atmosphere. The crystal structure consists of a three-dimensional skeleton constructed from Ni 3 O 14 edge-sharing octahedra, which are interconnected by (PO 4 ) 3- oxoanions with tetrahedral geometry. The magnetic behavior was studied on powdered sample by using susceptibility, specific heat and neutron diffraction data. The nickel(II) orthophosphate exhibits a three-dimensional magnetic ordering at approximately 17.1 K. However, its complex crystal structure hampers any parametrization of the J-exchange parameter. The specific heat measurements of Ni 3 (PO 4 ) 2 exhibit a three-dimensional magnetic ordering (λ-type) peak at 17.1 K. Measurements above T N suggest the presence of a small short-range order in this phase. The total magnetic entropy was found to be 28.1 KJ/mol at 50 K. The magnetic structure of the nickel(II) phosphate exhibits ferromagnetic interactions inside the Ni 3 O 14 trimers which are antiferromagnetically coupled between them, giving rise to a purely antiferromagnetic structure

  17. Diagnosis of Popliteal Venous Entrapment Syndrome by Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using Blood-Pool Contrast Agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beitzke, Dietrich; Wolf, Florian; Juelg, Gregor; Lammer, Johannes; Loewe, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Popliteal vascular entrapment syndrome is caused by aberrations or hypertrophy of the gastrocnemius muscles, which compress the neurovascular structures of the popliteal fossa, leading to symptoms of vascular and degeneration as well as aneurysm formation. Imaging of popliteal vascular entrapment may be performed with ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography angiography, and conventional angiography. The use of blood-pool contrast agents in MRI when popliteal vascular entrapment is suspected offers the possibility to perform vascular imaging with first-pass magnetic resonance angiographic, high-resolution, steady-state imaging and allows functional tests all within one examination with a single dose of contrast agent. We present imaging findings in a case of symptomatic popliteal vein entrapment diagnosed by the use of blood pool contrast-enhanced MRI.

  18. Diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid-gadolinium (DTPA-Gd)-conjugated polysuccinimide derivatives as magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ha Young; Jee, Hye Won; Seo, Sung Mi; Kwak, Byung Kook; Khang, Gilson; Cho, Sun Hang

    2006-01-01

    Biocompatible polysuccinimide (PSI) derivatives conjugated with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid gadolinium (DTPA-Gd) were prepared as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents. In this study, we synthesized PSI derivatives incorporating methoxy-poly(ethylene glycol) (mPEG) as hydrophilic ligand, hexadecylamine as hydrophobic ligand, and DTPA-Gd as contrast agent. PSI was synthesized by the polycondensation polymerization of aspartic acid. All the synthesized materials were characterized by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR). Critical micellization concentrations were determined using fluorescent probes (pyrene). Micelle size and shape were measured by electro-photometer light scattering (ELS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The formed micelle size ranged from 100 to 300 nm. The T1-weighted MR images of the phantom prepared with PSI-mPEG-C16-(DTPA-Gd) were obtained in a 3.0 T clinical MR imager, and the conjugates showed a great potential as MRI contrast agents.

  19. Technique for magnetic susceptibility determination in the highly doped semiconductors by electron spin resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veinger, A. I.; Zabrodskii, A. G.; Tisnek, T. V.; Goloshchapov, S. I.; Semenikhin, P. V. [Ioffe Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2014-08-20

    A method for determining the magnetic susceptibility in the highly doped semiconductors is considered. It is suitable for the semiconductors near the metal - insulator transition when the conductivity changes very quickly with the temperature and the resonance line form distorts. A procedure that is based on double integration of the positive part of the derivative of the absorption line having a Dyson shape and takes into account the depth of the skin layer is described. Analysis is made for the example of arsenic-doped germanium samples at a rather high concentration corresponding to the insulator-metal phase transition.

  20. Symmetric Anderson impurity model: Magnetic susceptibility, specific heat and Wilson ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalom, Peter; Pokorný, Vladislav; Janiš, Václav

    2018-05-01

    We extend the spin-polarized effective-interaction approximation of the parquet renormalization scheme from Refs. [1,2] applied on the symmetric Anderson model by adding the low-temperature asymptotics of the total energy and the specific heat. We calculate numerically the Wilson ratio and determine analytically its asymptotic value in the strong-coupling limit. We demonstrate in this way that the exponentially small Kondo scale from the strong-coupling regime emerges in qualitatively the same way in the spectral function, magnetic susceptibility and the specific heat.

  1. RGD-conjugated iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles for magnetic resonance imaging contrast enhancement and hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, S W; Huang, M; Hong, R Y; Deng, S M; Cheng, L F; Gao, B; Badami, D

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a specific targeting magnetic nanoparticle probe for magnetic resonance imaging and therapy in the form of local hyperthermia. Carboxymethyl dextran-coated ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with carboxyl groups were coupled to cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic peptides for integrin α(v)β₃ targeting. The particle size, magnetic properties, heating effect, and stability of the arginine-glycine-aspartic-ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide were measured. The arginine-glycine-aspartic-ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide demonstrates excellent stability and fast magneto-temperature response. Magnetic resonance imaging signal intensity of Bcap37 cells incubated with arginine-glycine-aspartic-ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide was significantly decreased compared with that incubated with plain ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide. The preferential uptake of arginine-glycine-aspartic-ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide by target cells was further confirmed by Prussian blue staining and confocal laser scanning microscopy.

  2. [Utilization of polymeric micelle magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent for theranostic system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Kouichi

    2013-01-01

    We applied a polymeric micelle carrier system for the targeting of a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent. Prepared polymeric micelle MRI contrast agent exhibited a long circulation characteristic in blood, and considerable amount of the contrast agent was found to accumulate in colon 26 solid tumor by the EPR effect. The signal intensities of tumor area showed 2-folds increase in T1-weighted images at 24 h after i.v. injection. To observe enhancement of the EPR effect by Cderiv pretreatment on tumor targeting, we used the contrast agent for the evaluation by means of MRI. Cderiv pretreatment significantly enhanced tumor accumulation of the contrast agent. Interestingly, very high signal intensity in tumor region was found at 24 h after the contrast agent injection in Cderiv pretreated mice. The contrast agent visualized a microenvironmental change in tumor. These results indicate that the contrast agent exhibits potential use for tumor diagnostic agent. To combine with a polymeric micelle carrier system for therapeutic agent, the usage of the combination makes a new concept of "theranostic" for a better cancer treatment.

  3. High magnetic susceptibility granodiorite as a source of surface magnetic anomalies in the King George Island, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kon, S.; Nakamura, N.; Funaki, M.; Sakanaka, S.

    2012-12-01

    station) in the western side of King George Island. The plutonic rocks of diorite and granodiorite show high values of bulk magnetic susceptibility of c.a. 0.01-0.4 SI, appearing to be the source of positive magnetic anomaly. We also revealed the preferred petrofabric lineation directions at the sites using anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS). The AMS showed the plutonic rocks represent the vertical intrusion from the deep seated magma. Our optical microscope observation verified the maximum AMS orientation is parallel to the preferred alignment of framework-forming plagioclase, suggesting the alignment of euhedral magnetite grains along the long-axes of plagioclases. Our ship-borne and foot-borne surveys of geomagnetic filed anomaly agree well with the distribution of the plutonic rocks, revealing the possible origin of surface magnetic anomaly. These suggests that the plutons in this area may be included ACG, and this magnetic surveys is proposed to infer the availability to find out the presence of granitoid.

  4. Low-temperature magnetic susceptibility of the solid solutions (ErxY1-x)3Al5O12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagdasarov, Kh.S.; Dodokin, A.P.; Sorokin, A.A.

    1988-01-01

    Measurements of magnetic susceptibility of erbium-yttrium alumogarnets in the 0.04-4.2 K temperature range are carried out. (Er x I 1-x ) 3 Al 5 O 12 monocrystals were grown by the method of vertical directed crystallization. The specimens were produced as 5 cm high cylinders 0.63 cm in diameter; the axis of the cylinders coincided with the (100) direction of the crystals. Magnetic susceptibility was measured by the Harsthorn bridge method at the frequency of 33 Hz. The analysis of measurement results shows that susceptibility of the investigated crystals at T >or approx. 2T N is well described by the Curie-Weiss law. Existence of threshold concentration of the magnetic component testifies to an essential role of exchange interactions in establishment of the magnetic order in Er 3 Al 5 O 12

  5. RECONSTRUCTING PALEO-SMT POSITIONS ON THE CASCADIA MARGIN USING MAGNETIC SUSCEPTIBILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Joel [Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States); Phillips, Stephen [Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States)

    2014-09-30

    Magnetic susceptibility (κ) is a mixed signal in marine sediments, representing primary depositional and secondary diagenetic processes. Production of hydrogen sulfide via anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) at the sulfate-methane transition (SMT) and organoclastic sulfate reduction above the SMT can result in the dissolution of iron oxides, altering κ in sediments in methane gas and gas hydrate bearing regions. We investigated records of κ on the Cascadia margin (ODP Sites 1249 and 1252; IODP Site 1325) using a Zr/Rb heavy mineral proxy from XRF core scanning to identify intervals of primary detrital magnetic susceptibility and intervals and predict intervals affected by magnetite dissolutions. We also measured total sulfur content, grain size distributions, total organic carbon (TOC) content, and magnetic mineral assemblage. The upper 100 m of Site 1252 contains a short interval of κ driven by primary magnetite, with multiple intervals (> 90 m total) of decreased κ correlated with elevated sulfur content, consistent with dissolution of magnetite and re-precipitation of pyrite. In the upper 90 m of Site 1249, κ is almost entirely altered by diagenetic processes, with much of the low κ explained by a high degree of pyritization, and some intervals affected by the precipitation of magnetic iron sulfides. At Site 1325, κ between 0-20 and 51-73 mbsf represents primary mineralogy, and in the interval 24-51 mbsf, κ may be reduced due to pyritization. This integrated approach allows for a prediction of primary κ and the amount of κ loss at each site when compared to actual κ measurements. In the case of magnetite dissolution and full pyritization, these drawdowns in κ are supported by sulfur measurements, and the exposure times of magnetite to hydrogen sulfide can be modeled. The presence of methane and methane hydrates at these sites, as well as large variations in TOC content, suggest that the past migration rates of the SMT and variation in sulfate

  6. [Heavy Metals Accmultio in the Caofeidian Reclamation Soils: Indicated by Soil Magnetic Susceptibility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yong; Zhou, Qian; Li, Yuan; Zhang, Hai-bo; Hu, Xue-feng; Luo, Yong-ming

    2016-04-15

    The environmental magnetism method has been widely applied to identify soil heavy metal pollution, which is characterized by simplicity, efficiency, non-destructivity and sensitivity. The present study used magnetic susceptibility to assess the accumulation of heavy metals in soils of the Caofeidian industrial zone which is a typical reclamation area in northern China. The study area was divided into three sub-zones based on the function, including industrial zone, living zone, natural tidal flat and wetland. A total of 35 topsoil samples (0-10 cm) and 3 soil profiles were collected from the three sub-zones. Magnetic susceptibility (X(lf)), iron oxide (Fe2O3) contents and heavy metals contents (Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Pb, Mn and V) of the samples were analyzed. The results showed that X(lf) values and heavy metals contents exhibited higher spatial variability in the top soil of the industrial zone, indicating the severe impacts of industrial activities. In the soil profiles of the industrial and living zones, all heavy metals were enriched to different degrees in the upper layer (0-20 cm). However, there was no significant change of heavy metal contents in the soil profiles of tidal flat which was far from the industrial area. The X(lf) value was significantly (P soil. This indicated that X(lf) could be used as an indicator for heavy metal accumulation in the industrial zone. However, the X(lf) value was not suitable to be an indicator to show the heavy metal accumulation in the soils of living zone and natural tidal flat. This might be associated with the different sources of magnetic materials among the different sub-zones and the special characteristics of the soils in the tidal flat and wetland.

  7. Kohn anomalies in momentum dependence of magnetic susceptibility of some three-dimensional systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanenko, A. A.; Volkova, D. O.; Igoshev, P. A.; Katanin, A. A.

    2017-11-01

    We study a question of the presence of Kohn points, yielding at low temperatures nonanalytic momentum dependence of magnetic susceptibility near its maximum, in electronic spectra of some threedimensional systems. In particular, we consider a one-band model on face-centered cubic lattice with hopping between the nearest and next-nearest neighbors, which models some aspects of the dispersion of ZrZn2, and the two-band model on body-centered cubic lattice, modeling the dispersion of chromium. For the former model, it is shown that Kohn points yielding maxima of susceptibility exist in a certain (sufficiently wide) region of electronic concentrations; the dependence of the wave vectors, corresponding to the maxima, on the chemical potential is investigated. For the two-band model, we show the existence of the lines of Kohn points, yielding maximum susceptibility, whose position agrees with the results of band structure calculations and experimental data on the wave vector of antiferromagnetism of chromium.

  8. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of tumours of the central nervous systems: a clinical review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graif, M.; Steiner, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    The clinical application of the intravascular paramagnetic contrast agent gadolinium-DTPA for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) imaging of tumours of the central nervous system (CNS) has been assessed over the past 3 years. Various patterns of contrast enhancement were observed, and situations in MRI where the administration of contrast medium may be useful have been defined. These include lesions which are isointense with normal brain matter, the separation of tumour from surrounding oedema, evaluation of the degree of blood-brain barrier breakdown, delineation of tumours obscured by overlying calcification on computed tomography (CT) and in the investigation of lesions in anatomical areas where CT has known limitations (brain, stem, cervical spine). Changes in relaxation times in normal and abnormal tissues following contrast medium, toxicity and dosage of gadolinium-DTPA, and MRI pulse sequence techniques are reviewed. (author)

  9. Detection of superparamagnetic particles in soils developed on basalts using frequency- and amplitude-dependent magnetic susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grison, H.; Petrovsky, E.; Kapicka, A.

    2016-12-01

    In rock, soil and environmental studies dealing with magnetic methods, the frequency-dependent magnetic susceptibility (κFD%) is parameter generally accepted as a tool for identification of ultrafine superparamagnetic (SP) particles. This parameter became an indicator of pedogenic magnetic fraction (increased pedogenesis). Despite the number of studies using this parameter, knowledge about threshold values of κFD% is not clear enough and this parameter may be misinterpreted. Moreover, in strongly magnetic soils, magnetic signal of the SP (mostly pedogenic) minerals may be masked by dominant lithological signal, carried by coarse-grain mineral fraction; therefore, influence of pedogenesis is hard to detect. The aim of this contribution is to compare results in determination of ultrafine SP magnetic particles in soils determined using different instruments: (a) Bartington MS2B dual-frequency meter, and (b) more sensitive AGICO Kappameter MFK1-FA. The values of the κFD % obtained by the Bartington MS2B varied from 0.9 to 5.8% (mass-specific magnetic susceptibility from 119 to 1533 × 10-8 m3/kg) while the AGICO MFK1-FA varied from 3.7 to 8.2% (mass-specific magnetic susceptibility from 295 to 1843 × 10-8 m3/kg). Although both instruments suggest significant portion of SP magnetic particles, the results can't be interpreted using the generally accepted threshold values based on Bartington data. However, our results suggest that relation between the mass-specific magnetic susceptibility and κFD% along whole soil profile may serve as suitable tool in discriminating between lithogenic and pedogenic control of magnetic fraction in the soil profile. Moreover, we propose new concept of identification of SP particles, based on field-dependent magnetic susceptibility. Its behaviour shows distinct features with significant change at amplitudes of about 100 A/m. Below this value, susceptibility decreases with increasing amplitude, reflecting saturation of magnetization due

  10. Magnetic susceptibilities of liquid Cr-Au, Mn-Au and Fe-Au alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohno, S.; Shimakura, H. [Niigata University of Pharmacy and Applied Life Sciences, Higashijima, Akiha-ku, Niigata 956-8603 (Japan); Tahara, S. [Faculty of Science, University of the Ryukyus, Nishihara-cho, Okinawa 903-0213 (Japan); Okada, T. [Niigata College of Technology, Kamishin’eicho, Nishi-ku, Niigata 950-2076 (Japan)

    2015-08-17

    The magnetic susceptibility of liquid Cr-Au, Mn-Au, Fe-Au and Cu-Au alloys was investigated as a function of temperature and composition. Liquid Cr{sub 1-c}Au{sub c} with 0.5 ≤ c and Mn{sub 1-c}Au{sub c} with 0.3≤c obeyed the Curie-Weiss law with regard to their dependence of χ on temperature. The magnetic susceptibilities of liquid Fe-Au alloys also exhibited Curie-Weiss behavior with a reasonable value for the effective number of Bohr magneton. On the Au-rich side, the composition dependence of χ for liquid TM-Au (TM=Cr, Mn, Fe) alloys increased rapidly with increasing TM content, respectively. Additionally, the composition dependences of χ for liquid Cr-Au, Mn-Au, and Fe-Au alloys had maxima at compositions of 50 at% Cr, 70 at% Mn, and 85 at% Fe, respectively. We compared the composition dependences of χ{sub 3d} due to 3d electrons for liquid binary TM-M (M=Au, Al, Si, Sb), and investigated the relationship between χ{sub 3d} and E{sub F} in liquid binary TM-M alloys at a composition of 50 at% TM.

  11. Serial contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance and magnetization transfer in the study of patients with multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rovira, A.; Alonso, J.; Cucurella, G.; Nos, C.; Tintore, M.; Pedraza, S.; Rio, J.; Montalban, X.

    1997-01-01

    To demonstrate the changes in the magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) of different demyelinating plaques, correlating them with the baseline values in T1-weighted contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) sequences in order to relate them more closely to the underlying disease. The study was based on 33 demyelinating plaques obtained from six patients clinically diagnosed as having remitting-recurring multiple sclerosis (MS). All the patients underwent two MR studies at a 3 to 5-month interval, including contrast-enhanced T1 and T2- weighted sequences and magnetization transfer images. The latter were used to calculate the MTR for each of the demyelinating plaques included in the study. The statistical analysis of the results obtained revealed statistically significant between initial MTR values and those of subsequent T1-weighted sequences. The MTR demonstrate significant differences between plaques according to contrast-enhanced T1-weigh tes sequences, probably indicating variable degrees of edema, demyelination and tissue destruction. These differences should be taken into account to enable the use of T1-weighted sequences to quantify the lesion load in MS patients. (Author) 35 refs

  12. Cine Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Small Bowel: Comparison of Different Oral Contrast Media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asbach, P.; Breitwieser, C.; Diederichs, G.; Eisele, S.; Kivelitz, D.; Taupitz, M.; Zeitz, M.; Hamm, B.; Klessen, C.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate several substances regarding small bowel distension and contrast on balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) cine magnetic resonance (MR) images. Material and Methods: Luminal contrast was evaluated in 24 volunteers after oral application of two different contrast agent groups leading to either bright lumen (pineapple, blueberry juice) or dark lumen (tap water, orange juice) on T1-weighted images. Bowel distension was evaluated in 30 patients ingesting either methylcellulose or mannitol solution for limiting intestinal absorption. Fifteen patients with duodeno-jejunal intubation served as the control. Quantitative evaluation included measurement of luminal signal intensities and diameters of four bowel segments, qualitative evaluation assessed luminal contrast and distension on a five-point scale. Results: Quantitative and qualitative evaluation of the four contrast agents revealed no significant differences regarding luminal contrast on bSSFP images. Quantitative evaluation revealed significantly lower (P<0.05) small bowel distension for three out of four segments (qualitative evaluation: two out of four segments) for methylcellulose in comparison to the control. Mannitol was found to be equal to the control. Conclusion: Oral ingestion of tap water or orange juice in combination with mannitol is recommended for cine MR imaging of the small bowel regarding luminal contrast and small bowel distension on bSSFP sequences

  13. Cine Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Small Bowel: Comparison of Different Oral Contrast Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asbach, P.; Breitwieser, C.; Diederichs, G.; Eisele, S.; Kivelitz, D.; Taupitz, M.; Zeitz, M.; Hamm, B.; Klessen, C. [Charite - Universitatsmedizin Berlin, Charite Campus Mitte, Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Radiology

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate several substances regarding small bowel distension and contrast on balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) cine magnetic resonance (MR) images. Material and Methods: Luminal contrast was evaluated in 24 volunteers after oral application of two different contrast agent groups leading to either bright lumen (pineapple, blueberry juice) or dark lumen (tap water, orange juice) on T1-weighted images. Bowel distension was evaluated in 30 patients ingesting either methylcellulose or mannitol solution for limiting intestinal absorption. Fifteen patients with duodeno-jejunal intubation served as the control. Quantitative evaluation included measurement of luminal signal intensities and diameters of four bowel segments, qualitative evaluation assessed luminal contrast and distension on a five-point scale. Results: Quantitative and qualitative evaluation of the four contrast agents revealed no significant differences regarding luminal contrast on bSSFP images. Quantitative evaluation revealed significantly lower (P<0.05) small bowel distension for three out of four segments (qualitative evaluation: two out of four segments) for methylcellulose in comparison to the control. Mannitol was found to be equal to the control. Conclusion: Oral ingestion of tap water or orange juice in combination with mannitol is recommended for cine MR imaging of the small bowel regarding luminal contrast and small bowel distension on bSSFP sequences.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging with liver-specific contrast agent in primary amyloidosis and intrahepatic cholestasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller, J.M.; Santoni-Rugiu, E.; Chabanova, E.; Logager, V.; Hansen, A.B.; Thomsen, H.S. [Depts. of Radiology and Pathology, Copenhagen Univ. Hospital, Herlev (Denmark)

    2007-02-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in hepatic amyloidosis are not well defined. Here, we report on a patient with renal failure caused by primary amyloidosis (AL type) who developed jaundice. Ultrasound and computed tomography were normal except for some ascites. MRI with oral manganese-containing contrast agent revealed several focal areas without contrast uptake in the hepatocytes and no bile secretion after 8 hours. No extrahepatic bile obstructions were found. Liver biopsy showed severe intraportal, vascular, and parenchymal amyloidosis causing severe cholestasis and atrophy of hepatocytes.

  15. Quantitative analysis of magnetic resonance imaging susceptibility artifacts caused by neurosurgical biomaterials. Comparison of 0.5, 1.5, and 3.0 tesla magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Hideki; Inoue, Takashi; Ogasawara, Kuniaki; Sasaki, Makoto; Konno, Hiromu; Kuzu, Yasutaka; Nishimoto, Hideaki; Ogawa, Akira

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is an important diagnostic tool for neurosurgical diseases but susceptibility artifacts caused by biomaterial instrumentation frequently causes difficulty in visualizing postoperative changes. The susceptibility artifacts caused by neurosurgical biomaterials were compared quantitatively by 0.5, 1.5, and 3.0 Tesla MR imaging. MR imaging of uniform size and shape of pieces ceramic (zirconia), pure titanium, titanium alloy, and cobalt-based alloy was performed at 0.5, 1.5, and 3.0 Tesla. A linear region of interest was defined across the center of the biomaterial in the transverse direction, and the susceptibility artifact diameter was calculated. Susceptibility artifacts developed around all biomaterials at all magnetic field strengths. The artifact diameters caused by pure titanium, titanium alloy, and cobalt-based alloy increased in the order of 0.5, 1.5, to 3.0 Tesla magnetic fields. The artifact diameter of ceramic was not influenced by magnetic field strength, and was the smallest of all biomaterials at all magnetic field strengths. The artifacts caused by biomaterials except ceramic increase with the magnetic field strength. Ceramic instrumentation will minimize artifacts in all magnetic fields. (author)

  16. SU-F-I-24: Feasibility of Magnetic Susceptibility to Relative Electron Density Conversion Method for Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, K; Kadoya, N; Chiba, M; Matsushita, H; Jingu, K [Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Miyagi (Japan); Sato, K; Nagasaka, T; Yamanaka, K [Tohoku University Hospital, Sendai, Miyagi (Japan); Dobashi, S; Takeda, K [Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to develop radiation treatment planning using magnetic susceptibility obtained from quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) via MR imaging. This study demonstrates the feasibility of a method for generating a substitute for a CT image from an MRI. Methods: The head of a healthy volunteer was scanned using a CT scanner and a 3.0 T MRI scanner. The CT imaging was performed with a slice thickness of 2.5 mm at 80 and 120 kV (dual-energy scan). These CT images were converted to relative electron density (rED) using the CT-rED conversion table generated by a previous dual-energy CT scan. The CT-rED conversion table was generated using the conversion of the energy-subtracted CT number to rED via a single linear relationship. One T2 star-weighted 3D gradient echo-based sequence with four different echo times images was acquired using the MRI scanner. These T2 star-weighted images were used to estimate the phase data. To estimate the local field map, a Laplacian unwrapping of the phase and background field removal algorithm were implemented to process phase data. To generate a magnetic susceptibility map from the local field map, we used morphology enabled dipole inversion method. The rED map was resampled to the same resolution as magnetic susceptibility, and the magnetic susceptibility-rED conversion table was obtained via voxel-by-voxel mapping between the magnetic susceptibility and rED maps. Results: A correlation between magnetic susceptibility and rED is not observed through our method. Conclusion: Our results show that the correlation between magnetic susceptibility and rED is not observed. As the next step, we assume that the voxel of the magnetic susceptibility map comprises two materials, such as water (0 ppm) and bone (-2.2 ppm) or water and marrow (0.81ppm). The elements of each voxel were estimated from the ratio of the two materials.

  17. Experimental investigation of temperature dependence of the magnetic susceptibility (T) of manganites La1-xAxMnO3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salakhitdinova, M.; Kuvandikov, O.; Shakarov, Kh.; Shodiev, Z.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: he interest to lanthanoid manganites is based that enormous magnetoresistance is found in them and this materials are capable to test diverse structural and magnetic phase transformations. The work is devoted to experimental investigation of temperature dependence of the magnetic susceptibility (T) of manganites La 1-x A x MnO 3 which doped with Ag, K, Sr metals in wide temperature interval 50-8500 C, as well as to determination of their magnetic characteristics from this dependence. The dependence (T) was measured by the Faraday method with high-temperature magnetic pendulum balance in the atmosphere of refined helium. Maximal relative error of the measurements did not exceed 3 %. The analysis of experimental (T) dependence of investigated manganites has shown that the rise of stoichiometric rate of doped metals the temperature dependence of magnetic susceptibility of manganites monotonously is decreased. (authors)

  18. A method to implement the reservoir-wave hypothesis using phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Gray, Robert D.M.; Parker, Kim H.; Quail, Michael A.; Taylor, Andrew M.; Biglino, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    The reservoir-wave hypothesis states that the blood pressure waveform can be usefully divided into a “reservoir pressure” related to the global compliance and resistance of the arterial system, and an “excess pressure” that depends on local conditions. The formulation of the reservoir-wave hypothesis applied to the area waveform is shown, and the analysis is applied to area and velocity data from high-resolution phase-contrast cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging. A validation stud...

  19. Combined blood pool and extracellular contrast agents for pediatric and young adult cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Joyce T. [Ann and Robert Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, 225 E. Chicago Ave., Box 21, Chicago, IL (United States); Ann and Robert Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Pediatrics, Chicago, IL (United States); Robinson, Joshua D. [Ann and Robert Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, 225 E. Chicago Ave., Box 21, Chicago, IL (United States); Ann and Robert Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Pediatrics, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University, Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Deng, Jie [Northwestern University, Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Ann and Robert Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Medical Imaging, Chicago, IL (United States); Rigsby, Cynthia K. [Ann and Robert Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Pediatrics, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University, Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Ann and Robert Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Medical Imaging, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2016-12-15

    A comprehensive cardiac magnetic resonance (cardiac MR) study including both late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) and MR angiography may be indicated for patients with a history of acquired or congenital heart disease. To study the novel use of an extracellular agent for assessment of LGE combined with a blood pool contrast agent for detailed MR angiography evaluation to yield a comprehensive cardiac MR study in these patients. We reviewed clinical cardiac MR studies utilizing extracellular and blood pool contrast agents and noted demographics, clinical data and adverse events. We rated LGE image quality and MR angiography image quality for each vascular segment and calculated inter-rater variability. We also quantified contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Thirty-three patients (mean age 13.9 ± 3 years) received an extracellular contrast agent (10 gadobenate dimeglumine, 23 gadopentetate dimeglumine) and blood pool contrast agent (33 gadofosveset trisodium). No adverse events were reported. MRI indications included Kawasaki disease (8), cardiomyopathy and coronary anatomy (15), repaired congenital heart disease (8), and other (2). Mean LGE quality was 2.6 ± 0.6 with 97% diagnostic imaging. LGE quality did not vary by type of contrast agent given (P = 0.07). Mean MR angiography quality score was 4.7 ± 0.6, with high inter-rater agreement (k = 0.6-0.8, P < 0.002). MR angiography quality did not vary by type of contrast agent used (P = 0.6). Cardiac MR studies utilizing both extracellular and blood pool contrast agents are feasible and safe and provide excellent-quality LGE and MR angiography images. The use of two contrast agents allows for a comprehensive assessment of both myocardial viability and vascular anatomy during the same exam. (orig.)

  20. Combined blood pool and extracellular contrast agents for pediatric and young adult cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Joyce T.; Robinson, Joshua D.; Deng, Jie; Rigsby, Cynthia K.

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive cardiac magnetic resonance (cardiac MR) study including both late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) and MR angiography may be indicated for patients with a history of acquired or congenital heart disease. To study the novel use of an extracellular agent for assessment of LGE combined with a blood pool contrast agent for detailed MR angiography evaluation to yield a comprehensive cardiac MR study in these patients. We reviewed clinical cardiac MR studies utilizing extracellular and blood pool contrast agents and noted demographics, clinical data and adverse events. We rated LGE image quality and MR angiography image quality for each vascular segment and calculated inter-rater variability. We also quantified contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Thirty-three patients (mean age 13.9 ± 3 years) received an extracellular contrast agent (10 gadobenate dimeglumine, 23 gadopentetate dimeglumine) and blood pool contrast agent (33 gadofosveset trisodium). No adverse events were reported. MRI indications included Kawasaki disease (8), cardiomyopathy and coronary anatomy (15), repaired congenital heart disease (8), and other (2). Mean LGE quality was 2.6 ± 0.6 with 97% diagnostic imaging. LGE quality did not vary by type of contrast agent given (P = 0.07). Mean MR angiography quality score was 4.7 ± 0.6, with high inter-rater agreement (k = 0.6-0.8, P < 0.002). MR angiography quality did not vary by type of contrast agent used (P = 0.6). Cardiac MR studies utilizing both extracellular and blood pool contrast agents are feasible and safe and provide excellent-quality LGE and MR angiography images. The use of two contrast agents allows for a comprehensive assessment of both myocardial viability and vascular anatomy during the same exam. (orig.)

  1. Cerebral perfusion MR imaging using FAIR-HASTE in chronic carotid occlusive disease. Comparison with dynamic susceptibility contrast-perfusion MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ida, Kentaro; Akaki, Shiro; Sei, Tetsuro; Kanazawa, Susumu; Tsunoda, Masatoshi

    2006-01-01

    To determine the efficacy of flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery using half-Fourier single-shot turbo spin-echo (FAIR-HASTE) in detecting cerebral hypoperfusion in chronic carotid occlusive disease, we subjected 12 patients with various degrees of cervical internal carotid artery stenoses and/or occlusion (Stenosis group) and 24 volunteers (Normal group) to FAIR-HASTE. In addition, 10 out of 12 patients in the Stenosis group underwent dynamic susceptibility contrast-perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-pMRI) before and after revascularization in the dominantly affected side. The absolute asymmetry indexes (AIs) of both cerebral hemispheres in the Normal and Stenosis groups were compared in FAIR-HASTE. In addition, the AIs were compared with those in the Stenosis group before and after revascularization in both FAIR-HASTE and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), calculated with DSC-pMRI. A statistically significant difference was recognized between the AIs in the Normal and Stenosis groups (AI=2.25±1.92, 8.09±4.60, respectively; p<0.0001). Furthermore, in the Stenosis group the AIs on both FAIR-HASTE (8.88±4.93, 2.22±1.79, respectively; p=0.0003) and rCBF (7.13±3.57, 1.25±1.33, respectively; p=0.0003) significantly decreased after revascularization. In the Stenosis group, before revascularization, signal intensity on both FAIR-HASTE and rCBF had a tendency to be lower in the dominantly affected side. FAIR-HASTE imaging was useful in the detection and evaluation of cerebral hypoperfusion in chronic occlusive carotid disease. (author)

  2. Observation of unusual critical region behavior in the magnetic susceptibility of EuSe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bykovetz, N.; Klein, J.; Lin, C. L.

