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Sample records for susceptibility contrast magnetic

  1. Magnetic susceptibility imaging with a nonionic contrast agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cacheris, W.; Rocklage, S.M.; Quay, S.; Dow, W.; Love, D.; Worah, D.; Lim, K.

    1988-01-01

    The magnetic susceptibility mechanism for MR imaging contrast enhancement has the advantage of providing useful information, such as cerebral blood flow, without crossing the blood-brain barrier. In this paper the authors report the use of a highly effective, relatively nontoxic chelate as a magnetic susceptibility agent. Dy-DTPA-bis(methylamide) (Dy-DTPA-BMA) has an extremely low acute toxicity (LD-50, intravenous, mice ∼ 40 mmol/kg). Doses of 1 mmol/kg and 2 mmol/kg Dy-DTPA-BMA lowered the initial signal intensity 63% to 57%, respectively. The utility of this technique in detecting areas of reduced blood flow within the brain was demonstrated by imaging a rabbit with a cerebral perfusion deficit

  2. Neural - levelset shape detection segmentation of brain tumors in dynamic susceptibility contrast enhanced and diffusion weighted magnetic resonance images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayakumar, C.; Bhargava, Sunil; Gharpure, Damayanti Chandrashekhar

    2008-01-01

    A novel Neuro - level set shape detection algorithm is proposed and evaluated for segmentation and grading of brain tumours. The algorithm evaluates vascular and cellular information provided by dynamic contrast susceptibility magnetic resonance images and apparent diffusion coefficient maps. The proposed neural shape detection algorithm is based on the levels at algorithm (shape detection algorithm) and utilizes a neural block to provide the speed image for the level set methods. In this study, two different architectures of level set method have been implemented and their results are compared. The results show that the proposed Neuro-shape detection performs better in differentiating the tumor, edema, necrosis in reconstructed images of perfusion and diffusion weighted magnetic resonance images. (author)

  3. Advantages of frequency-domain modeling in dynamic-susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance cerebral blood flow quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jean J; Smith, Michael R; Frayne, Richard

    2005-03-01

    In dynamic-susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance perfusion imaging, the cerebral blood flow (CBF) is estimated from the tissue residue function obtained through deconvolution of the contrast concentration functions. However, the reliability of CBF estimates obtained by deconvolution is sensitive to various distortions including high-frequency noise amplification. The frequency-domain Fourier transform-based and the time-domain singular-value decomposition-based (SVD) algorithms both have biases introduced into their CBF estimates when noise stability criteria are applied or when contrast recirculation is present. The recovery of the desired signal components from amid these distortions by modeling the residue function in the frequency domain is demonstrated. The basic advantages and applicability of the frequency-domain modeling concept are explored through a simple frequency-domain Lorentzian model (FDLM); with results compared to standard SVD-based approaches. The performance of the FDLM method is model dependent, well representing residue functions in the exponential family while less accurately representing other functions. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Magnetic susceptibilities of minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblum, Sam; Brownfield, I.K.

    2000-01-01

    Magnetic separation of minerals is a topic that is seldom reported in the literature for two reasons. First, separation data generally are byproducts of other projects; and second, this study requires a large amount of patience and is unusually tedious. Indeed, we suspect that most minerals probably are never investigated for this property. These data are timesaving for mineralogists who concentrate mono-mineralic fractions for chemical analysis, age dating, and for other purposes. The data can certainly be used in the ore-beneficiation industries. In some instances, magnetic-susceptibility data may help in mineral identification, where other information is insufficient. In past studies of magnetic separation of minerals, (Gaudin and Spedden, 1943; Tille and Kirkpatrick, 1956; Rosenblum, 1958; Rubinstein and others, 1958; Flinter, 1959; Hess, 1959; Baker, 1962; Meric and Peyre, 1963; Rojas and others, 1965; and Duchesne, 1966), the emphasis has been on the ferromagnetic and paramagnetic ranges of extraction. For readers interested in the history of magnetic separation of minerals, Krumbein and Pettijohn (1938, p. 344-346) indicated nine references back to 1848. The primary purpose of this paper is to report the magnetic-susceptibility data on as many minerals as possible, similar to tables of hardness, specific gravity, refractive indices, and other basic physical properties of minerals. A secondary purpose is to demonstrate that the total and best extraction ranges are influenced by the chemistry of the minerals. The following notes are offered to help avoid problems in separating a desired mineral concentrate from mixtures of mineral grains.

  5. Can Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging Replace Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography in the Diagnosis of Patients with Alzheimer's Disease? A Pilot Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavallin, L.; Danielsson, R.; Oeksengard, A.R.; Wahlund, L.O.; Julin, P.; Frank, A.; Engman, E.L.; Svensson, L.; Kristoffersen Wiberg, M. [Karolinska Univ. Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden). Div. of Radiology

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To compare single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a cohort of patients examined for suspected dementia, including patients with no objective cognitive impairment (control group), mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Material and Methods: Twenty-four patients, eight with AD, 10 with MCI, and six controls were investigated with SPECT using {sup 99m}Tc-hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime (HMPAO) and dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) with gadobutrol. Three observers performed a visual interpretation of the SPECT and MR images using a four-point visual scale. Results: SPECT was superior to DSC-MRI in differentiating normal from pathological. All three observers showed statistically significant results in discriminating between the control group, AD, and MCI by SPECT, with a P value of 0.0006, 0.04, and 0.01 for each observer. The statistical results were not significant for MR (P values 0.8, 0.1, and 0.2, respectively). Conclusion: DSC-MRI could not replace SPECT in the diagnosis of patients with Alzheimer's disease. Several patient- and method-related improvements should be made before this method can be recommended for clinical practice.

  6. Can Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging Replace Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography in the Diagnosis of Patients with Alzheimer's Disease? A Pilot Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavallin, L.; Danielsson, R.; Oeksengard, A.R.; Wahlund, L.O.; Julin, P.; Frank, A.; Engman, E.L.; Svensson, L.; Kristoffersen Wiberg, M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To compare single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a cohort of patients examined for suspected dementia, including patients with no objective cognitive impairment (control group), mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Material and Methods: Twenty-four patients, eight with AD, 10 with MCI, and six controls were investigated with SPECT using 99m Tc-hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime (HMPAO) and dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) with gadobutrol. Three observers performed a visual interpretation of the SPECT and MR images using a four-point visual scale. Results: SPECT was superior to DSC-MRI in differentiating normal from pathological. All three observers showed statistically significant results in discriminating between the control group, AD, and MCI by SPECT, with a P value of 0.0006, 0.04, and 0.01 for each observer. The statistical results were not significant for MR (P values 0.8, 0.1, and 0.2, respectively). Conclusion: DSC-MRI could not replace SPECT in the diagnosis of patients with Alzheimer's disease. Several patient- and method-related improvements should be made before this method can be recommended for clinical practice

  7. Autoregressive moving average (ARMA) model applied to quantification of cerebral blood flow using dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murase, Kenya; Yamazaki, Youichi; Shinohara, Masaaki

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of the autoregressive moving average (ARMA) model for quantification of cerebral blood flow (CBF) with dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) in comparison with deconvolution analysis based on singular value decomposition (DA-SVD). Using computer simulations, we generated a time-dependent concentration of the contrast agent in the volume of interest (VOI) from the arterial input function (AIF) modeled as a gamma-variate function under various CBFs, cerebral blood volumes and signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) for three different types of residue function (exponential, triangular, and box-shaped). We also considered the effects of delay and dispersion in AIF. The ARMA model and DA-SVD were used to estimate CBF values from the simulated concentration-time curves in the VOI and AIFs, and the estimated values were compared with the assumed values. We found that the CBF value estimated by the ARMA model was more sensitive to the SNR and the delay in AIF than that obtained by DA-SVD. Although the ARMA model considerably overestimated CBF at low SNRs, it estimated the CBF more accurately than did DA-SVD at high SNRs for the exponential or triangular residue function. We believe this study will contribute to an understanding of the usefulness and limitations of the ARMA model when applied to quantification of CBF with DSC-MRI. (author)

  8. Voxel-Based Correlation between Coregistered Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography and Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Subjects with Suspected Alzheimer Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavallin, L.; Axelsson, R.; Wahlund, L.O.; Oeksengard, A.R.; Svensson, L.; Juhlin, P.; Wiberg, M. Kristoffersen; Frank, A.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Current diagnosis of Alzheimer disease is made by clinical, neuropsychologic, and neuroimaging assessments. Neuroimaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) could be valuable in the differential diagnosis of Alzheimer disease, as well as in assessing prognosis. Purpose: To compare SPECT and MRI in a cohort of patients examined for suspected dementia, including patients with no objective cognitive impairment (control group), mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and Alzheimer disease (AD). Material and Methods: 24 patients, eight with AD, 10 with MCI, and six controls, were investigated with SPECT using 99m Tc-hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime (HMPAO, Ceretec; GE Healthcare Ltd., Little Chalsont UK) and dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) with a contrast-enhancing gadobutrol formula (Gadovist; Bayer Schering Pharma, Berlin, Germany). Voxel-based correlation between coregistered SPECT and DSC-MR images was calculated. Region-of-interest (ROI) analyses were then performed in 24 different brain areas using brain registration and analysis of SPECT studies (BRASS; Nuclear Diagnostics AB, Stockholm (SE)) on both SPECT and DSC-MRI. Results: Voxel-based correlation between coregistered SPECT and DSC-MR showed a high correlation, with a mean correlation coefficient of 0.94. ROI analyses of 24 regions showed significant differences between the control group and AD patients in 10 regions using SPECT and five regions in DSC-MR. Conclusion: SPECT remains superior to DSC-MRI in differentiating normal from pathological perfusion, and DSC-MRI could not replace SPECT in the diagnosis of patients with Alzheimer disease

  9. Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast Perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging Demonstrates Reduced Periventricular Cerebral Blood Flow in Dogs with Ventriculomegaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin J. Schmidt

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The nature of ventriculomegaly in dogs is still a matter of debate. Signs of increased intraventricular pressure and atrophy of the cerebral white matter have been found in dogs with ventriculomegaly, which would imply increased intraventricular pressure and, therefore, a pathological condition, i.e., to some extent. Reduced periventricular blood flow was found in people with high elevated intraventricular pressure. The aim of this study was to compare periventricular brain perfusion in dogs with and without ventriculomegaly using perfusion weighted-magnetic-resonance-imaging to clarify as to whether ventriculomegaly might be associated with an increase in intraventricular pressure. Perfusion was measured in 32 Cavalier King Charles spaniels (CKCS with ventriculomegaly, 10 CKCSs were examined as a control group. Cerebral blood flow (CBF was measured using free-hand regions of interest (ROI in five brain regions: periventricular white matter, caudate nucleus, parietal cortex, hippocampus, and thalamus. CBF was significantly lower in the periventricular white matter of the dogs with ventriculomegaly (p = 0.0029 but not in the other ROIs. Reduction of periventricular CBF might imply increase of intraventricular pressure in ventriculomegaly.

  10. Attempts to Improve Absolute Quantification of Cerebral Blood Flow in Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Simplified T1-Weighted Steady-State Cerebral Blood Volume Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirestam, R.; Knutsson, L.; Risberg, J.; Boerjesson, S.; Larsson, E.M.; Gustafson, L.; Passant, U.; Staahlberg, F.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Attempts to retrieve absolute values of cerebral blood flow (CBF) by dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) have typically resulted in overestimations. Purpose: To improve DSC-MRI CBF estimates by calibrating the DSC-MRI-based cerebral blood volume (CBV) with a corresponding T1-weighted (T1W) steady-state (ss) CBV estimate. Material and Methods: 17 volunteers were investigated by DSC-MRI and 133Xe SPECT. Steady-state CBV calculation, assuming no water exchange, was accomplished using signal values from blood and tissue, before and after contrast agent, obtained by T1W spin-echo imaging. Using steady-state and DSC-MRI CBV estimates, a calibration factor K = CBV(ss)/CBV(DSC) was obtained for each individual. Average whole-brain CBF(DSC) was calculated, and the corrected MRI-based CBF estimate was given by CBF(ss) = KxCBF(DSC). Results: Average whole-brain SPECT CBF was 40.1±6.9 ml/min 100 g, while the corresponding uncorrected DSC-MRI-based value was 69.2±13.8 ml/mi 100 g. After correction with the calibration factor, a CBF(ss) of 42.7±14.0 ml/min 100 g was obtained. The linear fit to CBF(ss)-versus-CBF(SPECT) data was close to proportionality (R 0.52). Conclusion: Calibration by steady-state CBV reduced the population average CBF to a reasonable level, and a modest linear correlation with the reference 133Xe SPECT technique was observed. Possible explanations for the limited accuracy are, for example, large-vessel partial-volume effects, low post-contrast signal enhancement in T1W images, and water-exchange effects

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, P.H.; Brainard, J.R.; Jarvinen, G.D.; Ryan, R.R.

    1997-12-30

    A family of contrast agents for use in magnetic resonance imaging and a method of enhancing the contrast of magnetic resonance images of an object by incorporating a contrast agent of this invention into the object prior to forming the images or during formation of the images. A contrast agent of this invention is a paramagnetic lanthanide hexaazamacrocyclic molecule, where a basic example has the formula LnC{sub 16}H{sub 14}N{sub 6}. Important applications of the invention are in medical diagnosis, treatment, and research, where images of portions of a human body are formed by means of magnetic resonance techniques. 10 figs.

  12. Magnetic susceptibility of curium pnictides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nave, S.E.; Huray, P.G.; Peterson, J.R.; Damien, D.A.; Haire, R.G.

    1981-09-01

    The magnetic susceptibility of microgram quantities of 248 CmP and 248 CmSb has been determined with the use of a SQUID micromagnetic susceptometer over the temperature range 4.2 to 340 K and in the applied magnetic field range of 0.45 to 1600 G. The fcc (NaCl-type) samples yield magnetic transitions at 73K and 162 K for the phosphide and antimonide, respectively. Together with published magnetic data for CmN and CmAs, these results indicate spatially extended exchange interactions between the relatively localized 5f electrons of the metallic actinide atoms

  13. Kinetic analysis of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in the liver of body-temperature-controlled mice using dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging and an empirical mathematical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murase, Kenya; Assanai, Purapan; Takata, Hiroshige; Matsumoto, Nozomi; Saito, Shigeyoshi; Nishiura, Motoko

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a method for analyzing the kinetic behavior of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) in the murine liver under control of body temperature using dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) and an empirical mathematical model (EMM). First, we investigated the influence of body temperature on the kinetic behavior of SPIONs in the liver by controlling body temperature using our temperature-control system. Second, we investigated the kinetic behavior of SPIONs in the liver when mice were injected with various doses of GdCl3, while keeping the body temperature at 36°C. Finally, we investigated it when mice were injected with various doses of zymosan, while keeping the body temperature at 36°C. We also investigated the effect of these substances on the number of Kupffer cells by immunohistochemical analysis using the specific surface antigen of Kupffer cells (CD68). To quantify the kinetic behavior of SPIONs in the liver, we calculated the upper limit of the relative enhancement (A), the rates of early contrast uptake (α) and washout or late contrast uptake (β), the parameter related to the slope of early uptake (q), the area under the curve (AUC), the maximum change of transverse relaxation rate (ΔR2) (ΔR2(max)), the time to ΔR2(max) (Tmax), and ΔR2 at the last time point (ΔR2(last)) from the time courses of ΔR2 using the EMM. The β and Tmax values significantly decreased and increased, respectively, with decreasing body temperature, suggesting that the phagocytic activity of Kupffer cells is significantly affected by body temperature. The AUC, ΔR2(max), and ΔR2(last) values decreased significantly with increasing dose of GdCl3, which was consistent with the change in the number of CD68-positive cells. They increased with increasing dose of zymosan, which was also consistent with the change in the number of CD68-positive cells. These results suggest that AUC, ΔR2(max), and ΔR2

  14. Whole tissue AC susceptibility after superparamagnetic iron oxide contrast agent administration in a rat model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazaro, Francisco Jose; Gutierrez, Lucia; Rosa Abadia, Ana; Soledad Romero, Maria; Lopez, Antonio; Jesus Munoz, Maria

    2007-01-01

    A magnetic AC susceptibility characterisation of rat tissues after intravenous administration of superparamagnetic iron oxide (Endorem ( R)), at the same dose as established for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) contrast enhancement in humans, has been carried out. The measurements reveal the presence of the contrast agent as well as that of physiological ferritin in liver and spleen while no traces have been magnetically detected in heart and kidney. This preliminary work opens suggestive possibilities for future biodistribution studies of any type of magnetic carriers

  15. Pulse sequences for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graves, Martin J.

    2007-01-01

    The theory and application of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) pulse sequences following the administration of an exogenous contrast agent are discussed. Pulse sequences are categorised according to the contrast agent mechanism: changes in proton density, relaxivity, magnetic susceptibility and resonant frequency shift. Applications in morphological imaging, magnetic resonance angiography, dynamic imaging and cell labelling are described. The importance of optimising the pulse sequence for each application is emphasised

  16. Magnetic susceptibility of functional groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herr, T.; Ferraro, M.B.; Contreras, R.H.

    1990-01-01

    Proceeding with a series of works where new criteria are applied to the the calculation of the contribution of molecular fragments to certain properties, results are presented for a group of 1-X-benzenes and 1-X-naphtalenes for the magnetic susceptibility constant. Both the diamagnetic and paramagnetic parts are taken into account. To reduce the problems associated with the Gauge dependence originated in the approximations made, Gauge independent atomic orbitals (GIAO) orbitals are used in the atomic orbital basis. Results are discussed in terms of functional groups. (Author). 17 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  17. Magnetic susceptibility characterisation of superparamagnetic microspheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grob, David Tim; Wise, Naomi; Oduwole, Olayinka; Sheard, Steve

    2018-04-01

    The separation of magnetic materials in microsystems using magnetophoresis has increased in popularity. The wide variety and availability of magnetic beads has fuelled this drive. It is important to know the magnetic characteristics of the microspheres in order to accurately use them in separation processes integrated on a lab-on-a-chip device. To investigate the magnetic susceptibility of magnetic microspheres, the magnetic responsiveness of three types of Dynabeads microspheres were tested using two different approaches. The magnetophoretic mobility of individual microspheres is studied using a particle tracking system and the magnetization of each type of Dynabeads microsphere is measured using SQUID relaxometry. The magnetic beads' susceptibility is obtained at four different applied magnetic fields in the range of 38-70 mT for both the mobility and SQUID measurements. The susceptibility values in both approaches show a consistent magnetic field dependence.

  18. Frequency dependence of magnetic susceptibility of weakly ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper reports the frequency dependence of magnetic susceptibility of weakly contaminated soil sediments. Low field magnetic susceptibility measurements were carried out on soil sediments at Bomo irrigation dam, Samaru College of Agriculture, Ahmadu Bello University, (ABU), Zaria, using the MS2D field loop.

  19. Accuracy of magnetic resonance based susceptibility measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdevig, Hannah E.; Russek, Stephen E.; Carnicka, Slavka; Stupic, Karl F.; Keenan, Kathryn E.

    2017-05-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is increasingly used to map the magnetic susceptibility of tissue to identify cerebral microbleeds associated with traumatic brain injury and pathological iron deposits associated with neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease. Accurate measurements of susceptibility are important for determining oxygen and iron content in blood vessels and brain tissue for use in noninvasive clinical diagnosis and treatment assessments. Induced magnetic fields with amplitude on the order of 100 nT, can be detected using MRI phase images. The induced field distributions can then be inverted to obtain quantitative susceptibility maps. The focus of this research was to determine the accuracy of MRI-based susceptibility measurements using simple phantom geometries and to compare the susceptibility measurements with magnetometry measurements where SI-traceable standards are available. The susceptibilities of paramagnetic salt solutions in cylindrical containers were measured as a function of orientation relative to the static MRI field. The observed induced fields as a function of orientation of the cylinder were in good agreement with simple models. The MRI susceptibility measurements were compared with SQUID magnetometry using NIST-traceable standards. MRI can accurately measure relative magnetic susceptibilities while SQUID magnetometry measures absolute magnetic susceptibility. Given the accuracy of moment measurements of tissue mimicking samples, and the need to look at small differences in tissue properties, the use of existing NIST standard reference materials to calibrate MRI reference structures is problematic and better reference materials are required.

  20. Whole tissue AC susceptibility after superparamagnetic iron oxide contrast agent administration in a rat model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazaro, Francisco Jose [Departamento de Ciencia y Tecnologia de Materiales y Fluidos, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain) and Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragon, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain)]. E-mail: osoro@unizar.es; Gutierrez, Lucia [Departamento de Ciencia y Tecnologia de Materiales y Fluidos, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Rosa Abadia, Ana [Dept. Farmacologia y Fisiologia, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50013 Zaragoza (Spain); Soledad Romero, Maria [Dept. Medicina y Psiquiatria, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Lopez, Antonio [CNAM - Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Jesus Munoz, Maria [Dept. Farmacologia y Fisiologia, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50013 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2007-04-15

    A magnetic AC susceptibility characterisation of rat tissues after intravenous administration of superparamagnetic iron oxide (Endorem{sup (R)}), at the same dose as established for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) contrast enhancement in humans, has been carried out. The measurements reveal the presence of the contrast agent as well as that of physiological ferritin in liver and spleen while no traces have been magnetically detected in heart and kidney. This preliminary work opens suggestive possibilities for future biodistribution studies of any type of magnetic carriers.

  1. Materials with low DC magnetic susceptibility for sensitive magnetic measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khatiwada, R; Kendrick, R; Khosravi, M; Peters, M; Smith, E; Snow, W M; Dennis, L

    2016-01-01

    Materials with very low DC magnetic susceptibility have many scientific applications. To our knowledge however, relatively little research has been conducted with the goal to produce a totally nonmagnetic material. This phrase in our case means after spatially averaging over macroscopic volumes, it possesses an average zero DC magnetic susceptibility. We report measurements of the DC magnetic susceptibility of three different types of nonmagnetic materials at room temperature: (I) solutions of paramagnetic salts and diamagnetic liquids, (II) liquid gallium–indium alloys and (III) pressed powder mixtures of tungsten and bismuth. The lowest measured magnetic susceptibility among these candidate materials is in the order of 10 −9 cgs volume susceptibility units, about two orders of magnitude smaller than distilled water. In all cases, the measured concentration dependence of the magnetic susceptibility is consistent with that expected for the weighted sum of the susceptibilities of the separate components within experimental error. These results verify the well-known Wiedemann additivity law for the magnetic susceptibility of inert mixtures of materials and thereby realize the ability to produce materials with small but tunable magnetic susceptibility. For our particular scientific application, we are also looking for materials with the largest possible number of neutrons and protons per unit volume. The gallium–indium alloys fabricated and measured in this work possess to our knowledge the smallest ratio of volume magnetic susceptibility to nucleon number density per unit volume for a room temperature liquid, and the tungsten-bismuth pressed powder mixtures possess to our knowledge the smallest ratio of volume magnetic susceptibility to nucleon number density per unit volume for a room temperature solid. This ratio is a figure of merit for a certain class of precision experiments that search for possible exotic spin-dependent forces of Nature. (paper)

  2. Absolute method of measuring magnetic susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, A.; Senftle, F.E.

    1959-01-01

    An absolute method of standardization and measurement of the magnetic susceptibility of small samples is presented which can be applied to most techniques based on the Faraday method. The fact that the susceptibility is a function of the area under the curve of sample displacement versus distance of the magnet from the sample, offers a simple method of measuring the susceptibility without recourse to a standard sample. Typical results on a few substances are compared with reported values, and an error of less than 2% can be achieved. ?? 1959 The American Institute of Physics.

  3. Out-of-phase magnetic susceptibility and environmental magnetism

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrouda, F.; Chadima, Martin; Ježek, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 18 (2016), EGU2016-6808 ISSN 1607-7962. [European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2016. 17.04.2016-22.04.2016, Vienna] Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : paleomagnetism * magnetic susceptibility * environmental magnetism Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism , Geodesy, Geography http://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EGU2016/EGU2016-6808.pdf

  4. Magnetic susceptibilities of integrable quantum ladders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Soo A; Lee, K.

    2001-01-01

    As an extension of previous studies, we consider the magnetic susceptibilities of a coupled spin chain model at low temperature and of a more realistic model at low temperature and of a more realistic model having a t-J ladder structure at zero temperature. The magnetic susceptibilities for both models are obtained numerically when the coupling constant is greater than its critical value. In this region, the ladders behave as a single chain for H c and as two independent chains for H>H c , showing a divergence at H c . This divergence is expected to smear out at a finite temperature

  5. Contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karadjian, V.

    1987-01-01

    The origine of nuclear magnetic resonance signal is reminded and different ways for contrast enhancement in magnetic resonance imaging are presented, especially, modifications of tissus relaxation times. Investigations have focused on development of agents incorporating either paramagnetic ions or stable free radicals. Pharmacological and toxicological aspects are developed. The diagnostic potential of these substances is illustrated by the example of gadolinium complexes [fr

  6. Magnetic susceptibility measurement using 3D NMR

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Marcon, P.; Bartušek, Karel; Kořínek, Radim

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 24, Suppl. 1 (2011), s. 381-382 ISSN 0968-5243. [ESMRMB 2011 Congress. 06.10.2011-08.10.2011, Leipzig] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP102/11/0318 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : MRI * artifact correction * magnetic susceptibility * gradient echo Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  7. Anisotropy of the magnetic susceptibility of gallium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankey, T.

    1960-01-01

    The bulk magnetic susceptibilities of single gallium crystals and polycrystalline gallium spheres were measured at 25??C. The following anisotropic diamagnetic susceptibilities were found: a axis (-0.119??0. 001)??10-6 emu/g, b axis (-0.416??0.002)??10 -6 emu/g, and c axis (-0.229??0.001) emu/g. The susceptibility of the polycrystalline spheres, assumed to be the average value for the bulk susceptibility of gallium, was (-0.257??0.003)??10-6 emu/g at 25??C, and (-0.299??0.003)??10-6 emu/g at -196??C. The susceptibility of liquid gallium was (0.0031??0.001) ??10-6 emu/g at 30??C and 100??C. Rotational diagrams of the susceptibilities in the three orthogonal planes of the unit cell were not sinusoidal. The anisotropy in the single crystals was presumably caused by the partial overlap of Brillouin zone boundaries by the Fermi-energy surface. The large change in susceptibility associated with the change in state was attributed to the absence of effective mass influence in the liquid state. ?? 1960 The American Institute of Physics.

  8. Real-time and quantitative isotropic spatial resolution susceptibility imaging for magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pi, Shiqiang; Liu, Wenzhong; Jiang, Tao

    2018-03-01

    The magnetic transparency of biological tissue allows the magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) to be a promising functional sensor and contrast agent. The complex susceptibility of MNPs, strongly influenced by particle concentration, excitation magnetic field and their surrounding microenvironment, provides significant implications for biomedical applications. Therefore, magnetic susceptibility imaging of high spatial resolution will give more detailed information during the process of MNP-aided diagnosis and therapy. In this study, we present a novel spatial magnetic susceptibility extraction method for MNPs under a gradient magnetic field, a low-frequency drive magnetic field, and a weak strength high-frequency magnetic field. Based on this novel method, a magnetic particle susceptibility imaging (MPSI) of millimeter-level spatial resolution (<3 mm) was achieved using our homemade imaging system. Corroborated by the experimental results, the MPSI shows real-time (1 s per frame acquisition) and quantitative abilities, and isotropic high resolution.

  9. Contrast Agent in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vu-Quang, Hieu

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles have been employed as contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in order to improve sensitivity and accuracy in diagnosis. In addition, these contrast agents are potentially combined with other therapeutic compounds or near infrared bio-imaging (NIR) fluorophores to obtain...... theranostic or dual imaging purposes, respectively. There were two main types of MRI contrast agent that were synthesized during this PhD project including fluorine containing nanoparticles and magnetic nanoparticles. In regard of fluorine containing nanoparticles, there were two types contrast agent...... that were synthesized in project I and II. In project I, Poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid)-block-poly (ethylene glycol)-Folate Pefluorooctyl Bromide/Indocyanine green/ Doxorubicin (PLGA-PEG-Folate PFOB/ICG/Dox) has been formulated for the dual imaging NIR and 19F MRI as well as in the combination of Dox...

  10. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogl, T.J.; Hoffmann, Y.; Muehler, A.; Felix, R.

    1994-01-01

    Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) protocols are based on standard sequence protocols like time of flight MRA, which evaluates inflowing spins. This technique is limited by a variety of artifacts like the saturation artifact via turbulent blood flow. Contrast media diminish these artifacts like extracellular agents and blood-pool contrast media. The clinical value of the contrast-enhanced MRA for cerebral pathologies is based on the use of the paramagnetic contrast agent Gd-DTPA. For extracerebral diseases this technique is restricted because of the simultaneous visualization of both arterial and venous vascular territorities. Occult venous sinus thrombosis or AV malformations are clinical essential indications for the use of C-MRA. Experimental data prove the excellent contrast abilities of blood-pool agents like Gd-DTPA-polylysin or Gd-DTPA-albumin, which demonstrate long intravascular persistence and retarded excretion. (orig.) [de

  11. Magnetic susceptibility measurement using 2D magnetic resonance imaging

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Marcon, P.; Bartušek, Karel; Burdkova, M.; Dokoupil, Zdeněk

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 10 (2011), 105702:1-8 ISSN 0957-0233 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP102/11/0318; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : magnetic flux density * magnetic susceptibility * MRI * MR signal * reaction field Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.494, year: 2011

  12. Nonlinear susceptibility magnitude imaging of magnetic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ficko, Bradley W.; Giacometti, Paolo; Diamond, Solomon G.

    2015-01-01

    This study demonstrates a method for improving the resolution of susceptibility magnitude imaging (SMI) using spatial information that arises from the nonlinear magnetization characteristics of magnetic nanoparticles (mNPs). In this proof-of-concept study of nonlinear SMI, a pair of drive coils and several permanent magnets generate applied magnetic fields and a coil is used as a magnetic field sensor. Sinusoidal alternating current (AC) in the drive coils results in linear mNP magnetization responses at primary frequencies, and nonlinear responses at harmonic frequencies and intermodulation frequencies. The spatial information content of the nonlinear responses is evaluated by reconstructing tomographic images with sequentially increasing voxel counts using the combined linear and nonlinear data. Using the linear data alone it is not possible to accurately reconstruct more than 2 voxels with a pair of drive coils and a single sensor. However, nonlinear SMI is found to accurately reconstruct 12 voxels (R 2 =0.99, CNR=84.9) using the same physical configuration. Several time-multiplexing methods are then explored to determine if additional spatial information can be obtained by varying the amplitude, phase and frequency of the applied magnetic fields from the two drive coils. Asynchronous phase modulation, amplitude modulation, intermodulation phase modulation, and frequency modulation all resulted in accurate reconstruction of 6 voxels (R 2 >0.9) indicating that time multiplexing is a valid approach to further increase the resolution of nonlinear SMI. The spatial information content of nonlinear mNP responses and the potential for resolution enhancement with time multiplexing demonstrate the concept and advantages of nonlinear SMI. - Highlights: • Development of a nonlinear susceptibility magnitude imaging model • Demonstration of nonlinear SMI with primary and harmonic frequencies • Demonstration of nonlinear SMI with primary and intermodulation frequencies

  13. Determination of magnetic susceptibility of sedimentation rock in Java island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahmawati; Rauf, Nurlela; Bijaksana, Satria

    2002-01-01

    Determination of magnetic susceptibility of sedimentation rock in java island. It has been done a research on detemlination of magnetic susceptibility of sedimentation and intrusion rock. A simple magnetic separation method was used to separate material with high contain magnetic mineral from the low contain magnetic mineral. Besides a data measurement from magnetic susceptibility and intensity there are also X-ray diffraction data available as suppolling data. The result shown that every material has magnetic mineral In it with different contain. And sedimentation rock has higher magnetic mineral than the intrusion rock

  14. Control of susceptibility-related image contrast by spin-lock techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martirosian, Petros; Rommel, Eberhard; Schick, Fritz; Deimling, Michael

    2008-12-01

    Macroscopic magnetic field inhomogeneities might lead to image distortions, while microscopic field inhomogeneities, due to susceptibility changes in tissues, cause spin dephasing and decreasing T(2)() relaxation time. The latter effects are especially observed in the trabecular bone and in regions adjacent to air-containing cavities when gradient-echo sequences are applied. In conventional MRI, these susceptibility-related signal voids can be avoided by applying spin-echo (SE) techniques. In this study, an alternative method for the examination and control of susceptibility-related effects by spin-lock (SL) radiofrequency pulses is presented: SL pulses were applied in two different susceptibility-sensitive sequence types: (a) between the jump and return 90 degrees pulses in a 90 degrees (x)-tau-90 degrees (-x) magnetization-prepared Fast Low Angle Shot (FLASH) sequence and (b) between the 90 degrees pulse and the 180 degrees pulse in an asymmetric SE sequence. The range of Larmor frequencies used for spin locking can be determined for different B(1) amplitudes of the SL pulses, allowing control of image contrast by the amplitude of the SL pulses.

  15. MRI contrast enhancement using Magnetic Carbon Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Rakesh P.; Kangasniemi, Kim; Takahashi, Masaya; Mohanty, Samarendra K.; Koymen, Ali R.; Department of Physics, University of Texas at Arlington Team; University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center Team

    2014-03-01

    In recent years, nanotechnology has become one of the most exciting forefront fields in cancer diagnosis and therapeutics such as drug delivery, thermal therapy and detection of cancer. Here, we report development of core (Fe)-shell (carbon) nanoparticles with enhanced magnetic properties for contrast enhancement in MRI imaging. These new classes of magnetic carbon nanoparticles (MCNPs) are synthesized using a bottom-up approach in various organic solvents, using the electric plasma discharge generated in the cavitation field of an ultrasonic horn. Gradient echo MRI images of well-dispersed MCNP-solutions (in tube) were acquired. For T2 measurements, a multi echo spin echo sequence was performed. From the slope of the 1/T2 versus concentration plot, the R2 value for different CMCNP-samples was measured. Since MCNPs were found to be extremely non-reactive, and highly absorbing in NIR regime, development of carbon-based MRI contrast enhancement will allow its simultaneous use in biomedical applications. We aim to localize the MCNPs in targeted tissue regions by external DC magnetic field, followed by MRI imaging and subsequent photothermal therapy.

  16. Analysis of MR Image in the Measurement of Magnetic Susceptibility

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bartušek, Karel; Gescheidtová, E.; Smékal, Z.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 1 (2006), 4203:17-26 ISSN 1738-9682 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : magnetic resonance * magnetic susceptibility * MR image * tomographic scanner Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  17. [Studying cerebral perfusion using magnetic susceptibility techniques: technique and applications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán-de-Villoria, J A; Fernández-García, P; Mateos-Pérez, J M; Desco, M

    2012-01-01

    Perfusion MRI makes it possible to evaluate the cerebral microvasculature through changes in signal due to a tracer passing through blood vessels. The most commonly used technique is based on the magnetic susceptibility of gadolinium in T2*-weighted sequences, and the most commonly evaluated parameters are cerebral blood volume, cerebral blood flow, and mean transit time. Diverse technical aspects, like the sequence used, and the dose and speed of contrast material injection, must be taken into account in perfusion MRI studies. It is also essential to consider possible sources of error like contrast material leaks due to changes in the permeability of the blood-brain barrier. The most widely used clinical applications of perfusion MRI include the determination of the degree of aggressiveness of gliomas, the differentiation of some histological types of tumors or pseudotumors, and the evaluation of the penumbral area in acute ischemia. Copyright © 2011 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. Method of magnetic susceptibility mapping of drilled cores. Experimental measurements for geologic structures determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delrive, C.

    1993-01-01

    The evaluation of the safety of a deep geologic repository for dangerous materials requires the knowledge of the interstitial system of the surrounding host rock. A method is proposed for the determination of geologic structures (in particular fractures) from the magnetic susceptibility mapping of drilled cores. The feasibility of the method has been demonstrated using a SQUID magneto-gradient meter. A measurement tool using a new magnetic susceptibility captor and a testing bench have been developed. This tool allows the measurement of rocks with a magnetic susceptibility greater than 10 -5 SI units and can generate magnetic susceptibility maps with 4 x 4 mm 2 pixels. A magnetic visibility criterion has been defined which allows to foresee if a structure is visible or not. According to the measurements done, it is shown that any centimeter-scale structure with a sufficient magnetic contrast (20%) with respect to the matrix is visible. Therefore, the dip and the orientation of such structure can be determined with a 3 degree and a 5 degree precision, respectively. The position of the structure along the core axis is known with a 4 mm precision. On the other hand, about half of the magnetic contrasts observed do not correspond to the visual analyses and can be explained by very small variations of the mineralogic composition. This last point offers some interesting ways for future research using magnetic susceptibility mapping. (J.S.). 31 refs., 90 figs., 18 tabs., 2 photos., 6 appends

  19. Inflationary susceptibilities, duality and large-scale magnetic fields generation

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    We investigate what can be said about the interaction of scalar fields with Abelian gauge fields during a quasi-de Sitter phase of expansion and under the assumption that the electric and the magnetic susceptibilities do not coincide. The duality symmetry, transforming the magnetic susceptibility into the inverse of the electric susceptibility, exchanges the magnetic and electric power spectra. The mismatch between the two susceptibilities determines an effective refractive index affecting the evolution of the canonical fields. The constraints imposed by the duration of the inflationary phase and by the magnetogenesis requirements pin down the rate of variation of the susceptibilities that is consistent with the observations of the magnetic field strength over astrophysical and cosmological scales but avoids back-reaction problems. The parameter space of this magnetogenesis scenario is wider than in the case when the susceptibilities are equal, as it happens when the inflaton or some other spectator field is ...

  20. Magnetic susceptibility in the edged topological disordered nanoscopic cylinder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faizabadi, Edris; Omidi, Mahboubeh

    2011-01-01

    The effects of edged topological disorder on magnetic susceptibility are investigated in a nanoscopic cylinder threaded by a magnetic flux. Persistent current versus even or odd number of electrons shows different signs in ordered and disordered cylinders and also in short or long ones. In addition, temperature-averaged susceptibility has only diamagnetic signs in strong regimes and it is associated with paramagnetic signs in ordered and weak disordered ones. Besides, in an edged topological disordered cylinder, the temperature-averaged susceptibility decreases by raising the temperature somewhat and then increasing initiates and finally at high temperature tends to zero as the ordered one. - Research highlights: → Magnetic susceptibility in one-dimensional topological disordered quantum ring. → Edged topological disorder effect on magnetic susceptibility in nanoscopic cylinder. → Edged topological disorder effect on temperature-averaged susceptibility in cylinder.

  1. Magnetic resonance perfusion imaging without contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martirosian, Petros; Graf, Hansjoerg; Schick, Fritz; Boss, Andreas; Schraml, Christina; Schwenzer, Nina F.; Claussen, Claus D.

    2010-01-01

    Principles of magnetic resonance imaging techniques providing perfusion-related contrast weighting without administration of contrast media are reported and analysed systematically. Especially common approaches to arterial spin labelling (ASL) perfusion imaging allowing quantitative assessment of specific perfusion rates are described in detail. The potential of ASL for perfusion imaging was tested in several types of tissue. After a systematic comparison of technical aspects of continuous and pulsed ASL techniques the standard kinetic model and tissue properties of influence to quantitative measurements of perfusion are reported. For the applications demonstrated in this paper a flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) ASL perfusion preparation approach followed by true fast imaging with steady precession (true FISP) data recording was developed and implemented on whole-body scanners operating at 0.2, 1.5 and 3 T for quantitative perfusion measurement in various types of tissue. ASL imaging provides a non-invasive tool for assessment of tissue perfusion rates in vivo. Images recorded from kidney, lung, brain, salivary gland and thyroid gland provide a spatial resolution of a few millimetres and sufficient signal to noise ratio in perfusion maps after 2-5 min of examination time. Newly developed ASL techniques provide especially high image quality and quantitative perfusion maps in tissues with relatively high perfusion rates (as also present in many tumours). Averaging of acquisitions and image subtraction procedures are mandatory, leading to the necessity of synchronization of data recording to breathing in abdominal and thoracic organs. (orig.)

  2. The magnetic susceptibility of soils in Krakow, southern Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojas, Anna

    2017-06-01

    Studies into the magnetic susceptibility have been used to assess the soils contamination in the Krakow area. The results of topsoil (over a 2 × 2 km grid), subsoil (37 shallow holes) and soil samples (112) measurements were presented as maps of soil magnetic susceptibility (both volume and mass) illustrating the distribution of parameters in topsoil horizon (0-10 cm) and differential magnetic susceptibility maps between topsoil horizon and subsoil (40-60 cm). All evidence leads to the finding that the highest values of magnetic susceptibility of soil are found exclusively in industrial areas. Taking into consideration the type of land use, the high median value (89.8 × 10-8 m3kg-1) was obtained for samples of cultivated soils and is likely to be connected with occurrence of fertile soil (chernozem). Moreover, enrichment of soils with Pb and Zn accompanies magnetic susceptibility anomalies in the vicinity of the high roads and in the steelworks area, respectively.

  3. MR measurement of alloy magnetic susceptibility: towards developing tissue-susceptibility matched metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astary, Garrett W; Peprah, Marcus K; Fisher, Charles R; Stewart, Rachel L; Carney, Paul R; Sarntinoranont, Malisa; Meisel, Mark W; Manuel, Michele V; Mareci, Thomas H

    2013-08-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used to relate structure to function mapped with high-temporal resolution electrophysiological recordings using metal electrodes. Additionally, MRI may be used to guide the placement of electrodes or conductive cannula in the brain. However, the magnetic susceptibility mismatch between implanted metals and surrounding brain tissue can severely distort MR images and spectra, particularly in high magnetic fields. In this study, we present a modified MR method of characterizing the magnetic susceptibility of materials that can be used to develop biocompatible, metal alloys that match the susceptibility of host tissue in order to eliminate MR distortions proximal to the implant. This method was applied at 4.7T and 11.1T to measure the susceptibility of a model solid-solution alloy of Cu and Sn, which is inexpensive but not biocompatible. MR-derived relative susceptibility values of four different compositions of Cu-Sn alloy deviated by less than 3.1% from SQUID magnetometry absolute susceptibility measurements performed up to 7T. These results demonstrate that the magnetic susceptibility varies linearly with atomic percentage in these solid-solution alloys, but are not simply the weighted average of Cu and Sn magnetic susceptibilities. Therefore susceptibility measurements are necessary when developing susceptibility-matched, solid-solution alloys for the elimination of susceptibility artifacts in MR. This MR method does not require any specialized equipment and is free of geometrical constraints, such as sample shape requirements associated with SQUID magnetometry, so the method can be used at all stages of fabrication to guide the development of a susceptibility matched, biocompatible device. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Topsoil magnetic susceptibility mapping: data reproducibility and compatibility, measurement strategy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schibler, L.; Boyko, T.; Ferdyn, M.; Gajda, B.; Höll, S.; Jordanova, Neli; Rösler, W.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 1 (2002), s. 43-57 ISSN 0039-3169 Grant - others:EU 5FP RTD Project MAGPROX(XE) No.EVK2-CT-1999-00019 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3012916 Keywords : soil magnetism * industrial pollution * magnetic susceptibility Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 0.571, year: 2002

  5. Enhancing contrast of magnetic resonance imaging in patients with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DTPA), a recent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent, in hepatobiliary system of patients with liver cirrhosis. Methods: Liver cirrhosis patients that underwent contrast MRI examination at Renai Hospital, Taipei City, Taiwan were ...

  6. Enhancing contrast of magnetic resonance imaging in patients with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DTPA), a recent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent, in hepatobiliary system of patients with liver cirrhosis. Methods: Liver cirrhosis patients that underwent contrast MRI examination at Renai Hospital, Taipei. City, Taiwan were ...

  7. NON-CONTRAST MAGNETIC RESONANCE UROGRAPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arpita C

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Magnetic Resonance (MR urography with its optimal contrast resolution and lack of ionizing radiation provides a comprehensive examination of the entire urinary tract noninvasively. MR urography is clinically useful in the evaluation of suspected urinary tract obstruction, haematuria, congenital anomalies, and surgically altered anatomy. It is particularly useful in cases of where there is contraindication of ionizing radiation and in paediatric and pregnant patients. The common MR urographic techniques are: Static-fluid MR urography and excretory MR urography. Static-fluid MR urography uses of heavily T2-weighted sequences to image the urinary tract as a static collection of fluid, can be repeated sequentially (Cine MR urography to better demonstrate the ureters in their entirety and to confirm the presence of fixed stenoses. Excretory MR urography is performed during the excretory phase of enhancement after the intravenous administration of gadolinium-based contrast material; thus, the patient must have sufficient renal function to allow the excretion. Static-fluid and excretory MR urography can be combined with conventional MR imaging for comprehensive evaluation of the urinary tract. The limitations are limited availability, high cost, relatively long examination time, low spatial resolution compared to IVU (Intravenous Urogram and CT Urography; sensitivity to motion (breathing and ureteral peristalsis inherent contraindications like patients with pacemakers, claustrophobia, and relative insensitivity for calcification and ureteric calculi. In this article, an attempt has been made to demonstrate the potential of static-fluid MRU to demonstrate a spectrum of urologic pathology involving the kidneys, ureters, and bladder while discussing the limitations. METHODS Thirty patients with urinary tract abnormalities were evaluated with MR urography performed between May 2014 to April 2016 using routine MR sequences and

  8. The influence of soil moisture on magnetic susceptibility measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, G.; Scholger, R.; Schön, J.

    2006-06-01

    An important methodological question for magnetic susceptibility measurements is if a variation of the soil conductivity, as a result of a change in soil moisture, influences the measured susceptibility values. An answer to this question is essential because an accurate magnetic susceptibility mapping requires a grid of comparable magnetic susceptibility values, which indicate the magnetic iron-mineral contents of the soils. Therefore, in the framework of the MAGPROX project (EU-Project EVK2-CT-1999-00019), the study aims at investigating the influence of soil moisture and the possible correlation between magnetic susceptibility and electric conductivity. This approach was realised by model experiments in the laboratory and a field monitoring experiment, which was performed in an analogical manner as the model. For the laboratory experiment, a plastic tub with a water in- and outflow system and installed lines of electrodes was used. The measurements were carried out with layers of different magnetic material within the experimental sand formation under varying water saturation conditions. For the field experiment, which was carried out from July to December 2003, two test sites were selected. The magnetic susceptibility was measured by means of the recently developed vertical soil profile kappa meter SM400 and a commonly used Bartington MS2D probe. The electric resistivity was recorded using a 4-point light system (laboratory) and a ground conductivity meter EM38 (field). The knowledge of the resistivity of the sand formation enabled an estimation of porosity and water saturation in consideration of the Archie equations. The laboratory experiment results showed a very slight variation of measured magnetic susceptibility under different degrees of moisture, indicating mainly the influence from the diamagnetic contribution of the water volume. A measurement error in connection with the measurement method, for example caused by an interfering effect of soil

  9. Effect of centrifugation on dynamic susceptibility of magnetic fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pshenichnikov, Alexander; Lebedev, Alexander; Lakhtina, Ekaterina; Kuznetsov, Andrey

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Six samples of magnetic fluid were obtained by centrifuging two base ferrocolloids. • Aggregates in magnetic fluids are main reason of dynamic susceptibility dispersion. • Centrifugation is an effective way of changing the dynamic susceptibility. - Abstract: The dispersive composition, dynamic susceptibility and spectrum of times of magnetization relaxation for six samples of magnetic fluid obtained by centrifuging two base colloidal solutions of the magnetite in kerosene was investigated experimentally. The base solutions differed by the concentration of the magnetic phase and the width of the particle size distribution. The procedure of cluster analysis allowing one to estimate the characteristic sizes of aggregates with uncompensated magnetic moments was described. The results of the magnetogranulometric and cluster analyses were discussed. It was shown that centrifugation has a strong effect on the physical properties of the separated fractions, which is related to the spatial redistribution of particles and multi-particle aggregates. The presence of aggregates in magnetic fluids is interpreted as the main reason of low-frequency (0.1–10 kHz) dispersion of the dynamic susceptibility. The obtained results count in favor of using centrifugation as an effective means of changing the dynamic susceptibility over wide limits and obtaining fluids with the specified type of susceptibility dispersion.

  10. Soil magnetic susceptibility as indicator of radioactive contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curda, S.

    2006-01-01

    Measurement of magnetic susceptibility is a method, which is used in many areas of research. The locality Ak-Tjuz is typical example of old ecological load. One of the negative effects represents radioactive contamination. This situation is caused by environmental disaster in 1964. For useful reparation it is really necessary to determinate the surface range of contamination. And measurement of the magnetic susceptibility could be the suitable method for that kind of monitoring. (author)

  11. Magnetic Susceptibilities as they appeared to me - An Amperian approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van den Bosch, A.

    2008-08-15

    Starting from scratch, the book narrates a systematic story of the basic ideas you need for understanding quasi static magnetic susceptibilities. The story leans on the authors 25 year experience measuring susceptibilities following the Faraday technique (related with solid state physics, radiation effects, materials and magneto chemistry). The base of magnetism, the current-current interaction, is the linkage between the topics treated. The number of mathematical equations are reduced to a minimum and can be skipped without losing the thread of the story. The story is positive towards the sound bases of magnetism. However, room is left for the interpretation of measuring data. As the word susceptibility covers different meanings, the story answers for different situations the question: what is susceptible to what for creating what?

  12. Magnetic Susceptibilities as they appeared to me - An Amperian approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van den Bosch, A.

    2008-01-01

    Starting from scratch, the book narrates a systematic story of the basic ideas you need for understanding quasi static magnetic susceptibilities. The story leans on the authors 25 year experience measuring susceptibilities following the Faraday technique (related with solid state physics, radiation effects, materials and magneto chemistry). The base of magnetism, the current-current interaction, is the linkage between the topics treated. The number of mathematical equations are reduced to a minimum and can be skipped without losing the thread of the story. The story is positive towards the sound bases of magnetism. However, room is left for the interpretation of measuring data. As the word susceptibility covers different meanings, the story answers for different situations the question: what is susceptible to what for creating what?

  13. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) studies of Campanian ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Oriented samples of sediments from Ariyalur Group, Cauvery Basin, south India, were studied for low field anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) measurements to unravel the magnetic fabrics and pale- ocurrent directions. The results of AMS parameters of the sediments indicate primary depositional fabrics.

  14. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) studies of Campanian ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Oriented samples of sediments from Ariyalur Group, Cauvery Basin, south India, were studied for low field anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) measurements to unravel the magnetic fabrics and paleocurrent directions. The results of AMS parameters of the sediments indicate primary depositional fabrics for Sillakkudi ...

  15. A simple and accurate relative alternative magnetic susceptibility measurement technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zawilski, B.M., E-mail: zawilski@grenoble.cnrs.f [Institut Neel-MCMF--CNRS-UJF 25, Rue des Martyrs, F 38042 Grenoble Cedex (France); Marcus, J.; Plaindoux, P. [Institut Neel-MCMF-CNRS-UJF 25, Rue des Martyrs, F 38042 Grenoble Cedex (France)

    2010-09-15

    Investigation of relative AC magnetic susceptibility interests for many magnetic transition studies such as superconductor transition. A technique based on mutual or self inductive measure provides a fast and relatively easy (no contact) way to determinate the temperature of any transition affecting the magnetic susceptibility. The half Wheatstone inductive/resistive bridge is used instead of the usual RLC quarter bridge in order to balance the bore inductance of the coil. A comparison between quarter and half bridge measurements illustrates the accuracy of our device.

  16. Mapping Magnetic Susceptibility Anisotropies of White Matter in vivo in the Human Brain at 7 Tesla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xu; Vikram, Deepti S; Lim, Issel Anne L; Jones, Craig K; Farrell, Jonathan A.D.; van Zijl, Peter C. M.

    2012-01-01

    High-resolution magnetic resonance phase- or frequency- shift images acquired at high field show contrast related to magnetic susceptibility differences between tissues. Such contrast varies with the orientation of the organ in the field, but the development of quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) has made it possible to reproducibly image the intrinsic tissue susceptibility contrast. However, recent studies indicate that magnetic susceptibility is anisotropic in brain white matter and, as such, needs to be described by a symmetric second-rank tensor (χ¯¯). To fully determine the elements of this tensor, it would be necessary to acquire frequency data at six or more orientations. Assuming cylindrical symmetry of the susceptibility tensor in myelinated white matter fibers, we propose a simplified method to reconstruct the susceptibility tensor in terms of a mean magnetic susceptibility, MMS = (χ∥ + 2χ⊥)/3 and a magnetic susceptibility anisotropy, MSA = χ∥ − χ⊥, where χ∥ and χ⊥ are susceptibility parallel and perpendicular to the white matter fiber direction, respectively. Computer simulations show that with a practical head rotation angle of around 20°–30°, four head orientations suffice to reproducibly reconstruct the tensor with good accuracy. We tested this approach on whole brain 1×1×1 mm3 frequency data acquired from five healthy subjects at 7 T. The frequency information from phase images collected at four head orientations was combined with the fiber direction information extracted from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to map the white matter susceptibility tensor. The MMS and MSA were quantified for regions in several large white matter fiber structures, including the corona radiata, posterior thalamic radiation and corpus callosum. MMS ranged from −0.037 to −0.053 ppm (referenced to CSF being about zero). MSA values could be quantified without the need for a reference and ranged between 0.004 and 0.029 ppm, in line with

  17. Initial magnetic susceptibility of the diluted magnetopolymer elastic composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borin, D.Yu.; Odenbach, S.

    2017-01-01

    In this work diluted magnetopolymer elastic composites based on magnetic microparticles are experimentally studied. Considered samples have varied concentration of the magnetic powder and different structural anisotropy. Experimental data on magnetic properties are accomplished by microstructural observations performed using X-Ray tomography. Influence of the particles amount and structuring effects on the initial magnetic susceptibility of the composites as well as the applicability of the Maxwell-Garnett approximation, which is widely used in considerations of magnetopolymer elastic composites, are evaluated. It is demonstrated that the approximation works well for diluted samples containing randomly distributed magnetic particles and for the diluted samples with chain-like structures oriented perpendicular to an externally applied field, while it fails to predict the susceptibility of the samples with structures oriented parallel to the field. Moreover, it is shown, that variation of the chains morphology does not significantly change the composite initial magnetic susceptibility. - Highlights: • The Maxwell-Garnet prediction works well for the diluted isotropic composites. • The Maxwell-Garnet prediction can be used for composites with structures oriented perpendicular to an applied field. • Chains oriented parallel to an applied field significantly increase the composite initial magnetic susceptibility. • The number and thickness of chains is not of the highest importance for the diluted composites. • The crucial reason of the observed effect is expected to be the demagnetisation factor of the chains.

  18. Clay mineralogy and magnetic susceptibility of Oxisols in geomorphic surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia Arantes Camargo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Studies analyzing the variability of clay minerals and magnetic susceptibility provide data for the delineation of site-specific management areas since many of their attributes are important to agronomy and the environment. This study aimed to evaluate the spatial variability of clay minerals, magnetic susceptibility, adsorbed phosphorus and physical attributes in Oxisols of sandstones in different geomorphic surfaces. For that purpose, soil samples were collected every 25 m along a transect located within the area where the geomorphic surfaces were identified and mapped. The transect occupied the central portion of 500 ha, where it was also sampled for density purposes with one sample per six hectares. Soil samples were collected at a depth of 0.0-0.2 m. The results of the physical, chemical, mineralogical and magnetic susceptibility analyses were subjected to statistical and geostatistical analyses. The nature of the clay minerals and magnetic susceptibility was dependent on the variation of the soil parent material. High values of magnetic susceptibility were associated with the presence of maghemite and magnetite of coarse size. The spatial variability of crystallinity and the content of Fe oxides, as well as magnetic susceptibility, were dependent on the age of the geomorphic surfaces. The youngest surface had greater spatial variability of these attributes. The iron (goethite and hematite and aluminum (gibbsite oxides in the youngest geomorphic surface influenced the low values of soil density and high values of total pore volume, micropores and P adsorption. The characterization of the spatial variability of Fe oxides and susceptibility allowed for the delineation of homogeneous areas.

  19. Low-temperature susceptibility of concentrated magnetic fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pshenichnikov, Alexander F.; Lebedev, Alexander V.

    2004-09-01

    The initial susceptibility of concentrated magnetic fluids (ferrocolloids) has been experimentally investigated at low temperatures. The results obtained indicate that the interparticle dipole-dipole interactions can increase the susceptibility by several times as compared to the Langevin value. It is shown that good agreement between recent theoretical models and experimental observations can be achieved by introducing a correction for coefficients in the series expansion of susceptibility in powers of density and aggregation parameter. A modified equation for equilibrium susceptibility is offered to sum over corrections made by Kalikmanov (Statistical Physics of Fluids, Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 2001) and by B. Huke and M. Lücke (Phys. Rev. E 67, 051403, 2003). The equation gives good quantitative agreement with the experimental data in the wide range of temperature and magnetic particles concentration. It has been found that in some cases the magnetic fluid solidification occurs at temperature several tens of kelvins higher than the crystallization temperature of the carrier liquid. The solidification temperature of magnetic fluids is independent of particle concentration (i.e., magneto-dipole interparticle interactions) and dependent on the surfactant type and carrier liquid. This finding allows us to suggest that molecular interactions and generation of some large-scale structure from colloidal particles in magnetic fluids are responsible for magnetic fluid solidification. If the magnetic fluid contains the particles with the Brownian relaxation mechanism of the magnetic moment, the solidification manifests itself as the peak on the "susceptibility-temperature" curve. This fact proves the dynamic nature of the observed peak: it arises from blocking the Brownian mechanism of the magnetization relaxation.