    2018-05-01

    The Europium Chalcogenides (EuCh: EuO, EuS, EuSe, and EuTe) have been regarded as model examples of simple, cubic, Heisenberg exchange coupled magnetic systems, with a ferromagnetic nearest-neighbor exchange constant J1 and an antiferromagnetic next-nearest-neighbor constant J2. Unlike the other EuCh, EuSe exhibits a range of complex magnetic behaviors, the latter being attributed to EuSe being near the point where J2=-J1, where its magnetism appears to consist of nearly de-coupled 2D ferromagnetic sheets. Analysis of precision SQUID measurements of the magnetic susceptibility χ in EuSe showed that in the region from ˜Tc to ˜2Tc, a fit of the data to the critical equation χ = χ2Tc(T/Tc-1)-γ gives γ=2.0, an exponent not predicted by any current theory. Additionally, this fit predicts that Tc should be ˜0K. We tentatively interpret this by saying that in the paramagnetic region the system "thinks" EuSe should not order above T=0. Tc=0K is predicted by the Mermin-Wagner theorem (MW) for Heisenberg-coupled 2D magnetic systems, and we can show that when J2=-J1, MW can also be applied to the J1, J2 exchange model of the EuCh to give a rigorous Tc=0 prediction. Under 10 kbar applied pressure EuSe exhibits a different γ and fitted Tc. An additional, and rather strange, critical-region effect was discovered. The EuSe sample was found to exhibit a relaxation effect in a small range of temperatures, just above and just below the actual Tc of 4.7K, with time constants of up to 5 minutes. We cannot yet fully explain this observed macroscopic effect.

  3. Influence of oxygen disordering on static magnetic susceptibility of YBa2Cu3O7-x ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, B.Yu.; Vil'danov, R.R.

    2008-01-01

    Influence of disordering of the populated oxygen positions in YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x ceramic's structure on its static magnetic susceptibility in the range of temperatures T>Tc is investigated. For occurrence of disordering the initial ceramics YBa 2 Cu 3 O 6,9 was annealed at T=520 C with the subsequent quenching in liquid nitrogen. Evolutions of a magnetic susceptibility and resistance of annealed ceramics during its air storage at a room temperature were studied. It is revealed that, unlike the initial optimum doped ceramics, annealed samples have appreciable temperature dependence of a magnetic susceptibility. Interpretation of results is executed on the basis of model of electronic phase separation and occurrence of a pseudo gap in a energy spectrum of free carriers of a superconductor. (authors)

  4. Application of phase-contrast cine magnetic resonance imaging in endoscopic aqueductoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guoqiang; Zheng, Jiaping; Xiao, Qing; Liu, Yunsheng

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the application of phase-contrast cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in endoscopic aqueductoplasty (EA) for patients with obstructive hydrocephalus. The clinical diagnosis of hydrocephalus caused by aqueduct obstruction in 23 patients was confirmed by phase-contrast cine MRI examination. The patients were treated with EA and MRI was repeated during the follow-up. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow velocity in the aqueduct was measured to determine whether the aqueduct was obstructed. The results of phase-contrast cine MRI examinations indicated that there was no CSF flow in the aqueduct for all patients prior to surgery. Aqueductoplasty was successfully performed in all patients. The results of phase-contrast cine MRI examinations performed a week after surgery demonstrated an average CSF flow velocity of 4.74±1.77 cm/sec. During the follow-up, intracranial hypertension recurred in two patients in whom CSF flow was not observed in the aqueduct by the phase-contrast cine MRI scan. Aqueduct re-occlusion was revealed by an endoscopic exploration. By measuring the CSF flow velocity, phase-contrast cine MRI accurately identifies aqueduct obstruction. Cine MRI is a nontraumatic, simple and reliable method for determining whether the aqueduct is successfully opened following aqueductoplasty.

  5. Characterization of nanoparticle-based contrast agents for molecular magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shan, Liang; Chopra, Arvind; Leung, Kam; Eckelman, William C.; Menkens, Anne E.

    2012-01-01

    The development of molecular imaging agents is currently undergoing a dramatic expansion. As of October 2011, ∼4,800 newly developed agents have been synthesized and characterized in vitro and in animal models of human disease. Despite this rapid progress, the transfer of these agents to clinical practice is rather slow. To address this issue, the National Institutes of Health launched the Molecular Imaging and Contrast Agents Database (MICAD) in 2005 to provide freely accessible online information regarding molecular imaging probes and contrast agents for the imaging community. While compiling information regarding imaging agents published in peer-reviewed journals, the MICAD editors have observed that some important information regarding the characterization of a contrast agent is not consistently reported. This makes it difficult for investigators to evaluate and meta-analyze data generated from different studies of imaging agents, especially for the agents based on nanoparticles. This article is intended to serve as a guideline for new investigators for the characterization of preclinical studies performed with nanoparticle-based MRI contrast agents. The common characterization parameters are summarized into seven categories: contrast agent designation, physicochemical properties, magnetic properties, in vitro studies, animal studies, MRI studies, and toxicity. Although no single set of parameters is suitable to define the properties of the various types of contrast agents, it is essential to ensure that these agents meet certain quality control parameters at the preclinical stage, so that they can be used without delay for clinical studies.

  6. Nitroxide radicals as contrast substances for magnetic resonance imaging diagnostics. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhelev, Z.

    2016-01-01

    In last ten years, there is a significant progress in the selective and localized detection of redox-active compounds in the cells, tissues, and intact organisms. This progress is due to the development of new synthetic and genetically encoded redox-sensitive contrast substances, as well as due to the improvement of the techniques for their imaging: fluorescent, chemiluminescent, magnetic resonance, nuclear, ultrasonic. One of the most attractive redox-sensitive contrast substances are cyclic (stable) nitroxide radicals. They can be visualized and analyzed in vitro and in vivo by a variety of magnetic resonance techniques - electron-paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), Overhauser-enhanced MRI (OMRI). This review describes the merits and demerits of the nitroxide-enhanced EPR and MRI and the perspectives for their application in biomedical studies and clinical practice. The article is intended for a wide range of readers - from students to specialists in the field. Key words: Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Electron-Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR). Overhauser-Enhanced MRI (O MRI). Nitroxide

  7. Anomalous behaviour of the magnetic susceptibility of the mixed spin-1 and spin- 1/2 anisotropic Heisenberg model in the Oguchi approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobak, Andrej; Dely, Jan; Pokorny, Vladislav

    2010-01-01

    The effects of both an exchange anisotropy and a single-ion anisotropy on the magnetic susceptibility of the mixed spin-1 and spin- 1/2 Heisenberg model are investigated by the use of an Oguchi approximation. Particular emphasis is given to the simple cubic lattice with coordination number z = 6 for which the magnetic susceptibility is determined numerically. Anomalous behaviour in the thermal variation of the magnetic susceptibility in the low-temperature region is found due to the applied negative single-ion anisotropy field strength. Also, the difference between the behaviours of the magnetic susceptibility of the Heisenberg and Ising models is discussed.

  8. Complications from the use of intravenous gadolinium-based contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elias Junior, Jorge; Santos, Antonio Carlos dos; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello Henrique; Muglia, Valdair Francisco; Koenigkam-Santos, Marcel [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Centro de Ciencias das Imagens e Fisica Medica]. E-mail: jejunior@fmrp.usp.br

    2008-07-15

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents are much safer than the iodinated ones; however complications may occur and should be recognized for appropriate orientation and management. The total incidence of adverse reactions to contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging ranges between 2% and 4%. Cases of severe acute reactions to gadolinium, such as laryngospasm and anaphylactic shock, are rare. Chronic complications secondary to the use of gadolinium also can occur and, recently an association between its use and a rare dermatologic disease occurring in patients with renal failure has been reported. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis was the subject of an official health notification issued by the American Food and Drug Administration. This progressive disease is characterized by hardened skin with fibrotic nodules and plaques which may involve other parts of the body. Patients who have been affected by this disorder presented chronic renal failure, with metabolic acidosis and had been submitted to magnetic resonance angiography, probably involving exposure to large amounts of intravenous paramagnetic contrast. This review is aimed at presenting a succinct description of the gadolinium-based contrast agent types, possible secondary complications, their preventive measures and management. (author)

  9. MRI contrast agent for molecular imaging of the HER2/neu receptor using targeted magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasaneh, Samira; Rajabi, Hossein, E-mail: hrajabi@modares.ac.ir [Tarbiat Modares University, Department of Medical Physics (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Babaei, Mohammad Hossein [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Department of Radioisotope (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Akhlaghpoor, Shahram [Sina Hospital, Tehran Medical University, Noor Medical Imaging Center (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-06-15

    In this study, Trastuzumab modified Magnetic Nanoparticles (TMNs) were prepared as a new contrast agent for detecting HER2 (Human epidermal growth factor receptor-2) expression tumors by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). TMNs were prepared based on iron oxide nanoparticles core and Trastuzumab modified dextran coating. The TMNs core and hydrodynamic size were determined by transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. TMNs stability and cytotoxicity were investigated. The ability of TMNs for HER2 detection were evaluated in breast carcinoma cell lines (SKBr3 and MCF7 cells) and tumor-bearing mice by MRI and iron uptake determination. The particles core and hydrodynamic size were 9 {+-} 2.5 and 41 {+-} 15 nm (size range: 15-87 nm), respectively. The molar antibody/nanoparticle ratio was 3.1-3.5. TMNs were non-toxic to the cells below the 30 {mu}g (Fe)/mL concentration and good stable up to 8 weeks in PBS buffer. TMNs could detect HER2 oncogenes in the cells surface with imagable contrast by MRI. The invivo study in mice bearing tumors indicated that TMNs possessed a good diagnostic ability as HER2 specific contrast agent by MRI. TMNs were demonstrated to be able to selectively accumulate in the tumor cells, with a proper signal enhancement in MRI T2 images. So, the complex may be considered for further investigations as an MRI contrast agent for detection of HER2 expression tumors in human.

  10. Design and Optimization of Gadolinium Based Contrast Agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, G.A.; Geraldes, C.F.G.C.; University of Coimbra

    2007-01-01

    The role of Gd 3+ chelates as contrast agents in Magnetic Resonance Imaging is discussed. The theory describing the different contributions to paramagnetic relaxation relevant to the understanding of the molecular parameters determining the relativity of those Gd 3+ chelates, is presented. The experimental techniques used to obtain those parameters are also described. Then, the various approaches taken to optimize those parameters, leading to maximum relativity (efficiency) of the contrast agents, are also illustrated with relevant examples taken from the literature. The various types of Gd 3+ -based agents, besides non-specific and hepatobiliary agents, are also discussed, namely blood pool, targeting, responsive and paramagnetic chemical shift saturation transfer (PARACEST) agents. Finally, a perspective is presented of some of the challenges lying ahead in the optimization of MRI contrast agents to be useful in Molecular Imaging. (author)

  11. Magnetic resonance tomography (MR) of intracranial tumours: Contrast versus T2-weighted tomograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoerner, W.; Laniado, M.; Claussen, C.; Kazner, E.; Niendorf, H.P.; Felix, R.

    1986-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance tomography was performed on 38 patients with intracranial tumours, before and after the administration of contrast, using a 0.35 T Magnetom. The MR examinations included various plain spin-echo sequences (SE 400/35, 800/35, 1600/35, 1600/70, 1600/105, 1600/120) as well as examinations after the iv-administration of gadolinium-DTPA (SE 800/35). On all occasions, the abnormalities were visible without contrast. Differentiation of tumour and its surroundings was possible in 19 out of 38 cases without contrast. Delineation of expansively growing tumours (eg. meningiomas) was possible in twelve out of 14 cases, but in only seven out of 24 cases with infiltrating tumours (eg. glioblastomas). On the other hand, clear differentiation between tumour and adjacent edema and normal brain, respectively, was possible in 35 out of 38 cases after Gadolinium-DTPA. (orig.) [de

  12. Magnetic susceptibility of scandium-hydrogen and lutetium-hydrogen solid-solution alloys from 2 to 3000K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stierman, R.J.

    1982-12-01

    Results for pure Sc show that the maximum and minimum in the susceptibility discovered earlier are enhanced as the impurity level of iron in scandium decreases. The Stoner enhancement factor, calculated from low-temperature heat capacity data, susceptibility data, and band-structure calculations show Sc to be a strongly enhanced paramagnet. Below 2 0 K, the magnetic anisotropy between the hard and easy directions of scandium decreases linearly with decreasing temperature, tending toward zero at 0 K. The large increase in the susceptibility of Sc at lower temperatures indicates magnetic ordering. Pure Lu and Lu-H alloys showed an anisotropy in susceptibility vs orientation; thus the samples were not random polycrystalline samples. Pure Lu shows the shallow maximum and minimum, but the increase in susceptibility at low temperatures is larger than previously observed. The susceptibility-composition dependence of the Lu-H alloys also did not match other data. The susceptibility-composition dependence does not match the composition dependence of the electronic specific heat constant below 150 K, showing the electronic specific heat is being affected by terms other than phonon-electron and pure electron-electron interactions

  13. Gadolinium-porphyrins: new potential magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents for melanoma detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daryoush Shahbazi-Gahrouei

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Two new porphyrin-based magnetic resonance imaging (MRI contrast agents, Gd-hematoporphyrin (Gd-H and Gd-tetra-carboranylmethoxyphenyl-porphyrin (Gd-TCP were synthesized and tested in nude mice with human melanoma (MM-138 xenografts as new melanoma contrast agents. METHODS: Subcutaneous xenografts of human melanoma cells (MM-138 were studied in 30 (five groups of six nude mice. The effect of different contrast agents (Gd-TCP, Gd-H, GdCl3 and Gd-DTPA on proton relaxation times was measured in tumors and other organs. T1 values, signal enhancement and the Gd concentration for different contrast agent solutions were also investigated. RESULTS: The porphyrin agents showed higher relaxivity compared to the clincal agent, Gd-DTPA. A significant 16% and 21% modification in T1 relaxation time of the water in human melanoma tumors grafted in the nude mice was revealed 24 hours after injection of Gd-TCP and Gd-H, respectively. The percentage of injected Gd localized to the tumor measured by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES was approximately 21% for Gd-TCP and 28% for Gd-H which were higher than that of Gd-DTPA (10%. CONCLUSIONS: The high concentration of Gd in the tumor is indicative of a selective retention of the compounds and indicates that Gd-TCP and Gd-H are promising MR imaging contrast agents for melanoma detection. Gd-porphyrins have considerable promise for further diagnostic applications in magnetic resonance imaging. KEY WORDS: MRI, porphyrin-based contrast agent, hematoporphyrin, melanoma.

  14. Carbon Nano-Allotrope/Magnetic Nanoparticle Hybrid Nanomaterials as T2 Contrast Agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunxiang Gao

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is the most powerful tool for deep penetration and high-quality 3D imaging of tissues with anatomical details. However, the sensitivity of the MRI technique is not as good as that of the radioactive or optical imaging methods. Carbon-based nanomaterials have attracted significant attention in biomaterial research in recent decades due to their unique physical properties, versatile functionalization chemistry, as well as excellent biological compatibility. Researchers have employed various carbon nano-allotropes to develop hybrid MRI contrast agents for improved sensitivity. This review summarizes the new research progresses in carbon-based hybrid MRI contrast agents, especially those reported in the past five years. The review will only focus on T2-weighted MRI agents and will be categorized by the different carbon allotrope types and magnetic components. Considering the strong trend in recent bio-nanotechnology research towards multifunctional diagnosis and therapy, carbon-based MRI contrast agents integrated with other imaging modalities or therapeutic functions are also covered.

  15. Neptunium tetrabromide: a Moessbauer and magnetic susceptibility study below 200K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, J.L.; Jones, E.R. Jr.; Stone, J.A.; Karraker, D.G.

    1974-01-01

    NpBr 4 was studied by 237 Np Moessbauer resonance from 4.2 to 20 0 K and by vibrating-sample magnetometer from 2.2 to 70.5 0 K. The magnetic susceptibility exhibits typical Curie-Weiss behavior about 20 0 K and displays a sharp peak at 12.5 +- 0.5 0 K indicating an antiferromagnetic transition. The Moessbauer spectrum at 4.2 0 K agrees with previous work by Stone and Pillinger [J.A. Stone and W.L. Pillinger, Sym. Faraday Soc., 1, 77(1967)]. At approximately 13 0 K, there is a small decline in H/sub eff/ with paramagnetic relaxation effects remaining at higher temperatures. (U.S.)

  16. Susceptibility weighted imaging: a new tool in magnetic resonance imaging of stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santhosh, K. [Department of Imaging Sciences and Interventional Radiology, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Trivandrum (India); Kesavadas, C. [Department of Imaging Sciences and Interventional Radiology, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Trivandrum (India)], E-mail: chandkesav@yahoo.com; Thomas, B.; Gupta, A.K.; Thamburaj, K.; Kapilamoorthy, T. Raman [Department of Imaging Sciences and Interventional Radiology, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Trivandrum (India)

    2009-01-15

    Susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) is a magnetic resonance (MR) technique that is exquisitely sensitive to paramagnetic substances, such as deoxygenated blood, blood products, iron, and calcium. This sequence allows detection of haemorrhage as early as 6 h and can reliably detect acute intracerebral parenchymal, as well as subarachnoid haemorrhage. It detects early haemorrhagic transformation within an infarct and provides insight into the cerebral haemodynamics following stroke. It helps in the diagnosis of cerebral venous thrombosis. It also has applications in the work-up of stroke patients. The sequence helps in detecting microbleeds in various conditions, such as vasculitis, cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy, subacute infarcts and leucoencephalopathy (CADASIL), amyloid angiopathy, and Binswanger's disease. The sequence also aids in the diagnosis of vascular malformations and perinatal cerebrovascular injuries. This review briefly illustrates the utility of this MR technique in various aspects of stroke diagnosis and management.

  17. The role of dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced perfusion MR imaging in differentiating between infectious and neoplastic focal brain lesions: results from a cohort of 100 consecutive patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdeci Hélio Floriano

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Differentiating between infectious and neoplastic focal brain lesions that are detected by conventional structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI may be a challenge in routine practice. Brain perfusion-weighted MRI (PWI may be employed as a complementary non-invasive tool, providing relevant data on hemodynamic parameters, such as the degree of angiogenesis of lesions. We aimed to employ dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced perfusion MR imaging (DSC-MRI to differentiate between infectious and neoplastic brain lesions by investigating brain microcirculation changes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: DSC-MRI perfusion studies of one hundred consecutive patients with non-cortical neoplastic (n = 54 and infectious (n = 46 lesions were retrospectively assessed. MRI examinations were performed using a 1.5-T scanner. A preload of paramagnetic contrast agent (gadolinium was administered 30 seconds before acquisition of dynamic images, followed by a standard dose 10 seconds after starting imaging acquisitions. The relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV values were determined by calculating the regional cerebral blood volume in the solid areas of lesions, normalized to that of the contralateral normal-appearing white matter. Discriminant analyses were performed to determine the cutoff point of rCBV values that would allow the differentiation of neoplastic from infectious lesions and to assess the corresponding diagnostic performance of rCBV when using this cutoff value. RESULTS: Neoplastic lesions had higher rCBV values (4.28±2.11 than infectious lesions (0.63±0.49 (p<0.001. When using an rCBV value <1.3 as the parameter to define infectious lesions, the sensitivity of the method was 97.8% and the specificity was 92.6%, with a positive predictive value of 91.8%, a negative predictive value of 98.0%, and an accuracy of 95.0%. CONCLUSION: PWI is a useful complementary tool in distinguishing between infectious and neoplastic brain

  18. Design and development of novel MRI compatible zirconium- ruthenium alloys with ultralow magnetic susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H F; Zhou, F Y; Li, L; Zheng, Y F

    2016-04-19

    In the present study, novel MRI compatible zirconium-ruthenium alloys with ultralow magnetic susceptibility were developed for biomedical and therapeutic devices under MRI diagnostics environments. The results demonstrated that alloying with ruthenium into pure zirconium would significantly increase the strength and hardness properties. The corrosion resistance of zirconium-ruthenium alloys increased significantly. High cell viability could be found and healthy cell morphology observed when culturing MG 63 osteoblast-like cells and L-929 fibroblast cells with zirconium-ruthenium alloys, whereas the hemolysis rates of zirconium-ruthenium alloys are zirconium-ruthenium alloys (1.25 × 10(-6) cm(3)·g(-1)-1.29 × 10(-6) cm(3)·g(-1) for zirconium-ruthenium alloys) are ultralow, about one-third that of Ti-based alloys (Ti-6Al-4V, ~3.5 × 10(-6) cm(3)·g(-1), CP Ti and Ti-6Al-7Nb, ~3.0 × 10(-6) cm(3)·g(-1)), and one-sixth that of Co-Cr alloys (Co-Cr-Mo, ~7.7 × 10(-6) cm(3)·g(-1)). Among the Zr-Ru alloy series, Zr-1Ru demonstrates enhanced mechanical properties, excellent corrosion resistance and cell viability with lowest magnetic susceptibility, and thus is the optimal Zr-Ru alloy system as therapeutic devices under MRI diagnostics environments.

  19. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography of persistent fifth aortic arch in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, Yumin; Zhu, Ming; Sun, Aimin; Li, Yuhua; Jaffe, Richard B.; Gao, Wei

    2007-01-01

    Cine angiography and echocardiography have been utilized to diagnose congenital aortic arch anomalies. However, the visualization of great vessels by echocardiography is limited, while cine angiography requires cardiac catheterization with ionizing radiation. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) is a noninvasive modality suitable for visualization of congenital aortic arch anomalies. To evaluate the utility of contrast-enhanced MRA in the diagnosis of persistent fifth aortic arch, a rare congenital aortic arch anomaly, and to compare the diagnostic accuracy of MRA with that of echocardiography and cine angiography. In four pediatric patients, contrast-enhanced MRA studies were performed for diagnosing persistent fifth aortic arch. The findings of MRA were compared with echocardiographic findings and confirmed by cine angiography and operation. Transthoracic surface echocardiography noted an aberrant vessel arising from the ascending aorta in two of four patients; the etiology of this vessel was uncertain. In the other two patients a diagnosis of coarctation was made. Of the four patients, only one was diagnosed with interruption of the aortic arch. Contrast-enhanced MRA clarified uncertain echocardiographic findings, enabling the correct diagnosis of persistent fifth aortic arch with fourth aortic arch interruption in all four patients. Contrast-enhanced MRA is a safe, accurate, and fast imaging technique for the evaluation of persistent fifth aortic arch and may obviate the need for conventional cine angiography. Cardiac catheterization may be reserved for some types of complicated congenital heart disease and for obtaining hemodynamic information. (orig.)

  20. Magnetization transfer contrast MR imaging of the knee at 0.3 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshioka, Hiroshi; Onaya, Hiroaki; Niitsu, Mamoru; Anno, Izumi; Itai, Yuji; Nishimura, Hiroshi; Kajiyama, Koji; Masuda, Tomonori; Nakajima, Kotaro.

    1994-01-01

    It has been reported that magnetization transfer contrast (MTC) images were effective in evaluating the articular cartilage. However, only one in vivo study of the articular cartilage in the knee has been demonstrated at 1.5T. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the optimal off-resonance MTC pulse at 0.3T MR imager and assess its clinical usefulness. Five normal volunteers and eleven patients with suspected knee injuries were investigated using off-resonance sinc, gaussian, constant shaped irradiation pulses. All MTC images revealed higher contrast and contrast-to-noise (C/N) ratio between articular cartilage and external reference (saline) in the normal volunteers' knee than conventional gradient recalled echo images. MTC images with the gaussian or sinc shaped pulse were judged superior to those with constant wave pulse because the former images showed a fewer artifact with lower specific absorption rate than the latter images. The sinc MTC images were performed with the lowest SAR. The gaussian MTC images revealed better contrast and C/N between articular cartilage and joint fluid than the sinc MTC images in patients. 3D MTC images using Guassian pulse were also performed within a clinically tolerable imaging time (13 min 39 sec). Thus, MTC images in the knee at 0.3T using off-resonance pulse may be effective to assess knee injury due to better contrast between articular cartilage and joint fluid. (author)

  1. Pineapple juice labeled with gadolinium: a convenient oral contrast for magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coppens, Emmanuel; Metens, Thierry; Winant, Catherine; Matos, Celso

    2005-01-01

    The aim of our study was to prepare in vitro a pineapple juice (PJ) solution labeled with a minimal gadolinium concentration working as a negative contrast agent in heavily T2-weighted imaging and to assess that solution in vivo as a negative oral contrast agent for magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP). Three PJs were compared in vitro according to their T2. Increasing concentrations of gadolinium (Gd)-DOTA in PJ were assessed in vitro for T2 reduction. Single-shot turbo spin echo T2-weighted MR cholangiopancreatograms were obtained for 35 patients with suspected biliopancreatic duct disease, before and after ingestion of the PJ/Gd-DOTA solution. Signal intensity (SI) measurements of gastroduodenal lumens, pancreatobiliary ducts, and image quality scores were obtained systematically before and after contrast ingestion. The in vitro selected Gd-DOTA concentration in the PJ was 2.76 mmol/l. Ingestion of 180 ml of PJ labeled with 1 ml of Gd-DOTA eliminated efficiently the gastroduodenal SI in MRCP, improving significantly the rates of complete visualization of the pancreatobiliary ducts (P<0.01) and the MRCP image quality scores (P<0.05). All patients easily ingested the contrast solution and found the solution palatable. PJ labeled with gadolinium constituted an efficient and convenient negative oral contrast agent for MRCP. (orig.)

  2. Pineapple juice labeled with gadolinium: a convenient oral contrast for magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coppens, Emmanuel; Metens, Thierry; Winant, Catherine; Matos, Celso [Hopital Erasme, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Department of Radiology, Division of Magnetic Resonance, Brussels (Belgium)

    2005-10-01

    The aim of our study was to prepare in vitro a pineapple juice (PJ) solution labeled with a minimal gadolinium concentration working as a negative contrast agent in heavily T2-weighted imaging and to assess that solution in vivo as a negative oral contrast agent for magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP). Three PJs were compared in vitro according to their T2. Increasing concentrations of gadolinium (Gd)-DOTA in PJ were assessed in vitro for T2 reduction. Single-shot turbo spin echo T2-weighted MR cholangiopancreatograms were obtained for 35 patients with suspected biliopancreatic duct disease, before and after ingestion of the PJ/Gd-DOTA solution. Signal intensity (SI) measurements of gastroduodenal lumens, pancreatobiliary ducts, and image quality scores were obtained systematically before and after contrast ingestion. The in vitro selected Gd-DOTA concentration in the PJ was 2.76 mmol/l. Ingestion of 180 ml of PJ labeled with 1 ml of Gd-DOTA eliminated efficiently the gastroduodenal SI in MRCP, improving significantly the rates of complete visualization of the pancreatobiliary ducts (P<0.01) and the MRCP image quality scores (P<0.05). All patients easily ingested the contrast solution and found the solution palatable. PJ labeled with gadolinium constituted an efficient and convenient negative oral contrast agent for MRCP. (orig.)

  3. Effect of Low-Frequency AC Magnetic Susceptibility and Magnetic Properties of CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB Magnetic Tunnel Junctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Tsung Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this investigation, the low-frequency alternate-current (AC magnetic susceptibility (χac and hysteresis loop of various MgO thickness in CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB magnetic tunneling junction (MTJ determined coercivity (Hc and magnetization (Ms and correlated that with χac maxima. The multilayer films were sputtered onto glass substrates and the thickness of intermediate barrier MgO layer was varied from 6 to 15 Å. An experiment was also performed to examine the variation of the highest χac and maximum phase angle (θmax at the optimal resonance frequency (fres, at which the spin sensitivity is maximal. The results reveal that χac falls as the frequency increases due to the relationship between magnetization and thickness of the barrier layer. The maximum χac is at 10 Hz that is related to the maximal spin sensitivity and that this corresponds to a MgO layer of 11 Å. This result also suggests that the spin sensitivity is related to both highest χac and maximum phase angle. The corresponding maximum of χac is related to high exchange coupling. High coercivity and saturation magnetization contribute to high exchange-coupling χac strength.

  4. Nanoparticles in magnetic resonance imaging: from simple to dual contrast agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estelrich J

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Joan Estelrich,1,2 María Jesús Sánchez-Martín,1 Maria Antònia Busquets1,2 1Departament de Fisicoquímica, Facultat de Farmàcia, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain; 2Institut de Nanociència I Nanotecnologia (IN2UB, Barcelona, Catalonia, SpainAbstract: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has become one of the most widely used and powerful tools for noninvasive clinical diagnosis owing to its high degree of soft tissue contrast, spatial resolution, and depth of penetration. MRI signal intensity is related to the relaxation times (T1, spin–lattice relaxation and T2, spin–spin relaxation of in vivo water protons. To increase contrast, various inorganic nanoparticles and complexes (the so-called contrast agents are administered prior to the scanning. Shortening T1 and T2 increases the corresponding relaxation rates, 1/T1 and 1/T2, producing hyperintense and hypointense signals respectively in shorter times. Moreover, the signal-to-noise ratio can be improved with the acquisition of a large number of measurements. The contrast agents used are generally based on either iron oxide nanoparticles or ferrites, providing negative contrast in T2-weighted images; or complexes of lanthanide metals (mostly containing gadolinium ions, providing positive contrast in T1-weighted images. Recently, lanthanide complexes have been immobilized in nanostructured materials in order to develop a new class of contrast agents with functions including blood-pool and organ (or tumor targeting. Meanwhile, to overcome the limitations of individual imaging modalities, multimodal imaging techniques have been developed. An important challenge is to design all-in-one contrast agents that can be detected by multimodal techniques. Magnetoliposomes are efficient multimodal contrast agents. They can simultaneously bear both kinds of contrast and can, furthermore, incorporate targeting ligands and chains of polyethylene glycol to enhance the accumulation of

  5. Chemistry of paramagnetic and diamagnetic contrast agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Mayoral, Elena; Negri, Viviana; Soler-Padros, Jordi; Cerdan, Sebastian; Ballesteros, Paloma

    2008-01-01

    We provide a brief overview of the chemistry and most relevant properties of paramagnetic and diamagnetic contrast agents (CAs) for Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging. Paramagnetic CAs for MRI consist mainly of Gd(III) complexes from linear or macrocyclic polyaminopolycarboxylates. These agents reduce, the relaxation times T 1 and T 2 of the water protons in a concentration dependent manner, increasing selectively MRI contrast in those regions in which they accumulate. In most instances they provide anatomical information on the localization of lesions and in some specific cases they may allow to estimate some physiological properties of tissues including mainly vascular performance. Because of its ability to discriminate easily between normal and diseased tissue, extracellular pH (pH e ) has been added recently, to the battery of variables amenable to MRI investigation. A variety of Gd(III) containing macrocycles sensitive to pH, endogenous or exogenous polypeptides or even liposomes have been investigated for this purpose, using the pH dependence of their relaxivity or magnetization transfer rate constant (chemical exchange saturation transfer, CEST). Many environmental circumstances in addition to pH affect, however, relaxivity or magnetization transfer rate constants of these agents, making the results of pH measurements by MRI difficult to interpret. To overcome these limitations, our laboratory synthesized and developed a novel series of diamagnetic CAs for Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging, a new family of monomeric and dimeric imidazolic derivatives able to provide unambiguous measurements of pH e , independent of water relaxivity, diffusion or exchange

  6. Chemistry of paramagnetic and diamagnetic contrast agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Mayoral, Elena [Laboratorio de Sintesis Organica e Imagen Molecular por Resonancia Magnetica, Facultad de Ciencias, UNED, Paseo Senda del Rey 9, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Quimica Inorganica y Quimica Tecnica, Facultad de Ciencias, UNED, Paseo Senda del Rey 9, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Negri, Viviana; Soler-Padros, Jordi [Laboratorio de Sintesis Organica e Imagen Molecular por Resonancia Magnetica, Facultad de Ciencias, UNED, Paseo Senda del Rey 9, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Cerdan, Sebastian [Laboratorio de Imagen Espectroscopica por Resonancia Magnetica (LIERM), Instituto de Investigaciones Biomedicas ' Alberto Sols' , CSIC/UAM, c/Arturo Duperier 4, E-28029 Madrid (Spain); Ballesteros, Paloma [Laboratorio de Sintesis Organica e Imagen Molecular por Resonancia Magnetica, Facultad de Ciencias, UNED, Paseo Senda del Rey 9, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: pballesteros@ccia.uned.es

    2008-09-15

    We provide a brief overview of the chemistry and most relevant properties of paramagnetic and diamagnetic contrast agents (CAs) for Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging. Paramagnetic CAs for MRI consist mainly of Gd(III) complexes from linear or macrocyclic polyaminopolycarboxylates. These agents reduce, the relaxation times T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} of the water protons in a concentration dependent manner, increasing selectively MRI contrast in those regions in which they accumulate. In most instances they provide anatomical information on the localization of lesions and in some specific cases they may allow to estimate some physiological properties of tissues including mainly vascular performance. Because of its ability to discriminate easily between normal and diseased tissue, extracellular pH (pH{sub e}) has been added recently, to the battery of variables amenable to MRI investigation. A variety of Gd(III) containing macrocycles sensitive to pH, endogenous or exogenous polypeptides or even liposomes have been investigated for this purpose, using the pH dependence of their relaxivity or magnetization transfer rate constant (chemical exchange saturation transfer, CEST). Many environmental circumstances in addition to pH affect, however, relaxivity or magnetization transfer rate constants of these agents, making the results of pH measurements by MRI difficult to interpret. To overcome these limitations, our laboratory synthesized and developed a novel series of diamagnetic CAs for Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging, a new family of monomeric and dimeric imidazolic derivatives able to provide unambiguous measurements of pH{sub e}, independent of water relaxivity, diffusion or exchange.