  20. Magnetic susceptibility mapping of soil pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kluciarova, D.; Gregorova, D.; Tunyi, I.

    2006-01-01

    Fast and cost-effective detection of industrial pollution can significantly promote its ecological, economic and social assesment. A magnetometric method, used for qualitative determination of anthropogenic contamination, meets these requirements but needs further development in more quantitative terms.lt could be used successfully in numerous cases when heavy metals coexists with strongly magnetic iron oxide particles in the source dust. We presented a magnetic study which examines the utility of magnetometric techniques for rapid, qualitative detection of metallic pollutants in soils. In the present paper we tested the use of rock-magnetic method designed to access the degree of pollution of soil taken from Novaky situated in the south-western of Slovakia. The aim was to identify magnetic particles and to link magnetic pollution, to trace distribution and concentration of contaminants in soil. About 40 years the rainwater overflow the dump and flooded out the ash waste from the brown coal power plant in Novaky. Soil samples have been taken from 3 horizons (20, 40 and 60 cm) and measured by KLY-kappabridge in the Slovak Academy of Sciences, in Geophysical Institute in Bratislava. Our results clearly demonstrate that magnetic anomalies can be explained by human activity. (authors)

  1. Ac magnetic susceptibility study of in vivo nanoparticle biodistribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez, L; Veintemillas-Verdaguer, S; Serna, C J; Morales, M P [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, ICMM-CSIC, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, Cantoblanco 28049, Madrid (Spain); MejIas, R; Barber, D F [Centro Nacional de BiotecnologIa, CNB-CSIC, Darwin 3, Cantoblanco 28049, Madrid (Spain); Lazaro, F J, E-mail: lucia@icmm.csic.es [Departamento de Ciencia y Tecnologia de Materiales y Fluidos, Universidad de Zaragoza, Maria de Luna 3, 50018, Zaragoza (Spain)

    2011-06-29

    We analysed magnetic nanoparticle biodistribution, before and after cytokine conjugation, in a mouse model by ac susceptibility measurements of the corresponding resected tissues. Mice received repeated intravenous injections of nanoparticle suspension for two weeks and they were euthanized 1 h after the last injection. In general, only 10% of the total injected nanoparticles after multiple exposures were found in tissues. The rest of the particles may probably be metabolized or excreted by the organism. Our findings indicate that the adsorption of interferon to DMSA-coated magnetic nanoparticles changes their biodistribution, reducing the presence of nanoparticles in lungs and therefore their possible toxicity. The specific targeting of the particles to tumour tissues by the use of an external magnetic field has also been studied. Magnetic nanoparticles were observed by transmission electron microscopy in the targeted tissue and quantified by ac magnetic susceptibility.

  2. Contrast Agent in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vu-Quang, Hieu

    2015-01-01

    cancer cells for cancer diagnosis in MRI. F127-Folate coated SPION were stable in various types of suspension medium for over six months. They could specifically target folate receptor of cancer cells in vitro and in vivo thus enhancing the contrast in MRI T2/T2* weighted images. These are preliminary...... for chemotherapy. The nanoparticles were 150 nm in size with spherical shape, which contained PFOB in the inner core and Dox and ICG in the polymeric shell. More importantly, they could target folate receptor expressing cancer cells, which provide positive in vitro and in vivo NIR and 19F MRI results. In project...

  3. Effect of centrifugation on dynamic susceptibility of magnetic fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pshenichnikov, Alexander; Lebedev, Alexander; Lakhtina, Ekaterina; Kuznetsov, Andrey

    2017-06-01

    The dispersive composition, dynamic susceptibility and spectrum of times of magnetization relaxation for six samples of magnetic fluid obtained by centrifuging two base colloidal solutions of the magnetite in kerosene was investigated experimentally. The base solutions differed by the concentration of the magnetic phase and the width of the particle size distribution. The procedure of cluster analysis allowing one to estimate the characteristic sizes of aggregates with uncompensated magnetic moments was described. The results of the magnetogranulometric and cluster analyses were discussed. It was shown that centrifugation has a strong effect on the physical properties of the separated fractions, which is related to the spatial redistribution of particles and multi-particle aggregates. The presence of aggregates in magnetic fluids is interpreted as the main reason of low-frequency (0.1-10 kHz) dispersion of the dynamic susceptibility. The obtained results count in favor of using centrifugation as an effective means of changing the dynamic susceptibility over wide limits and obtaining fluids with the specified type of susceptibility dispersion.

  4. Magnetic susceptibility of multiferroics and chemical ordering

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Maryško, Miroslav; Laguta, Valentyn; Raevski, I. P.; Kuzian, R. O.; Olekhnovich, N.M.; Pushkarev, A.V.; Radyush, Yu.V.; Raevskaya, S. I.; Titov, V.V.; Kubrin, S.P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 5 (2017), s. 1-6, č. článku 056409. ISSN 2158-3226 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-11473S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : multiferroic * spin glass * antiferromagnetic * ferroelectrics Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 1.568, year: 2016

  5. Assessing magnetic nanoparticle aggregation in polymer melts by dynamic magnetic susceptibility measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sierra-Bermúdez, Sergio; Maldonado-Camargo, Lorena P.; Orange, François; Guinel, Maxime J.-F.; Rinaldi, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Aggregation of magnetic nanoparticles in polymer melts was assessed using dynamic magnetic susceptibility measurements. Magnetic nanocomposites consisting of polybutadiene/CoFe 2 O 4 and polystyrene/CoFe 2 O 4 mixtures were prepared using different techniques and characterized using dynamic magnetic susceptibility measurements. The presence of nanoparticle aggregates determined using magnetic measurements was confirmed with transmission electron microscopy examinations. The results were in good agreement with predictions from the Flory–Huggins interaction parameters. - Highlights: • Oleic acid coated magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were dispersed in polymer melts. • MNPs dispersed well in polybutadiene but not in polystyrene. • Dynamic magnetic susceptibility (DMS) measurements assessed presence of aggregates. • DMS predictions were confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. • The Flory-Huggins interaction parameter correlated with MNP dispersion

  6. Assessing magnetic nanoparticle aggregation in polymer melts by dynamic magnetic susceptibility measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sierra-Bermúdez, Sergio [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Puerto Rico, P.O. Box 9000 Mayaguez, PR 00681 PR (United States); Maldonado-Camargo, Lorena P. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Florida, 1006 Center Drive, Gainesville, FL 32603 (United States); Orange, François [Department of Physics and Nanoscopy Facility, College of Natural Sciences, University of Puerto Rico, PO Box 70377, San Juan, PR 00936-8377 (United States); Guinel, Maxime J.-F. [Department of Physics and Nanoscopy Facility, College of Natural Sciences, University of Puerto Rico, PO Box 70377, San Juan, PR 00936-8377 (United States); Department of Chemistry, College of Natural Sciences, University of Puerto Rico, PO Box 70377, San Juan, PR 00936-8377 (United States); Rinaldi, Carlos, E-mail: carlos.rinaldi@bme.ufl.edu [J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, PO Box 116131, Gainesville, FL 32611-6131 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Aggregation of magnetic nanoparticles in polymer melts was assessed using dynamic magnetic susceptibility measurements. Magnetic nanocomposites consisting of polybutadiene/CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and polystyrene/CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} mixtures were prepared using different techniques and characterized using dynamic magnetic susceptibility measurements. The presence of nanoparticle aggregates determined using magnetic measurements was confirmed with transmission electron microscopy examinations. The results were in good agreement with predictions from the Flory–Huggins interaction parameters. - Highlights: • Oleic acid coated magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were dispersed in polymer melts. • MNPs dispersed well in polybutadiene but not in polystyrene. • Dynamic magnetic susceptibility (DMS) measurements assessed presence of aggregates. • DMS predictions were confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. • The Flory-Huggins interaction parameter correlated with MNP dispersion.

  7. Multifractal model of magnetic susceptibility distributions in some igneous rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. Gettings

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of in-situ magnetic susceptibility were compiled from mainly Precambrian crystalline basement rocks beneath the Colorado Plateau and ranges in Arizona, Colorado, and New Mexico. The susceptibility meter used measures about 30 cm3 of rock and measures variations in the modal distribution of magnetic minerals that form a minor component volumetrically in these coarsely crystalline granitic to granodioritic rocks. Recent measurements include 50–150 measurements on each outcrop, and show that the distribution of magnetic susceptibilities is highly variable, multimodal and strongly non-Gaussian. Although the distribution of magnetic susceptibility is well known to be multifractal, the small number of data points at an outcrop precludes calculation of the multifractal spectrum by conventional methods. Instead, a brute force approach was adopted using multiplicative cascade models to fit the outcrop scale variability of magnetic minerals. Model segment proportion and length parameters resulted in 26 676 models to span parameter space. Distributions at each outcrop were normalized to unity magnetic susceptibility and added to compare all data for a rock body accounting for variations in petrology and alteration. Once the best-fitting model was found, the equation relating the segment proportion and length parameters was solved numerically to yield the multifractal spectrum estimate. For the best fits, the relative density (the proportion divided by the segment length of one segment tends to be dominant and the other two densities are smaller and nearly equal. No other consistent relationships between the best fit parameters were identified. The multifractal spectrum estimates appear to distinguish between metamorphic gneiss sites and sites on plutons, even if the plutons have been metamorphosed. In particular, rocks that have undergone multiple tectonic events tend to have a larger range of scaling exponents.

  8. Magnetic iron oxide for contrast-enhanced MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fahlvik, A.K.

    1991-05-01

    The main objective of this experimental work has been to study the biological fate and the contrast enhancing potential of a model preparation of magnetic iron oxide (MSM) after intravenous injection to rodents. This was achieved by: Studying in vitro contrast efficacy of various magnetic iron oxide preparations by relaxation analysis. Studying in vivo contrast efficacy of MSM by relaxation analysis and NMR imaging. Studying the biodistribution and bioelimination of MSM in independent experiments using relaxation analysis, radioactivity studies and histological techniques. Studying interactions of MSM with target cells and target organelles using ex vivo techniques. Based on the presented experimental study, the MSM model preparation of magnetic iron oxide seems to fulfill basic requirements of NMR contrast agents: efficient proton relaxation, specific in vivo distribution, and biological tolerance. 177 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  9. Role of magnetic susceptibility weighted imaging in evaluation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) is a new method in MR imaging. SWI detects the signal loss created by disturbance of a homogeneous magnetic field; these disturbances can be caused by paramagnetic, ferromagnetic, or diamagnetic substances. There are many neurologic conditions that can benefit ...

  10. The use of magnetic susceptibility measurements to determine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research work presents a study on the application of magnetic susceptibility measurements and geochemical analysis for mapping or assessing heavy metal pollution in the agricultural soil in road proximity. The research work was also done to check any runoff of heavy metals pollution to the Owabi dam which serves ...

  11. Automatic magnetic susceptibility measurements between 4 K and 1200 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raphael, G.

    1969-01-01

    We give a detailed description of a Faraday magnetic susceptibility balance which operates from 4 K to 1200 K. Some preliminary results on platinum and tantalum illustrate the precision and the sensitivity of the measurements. The apparatus has been designed for measurements on the plutonium compounds which present severe health hazards. (author) [fr

  12. Variable Temperature Equipment for a Commercial Magnetic Susceptibility Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotz, Albert

    2008-01-01

    Variable temperature equipment for the magnetic susceptibility balance MSB-MK1 of Sherwood Scientific, Ltd., is described. The sample temperature is controlled with streaming air heated by water in a heat exchanger. Whereas the balance as sold commercially can be used only for room temperature measurements, the setup we designed extends the…

  13. Determination of arterial input function in dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI using group independent component analysis technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.; Liu, H.-L.; Yang Yihong; Hsu, Y.-Y.; Chuang, K.-S.

    2006-01-01

    Quantification of cerebral blood flow (CBF) with dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) requires the determination of the arterial input function (AIF). The segmentation of surrounding tissue by manual selection is error-prone due to the partial volume artifacts. Independent component analysis (ICA) has the advantage in automatically decomposing the signals into interpretable components. Recently group ICA technique has been applied to fMRI study and showed reduced variance caused by motion artifact and noise. In this work, we investigated the feasibility and efficacy of the use of group ICA technique to extract the AIF. Both simulated and in vivo data were analyzed in this study. The simulation data of eight phantoms were generated using randomized lesion locations and time activity curves. The clinical data were obtained from spin-echo EPI MR scans performed in seven normal subjects. Group ICA technique was applied to analyze data through concatenating across seven subjects. The AIFs were calculated from the weighted average of the signals in the region selected by ICA. Preliminary results of this study showed that group ICA technique could not extract accurate AIF information from regions around the vessel. The mismatched location of vessels within the group reduced the benefits of group study

  14. A theoretical framework for determining cerebral vascular function and heterogeneity from dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digernes, Ingrid; Bjørnerud, Atle; Vatnehol, Svein Are S; Løvland, Grete; Courivaud, Frédéric; Vik-Mo, Einar; Meling, Torstein R; Emblem, Kyrre E

    2017-06-01

    Mapping the complex heterogeneity of vascular tissue in the brain is important for understanding cerebrovascular disease. In this translational study, we build on previous work using vessel architectural imaging (VAI) and present a theoretical framework for determining cerebral vascular function and heterogeneity from dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Our tissue model covers realistic structural architectures for vessel branching and orientations, as well as a range of hemodynamic scenarios for blood flow, capillary transit times and oxygenation. In a typical image voxel, our findings show that the apparent MRI relaxation rates are independent of the mean vessel orientation and that the vortex area, a VAI-based parameter, is determined by the relative oxygen saturation level and the vessel branching of the tissue. Finally, in both simulated and patient data, we show that the relative distributions of the vortex area parameter as a function of capillary transit times show unique characteristics in normal-appearing white and gray matter tissue, whereas tumour-voxels in comparison display a heterogeneous distribution. Collectively, our study presents a comprehensive framework that may serve as a roadmap for in vivo and per-voxel determination of vascular status and heterogeneity in cerebral tissue.

  15. Dynamic magnetic susceptibility of systems with long-range magnetic order

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vannette, Matthew Dano [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2009-01-01

    The utility of the TDR as an instrument in the study of magnetically ordered materials has been expanded beyond the simple demonstration purposes. Results of static applied magnetic field dependent measurements of the dynamic magnetic susceptibility, χ, of various ferromagnetic (FM) and antiferromagnetic (AFM) materials showing a range of transition temperatures (1-800 K) are presented. Data was collected primarily with a tunnel diode resonator (TDR) at different radio-frequencies (~10-30 MHz). In the vicinity of TC local moment ferromagnets show a very sharp, narrow peak in χ which is suppressed in amplitude and shifted to higher temperatures as the static bias field is increased. Unexpectedly, critical scaling analysis fails for these data. It is seen that these data are frequency dependent, however there is no simple method whereby measurement frequency can be changed in a controllable fashion. In contrast, itinerant ferromagnets show a broad maximum in χ well below TC which is suppressed and shifts to lower temperatures as the dc bias field is increased. The data on itinerant ferromagnets is fitted to a semi-phenomenological model that suggests the sample response is dominated by the uncompensated minority spins in the conduction band. Concluding remarks suggest possible scenarios to achieve frequency resolved data using the TDR as well as other fields in which the apparatus may be exploited.

  16. Dynamic magnetic susceptibility of systems with long-range magnetic order

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vannette, Matthew Dano

    2009-01-01

    The utility of the TDR as an instrument in the study of magnetically ordered materials has been expanded beyond the simple demonstration purposes. Results of static applied magnetic field dependent measurements of the dynamic magnetic susceptibility, ?, of various ferromagnetic (FM) and antiferromagnetic (AFM) materials showing a range of transition temperatures (1-800 K) are presented. Data was collected primarily with a tunnel diode resonator (TDR) at different radio-frequencies (∼10-30 MHz). In the vicinity of TC local moment ferromagnets show a very sharp, narrow peak in ? which is suppressed in amplitude and shifted to higher temperatures as the static bias field is increased. Unexpectedly, critical scaling analysis fails for these data. It is seen that these data are frequency dependent, however there is no simple method whereby measurement frequency can be changed in a controllable fashion. In contrast, itinerant ferromagnets show a broad maximum in ? well below TC which is suppressed and shifts to lower temperatures as the dc bias field is increased. The data on itinerant ferromagnets is fitted to a semi-phenomenological model that suggests the sample response is dominated by the uncompensated minority spins in the conduction band. Concluding remarks suggest possible scenarios to achieve frequency resolved data using the TDR as well as other fields in which the apparatus may be exploited.

  17. Brain magnetic resonance imaging with contrast dependent on blood oxygenation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, S.; Lee, T.M.; Kay, A.R.; Tank, D.W.

    1990-01-01

    Paramagnetic deoxyhemoglobin in venous blood is a naturally occurring contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). By accentuating the effects of this agent through the use of gradient-echo techniques in high yields, the authors demonstrate in vivo images of brain microvasculature with image contrast reflecting the blood oxygen level. This blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast follows blood oxygen changes induced by anesthetics, by insulin-induced hypoglycemia, and by inhaled gas mixtures that alter metabolic demand or blood flow. The results suggest that BOLD contrast can be used to provide in vivo real-time maps of blood oxygenation in the brain under normal physiological conditions. BOLD contrast adds an additional feature to magnetic resonance imaging and complement other techniques that are attempting to provide position emission tomography-like measurements related to regional neural activity

  18. Repeatability of Cerebral Perfusion Using Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast MRI in Glioblastoma Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari-Khouzani, Kourosh; Emblem, Kyrre E; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Bjørnerud, Atle; Vangel, Mark G; Gerstner, Elizabeth R; Schmainda, Kathleen M; Paynabar, Kamran; Wu, Ona; Wen, Patrick Y; Batchelor, Tracy; Rosen, Bruce; Stufflebeam, Steven M

    2015-06-01

    This study evaluates the repeatability of brain perfusion using dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) with a variety of post-processing methods. Thirty-two patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma were recruited. On a 3-T MRI using a dual-echo, gradient-echo spin-echo DSC-MRI protocol, the patients were scanned twice 1 to 5 days apart. Perfusion maps including cerebral blood volume (CBV) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) were generated using two contrast agent leakage correction methods, along with testing normalization to reference tissue, and application of arterial input function (AIF). Repeatability of CBV and CBF within tumor regions and healthy tissues, identified by structural images, was assessed with intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) and repeatability coefficients (RCs). Coefficients of variation (CVs) were reported for selected methods. CBV and CBF were highly repeatable within tumor with ICC values up to 0.97. However, both CBV and CBF showed lower ICCs for healthy cortical tissues (up to 0.83), healthy gray matter (up to 0.95), and healthy white matter (WM; up to 0.93). The values of CV ranged from 6% to 10% in tumor and 3% to 11% in healthy tissues. The values of RC relative to the mean value of measurement within healthy WM ranged from 22% to 42% in tumor and 7% to 43% in healthy tissues. These percentages show how much variation in perfusion parameter, relative to that in healthy WM, we expect to observe to consider it statistically significant. We also found that normalization improved repeatability, but AIF deconvolution did not. DSC-MRI is highly repeatable in high-grade glioma patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Repeatability of Cerebral Perfusion Using Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast MRI in Glioblastoma Patients12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari-Khouzani, Kourosh; Emblem, Kyrre E.; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Bjørnerud, Atle; Vangel, Mark G.; Gerstner, Elizabeth R.; Schmainda, Kathleen M.; Paynabar, Kamran; Wu, Ona; Wen, Patrick Y.; Batchelor, Tracy; Rosen, Bruce; Stufflebeam, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES This study evaluates the repeatability of brain perfusion using dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) with a variety of post-processing methods. METHODS Thirty-two patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma were recruited. On a 3-T MRI using a dual-echo, gradient-echo spin-echo DSC-MRI protocol, the patients were scanned twice 1 to 5 days apart. Perfusion maps including cerebral blood volume (CBV) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) were generated using two contrast agent leakage correction methods, along with testing normalization to reference tissue, and application of arterial input function (AIF). Repeatability of CBV and CBF within tumor regions and healthy tissues, identified by structural images, was assessed with intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) and repeatability coefficients (RCs). Coefficients of variation (CVs) were reported for selected methods. RESULTS CBV and CBF were highly repeatable within tumor with ICC values up to 0.97. However, both CBV and CBF showed lower ICCs for healthy cortical tissues (up to 0.83), healthy gray matter (up to 0.95), and healthy white matter (WM; up to 0.93). The values of CV ranged from 6% to 10% in tumor and 3% to 11% in healthy tissues. The values of RC relative to the mean value of measurement within healthy WM ranged from 22% to 42% in tumor and 7% to 43% in healthy tissues. These percentages show how much variation in perfusion parameter, relative to that in healthy WM, we expect to observe to consider it statistically significant. We also found that normalization improved repeatability, but AIF deconvolution did not. CONCLUSIONS DSC-MRI is highly repeatable in high-grade glioma patients. PMID:26055170

  20. Magnetic susceptibility in the deep layers of the primary motor cortex in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costagli, M; Donatelli, G; Biagi, L; Caldarazzo Ienco, E; Siciliano, G; Tosetti, M; Cosottini, M

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurological disorder that entails degeneration of both upper and lower motor neurons. The primary motor cortex (M1) in patients with upper motor neuron (UMN) impairment is pronouncedly hypointense in Magnetic Resonance (MR) T2* contrast. In the present study, 3D gradient-recalled multi-echo sequences were used on a 7 Tesla MR system to acquire T2*-weighted images targeting M1 at high spatial resolution. MR raw data were used for Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping (QSM). Measures of magnetic susceptibility correlated with the expected concentration of non-heme iron in different regions of the cerebral cortex in healthy subjects. In ALS patients, significant increases in magnetic susceptibility co-localized with the T2* hypointensity observed in the middle and deep layers of M1. The magnetic susceptibility, hence iron concentration, of the deep cortical layers of patients' M1 subregions corresponding to Penfield's areas of the hand and foot in both hemispheres significantly correlated with the clinical scores of UMN impairment of the corresponding limbs. QSM therefore reflects the presence of iron deposits related to neuroinflammatory reaction and cortical microgliosis, and might prove useful in estimating M1 iron concentration, as a possible radiological sign of severe UMN burden in ALS patients.

  1. Magnetic susceptibility in the deep layers of the primary motor cortex in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Costagli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS is a progressive neurological disorder that entails degeneration of both upper and lower motor neurons. The primary motor cortex (M1 in patients with upper motor neuron (UMN impairment is pronouncedly hypointense in Magnetic Resonance (MR T2* contrast. In the present study, 3D gradient-recalled multi-echo sequences were used on a 7 Tesla MR system to acquire T2*-weighted images targeting M1 at high spatial resolution. MR raw data were used for Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping (QSM. Measures of magnetic susceptibility correlated with the expected concentration of non-heme iron in different regions of the cerebral cortex in healthy subjects. In ALS patients, significant increases in magnetic susceptibility co-localized with the T2* hypointensity observed in the middle and deep layers of M1. The magnetic susceptibility, hence iron concentration, of the deep cortical layers of patients' M1 subregions corresponding to Penfield's areas of the hand and foot in both hemispheres significantly correlated with the clinical scores of UMN impairment of the corresponding limbs. QSM therefore reflects the presence of iron deposits related to neuroinflammatory reaction and cortical microgliosis, and might prove useful in estimating M1 iron concentration, as a possible radiological sign of severe UMN burden in ALS patients.

  2. Magnetic susceptibility: a proxy method of estimating increased pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kluciarova, D.; Gregorova, D.; Tunyi, I.

    2004-01-01

    A need for rapid and inexpensive (proxy) methods of outlining areas exposed to increased pollution by atmospheric particulates of industrial origin caused scientists in various fields to use and validate different non-traditional (or non-chemical) techniques. Among them, soil magnetometry seems to be a suitable tool. This method is based on the knowledge that ferrimagnetic particles, namely magnetite, are produced from pyrite during combustion of fossil fuel. Besides the combustion processes, magnetic particles can also originate from road traffic, for example, or can be included in various waste-water outlets. In our study we examine the magnetic susceptibility as a convenient measure of determining the concentration of (ferri) magnetic minerals by rapid and non-destructive means. We used for measure KLY-2 Kappabridge. Concentration of ferrimagnetic minerals in different soils is linked to pollution sources. Higher χ values were observed in soils on the territory in Istebne (47383x10 -6 SI ). The susceptibility anomaly may be caused by particular geological circumstances and can be related to high content of ferromagnetic minerals in the host rocks. Positive correlation of magnetic susceptibility are conditioned by industrial contamination mainly by metal working factories and by traffic. The proposed method can be successfully applied in determining heavy metal pollution of soils on the city territories. (authors)

  3. Susceptibility contrast imaging of CO2-induced changes in the blood volume of the human brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostrup, Egill; Larsson, H B; Toft, P B

    1996-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate changes in the regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) in human subjects during rest and hypercapnia by MR imaging, and to compare the results from contrast-enhanced and noncontrast-enhanced susceptibility-weighted imaging. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Five healthy volunteers (aged...

  4. Contrasting patterns of coral bleaching susceptibility in 2010 suggest an adaptive response to thermal stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James R Guest

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Coral bleaching events vary in severity, however, to date, the hierarchy of susceptibility to bleaching among coral taxa has been consistent over a broad geographic range and among bleaching episodes. Here we examine the extent of spatial and temporal variation in thermal tolerance among scleractinian coral taxa and between locations during the 2010 thermally induced, large-scale bleaching event in South East Asia. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Surveys to estimate the bleaching and mortality indices of coral genera were carried out at three locations with contrasting thermal and bleaching histories. Despite the magnitude of thermal stress being similar among locations in 2010, there was a remarkable contrast in the patterns of bleaching susceptibility. Comparisons of bleaching susceptibility within coral taxa and among locations revealed no significant differences between locations with similar thermal histories, but significant differences between locations with contrasting thermal histories (Friedman = 34.97; p<0.001. Bleaching was much less severe at locations that bleached during 1998, that had greater historical temperature variability and lower rates of warming. Remarkably, Acropora and Pocillopora, taxa that are typically highly susceptible, although among the most susceptible in Pulau Weh (Sumatra, Indonesia where respectively, 94% and 87% of colonies died, were among the least susceptible in Singapore, where only 5% and 12% of colonies died. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The pattern of susceptibility among coral genera documented here is unprecedented. A parsimonious explanation for these results is that coral populations that bleached during the last major warming event in 1998 have adapted and/or acclimatised to thermal stress. These data also lend support to the hypothesis that corals in regions subject to more variable temperature regimes are more resistant to thermal stress than those in less variable environments.

  5. Electric and magnetic properties of contrast agents for thermoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunlade, Olumide; Beard, Paul

    2014-03-01

    The endogenous contrast in thermoacoustic imaging is due to the water and ionic content in tissue. This results in poor tissue speci city between high water content tissues. As a result, exogenous contrast agents have been employed to improve tissue speci city and also increase the SNR. An investigation into the sources of contrast produced by several exogenous contrast agents is described. These include three gadolinium based MRI contrast agents, iron oxide particles, single wall carbon nanotubes, saline and sucrose solutions. Both the dielectric and magnetic properties of contrast agents at 3GHz have been measured using microwave resonant cavities. The DC conductivity of the contrast agents were also measured. It is shown that the measured increase in dielectric contrast, relative to water, is due to dipole rotational loss of polar non electrolytes, ionic loss of electrolytes or a combination of both. It is shown that for the same dielectric contrast, electrolytes make better thermoacoustic contrast agents than non-electrolytes, for thermoacoustic imaging.

  6. Determining magnetic susceptibilities of everyday materials using an electronic balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laumann, Daniel; Heusler, Stefan

    2017-05-01

    The magnetic properties of an object and its interaction with an external magnetic field can be described through the magnetic (volume) susceptibility χV, which divides nearly all kinds of matter into diamagnetic, paramagnetic, and ferromagnetic substances. Quantitative measurements of χV are usually technically sophisticated or require the investigation of substances with high values of χV to reveal meaningful results. Here, we show that both diamagnetic and paramagnetic effects in everyday materials can be measured using only an electronic balance and a neodymium magnet, both of which are within the reach of typical introductory college and high school physics classrooms. The experimental results match related literature values remarkably well.

  7. Geochemical normalization of magnetic susceptibility for investigation of floodplain sediments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Faměra, Martin; Matys Grygar, Tomáš; Elznicová, J.; Grison, Hana

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 77, č. 5 (2018), č. článku 189. ISSN 1866-6280 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-00340S Institutional support: RVO:61388980 ; RVO:67985530 Keywords : Background functions * Geochemical normalization * Mass-specific magnetic susceptibility * Post-depositional processes * Provenance Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry OBOR OECD: Environmental sciences (social aspects to be 5.7); Geology (GFU-E) Impact factor: 1.569, year: 2016

  8. Magnetic susceptibilities of bynary non-electrolyte mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caceres, P.; Acevedo, I.L.; Postigo, M.A.; Kartz, M.

    1987-01-01

    Molar magnetic susceptibilities are determined by the Goy method for the following two systems: 1-propanol + methyl acetate and 2-propanol + methyl acetate at 298 K where the three molecules are polar and the alcohol molecules are associated in their pure state. Excess diamagnetic susceptibilties are calculated to obtain information about possible interactions. Diamagnetic suscetibilities were related with molecular polarizabilities by Boyer-Donzelot's equation and compared with experimental results. (author) [pt

  9. Value of dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion MRI in the acute phase of transient global amnesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Förster

    Full Text Available Transient global amnesia (TGA is a transitory, short-lasting neurological disorder characterized by a sudden onset of antero- and retrograde amnesia. Perfusion abnormalities in TGA have been evaluated mainly by use of positron emission tomography (PET or single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT. In the present study we explore the value of dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion-weighted MRI (PWI in TGA in the acute phase.From a MRI report database we identified TGA patients who underwent MRI including PWI in the acute phase and compared these to control subjects. Quantitative perfusion maps (cerebral blood flow (CBF and volume (CBV were generated and analyzed by use of Signal Processing In NMR-Software (SPIN. CBF and CBV values in subcortical brain regions were assessed by use of VOI created in FIRST, a model-based segmentation tool in the Oxford Centre for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain (FMRIB Software Library (FSL.Five TGA patients were included (2 men, 3 women. On PWI, no relevant perfusion alterations were found by visual inspection in TGA patients. Group comparisons for possible differences between TGA patients and control subjects showed significant lower rCBF values bilaterally in the hippocampus, in the left thalamus and globus pallidus as well as bilaterally in the putamen and the left caudate nucleus. Correspondingly, significant lower rCBV values were observed bilaterally in the hippocampus and the putamen as well as in the left caudate nucleus. Group comparisons for possible side differences in rCBF and rCBV values in TGA patients revealed a significant lower rCBV value in the left caudate nucleus.Mere visual inspection of PWI is not sufficient for the assessment of perfusion changes in TGA in the acute phase. Group comparisons with healthy control subjects might be useful to detect subtle perfusion changes on PWI in TGA patients. However, this should be confirmed in larger data sets and serial PWI

  10. Comparison of Magnetic Susceptibility Tensor and Diffusion Tensor of the Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Liu, Chunlei

    2013-10-01

    Susceptibility tensor imaging (STI) provides a novel approach for noninvasive assessment of the white matter pathways of the brain. Using mouse brain ex vivo , we compared STI with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), in terms of tensor values, principal tensor values, anisotropy values, and tensor orientations. Despite the completely different biophysical underpinnings, magnetic susceptibility tensors and diffusion tensors show many similarities in the tensor and principal tensor images, for example, the tensors perpendicular to the fiber direction have the highest gray-white matter contrast, and the largest principal tensor is along the fiber direction. Comparison to DTI fractional anisotropy, the susceptibility anisotropy provides much higher sensitivity to the chemical composition of the white matter, especially myelin. The high sensitivity can be further enhanced with the perfusion of ProHance, a gadolinium-based contrast agent. Regarding the tensor orientations, the direction of the largest principal susceptibility tensor agrees with that of diffusion tensors in major white matter fiber bundles. The STI fiber tractography can reconstruct the fiber pathways for the whole corpus callosum and for white matter fiber bundles that are in close contact but in different orientations. There are some differences between susceptibility and diffusion tensor orientations, which are likely due to the limitations in the current STI reconstruction. With the development of more accurate reconstruction methods, STI holds the promise for probing the white matter micro-architectures with more anatomical details and higher chemical sensitivity.

  11. Pseudo-extravasation rate constant of dynamic susceptibility contrast-MRI determined from pharmacokinetic first principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Varallyay, Csanad G; Gahramanov, Seymur; Fu, Rongwei; Rooney, William D; Neuwelt, Edward A

    2017-11-01

    Dynamic susceptibility contrast-magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) is widely used to obtain informative perfusion imaging biomarkers, such as the relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV). The related post-processing software packages for DSC-MRI are available from major MRI instrument manufacturers and third-party vendors. One unique aspect of DSC-MRI with low-molecular-weight gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast reagent (CR) is that CR molecules leak into the interstitium space and therefore confound the DSC signal detected. Several approaches to correct this leakage effect have been proposed throughout the years. Amongst the most popular is the Boxerman-Schmainda-Weisskoff (BSW) K 2 leakage correction approach, in which the K 2 pseudo-first-order rate constant quantifies the leakage. In this work, we propose a new method for the BSW leakage correction approach. Based on the pharmacokinetic interpretation of the data, the commonly adopted R 2 * expression accounting for contributions from both intravascular and extravasating CR components is transformed using a method mathematically similar to Gjedde-Patlak linearization. Then, the leakage rate constant (K L ) can be determined as the slope of the linear portion of a plot of the transformed data. Using the DSC data of high-molecular-weight (~750 kDa), iron-based, intravascular Ferumoxytol (FeO), the pharmacokinetic interpretation of the new paradigm is empirically validated. The primary objective of this work is to empirically demonstrate that a linear portion often exists in the graph of the transformed data. This linear portion provides a clear definition of the Gd CR pseudo-leakage rate constant, which equals the slope derived from the linear segment. A secondary objective is to demonstrate that transformed points from the initial transient period during the CR wash-in often deviate from the linear trend of the linearized graph. The inclusion of these points will have a negative impact on the accuracy of the leakage

  12. The clinical use of contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bydder, G.M.

    1987-01-01

    Interest in the use of external agents to increase tissue contrasts has come from many sources dating back to the earliest work in NMR, to animal studies and to the widespread use of contrast agents in conventional radiological practice. The first clinical magnetic resonance images were published in 1980 and in the following year a brief account of the use of the paramagnetic agents in human volunteers was established. It was apparent relatively early in the development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that a high level of soft tissue contrast was available de novo and the need for externally administered agents might therefore be small. This observation was tempered by the fact that separation of tumour from oedema was frequently better with contrast enhanced CT X-ray than with unenhanced MRI and that of a contrast agent might therefore be needed for MRI. At the end of 1983 the first parenteral agent gadoliminum diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) was used in volunteers and clinical studies began in 1984. At the present time only molecular O/sub 2/, oral iron compounds and Gd-DTPA are in clinical use although there are a number of other agents which have been used in animals and some of these may become available for clinical use in the foreseeable future

  13. Microcomputer simulation of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging contrasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Bihan, D.

    1985-01-01

    The high information content of magnetic resonance images is due to the multiplicity of its parameters. However, this advantage introduces a difficulty in the interpretation of the contrast: an image is strongly modified according to the visualised parameters. The author proposes a micro-computer simulation program. After recalling the main intrinsic and extrinsic parameters, he shows how the program works and its interest as a pedagogic tool and as an aid for contrast optimisation of images as a function of the suspected pathology [fr

  14. Nonlinear dynamic susceptibilities of interacting and noninteracting magnetic nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Joensson, P; García-Palacios, J L; Svedlindh, P

    2000-01-01

    The linear and cubic dynamic susceptibilities of solid dispersions of nanosized maghemite gamma-Fe sub 2 O sub 3 particles have been measured for three samples with a volume concentration of magnetic particles ranging from 0.3% to 17%, in order to study the effect of dipole-dipole interactions. Significant differences between the dynamic response of the samples are observed. While the linear and cubic dynamic susceptibilities of the most dilute sample compare reasonably well with the corresponding expressions proposed by Raikher and Stepanov for noninteracting particles, the nonlinear dynamic response of the most concentrated sample exhibits at low temperatures similar features as observed in a Ag(11 at% Mn) spin glass.

  15. Mapping soil magnetic susceptibility and mineralogy in Ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menshov, Oleksandr; Pereira, Paulo; Kruglov, Oleksandr; Sukhorada, Anatoliy

    2017-04-01

    Soil suatainable planning is fundamental for agricultural areas. Soil mapping and modeling are increasingly used in agricultural areas in the entire world (Brevik et al., 2016). They are beneficial to land managers, to reduce soil degradation, increase soil productivity and their restoration. Magnetic susceptibility (MS) methods are low cost and accurate for the developing maps of agricultural areas.. The objective of this work is to identify the minerals responsible for MS increase in soils from the two study areas in Poltava and Kharkiv region. The thermomagnetic analyses were conducted using the KLY-4 with an oven apparatus. The hysteresis parameters were measured with the Rotating Magnetometer at the Geophysical Centre Dourbes, Belgium. The results showed that all of samples from Kharkiv area and the majortity of the samples collected in Poltava area represent the pseudo single domain (PSD) zone particles in Day plot. According to Hanesch et al. (2006), the transformation of goethite, ferrihydrite or hematite to a stronger ferrimagnetic phase like magnetite or maghemite is common in strongly magnetic soils with high values of organic carbon content. In our case of thermomagnetic study, the first peak on the heating curve near 260 ˚C indicates the presence of ferrihydrite which gradually transforms into maghemite (Jordanova et al., 2013). A further decrease in the MS identified on the heating curve may be related to the transformation of the maghemite to hematite. A second MS peak on the heating curve near 530 ˚C and the ultimate loss of magnetic susceptibility near 580 ˚C were caused by the reduction of hematite to magnetite. The shape of the thermomagnetic curves suggests the presence of single domain (SD) particles at room temperature and their transformation to a superparamagnetic (SP) state under heating. Magnetic mineralogical analyses suggest the presence of highly magnetic minerals like magnetite and maghemite as well as slightly magnetic goethite

  16. Magnetic susceptibility, nanorheology, and magnetoviscosity of magnetic nanoparticles in viscoelastic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilg, Patrick; Evangelopoulos, Apostolos E. A. S.

    2018-03-01

    While magnetic nanoparticles suspended in Newtonian solvents (ferrofluids) have been intensively studied in recent years, the effects of viscoelasticity of the surrounding medium on the nanoparticle dynamics are much less understood. Here we investigate a mesoscopic model for the orientational dynamics of isolated magnetic nanoparticles subject to external fields, viscous and viscoelastic friction, as well as the corresponding random torques. We solve the model analytically in the overdamped limit for weak viscoelasticity. By comparison to Brownian dynamics simulations we establish the limits of validity of the analytical solution. We find that viscoelasticity not only slows down the magnetization relaxation, shifts the peak of the imaginary magnetic susceptibility χ″ to lower frequencies, and increases the magnetoviscosity but also leads to nonexponential relaxation and a broadening of χ″. The model we study also allows us to test a recent proposal for using magnetic susceptibility measurements as a nanorheological tool using a variant of the Germant-DiMarzio-Bishop relation. We find for the present model and certain parameter ranges that the relation of the magnetic susceptibility to the shear modulus is satisfied to a good approximation.

  17. Double-contrast magnetic resonance examination of ulcerative colitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sardanelli, F.; De Cicco, E.; Renzetti, P.; Parodi, R.C.; Calabrese, M. [Department of Radiology, University of Genoa (Italy)

    1999-06-01

    The aim of our work was to propose a double-contrast magnetic resonance examination (DCMRE) in the follow-up of ulcerative colitis (UC), comparing this new technique with X-ray double-contrast barium enema (DCBE). After preparation with colon-cleansing regimen used for DCBE, six UC patients and six control subjects underwent a 1.5-T examination: supine position, coronal and axial fat-spectral-saturation breath-hold gradient-echo T1-weighted sequences after intravenous hypotonization and 1500-2000 cc air insufflation. Without evacuating the primarily insufflated air, the same images were acquired after endorectal administration of negative superparamagnetic contrast agent (600 cc) and intravenous administration of positive paramagnetic contrast agent (0.2 mmol/kg). All patients had undergone DCBE in the four preceding weeks. We found significant increase in wall thickness of UC affected vs apparently unaffected segments (p = 0.0425) and vs CG (p = 0.0447), significant increase in enhancement percent of UC affected vs apparently unaffected segments (p = 0.0161) and vs CG (p = 0.0185), and no significant difference for enhancement percent of UC unaffected segments vs CG. DCMRE and DCBE localized the UC extension at the same sites in all patients. Double-contrast MR examination time was 20-30 min. This new method could be used in follow-up of UC patients. (orig.) With 4 figs., 14 refs.

  18. Upgrading of magnetic susceptibility of conodont sample residues before magnetic separation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Carls, P.; Slavík, Ladislav

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 2 (2005), s. 171-172 ISSN 0024-1164. [Lethaia Seminar. Oslo , 15.06.2005] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KSK6005114 Keywords : magnetic susceptibility * heavy liquids * conodont concentration Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 1.562, year: 2005

  19. Magnetic susceptibility as a simple tracer for fluvial sediment source ascription during storm events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowntree, Kate M; van der Waal, Bennie W; Pulley, Simon

    2017-06-01

    ) coincided with the flood peak. Low X lf values indicated that mudstones in the lower catchment soils dominated the sediment load throughout the entire event. Sediment tracing using a single property (X lf) was thus used effectively to study changing sediment sources both between and during a flood event in a catchment with strongly contrasting magnetic signatures in different areas. The results support the use of magnetic susceptibility as a simple and cheap tool to determine sediment provenance that can be used to guide catchment restoration in similar environments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Magnetization, magnetic susceptibility, effective magnetic moment of Fe3+ ions in Bi25FeO39 ferrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zatsiupa, A.A.; Bashkirov, L.A.; Troyanchuk, I.O.; Petrov, G.S.; Galyas, A.I.; Lobanovsky, L.S.; Truhanov, S.V.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic susceptibility for ferrite Bi 25 FeO 39 is measured at 5–950 K in the magnetic field of 0.86 T. It is shown that Bi 25 FeO 39 is paramagnetic in the temperature range 5−950 K. The saturation magnetization is equal to 5.04μ B per formula unit at 5 K in a magnetic field of 10 T. It is found that at 5−300 K the effective magnetic moment of Fe 3+ ions in Bi 25 FeO 39 is equal to 5.82μ B . - Graphical abstract: The dependence of the magnetization (n, μ B ) on the magnetic field for one formula unit of Bi 25 FeO 39 at 5 K. - Highlights: • Magnetic susceptibility for Bi 25 FeO 39 is measured at 5–950 K in the magnetic field of 0.86 T. • It is shown that Bi 25 FeO 39 is paramagnetic in the temperature range 5−950 K. • The saturation magnetization is equal to 5.04μ B per formula unit at 5 K in a magnetic field of 10 T

  1. Susceptibility contrast imaging of CO2-induced changes in the blood volume of the human brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostrup, Egill; Larsson, H B; Toft, P B

    1996-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate changes in the regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) in human subjects during rest and hypercapnia by MR imaging, and to compare the results from contrast-enhanced and noncontrast-enhanced susceptibility-weighted imaging. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Five healthy volunteers (aged...... by fitting a gamma-variate function to the data. The tissue concentration vs time curves were deconvoluted using an input function obtained by arterial sampling. RESULTS: The ratio of gray to white matter CBV (1.9-2.5) as well as the fractional increase in rCBV during hypercapnia (about 30%) was found...

  2. Macromolecular and dendrimer-based magnetic resonance contrast agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bumb, Ambika; Brechbiel, Martin W. (Radiation Oncology Branch, National Cancer Inst., National Inst. of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)), e-mail: pchoyke@mail.nih.gov; Choyke, Peter (Molecular Imaging Program, National Cancer Inst., National Inst. of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States))

    2010-09-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful imaging modality that can provide an assessment of function or molecular expression in tandem with anatomic detail. Over the last 20-25 years, a number of gadolinium-based MR contrast agents have been developed to enhance signal by altering proton relaxation properties. This review explores a range of these agents from small molecule chelates, such as Gd-DTPA and Gd-DOTA, to macromolecular structures composed of albumin, polylysine, polysaccharides (dextran, inulin, starch), poly(ethylene glycol), copolymers of cystamine and cystine with GD-DTPA, and various dendritic structures based on polyamidoamine and polylysine (Gadomers). The synthesis, structure, biodistribution, and targeting of dendrimer-based MR contrast agents are also discussed

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents: A Review of Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Sahraei

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available  Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI contrast agents most commonly agents used in diagnosing different diseases. Several agents have been ever introduced with different peculiar characteristics. They vary in potency, adverse reaction and other specification, so it is important to select the proper agent in different situations. We conducted a systematic literature search in MEDLINE/PUBMED, Web of Science (ISI, Scopus,Google Scholar by using keywords "gadolinium" and "MRI contrast Medias", "Gadofosvest", "Gadobenate" and "Gadoxetate". The most frequent contrast media agents made based on gadolinium (Gd. These are divided into two categories based on the structure of their chelating parts, linear agents and macrocyclic agents. All characteristics of contrast media factors, including efficiency, kinetic properties, stability, side effects and the rate of resolution are directly related to the structure of chelating part of that formulation.In vitro data has shown that the macrocyclic compounds are the most stable Gd-CA as they do not bind to serum proteins, they all possess similar and relatively low relaxivity and the prevalence of Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis (NSF has decreased by increasing the use of macrocyclic agents in recent years. No cases of NSF have been recorded after the administration of any of the high-relaxivity protein interacting agents, the vascular imaging agent gadofosveset trisodium (Ablavar, the hepatic imaging agent gadoxetate meglumine (Eovist, and the multipurpose agent gadobenate dimeglumine (MultiHance. In pregnancy and lactating women, stable macrocyclic agent is recommended.

  4. Magnetic susceptibility of Mn(III) complexes of hydroxamate siderophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Stephen D; Butler, Alison

    2015-07-01

    The hydroxamate siderophores putrebactin, desferrioxamine B, and desferrioxamine E bind Mn(II) and promote the air oxidation of Mn(II) to Mn(III) at pH>7.1. The magnetic susceptibility of the manganese complexes were determined by the Evans method and the stoichiometry was probed with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESIMS). The room temperature magnetic moments (μeff) for the manganese complexes of desferrioxamines B and E were 4.85 BM and 4.84 BM, respectively, consistent with a high spin, d(4), Mn(III) electronic configuration. The manganese complex of putrebactin had a magnetic moment of 4.98 BM, consistent with incomplete oxidation of Mn(II), as confirmed by X band EPR spectroscopy. Mass spectra of the Mn(III) desferrioxamine B and E complexes showed complexes at m/z 613.26 and 653.26, respectively, consistent with 1:1 complexation. Mass spectral peaks for manganese putrebactin at m/z 797.31 and 1221.41 corresponds to 1:2 and 2:3 Mn:putrebactin complexation. This study directly confirms the Mn(III) oxidation state in hydroxamate siderophore complexes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Magnetic susceptibility and magnetic resonance measurements of the moisture content and hydration condition of a magnetic mixture material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukada, K.; Kusaka, T.; Saari, M. M.; Takagi, R.; Sakai, K.; Kiwa, T.; Bito, Y.

    2014-01-01

    We developed a magnetic measurement method to measure the moisture content and hydration condition of mortar as a magnetic mixture material. Mortar is a mixture of Portland cement, sand, and water, and these materials exhibit different magnetic properties. The magnetization–magnetic field curves of these components and of mortars with different moisture contents were measured, using a specially developed high-temperature-superconductor superconducting quantum interference device. Using the differences in magnetic characteristics, the moisture content of mortar was measured at the ferromagnetic saturation region over 250 mT. A correlation between magnetic susceptibility and moisture content was successfully established. After Portland cement and water are mixed, hydration begins. At the early stage of the hydration/gel, magnetization strength increased over time. To investigate the magnetization change, we measured the distribution between bound and free water in the mortar in the early stage by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The MRI results suggest that the amount of free water in mortar correlates with the change in magnetic susceptibility

  6. Magnetic susceptibility and magnetic resonance measurements of the moisture content and hydration condition of a magnetic mixture material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukada, K., E-mail: tsukada@cc.okayama-u.ac.jp; Kusaka, T.; Saari, M. M.; Takagi, R.; Sakai, K.; Kiwa, T. [The Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Okayama University, 3-1-1 Tsushima-Naka, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Bito, Y. [Central Research Lab., Hitachi. Ltd., 1-280 Higashi-Koigakubo, Kokubunji, Tokyo 185-8601 (Japan)

    2014-05-07

    We developed a magnetic measurement method to measure the moisture content and hydration condition of mortar as a magnetic mixture material. Mortar is a mixture of Portland cement, sand, and water, and these materials exhibit different magnetic properties. The magnetization–magnetic field curves of these components and of mortars with different moisture contents were measured, using a specially developed high-temperature-superconductor superconducting quantum interference device. Using the differences in magnetic characteristics, the moisture content of mortar was measured at the ferromagnetic saturation region over 250 mT. A correlation between magnetic susceptibility and moisture content was successfully established. After Portland cement and water are mixed, hydration begins. At the early stage of the hydration/gel, magnetization strength increased over time. To investigate the magnetization change, we measured the distribution between bound and free water in the mortar in the early stage by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The MRI results suggest that the amount of free water in mortar correlates with the change in magnetic susceptibility.

  7. Partial volume effects in dynamic contrast magnetic resonance renal studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez, D. Rodriguez; Wells, K.; Diaz Montesdeoca, O.; Moran Santana, A.; Mendichovszky, I.A.; Gordon, I.

    2010-01-01

    This is the first study of partial volume effect in quantifying renal function on dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. Dynamic image data were acquired for a cohort of 10 healthy volunteers. Following respiratory motion correction, each voxel location was assigned a mixing vector representing the 'overspilling' contributions of each tissue due to the convolution action of the imaging system's point spread function. This was used to recover the true intensities associated with each constituent tissue. Thus, non-renal contributions from liver, spleen and other surrounding tissues could be eliminated from the observed time-intensity curves derived from a typical renal cortical region of interest. This analysis produced a change in the early slope of the renal curve, which subsequently resulted in an enhanced glomerular filtration rate estimate. This effect was consistently observed in a Rutland-Patlak analysis of the time-intensity data: the volunteer cohort produced a partial volume effect corrected mean enhancement of 36% in relative glomerular filtration rate with a mean improvement of 7% in r 2 fitting of the Rutland-Patlak model compared to the same analysis undertaken without partial volume effect correction. This analysis strongly supports the notion that dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of kidneys is substantially affected by the partial volume effect, and that this is a significant obfuscating factor in subsequent glomerular filtration rate estimation.

  8. Partial volume effects in dynamic contrast magnetic resonance renal studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez, D. Rodriguez, E-mail: drodriguez@biotronics3d.co [CVSSP, Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey (United Kingdom); Wells, K., E-mail: k.wells@surrey.ac.u [CVSSP, Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey (United Kingdom); Diaz Montesdeoca, O., E-mail: o.diaz.montesdeoca@gmail.co [EUITT, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain); Moran Santana, A. [EUITT, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain); Mendichovszky, I.A., E-mail: iosifm@hotmail.co [Radiology and Physics Unit, UCL Institute of Child Health, London WC1N 1EH (United Kingdom); Gordon, I., E-mail: i.gordon@ich.ucl.ac.u [Radiology and Physics Unit, UCL Institute of Child Health, London WC1N 1EH (United Kingdom)

    2010-08-15

    This is the first study of partial volume effect in quantifying renal function on dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. Dynamic image data were acquired for a cohort of 10 healthy volunteers. Following respiratory motion correction, each voxel location was assigned a mixing vector representing the 'overspilling' contributions of each tissue due to the convolution action of the imaging system's point spread function. This was used to recover the true intensities associated with each constituent tissue. Thus, non-renal contributions from liver, spleen and other surrounding tissues could be eliminated from the observed time-intensity curves derived from a typical renal cortical region of interest. This analysis produced a change in the early slope of the renal curve, which subsequently resulted in an enhanced glomerular filtration rate estimate. This effect was consistently observed in a Rutland-Patlak analysis of the time-intensity data: the volunteer cohort produced a partial volume effect corrected mean enhancement of 36% in relative glomerular filtration rate with a mean improvement of 7% in r{sup 2} fitting of the Rutland-Patlak model compared to the same analysis undertaken without partial volume effect correction. This analysis strongly supports the notion that dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of kidneys is substantially affected by the partial volume effect, and that this is a significant obfuscating factor in subsequent glomerular filtration rate estimation.

  9. Magnetic susceptibilities and thermal expansion of artificial graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornuault, P.; Herpin, A.; Hering, H.; Seguin, M.; Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, Saclay

    1960-01-01

    Starting from measurements of the magnetic susceptibility made in the two principal directions of a graphite bar, the distribution function of the normals to the carbon planes in the crystallites has been evaluated. The effect of different variation in the manufacturing process on this crystalline anisotropy has been studied. From this crystalline anisotropy we have calculated the thermal expansion coefficient possessed by a compact mass of crystallites having exactly the same orientational anisotropy as the porous body consideration. The difference between this and the observed expansion coefficient leads to the determination of the expansion of the non-graphitic part of the mass which turns out to have a negative value and is also anisotropic. We have attempted to draw some conclusions from this result. (author) [fr

  10. Image fusion for dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leach Martin O

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multivariate imaging techniques such as dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI have been shown to provide valuable information for medical diagnosis. Even though these techniques provide new information, integrating and evaluating the much wider range of information is a challenging task for the human observer. This task may be assisted with the use of image fusion algorithms. Methods In this paper, image fusion based on Kernel Principal Component Analysis (KPCA is proposed for the first time. It is demonstrated that a priori knowledge about the data domain can be easily incorporated into the parametrisation of the KPCA, leading to task-oriented visualisations of the multivariate data. The results of the fusion process are compared with those of the well-known and established standard linear Principal Component Analysis (PCA by means of temporal sequences of 3D MRI volumes from six patients who took part in a breast cancer screening study. Results The PCA and KPCA algorithms are able to integrate information from a sequence of MRI volumes into informative gray value or colour images. By incorporating a priori knowledge, the fusion process can be automated and optimised in order to visualise suspicious lesions with high contrast to normal tissue. Conclusion Our machine learning based image fusion approach maps the full signal space of a temporal DCE-MRI sequence to a single meaningful visualisation with good tissue/lesion contrast and thus supports the radiologist during manual image evaluation.

  11. Anisotropy of susceptibility in rocks that are magnetically non-linear even in weak fields

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chadima, Martin; Ježek, J.; Hrouda, F.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 19, EGU General Assembly 2017 (2017) ISSN 1029-7006. [European Geosciences Union General Assembly. 23.04.2017-28.04.2017, Vienna] Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility * field-dependent susceptibility * second-rank tensor Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography http://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EGU2017/EGU2017-7210-1.pdf

  12. Limits of out-of-phase susceptibility in magnetic granulometry of rocks and soils

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrouda, F.; Pokorný, J.; Chadima, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 2 (2015), s. 294-308 ISSN 0039-3169 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : out-of-phase susceptibility * frequency-dependent susceptibility measurement accuracy * environmetal magnetism * loess * soil * paleoclimatic reconstruction Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism , Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 0.818, year: 2015

  13. Magnetic susceptibility mapping of the human thorax using a SQUID biomagnetometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, S C; Ni, C; Fardy, J; Rassi, D

    1994-01-01

    Biomagnetism is essentially the study of the weak magnetic fields generated by biological organisms, in particular the human body. The human thorax is composed of a variety of tissues and organs of slightly different magnetic susceptibility. In an applied magnetic field (of the order of milliTeslas) these small differences in susceptibility lead to measurable field variations (of the order of nanoTeslas) at the body surface which may be of diagnostic value. Physiological processes such as cardiac activity, cardiac output, blood flow and respiratory related lung volume changes also contribute to the observed signal. In this study susceptibility 'maps' were obtained by measuring the magnetic field at several hundred points over the thorax. Results indicate that magnetic susceptibility mapping produces low-resolution images of internal body structures from which is should be possible to detect pathologies that cause alterations in tissue susceptibility.

  14. Photo-magnetic imaging: resolving optical contrast at MRI resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Yuting; Thayer, David; Luk, Alex L; Gulsen, Gultekin; Gao Hao

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we establish the mathematical framework of a novel imaging technique, namely photo-magnetic imaging (PMI). PMI uses a laser to illuminate biological tissues and measure the induced temperature variations using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). PMI overcomes the limitation of conventional optical imaging and allows imaging of the optical contrast at MRI spatial resolution. The image reconstruction for PMI, using a finite-element-based algorithm with an iterative approach, is presented in this paper. The quantitative accuracy of PMI is investigated for various inclusion sizes, depths and absorption values. Then, a comparison between conventional diffuse optical tomography (DOT) and PMI is carried out to illustrate the superior performance of PMI. An example is presented showing that two 2 mm diameter inclusions embedded 4.5 mm deep and located side by side in a 25 mm diameter circular geometry medium are recovered as a single 6 mm diameter object with DOT. However, these two objects are not only effectively resolved with PMI, but their true concentrations are also recovered successfully. (paper)

  15. Assessing Tumor Angiogenesis with Dynamic Contrast Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esparza-Coss, Emilio; Jackson, Edward F.

    2006-09-01

    Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) is a method able of assessing microvascular changes at high spatial resolution and without ionizing radiation. The microcirculation and structure of tumors are fundamentally chaotic in that tumor-derived factors stimulate the endothelial cells to form new small vessels (angiogenesis) and this vasculature deviates markedly from normal hierarchical branching patterns. The tumor-induced microvascular changes lead to blood flow that is both spatially and temporally more heterogeneous than the efficient and uniform perfusion of normal organs and tissues. DCE-MRI allows for the assessment of perfusion and permeability of the tumor microvasculature, including the network of vessels with diameters less than 100 μm, which are beyond the resolution of conventional angiograms. The microvessel permeability to small molecular weight contrast media as well as measures of tumor response can be assessed with different analysis techniques ranging from simple measures of enhancement to pharmacokinetic models. In this work, such DCE-MRI analysis techniques are discussed.

  16. Geophysical monitoring of simulated graves with resistivity, magnetic susceptibility, conductivity and GPR in Colombia, South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Carlos Martin; Pringle, Jamie K; Saumett, Miguel; Evans, Gethin T

    2016-04-01

    In most Latin American countries there are significant numbers of both missing people and forced disappearances, ∼71,000 Colombia alone. Successful detection of buried human remains by forensic search teams can be difficult in varying terrain and climates. Three clandestine burials were simulated at two different depths commonly encountered in Latin America. In order to gain critical knowledge of optimum geophysical detection techniques, burials were monitored using: ground penetrating radar, magnetic susceptibility, bulk ground conductivity and electrical resistivity up to twenty-two months post-burial. Radar survey results showed good detection of modern 1/2 clothed pig cadavers throughout the survey period on 2D profiles, with the 250MHz antennae judged optimal. Both skeletonised and decapitated and burnt human remains were poorly imaged on 2D profiles with loss in signal continuity observed throughout the survey period. Horizontal radar time slices showed good anomalies observed over targets, but these decreased in amplitude over the post-burial time. These were judged due to detecting disturbed grave soil rather than just the buried targets. Magnetic susceptibility and electrical resistivity were successful at target detection in contrast to bulk ground conductivity surveys which were unsuccessful. Deeper burials were all harder to image than shallower ones. Forensic geophysical surveys should be undertaken at suspected burial sites. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Magnetic susceptibility, specific heat and magnetic structure of CuNi2(PO4)2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escobal, Jaione; Pizarro, Jose L.; Mesa, Jose L.; Larranaga, Aitor; Fernandez, Jesus Rodriguez; Arriortua, Maria I.; Rojo, Teofilo

    2006-01-01

    The CuNi 2 (PO 4 ) 2 phosphate has been synthesized by the ceramic method at 800 deg. C in air. The crystal structure consists of a three-dimensional skeleton constructed from MO 4 (M II =Cu and Ni) planar squares and M 2 O 8 dimers with square pyramidal geometry, which are interconnected by (PO 4 ) 3- oxoanions with tetrahedral geometry. The magnetic behavior has been studied on powdered sample by using susceptibility, specific heat and neutron diffraction data. The bimetallic copper(II)-nickel(II) orthophosphate exhibits a three-dimensional magnetic ordering at, approximately, 29.8 K. However, its complex crystal structure hampers any parametrization of the J-exchange parameter. The specific heat measurements exhibit a three-dimensional magnetic ordering (λ-type) peak at 29.5 K. The magnetic structure of this phosphate shows ferromagnetic interactions inside the Ni 2 O 8 dimers, whereas the sublattice of Cu(II) ions presents antiferromagnetic couplings along the y-axis. The change of the sign in the magnetic unit-cell, due to the [1/2, 0, 1/2] propagation vector determines a purely antiferromagnetic structure. - Graphical abstract: Magnetic structure of CuNi2(PO4)2

  18. Mean magnetic susceptibility regularized susceptibility tensor imaging (MMSR-STI) for estimating orientations of white matter fibers in human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xu; van Zijl, Peter C M

    2014-09-01

    An increasing number of studies show that magnetic susceptibility in white matter fibers is anisotropic and may be described by a tensor. However, the limited head rotation possible for in vivo human studies leads to an ill-conditioned inverse problem in susceptibility tensor imaging (STI). Here we suggest the combined use of limiting the susceptibility anisotropy to white matter and imposing morphology constraints on the mean magnetic susceptibility (MMS) for regularizing the STI inverse problem. The proposed MMS regularized STI (MMSR-STI) method was tested using computer simulations and in vivo human data collected at 3T. The fiber orientation estimated from both the STI and MMSR-STI methods was compared to that from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Computer simulations show that the MMSR-STI method provides a more accurate estimation of the susceptibility tensor than the conventional STI approach. Similarly, in vivo data show that use of the MMSR-STI method leads to a smaller difference between the fiber orientation estimated from STI and DTI for most selected white matter fibers. The proposed regularization strategy for STI can improve estimation of the susceptibility tensor in white matter. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Utility of magnetic susceptibility values for the petrographic analysis of weathering crust basement samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Hernández-Ramsay

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This article exposes the resolving power of the magnetic susceptibility measurements in basement minerals samples of the lateritic weathering profile as an element of complementary analysis in the petrographic characterization of the rocks, and useful in the mapping of the magnetic heterogeneities of the basement. The comparison of the magnetic susceptibility data with the petrographic data of different samples revealed that even in samples that correspond to homogeneous lithotypes, great heterogeneities and differences can be manifested from the physical-mineralogical point of view. In general, a high concordance was observed between the intensity of the weathering processes in the rock samples, and the values of the magnetic susceptibility of such samples. The results support the possibility of extrapolating the composition information to samples with magnetic susceptibility measurements and without petrographic studies.

  20. Characterizing the magnetic susceptibility tensor of lanthanide-containing polymethylated-DOTA complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strickland, Madeleine [National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics, Biochemistry and Biophysics Center, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (United States); Schwieters, Charles D. [National Institutes of Health, Office of Intramural Research, Center for Information Technology (United States); Göbl, Christoph [Technische Universität München, Department of Chemistry (Germany); Opina, Ana C. L. [National Institutes of Health, Imaging Probe Development Center, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (United States); Strub, Marie-Paule [National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics, Biochemistry and Biophysics Center, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (United States); Swenson, Rolf E.; Vasalatiy, Olga [National Institutes of Health, Imaging Probe Development Center, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (United States); Tjandra, Nico, E-mail: tjandran@nhlbi.nih.gov [National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics, Biochemistry and Biophysics Center, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Lanthanide complexes based on the DOTA (1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid) cage are commonly used as phase contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging, but can also be utilized in structural NMR applications due to their ability to induce either paramagnetic relaxation enhancement or a pseudocontact shift (PCS) depending on the choice of the lanthanide. The size and sign of the PCS for any given atom is determined by its coordinates relative to the metal center, and the characteristics of the lanthanide’s magnetic susceptibility tensor. Using a polymethylated DOTA tag (Ln-M8-SPy) conjugated to ubiquitin, we calculated the position of the metal center and characterized the susceptibility tensor for a number of lanthanides (dysprosium, thulium, and ytterbium) under a range of pH and temperature conditions. We found that there was a difference in temperature sensitivity for each of the complexes studied, which depended on the size of the lanthanide ion as well as the isomeric state of the cage. Using {sup 17}O-NMR, we confirmed that the temperature sensitivity of the compounds was enhanced by the presence of an apically bound water molecule. Since amide-containing lanthanide complexes are known to be pH sensitive and can be used as probes of physiological pH, we also investigated the effect of pH on the Ln-M8-SPy susceptibility tensor, but we found that the changes in this pH range (5.0–7.4) were not significant.

  1. Complex magnetic susceptibility setup for spectroscopy in the extremely low-frequency range

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, B.W.M.; Bakelaar, I.A.; Klokkenburg, M.; Erne, B.H.

    2008-01-01

    A sensitive balanced differential transformer was built to measure complex initial parallel magnetic susceptibility spectra in the 0.01–1000 Hz range. The alternating magnetic field can be chosen sufficiently weak that the magnetic structure of the samples is only slightly perturbed and the low

  2. Temperature dependence of magnetic susceptibility in the vicinity of martensitic transformation in ferromagnetic shape memory alloys

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zablotskyy, Vitaliy A.; Pérez-Landazábal, J.I.; Recarte, V.; Gómez-Polo, C.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 31 (2010), 316004/1-316004/7 ISSN 0953-8984 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : shape memory alloys * magnetic susceptibility * martensitic transition * magnetic domains Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.332, year: 2010

  3. Local magnetic susceptibility of the muon in the S=1/2V{sub 15} molecular nano-magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salman, Z., E-mail: z.salman1@physics.ox.ac.u [Department of Physics, Clarendon Laboratory, Oxford University, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Kiefl, R.F. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2A3 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Canadian Institute for Advanced Research (Canada); Chow, K.H. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2G7 (Canada); MacFarlane, W.A. [Department of Chemistry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Keeler, T.A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Parolin, T.J. [Department of Chemistry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Wang, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada)

    2009-04-15

    We report muon spin rotation measurements of the local magnetic susceptibility around a positive muon in the V{sub 15} spin 1/2 molecular nano-magnet. We find that the measured temperature dependence of the local susceptibility agrees with bulk. No temperature dependence is observed below 200 mK, indicating that at these temperatures the V{sub 15} molecular spin resides in its S=1/2 ground state.

  4. Methods for the computation of templates from quantitative magnetic susceptibility maps (QSM): Toward improved atlas- and voxel-based analyses (VBA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanspach, Jannis; Dwyer, Michael G; Bergsland, Niels P; Feng, Xiang; Hagemeier, Jesper; Bertolino, Nicola; Polak, Paul; Reichenbach, Jürgen R; Zivadinov, Robert; Schweser, Ferdinand

    2017-11-01

    To develop and assess a method for the creation of templates for voxel-based analysis (VBA) and atlas-based approaches using quantitative magnetic susceptibility mapping (QSM). We studied four strategies for the creation of magnetic susceptibility brain templates, derived as successive extensions of the conventional template generation (CONV) based on only T 1 -weighted (T 1 w) images. One method that used only T 1 w images involved a minor improvement of CONV (U-CONV). One method used only magnetic susceptibility maps as input for template generation (DIRECT), and the other two used a linear combination of susceptibility and T 1 w images (HYBRID) and an algorithm that directly used both image modalities (MULTI), respectively. The strategies were evaluated in a group of N = 10 healthy human subjects and semiquantitatively assessed by three experienced raters. Template quality was compared statistically via worth estimates (WEs) obtained with a log-linear Bradley-Terry model. The overall quality of the templates was better for strategies including both susceptibility and T 1 w contrast (MULTI: WE = 0.62; HYBRID: WE = 0.21), but the best method depended on the anatomical region of interest. While methods using only one modality resulted in lower WEs, lowest overall WEs were obtained when only T 1 w images were used (DIRECT: WE = 0.12; U-CONV: WE = 0.05). Template generation strategies that employ only magnetic susceptibility contrast or both magnetic susceptibility and T 1 w contrast produce templates with the highest quality. The optimal approach depends on the anatomical structures of interest. The established approach of using only T 1 w images (CONV) results in reduced image quality compared to all other approaches studied. 2 Technical Efficacy: Stage 1 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017;46:1474-1484. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  5. ASFNR Recommendations for Clinical Performance of MR Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast Perfusion Imaging of the Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welker, K.; Boxerman, J.; Kalnin, A.; Kaufmann, T.; Shiroishi, M.; Wintermark, M.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY MR perfusion imaging is becoming an increasingly common means of evaluating a variety of cerebral pathologies, including tumors and ischemia. In particular, there has been great interest in the use of MR perfusion imaging for both assessing brain tumor grade and for monitoring for tumor recurrence in previously treated patients. Of the various techniques devised for evaluating cerebral perfusion imaging, the dynamic susceptibility contrast method has been employed most widely among clinical MR imaging practitioners. However, when implementing DSC MR perfusion imaging in a contemporary radiology practice, a neuroradiologist is confronted with a large number of decisions. These include choices surrounding appropriate patient selection, scan-acquisition parameters, data-postprocessing methods, image interpretation, and reporting. Throughout the imaging literature, there is conflicting advice on these issues. In an effort to provide guidance to neuroradiologists struggling to implement DSC perfusion imaging in their MR imaging practice, the Clinical Practice Committee of the American Society of Functional Neuroradiology has provided the following recommendations. This guidance is based on review of the literature coupled with the practice experience of the authors. While the ASFNR acknowledges that alternate means of carrying out DSC perfusion imaging may yield clinically acceptable results, the following recommendations should provide a framework for achieving routine success in this complicated-but-rewarding aspect of neuroradiology MR imaging practice. PMID:25907520

  6. Fully automated measurement of anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility using 3D rotator

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Studýnka, J.; Chadima, Martin; Suza, P.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 629, 26 August (2014), s. 6-13 ISSN 0040-1951 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : AMS * Kappabridge * susceptibility tensor Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 2.872, year: 2014

  7. Evaluating the Effects of Magnetic Susceptibility in UXO Discrimination Problems (SERDP SEED Project UX-1285)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pasion, Leonard R; Billings, Stephen D; Oldenburg, Douglas W; Sinex, David; Li, Yaoguo

    2003-01-01

    ...) method in UXO discrimination problems. We have demonstrated that the static magnetic susceptibility can be effectively modeled using a correlated random process, and that Wiener optimal filter can be used as a preprocessing tool to remove...

  8. Critical behavior of the magnetic susceptibility of the uniaxial ferromagnet LiHoF4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beauvillain, P.; Renard, J. P.; Laursen, Ib

    1978-01-01

    The magnetic susceptibility of two LiHoF4 single crystals has been measured in the range 1.2-4.2 K. Ferromagnetic order occurs at Tc=1.527 K. Above 2.5 K, the susceptibilities parallel and perpendicular to the fourfold c axis are well interpreted by the molecular-field approximation, taking into ...

  9. Translation balance for measuring magnetic susceptibilities at high or low temperatures (1962)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaise, A.; Peuch, M.A.

    1962-01-01

    A translation balance is described for the measurement of the magnetic susceptibilities of liquids or solids in the temperature range from 1.7 to 1400 deg. K. Measurements are made within a magnetic field adjustable from 3400 to 16000 oersteds, in any desired atmosphere. Susceptibilities between 10 -8 and 10 -4 u.e.m. C.G.S., can be measured. (authors) [fr

  10. Gadolinium-based contrast agents in pediatric magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gale, Eric M.; Caravan, Peter [Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, The Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Boston, MA (United States); Rao, Anil G. [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); McDonald, Robert J. [College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States); Winfeld, Matthew [University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Fleck, Robert J. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Gee, Michael S. [MassGeneral Hospital for Children, Harvard Medical School, Division of Pediatric Imaging, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2017-05-15

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents can increase the accuracy and expediency of an MRI examination. However the benefits of a contrast-enhanced scan must be carefully weighed against the well-documented risks associated with administration of exogenous contrast media. The purpose of this review is to discuss commercially available gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) in the context of pediatric radiology. We discuss the chemistry, regulatory status, safety and clinical applications, with particular emphasis on imaging of the blood vessels, heart, hepatobiliary tree and central nervous system. We also discuss non-GBCA MRI contrast agents that are less frequently used or not commercially available. (orig.)

  11. Gadolinium-based contrast agents in pediatric magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gale, Eric M.; Caravan, Peter; Rao, Anil G.; McDonald, Robert J.; Winfeld, Matthew; Fleck, Robert J.; Gee, Michael S.

    2017-01-01

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents can increase the accuracy and expediency of an MRI examination. However the benefits of a contrast-enhanced scan must be carefully weighed against the well-documented risks associated with administration of exogenous contrast media. The purpose of this review is to discuss commercially available gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) in the context of pediatric radiology. We discuss the chemistry, regulatory status, safety and clinical applications, with particular emphasis on imaging of the blood vessels, heart, hepatobiliary tree and central nervous system. We also discuss non-GBCA MRI contrast agents that are less frequently used or not commercially available. (orig.)

  12. Assessment of brain metastases by means of dynamic susceptibility contrast enhanced MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knopp, M.; Wenz, F.; Debus, J.; Hentrich, H.R.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: To assess if pre therapeutic measurements of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and volume (rCVB) are able to predict the response of brain metastases to radiation therapy and to assess the influence of radiosurgery on rCBF and rCBV on brain metastases and normal surrounding tissue. We examined 25 patients with brain metastases prior to high dose radiosurgery with conventional T1 and T2 weighted MRI and dynamic susceptibility contrast enhanced MRI (DSC MRI). For DSC MRI 55 T2*w GE images of two sections were acquired after bolus administration of 0.1 mmol/kg gadoteridol (ProHance) for the simultaneous measurement of brain feeding arteries and brain tissue. This allowed an absolute quantification of rCBF and rCBV. Follow-up examinations were performed 6 weeks and 3 months after radiotherapy and the acquired perfusion data were related to a 3 point scale of treatment outcome. Radiosurgery was performed by a linear accelerator with a 80% isodose of 18-20 Gv. For treatment planning the heads of the patients were immobilized by a cask mask to avoid head movement. DSC MRI was able to assess perfusion data in all patients. Higher pre therapeutic rCBV seems to predict a poor treatment outcome. After radiosurgery patients with tumor remission and stable disease presented a decrease of rCBV over time regardless of temporary tumor volume increase. Patients with tumor progression at the 3 month followup presented an increase of rCBV. Effects on normal surrounding tissue could not be observed. DSC MRI using Gadoteridol allows the non-invasive assessment of rCBV and rCBF of brain metastases and its changes due to radiosurgery. The method may also be able to predict treatment outcome. Furthermore radiofrequency effects on surrounding unaffected tissue can be monitored. Copyright (2002) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  13. Static magnetic susceptibility of radiopaque NiTiPt and NiTiEr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chovan, Drahomír; Gandhi, Abbasi; Butler, James; Tofail, Syed A. M.

    2018-04-01

    Magnetic properties of metallic alloys used in biomedical industry are important for the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). If the alloys were to be used for long term implants or as guiding devices, safety of the patient as well as the medical staff has to be ensured. Strong response to the external magnetic field can cause mechanical damage to the patients body. In this paper we present magnetic susceptibility of nickel rich, ternary NiTiPt and NiTiEr to static magnetic field. We show that the magnetic susceptibility of these radiopaque alloys has values in low paramagnetic region comparable to the binary nickel-titanium. Furthermore, we studied the effect of the thermal and mechanical treatments on magnetic properties. Despite deviation from linear M (H) treated samples spanning small region around H = 0 , the linearity of the M (H) and χ =d M /d H values suggest that these ternary alloys are safe to use under MRI conditions.

  14. Enhancement of MS2D Bartington point measurement of soil magnetic susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabijańczyk, Piotr; Zawadzki, Jarosław

    2015-04-01

    Field magnetometry is fast method used to assess the potential soil pollution. The most popular device used to measure the soil magnetic susceptibility on the soil surface is a MS2D Bartington. Single reading using MS2D device of soil magnetic susceptibility is low time-consuming but often characterized by considerable errors related to the instrument or environmental and lithogenic factors. Typically, in order to calculate the reliable average value of soil magnetic susceptibility, a series of MS2D readings is performed in the sample point. As it was analyzed previously, such methodology makes it possible to significantly reduce the nugget effect of the variograms of soil magnetic susceptibility that is related to the micro-scale variance and measurement errors. The goal of this study was to optimize the process of taking a series of MS2D readings, whose average value constitutes a single measurement, in order to take into account micro-scale variations of soil magnetic susceptibility in proper determination of this parameter. This was done using statistical and geostatistical analyses. The analyses were performed using field MS2D measurements that were carried out in the study area located in the direct vicinity of the Katowice agglomeration. At 150 sample points 10 MS2D readings of soil magnetic susceptibility were taken. Using this data set, series of experimental variograms were calculated and modeled. Firstly, using single random MS2D reading for each sample point, and next using the data set increased by adding one more MS2D reading, until their number reached 10. The parameters of variogram: nugget effect, sill and range of correlation were used to determine the most suitable number of MS2D readings at sample point. The distributions of soil magnetic susceptibility at sample point were also analyzed in order to determine adequate number of readings enabling to calculate reliable average soil magnetic susceptibility. The research leading to these results has

  15. Magnetic susceptibility as a method of investigation of short-range order in strongly nonstoichiometric carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazarova, S.Z.; Gusev, A.I.

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic susceptibility in disordered and ordered carbides of transition metals (M = Ti, Zr, Hf, Nb, Ta) was studied, the results are generalized. It was ascertained that the change in carbide susceptibility induced by deviation from stoichiometry stems from specific features of electronic spectra of the compounds. The use of magnetic susceptibility for determining structural disorder-order transitions is discussed. It is shown that change in the contribution made by orbital paramagnetism, resulting from short-range order formation, is the reason of decrease in susceptibility of nonstoichiometric carbides during the ordering. Experimentally obtained data on susceptibility permitted evaluating short- and far-range order parameters in NbC y , TaC y , TiC y and HfC y carbides [ru

  16. Surveying the anthropogenic impact of the Moldau river sediments and nearby soils using magnetic susceptibility

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Knab, M.; Hoffmann, V.; Petrovský, Eduard; Kapička, Aleš; Jordanova, N.; Appel, E.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 4 (2006), s. 527-535 ISSN 0943-0105 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3012916 Keywords : Moldau river sediments * magnetic susceptibility * anthropogenic impact Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 0.610, year: 2006

  17. Clusters of magnetic nanoparticles as contrast agents for MRI: effect of aggregation on transverse relaxivity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dědourková, T.; Kaman, Ondřej; Veverka, Pavel; Koktan, Jakub; Veverka, Miroslav; Kuličková, Jarmila; Jirák, Zdeněk; Herynek, V.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 11 (2015), s. 5300804 ISSN 0018-9464 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-10088S; GA MPO FR-TI3/521 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : contrast agents * magnetic resonance imaging * magnetic nanoparticles * manganites * transverse relaxivity Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.277, year: 2015

  18. High magnetic field susceptibility and neutron scattering measurements for ZnFe2O4 single crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamazawa, Kazuya; Nakajima, Kenji; Kohn, Key; Tsunoda, Yorihiko

    2004-01-01

    We studied field dependences of magnetic susceptibility and neutron scattering measurements for frustrated normal spinel ZnFe 2 O 4 . Although a peak which is similar to the antiferromagnetic transition is observed at 13 K in the magnetic susceptibility, there is no magnetic long-range order in our neutron scattering measurements. When we measure the magnetic susceptibility under the high magnetic field, the peak position moves toward the high temperature. In the neutron scattering measurements, magnetic diffuse scattering around the nuclear Bragg peaks disappear under the magnetic field of 3 T

  19. 3D and 4D magnetic susceptibility tomography based on complex MR images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zikuan; Calhoun, Vince D

    2014-11-11

    Magnetic susceptibility is the physical property for T2*-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (T2*MRI). The invention relates to methods for reconstructing an internal distribution (3D map) of magnetic susceptibility values, .chi. (x,y,z), of an object, from 3D T2*MRI phase images, by using Computed Inverse Magnetic Resonance Imaging (CIMRI) tomography. The CIMRI technique solves the inverse problem of the 3D convolution by executing a 3D Total Variation (TV) regularized iterative convolution scheme, using a split Bregman iteration algorithm. The reconstruction of .chi. (x,y,z) can be designed for low-pass, band-pass, and high-pass features by using a convolution kernel that is modified from the standard dipole kernel. Multiple reconstructions can be implemented in parallel, and averaging the reconstructions can suppress noise. 4D dynamic magnetic susceptibility tomography can be implemented by reconstructing a 3D susceptibility volume from a 3D phase volume by performing 3D CIMRI magnetic susceptibility tomography at each snapshot time.

  20. Gadolinium chloride as a contrast agent for imaging wood composite components by magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas L. Eberhardt; Chi-Leung So; Andrea Protti; Po-Wah So

    2009-01-01

    Although paramagnetic contrast agents have an established track record in medical uses of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), only recently has a contrast agent been used for enhancing MRI images of solid wood specimens. Expanding on this concept, wood veneers were treated with a gadolinium-based contrast agent and used in a model system comprising three-ply plywood...

  1. Estimating susceptibility and magnetization within the Earth's continental crust: Petrophysical and Satellite approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purucker, M. E.; McEnroe, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    Magnetic models (Xchaos) made from Champ and Orsted data are used to place constraints on the average magnetic susceptibility and its variability in the continental crust. Estimates of magnetic crustal thickness are made in a two-step process. The first step uses a recent seismic model (Crust1.0) to estimate the thickness of crystalline crust above the Moho, modified in the Andes and the Himalayas to account for the non-magnetic lower crust there. The second step calculates the magnetic field expected from such a layer of crystalline rock assuming the magnetization is solely induced in the earth's main field by rock of constant magnetic susceptibility, and modifies the starting crustal thickness to bring it into agreement with the Xchaos model. This global model removes spherical harmonic degrees less than 15 to account for the core field mask. We restrict our attention to the continental crust, in particular to Australia, western North America, and Scandinavia. Petrophysical and petrological data from Scandinavian rocks that have been deep in the crust help place limits on susceptibility values. Our simulations use two susceptibilities, 0.02 and 0.04 SI. The mean crystalline crustal thickness from the seismic model is 42 and 37 km in western North America and Australia, respectively, and the modification with the magnetic data makes little change to the mean crustal thickness, irrespective of whether the susceptibility is 0.02 or 0.04 SI. However, the modification with the magnetic data does make a significant difference to the standard deviation of the crustal thickness, increasing it by a factor of two in the case of a susceptibility of 0.04, and by a factor of four in the case of a susceptibility of 0.02. The changes to the standard deviation of the crustal thickness are also evident in the Scandinavian data, but the mean crystalline crustal thickness of 45 km is significantly larger than that found from either magnetic model (33 and 30 km). The differences

  2. ESR and magnetic susceptibilities in the '2223' superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geru, I.I.; Pop, A.V.; Konopko, L.A.; Ilonca, Gh.; Pop, V.; Cosma, I.

    1995-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) of the (Bi Pb)-(Sr Ba)-Ca-Cu-O high T c superconductor was performed. The a.c. susceptibility shows two superconducting transitions at 109 K and 88 K respectively. An unusual behaviour is observed at 240 K in the EPR linewidth and in the Lande factor (the g value). (author) 3 figs., 12 refs

  3. Magnon heat capacity and magnetic susceptibility of the spin Lieb lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarmohammadi, Mohsen, E-mail: m.yarmohammadi69@gamil.com

    2016-11-01

    Using linear response theory, Heisenberg model Hamiltonian and Green's function technique, the influences of Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction (DMI), external magnetic field and next-nearest-neighbor (NNN) coupling on the density of magnon modes (DMM), the magnetic susceptibility (MS) and the magnon heat capacity (MHC) of a spin Lieb lattice, a face-centered square lattice, are investigated. The results reveal a band gap in the DMM and we witness an extension in the bandwidth and an increase in the number of van-Hove singularities as well. As a notable point, besides the magnetic nature which includes ferromagnetism in spin Lieb-based nanosystems, MS is investigated. Further, we report a Schottky anomaly in the MHC. The results show that the effects of the magnetic field on the MHC and MS have different behaviors in two temperature regions. In the low temperature region, MHC and MS increase when the magnetic field strength increases. On the other hand, the MHC and MS reduce with increasing the magnetic field strength in the high temperature region. Also comprehensive numerical modelling of the DMM, the MS and the MHC of a spin Lieb lattice yields excellent qualitative agreement with the experimental data. - Highlights: • Theoretical calculation of density of states of the spin Lieb lattice. • The investigation of the effect of external magnetic field on the magnon heat capacity and magnetic susceptibility. • The investigation of the effect of NNN coupling and the DMI strength on the magnon heat capacity and magnetic susceptibility.

  4. Magnetic nanoparticles as contrast agents for molecular imaging in medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Matthew

    2018-05-01

    For over twenty years, superparamagnetic nanoparticles have been developed for a number of medical applications ranging from bioseparations, magnetic drug targeting, hyperthermia and imaging. Recent studies have shown that they can be functionalized for in vivo biological targeting, potentially enabling nanoagents for molecular imaging and site-localized drug delivery. Here we review several imaging technologies developed using functionalized superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) as targeted molecular agents. Several imaging modalities have exploited the large induced magnetic moment of SPIONs to create local mechanical force. Magnetic force microscopy can probe nanoparticle uptake in single cells. For in vivo applications, magnetomotive modulation of primary images in ultrasound (US), photoacoustics (PA), and optical coherence tomography (OCT) can help identify very small concentrations of nanoagents while simultaneously suppressing intrinsic background signals from tissue.

  5. In situ identification, pairing, and classification of meteorites from Antarctica through magnetic susceptibility measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folco, Luigi; Rochette, Pierre; Gattacceca, JéRôMe; Perchiazzi, Natale

    2006-03-01

    We report on the effectiveness of using magnetic measurements in the search for meteorites on the Antarctic ice sheet, which is thus far the Earth's most productive terrain. Magnetic susceptibility measurements carried out with a pocket meter (SM30) during the 2003/04 PNRA meteorite collection expedition to northern Victoria Land (Antarctica) proved to be a rapid, sensitive, non-destructive means for the in situ identification, pairing, and classification of meteorites. In blue ice fields characterized by the presence of moraines and glacial drifts (e.g., Miller Butte, Roberts Butte, and Frontier Mountain), magnetic susceptibility measurements allowed discrimination of meteorites from abundant terrestrial stones that look like meteorites thanks to the relatively high magnetic susceptibility of the former with respect to terrestrial rocks. Comparative measurements helped identify 16 paired fragments found at Johannessen Nunataks, thereby reducing unnecessary duplication of laboratory analyses and statistical bias. Following classifications schemes developed by us in this and previous works, magnetic susceptibility measurements also helped classify stony meteorites directly in the field, thereby providing a means for selecting samples with higher research priority. A magnetic gradiometer capable of detecting perturbations in the Earth's magnetic field induced by the presence of meteorites was an efficient tool for locating meteorites buried in snow along the downwind margin of the Frontier Mountain blue ice field. Based on these results, we believe that magnetic sensors should constitute an additional payload for robotic search for meteorites on the Antarctic ice sheet and, by extension, on the surface of Mars where meteorite accumulations are predicted by theoretical works. Lastly, magnetic susceptibility data was successfully used to crosscheck the later petrographic classification of the 123 recovered meteorites, allowing the detection of misclassified or peculiar

  6. Magnetic Susceptibility depending on the Thermal Degradation of HK-40 Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeong Min; Park, Jong Seo; Nahm, Seung Hoon [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Son, De Rac [Hannam University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Gyun [Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Han, Sang In; Choi, Song Chun [Korea Gas Safety Corporation, Siheung (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Dae Hyun [Hansei University, Gunpo (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-02-15

    Since the used materials of furnace heater tube with different kinds of thermal degradation were not commonly available, the HK-40 steel specimens were heat-treated isothermally at elevated temperature to simulate the microstructure at the service temperature. HK-40 steel specimens with five different aging time were prepared by isothermal heat treatment at 1050 .deg. C . The characteristics of the magnetic susceptibility have been investigated for the degradation evaluation of HK-40 steel. The magnetic susceptibility at room temperature increases as the extent of degradation of the materials increases. The variation of magnetic susceptibility was compared with the variation of tensile properties and Vickers hardness. To investigate the effect of the microsturctural change on the characteristics of tensile properties, hardness and magnetic susceptibility, the microstructures were examined by a scanning electron microscope(SEM) and the chemical compositions were analyzed by a energy spectrometer of SEM. As a result, the magnetic susceptibility method can be suggested as one of the nondestructive evaluation methods for the degradation of the HK-40 steel

  7. CONTRAST

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Thomas Krogsgaard

    2007-01-01

    Dette er en afrapportering fra den årlige CONTRAST workshop, der i 2007 blev afholdt i Yaoundé, Cameroon.......Dette er en afrapportering fra den årlige CONTRAST workshop, der i 2007 blev afholdt i Yaoundé, Cameroon....

  8. RHIC susceptibility to variations in systematic magnetic harmonic errors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dell, G.F.; Peggs, S.; Pilat, F.; Satogata, T.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Wei, J.

    1994-01-01

    Results of a study to determine the sensitivity of tune to uncertainties of the systematic magnetic harmonic errors in the 8 cm dipoles of RHIC are reported. Tolerances specified to the manufacturer for tooling and fabrication can result in systematic harmonics different from the expected values. Limits on the range of systematic harmonics have been established from magnet calculations, and the impact on tune from such harmonics has been established

  9. Cerebral Hemodynamics in Patients with Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome Assessed by Susceptibility Weighted Imaging and Four-Dimensional Non-Contrast MR Angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löbel, Ulrike; Forkert, Nils Daniel; Schmitt, Peter; Dohrmann, Thorsten; Schroeder, Maria; Magnus, Tim; Kluge, Stefan; Weiler-Normann, Christina; Bi, Xiaoming; Fiehler, Jens; Sedlacik, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of patients with hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) and neurological symptoms performed during an epidemic outbreak of Escherichia coli O104:H4 in Northern Europe has previously shown pathological changes in only approximately 50% of patients. In contrast, susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) revealed a loss of venous contrast in a large number of patients. We hypothesized that this observation may be due to an increase in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and aimed to identify a plausible cause. Baseline 1.5T MRI scans of 36 patients (female, 26; male, 10; mean age, 38.2±19.3 years) were evaluated. Venous contrast was rated on standard SWI minimum intensity projections. A prototype four-dimensional (time resolved) magnetic resonance angiography (4D MRA) assessed cerebral hemodynamics by global time-to-peak (TTP), as a surrogate marker for CBF. Clinical parameters studied were hemoglobin, hematocrit, creatinine, urea levels, blood pressure, heart rate, and end-tidal CO2. SWI venous contrast was abnormally low in 33 of 36 patients. TTP ranged from 3.7 to 10.2 frames (mean, 7.9 ± 1.4). Hemoglobin at the time of MRI (n = 35) was decreased in all patients (range, 5.0 to 12.6 g/dL; mean, 8.2 ± 1.4); hematocrit (n = 33) was abnormally low in all but a single patient (range, 14.3 to 37.2%; mean, 23.7 ± 4.2). Creatinine was abnormally high in 30 of 36 patients (83%) (range, 0.8 to 9.7; mean, 3.7 ± 2.2). SWI venous contrast correlated significantly with hemoglobin (r = 0.52, P = 0.0015), hematocrit (r = 0.65, P effect of blood transfusions in patients with HUS and neurological symptoms.

  10. Simultaneous effects of electron-electron interactions, Rashba spin-orbit interaction and magnetic field on susceptibility of quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khordad, R.

    2018-03-01

    In this work, we have theoretically studied susceptibility of an InAs quantum dot in the presence of Rashba spin-orbit interaction (SOI), electron-electron (e--e-) interaction, and magnetic field. We have used two potential models, shifted parabolic and inverse lateral shifted parabolic potentials. We have first solved the Schrodinger equation to obtain energy levels and then obtain the susceptibility using canonical ensemble. It is found that the susceptibility at low magnetic field is negative and then it becomes positive with increasing the magnetic field. This transition occurs at a particular magnetic field. The transition diamagnetism to paramagnetism occurs at lower magnetic field when the temperature increases. The susceptibility reduces with increasing temperature without considering the Rashba SOI. With considering e--e- interaction, the peak position of susceptibility shifts toward lower magnetic fields. Also, the temperature has an effect on width and height of susceptibility.

  11. Magnetic susceptibility of Inconel alloys 718, 625, and 600 at cryogenic temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Ira B.; Mitchell, Michael R.; Murphy, Allan R.; Goldfarb, Ronald B.; Loughran, Robert J.

    1990-01-01

    After a hydrogen fuel bleed valve problem on the Discovery Space Shuttle was traced to the strong magnetization of Inconel 718 in the armature of the linear variable differential transformer near liquid hydrogen temperatures, the ac magnetic susceptibility of three samples of Inconel 718 of slightly different compositions, one sample of Inconel 625, and on sample of Inconel 600 were measured as a function of temperature. Inconel 718 alloys are found to exhibit a spin glass state below 16 K. Inconel 600 exhibits three different magnetic phases, the lowest-temperature state (below 6 K) being somewhat similar to that of Inconel 718. The magnetic states of the Inconel alloys and their magnetic susceptibilities appear to be strongly dependent on the exact composition of the alloy.

  12. Magnetic Susceptibility Analysis of Soil Affected by Hydrocarbon in Wonocolo Traditional Oil Field, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulfah, Melianna; Wijatmoko, Bambang; Fitriani, Dini

    2017-04-01

    Magnetic susceptibility of soil affected by hydrocarbon was studied through cored soil samples in two zones (Zone One and Zone Two) of an oil field in Wonocolo Village, East Java. We also collected soil samples as the background from a residential area near the oil field (Zone Three). The Zone One, consisted two cores near producing well; the Zone Two consisted two cores obtained from near a dry hole well and a discontinued well; and the Zone Three consisted two cores to validate the initial soil magnetic susceptibility value in this area. The hydrocarbon content measurement was also done for the upper part of each cores using distillation method to identify the correlation between magnetic susceptibility and hydrocarbon content. From magnetic susceptibility measurement in dual frequency, samples from the Zone One and Zone Two have magnetic susceptibility range from 6,1 × 10-8 m3kg-1 - 160 × 10-8 m3kg-1 and 15,7 × 10-8 m3kg-1 - 417,9 × 10-8 m3kg-1, respectively. Whereas background samples from Zone Three have magnetic susceptibility range from 4,8 × 10-8 m3kg-1 to 81,1 × 10-8 m3kg-1. We found low χfd (%) in samples with high magnetic susceptibility values, shown that there was no indication of superparamagnetic minerals in the samples. The hydrocarbon content measurement shows the value range of 8% - 14% only exists in the upper part of all cores in Zone One and one core in Zone Two. From this analysis, we assume that other than the volume of the hydrocarbon content in soil, the period of petroleum hydrocarbon deposition in soil and the fossil fuel combustion generated in the study site could differently increase the soil magnetic susceptibility value in this area. Positive correlation between the two parameters hopefully could contribute to develop environmental magnetic methods for detecting oil spills in soil, especially to remediate former hydrocarbon exploration and production area.

  13. Magnetic susceptibility and electrical conductivity of metallic dental materials and their impact on MR imaging artifacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starcuková, Jana; Starcuk, Zenon; Hubálková, Hana; Linetskiy, Igor

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that dental materials vary significantly in MR-relevant material parameters-magnetic susceptibility and electrical conductivity, and that knowledge of these parameters may be used to estimate the quality of MR imaging in the presence of devices made of such materials. Magnetic susceptibility, electrical conductivity and artifacts were evaluated for 45 standardized cylindrical samples of dental alloys and amalgams. Magnetic susceptibility was determined by fitting the phase of gradient-echo MR images to numerically modeled data. Electrical conductivity was determined by standard electrotechnical measurements. Artifact sizes were measured in spin-echo (SE) and gradient-echo (GE) images at 1.5T according to the standards of the American Society for Testing and Materials. It has been confirmed that dental materials differ considerably in their magnetic susceptibility, electrical conductivity and artifacts. For typical dental devices, magnetic susceptibility differences were found of little clinical importance for diagnostic SE/GE imaging of the neck and brain, but significant for orofacial imaging. Short-TE GE imaging has been found possible even in very close distances from dental devices made of amalgams, precious alloys and titanium alloys. Nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium artifacts were found still acceptable, but large restorations of aluminum bronzes may preclude imaging of the orofacial region. The influence of electrical conductivity on the artifact size was found negligible. MR imaging is possible even close to dental devices if they are made of dental materials with low magnetic susceptibility. Not all materials in current use meet this requirement.

  14. Susceptibility effects in nuclear magnetic resonance imaging; Suszeptibilitaetseffekte in der Kernspinresonanzbildgebung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziener, Christian Herbert

    2008-07-01

    The properties of dephasing and the resulting relaxation of the magnetization are the basic principle on which all magnetic resonance imaging methods are based. The signal obtained from the gyrating spins is essentially determined by the properties of the considered tissue. Especially the susceptibility differences caused by magnetized materials (for example, deoxygenated blood, BOLD-effect) or magnetic nanoparticles are becoming more important for biomedical imaging. In the present work, the influence of such field inhomogeneities on the NMR-signal is analyzed. (orig.)

  15. Contrasting the magnetic response between magnetic-glass and reentrant spin-glass

    OpenAIRE

    Roy, S. B.; Chattopadhyay, M. K.

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic-glass is a recently identified phenomenon in various classes of magnetic systems undergoing a first order magnetic phase transition. We shall highlight here a few experimentally determined characteristics of magnetic-glass and the relevant set of experiments, which will enable to distinguish a magnetic-glass unequivocally from the well known phenomena of spin-glass and reentrant spin-glass.

  16. Modified mean-field theory of the magnetic properties of concentrated, high-susceptibility, polydisperse ferrofluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solovyova, Anna Yu; Elfimova, Ekaterina A; Ivanov, Alexey O; Camp, Philip J

    2017-11-01

    The effects of particle-size polydispersity on the magnetostatic properties of concentrated ferrofluids are studied using theory and computer simulation. The second-order modified mean-field (MMF2) theory of Ivanov and Kuznetsova [Phys. Rev. E 64, 041405 (2001)1063-651X10.1103/PhysRevE.64.041405] has been extended by calculating additional terms of higher order in the dipolar coupling constant in the expansions of the initial magnetic susceptibility and the magnetization curve. The theoretical predictions have been tested rigorously against results from Monte Carlo simulations of model monodisperse, bidisperse, and highly polydisperse ferrofluids. Comparisons have been made between systems with the same Langevin susceptibility and the same saturation magnetization. In all cases, the new theoretical magnetization curve shows better agreement with simulation data than does the MMF2 theory. As for the initial susceptibility, MMF2 theory is most accurate for the monodisperse model, while the new theory works best for polydisperse systems with a significant proportion of large particles. These results are important for the analysis and characterization of recently synthesized polydisperse ferrofluids with record-breaking values of the initial magnetic susceptibility.

  17. Magnetic susceptibility and heavy metals contamination in soils of Southern Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strzyszcz, Z.; Magiera, T.

    The anthropogenic character of the increase in magnetic susceptibility of Silesian soils is doubtless. The dependence between the magnetic susceptibility of industrial dust and the concentration of heavy metals was investigated. Correlation coefficients between those two parameters range for metallurgic dust from 0.911 to 0.998 for Ni and Zn, for fly ashes from 0.710 to 0.820, for Pb and Zn, for cement dust from 0.261 to 0.519 for Ni and Pb, respectively. The anthropogenic character of this dependence is also confirmed by the values of the correlation coefficients between magnetic susceptibility and dust emission, fly ash, metallurgic dust, cement dust, are 0.903, 0.867, 0.918 and 0.365, respectively. For immission the correlation coefficients are as follow: 0.817, 0.656, 0.440 for dustfall, suspended dust and iron fall, respectively. In magnetic particles selected from fly ashes high concentrations of Pb, Zn, Ni and Cu were found. Regarding dependence of magnetic susceptibility on concentration of heavy metals in soils Upper Silesian Industrial Region the correltion coefficients were: between 0.616 - 0.986 for Zn, 0.724 - 0.979 for Pb, and 0.175 - 0.581 for Cd. These values were lower for 90 soil profiles collected from an area of 22 000 km 2 (Katowice Forest State Directorate) resulting from varying conditions of emission and immission of industrial pollutants.

  18. Possibility of third-order magnetic susceptibility investigations in magnetic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazhan, A.N.

    2004-01-01

    Three-coordinate vector magnetometer for investigations of the magnetic field dependencies of the three separate magnetic moment components, along and perpendicular to the applied magnetic field, is described. Additionally to investigations of the sample magnetic moments orientations with respect to sample axis in magnetically ordered materials, possibilities in investigations of non-linear magnetic field dependencies of sample magnetic moments components of some paramagnetic materials are discussed

  19. Critical enhancements of MRI contrast and hyperthermic effects by dopant-controlled magnetic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jung-tak; Nah, Hyunsoo; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Moon, Seung Ho; Kim, Min Gyu; Cheon, Jinwoo

    2009-01-01

    Doped up: The incorporation of Zn(2+) dopants in tetrahedral sites leads to the successful magnetism tuning of spinel metal ferrite nanoparticles (see picture). (Zn(0.4)Mn(0.6))Fe(2)O(4) nanoparticles exhibit the highest magnetization value among the metal ferrite nanoparticles. Such high magnetism results in the largest MRI contrast effects (r2=860 mm(-1) s(-1)) reported to date and also huge hyperthermic effects.

  20. Discrimination of lithogenic and anthropogenic influences on topsoil magnetic susceptibility in Central Europe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Magiera, T.; Strzyszcz, Z.; Kapička, Aleš; Petrovský, Eduard

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 130, 3-4 (2006), s. 299-311 ISSN 0016-7061 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK3046108; GA AV ČR IBS3012354 Grant - others:EC(XE) EVK2-CT-1999-00019 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3012916 Keywords : magnetic susceptibility * soil profiles * anthropogenic pollution Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 2.124, year: 2006

  1. Application of magnetic susceptibility as a function of temperature, field and frequency

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chadima, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 2 (2011), E03-E03 ISSN N. [Latinmag Biennial Meeting /2./. 23.11.2011-26.11.2011, Tandil] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : palaeomagnetism * magnetic susceptibility * geophysics Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography http://www. geofisica .unam.mx/LatinmagLetters/LL11-0102P/E/E03-chadima-1.pdf

  2. Sixty years of anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility in deformed sedimentary rocks

    OpenAIRE

    Parés, Josep M.

    2015-01-01

    The use of the Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility (AMS) has become a rather common practice in Earth Sciences since the pioneer note by Graham (1954). The versatility of the technique, and the rapidness in obtaining and processing AMS data largely improved in the past thirty years, and has generated a wealth of literature, notably on mudrock fabrics. The assessment of the current trends in magnetic fabric studies reveals that AMS has one of its largest potential in sedimentary rocks from s...

  3. Influence of iron valency on the magnetic susceptibility of a microbially produced iron sulphide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marius, M S; James, P A B; Bahaj, A S; Smallman, D J [University of Southampton, School of Civil Engineering and the Environment, Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2005-01-01

    Microbial iron sulphide is well known as an adsorbent for the treatment of metallic ion polluted wastewater. Under certain culture conditions a highly magnetic iron sulphide can be produced which would enable a low cost biomagnetic separation process to be developed. This paper illustrates that by raising the ferrous content of a ferrous - ferric sulphate rich medium the magnetic susceptibility of the iron sulphide produced is increased.

  4. Influence of iron valency on the magnetic susceptibility of a microbially produced iron sulphide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marius, M. S.; James, P. A. B.; Bahaj, A. S.; Smallman, D. J.

    2005-01-01

    Microbial iron sulphide is well known as an adsorbent for the treatment of metallic ion polluted wastewater. Under certain culture conditions a highly magnetic iron sulphide can be produced which would enable a low cost biomagnetic separation process to be developed. This paper illustrates that by raising the ferrous content of a ferrous - ferric sulphate rich medium the magnetic susceptibility of the iron sulphide produced is increased.

  5. Optimization of dose and technique for magnetic resonance studies with an oral contrast agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broglia, L.; Tortora, A.; Maccioni, F.; Arpesani, R.; Marcelli, G.; Ascarelli, A.; Rossi, P.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the study was to optimize the dose, scan delay and sequences for use in magnetic resonance (MR) studies with an oral contrast agent (FerriSeltz, Bracco Spa, Milan, Italy) to obtain positive or negative contrast enhancement in the bowel lumen. Ferric ammonium citrate, being positive or negative contrast agent according to its dilution, permits to tailor the dose to optimize bowel lumen opacification [it

  6. The detection of common cycles in magnetic susceptibility observed in distant magnetostratigraphic sections

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Man, Otakar; Pruner, Petr; Schnabl, Petr

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 3 (2012), s. 735-750 ISSN 0039-3169 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/07/1365 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : time-series analysis * spectral analysis * magnetostratigraphy * magnetic susceptibility * Milankovitch cycles Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 0.975, year: 2012

  7. Inhomogeneity of asteroid 2008 TC3 (Almahata Sitta meteorites) revealed through magnetic susceptibility measurements

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kohout, Tomáš; Jenniskens, P.; Shaddad, M.H.; Haloda, J.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 45, 10/11 (2010), s. 1778-1788 ISSN 1086-9379 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB300130903 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : ureilite * magnetic susceptibility * Almahata Sitta * 2008 TC3 Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 2.624, year: 2010

  8. Magnetic susceptibility as a tool for characterization of an asteroid regolith and sample return

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kohout, Tomáš; Britt, D.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 46, Supplement (2011), A128-A128 ISSN 1086-9379. [Annual Meeting of the Meteoritical Society /74./. 08.08.2011-12.08.2011, London] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : magnetic susceptibility * meteorite * asteroid Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics

  9. Magnetic susceptibility and electrical conductivity of metallic dental materials and their impact on MR imaging artifacts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Starčuková, Jana; Starčuk jr., Zenon; Hubálková, H.; Linetskiy, I.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 6 (2008), s. 715-723 ISSN 0109-5641 R&D Projects: GA MZd NR8110 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : metallic dental materials * dental alloys * amalgams * MR imaging * magnetic susceptibility * electric conductivity * image artifact Subject RIV: FF - HEENT, Dentistry Impact factor: 2.941, year: 2008

  10. Magnetic susceptibility of complex compounds of rhenium with 1.2.4-triazole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avetikyan, G.B.; Amindzhanov, A.A.; Gagieva, S.Ch.; Kotegov, K.V.

    1991-01-01

    Present article is devoted to magnetic susceptibility of complex compounds of rhenium with 1.2.4-triazole. The thermal transformations of chloride-1.2.4-triazole rhenium complexes were studied by means of static magneto chemistry and thermal differential analysis methods.

  11. Viscosity of magnetic fluids must be modified in calculations of dynamic susceptibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebedev, A.V., E-mail: lav@icmm.ru

    2017-06-01

    The frequency dependences of dynamic susceptibility were measured for a series of magnetic fluid samples with the same dispersed composition at different temperatures. Coincidence of normalized dynamic susceptibility curves plotted for different concentrations was obtained only after introducing correction for the value of dynamic viscosity of the magnetic fluid. The value of the correction coefficient doesn’t depend on temperature and is the universal function of the hydrodynamic concentration of particles. - Highlights: • Dynamic susceptibility was measured at different temperatures and concentrations. • Coincidence of curves requires a correction of value of viscosity in calculations. • This correction is function of the hydrodynamic concentration of particles. • With this function the rotation of particles are described correctly.

  12. Alternating current magnetic susceptibility of a molecular magnet submonolayer directly patterned onto a micro superconducting quantum interference device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martínez-Pérez, M. J.; Luis, F.; Bellido, E.; Ruiz-Molina, D.; Miguel, R. de; Sesé, J.; Lostao, A.

    2011-01-01

    We report the controlled integration, via dip pen nanolithography, of monolayer dots of ferritin-based CoO nanoparticles (12 μ B ) into the most sensitive areas of a microSQUID sensor. The nearly optimum flux coupling between these nanomagnets and the microSQUID improves the achievable sensitivity by a factor 10 2 , enabling us to measure the linear susceptibility of the molecular array down to very low temperatures (13 mK). This method opens the possibility of applying ac susceptibility experiments to characterize two-dimensional arrays of single molecule magnets within a wide range of temperatures and frequencies.

  13. Global Lithospheric Apparent Susceptibility Distribution Converted from Geomagnetic Models by CHAMP and Swarm Satellite Magnetic Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jinsong; Chen, Chao; Xiong, Xiong; Li, Yongdong; Liang, Qing

    2016-04-01

    Recently, because of continually accumulated magnetic measurements by CHAMP satellite and Swarm constellation of three satellites and well developed methodologies and techniques of data processing and geomagnetic field modeling etc., global lithospheric magnetic anomaly field models become more and more reliable. This makes the quantitative interpretation of lithospheric magnetic anomaly field possible for having an insight into large-scale magnetic structures in the crust and uppermost mantle. Many different approaches have been utilized to understand the magnetized sources, such as forward, inversion, statistics, correlation analysis, Euler deconvolution, signal transformations etc. Among all quantitative interpretation methods, the directly converting a magnetic anomaly map into a magnetic susceptibility anomaly map proposed by Arkani-Hamed & Strangway (1985) is, we think, the most fast quantitative interpretation tool for global studies. We just call this method AS85 hereinafter for short. Although Gubbins et al. (2011) provided a formula to directly calculate the apparent magnetic vector distribution, the AS85 method introduced constraints of magnetized direction and thus corresponding results are expected to be more robust especially in world-wide continents. Therefore, in this study, we first improved the AS85 method further considering non-axial dipolar inducing field using formulae by Nolte & Siebert (1987), initial model or priori information for starting coefficients in the apparent susceptibility conversion, hidden longest-wavelength components of lithospheric magnetic field and field contaminations from global oceanic remanent magnetization. Then, we used the vertically integrated susceptibility model by Hemant & Maus (2005) and vertically integrated remanent magnetization model by Masterton et al. (2013) to test the validity of our improved method. Subsequently, we applied the conversion method to geomagnetic field models by CHAMP and Swarm satellite

  14. Soil magnetic susceptibility mapping as a pollution and provenance tool: an example from southern New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, A. P.; Ohneiser, C.; Turnbull, R. E.; Strong, D. T.; Demler, S.

    2018-02-01

    The presence or absence, degree and variation of heavy metal contamination in New Zealand soils is a matter of ongoing debate as it affects soil quality, agriculture and human health. In many instances, however, the soil heavy metal concentration data do not exist to answer these questions and the debate is ongoing. To address this, magnetic susceptibility (a common proxy for heavy metal contamination) values were measured in topsoil (0-30 cm) and subsoil (50-70 cm) at grid sites spaced at 8 km intervals across ca. 20 000 km2 of southern New Zealand. Samples were measured for both mass- and volume-specific magnetic susceptibility, with results being strongly, positively correlated. Three different methods of determining anomalies were applied to the data including the topsoil-subsoil difference method, Tukey boxplot method and geoaccumulation index method, with each method filtering out progressively more anomalies. Additional soil magnetic (hysteresis, isothermal remanence and thermomagnetic) measurements were made on a select subset of samples from anomalous sites. Magnetite is the dominant remanence carrying mineral, and magnetic susceptibility is governed by that minerals concentration in soils, rather than mineral type. All except two anomalous sites have a dominant geogenic source (cf. anthropogenic). By proxy, heavy metal contamination in southern New Zealand soils is minimal, making them relatively pristine. The provenance of the magnetic minerals in the anomalous sites can be traced back to likely sources in outcrops of igneous rocks within the same catchment, terrane or rock type: a distance of data.

  15. Out-of-phase magnetic susceptibility of rocks and soils: a rapid tool for magnetic granulometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrouda, F.; Pokorný, J.; Ježek, J.; Chadima, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 194, č. 1 (2013), s. 170-181 ISSN 0956-540X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP210/10/2351 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : environmental magnetism * magnetic mineralogy and petrology * rock and mineral magnetism Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 2.724, year: 2013

  16. Magnetic susceptibility as an indicator of heavy metal contamination in compost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradelo, Remigio; Moldes, Ana Belén; Barral, María Teresa

    2009-02-01

    One of the main restrictions to the agronomic use of compost is the excess of heavy metals, which are often present due to inadequate separation of biodegradable fractions from non-degradable or inert materials. Magnetic susceptibility (MS) measurements are a simple technique that has been reported as a useful tool for assessing anthropogenic pollution, especially heavy metal pollution on soil and sediment samples. The close relationship of MS with heavy metal contamination has been proved by combined analyses of chemical and magnetic data. In this study, the MS and total heavy metal concentrations of eight composts from different origins were determined; all composts were passed under a magnet to remove the magnetic material, and total heavy metals were determined again. In our work, high correlations were found between magnetic susceptibility and total Cd, Zn, Pb, Cr and Ni, thus confirming the applicability of MS measurement as a proxy for heavy metal contamination in compost quality assessments. The application of a magnet over the composts reduced the MS as well as the heavy metal content, the reduction of Fe and MS being the most significantly correlated. Thus, the inclusion of an additional magnetic separation step in the post-process compost finishing could be envisaged.

  17. The complex initial reluctivity, permeability and susceptibility spectra of magnetic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, N. C.