  7. Contrast Induced by a Static Magnetic Field for Improved Detection in Nanodiamond Fluorescence Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singam, Shashi K. R.; Motylewski, Jaroslaw; Monaco, Antonina; Gjorgievska, Elena; Bourgeois, Emilie; Nesládek, Milos; Giugliano, Michele; Goovaerts, Etienne

    2016-12-01

    Diamond nanoparticles with negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers are highly efficient nonblinking emitters that exhibit spin-dependent intensity. An attractive application of these emitters is background-free fluorescence microscopy exploiting the fluorescence quenching induced either by resonant microwaves (RMWs) or by an applied static magnetic field (SMF). Here, we compare RMW- and SMF-induced contrast measurements over a wide range of optical excitation rates for fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) and for NV centers shallowly buried under the (100)-oriented surface of a diamond single crystal (SC). Contrast levels are found to be systematically lower in the FNDs than in the SC. At low excitation rates, the RMW contrast initially rises to a maximum (up to 7% in FNDs and 13% in the SC) but then decreases steadily at higher intensities. Conversely, the SMF contrast increases from approximately 12% at low excitation rates to high values of 20% and 38% for the FNDs and SC, respectively. These observations are well described in a rate-equations model for the charged NV defect using parameters in good agreement with the literature. The SMF approach yields higher induced contrast in image collection under commonly applied optical excitation. Unlike the RMW method, there is no thermal load exerted on the aqueous media in biological samples in the SMF approach. We demonstrate imaging by SMF-induced contrast in neuronal cultures incorporating FNDs (i) in a setup for patch-clamp experiments in parallel with differential-interference-contrast microscopy, (ii) after a commonly used staining procedure as an illustration of the high selectivity against background fluorescence, and (iii) in a confocal fluorescence microscope in combination with bright-field microscopy.

  8. Magnetic susceptibility measurements of σ plutonium alloys. Contribution to the study of the 5f electrons localization in the plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meot-Reymond, S.

    1996-01-01

    Physical properties of actinide metals are essentially ruled by the 5f electrons localization. From a theoretically point of view, this localization is more important in the δ-phase than in the α-one. To compare their magnetic behaviour, low temperature magnetic susceptibility measurements have been performed and previous-resistivity data have been analysed. Experimental results and theoretical data can be conciliate by the existence of a Kondo effect in the δ-Pu phase. (author)

  9. Paramagnetic contrast media for magnetic resonance imaging of the central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNamara, M.T.

    1987-01-01

    Presently, a variety of radiofrequency (RF) and magnetic field gradient pulse sequences is used to manipulate magnetic resonance (MR) image contrast. Such manipulation may be performed by altering the RF pulse sequence repetition time (TR), the spin-echo delay time (TE), the inversion-delay time (TI), and the flip angle. The detection and characterization of a lesion or structure may thus be optimized. Although such contrast manipulation is noninvasive, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) still suffers somewhat from lack of specificity. Also, the use of multiple imaging sequences to locate and characterize a lesion may prolong the imaging time and, thus, might place an economic burden on the system. Paramagnetic pharmaceuticals offer promise in this regard. They shorten tissue relaxation times, thus permitting the use of shorter imaging parameters, and in some circumstances, may obviate additional and more time-consuming pulse sequences. Paramagnetics could expand the sensitivity and specificity of MRI and provide functional information with regard to tissue perfusion, tissue viability, and blood-brain barrier integrity

  10. The initial magnetic susceptibility of polydisperse ferrofluids: A comparison between experiment and theory over a wide range of concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solovyova, Anna Y.; Goldina, Olga A.; Ivanov, Alexey O.; Elfimova, Ekaterina A.; Lebedev, Aleksandr V.

    2016-01-01

    Temperature dependencies of the static initial magnetic susceptibility for ferrofluids at various concentrations are studied using experiment and statistical-mechanical theories. Magnetic susceptibility measurements are carried out for twelve samples of magnetite-based fluids stabilized with oleic acid over a wide range of temperatures (210 K ≲T ≲ 390 K); all samples have the same granulometric composition but different volume ferroparticle concentrations (0.2 ≲ φ ≲ 0.5). Experimental results are analyzed using three theories: the second-order modified mean-field theory (MMF2) [A. O. Ivanov and O. B. Kuznetsova, Phys. Rev. E 64, 41405 (2001)]; its correction for polydisperse ferrofluids arising from Mayer-type cluster expansion and taking into account the first terms of the polydisperse second virial coefficient [A. O. Ivanov and E. A. Elfimova, J. Magn. Magn. Mater 374, 327 (2015)]; and a new theory based on MMF2 combined with the first terms of the polydisperse second and third virial contributions to susceptibility. It turns out that the applicability of each theory depends on the experimental sample density. If twelve ferrofluid samples are split into three groups of strong, moderate, and low concentrated fluids, the temperature dependences of the initial magnetic susceptibility in each group are very precisely described by one of the three theories mentioned above. The determination of a universal formula predicting a ferrofluid susceptibility over a broad range of concentrations and temperatures remains as a challenge.

  11. Magnetic and structural properties of an octanuclear Cu(II) S=1/2 mesoscopic ring: Susceptibility and NMR measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lascialfari, A.; Jang, Z. H.; Borsa, F.; Gatteschi, D.; Cornia, A.; Rovai, D.; Caneschi, A.; Carretta, P.

    2000-01-01

    Magnetic susceptibility, 1 H NMR and 63 Cu NMR-NQR experiments on two slightly different species of the molecular S=1/2 antiferromagnetic (AF) ring Cu8, [Cu 8 (dmpz) 8 (OH) 8 ]·2C 5 H 5 N (Cu8P) and [Cu 8 (dmpz) 8 (OH) 8 ]·2C 5 H 5 NO 2 (Cu8N), are presented. The magnetic energy levels are calculated exactly for an isotropic Heisenberg model Hamiltonian in zero magnetic field. From the magnetic susceptibility measurements we estimate the AF exchange coupling constant J∼1000 K and the resulting gap Δ∼500 K between the S T =0 ground state and the S T =1 first excited state. The 63,65 Cu NQR spectra indicate the presence of four crystallographically inequivalent copper nuclei in each ring. From the combination of the 63 Cu NQR spectra and of the 63 Cu NMR spectra at high magnetic field, we estimate the quadrupole coupling constant v Q of each site and the average asymmetry parameter η of the electric-field gradient tensor. The nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate (NSLR) decreases exponentially on decreasing temperature for all nuclei investigated. The gap parameter extracted from 63 Cu NQR-NSLR is the same as for the susceptibility while a smaller value is obtained from the 63 Cu NMR-NSLR in an external magnetic field of 8.2 T. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  12. Soil and water pollution studies from a waste site deposit in Bantama, Kumasi, Ghana using magnetic susceptibility measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadi, M.; Preko, K.; Ashia, T.

    2012-01-01

    The magnetic susceptibility of soil and water samples from around the Uadara barracks waste site deposit in Bantama, a suburb of Kumasi was measured with the aim of investigating the potential threat of pollution to the soil, streams, fish ponds and other water sources at the site around Armed Forces Senior High School campus which shares the same premises with the barracks. The studied soil samples were picked from the near surface (∼10 cm depth) along profiles taken from the waste site towards the stream and the ponds. Again, water samples were picked along the stream and from ten (10) ponds aligned along the stream. Laboratory measurements of the magnetic susceptibility were done using the Bartington MS2 metre and the MS2B dual frequency sensor for the soil samples, and the MS2G sensor for the water samples. The soil samples from the site registered an average magnetic susceptibility of 180. 04 x 10 -5 SI whereas the water samples recorded an average of -2.3 x 10 -6 SI showing a significant increment in comparison with the standard water magnetic susceptibility of -9.04 x 10 -6 SI. Thus, not withstand the lithology of the area studied, the presence of heavy metals and other chemical waste materials form the Uadara barracks garbage deposit site were found to greatly pollute the soil and particularly the water bodies around the Armed Forces Senior High School. (au)

  13. Antiferromagnetism in the organic conductor bis-tetramethyltetraselenafulvalene hexafluoroarsenate [(TMTSF)2AsF6]: Static magnetic susceptibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Kell; Tomkiewicz, Yaffa; Bechgaard, Klaus

    1982-01-01

    The anisotropy in the static magnetic susceptibility of bis-tetramethyltetraselenafulvalene hexafluoroarsenate [(TMTSF)2AsF6] has been investigated above and below the metal-to-insulator transition for a range of fields between 0.5 and 30 kG. The results are consistent with the expectations of a ...

  14. Anomalous magnetic susceptibility values and traces of subsurface microbial activity in carbonate banks on San Salvador Island, Bahamas

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hladil, Jindřich; Carew, J. L.; Mylroie, J. E.; Pruner, Petr; Kohout, Tomáš; Jell, J. S.; Lacka, B.; Langrová, Anna

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 2 (2004), s. 161-182 ISSN 0172-9179 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA3013209 Keywords : carbonate rocks * magnetic susceptibility * subsurface microbial diagenesis Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 0.857, year: 2004

  15. Influence of deuterium on the magnetic susceptibility and thermal expansion of the mixed valence compound CePd3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinzierl, P.; Blaschko, O.; Fratzl, P.; Krexner, G.; Ernst, G.; Hilscher, G.

    1984-01-01

    The possibility of studying mixed valent rare earth compounds by addition of interstitially solved hydrogen is discussed. First measurements of the thermal expansion and of the magnetic susceptibility of 4 K in intermediate valent CePd 3 Dsub(0.05) are presented. (orig.) [de

  16. Hyperpolarized krypton-83 as a contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlovskaya, Galina E; Cleveland, Zackary I; Stupic, Karl F; Basaraba, Randall J; Meersmann, Thomas

    2005-12-20

    For the first time, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with hyperpolarized (hp) krypton-83 (83Kr) has become available. The relaxation of the nuclear spin of 83Kr atoms (I = 9/2) is driven by quadrupolar interactions during brief adsorption periods on surrounding material interfaces. Experiments in model systems reveal that the longitudinal relaxation of hp 83Kr gas strongly depends on the chemical composition of the materials. The relaxation-weighted contrast in hp 83Kr MRI allows for the distinction between hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces. The feasibility of hp 83Kr MRI of airways is tested in canine lung tissue by using krypton gas with natural abundance isotopic distribution. Additionally, the influence of magnetic field strength and the presence of a breathable concentration of molecular oxygen on longitudinal relaxation are investigated.

  17. Constraints on deformation of the Southern Andes since the Cretaceous from anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffione, Marco; Hernandez-Moreno, Catalina; Ghiglione, Matias C.; Speranza, Fabio; van Hinsbergen, Douwe J. J.; Lodolo, Emanuele

    2015-12-01

    The southernmost segment of the Andean Cordillera underwent a complex deformation history characterized by alternation of contractional, extensional, and strike-slip tectonics. Key elements of southern Andean deformation that remain poorly constrained, include the origin of the orogenic bend known as the Patagonian Orocline (here renamed as Patagonian Arc), and the exhumation mechanism of an upper amphibolite facies metamorphic complex currently exposed in Cordillera Darwin. Here, we present results of anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) from 22 sites in Upper Cretaceous to upper Eocene sedimentary rocks within the internal structural domain of the Magallanes fold-and-thrust belt in Tierra del Fuego (Argentina). AMS parameters from most sites reveal a weak tectonic overprint of the original magnetic fabric, which was likely acquired upon layer-parallel shortening soon after sedimentation. Magnetic lineation from 17 sites is interpreted to have formed during compressive tectonic phases associated to a continuous N-S contraction. Our data, combined with the existing AMS database from adjacent areas, show that the Early Cretaceous-late Oligocene tectonic phases in the Southern Andes yielded continuous contraction, variable from E-W in the Patagonian Andes to N-S in the Fuegian Andes, which defined a radial strain field. A direct implication is that the exhumation of the Cordillera Darwin metamorphic complex occurred under compressive, rather than extensional or strike-slip tectonics, as alternatively proposed. If we agree with recent works considering the curved Magallanes fold-and-thrust belt as a primary arc (i.e., no relative vertical-axis rotation of the limbs occurs during its formation), then other mechanisms different from oroclinal bending should be invoked to explain the documented radial strain field. We tentatively propose a kinematic model in which reactivation of variably oriented Jurassic faults at the South American continental margin controlled

  18. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography: evaluation of renal arteries in living renal transplant donors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firat, Ali; Akin, Oguz; Muhtesem Agildere, Ahmet; Aytekin, Cuneyt; Haberal, Mehmet

    2004-01-01

    One of the most important steps before living-donor nephrectomy is assessment of renal vascular anatomy. The number, origins and lengths of the renal arteries and variations of renal veins must be determined in order to identify the kidney that is most suitable for transplantation. Digital subtraction angiography was long considered the standard procedure for this purpose, but this method has been replaced by non-invasive techniques. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography is an accurate, safe and reliable method for imaging vasculature. This article reviews the technique and the clinical features of this method in the evaluation of living renal transplant donors

  19. Effect of collagen on magnetization transfer contrast assessed in cultured cartilage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Jun; Seo, Gwy-Suk; Karakida, Osamu; Ueda, Hitoshi; Sone, Shusuke; Hiraki, Yuji; Shukunami, Chisa; Moriya, Hiroto.

    1996-01-01

    We investigated the effect of collagen on magnetization transfer contrast (MTC) in cultured cartilage. In our culture system, only collagen synthesis was increased by the addition of vitamin C, while proteoglycan synthesis and the number of chondrocytes were unaffected. The MTC effect was assessed by using an off-resonance RF pulse (0.3 KHz off-resonance, sinc wave of 18 msec, maximum amplitude 4.61 x 10 -4 T) on a GRASS sequence. The cartilage cultured with vitamin C showed a higher MTC effect than that cultured without vitamin C. The major role of collagen on MTC was confirmed in living cartilage tissue. (author)

  20. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography: evaluation of renal arteries in living renal transplant donors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firat, Ali; Akin, Oguz; Muhtesem Agildere, Ahmet; Aytekin, Cuneyt; Haberal, Mehmet

    2004-10-01

    One of the most important steps before living-donor nephrectomy is assessment of renal vascular anatomy. The number, origins and lengths of the renal arteries and variations of renal veins must be determined in order to identify the kidney that is most suitable for transplantation. Digital subtraction angiography was long considered the standard procedure for this purpose, but this method has been replaced by non-invasive techniques. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography is an accurate, safe and reliable method for imaging vasculature. This article reviews the technique and the clinical features of this method in the evaluation of living renal transplant donors.

  1. Rapid non-contrast magnetic resonance imaging for post appendectomy intra-abdominal abscess in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Megan H.; Eutsler, Eric P.; Khanna, Geetika; Sheybani, Elizabeth F.

    2017-01-01

    Acute appendicitis, especially if perforated at presentation, is often complicated by postoperative abscess formation. The detection of a postoperative abscess relies primarily on imaging. This has traditionally been done with contrast-enhanced computed tomography. Non-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has the potential to accurately detect intra-abdominal abscesses, especially with the use of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). To evaluate our single-center experience with a rapid non-contrast MRI protocol evaluating post-appendectomy abscesses in children with persistent postsurgical symptoms. In this retrospective, institutional review board-approved study, all patients underwent a clinically indicated non-contrast 1.5- or 3-Tesla abdomen/pelvis MRI consisting of single-shot fast spin echo, inversion recovery and DWI sequences. All MRI studies were reviewed by two blinded pediatric radiologists to identify the presence of a drainable fluid collection. Each fluid collection was further characterized as accessible or not accessible for percutaneous or transrectal drainage. Imaging findings were compared to clinical outcome. Seven of the 15 patients had a clinically significant fluid collection, and 5 of these patients were treated with percutaneous drain placement or exploratory laparotomy. The other patients had a phlegmon or a clinically insignificant fluid collection and were discharged home within 48 h. Rapid non-contrast MRI utilizing fluid-sensitive and DWI sequences can be used to identify drainable fluid collections in post-appendectomy patients. This protocol can be used to triage patients between conservative management vs. abscess drainage without oral/intravenous contrast or exposure to ionizing radiation. (orig.)

  2. Rapid non-contrast magnetic resonance imaging for post appendectomy intra-abdominal abscess in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Megan H. [Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, St. Louis, MO (United States); Eutsler, Eric P.; Khanna, Geetika [Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Pediatric Radiology, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, St. Louis, MO (United States); Sheybani, Elizabeth F. [Mercy Hospital St. Louis, Department of Radiology, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2017-07-15

    Acute appendicitis, especially if perforated at presentation, is often complicated by postoperative abscess formation. The detection of a postoperative abscess relies primarily on imaging. This has traditionally been done with contrast-enhanced computed tomography. Non-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has the potential to accurately detect intra-abdominal abscesses, especially with the use of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). To evaluate our single-center experience with a rapid non-contrast MRI protocol evaluating post-appendectomy abscesses in children with persistent postsurgical symptoms. In this retrospective, institutional review board-approved study, all patients underwent a clinically indicated non-contrast 1.5- or 3-Tesla abdomen/pelvis MRI consisting of single-shot fast spin echo, inversion recovery and DWI sequences. All MRI studies were reviewed by two blinded pediatric radiologists to identify the presence of a drainable fluid collection. Each fluid collection was further characterized as accessible or not accessible for percutaneous or transrectal drainage. Imaging findings were compared to clinical outcome. Seven of the 15 patients had a clinically significant fluid collection, and 5 of these patients were treated with percutaneous drain placement or exploratory laparotomy. The other patients had a phlegmon or a clinically insignificant fluid collection and were discharged home within 48 h. Rapid non-contrast MRI utilizing fluid-sensitive and DWI sequences can be used to identify drainable fluid collections in post-appendectomy patients. This protocol can be used to triage patients between conservative management vs. abscess drainage without oral/intravenous contrast or exposure to ionizing radiation. (orig.)

  3. Non-invasive assessment of pulsatile intracranial pressure with phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geir Ringstad

    Full Text Available Invasive monitoring of pulsatile intracranial pressure can accurately predict shunt response in patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus, but may potentially cause complications such as bleeding and infection. We tested how a proposed surrogate parameter for pulsatile intracranial pressure, the phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging derived pulse pressure gradient, compared with its invasive counterpart. In 22 patients with suspected idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus, preceding invasive intracranial pressure monitoring, and any surgical shunt procedure, we calculated the pulse pressure gradient from phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging derived cerebrospinal fluid flow velocities obtained at the upper cervical spinal canal using a simplified Navier-Stokes equation. Repeated measurements of the pulse pressure gradient were also undertaken in four healthy controls. Of 17 shunted patients, 16 responded, indicating high proportion of "true" normal pressure hydrocephalus in the patient cohort. However, there was no correlation between the magnetic resonance imaging derived pulse pressure gradient and pulsatile intracranial pressure (R = -.18, P = .43. Pulse pressure gradients were also similar in patients and healthy controls (P = .26, and did not differ between individuals with pulsatile intracranial pressure above or below established thresholds for shunt treatment (P = .97. Assessment of pulse pressure gradient at level C2 was therefore not found feasible to replace invasive monitoring of pulsatile intracranial pressure in selection of patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus for surgical shunting. Unlike invasive, overnight monitoring, the pulse pressure gradient from magnetic resonance imaging comprises short-term pressure fluctuations only. Moreover, complexity of cervical cerebrospinal fluid flow and -pulsatility at the upper cervical spinal canal may render the pulse pressure gradient a poor surrogate

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of urinary bladder carcinoma: tumor staging and gadolinium contrast-enhanced imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doringer, E.; Joos, H.; Forstner, R.; Schmoller, H.

    1992-01-01

    Forty-nine patients with urinary bladder carcinomas underwent pre-operative examinations using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The results of the MR examinations were correlated with the clinical-pathological findings following transurethral resection (TUR) and bimanual palpation (n = 47) or radical cystectomy (n = 2). The results of pre-contrast MR tumor staging (T1, T2), viewing stages Tis-T2 collectively, and subsequent to separate assessments of stages T3b-T4b, were correct 76.6% of the time. Gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA) contrast-enhanced examinations (pre-contrast T1 and after Gd-DTPA) showed a staging accuracy rate of 85.7%. T2-weighted images did not indicate any advantage when compared to T1-weighted images following Gd-DTPA. The signal intensity ratios of tumor/fat and tumor/muscle tissue were measured on T1-weighted pre-contrast images and following Gd-DTPA and then evaluated statistically, whereby the increased tumor signal intensity was statistically significant (Wilcoxon test, P < 0.01). Due to the relatively short examination time needed for T1-weighted images and the specific tumor enhancement, the administration of Gd-DTPA proves valuable in the diagnosis of bladder carcinomas. T2-weighted images are not necessary. (orig.)

  5. Anisotropies of field-dependent in-phase and out-of-phase magnetic susceptibilities of some pyrrhotite-bearing rocks

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrouda, F.; Chadima, Martin; Ježek, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 19, EGU General Assembly 2017 (2017) ISSN 1029-7006. [European Geosciences Union General Assembly. 23.04.2017-28.04.2017, Vienna] Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility * field-dependent susceptibility * pyrrhotite Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography http://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EGU2017/EGU2017-7091.pdf

  6. Diagenetic versus detrital origin of the magnetic susceptibility variations in some carbonate Frasnian-Famennian boundary sections from Northern Africa and Western Europe: implications for paleoenvironmental reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riquier, Laurent; Averbuch, Olivier; Devleeschouwer, Xavier; Tribovillard, Nicolas

    2010-10-01

    To provide a new insight into the diagenetic versus detrital origin of the magnetic susceptibility variations in ancient carbonate sequences, a study was conducted within four Frasnian-Famennian platform carbonate sections from Germany, France and Morocco. The study includes along-section magnetic susceptibility and carbonate content measurements complemented by analyses of magnetic hysteresis parameters, inorganic geochemistry and clay mineralogy. Our results show that the magnetic susceptibility evolution is dominantly controlled by the variations in the concentration of low-coercivity ferromagnetic magnetite grains and, to a lesser extent, of paramagnetic clays. In more detail, hysteresis ratios suggest the coexistence of two magnetite populations with significantly different grain size: (1) a dominantly coarse-grained detrital fraction including a mixture of multi-domain and single-domain particles (2) an authigenic fine-grained fraction composed of a mixture of single-domain and superparamagnetic particles. Despite a diagenetic imprint on the clay assemblages, no relationship is established between magnetic susceptibility and illite crystallinity, therefore discarding a noticeable distortion of primary within-section magnetic susceptibility evolution. The overall inherited character of the magnetic susceptibility fluctuations is corroborated by a significant correlation of magnetic susceptibility with terrigenous proxies (Zr, Th). The poorer correlation of magnetic susceptibility with the Fe content is consistent with the existence of a very fine-grained authigenic magnetite component that possibly induces a global magnetic susceptibility increase at the section scale, but no distortion of the within-section evolution. The magnetic susceptibility curves presented here provide a general record of climate-driven detrital influx and carbonate productivity through Frasnian-Lower Famennian times.

  7. Measurement of magnetic susceptibility on tailings cores report on cores obtained from the Ontario Research Foundation lysimeter experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-10-01

    Bulk susceptibility and induced magnetic remanence results are reported for 40 cores obtained from the uranium tailings lysimeter experiment at the Ontario Research Foundation. Both methods indicate a broad threefold subdivision of the tailings pile. An upper zone is characterized by an enhanced susceptibility level, which is related to enhanced concentration of both magnetite and hematite. Depletion zones, where present, are of limited areal extent and strongly developed. An intermediate zone is characterized by a mixture of large areas of reduced susceptibility that separate smaller regions of slightly enhanced susceptibility. The zones of susceptibility depletion appear to define a dendritic drainage pattern. Locally in this zone magnetite is enhanced and hematite depleted. In the lowermost zone susceptibility levels are reduced over most of the tailings bed. Only in the upper most right hand corner is there any vestige of a positive susceptibility concentration. Both magnetite and hematite are strongly depleted in this lower zone. Visually it is apparent that this lowermost depleted zone correlates to the zones of strongest 'yellowcake' development

  8. Differentiation between early rheumatoid arthritis patients and healthy persons by conventional and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsen, Mette Bjørndal; Ejbjerg, B J; Hetland, M L

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To identify the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) parameter that best differentiates healthy persons and patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and to investigated responsiveness to treatment of various MRI parameters. METHOD: Conventional MRI and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE...

  9. Magnetization and susceptibility of a parabolic InAs quantum dot with electron–electron and spin–orbit interactions in the presence of a magnetic field at finite temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, D. Sanjeev, E-mail: sanjeevchs@gmail.com [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046 (India); Mukhopadhyay, Soma [Department of Physics, CMR College of Engineering and Technology, Hyderabad (India); Chatterjee, Ashok [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046 (India)

    2016-11-15

    The magnetization and susceptibility of a two-electron parabolic quantum dot are studied in the presence of electron–electron and spin–orbit interactions as a function of magnetic field and temperature. The spin–orbit interactions are treated by a unitary transformation and an exactly soluble parabolic interaction model is considered to mimic the electron–electron interaction. The theory is finally applied to an InAs quantum dot. Magnetization and susceptibility are calculated using canonical ensemble approach. Our results show that Temperature has no effect on magnetization and susceptibility in the diamagnetic regime whereas electron–electron interaction reduces them. The temperature however reduces the height of the paramagnetic peak. The Rashba spin–orbit interaction is shown to shift the paramagnetic peak towards higher magnetic fields whereas the Dresselhaus spin–orbit interaction shifts it to the lower magnetic field side. Spin–orbit interaction has no effect on magnetization and susceptibility at larger temperatures. - Highlights: • Temperature has no effect on magnetization and susceptibility in the diamagnetic regime but reduces the height of the paramagnetic peak. • Electron-electron interaction reduces magnetization and susceptibility in the diamagnetic region. • Rashba spin–orbit interaction shifts the paramagnetic peak towards higher magnetic fields. • Dresselhaus spin–orbit interaction shifts the paramagnetic peak towards lower magnetic fields. • Spin–orbit interaction has no effect on magnetization and susceptibility at larger temperatures.

  10. Mössbauer spectroscopy, magnetization, magnetic susceptibility, and low temperature heat capacity of α-Na2NpO4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Anna L; Hen, Amir; Magnani, Nicola; Colineau, Eric; Griveau, Jean-Christophe; Raison, Philippe E; Caciuffo, Roberto; Konings, Rudy J M; Sanchez, Jean-Pierre; Cheetham, Anthony K

    2016-01-01

    The physical and chemical properties at low temperatures of hexavalent disodium neptunate α-Na 2 NpO 4 are investigated for the first time in this work using Mössbauer spectroscopy, magnetization, magnetic susceptibility, and heat capacity measurements. The Np(VI) valence state is confirmed by the isomer shift value of the Mössbauer spectra, and the local structural environment around the neptunium cation is related to the fitted quadrupole coupling constant and asymmetry parameters. Moreover, magnetic hyperfine splitting is reported below 12.5 K, which could indicate magnetic ordering at this temperature. This interpretation is further substantiated by the existence of a λ-peak at 12.5 K in the heat capacity curve, which is shifted to lower temperatures with the application of a magnetic field, suggesting antiferromagnetic ordering. However, the absence of any anomaly in the magnetization and magnetic susceptibility data shows that the observed transition is more intricate. In addition, the heat capacity measurements suggest the existence of a Schottky-type anomaly above 15 K associated with a low-lying electronic doublet found about 60 cm −1 above the ground state doublet. The possibility of a quadrupolar transition associated with a ground state pseudoquartet is thereafter discussed. The present results finally bring new insights into the complex magnetic and electronic peculiarities of α-Na 2 NpO 4 . (paper)

  11. Magnetic susceptibility of Dirac fermions, Bi-Sb alloys, interacting Bloch fermions, dilute nonmagnetic alloys, and Kondo alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buot, Felix A., E-mail: fbuot@gmu.edu [Computational Materials Science Center, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); TCSE Center, Spintronics Group, Physics Department, University of San Carlos, Talamban, Cebu 6000 (Philippines); C& LB Research Institute, Carmen, Cebu 6005 (Philippines); Otadoy, Roland E.S.; Rivero, Karla B. [TCSE Center, Spintronics Group, Physics Department, University of San Carlos, Talamban, Cebu 6000 (Philippines)

    2017-03-01

    Wide ranging interest in Dirac Hamiltonian is due to the emergence of novel materials, namely, graphene, topological insulators and superconductors, the newly-discovered Weyl semimetals, and still actively-sought after Majorana fermions in real materials. We give a brief review of the relativistic Dirac quantum mechanics and its impact in the developments of modern physics. The quantum band dynamics of Dirac Hamiltonian is crucial in resolving the giant diamagnetism of bismuth and Bi-Sb alloys. Quantitative agreement of the theory with the experiments on Bi-Sb alloys has been achieved, and physically meaningful contributions to the diamagnetism has been identified. We also treat relativistic Dirac fermion as an interband dynamics in uniform magnetic fields. For the interacting Bloch electrons, the role of translation symmetry for calculating the magnetic susceptibility avoids any approximation to second order in the field. The expressions for magnetic susceptibility of dilute nonmagnetic alloys give a firm theoretical foundation of the empirical formulas used in fitting experimental results. The unified treatment of all the above calculations is based on the lattice Weyl-Wigner formulation of discrete phase-space quantum mechanics. For completeness, the magnetic susceptibility of Kondo alloys is also given since Dirac fermions in conduction band and magnetic impurities exhibit Kondo effect.

  12. Magnetic susceptibilities of Ca/sub y/U/sub 1-y/O/sub 2+x/ solid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinatsu, Y.; Fujino, T.

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic susceptibilities of Ca/sub y/U/sub 1-y/O/sub 2+x/ solid solutions with fluorite structure were measured from 4.2 K to room temperature. An antiferromagnetic transition was observed for all the solid solutions examined in this study (y ≤ 0.33). The Neel temperature of the oxygen-hypostoichiometric solid solutions (x 2 solid solutions, but different from that of (U,Th)O 2 solid solutions. The effective magnetic moment decreased with increasing calcium concentration, which indicates the oxidation of uranium in the solid solutions. From the analysis of the magnetic susceptibility data, it was found that the oxidation state of uranium was either tetravalent or pentavalent. The Neel temperature of the hyperstoichiometric solid solutions (x > 0) did not change appreciably with calcium concentrations. From the comparison of the magnetic susceptibility data of the hypostoichiometric solid solutions with those of the hyperstoichiometric solid solutions, the effect of oxygen vacancies is more significant than that of interstitial oxygens on the decrease of magnetic interactions between uranium ions

  13. Prospective study of ultrasound with perflutrene contrast compared to magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of hepatic hemangiomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Schmillevitch

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT:The incidence of hepatic hemangiomas ranges from 0.4% to 20% in the general population. Conventional ultrasound is usually the first diagnostic method to identify these hemangiomas, typically as an incidental finding. Ultrasonography with second generation contrast materials is being used in various areas of hepatology, yielding similar results to those obtained with computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of hepatic hemangiomas. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the agreement between ultrasound with perflutrene contrast and magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of hepatic hemangiomas. METHODS: A total of 37 patients were prospectively examined between January 2006 and August 2008. A total of 57 hepatic nodules were documented in this group as incidental findings on routine ultrasound exams. The 37 patients were administered perflutrene contrast without adverse reactions, and were all submitted to magnetic resonance exams. RESULTS: Conventional ultrasound identified 15 patients with nodules typical of hemangiomas and 22 patients with other nodules. In 35 patients, the contrast characteristics were consistent with hepatic hemangiomas. CONCLUSION: Agreement between the data obtained from ultrasound with contrast and magnetic resonance was 94.5%. In discordant cases, the magnetic resonance diagnosis prevailed. In the case which presented indeterminate findings on contrast ultrasonography, magnetic resonance was repeated after 3 months, confirming the diagnosis of a hepatic hemangioma. A biopsy was performed on the suspected malignant nodule which also confirmed the presence of a hepatic hemangioma. Ultrasonography with contrast has the advantages of being more accessible to the public at large and lower cost than magnetic resonance. The results of our study highlight the need for a new protocol in hepatic nodules incidentally identified on conventional ultrasonography. In the case of typical hemangiomas

  14. Novel Gd nanoparticles enhance vascular contrast for high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tot Bui

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Gadolinium (Gd, with its 7 unpaired electrons in 4f orbitals that provide a very large magnetic moment, is proven to be among the best agents for contrast enhanced MRI. Unfortunately, the most potent MR contrast agent based on Gd requires relatively high doses of Gd. The Gd-chelated to diethylene-triamine-penta-acetic acid (DTPA, or other derivatives (at 0.1 mmole/kg recommended dose, distribute broadly into tissues and clear through the kidney. These contrast agents carry the risk of Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis (NSF, particularly in kidney impaired subjects. Thus, Gd contrast agents that produce higher resolution images using a much lower Gd dose could address both imaging sensitivity and Gd safety.To determine whether a biocompatible lipid nanoparticle with surface bound Gd can improve MRI contrast sensitivity, we constructed Gd-lipid nanoparticles (Gd-LNP containing lipid bound DTPA and Gd. The Gd-LNP were intravenously administered to rats and MR images collected. We found that Gd in Gd-LNP produced a greater than 33-fold higher longitudinal (T(1 relaxivity, r(1, constant than the current FDA approved Gd-chelated contrast agents. Intravenous administration of these Gd-LNP at only 3% of the recommended clinical Gd dose produced MRI signal-to-noise ratios of greater than 300 in all vasculatures. Unlike current Gd contrast agents, these Gd-LNP stably retained Gd in normal vasculature, and are eliminated predominately through the biliary, instead of the renal system. Gd-LNP did not appear to accumulate in the liver or kidney, and was eliminated completely within 24 hrs.The novel Gd-nanoparticles provide high quality contrast enhanced vascular MRI at 97% reduced dose of Gd and do not rely on renal clearance. This new agent is likely to be suitable for patients exhibiting varying degrees of renal impairment. The simple and adaptive nanoparticle design could accommodate ligand or receptor coating for drug delivery optimization and in vivo drug

  15. The optimization of scan timing for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Min; Chang, Yong Min; Ryeom, Hun Kyu; Lee, Sang Kwon; Kim, Yong Sun; Kang, Duk Sik; Tirman, Philip J.

    2000-01-01

    To determine the optimal scan timing for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography and to evaluate a new timing method based on the arteriovenous circulation time. Eighty-nine contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiographic examinations were performed mainly in the extremities. A 1.5T scanner with a 3-D turbo-FLASH sequence was used, and during each study, two consecutive arterial phases and one venous phase were acquired. Scan delay time was calculated from the time-intensity curve by the traditional (n = 48) and/or the new (n = 41) method. This latter was based on arteriovenous circulation time rather than peak arterial enhancement time, as used in the traditional method. The numbers of first-phase images showing a properly enhanced arterial phase were compared between the two methods. Mean scan delay time was 5.4 sec longer with the new method than with the traditional. Properly enhanced first-phase images were found in 65% of cases (31/48) using the traditional timing method, and 95% (39/41) using the new method. When cases in which there was mismatch between the target vessel and the Time-intensity curve acquisition site are excluded, erroneous acquisition occurred in seven cases with the traditional method, but in none with the new method. The calculation of scan delay time on the basis of arteriovenous circulation time provides better timing for arterial phase acquisition than the traditional method

  16. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the sarcopenic muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicolato, Elena; Farace, Paolo; Asperio, Roberto M; Marzola, Pasquina; Lunati, Ernesto; Sbarbati, Andrea; Osculati, Francesco [Dipartimento di Scienze Morfologico-Biomediche, Sezione di Anatomia ed Istologia, Università di Verona, Verona, I-37194 (Italy)

    2002-06-05

    Studies about capillarity of the aged muscle provided conflicting results and no data are currently available about the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in vivo characteristics of the microvascular bed in aged rats. We have studied age-related modifications of the skeletal muscle by in vivo T2-relaxometry and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI) at high field intensity (4.7 T). The aim of the work was to test the hypothesis that the ageing process involves microvessels in skeletal muscle. The study was performed in 4-month-old (n = 6) and 20-month-old (n = 6) rats. At MRI examination, the relaxation time T2 of the gastrocnemius muscle showed no significant difference between these two groups. The kinetic of contrast penetration in the tissue showed that in 4-month-old rats the enhancement values of the signal intensity at different time-points were significantly higher than those found in senescent rats. The reported finding suggests that there is a modification of the microcirculatory function in skeletal muscle of aged rats. This work also demonstrates that CE-MRI allows for an in vivo quantification of the multiple biological processes involving the skeletal muscle during aging. Therefore, CE-MRI could represent a further tool for the follow up of tissue modification and therapeutic intervention both in patients with sarcopenia and in experimental models of this pathology.

  17. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the sarcopenic muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolato, Elena; Farace, Paolo; Asperio, Roberto M; Marzola, Pasquina; Lunati, Ernesto; Sbarbati, Andrea; Osculati, Francesco

    2002-01-01

    Studies about capillarity of the aged muscle provided conflicting results and no data are currently available about the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in vivo characteristics of the microvascular bed in aged rats. We have studied age-related modifications of the skeletal muscle by in vivo T2-relaxometry and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI) at high field intensity (4.7 T). The aim of the work was to test the hypothesis that the ageing process involves microvessels in skeletal muscle. The study was performed in 4-month-old (n = 6) and 20-month-old (n = 6) rats. At MRI examination, the relaxation time T2 of the gastrocnemius muscle showed no significant difference between these two groups. The kinetic of contrast penetration in the tissue showed that in 4-month-old rats the enhancement values of the signal intensity at different time-points were significantly higher than those found in senescent rats. The reported finding suggests that there is a modification of the microcirculatory function in skeletal muscle of aged rats. This work also demonstrates that CE-MRI allows for an in vivo quantification of the multiple biological processes involving the skeletal muscle during aging. Therefore, CE-MRI could represent a further tool for the follow up of tissue modification and therapeutic intervention both in patients with sarcopenia and in experimental models of this pathology

  18. Fast magnetic resonance fingerprinting for dynamic contrast-enhanced studies in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yuning; Wang, Charlie Y; Anderson, Christian E; Liu, Yuchi; Hu, He; Johansen, Mette L; Ma, Dan; Jiang, Yun; Ramos-Estebanez, Ciro; Brady-Kalnay, Susann; Griswold, Mark A; Flask, Chris A; Yu, Xin

    2018-05-09

    The goal of this study was to develop a fast MR fingerprinting (MRF) method for simultaneous T 1 and T 2 mapping in DCE-MRI studies in mice. The MRF sequences based on balanced SSFP and fast imaging with steady-state precession were implemented and evaluated on a 7T preclinical scanner. The readout used a zeroth-moment-compensated variable-density spiral trajectory that fully sampled the entire k-space and the inner 10 × 10 k-space with 48 and 4 interleaves, respectively. In vitro and in vivo studies of mouse brain were performed to evaluate the accuracy of MRF measurements with both fully sampled and undersampled data. The application of MRF to dynamic T 1 and T 2 mapping in DCE-MRI studies were demonstrated in a mouse model of heterotopic glioblastoma using gadolinium-based and dysprosium-based contrast agents. The T 1 and T 2 measurements in phantom showed strong agreement between the MRF and the conventional methods. The MRF with spiral encoding allowed up to 8-fold undersampling without loss of measurement accuracy. This enabled simultaneous T 1 and T 2 mapping with 2-minute temporal resolution in DCE-MRI studies. Magnetic resonance fingerprinting provides the opportunity for dynamic quantification of contrast agent distribution in preclinical tumor models on high-field MRI scanners. © 2018 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  19. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the sarcopenic muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sbarbati Andrea

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies about capillarity of the aged muscle provided conflicting results and no data are currently available about the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in vivo characteristics of the microvascular bed in aged rats. We have studied age-related modifications of the skeletal muscle by in vivo T2-relaxometry and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI at high field intensity (4.7 T. The aim of the work was to test the hypothesis that the ageing process involves microvessels in skeletal muscle. Methods The study was performed in 4-month-old (n = 6 and 20-month-old (n = 6 rats. Results At MRI examination, the relaxation time T2 of the gastrocnemius muscle showed no significant difference between these two groups. The kinetic of contrast penetration in the tissue showed that in 4-month-old rats the enhancement values of the signal intensity at different time-points were significantly higher than those found in senescent rats. Conclusion The reported finding suggests that there is a modification of the microcirculatory function in skeletal muscle of aged rats. This work also demonstrates that CE-MRI allows for an in vivo quantification of the multiple biological processes involving the skeletal muscle during aging. Therefore, CE-MRI could represent a further tool for the follow up of tissue modification and therapeutic intervention both in patients with sarcopenia and in experimental models of this pathology.

  20. Perfusion MRI (dynamic susceptibility contrast imaging) with different measurement approaches for the evaluation of blood flow and blood volume in human gliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomsen, H. (Den Sundhedsfaglige Kandidatuddannelse, Aarhus Universitet Bygning 1264, Aarhus (Denmark); University College Nordjylland, Aalborg (Denmark)), Email: hnt@ucn.dk; Steffensen, E. (Aalborg Hospital/Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Aalborg (Denmark)); Larsson, E. M. (Aalborg Hospital/Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Aalborg (Denmark); Uppsala University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Uppsala (Sweden))

    2012-02-15

    Background. Perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly used in the evaluation of brain tumors. Relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) is usually obtained by dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) MRI using normal appearing white matter as reference region. The emerging perfusion technique arterial spin labelling (ASL) presently provides measurement only of cerebral blood flow (CBF), which has not been widely used in human brain tumor studies. Purpose. To assess if measurement of blood flow is comparable with measurement of blood volume in human biopsy-proven gliomas obtained by DSC-MRI using two different regions for normalization and two different measurement approaches. Material and Methods. Retrospective study of 61 patients with different types of gliomas examined with DSC perfusion MRI. Regions of interest (ROIs) were placed in tumor portions with maximum perfusion on rCBF and rCBV maps, with contralateral normal appearing white matter and cerebellum as reference regions. Larger ROIs were drawn for histogram analyses. The type and grade of the gliomas were obtained by histopathology. Statistical comparison was made between diffuse astrocytomas, anaplastic astrocytomas, and glioblastomas. Results. rCBF and rCBV measurements obtained with the maximum perfusion method were correlated when normalized to white matter (r = 0.60) and to the cerebellum (r = 0.49). Histogram analyses of rCBF and rCBV showed that mean and median values as well as skewness and peak position were correlated (0.61 < r < 0.93), whereas for kurtosis and peak height, the correlation coefficient was about 0.3 when comparing rCBF and rCBV values for the same reference region. Neither rCBF nor rCBV quantification provided a statistically significant difference between the three types of gliomas. However, both rCBF and rCBV tended to increase with tumor grade and to be lower in patients who had undergone resection/treatment. Conclusion. rCBF measurements normalized to white matter

  1. Functional and morphological effects of diazepam and midazolam on tumor vasculature in the 9L gliosarcoma brain tumor model using dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI: a comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan N

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Nuo Yan,1 Yuzhen Zheng,2 Cheng Yang1 1Second Department of Anesthesiology, The Affiliated Hospital to Logistics University of PAP, Tianjin, 2Department of Anesthesiology, Tianjin Huanhu Hospital, Tianjin, China Abstract: Antiangiogenic therapy attenuates tumor growth by reducing vascularization. Diazepam (DZP and midazolam (MZL have antiangiogenic properties in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Thus, we investigated the antiangiogenic activity of DZP and MZL in the rat 9L gliosarcoma brain tumor model. The effect on tumor vasculature was evaluated using dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging with gradient-echo (GE and spin-echo (SE to assess perfusion parameters, including cerebral blood volume (CBV, cerebral blood flow (CBF, mean transit time (MTT, and mean vessel diameter. The GE-normalized CBF (nCBF in the tumors of untreated controls was significantly lower than that in normal brain tissue, whereas the CBV and MTT were higher. DZP- and MZL-treated rats had higher CBF and lower CBV and MTT values than did untreated controls. The tumor size decreased significantly to 33.5% in DZP-treated rats (P<0.001 and 22.5% in MZL-treated rats (P<0.01 relative to controls. The SE-normalized CBV was lower in DZP-treated (32.9% and MZL-treated (10.6% rats compared with controls. The mean vessel diameter decreased significantly by 32.5% in DPZ-treated and by 24.9% in MZL-treated rats compared with controls (P<0.01. The GE and SE nCBF values were higher in DZP-treated (49.9% and 40.1%, respectively and MZL-treated (41.2% and 32.1%, respectively rats than in controls. The GE- and SE-normalized MTTs were lower in DZP-treated (48.2% and 59.8%, respectively and MZL-treated (40.5% and 51.2%, respectively rats than in controls. Both DZP and MZL had antiangiogenic effects on tumor perfusion and vasculature; however, the antiangiogenic activity of DZP is more promising than that of MZL. Keywords: diazepam, midazolam, 9L gliosarcoma

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of osteosarcoma using a bis(alendronate)-based bone-targeted contrast agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Pingju; Sheng, Fugeng; Jin, Yiguang; Tong, Li; Du, Lina; Zhang, Lei; Tian, Ning; Li, Gongjie

    2016-12-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) is currently used for diagnosis of osteosarcoma but not well even though contrast agents are administered. Here, we report a novel bone-targeted MR imaging contrast agent, Gd 2 -diethylenetriaminepentaacetate-bis(alendronate) (Gd 2 -DTPA-BA) for the diagnosis of osteosarcoma. It is the conjugate of a bone cell-seeking molecule (i.e., alendronate) and an MR imaging contrast agent (i.e., Gd-DTPA). Its physicochemical parameters were measured, including pK a , complex constant, and T 1 relaxivity. Its bone cell-seeking ability was evaluated by measuring its adsorption on hydroxyapatite. Hemolysis was investigated. MR imaging and biodistribution of Gd 2 -DTPA-BA and Gd-DTPA were studied on healthy and osteosarcoma-bearing nude mice. Gd 2 -DTPA-BA showed high adsorption on hydroxyapatite, the high MR relaxivity (r 1 ) of 7.613mM -1 s -1 (2.6 folds of Gd-DTPA), and no hemolysis. The MR contrast effect of Gd 2 -DTPA-BA was much higher than that of Gd-DTPA after intravenous injection to the mice. More importantly, the MR imaging of osteosarcoma was significantly improved by Gd 2 -DTPA-BA. The signal intensity of Gd 2 -DTPA-BA reached 120.3% at 50min, equal to three folds of Gd-DTPA. The bone targeting index (bone/blood) of Gd 2 -DTPA-BA in the osteosarcoma-bearing mice was very high to 130 at 180min. Furthermore, the contrast enhancement could also be found in the lung due to metastasis of osteosarcoma. Gd 2 -DTPA-BA plays a promising role in the diagnoses of osteosacomas, including the primary bone tumors and metastases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Spatial variability of soil magnetic susceptibility in an agricultural field located in Eastern Ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menshov, Oleksandr; Pereira, Paulo; Kruglov, Oleksandr

    2015-04-01

    Magnetic susceptibility (MS) have been used to characterize soil properties. It gives an indirect information about heavy metals content and degree of human impacts on soil contamination derived from atmospheric pollution (Girault et al., 2011). This method is inexpensive in relation to chemical analysis and very useful to track soil pollution, since several toxic components deposited on soil surface are rich in particulates produced by oxidation processes (Boyko et al., 2004; Morton-Bernea et al., 2009). Thus, identify the spatial distribution of MS is of major importance, since can give an indirect information of high metals content (Dankoub et al., 2012). This allows also to distinguish the pedogenic and technogenic origin magnetic signal. For example Ukraine chernozems contain fine-grained oxidized magnetite and maghemite of pedogenic origin formed by weathering of the parent material (Jeleńska et al., 2004). However, to a correct understanding of variables distribution, the identification of the most accurate interpolation method is fundamental for a better interpretation of map information (Pereira et al., 2013). The objective of this work is to study the spatial variability of soil MS in an agricultural fields located in the Tcherkascy Tishki area (50.11°N, 36.43 °E, 162 m a.s.l), Ukraine. Soil MS was measured in 77 sampling points in a north facing slope. To estimate the best interpolation method, several interpolation methods were tested, as inverse distance to a weight (IDW) with the power of 1,2,3,4 and 5, Local Polynomial (LP) with the power of 1 and 2, Global Polynomial (GP), radial basis functions - spline with tension (SPT), completely regularized spline (CRS), multiquatratic (MTQ), inverse multiquatratic (IMTQ), and thin plate spline (TPS) - and some geostatistical methods as, ordinary kriging (OK), Simple Kriging (SK) and Universal Kriging (UK), used in previous works (Pereira et al., 2014). On average, the soil MS of the studied plot had 686

  4. Magnetic susceptibility of MnZn and NiZn soft ferrites using Laplace transform and the Routh-Hurwitz criterion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fano, Walter Gustavo; Boggi, Silvina; Razzitte, Adrian Cesar

    2011-01-01

    This paper is devoted to study the Routh-Hurwitz stability criterion from the MnZn and NiZn soft ferrites using a phenomenological model with the gyromagnetic spin contribution and domain wall contribution. The magnetodynamic equation and the harmonic oscillator equation have been used to obtain the domain walls and the spin contribution of the magnetic susceptibility. The ferrite materials have been considered as linear, time invariant, isotropic and homogeneous, and the magnetization vector is proportional to the magnetic field vector. The resulting expression of the magnetization in time domain of both ferrites under study has been obtained by mean of the inverse Laplace transformation applying the residue method. The poles of the magnetic susceptibility have negative real parts, which ensures that the response decays exponentially to zero as the time increase. The degree of the numerator's polynomial of the magnetic susceptibility is less than the degree of denominator's polynomial in the magnetic susceptibility function: and the poles are located in the half left s-plane. Then the system is bounded-input, bounded-output (BIBO), and the results agree with the Routh-Hurwitz stability criterion for the MnZn and NiZn soft ferrites. - Research Highlights: → Laplace transform of the magnetic susceptibility of the MnZn and NiZn soft ferrites. → Routh-Hurwitz stability criterion of magnetic materials. → Bode plot of magnetic susceptibility. → Inverse Laplace transform using residue theorem.

  5. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension: Use of Delayed Contrast-Enhanced Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance in Risk Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bessa, Luiz Gustavo Pignataro; Junqueira, Flávia Pegado; Bandeira, Marcelo Luiz da Silva; Garcia, Marcelo Iorio; Xavier, Sérgio Salles; Lavall, Guilherme; Torres, Diego; Waetge, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a severe and progressive disease. Its early diagnosis is the greatest clinical challenge. To evaluate the presence and extension of the delayed myocardial contrast-enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance, as well as to verify if the percentage of the myocardial fibrosis mass is a severity predictor. Cross-sectional study with 30 patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension of groups I and IV, subjected to clinical, functional and hemodynamic evaluation, and to cardiac magnetic resonance. The mean age of patients was 52 years old, with female predominance (77%). Among the patients, 53% had right ventricular failure at diagnosis, and 90% were in functional class II/III. The mean of the 6-minute walk test was 395m. In hemodynamic study with right catheterism, the mean average pulmonary arterial pressure was 53.3mmHg, of the cardiac index of 2.1L/ min.m 2 , and median right atrial pressure was 13.5 mmHg. Delayed myocardial contrast enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance was found in 28 patients. The mean fibrosis mass was 9.9 g and the median percentage of fibrosis mass was 6.17%. The presence of functional class IV, right ventricular failure at diagnosis, 6-minute walk test < 300 meters and right atrial pressure ≥ 15 mmHg, with cardiac index < 2.0 L/ min.m 2 , there was a relevant association with the increased percentage of myocardial fibrosis. The percentage of the myocardial fibrosis mass indicates a non-invasive marker with promising perspectives in identifying patients with high risk factors for pulmonary hypertension

  6. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension: Use of Delayed Contrast-Enhanced Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance in Risk Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bessa, Luiz Gustavo Pignataro, E-mail: lgpignataro@ig.com.br; Junqueira, Flávia Pegado; Bandeira, Marcelo Luiz da Silva; Garcia, Marcelo Iorio; Xavier, Sérgio Salles; Lavall, Guilherme; Torres, Diego; Waetge, Daniel [Hospital Universitário Clementino Fraga Filho, Ilha do Fundão, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-10-15

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a severe and progressive disease. Its early diagnosis is the greatest clinical challenge. To evaluate the presence and extension of the delayed myocardial contrast-enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance, as well as to verify if the percentage of the myocardial fibrosis mass is a severity predictor. Cross-sectional study with 30 patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension of groups I and IV, subjected to clinical, functional and hemodynamic evaluation, and to cardiac magnetic resonance. The mean age of patients was 52 years old, with female predominance (77%). Among the patients, 53% had right ventricular failure at diagnosis, and 90% were in functional class II/III. The mean of the 6-minute walk test was 395m. In hemodynamic study with right catheterism, the mean average pulmonary arterial pressure was 53.3mmHg, of the cardiac index of 2.1L/ min.m{sup 2}, and median right atrial pressure was 13.5 mmHg. Delayed myocardial contrast enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance was found in 28 patients. The mean fibrosis mass was 9.9 g and the median percentage of fibrosis mass was 6.17%. The presence of functional class IV, right ventricular failure at diagnosis, 6-minute walk test < 300 meters and right atrial pressure ≥ 15 mmHg, with cardiac index < 2.0 L/ min.m{sup 2}, there was a relevant association with the increased percentage of myocardial fibrosis. The percentage of the myocardial fibrosis mass indicates a non-invasive marker with promising perspectives in identifying patients with high risk factors for pulmonary hypertension.

  7. Magnetic and relaxometric properties of polyethylenimine-coated superparamagnetic MRI contrast agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corti, M.; Lascialfari, A.; Marinone, M.; Masotti, A.; Micotti, E.; Orsini, F.; Ortaggi, G.; Poletti, G.; Innocenti, C.; Sangregorio, C.

    2008-01-01

    Novel systems to be employed as superparamagnetic contrast agents (CA) for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been synthesized. These compounds are composed of an iron oxide magnetic core coated by polyethylenimine (PEI) or carboxylated polyethylenimine (PEI-COOH). The aim of the present work was to prepare and study new nanostructured systems (with better or at least comparable relaxivities, R 1 and R 2 , with respect to the commercial ones) with controlled, almost monodisperse average dimensions and shape, as candidates for molecular targeting. By means of atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements we determined the average diameter, of the order of 200 nm, and the shape of the particles. The superparamagnetic behavior was assessed by SQUID measurements. From X-ray data the estimated average diameters of the magnetic cores were found to be ∼5.8 nm for PEI-COOH60 and ∼20 nm for the compound named PEI25. By NMR-dispersion (NMRD), we found that PEI-COOH60 presents R 1 and R 2 relaxivities slightly lower than Endorem. The experimental results suggest that these novel compounds can be used as MRI CA

  8. Intrinsic functional brain mapping in reconstructed 4D magnetic susceptibility (χ) data space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zikuan; Calhoun, Vince

    2015-02-15

    By solving an inverse problem of T2*-weighted magnetic resonance imaging for a dynamic fMRI study, we reconstruct a 4D magnetic susceptibility source (χ) data space for intrinsic functional mapping. A 4D phase dataset is calculated from a 4D complex fMRI dataset. The background field and phase wrapping effect are removed by a Laplacian technique. A 3D χ source map is reconstructed from a 3D phase image by a computed inverse MRI (CIMRI) scheme. A 4D χ data space is reconstructed by repeating the 3D χ source reconstruction for each time point. A functional map is calculated by a temporal correlation between voxel signals in the 4D χ space and the timecourse of the task paradigm. With a finger-tapping experiment, we obtain two 3D functional mappings in the 4D magnitude data space and in the reconstructed 4D χ data space. We find that the χ-based functional mapping reveals co-occurrence of bidirectional responses in a 3D activation map that is different from the conventional magnitude-based mapping. The χ-based functional mapping can also be achieved by a 3D deconvolution of a phase activation map. Based on a subject experimental comparison, we show that the 4D χ tomography method could produce a similar χ activation map as obtained by the 3D deconvolution method. By removing the dipole effect and other fMRI technological contaminations, 4D χ tomography provides a 4D χ data space that allows a more direct and truthful functional mapping of a brain activity. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. A study on utility of magnetic resonance imaging for female pelvic cavity using enteral MRI contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ham Gyum

    1997-01-01

    For radiological test in soft tissue or neighboring part with same signal intensity, proper test method and equipment shall be selected as needed. In case of female pelvic cavity, ultrasonography or computed tomography alternatively used, but MRI can be more usefully applied to design treatment method or operation plan by improving the diagnostic accuracy and careful observation of lesion characteristics. Magnetic Resonance Imaging using recently developed Enteral MRI contrast media can acquire more diagnostic information than using only intravenous contrast media. Thus this study attempted to examine the utility of anatomic structure and diagnostic acquisition by imaging the female pelvic cavity using Enteral MRI contrast media. As a result of analyzing magnetic resonance imaging after administering Enteral MRI contrast media to pelvic cavity suspect patients, more diagnostic information media could be acquired than only using intravenous contrast. Especially, in the diagnosis of lesion position, shape, distinction from neighboring tissues it is thought that external Enteral MRI contrast media should be used

  10. Contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the brain using gadolinium-DTPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valk, J.; Slegte, R.G.M. de; Crezee, F.C.; Hazenberg, G.J.; Thjaha, S.I.; Nauta, J.J.P.; Vrije Univ., Amsterdam; Vrije Univ., Amsterdam; Vrije Univ., Amsterdam

    1987-01-01

    This report concerns a clinical trial with gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA) as an intravenous contrast medium for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with disorders of the central nervous system. Fifty patients, 30 females and 20 males, were examined without and with Gd-GTPA. The contrast medium was well tolerated by all patients. The results of MRI scanning without and with Gd-DTPA and those obtained with computed tomography (CT) using intravenous contrast enhancement were compared. This investigation comprised mainly patients with intracranial tumors, multiple sclerosis, and nasopharyngeal tumors. The results may be summarized as follows: 1) MRI with Gd-DTPA (MRI+) gave better results than MRI without Gd as regards delineation of the lesion, blood vessels and edema in cerebral tumors, pituitary adenomas and acute forms of multiple sclerosis (MS). MRI+ was better than CT in 32 of the 50 cases examined; with intracerebral tumors it was better in 15 out of 18 cases. 3) MRI+ was always better than CT in patients with MS. In 3 out of 7 cases MRI demonstrated the acute MS lesions. 4) MRI+ seemed to have advantages also in nasopharyngeal tumors as ascertained from this limited experience. (orig.)

  11. PEGylated chitosan grafted with polyamidoaminedendron as tumor-targeted magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guangyue Zu; Xiaoyan Tong; Yi Cao; Ye Kuang; Yajie Zhang; Min Liu; Renjun Pei

    2017-01-01

    Macromolecular contrast agents labeled with targeting ligands are now receiving growing interest in tumor-targeted magnetic resonance imaging. In this study, a macromolecular contrast agent based on PEGylated chitosan was synthesized and characterized, and its application as an MRI contrast agent was then demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo. First, the chitosan backbone was partially grafted with poly(ethylene glycol), which was used to improve the in vivo stability, followed by modifying with azide groups. Second, alkynyl-terminated PAMAM dendron modified with gadolinium diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) was synthesized and conjugated onto the chitosan backbone through click chemistry. Finally, the obtained mCA was further functionalized with folic acid to improve the target specificity. The obtained FA labeled mCA exhibited higher relaxivity (9.53 mM"-"1.s"-"1) relative to Gd-DTPA (4.25 mM"-"1.s"-"1) and showed negligible toxicity as determined by the WST assay. In vivo MRI results suggested that a relatively high signal enhancement was observed in the tumor region, which made it a promising candidate for tumor-targeted MRI CA. (authors)

  12. Interactive neonatal gastrointestinal magnetic resonance imaging using fruit juice as an oral contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthurs, Owen J; Graves, Martin J; Edwards, Andrea D; Joubert, Ilse; Set, Pat AK; Lomas, David J

    2014-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate the use of fruit juice with an interactive inversion recovery (IR) MR pulse sequence to visualise the gastrointestinal tract. We investigated the relaxation properties of 12 different natural fruit juices in vitro, to identify which could be used as oral contrast. We then describe our initial experience using an interactive MR pulse sequence to allow optimal visualisation after administering pineapple juice orally, and suppressing pre-existing bowel fluid contents, with variable TI in three adult and one child volunteer. Pineapple juice (PJ) had both the shortest T 1 (243 ms) and shortest T 2 (48 ms) of the fruit juices tested. Optimal signal differentiation between pre-existing bowel contents and oral PJ administration was obtained with TIs of between 900 and 1100 ms. The use of an inversion recovery preparation allowed long T 1 pre-existing bowel contents to be suppressed whilst the short T 1 of fruit juice acts as a positive contrast medium. Pineapple juice could be used as oral contrast agent for neonatal gastrointestinal magnetic resonance imaging

  13. Highly stabilized gadolinium chelates functionalized on metal nanoparticles as magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Talha S.

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive method for imaging and diagnosing tissue damage, organ function and the vascular system. Magnevist(TM) a complex of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) and Gd3+ is a clinically approved contrast agent for MRI. A derivative of DTPA was formed by the addition of two cysteine groups (DTPA-L-Cys) through amide linkage. The Gd complex of this ligand bonds with the silver surfaces through the cysteine thiols. GdDTPA-L-Cys was bound to ˜10nm diameter Ag nanoparticles for use as a multifunctional MRI contrast agent. The ligand and complex were characterized by 1H and 13C NMR, ESI-MS and IR spectroscopy. The silver construct was characterized by TEM, TGA and UV-Vis absorption spectra. The per metal complex r1 relaxivity of GdDTPA-L-Cys{Ag} greater than that of Magnavist(TM) with the same molarity for both compounds. The synthesis of a DTPA derivative is described that allows it to bind to silver or gold nanoparticles through a single thiol linkage (DTPASH). The resulting Gd complex, GdDTPASH, was bound to Ag nanoparticles to create a single monolayer on the surface. The construct was further stabilized in buffered solution with the addition of a thiolated PEG chain. The highly stabilized nanoparticle construct delivers a high payload of Gd compelex and is an effective T1 brightening agent. The production of this type of construct opens the way for engineered multimodal MRI contrast agents.

  14. Clinical use of gadobutrol for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of neurological diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng KT

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Kenneth T Cheng1, Hannah Y Cheng2, Kam Leung31Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA; 2Freelance Technical Writer, New Orleans, LA, USA; 3National Center for Biotechnology Information, National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USAAbstract: Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI is an important clinical tool for diagnosing neurological diseases. The appropriate use of a suitable MRI contrast agent or contrast pharmaceutical is essential for CE-MRI to produce desirable diagnostic images. Currently, there are seven contrast agents (CAs or pharmaceuticals approved for clinical imaging of the central nervous system (CNS in the US, Europe, or Japan. All of the clinically approved CAs are water-soluble gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs which do not penetrate the CNS blood–brain barrier (BBB. These agents are used for imaging CNS areas without a BBB, or various pathologies, such as tumors and infection that break down the BBB and allow CAs to enter into the surrounding parenchyma. Clinically, GBCAs are most useful for detecting primary and secondary cerebral neoplastic lesions. Among these CNS GBCAs, gadobutrol (Gd-BT-DO3A, Gadovist™ is a neutral, nonionic, macrocyclic compound that showed promising results from clinical trials of CNS imaging. In comparison with other GBCAs, Gd-BT-DO3A has relatively high in vitro kinetic stability and r1 relaxivity. Gd-BT-DO3A has been recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA in 2011 for CNS imaging. A review of available literature shows that Gd-BT-DO3A exhibits similar safety and clinical efficacy profiles to other GBCAs. Gd-BT-DO3A has the distinguishing feature that it is the only clinical agent commercially available in a formulation of 1.0 M concentration with a relatively higher in vitro T1 shortening per unit volume than other clinical GBCAs which are only

  15. Susceptibility investigation of the nanoparticle coating-layer effect on the particle interaction in biocompatible magnetic fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morais, P.C.; Santos, J.G.; Silveira, L.B.; Gansau, C.; Buske, N.; Nunes, W.C.; Sinnecker, J.P.