    2015-03-01

    The HF complex permeability spectrum of a magnetic material is deduced from the measured impedance spectrum, which is then normalized to a series permeability spectrum. However, this series permeability spectrum has previously been shown to correspond to a parallel magnetic circuit, which is not appropriate. Some of the implications of this truth are examined. This electric/magnetic duality has frustrated efforts to interpret the shape of the complex magnetic permeability spectra of materials, and has hindered the application of impedance spectroscopy to magnetic materials. In the presence of magnetic loss, the relationship between the relative magnetic permeability and the magnetic susceptibility is called into question. The use of reluctivity spectra for expressing magnetic material properties is advocated. The relative loss factor, tanδm/μi is shown to be an approximation for the imaginary part of the reluctivity. A single relaxation model for the initial reluctivity spectra of magnetic materials is presented, and its principles are applied to measurements of a high permeability ferrite. The results are presented as contour plots of the spectra as a function of temperature.

  18. Confident Diagnosis of Bronchobiliary Fistula Using Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Cholangiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karabulut, Nevzat; Cakmak, Vefa; Kiter, Go ksel

    2010-01-01

    We report the utility of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC) using gadoxetic acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA) in the diagnosis of bronchobiliary fistula associated with liver hydatid cyst. Contrast-enhanced MRC clearly delineated the leakage of contrast agent from the biliary duct and its communication with the bronchial tree. Providing functional information about physiologic or pathologic biliary flow in addition to the display of biliary anatomy, contrast enhanced MRC stands as a robust technique in confidently detecting bronchobiliary fistula and bile leaks

  19. Magnetic resonance tomography for focal lesions in the liver using the para-magnetic contrast medium gadolinium DTPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamm, B.; Roemer, T.; Felix, R.; Wolf, K.J.; Klinikum Charlottenburg, Berlin

    1986-01-01

    The use of the para-magnetic contrast medium gadolinium DTPA for magnetic resonance tomography of focal lesions in the liver was investigated in 31 patients. Two dosage schedules of the contrast medium (0.1 and 0.2 mmol/kg body weight) were used with field strengths of 0.35 and 0.5 Tesla. Using T 1 sequences, gadolinium DTPA showed increased signal intensity in the liver and in tumours, but this was significantly more marked in the tumour. On T 1 spin-echo sequences, previously iso-intense lesions became visible after administration of contrast. On the other hand, contrast-enhanced lesions were less well seen on inversion recovery sequences because of a reduction in the contrast between tumour and liver tissue. The contrast between tumour and liver tissue was not improved by gadolinium DTPA in comparison with precontrast inversion recovery sequences and T 2 spin-echo sequences. The perfusion of intra-hepatic tumours could be elucidated by magnetic resonance tomography after the administration of gadolinium DTPA. (orig.) [de

  20. AC susceptibility as a tool to probe the dipolar interaction in magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landi, Gabriel T., E-mail: gtlandi@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do ABC, 09210-580 Santo André (Brazil); Arantes, Fabiana R. [Universidade Federal do ABC, 09210-580 Santo André (Brazil); Cornejo, Daniel R. [Instituto de Física da Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo 05508-090 (Brazil); Bakuzis, Andris F. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Goiás, 74690-900 Goiânia-GO (Brazil); Andreu, Irene; Natividad, Eva [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón (ICMA), CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza 50018 (Spain)

    2017-01-01

    The dipolar interaction is known to substantially affect the properties of magnetic nanoparticles. This is particularly important when the particles are kept in a fluid suspension or packed within nano-carriers. In addition to its usual long-range nature, in these cases the dipolar interaction may also induce the formation of clusters of particles, thereby strongly modifying their magnetic anisotropies. In this paper we show how AC susceptibility may be used to obtain information regarding the influence of the dipolar interaction in a sample. We develop a model which includes both aspects of the dipolar interaction and may be fitted directly to the susceptibility data. The usual long-range nature of the interaction is implemented using a mean-field approximation, whereas the particle-particle aggregation is modeled using a distribution of anisotropy constants. The model is then applied to two samples studied at different concentrations. One consists of spherical magnetite nanoparticles dispersed in oil and the other of cubic magnetite nanoparticles embedded on polymeric nanospheres. We also introduce a simple technique to address the presence of the dipolar interaction in a given sample, based on the height of the AC susceptibility peaks for different driving frequencies. - Highlights: We discuss the importance of the dipolar interaction in magnetic nanoparticle samples. It is shown that AC susceptibility may be used to estimate the extent of this interaction. We develop a model that accounts for particle aggregation. The theoretical model is then fitted to distinct magnetite samples.

  1. Scaling of the susceptibility vs. magnetic-field sweep rate in Fe8 molecular magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordi, M.; Hernandez-Mínguez, A.; Hernandez, J. M.; Tejada, J.; Stroobants, S.; Vanacken, J.; Moshchalkov, V. V.

    2004-12-01

    The dependence of the magnetization reversal on the sweep rate of the applied magnetic field has been studied for single crystals of Fe8 magnetic molecules. Our experiments have been conducted at temperatures below 1 K and sweep rates of the magnetic field between 103 T/s to 104 T/s. The systematic shift of the values of the magnetic field at which the magnetization reversal occurs, indicates that this reversal process is not governed by the Landau-Zener transition model. Our data can be explained in terms of the superradiance emission model proposed by Chudnovsky and Garanin (Phys. Rev. Lett. 89 (2002) 157201).

  2. Monitoring colloidal stability of polymer-coated magnetic nanoparticles using AC susceptibility measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Adriana P; Barrera, Carola; Zayas, Yashira; Rinaldi, Carlos

    2010-02-15

    The application of the response of magnetic nanoparticles to oscillating magnetic fields to probe transitions in colloidal state and structure of polymer-coated nanoparticles is demonstrated. Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles with narrow size distribution were prepared and shown to respond to oscillating magnetic fields through a Brownian relaxation mechanism, which is dependent on the mechanical coupling between the particle dipoles and the surrounding matrix. These nanoparticles were coated with covalently-attached poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAM) or poly(N-isopropylmethacrylamide) (pNIPMAM) through free radical polymerization. The temperature induced transitions of colloidal suspensions of these nanoparticles were studied through a combination of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and AC susceptibility measurements. In the pNIPAM coated nanoparticles excellent agreement was found for a transition temperature of approximately 30 degrees C by all three methods, although the AC susceptibility measurements indicated aggregation which was not evident from the DLS results. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) results obtained for pNIPAM coated nanoparticles confirmed that aggregation indeed occurs above the lower critical transition temperature of pNIPAM. For the pNIPMAM coated nanoparticles DLS and AC susceptibility measurements indicated aggregation at a temperature of approximately 33-35 degrees C, much lower than the transition temperature peak at 40 degrees C observed by DSC. However, the transition observed by DSC is very broad, hence it is possible that aggregation begins to occur at temperatures lower than the peak, as indicated by the AC susceptibility and DLS results. These experiments and observations demonstrate the possibility of using AC susceptibility measurements to probe transitions in colloidal suspensions induced by external stimuli. Because magnetic measurements do not require optical transparency, these

  3. Evaluation of sclerosis in Modic changes of the spine using susceptibility-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Böker, Sarah M., E-mail: Sarah-maria.boeker@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Bender, Yvonne Y., E-mail: Yi-na.bender@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Adams, Lisa C., E-mail: Lisa.adams@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Fallenberg, Eva M., E-mail: Eva.fallenberg@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Wagner, Moritz, E-mail: Moritz.wagner@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Hamm, Bernd, E-mail: Bernd.hamm@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Makowski, Marcus R., E-mail: Marcus.makowski@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin (Germany)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • SWMR allows a reliable detection of sclerosis in Modic changes. • SWI has a better accuracy for detection of sclerosis in Modic changes than T1/T2w MR. • By applying SWMR the use of additional CT/radiography can be minimized. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic performance of susceptibility-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (SWMR) for the differentiation of sclerotic and non-sclerotic Modic changes (MC) of the spine compared to computed tomography (CT) and radiographs. Materials and methods: The Institutional Ethics-Review-Board approved this prospective study in advance. Written consent was obtained from all subjects. SWMR and standard T1/T2 MR of the cervical (n = 21) and/or lumbar spine (n = 34) were performed in 54 patients. 21 patients served as control. 18 patients were evaluated with CT; in all other patients radiographs were available. 67 Modic changes were identified on T1/T2 MR. On SWMR changes were classified as sclerotic and non-sclerotic based on signal intensity measurements. The sensitivity and specificity of SWMR and T1/T2 MR for differentiating between sclerotic and non-sclerotic Modic changes were determined with CT and radiographs as reference standard. Results: On SWMR, signal measurements between sclerotic and non-sclerotic Modic changes differed significantly (p < 0.01). On T1- and T2-weighted MR no significant difference (p > 0.05) was measured. On SWMR, a reliable differentiation between sclerotic and non-sclerotic Modic changes could be achieved, with a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 95%. In contrast, the combination of T1-/T2-weighted MR yielded a significantly lower sensitivity to detect sclerosis (20%). Conclusion: SWMR allows a reliable detection of sclerosis in Modic changes with a higher accuracy compared to standard spine MR sequences, using radiographs and CT as reference standard.

  4. Temperature dependence of the magnetic volume susceptibility of human breast fat tissue: an NMR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprinkhuizen, Sara M; Bakker, Chris J G; Ippel, Johannes H; Boelens, Rolf; Viergever, Max A; Bartels, Lambertus W

    2012-02-01

    Proton resonance frequency shift (PRFS)-based MR thermometry (MRT) is hampered by heat-induced susceptibility changes when applied in tissues containing fat, e.g., the human breast. In order to assess the impact of fat susceptibility changes on PRFS-based MRT during thermal therapy in the human breast, reliable knowledge of the temperature dependence of the magnetic volume susceptibility of fat, dχ(fat)/dT, is a prerequisite. In this work we have measured dχ(fat)/dT of human breast fat tissue, using a double-reference method to ensure invariance to temperature-induced changes in the proton electron screening constant. Ex vivo measurements were taken on a 14.1 T five mm narrow bore NMR spectrometer. Breast fat tissue samples were collected from six subjects, directly postmortem. The susceptibility was measured over a temperature range from 24°C to 65°C. A linear behavior of the susceptibility over temperature was observed for all samples. The resulting dχ(fat)/dT of human breast fat ranged between 0.0039 and 0.0076 ppm/°C. It is concluded that the impact of heat-induced susceptibility changes of fat during thermal therapy in the breast may not be neglected.

  5. Reproducibility of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI and dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI in the study of brain gliomas: a comparison of data obtained using different commercial software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conte, Gian Marco; Castellano, Antonella; Altabella, Luisa; Iadanza, Antonella; Cadioli, Marcello; Falini, Andrea; Anzalone, Nicoletta

    2017-04-01

    Dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI (DSC) and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE) are useful tools in the diagnosis and follow-up of brain gliomas; nevertheless, both techniques leave the open issue of data reproducibility. We evaluated the reproducibility of data obtained using two different commercial software for perfusion maps calculation and analysis, as one of the potential sources of variability can be the software itself. DSC and DCE analyses from 20 patients with gliomas were tested for both the intrasoftware (as intraobserver and interobserver reproducibility) and the intersoftware reproducibility, as well as the impact of different postprocessing choices [vascular input function (VIF) selection and deconvolution algorithms] on the quantification of perfusion biomarkers plasma volume (Vp), volume transfer constant (K trans ) and rCBV. Data reproducibility was evaluated with the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and Bland-Altman analysis. For all the biomarkers, the intra- and interobserver reproducibility resulted in almost perfect agreement in each software, whereas for the intersoftware reproducibility the value ranged from 0.311 to 0.577, suggesting fair to moderate agreement; Bland-Altman analysis showed high dispersion of data, thus confirming these findings. Comparisons of different VIF estimation methods for DCE biomarkers resulted in ICC of 0.636 for K trans and 0.662 for Vp; comparison of two deconvolution algorithms in DSC resulted in an ICC of 0.999. The use of single software ensures very good intraobserver and interobservers reproducibility. Caution should be taken when comparing data obtained using different software or different postprocessing within the same software, as reproducibility is not guaranteed anymore.

  6. Anisotropy of the Magnetic Susceptibility of the Alnö alkaline and carbonatite igneous complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, M.; Almqvist, B.; Malehmir, A.; Troll, V. R.; Snowball, I.; Lougheed, B.

    2013-12-01

    The Alnö igneous complex in central Sweden is one of the largest (radius ~2.5 km) of the few well-known alkaline and carbonatite ring-intrusions in the world. The lithologies span from alkaline silicate rocks (nepheline syenite, ijolite, and pyroxenite) to a range of carbonatite dykes (e.g. sövite) with variable composition. The depth extent, dip, and dip direction of the alkaline and carbonatite rocks have been inferred from surface geological mapping, and a dome-shaped magma chamber with the roof at ~2 km below the palaeosurface was inferred to have supplied steeply dipping radial dykes and (shallowly dipping) cone sheets. Recent high-resolution reflection seismic profiles and gravity and ground magnetic measurements suggest, in turn, a saucer-shaped magma chamber at ~3 km depth below present day land surface. To provide further insight into the internal flow mechanics of these dykes and into their emplacement mechanisms, we have measured the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS). About 250 samples from 119 oriented cores were collected with a handheld drilling machine from 26 localities within the Alnö complex. Prior to preparation of discrete samples for AMS, the cores were measured for their density and for ultrasonic P- and S-wave velocities. Most of the sampling locations lie on a transect through the intrusion. Three locations have been sampled in detail, to determine the variation of AMS within individual carbonatite dykes. The AMS of samples were measured in low-field, using a KLY-2 Kappabridge. Bulk magnetic susceptibility ranges from 3.01e-5 to 2.50e-1 SI, and correlates with lithology. The sövites have the widest range of susceptibility (average 4.32e-2, with a range from 3.01e-5 to 2.50e-1 SI), whereas fenites have the lowest average susceptibility (average 2.06e-3, with a range from 9.86e-5 to 1.47e-2 SI); nepheline-syenite, ijolite and pyroxenite have susceptibilities between these two end member lithologies. Sövite consists mainly of

  7. Magnetic susceptibility of the Kagome antiferromagnet ZnCu3(OH)6Cl2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigol, Marcos; Singh, Rajiv R P

    2007-05-18

    We analyze the experimental data for the magnetic susceptibility of the material ZnCu3(OH)6Cl2 in terms of the Kagome Lattice Heisenberg model (KLHM), discussing possible role of impurity spins, dilution, exchange anisotropy, and both out-of-plane and in-plane Dzyloshinski-Moriya (DM) anisotropies, with explicit theoretical calculations using the numerical linked cluster method and exact diagonalization. The high-temperature experimental data are well described by the pure Heisenberg model with J=170 K. We show that the sudden upturn in the susceptibility around T=75 K is due to DM interactions. We also observe that at intermediate temperatures, below T=J, our calculated susceptibility for KLHM fits well with a power law T(-0.25).

  8. Impact of Long-Term Irrigation with Treated Sewage on Soil Magnetic Susceptibility and Organic Matter Content in North China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, P G; Yang, M; Mao, R Z; Byrne, J M

    2015-07-01

    This study assessed the effect on magnetic susceptibility and organic matter content of arable soil by irrigation with either treated sewage or groundwater. Results indicated that organic matter and magnetic susceptibility values in the soil irrigated with sewage were increased by 7.1 % and 13.5 %, respectively, compared to agricultural soil that irrigated with groundwater. Both the sewage and groundwater irrigated soils contained a significant fraction of ultrafine superpara magnetic grains, as indicated by high frequency dependent susceptibility (χfd > 6 %). The enhancement of soil magnetic properties was determined to be caused by anthropogenic sewage irrigation and agrochemical use by investigation of vertical soil profiles. Magnetic susceptibility parameters were shown to be significantly correlated with organic matter content (y = 0.0057x + 1.3439, R(2) = 0.09, p soils.

  9. Investigation of roadside pollution in Aliaga Industrial Zone (Izmir/Turkey) by using magnetic susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timur, Emre

    2014-05-01

    Pollution of soils is significantly reducing environmental quality and affecting human health. As a condition for effective protection and remediation actions, the screening and detection of soil and sediment pollution has become increasingly important. The pollutants of most cases are usually heavy metals, organic contaminants and agricultural applications such as chemical fertilizers, pestisides and hormones. The aim of this study is to trace the distribution and concentration of contaminants in soils along roads carrying both appreciably high and low traffic along three roads around Aliaga industrial zone. Magnetic susceptibility (Bartington MS2E) is used for pollution mapping in the field. The distribution of the susceptibility values represents contaminated areas strongly influenced by traffic frequency, roadside topography, vegetation and meteorological conditions. It was determined that approximately 5 m along both sides of Canakkale-Izmir highway, which has a very high traffic density (250 car/min), shows very high susceptibility values in comparison with the rest of the profile. This value reduced to 2.4 m and 0.7 m along two side roads, which are 300 and 1100 m away from the highway. Also these roads were having traffic densities of 47 cars/min and 3 cars/min respectively. The measurements were repeated in summer and winter seasons in order to observe possible climate effects. Also soil samples were collected at 2 stations in both sides of the roads to compare the heavy metal content with the background values. According to geochemical data Fe-oxides are found to be responsible for the high values of magnetic susceptibility. It was determined that magnetic susceptibility is a rapid and cheap method for investigating potentially contaminated areas.

  10. Anisotropies of anhysteretic remanence and magnetic susceptibility of marly clays from Central Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Sagnotti

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available Marly clays from an Upper Pliocene unit at Valle Ricca (Rorne were investigated for their Anisotropy of Anhysteretic Remanence (AAR and Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility (AMS. The study of AAR was accomplished for the first time in ltaly, developing a suitable laboratory technique and adapting a standard statistical procedure. The comparison between anhysteretic remanence and magnetic susceptibility anisotropies discriminates the fabric of the ferromagnetic fraction from that of the paramagnetic matrix of the rock. The separation of fabric components was applied to distinguish subsequent geological processes that affected the total rock fabric. The results indicate that the clayey units are particularly suitable for the empirical investigation of fabric to strain relationship in weakly deformed rocks.

  11. Magnetic susceptibility of CoFeBSiNb alloys in liquid state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidorov, V., E-mail: vesidor@mail.ru [Ural State Pedagogical University, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Hosko, J. [Institute of Physics SAS, Bratislava (Slovakia); Mikhailov, V.; Rozkov, I.; Uporova, N. [Ural State Pedagogical University, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Svec, P.; Janickovic, D.; Matko, I.; Svec Sr, P. [Institute of Physics SAS, Bratislava (Slovakia); Malyshev, L. [Ural Federal University, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2014-03-15

    The influence of small additions of gallium and antimony on magnetic susceptibility of the bulk glass forming Co{sub 47}Fe{sub 20.9}B{sub 21.2}Si{sub 4.6}Nb{sub 6.3} alloy was studied in a wide temperature range up to 1830 K by the Faraday’s method. The undercooling for all the samples was measured experimentally. Both Ga and Sb additions were found to increase liquidus and solidification temperatures. However, gallium atoms strengthen interatomic interaction in the melts, whereas antimony atoms reduce it. - Highlights: • Bulk metallic glasses from CoFeBSiNb-based alloys were produced as in situ composites. • Magnetic susceptibility of these alloys was measured in a wide temperature range including liquid state. • Undercooling of these melts was measured experimentally. • Ga additions strengthen interatomic interaction in BMG melts, whereas Sb atoms reduce it.

  12. Comparison of Different Post-Processing Algorithms for Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast Perfusion Imaging of Cerebral Gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Kohsuke; Uwano, Ikuko; Hirai, Toshinori; Murakami, Ryuji; Nakamura, Hideo; Fujima, Noriyuki; Yamashita, Fumio; Goodwin, Jonathan; Higuchi, Satomi; Sasaki, Makoto

    2017-04-10

    The purpose of the present study was to compare different software algorithms for processing DSC perfusion images of cerebral tumors with respect to i) the relative CBV (rCBV) calculated, ii) the cutoff value for discriminating low- and high-grade gliomas, and iii) the diagnostic performance for differentiating these tumors. Following approval of institutional review board, informed consent was obtained from all patients. Thirty-five patients with primary glioma (grade II, 9; grade III, 8; and grade IV, 18 patients) were included. DSC perfusion imaging was performed with 3-Tesla MRI scanner. CBV maps were generated by using 11 different algorithms of four commercially available software and one academic program. rCBV of each tumor compared to normal white matter was calculated by ROI measurements. Differences in rCBV value were compared between algorithms for each tumor grade. Receiver operator characteristics analysis was conducted for the evaluation of diagnostic performance of different algorithms for differentiating between different grades. Several algorithms showed significant differences in rCBV, especially for grade IV tumors. When differentiating between low- (II) and high-grade (III/IV) tumors, the area under the ROC curve (Az) was similar (range 0.85-0.87), and there were no significant differences in Az between any pair of algorithms. In contrast, the optimal cutoff values varied between algorithms (range 4.18-6.53). rCBV values of tumor and cutoff values for discriminating low- and high-grade gliomas differed between software packages, suggesting that optimal software-specific cutoff values should be used for diagnosis of high-grade gliomas.

  13. The influence of molecular order and microstructure on the R2* and the magnetic susceptibility tensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisnieff, Cynthia; Liu, Tian; Wang, Yi; Spincemaille, Pascal

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we demonstrate that in the presence of ordered sub-voxel structure such as tubular organization, biomaterials with molecular isotropy exhibits only apparent R2* anisotropy, while biomaterials with molecular anisotropy exhibit both apparent R2* and susceptibility anisotropy by means of susceptibility tensor imaging (STI). To this end, R2* and STI from gradient echo magnitude and phase data were examined in phantoms made from carbon fiber and Gadolinium (Gd) solutions with and without intrinsic molecular order and sub-voxel structure as well as in the in vivo brain. Confidence in the tensor reconstructions was evaluated with a wild bootstrap analysis. Carbon fiber showed both apparent anisotropy in R2* and anisotropy in STI, while the Gd filled capillary tubes only showed apparent anisotropy on R2*. Similarly, white matter showed anisotropic R2* and magnetic susceptibility with higher confidence, while the cerebral veins displayed only strong apparent R2* tensor anisotropy. Ordered sub-voxel tissue microstructure leads to apparent R2* anisotropy, which can be found in both white matter tracts and cerebral veins. However, additional molecular anisotropy is required for magnetic susceptibility anisotropy, which can be found in white matter tracts but not in cerebral veins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Gadolinium-porphyrins: new potential magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents for melanoma detection

    OpenAIRE

    Daryoush Shahbazi-Gahrouei

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Two new porphyrin-based magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents, Gd-hematoporphyrin (Gd-H) and Gd-tetra-carboranylmethoxyphenyl-porphyrin (Gd-TCP) were synthesized and tested in nude mice with human melanoma (MM-138) xenografts as new melanoma contrast agents. METHODS: Subcutaneous xenografts of human melanoma cells (MM-138) were studied in 30 (five groups of six) nude mice. The effect of different contrast agents (Gd-TCP, Gd-H, GdCl3 and Gd-DTPA) on proton relaxatio...

  15. Magnetic susceptibility correlation of km-thick Eifelian–Frasnian sections (Ardennes and Moravia)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Boulvain, F.; da Silva, A.C.; Mabille, C.; Hladil, Jindřich; Geršl, M.; Koptíková, Leona; Schnabl, Petr

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 4 (2010), s. 309-318 ISSN 1374-8505 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300130702; GA AV ČR IAAX00130702 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : Devonian limestone * magnetic susceptibility * Moravian Karst * Ardennes Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 0.645, year: 2010 http://popups.ulg.ac.be/Geol/docannexe.php?id=3181

  16. Magnetic susceptibility, electrical resistivity and elastic constants of antiferromagnetic UN single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Plessis, P. de V.; Doorn, C.F. van

    1977-01-01

    Susceptibility and electrical resistivity measurements on UN indicate Tsub(N) approximately 53 K. The spin-disorder resistivity is mainly proportional to 1-m 2 sub(n)(msub(n) is the reduced sublattice magnetization). The elastic constant C 44 shows a renormalization proportional to M 2 sub(n), whereas C 11 exhibits an anomalous softening of 10% well below Tsub(N) at 47 K. (Auth.)

  17. Magnetic viscosity, susceptibility and fluctuation fields in sintered NdFeB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomka, G.J.; Bissell, P.R.; O'Grady, K.; Chantrell, R.W.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic viscosity and irreversible susceptibility of a sample of anisotropic sintered NdFeB have been measured using a vibrating sample magnetometer. The fluctuation field as a function of local field is found to decrease with increasing demagnetizing field with a dip at the coercivity. This behavior is compared with an existing computer model based on a non-interacting system of fine, uniaxial, randomly oriented particles

  18. High-relaxivity contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance neuroimaging: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giesel, Frederik L. [German Cancer Research Centre (DKFZ), Department of Radiology E010, Heidelberg (Germany); University of Heidelberg, Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Mehndiratta, Amit [German Cancer Research Centre (DKFZ), Department of Radiology E010, Heidelberg (Germany); Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Essig, Marco [German Cancer Research Centre (DKFZ), Department of Radiology E010, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2010-10-15

    Evaluation of brain lesions using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides information that is critical for accurate diagnosis, prognosis, therapeutic intervention and monitoring response. Conventional contrast-enhanced MR neuroimaging using gadolinium (Gd) contrast agents primarily depicts disruption of the blood-brain barrier, demonstrating location and extent of disease, and also the morphological details at the lesion site. However, conventional imaging results do not always accurately predict tumour aggressiveness. Advanced functional MRI techniques such as dynamic contrast-enhanced perfusion-weighted imaging utilise contrast agents to convey physiological information regarding the haemodynamics and neoangiogenic status of the lesion that is often complementary to anatomical information obtained through conventional imaging. Most of the Gd contrast agents available have similar T1 and T2 relaxivities, and thus their contrast-enhancing capabilities are comparable. Exceptions are gadobenate-dimeglumine, Gd-EOB-DTPA, Gadobutrol and gadofosveset, which, owing to their transient-protein-binding capability, possess almost twice (and more) the T1 and T2 relaxivities as other agents at all magnetic field strengths. Numerous comparative studies have demonstrated the advantages of the increased relaxivity in terms of enhanced image contrast, image quality and diagnostic confidence. Here we summarise the benefits of higher relaxivity for the most common neuroimaging applications including MRI, perfusion-weighted imaging and MRA for evaluation of brain tumours, cerebrovascular disease and other CNS lesions. (orig.)

  19. Measuring SPIO and Gd contrast agent magnetization using 3 T MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantillon-Murphy, Pádraig; Wald, Lawrence L.; Zahn, Markus; Adalsteinsson, Elfar

    2011-01-01

    Traditional methods of measuring magnetization in magnetic fluid samples, such as vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM), are typically limited to maximum field strengths of about 1 T. This work demonstrates the ability of MRI to measure the magnetization associated with two commercial MRI contrast agents at 3 T by comparing analytical solutions to experimental imaging results for the field pattern associated with agents in cylindrical vials. The results of the VSM and fitted MRI data match closely. The method represents an improvement over VSM measurements since results are attainable at imaging field strengths. The agents investigated are Feridex, a superparamagnetic iron oxide suspension used primarily for liver imaging, and Magnevist, a paramagnetic, gadolinium-based compound used for tumors, inflammation and vascular lesions. MR imaging of the agents took place in sealed cylindrical vials in the presence of a surrounding volume of deionized water where the effects of the contrast agents had a measurable effect on the water's magnetization in the vicinity of the compartment of contrast agent. A pair of phase images were used to reconstruct a B0 fieldmap. The resultant B0 maps in the water region, corrected for shimming and container edge effects, were used to predict the agent's magnetization at 3 T. The results were compared with the results from VSM measurements up to 1.2 T and close correlation was observed. The technique should be of interest to those seeking quantification of the magnetization associated with magnetic suspensions beyond the traditional scope of VSM. The magnetization needs to be sufficiently strong (Ms≳50 Am2/kg Fe for Feridex and χm≳5 × 10−5 m3/kg Gd for Magnevist) for a measurable dipole field in the surrounding water. For this reason, the technique is mostly suitable for undiluted agents. PMID:19588450

  20. Susceptibility tensor imaging (STI) of the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Liu, Chunlei; Duong, Timothy Q; van Zijl, Peter C M; Li, Xu

    2017-04-01

    Susceptibility tensor imaging (STI) is a recently developed MRI technique that allows quantitative determination of orientation-independent magnetic susceptibility parameters from the dependence of gradient echo signal phase on the orientation of biological tissues with respect to the main magnetic field. By modeling the magnetic susceptibility of each voxel as a symmetric rank-2 tensor, individual magnetic susceptibility tensor elements as well as the mean magnetic susceptibility and magnetic susceptibility anisotropy can be determined for brain tissues that would still show orientation dependence after conventional scalar-based quantitative susceptibility mapping to remove such dependence. Similar to diffusion tensor imaging, STI allows mapping of brain white matter fiber orientations and reconstruction of 3D white matter pathways using the principal eigenvectors of the susceptibility tensor. In contrast to diffusion anisotropy, the main determinant factor of the susceptibility anisotropy in brain white matter is myelin. Another unique feature of the susceptibility anisotropy of white matter is its sensitivity to gadolinium-based contrast agents. Mechanistically, MRI-observed susceptibility anisotropy is mainly attributed to the highly ordered lipid molecules in the myelin sheath. STI provides a consistent interpretation of the dependence of phase and susceptibility on orientation at multiple scales. This article reviews the key experimental findings and physical theories that led to the development of STI, its practical implementations, and its applications for brain research. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Technical aspects of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the breast: literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leopoldino, Denise de Deus; Gracio, Tatiana Schiller; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe; Bezerra, Alexandre Sergio de Araujo; Gracio, Tatiana Schiller

    2005-01-01

    With the advances in surface coil technology and the development of new imaging protocols in addition to the increase of the use of contrast agents, contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has emerged as a promising modality for detection, diagnosis and staging of breast cancer. Despite these advances, there are some unresolved issues, including no defined standard technique for contrast-enhanced breast MRI and no standard criteria of interpretation for the evaluation of such studies. In this article, we review the literature and discuss the general requirements and recommendations for contrast agent-enhanced breast MRI, including image interpretation criteria, MR equipment, dedicated radiofrequency coils, use of paramagnetic contrast agents, fat-suppression techniques, planes of acquisition, pulse sequence specifications and artifact sources. (author)

  2. Calix[4]arenes as Molecular Platforms for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Contrast Agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schehle, Daniel T.; Schatz, Juergen; Laurent, Sophie; Elst, Luce Vander; Muller, Robert N.; Stuart, Marc C. A.; Peters, Joop A.

    2009-01-01

    An amphiphilic conjugate 1 of a calix[4]arene with four Gd-DOTA chelates (DOTA=1,4,7,10-tetra(carboxymethyl)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane) was prepared and the properties relevant to its application as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent were investigated by NMR, dynamic light

  3. Protein corona affects the relaxivity and MRI contrast efficiency of magnetic nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amiri, H.; Bordonali, L.; Lascialfari, A.; Wan, S.; Monopoli, M.P.; Lynch, I.; Laurent, S.; Mahmoudi, M.

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) are increasingly being considered for use in biomedical applications such as biosensors, imaging contrast agents and drug delivery vehicles. In a biological fluid, proteins associate in a preferential manner with NPs. The small sizes and high curvature angles of NPs

  4. Tumor microvascular changes in antiangiogenic treatment : Assessment by magnetic resonance contrast media of different molecular weights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turetschek, K; Preda, A; Novikov, [No Value; Brasch, RC; Weinmann, HJ; Wunderbaldinger, P; Roberts, TPL

    Purpose: To test magnetic resonance (MR) contrast media of different molecular weights (MWs) for their potential to characterize noninvasively microvascular changes in an experimental tumor treatment model. Materials and Methods: MD-MBA-435, a poorly differentiated human breast cancer cell line, was

  5. Simultaneous topographic and elemental chemical and magnetic contrast in scanning tunneling microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Volker; Preissner, Curt A; Hla, Saw-Wai; Wang, Kangkang; Rosenmann, Daniel

    2014-09-30

    A method and system for performing simultaneous topographic and elemental chemical and magnetic contrast analysis in a scanning, tunneling microscope. The method and system also includes nanofabricated coaxial multilayer tips with a nanoscale conducting apex and a programmable in-situ nanomanipulator to fabricate these tips and also to rotate tips controllably.

  6. Assessment of Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness Using Dynamic Contrast-enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging at 3 T

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, E.K.; Litjens, G.J.S.; Kobus, T.; Hambrock, T.; Kaa, C.A. van de; Barentsz, J.O.; Huisman, H.J.; Scheenen, T.W.J.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A challenge in the diagnosis of prostate cancer (PCa) is the accurate assessment of aggressiveness. OBJECTIVE: To validate the performance of dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the prostate at 3 tesla (T) for the assessment of PCa aggressiveness, with

  7. High-relaxivity gadolinium-modified high-density lipoproteins as magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Briley-Saebo, Karen C.; Geninatti-Crich, Simonetta; Cormode, David P.; Barazza, Alessandra; Mulder, Willem J. M.; Chen, Wei; Giovenzana, Giovanni B.; Fisher, Edward A.; Aime, Silvio; Fayad, Zahi A.

    2009-01-01

    There is an ongoing desire to produce high-relaxivity, Gd-based magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents. These may allow for lower doses to be used, which is especially important in view of the current safety concerns surrounding Gd in patients. Here we report the synthesis of a

  8. Cerebral Hemodynamics in Patients with Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome Assessed by Susceptibility Weighted Imaging and Four-Dimensional Non-Contrast MR Angiography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Löbel

    Full Text Available Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of patients with hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS and neurological symptoms performed during an epidemic outbreak of Escherichia coli O104:H4 in Northern Europe has previously shown pathological changes in only approximately 50% of patients. In contrast, susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI revealed a loss of venous contrast in a large number of patients. We hypothesized that this observation may be due to an increase in cerebral blood flow (CBF and aimed to identify a plausible cause.Baseline 1.5T MRI scans of 36 patients (female, 26; male, 10; mean age, 38.2±19.3 years were evaluated. Venous contrast was rated on standard SWI minimum intensity projections. A prototype four-dimensional (time resolved magnetic resonance angiography (4D MRA assessed cerebral hemodynamics by global time-to-peak (TTP, as a surrogate marker for CBF. Clinical parameters studied were hemoglobin, hematocrit, creatinine, urea levels, blood pressure, heart rate, and end-tidal CO2.SWI venous contrast was abnormally low in 33 of 36 patients. TTP ranged from 3.7 to 10.2 frames (mean, 7.9 ± 1.4. Hemoglobin at the time of MRI (n = 35 was decreased in all patients (range, 5.0 to 12.6 g/dL; mean, 8.2 ± 1.4; hematocrit (n = 33 was abnormally low in all but a single patient (range, 14.3 to 37.2%; mean, 23.7 ± 4.2. Creatinine was abnormally high in 30 of 36 patients (83% (range, 0.8 to 9.7; mean, 3.7 ± 2.2. SWI venous contrast correlated significantly with hemoglobin (r = 0.52, P = 0.0015, hematocrit (r = 0.65, P < 0.001, and TTP (r = 0.35, P = 0.036. No correlation of SWI with blood pressure, heart rate, end-tidal CO2, creatinine, and urea level was observed. Findings suggest that the loss of venous contrast is related to an increase in CBF secondary to severe anemia related to HUS. SWI contrast of patients with pathological conventional MRI findings was significantly lower compared to patients with normal MRI (mean SWI score, 1

  9. Estimating the contribution of Brownian and Néel relaxation in a magnetic fluid through dynamic magnetic susceptibility measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maldonado-Camargo, L. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Torres-Díaz, I. [J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Chiu-Lam, A. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Hernández, M. [J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Rinaldi, C., E-mail: carlos.rinaldi@bme.ufl.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    We demonstrate how dynamic magnetic susceptibility measurements (DMS) can be used to estimate the relative contributions of Brownian and Néel relaxation to the dynamic magnetic response of a magnetic fluid, a suspension of magnetic nanoparticles. The method applies to suspensions with particles that respond through Brownian or Néel relaxation and for which the characteristic Brownian and Néel relaxation times are widely separated. First, we illustrate this using magnetic fluids consisting of mixtures of particles that relax solely by the Brownian or Néel mechanisms. Then, it is shown how the same approach can be applied to estimate the relative contributions of Brownian and Néel relaxation in a suspension consisting of particles obtained from a single synthesis and whose size distribution straddles the transition from Néel to Brownian relaxation. - Highlights: • Method to estimate the contributions of the relaxation mechanism to the magnetic response. • Method applies to cases where the Brownian and Néel peaks do not overlap. • The method applies for ferrofluids prepared with as–synthesized particles.

  10. Detection of microcalcifications by characteristic magnetic susceptibility effects using MR phase image cross-correlation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baheza, Richard A. [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Institute of Imaging Science, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-2310 (United States); Welch, E. Brian [Institute of Imaging Science and Departments of Radiology and Radiological Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-2310 (United States); Gochberg, Daniel F. [Institute of Imaging Science and Departments of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, and Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-2310 (United States); Sanders, Melinda [Department of Pathology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-2310 (United States); Harvey, Sara [Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-2310 (United States); Gore, John C. [Institute of Imaging Science and Departments of Biomedical Engineering, Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Physics and Astronomy, and Molecular Physiology and Biophysics, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-2310 (United States); Yankeelov, Thomas E., E-mail: thomas.yankeelov@vanderbilt.edu [Institute of Imaging Science and Departments of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Biomedical Engineering, Physics and Astronomy, and Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-2310 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a new method for detecting calcium deposits using their characteristic magnetic susceptibility effects on magnetic resonance (MR) images at high fields and demonstrate its potential in practice for detecting breast microcalcifications. Methods: Characteristic dipole signatures of calcium deposits were detected in magnetic resonance phase images by computing the cross-correlation between the acquired data and a library of templates containing simulated phase patterns of spherical deposits. The influence of signal-to-noise ratio and various other MR parameters on the results were assessed using simulations and validated experimentally. The method was tested experimentally for detection of calcium fragments within gel phantoms and calcium-like inhomogeneities within chicken tissue at 7 T with optimized MR acquisition parameters. The method was also evaluated for detection of simulated microcalcifications, modeled from biopsy samples of malignant breast cancer, inserted in silico into breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRIs) of healthy subjects at 7 T. For both assessments of calcium fragments in phantoms and biopsy-based simulated microcalcifications in breast MRIs, receiver operator characteristic curve analyses were performed to determine the cross-correlation index cutoff, for achieving optimal sensitivity and specificity, and the area under the curve (AUC), for measuring the method’s performance. Results: The method detected calcium fragments with sizes of 0.14–0.79 mm, 1 mm calcium-like deposits, and simulated microcalcifications with sizes of 0.4–1.0 mm in images with voxel sizes between (0.2 mm){sup 3} and (0.6 mm){sup 3}. In images acquired at 7 T with voxel sizes of (0.2 mm){sup 3}–(0.4 mm){sup 3}, calcium fragments (size 0.3–0.4 mm) were detected with a sensitivity, specificity, and AUC of 78%–90%, 51%–68%, and 0.77%–0.88%, respectively. In images acquired with a human 7 T scanner, acquisition times below 12

  11. Detection of microcalcifications by characteristic magnetic susceptibility effects using MR phase image cross-correlation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baheza, Richard A.; Welch, E. Brian; Gochberg, Daniel F.; Sanders, Melinda; Harvey, Sara; Gore, John C.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a new method for detecting calcium deposits using their characteristic magnetic susceptibility effects on magnetic resonance (MR) images at high fields and demonstrate its potential in practice for detecting breast microcalcifications. Methods: Characteristic dipole signatures of calcium deposits were detected in magnetic resonance phase images by computing the cross-correlation between the acquired data and a library of templates containing simulated phase patterns of spherical deposits. The influence of signal-to-noise ratio and various other MR parameters on the results were assessed using simulations and validated experimentally. The method was tested experimentally for detection of calcium fragments within gel phantoms and calcium-like inhomogeneities within chicken tissue at 7 T with optimized MR acquisition parameters. The method was also evaluated for detection of simulated microcalcifications, modeled from biopsy samples of malignant breast cancer, inserted in silico into breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRIs) of healthy subjects at 7 T. For both assessments of calcium fragments in phantoms and biopsy-based simulated microcalcifications in breast MRIs, receiver operator characteristic curve analyses were performed to determine the cross-correlation index cutoff, for achieving optimal sensitivity and specificity, and the area under the curve (AUC), for measuring the method’s performance. Results: The method detected calcium fragments with sizes of 0.14–0.79 mm, 1 mm calcium-like deposits, and simulated microcalcifications with sizes of 0.4–1.0 mm in images with voxel sizes between (0.2 mm)3 and (0.6 mm)3. In images acquired at 7 T with voxel sizes of (0.2 mm)3–(0.4 mm)3, calcium fragments (size 0.3–0.4 mm) were detected with a sensitivity, specificity, and AUC of 78%–90%, 51%–68%, and 0.77%–0.88%, respectively. In images acquired with a human 7 T scanner, acquisition times below 12 min, and voxel sizes of

  12. Tensor of effective susceptibility in random magnetic composites: Application to two-dimensional and three-dimensional cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posnansky, Oleg P.

    2018-05-01

    The measuring of dynamic magnetic susceptibility by nuclear magnetic resonance is used for revealing information about the internal structure of various magnetoactive composites. The response of such material on the applied external static and time-varying magnetic fields encodes intrinsic dynamic correlations and depends on links between macroscopic effective susceptibility and structure on the microscopic scale. In the current work we carried out computational analysis of the frequency dependent dynamic magnetic susceptibility and demonstrated its dependence on the microscopic architectural elements while also considering Euclidean dimensionality. The proposed numerical method is efficient in the simulation of nuclear magnetic resonance experiments in two- and three-dimensional random magnetic media by choosing and modeling the influence of the concentration of components and internal hierarchical characteristics of physical parameters.

  13. RGD-conjugated iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles for magnetic resonance imaging contrast enhancement and hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, S W; Huang, M; Hong, R Y; Deng, S M; Cheng, L F; Gao, B; Badami, D

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a specific targeting magnetic nanoparticle probe for magnetic resonance imaging and therapy in the form of local hyperthermia. Carboxymethyl dextran-coated ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with carboxyl groups were coupled to cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic peptides for integrin α(v)β₃ targeting. The particle size, magnetic properties, heating effect, and stability of the arginine-glycine-aspartic-ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide were measured. The arginine-glycine-aspartic-ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide demonstrates excellent stability and fast magneto-temperature response. Magnetic resonance imaging signal intensity of Bcap37 cells incubated with arginine-glycine-aspartic-ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide was significantly decreased compared with that incubated with plain ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide. The preferential uptake of arginine-glycine-aspartic-ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide by target cells was further confirmed by Prussian blue staining and confocal laser scanning microscopy.

  14. Zn induced in-gap electronic states in La214 probed by uniform magnetic susceptibility: relevance to the suppression of superconducting T c

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, R. S.; Naqib, S. H.

    2018-02-01

    Substitution of isovalent non-magnetic defects, such as Zn, in the CuO2 plane strongly modifies the magnetic properties of strongly electron correlated hole doped cuprate superconductors. The reason for enhanced uniform magnetic susceptibility, χ, in Zn substituted cuprates is debatable. Generally the defect induced magnetic behavior has been analyzed mainly in terms of two somewhat contrasting scenarios. The first one is due to independent localized moments appearing in the vicinity of Zn arising because of the strong electronic/magnetic correlations present in the host compound and the second one is due to transfer of quasiparticle (QP) spectral weight and creation of weakly localized low-energy electronic states associated with each Zn atom in place of an in-plane Cu. If the second scenario is correct, one should expect a direct correspondence between Zn induced suppression of the superconducting transition temperature, T c, and the extent of the enhanced magnetic susceptibility at low temperature. In this case, the low-T enhancement of χ would be due to weakly localized QP states at low energy and these electronic states will be precluded from taking part in Cooper pairing. We explore this second possibility by analyzing the χ(T) data for La2-x Sr x Cu1-y Zn y O4 with different hole contents, p (=x), and Zn concentrations (y) in this paper. The results of our analysis support this scenario.

  15. Simultaneous determination of arterial input function of the internal carotid and middle cerebral arteries for dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholdei, R.; Wenz, F.; Fuss, M.; Essig, M.; Knopp, M.V.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: The determination of the arterial input function (AIF) is necessary for absolute quantification of the regional cerebral blood volume and blood flow using dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI. The suitability of different vessels (ICA-internal carotid artery, MCA-middle cerebral artery) for AIF determination was compared in this study. Methods: A standard 1.5 T MR system and a simultaneous dual FLASH sequence (TR/TE1/TE2/α=32/15/25/10 ) were used to follow a bolus of contrast agent. Slice I was chosen to cut the ICA perpendicularly. Slice II included the MCA. Seventeen data sets from ten subjects were evaluated. Results: The number of AIF-relevant pixels, the area under the AIF and the maximum concentration were all lower when the AIF was determined from the MCA compared to the ICA. Additionally, the mean transit time (MTT) and the time to maximum concentration (TTM) were longer in the MCA, complicating the computerized identification of AIF-relevant pixels. Data from one subject, who was examined five times, demonstrated that the intraindividual variance of the measured parameters was markedly lower than the interpersonal variance. Conclusions: It appears to be advantageous to measure the AIF in the ICA rather than the MCA. (orig.) [de

  16. Automated Determination of Arterial Input Function for Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast MRI from Regions around Arteries Using Independent Component Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Quantitative cerebral blood flow (CBF measurement using dynamic susceptibility contrast- (DSC- MRI requires accurate estimation of the arterial input function (AIF. The present work utilized the independent component analysis (ICA method to determine the AIF in the regions adjacent to the middle cerebral artery (MCA by the alleviated confounding of partial volume effect. Materials and Methods. A series of spin-echo EPI MR scans were performed in 10 normal subjects. All subjects received 0.2 mmol/kg Gd-DTPA contrast agent. AIFs were calculated by two methods: (1 the region of interest (ROI selected manually and (2 weighted average of each component selected by ICA (weighted-ICA. The singular value decomposition (SVD method was then employed to deconvolve the AIF from the tissue concentration time curve to obtain quantitative CBF values. Results. The CBF values calculated by the weighted-ICA method were 41.1 ± 4.9 and 22.1 ± 2.3 mL/100 g/min for cortical gray matter (GM and deep white matter (WM regions, respectively. The CBF values obtained based on the manual ROIs were 53.6 ± 12.0 and 27.9 ± 5.9 mL/100 g/min for the same two regions, respectively. Conclusion. The weighted-ICA method allowed semiautomatic and straightforward extraction of the ROI adjacent to MCA. Through eliminating the partial volume effect to minimum, the CBF thus determined may reflect more accurate physical characteristics of the T2⁎ signal changes induced by the contrast agent.

  17. Sixty Years of Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility in deformed sedimentary rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep M Pares

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of the Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility (AMS has become a rather common practice in Earth Sciences since the pioneer note by Graham (1954. The versatility of the technique, and the rapidness in obtaining and processing AMS data largely improved in the past thirty years, and has generated a wealth of literature, notably on mudrock fabrics. The assessment of the current trends in magnetic fabric studies reveals that AMS has one of its largest potential in sedimentary rocks from structural settings where the ductile component of deformation is cryptic or hindered by the brittle component. Abundant evidence provided by AMS data reveal that deformation extents beyond the deformation or cleavage front in contractional settings, including fold-and-thrust belts and active accretionary prisms, configuring magnetic fabrics as a standard method for fabric quantification in deformed sedimentary rocks.

  18. Characterization of tissue magnetic susceptibility-induced distortions for MRIgRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanescu, T; Wachowicz, K; Jaffray, D A

    2012-12-01

    MR image geometric integrity is one of the building blocks of MRI-guided radiotherapy. In particular, tissue magnetic susceptibility-induced effects are patient-dependent and their behavior is difficult to assess and predict. In this study, the authors investigated in detail the characteristics of susceptibility (χ) distortions in the context of MRIgRT, including the case of two common MR-linac system configurations. The magnetic field distortions were numerically simulated for several imaging parameters and anatomical sites, i.e., brain, lung, pelvis (with air pockets), and prostate. The simulation process consisted of (a) segmentation of patient CT data into susceptibility relevant anatomical volumes (i.e., soft-tissue, bone and air∕lung), (b) conversion of CT data into susceptibility masks by assigning bulk χ values to the structures defined at (a), (c) numerical computations of the local magnetic fields by using a finite difference algorithm, and (d) generation of the geometric distortion maps from the magnetic field distributions. For each patient anatomy, the distortions were quantified at the interfaces of anatomical structures with significantly different χ values. The analysis was performed for two specific orientations of the external main magnetic field (B(0)) characteristic to the MR-linac systems, specifically along the z-axis for a bore MR scanner and in the (x,y)-plane for a biplanner magnet. The magnetic field local perturbations were reported in ppm. The metrics used to quantify the geometric distortions were the maximum, mean, and range of distortions. The numerical simulation algorithm was validated using phantom data measurements. Susceptibility-induced distortions were determined for both quadratic and patient specific geometries. The numerical simulations showed a good agreement with the experimental data. The measurements were acquired at 1.5 and 3 T and with an encoding gradient varying between 3 and 20 mT∕m by using an annular

  19. Multi-contrast brain magnetic resonance image super-resolution using the local weight similarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hong; Qu, Xiaobo; Bai, Zhengjian; Liu, Yunsong; Guo, Di; Dong, Jiyang; Peng, Xi; Chen, Zhong

    2017-01-17

    Low-resolution images may be acquired in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) due to limited data acquisition time or other physical constraints, and their resolutions can be improved with super-resolution methods. Since MRI can offer images of an object with different contrasts, e.g., T1-weighted or T2-weighted, the shared information between inter-contrast images can be used to benefit super-resolution. In this study, an MRI image super-resolution approach to enhance in-plane resolution is proposed by exploring the statistical information estimated from another contrast MRI image that shares similar anatomical structures. We assume some edge structures are shown both in T1-weighted and T2-weighted MRI brain images acquired of the same subject, and the proposed approach aims to recover such kind of structures to generate a high-resolution image from its low-resolution counterpart. The statistical information produces a local weight of image that are found to be nearly invariant to the image contrast and thus this weight can be used to transfer the shared information from one contrast to another. We analyze this property with comprehensive mathematics as well as numerical experiments. Experimental results demonstrate that the image quality of low-resolution images can be remarkably improved with the proposed method if this weight is borrowed from a high resolution image with another contrast. Multi-contrast MRI Image Super-resolution with Contrast-invariant Regression Weights.

  20. Magnetic susceptibility anisotropy: cylindrical symmetry from macroscopically ordered anisotropic molecules and accuracy of MRI measurements using few orientations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisnieff, Cynthia; Liu, Tian; Spincemaille, Pascal; Wang, Shuai; Zhou, Dong; Wang, Yi

    2013-04-15

    White matter is an essential component of the central nervous system and is of major concern in neurodegenerative diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS). Recent MRI studies have explored the unique anisotropic magnetic properties of white matter using susceptibility tensor imaging. However, these measurements are inhibited in practice by the large number of different head orientations needed to accurately reconstruct the susceptibility tensor. Adding reasonable constraints reduces the number of model parameters and can help condition the tensor reconstruction from a small number of orientations. The macroscopic magnetic susceptibility is decomposed as a sum of molecular magnetic polarizabilities, demonstrating that macroscopic order in molecular arrangement is essential to the existence of and symmetry in susceptibility anisotropy and cylindrical symmetry is a natural outcome of an ordered molecular arrangement. Noise propagation in the susceptibility tensor reconstruction is analyzed through its condition number, showing that the tensor reconstruction is highly susceptible to the distribution of acquired subject orientations and to the tensor symmetry properties, with a substantial over- or under-estimation of susceptibility anisotropy in fiber directions not favorably oriented with respect to the acquired orientations. It was found that a careful acquisition of three non-coplanar orientations and the use of cylindrical symmetry guided by diffusion tensor imaging allowed reasonable estimation of magnetic susceptibility anisotropy in certain major white matter tracts in the human brain. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Pixelated detectors and improved efficiency for magnetic imaging in STEM differential phase contrast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krajnak, Matus; McGrouther, Damien; Maneuski, Dzmitry; Shea, Val O'; McVitie, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    The application of differential phase contrast imaging to the study of polycrystalline magnetic thin films and nanostructures has been hampered by the strong diffraction contrast resulting from the granular structure of the materials. In this paper we demonstrate how a pixelated detector has been used to detect the bright field disk in aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and subsequent processing of the acquired data allows efficient enhancement of the magnetic contrast in the resulting images. Initial results from a charged coupled device (CCD) camera demonstrate the highly efficient nature of this improvement over previous methods. Further hardware development with the use of a direct radiation detector, the Medipix3, also shows the possibilities where the reduction in collection time is more than an order of magnitude compared to the CCD. We show that this allows subpixel measurement of the beam deflection due to the magnetic induction. While the detection and processing is data intensive we have demonstrated highly efficient DPC imaging whereby pixel by pixel interpretation of the induction variation is realised with great potential for nanomagnetic imaging. - Highlights: • Pixelated STEM DPC vastly improves magnetic imaging for polycrystalline thin films. • Improved efficiency imaging demonstrated on CCD camera. • Direct radiation detector faster with reduced charge spreading. • BF disk edge filtering algorithm superior to thresholding and centre of mass method. • Data intensive process but provides a step change in what is possible with STEM DPC.

  2. Development of New Contrast Agents for Imaging Function and Metabolism by Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Carvalho

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Liposomes are interesting nanosystems with a wide range of medical application. One particular application is their ability to enhance contrast in magnetic resonance images; when properly loaded with magnetic/superparamagnetic nanoparticles, this means to act as contrast agents. The design of liposomes loaded with magnetic particles, magnetoliposomes, presents a large number of possibilities depending on the application from image function to metabolism. More interesting is its double function application as theranostics (diagnostics and therapy. The synthesis, characterization, and possible medical applications of two types of magnetoliposomes are reviewed. Their performance will be compared, in particular, their efficiency as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging, measured by their relaxivities r 1 and r 2 relating to their particular composition. One of the magnetoliposomes had 1,2-diacyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (soy as the main phospholipid component, with and without cholesterol, varying its phospholipid to cholesterol molar ratios. The other formulation is a long-circulating liposome composed of 1,2-diacyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (egg, cholesterol, and 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphoethanolamine- N -[methoxy(polyethylene glycol-2000]. Both nanosystems were loaded with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with different sizes and coatings.

  3. Serial contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance and magnetization transfer in the study of patients with multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rovira, A.; Alonso, J.; Cucurella, G.; Nos, C.; Tintore, M.; Pedraza, S.; Rio, J.; Montalban, X.

    1997-01-01

    To demonstrate the changes in the magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) of different demyelinating plaques, correlating them with the baseline values in T1-weighted contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) sequences in order to relate them more closely to the underlying disease. The study was based on 33 demyelinating plaques obtained from six patients clinically diagnosed as having remitting-recurring multiple sclerosis (MS). All the patients underwent two MR studies at a 3 to 5-month interval, including contrast-enhanced T1 and T2- weighted sequences and magnetization transfer images. The latter were used to calculate the MTR for each of the demyelinating plaques included in the study. The statistical analysis of the results obtained revealed statistically significant between initial MTR values and those of subsequent T1-weighted sequences. The MTR demonstrate significant differences between plaques according to contrast-enhanced T1-weigh tes sequences, probably indicating variable degrees of edema, demyelination and tissue destruction. These differences should be taken into account to enable the use of T1-weighted sequences to quantify the lesion load in MS patients. (Author) 35 refs

  4. Liposomes loaded with hydrophilic magnetite nanoparticles: Preparation and application as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    German, S V; Navolokin, N A; Kuznetsova, N R; Zuev, V V; Inozemtseva, O A; Anis'kov, A A; Volkova, E K; Bucharskaya, A B; Maslyakova, G N; Fakhrullin, R F; Terentyuk, G S; Vodovozova, E L; Gorin, D A

    2015-11-01

    Magnetic fluid-loaded liposomes (MFLs) were fabricated using magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) and natural phospholipids via the thin film hydration method followed by extrusion. The size distribution and composition of MFLs were studied using dynamic light scattering and spectrophotometry. The effective ranges of magnetite concentration in MNPs hydrosol and MFLs for contrasting at both T2 and T1 relaxation were determined. On T2 weighted images, the MFLs effectively increased the contrast if compared with MNPs hydrosol, while on T1 weighted images, MNPs hydrosol contrasting was more efficient than that of MFLs. In vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrasting properties of MFLs and their effects on tumor and normal tissues morphology, were investigated in rats with transplanted renal cell carcinoma upon intratumoral administration of MFLs. No significant morphological changes in rat internal organs upon intratumoral injection of MFLs were detected, suggesting that the liposomes are relatively safe and can be used as the potential contrasting agents for MRI. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging with liver-specific contrast agent in primary amyloidosis and intrahepatic cholestasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller, J.M.; Santoni-Rugiu, E.; Chabanova, E.; Logager, V.; Hansen, A.B.; Thomsen, H.S. [Depts. of Radiology and Pathology, Copenhagen Univ. Hospital, Herlev (Denmark)

    2007-02-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in hepatic amyloidosis are not well defined. Here, we report on a patient with renal failure caused by primary amyloidosis (AL type) who developed jaundice. Ultrasound and computed tomography were normal except for some ascites. MRI with oral manganese-containing contrast agent revealed several focal areas without contrast uptake in the hepatocytes and no bile secretion after 8 hours. No extrahepatic bile obstructions were found. Liver biopsy showed severe intraportal, vascular, and parenchymal amyloidosis causing severe cholestasis and atrophy of hepatocytes.

  6. Cine Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Small Bowel: Comparison of Different Oral Contrast Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asbach, P.; Breitwieser, C.; Diederichs, G.; Eisele, S.; Kivelitz, D.; Taupitz, M.; Zeitz, M.; Hamm, B.; Klessen, C. [Charite - Universitatsmedizin Berlin, Charite Campus Mitte, Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Radiology

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate several substances regarding small bowel distension and contrast on balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) cine magnetic resonance (MR) images. Material and Methods: Luminal contrast was evaluated in 24 volunteers after oral application of two different contrast agent groups leading to either bright lumen (pineapple, blueberry juice) or dark lumen (tap water, orange juice) on T1-weighted images. Bowel distension was evaluated in 30 patients ingesting either methylcellulose or mannitol solution for limiting intestinal absorption. Fifteen patients with duodeno-jejunal intubation served as the control. Quantitative evaluation included measurement of luminal signal intensities and diameters of four bowel segments, qualitative evaluation assessed luminal contrast and distension on a five-point scale. Results: Quantitative and qualitative evaluation of the four contrast agents revealed no significant differences regarding luminal contrast on bSSFP images. Quantitative evaluation revealed significantly lower (P<0.05) small bowel distension for three out of four segments (qualitative evaluation: two out of four segments) for methylcellulose in comparison to the control. Mannitol was found to be equal to the control. Conclusion: Oral ingestion of tap water or orange juice in combination with mannitol is recommended for cine MR imaging of the small bowel regarding luminal contrast and small bowel distension on bSSFP sequences.

  7. Cine Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Small Bowel: Comparison of Different Oral Contrast Media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asbach, P.; Breitwieser, C.; Diederichs, G.; Eisele, S.; Kivelitz, D.; Taupitz, M.; Zeitz, M.; Hamm, B.; Klessen, C.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate several substances regarding small bowel distension and contrast on balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) cine magnetic resonance (MR) images. Material and Methods: Luminal contrast was evaluated in 24 volunteers after oral application of two different contrast agent groups leading to either bright lumen (pineapple, blueberry juice) or dark lumen (tap water, orange juice) on T1-weighted images. Bowel distension was evaluated in 30 patients ingesting either methylcellulose or mannitol solution for limiting intestinal absorption. Fifteen patients with duodeno-jejunal intubation served as the control. Quantitative evaluation included measurement of luminal signal intensities and diameters of four bowel segments, qualitative evaluation assessed luminal contrast and distension on a five-point scale. Results: Quantitative and qualitative evaluation of the four contrast agents revealed no significant differences regarding luminal contrast on bSSFP images. Quantitative evaluation revealed significantly lower (P<0.05) small bowel distension for three out of four segments (qualitative evaluation: two out of four segments) for methylcellulose in comparison to the control. Mannitol was found to be equal to the control. Conclusion: Oral ingestion of tap water or orange juice in combination with mannitol is recommended for cine MR imaging of the small bowel regarding luminal contrast and small bowel distension on bSSFP sequences

  8. Temporal Changes in Magnetic Susceptibility Induced by Microbial Manipulation of Iron Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enright, A. M.; Price, A.; Rosier, C. L.; Beaver, C. L.; Rossbach, S.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Slater, L. D.; Lund, A.; Atekwana, E. A.

    2016-12-01

    Sequential iron extractions were used to determine the mineral and oxidation state speciation of iron in a series of cores from an oil spill site in Bemidji, Minnesota. Cores were collected over five years, from a location where a magnetic susceptibility (MS) anomaly was initially observed in 2011. Further field and laboratory MS measurements confirmed the magnetic anomaly, yet revealed a trend to lower MS values over the measured time frame. Conventional interpretation typically dictates that MS peaks are indicative of mixed-valence oxide mineral phases (i.e. magnetite or greigite) here the diminished, but persistent MS anomaly is most closely coupled with high concentrations of the fully-oxidized iron oxides, such as hematite. Microbiological community fingerprinting analysis (PCR-DGGE) of core samples suggest that the anomaly could result from methanogenically-derived magnetite occurring during water table high stand, which was then oxidized as water levels seasonally decreased. The diminished, but persistent presence of magnetic susceptibility anomaly appears to indicate the transformation of magnetite to iron oxides mediated by microbial metabolic processes (i.e. methanogenesis). We hypothesize that the MS response is related to the biological transformations of iron in the groundwater table fluctuation zone, and that the magnitude of the anomaly evolves along with oxidation state of iron in the sediments, and may serve as a record of the microbial manipulation of iron.

  9. Magnetic susceptibility of oxygen adsorbed on the surface of spherical and fibrous activated carbon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyoshi Kawamura

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The magnetic susceptibilities of oxygen adsorbed on the surface of bead-shaped activated carbon and activated carbon fibers were evaluated as a function of temperature between 4.2 K and 300 K, and found to exhibit a sharp peak at around 50 K. This implies that the adsorbed oxygen molecules form an antiferromagnetic state. The relation between the susceptibility and the adsorbed mass suggest that the thickness of the adsorbed oxygen is thin enough to consider a two-dimensional structure for bead–shaped activated carbon and carbon fibers across the fiber axis but thick enough to regard it as three-dimensional along the fiber axis. The result is discussed with reference to the study on one-dimensional oxygen array.

  10. Neutron diffraction, specific heat and magnetic susceptibility of Ni3(PO4)2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escobal, J.; Pizarro, J.L.; Mesa, J.L.; Rojo, J.M.; Bazan, B.; Arriortua, M.I.; Rojo, T.

    2005-01-01

    The Ni 3 (PO 4 ) 2 phosphate was synthesized by the ceramic method in air atmosphere. The crystal structure consists of a three-dimensional skeleton constructed from Ni 3 O 14 edge-sharing octahedra, which are interconnected by (PO 4 ) 3- oxoanions with tetrahedral geometry. The magnetic behavior was studied on powdered sample by using susceptibility, specific heat and neutron diffraction data. The nickel(II) orthophosphate exhibits a three-dimensional magnetic ordering at approximately 17.1 K. However, its complex crystal structure hampers any parametrization of the J-exchange parameter. The specific heat measurements of Ni 3 (PO 4 ) 2 exhibit a three-dimensional magnetic ordering (λ-type) peak at 17.1 K. Measurements above T N suggest the presence of a small short-range order in this phase. The total magnetic entropy was found to be 28.1 KJ/mol at 50 K. The magnetic structure of the nickel(II) phosphate exhibits ferromagnetic interactions inside the Ni 3 O 14 trimers which are antiferromagnetically coupled between them, giving rise to a purely antiferromagnetic structure

  11. Magnetic hyperthermia efficiency and MRI contrast sensitivity of colloidal soft/hard ferrite nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vamvakidis, Kosmas; Mourdikoudis, Stefanos; Makridis, Antonis; Paulidou, Eleni; Angelakeris, Mavroeidis; Dendrinou-Samara, Catherine

    2018-02-01

    The use of magnetic nanostructures as theranostic agents is a multiplex task as physiochemical and biochemical properties including excellent magneto-responsive properties, low toxicity, colloidal stability and facile surface engineering capability are all required. Nonetheless, much progress has been made in recent years synthesis of "all-in-one" MNPs remain unambiguously challenging. Towards this direction, in this study is presented a facile incorporation of a soft magnetic phase (MnFe 2 O 4 NPs) with a hard phase (CoFe 2 O 4 NPs) in the presence of the biocompatible polymer sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), into spherical and compact bi-magnetic nanoclusters (NCs) with modulated magnetic properties that critically enhance hyperthermic efficiency and MRI contrast effect. Hydrophobic MnFe 2 O 4 and CoFe 2 O 4 NPs coated with oleylamine of the same size (9 nm) were used as primary building units for the formation of the bi-magnetic NCs through a microemulsion approach where a set of experiments were conducted to identify the optimal concentration of SDS (19.5 mM) for the cluster formation. Additionally, homo-magnetic NCs of MnFe 2 O 4 NPs and CoFe 2 O 4 NPs, respectively were synthesized for comparative studies. The presence of distinct magnetic phases within the bi-magnetic NCs resulting in synergistic behavior, where the soft phase offers moderate coercivity H c and the hard one high magnetization M s . Increased specific loss power (SLP) value was obtained for the bi-magnetic system (525 W/g) when compared with the homo-magnetic NCs (104 W/g for MnNCs and 223 W/g for CoNCs) under field conditions of 25 kA/m and 765 kHz. Relaxivities (r 2 ) of the bi-magnetic NCs were also higher (81.8 mM -1  s -1 ) than those of the homo-magnetic NCs (47.4 mM -1  s -1 for MnNCs and 3.1 mM -1  s -1 for CoNCs), while the high r 2 /r 1 value renders the system suitable for T 2 -weighted MRI imaging. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A method to implement the reservoir-wave hypothesis using phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Gray, Robert D.M.; Parker, Kim H.; Quail, Michael A.; Taylor, Andrew M.; Biglino, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    The reservoir-wave hypothesis states that the blood pressure waveform can be usefully divided into a “reservoir pressure” related to the global compliance and resistance of the arterial system, and an “excess pressure” that depends on local conditions. The formulation of the reservoir-wave hypothesis applied to the area waveform is shown, and the analysis is applied to area and velocity data from high-resolution phase-contrast cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging. A validation stud...

  13. Slice accelerated gradient-echo spin-echo dynamic susceptibility contrast imaging with blipped CAIPI for increased slice coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichner, Cornelius; Jafari-Khouzani, Kourosh; Cauley, Stephen; Bhat, Himanshu; Polaskova, Pavlina; Andronesi, Ovidiu C; Rapalino, Otto; Turner, Robert; Wald, Lawrence L; Stufflebeam, Steven; Setsompop, Kawin

    2014-09-01

    To improve slice coverage of gradient echo spin echo (GESE) sequences for dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) MRI using a simultaneous-multiple-slice (SMS) method. Data were acquired on 3 Tesla (T) MR scanners with a 32-channel head coil. To evaluate use of SMS for DSC, an SMS GESE sequence with two-fold slice coverage and same temporal sampling was compared with a standard GESE sequence, both with 2× in-plane acceleration. A signal to noise ratio (SNR) comparison was performed on one healthy subject. Additionally, data with Gadolinium injection were collected on three patients with glioblastoma using both sequences, and perfusion analysis was performed on healthy tissues as well as on tumor. Retained SNR of SMS DSC is 90% for a gradient echo (GE) and 99% for a spin echo (SE) acquisition, compared with a standard acquisition without slice acceleration. Comparing cerebral blood volume maps, it was observed that the results of standard and SMS acquisitions are comparable for both GE and SE images. Two-fold slice accelerated DSC MRI achieves similar SNR and perfusion metrics as a standard acquisition, while allowing a significant increase in slice coverage of the brain. The results also point to a possibility to improve temporal sampling rate, while retaining the same slice coverage. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Automatic determination of the arterial input function in dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI: comparison of different reproducible clustering algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, Jiandong; Yang, Jiawen; Guo, Qiyong

    2015-01-01

    Arterial input function (AIF) plays an important role in the quantification of cerebral hemodynamics. The purpose of this study was to select the best reproducible clustering method for AIF detection by comparing three algorithms reported previously in terms of detection accuracy and computational complexity. First, three reproducible clustering methods, normalized cut (Ncut), hierarchy (HIER), and fast affine propagation (FastAP), were applied independently to simulated data which contained the true AIF. Next, a clinical verification was performed where 42 subjects participated in dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI (DSC-MRI) scanning. The manual AIF and AIFs based on the different algorithms were obtained. The performance of each algorithm was evaluated based on shape parameters of the estimated AIFs and the true or manual AIF. Moreover, the execution time of each algorithm was recorded to determine the algorithm that operated more rapidly in clinical practice. In terms of the detection accuracy, Ncut and HIER method produced similar AIF detection results, which were closer to the expected AIF and more accurate than those obtained using FastAP method; in terms of the computational efficiency, the Ncut method required the shortest execution time. Ncut clustering appears promising because it facilitates the automatic and robust determination of AIF with high accuracy and efficiency. (orig.)

  15. Momentum-dependent susceptibilities and magnetic exchange in bcc iron from supercell dynamical mean-field theory calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belozerov, A. S.; Katanin, A. A.; Anisimov, V. I.

    2017-08-01

    We analyze the momentum and temperature dependences of the magnetic susceptibilities and magnetic exchange interaction in paramagnetic bcc iron by a combination of density functional theory and dynamical mean-field theory (DFT+DMFT). By considering a general derivation of the orbital-resolved effective model for spin degrees of freedom for Hund's metals, we relate momentum-dependent susceptibilities in the paramagnetic phase to the magnetic exchange. We then calculate nonuniform orbital-resolved susceptibilities at high-symmetry wave vectors by constructing appropriate supercells in the DMFT approach. Extracting the irreducible parts of susceptibilities with respect to Hund's exchange interaction, we determine the corresponding orbital-resolved exchange interactions, which are then interpolated to the whole Brillouin zone. Using the spherical model we estimate the temperature dependence of the resulting exchange between local moments.

  16. Low temperature magnetic susceptibility behavior of the Neuschwanstein EL6 meteorite and mineral daubreelite (FeCr2S4)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kohout, Tomáš; Kletetschka, Günther; Lehtinen, M.; Pesonen, L. J.; Wasilewski, P. J.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 87, č. 52 (2006) ISSN 0096-3941. [2006 American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting. 11.12.2006-15.12.2006, San Francisco] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : magnetic susceptibility * Neuschwanstein * daubreelite Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  17. Combined blood pool and extracellular contrast agents for pediatric and young adult cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Joyce T. [Ann and Robert Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, 225 E. Chicago Ave., Box 21, Chicago, IL (United States); Ann and Robert Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Pediatrics, Chicago, IL (United States); Robinson, Joshua D. [Ann and Robert Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, 225 E. Chicago Ave., Box 21, Chicago, IL (United States); Ann and Robert Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Pediatrics, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University, Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Deng, Jie [Northwestern University, Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Ann and Robert Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Medical Imaging, Chicago, IL (United States); Rigsby, Cynthia K. [Ann and Robert Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Pediatrics, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University, Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Ann and Robert Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Medical Imaging, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2016-12-15

    A comprehensive cardiac magnetic resonance (cardiac MR) study including both late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) and MR angiography may be indicated for patients with a history of acquired or congenital heart disease. To study the novel use of an extracellular agent for assessment of LGE combined with a blood pool contrast agent for detailed MR angiography evaluation to yield a comprehensive cardiac MR study in these patients. We reviewed clinical cardiac MR studies utilizing extracellular and blood pool contrast agents and noted demographics, clinical data and adverse events. We rated LGE image quality and MR angiography image quality for each vascular segment and calculated inter-rater variability. We also quantified contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Thirty-three patients (mean age 13.9 ± 3 years) received an extracellular contrast agent (10 gadobenate dimeglumine, 23 gadopentetate dimeglumine) and blood pool contrast agent (33 gadofosveset trisodium). No adverse events were reported. MRI indications included Kawasaki disease (8), cardiomyopathy and coronary anatomy (15), repaired congenital heart disease (8), and other (2). Mean LGE quality was 2.6 ± 0.6 with 97% diagnostic imaging. LGE quality did not vary by type of contrast agent given (P = 0.07). Mean MR angiography quality score was 4.7 ± 0.6, with high inter-rater agreement (k = 0.6-0.8, P < 0.002). MR angiography quality did not vary by type of contrast agent used (P = 0.6). Cardiac MR studies utilizing both extracellular and blood pool contrast agents are feasible and safe and provide excellent-quality LGE and MR angiography images. The use of two contrast agents allows for a comprehensive assessment of both myocardial viability and vascular anatomy during the same exam. (orig.)

  18. Application of phase-contrast cine magnetic resonance imaging in endoscopic aqueductoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guoqiang; Zheng, Jiaping; Xiao, Qing; Liu, Yunsheng

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the application of phase-contrast cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in endoscopic aqueductoplasty (EA) for patients with obstructive hydrocephalus. The clinical diagnosis of hydrocephalus caused by aqueduct obstruction in 23 patients was confirmed by phase-contrast cine MRI examination. The patients were treated with EA and MRI was repeated during the follow-up. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow velocity in the aqueduct was measured to determine whether the aqueduct was obstructed. The results of phase-contrast cine MRI examinations indicated that there was no CSF flow in the aqueduct for all patients prior to surgery. Aqueductoplasty was successfully performed in all patients. The results of phase-contrast cine MRI examinations performed a week after surgery demonstrated an average CSF flow velocity of 4.74±1.77 cm/sec. During the follow-up, intracranial hypertension recurred in two patients in whom CSF flow was not observed in the aqueduct by the phase-contrast cine MRI scan. Aqueduct re-occlusion was revealed by an endoscopic exploration. By measuring the CSF flow velocity, phase-contrast cine MRI accurately identifies aqueduct obstruction. Cine MRI is a nontraumatic, simple and reliable method for determining whether the aqueduct is successfully opened following aqueductoplasty.

  19. Complications from the use of intravenous gadolinium-based contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elias Junior, Jorge; Santos, Antonio Carlos dos; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello Henrique; Muglia, Valdair Francisco; Koenigkam-Santos, Marcel [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Centro de Ciencias das Imagens e Fisica Medica]. E-mail: jejunior@fmrp.usp.br

    2008-07-15

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents are much safer than the iodinated ones; however complications may occur and should be recognized for appropriate orientation and management. The total incidence of adverse reactions to contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging ranges between 2% and 4%. Cases of severe acute reactions to gadolinium, such as laryngospasm and anaphylactic shock, are rare. Chronic complications secondary to the use of gadolinium also can occur and, recently an association between its use and a rare dermatologic disease occurring in patients with renal failure has been reported. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis was the subject of an official health notification issued by the American Food and Drug Administration. This progressive disease is characterized by hardened skin with fibrotic nodules and plaques which may involve other parts of the body. Patients who have been affected by this disorder presented chronic renal failure, with metabolic acidosis and had been submitted to magnetic resonance angiography, probably involving exposure to large amounts of intravenous paramagnetic contrast. This review is aimed at presenting a succinct description of the gadolinium-based contrast agent types, possible secondary complications, their preventive measures and management. (author)

  20. MRI contrast agent for molecular imaging of the HER2/neu receptor using targeted magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasaneh, Samira; Rajabi, Hossein; Babaei, Mohammad Hossein; Akhlaghpoor, Shahram

    2011-06-01

    In this study, Trastuzumab modified Magnetic Nanoparticles (TMNs) were prepared as a new contrast agent for detecting HER2 (Human epidermal growth factor receptor-2) expression tumors by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). TMNs were prepared based on iron oxide nanoparticles core and Trastuzumab modified dextran coating. The TMNs core and hydrodynamic size were determined by transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. TMNs stability and cytotoxicity were investigated. The ability of TMNs for HER2 detection were evaluated in breast carcinoma cell lines (SKBr3 and MCF7 cells) and tumor-bearing mice by MRI and iron uptake determination. The particles core and hydrodynamic size were 9 ± 2.5 and 41 ± 15 nm (size range: 15-87 nm), respectively. The molar antibody/nanoparticle ratio was 3.1-3.5. TMNs were non-toxic to the cells below the 30 μg (Fe)/mL concentration and good stable up to 8 weeks in PBS buffer. TMNs could detect HER2 oncogenes in the cells surface with imagable contrast by MRI. The invivo study in mice bearing tumors indicated that TMNs possessed a good diagnostic ability as HER2 specific contrast agent by MRI. TMNs were demonstrated to be able to selectively accumulate in the tumor cells, with a proper signal enhancement in MRI T2 images. So, the complex may be considered for further investigations as an MRI contrast agent for detection of HER2 expression tumors in human.

  1. MRI contrast agent for molecular imaging of the HER2/neu receptor using targeted magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasaneh, Samira; Rajabi, Hossein, E-mail: hrajabi@modares.ac.ir [Tarbiat Modares University, Department of Medical Physics (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Babaei, Mohammad Hossein [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Department of Radioisotope (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Akhlaghpoor, Shahram [Sina Hospital, Tehran Medical University, Noor Medical Imaging Center (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-06-15

    In this study, Trastuzumab modified Magnetic Nanoparticles (TMNs) were prepared as a new contrast agent for detecting HER2 (Human epidermal growth factor receptor-2) expression tumors by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). TMNs were prepared based on iron oxide nanoparticles core and Trastuzumab modified dextran coating. The TMNs core and hydrodynamic size were determined by transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. TMNs stability and cytotoxicity were investigated. The ability of TMNs for HER2 detection were evaluated in breast carcinoma cell lines (SKBr3 and MCF7 cells) and tumor-bearing mice by MRI and iron uptake determination. The particles core and hydrodynamic size were 9 {+-} 2.5 and 41 {+-} 15 nm (size range: 15-87 nm), respectively. The molar antibody/nanoparticle ratio was 3.1-3.5. TMNs were non-toxic to the cells below the 30 {mu}g (Fe)/mL concentration and good stable up to 8 weeks in PBS buffer. TMNs could detect HER2 oncogenes in the cells surface with imagable contrast by MRI. The invivo study in mice bearing tumors indicated that TMNs possessed a good diagnostic ability as HER2 specific contrast agent by MRI. TMNs were demonstrated to be able to selectively accumulate in the tumor cells, with a proper signal enhancement in MRI T2 images. So, the complex may be considered for further investigations as an MRI contrast agent for detection of HER2 expression tumors in human.

  2. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance cholangiography using gadolinium-EOB-DTPA. Preliminary experience and clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holzapfel, K.; Breitwieser, C.; Rummeny, E.J.; Gaa, J.; Prinz, C.

    2007-01-01

    Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreaticography (MRCP) with heavily T2-weighted RARE and HASTE sequences has become an important imaging modality for the morphologic evaluation of intra- and extrahepatic bile ducts. However, for the diagnosis of functional biliary disorders, cholangiopancreaticography (ERCP) and endoscopic manometry, two invasive techniques with considerable morbidity and mortality, remain the standard. Biliary scintigraphy, secretin-stimulated MRCP, and secretin-stimulated endoscopic ultrasound have not proven to be sufficient to replace these techniques as they lack diagnostic accuracy and correlate poorly with manometry results. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance cholangiography (CE-MRC) uses hepatocyte specifically contrast agents that are eliminated by the biliary system. Therefore, these substances can serve as biliary contrast agents in T1-weighted MR imaging. This method makes a noninvasive functional evaluation of the hepatobiliary system possible. In the present article, our preliminar experience with Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRC is summarized and potential clinical applications of this method are discussed. Additionally, the article reviews publications evaluating a possible benefit of CE-MRC with other hepathobiliary contrast agents such as mangafodipir trisodium. (orig.)

  3. Anisotropy of out-of-phase magnetic susceptibility of rocks as a tool for direct determination of magnetic sub-fabrics of some minerals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrouda, F.; Chadima, Martin; Ježek, J.; Pokorný, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 17 (2015), s. 5321-5321 ISSN 1029-7006. [EGU General Assembly. 17.4.2015-22.4.2015, Vienna] Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : palaeomagnetism * magnetic susceptibility * minerals Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography http://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EGU2015/EGU2015-5321.pdf

  4. Gd-based macromolecules and nanoparticles as magnetic resonance contrast agents for molecular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ching-Hui; Tsourkas, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    As we move towards an era of personalized medicine, molecular imaging contrast agents are likely to see an increasing presence in routine clinical practice. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has garnered particular interest as a platform for molecular imaging applications due its ability to monitor anatomical changes concomitant with physiologic and molecular changes. One promising new direction in the development of MR contrast agents involves the labeling and/or loading of nanoparticles with gadolinium (Gd). These nanoplatforms are capable of carrying large payloads of Gd, thus providing the requisite sensitivity to detect molecular signatures within disease pathologies. In this review, we discuss some of the progress that has recently been made in the development of Gd-based macromolecules and nanoparticles and outline some of the physical and chemical properties that will be important to incorporate into the next generation of contrast agents, including high Gd chelate stability, high "relaxivity per particle" and "relaxivity density", and biodegradability.

  5. Gadolinium-porphyrins: new potential magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents for melanoma detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daryoush Shahbazi-Gahrouei

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Two new porphyrin-based magnetic resonance imaging (MRI contrast agents, Gd-hematoporphyrin (Gd-H and Gd-tetra-carboranylmethoxyphenyl-porphyrin (Gd-TCP were synthesized and tested in nude mice with human melanoma (MM-138 xenografts as new melanoma contrast agents. METHODS: Subcutaneous xenografts of human melanoma cells (MM-138 were studied in 30 (five groups of six nude mice. The effect of different contrast agents (Gd-TCP, Gd-H, GdCl3 and Gd-DTPA on proton relaxation times was measured in tumors and other organs. T1 values, signal enhancement and the Gd concentration for different contrast agent solutions were also investigated. RESULTS: The porphyrin agents showed higher relaxivity compared to the clincal agent, Gd-DTPA. A significant 16% and 21% modification in T1 relaxation time of the water in human melanoma tumors grafted in the nude mice was revealed 24 hours after injection of Gd-TCP and Gd-H, respectively. The percentage of injected Gd localized to the tumor measured by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES was approximately 21% for Gd-TCP and 28% for Gd-H which were higher than that of Gd-DTPA (10%. CONCLUSIONS: The high concentration of Gd in the tumor is indicative of a selective retention of the compounds and indicates that Gd-TCP and Gd-H are promising MR imaging contrast agents for melanoma detection. Gd-porphyrins have considerable promise for further diagnostic applications in magnetic resonance imaging. KEY WORDS: MRI, porphyrin-based contrast agent, hematoporphyrin, melanoma.

  6. RECONSTRUCTING PALEO-SMT POSITIONS ON THE CASCADIA MARGIN USING MAGNETIC SUSCEPTIBILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Joel [Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States); Phillips, Stephen [Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States)

    2014-09-30

    Magnetic susceptibility (κ) is a mixed signal in marine sediments, representing primary depositional and secondary diagenetic processes. Production of hydrogen sulfide via anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) at the sulfate-methane transition (SMT) and organoclastic sulfate reduction above the SMT can result in the dissolution of iron oxides, altering κ in sediments in methane gas and gas hydrate bearing regions. We investigated records of κ on the Cascadia margin (ODP Sites 1249 and 1252; IODP Site 1325) using a Zr/Rb heavy mineral proxy from XRF core scanning to identify intervals of primary detrital magnetic susceptibility and intervals and predict intervals affected by magnetite dissolutions. We also measured total sulfur content, grain size distributions, total organic carbon (TOC) content, and magnetic mineral assemblage. The upper 100 m of Site 1252 contains a short interval of κ driven by primary magnetite, with multiple intervals (> 90 m total) of decreased κ correlated with elevated sulfur content, consistent with dissolution of magnetite and re-precipitation of pyrite. In the upper 90 m of Site 1249, κ is almost entirely altered by diagenetic processes, with much of the low κ explained by a high degree of pyritization, and some intervals affected by the precipitation of magnetic iron sulfides. At Site 1325, κ between 0-20 and 51-73 mbsf represents primary mineralogy, and in the interval 24-51 mbsf, κ may be reduced due to pyritization. This integrated approach allows for a prediction of primary κ and the amount of κ loss at each site when compared to actual κ measurements. In the case of magnetite dissolution and full pyritization, these drawdowns in κ are supported by sulfur measurements, and the exposure times of magnetite to hydrogen sulfide can be modeled. The presence of methane and methane hydrates at these sites, as well as large variations in TOC content, suggest that the past migration rates of the SMT and variation in sulfate

  7. Exploiting the Temperature Dependence of Magnetic Susceptibility to Control Convection in Fundamental Studies of Solidification Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seybert, C. D.; Evans, J. W.; Leslie, Fred; Jones, W. K., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    It is well known that convection is a dominant mass transport mechanism when materials are solidified on Earth's surface. This convection is caused by gradients in density (and therefore gravitational force) that are brought about by gradients in temperature, composition or both. Diffusion of solute is therefore dwarfed by convection and the study of fundamental parameters, such as dendrite tip shape and growth velocity in the absence of convection is nearly impossible. Significant experimental work has therefore been carried out in orbiting laboratories with the intent of minimizing convection by minimizing gravity. One of the best known experiments of this kind is the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE), supported by NASA. Naturally such experiments are costly and one objective of the present investigation is to develop an experimental method whereby convection can be- halted, in solidification and other experiments, on the surface. A second objective is to use the method to minimize convection resulting from the residual accelerations suffered by experiments in microgravity. The method to be used to minimize convection relies on the dependence of the magnetic susceptibility of a fluid on temperature or composition (whichever is driving convection). All materials experience a force when placed in a magnetic field gradient. The direction and magnitude of that force depend on the magnetic susceptibility of the material. Consequently the force will vary if the susceptibility varies with temperature or composition. With a magnetic field gradient in the right direction (typically upward) and of the right magnitude, this variation in the magnetic force can be made to exactly cancel the variation in the gravitational force. Expressed another way, normal buoyancy is exactly countered by a "magnetic buoyancy". To demonstrate the principle, a solution of MnC12 in water has been used. First the variation of the susceptibility of this paramagnetic solution with

  8. Surfactant-controlled morphology and magnetic property of manganese ferrite nanocrystal contrast agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu He; Tian Zhiqing; Liang Jie; Yang Hong; Dai Antao; An Lu; Wu Huixia; Yang Shiping, E-mail: shipingy@shnu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Shanghai Normal University, No.100 Guilin Road, Shanghai 200234 (China)

    2011-02-25

    MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanocrystals (NCs) coated with three different surfactants (oleic acid, oleylamine or 1,2-hexadecanediol) and their mixtures, with sizes in range 6-12 nm, were synthesized by high-temperature decomposition of organometallic precursors. The effects of morphology and surface chemistry of MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} NCs on the magnetic properties were systematically investigated by comparing their saturation magnetization values and their capability to improve the negative contrast for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after converting the hydrophobic NCs to hydrophilic ones by a ligand exchange protocol. An important finding is that the magnetization values and proton relaxivity rates of MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} NCs are strongly dependent on the size and surface state of the particles that covalently bonded with different hydrophobic ligands before ligand exchange. In particular, monodisperse cubic MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} NCs could be obtained when oleylamine and 1,2-hexadecanediol were used as mixed stabilizers, and showed excellent morphology and magnetic properties. Furthermore, the low cytotoxicity and good cell uptake MR imaging of the dopamine capped MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} NCs make them promising candidates for use as bio-imaging probes.

  9. Magnetic susceptibilities of liquid Cr-Au, Mn-Au and Fe-Au alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohno, S.; Shimakura, H. [Niigata University of Pharmacy and Applied Life Sciences, Higashijima, Akiha-ku, Niigata 956-8603 (Japan); Tahara, S. [Faculty of Science, University of the Ryukyus, Nishihara-cho, Okinawa 903-0213 (Japan); Okada, T. [Niigata College of Technology, Kamishin’eicho, Nishi-ku, Niigata 950-2076 (Japan)

    2015-08-17

    The magnetic susceptibility of liquid Cr-Au, Mn-Au, Fe-Au and Cu-Au alloys was investigated as a function of temperature and composition. Liquid Cr{sub 1-c}Au{sub c} with 0.5 ≤ c and Mn{sub 1-c}Au{sub c} with 0.3≤c obeyed the Curie-Weiss law with regard to their dependence of χ on temperature. The magnetic susceptibilities of liquid Fe-Au alloys also exhibited Curie-Weiss behavior with a reasonable value for the effective number of Bohr magneton. On the Au-rich side, the composition dependence of χ for liquid TM-Au (TM=Cr, Mn, Fe) alloys increased rapidly with increasing TM content, respectively. Additionally, the composition dependences of χ for liquid Cr-Au, Mn-Au, and Fe-Au alloys had maxima at compositions of 50 at% Cr, 70 at% Mn, and 85 at% Fe, respectively. We compared the composition dependences of χ{sub 3d} due to 3d electrons for liquid binary TM-M (M=Au, Al, Si, Sb), and investigated the relationship between χ{sub 3d} and E{sub F} in liquid binary TM-M alloys at a composition of 50 at% TM.

  10. Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility Studies in Lava Flows of the Eastern Anatolia Region, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ucar, Hakan; Cengiz Cinku, Mualla

    2017-04-01

    Eastern Anatolia comprises one of the high plateaus of the Alpine-Himalaya mountain belt with an average elevation of 2 km above the sea level. Available geochronologic data indicate that the volcanism started in the south of the region around the north of Lake Van and continued towards the norths in a age interval of 15.0 Ma to 0.4 Ma. The products are exposed as stratovolcanoes like Agri, Tendurek, Suphan and Girekol with the eruption of andesitic to rhyolitic lavas, ignimbrites and basaltic lava flows. In this study, anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility measurements were carried out on different lava flows (Tendurek, Girekol and Suphan) to determine the flow direction of lavas. It has been shown that the direction of maximum susceptibility is associated with magma flow direction in the vertical direction, while a horizontal flow direction is predicted for the volcano structure of Suphan. Anisotropy of magnetic measurements show a trend of lineation towards the center of the projection and shallow-dipping foliations which are largely scattered.

  11. Chemistry of paramagnetic and diamagnetic contrast agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Mayoral, Elena [Laboratorio de Sintesis Organica e Imagen Molecular por Resonancia Magnetica, Facultad de Ciencias, UNED, Paseo Senda del Rey 9, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Quimica Inorganica y Quimica Tecnica, Facultad de Ciencias, UNED, Paseo Senda del Rey 9, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Negri, Viviana; Soler-Padros, Jordi [Laboratorio de Sintesis Organica e Imagen Molecular por Resonancia Magnetica, Facultad de Ciencias, UNED, Paseo Senda del Rey 9, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Cerdan, Sebastian [Laboratorio de Imagen Espectroscopica por Resonancia Magnetica (LIERM), Instituto de Investigaciones Biomedicas ' Alberto Sols' , CSIC/UAM, c/Arturo Duperier 4, E-28029 Madrid (Spain); Ballesteros, Paloma [Laboratorio de Sintesis Organica e Imagen Molecular por Resonancia Magnetica, Facultad de Ciencias, UNED, Paseo Senda del Rey 9, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: pballesteros@ccia.uned.es

    2008-09-15

    We provide a brief overview of the chemistry and most relevant properties of paramagnetic and diamagnetic contrast agents (CAs) for Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging. Paramagnetic CAs for MRI consist mainly of Gd(III) complexes from linear or macrocyclic polyaminopolycarboxylates. These agents reduce, the relaxation times T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} of the water protons in a concentration dependent manner, increasing selectively MRI contrast in those regions in which they accumulate. In most instances they provide anatomical information on the localization of lesions and in some specific cases they may allow to estimate some physiological properties of tissues including mainly vascular performance. Because of its ability to discriminate easily between normal and diseased tissue, extracellular pH (pH{sub e}) has been added recently, to the battery of variables amenable to MRI investigation. A variety of Gd(III) containing macrocycles sensitive to pH, endogenous or exogenous polypeptides or even liposomes have been investigated for this purpose, using the pH dependence of their relaxivity or magnetization transfer rate constant (chemical exchange saturation transfer, CEST). Many environmental circumstances in addition to pH affect, however, relaxivity or magnetization transfer rate constants of these agents, making the results of pH measurements by MRI difficult to interpret. To overcome these limitations, our laboratory synthesized and developed a novel series of diamagnetic CAs for Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging, a new family of monomeric and dimeric imidazolic derivatives able to provide unambiguous measurements of pH{sub e}, independent of water relaxivity, diffusion or exchange.

  12. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography of persistent fifth aortic arch in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, Yumin; Zhu, Ming; Sun, Aimin; Li, Yuhua; Jaffe, Richard B.; Gao, Wei

    2007-01-01

    Cine angiography and echocardiography have been utilized to diagnose congenital aortic arch anomalies. However, the visualization of great vessels by echocardiography is limited, while cine angiography requires cardiac catheterization with ionizing radiation. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) is a noninvasive modality suitable for visualization of congenital aortic arch anomalies. To evaluate the utility of contrast-enhanced MRA in the diagnosis of persistent fifth aortic arch, a rare congenital aortic arch anomaly, and to compare the diagnostic accuracy of MRA with that of echocardiography and cine angiography. In four pediatric patients, contrast-enhanced MRA studies were performed for diagnosing persistent fifth aortic arch. The findings of MRA were compared with echocardiographic findings and confirmed by cine angiography and operation. Transthoracic surface echocardiography noted an aberrant vessel arising from the ascending aorta in two of four patients; the etiology of this vessel was uncertain. In the other two patients a diagnosis of coarctation was made. Of the four patients, only one was diagnosed with interruption of the aortic arch. Contrast-enhanced MRA clarified uncertain echocardiographic findings, enabling the correct diagnosis of persistent fifth aortic arch with fourth aortic arch interruption in all four patients. Contrast-enhanced MRA is a safe, accurate, and fast imaging technique for the evaluation of persistent fifth aortic arch and may obviate the need for conventional cine angiography. Cardiac catheterization may be reserved for some types of complicated congenital heart disease and for obtaining hemodynamic information. (orig.)

  13. Nanoparticles in magnetic resonance imaging: from simple to dual contrast agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estelrich J

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Joan Estelrich,1,2 María Jesús Sánchez-Martín,1 Maria Antònia Busquets1,2 1Departament de Fisicoquímica, Facultat de Farmàcia, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain; 2Institut de Nanociència I Nanotecnologia (IN2UB, Barcelona, Catalonia, SpainAbstract: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has become one of the most widely used and powerful tools for noninvasive clinical diagnosis owing to its high degree of soft tissue contrast, spatial resolution, and depth of penetration. MRI signal intensity is related to the relaxation times (T1, spin–lattice relaxation and T2, spin–spin relaxation of in vivo water protons. To increase contrast, various inorganic nanoparticles and complexes (the so-called contrast agents are administered prior to the scanning. Shortening T1 and T2 increases the corresponding relaxation rates, 1/T1 and 1/T2, producing hyperintense and hypointense signals respectively in shorter times. Moreover, the signal-to-noise ratio can be improved with the acquisition of a large number of measurements. The contrast agents used are generally based on either iron oxide nanoparticles or ferrites, providing negative contrast in T2-weighted images; or complexes of lanthanide metals (mostly containing gadolinium ions, providing positive contrast in T1-weighted images. Recently, lanthanide complexes have been immobilized in nanostructured materials in order to develop a new class of contrast agents with functions including blood-pool and organ (or tumor targeting. Meanwhile, to overcome the limitations of individual imaging modalities, multimodal imaging techniques have been developed. An important challenge is to design all-in-one contrast agents that can be detected by multimodal techniques. Magnetoliposomes are efficient multimodal contrast agents. They can simultaneously bear both kinds of contrast and can, furthermore, incorporate targeting ligands and chains of polyethylene glycol to enhance the accumulation of

  14. Non-caloric sweetener provides magnetic resonance imaging contrast for cancer detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagga, Puneet; Haris, Mohammad; D'Aquilla, Kevin; Wilson, Neil E; Marincola, Francesco M; Schnall, Mitchell D; Hariharan, Hari; Reddy, Ravinder

    2017-05-30

    Image contrast enhanced by exogenous contrast agents plays a crucial role in the early detection, characterization, and determination of the precise location of cancers. Here, we investigate the feasibility of using a non-nutritive sweetener, sucralose (commercial name, Splenda), as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent for cancer studies. High-resolution nuclear-magnetic-resonance spectroscopy and MR studies on sucralose solution phantom were performed to detect the chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) property of sucralose hydroxyl protons with bulk water (sucCEST). For the animal experiments, female Fisher rats (F344/NCR) were used to generate 9L-gliosarcoma model. MRI with CEST experiments were performed on anesthetized rats at 9.4 T MR scanner. Following the baseline CEST scans, sucralose solution was intravenously administered in control and tumor bearing rats. CEST acquisitions were continued during and following the administration of sucralose. Following the sucCEST, Gadolinium-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid was injected to perform Gd-enhanced imaging for visualizing the tumor. The sucCEST contrast in vitro was found to correlate positively with the sucralose concentration and negatively with the pH, indicating the potential of this technique in cancer imaging. In a control animal, the CEST contrast from the brain was found to be unaffected following the administration of sucralose, demonstrating its blood-brain barrier impermeability. In a 9L glioma model, enhanced localized sucCEST contrast in the tumor region was detected while the unaffected brain region showed unaltered CEST effect implying the specificity of sucralose toward the tumorous tissue. The CEST asymmetry plots acquired from the tumor region before and after the sucralose infusion showed elevation of asymmetry at 1 ppm, pointing towards the role of sucralose in increased contrast. We show the feasibility of using sucralose and sucCEST in study of preclinical models of

  15. Contrast Induced by a Static Magnetic Field for Improved Detection in Nanodiamond Fluorescence Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singam, Shashi K. R.; Motylewski, Jaroslaw; Monaco, Antonina; Gjorgievska, Elena; Bourgeois, Emilie; Nesládek, Milos; Giugliano, Michele; Goovaerts, Etienne

    2016-12-01

    Diamond nanoparticles with negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers are highly efficient nonblinking emitters that exhibit spin-dependent intensity. An attractive application of these emitters is background-free fluorescence microscopy exploiting the fluorescence quenching induced either by resonant microwaves (RMWs) or by an applied static magnetic field (SMF). Here, we compare RMW- and SMF-induced contrast measurements over a wide range of optical excitation rates for fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) and for NV centers shallowly buried under the (100)-oriented surface of a diamond single crystal (SC). Contrast levels are found to be systematically lower in the FNDs than in the SC. At low excitation rates, the RMW contrast initially rises to a maximum (up to 7% in FNDs and 13% in the SC) but then decreases steadily at higher intensities. Conversely, the SMF contrast increases from approximately 12% at low excitation rates to high values of 20% and 38% for the FNDs and SC, respectively. These observations are well described in a rate-equations model for the charged NV defect using parameters in good agreement with the literature. The SMF approach yields higher induced contrast in image collection under commonly applied optical excitation. Unlike the RMW method, there is no thermal load exerted on the aqueous media in biological samples in the SMF approach. We demonstrate imaging by SMF-induced contrast in neuronal cultures incorporating FNDs (i) in a setup for patch-clamp experiments in parallel with differential-interference-contrast microscopy, (ii) after a commonly used staining procedure as an illustration of the high selectivity against background fluorescence, and (iii) in a confocal fluorescence microscope in combination with bright-field microscopy.

  16. Gadolinium-containing magnetic resonance imaging contrast and nephrogenic systemic fibrosis: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallen, Alexander J; Jhung, Michael A; Cheng, Steven; Hess, Theresa; Turabelidze, George; Abramova, Liana; Arduino, Matthew; Guarner, Jeannette; Pollack, Brian; Saab, Georges; Patel, Priti R

    2008-06-01

    Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) is a newly described disorder occurring in persons with renal failure. Gadolinium-based contrast used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been suggested as a cause. A cluster of patients with NSF was investigated to identify risk factors. Limited preliminary findings from this investigation were presented in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Matched case-control. Dialysis patients with and without a diagnosis of NSF treated at an academic medical center. Exposure to gadolinium-based contrast. Laboratory and clinical characteristics of NSF. 19 of 28 cases identified at the hospital from December 2002 to August 2006 met inclusion criteria and were matched to 57 controls. In univariate analysis, receipt of gadolinium-containing MRI contrast in the preceding year (odds ratio [OR], 7.99; 95% confidence interval, 2.22 to 28.8) was associated with NSF; the measure of association increased as cumulative dose increased. Gadodiamide exposure (OR, 9.83; 95% confidence interval, 2.09 to 46.2) was associated more strongly with NSF than gadoversetamide (OR, 1.82; 95% confidence interval, 0.33 to 10.2). Although not statistically significant, cases were more likely than controls to have undergone primarily peritoneal dialysis in the preceding 6 months. There was no significant difference in receipt of high-dose recombinant erythropoietin between cases and controls. In multivariable analysis, gadolinium contrast exposure (OR, 8.97; 95% confidence interval, 1.28 to 63.0) remained significantly associated with NSF. Retrospective design, small sample size, inability to completely evaluate erythropoietin. Receipt of gadolinium-containing MRI contrast is associated with NSF in a dose-dependent manner. The risk associated with gadolinium may differ by contrast agent and dialysis modality. Use of gadolinium-based contrast agents should be avoided when possible in patients with renal failure.

  17. Magnetic nano-particles, contrast agent for NMR imaging; Nanoparticules magnetiques, agents de contraste pour l'imagerie par resonance magnetique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gazeau, F.; Wilhelm, C.; Bacri, J.C. [Universite Paris 6 / associe a Paris 7, Lab. Milieux Desordonnes et Heterogenes (LMDH), 75 - Paris (France); Clement, O. [Hopital Necker-Enfants-Malades, Lab. Recherche en Imagerie, 75 - Paris (France)

    2004-08-01

    The purpose of contrast media in NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) imaging is to disturb the magnetization of surrounding protons by generating a local magnetic field. There are 2 types of contrast agents: paramagnetic molecular complexes and ferromagnetic nano-particles. Paramagnetic molecular complexes contain paramagnetic ions such as Gd{sup 3+}, Fe{sup 3+} or Mn{sup 2+}. Ferromagnetic nano-particles are monocrystals of iron oxide whose diameters have a magnitude of about ten nanometers, each particle acts as a little magnet of 10{sup 4} Bohr magnetons. These nano-particles have to be put in colloidal suspension in a bio-compatible solvent in order to be injected into the body. The effect of nano-particles on surrounding protons is far more important than that of paramagnetic complexes because their magnetic moment is increased by a factor 1000. Paramagnetic complexes (like gadolinium chelate) do not aggregate to plasma proteins and as a consequence they go easily through capillary blood vessels, and scatter quickly in the aqueous extra-cellular compartments, they are eliminated through kidneys in a matter of hours. Magnetic nano-particles have a different kinetics inside the body that depends strongly on their sizes and the nature of their surface. Clinical uses of magnetic nano-particles involve pathology in which liver, spleen, or bone marrow are concerned, or lymphography or the visualization of the piling-up of macrophages in any inflammatory zones. (A.C.)

  18. SU-F-I-24: Feasibility of Magnetic Susceptibility to Relative Electron Density Conversion Method for Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, K; Kadoya, N; Chiba, M; Matsushita, H; Jingu, K [Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Miyagi (Japan); Sato, K; Nagasaka, T; Yamanaka, K [Tohoku University Hospital, Sendai, Miyagi (Japan); Dobashi, S; Takeda, K [Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to develop radiation treatment planning using magnetic susceptibility obtained from quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) via MR imaging. This study demonstrates the feasibility of a method for generating a substitute for a CT image from an MRI. Methods: The head of a healthy volunteer was scanned using a CT scanner and a 3.0 T MRI scanner. The CT imaging was performed with a slice thickness of 2.5 mm at 80 and 120 kV (dual-energy scan). These CT images were converted to relative electron density (rED) using the CT-rED conversion table generated by a previous dual-energy CT scan. The CT-rED conversion table was generated using the conversion of the energy-subtracted CT number to rED via a single linear relationship. One T2 star-weighted 3D gradient echo-based sequence with four different echo times images was acquired using the MRI scanner. These T2 star-weighted images were used to estimate the phase data. To estimate the local field map, a Laplacian unwrapping of the phase and background field removal algorithm were implemented to process phase data. To generate a magnetic susceptibility map from the local field map, we used morphology enabled dipole inversion method. The rED map was resampled to the same resolution as magnetic susceptibility, and the magnetic susceptibility-rED conversion table was obtained via voxel-by-voxel mapping between the magnetic susceptibility and rED maps. Results: A correlation between magnetic susceptibility and rED is not observed through our method. Conclusion: Our results show that the correlation between magnetic susceptibility and rED is not observed. As the next step, we assume that the voxel of the magnetic susceptibility map comprises two materials, such as water (0 ppm) and bone (-2.2 ppm) or water and marrow (0.81ppm). The elements of each voxel were estimated from the ratio of the two materials.

  19. Cerebral perfusion MR imaging using FAIR-HASTE in chronic carotid occlusive disease. Comparison with dynamic susceptibility contrast-perfusion MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ida, Kentaro; Akaki, Shiro; Sei, Tetsuro; Kanazawa, Susumu; Tsunoda, Masatoshi

    2006-01-01

    To determine the efficacy of flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery using half-Fourier single-shot turbo spin-echo (FAIR-HASTE) in detecting cerebral hypoperfusion in chronic carotid occlusive disease, we subjected 12 patients with various degrees of cervical internal carotid artery stenoses and/or occlusion (Stenosis group) and 24 volunteers (Normal group) to FAIR-HASTE. In addition, 10 out of 12 patients in the Stenosis group underwent dynamic susceptibility contrast-perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-pMRI) before and after revascularization in the dominantly affected side. The absolute asymmetry indexes (AIs) of both cerebral hemispheres in the Normal and Stenosis groups were compared in FAIR-HASTE. In addition, the AIs were compared with those in the Stenosis group before and after revascularization in both FAIR-HASTE and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), calculated with DSC-pMRI. A statistically significant difference was recognized between the AIs in the Normal and Stenosis groups (AI=2.25±1.92, 8.09±4.60, respectively; p<0.0001). Furthermore, in the Stenosis group the AIs on both FAIR-HASTE (8.88±4.93, 2.22±1.79, respectively; p=0.0003) and rCBF (7.13±3.57, 1.25±1.33, respectively; p=0.0003) significantly decreased after revascularization. In the Stenosis group, before revascularization, signal intensity on both FAIR-HASTE and rCBF had a tendency to be lower in the dominantly affected side. FAIR-HASTE imaging was useful in the detection and evaluation of cerebral hypoperfusion in chronic occlusive carotid disease. (author)

  20. Technical aspects of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the breast: literature review; Aspectos tecnicos da ressonancia magnetica de mama com meio de contraste: revisao da literatura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leopoldino, Denise de Deus; Gracio, Tatiana Schiller [Hospital Sao Luiz, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Setor de Tomografia e Ressonancia Magnetica]. E-mail: leopoldinod@yahoo.com; D' Ippolito, Giuseppe; Bezerra, Alexandre Sergio de Araujo; Gracio, Tatiana Schiller [Hospital Sao Luiz, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Setor de Diagnostico por Imagem

    2005-07-15

    With the advances in surface coil technology and the development of new imaging protocols in addition to the increase of the use of contrast agents, contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has emerged as a promising modality for detection, diagnosis and staging of breast cancer. Despite these advances, there are some unresolved issues, including no defined standard technique for contrast-enhanced breast MRI and no standard criteria of interpretation for the evaluation of such studies. In this article, we review the literature and discuss the general requirements and recommendations for contrast agent-enhanced breast MRI, including image interpretation criteria, MR equipment, dedicated radiofrequency coils, use of paramagnetic contrast agents, fat-suppression techniques, planes of acquisition, pulse sequence specifications and artifact sources. (author)

  1. Influence of oxygen disordering on static magnetic susceptibility of YBa2Cu3O7-x ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, B.Yu.; Vil'danov, R.R.

    2008-01-01

    Influence of disordering of the populated oxygen positions in YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x ceramic's structure on its static magnetic susceptibility in the range of temperatures T>Tc is investigated. For occurrence of disordering the initial ceramics YBa 2 Cu 3 O 6,9 was annealed at T=520 C with the subsequent quenching in liquid nitrogen. Evolutions of a magnetic susceptibility and resistance of annealed ceramics during its air storage at a room temperature were studied. It is revealed that, unlike the initial optimum doped ceramics, annealed samples have appreciable temperature dependence of a magnetic susceptibility. Interpretation of results is executed on the basis of model of electronic phase separation and occurrence of a pseudo gap in a energy spectrum of free carriers of a superconductor. (authors)

  2. Non-invasive assessment of pulsatile intracranial pressure with phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geir Ringstad

    Full Text Available Invasive monitoring of pulsatile intracranial pressure can accurately predict shunt response in patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus, but may potentially cause complications such as bleeding and infection. We tested how a proposed surrogate parameter for pulsatile intracranial pressure, the phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging derived pulse pressure gradient, compared with its invasive counterpart. In 22 patients with suspected idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus, preceding invasive intracranial pressure monitoring, and any surgical shunt procedure, we calculated the pulse pressure gradient from phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging derived cerebrospinal fluid flow velocities obtained at the upper cervical spinal canal using a simplified Navier-Stokes equation. Repeated measurements of the pulse pressure gradient were also undertaken in four healthy controls. Of 17 shunted patients, 16 responded, indicating high proportion of "true" normal pressure hydrocephalus in the patient cohort. However, there was no correlation between the magnetic resonance imaging derived pulse pressure gradient and pulsatile intracranial pressure (R = -.18, P = .43. Pulse pressure gradients were also similar in patients and healthy controls (P = .26, and did not differ between individuals with pulsatile intracranial pressure above or below established thresholds for shunt treatment (P = .97. Assessment of pulse pressure gradient at level C2 was therefore not found feasible to replace invasive monitoring of pulsatile intracranial pressure in selection of patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus for surgical shunting. Unlike invasive, overnight monitoring, the pulse pressure gradient from magnetic resonance imaging comprises short-term pressure fluctuations only. Moreover, complexity of cervical cerebrospinal fluid flow and -pulsatility at the upper cervical spinal canal may render the pulse pressure gradient a poor surrogate

  3. Nanocrystalline GdAlO{sub 3}: XPS, EPR and magnetic susceptibility studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrov, Dimitar [University of Food Technologies, Department of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Plovdiv (Bulgaria)

    2011-09-15

    Nanocrystalline gadolinium monoaluminate (GdAlO{sub 3}) has been synthesized by sol-gel method after sintering the precursor gel at 950 C. The microstructural features have been proved by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). The XRD pattern confirms the formation of single-phase GdAlO{sub 3} while EDX shows that this nanomaterial is stoichiometric; the average size of the nanoparticles is 40 nm. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has been used to study the chemical composition and bonding in the as-prepared samples. The binding energies of core-level electrons in Gd, Al and O in GdAlO{sub 3} nanopowder have been found slightly shifted compared to the corresponding values of the same elements. The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra at 9.23 GHz (X-band) and different temperatures indicate the existence of magnetically concentrated solid containing Gd{sup 3+} ions. Neel temperature, T{sub N} =3.993 K, effective Bohr magneton number, {mu} {sub eff}=8.18, and constant of magnetic exchange interaction, J{sub ex}=-0.069 cm {sup -1}, have been determined from DC magnetic susceptibilities measured in the range 2-300 K. (orig.)

  4. Magnetic susceptibility of spider webs as a proxy of airborne metal pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachwał, Marzena; Rybak, Justyna; Rogula-Kozłowska, Wioletta

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to test spider webs as a fast tool for magnetic biomonitoring of air pollution. The study involved the investigation of webs made by four types of spiders: Pholcus phalangioides (Pholcidae), Eratigena atrica and Agelena labirynthica (Agelenidae) and Linyphia triangularis (Linyphiidae). These webs were obtained from outdoor and indoor study sites. Compared to the clean reference webs, an increase was observed in the values of magnetic susceptibility in the webs sampled from both indoor and outdoor sites, which indicates contamination by anthropogenically produced pollution particles that contain ferrimagnetic iron minerals. This pilot study has demonstrated that spider webs are able to capture particulate matter in a manner that is equivalent to flora-based bioindicators applied to date (such as mosses, lichens, leaves). They also have additional advantages; for example, they can be generated in isolated clean habitats, and exposure can be monitored in indoor and outdoor locations, at any height and for any period of time. Moreover, webs are ubiquitous in an anthropogenic, heavily polluted environment, and they can be exposed throughout the year. As spider webs accumulate pollutants to which humans are exposed, they become a reliable source of information about the quality of the environment. Therefore, spider webs are recommended for magnetic biomonitoring of airborne pollution and for the assessment of the environment because they are non-destructive, low-cost, sensitive and efficient. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Superspin relaxation in Fe3O4/hexane magnetic fluids: A dynamic susceptibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botez, Cristian E.; Morris, Joshua L.; Eastman, Michael P.

    2012-07-01

    We have used frequency-resolved (100 Hz < f < 10,000 Hz) ac magnetic susceptibility measurements to directly determine the Néel and Brown relaxation times in 30-nm-size Fe3O4/hexane magnetic fluids at temperatures between 200 and 300 K. Our data collected on both powder and magnetic fluid samples allow the separation of the contributions from the Néel and Brown relaxation mechanisms that act concomitantly within the above-mentioned temperature range. At all temperatures we find that the Brown relaxation times (τB) are shorter than their Néel counterparts (τN), evidence that the Brown mechanism yields the major contribution towards the system's overall superspin dynamics. τB exhibits a steep two-order-of-magnitude decrease upon heating, from τB = 1 × 10-3 s at T = 237 K to τB = 1.5 × 10-5 s at T = 270 K, a behavior mostly driven by the heating-induced reduction of the liquid carrier's viscosity.