    2004-01-01

    AC susceptibility was used to investigate the effect of the surface-coating layer in two biocompatible, magnetite-based, magnetic fluid samples. Dextran and dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) were the surface coating species. The temperature and frequency dependence of the peak susceptibility was discussed using the Vogel-Fulcher relation, from which the typical energy barrier (temperature correction) values of 1340±20 K (70±3 K) and 1230±30 K (86±5 K) were obtained for the dextran- and DMSA-coated nanoparticles, respectively

  16. Changes of deep gray matter magnetic susceptibility over 2years in multiple sclerosis and healthy control brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesper Hagemeier

    Full Text Available In multiple sclerosis, pathological changes of both tissue iron and myelin occur, yet these factors have not been characterized in a longitudinal fashion using the novel iron- and myelin-sensitive quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM MRI technique. We investigated disease-relevant tissue changes associated with myelin loss and iron accumulation in multiple sclerosis deep gray matter (DGM over two years. One-hundred twenty (120 multiple sclerosis patients and 40 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were included in this prospective study. Written informed consent and local IRB approval were obtained from all participants. Clinical testing and QSM were performed both at baseline and at follow-up. Brain magnetic susceptibility was measured in major DGM structures. Temporal (baseline vs. follow-up and cross-sectional (multiple sclerosis vs. controls differences were studied using mixed factorial ANOVA analysis and appropriate t-tests. At either time-point, multiple sclerosis patients had significantly higher susceptibility in the caudate and globus pallidus and lower susceptibility in the thalamus. Over two years, susceptibility increased significantly in the caudate of both controls and multiple sclerosis patients. Inverse thalamic findings among MS patients suggest a multi-phase pathology explained by simultaneous myelin loss and/or iron accumulation followed by iron depletion and/or calcium deposition at later stages. Keywords: Quantitative susceptibility mapping, QSM, Iron, Multiple sclerosis, Longitudinal study

  17. Magnetic Susceptibility as a Tool for Investigating Igneous Rocks—Experience from IODP Expedition 304

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger C. Searle

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Continuous measurements of magnetic susceptibility have been commonly used on Ocean Drilling Program (ODP and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODPexpeditions to study minor lithological variations (forexample, those related to climatic cycles in sedimentary rocks, but they have been less frequently used on igneous rocks, although important post-cruise studies have utilized them (e.g., Ildefonse and Pezard, 2001. Here I report its use (and that of the closely related electrical conductivity on IODP Expedition 304 to examine igneous crustal rocks. Expedition 304/305 targeted the Atlantis Massif, an oceanic core complex on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, and recovered a suite of igneous rocks comprising mainly gabbros, troctolites, and some diabases (Blackman et al., 2006; Ildefonse et al., 2006, 2007; IODP Expeditions 304 and 305 Scientists, 2005. Shipboard measurements (on D/V JOIDES Resolution of physical properties were made to characterize lithological units and alteration products, to correlate cored material with down-hole logging data, and to interpret broader-scale geophysical data.

  18. Soil magnetic susceptibility: A quantitative proxy of soil drainage for use in ecological restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimley, D.A.; Wang, J.-S.; Liebert, D.A.; Dawson, J.O.

    2008-01-01

    Flooded, saturated, or poorly drained soils are commonly anaerobic, leading to microbially induced magnetite/maghemite dissolution and decreased soil magnetic susceptibility (MS). Thus, MS is considerably higher in well-drained soils (MS typically 40-80 ?? 10-5 standard international [SI]) compared to poorly drained soils (MS typically 10-25 ?? 10-5 SI) in Illinois, other soil-forming factors being equal. Following calibration to standard soil probings, MS values can be used to rapidly and precisely delineate hydric from nonhydric soils in areas with relatively uniform parent material. Furthermore, soil MS has a moderate to strong association with individual tree species' distribution across soil moisture regimes, correlating inversely with independently reported rankings of a tree species' flood tolerance. Soil MS mapping can thus provide a simple, rapid, and quantitative means for precisely guiding reforestation with respect to plant species' adaptations to soil drainage classes. For instance, in native woodlands of east-central Illinois, Quercus alba , Prunus serotina, and Liriodendron tulipifera predominantly occur in moderately well-drained soils (MS 40-60 ?? 10-5 SI), whereas Acer saccharinum, Carya laciniosa, and Fraxinus pennsylvanica predominantly occur in poorly drained soils (MS Urbana, IL, U.S.A.). Through use of soil MS maps calibrated to soil drainage class and native vegetation occurrence, restoration efforts can be conducted more successfully and species distributions more accurately reconstructed at the microecosystem level. ?? 2008 Society for Ecological Restoration International.

  19. Generalized magnetic susceptibilities in metals: application of the analytic tetrahedron linear energy method to Sc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rath, J.; Freeman, A.J.

    1975-01-01

    A detailed study of the generalized susceptibility chi(vector q) of Sc metal determined from an accurate augmented-plane-wave method calculation of its energy-band structure is presented. The calculations were done by means of a computational scheme for chi(vector q) derived as an extension of the work of Jepsen and Andersen and Lehmann and Taut on the density-of-states problem. The procedure yields simple analytic expressions for the chi(vector q) integral inside a tetrahedral microzone of the Brillouin zone which depends only on the volume of the tetrahedron and the differences of the energies at its corners. Constant-matrix-element results have been obtained for Sc which show very good agreement with the results of Liu, Gupta, and Sinha (but with one less peak) and exhibit a first maximum in chi(vector q) at (0, 0, 0.31) 2π/c [vs (0, 0, 0.35) 2π/c obtained by Liu et al.] which relates very well to dilute rare-earth alloy magnetic ordering at vector q/sub m/ = (0, 0, 0.28) 2π/c and to the kink in the LA-phonon dispersion curve at (0, 0, 0.27) 2π/c. (U.S.)

  20. Application of Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility to large-scale fault kinematics: an evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Antonio M.; Roman-Berdiel, Teresa; Marcén, Marcos; Oliva-Urcia, Belen; Soto, Ruth; Garcia-Lasanta, Cristina; Calvin, Pablo; Pocovi, Andres; Gil-Imaz, Andres; Pueyo-Anchuela, Oscar; Izquierdo-Llavall, Esther; Vernet, Eva; Santolaria, Pablo; Osacar, Cinta; Santanach, Pere; Corrado, Sveva; Invernizzi, Chiara; Aldega, Luca; Caricchi, Chiara; Villalain, Juan Jose

    2017-04-01

    Major discontinuities in the Earth's crust are expressed by faults that often cut across its whole thickness favoring, for example, the emplacement of magmas of mantelic origin. These long-lived faults are common in intra-plate environments and show multi-episodic activity that spans for hundred of million years and constitute first-order controls on plate evolution, favoring basin formation and inversion, rotations and the accommodation of deformation in large segments of plates. Since the post-Paleozoic evolution of these large-scale faults has taken place (and can only be observed) at shallow crustal levels, the accurate determination of fault kinematics is hampered by scarcely developed fault rocks, lack of classical structural indicators and the brittle deformation accompanying fault zones. These drawbacks are also found when thick clayey or evaporite levels, with or without diapiric movements, are the main detachment levels that facilitate large displacements in the upper crust. Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility (AMS) provides a useful tool for the analysis of fault zones lacking fully developed kinematic indicators. However, its meaning in terms of deformational fabrics must be carefully checked by means of outcrop and thin section analysis in order to establish the relationship between the orientation of magnetic ellipsoid axes and the transport directions, as well as the representativity of scalar parameters regarding deformation mechanisms. Timing of faulting, P-T conditions and magnetic mineralogy are also major constraints for the interpretation of magnetic fabrics and therefore, separating ferro- and para-magnetic fabric components may be necessary in complex cases. AMS results indicate that the magnetic lineation can be parallel (when projected onto the shear plane) or perpendicular (i.e. parallel to the intersection lineation) to the transport direction depending mainly on the degree of shear deformation. Changes between the two end-members can

  1. Magnetic Anisotropic Susceptibility Studies on Impact Structures in the Serra Geral Basalt, Paraná Basin, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosta, A. P.; MacDonald, W. D.

    2009-12-01

    Studies of magnetic properties of shocked basalt are underway for two impact craters in the 132 Ma Serra Geral basalt of southern Brazil: the Vista Alegre crater (25.95°S, 41.69°W) in the state of Paraná, with a diameter of 12.4 km, and the Vargeão crater (26.81°S, 52.17°W) in Santa Catarina, of 9.5 km. Shatter cones and quartz planar deformation features (pdfs) have been found at both structures. Uplifted crater rims and external ejecta deposits have been removed by erosion at both craters. The interior of the Vista Alegre crater contains ejecta fallback deposits, typically reworked and weathered, and basalts of the crater floor are poorly exposed. In contrast, shocked basalts are exposed across the interior of the Vargeão structure, ejecta fallback deposits have been removed by erosion, and a central domal uplift of quartzose strata from beneath the basalt is found. Discounting the possibility of differential erosion rates, these differences might suggest that the Vargeão is the older of the two structures. Laboratory experiments elsewhere have suggested that major axes of the ellipse of anisotropic susceptibility (K1 major; K3 minor) could be aligned with the direction of propagation of the shockwave accompanying impact processes. Insufficient exposures exist at Vista Alegre to test this hypothesis. Oriented samples along a NNW-trending diametral profile across the better exposed Vargeão structure did not show a radial alignment of either K1 or K3 relative to the centre of that structure. In general, the mean susceptibility at Vargeão is lower towards the center; the degree of anisotropy is low (Pjcentral uplift. The shape factor (T) varies considerably (-0.5 (prolate) to +0.7 (oblate)); most magnetofabrics are oblate. Only 3 of 16 sites are prolate, and those are near the crater margin. K3 (minimum) axes are mainly steep, with a mean direction steep and slightly north of the center. K1 (maximum) axes are mainly gently plunging (tendency to preferring

  2. Magnetic susceptibility as an indicator to paleo-environmental pollution in an urban lagoon near Istanbul city

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpar, Bedri; Unlu, Selma; Altinok, Yildiz; Ongen, Sinan

    2014-05-01

    For assessing anthropogenic pollution, magnetic susceptibility profiles and accompanying data were measured along three short cores recovered at the southern part of an urban lagoon; Kucukcekmece, Istanbul, Turkey. This marine inlet, connected to the Sea of Marmara by a very narrow channel, was used as a drinking water reservoir 40-50 years ago before it was contaminated by municipal, agricultural and industrial activities, mainly carried by three streams feeding the lagoon. The magnetic signals decrease gradually from the lake bottom towards the core base showing some characteristic anomalies. These signatures were tested as an environmental magnetic parameter against the lithological diversity (silici-clastic, total organic matter and carbonate), metal enrichments with larger variations (Pb, Mn, Zn, Ni, Co, Cr, U and Al) and probable hydrocarbon contamination. Mineral assemblage was determined by a computer driven X-ray diffractometer. The heavy metal concentrations and total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) were measured by ICP-MS and UVF spectrometry, respectively. Magnetic susceptibility shows slightly higher values in interlayers containing higher silici-clastic material and organic content which may suggest first-order changes in the relative supplies of terrigenous and biogenic materials. On the basis of cluster analyses, enhanced magnetic signals could be correlated with the elevated concentrations of Co, Zn, U, Pb and TPH along the cores. The Pb concentrations at the upper parts of the cores were higher than the "Severe Effect Level" and could pose a potential risk for living organisms. Greater amounts of organic carbon tend to accumulate in muddy sediments. In fact, there are a few studies reporting some relationship between enhanced magnetic signals and organic contamination mainly due to petroleum aromatic hydrocarbons. In conclusion, the magnetic susceptibility changes in sedimentary depositional environments could be used as a rapid and cost

  3. Magnetic susceptibility to identify landscape segments on a detailed scale in the region of Jaboticabal, São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana dos Reis Barrios

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The agricultural potential is generally assessed and managed based on a one-dimensional vision of the soil profile, however, the increased appreciation of sustainable production has stimulated studies on faster and more accurate evaluation techniques and methods of the agricultural potential on detailed scales. The objective of this study was to investigate the possibility of using soil magnetic susceptibility for the identification of landscape segments on a detailed scale in the region of Jaboticabal, São Paulo State. The studied area has two slope curvatures: linear and concave, subdivided into three landscape segments: upper slope (US, concave, middle slope (MS, linear and lower slope (LS, linear. In each of these segments, 20 points were randomly sampled from a database with 207 samples forming a regular grid installed in each landscape segment. The soil physical and chemical properties, CO2 emissions (FCO2 and magnetic susceptibility (MS of the samples were evaluated represented by: magnetic susceptibility of air-dried fine earth (MS ADFE, magnetic susceptibility of the total sand fraction (MS TS and magnetic susceptibility of the clay fraction (MS Cl in the 0.00 - 0.15 m layer. The principal component analysis showed that MS is an important property that can be used to identify landscape segments, because the correlation of this property within the first principal component was high. The hierarchical cluster analysis method identified two groups based on the variables selected by principal component analysis; of the six selected variables, three were related to magnetic susceptibility. The landscape segments were differentiated similarly by the principal component analysis and by the cluster analysis using only the properties with higher discriminatory power. The cluster analysis of MS ADFE, MS TS and MS Cl allowed the formation of three groups that agree with the segment division established in the field. The grouping by cluster

  4. Susceptibility of CoFeB/AlOx/Co Magnetic Tunnel Junctions to Low-Frequency Alternating Current

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Tsung Chen

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This investigation studies CoFeB/AlOx/Co magnetic tunneling junction (MTJ in the magnetic field of a low-frequency alternating current, for various thicknesses of the barrier layer AlOx. The low-frequency alternate-current magnetic susceptibility (χac and phase angle (θ of the CoFeB/AlOx/Co MTJ are determined using an cac analyzer. The driving frequency ranges from 10 to 25,000 Hz. These multilayered MTJs are deposited on a silicon substrate using a DC and RF magnetron sputtering system. Barrier layer thicknesses are 22, 26, and 30 Å. The X-ray diffraction patterns (XRD include a main peak at 2θ = 44.7° from hexagonal close-packed (HCP Co with a highly (0002 textured structure, with AlOx and CoFeB as amorphous phases. The full width at half maximum (FWHM of the Co(0002 peak, decreases as the AlOx thickness increases; revealing that the Co layer becomes more crystalline with increasing thickness. χac result demonstrates that the optimal resonance frequency (fres that maximizes the χac value is 500 Hz. As the frequency increases to 1000 Hz, the susceptibility decreases rapidly. However, when the frequency increases over 1000 Hz, the susceptibility sharply declines, and almost closes to zero. The experimental results reveal that the mean optimal susceptibility is 1.87 at an AlOx barrier layer thickness of 30 Å because the Co(0002 texture induces magneto-anisotropy, which improves the indirect CoFeB and Co spin exchange-coupling strength and the χac value. The results concerning magnetism indicate that the magnetic characteristics are related to the crystallinity of Co.

  5. The progress in diagnostic imaging for staging of bladder and prostate cancer. Endorectal magnetic resonance imaging and magnetization transfer contrast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arima, Kiminobu; Hayashi, Norio; Yanagawa, Makoto; Kawamura, Juichi; Kobayashi, Shigeki; Takeda, Kan; Sugimura, Yoshiki

    1999-01-01

    We retrospectively studied the staging accuracy of endorectal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in comparison with transrectal ultrasound examination (TRUS) for 71 localized bladder cancers and 19 localized prostate cancers (PC) radically resected. The accuracy of clinical staging for bladder cancer in endorectal MRI and TRUS was 85.9% and 69.2%, respectively. The presence or absence of the continuity of submucosal enhancement on T2-weighted MRI images could be useful for the staging of bladder cancer. The accuracy of the seminal vesicular invasion for prostate cancer in endorectal MRI and TRUS was 95% and 63%, respectively. To determine whether magnetization transfer contrast (MTC) provides additional information in the diagnosis of prostate cancer, the magnetization transfer ratios (MTRs) were calculated in 22 patients with PC, 5 with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and 4 controls. The mean MTR in the peripheral zone of the normal prostate (8.0%±3.4 [standard deviation]) showed a statistically significant decrease relative to that in the inner zone of the normal prostate (27.4%±3.4, p<0.01), BPH (25.5%±3.7, p<0.01), pre-treatment PC (30.6%±5.9, p<0.01), and PC after hormonal therapy (20.3%±6.3, p<0.01). The mean MTR in pre-treatment PC was significantly higher than that in BPH, or in PC after hormonal therapy (p<0.01). MTC was considered to be useful for conspicuity of prostate cancer lesion. (author)

  6. Performance characteristics of magnetic resonance imaging without contrast agents or sedation in pediatric appendicitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Didier, Ryne A.; Hopkins, Katharine L.; Coakley, Fergus V.; Foster, Bryan R. [Oregon Health and Science University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Portland, OR (United States); Krishnaswami, Sanjay [Oregon Health and Science University, Department of Surgery, Portland, OR (United States); Oregon Health and Science University, Department of Pediatrics, Portland, OR (United States); Spiro, David M. [Oregon Health and Science University, Department of Pediatrics, Portland, OR (United States)

    2017-09-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has emerged as a promising modality for evaluating pediatric appendicitis. However optimal imaging protocols, including roles of contrast agents and sedation, have not been established and diagnostic criteria have not been fully evaluated. To investigate performance characteristics of rapid MRI without contrast agents or sedation in the diagnosis of pediatric appendicitis. We included patients ages 4-18 years with suspicion of appendicitis who underwent rapid MRI between October 2013 and March 2015 without contrast agent or sedation. After two-radiologist review, we determined performance characteristics of individual diagnostic criteria and aggregate diagnostic criteria by comparing MRI results to clinical outcomes. We used receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves to determine cut-points for appendiceal diameter and wall thickness for optimization of predictive power, and we calculated area under the curve (AUC) as a measure of test accuracy. Ninety-eight MRI examinations were performed in 97 subjects. Overall, MRI had a 94% sensitivity, 95% specificity, 91% positive predictive value and 97% negative predictive value. Optimal cut-points for appendiceal diameter and wall thickness were ≥7 mm and ≥2 mm, respectively. Independently, those cut-points produced sensitivities of 91% and 84% and specificities of 84% and 43%. Presence of intraluminal fluid (30/33) or localized periappendiceal fluid (32/33) showed a significant association with acute appendicitis (P<0.01), with sensitivities of 91% and 97% and specificities of 60% and 50%. For examinations in which the appendix was not identified by one or both reviewers (23/98), the clinical outcome was negative. Rapid MRI without contrast agents or sedation is accurate for diagnosis of pediatric appendicitis when multiple diagnostic criteria are considered in aggregate. Individual diagnostic criteria including optimized cut-points of ≥7 mm for diameter and ≥2 mm for wall

  7. Performance characteristics of magnetic resonance imaging without contrast agents or sedation in pediatric appendicitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Didier, Ryne A.; Hopkins, Katharine L.; Coakley, Fergus V.; Foster, Bryan R.; Krishnaswami, Sanjay; Spiro, David M.

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has emerged as a promising modality for evaluating pediatric appendicitis. However optimal imaging protocols, including roles of contrast agents and sedation, have not been established and diagnostic criteria have not been fully evaluated. To investigate performance characteristics of rapid MRI without contrast agents or sedation in the diagnosis of pediatric appendicitis. We included patients ages 4-18 years with suspicion of appendicitis who underwent rapid MRI between October 2013 and March 2015 without contrast agent or sedation. After two-radiologist review, we determined performance characteristics of individual diagnostic criteria and aggregate diagnostic criteria by comparing MRI results to clinical outcomes. We used receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves to determine cut-points for appendiceal diameter and wall thickness for optimization of predictive power, and we calculated area under the curve (AUC) as a measure of test accuracy. Ninety-eight MRI examinations were performed in 97 subjects. Overall, MRI had a 94% sensitivity, 95% specificity, 91% positive predictive value and 97% negative predictive value. Optimal cut-points for appendiceal diameter and wall thickness were ≥7 mm and ≥2 mm, respectively. Independently, those cut-points produced sensitivities of 91% and 84% and specificities of 84% and 43%. Presence of intraluminal fluid (30/33) or localized periappendiceal fluid (32/33) showed a significant association with acute appendicitis (P<0.01), with sensitivities of 91% and 97% and specificities of 60% and 50%. For examinations in which the appendix was not identified by one or both reviewers (23/98), the clinical outcome was negative. Rapid MRI without contrast agents or sedation is accurate for diagnosis of pediatric appendicitis when multiple diagnostic criteria are considered in aggregate. Individual diagnostic criteria including optimized cut-points of ≥7 mm for diameter and ≥2 mm for wall

  8. Chitosan-coated nickel-ferrite nanoparticles as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, Tanveer; Bae, Hongsub; Iqbal, Yousaf; Rhee, Ilsu; Hong, Sungwook; Chang, Yongmin; Lee, Jaejun; Sohn, Derac

    2015-01-01

    We report evidence for the possible application of chitosan-coated nickel-ferrite (NiFe 2 O 4 ) nanoparticles as both T 1 and T 2 contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The coating of nickel-ferrite nanoparticles with chitosan was performed simultaneously with the synthesis of the nickel-ferrite nanoparticles by a chemical co-precipitation method. The coated nanoparticles were cylindrical in shape with an average length of 17 nm and an average width of 4.4 nm. The bonding of chitosan onto the ferrite nanoparticles was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The T 1 and T 2 relaxivities were 0.858±0.04 and 1.71±0.03 mM −1 s −1 , respectively. In animal experimentation, both a 25% signal enhancement in the T 1 -weighted mage and a 71% signal loss in the T 2 -weighted image were observed. This demonstrated that chitosan-coated nickel-ferrite nanoparticles are suitable as both T 1 and T 2 contrast agents in MRI. We note that the applicability of our nanoparticles as both T 1 and T 2 contrast agents is due to their cylindrical shape, which gives rise to both inner and outer sphere processes of nanoparticles. - Highlights: • Chitosan-coated nickel-ferrite (Ni-Fe 2 O 4 ) nanoparticles were synthesized in an aqueous system by chemical co-precipitation. • The characterization of bare and chitosan-coated nanoparticles were performed using various analytical tools, such as TEM, FTIR, XRD, and VMS. • We evaluated the coated particles as potential T 1 and T 2 contrast agents for MRI by measuring T 1 and T 2 relaxation times as a function of iron concentration. • Both T 1 and T 2 effects were also observed in animal experimentation

  9. Detection of the pedogenic magnetic fraction in volcanic soils developed on basalts using frequency-dependent magnetic susceptibility: comparison of two instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grison, Hana; Petrovsky, Eduard; Kapicka, Ales; Hanzlikova, Hana

    2017-05-01

    In studies of the magnetic properties of soils, the frequency-dependent magnetic susceptibility percentage (χFD%) is often used for the identification of ultrafine magnetically superparamagnetic/stable single-domain (SP/SSD) particles. This parameter is commonly used as an indicator for increased pedogenesis. In strongly magnetic soils, the SP/SSD magnetic signal (mostly bio-pedogenic) may be masked by lithological signals; making pedogenesis hard to detect. In this study, we compare results for the detection of ultrafine SP/SSD magnetic particles in andic soils using two instruments: a Bartington MS2B dual-frequency meter and an AGICO Kappabridge MFK1-FA. In particular, the study focuses on the effect of pedogenesis by investigating the relationship between specific soil magnetic and chemical properties (soil organic carbon and pHH2O). The values of χFD% obtained with the MS2B varied from 2.4 to 5.9 per cent, and mass-specific magnetic susceptibility (χLF) from 283 to 1688 × 10-8 m3 kg-1, while values of χFD% and χLF obtained with the MFK1-FA varied from 2.7 to 8.2 per cent and from 299 to 1859 × 10-8 m3 kg-1, respectively. Our results suggest that the detection of the SP/SSD magnetic fraction can be accomplished by comparing relative trends of χFD% along the soil profile. Moreover, the discrimination between bio-pedogenic and lithogenic magnetic contributions in the SP/SSD fraction is possible by comparing the χFD% and χLF data determined in the fine earth (<2 mm) and the coarse fraction (4-10 mm) samples down the soil profile.

  10. Finite-size effects on the dynamic susceptibility of CoPhOMe single-chain molecular magnets in presence of a static magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pini, M. G.; Rettori, A.; Bogani, L.; Lascialfari, A.; Mariani, M.; Caneschi, A.; Sessoli, R.

    2011-09-01

    The static and dynamic properties of the single-chain molecular magnet Co(hfac)2NITPhOMe (CoPhOMe) (hfac = hexafluoroacetylacetonate, NITPhOMe = 4'-methoxy-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide) are investigated in the framework of the Ising model with Glauber dynamics, in order to take into account both the effect of an applied magnetic field and a finite size of the chains. For static fields of moderate intensity and short chain lengths, the approximation of a monoexponential decay of the magnetization fluctuations is found to be valid at low temperatures; for strong fields and long chains, a multiexponential decay should rather be assumed. The effect of an oscillating magnetic field, with intensity much smaller than that of the static one, is included in the theory in order to obtain the dynamic susceptibility χ(ω). We find that, for an open chain with N spins, χ(ω) can be written as a weighted sum of N frequency contributions, with a sum rule relating the frequency weights to the static susceptibility of the chain. Very good agreement is found between the theoretical dynamic susceptibility and the ac susceptibility measured in moderate static fields (Hdc≤2 kOe), where the approximation of a single dominating frequency for each segment length turns out to be valid. For static fields in this range, data for the relaxation time, τ versus Hdc, of the magnetization of CoPhOMe at low temperature are also qualitatively reproduced by theory, provided that finite-size effects are included.

  11. Imaging vascular function for early stage clinical trials using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leach, M.O.; Orton, M. [Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Cancer Research UK and EPSRC Cancer Imaging Centre, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Morgan, B. [Univ. of Leicester, College of Medicine, Biological Sciences and Psychology, Leicester (United Kingdom); Tofts, P.S. [Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Univ. of Sussex, Clinical Imaging Sciences Centre, Sussex (United Kingdom); Buckley, D.L. [University of Leeds, Division of Medical Physics, Leeds (United Kingdom); Huang, W. [Oregon Health and Science Univ., Advanced Imaging Research Centre, Portland, OR (United States); Horsfield, M.A. [Medical Physics Section, Leicester Royal Infirmary, Dept. of Cardiovascular Sciences, Leicester (United Kingdom); Chenevert, T.L. [Univ. of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Collins, D.J. [Royal Marsden Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Cancer Research UK and EPSRC Cancer Imaging Centre, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Jackson, A. [Univ. of Manchester, Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre, Withington, Manchester, M20 3LJ (United Kingdom); Lomas, D. [Univ. of Cambridge, Dept. of Radiology, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Whitcher, B. [Unit 2 Greenways Business Park, Mango Solutions, Chippenham (United Kingdom); Clarke, L. [Cancer Imaging Program, Imaging Technology Development Branch, Rockville, MD (United States); Plummer, R. [Univ. of Newcastle Upon Tyne, The Medical School, Medical Oncology, Northern Inst. for Cancer Research, Newcastle Upon Tyne (United Kingdom); Judson, I. [Royal Marsden Hospital, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Jones, R. [Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Alonzi, R. [Mount Vernon Cancer Centre, Northwood (United Kingdom); Brunner, T. [Gray Inst. for Radiation, Oncology and Biology, Oxford (United Kingdom); Koh, D.M. [Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Diagnostic Radiology, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom)] [and others

    2012-07-15

    Many therapeutic approaches to cancer affect the tumour vasculature, either indirectly or as a direct target. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) has become an important means of investigating this action, both pre-clinically and in early stage clinical trials. For such trials, it is essential that the measurement process (i.e. image acquisition and analysis) can be performed effectively and with consistency among contributing centres. As the technique continues to develop in order to provide potential improvements in sensitivity and physiological relevance, there is considerable scope for between-centre variation in techniques. A workshop was convened by the Imaging Committee of the Experimental Cancer Medicine Centres (ECMC) to review the current status of DCE-MRI and to provide recommendations on how the technique can best be used for early stage trials. This review and the consequent recommendations are summarised here. (orig.)

  12. Turbulent stress measurements with phase-contrast magnetic resonance through tilted slices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacKenzie, Jordan; Soederberg, Daniel; Lundell, Fredrik [Linne FLOW Centre, KTH Mechanics, Stockholm (Sweden); Swerin, Agne [SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden-Chemistry, Materials and Surfaces, Stockholm (Sweden); KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Surface and Corrosion Science, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2017-05-15

    Aiming at turbulent measurements in opaque suspensions, a simplistic methodology for measuring the turbulent stresses with phase-contrast magnetic resonance velocimetry is described. The method relies on flow-compensated and flow-encoding protocols with the flow encoding gradient normal to the slice. The experimental data is compared with direct numerical simulations (DNS), both directly but also, more importantly, after spatial averaging of the DNS data that resembles the measurement and data treatment of the experimental data. The results show that the most important MRI data (streamwise velocity, streamwise variance and Reynolds shear stress) is reliable up to at least anti r = 0.75 without any correction, paving the way for dearly needed turbulence and stress measurements in opaque suspensions. (orig.)

  13. Evaluation of potential practical oral contrast agents for pediatric magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisset, G.S. III; Cincinnati Univ., OH; Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH

    1989-01-01

    Development of a practical oral contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging is necessary to improve differentiation of bowel from adjacent structures. In order to find a readily available, inexpensive, non-toxic, palatable solution for use in the pediatric population, several formulas, milk products and a common oral sedative were evaluated in vitro. T1, T2 and signal intensity measurements were performed on a 1.5 T system. Similac with standard iron proved to be a useful high signal intensity agent on multiple pulse sequences. Early in vivo experience in four normal volunteers indicates that this agent provides excellent delineation of the stomach and duodenum from contiguous viscera. Distal small bowel visualization is less predictabel. Further clinical trials should confirm the utility of this solution, which contains a combination of iron salts and paramagnetic metallic ions. (orig.)

  14. Reliability and responsiveness of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsen, M.B.; Poggenborg, R.P.; Stoltenberg, M.

    2013-01-01

    intraarticular injection with 80 mg methylprednisolone. Using semi-automated image processing software, DCE-MRI parameters, including the initial rate of enhancement (IRE) and maximal enhancement (ME), were generated for three regions of interest (ROIs): ‘Whole slice’, ‘Quick ROI’, and ‘Precise ROI......Objectives: To investigate the responsiveness to treatment and the reliability of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) knee joints. Methods: DCE-MRI was performed in 12 clinically active RA knee joints before and 1, 7, 30, and 180 days after......’. The smallest detectable difference (SDD), the smallest detectable change (SDC), and intra- and inter-reader intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were used to assess the reliability of DCE-MRI. Responsiveness to treatment was assessed by the standardized response mean (SRM). Results: In all patients...

  15. Magnetization transfer contrast on gradient echo MR imaging of the temporomandibular joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niitsu, M.; Hirohata, H.; Yoshioka, H.; Anno, I.; Campeau, N.G.; Itai, Y.

    1995-01-01

    Thirty-nine temporomandibular joints (TMJ) from 20 patients with suspected internal derangements were imaged by a 1.5 T MR imager. The on-resonance binomial magnetization transfer contrast (MTC) pulse was applied to gradient echo images with a dual receiver coil (9 s/section). With the use of an opening device, a series of sequential images were obtained at increments of mouth opening and closing. The tissue signal intensities with (Ms) and without (Mo) MTC were measured and subjective image analysis was performed. Compared with the standard images, MTC technique provided selective signal suppression of disks. The average of Ms/Mo ratio of the disks (0.56) was lower than that of the retrodiskal pad (0.79) and of the effusion (0.89). With MTC technique, fluid conspicuity was superior to standard image. However, no significant superiority was found in disk definition subjectively. (orig.)

  16. 3D Modeling of Vascular Pathologies from contrast enhanced magnetic resonance images (MRI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantor Rivera, Diego; Orkisz, Maciej; Arias, Julian; Uriza, Luis Felipe

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a method for generating 3D vascular models from contrast enhanced magnetic resonance images (MRI) using a fast marching algorithm. The main contributions of this work are: the use of the original image for defining a speed function (which determines the movement of the interface) and the calculation of the time in which the interface identifies the artery. The proposed method was validated on pathologic carotid artery images of patients and vascular phantoms. A visual appraisal of vascular models obtained with the method shows a satisfactory extraction of the vascular wall. A quantitative assessment proved that the generated models depend on the values of algorithm parameters. The maximum induced error was equal to 1.34 voxels in the diameter of the measured stenoses.

  17. Current status of superparamagnetic iron oxide contrast agents for liver magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Xiang J

    2015-12-21

    Five types of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO), i.e. Ferumoxides (Feridex(®) IV, Berlex Laboratories), Ferucarbotran (Resovist(®), Bayer Healthcare), Ferumoxtran-10 (AMI-227 or Code-7227, Combidex(®), AMAG Pharma; Sinerem(®), Guerbet), NC100150 (Clariscan(®), Nycomed,) and (VSOP C184, Ferropharm) have been designed and clinically tested as magnetic resonance contrast agents. However, until now Resovist(®) is current available in only a few countries. The other four agents have been stopped for further development or withdrawn from the market. Another SPIO agent Ferumoxytol (Feraheme(®)) is approved for the treatment of iron deficiency in adult chronic kidney disease patients. Ferumoxytol is comprised of iron oxide particles surrounded by a carbohydrate coat, and it is being explored as a potential imaging approach for evaluating lymph nodes and certain liver tumors.