  6. Accelerated free breathing ECG triggered contrast enhanced pulmonary vein magnetic resonance angiography using compressed sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Roujol, Sébastien; Foppa, Murilo; Basha, Tamer A; Akçakaya, Mehmet; Kissinger, Kraig V; Goddu, Beth; Berg, Sophie; Nezafat, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background: To investigate the feasibility of accelerated electrocardiogram (ECG)-triggered contrast enhanced pulmonary vein magnetic resonance angiography (CE-PV MRA) with isotropic spatial resolution using compressed sensing (CS). Methods: Nineteen patients (59 ± 13 y, 11 M) referred for MR were scanned using the proposed accelerated free breathing ECG-triggered 3D CE-PV MRA sequence (FOV = 340 × 340 × 110 mm3, spatial resolution = 1.5 × 1.5 × 1.5 mm3, acquisition window = 140 ms at mid dia...

  7. Vortex beam production and contrast enhancement from a magnetic spiral phase plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackburn, A.M.; Loudon, J.C.

    2014-01-01

    Electron vortex beam probes offer the possibility of mapping magnetic moments with atomic resolution. In this work we consider using the stray magnetic field produced from a narrow ferromagnetic rod magnetised along its long axis to produce a vortex beam probe, as an alternative to the currently used holographic apertures or gratings. We show through numerical modelling, electron holography observations and direct imaging of the electron probe, that a long narrow ferromagnetic rod induces a phase shift in the wave-function of passing electrons that approximately describes a helix in the regions near its ends. Directing this rod towards the optical axis of a charged-particle beam probe forming system at a limiting aperture position, with the free-end sufficiently close to the axis, is shown to offer a point spread function composed of vortex modes, with evidence of this appearing in observations of the electron probe formed from inserting a micro-fabricated CoFe rod into the beam path of a 300 keV transmission electron microscope (TEM). If the rod is arranged to contain the magnetic flux of h/e, thus producing a maximum phase shift of 2π, it produces a simple spiral-like phase contrast transfer function for weak phase objects. In this arrangement the ferromagnetic rod can be used as a phase plate, positioned at the objective aperture position of a TEM, yielding enhanced image contrast which is simulated to be intermediate between comparable Zernike and Hilbert phase plates. Though this aspect of the phase plate performance is not demonstrated here, agreement between our observations and models for the probe formed from an example rod containing a magnetic flux of ∼2.35h/e, indicate this phase plate arrangement could be a simple means of enhancing contrast and gaining additional information from TEM imaged weak phase samples, while also offering the capability to produce vortex beam probes. However, steps still need to be taken to either remove or improve the

  8. Responsive magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents as chemical sensors for metals in biology and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Que, Emily L; Chang, Christopher J

    2010-01-01

    This tutorial review highlights progress in the development of responsive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents for detecting and sensing biologically relevant metal ions. Molecular imaging with bioactivatable MRI indicators offers a potentially powerful methodology for studying the physiology and pathology of metals by capturing dynamic three-dimensional images of living systems for research and clinical applications. This emerging area at the interface of inorganic chemistry and the life sciences offers a broad palette of opportunities for researchers with interests ranging from coordination chemistry and spectroscopy to supramolecular chemistry and molecular recognition to metals in biology and medicine.

  9. Effect of collagen on magnetization transfer contrast assessed in cultured cartilage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Jun; Seo, Gwy-Suk; Karakida, Osamu; Ueda, Hitoshi; Sone, Shusuke; Hiraki, Yuji; Shukunami, Chisa; Moriya, Hiroto.

    1996-01-01

    We investigated the effect of collagen on magnetization transfer contrast (MTC) in cultured cartilage. In our culture system, only collagen synthesis was increased by the addition of vitamin C, while proteoglycan synthesis and the number of chondrocytes were unaffected. The MTC effect was assessed by using an off-resonance RF pulse (0.3 KHz off-resonance, sinc wave of 18 msec, maximum amplitude 4.61 x 10 -4 T) on a GRASS sequence. The cartilage cultured with vitamin C showed a higher MTC effect than that cultured without vitamin C. The major role of collagen on MTC was confirmed in living cartilage tissue. (author)

  10. The progress in diagnostic imaging for staging of bladder and prostate cancer. Endorectal magnetic resonance imaging and magnetization transfer contrast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arima, Kiminobu; Hayashi, Norio; Yanagawa, Makoto; Kawamura, Juichi; Kobayashi, Shigeki; Takeda, Kan [Mie Univ., Tsu (Japan). School of Medicine; Sugimura, Yoshiki

    1999-08-01

    We retrospectively studied the staging accuracy of endorectal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in comparison with transrectal ultrasound examination (TRUS) for 71 localized bladder cancers and 19 localized prostate cancers (PC) radically resected. The accuracy of clinical staging for bladder cancer in endorectal MRI and TRUS was 85.9% and 69.2%, respectively. The presence or absence of the continuity of submucosal enhancement on T2-weighted MRI images could be useful for the staging of bladder cancer. The accuracy of the seminal vesicular invasion for prostate cancer in endorectal MRI and TRUS was 95% and 63%, respectively. To determine whether magnetization transfer contrast (MTC) provides additional information in the diagnosis of prostate cancer, the magnetization transfer ratios (MTRs) were calculated in 22 patients with PC, 5 with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and 4 controls. The mean MTR in the peripheral zone of the normal prostate (8.0%{+-}3.4 [standard deviation]) showed a statistically significant decrease relative to that in the inner zone of the normal prostate (27.4%{+-}3.4, p<0.01), BPH (25.5%{+-}3.7, p<0.01), pre-treatment PC (30.6%{+-}5.9, p<0.01), and PC after hormonal therapy (20.3%{+-}6.3, p<0.01). The mean MTR in pre-treatment PC was significantly higher than that in BPH, or in PC after hormonal therapy (p<0.01). MTC was considered to be useful for conspicuity of prostate cancer lesion. (author)

  11. Rapid non-contrast magnetic resonance imaging for post appendectomy intra-abdominal abscess in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Megan H.; Eutsler, Eric P.; Khanna, Geetika; Sheybani, Elizabeth F.

    2017-01-01

    Acute appendicitis, especially if perforated at presentation, is often complicated by postoperative abscess formation. The detection of a postoperative abscess relies primarily on imaging. This has traditionally been done with contrast-enhanced computed tomography. Non-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has the potential to accurately detect intra-abdominal abscesses, especially with the use of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). To evaluate our single-center experience with a rapid non-contrast MRI protocol evaluating post-appendectomy abscesses in children with persistent postsurgical symptoms. In this retrospective, institutional review board-approved study, all patients underwent a clinically indicated non-contrast 1.5- or 3-Tesla abdomen/pelvis MRI consisting of single-shot fast spin echo, inversion recovery and DWI sequences. All MRI studies were reviewed by two blinded pediatric radiologists to identify the presence of a drainable fluid collection. Each fluid collection was further characterized as accessible or not accessible for percutaneous or transrectal drainage. Imaging findings were compared to clinical outcome. Seven of the 15 patients had a clinically significant fluid collection, and 5 of these patients were treated with percutaneous drain placement or exploratory laparotomy. The other patients had a phlegmon or a clinically insignificant fluid collection and were discharged home within 48 h. Rapid non-contrast MRI utilizing fluid-sensitive and DWI sequences can be used to identify drainable fluid collections in post-appendectomy patients. This protocol can be used to triage patients between conservative management vs. abscess drainage without oral/intravenous contrast or exposure to ionizing radiation. (orig.)

  12. Rapid non-contrast magnetic resonance imaging for post appendectomy intra-abdominal abscess in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Megan H. [Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, St. Louis, MO (United States); Eutsler, Eric P.; Khanna, Geetika [Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Pediatric Radiology, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, St. Louis, MO (United States); Sheybani, Elizabeth F. [Mercy Hospital St. Louis, Department of Radiology, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2017-07-15

    Acute appendicitis, especially if perforated at presentation, is often complicated by postoperative abscess formation. The detection of a postoperative abscess relies primarily on imaging. This has traditionally been done with contrast-enhanced computed tomography. Non-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has the potential to accurately detect intra-abdominal abscesses, especially with the use of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). To evaluate our single-center experience with a rapid non-contrast MRI protocol evaluating post-appendectomy abscesses in children with persistent postsurgical symptoms. In this retrospective, institutional review board-approved study, all patients underwent a clinically indicated non-contrast 1.5- or 3-Tesla abdomen/pelvis MRI consisting of single-shot fast spin echo, inversion recovery and DWI sequences. All MRI studies were reviewed by two blinded pediatric radiologists to identify the presence of a drainable fluid collection. Each fluid collection was further characterized as accessible or not accessible for percutaneous or transrectal drainage. Imaging findings were compared to clinical outcome. Seven of the 15 patients had a clinically significant fluid collection, and 5 of these patients were treated with percutaneous drain placement or exploratory laparotomy. The other patients had a phlegmon or a clinically insignificant fluid collection and were discharged home within 48 h. Rapid non-contrast MRI utilizing fluid-sensitive and DWI sequences can be used to identify drainable fluid collections in post-appendectomy patients. This protocol can be used to triage patients between conservative management vs. abscess drainage without oral/intravenous contrast or exposure to ionizing radiation. (orig.)

  13. Anomalous behaviour of the magnetic susceptibility of the mixed spin-1 and spin- 1/2 anisotropic Heisenberg model in the Oguchi approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobak, Andrej; Dely, Jan; Pokorny, Vladislav

    2010-01-01

    The effects of both an exchange anisotropy and a single-ion anisotropy on the magnetic susceptibility of the mixed spin-1 and spin- 1/2 Heisenberg model are investigated by the use of an Oguchi approximation. Particular emphasis is given to the simple cubic lattice with coordination number z = 6 for which the magnetic susceptibility is determined numerically. Anomalous behaviour in the thermal variation of the magnetic susceptibility in the low-temperature region is found due to the applied negative single-ion anisotropy field strength. Also, the difference between the behaviours of the magnetic susceptibility of the Heisenberg and Ising models is discussed.

  14. Effect of Low-Frequency AC Magnetic Susceptibility and Magnetic Properties of CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB Magnetic Tunnel Junctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Tsung Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this investigation, the low-frequency alternate-current (AC magnetic susceptibility (χac and hysteresis loop of various MgO thickness in CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB magnetic tunneling junction (MTJ determined coercivity (Hc and magnetization (Ms and correlated that with χac maxima. The multilayer films were sputtered onto glass substrates and the thickness of intermediate barrier MgO layer was varied from 6 to 15 Å. An experiment was also performed to examine the variation of the highest χac and maximum phase angle (θmax at the optimal resonance frequency (fres, at which the spin sensitivity is maximal. The results reveal that χac falls as the frequency increases due to the relationship between magnetization and thickness of the barrier layer. The maximum χac is at 10 Hz that is related to the maximal spin sensitivity and that this corresponds to a MgO layer of 11 Å. This result also suggests that the spin sensitivity is related to both highest χac and maximum phase angle. The corresponding maximum of χac is related to high exchange coupling. High coercivity and saturation magnetization contribute to high exchange-coupling χac strength.

  15. Effect of Low-Frequency AC Magnetic Susceptibility and Magnetic Properties of CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB Magnetic Tunnel Junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuan-Tsung; Lin, Sung-Hao; Sheu, Tzer-Shin

    2014-01-02

    In this investigation, the low-frequency alternate-current (AC) magnetic susceptibility (χ ac ) and hysteresis loop of various MgO thickness in CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB magnetic tunneling junction (MTJ) determined coercivity ( H c ) and magnetization ( M s ) and correlated that with χ ac maxima. The multilayer films were sputtered onto glass substrates and the thickness of intermediate barrier MgO layer was varied from 6 to 15 Å. An experiment was also performed to examine the variation of the highest χ ac and maximum phase angle (θ max ) at the optimal resonance frequency ( f res ), at which the spin sensitivity is maximal. The results reveal that χ ac falls as the frequency increases due to the relationship between magnetization and thickness of the barrier layer. The maximum χ ac is at 10 Hz that is related to the maximal spin sensitivity and that this corresponds to a MgO layer of 11 Å. This result also suggests that the spin sensitivity is related to both highest χ ac and maximum phase angle. The corresponding maximum of χ ac is related to high exchange coupling. High coercivity and saturation magnetization contribute to high exchange-coupling χ ac strength.

  16. Cerebral blood volume calculated by dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced perfusion MR imaging: preliminary correlation study with glioblastoma genetic profiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inseon Ryoo

    Full Text Available To evaluate the usefulness of dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC enhanced perfusion MR imaging in predicting major genetic alterations in glioblastomas.Twenty-five patients (M:F = 13∶12, mean age: 52.1±15.2 years with pathologically proven glioblastoma who underwent DSC MR imaging before surgery were included. On DSC MR imaging, the normalized relative tumor blood volume (nTBV of the enhancing solid portion of each tumor was calculated by using dedicated software (Nordic TumorEX, NordicNeuroLab, Bergen, Norway that enabled semi-automatic segmentation for each tumor. Five major glioblastoma genetic alterations (epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN, Ki-67, O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT and p53 were confirmed by immunohistochemistry and analyzed for correlation with the nTBV of each tumor. Statistical analysis was performed using the unpaired Student t test, ROC (receiver operating characteristic curve analysis and Pearson correlation analysis.The nTBVs of the MGMT methylation-negative group (mean 9.5±7.5 were significantly higher than those of the MGMT methylation-positive group (mean 5.4±1.8 (p = .046. In the analysis of EGFR expression-positive group, the nTBVs of the subgroup with loss of PTEN gene expression (mean: 10.3±8.1 were also significantly higher than those of the subgroup without loss of PTEN gene expression (mean: 5.6±2.3 (p = .046. Ki-67 labeling index indicated significant positive correlation with the nTBV of the tumor (p = .01.We found that glioblastomas with aggressive genetic alterations tended to have a high nTBV in the present study. Thus, we believe that DSC-enhanced perfusion MR imaging could be helpful in predicting genetic alterations that are crucial in predicting the prognosis of and selecting tailored treatment for glioblastoma patients.

  17. Time-Evolution Contrast of Target MRI Using High-Stability Antibody Functionalized Magnetic Nanoparticles: An Animal Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. W. Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, high-quality antibody functionalized Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles are synthesized. Such physical characterizations as particle morphology, particle size, stability, and relaxivity of magnetic particles are investigated. The immunoreactivity of biofunctionalized magnetic nanoparticles is examined by utilizing immunomagnetic reduction. The results show that the mean diameter of antibody functionalized magnetic nanoparticles is around 50 nm, and the relaxivity of the magnetic particles is 145 (mM·s−1. In addition to characterizing the magnetic nanoparticles, the feasibility of using the antibody functionalized magnetic nanoparticles for the contrast medium of target magnetic resonance imaging is investigated. These antibody functionalized magnetic nanoparticles are injected into mice bearing with tumor. The tumor magnetic-resonance image becomes darker after the injection and then recovers 50 hours after the injection. The tumor magnetic-resonance image becomes the darkest at around 20 hours after the injection. Thus, the observing time window for the specific labeling of tumors with antibody functionalized magnetic nanoparticles was found to be 20 hours after injecting biofunctionalized magnetic nanoparticles into mice. The biopsy of tumor is stained after the injection to prove that the long-term darkness of tumor magnetic-resonance image is due to the specific anchoring of antibody functionalized magnetic nanoparticles at tumor.

  18. Susceptibility weighted imaging: a new tool in magnetic resonance imaging of stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santhosh, K. [Department of Imaging Sciences and Interventional Radiology, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Trivandrum (India); Kesavadas, C. [Department of Imaging Sciences and Interventional Radiology, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Trivandrum (India)], E-mail: chandkesav@yahoo.com; Thomas, B.; Gupta, A.K.; Thamburaj, K.; Kapilamoorthy, T. Raman [Department of Imaging Sciences and Interventional Radiology, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Trivandrum (India)

    2009-01-15

    Susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) is a magnetic resonance (MR) technique that is exquisitely sensitive to paramagnetic substances, such as deoxygenated blood, blood products, iron, and calcium. This sequence allows detection of haemorrhage as early as 6 h and can reliably detect acute intracerebral parenchymal, as well as subarachnoid haemorrhage. It detects early haemorrhagic transformation within an infarct and provides insight into the cerebral haemodynamics following stroke. It helps in the diagnosis of cerebral venous thrombosis. It also has applications in the work-up of stroke patients. The sequence helps in detecting microbleeds in various conditions, such as vasculitis, cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy, subacute infarcts and leucoencephalopathy (CADASIL), amyloid angiopathy, and Binswanger's disease. The sequence also aids in the diagnosis of vascular malformations and perinatal cerebrovascular injuries. This review briefly illustrates the utility of this MR technique in various aspects of stroke diagnosis and management.

  19. The optimization of scan timing for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Min; Chang, Yong Min; Ryeom, Hun Kyu; Lee, Sang Kwon; Kim, Yong Sun; Kang, Duk Sik; Tirman, Philip J.

    2000-01-01

    To determine the optimal scan timing for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography and to evaluate a new timing method based on the arteriovenous circulation time. Eighty-nine contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiographic examinations were performed mainly in the extremities. A 1.5T scanner with a 3-D turbo-FLASH sequence was used, and during each study, two consecutive arterial phases and one venous phase were acquired. Scan delay time was calculated from the time-intensity curve by the traditional (n = 48) and/or the new (n = 41) method. This latter was based on arteriovenous circulation time rather than peak arterial enhancement time, as used in the traditional method. The numbers of first-phase images showing a properly enhanced arterial phase were compared between the two methods. Mean scan delay time was 5.4 sec longer with the new method than with the traditional. Properly enhanced first-phase images were found in 65% of cases (31/48) using the traditional timing method, and 95% (39/41) using the new method. When cases in which there was mismatch between the target vessel and the Time-intensity curve acquisition site are excluded, erroneous acquisition occurred in seven cases with the traditional method, but in none with the new method. The calculation of scan delay time on the basis of arteriovenous circulation time provides better timing for arterial phase acquisition than the traditional method

  20. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the sarcopenic muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolato, Elena; Farace, Paolo; Asperio, Roberto M; Marzola, Pasquina; Lunati, Ernesto; Sbarbati, Andrea; Osculati, Francesco

    2002-01-01

    Studies about capillarity of the aged muscle provided conflicting results and no data are currently available about the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in vivo characteristics of the microvascular bed in aged rats. We have studied age-related modifications of the skeletal muscle by in vivo T2-relaxometry and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI) at high field intensity (4.7 T). The aim of the work was to test the hypothesis that the ageing process involves microvessels in skeletal muscle. The study was performed in 4-month-old (n = 6) and 20-month-old (n = 6) rats. At MRI examination, the relaxation time T2 of the gastrocnemius muscle showed no significant difference between these two groups. The kinetic of contrast penetration in the tissue showed that in 4-month-old rats the enhancement values of the signal intensity at different time-points were significantly higher than those found in senescent rats. The reported finding suggests that there is a modification of the microcirculatory function in skeletal muscle of aged rats. This work also demonstrates that CE-MRI allows for an in vivo quantification of the multiple biological processes involving the skeletal muscle during aging. Therefore, CE-MRI could represent a further tool for the follow up of tissue modification and therapeutic intervention both in patients with sarcopenia and in experimental models of this pathology

  1. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension: Use of Delayed Contrast-Enhanced Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance in Risk Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bessa, Luiz Gustavo Pignataro, E-mail: lgpignataro@ig.com.br; Junqueira, Flávia Pegado; Bandeira, Marcelo Luiz da Silva; Garcia, Marcelo Iorio; Xavier, Sérgio Salles; Lavall, Guilherme; Torres, Diego; Waetge, Daniel [Hospital Universitário Clementino Fraga Filho, Ilha do Fundão, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-10-15

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a severe and progressive disease. Its early diagnosis is the greatest clinical challenge. To evaluate the presence and extension of the delayed myocardial contrast-enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance, as well as to verify if the percentage of the myocardial fibrosis mass is a severity predictor. Cross-sectional study with 30 patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension of groups I and IV, subjected to clinical, functional and hemodynamic evaluation, and to cardiac magnetic resonance. The mean age of patients was 52 years old, with female predominance (77%). Among the patients, 53% had right ventricular failure at diagnosis, and 90% were in functional class II/III. The mean of the 6-minute walk test was 395m. In hemodynamic study with right catheterism, the mean average pulmonary arterial pressure was 53.3mmHg, of the cardiac index of 2.1L/ min.m{sup 2}, and median right atrial pressure was 13.5 mmHg. Delayed myocardial contrast enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance was found in 28 patients. The mean fibrosis mass was 9.9 g and the median percentage of fibrosis mass was 6.17%. The presence of functional class IV, right ventricular failure at diagnosis, 6-minute walk test < 300 meters and right atrial pressure ≥ 15 mmHg, with cardiac index < 2.0 L/ min.m{sup 2}, there was a relevant association with the increased percentage of myocardial fibrosis. The percentage of the myocardial fibrosis mass indicates a non-invasive marker with promising perspectives in identifying patients with high risk factors for pulmonary hypertension.

  2. Magnetic susceptibility measurements of σ plutonium alloys. Contribution to the study of the 5f electrons localization in the plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meot-Reymond, S.

    1996-01-01

    Physical properties of actinide metals are essentially ruled by the 5f electrons localization. From a theoretically point of view, this localization is more important in the δ-phase than in the α-one. To compare their magnetic behaviour, low temperature magnetic susceptibility measurements have been performed and previous-resistivity data have been analysed. Experimental results and theoretical data can be conciliate by the existence of a Kondo effect in the δ-Pu phase. (author)

  3. Magnetic and relaxometric properties of polyethylenimine-coated superparamagnetic MRI contrast agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corti, M.; Lascialfari, A.; Marinone, M.; Masotti, A.; Micotti, E.; Orsini, F.; Ortaggi, G.; Poletti, G.; Innocenti, C.; Sangregorio, C.

    2008-01-01

    Novel systems to be employed as superparamagnetic contrast agents (CA) for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been synthesized. These compounds are composed of an iron oxide magnetic core coated by polyethylenimine (PEI) or carboxylated polyethylenimine (PEI-COOH). The aim of the present work was to prepare and study new nanostructured systems (with better or at least comparable relaxivities, R 1 and R 2 , with respect to the commercial ones) with controlled, almost monodisperse average dimensions and shape, as candidates for molecular targeting. By means of atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements we determined the average diameter, of the order of 200 nm, and the shape of the particles. The superparamagnetic behavior was assessed by SQUID measurements. From X-ray data the estimated average diameters of the magnetic cores were found to be ∼5.8 nm for PEI-COOH60 and ∼20 nm for the compound named PEI25. By NMR-dispersion (NMRD), we found that PEI-COOH60 presents R 1 and R 2 relaxivities slightly lower than Endorem. The experimental results suggest that these novel compounds can be used as MRI CA

  4. A study on utility of magnetic resonance imaging for female pelvic cavity using enteral MRI contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ham Gyum

    1997-01-01

    For radiological test in soft tissue or neighboring part with same signal intensity, proper test method and equipment shall be selected as needed. In case of female pelvic cavity, ultrasonography or computed tomography alternatively used, but MRI can be more usefully applied to design treatment method or operation plan by improving the diagnostic accuracy and careful observation of lesion characteristics. Magnetic Resonance Imaging using recently developed Enteral MRI contrast media can acquire more diagnostic information than using only intravenous contrast media. Thus this study attempted to examine the utility of anatomic structure and diagnostic acquisition by imaging the female pelvic cavity using Enteral MRI contrast media. As a result of analyzing magnetic resonance imaging after administering Enteral MRI contrast media to pelvic cavity suspect patients, more diagnostic information media could be acquired than only using intravenous contrast. Especially, in the diagnosis of lesion position, shape, distinction from neighboring tissues it is thought that external Enteral MRI contrast media should be used

  5. Using magnetic resonance phase-contrast velocity mapping for diagnosing pelvic congestion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneses, L Q; Uribe, S; Tejos, C; Andía, M E; Fava, M; Irarrazaval, P

    2011-06-01

    To evaluate phase-contrast velocity mapping (PCVM) as a diagnostic tool for pelvic congestion syndrome and comparing this approach with direct venography. We prospectively include nine women with clinical suspicion of pelvic congestion syndrome during a six-month period. All patients underwent a magnetic resonance phase-contrast scan before a direct venography. We considered a case of pelvic congestion syndrome when the PCVM showed a retrograde or slow (less than 5 cm/second) flow in any gonadal vein. This criterion was compared with the standard diagnostic criterion observed from a direct venography. Using direct venography we found 14 abnormal veins and all of them were correctly identified by the PCVM. The other four veins were found to be normal by the direct venography. However, two of them (the same patient) were abnormal in the PCVM, even though this patient had the classical symptoms of pelvic congestion syndrome. PCVM is a useful tool for diagnosing pelvic contrast syndrome and can avoid invasive procedures such as direct venography.

  6. Hydrazo-CEST: Hydrazone-dependent Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Trina; Suchy, Mojmir; Truong, Yen; Oakden, Wendy; Lam, Wilfred; Lazurko, Caitlin; Facey, Glenn; Stanisz, Greg; Shuhendler, Adam

    2018-04-12

    The rapid formation of hydrazones under physiological conditions was exploited for the detection of aldehydes through chemical exchange saturation transfer magnetic resonance imaging (CEST-MRI). A metal-free, diamagnetic contrast agent derived from N-amino anthranilic acid was introduced, which selectively 'turned-on' upon hydrazone formation through an effect termed Hydrazo-CEST. While the hydrazine form of the probe produced no CEST-MRI signal enhancement, the formation of the aryl hydrazone resulted in >20% intensity decrease in the bulk water signal through the CEST effect, as measured by 300 MHz 1H NMR, 3T and 7T MRI. Both the electronic contributions of the N-amino anthranilate and the aldehyde binding partner were shown to directly impact the exchange rate of the proton on the ring-proximal nitrogen, and thus the imaging signal. Additionally, the presence of the carboxylic acid moiety ortho to the hydrazine was necessary not only for contrast production, but also for rapid hydrazone formation and prolonged hydrazone product stability under physiological conditions. This work provided the first example of an MRI-based contrast agent capable of a 'turn on' response upon reaction with bioactive aldehydes, and outlined both the structural and electronic requirements to expand on Hydrazo-CEST, a novel, hydrazone-dependent subtype of diamagnetic CEST-MRI. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Cholangiography: Practical Tips and Clinical Indications for Biliary Disease Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Palmucci

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Since its introduction, MRCP has been improved over the years due to the introduction of several technical advances and innovations. It consists of a noninvasive method for biliary tree representation, based on heavily T2-weighted images. Conventionally, its protocol includes two-dimensional single-shot fast spin-echo images, acquired with thin sections or with multiple thick slabs. In recent years, three-dimensional T2-weighted fast-recovery fast spin-echo images have been added to the conventional protocol, increasing the possibility of biliary anatomy demonstration and leading to a significant benefit over conventional 2D imaging. A significant innovation has been reached with the introduction of hepatobiliary contrasts, represented by gadoxetic acid and gadobenate dimeglumine: they are excreted into the bile canaliculi, allowing the opacification of the biliary tree. Recently, 3D interpolated T1-weighted spoiled gradient echo images have been proposed for the evaluation of the biliary tree, obtaining images after hepatobiliary contrast agent administration. Thus, the acquisition of these excretory phases improves the diagnostic capability of conventional MRCP—based on T2 acquisitions. In this paper, technical features of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance cholangiography are briefly discussed; main diagnostic tips of hepatobiliary phase are showed, emphasizing the benefit of enhanced cholangiography in comparison with conventional MRCP.

  8. Clinical use of gadobutrol for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of neurological diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng KT

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Kenneth T Cheng1, Hannah Y Cheng2, Kam Leung31Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA; 2Freelance Technical Writer, New Orleans, LA, USA; 3National Center for Biotechnology Information, National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USAAbstract: Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI is an important clinical tool for diagnosing neurological diseases. The appropriate use of a suitable MRI contrast agent or contrast pharmaceutical is essential for CE-MRI to produce desirable diagnostic images. Currently, there are seven contrast agents (CAs or pharmaceuticals approved for clinical imaging of the central nervous system (CNS in the US, Europe, or Japan. All of the clinically approved CAs are water-soluble gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs which do not penetrate the CNS blood–brain barrier (BBB. These agents are used for imaging CNS areas without a BBB, or various pathologies, such as tumors and infection that break down the BBB and allow CAs to enter into the surrounding parenchyma. Clinically, GBCAs are most useful for detecting primary and secondary cerebral neoplastic lesions. Among these CNS GBCAs, gadobutrol (Gd-BT-DO3A, Gadovist™ is a neutral, nonionic, macrocyclic compound that showed promising results from clinical trials of CNS imaging. In comparison with other GBCAs, Gd-BT-DO3A has relatively high in vitro kinetic stability and r1 relaxivity. Gd-BT-DO3A has been recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA in 2011 for CNS imaging. A review of available literature shows that Gd-BT-DO3A exhibits similar safety and clinical efficacy profiles to other GBCAs. Gd-BT-DO3A has the distinguishing feature that it is the only clinical agent commercially available in a formulation of 1.0 M concentration with a relatively higher in vitro T1 shortening per unit volume than other clinical GBCAs which are only

  9. 1D magnetic interactions in Cu(II) oxovanadium phosphates (VPO), magnetic susceptibility, DFT, and single-crystal EPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venegas-Yazigi, Diego; Spodine, Evgenia; Saldias, Marianela; Vega, Andrés; Paredes-García, Verónica; Calvo, Rafael; de Santana, Ricardo Costa

    2015-04-20

    We report the crystal face indexing and molecular spatial orientation, magnetic properties, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations of two previously reported oxovanadium phosphates functionalized with Cu(II) complexes, namely, [Cu(bipy)(VO2)(PO4)]n (1) and [{Cu(phen)}2(VO2(H2O)2)(H2PO4)2 (PO4)]n (2), where bipy = 2,2'-bipyridine and phen = 1,10-phenanthroline, obtained by a new synthetic route allowing the growth of single crystals appropriate for the EPR measurements. Compounds 1 and 2 crystallize in the triclinic group P1̅ and in the orthorhombic Pccn group, respectively, containing dinuclear copper units connected by two -O-P-O- bridges in 1 and by a single -O-P-O- bridge in 2, further connected through -O-P-O-V-O- bridges. We emphasize in our work the structural aspects related to the chemical paths that determine the magnetic properties. Magnetic susceptibility data indicate bulk antiferromagnetism for both compounds, allowing to calculate J = -43.0 cm(-1) (dCu-Cu = 5.07 Å; J defined as Hex(i,j) = -J Si·Sj), considering dinuclear units for 1, and J = -1.44 cm(-1) (dCu-Cu = 3.47 Å) using the molecular field approximation for 2. The single-crystal EPR study allows evaluation of the g matrices, which provide a better understanding of the electronic structure. The absence of structure of the EPR spectra arising from the dinuclear character of the compounds allows estimation of weak additional exchange couplings |J'| > 0.3 cm(-1) for 1 (dCu-Cu = 5.54 Å) and a smaller value of |J'| ≥ 0.15 cm(-1) for 2 (dCu-Cu = 6.59 Å). DFT calculations allow evaluating two different exchange couplings for each compound, specifically, J = -36.60 cm(-1) (dCu-Cu = 5.07 Å) and J' = 0.20 cm(-1) (dCu-Cu =5.54 Å) for 1 and J = -1.10 cm(-1) (dCu-Cu =3.47 Å) and J' = 0.01 cm(-1) (dCu-Cu = 6.59 Å) for 2, this last value being in the range of the uncertainties of the calculations. Thus, these values are in good agreement

  10. The progress in diagnostic imaging for staging of bladder and prostate cancer. Endorectal magnetic resonance imaging and magnetization transfer contrast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arima, Kiminobu; Hayashi, Norio; Yanagawa, Makoto; Kawamura, Juichi; Kobayashi, Shigeki; Takeda, Kan; Sugimura, Yoshiki

    1999-01-01

    We retrospectively studied the staging accuracy of endorectal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in comparison with transrectal ultrasound examination (TRUS) for 71 localized bladder cancers and 19 localized prostate cancers (PC) radically resected. The accuracy of clinical staging for bladder cancer in endorectal MRI and TRUS was 85.9% and 69.2%, respectively. The presence or absence of the continuity of submucosal enhancement on T2-weighted MRI images could be useful for the staging of bladder cancer. The accuracy of the seminal vesicular invasion for prostate cancer in endorectal MRI and TRUS was 95% and 63%, respectively. To determine whether magnetization transfer contrast (MTC) provides additional information in the diagnosis of prostate cancer, the magnetization transfer ratios (MTRs) were calculated in 22 patients with PC, 5 with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and 4 controls. The mean MTR in the peripheral zone of the normal prostate (8.0%±3.4 [standard deviation]) showed a statistically significant decrease relative to that in the inner zone of the normal prostate (27.4%±3.4, p<0.01), BPH (25.5%±3.7, p<0.01), pre-treatment PC (30.6%±5.9, p<0.01), and PC after hormonal therapy (20.3%±6.3, p<0.01). The mean MTR in pre-treatment PC was significantly higher than that in BPH, or in PC after hormonal therapy (p<0.01). MTC was considered to be useful for conspicuity of prostate cancer lesion. (author)

  11. Anomalous magnetic susceptibility values and traces of subsurface microbial activity in carbonate banks on San Salvador Island, Bahamas

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hladil, Jindřich; Carew, J. L.; Mylroie, J. E.; Pruner, Petr; Kohout, Tomáš; Jell, J. S.; Lacka, B.; Langrová, Anna

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 2 (2004), s. 161-182 ISSN 0172-9179 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA3013209 Keywords : carbonate rocks * magnetic susceptibility * subsurface microbial diagenesis Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 0.857, year: 2004

  12. A comparative quantitative analysis of magnetic susceptibility artifacts in echo planar and PROPELLER diffusion-weighted images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jae-Hwan; Lee, Hae-Kag; Yang, Han-Joon; Lee, Gui-Won; Park, Yong-Soon; Chung, Woon-Kwan

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the authors investigated whether periodically-rotated overlapping parallel lines with enhanced reconstruction (PROPELLER) diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) can remove magnetic susceptibility artifacts and compared apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values for PROPELLER DWI and the common echo planar (EP) DWI. Twenty patients that underwent brain MRI with a metal dental implant were selected. A 3.0T MR scanner was then used to obtain EP DWI, PROPELLER DWI, and corresponding apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps for a b-value of 0 and 1,000 s/mm2. The frequencies of magnetic susceptibility artifacts in four parts of the brain (bilateral temporal lobes, pons, and orbit) were selected. In the ADC maps, we measured the ADC values of both sides of the temporal lobe and the pons. According to the study results, the frequency of magnetic susceptibility artifacts in PROPELLER DW images was lower than it was in EP DW images. In ADC maps, the ADC values of the bilateral temporal lobes and the pons were all higher in PROPELLER ADC maps than in EP ADC maps. Our findings show that when a high-field MRI machine is used, magnetic susceptibility artifacts can distort anatomical structures and produce high-intensity signals. Furthermore, our findings suggest that in many cases, PROPELLER DWI would be helpful in terms of achieving a correct diagnosis.

  13. Constraints on deformation of the Southern Andes since the Cretaceous from anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffione, Marco; Hernandez-Moreno, Catalina; Ghiglione, Matias C.; Speranza, Fabio; van Hinsbergen, Douwe J. J.; Lodolo, Emanuele

    2015-12-01

    The southernmost segment of the Andean Cordillera underwent a complex deformation history characterized by alternation of contractional, extensional, and strike-slip tectonics. Key elements of southern Andean deformation that remain poorly constrained, include the origin of the orogenic bend known as the Patagonian Orocline (here renamed as Patagonian Arc), and the exhumation mechanism of an upper amphibolite facies metamorphic complex currently exposed in Cordillera Darwin. Here, we present results of anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) from 22 sites in Upper Cretaceous to upper Eocene sedimentary rocks within the internal structural domain of the Magallanes fold-and-thrust belt in Tierra del Fuego (Argentina). AMS parameters from most sites reveal a weak tectonic overprint of the original magnetic fabric, which was likely acquired upon layer-parallel shortening soon after sedimentation. Magnetic lineation from 17 sites is interpreted to have formed during compressive tectonic phases associated to a continuous N-S contraction. Our data, combined with the existing AMS database from adjacent areas, show that the Early Cretaceous-late Oligocene tectonic phases in the Southern Andes yielded continuous contraction, variable from E-W in the Patagonian Andes to N-S in the Fuegian Andes, which defined a radial strain field. A direct implication is that the exhumation of the Cordillera Darwin metamorphic complex occurred under compressive, rather than extensional or strike-slip tectonics, as alternatively proposed. If we agree with recent works considering the curved Magallanes fold-and-thrust belt as a primary arc (i.e., no relative vertical-axis rotation of the limbs occurs during its formation), then other mechanisms different from oroclinal bending should be invoked to explain the documented radial strain field. We tentatively propose a kinematic model in which reactivation of variably oriented Jurassic faults at the South American continental margin controlled

  14. Understanding the Morphological Mismatch between Magnetic Susceptibility Source and T2 Image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zikuan Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose Recent research has shown that a T2 * image (either magnitude or phase is not identical to the internal spatial distribution of a magnetic susceptibility (χ source. In this paper, we examine the reasons behind these differences by looking into the insights of T2 * -weighted magnetic resonance imaging (T2 * MRI and provide numerical characterizations of the source/image mismatches by numerical simulations. Methods For numerical simulations of T2 * MRI, we predefine a 3D χ source and calculate the complex-valued T2 * image by intravoxel dephasing in presence and absence of diffusion. We propose an empirical α-power model to describe the overall source/image transformation. For a Gaussian-shaped χ source, we numerically characterize the source/image morphological mismatch in terms of spatial correlation and FWHM (full width at half maximum. Results In theory, we show that the χ-induced fieldmap is morphologically different from the χ source due to dipole effect, and the T2 * magnitude image is related to the fieldmap by a quadratic transformation in the small phase angle regime, which imposes an additional morphological change. The numerical simulations with a Gaussian-shaped χ source show that a T2 * magnitude image may suffer an overall source/image morphological shrinkage of 20% to 25% and that the T2 * phase image is almost identical to the fieldmap thus maintaining a morphological mismatch from the χ source due to dipole effect. Conclusion The morphological mismatch between a bulk χ source and its T2 * image is caused by the 3D convolution during tissue magnetization (dipole effect, the nonlinearity of the T2 * magnitude and phase calculation, and the spin diffusion effect. In the small phase angle regime, the T2 * magnitude exhibits an overall morphological shrinkage, and the T2 * phase image suffers a dipole effect but maintains the χ-induced fieldmap morphology.

  15. Performance characteristics of magnetic resonance imaging without contrast agents or sedation in pediatric appendicitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Didier, Ryne A.; Hopkins, Katharine L.; Coakley, Fergus V.; Foster, Bryan R. [Oregon Health and Science University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Portland, OR (United States); Krishnaswami, Sanjay [Oregon Health and Science University, Department of Surgery, Portland, OR (United States); Oregon Health and Science University, Department of Pediatrics, Portland, OR (United States); Spiro, David M. [Oregon Health and Science University, Department of Pediatrics, Portland, OR (United States)

    2017-09-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has emerged as a promising modality for evaluating pediatric appendicitis. However optimal imaging protocols, including roles of contrast agents and sedation, have not been established and diagnostic criteria have not been fully evaluated. To investigate performance characteristics of rapid MRI without contrast agents or sedation in the diagnosis of pediatric appendicitis. We included patients ages 4-18 years with suspicion of appendicitis who underwent rapid MRI between October 2013 and March 2015 without contrast agent or sedation. After two-radiologist review, we determined performance characteristics of individual diagnostic criteria and aggregate diagnostic criteria by comparing MRI results to clinical outcomes. We used receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves to determine cut-points for appendiceal diameter and wall thickness for optimization of predictive power, and we calculated area under the curve (AUC) as a measure of test accuracy. Ninety-eight MRI examinations were performed in 97 subjects. Overall, MRI had a 94% sensitivity, 95% specificity, 91% positive predictive value and 97% negative predictive value. Optimal cut-points for appendiceal diameter and wall thickness were ≥7 mm and ≥2 mm, respectively. Independently, those cut-points produced sensitivities of 91% and 84% and specificities of 84% and 43%. Presence of intraluminal fluid (30/33) or localized periappendiceal fluid (32/33) showed a significant association with acute appendicitis (P<0.01), with sensitivities of 91% and 97% and specificities of 60% and 50%. For examinations in which the appendix was not identified by one or both reviewers (23/98), the clinical outcome was negative. Rapid MRI without contrast agents or sedation is accurate for diagnosis of pediatric appendicitis when multiple diagnostic criteria are considered in aggregate. Individual diagnostic criteria including optimized cut-points of ≥7 mm for diameter and ≥2 mm for wall

  16. Chitosan-coated nickel-ferrite nanoparticles as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, Tanveer; Bae, Hongsub; Iqbal, Yousaf; Rhee, Ilsu; Hong, Sungwook; Chang, Yongmin; Lee, Jaejun; Sohn, Derac

    2015-01-01

    We report evidence for the possible application of chitosan-coated nickel-ferrite (NiFe 2 O 4 ) nanoparticles as both T 1 and T 2 contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The coating of nickel-ferrite nanoparticles with chitosan was performed simultaneously with the synthesis of the nickel-ferrite nanoparticles by a chemical co-precipitation method. The coated nanoparticles were cylindrical in shape with an average length of 17 nm and an average width of 4.4 nm. The bonding of chitosan onto the ferrite nanoparticles was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The T 1 and T 2 relaxivities were 0.858±0.04 and 1.71±0.03 mM −1 s −1 , respectively. In animal experimentation, both a 25% signal enhancement in the T 1 -weighted mage and a 71% signal loss in the T 2 -weighted image were observed. This demonstrated that chitosan-coated nickel-ferrite nanoparticles are suitable as both T 1 and T 2 contrast agents in MRI. We note that the applicability of our nanoparticles as both T 1 and T 2 contrast agents is due to their cylindrical shape, which gives rise to both inner and outer sphere processes of nanoparticles. - Highlights: • Chitosan-coated nickel-ferrite (Ni-Fe 2 O 4 ) nanoparticles were synthesized in an aqueous system by chemical co-precipitation. • The characterization of bare and chitosan-coated nanoparticles were performed using various analytical tools, such as TEM, FTIR, XRD, and VMS. • We evaluated the coated particles as potential T 1 and T 2 contrast agents for MRI by measuring T 1 and T 2 relaxation times as a function of iron concentration. • Both T 1 and T 2 effects were also observed in animal experimentation

  17. Performance characteristics of magnetic resonance imaging without contrast agents or sedation in pediatric appendicitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Didier, Ryne A.; Hopkins, Katharine L.; Coakley, Fergus V.; Foster, Bryan R.; Krishnaswami, Sanjay; Spiro, David M.

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has emerged as a promising modality for evaluating pediatric appendicitis. However optimal imaging protocols, including roles of contrast agents and sedation, have not been established and diagnostic criteria have not been fully evaluated. To investigate performance characteristics of rapid MRI without contrast agents or sedation in the diagnosis of pediatric appendicitis. We included patients ages 4-18 years with suspicion of appendicitis who underwent rapid MRI between October 2013 and March 2015 without contrast agent or sedation. After two-radiologist review, we determined performance characteristics of individual diagnostic criteria and aggregate diagnostic criteria by comparing MRI results to clinical outcomes. We used receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves to determine cut-points for appendiceal diameter and wall thickness for optimization of predictive power, and we calculated area under the curve (AUC) as a measure of test accuracy. Ninety-eight MRI examinations were performed in 97 subjects. Overall, MRI had a 94% sensitivity, 95% specificity, 91% positive predictive value and 97% negative predictive value. Optimal cut-points for appendiceal diameter and wall thickness were ≥7 mm and ≥2 mm, respectively. Independently, those cut-points produced sensitivities of 91% and 84% and specificities of 84% and 43%. Presence of intraluminal fluid (30/33) or localized periappendiceal fluid (32/33) showed a significant association with acute appendicitis (P<0.01), with sensitivities of 91% and 97% and specificities of 60% and 50%. For examinations in which the appendix was not identified by one or both reviewers (23/98), the clinical outcome was negative. Rapid MRI without contrast agents or sedation is accurate for diagnosis of pediatric appendicitis when multiple diagnostic criteria are considered in aggregate. Individual diagnostic criteria including optimized cut-points of ≥7 mm for diameter and ≥2 mm for wall

  18. Anisotropies of field-dependent in-phase and out-of-phase magnetic susceptibilities of some pyrrhotite-bearing rocks

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrouda, F.; Chadima, Martin; Ježek, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 19, EGU General Assembly 2017 (2017) ISSN 1029-7006. [European Geosciences Union General Assembly. 23.04.2017-28.04.2017, Vienna] Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility * field-dependent susceptibility * pyrrhotite Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography http://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EGU2017/EGU2017-7091.pdf

  19. Magnetization and susceptibility of a parabolic InAs quantum dot with electron–electron and spin–orbit interactions in the presence of a magnetic field at finite temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, D. Sanjeev, E-mail: sanjeevchs@gmail.com [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046 (India); Mukhopadhyay, Soma [Department of Physics, CMR College of Engineering and Technology, Hyderabad (India); Chatterjee, Ashok [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046 (India)

    2016-11-15

    The magnetization and susceptibility of a two-electron parabolic quantum dot are studied in the presence of electron–electron and spin–orbit interactions as a function of magnetic field and temperature. The spin–orbit interactions are treated by a unitary transformation and an exactly soluble parabolic interaction model is considered to mimic the electron–electron interaction. The theory is finally applied to an InAs quantum dot. Magnetization and susceptibility are calculated using canonical ensemble approach. Our results show that Temperature has no effect on magnetization and susceptibility in the diamagnetic regime whereas electron–electron interaction reduces them. The temperature however reduces the height of the paramagnetic peak. The Rashba spin–orbit interaction is shown to shift the paramagnetic peak towards higher magnetic fields whereas the Dresselhaus spin–orbit interaction shifts it to the lower magnetic field side. Spin–orbit interaction has no effect on magnetization and susceptibility at larger temperatures. - Highlights: • Temperature has no effect on magnetization and susceptibility in the diamagnetic regime but reduces the height of the paramagnetic peak. • Electron-electron interaction reduces magnetization and susceptibility in the diamagnetic region. • Rashba spin–orbit interaction shifts the paramagnetic peak towards higher magnetic fields. • Dresselhaus spin–orbit interaction shifts the paramagnetic peak towards lower magnetic fields. • Spin–orbit interaction has no effect on magnetization and susceptibility at larger temperatures.

  20. Diagenetic versus detrital origin of the magnetic susceptibility variations in some carbonate Frasnian-Famennian boundary sections from Northern Africa and Western Europe: implications for paleoenvironmental reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riquier, Laurent; Averbuch, Olivier; Devleeschouwer, Xavier; Tribovillard, Nicolas

    2010-10-01

    To provide a new insight into the diagenetic versus detrital origin of the magnetic susceptibility variations in ancient carbonate sequences, a study was conducted within four Frasnian-Famennian platform carbonate sections from Germany, France and Morocco. The study includes along-section magnetic susceptibility and carbonate content measurements complemented by analyses of magnetic hysteresis parameters, inorganic geochemistry and clay mineralogy. Our results show that the magnetic susceptibility evolution is dominantly controlled by the variations in the concentration of low-coercivity ferromagnetic magnetite grains and, to a lesser extent, of paramagnetic clays. In more detail, hysteresis ratios suggest the coexistence of two magnetite populations with significantly different grain size: (1) a dominantly coarse-grained detrital fraction including a mixture of multi-domain and single-domain particles (2) an authigenic fine-grained fraction composed of a mixture of single-domain and superparamagnetic particles. Despite a diagenetic imprint on the clay assemblages, no relationship is established between magnetic susceptibility and illite crystallinity, therefore discarding a noticeable distortion of primary within-section magnetic susceptibility evolution. The overall inherited character of the magnetic susceptibility fluctuations is corroborated by a significant correlation of magnetic susceptibility with terrigenous proxies (Zr, Th). The poorer correlation of magnetic susceptibility with the Fe content is consistent with the existence of a very fine-grained authigenic magnetite component that possibly induces a global magnetic susceptibility increase at the section scale, but no distortion of the within-section evolution. The magnetic susceptibility curves presented here provide a general record of climate-driven detrital influx and carbonate productivity through Frasnian-Lower Famennian times.

  1. Turbulent stress measurements with phase-contrast magnetic resonance through tilted slices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacKenzie, Jordan; Soederberg, Daniel; Lundell, Fredrik [Linne FLOW Centre, KTH Mechanics, Stockholm (Sweden); Swerin, Agne [SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden-Chemistry, Materials and Surfaces, Stockholm (Sweden); KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Surface and Corrosion Science, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2017-05-15

    Aiming at turbulent measurements in opaque suspensions, a simplistic methodology for measuring the turbulent stresses with phase-contrast magnetic resonance velocimetry is described. The method relies on flow-compensated and flow-encoding protocols with the flow encoding gradient normal to the slice. The experimental data is compared with direct numerical simulations (DNS), both directly but also, more importantly, after spatial averaging of the DNS data that resembles the measurement and data treatment of the experimental data. The results show that the most important MRI data (streamwise velocity, streamwise variance and Reynolds shear stress) is reliable up to at least anti r = 0.75 without any correction, paving the way for dearly needed turbulence and stress measurements in opaque suspensions. (orig.)

  2. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI in Preclinical Studies of Antivascular Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R. Horsman

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Antivascular treatments can either be antiangiogenic or targeting established tumour vasculature. These treatments affect the tumour microvasculature and microenvironment but may not change clinical measures like tumour volume and growth. In research on antivascular treatments, information on the tumour vasculature is therefore essential. Preclinical research is often used for optimization of antivascular drugs alone or in combined treatments. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI is an in vivo imaging method providing vascular information, which has become an important tool in both preclinical and clinical research. This review discusses common DCE-MRI imaging protocols and analysis methods and provides an overview of preclinical research on antivascular treatments utilizing DCE-MRI.

  3. Reliability and responsiveness of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsen, M.B.; Poggenborg, R.P.; Stoltenberg, M.

    2013-01-01

    intraarticular injection with 80 mg methylprednisolone. Using semi-automated image processing software, DCE-MRI parameters, including the initial rate of enhancement (IRE) and maximal enhancement (ME), were generated for three regions of interest (ROIs): ‘Whole slice’, ‘Quick ROI’, and ‘Precise ROI......Objectives: To investigate the responsiveness to treatment and the reliability of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) knee joints. Methods: DCE-MRI was performed in 12 clinically active RA knee joints before and 1, 7, 30, and 180 days after......’. The smallest detectable difference (SDD), the smallest detectable change (SDC), and intra- and inter-reader intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were used to assess the reliability of DCE-MRI. Responsiveness to treatment was assessed by the standardized response mean (SRM). Results: In all patients...

  4. Preparation of biopolymer-coated magnetite nanoparticles for magnetic resonance image contrast agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, J H; Ko, S G; Ahn, Y K; Song, K C; Choi, E J

    2009-02-01

    The magnetite nanoparticles were synthesized using the sonochemical method with oleic acid as surfactant. The average size of the magnetite particles can be controlled by the ratio R = [H2O]/[surfactant] in the range of 2 to 9 nm. The size of the magnetite nanoparticles prepared by this method shows the narrow distribution. To prepare biopolymer(beta-glucan)-coated magnetite nanoparticles, beta-glucan solution was added to the magnetic colloid suspensions under the ultrasonication at room temperature. The beta-glucan coated magnetite colloidal suspensions of various concentrations did not agglomerate for 15 days, indicating their good stability. The beta-glucan-coated magnetite colloidal suspensions exhibited the enhancement of MRI contrasts in vitro.

  5. Imaging vascular function for early stage clinical trials using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leach, M.O.; Orton, M. [Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Cancer Research UK and EPSRC Cancer Imaging Centre, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Morgan, B. [Univ. of Leicester, College of Medicine, Biological Sciences and Psychology, Leicester (United Kingdom); Tofts, P.S. [Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Univ. of Sussex, Clinical Imaging Sciences Centre, Sussex (United Kingdom); Buckley, D.L. [University of Leeds, Division of Medical Physics, Leeds (United Kingdom); Huang, W. [Oregon Health and Science Univ., Advanced Imaging Research Centre, Portland, OR (United States); Horsfield, M.A. [Medical Physics Section, Leicester Royal Infirmary, Dept. of Cardiovascular Sciences, Leicester (United Kingdom); Chenevert, T.L. [Univ. of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Collins, D.J. [Royal Marsden Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Cancer Research UK and EPSRC Cancer Imaging Centre, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Jackson, A. [Univ. of Manchester, Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre, Withington, Manchester, M20 3LJ (United Kingdom); Lomas, D. [Univ. of Cambridge, Dept. of Radiology, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Whitcher, B. [Unit 2 Greenways Business Park, Mango Solutions, Chippenham (United Kingdom); Clarke, L. [Cancer Imaging Program, Imaging Technology Development Branch, Rockville, MD (United States); Plummer, R. [Univ. of Newcastle Upon Tyne, The Medical School, Medical Oncology, Northern Inst. for Cancer Research, Newcastle Upon Tyne (United Kingdom); Judson, I. [Royal Marsden Hospital, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Jones, R. [Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Alonzi, R. [Mount Vernon Cancer Centre, Northwood (United Kingdom); Brunner, T. [Gray Inst. for Radiation, Oncology and Biology, Oxford (United Kingdom); Koh, D.M. [Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Diagnostic Radiology, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom)] [and others

    2012-07-15

    Many therapeutic approaches to cancer affect the tumour vasculature, either indirectly or as a direct target. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) has become an important means of investigating this action, both pre-clinically and in early stage clinical trials. For such trials, it is essential that the measurement process (i.e. image acquisition and analysis) can be performed effectively and with consistency among contributing centres. As the technique continues to develop in order to provide potential improvements in sensitivity and physiological relevance, there is considerable scope for between-centre variation in techniques. A workshop was convened by the Imaging Committee of the Experimental Cancer Medicine Centres (ECMC) to review the current status of DCE-MRI and to provide recommendations on how the technique can best be used for early stage trials. This review and the consequent recommendations are summarised here. (orig.)

  6. Evaluation of pharmacokinetic models for perfusion imaging with dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in porcine skeletal muscle using low-molecular-weight contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindel, Stefan; Papanastasiou, Giorgos; Wust, Peter; Maaß, Marc; Söhner, Anika; Lüdemann, Lutz

    2018-06-01

    Pharmacokinetic models for perfusion quantification with a low-molecular-weight contrast agent (LMCA) in skeletal muscle using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) were evaluated. Tissue perfusion was measured in seven regions of interest (ROIs) placed in the total hind leg supplied by the femoral artery in seven female pigs. DCE-MRI was performed using a 3D gradient echo sequence with k-space sharing. The sequence was acquired twice, first after LMCA and then after blood pool contrast agent injection. Blood flow was augmented by continuous infusion of the vasodilator adenosine into the femoral artery, resulting in up to four times increased blood flow. The results obtained with several LMCA models were compared with those of a two-compartment blood pool model (2CBPM) consisting of a capillary and an arteriolar compartment. Measurements performed with a Doppler flow probe placed at the femoral artery served as ground truth. The two-compartment exchange model extended by an arteriolar compartment (E2CXM) showed the highest fit quality of all LMCA models and the most significant correlation with the Doppler measurements, r = 0.78 (P Reson Med 79:3154-3162, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  7. Magnetic susceptibility of Dirac fermions, Bi-Sb alloys, interacting Bloch fermions, dilute nonmagnetic alloys, and Kondo alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buot, Felix A., E-mail: fbuot@gmu.edu [Computational Materials Science Center, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); TCSE Center, Spintronics Group, Physics Department, University of San Carlos, Talamban, Cebu 6000 (Philippines); C& LB Research Institute, Carmen, Cebu 6005 (Philippines); Otadoy, Roland E.S.; Rivero, Karla B. [TCSE Center, Spintronics Group, Physics Department, University of San Carlos, Talamban, Cebu 6000 (Philippines)

    2017-03-01

    Wide ranging interest in Dirac Hamiltonian is due to the emergence of novel materials, namely, graphene, topological insulators and superconductors, the newly-discovered Weyl semimetals, and still actively-sought after Majorana fermions in real materials. We give a brief review of the relativistic Dirac quantum mechanics and its impact in the developments of modern physics. The quantum band dynamics of Dirac Hamiltonian is crucial in resolving the giant diamagnetism of bismuth and Bi-Sb alloys. Quantitative agreement of the theory with the experiments on Bi-Sb alloys has been achieved, and physically meaningful contributions to the diamagnetism has been identified. We also treat relativistic Dirac fermion as an interband dynamics in uniform magnetic fields. For the interacting Bloch electrons, the role of translation symmetry for calculating the magnetic susceptibility avoids any approximation to second order in the field. The expressions for magnetic susceptibility of dilute nonmagnetic alloys give a firm theoretical foundation of the empirical formulas used in fitting experimental results. The unified treatment of all the above calculations is based on the lattice Weyl-Wigner formulation of discrete phase-space quantum mechanics. For completeness, the magnetic susceptibility of Kondo alloys is also given since Dirac fermions in conduction band and magnetic impurities exhibit Kondo effect.