  18. Magnetic and structural properties of an octanuclear Cu(II) S=1/2 mesoscopic ring: Susceptibility and NMR measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lascialfari, A. [Department of Physics ' ' A. Volta' ' and Unita INFM, University of Pavia, Via Bassi 6, I-27100 Pavia, (Italy); Jang, Z. H. [Ames Laboratory and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Borsa, F. [Department of Physics ' ' A. Volta' ' and Unita INFM, University of Pavia, Via Bassi 6, I-27100 Pavia, (Italy); Ames Laboratory and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Gatteschi, D. [Department of Chemistry, University of Florence, Via Maragliano 77, I-50144 Florence, (Italy); Cornia, A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Modena, Via Campi 183, I-41100 Modena, (Italy); Rovai, D. [Department of Chemistry, University of Florence, Via Maragliano 77, I-50144 Florence, (Italy); Caneschi, A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Florence, Via Maragliano 77, I-50144 Florence, (Italy); Carretta, P. [Department of Physics ' ' A. Volta' ' and Unita INFM, University of Pavia, Via Bassi 6, I-27100 Pavia, (Italy)

    2000-03-01

    Magnetic susceptibility, {sup 1}H NMR and {sup 63}Cu NMR-NQR experiments on two slightly different species of the molecular S=1/2 antiferromagnetic (AF) ring Cu8, [Cu{sub 8}(dmpz){sub 8}(OH){sub 8}]{center_dot}2C{sub 5}H{sub 5}N (Cu8P) and [Cu{sub 8}(dmpz){sub 8}(OH){sub 8}]{center_dot}2C{sub 5}H{sub 5}NO{sub 2} (Cu8N), are presented. The magnetic energy levels are calculated exactly for an isotropic Heisenberg model Hamiltonian in zero magnetic field. From the magnetic susceptibility measurements we estimate the AF exchange coupling constant J{approx}1000 K and the resulting gap {delta}{approx}500 K between the S{sub T}=0 ground state and the S{sub T}=1 first excited state. The {sup 63,65}Cu NQR spectra indicate the presence of four crystallographically inequivalent copper nuclei in each ring. From the combination of the {sup 63}Cu NQR spectra and of the {sup 63}Cu NMR spectra at high magnetic field, we estimate the quadrupole coupling constant v{sub Q} of each site and the average asymmetry parameter {eta} of the electric-field gradient tensor. The nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate (NSLR) decreases exponentially on decreasing temperature for all nuclei investigated. The gap parameter extracted from {sup 63}Cu NQR-NSLR is the same as for the susceptibility while a smaller value is obtained from the {sup 63}Cu NMR-NSLR in an external magnetic field of 8.2 T. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  19. Biocompatible KMnF3 nanoparticular contrast agent with proper plasma retention time for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhi-jun; Song, Xiao-xia; Xu, Xian-zhu; Tang, Qun

    2014-04-18

    Nanoparticular MRI contrast agents are rapidly becoming suitable for use in clinical diagnosis. An ideal nanoparticular contrast agent should be endowed with high relaxivity, biocompatibility, proper plasma retention time, and tissue-specific or tumor-targeting imaging. Herein we introduce PEGylated KMnF3 nanoparticles as a new type of T1 contrast agent. Studies showed that the nanoparticular contrast agent revealed high bio-stability with bovine serum albumin in PBS buffer solution, and presented excellent biocompatibility (low cytotoxicity, undetectable hemolysis and hemagglutination). Meanwhile the new contrast agent possessed proper plasma retention time (circulation half-life t1/2 is approximately 2 h) in the body of the administrated mice. It can be delivered into brain vessels and maintained there for hours, and is mostly cleared from the body within 48 h, as demonstrated by time-resolved MRI and Mn-biodistribution analysis. Those distinguishing features make it suitable to obtain contrast-enhanced brain magnetic resonance angiography. Moreover, through the process of passive targeting delivery, the T1 contrast agent clearly illuminates a brain tumor (glioma) with high contrast image and defined shape. This study demonstrates that PEGylated KMnF3 nanoparticles represent a promising biocompatible vascular contrast agent for magnetic resonance angiography and can potentially be further developed into an active targeted tumor MRI contrast agent.

  20. Use of contrast media in computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in horses: Techniques, adverse events and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, B B; Goodrich, L R; Barrett, M F; Grinstaff, M W; Kawcak, C E

    2017-07-01

    The use of contrast media in computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasing in horses. These contrast-enhanced imaging techniques provide improved tissue delineation and evaluation, thereby expanding diagnostic capabilities. While generally considered safe, not all contrast media exhibit the same safety profiles. The safety of contrast media use and descriptions of adverse events occurring in horses are sparsely reported. This review summarises the reported evidence of contrast media use and adverse events that occur in horses, with added contribution from other veterinary species and studies in man for comparison. This comprehensive data set empowers equine clinicians to develop use and monitoring strategies when working with contrast media. Finally, it summarises the current state-of-the-art and highlights the potential applications of contrast-enhanced CT and MRI for assessment of diseased or injured equine tissues, as well as (patho)physiological processes. © 2017 EVJ Ltd.

  1. The influence of interparticle correlations and self-assembly on the dynamic initial magnetic susceptibility spectra of ferrofluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, A.O., E-mail: alexey.ivanov@urfu.ru [Institute of Mathematics and Computer Sciences, Ural Federal University, Lenin Avenue 51, 620000 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Kantorovich, S.S. [Institute of Mathematics and Computer Sciences, Ural Federal University, Lenin Avenue 51, 620000 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, Sensengasse 8, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Elfimova, E.A.; Zverev, V.S. [Institute of Mathematics and Computer Sciences, Ural Federal University, Lenin Avenue 51, 620000 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Sindt, J.O. [School of Chemistry, University of Edinburgh, David Brewster Road, Edinburgh EH9 3FJ, Scotland (United Kingdom); Camp, P.J. [Institute of Mathematics and Computer Sciences, Ural Federal University, Lenin Avenue 51, 620000 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); School of Chemistry, University of Edinburgh, David Brewster Road, Edinburgh EH9 3FJ, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2017-06-01

    Using computer simulations and a mean-field theoretical approach, we study how the growth in dipolar interparticle correlations manifests itself in the frequency-dependent initial magnetic susceptibility of a ferrofluid. Our recently developed theory gives the correct single-particle Debye-theory results in the low-concentration, non-interacting regime; and it yields the exact leading-order contributions from interparticle correlations. The susceptibility spectra are analysed in terms of the low-frequency behaviours of the real and imaginary parts, and the position of the peak in the imaginary part. By comparing the theoretical predictions to the results from Brownian dynamics simulations, it is possible to identify the conditions where correlations are important, but where self-assembly has not developed. We also provide a qualitative explanation for the behaviour of spectra beyond the mean-field limit. - Highlights: • The interparticle interaction influences the dynamic susceptibility spectra of magnetic fluids. • The imaginary part maximum shifts to lower frequencies due to the dipolar interparticle interaction. • Chain formation should influence the susceptibility spectrum by shifting the absorption peak to lower frequencies.

  2. The influence of interparticle correlations and self-assembly on the dynamic initial magnetic susceptibility spectra of ferrofluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, A.O.; Kantorovich, S.S.; Elfimova, E.A.; Zverev, V.S.; Sindt, J.O.; Camp, P.J.

    2017-01-01

    Using computer simulations and a mean-field theoretical approach, we study how the growth in dipolar interparticle correlations manifests itself in the frequency-dependent initial magnetic susceptibility of a ferrofluid. Our recently developed theory gives the correct single-particle Debye-theory results in the low-concentration, non-interacting regime; and it yields the exact leading-order contributions from interparticle correlations. The susceptibility spectra are analysed in terms of the low-frequency behaviours of the real and imaginary parts, and the position of the peak in the imaginary part. By comparing the theoretical predictions to the results from Brownian dynamics simulations, it is possible to identify the conditions where correlations are important, but where self-assembly has not developed. We also provide a qualitative explanation for the behaviour of spectra beyond the mean-field limit. - Highlights: • The interparticle interaction influences the dynamic susceptibility spectra of magnetic fluids. • The imaginary part maximum shifts to lower frequencies due to the dipolar interparticle interaction. • Chain formation should influence the susceptibility spectrum by shifting the absorption peak to lower frequencies.

  3. Polarized Neutron Diffraction as a Tool for Mapping Molecular Magnetic Anisotropy: Local Susceptibility Tensors in Co(II) Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridier, Karl; Gillon, Béatrice; Gukasov, Arsen; Chaboussant, Grégory; Cousson, Alain; Luneau, Dominique; Borta, Ana; Jacquot, Jean-François; Checa, Ruben; Chiba, Yukako; Sakiyama, Hiroshi; Mikuriya, Masahiro

    2016-01-11

    Polarized neutron diffraction (PND) experiments were carried out at low temperature to characterize with high precision the local magnetic anisotropy in two paramagnetic high-spin cobalt(II) complexes, namely [Co(II) (dmf)6 ](BPh4 )2 (1) and [Co(II) 2 (sym-hmp)2 ](BPh4 )2 (2), in which dmf=N,N-dimethylformamide; sym-hmp=2,6-bis[(2-hydroxyethyl)methylaminomethyl]-4-methylphenolate, and BPh4 (-) =tetraphenylborate. This allowed a unique and direct determination of the local magnetic susceptibility tensor on each individual Co(II) site. In compound 1, this approach reveals the correlation between the single-ion easy magnetization direction and a trigonal elongation axis of the Co(II) coordination octahedron. In exchange-coupled dimer 2, the determination of the individual Co(II) magnetic susceptibility tensors provides a clear outlook of how the local magnetic properties on both Co(II) sites deviate from the single-ion behavior because of antiferromagnetic exchange coupling. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Downhole logs of natural gamma radiation and magnetic susceptibility and their use in interpreting lithostratigraphy in AND-1B, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, T.; Morin, R. H.; Jarrard, R. D.; Jackolski, C. L.; Henrys, S. A.; Niessen, F.; Magens, D.; Kuhn, G.; Monien, D.; Powell, R. D.

    2010-12-01

    The ANDRILL McMurdo Ice Shelf (MIS) project drilled 1285 metres of sediment representing the last 14 million years of glacial history. Downhole geophysical logs were acquired to a depth of 1018 metres, and are complementary to data acquired from the core itself. We describe here the natural gamma radiation (NGR) and magnetic susceptibility logs, and their application to understanding lithological and paleoenvironmental change at ANDRILL McMurdo Ice Shelf Hole AND-1B. Natural gamma radiation logs cover the whole interval from the sea floor to 1018 metres, and magnetic susceptibility and other logs covered the open-hole intervals between 692-1018 and 237-342 metres. NGR logs were stacked and corrected for signal attenuation through the drill pipe, and magnetic susceptibility logs were corrected for drift. In the upper part of AND-1B, clear alternations between low and high NGR values distinguish between diatomite (lacking minerals containing naturally radioactive K, U, and Th) and diamict (containing K-bearing clays, K-feldspar, and heavy minerals). In the lower open-hole logged section, NGR and magnetic susceptibility can also distinguish claystones (rich in K-bearing clay minerals, relatively low in magnetite) and diamicts (relatively high in magnetite), while sandstones generally have high resistivity log values at AND-1B. On the basis of these three downhole logs, three sets of facies can be predicted correctly for 74% of the 692-1018m interval. The logs were then used to predict facies for the 7% of this interval that was unrecovered by coring. Similarly, the NGR log provides the best information on the lithology of the poorly recovered top 25m of AND-1B. Given the understanding of the physical property characteristics of different facies, it is also possible to identify subtle changes in lithology from the physical properties, and help refine parts of the lithostratigraphy (for example, the varying terrigenous content of diatomites).

  5. Acute myocardial ischemia: magnetic resonance contrast enhancement with gadolinium-DTPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNamara, M.T.; Higgins, C.B.; Ehman, R.L.; Revel, D.; Sievers, R.; Brasch, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    Gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA) was used to improve the diagnostic utility of magnetic resonance (MR) in detecting early ischemia, before the onset of infarction. Following one minute of left anterior descending coronary artery occlusion, 9 dogs were intraveneously injected with either 0.5 mM/kg of Gd-DTPA (6 dogs) or normal saline (3 dogs). There was no visible difference in intensity or alterations in magnetic relaxation times between normal and ischemic myocardium in the control (saline-injected) animals. The Gd-DTPA-injected dogs had a well-defined segment of high intensity representing the ischemic myocardium in the anterior wall of the left ventricle. Both T1 and T2 were significantly shortened in the normal myocardium of the Gd-DTPA animals, but relatively greater T2 relaxation rate enhancement resulted in reduced intensity of normal myocardium, thus increasing contrast with ischemic myocardium. It is concluded that Gd-DTPA has the potential to expand the sensitivity and diagnostic utility of MR in the study of occlusive coronary artery disease

  6. Synthesis and magnetic hyperthermia studies on high susceptible Fe1-xMgxFe2O4 superparamagnetic nanospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manohar, A.; Krishnamoorthi, C.

    2017-12-01

    Majority studies on magnetic hyperthermia properties were carried out by modifying the saturation mass magnetization (Ms) of the samples. Here efforts were made to enhance the specific heat generation rate (SHGR) of single domain superparamagnetic (SP) material by modifying its magnetic susceptibility. Well crystallined, inverse spinel structured and close to monosize Fe1-xMgxFe2O4 (x = 0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, & 0.5) compounds with nanosphere geometry (diameter 10 nm) were synthesized by solvothermal reflux method at ≈ 300 °C . In the literature it is reported that magnesium ferrites synthesized at high temperatures yield mixed (normal & inverse) spinel structures. The inverse spinel structure was confirmed by X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), lattice vibrations and magnetic characteristics of the compounds. The Ms of the compounds decrease with increase of substituent Mg2+ concentration. Under high excitation energy the inter-valance charge transfer whereas under low excitation energy the intra-valance charge transfer process were predominant. The as-synthesized nanospheres were encapsulated by hydrophobic oleic acid and were exchanged by hydrophilic poly(acrylic acid) by chemical exchange process. Estimated magnetic hyperthermia power or SHGR of the x = 0, 0.3 & 0.5 were 11, 11.4 & 22.4 W per gram of respective compounds, respectively, under 63.4 kA m-1 field amplitude and 126 kHz frequency. The SHGR enhances with Mg2+ concentration though its Ms reduces and is attributed to reduced spin-orbital coupling in the compounds with enhanced Mg2+ concentration. This may pave a new way to develop magnetic hyperthermia material by modifying magnetic susceptibility of the compounds against to the reported Ms modification approach. The obtained high SHGR of the biocompatible compounds could be used in magnetic hyperthermia applications in biomedical field.

  7. Magnetic resonance angiography with blood-pool contrast agents: future applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, C. [Univ. Hospitals, Grosshadern, Munich (Germany); Goyen, M. [Univ. Medical Center, Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Lotz, J. [Hannover Medical School, Hannover (Germany)

    2007-03-15

    Blood pool agents remain in the intravascular space for a longer time period. Therefore the optimal imaging window for vascular structures is widened to about 30 minutes. Gadofosveset trisodium (Vasovist, Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Berlin, Germany) is the first blood-pool contrast agent approved in Europe for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) of vessels in the abdomen, pelvis and lower extremity in adults. Other possible applications of blood-pool agents are now being considered, such as assessment of venous thromboembolism, coronary artery disease or sinus venous thrombosis. Perfusion MR imaging holds promise for detecting lung perfusion defects with higher spatial resolution and reduced scan time compared with radionuclide scintigraphy. In coronary artery disease, blood-pool agents enable a substantial increase in the quality of coronary artery imaging. Quantitative myocardial perfusion and myocardial viability seem to be possible, although modifications in protocols and sequence design are necessary for optimal results. Other novel applications of blood-pool agents include monitoring of inflammatory changes in systemic lupus erythematosus and evaluation of tumour invasion into lymph nodes and more reliable assessment of cerebral venous and sinus thrombosis. (orig.)

  8. Magnetic resonance angiography with blood-pool contrast agents: future applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, C.; Goyen, M.; Lotz, J.

    2007-01-01

    Blood pool agents remain in the intravascular space for a longer time period. Therefore the optimal imaging window for vascular structures is widened to about 30 minutes. Gadofosveset trisodium (Vasovist, Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Berlin, Germany) is the first blood-pool contrast agent approved in Europe for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) of vessels in the abdomen, pelvis and lower extremity in adults. Other possible applications of blood-pool agents are now being considered, such as assessment of venous thromboembolism, coronary artery disease or sinus venous thrombosis. Perfusion MR imaging holds promise for detecting lung perfusion defects with higher spatial resolution and reduced scan time compared with radionuclide scintigraphy. In coronary artery disease, blood-pool agents enable a substantial increase in the quality of coronary artery imaging. Quantitative myocardial perfusion and myocardial viability seem to be possible, although modifications in protocols and sequence design are necessary for optimal results. Other novel applications of blood-pool agents include monitoring of inflammatory changes in systemic lupus erythematosus and evaluation of tumour invasion into lymph nodes and more reliable assessment of cerebral venous and sinus thrombosis. (orig.)

  9. Initial study of magnetization transfer contrast MR imaging of the knee at 3 Tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshioka, Hiroshi; Echigo, Junko; Niitsu, Mamoru; Anno, Izumi; Itai, Yuji [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Clinical Medicine; Nakai, Toshiharu; Sato, Hiroshi; Tsukamoto, Tetsuji

    1998-10-01

    It has been reported that various image sequences, including magnetization transfer contrast (MTC) were effective in evaluating articular cartilage. It is difficult to identify cartilaginous structures, however, using conventional MR imaging because of low spatial resolution and low signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the optimal imaging sequences with MTC pulse at 3 T and to assess the feasibility of the clinical application thereof. Five porcine knees were studied using varying imaging parameters (frequency offset, flip angle (FA) and echo time (TE)) combined with off-resonance sinc radiation pulses. The effect of MTC was analyzed by dividing the signal intensity of MTC GRE images by that of conventional GRE images (Ms/Mo). MTC images were obtained with a low specific absorption rate (SAR). With an offset frequency of 1.5 kHz (repetition time/TE/FA=60 ms/8 ms/30 degrees), the mean Ms/Mo of articular cartilage and meniscus was 0.70 and 0.65, respectively. An FA of 20 to 30 degrees and a TE of 11 to 12 ms appear to be optimal parameters at 3 T with MTC pulse because of the higher S/N ratio of cartilage and higher contrast-to-noise ratio of cartilage relative to that of distilled water. These findings suggest that MTC at 3 T may be feasible and effective for assessment of cartilage and meniscus in clinical applications. (author)

  10. Characterization of colloidal manganese hydroxylapatite: A potential magnetic resonance contrast agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorshow, Richard B.; Kofi Adzamli, I.; Nosco, Dennis L.; Joslin, Frederick L.

    1996-03-01

    Particulate contrast agents for blood pool imaging need to be constructed with the appropriate particle size distribution (PSD), and need to be resistant to opsonization. Hence, the PSD of an aqueous colloidal suspension of polyethylene glycol (PEG)-stabilized manganese hydroxylapatite (potentially useful as a magnetic resonance contrast agent for blood pool imaging) has been investigated as a function of PEG concentration and molecular weight. At low PEG concentrations, dynamic light scattering (DLS) and sedimentation field flow fractionation measurements yield a broad PSD, with the largest particle diameters near 100nm. Flow field flow fractionation (FlFFF) measurements, however, yield a distinct population near 10nm, which is not readily detectable by the other two techniques. As the PEG concentration is increased, the PSD shifts toward the lower size population. At the highest PEG concentration employed, only particles of diameter 10nm remain, verified by both FlFFF and DLS. Thus, the search for an optimum PSD for blood pool imaging is facilitated by choice of PEG molecular weight and concentration, and by employing complementary use of light scattering and field flow fractionation techniques.

  11. A Novel Polyacrylamide Magnetic Nanoparticle Contrast Agent for Molecular Imaging using MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradford A. Moffat

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available A novel Polyacrylamide superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle platform is described which has been synthetically prepared such that multiple crystals of iron oxide are encapsulated within a single Polyacrylamide matrix (PolyAcrylamide Magnetic [PAM] nanoparticles. This formulation provides for an extremely large T2 and T2* relaxivity of between 620 and 1140 sec−1 mM−1. Administration of PAM nanoparticles into rats bearing orthotopic 9L gliomas allowed quantitative pharmacokinetic analysis of the uptake of nanoparticles in the vasculature, brain, and glioma. Addition of polyethylene glycol of varying sizes (0.6, 2, and 10 kDa to the surface of the PAM nanoparticles resulted in an increase in plasma half-life and affected tumor uptake and retention of the nanoparticles as quantified by changes in tissue contrast using MRI. The flexible formulation of these nanoparticles suggests that future modifications could be accomplished allowing for their use as a targeted molecular imaging contrast agent and/or therapeutic platform for multiple indications.

  12. Cross-linkable liposomes stabilize a magnetic resonance contrast-enhancing polymeric fastener.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Cartney E; Kong, Hyunjoon

    2014-04-08

    Liposomes are commonly used to deliver drugs and contrast agents to their target site in a controlled manner. One of the greatest obstacles in the performance of such delivery vehicles is their stability in the presence of serum. Here, we demonstrate a method to stabilize a class of liposomes that load gadolinium, a magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agent, as a model cargo on their surfaces. We hypothesized that the sequential adsorption of a gadolinium-binding chitosan fastener on the liposome surface followed by covalent cross-linking of the lipid bilayer would provide enhanced stability and improved MR signal in the presence of human serum. To investigate this hypothesis, liposomes composed of diyne-containing lipids were assembled and functionalized via chitosan conjugated with a hydrophobic anchor and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA). This postadsorption cross-linking strategy served to stabilize the thermodynamically favorable association between liposome and polymeric fastener. Furthermore, the chitosan-coated, cross-linked liposomes proved more effective as delivery vehicles of gadolinium than uncross-linked liposomes due to the reduced liposome degradation and chitosan desorption. Overall, this study demonstrates a useful method to stabilize a broad class of particles used for systemic delivery of various molecular payloads.

  13. Diagnostic Accuracy of Dynamic Contrast Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Characterizing Lung Masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inan, Nagihan; Arslan, Arzu; Donmez, Muhammed; Sarisoy, Hasan Tahsin

    2016-01-01

    Background Imaging plays a critical role not only in the detection, but also in the characterization of lung masses as benign or malignant. Objectives To determine the diagnostic accuracy of dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the differential diagnosis of benign and malignant lung masses. Patients and Methods Ninety-four masses were included in this prospective study. Five dynamic series of T1-weighted spoiled gradient echo (FFE) images were obtained, followed by a T1-weighted FFE sequence in the late phase (5th minutes). Contrast enhancement patterns in the early (25th second) and late (5th minute) phase images were evaluated. For the quantitative evaluation, signal intensity (SI)-time curves were obtained and the maximum relative enhancement, wash-in rate, and time-to-peak enhancement of masses in both groups were calculated. Results The early phase contrast enhancement patterns were homogeneous in 78.2% of the benign masses, while heterogeneous in 74.4% of the malignant tumors. On the late phase images, 70.8% of the benign masses showed homogeneous enhancement, while most of the malignant masses showed heterogeneous enhancement (82.4%). During the first pass, the maximum relative enhancement and wash-in rate values of malignant masses were significantly higher than those of the benign masses (P = 0.03 and 0.04, respectively). The cutoff value at 15% yielded a sensitivity of 85.4%, specificity of 61.2%, and positive predictive value of 68.7% for the maximum relative enhancement. Conclusion Contrast enhancement patterns and SI-time curve analysis of MRI are helpful in the differential diagnosis of benign and malignant lung masses. PMID:27703654

  14. Magnetic Resonance angiography with bolus contrast agent in abdominal aortic aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Cesare, E.; Cerone, G.; Giordano, A.V.; Marsili, L.; Barile, A.; Michelini, O.; Masciocchi, C.; Spartera, C.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose of this paper is to investigate the potentials of 3D breath-hold contrast-enhanced Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) in the diagnosis, follow-up and treatment planning of abdominal aortic aneurysms. Twenty-four patients with infrarenal aortic aneurysm underwent MRA. It was used a 1.5 T unit (GE Horizon, Echospeed 8.2), a phased array surface coil and 3D Fast SPGR T1-weighted sequences acquired on the coronal plane during patient breath-hold and after contrast agent i.v. administration. A bolus-test was done before angiography to optimize imaging delay time. After 3D MRA a Fast-SPGR T1-weighted sequence was acquired on the axial plane. The 3D MRA source images were processed with the MIP algorithm. Qualitative and quantitative analyses were carried out. Helical CT was performed in 6 cases and DSA in 7 cases. Surgery was the reference standard in 15 patients. MRA depicted aneurysm thrombosis in 22 cases, carrefour involvement in 18 cases and iliac arteries involvement in 3 cases. Accessory renal arteries were shown in 4 cases; iliac artery stenosis was associated in 5 cases. There was agreement between MR and Helical CT and DSA findings: surgery confirmed MRA results in 15/15 cases. 3D contrast-enhanced MRA can be considered the method of choice in the follow-up and treatment planning of abdominal aortic aneurysms, because it provides both angiographic and tomographic images: this allows to obtain more information, noninvasively and without the use of ionizing radiations [it

  15. Performance characteristics of magnetic resonance imaging without contrast agents or sedation in pediatric appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didier, Ryne A; Hopkins, Katharine L; Coakley, Fergus V; Krishnaswami, Sanjay; Spiro, David M; Foster, Bryan R

    2017-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has emerged as a promising modality for evaluating pediatric appendicitis. However optimal imaging protocols, including roles of contrast agents and sedation, have not been established and diagnostic criteria have not been fully evaluated. To investigate performance characteristics of rapid MRI without contrast agents or sedation in the diagnosis of pediatric appendicitis. We included patients ages 4-18 years with suspicion of appendicitis who underwent rapid MRI between October 2013 and March 2015 without contrast agent or sedation. After two-radiologist review, we determined performance characteristics of individual diagnostic criteria and aggregate diagnostic criteria by comparing MRI results to clinical outcomes. We used receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves to determine cut-points for appendiceal diameter and wall thickness for optimization of predictive power, and we calculated area under the curve (AUC) as a measure of test accuracy. Ninety-eight MRI examinations were performed in 97 subjects. Overall, MRI had a 94% sensitivity, 95% specificity, 91% positive predictive value and 97% negative predictive value. Optimal cut-points for appendiceal diameter and wall thickness were ≥7 mm and ≥2 mm, respectively. Independently, those cut-points produced sensitivities of 91% and 84% and specificities of 84% and 43%. Presence of intraluminal fluid (30/33) or localized periappendiceal fluid (32/33) showed a significant association with acute appendicitis (Pappendicitis when multiple diagnostic criteria are considered in aggregate. Individual diagnostic criteria including optimized cut-points of ≥7 mm for diameter and ≥2 mm for wall thickness demonstrate high sensitivities but relatively low specificities. Nonvisualization of the appendix favors a negative diagnosis.

  16. Paleomagnetism and Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility study of the Miocene Jack Springs Tuff (Nevada, USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, S.; Petronis, M. S.; Pluhar, C. J.; Gordon, L.

    2014-12-01

    The mid-Miocene Jack Springs Tuff (JST) outcrops across the western Mina Deflection accommodation zone, west-central Nevada and into eastern California. Previously, the source location for the JST was unknown, yet recent studies northwest of Mono Lake, CA have identified a relatively un-rotated structural block in which to reference the paleomagnetic data. Although new studies have indicated that this block may be rotated up to 13º, we argue that the probable source area is located near the Bodie Hills, CA. At this site, the paleomagnetic reference direction is D = 353°, I = 43°, α95 = 7.7° (Carlson et al, 2013). Based on these data, the JST can be used to measure absolute vertical-axis rotation as well as enable reconstruction of the paleo-topography using the corrected anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) data. A total of 19 sites were sampled to constrain Cenozoic to recent vertical axis rotation within the region and AMS experiments were conducted to determine the flow direction of the JST. Curie point estimates indicate that the JST ranges in titanium concentration from 0.042 to 1.10, indicating a low to moderate titanomagnetite phase (Akimoto, 1962). Demagnetization experiments reveal mean destructive fields of the NRM ranging between 15mT and 40mT suggesting that both multi-domain to pseudo-single domain grains are the dominant ferromagnetic phases that carry the remanence and AMS fabric. Preliminary paleomagnetic data yield stable single component demagnetization behavior for most sites that, after structural correction, indicate clockwise vertical axis rotation ranging from +20°± 10° to +60°± 11° between multiple fault blocks. The uncorrected AMS data yield oblate magnetic fabrics that can be used to infer the transport direction, source region, and paleovalley geometry of the JST. These data are tentatively interpreted to indicate west to east transport of the JST across the Mono Basin region into the Mina Deflection that was erupted and

  17. Laboratory Investigation of Complex Conductivity and Magnetic Susceptibility on Natural Iron Oxide Coated Sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C.; Slater, L. D.; Day-Lewis, F. D.; Briggs, M. A.

    2017-12-01

    Redox reactions occurring at the oxic/anoxic interface where groundwater discharges to surface water commonly result in iron oxide deposition that coats sediment grains. With relatively large total surface area, these iron oxide coated sediments serve as a sink for sorption of dissolved contaminants, although this sink may be temporary if redox conditions fluctuate with varied flow conditions. Characterization of the distribution of iron oxides in streambed sediments could provide valuable understanding of biogeochemical reactions and the ability of a natural system to sorb contaminants. Towards developing a field methodology, we conducted laboratory spectral induced polarization (SIP) and magnetic susceptibility (MS) measurements on natural iron oxide coated sand (Fe-sand) with grain sizes ranging from 0.3 to 2.0 mm in order to assess the sensitivity of these measurements to iron oxides in sediments. The Fe-sand was also sorted by sieving into various grain sizes to study the impact of grain size on the polarization mechanisms. The unsorted Fe-sand saturated with 0.01 S/m NaCl solution exhibited a distinct phase response ( > 4 mrad) in the frequency range from 0.001 to 100 Hz whereas regular silica sand was characterized by a phase response less than 1 mrad under the same conditions. The presence of iron oxide substantially increased MS (3.08×10-3 SI) over that of regular sand ( Laboratory results demonstrated that SIP and MS may be well suited to mapping the distribution of iron oxides in streambed sediments associated with anoxic groundwater discharge.

  18. Task-evoked brain functional magnetic susceptibility mapping by independent component analysis (χICA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zikuan; Calhoun, Vince D

    2016-03-01

    Conventionally, independent component analysis (ICA) is performed on an fMRI magnitude dataset to analyze brain functional mapping (AICA). By solving the inverse problem of fMRI, we can reconstruct the brain magnetic susceptibility (χ) functional states. Upon the reconstructed χ dataspace, we propose an ICA-based brain functional χ mapping method (χICA) to extract task-evoked brain functional map. A complex division algorithm is applied to a timeseries of fMRI phase images to extract temporal phase changes (relative to an OFF-state snapshot). A computed inverse MRI (CIMRI) model is used to reconstruct a 4D brain χ response dataset. χICA is implemented by applying a spatial InfoMax ICA algorithm to the reconstructed 4D χ dataspace. With finger-tapping experiments on a 7T system, the χICA-extracted χ-depicted functional map is similar to the SPM-inferred functional χ map by a spatial correlation of 0.67 ± 0.05. In comparison, the AICA-extracted magnitude-depicted map is correlated with the SPM magnitude map by 0.81 ± 0.05. The understanding of the inferiority of χICA to AICA for task-evoked functional map is an ongoing research topic. For task-evoked brain functional mapping, we compare the data-driven ICA method with the task-correlated SPM method. In particular, we compare χICA with AICA for extracting task-correlated timecourses and functional maps. χICA can extract a χ-depicted task-evoked brain functional map from a reconstructed χ dataspace without the knowledge about brain hemodynamic responses. The χICA-extracted brain functional χ map reveals a bidirectional BOLD response pattern that is unavailable (or different) from AICA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Magnetic susceptibilities and thermal expansion of artificial graphites; Susceptibilites magnetiques et dilatation thermique des graphites artificiels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornuault, P; Herpin, A; Hering, H; Seguin, M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Paris (France); Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1960-07-01

    Starting from measurements of the magnetic susceptibility made in the two principal directions of a graphite bar, the distribution function of the normals to the carbon planes in the crystallites has been evaluated. The effect of different variation in the manufacturing process on this crystalline anisotropy has been studied. From this crystalline anisotropy we have calculated the thermal expansion coefficient possessed by a compact mass of crystallites having exactly the same orientational anisotropy as the porous body consideration. The difference between this and the observed expansion coefficient leads to the determination of the expansion of the non-graphitic part of the mass which turns out to have a negative value and is also anisotropic. We have attempted to draw some conclusions from this result. (author) [French] En partant des mesures de la susceptibilite magnetique faites dans les directions des axes principaux d'un barreau de graphite, on a calcule la fonction de distribution des perpendiculaires aux plans graphitiques dans les cristallites. On a etudie les effets que pouvaient provoquer des modifications dans le procede de fabrication sur l'anisotropie cristalline. En considerant cette anisotropie cristalline, nous avons calcule le coefficient de dilatation thermique pour un bloc compact de cristallites ayant exactement la meme anisotropie d'orientation que le corps poreux en question. La difference entre cette valeur et celle mesuree du coefficient de dilatation, nous permet de calculer la dilatation pour la partie non-graphitique du bloc, en l'occurence, on trouve une valeur negative du coefficient pour cette partie, qui est egalement anisotropique. On a essaye d'en tirer quelques conclusions. (auteur)

  20. Complications after liver transplantation: evaluation with magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic resonance cholangiography, and 3-dimensional contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography in a single session

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boraschi, P.; Donati, F.; Gigoni, R.; Salemi, S.; Urbani, L.; Filipponi, F.; Falaschi, F.; Bartolozzi, C.

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate a comprehensive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol as noninvasive diagnostic modality for simultaneous detection of parenchymal, biliary, and vascular complications after liver transplantation. Fifty-two liver transplant recipients suspected to have parenchymal, biliary, and (or) vascular complications underwent our MRI protocol at 1.5T unit using a phased array coil. After preliminary acquisition of axial T 1 w and T 2 w sequences, magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC) was performed through a breath-hold, thin- and thick-slab, single-shot T 2 w sequence in the coronal plane. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CEMRA) was obtained using a 3-dimensional coronal spoiled gradient-echo sequence, which enabled acquisition of 32 partitions 2.0 mm thick. A fixed dose of 20 ml gadobenate dimeglumine was administered at 2 mL/s. A post-contrast T 1 w sequence was also performed. Two observers in conference reviewed source images and 3-dimensional reconstructions to determine the presence of parenchymal, biliary, and vascular complications. MRI findings were correlated with surgery, endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC), biopsy, digital subtraction angiography (DSA), and imaging follow-up. MRI revealed abnormal findings in 32 out of 52 patients (61%), including biliary complications (anastomotic and nonanastomotic strictures, and lithiasis) in 31, vascular disease (hepatic artery stenosis and thrombosis) in 9, and evidence of hepatic abscess and hematoma in 2. ERC confirmed findings of MRC in 30 cases, but suggested disease underestimation in 2. DSA confirmed 7 magnetic resonance angiogram (MRA) findings, but suggested disease overestimation in 2. MRI combined with MRC and CEMRA can provide a comprehensive assessment of parenchymal, biliary, and vascular complications in most recipients of liver transplantation. (author)

  1. Magnetism of a sigma-phase Fe{sub 60}V{sub 40} alloy: Magnetic susceptibilities and magnetocaloric effect studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bałanda, Maria [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Science, PL-31-342 Kraków (Poland); Dubiel, Stanisław M., E-mail: Stanislaw.Dubiel@fis.agh.edu.pl [AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, PL-30-059 Kraków (Poland); Pełka, Robert [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Science, PL-31-342 Kraków (Poland)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Sigma-phase Fe{sub 60}V{sub 40} alloy was studied by means of AC and DC magnetic susceptibilities. • Re-entrant character of the magnetism has been evidenced. • Curie temperature was found as ∼169 K and the spin-freezing temperature as ∼164 K. • Critical exponents β = 0.6, γ = 1.0 and Δ = 1.6 were determined. • Magnetocaloric effect was investigated. - Abstract: Magnetic properties of a sigma-phase Fe{sub 60}V{sub 40} intermetallic compound were studied by means of ac and dc magnetic susceptibility and magnetocaloric effect measurements. The compound is a soft magnet yet it was found to behave like a re-entrant spin-glass system. The magnetic ordering temperature was found to be T{sub C} ≈ 170 K, while the spin-freezing temperature was ∼164 K. Its relative shift per decade of ac frequency was 0.002, a value smaller than that typical of canonical spin-glasses. Magnetic entropy change, ΔS, in the vicinity of T{sub C} was determined for magnetic field, H, ranging between 5 and 50 kOe. Analysis of ΔS in terms of the power law yielded the critical exponent, n, vs. temperature with the minimum value of 0.75 at T{sub C}, while from the analysis of a relative shift of the maximum value of ΔS with the field a critical exponent Δ = 1.7 was obtained. Based on scaling laws relationships values of other two exponents viz. β = 0.6 and γ = 1 were determined.

  2. On the relevance of the ac magnetic susceptibility on the study of superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoder, A.F.; Couach, M.; Barbara, B.

    1988-01-01

    It is shown that the ac susceptibility method allows to study in details the bulk superconductivity of as well homogeneous and inhomogeneous materials, such as high-T c superconductors. Shielding and Meissner effects at T c can be distinguished by a careful analysis of x' and x'' components of the susceptibility

  3. Chitosan-coated nickel-ferrite nanoparticles as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Tanveer [Department of Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics, Abdul Wali Khan University, Mardan (Pakistan); Bae, Hongsub; Iqbal, Yousaf [Department of Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Rhee, Ilsu, E-mail: ilrhee@knu.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Sungwook [Division of Science Education, Daegu University, Gyeongsan 712-714 (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Yongmin; Lee, Jaejun [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, College of Medicine, Kyungpook National University and Hospital, Daegu 700-721 (Korea, Republic of); Sohn, Derac [Department of Physics, Hannam University, Daejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-01

    We report evidence for the possible application of chitosan-coated nickel-ferrite (NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles as both T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The coating of nickel-ferrite nanoparticles with chitosan was performed simultaneously with the synthesis of the nickel-ferrite nanoparticles by a chemical co-precipitation method. The coated nanoparticles were cylindrical in shape with an average length of 17 nm and an average width of 4.4 nm. The bonding of chitosan onto the ferrite nanoparticles was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} relaxivities were 0.858±0.04 and 1.71±0.03 mM{sup −1} s{sup −1}, respectively. In animal experimentation, both a 25% signal enhancement in the T{sub 1}-weighted mage and a 71% signal loss in the T{sub 2}-weighted image were observed. This demonstrated that chitosan-coated nickel-ferrite nanoparticles are suitable as both T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} contrast agents in MRI. We note that the applicability of our nanoparticles as both T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} contrast agents is due to their cylindrical shape, which gives rise to both inner and outer sphere processes of nanoparticles. - Highlights: • Chitosan-coated nickel-ferrite (Ni-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles were synthesized in an aqueous system by chemical co-precipitation. • The characterization of bare and chitosan-coated nanoparticles were performed using various analytical tools, such as TEM, FTIR, XRD, and VMS. • We evaluated the coated particles as potential T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} contrast agents for MRI by measuring T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} relaxation times as a function of iron concentration. • Both T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} effects were also observed in animal experimentation.

  4. Simple method for quantification of gadolinium magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents using ESR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshita, Keizo; Kinoshita, Shota; Okazaki, Shoko

    2012-01-01

    To develop an estimation method of gadolinium magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents, the effect of concentration of Gd compounds on the ESR spectrum of nitroxyl radical was examined. A solution of either 4-oxo-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl (TEMPONE) or 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl (TEMPOL) was mixed with a solution of Gd compound and the ESR spectrum was recorded. Increased concentration of gadolinium-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid chelate (Gd-DTPA), an MRI contrast agent, increased the peak-to-peak line widths of ESR spectra of the nitroxyl radicals, in accordance with a decrease of their signal heights. A linear relationship was observed between concentration of Gd-DTPA and line width of ESR signal, up to approximately 50 mmol/L Gd-DTPA, with a high correlation coefficient. Response of TEMPONE was 1.4-times higher than that of TEMPOL as evaluated from the slopes of the lines. The response was slightly different among Gd compounds; the slopes of calibration curves for acua[N,N-bis[2-[(carboxymethyl)[(methylcarbamoyl)methyl]amino]ethyl]glycinato(3-)]gadolinium hydrate (Gd-DTPA-BMA) (6.22 μT·L/mmol) and gadolinium-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid chelate (Gd-DOTA) (6.62 μT·L/mmol) were steeper than the slope for Gd-DTPA (5.45 μT·L/mmol), whereas the slope for gadolinium chloride (4.94 μT·L/mmol) was less steep than that for Gd-DTPA. This method is simple to apply. The results indicate that this method is useful for rough estimation of the concentration of Gd contrast agents if calibration is carried out with each standard compound. It was also found that the plot of the reciprocal square root of signal height against concentrations of contrast agents could be useful for the estimation if a constant volume of sample solution is taken and measured at the same position in the ESR cavity every time.

  5. Spin dynamics of Mn12-acetate in the thermally activated tunneling regime: ac susceptibility and magnetization relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohjola, Teemu; Schoeller, Herbert

    2000-12-01

    In this work, we study the spin dynamics of Mn12-acetate molecules in the regime of thermally assisted tunneling. In particular, we describe the system in the presence of a strong transverse magnetic field. Similar to recent experiments, the relaxation time/rate is found to display a series of resonances; their Lorentzian shape is found to stem from the tunneling. The dynamic susceptibility χ(ω) is calculated starting from the microscopic Hamiltonian and the resonant structure manifests itself also in χ(ω). Similar to recent results reported on another molecular magnet, Fe8, we find oscillations of the relaxation rate as a function of the transverse magnetic field when the field is directed along a hard axis of the molecules. This phenomenon is attributed to the interference of the geometrical or Berry phase. We propose susceptibility experiments to be carried out for strong transverse magnetic fields to study these oscillations and for a better resolution of the sharp satellite peaks in the relaxation rates.

  6. Comparison of Accuracy of Contrast Enhanced Computed Tomography with Accuracy of Non-Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Evaluation of Local Extension of Base of Tongue Malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketan Rathod

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosis of base of tongue malignancy can be obtained through clinical examination and biopsy. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI and Computed Tomography (CT are used to detect its local extension, nodal spread and distant metastases. The main aim of study was to compare the accuracy of MRI and contrast enhanced CT in determining the local extent of base of tongue malignancy. Twenty five patients, biopsy proven cases of squamous cell carcinoma of base of tongue were taken. 1.5 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Unit with T2 weighted axial, coronal image; T1 weighted axial, coronal image; and STIR (Short tau inversion recovery axial and coronal images were used. 16 slice Computed Tomography unit with non-contrast and contrast enhanced images were used. Accuracy of CT to detect midline crossing: 50%; accuracy of MRI to detect midline crossing: 100%; accuracy of CT to detect anterior extension: 92%; accuracy of MRI to detect anterior extension: 100%; accuracy of CT to detect tonsillar fossa invasion: 83%; accuracy of MRI to detect tonsillar fossa invasion: 100%; accuracy of CT to detect oro pharyngeal spread: 83%; accuracy of MRI to detect oro pharyngeal spread: 100%; accuracy of CT to detect bone involvement: 20%; accuracy of MRI to detect bone involvement: 100%. MRI proved to be a better investigation than CT, in terms of evaluation of depth of invasion, presence of bony involvement, extension to opposite side, anterior half of tongue, tonsillar fossa, floor of mouth or oropharynx.

  7. Effects of iodinated contrast agent, xylocaine and gadolinium concentration on the signal emitted in magnetic resonance arthrography: a samples study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvana Lopes Pinheiro da Silva

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the effects of dilution of paramagnetic contrast agent with iodinated contrast and xylocaine on the signal intensity during magnetic resonance arthrography, and to improve the paramagnetic contrast agent concentration utilized in this imaging modality. Materials and Methods: Samples specially prepared for the study with three different concentrations of paramagnetic contrast agent diluted in saline, iodinated contrast agent and xylocaine were imaged with fast spin echo T1-weighted sequences with fat saturation. The samples were placed into flasks and graphical analysis of the signal intensity was performed as a function of the paramagnetic contrast concentration. Results: As compared with samples of equal concentrations diluted only with saline, the authors have observed an average signal intensity decrease of 20.67% for iodinated contrast agent, and of 28.34% for xylocaine. However, the increased gadolinium concentration in the samples caused decrease in signal intensity with all the dilutions. Conclusion: Minimizing the use of iodinated contrast media and xylocaine and/or the use of a gadolinium concentration of 2.5 mmol/L diluted in saline will improve the sensitivity of magnetic resonance arthrography.

  8. Magnetic susceptibility of road deposited sediments at a national scale – Relation to population size and urban pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordanova, Diana; Jordanova, Neli; Petrov, Petar

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic properties of road dusts from 26 urban sites in Bulgaria are studied. Temporal variations of magnetic susceptibility (χ) during eighteen months monitoring account for approximately 1/3rd of the mean annual values. Analysis of heavy metal contents and magnetic parameters for the fraction d  2  = −0.84) is observed between the ratio ARM/χ and Pb content. It suggests that Pb is related to brake/tyre wear emissions, releasing larger particles and higher Pb during slow driving – braking. Bulk χ values of road dusts per city show significant correlation with population size and mean annual NO 2 concentration on a log-normal scale. The results demonstrate the applicability of magnetic measurements of road dusts for estimation of mean NO 2 levels at high spatial density, which is important for pollution modelling and health risk assessment. - Highlights: • temporal variations of road dust magnetic susceptibility comprise 1/3 of the signal. • high negative correlation between Pb content and magnetic ratio ARM/χ is obtained. • brake- and tyre ware emissions are the main pollution sources of the road dusts. • road dust magnetic susceptibility rises parallel with logarithm of population size. • linear correlation is found between mean NO 2 concentrations and susceptibility. - Magnetic susceptibility of road dusts on a national scale increases proportionally to the population size and mean NO 2 concentrations due to the effect of traffic related pollution

  9. Gd_2O_3 nanoparticles stabilized by hydrothermally modified dextrose for positive contrast magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babić-Stojić, Branka; Jokanović, Vukoman; Milivojević, Dušan; Požek, Miroslav; Jagličić, Zvonko; Makovec, Darko; Arsikin, Katarina; Paunović, Verica

    2016-01-01

    Gd_2O_3 nanoparticles of a few nm in size and their agglomerates dispersed in dextrose derived polymer template were synthesized by hydrothermal treatment. The produced nanosized material was investigated by TEM, FTIR spectroscopy, SQUID measurements and NMR relaxometry. Biological evaluation of this material was done by crystal violet and MTT assays to determine the cell viability. Longitudinal and transverse NMR relaxivities of water diluted Gd_2O_3 nanoparticle dispersions measured at the magnetic field of 1.5 T, estimated to be r_1(Gd_2O_3)=9.6 s"−"1 mM"−"1 in the Gd concentration range 0.1–30 mM and r_2(Gd_2O_3)=17.7 s"−"1 mM"−"1 in the lower concentration range 0.1–0.8 mM, are significantly higher than the corresponding relaxivities measured for the standard contrast agent r_1(Gd-DTPA)=4.1 s"−"1 mM"−"1 and r_2(Gd-DTPA)=5.1 s"−"1 mM"−"1. The ratio of the two relaxivities for Gd_2O_3 nanoparticles r_2/r_1=1.8 is suitable for T_1-weighted imaging. Good MRI signal intensities of the water diluted Gd_2O_3 nanoparticle dispersions were recorded at lower Gd concentrations 0.2–0.8 mM. The Gd_2O_3 samples did not exert any significant cytotoxic effects at Gd concentrations of 0.2 mM and below. These properties of the produced Gd_2O_3 nanoparticles in hydrothermally modified dextrose make them promising for potential application in MRI for the design of a positive MRI contrast agent. - Highlights: • Gd_2O_3 nanoparticles (NPs) were stabilized by hydrothermally modified dextrose. • Magnetic moment per Gd"3"+ ion in the Gd_2O_3 NPs is much lower than that in the bulk. • The ratio r_2/r_1=1.8 for Gd_2O_3 NPs dispersions is favorable for T_1-weighted MRI. • Gd_2O_3 NPs dispersions had good MRI signal intensity just at lower Gd concentrations. • Gd concentrations of 0.2 mM and below in the Gd_2O_3 NPs dispersions were not toxic.

  10. Feasibility study of determining axial stress in ferromagnetic bars using reciprocal amplitude of initial differential susceptibility obtained from static magnetization by permanent magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Dongge; Wu, Xinjun

    2018-03-01

    An electromagnetic method for determining axial stress in ferromagnetic bars is proposed. In this method, the tested bar is under the static magnetization provided by permanent magnets. The tested bar do not have to be magnetized up to the technical saturation because reciprocal amplitude of initial differential susceptibility (RAIDS) is adopted as the feature parameter. RAIDS is calculated from the radial magnetic flux density Br Lo = 0.5 at the Lift-off Lo = 0.5 mm, radial magnetic flux density Br Lo = 1 at the Lift-off Lo = 1 mm and axial magnetic flux density Bz Lo = 1 at the Lift-off Lo = 1 mm from the surface of the tested bar. Firstly, the theoretical derivation of RAIDS is carried out according to Gauss' law for magnetism, Ampere's Law and the Rayleigh relation in Rayleigh region. Secondly, the experimental system is set up for a 2-meter length and 20 mm diameter steel bar. Thirdly, an experiment is carried out on the steel bar to analyze the relationship between the obtained RAIDS and the axial stress. Experimental results show that the obtained RAIDS decreases almost linearly with the increment of the axial stress inside the steel bar in the initial elastic region. The proposed method has the potential to determine tensile axial stress in the slender cylindrical ferromagnetic bar.

  11. Cardiac magnetic resonance: is phonocardiogram gating reliable in velocity-encoded phase contrast imaging?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nassenstein, Kai; Schlosser, Thomas; Orzada, Stephan; Ladd, Mark E.; Maderwald, Stefan; Haering, Lars; Czylwik, Andreas; Jensen, Christoph; Bruder, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    To assess the diagnostic accuracy of phonocardiogram (PCG) gated velocity-encoded phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Flow quantification above the aortic valve was performed in 68 patients by acquiring a retrospectively PCG- and a retrospectively ECG-gated velocity-encoded GE-sequence at 1.5 T. Peak velocity (PV), average velocity (AV), forward volume (FV), reverse volume (RV), net forward volume (NFV), as well as the regurgitant fraction (RF) were assessed for both datasets, as well as for the PCG-gated datasets after compensation for the PCG trigger delay. PCG-gated image acquisition was feasible in 64 patients, ECG-gated in all patients. PCG-gated flow quantification overestimated PV (Δ 3.8 ± 14.1 cm/s; P = 0.037) and underestimated FV (Δ -4.9 ± 15.7 ml; P = 0.015) and NFV (Δ -4.5 ± 16.5 ml; P = 0.033) compared with ECG-gated imaging. After compensation for the PCG trigger delay, differences were only observed for PV (Δ 3.8 ± 14.1 cm/s; P = 0.037). Wide limits of agreement between PCG- and ECG-gated flow quantification were observed for all variables (PV: -23.9 to 31.4 cm/s; AV: -4.5 to 3.9 cm/s; FV: -35.6 to 25.9 ml; RV: -8.0 to 7.2 ml; NFV: -36.8 to 27.8 ml; RF: -10.4 to 10.2 %). The present study demonstrates that PCG gating in its current form is not reliable enough for flow quantification based on velocity-encoded phase contrast gradient echo (GE) sequences. (orig.)

  12. Gd2O3 nanoparticles stabilized by hydrothermally modified dextrose for positive contrast magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babić-Stojić, Branka; Jokanović, Vukoman; Milivojević, Dušan; Požek, Miroslav; Jagličić, Zvonko; Makovec, Darko; Arsikin, Katarina; Paunović, Verica

    2016-04-01

    Gd2O3 nanoparticles of a few nm in size and their agglomerates dispersed in dextrose derived polymer template were synthesized by hydrothermal treatment. The produced nanosized material was investigated by TEM, FTIR spectroscopy, SQUID measurements and NMR relaxometry. Biological evaluation of this material was done by crystal violet and MTT assays to determine the cell viability. Longitudinal and transverse NMR relaxivities of water diluted Gd2O3 nanoparticle dispersions measured at the magnetic field of 1.5 T, estimated to be r1(Gd2O3)=9.6 s-1 mM-1 in the Gd concentration range 0.1-30 mM and r2(Gd2O3)=17.7 s-1 mM-1 in the lower concentration range 0.1-0.8 mM, are significantly higher than the corresponding relaxivities measured for the standard contrast agent r1(Gd-DTPA)=4.1 s-1 mM-1 and r2(Gd-DTPA)=5.1 s-1 mM-1. The ratio of the two relaxivities for Gd2O3 nanoparticles r2/r1=1.8 is suitable for T1-weighted imaging. Good MRI signal intensities of the water diluted Gd2O3 nanoparticle dispersions were recorded at lower Gd concentrations 0.2-0.8 mM. The Gd2O3 samples did not exert any significant cytotoxic effects at Gd concentrations of 0.2 mM and below. These properties of the produced Gd2O3 nanoparticles in hydrothermally modified dextrose make them promising for potential application in MRI for the design of a positive MRI contrast agent.

  13. Relationships between magnetic susceptibility and heavy metals in urban topsoils in the arid region of Isfahan, central Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Rezvan; Ayoubi, Shamsollah; Jalalian, Ahmad; Sheikh-Hosseini, Ahmad Reza; Afyuni, Majid

    2011-05-01

    Recently methods dealing with magnetometry have been proposed as a proper proxy for assessing the heavy metal pollution of soils. A total of 113 topsoil samples were collected from public parks and green strips along the rim of roads with high-density traffic within the city of Isfahan, central Iran. The magnetic susceptibility (χ) of the collected soil samples was measured at both low and high frequency (χlf and χhf) using the Bartington MS2 dual frequency sensor. As, Cd, Cr, Ba, Cu, Mn, Pb, Zn, Sr and V concentrations were measured in the all collected soil samples. Significant correlations were found between Zn and Cu (0.85) and between Zn and Pb (0.84). The χfd value of urban topsoil varied from 0.45% to 7.7%. Low mean value of χfd indicated that the magnetic properties of the samples are predominately contributed by multi-domain grains, rather than by super-paramagnetic particles. Lead, Cu, Zn, and Ba showed positive significant correlations with magnetic susceptibility, but As, Sr, Cd, Mn, Cr and V, had no significant correlation with the magnetic susceptibility. There was a significant correlation between pollution load index (PLI) and χlf. PLI was computed to evaluate the soil environmental quality of selected heavy metals. Moreover, the results of multiple regression analysis between χlf and heavy metal concentrations indicated the LnPb, V and LnCu could explain approximately 54% of the total variability of χlf in the study area. These results indicate the potential of the magnetometric methods to evaluate the heavy metal pollution of soils.

  14. Maximum Entropy Approach in Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farsani, Zahra Amini; Schmid, Volker J

    2017-01-01

    In the estimation of physiological kinetic parameters from Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI) data, the determination of the arterial input function (AIF) plays a key role. This paper proposes a Bayesian method to estimate the physiological parameters of DCE-MRI along with the AIF in situations, where no measurement of the AIF is available. In the proposed algorithm, the maximum entropy method (MEM) is combined with the maximum a posterior approach (MAP). To this end, MEM is used to specify a prior probability distribution of the unknown AIF. The ability of this method to estimate the AIF is validated using the Kullback-Leibler divergence. Subsequently, the kinetic parameters can be estimated with MAP. The proposed algorithm is evaluated with a data set from a breast cancer MRI study. The application shows that the AIF can reliably be determined from the DCE-MRI data using MEM. Kinetic parameters can be estimated subsequently. The maximum entropy method is a powerful tool to reconstructing images from many types of data. This method is useful for generating the probability distribution based on given information. The proposed method gives an alternative way to assess the input function from the existing data. The proposed method allows a good fit of the data and therefore a better estimation of the kinetic parameters. In the end, this allows for a more reliable use of DCE-MRI. Schattauer GmbH.

  15. Venous reflux on contrast-enhanced head and neck magnetic resonance angiography: Analysis of causative factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Dong Jae; Lee, Eun Ja; Bae, Jong Myon

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the causative factors of venous reflux on contrast-enhanced head and neck magnetic resonance angiography. We retrospectively reviewed 150 patients with right-arm injections and 150 patients with left-arm injections. We included the age, gender, body mass index, history of hypertension, and history of diabetes mellitus in the evaluation of all patients. We measured the shortest width of the left or right brachiocephalic vein (BCV), the diameter of the aortic arch, and the distance between the sternum and vertebral body. The relationship between these factors and the venous reflux was analyzed. In patients with venous reflux, we performed qualitative image scoring for suboptimal images. In patients with venous reflux, the image quality of the left-arm injection group was significantly inferior to the image quality of the right-arm injection group. The mean age and the male-to-female ratio of patients with venous reflux were significantly higher than those of patients without venous reflux. In patients receiving the left-arm injection, the mean shortest width of the left BCV was significantly narrower in patients with venous reflux than in patients without venous reflux. A left-arm injection should be avoided, especially in elderly patients, to acquire an optimal image

  16. Venous reflux on contrast-enhanced head and neck magnetic resonance angiography: Analysis of causative factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Dong Jae; Lee, Eun Ja [Dept. of Radiology, Dongguk University Ilsan Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Jong Myon [Dept. of Preventive Medicine, Jeju National University School of Medicine, Jeju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the causative factors of venous reflux on contrast-enhanced head and neck magnetic resonance angiography. We retrospectively reviewed 150 patients with right-arm injections and 150 patients with left-arm injections. We included the age, gender, body mass index, history of hypertension, and history of diabetes mellitus in the evaluation of all patients. We measured the shortest width of the left or right brachiocephalic vein (BCV), the diameter of the aortic arch, and the distance between the sternum and vertebral body. The relationship between these factors and the venous reflux was analyzed. In patients with venous reflux, we performed qualitative image scoring for suboptimal images. In patients with venous reflux, the image quality of the left-arm injection group was significantly inferior to the image quality of the right-arm injection group. The mean age and the male-to-female ratio of patients with venous reflux were significantly higher than those of patients without venous reflux. In patients receiving the left-arm injection, the mean shortest width of the left BCV was significantly narrower in patients with venous reflux than in patients without venous reflux. A left-arm injection should be avoided, especially in elderly patients, to acquire an optimal image.

  17. Evaluation of colonic involvement in endometriosis: double-contrast barium enema vs. magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faccioli, N; Foti, G; Manfredi, R; Mainardi, P; Spoto, E; Ruffo, G; Minelli, L; Mucelli, R Pozzi

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the accuracy of double-contrast barium enema (DCBE) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis of intestinal endometriosis using the histological examination on resected specimen as comparative standard. Eighty-three consecutive patients with suspected intestinal endometriosis, resected between 2005 and 2007, were prospectively evaluated. All of the women underwent preoperative DCBE and MRI on the same day. We evaluated number, site (rectum, sigmoid, cecum), and size of the lesions. The imaging findings were correlated with those resulting at pathology. Among the 65 women who underwent surgery, 50/65 (76.9%) were found to have bowel endometriosis, with 9/50 (18%) patients presenting two lesions; DCBE allowed to detect 50/59 (84.7%) lesions. MRI allowed to detect 42/59 (71.1%) lesions. DCBE showed sensibility, specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy of respectively 84.7, 93.7, 98.0, 62.5, and 86.6%, MRI of 71.1, 83.3, 93.3, 46.8, and 74.6%. DCBE is more accurate than unenhanced MRI in the diagnosis of bowel endometriosis, and should be preferred in the preoperative management of this disease, since it usually enables a proper surgical planning.

  18. Demonstration of evolution of hemispherical spondysclerosis by contrast enhanced Gd-DTPA magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jevtic, V.; Majcen, N.

    2004-01-01

    Background. The purpose of the study was to estimate the value of Gd-DTPA magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in demonstrating the evolution of hemispherical spondylosclerosis (HSS). Patients and methods. In eighteen patients with chronic low back pain and typical radiographic findings of HSS seen on plain films, Gd-DTPA MRI of the lumbar spine was performed. MRI morphological and signal intensity appearances of HSS were analysed and compared with radiographic changes. Results. On the basis of MRI features, three distinct groups of cases were identifiable. Within the first group the region of dome-shaped osteosclerosis demonstrated low signal intensity on T1-weighted precontrast spin-echo images, high signal intensity on T2-weighted images and diffuse contrast enhancement on T1-weighted postcontrast images, findings compatible with bone marrow oedema and hyperaemia. The second group showed high signal intensity vertebral body corners surrounded by low signal intensity area, which indicated the combination of fat accumulation and the sclerotic bone. In the third intermediate group anterior disco-vertebral junctions revealed a mixture of MRI appearances characteristic of the first and the second group. Conclusions. Gd-DTPA MRI is capable of demonstrating a spectrum of features which reflect the evolution of HSS. These typical appearances showed by MRI could be of eventual clinical relevance in following the progression of HSS. (author)

  19. A.c. susceptibility measurements in the presence of d.c. magnetic fields for Nd-Ba-Cu-O superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watahiki, M.; Murakami, M.; Yoo, S.I.

    1997-01-01

    We report the temperature and magnetic field dependence of the complex a.c. susceptibility with bias d.c. magnetic fields for melt-processed Nd-Ba-Cu-O superconductor. The onset temperature (T onset ) of the real part of a.c. susceptibility shifted to a lower temperature with increasing d.c. magnetic field. The superconducting transition temperature (T c ) determined by d.c. magnetization measurements did not shift appreciably to a lower-temperature region with increasing d.c. magnetic field. The distinction between T onset and T c indicates that the a.c. susceptibility measurements detect the energy dissipation generated by the motion of flux lines. We have also measured flux profiles and found that there was no appreciable change in flux penetration below and above the peak field, which suggests that the peak effect in Nd-Ba-Cu-O is not due to the phase transition in the flux line lattice. (author)

  20. Importance of contrast-enhanced fluid-attenuated inversion reconvery magnetic resonance imaging in various intracranial pathologic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Kyoung; Lee, Eun Ja; Kim, Sung Won; Lee, Yong Seok [Dept. of Radiology, Dongguk University Ilsan Hospital, Goyang(Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    Intracranial lesions may show contrast enhancement through various mechanisms that are closely associated with the disease process. The preferred magnetic resonance sequence in contrast imaging is T1-weighted imaging (T1WI) at most institutions. However, lesion enhancement is occasionally inconspicuous on T1WI. Although fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequences are commonly considered as T2-weighted imaging with dark cerebrospinal fluid, they also show mild T1-weighted contrast, which is responsible for the contrast enhancement. For several years, FLAIR imaging has been successfully incorporated as a routine sequence at our institution for contrast-enhanced (CE) brain imaging in detecting various intracranial diseases. In this pictorial essay, we describe and illustrate the diagnostic importance of CE-FLAIR imaging in various intracranial pathologic conditions.

  1. Multivalent contrast agents based on Gd-DTPA-terminated poly (propylene imine) dendrimers for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langereis, S.; Lussanet, de Q.G; Genderen, van M.H.P.; Backes, W.H.; Meijer, E.W.

    2004-01-01

    A convenient methodol. has been developed for the synthesis of gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA)-terminated poly(propylene imine) dendrimers as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In our strategy, isocyanate-activated, tert-butyl-protected DTPA analogs were

  2. Study of amorphous semiconductors doped with rare earths (Gd and Er) and conducting polymers by EPR techniques and magnetic susceptibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sercheli, Mauricio da Silva

    1999-01-01

    This thesis involves the study of amorphous semiconductors and conducting polymers, which have been characterized by EPR and magnetic susceptibility measurements, and to a lesser extent by Raman spectroscopy and RBS. The semiconductors were studied using thin films of silicon doped with rare earth metals, e.g. erbium and gadolinium, which had their magnetic properties studied. Using these studies we could determine the state of valence of the rare earths as well as their concentrations in the silicon matrix. According to our results, the valence of the rare earth metal ions is 3+, and we were able to conclude that 4f electronic shells could not be used for the calculation of the conducting band in this system. Furthermore, the analysis of the data on the magnetic susceptibility of the Er 3+ ion with cubic crystalline acting field, gave us the opportunity to estimate the overall splitting of their electronic states for the first time. The conducting polymers were studied using samples of poly(3-methylthiophene) doped with ClO 4 - , which show a phase transition in the range of 230 K to 130 K. The electron paramagnetic resonance also gives important information on the crystallization, doping level and the presence of polarons or bipolarons in conducting polymers. (author)

  3. Lithology and chronology of ice-sheet fluctuations (magnetic susceptibility of cores from the western Ross Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Anne E.

    1993-01-01

    The goals of the marine geology part of WAIS include reconstructing the chronology and areal extent of ice-sheet fluctuations and understanding the climatic and oceanographic influences on ice-sheet history. As an initial step toward attaining these goals, down-core volume magnetic susceptibility (MS) logs of piston cores from three N-S transects in the western Ross Sea are compared. The core transects are within separate petrographic provinces based on analyses of till composition. The provinces are thought to reflect the previous locations of ice streams on the shelf during the last glaciation. Magnetic susceptibility is a function of magnetic mineral composition, sediment texture, and sediment density. It is applied in the western Ross Sea for two purposes: (1) to determine whether MS data differentiates the three transects (i.e., flow lines), and thus can be used to make paleodrainage reconstructions of the late Wisconsinan ice sheet; and (2) to determine whether the MS data can aid in distinguishing basal till diamictons from diamictons of glacial-marine origin and thus, aid paleoenvironmental interpretations. A comparison of the combined data of cores in each transect is presented.