  8. Collagen based magnetic nanobiocomposite as MRI contrast agent and for targeted delivery in cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, A; Sekar, S; Kanagavel, M; Chandrasekaran, N; Mukherjee, A; Sastry, T P

    2013-10-01

    In this study, an attempt has been made with the advent of technology to prepare a multifunctional nanobiocomposite (NBC) for targeted drug delivery in cancer therapy. Collagen (C) was fabricated as nanofibers with multifunctional moieties viz. CFeAb*D by incorporating iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe), coupling with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeled antibody (Ab*) and loading an anticancer gemcitabine drug (D). This NBC was characterized by conventional methods and evaluated for its biological activities. The UV-vis and FTIR spectroscopic studies revealed the fluorescein to protein ratio and revealed the presence of iron oxide nanoparticles and their interaction with the collagen molecules, respectively. While SDS-PAGE showed the proteinaceous nature of collagen, VSM and TEM studies revealed magnetic saturation as 54.97emu/g and a magnetic nanoparticle with a diameter in the range of 10-30nm and the dimension of nanofiber ranging from 97 to 270nm. A MRI scan has shown a super paramagnetic effect, which reveals that the prepared NBC can be used as a MRI contrast agent. The MTT assay has shown biocompatibility and an apoptotic effect while phase contrast microscopy exhibited receptor mediated uptake of endocytosis. The novelty in the prepared NBC lies in the collagen nanofibers, which have a higher penetrating property without causing much cell damage, biocompatibility and multifunctional properties and is able to carry multifunctional agents. The study has demonstrated the possible use of CFeAb*D as a multifunctional NBC for biomedical applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Physicochemical characterization of a novel graphene-based magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanakia S

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Shruti Kanakia,1 Jimmy D Toussaint,1 Sayan Mullick Chowdhury,1 Gaurav Lalwanim,1 Tanuf Tembulkar,1 Terry Button,1,2 Kenneth R Shroyer,3 William Moore,2 Balaji Sitharaman11Department of Biomedical Engineering, 2Department of Radiology, 3Department of Pathology, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY, USAAbstract: We report the synthesis and characterization of a novel carbon nanostructure-based magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent (MRI CA; graphene nanoplatelets intercalated with manganese (Mn2+ ions, functionalized with dextran (GNP-Dex; and the in vitro assessment of its essential preclinical physicochemical properties: osmolality, viscosity, partition coefficient, protein binding, thermostability, histamine release, and relaxivity. The results indicate that, at concentrations between 0.1 and 100.0 mg/mL, the GNP-Dex formulations are hydrophilic, highly soluble, and stable in deionized water, as well as iso-osmolar (upon addition of mannitol and iso-viscous to blood. At potential steady-state equilibrium concentrations in blood (0.1–10.0 mg/mL, the thermostability, protein-binding, and histamine-release studies indicate that the GNP-Dex formulations are thermally stable (with no Mn2+ ion dissociation, do not allow non-specific protein adsorption, and elicit negligible allergic response. The r1 relaxivity of GNP-Dex was 92 mM-1s-1 (per-Mn2+ ion, 22 MHz proton Larmor frequency; ~20- to 30-fold greater than that of clinical gadolinium (Gd3+- and Mn2+-based MRI CAs. The results open avenues for preclinical in vivo safety and efficacy studies with GNP-Dex toward its development as a clinical MRI CA.Keywords: manganese, dextran, preclinical, physicochemical properties, relaxivity, graphene, magnetic resonance imaging, contrast agent

  10. Enhanced magnetic resonance contrast of iron oxide nanoparticles embedded in a porous silicon nanoparticle host

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsella, Joseph; Ananda, Shalini; Andrew, Jennifer; Grondek, Joel; Chien, Miao-Ping; Scandeng, Miriam; Gianneschi, Nathan; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Sailor, Michael

    2013-02-01

    In this report, we prepared a porous Si nanoparticle with a pore morphology that facilitates the proximal loading and alignment of magnetite nanoparticles. We characterized the composite materials using superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry, dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, and MRI. The in vitro cytotoxicity of the composite materials was tested using cell viability assays on human liver cancer cells and rat hepatocytes. An in vivo analysis using a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) Sprague Dawley rat model was used to determine the biodistribution properties of the material, while naïve Sprague Dawley rats were used to determine the pharmocokinetic properties of the nanomaterials. The composite material reported here demonstrates an injectable nanomaterial that exploits the dipolar coupling of superparamagnetic nanoparticles trapped within a secondary inorganic matrix to yield significantly enhanced MRI contrast. This preparation successfully avoids agglomeration issues that plague larger ferromagnetic systems. A Fe3O4:pSi composite formulation consisting of 25% by mass Fe3O4 yields an maximal T2* value of 556 mM Fe-1 s-1. No cellular (HepG2 or rat hepatocyte cells) or in vivo (rat) toxicity was observed with the formulation, which degrades and is eliminated after 4-8 h in vivo. The ability to tailor the magnetic properties of such materials may be useful for in vivo imaging, magnetic hyperthermia, or drug-delivery applications.

  11. Detection of severe acute pancreatitis by contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piironen, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Tampere City Hospital (Finland); Kivisaari, R.; Poutanen, V.P.; Kivisaari, L. [Dept. of Radiology, Helsinki University Central Hospital (Finland); Kemppainen, E. [Dept. of Surgery, Helsinki University Central Hospital (Finland); Laippala, P.; Koivisto, A.M. [School of Public Health, Biometry Unit, Tampere Univ. (Finland)

    2000-02-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the ability of MRI to differentiate between the two forms of severity of acute pancreatitis (AP), which is important for the detection of patients who require intensive monitoring and therapy. The second objective was to evaluate whether the distinction would be possible regardless of the MRI equipment. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed before and after intravenous administration of a gadolinium (Gd) chelate at 1.0 T using the breath-hold multislice rapid gradient-echo turbo fast low-angle shot (FLASH) sequence in 14 patients, and at 1.5 T with the 2D FLASH(50) sequence with fat saturation in 18 patients with acute pancreatitis early in the course of the disease. The patients were classified according to the Atlanta classification system as having the mild (MAP) or severe (SAP) form of the disease. At 1.0 T with use of a body coil, contrast-enhanced MRI failed to distinguish mild from severe pancreatitis. At 1.5 T with a phased-array body coil, the signal intensities of the patients with SAP were statistically significantly lower than those of the MAP group. Our initial clinical experience suggests that MRI with a sufficient magnetic field gradient strength may be useful for separating the two forms of acute pancreatitis in their early phases. (orig.)

  12. Use of contrast media in computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in horses: Techniques, adverse events and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, B B; Goodrich, L R; Barrett, M F; Grinstaff, M W; Kawcak, C E

    2017-07-01

    The use of contrast media in computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasing in horses. These contrast-enhanced imaging techniques provide improved tissue delineation and evaluation, thereby expanding diagnostic capabilities. While generally considered safe, not all contrast media exhibit the same safety profiles. The safety of contrast media use and descriptions of adverse events occurring in horses are sparsely reported. This review summarises the reported evidence of contrast media use and adverse events that occur in horses, with added contribution from other veterinary species and studies in man for comparison. This comprehensive data set empowers equine clinicians to develop use and monitoring strategies when working with contrast media. Finally, it summarises the current state-of-the-art and highlights the potential applications of contrast-enhanced CT and MRI for assessment of diseased or injured equine tissues, as well as (patho)physiological processes. © 2017 EVJ Ltd.

  13. Impact of organic carbon and iron bioavailability on the magnetic susceptibility of soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porsch, Katharina; Rijal, Moti L.; Borch, Thomas; Troyer, Lyndsay D.; Behrens, Sebastian; Wehland, Florian; Appel, Erwin; Kappler, Andreas

    2014-03-01

    Microorganisms are known to couple the degradation of hydrocarbons to Fe(III) reduction leading to the dissolution and (trans)formation of Fe minerals including ferro(i)magnetic Fe minerals such as magnetite. The screening of soil magnetic properties, in particular magnetic susceptibility (MS), has the potential to assist in locating and assessing hydrocarbon (e.g. gasoline) contamination in the environment. In order to evaluate this, it must be understood how changes in soil geochemistry and hydrocarbon input impact MS. To this end, we incubated microcosms with soils from six different field sites anoxically and followed the changes in soil MS. In parallel we simulated hydrocarbon (i.e., gasoline) contamination in the same soils under anoxic conditions. We found that in microbially active microcosms both with or without added gasoline, average changes in MS of 6.9 ± 2.6% occurred, whereas in sterile controls the changes were less than 2.5% demonstrating that microbial metabolism played a major role in the (trans)formation of ferro(i)magnetic minerals. The microcosms reached stable MS values after a few weeks to months in four out of the six soils showing an increase in MS while in two soils the MS decreased over time. After stable MS values were reached, further addition of labile organic carbon (i.e., lactate/acetate) did not lead to further changes in MS, but the addition of Fe(III) oxyhydroxides (ferrihydrite) led to increases in MS suggesting that the changes in MS were limited by bioavailable Fe and not by bioavailable organic carbon. In the control experiments without carbon amendment, we observed that natural organic matter was mobilized from the soil matrix by water or microbial growth medium (0.33-0.47 mL/g field moist soil) added to the microcosms, and that this mobilized organic matter also stimulated microbial Fe metabolism and thus also led to a microbially driven change in MS. This study shows that changes in MS after an increase of the amount of

  14. Characterization of colloidal manganese hydroxylapatite: A potential magnetic resonance contrast agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorshow, Richard B.; Kofi Adzamli, I.; Nosco, Dennis L.; Joslin, Frederick L.

    1996-03-01

    Particulate contrast agents for blood pool imaging need to be constructed with the appropriate particle size distribution (PSD), and need to be resistant to opsonization. Hence, the PSD of an aqueous colloidal suspension of polyethylene glycol (PEG)-stabilized manganese hydroxylapatite (potentially useful as a magnetic resonance contrast agent for blood pool imaging) has been investigated as a function of PEG concentration and molecular weight. At low PEG concentrations, dynamic light scattering (DLS) and sedimentation field flow fractionation measurements yield a broad PSD, with the largest particle diameters near 100nm. Flow field flow fractionation (FlFFF) measurements, however, yield a distinct population near 10nm, which is not readily detectable by the other two techniques. As the PEG concentration is increased, the PSD shifts toward the lower size population. At the highest PEG concentration employed, only particles of diameter 10nm remain, verified by both FlFFF and DLS. Thus, the search for an optimum PSD for blood pool imaging is facilitated by choice of PEG molecular weight and concentration, and by employing complementary use of light scattering and field flow fractionation techniques.

  15. Atherosclerotic Carotid Plaques: Multimodality Imaging with Contrast-enhanced Ultrasound, Computed Tomography, and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hingwala, Divyata R; Chandrasekhakan, Kesavadas; Thomas, Bejoy; Sylaja, P N; Unnikrishnan, M; Kapilamoorthy, T R

    2017-01-01

    The imaging of carotid plaques has undergone a paradigm shift increasing importance being given to plaque characterization. Patients with "vulnerable" plaques are more prone to develop future neurovascular events. The purpose of this study is to analyze the role of multimodality imaging techniques in the assessment of carotid atherosclerotic plaques. Twenty-six patients were prospectively enrolled in the study. Patients underwent multidetector computed tomography (CT) angiography, ultrasound, contrast-enhanced ultrasound, and high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the carotid arteries with special emphasis on the carotid bifurcation. The mean age of patients was 65.41 years. Twenty-one were males. Plaque neovascularization was seen in 10 of the 18 plaques studied (55.56%). Based on the predominant components of the plaque, plaques were characterized as lipid (3), lipid with recent hemorrhage (1), fibrous (7), fibrofatty (4), fibrofatty with some hemorrhagic components (3), and recent hemorrhage (2). Together, contrast-enhanced ultrasound, CT, and MRI provide complete information about the plaque characteristics.

  16. Rapid 2D phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiography reconstruction algorithm via compressed sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Hoon; Hong, Cheol-Pyo; Lee, Man-Woo; Han, Bong-Soo

    2013-09-01

    Phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiography (PC MRA) is an excellent technique for visualization of venous vessels. However, the scan time of PC MRA is long compared with there of other MRA techniques. Recently, the potential of compressed sensing (CS) reconstruction to reduce the scan time in MR image acquisition using a sparse sampling dataset has become an active field of study. In this study, we propose a combination method to apply the CS reconstruction method to 2D PC MRA. This work was performed to enable faster 2D PC MRA imaging acquisition and to demonstrate its feasibility. We used a 0.32 T MR imaging (MRI) system and a total variation (TV)-based CS reconstruction algorithm. To validate the usefulness of our proposed reconstruction method, we used visual assessment for reconstructed images, and we measured the quantitative information for sampling rates from 12.5 to 75.0%. Based on our results, when the sampling ratio is increased, images reconstructed with the CS method have a similar level of image quality to fully sampled reconstruction images. The signal to noise ratio (SNR) and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were also closer to the reference values when the sampling ratio was increased. We confirmed the feasibility of 2D PC MRA with the CS reconstruction method. Our results provide evidence that this method can improve the time resolution of 2D PC MRA.

  17. A Novel Polyacrylamide Magnetic Nanoparticle Contrast Agent for Molecular Imaging using MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradford A. Moffat

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available A novel Polyacrylamide superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle platform is described which has been synthetically prepared such that multiple crystals of iron oxide are encapsulated within a single Polyacrylamide matrix (PolyAcrylamide Magnetic [PAM] nanoparticles. This formulation provides for an extremely large T2 and T2* relaxivity of between 620 and 1140 sec−1 mM−1. Administration of PAM nanoparticles into rats bearing orthotopic 9L gliomas allowed quantitative pharmacokinetic analysis of the uptake of nanoparticles in the vasculature, brain, and glioma. Addition of polyethylene glycol of varying sizes (0.6, 2, and 10 kDa to the surface of the PAM nanoparticles resulted in an increase in plasma half-life and affected tumor uptake and retention of the nanoparticles as quantified by changes in tissue contrast using MRI. The flexible formulation of these nanoparticles suggests that future modifications could be accomplished allowing for their use as a targeted molecular imaging contrast agent and/or therapeutic platform for multiple indications.

  18. Magnetic resonance angiography with blood-pool contrast agents: future applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, C.; Goyen, M.; Lotz, J.

    2007-01-01

    Blood pool agents remain in the intravascular space for a longer time period. Therefore the optimal imaging window for vascular structures is widened to about 30 minutes. Gadofosveset trisodium (Vasovist, Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Berlin, Germany) is the first blood-pool contrast agent approved in Europe for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) of vessels in the abdomen, pelvis and lower extremity in adults. Other possible applications of blood-pool agents are now being considered, such as assessment of venous thromboembolism, coronary artery disease or sinus venous thrombosis. Perfusion MR imaging holds promise for detecting lung perfusion defects with higher spatial resolution and reduced scan time compared with radionuclide scintigraphy. In coronary artery disease, blood-pool agents enable a substantial increase in the quality of coronary artery imaging. Quantitative myocardial perfusion and myocardial viability seem to be possible, although modifications in protocols and sequence design are necessary for optimal results. Other novel applications of blood-pool agents include monitoring of inflammatory changes in systemic lupus erythematosus and evaluation of tumour invasion into lymph nodes and more reliable assessment of cerebral venous and sinus thrombosis. (orig.)

  19. Linking Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility (AMS) to transport direction: The Gavarnie Thrust, Axial Zone, Pyrenees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcén, Marcos; Casas-Sainz, Antonio; Román-Berdiel, Teresa; Soto, Ruth; Oliva-Urcía, Belén

    2017-04-01

    This work deals with the application of the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS), structural analysis and microstructural analysis to the study of shear zones. Mylonitized fault rocks have been sampled in the Gavarnie Trust, one of the main structures of the Pyrenean Axial Zone, which was structured as a south-verging antiformal stack during the Alpine Orogeny. In the studied area, the Gavarnie Unit (Silurian-Carboniferous, low grade metasedimentary rocks) overthrust the Millares and Bielsa Units (Permian and Cretaceous cover, Cambro-Ordovician medium grade metamorphic rocks and granitoids), with a minimum horizontal displacement of 12km. Three profiles of the shear zone were studied with the goal of observing changes in the transport direction, the strain distribution and the orientation of the magnetic ellipsoid., One profile is parallel to the basal thrust plane, where the core zone has been identified, and the other two are vertical transects (profiles 1 and 2), perpendicular to the thrust plane. The shear zone, developed into the hangingwall phyllitic Silurian and Devonian units, is at least 30 m wide. The structural analysis reveals that the Silurian rocks are the local detachment level, which becomes thinner and pinchs out completely towards the South, where the detachment level is within the Devonian units (Fourche de la Sede Fm.). In both vertical profiles, the shear zone shows a decrease in the strain from the contact with the Cretaceous limestones at the footwall, towards the upper limit of the shear zone. This is evidenced by the lower development of mylonitic foliations and SCC' structures and the upwards increase of brittle deformation. The transport direction inferred from SC structures (stretching lineations in S and C planes) is constant in all sites, with an average of N190E. AMS data are in perfect agreement with the structural analysis, being the magnetic foliation parallel to the S or C planes of the SC structures. The magnetic

  20. Magnetic susceptibility of MnZn and NiZn soft ferrites using Laplace transform and the Routh-Hurwitz criterion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fano, Walter Gustavo; Boggi, Silvina; Razzitte, Adrian Cesar

    2011-01-01

    This paper is devoted to study the Routh-Hurwitz stability criterion from the MnZn and NiZn soft ferrites using a phenomenological model with the gyromagnetic spin contribution and domain wall contribution. The magnetodynamic equation and the harmonic oscillator equation have been used to obtain the domain walls and the spin contribution of the magnetic susceptibility. The ferrite materials have been considered as linear, time invariant, isotropic and homogeneous, and the magnetization vector is proportional to the magnetic field vector. The resulting expression of the magnetization in time domain of both ferrites under study has been obtained by mean of the inverse Laplace transformation applying the residue method. The poles of the magnetic susceptibility have negative real parts, which ensures that the response decays exponentially to zero as the time increase. The degree of the numerator's polynomial of the magnetic susceptibility is less than the degree of denominator's polynomial in the magnetic susceptibility function: and the poles are located in the half left s-plane. Then the system is bounded-input, bounded-output (BIBO), and the results agree with the Routh-Hurwitz stability criterion for the MnZn and NiZn soft ferrites. - Research Highlights: → Laplace transform of the magnetic susceptibility of the MnZn and NiZn soft ferrites. → Routh-Hurwitz stability criterion of magnetic materials. → Bode plot of magnetic susceptibility. → Inverse Laplace transform using residue theorem.

  1. Diagnostic Accuracy of Dynamic Contrast Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Characterizing Lung Masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inan, Nagihan; Arslan, Arzu; Donmez, Muhammed; Sarisoy, Hasan Tahsin

    2016-01-01

    Background Imaging plays a critical role not only in the detection, but also in the characterization of lung masses as benign or malignant. Objectives To determine the diagnostic accuracy of dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the differential diagnosis of benign and malignant lung masses. Patients and Methods Ninety-four masses were included in this prospective study. Five dynamic series of T1-weighted spoiled gradient echo (FFE) images were obtained, followed by a T1-weighted FFE sequence in the late phase (5th minutes). Contrast enhancement patterns in the early (25th second) and late (5th minute) phase images were evaluated. For the quantitative evaluation, signal intensity (SI)-time curves were obtained and the maximum relative enhancement, wash-in rate, and time-to-peak enhancement of masses in both groups were calculated. Results The early phase contrast enhancement patterns were homogeneous in 78.2% of the benign masses, while heterogeneous in 74.4% of the malignant tumors. On the late phase images, 70.8% of the benign masses showed homogeneous enhancement, while most of the malignant masses showed heterogeneous enhancement (82.4%). During the first pass, the maximum relative enhancement and wash-in rate values of malignant masses were significantly higher than those of the benign masses (P = 0.03 and 0.04, respectively). The cutoff value at 15% yielded a sensitivity of 85.4%, specificity of 61.2%, and positive predictive value of 68.7% for the maximum relative enhancement. Conclusion Contrast enhancement patterns and SI-time curve analysis of MRI are helpful in the differential diagnosis of benign and malignant lung masses. PMID:27703654

  2. Preclinical 4D-flow magnetic resonance phase contrast imaging of the murine aortic arch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moritz Braig

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular diseases remain the number one death cause worldwide. Preclinical 4D flow phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging can provide substantial insights in the analysis of aortic pathophysiologies in various animal models. These insights may allow a better understanding of pathophysiologies, therapy monitoring, and can possibly be translated to humans. This study provides a framework to acquire the velocity field within the aortic arch. It analyses important flow values at different locations within the aortic arch. Imaging parameters with high temporal and spatial resolution are provided, that still allow combining this time-consuming method with other necessary imaging-protocols.A new setup was established where a prospectively gated 4D phase contrast sequence is combined with a highly sensitive cryogenic coil on a preclinical magnetic resonance scanner. The sequence was redesigned to maintain a close to steady state condition of the longitudinal magnetization and hence to overcome steady state artifacts. Imaging parameters were optimized to provide high spatial and temporal resolution. Pathline visualizations were generated from the acquired velocity data in order to display complex flow patterns.Our setup allows data acquisition with at least two times the rate than that of previous publications based on Cartesian encoding, at an improved image quality. The "steady state" sequence reduces observed artifacts and provides uniform image intensity over the heart cycle. This made possible quantification of blood speed and wall shear stress (WSS within the aorta and its branches. The highest velocities were observed in the ascending aorta with 137.5 ± 8 cm/s. Peak velocity values in the Brachiocephalic trunk were 57 ± 12 cm/s. Quantification showed that the peak flow occurs around 20 ms post R-wave in the ascending aorta. The highest mean axial wall shear stress was observed in the analysis plane between the left common carotid artery

  3. Complications after liver transplantation: evaluation with magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic resonance cholangiography, and 3-dimensional contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography in a single session

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boraschi, P.; Donati, F.; Gigoni, R.; Salemi, S.; Urbani, L.; Filipponi, F.; Falaschi, F.; Bartolozzi, C.

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate a comprehensive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol as noninvasive diagnostic modality for simultaneous detection of parenchymal, biliary, and vascular complications after liver transplantation. Fifty-two liver transplant recipients suspected to have parenchymal, biliary, and (or) vascular complications underwent our MRI protocol at 1.5T unit using a phased array coil. After preliminary acquisition of axial T 1 w and T 2 w sequences, magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC) was performed through a breath-hold, thin- and thick-slab, single-shot T 2 w sequence in the coronal plane. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CEMRA) was obtained using a 3-dimensional coronal spoiled gradient-echo sequence, which enabled acquisition of 32 partitions 2.0 mm thick. A fixed dose of 20 ml gadobenate dimeglumine was administered at 2 mL/s. A post-contrast T 1 w sequence was also performed. Two observers in conference reviewed source images and 3-dimensional reconstructions to determine the presence of parenchymal, biliary, and vascular complications. MRI findings were correlated with surgery, endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC), biopsy, digital subtraction angiography (DSA), and imaging follow-up. MRI revealed abnormal findings in 32 out of 52 patients (61%), including biliary complications (anastomotic and nonanastomotic strictures, and lithiasis) in 31, vascular disease (hepatic artery stenosis and thrombosis) in 9, and evidence of hepatic abscess and hematoma in 2. ERC confirmed findings of MRC in 30 cases, but suggested disease underestimation in 2. DSA confirmed 7 magnetic resonance angiogram (MRA) findings, but suggested disease overestimation in 2. MRI combined with MRC and CEMRA can provide a comprehensive assessment of parenchymal, biliary, and vascular complications in most recipients of liver transplantation. (author)

  4. Complications after liver transplantation: evaluation with magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic resonance cholangiography, and 3-dimensional contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography in a single session

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boraschi, P.; Donati, F.; Gigoni, R. [Pisa Univ. Hospital, Second Dept. of Radiology, Pisa (Italy)], E-mail: p.boraschi@do.med.unipi.it; Salemi, S. [Univ. of Pisa, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Pisa (Italy); Urbani, L.; Filipponi, F. [Univ. of Pisa, Liver Transplant Unit of the Dept. of Oncology, Transplants and Advanced Technologies in Medicine, Pisa (Italy); Falaschi, F. [Pisa Univ. Hospital, Second Dept. of Radiology, Pisa (Italy); Bartolozzi, C. [Univ. of Pisa, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Pisa (Italy)

    2008-12-15

    To evaluate a comprehensive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol as noninvasive diagnostic modality for simultaneous detection of parenchymal, biliary, and vascular complications after liver transplantation. Fifty-two liver transplant recipients suspected to have parenchymal, biliary, and (or) vascular complications underwent our MRI protocol at 1.5T unit using a phased array coil. After preliminary acquisition of axial T{sub 1}w and T{sub 2}w sequences, magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC) was performed through a breath-hold, thin- and thick-slab, single-shot T{sub 2}w sequence in the coronal plane. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CEMRA) was obtained using a 3-dimensional coronal spoiled gradient-echo sequence, which enabled acquisition of 32 partitions 2.0 mm thick. A fixed dose of 20 ml gadobenate dimeglumine was administered at 2 mL/s. A post-contrast T{sub 1}w sequence was also performed. Two observers in conference reviewed source images and 3-dimensional reconstructions to determine the presence of parenchymal, biliary, and vascular complications. MRI findings were correlated with surgery, endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC), biopsy, digital subtraction angiography (DSA), and imaging follow-up. MRI revealed abnormal findings in 32 out of 52 patients (61%), including biliary complications (anastomotic and nonanastomotic strictures, and lithiasis) in 31, vascular disease (hepatic artery stenosis and thrombosis) in 9, and evidence of hepatic abscess and hematoma in 2. ERC confirmed findings of MRC in 30 cases, but suggested disease underestimation in 2. DSA confirmed 7 magnetic resonance angiogram (MRA) findings, but suggested disease overestimation in 2. MRI combined with MRC and CEMRA can provide a comprehensive assessment of parenchymal, biliary, and vascular complications in most recipients of liver transplantation. (author)

  5. Intrinsic functional brain mapping in reconstructed 4D magnetic susceptibility (χ) data space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zikuan; Calhoun, Vince

    2015-02-15

    By solving an inverse problem of T2*-weighted magnetic resonance imaging for a dynamic fMRI study, we reconstruct a 4D magnetic susceptibility source (χ) data space for intrinsic functional mapping. A 4D phase dataset is calculated from a 4D complex fMRI dataset. The background field and phase wrapping effect are removed by a Laplacian technique. A 3D χ source map is reconstructed from a 3D phase image by a computed inverse MRI (CIMRI) scheme. A 4D χ data space is reconstructed by repeating the 3D χ source reconstruction for each time point. A functional map is calculated by a temporal correlation between voxel signals in the 4D χ space and the timecourse of the task paradigm. With a finger-tapping experiment, we obtain two 3D functional mappings in the 4D magnitude data space and in the reconstructed 4D χ data space. We find that the χ-based functional mapping reveals co-occurrence of bidirectional responses in a 3D activation map that is different from the conventional magnitude-based mapping. The χ-based functional mapping can also be achieved by a 3D deconvolution of a phase activation map. Based on a subject experimental comparison, we show that the 4D χ tomography method could produce a similar χ activation map as obtained by the 3D deconvolution method. By removing the dipole effect and other fMRI technological contaminations, 4D χ tomography provides a 4D χ data space that allows a more direct and truthful functional mapping of a brain activity. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Spatial variability of soil magnetic susceptibility in an agricultural field located in Eastern Ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menshov, Oleksandr; Pereira, Paulo; Kruglov, Oleksandr

    2015-04-01

    Magnetic susceptibility (MS) have been used to characterize soil properties. It gives an indirect information about heavy metals content and degree of human impacts on soil contamination derived from atmospheric pollution (Girault et al., 2011). This method is inexpensive in relation to chemical analysis and very useful to track soil pollution, since several toxic components deposited on soil surface are rich in particulates produced by oxidation processes (Boyko et al., 2004; Morton-Bernea et al., 2009). Thus, identify the spatial distribution of MS is of major importance, since can give an indirect information of high metals content (Dankoub et al., 2012). This allows also to distinguish the pedogenic and technogenic origin magnetic signal. For example Ukraine chernozems contain fine-grained oxidized magnetite and maghemite of pedogenic origin formed by weathering of the parent material (Jeleńska et al., 2004). However, to a correct understanding of variables distribution, the identification of the most accurate interpolation method is fundamental for a better interpretation of map information (Pereira et al., 2013). The objective of this work is to study the spatial variability of soil MS in an agricultural fields located in the Tcherkascy Tishki area (50.11°N, 36.43 °E, 162 m a.s.l), Ukraine. Soil MS was measured in 77 sampling points in a north facing slope. To estimate the best interpolation method, several interpolation methods were tested, as inverse distance to a weight (IDW) with the power of 1,2,3,4 and 5, Local Polynomial (LP) with the power of 1 and 2, Global Polynomial (GP), radial basis functions - spline with tension (SPT), completely regularized spline (CRS), multiquatratic (MTQ), inverse multiquatratic (IMTQ), and thin plate spline (TPS) - and some geostatistical methods as, ordinary kriging (OK), Simple Kriging (SK) and Universal Kriging (UK), used in previous works (Pereira et al., 2014). On average, the soil MS of the studied plot had 686

  7. Application of Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility to large-scale fault kinematics: an evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Antonio M.; Roman-Berdiel, Teresa; Marcén, Marcos; Oliva-Urcia, Belen; Soto, Ruth; Garcia-Lasanta, Cristina; Calvin, Pablo; Pocovi, Andres; Gil-Imaz, Andres; Pueyo-Anchuela, Oscar; Izquierdo-Llavall, Esther; Vernet, Eva; Santolaria, Pablo; Osacar, Cinta; Santanach, Pere; Corrado, Sveva; Invernizzi, Chiara; Aldega, Luca; Caricchi, Chiara; Villalain, Juan Jose

    2017-04-01

    Major discontinuities in the Earth's crust are expressed by faults that often cut across its whole thickness favoring, for example, the emplacement of magmas of mantelic origin. These long-lived faults are common in intra-plate environments and show multi-episodic activity that spans for hundred of million years and constitute first-order controls on plate evolution, favoring basin formation and inversion, rotations and the accommodation of deformation in large segments of plates. Since the post-Paleozoic evolution of these large-scale faults has taken place (and can only be observed) at shallow crustal levels, the accurate determination of fault kinematics is hampered by scarcely developed fault rocks, lack of classical structural indicators and the brittle deformation accompanying fault zones. These drawbacks are also found when thick clayey or evaporite levels, with or without diapiric movements, are the main detachment levels that facilitate large displacements in the upper crust. Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility (AMS) provides a useful tool for the analysis of fault zones lacking fully developed kinematic indicators. However, its meaning in terms of deformational fabrics must be carefully checked by means of outcrop and thin section analysis in order to establish the relationship between the orientation of magnetic ellipsoid axes and the transport directions, as well as the representativity of scalar parameters regarding deformation mechanisms. Timing of faulting, P-T conditions and magnetic mineralogy are also major constraints for the interpretation of magnetic fabrics and therefore, separating ferro- and para-magnetic fabric components may be necessary in complex cases. AMS results indicate that the magnetic lineation can be parallel (when projected onto the shear plane) or perpendicular (i.e. parallel to the intersection lineation) to the transport direction depending mainly on the degree of shear deformation. Changes between the two end-members can

  8. Magnetic susceptibility as an indicator to paleo-environmental pollution in an urban lagoon near Istanbul city

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpar, Bedri; Unlu, Selma; Altinok, Yildiz; Ongen, Sinan

    2014-05-01

    For assessing anthropogenic pollution, magnetic susceptibility profiles and accompanying data were measured along three short cores recovered at the southern part of an urban lagoon; Kucukcekmece, Istanbul, Turkey. This marine inlet, connected to the Sea of Marmara by a very narrow channel, was used as a drinking water reservoir 40-50 years ago before it was contaminated by municipal, agricultural and industrial activities, mainly carried by three streams feeding the lagoon. The magnetic signals decrease gradually from the lake bottom towards the core base showing some characteristic anomalies. These signatures were tested as an environmental magnetic parameter against the lithological diversity (silici-clastic, total organic matter and carbonate), metal enrichments with larger variations (Pb, Mn, Zn, Ni, Co, Cr, U and Al) and probable hydrocarbon contamination. Mineral assemblage was determined by a computer driven X-ray diffractometer. The heavy metal concentrations and total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) were measured by ICP-MS and UVF spectrometry, respectively. Magnetic susceptibility shows slightly higher values in interlayers containing higher silici-clastic material and organic content which may suggest first-order changes in the relative supplies of terrigenous and biogenic materials. On the basis of cluster analyses, enhanced magnetic signals could be correlated with the elevated concentrations of Co, Zn, U, Pb and TPH along the cores. The Pb concentrations at the upper parts of the cores were higher than the "Severe Effect Level" and could pose a potential risk for living organisms. Greater amounts of organic carbon tend to accumulate in muddy sediments. In fact, there are a few studies reporting some relationship between enhanced magnetic signals and organic contamination mainly due to petroleum aromatic hydrocarbons. In conclusion, the magnetic susceptibility changes in sedimentary depositional environments could be used as a rapid and cost

  9. Magnetothermal Convection of Water with the Presence or Absence of a Magnetic Force Acting on the Susceptibility Gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, Syou

    2016-01-01

    Heat transfer of magnetothermal convection with the presence or absence of the magnetic force acting on the susceptibility gradient (fsc) was examined by three-dimensional numerical computations. Thermal convection of water enclosed in a shallow cylindrical vessel (diameter over vessel height = 6.0) with the Rayleigh-Benard model was adopted as the model, under the conditions of Prandtl number 6.0 and Ra number 7000, respectively. The momentum equations of convection were nondimensionalized, which involved the term of fsc and the term of magnetic force acting on the magnetic field gradient (fb). All the computations resulted in axisymmetric steady rolls. The values of the averaged Nu, the averaged velocity components U, V, and W, and the isothermal distributions and flow patterns were almost completely the same, regardless of the presence or absence of the term of fsc. As a result, we found that the effect of fsc was extremely small, although much previous research emphasized the effect with paramagnetic solutions under an unsteady state. The magnitude of fsc depends not only on magnetic conditions (magnitudes of magnetic susceptibility and magnetic flux density), but also on the thermal properties of the solution (thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, and viscosity). Therefore the effect of fb becomes dominant on the magnetothermal convection. Active control over the density gradient with temperature will be required to advance heat transfer with the effect of fsc.

  10. Magnetothermal Convection of Water with the Presence or Absence of a Magnetic Force Acting on the Susceptibility Gradient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syou Maki

    Full Text Available Heat transfer of magnetothermal convection with the presence or absence of the magnetic force acting on the susceptibility gradient (fsc was examined by three-dimensional numerical computations. Thermal convection of water enclosed in a shallow cylindrical vessel (diameter over vessel height = 6.0 with the Rayleigh-Benard model was adopted as the model, under the conditions of Prandtl number 6.0 and Ra number 7000, respectively. The momentum equations of convection were nondimensionalized, which involved the term of fsc and the term of magnetic force acting on the magnetic field gradient (fb. All the computations resulted in axisymmetric steady rolls. The values of the averaged Nu, the averaged velocity components U, V, and W, and the isothermal distributions and flow patterns were almost completely the same, regardless of the presence or absence of the term of fsc. As a result, we found that the effect of fsc was extremely small, although much previous research emphasized the effect with paramagnetic solutions under an unsteady state. The magnitude of fsc depends not only on magnetic conditions (magnitudes of magnetic susceptibility and magnetic flux density, but also on the thermal properties of the solution (thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, and viscosity. Therefore the effect of fb becomes dominant on the magnetothermal convection. Active control over the density gradient with temperature will be required to advance heat transfer with the effect of fsc.

  11. Pauli magnetic susceptibility of bilayer graphene and hexagonal boron-nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mousavi, Hamze, E-mail: hamze.mousavi@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jalilvand, Samira [Department of Physics, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kurdestany, Jamshid Moradi [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65201 (United States)

    2016-12-01

    We study the contribution of s and p orbitals on the Pauli magnetic susceptibility (PMS) and density of state (DOS) of the following three structures (1) bilayer graphene (2) bilayer boron-nitride (BN) and (3) bilayer graphene-BN within a two-band tight-binding Harrison Hamiltonian and the Green's function technique. It is shown that in all three cases, the contribution of s and p{sub x} or p{sub y} orbitals have no states around the Fermi level, while for bilayer graphene and graphene-BN the total DOS and DOS of p{sub z} orbital appear to be a linear function around this level. We show explicitly that for bilayer BN the contribution of p{sub z} orbital does not have states around the Fermi level, because of ionization energy difference between the boron (B) and nitrogen (N) atoms. We find that the bandwidth of s, p{sub x} or p{sub y} is more extension than case of p{sub z} orbital as a result of the Van-Hove singularities in the DOS. This leads to consideration of the PMS in two, low and high temperature, regions.

  12. Analytical expressions for crystal fields of hexagonal symmetry: high temperature magnetic susceptibility applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobral, R.R.; Guimaraes, A.P.; Silva, X.A. da.

    1996-09-01

    This paper discusses the use of Computer Algebra (CA) to obtain analytical results of interest for the studies of magnetic behavior of rare-earth intermetallic compounds, where the CF has hexagonal symmetry. In the first part, CA techniques are applied to obtain the characteristic polynomials of the CF Hamiltonian. A remarkable result is that for most J's the characteristic polynomials are entirely factored, allowing the analytical derivation of the eigenvalues as a function of the CF parameters. A comparison with the values obtained numerically is made for two cases, showing, as expected, excellent agreement. In the second part, a model Hamiltonian containing the CF term and exchange is used, and an expression for the high temperature susceptibility (HTS), suitable for algebraic computation is derived. We compute the HTS expressions using results of the first part plus the partially factored polynomials of the model Hamiltonian. In the molecular field approximation, we re-obtain results of the literature for HTS in the parallel and perpendicular directions. This treatment may be extended to other high anisotropy systems, both hexagonal and rhombohedral, as the nitrided R 2 Fe 17 intermetallic compounds. (author). 13 refs., 2 tabs

  13. Generalized magnetic susceptibilities in metals: application of the analytic tetrahedron linear energy method to Sc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rath, J.; Freeman, A.J.

    1975-01-01

    A detailed study of the generalized susceptibility chi(vector q) of Sc metal determined from an accurate augmented-plane-wave method calculation of its energy-band structure is presented. The calculations were done by means of a computational scheme for chi(vector q) derived as an extension of the work of Jepsen and Andersen and Lehmann and Taut on the density-of-states problem. The procedure yields simple analytic expressions for the chi(vector q) integral inside a tetrahedral microzone of the Brillouin zone which depends only on the volume of the tetrahedron and the differences of the energies at its corners. Constant-matrix-element results have been obtained for Sc which show very good agreement with the results of Liu, Gupta, and Sinha (but with one less peak) and exhibit a first maximum in chi(vector q) at (0, 0, 0.31) 2π/c [vs (0, 0, 0.35) 2π/c obtained by Liu et al.] which relates very well to dilute rare-earth alloy magnetic ordering at vector q/sub m/ = (0, 0, 0.28) 2π/c and to the kink in the LA-phonon dispersion curve at (0, 0, 0.27) 2π/c. (U.S.)

  14. On magnetic field strength effect on velocity and turbulence characterization using Phase-Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging (PC-MRI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Moortele, Pierre-Francois; Amili, Omid; Coletti, Filippo; Toloui, Mostafa

    2017-11-01

    Cardiovascular flows are predominantly laminar. Nevertheless, transient and even turbulent flows have been observed in the vicinity of the heart (e.g. valves, ascending aorta, valvular/vascular stenosis). Effective in-vivo hemodynamic-based diagnostics in these sites require both high-resolution velocity measurements (especially in the near-vessel wall regions) and accurate evaluation of blood flow turbulence level (e.g. in terms of TKE). In addition to phase contrast (PC), appropriately designed PC-MRI sequences provide intravoxel incoherent motion encoding, a unique tool for simultaneous, non-invasive evaluation of velocity 3D vector fields and Reynolds stresses in cardiovascular flows in vivo. However, limited spatial and temporal resolution of PC-MRI result in inaccuracies in the estimation of hemodynamics (e.g. WSS) and of flow turbulence characteristics. This study aims to assess whether SNR gains at higher magnetic field could overcome these limits, providing more accurate velocity and turbulence characterization at higher spatial resolution. Experiments are conducted on MR Scanners at 3 and 7 Tesla with a U-bent pipe flow shaped phantom. 3D velocity fields, Reynolds stresses and TKE are analyzed and compared to a reference PIV experiments.

  15. Magnetic Anisotropic Susceptibility Studies on Impact Structures in the Serra Geral Basalt, Paraná Basin, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosta, A. P.; MacDonald, W. D.

    2009-12-01

    Studies of magnetic properties of shocked basalt are underway for two impact craters in the 132 Ma Serra Geral basalt of southern Brazil: the Vista Alegre crater (25.95°S, 41.69°W) in the state of Paraná, with a diameter of 12.4 km, and the Vargeão crater (26.81°S, 52.17°W) in Santa Catarina, of 9.5 km. Shatter cones and quartz planar deformation features (pdfs) have been found at both structures. Uplifted crater rims and external ejecta deposits have been removed by erosion at both craters. The interior of the Vista Alegre crater contains ejecta fallback deposits, typically reworked and weathered, and basalts of the crater floor are poorly exposed. In contrast, shocked basalts are exposed across the interior of the Vargeão structure, ejecta fallback deposits have been removed by erosion, and a central domal uplift of quartzose strata from beneath the basalt is found. Discounting the possibility of differential erosion rates, these differences might suggest that the Vargeão is the older of the two structures. Laboratory experiments elsewhere have suggested that major axes of the ellipse of anisotropic susceptibility (K1 major; K3 minor) could be aligned with the direction of propagation of the shockwave accompanying impact processes. Insufficient exposures exist at Vista Alegre to test this hypothesis. Oriented samples along a NNW-trending diametral profile across the better exposed Vargeão structure did not show a radial alignment of either K1 or K3 relative to the centre of that structure. In general, the mean susceptibility at Vargeão is lower towards the center; the degree of anisotropy is low (Pjcentral uplift. The shape factor (T) varies considerably (-0.5 (prolate) to +0.7 (oblate)); most magnetofabrics are oblate. Only 3 of 16 sites are prolate, and those are near the crater margin. K3 (minimum) axes are mainly steep, with a mean direction steep and slightly north of the center. K1 (maximum) axes are mainly gently plunging (tendency to preferring

  16. Novel Imaging Contrast Methods for Hyperpolarized 13 C Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Galen Durant

    Magnetic resonance imaging using hyperpolarized 13C-labeled small molecules has emerged as an extremely powerful tool for the in vivo monitoring of perfusion and metabolism. This work presents methods for improved imaging, parameter mapping, and image contrast generation for in vivo hyperpolarized 13C MRI. Angiography using hyperpolarized urea was greatly improved with a highly T2-weighted acquisition in combination with 15N labeling of the urea amide groups. This is due to the fact that the T2 of [13C]urea is strongly limited by the scalar coupling to the neighboring quadrupolar 14N. The long in vivo T2 values of [13C, 15N2]urea were utilized for sub-millimeter projection angiography using a contrast agent that could be safely injected in concentrations of 10-100 mM while still tolerated in patients with renal insufficiency. This study also presented the first method for in vivo T2 mapping of hyperpolarized 13C compounds. The in vivo T2 of urea was short in the blood and long within the kidneys. This persistent signal component was isolated to the renal filtrate, thus enabling for the first time direct detection of an imaging contrast agent undergoing glomerular filtration. While highly T2-weighted acquisitions select for molecules with short rotational correlation times, high diffusion weighting selects for those with the long translational correlation times. A specialized spin-echo EPI sequence was developed in order to generate highly diffusion-weighted hyperpolarized 13C images on a clinical MRI system operating within clinical peak- RF and gradient amplitude constraints. Low power adiabatic spin echo pulses were developed in order to generate a sufficiently large refocused bandwidth while maintaining low nominal power. This diffusion weighted acquisition gave enhanced tumor contrast-to-noise ratio when imaging [1-13C]lactate after infusion of [1-13C]pyruvate. Finally, the first in-man hyperpolarized 13C MRI clinical trial is discussed.

  17. Evaluation of microbubbles as contrast agents for ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Microbubbles (MBs can serve as an ultrasound contrast agent, and has the potential for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Due to the relatively low effect of MBs on MRI, it is necessary to develop new MBs that are more suitable for MRI. In this study, we evaluate the properties of SonoVue® and custom-made Fe(3O(4-nanoparticle-embedded microbubbles (Fe(3O(4-MBs in terms of contrast agents for ultrsonography (US and MRI. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A total of 20 HepG2 subcutaneous-tumor-bearing nude mice were randomly assigned to 2 groups (i.e., n = 10 mice each group, one for US test and the other for MRI test. Within each group, two tests were performed for each mouse. The contrast agent for the first test is SonoVue®, and the second is Fe(3O(4-MBs. US was performed using a Technos(MPX US system (Esaote, Italy with a contrast-tuned imaging (CnTI™ mode. MRI was performed using a 7.0T Micro-MRI (PharmaScan, Bruker Biospin GmbH, Germany with an EPI-T(2* sequence. The data of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR from the region-of-interest of each US and MR image was calculated by ImageJ (National Institute of Health, USA. In group 1, enhancement of SonoVue® was significantly higher than Fe(3O(4-MBs on US (P0.05. The SNR analysis of the enhancement process reveals a strong negative correlation in both cases (i.e., SonoVue® r = -0.733, Fe(3O(4-MBs r = -0.903, with P<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: It might be important to change the Fe(3O(4-MBs' shell structure and/or the imagining strategy of US to improve the imaging quality of Fe(3O(4-MBs on US. As an intriguing prospect that can be detected by US and MRI, MBs are worthy of further study.

  18. Chitosan-coated nickel-ferrite nanoparticles as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Tanveer [Department of Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics, Abdul Wali Khan University, Mardan (Pakistan); Bae, Hongsub; Iqbal, Yousaf [Department of Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Rhee, Ilsu, E-mail: ilrhee@knu.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Sungwook [Division of Science Education, Daegu University, Gyeongsan 712-714 (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Yongmin; Lee, Jaejun [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, College of Medicine, Kyungpook National University and Hospital, Daegu 700-721 (Korea, Republic of); Sohn, Derac [Department of Physics, Hannam University, Daejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-01

    We report evidence for the possible application of chitosan-coated nickel-ferrite (NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles as both T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The coating of nickel-ferrite nanoparticles with chitosan was performed simultaneously with the synthesis of the nickel-ferrite nanoparticles by a chemical co-precipitation method. The coated nanoparticles were cylindrical in shape with an average length of 17 nm and an average width of 4.4 nm. The bonding of chitosan onto the ferrite nanoparticles was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} relaxivities were 0.858±0.04 and 1.71±0.03 mM{sup −1} s{sup −1}, respectively. In animal experimentation, both a 25% signal enhancement in the T{sub 1}-weighted mage and a 71% signal loss in the T{sub 2}-weighted image were observed. This demonstrated that chitosan-coated nickel-ferrite nanoparticles are suitable as both T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} contrast agents in MRI. We note that the applicability of our nanoparticles as both T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} contrast agents is due to their cylindrical shape, which gives rise to both inner and outer sphere processes of nanoparticles. - Highlights: • Chitosan-coated nickel-ferrite (Ni-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles were synthesized in an aqueous system by chemical co-precipitation. • The characterization of bare and chitosan-coated nanoparticles were performed using various analytical tools, such as TEM, FTIR, XRD, and VMS. • We evaluated the coated particles as potential T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} contrast agents for MRI by measuring T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} relaxation times as a function of iron concentration. • Both T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} effects were also observed in animal experimentation.

  19. Susceptibility of CoFeB/AlOx/Co Magnetic Tunnel Junctions to Low-Frequency Alternating Current

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Tsung Chen

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This investigation studies CoFeB/AlOx/Co magnetic tunneling junction (MTJ in the magnetic field of a low-frequency alternating current, for various thicknesses of the barrier layer AlOx. The low-frequency alternate-current magnetic susceptibility (χac and phase angle (θ of the CoFeB/AlOx/Co MTJ are determined using an cac analyzer. The driving frequency ranges from 10 to 25,000 Hz. These multilayered MTJs are deposited on a silicon substrate using a DC and RF magnetron sputtering system. Barrier layer thicknesses are 22, 26, and 30 Å. The X-ray diffraction patterns (XRD include a main peak at 2θ = 44.7° from hexagonal close-packed (HCP Co with a highly (0002 textured structure, with AlOx and CoFeB as amorphous phases. The full width at half maximum (FWHM of the Co(0002 peak, decreases as the AlOx thickness increases; revealing that the Co layer becomes more crystalline with increasing thickness. χac result demonstrates that the optimal resonance frequency (fres that maximizes the χac value is 500 Hz. As the frequency increases to 1000 Hz, the susceptibility decreases rapidly. However, when the frequency increases over 1000 Hz, the susceptibility sharply declines, and almost closes to zero. The experimental results reveal that the mean optimal susceptibility is 1.87 at an AlOx barrier layer thickness of 30 Å because the Co(0002 texture induces magneto-anisotropy, which improves the indirect CoFeB and Co spin exchange-coupling strength and the χac value. The results concerning magnetism indicate that the magnetic characteristics are related to the crystallinity of Co.

  20. Magnetic susceptibility to identify landscape segments on a detailed scale in the region of Jaboticabal, São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana dos Reis Barrios

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The agricultural potential is generally assessed and managed based on a one-dimensional vision of the soil profile, however, the increased appreciation of sustainable production has stimulated studies on faster and more accurate evaluation techniques and methods of the agricultural potential on detailed scales. The objective of this study was to investigate the possibility of using soil magnetic susceptibility for the identification of landscape segments on a detailed scale in the region of Jaboticabal, São Paulo State. The studied area has two slope curvatures: linear and concave, subdivided into three landscape segments: upper slope (US, concave, middle slope (MS, linear and lower slope (LS, linear. In each of these segments, 20 points were randomly sampled from a database with 207 samples forming a regular grid installed in each landscape segment. The soil physical and chemical properties, CO2 emissions (FCO2 and magnetic susceptibility (MS of the samples were evaluated represented by: magnetic susceptibility of air-dried fine earth (MS ADFE, magnetic susceptibility of the total sand fraction (MS TS and magnetic susceptibility of the clay fraction (MS Cl in the 0.00 - 0.15 m layer. The principal component analysis showed that MS is an important property that can be used to identify landscape segments, because the correlation of this property within the first principal component was high. The hierarchical cluster analysis method identified two groups based on the variables selected by principal component analysis; of the six selected variables, three were related to magnetic susceptibility. The landscape segments were differentiated similarly by the principal component analysis and by the cluster analysis using only the properties with higher discriminatory power. The cluster analysis of MS ADFE, MS TS and MS Cl allowed the formation of three groups that agree with the segment division established in the field. The grouping by cluster

  1. Effects of iodinated contrast agent, xylocaine and gadolinium concentration on the signal emitted in magnetic resonance arthrography: a samples study

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    Yvana Lopes Pinheiro da Silva

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the effects of dilution of paramagnetic contrast agent with iodinated contrast and xylocaine on the signal intensity during magnetic resonance arthrography, and to improve the paramagnetic contrast agent concentration utilized in this imaging modality. Materials and Methods: Samples specially prepared for the study with three different concentrations of paramagnetic contrast agent diluted in saline, iodinated contrast agent and xylocaine were imaged with fast spin echo T1-weighted sequences with fat saturation. The samples were placed into flasks and graphical analysis of the signal intensity was performed as a function of the paramagnetic contrast concentration. Results: As compared with samples of equal concentrations diluted only with saline, the authors have observed an average signal intensity decrease of 20.67% for iodinated contrast agent, and of 28.34% for xylocaine. However, the increased gadolinium concentration in the samples caused decrease in signal intensity with all the dilutions. Conclusion: Minimizing the use of iodinated contrast media and xylocaine and/or the use of a gadolinium concentration of 2.5 mmol/L diluted in saline will improve the sensitivity of magnetic resonance arthrography.

  2. Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for hypoxia mapping and potential for brachytherapy targeting

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    Anna Li

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI may be used to visualize tumor hypoxia, and was in this work explored in treatment planning of hypoxia-guided brachytherapy of patients with locally advanced cervical cancer (LACC. Materials and methods: Pharmacokinetic ABrix maps were derived from DCE-MR images taken prior to chemoradiotherapy of 78 patients with LACC. A logistic regression procedure was used to segment the tumor volume fraction from the ABrix maps that showed the strongest association with patient survival, denoted biological target volume (BTV fraction. A hypoxia gene score was calculated from a biopsy-based gene signature and correlated against the BTV fraction. Brachytherapy planning based on the ABrix maps was performed, for 23 patients. A general planning aim was a minimum D90 dose of 7.5 Gy to the tumor per brachytherapy fraction. Two planning approaches were explored: (1 a conventional uniform and (2 a non-uniform approach targeting the BTV to the highest dose possible. Results: The segmented BTV fraction was significantly associated local and locoregional control (P = 0.025 and the hypoxia gene score (P = 0.002. Comparing brachytherapy approaches 1 and 2, it was possible to dose escalate the BTV with 0.4 Gy per fraction in median (D90; cohort range [0, 3.8]. Some tumors could not be dose escalated without violating the dose constraints to the organs at risk. Conclusions: Tumor regions associated with hypoxia may be targeted with brachytherapy. The presented methodology may become useful in future strategies to improve cure probability of resistant tumors. Keywords: Hypoxia, Uterine cervical cancer, Computer-assisted image analysis, Magnetic resonance imaging, Brachytherapy

  3. Moderate value of non-contrast magnetic resonance imaging after non-dislocating shoulder trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Marc; Müller-Hübenthal, Jonas; Grimme, Stefan; Balke, Maurice; Bouillon, Bertil; Lefering, Rolf; Goßmann, Axel; Shafizadeh, Sven

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the value of shoulder magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) obtained in the community setting interpreted by musculoskeletal radiologists in patients with shoulder pain initiated by a single non-dislocating shoulder trauma. In 56 of 61 consecutive patients who underwent shoulder arthroscopy due to pain after a single non-dislocating shoulder trauma, the data sets of non-contrast MRI were complete. These were retrospectively interpreted by three radiologists specialized on musculoskeletal MRI who were blinded for patients' history and who did not have access to the reports of arthroscopy. Standard evaluation forms were used to assess the MRIs for superior labrum anterior and posterior (SLAP) lesions, anterior or posterior labrum lesions, lesions of the long head of biceps tendon (LHB) and for partial tears of the supraspinatus tendon and the upper quarter of the subscapularis tendon. Quality of the MRI was assessed by each radiologist on a four-point scale. The pooled sensitivity for the three radiologists for the detection of SLAP lesions was 45.0 %, for anterior or posterior labrum tears 77.8 and 66.7 %, for lesions of the LHB 63.2 % and for partial tears of the supraspinatus or subscapularis tendon tears 84.8 and 33.3 %. Corresponding inter-rater reliabilities were poor (SLAP lesions) to substantial (anterior labrum tears). Quality of MRI only influenced the accuracy for the detection of posterior labrum tears. A non-contrast shoulder MRI obtained in the community setting after non-dislocating shoulder trauma has a moderate sensitivity for most intraarticular pathologies when interpreted by musculoskeletal radiologists. Accuracy is dependent on the observer and not on the assessed quality. Case series, Level IV.

  4. Theranostic liposomes as a bimodal carrier for magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent and photosensitizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skupin-Mrugalska, Paulina; Sobotta, Lukasz; Warowicka, Alicja; Wereszczynska, Beata; Zalewski, Tomasz; Gierlich, Piotr; Jarek, Marcin; Nowaczyk, Grzegorz; Kempka, Marek; Gapinski, Jacek; Jurga, Stefan; Mielcarek, Jadwiga

    2018-03-01

    The present study is focused on the development of liposomes bearing gadolinium chelate (GdLip) providing two functionalities for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and photodynamic therapy of cancer. A lipid derivative of gadolinium(III) diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid salt (GdDTPA1) was inserted in the liposomal membrane and served as MRI contrast agent whereas a zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) was used as a model photosensitizer. In addition to conventional liposomes, pegylated lipids were used for the preparation of "stealth" liposomes. The characterization of different GdLip formulations involved evaluation of the liposomes size by nanoparticle tracking analysis, thermal phase behavior by differential scanning calorimetry and ZnPc-mediated singlet oxygen production. Furthermore, relaxivity measurements were performed as well as cytotoxicity and photodynamic activity against cancerous and normal cell lines was studied. Size and thermal behavior were only slightly influenced by GdLip composition, however it distinctly affected singlet oxygen production of ZnPc-loaded GdLip. The quantum yields of singlet oxygen generation by zinc phthalocyanine incorporated in GdLip containing cationic or/and pegylated lipids were smaller than those obtained for non-pegylated carriers with l-α-phosphatidylglycerol. In general, all formulations of GdLip, irrespectively of composition, were characterized by relaxivities higher than those of commercially used contrast agents (e.g. Magnevist®). NMR study has shown that the incorporation of ZnPc into the formulations of GdLip increases the relaxation parameters r 1 and r 2 , compared to the values for the non-loaded vesicles. GdDTPA1 did not influence the photodynamic activity of ZnPc against HeLa cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Rapid nanoparticle-mediated monitoring of bacterial metabolic activity and assessment of antimicrobial susceptibility in blood with magnetic relaxation.