  4. Application of histogram analysis for the evaluation of vascular permeability in glioma by the K2 parameter obtained with the dynamic susceptibility contrast method: Comparisons with Ktrans obtained with the dynamic contrast enhance method and cerebral blood volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taoka, Toshiaki; Kawai, Hisashi; Nakane, Toshiki; Hori, Saeka; Ochi, Tomoko; Miyasaka, Toshiteru; Sakamoto, Masahiko; Kichikawa, Kimihiko; Naganawa, Shinji

    2016-09-01

    The "K2" value is a factor that represents the vascular permeability of tumors and can be calculated from datasets obtained with the dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) method. The purpose of the current study was to correlate K2 with Ktrans, which is a well-established permeability parameter obtained with the dynamic contrast enhance (DCE) method, and determine the usefulness of K2 for glioma grading with histogram analysis. The subjects were 22 glioma patients (Grade II: 5, III: 6, IV: 11) who underwent DSC studies, including eight patients in which both DSC and DCE studies were performed on separate days within 10days. We performed histogram analysis of regions of interest of the tumors and acquired 20th percentile values for leakage-corrected cerebral blood volume (rCBV20%ile), K2 (K220%ile), and for patients who underwent a DCE study, Ktrans (Ktrans20%ile). We evaluated the correlation between K220%ile and Ktrans20%ile and the statistical difference between rCBV20%ile and K220%ile. We found a statistically significant correlation between K220%ile and Ktrans20%ile (r=0.717, pK220%ile showed a statistically significant (pK2 value calculated from the DSC dataset, which can be obtained with a short acquisition time, showed a correlation with Ktrans obtained with the DCE method and may be useful for glioma grading when analyzed with histogram analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of magnetic and nonmagnetic impurities on the spin susceptibility of a noncentrosymmetrical superconductor: Application to CePt3Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavari, H.; Mokhtari, M.; Tamaddonpour, M.

    2013-10-01

    The combined effect of nonmagnetic and magnetic impurities on the spin susceptibility of a noncentrosymmetrical superconductor by considering a Cooper pairing model with a two-component order parameter composed of spin-singlet and spin-triplet pairing components is investigated. For clean superconductor CePt3Si, the low-temperature dependence (T →0) of spin susceptibility is linear which suggests that the gap function has line nodes, consistent with our gap model. We will show that in the presence of magnetic impurities the susceptibility does not vanish even in the absence of spin orbit coupling and in the region where the energy gap still is finite, and in the low concentration of magnetic impurities the spin susceptibility at zero temperature is proportional to impurity concentration.

  6. New calcium-selective smart contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Kirti Dhingra; Forgács, Attila; Uh, Hyounsoo; Beyerlein, Michael; Maier, Martin E; Petoud, Stéphane; Botta, Mauro; Logothetis, Nikos K

    2013-12-23

    Calcium plays a vital role in the human body and especially in the central nervous system. Precise maintenance of Ca(2+) levels is very crucial for normal cell physiology and health. The deregulation of calcium homeostasis can lead to neuronal cell death and brain damage. To study this functional role played by Ca(2+) in the brain noninvasively by using magnetic resonance imaging, we have synthesized a new set of Ca(2+) -sensitive smart contrast agents (CAs). The agents were found to be highly selective to Ca(2+) in the presence of other competitive anions and cations in buffer and in physiological fluids. The structure of CAs comprises Gd(3+)-DO3A (DO3A=1,4,7-tris(carboxymethyl)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane) coupled to a Ca(2+) chelator o-amino phenol-N,N,O-triacetate (APTRA). The agents are designed to sense Ca(2+) present in extracellular fluid of the brain where its concentration is relatively high, that is, 1.2-0.8 mM. The determined dissociation constant of the CAs to Ca(2+) falls in the range required to sense and report changes in extracellular Ca(2+) levels followed by an increase in neural activity. In buffer, with the addition of Ca(2+) the increase in relaxivity ranged from 100-157%, the highest ever known for any T1-based Ca(2+)-sensitive smart CA. The CAs were analyzed extensively by the measurement of luminescence lifetime measurement on Tb(3+) analogues, nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD), and (17)O NMR transverse relaxation and shift experiments. The results obtained confirmed that the large relaxivity enhancement observed upon Ca(2+) addition is due to the increase of the hydration state of the complexes together with the slowing down of the molecular rotation and the retention of a significant contribution of the water molecules of the second sphere of hydration. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Magnetic field induced third order susceptibility of third order harmonic generation in a ZnMgSe strained quantum well

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark, J. Abraham Hudson, E-mail: a.john.peter@gmail.com; Peter, A. John, E-mail: a.john.peter@gmail.com [Dept. of Physics, SSM Institute of Engineering and Technology, Dindigul-624002 (India)

    2014-04-24

    Third order susceptibility of third order harmonic generation is investigated in a Zn{sub 0.1}Mg{sub 0.9}Se/Zn{sub 0.8}Mg{sub 0.2}Se/Zn{sub 0.1}Mg{sub 0.9}Se quantum well in the presence of magnetic field strength. The confinement potential is considered as the addition of energy offsets of the conduction band (or valence band) and the strain-induced potential in our calculations. The material dependent effective mass is followed throughout the computation because it has a high influence on the electron energy levels in low dimensional semiconductor systems.

  8. Moessbauer, electron paramagnetic resonance and magnetic susceptibility studies of photosensitive nitrile hydratase from Rhodococcus sp. N-771

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagamune, Teruyuki; Honda, Jun; Kobayashi, Yoshio; Sasabe, Hiroyuki; Endo, Isao; Ambe, Fumitoshi; Teratani, Yoshitaka; Hirata, Akira

    1992-01-01

    Moessbauer, magnetic susceptibility and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies of inactive and photoactivated NHase enzymes were performed to elucidate the electronic change of non-heme two-iron atom center of the enzyme by photoactivation. These spectroscopic investigations revealed that both the two iron atoms of the active NHase could be assigned to low-spin ferric state, and those of the inactive NHase could each be assigned to low-spin ferric and low-spin ferrous ones. From these results, it was concluded that one of the non-heme iron atoms is oxidized in the inactive NHase during photoactivation. (orig.)

  9. Differentiating perforated from non-perforated appendicitis on contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenbaum, Daniel G.; Kovanlikaya, Arzu; Askin, Gulce; Beneck, Debra M.

    2017-01-01

    The role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in pediatric appendicitis is increasing; MRI findings predictive of appendiceal perforation have not been specifically evaluated. To assess the performance of MRI in differentiating perforated from non-perforated appendicitis. A retrospective review of pediatric patients undergoing contrast-enhanced MRI and subsequent appendectomy was performed, with surgicopathological confirmation of perforation. Appendiceal diameter and the following 10 MRI findings were assessed: appendiceal restricted diffusion, wall defect, appendicolith, periappendiceal free fluid, remote free fluid, restricted diffusion within free fluid, abscess, peritoneal enhancement, ileocecal wall thickening and ileus. Two-sample t-test and chi-square tests were used to analyze continuous and discrete data, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity for individual MRI findings were calculated and optimal thresholds for measures of accuracy were selected. Seventy-seven patients (mean age: 12.2 years) with appendicitis were included, of whom 22 had perforation. The perforated group had a larger mean appendiceal diameter and mean number of MRI findings than the non-perforated group (12.3 mm vs. 8.6 mm; 5.0 vs. 2.0, respectively). Abscess, wall defect and restricted diffusion within free fluid had the greatest specificity for perforation (1.00, 1.00 and 0.96, respectively) but low sensitivity (0.36, 0.25 and 0.32, respectively). The receiver operator characteristic curve for total number of MRI findings had an area under the curve of 0.92, with an optimal threshold of 3.5. A threshold of any 4 findings had the best ability to accurately discriminate between perforated and non-perforated cases, with a sensitivity of 82% and specificity of 85%. Contrast-enhanced MRI can differentiate perforated from non-perforated appendicitis. The presence of multiple findings increases diagnostic accuracy, with a threshold of any four findings optimally discriminating between

  10. Differentiating perforated from non-perforated appendicitis on contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Daniel G; Askin, Gulce; Beneck, Debra M; Kovanlikaya, Arzu

    2017-10-01

    The role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in pediatric appendicitis is increasing; MRI findings predictive of appendiceal perforation have not been specifically evaluated. To assess the performance of MRI in differentiating perforated from non-perforated appendicitis. A retrospective review of pediatric patients undergoing contrast-enhanced MRI and subsequent appendectomy was performed, with surgicopathological confirmation of perforation. Appendiceal diameter and the following 10 MRI findings were assessed: appendiceal restricted diffusion, wall defect, appendicolith, periappendiceal free fluid, remote free fluid, restricted diffusion within free fluid, abscess, peritoneal enhancement, ileocecal wall thickening and ileus. Two-sample t-test and chi-square tests were used to analyze continuous and discrete data, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity for individual MRI findings were calculated and optimal thresholds for measures of accuracy were selected. Seventy-seven patients (mean age: 12.2 years) with appendicitis were included, of whom 22 had perforation. The perforated group had a larger mean appendiceal diameter and mean number of MRI findings than the non-perforated group (12.3 mm vs. 8.6 mm; 5.0 vs. 2.0, respectively). Abscess, wall defect and restricted diffusion within free fluid had the greatest specificity for perforation (1.00, 1.00 and 0.96, respectively) but low sensitivity (0.36, 0.25 and 0.32, respectively). The receiver operator characteristic curve for total number of MRI findings had an area under the curve of 0.92, with an optimal threshold of 3.5. A threshold of any 4 findings had the best ability to accurately discriminate between perforated and non-perforated cases, with a sensitivity of 82% and specificity of 85%. Contrast-enhanced MRI can differentiate perforated from non-perforated appendicitis. The presence of multiple findings increases diagnostic accuracy, with a threshold of any four findings optimally discriminating between

  11. Differentiating perforated from non-perforated appendicitis on contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenbaum, Daniel G.; Kovanlikaya, Arzu [New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medicine, Division of Pediatric Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Askin, Gulce [Weill Cornell Medical College, Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, New York, NY (United States); Beneck, Debra M. [New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medicine, Department of Pathology, New York, NY (United States)

    2017-10-15

    The role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in pediatric appendicitis is increasing; MRI findings predictive of appendiceal perforation have not been specifically evaluated. To assess the performance of MRI in differentiating perforated from non-perforated appendicitis. A retrospective review of pediatric patients undergoing contrast-enhanced MRI and subsequent appendectomy was performed, with surgicopathological confirmation of perforation. Appendiceal diameter and the following 10 MRI findings were assessed: appendiceal restricted diffusion, wall defect, appendicolith, periappendiceal free fluid, remote free fluid, restricted diffusion within free fluid, abscess, peritoneal enhancement, ileocecal wall thickening and ileus. Two-sample t-test and chi-square tests were used to analyze continuous and discrete data, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity for individual MRI findings were calculated and optimal thresholds for measures of accuracy were selected. Seventy-seven patients (mean age: 12.2 years) with appendicitis were included, of whom 22 had perforation. The perforated group had a larger mean appendiceal diameter and mean number of MRI findings than the non-perforated group (12.3 mm vs. 8.6 mm; 5.0 vs. 2.0, respectively). Abscess, wall defect and restricted diffusion within free fluid had the greatest specificity for perforation (1.00, 1.00 and 0.96, respectively) but low sensitivity (0.36, 0.25 and 0.32, respectively). The receiver operator characteristic curve for total number of MRI findings had an area under the curve of 0.92, with an optimal threshold of 3.5. A threshold of any 4 findings had the best ability to accurately discriminate between perforated and non-perforated cases, with a sensitivity of 82% and specificity of 85%. Contrast-enhanced MRI can differentiate perforated from non-perforated appendicitis. The presence of multiple findings increases diagnostic accuracy, with a threshold of any four findings optimally discriminating between

  12. Magnetic susceptibility and spectral gamma logs in the Tithonian-Berriasian pelagic carbonates in the Tatra Mts (Western Carpathians, Poland): Palaeoenvironmental changes at the Jurassic/Cretaceous boundary

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grabowski, J.; Schnyder, J.; Sobien, K.; Koptíková, Leona; Krzemiński, L.; Pszczółkowski, A.; Hejnar, J.; Schnabl, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 43, June 2013 (2013), s. 1-17 ISSN 0195-6671 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : Berriasian * Gamma-ray spectrometry * magnetic susceptibility * palaeoenvironmental trends * Tithonian Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 2.390, year: 2013

  13. Quantitative evaluation of susceptibility effects caused by dental materials in head magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strocchi, S.; Ghielmi, M.; Basilico, F.; Macchi, A.; Novario, R.; Ferretti, R.; Binaghi, E.

    2016-03-01

    This work quantitatively evaluates the effects induced by susceptibility characteristics of materials commonly used in dental practice on the quality of head MR images in a clinical 1.5T device. The proposed evaluation procedure measures the image artifacts induced by susceptibility in MR images by providing an index consistent with the global degradation as perceived by the experts. Susceptibility artifacts were evaluated in a near-clinical setup, using a phantom with susceptibility and geometric characteristics similar to that of a human head. We tested different dentist materials, called PAL Keramit, Ti6Al4V-ELI, Keramit NP, ILOR F, Zirconia and used different clinical MR acquisition sequences, such as "classical" SE and fast, gradient, and diffusion sequences. The evaluation is designed as a matching process between reference and artifacts affected images recording the same scene. The extent of the degradation induced by susceptibility is then measured in terms of similarity with the corresponding reference image. The matching process involves a multimodal registration task and the use an adequate similarity index psychophysically validated, based on correlation coefficient. The proposed analyses are integrated within a computer-supported procedure that interactively guides the users in the different phases of the evaluation method. 2-Dimensional and 3-dimensional indexes are used for each material and each acquisition sequence. From these, we drew a ranking of the materials, averaging the results obtained. Zirconia and ILOR F appear to be the best choice from the susceptibility artefacts point of view, followed, in order, by PAL Keramit, Ti6Al4V-ELI and Keramit NP.

  14. Static magnetic susceptibility, crystal field and exchange interactions in rare earth titanate pyrochlores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkin, B Z; Lummen, T T A; van Loosdrecht, P H M; Dhalenne, G; Zakirov, A R

    2010-07-14

    The experimental temperature dependence (T = 2-300 K) of single crystal bulk and site susceptibilities of rare earth titanate pyrochlores R(2)Ti(2)O(7) (R = Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Yb) is analyzed in the framework of crystal field theory and a mean field approximation. Analytical expressions for the site and bulk susceptibilities of the pyrochlore lattice are derived taking into account long range dipole-dipole interactions and anisotropic exchange interactions between the nearest neighbor rare earth ions. The sets of crystal field parameters and anisotropic exchange coupling constants have been determined and their variations along the lanthanide series are discussed.

  15. Assessment of Tumor Radioresponsiveness and Metastatic Potential by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ovrebo, Kirsti Marie; Gulliksrud, Kristine; Mathiesen, Berit; Rofstad, Einar K.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: It has been suggested that gadolinium diethylene-triamine penta-acetic acid (Gd-DTPA)-based dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) may provide clinically useful biomarkers for personalized cancer treatment. In this preclinical study, we investigated the potential of DCE-MRI as a noninvasive method for assessing the radioresponsiveness and metastatic potential of tumors. Methods and Materials: R-18 melanoma xenografts growing in BALB/c nu/nu mice were used as experimental tumor models. Fifty tumors were subjected to DCE-MRI, and parametric images of K trans (the volume transfer constant of Gd-DTPA) and v e (the fractional distribution volume of Gd-DTPA) were produced by pharmacokinetic analysis of the DCE-MRI series. The tumors were irradiated after the DCE-MRI, either with a single dose of 10 Gy for detection of radiobiological hypoxia (30 tumors) or with five fractions of 4 Gy in 48 h for assessment of radioresponsiveness (20 tumors). The host mice were then euthanized and examined for lymph node metastases, and the primary tumors were resected for measurement of cell survival in vitro. Results: Tumors with hypoxic cells showed significantly lower K trans values than tumors without significant hypoxia (p trans decreased with increasing cell surviving fraction for tumors given fractionated radiation treatment (p trans values than tumors in metastasis-negative mice (p e and tumor hypoxia, radioresponsiveness, or metastatic potential could not be detected. Conclusions: R-18 tumors with low K trans values are likely to be resistant to radiation treatment and have a high probability of developing lymph node metastases. The general validity of these observations should be investigated further by studying preclinical tumor models with biological properties different from those of the R-18 tumors.

  16. Assessment of Hypoxia in Human Cervical Carcinoma Xenografts by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellingsen, Christine; Egeland, Tormod A.M.; Gulliksrud, Kristine M.Sc.; Gaustad, Jon-Vidar; Mathiesen, Berit; Rofstad, Einar K.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Patients with advanced cervical cancer and highly hypoxic primary tumors show increased frequency of locoregional treatment failure and poor disease-free and overall survival rates. The potential usefulness of gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA)-based dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) in assessing tumor hypoxia noninvasively was investigated in the present preclinical study. Methods and Materials: CK-160 and TS-415 human cervical carcinoma xenografts transplanted intramuscularly (i.m.) or subcutaneously (s.c.) in BALB/c nu/nu mice were subjected to DCE-MRI and measurement of fraction of radiobiologically hypoxic cells. Tumor images of K trans (the volume transfer constant of Gd-DTPA) and v e (the extracellular volume fraction of the imaged tissue) were produced by pharmacokinetic analysis of the DCE-MRI data. Fraction of radiobiologically hypoxic cells was measured by using the paired survival curve method. Results: Fraction of radiobiologically hypoxic cells differed significantly among the four tumor groups. The mean values ± SE were determined to be 44% ± 7% (i.m. CK-160), 77% ± 10% (s.c. CK-160), 23% ± 5% (i.m. TS-415), and 52% ± 6% (s.c. TS-415). The four tumor groups differed significantly also in K trans , and there was an unambiguous inverse relationship between K trans and fraction of radiobiologically hypoxic cells. On the other hand, significant differences among the groups in v e could not be detected. Conclusions: The study supports the clinical development of DCE-MRI as a method for assessing the extent of hypoxia in carcinoma of the cervix

  17. Assessment of irradiated brain metastases using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida-Freitas, Daniela B.; Pinho, Marco C.; Otaduy, Maria C.G.; Costa Leite, Claudia da; Braga, Henrique F.; Meira-Freitas, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) on cerebral metastases using the transfer constant (K trans ) assessed by dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI. Furthermore, we aimed to evaluate the ability of K trans measurements to predict midterm tumor outcomes after SRS. The study received institutional review board approval, and informed consent was obtained from all subjects. Twenty-six adult patients with a total of 34 cerebral metastases underwent T1-weighted DCE MRI in a 1.5-T magnet at baseline (prior to SRS) and 4-8 weeks after treatment. Quantitative analysis of DCE MRI was performed by generating K trans parametric maps, and region-of-interest-based measurements were acquired for each metastasis. Conventional MRI was performed at least 16 weeks after SRS to assess midterm tumor outcome using volume variation. The mean (±SD) K trans value was 0.13 ± 0.11 min -1 at baseline and 0.08 ± 0.07 min -1 after 4-8 weeks post-treatment (p trans after SRS was predictive of tumor progression (hazard ratio = 1.50; 95 % CI = 1.16-1.70, p trans showed a sensitivity of 78 % and a specificity of 85 % for the prediction of progression at midterm follow-up. SRS was associated with a reduction of K trans values of the cerebral metastases in the early post-treatment period. Furthermore, K trans variation as assessed using DCE MRI may be helpful to predict midterm outcomes after SRS. (orig.)

  18. Variation in supratentorial cerebrospinal fluid production rate in one day. Measurement by nontriggered phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Hiroto; Tanaka, Hisashi; Fujita, Norihiko; Murase, Kenya; Tomiyama, Noriyuki

    2011-01-01

    Measuring the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) production rate is important for understanding the physiology related to normal conditions and neurological disorders. Triggered phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been used to measure CSF production rate, but the use of nontriggered phase-contrast MRI has not been reported. The purposes of this study were to assess the feasibility of using nontriggered phase-contrast MRI to measure CSF flow and to determine whether CSF production exhibits circadian rhythm. The feasibility of phase-contrast MRI was assessed with a phantom simulated human cerebral aqueduct. CSF flow through the cerebral aqueduct was measured with nontriggered phase-contrast MRI four times during 1 day in 10 normal volunteers. In the phantom study, linear regression analysis gave the following measured values (ml/h): 0.80 x (value of steady flow)-10.0 for triggered phase-contrast MRI and 1.27 x (value of steady flow)-12.2 for nontriggered phase-contrast MRI. One-factor analysis of variance showed no significant effect of the time of the measurements (P=0.47). The supratentorial CSF production rate was 510±549 ml/day (mean ± SD). Nontriggered phase-contrast MRI provided good estimates of the flow rate in the phantom study. We observed no circadian rhythm in CSF production. (author)

  19. Correlative Study of Angiogenesis and Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Features of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, B.; Gao, Z.Q.; Yan, X.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To explore the correlation between contrast-enhancement patterns on dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and angiogenesis by analyzing microvessel density (MVD), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and P53 protein expression in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Material and Methods: MRI was performed with a GE Signa 5T MR scanner using SE and FMPSPGR sequences in 30 patients (38 lesions) during the period October 1998 to March 2000. All had histopathologically proven HCC. MR images were reviewed/analyzed retrospectively. The 30 patients were between 35 and 65 years of age. SE T1WI, PDWI, and T2WI were acquired initially. The FMPSPGR sequence was acquired in the same position. The DCE-MRI was performed in the arterial, portal vein, and delay phase after a bolus injection of Gd-DTPA. The specimens were stained immunohistochemically for CD34, VEGF, and P53. MVD was highlighted by anti-CD34 antibody staining. The enhancement features of HCC lesions were studied correlatively with the tumor MVD, VEGF, and P53 expression at protein level. Results: In the arterial phase, the results showed that MVD of HCC in the high-enhancement group (229.76±80.96) was higher than that in the equal-enhancement (173.09±61.38) and low-enhancement groups (153.00±108.58) (P <0.01, respectively). VEGF expression of HCC in the high-enhancement group (68.42%) was higher than that in the equal-enhancement (36.36%) and low-enhancement groups (38.89%) (P <0.05, respectively). In the portal vein phase, MVD of HCC in the enhancement group (259.80±93.30) was higher than that in the non-enhancement group (178.64±92.65) (P <0.05). No significant correlation was found between VEGF expression and the enhancement feature in the portal vein phase. In the delay phase, MVD of HCC in the ring-enhancement group (269.06±57.89) was significantly higher than that in the non-ring-enhancement group (144.10±88.90) (P <0.01). There was a significant difference in VEGF

  20. Magnetic susceptibility and electron–phonon (e–p) interaction in some U and Ce based heavy fermion (HF) systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, J.; Shadangi, N.; Nayak, P.

    2015-01-01

    Here an attempt is made to explore the variation of magnetic susceptibility with temperature for different values of the position of f-level (d) and electron–phonon interaction (EPI) strength (r) in some U and Ce based heavy Fermion (HF) systems within Periodic Anderson Model (PAM) in the presence of a static magnetic field B and interaction of phonons with electrons of hybridization band. Since magnetic susceptibility χ is related to the f-electron occupation n ±σ f , the expression for the latter is analytically derived through f–f correlation function following the Green function technique of Zubarev. The numerical analysis of χ as a function of temperature ‘T’ is done for different values of d and r. The results show a good agreement with the experiments for some U and Ce based HFs. An explanation for the existence of a critical value of d w.r.t. E F for switching of nature of χ∼T from U to Ce based HF systems is provided. Our calculated value of the temperature T χmax corresponding to the peak position of χ for small values of hybridization constant γ=0.002 and 0.0036 coincides with the experimental value of 19 K for UPt 3 and 35 K for UPd 2 Al 3 reported by Frings et al. and Geibel et al. respectively. - Highlights: • Variation of magnetic susceptibility χ with temperature T is studied for some HF systems. • Periodic Anderson Model in presence of magnetic field and electron–phonon interaction is used for numerical evaluation. • The existence of a critical value of the position of f-level(d) is proposed for distinction between χ∼T behavior of U and Ce based HF systems. • Results obtained are in good agreement with the experimental observations for some Ce and U based HF systems. • Theoretically evaluated temperature corresponding to the peak value of χ matches with the experimental results of UPt 3 and UPd 2 Al 3

  1. A semimetal model of the normal state magnetic susceptibility and transport properties of Ba(Fe1-xCox)2As2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sales, B.C.; McGuire, M.A.; Sefat, A.S.; Mandrus, D.

    2010-01-01

    A simple two-band 3D model of a semimetal is constructed to determine which normal state features of the Ba(Fe 1-x Co x ) 2 As 2 superconductors can be qualitatively understood within this framework. The model is able to account in a semiquantitative fashion for the measured magnetic susceptibility, Hall, and Seebeck data, and the low temperature Sommerfeld coefficient for 0 < x < 0.3 with only three parameters for all x. The purpose of the model is not to fit the data but to provide a simple starting point for thinking about the physics of these interesting materials. Although many of the static magnetic properties, such as the increase of the magnetic susceptibility with temperature, are reproduced by the model, none of the spin-fluctuation dynamics are addressed. A general conclusion from the model is that the magnetic susceptibility of most semimetals should increase with temperatures.

  2. Static magnetic susceptibility, crystal field and exchange interactions in rare earth titanate pyrochlores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malkin, B. Z.; Lummen, T. T. A.; van Loosdrecht, P. H. M.; Dhalenne, G.; Zakirov, A. R.

    2010-01-01

    The experimental temperature dependence (T = 2-300 K) of single crystal bulk and site susceptibilities of rare earth titanate pyrochlores R2Ti2O7 (R = Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Yb) is analyzed in the framework of crystal field theory and a mean field approximation. Analytical expressions for the

  3. Ultrasmall cationic superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as nontoxic and efficient MRI contrast agent and magnetic-targeting tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Mayara Klimuk; Toma, Sergio Hiroshi; Rodrigues, Stephen Fernandes; Shimada, Ana Lucia Borges; Loiola, Rodrigo Azevedo; Cervantes Rodríguez, Hernán Joel; Oliveira, Pedro Vitoriano; Luz, Maciel Santos; Rabbani, Said Rahnamaye; Toma, Henrique Eisi; Poliselli Farsky, Sandra Helena; Araki, Koiti

    2015-01-01

    Fully dispersible, cationic ultrasmall (7 nm diameter) superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, exhibiting high relaxivity (178 mM−1s−1 in 0.47 T) and no acute or subchronic toxicity in Wistar rats, were studied and their suitability as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging and material for development of new diagnostic and treatment tools demonstrated. After intravenous injection (10 mg/kg body weight), they circulated throughout the vascular system causing no microhemorrhage or thrombus, neither inflammatory processes at the mesentery vascular bed and hepatic sinusoids (leukocyte rolling, adhesion, or migration as evaluated by intravital microscopy), but having been spontaneously concentrated in the liver, spleen, and kidneys, they caused strong negative contrast. The nanoparticles are cleared from kidneys and bladder in few days, whereas the complete elimination from liver and spleen occurred only after 4 weeks. Ex vivo studies demonstrated that cationic ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles caused no effects on hepatic and renal enzymes dosage as well as on leukocyte count. In addition, they were readily concentrated in rat thigh by a magnet showing its potential as magnetically targeted carriers of therapeutic and diagnostic agents. Summarizing, cationic ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are nontoxic and efficient magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents useful as platform for the development of new materials for application in theranostics. PMID:26251595

  4. Erythrocyte enrichment in hematopoietic progenitor cell cultures based on magnetic susceptibility of the hemoglobin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxia Jin

    Full Text Available Using novel media formulations, it has been demonstrated that human placenta and umbilical cord blood-derived CD34+ cells can be expanded and differentiated into erythroid cells with high efficiency. However, obtaining mature and functional erythrocytes from the immature cell cultures with high purity and in an efficient manner remains a significant challenge. A distinguishing feature of a reticulocyte and maturing erythrocyte is the increasing concentration of hemoglobin and decreasing cell volume that results in increased cell magnetophoretic mobility (MM when exposed to high magnetic fields and gradients, under anoxic conditions. Taking advantage of these initial observations, we studied a noninvasive (label-free magnetic separation and analysis process to enrich and identify cultured functional erythrocytes. In addition to the magnetic cell separation and cell motion analysis in the magnetic field, the cell cultures were characterized for cell sedimentation rate, cell volume distributions using differential interference microscopy, immunophenotyping (glycophorin A, hemoglobin concentration and shear-induced deformability (elongation index, EI, by ektacytometry to test for mature erythrocyte attributes. A commercial, packed column high-gradient magnetic separator (HGMS was used for magnetic separation. The magnetically enriched fraction comprised 80% of the maturing cells (predominantly reticulocytes that showed near 70% overlap of EI with the reference cord blood-derived RBC and over 50% overlap with the adult donor RBCs. The results demonstrate feasibility of label-free magnetic enrichment of erythrocyte fraction of CD34+ progenitor-derived cultures based on the presence of paramagnetic hemoglobin in the maturing erythrocytes.

  5. Investigation of polluted alluvial soils by magnetic susceptibility methods: a case study of the Litavka River

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dlouhá, Šárka; Petrovský, Eduard; Kapička, Aleš; Borůvka, L.; Ash, Ch.; Drábek, O.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 4 (2013), s. 151-157 ISSN 1801-5395 Institutional support: RVO:67985530 Keywords : environmental magnetism * Fluvisols * magnetite/maghemite * risk elements Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 0.615, year: 2013

  6. Measurement of susceptibility artifacts with histogram-based reference value on magnetic resonance images according to standard ASTM F2119.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Andreas; Teichgräber, Ulf K; Güttler, Felix V

    2015-12-01

    The standard ASTM F2119 describes a test method for measuring the size of a susceptibility artifact based on the example of a passive implant. A pixel in an image is considered to be a part of an image artifact if the intensity is changed by at least 30% in the presence of a test object, compared to a reference image in which the test object is absent (reference value). The aim of this paper is to simplify and accelerate the test method using a histogram-based reference value. Four test objects were scanned parallel and perpendicular to the main magnetic field, and the largest susceptibility artifacts were measured using two methods of reference value determination (reference image-based and histogram-based reference value). The results between both methods were compared using the Mann-Whitney U-test. The difference between both reference values was 42.35 ± 23.66. The difference of artifact size was 0.64 ± 0.69 mm. The artifact sizes of both methods did not show significant differences; the p-value of the Mann-Whitney U-test was between 0.710 and 0.521. A standard-conform method for a rapid, objective, and reproducible evaluation of susceptibility artifacts could be implemented. The result of the histogram-based method does not significantly differ from the ASTM-conform method.

  7. Image Quality of the 3 Dimensional Phase-Contrast Technique in an Intracranial Magnetic Resonance Angiography with Artifacts Caused by Orthodontic Devices: A Comparison with 3 Dimensional Time-of-Flight Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Seong Jin; Kim, Young Soo; Hong, Hyun Sook; Kim, Dong Hun

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the degree of image distortion caused by orthodontic devices during a intracranial magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), and to determine the effectiveness of the 3 dimensional phase-contrast (3D PC). Subjects were divided into group A (n = 20) wearing a home-made orthodontic device, and group B (n = 10) with an actual orthodontic device. A 3.0T MR scanner was used, applying 3D time-of-flight (TOF) and 3D PC. Two board-certified radiologists evaluated images independently based on a four point scale classifying segments of the circle of Willis. Magnetic susceptibility variations and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) on maximum intensity projection images were measured. In group A, scores of the 3D TOF and 3D PC were 2.84 ± 0.1 vs. 2.88 ± 0.1 (before) and 1.8 ± 0.4 vs 2.83 ± 0.1 (after wearing device), respectively. In group B, the scores of 3D TOF and 3D PC were 1.86 ± 0.43 and 2.81 ± 0.15 (p = 0.005), respectively. Magnetic susceptibility variations showed meaningful results after wearing the device (p = 0.0001). CNRs of the 3D PC before and after wearing device were 142.9 ± 6.6 vs. 140.8 ± 7.2 (p = 0.7507), respectively. In the 3D TOF, CNRs were 324.8 ± 25.4 vs. 466.3 ± 41.7 (p = 0.0001). The 3D PC may be a solution method for distorted images by magnetic susceptibility in the intracranial MRA compared with 3D TOF.

  8. Image Quality of the 3 Dimensional Phase-Contrast Technique in an Intracranial Magnetic Resonance Angiography with Artifacts Caused by Orthodontic Devices: A Comparison with 3 Dimensional Time-of-Flight Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Seong Jin; Kim, Young Soo; Hong, Hyun Sook [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Buche