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    Charalambos Kaittanis

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Considering the increased incidence of bacterial infections and the emergence of multidrug resistant bacteria at the global level, we designed superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as nanosensors for the assessment of antimicrobial susceptibility through magnetic relaxation. In this report, we demonstrate that iron oxide nanosensors, either dextran-coated supplemented with Con A or silica-coated conjugated directly to Con A, can be used for the fast (1 quantification of polysaccharides, (2 assessment of metabolic activity and (3 determination of antimicrobial susceptibility in blood. The use of these polysaccharide nanosensors in the determination of antimicrobial susceptibility in the clinic or the field, and the utilization of these nanoprobes in pharmaceutical R&D are anticipated.

  6. Synthesis and magnetic hyperthermia studies on high susceptible Fe1-xMgxFe2O4 superparamagnetic nanospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manohar, A.; Krishnamoorthi, C.

    2017-12-01

    Majority studies on magnetic hyperthermia properties were carried out by modifying the saturation mass magnetization (Ms) of the samples. Here efforts were made to enhance the specific heat generation rate (SHGR) of single domain superparamagnetic (SP) material by modifying its magnetic susceptibility. Well crystallined, inverse spinel structured and close to monosize Fe1-xMgxFe2O4 (x = 0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, & 0.5) compounds with nanosphere geometry (diameter 10 nm) were synthesized by solvothermal reflux method at ≈ 300 °C . In the literature it is reported that magnesium ferrites synthesized at high temperatures yield mixed (normal & inverse) spinel structures. The inverse spinel structure was confirmed by X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), lattice vibrations and magnetic characteristics of the compounds. The Ms of the compounds decrease with increase of substituent Mg2+ concentration. Under high excitation energy the inter-valance charge transfer whereas under low excitation energy the intra-valance charge transfer process were predominant. The as-synthesized nanospheres were encapsulated by hydrophobic oleic acid and were exchanged by hydrophilic poly(acrylic acid) by chemical exchange process. Estimated magnetic hyperthermia power or SHGR of the x = 0, 0.3 & 0.5 were 11, 11.4 & 22.4 W per gram of respective compounds, respectively, under 63.4 kA m-1 field amplitude and 126 kHz frequency. The SHGR enhances with Mg2+ concentration though its Ms reduces and is attributed to reduced spin-orbital coupling in the compounds with enhanced Mg2+ concentration. This may pave a new way to develop magnetic hyperthermia material by modifying magnetic susceptibility of the compounds against to the reported Ms modification approach. The obtained high SHGR of the biocompatible compounds could be used in magnetic hyperthermia applications in biomedical field.

  7. Estrogen receptor targeted contrast agents for molecular magnetic resonance imaging of breast cancer hormonal status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adi ePais

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The estrogen receptor α (ER is over expressed in most breast cancers and its level serves as a major prognostic factor. It is important to develop quantitative molecular imaging methods that specifically detect ER in vivo and assess its function throughout the entire primary breast cancer, as well as in metastatic breast cancer lesions. This study presents the biochemical and molecular features, as well as the magnetic resonance imaging effects of two novel ER- targeted contrast agents (CAs based on pyridine-tetra-acetate-Gd(III chelate conjugated to 17β-estradiol (EPTA-Gd or to tamoxifen (TPTA-Gd. The experiments were conducted in solution, in human breast cancer cells and in severe combined immunodeficient mice implanted with transfected ER-positive and ER-negative MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer xenografts. Binding studies with ER in solution and in human breast cancer cells indicated affinities in the micromolar range of both CAs. Biochemical and molecular studies in breast cancer cell cultures showed that both CAs exhibit estrogen like agonistic activity, enhancing cell proliferation, as well as up-regulating cMyc oncogene and down-regulating ER expression levels. The MRI longitudinal relaxivity was significantly augmented by EPTA-Gd in ER-positive cells as compared to ER-negative cells. Dynamic contrast enhanced studies with EPTA-Gd in vivo indicated specific augmentation of the MRI water signal in the ER-positive versus ER-negative xenografts, confirming EPTA-Gd specific interaction with ER. In contrast, TPTA-Gd did not show increased enhancement in ER-positive tumors and did not appear to interact in vivo with the tumors’ ER. However, TPTA-Gd was found to interact strongly with muscle tissue, enhancing muscle signal intensity in a mechanism independent of the presence of ER. The specificity of EPTA-Gd interaction with ER in vivo was further verified by acute and chronic competition with tamoxifen. The chronic tamoxifen treatment also

  8. The influence of interparticle correlations and self-assembly on the dynamic initial magnetic susceptibility spectra of ferrofluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, A.O., E-mail: alexey.ivanov@urfu.ru [Institute of Mathematics and Computer Sciences, Ural Federal University, Lenin Avenue 51, 620000 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Kantorovich, S.S. [Institute of Mathematics and Computer Sciences, Ural Federal University, Lenin Avenue 51, 620000 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, Sensengasse 8, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Elfimova, E.A.; Zverev, V.S. [Institute of Mathematics and Computer Sciences, Ural Federal University, Lenin Avenue 51, 620000 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Sindt, J.O. [School of Chemistry, University of Edinburgh, David Brewster Road, Edinburgh EH9 3FJ, Scotland (United Kingdom); Camp, P.J. [Institute of Mathematics and Computer Sciences, Ural Federal University, Lenin Avenue 51, 620000 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); School of Chemistry, University of Edinburgh, David Brewster Road, Edinburgh EH9 3FJ, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2017-06-01

    Using computer simulations and a mean-field theoretical approach, we study how the growth in dipolar interparticle correlations manifests itself in the frequency-dependent initial magnetic susceptibility of a ferrofluid. Our recently developed theory gives the correct single-particle Debye-theory results in the low-concentration, non-interacting regime; and it yields the exact leading-order contributions from interparticle correlations. The susceptibility spectra are analysed in terms of the low-frequency behaviours of the real and imaginary parts, and the position of the peak in the imaginary part. By comparing the theoretical predictions to the results from Brownian dynamics simulations, it is possible to identify the conditions where correlations are important, but where self-assembly has not developed. We also provide a qualitative explanation for the behaviour of spectra beyond the mean-field limit. - Highlights: • The interparticle interaction influences the dynamic susceptibility spectra of magnetic fluids. • The imaginary part maximum shifts to lower frequencies due to the dipolar interparticle interaction. • Chain formation should influence the susceptibility spectrum by shifting the absorption peak to lower frequencies.

  9. The influence of interparticle correlations and self-assembly on the dynamic initial magnetic susceptibility spectra of ferrofluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, A.O.; Kantorovich, S.S.; Elfimova, E.A.; Zverev, V.S.; Sindt, J.O.; Camp, P.J.

    2017-01-01

    Using computer simulations and a mean-field theoretical approach, we study how the growth in dipolar interparticle correlations manifests itself in the frequency-dependent initial magnetic susceptibility of a ferrofluid. Our recently developed theory gives the correct single-particle Debye-theory results in the low-concentration, non-interacting regime; and it yields the exact leading-order contributions from interparticle correlations. The susceptibility spectra are analysed in terms of the low-frequency behaviours of the real and imaginary parts, and the position of the peak in the imaginary part. By comparing the theoretical predictions to the results from Brownian dynamics simulations, it is possible to identify the conditions where correlations are important, but where self-assembly has not developed. We also provide a qualitative explanation for the behaviour of spectra beyond the mean-field limit. - Highlights: • The interparticle interaction influences the dynamic susceptibility spectra of magnetic fluids. • The imaginary part maximum shifts to lower frequencies due to the dipolar interparticle interaction. • Chain formation should influence the susceptibility spectrum by shifting the absorption peak to lower frequencies.

  10. Assessment of esophageal carcinoma undergoing concurrent chemoradiotherapy with quantitative dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Jing; Han, Qian; Zhu, Shaocheng; Shi, Dapeng; Dou, Shewei; Su, Zihua; Xu, Xiao

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether quantitative dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) can predict an early response in primary esophageal carcinoma patients undergoing concurrent chemoradiotherapy. A total of 25 patients with who were pathologically confirmed stage II-III esophageal carcinoma underwent quantitative DCE-MRI prior to chemoradiotherapy, and at 3 weeks post-treatment, the quantitative parameters [K trans (volume transfer constant; the rate at which contrast agent distributes from the plasma to the EES), K ep (rate contrast; the rate at which the contrast agent that has diffused to the EES returns to the plasma) and V e (the contrast agent percentage in the space of the extracellular fluid)] were analyzed respectively. The 25 cases were categorized as a complete response (CR) or a partial response (PR). An independent samples Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare the quantitative parameters between CR and PR. A receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) was used to determine the best predictor. In total, 17 patients were in the CR group and 8 patients were in the PR group. Pretreatment Ktrans, K ep and V e values were 0.54±0.17/min, 1.12±0.46/min and 0.37±0.14, respectively, in the CR group, and 0.40±0.21/min, 1.07±0.37/min and 0.40±0.22, respectively, in the PR group. There was a significant difference between the two groups for K trans , but there were no significant differences between the two groups for K ep and V e . The K trans , K ep and V e values at 3 weeks post-treatment were 0.33±0.11/min, 0.86±0.31/min and 0.66±0.05, respectively, in the CR group, and 0.62±0.22/min, 1.19±0.39/min and 0.45±0.19, respectively, in the PR group. The corresponding U values were -3.319, -1.719 and -2.628, respectively, and the P-values were 0.006, 0.119 and 0.021, respectively. The areas under the ROC curve of K trans prior to chemoradiotherapy, and of K trans and K ep at 3 weeks post-treatment were 0

  11. Evaluation of colonic involvement in endometriosis: double-contrast barium enema vs. magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faccioli, N; Foti, G; Manfredi, R; Mainardi, P; Spoto, E; Ruffo, G; Minelli, L; Mucelli, R Pozzi

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the accuracy of double-contrast barium enema (DCBE) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis of intestinal endometriosis using the histological examination on resected specimen as comparative standard. Eighty-three consecutive patients with suspected intestinal endometriosis, resected between 2005 and 2007, were prospectively evaluated. All of the women underwent preoperative DCBE and MRI on the same day. We evaluated number, site (rectum, sigmoid, cecum), and size of the lesions. The imaging findings were correlated with those resulting at pathology. Among the 65 women who underwent surgery, 50/65 (76.9%) were found to have bowel endometriosis, with 9/50 (18%) patients presenting two lesions; DCBE allowed to detect 50/59 (84.7%) lesions. MRI allowed to detect 42/59 (71.1%) lesions. DCBE showed sensibility, specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy of respectively 84.7, 93.7, 98.0, 62.5, and 86.6%, MRI of 71.1, 83.3, 93.3, 46.8, and 74.6%. DCBE is more accurate than unenhanced MRI in the diagnosis of bowel endometriosis, and should be preferred in the preoperative management of this disease, since it usually enables a proper surgical planning.

  12. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the wrist in early arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Cimmino

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: MRI has been proposed as the imaging method of choice to evaluate the long-term outcome in patients with early arthritis. The role of dynamic MRI, performed at presentation, in predicting the outcome of patients with early arthritis has been addressed in the present study. Methods: 39 patients with early arthritis, involving at least one wrist, were studied with clinical visits and laboratory investigations, every 3 months. Dynamic MRI was performed with a low-field (0.2T, extremity-dedicated machine (Artoscan, Esaote, Genova, Italy equipped with a permanent magnet and with a dedicated hand and wrist coil. During the intravenous injection of Gd-DTPA, twenty consecutive fast images of 3 slices of the wrist were acquired. The synovial contrast enhancement ratio was calculated both as rate of early enhancement (REE per second during the first 55” and as relative enhancement (RE at t seconds. Results: In our cohort of patients, REE and RE were significantly lower than those observed in a historical cohort of 36 patients with active rheumatoid arthritis. In univariate analysis, low RE predicted complete remission of arthritis. In multivariate analysis, fulfillment of RA criteria during follow-up was predicted by high RE. The need for immunosuppressive treatment at the end of follow-up was predicted by both low RE and high REE. Conclusions: Dynamic MRI may be used to predict several outcomes of early arthritis involving the wrist

  13. Venous reflux on contrast-enhanced head and neck magnetic resonance angiography: Analysis of causative factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Dong Jae; Lee, Eun Ja [Dept. of Radiology, Dongguk University Ilsan Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Jong Myon [Dept. of Preventive Medicine, Jeju National University School of Medicine, Jeju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the causative factors of venous reflux on contrast-enhanced head and neck magnetic resonance angiography. We retrospectively reviewed 150 patients with right-arm injections and 150 patients with left-arm injections. We included the age, gender, body mass index, history of hypertension, and history of diabetes mellitus in the evaluation of all patients. We measured the shortest width of the left or right brachiocephalic vein (BCV), the diameter of the aortic arch, and the distance between the sternum and vertebral body. The relationship between these factors and the venous reflux was analyzed. In patients with venous reflux, we performed qualitative image scoring for suboptimal images. In patients with venous reflux, the image quality of the left-arm injection group was significantly inferior to the image quality of the right-arm injection group. The mean age and the male-to-female ratio of patients with venous reflux were significantly higher than those of patients without venous reflux. In patients receiving the left-arm injection, the mean shortest width of the left BCV was significantly narrower in patients with venous reflux than in patients without venous reflux. A left-arm injection should be avoided, especially in elderly patients, to acquire an optimal image.

  14. Head and neck paragangliomas: diffusion weighted and dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Ying; Shi, Huimin; Tao, Xiaofeng

    2016-01-01

    To determine the feature values of head and neck paragangliomas on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Patients with primary head and neck paraganglioma who underwent both DWI and DCE-MRI before treatment between January 2010 and June 2013 were identified. Two radiologists assessed apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values on DWI and kinetic characteristics on DCE-MRI. The time intensity curves (TICs) and dynamic parameters, including peak height (PH), maximum enhancement ratio (ER max ), time to peak enhancement (T peak ) and maximum rise slope (Slope max ), were generated and evaluated. Ten patients with head and neck paraganglioma were retrospectively analyzed. On conventional MRI, the tumors demonstrated as well-circumscribed, strongly enhanced lesions. Mean ADC value of the lesions was 1.12 ± 0.15 × 10 −3 mm 2 /s. The TICs demonstrated washout pattern (type-III) in all lesions. The mean PH, ER max , T peak and Slope max value was 121.24 ± 63.99, 193.79 ± 67.18, 8.16 ± 3.29 and 25.42 ± 7.91, respectively. Head and neck paragangliomas demonstrate distinctive DWI and DCE-MRI results than for other benign tumors which should be taken into account in further evaluation of MRI on head and neck lesions

  15. Accelerated free breathing ECG triggered contrast enhanced pulmonary vein magnetic resonance angiography using compressed sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roujol, Sébastien; Foppa, Murilo; Basha, Tamer A; Akçakaya, Mehmet; Kissinger, Kraig V; Goddu, Beth; Berg, Sophie; Nezafat, Reza

    2014-11-22

    To investigate the feasibility of accelerated electrocardiogram (ECG)-triggered contrast enhanced pulmonary vein magnetic resonance angiography (CE-PV MRA) with isotropic spatial resolution using compressed sensing (CS). Nineteen patients (59±13 y, 11 M) referred for MR were scanned using the proposed accelerated free breathing ECG-triggered 3D CE-PV MRA sequence (FOV=340×340×110 mm3, spatial resolution=1.5×1.5×1.5 mm3, acquisition window=140 ms at mid diastole and CS acceleration factor=5) and a conventional first-pass breath-hold non ECG-triggered 3D CE-PV MRA sequence. CS data were reconstructed offline using low-dimensional-structure self-learning and thresholding reconstruction (LOST) CS reconstruction. Quantitative analysis of PV sharpness and subjective qualitative analysis of overall image quality were performed using a 4-point scale (1: poor; 4: excellent). Quantitative PV sharpness was increased using the proposed approach (0.73±0.09 vs. 0.51±0.07 for the conventional CE-PV MRA protocol, pMRA allows evaluation of PV anatomy with improved sharpness compared to conventional non-ECG gated first-pass CE-PV MRA. This technique may be a valuable alternative for patients in which the first pass CE-PV MRA fails due to inaccurate first pass timing or inability of the patient to perform a 20-25 seconds breath-hold.

  16. Unsupervised tissue segmentation from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiusano, Gabriele; Staglianò, Alessandra; Basso, Curzio; Verri, Alessandro

    2014-05-01

    Design, implement, and validate an unsupervised method for tissue segmentation from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). For each DCE-MRI acquisition, after a spatial registration phase, the time-varying intensity of each voxel is represented as a sparse linear combination of adaptive basis signals. Both the basis signals and the sparse coefficients are learned by minimizing a functional consisting of a data fidelity term and a sparsity inducing penalty. Tissue segmentation is then obtained by applying a standard clustering algorithm to the computed representation. Quantitative estimates on two real data sets are presented. In the first case, the overlap with expert annotation measured with the DICE metric is nearly 90% and thus 5% more accurate than state-of-the-art techniques. In the second case, assessment of the correlation between quantitative scores, obtained by the proposed method against imagery manually annotated by two experts, achieved a Pearson coefficient of 0.83 and 0.87, and a Spearman coefficient of 0.83 and 0.71, respectively. The sparse representation of DCE MRI signals obtained by means of adaptive dictionary learning techniques appears to be well-suited for unsupervised tissue segmentation and applicable to different clinical contexts with little effort. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Magnetism of a sigma-phase Fe{sub 60}V{sub 40} alloy: Magnetic susceptibilities and magnetocaloric effect studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bałanda, Maria [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Science, PL-31-342 Kraków (Poland); Dubiel, Stanisław M., E-mail: Stanislaw.Dubiel@fis.agh.edu.pl [AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, PL-30-059 Kraków (Poland); Pełka, Robert [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Science, PL-31-342 Kraków (Poland)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Sigma-phase Fe{sub 60}V{sub 40} alloy was studied by means of AC and DC magnetic susceptibilities. • Re-entrant character of the magnetism has been evidenced. • Curie temperature was found as ∼169 K and the spin-freezing temperature as ∼164 K. • Critical exponents β = 0.6, γ = 1.0 and Δ = 1.6 were determined. • Magnetocaloric effect was investigated. - Abstract: Magnetic properties of a sigma-phase Fe{sub 60}V{sub 40} intermetallic compound were studied by means of ac and dc magnetic susceptibility and magnetocaloric effect measurements. The compound is a soft magnet yet it was found to behave like a re-entrant spin-glass system. The magnetic ordering temperature was found to be T{sub C} ≈ 170 K, while the spin-freezing temperature was ∼164 K. Its relative shift per decade of ac frequency was 0.002, a value smaller than that typical of canonical spin-glasses. Magnetic entropy change, ΔS, in the vicinity of T{sub C} was determined for magnetic field, H, ranging between 5 and 50 kOe. Analysis of ΔS in terms of the power law yielded the critical exponent, n, vs. temperature with the minimum value of 0.75 at T{sub C}, while from the analysis of a relative shift of the maximum value of ΔS with the field a critical exponent Δ = 1.7 was obtained. Based on scaling laws relationships values of other two exponents viz. β = 0.6 and γ = 1 were determined.

  18. Stratigraphic correlations in mid- to late-Proterozoic carbonates of the Democratic Republic of Congo using magnetic susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delpomdor, Franck R. A.; Devleeschouwer, Xavier; Spassov, Simo; Préat, Alain R.

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we have tested the application of magnetic susceptibility measurements in Cu-Ag-Zn-Pb-(Fe)-mineralized carbonates of the BIe subgroup (Democratic Republic of Congo) as an efficient tool for regional and global high-resolution stratigraphic correlations in the Neoproterozoic marine carbonates. To achieve this goal, we integrate the low-field magnetic susceptibility (XLF) data with facies analyses, geochemistry and isotope stratigraphy. The microfacies analyses of two cores, Tshinyama#S70 and Kafuku#15, drilled in the early Neoproterozoic carbonates of the Mbuji-Mayi Supergroup reveal a deep carbonate ramp setting associated with a microbial/stromatolitic mid-ramp environment. High-resolution stratigraphic correlations using magnetic susceptibility and C-isotope curves established for both cores, 190 km apart, suggest a sedimentary hiatus at the base of the Tshinyama#S70 succession. C-O and Sr isotopes and Sr/Ca and Fe abundances show that a diagenetic meteoric overprint affected the series of the Tshinyama#S70 core and a thermal effect related to mineralizing fluids affected the Kafuku#15 core carbonates.

  19. Laboratory Investigation of Complex Conductivity and Magnetic Susceptibility on Natural Iron Oxide Coated Sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C.; Slater, L. D.; Day-Lewis, F. D.; Briggs, M. A.

    2017-12-01

    Redox reactions occurring at the oxic/anoxic interface where groundwater discharges to surface water commonly result in iron oxide deposition that coats sediment grains. With relatively large total surface area, these iron oxide coated sediments serve as a sink for sorption of dissolved contaminants, although this sink may be temporary if redox conditions fluctuate with varied flow conditions. Characterization of the distribution of iron oxides in streambed sediments could provide valuable understanding of biogeochemical reactions and the ability of a natural system to sorb contaminants. Towards developing a field methodology, we conducted laboratory spectral induced polarization (SIP) and magnetic susceptibility (MS) measurements on natural iron oxide coated sand (Fe-sand) with grain sizes ranging from 0.3 to 2.0 mm in order to assess the sensitivity of these measurements to iron oxides in sediments. The Fe-sand was also sorted by sieving into various grain sizes to study the impact of grain size on the polarization mechanisms. The unsorted Fe-sand saturated with 0.01 S/m NaCl solution exhibited a distinct phase response ( > 4 mrad) in the frequency range from 0.001 to 100 Hz whereas regular silica sand was characterized by a phase response less than 1 mrad under the same conditions. The presence of iron oxide substantially increased MS (3.08×10-3 SI) over that of regular sand ( < 10-5 SI). An increase of both phase peak and relaxation time was found with increasing grain size of the sorted Fe-sand. Laboratory results demonstrated that SIP and MS may be well suited to mapping the distribution of iron oxides in streambed sediments associated with anoxic groundwater discharge.

  20. Task-evoked brain functional magnetic susceptibility mapping by independent component analysis (χICA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zikuan; Calhoun, Vince D

    2016-03-01

    Conventionally, independent component analysis (ICA) is performed on an fMRI magnitude dataset to analyze brain functional mapping (AICA). By solving the inverse problem of fMRI, we can reconstruct the brain magnetic susceptibility (χ) functional states. Upon the reconstructed χ dataspace, we propose an ICA-based brain functional χ mapping method (χICA) to extract task-evoked brain functional map. A complex division algorithm is applied to a timeseries of fMRI phase images to extract temporal phase changes (relative to an OFF-state snapshot). A computed inverse MRI (CIMRI) model is used to reconstruct a 4D brain χ response dataset. χICA is implemented by applying a spatial InfoMax ICA algorithm to the reconstructed 4D χ dataspace. With finger-tapping experiments on a 7T system, the χICA-extracted χ-depicted functional map is similar to the SPM-inferred functional χ map by a spatial correlation of 0.67 ± 0.05. In comparison, the AICA-extracted magnitude-depicted map is correlated with the SPM magnitude map by 0.81 ± 0.05. The understanding of the inferiority of χICA to AICA for task-evoked functional map is an ongoing research topic. For task-evoked brain functional mapping, we compare the data-driven ICA method with the task-correlated SPM method. In particular, we compare χICA with AICA for extracting task-correlated timecourses and functional maps. χICA can extract a χ-depicted task-evoked brain functional map from a reconstructed χ dataspace without the knowledge about brain hemodynamic responses. The χICA-extracted brain functional χ map reveals a bidirectional BOLD response pattern that is unavailable (or different) from AICA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Importance of contrast-enhanced fluid-attenuated inversion reconvery magnetic resonance imaging in various intracranial pathologic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Kyoung; Lee, Eun Ja; Kim, Sung Won; Lee, Yong Seok [Dept. of Radiology, Dongguk University Ilsan Hospital, Goyang(Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    Intracranial lesions may show contrast enhancement through various mechanisms that are closely associated with the disease process. The preferred magnetic resonance sequence in contrast imaging is T1-weighted imaging (T1WI) at most institutions. However, lesion enhancement is occasionally inconspicuous on T1WI. Although fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequences are commonly considered as T2-weighted imaging with dark cerebrospinal fluid, they also show mild T1-weighted contrast, which is responsible for the contrast enhancement. For several years, FLAIR imaging has been successfully incorporated as a routine sequence at our institution for contrast-enhanced (CE) brain imaging in detecting various intracranial diseases. In this pictorial essay, we describe and illustrate the diagnostic importance of CE-FLAIR imaging in various intracranial pathologic conditions.

  2. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging in the Assessment of Inflammatory Breast Cancer Prior to and After Neoadjuvant Treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uden, D.J.P. van; Wilt, J.H.W. de; Meeuwis, C.; Blanken-Peeters, C.; Mann, R.M.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to describe the dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) features of inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) and to assess the value of DCE-MRI for the prediction of pathological complete response (pCR). METHODS: Image analysis was performed in 15

  3. MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING CONTRAST ENHANCEMENT OF EXTRA-OCULAR MUSCLES IN DOGS WITH NO CLINICAL EVIDENCE OF ORBITAL DISEASE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    JOSLYN, S.; Richards, S.; Boroffka, S.A.E.B.; Mitchell, M.; Hammond, G.; Sullivan, M.T.

    2013-01-01

    Enhancement of extra-ocular muscles has been reported in cases of orbital pathology in both veterinary and medical magnetic resonance imaging.We have also observed this finding in the absence of orbital disease. The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe extra-ocular muscle contrast

  4. Gender differences in contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging after acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhans, Birgit; Ibrahim, Tareq; Hausleiter, Jörg; Sonne, Carolin; Martinoff, Stefan; Schömig, Albert; Hadamitzky, Martin

    2013-03-01

    Besides different risk profiles for cardiovascular events in men and women, several studies reported gender differences in mortality after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). As infarct size has been shown to correlate with mortality, it is widely accepted as surrogate marker for clinical outcome. Currently, cardiovascular imaging studies covering the issue of gender differences are rare. As magnetic resonance scar characterization parameters are emerging as additional prognostic factors after acute myocardial infarction, we sought to evaluate gender differences in CMR infarct characteristics in patients after acute myocardial infarction. We prospectively analyzed patients (n = 448) with AMI and primary angioplasty, who underwent contrast-enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging on a 1.5 T scanner in median 5 [4, 6] days after the acute event. [corrected]. CMR scar size was measured 15 min after gadolinium injection. In addition presence and extent of microvascular obstruction (MVO) was assessed. A matched pair analysis was performed in order to exclude confounding by gender related co-morbidities and gender differences in established clinical risk factors. Matching process according to clinical risk defined by GRACE score resulted in 93 mixed gender couples. Women were significantly older than men (64.4 ± 11.9 vs. 60.5 ± 12.3, p = 0.03) and presented with a significantly better ejection fraction before angioplasty (48.9 ± 8.4 vs. 46.2 ± 8.9, p = 0.04). Infarct size did not differ significantly between women and men (13.5 ± 10.7 vs. 15.1 ± 11.8, p = 0.32). Size of MVO was significantly smaller in women than in men (0.48 ± 1.3 vs. 1.2 ± 3.0, p = 0.03). Comparing scar characterization between women and men with similar risk profiles revealed no gender differences in scar size. Size of MVO, however, was significantly smaller in women and might reflect better cardioprotective mechanisms in women. Whether these changes have prognostic implications has to

  5. Feasibility study of determining axial stress in ferromagnetic bars using reciprocal amplitude of initial differential susceptibility obtained from static magnetization by permanent magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Dongge; Wu, Xinjun

    2018-03-01

    An electromagnetic method for determining axial stress in ferromagnetic bars is proposed. In this method, the tested bar is under the static magnetization provided by permanent magnets. The tested bar do not have to be magnetized up to the technical saturation because reciprocal amplitude of initial differential susceptibility (RAIDS) is adopted as the feature parameter. RAIDS is calculated from the radial magnetic flux density Br Lo = 0.5 at the Lift-off Lo = 0.5 mm, radial magnetic flux density Br Lo = 1 at the Lift-off Lo = 1 mm and axial magnetic flux density Bz Lo = 1 at the Lift-off Lo = 1 mm from the surface of the tested bar. Firstly, the theoretical derivation of RAIDS is carried out according to Gauss' law for magnetism, Ampere's Law and the Rayleigh relation in Rayleigh region. Secondly, the experimental system is set up for a 2-meter length and 20 mm diameter steel bar. Thirdly, an experiment is carried out on the steel bar to analyze the relationship between the obtained RAIDS and the axial stress. Experimental results show that the obtained RAIDS decreases almost linearly with the increment of the axial stress inside the steel bar in the initial elastic region. The proposed method has the potential to determine tensile axial stress in the slender cylindrical ferromagnetic bar.

  6. Differentiating perforated from non-perforated appendicitis on contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenbaum, Daniel G.; Kovanlikaya, Arzu [New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medicine, Division of Pediatric Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Askin, Gulce [Weill Cornell Medical College, Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, New York, NY (United States); Beneck, Debra M. [New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medicine, Department of Pathology, New York, NY (United States)

    2017-10-15

    The role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in pediatric appendicitis is increasing; MRI findings predictive of appendiceal perforation have not been specifically evaluated. To assess the performance of MRI in differentiating perforated from non-perforated appendicitis. A retrospective review of pediatric patients undergoing contrast-enhanced MRI and subsequent appendectomy was performed, with surgicopathological confirmation of perforation. Appendiceal diameter and the following 10 MRI findings were assessed: appendiceal restricted diffusion, wall defect, appendicolith, periappendiceal free fluid, remote free fluid, restricted diffusion within free fluid, abscess, peritoneal enhancement, ileocecal wall thickening and ileus. Two-sample t-test and chi-square tests were used to analyze continuous and discrete data, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity for individual MRI findings were calculated and optimal thresholds for measures of accuracy were selected. Seventy-seven patients (mean age: 12.2 years) with appendicitis were included, of whom 22 had perforation. The perforated group had a larger mean appendiceal diameter and mean number of MRI findings than the non-perforated group (12.3 mm vs. 8.6 mm; 5.0 vs. 2.0, respectively). Abscess, wall defect and restricted diffusion within free fluid had the greatest specificity for perforation (1.00, 1.00 and 0.96, respectively) but low sensitivity (0.36, 0.25 and 0.32, respectively). The receiver operator characteristic curve for total number of MRI findings had an area under the curve of 0.92, with an optimal threshold of 3.5. A threshold of any 4 findings had the best ability to accurately discriminate between perforated and non-perforated cases, with a sensitivity of 82% and specificity of 85%. Contrast-enhanced MRI can differentiate perforated from non-perforated appendicitis. The presence of multiple findings increases diagnostic accuracy, with a threshold of any four findings optimally discriminating between

  7. Theoretical investigations of magnetic properties of MRI contrast agents and carbon nanostructures

    OpenAIRE

    Yazyev, Oleg; Helm, Lothar

    2008-01-01

    The phenomenon of magnetism is one of the key components of today's technological progress. Magnetic interactions and magnetic materials are essential for the scientific disciplines of physics, chemistry and biology, making this subject truly multidisciplinary. This thesis is devoted to magnetic properties of two classes of substances. The first class represents the complexes of the ions of paramagnetic metals, primarily of the gadolinium(III) ion. These molecular compounds have an important ...

  8. Spin dynamics of Mn12-acetate in the thermally activated tunneling regime: ac susceptibility and magnetization relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohjola, Teemu; Schoeller, Herbert

    2000-12-01

    In this work, we study the spin dynamics of Mn12-acetate molecules in the regime of thermally assisted tunneling. In particular, we describe the system in the presence of a strong transverse magnetic field. Similar to recent experiments, the relaxation time/rate is found to display a series of resonances; their Lorentzian shape is found to stem from the tunneling. The dynamic susceptibility χ(ω) is calculated starting from the microscopic Hamiltonian and the resonant structure manifests itself also in χ(ω). Similar to recent results reported on another molecular magnet, Fe8, we find oscillations of the relaxation rate as a function of the transverse magnetic field when the field is directed along a hard axis of the molecules. This phenomenon is attributed to the interference of the geometrical or Berry phase. We propose susceptibility experiments to be carried out for strong transverse magnetic fields to study these oscillations and for a better resolution of the sharp satellite peaks in the relaxation rates.

  9. Temperature dependence of the magnetic volume susceptibility of human breast fat tissue: an NMR study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprinkhuizen, S.M.; Bakker, C.J.G.; Ippel, J.H.; Boelens, R.; Viergever, M.A.; Bartels, L.W.

    2012-01-01

    Object Proton resonance frequency shift (PRFS)-based MR thermometry (MRT) is hampered by heat-induced susceptibility changes when applied in tissues containing fat, e.g., the human breast. In order to assess the impact of fat susceptibility changes on PRFS-based MRT during thermal therapy in the

  10. Automated low-contrast pattern recognition algorithm for magnetic resonance image quality assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehman, Morgan O; Bao, Zhonghao; Stiving, Scott O; Kasam, Mallik; Lanners, Dianna; Peterson, Teresa; Jonsgaard, Renee; Carter, Rickey; McGee, Kiaran P

    2017-08-01

    Low contrast (LC) detectability is a common test criterion for diagnostic radiologic quality control (QC) programs. Automation of this test is desirable in order to reduce human variability and to speed up analysis. However, automation is challenging due to the complexity of the human visual perception system and the ability to create algorithms that mimic this response. This paper describes the development and testing of an automated LC detection algorithm for use in the analysis of magnetic resonance (MR) images of the American College of Radiology (ACR) QC phantom. The detection algorithm includes fuzzy logic decision processes and various edge detection methods to quantify LC detectability. Algorithm performance was first evaluated using a single LC phantom MR image with the addition of incremental zero mean Gaussian noise resulting in a total of 200 images. A c-statistic was calculated to determine the role of CNR to indicate when the algorithm would detect ten spokes. To evaluate inter-rater agreement between experienced observers and the algorithm, a blinded observer study was performed on 196 LC phantom images acquired from nine clinical MR scanners. The nine scanners included two MR manufacturers and two field strengths (1.5 T, 3.0 T). Inter-rater and algorithm-rater agreement was quantified using Krippendorff's alpha. For the Gaussian noise added data, CNR ranged from 0.519 to 11.7 with CNR being considered an excellent discriminator of algorithm performance (c-statistic = 0.9777). Reviewer scoring of the clinical phantom data resulted in an inter-rater agreement of 0.673 with the agreement between observers and algorithm equal to 0.652, both of which indicate significant agreement. This study demonstrates that the detection of LC test patterns for MR imaging QC programs can be successfully developed and that their response can model the human visual detection system of expert MR QC readers. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  11. Monitoring ankylosing spondylitis therapy by dynamic contrast-enhanced and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaspersic, Natasa [University Medical Centre, Department of Rheumatology, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Sersa, Igor [Jozef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jevtic, Vladimir [Medical Faculty, Department of Radiology, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Tomsic, Matija; Praprotnik, Sonja [University Medical Centre, Department of Rheumatology, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2008-02-15

    The effects of different therapies on enthesitis/osteitis in active ankylosing spondylitis (AS) were evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The aim was to assess the role of quantitative MRI in the evaluation of AS treatment efficacy. Thirty patients with active spondylitis or bilateral sacroilitis were selected and followed up for 1 year. Ten of the patients were treated only with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, 10 patients additionally received at baseline an intravenous pulse of glucocorticoids and 10 patients were treated with regular infusions of infliximab. Disease activity was measured according to clinical instruments and laboratory tests. For each patient, one selected inflamed lesion was followed from baseline through control visits quantitatively by diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) measuring the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and by dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging (DCEI) with evaluation of the enhancement factor (f{sub enh}) and enhancement gradient (g{sub enh}). Clinical and quantitative MRI parameters diminished significantly with regression of the inflammatory activity. The improvement in AS was most pronounced in patients treated with infliximab; after 12 months the ADC diminished from an average of 1.31 to 0.88 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s, f{sub enh} from 1.85 to 0.60, and g{sub enh} from 3.09 to 1.40 %/s. Diffusion-weighted imaging and DCEI were shown to be effective in quantifying changes in inflammation in skeletal lesions during the treatment of AS, and could therefore be convenient for assessing treatment efficacy. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time DWI was used to evaluate the activity of skeletal inflammation in rheumatic diseases such as AS. (orig.)

  12. Vascular segmentation of head phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiograms using grayscale and shape features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ruoxiu; Ding, Hui; Zhai, Fangwen; Zhao, Tong; Zhou, Wenjing; Wang, Guangzhi

    2017-04-01

    In neurosurgery planning, vascular structures must be predetermined, which can guarantee the security of the operation carried out in the case of avoiding blood vessels. In this paper, an automatic algorithm of vascular segmentation, which combined the grayscale and shape features of the blood vessels, is proposed to extract 3D vascular structures from head phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiography dataset. First, a cost function of mis-segmentation is introduced on the basis of traditional Bayesian statistical classification, and the blood vessel of weak grayscale that tended to be misclassified into background will be preserved. Second, enhanced vesselness image is obtained according to the shape-based multiscale vascular enhancement filter. Third, a new reconstructed vascular image is established according to the fusion of vascular grayscale and shape features using Dempster-Shafer evidence theory; subsequently, the corresponding segmentation structures are obtained. Finally, according to the noise distribution characteristic of the data, segmentation ratio coefficient, which increased linearly from top to bottom, is proposed to control the segmentation result, thereby preventing over-segmentation. Experiment results show that, through the proposed method, vascular structures can be detected not only when both grayscale and shape features are strong, but also when either of them is strong. Compared with traditional grayscale feature- and shape feature-based methods, it is better in the evaluation of testing in segmentation accuracy, and over-segmentation and under-segmentation ratios. The proposed grayscale and shape features combined vascular segmentation is not only effective but also accurate. It may be used for diagnosis of vascular diseases and planning of neurosurgery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Evaluating the Microcirculation of Normal Extraocular Muscles Using Quantitative Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yu; Huo, Lei; Wang, Penghui; Huang, Lixiang; Chai, Chao; Sun, Fengyuan; Xia, Shuang; Shen, Wen

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate the microcirculation of normal extraocular muscles using quantitative dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (DCE-MRI). The institutional review board approved the study. Forty-eight eyes were examined using quantitative DCE-MRI on a 3-T MRI system. Quantitative parameters, including the volume transfer constant (Ktrans), the fractional volume of extravascular extracellular space (Ve), and the rate constant (Kep) of each extraocular muscles, were analyzed. The type of DEC time-intensity curve (TIC) was evaluated. The parameters of bilateral extraocular muscles were compared using the Wilcoxon test. The difference in quantitative values of different extraocular muscles was compared using independent-samples Kruskal-Wallis test. No statistical differences of parameters were found between the left and right extraocular muscles (P > 0.05). Volume transfer constant values in medial rectus (MR) muscles and inferior rectus (IR) muscles were significantly higher than those in the lateral rectus (LR) muscles and superior rectus (SR) muscles (P difference was not significant (P > 0.05). In the 4 extraocular muscles, the Ve values of MR are the largest, followed by the IR, LR, and SR values. The DCE time-intensity curves of extraocular muscles are type II or type III. Medial rectus and IR are mainly type III, and LR and SR are mainly type II. The quantitative DCE-MRI can be used as an important and noninvasive technique to evaluate the microcirculation of extraocular muscles. Further investigations for other extraocular muscles diseases by using quantitative DCE-MRI are warranted.

  14. Inbreeding depression increases susceptibility to bovine tuberculosis in lions: an experimental test using an inbred-outbred contrast through translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinkel, Martina; Cooper, Dave; Packer, Craig; Slotow, Rob

    2011-07-01

    Disease can dramatically influence the dynamics of endangered wildlife populations, especially when they are small and isolated, with increased risk of inbreeding. In Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park (HiP), a small, enclosed reserve in South Africa, a large lion (Panthera leo) population arose from a small founder group in the 1960s and started showing conspicuous signs of inbreeding. To restore the health status of the HiP lion population, outbred lions were translocated into the existing population. In this study, we determined the susceptibility to bovine tuberculosis (bTB), and the prevalence of antibody to feline viruses of native lions, and compared the findings with those from translocated outbred lions and their offspring. Antibodies to feline herpesvirus, feline calicivirus, feline parvovirus, and feline coronavirus were present in the lion population, but there was no significant difference in antibody prevalence between native and translocated lions and their offspring, and these feline viruses did not appear to have an effect on the clinical health of HiP lions. However, feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), which was previously absent from HiP, appears to have been introduced into the lion population through translocation. Within 7 yr, the prevalence of antibody to FIV increased up to 42%. Bovine tuberculosis posed a major threat to the inbred native lion population, but not to translocated lions and their offspring. More than 30% of the native lion population died from bTB or malnutrition compared with lions and their offspring. We have demonstrated that management of population genetics through supplementation can successfully combat a disease that threatens population persistence. However, great care must be taken not to introduce new diseases into populations through translocation.

  15. Magnetic susceptibility of road deposited sediments at a national scale – Relation to population size and urban pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordanova, Diana; Jordanova, Neli; Petrov, Petar

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic properties of road dusts from 26 urban sites in Bulgaria are studied. Temporal variations of magnetic susceptibility (χ) during eighteen months monitoring account for approximately 1/3rd of the mean annual values. Analysis of heavy metal contents and magnetic parameters for the fraction d  2  = −0.84) is observed between the ratio ARM/χ and Pb content. It suggests that Pb is related to brake/tyre wear emissions, releasing larger particles and higher Pb during slow driving – braking. Bulk χ values of road dusts per city show significant correlation with population size and mean annual NO 2 concentration on a log-normal scale. The results demonstrate the applicability of magnetic measurements of road dusts for estimation of mean NO 2 levels at high spatial density, which is important for pollution modelling and health risk assessment. - Highlights: • temporal variations of road dust magnetic susceptibility comprise 1/3 of the signal. • high negative correlation between Pb content and magnetic ratio ARM/χ is obtained. • brake- and tyre ware emissions are the main pollution sources of the road dusts. • road dust magnetic susceptibility rises parallel with logarithm of population size. • linear correlation is found between mean NO 2 concentrations and susceptibility. - Magnetic susceptibility of road dusts on a national scale increases proportionally to the population size and mean NO 2 concentrations due to the effect of traffic related pollution

  16. The diagnostic value of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in the detection of experimentally induced anular tears in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappalainen, Anu K; Kääpä, Eeva; Lamminen, Antti; Laitinen, Outi M; Grönblad, Mats

    2002-12-15

    An investigation of the visualization of experimental anular tears using contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. To investigate how different kinds of experimentally induced anular tears can be visualized on contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. Because the outer part of the anulus is innervated, tears of this part of disc are considered one cause for lumbar back pain. Moreover, clinical and experimental studies suggest that anular injuries may lead to a progressive degeneration of the entire disc. In the human disc, vascularized anular tears associated with disc degeneration can be visualized with contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, but acute peripheral anular injuries, probably caused by sudden trauma, have not been studied with this method. Two adjacent lumbar discs in adult sheep (n = 11) were injured with a scalpel blade. The L2-L3 discs were injured superficially, whereas in the L3-L4 discs, the incision reached the nucleus pulposus (full-thickness injury). In seven animals, only a stab incision was made to the disc, and in four animals, a small fragment (5 x 2 x 3 mm) of anulus was cut and removed. The animals were killed 3 weeks (acute injury, n = 5) and 3 months (subacute injury, n = 6) after surgery. Five minutes before death, gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid was injected intravenously. After death, the whole lumbar spines were excised and 1.5-T high-field magnetic resonance imaging was immediately performed. Thereafter, the disc samples were examined histologically to determine the existence of blood capillaries. In all injured discs, the injured area was macroscopically visible. Histologically, blood capillaries, lamellar destruction, and granulation tissue were clearly seen in every injured anulus. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging showed that the superficial injuries were only occasionally visible in magnetic resonance imaging (3 of 11), whereas the full-thickness injuries were visible in a majority of

  17. Correlative Study of Angiogenesis and Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Features of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, B.; Gao, Z.Q.; Yan, X.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To explore the correlation between contrast-enhancement patterns on dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and angiogenesis by analyzing microvessel density (MVD), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and P53 protein expression in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Material and Methods: MRI was performed with a GE Signa 5T MR scanner using SE and FMPSPGR sequences in 30 patients (38 lesions) during the period October 1998 to March 2000. All had histopathologically proven HCC. MR images were reviewed/analyzed retrospectively. The 30 patients were between 35 and 65 years of age. SE T1WI, PDWI, and T2WI were acquired initially. The FMPSPGR sequence was acquired in the same position. The DCE-MRI was performed in the arterial, portal vein, and delay phase after a bolus injection of Gd-DTPA. The specimens were stained immunohistochemically for CD34, VEGF, and P53. MVD was highlighted by anti-CD34 antibody staining. The enhancement features of HCC lesions were studied correlatively with the tumor MVD, VEGF, and P53 expression at protein level. Results: In the arterial phase, the results showed that MVD of HCC in the high-enhancement group (229.76±80.96) was higher than that in the equal-enhancement (173.09±61.38) and low-enhancement groups (153.00±108.58) (P <0.01, respectively). VEGF expression of HCC in the high-enhancement group (68.42%) was higher than that in the equal-enhancement (36.36%) and low-enhancement groups (38.89%) (P <0.05, respectively). In the portal vein phase, MVD of HCC in the enhancement group (259.80±93.30) was higher than that in the non-enhancement group (178.64±92.65) (P <0.05). No significant correlation was found between VEGF expression and the enhancement feature in the portal vein phase. In the delay phase, MVD of HCC in the ring-enhancement group (269.06±57.89) was significantly higher than that in the non-ring-enhancement group (144.10±88.90) (P <0.01). There was a significant difference in VEGF

  18. Differentiation between ductal carcinoma in situ and mastopathy using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and a model of contrast enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiura, Motoko; Tamaki, Yasuhiro; Murase, Kenya

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the feasibility of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) to differentiate between ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and mastopathy by analyzing their time-intensity curves (TICs) using the two-compartment pharmacokinetic model with an assumption of instantaneous injection of contrast medium (TCPM). After the pre-contrast MRI was performed using a 1.5 T MRI system, DCE-MRI was performed four times after the intravenous administration of contrast medium. We set the volumes of interest (VOIs) on the tumor and normal mammary gland, and obtained the TICs in these VOIs. We calculated the following parameters by fitting these TICs to the equation derived from TCPM; the initial slope of the TIC (Slope ini ), the area under the TIC (AUC), the time to peak enhancement (TTP) and the peak enhancement (PeakE). We calculated these parameters in both the lesion and normal mammary gland and the ratios of the parameters in the lesion to those in the normal gland (rSlope ini , rAUC, rTTP and rPeakE). There were significant differences in Slope ini (P = 0.009), PeakE (P = 0.019), rSlope ini (P = 0.010), and rTTP (P = 0.005) between DCIS and mastopathy. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve for Slope ini , PeakE, rSlope ini , and rTTP were 0.67 ± 0.06 (P = 0.009), 0.65 ± 0.06 (P = 0.019), 0.67 ± 0.06 (P = 0.01), and 0.68 ± 0.06 (P = 0.005), respectively. In conclusion, our results suggest that analysis of TICs obtained by DCE-MRI using TCPM appears to be useful for differentiating between DCIS and mastopathy.

  19. A.c. susceptibility measurements in the presence of d.c. magnetic fields for Nd-Ba-Cu-O superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watahiki, M.; Murakami, M.; Yoo, S.I.

    1997-01-01

    We report the temperature and magnetic field dependence of the complex a.c. susceptibility with bias d.c. magnetic fields for melt-processed Nd-Ba-Cu-O superconductor. The onset temperature (T onset ) of the real part of a.c. susceptibility shifted to a lower temperature with increasing d.c. magnetic field. The superconducting transition temperature (T c ) determined by d.c. magnetization measurements did not shift appreciably to a lower-temperature region with increasing d.c. magnetic field. The distinction between T onset and T c indicates that the a.c. susceptibility measurements detect the energy dissipation generated by the motion of flux lines. We have also measured flux profiles and found that there was no appreciable change in flux penetration below and above the peak field, which suggests that the peak effect in Nd-Ba-Cu-O is not due to the phase transition in the flux line lattice. (author)

  20. Phonon effect on the temperature dependence of spin susceptibility and magnetization in metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D.J.; Tanaka, C.; Ukon, S.

    1985-06-01

    In many transition metals the paramagnetic spin susceptibility X increases with increasing temperature much beyond ordinary theories could account for. We demonstrate how the effect of the electron-phonon interactions enable us to understand such temperature dependence of X.

  1. Human Aortic Endothelial Cell Labeling with Positive Contrast Gadolinium Oxide Nanoparticles for Cellular Magnetic Resonance Imaging at 7 Tesla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasir Loai

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Positive T1 contrast using gadolinium (Gd contrast agents can potentially improve detection of labeled cells on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Recently, gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3 nanoparticles have shown promise as a sensitive T1 agent for cell labeling at clinical field strengths compared to conventional Gd chelates. The objective of this study was to investigate Gado CELLTrack, a commercially available Gd2O3 nanoparticle, for cell labeling and MRI at 7 T. Relaxivity measurements yielded r1 = 4.7 s−1 mM−1 and r2/r1 = 6.2. Human aortic endothelial cells were labeled with Gd2O3 at various concentrations and underwent MRI from 1 to 7 days postlabeling. The magnetic resonance relaxation times T1 and T2 of labeled cell pellets were measured. Cellular contrast agent uptake was quantified by inductively coupled plasma–atomic emission spectroscopy, which showed very high uptake compared to conventional Gd compounds. MRI demonstrated significant positive T1 contrast and stable labeling on cells. Enhancement was optimal at low Gd concentrations, attained in the 0.02 to 0.1 mM incubation concentration range (corresponding cell uptake was 7.26 to 34.1 pg Gd/cell. Cell viability and proliferation were unaffected at the concentrations tested and up to at least 3 days postlabeling. Gd2O3 is a promising sensitive and stable positive contrast agent for cellular MRI at 7 T.

  2. Assessing the efficacy of nano- and micro-sized magnetic particles as contrast agents for MRI cell tracking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur Taylor

    Full Text Available Iron-oxide based contrast agents play an important role in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of labelled cells in vivo. Currently, a wide range of such contrast agents is available with sizes varying from several nanometers up to a few micrometers and consisting of single or multiple magnetic cores. Here, we evaluate the effectiveness of these different particles for labelling and imaging stem cells, using a mouse mesenchymal stem cell line to investigate intracellular uptake, retention and processing of nano- and microsized contrast agents. The effect of intracellular confinement on transverse relaxivity was measured by MRI at 7 T and in compliance with the principles of the '3Rs', the suitability of the contrast agents for MR-based cell tracking in vivo was tested using a chick embryo model. We show that for all particles tested, relaxivity was markedly reduced following cellular internalisation, indicating that contrast agent relaxivity in colloidal suspension does not accurately predict performance in MR-based cell tracking studies. Using a bimodal imaging approach comprising fluorescence and MRI, we demonstrate that labelled MSC remain viable following in vivo transplantation and can be tracked effectively using MRI. Importantly, our data suggest that larger particles might confer advantages for longer-term imaging.

  3. Host selection and probing behavior of the poplar aphid Chaitophorus leucomelas (Sternorrhyncha: Aphididae) on two poplar hybrids with contrasting susceptibility to aphids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios-San Martín, Joceline; Quiroz, Andrés; Verdugo, Jaime A; Parra, Leonardo; Hormazabal, Emilio; Astudillo, Luis A; Rojas-Herrera, Marcelo; Ramírez, Claudio C

    2014-02-01

    Poplars are frequently attacked by aphids. The differential susceptibility of poplar hybrids to the aphid Chaitophorus leucomelas Koch (Sternorrhyncha: Aphididae) has been described, but the mechanism underlying this pattern is unknown. This work tested the hypothesis that poplar resistance to this aphid is associated with the presence of volatiles and secondary plant compounds that affect host selection and feeding behavior. This hypothesis was tested by studying the host choice and feeding behavior of C. leucomelas on two poplar hybrids with contrasting susceptibilities to this aphid ([Populus trichocarpa Torrey & Gray x Populus deltoides Bartram ex Marshall] x P. deltoides [TD x D], and [P. trichocarpa x Populus maximowiczii Henry] x [P. trichocarpa x P. maximowiczii] [TM x TM]). The results showed that C. leucomelas rejected leaves of the TM x TM hybrid and did not prefer odors from either hybrid. Electronic monitoring of the probing behavior of C. leucomelas suggested the involvement of antifeedant factors in the TM x TM hybrid. In addition, the chemical characterization of volatiles, epicuticular waxes, and internal phenols of leaves from both poplar hybrids revealed that TM x TM had a higher abundance of monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, n-alkanes, and phenols. These results are discussed in terms of their contribution to poplar breeding programs aimed at enhancing insect resistance.

  4. Early changes in perfusion of glioblastoma during radio- and chemotherapy evaluated by T1-dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Lundemann, Michael; Law, Ian

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The survival times of patients with glioblastoma differ widely and biomarkers that would enable individualized treatment are needed. The objective of this study was to measure changes in the vascular physiology of tumor using T1-dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE...... months post-Tx. DCE-MRI at three Tesla generated maps of blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV), permeability (Ki) and volume of distribution (Vd) using a combination of model-free deconvolution and Patlak plots. Regions of interest in contrast enhancing tumor and in normal appearing white matter were...

  5. Study of amorphous semiconductors doped with rare earths (Gd and Er) and conducting polymers by EPR techniques and magnetic susceptibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sercheli, Mauricio da Silva

    1999-01-01

    This thesis involves the study of amorphous semiconductors and conducting polymers, which have been characterized by EPR and magnetic susceptibility measurements, and to a lesser extent by Raman spectroscopy and RBS. The semiconductors were studied using thin films of silicon doped with rare earth metals, e.g. erbium and gadolinium, which had their magnetic properties studied. Using these studies we could determine the state of valence of the rare earths as well as their concentrations in the silicon matrix. According to our results, the valence of the rare earth metal ions is 3+, and we were able to conclude that 4f electronic shells could not be used for the calculation of the conducting band in this system. Furthermore, the analysis of the data on the magnetic susceptibility of the Er 3+ ion with cubic crystalline acting field, gave us the opportunity to estimate the overall splitting of their electronic states for the first time. The conducting polymers were studied using samples of poly(3-methylthiophene) doped with ClO 4 - , which show a phase transition in the range of 230 K to 130 K. The electron paramagnetic resonance also gives important information on the crystallization, doping level and the presence of polarons or bipolarons in conducting polymers. (author)

  6. Lithology and chronology of ice-sheet fluctuations (magnetic susceptibility of cores from the western Ross Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Anne E.

    1993-01-01

    The goals of the marine geology part of WAIS include reconstructing the chronology and areal extent of ice-sheet fluctuations and understanding the climatic and oceanographic influences on ice-sheet history. As an initial step toward attaining these goals, down-core volume magnetic susceptibility (MS) logs of piston cores from three N-S transects in the western Ross Sea are compared. The core transects are within separate petrographic provinces based on analyses of till composition. The provinces are thought to reflect the previous locations of ice streams on the shelf during the last glaciation. Magnetic susceptibility is a function of magnetic mineral composition, sediment texture, and sediment density. It is applied in the western Ross Sea for two purposes: (1) to determine whether MS data differentiates the three transects (i.e., flow lines), and thus can be used to make paleodrainage reconstructions of the late Wisconsinan ice sheet; and (2) to determine whether the MS data can aid in distinguishing basal till diamictons from diamictons of glacial-marine origin and thus, aid paleoenvironmental interpretations. A comparison of the combined data of cores in each transect is presented.

  7. Magnetic resonance enema vs rectal water-contrast transvaginal sonography in diagnosis of rectosigmoid endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone Roberti Maggiore, U; Biscaldi, E; Vellone, V G; Venturini, P L; Ferrero, S

    2017-04-01

    To compare the accuracy of magnetic resonance enema (MR-e) and rectal water-contrast transvaginal sonography (RWC-TVS) in the diagnosis of rectosigmoid endometriosis. This prospective study included 286 patients of reproductive age with clinical suspicion of rectosigmoid endometriosis. Patients underwent MR-e and RWC-TVS before laparoscopic excision of endometriotic lesions. The findings of MR-e and RWC-TVS were compared with surgical and histological results. Of the 286 patients included in the study, 151 (52.8%) had rectosigmoid endometriosis. MR-e and RWC-TVS had similar accuracy in the diagnosis of rectosigmoid endometriosis (P = 0.063). In the diagnosis of rectosigmoid endometriosis with MR-e, the sensitivity was 95.4% (95% CI, 90.7-99.1%), specificity was 97.8% (95% CI, 93.6-99.5%), positive predictive value (PPV) was 98.0% (95% CI, 94.1-99.6%), negative predictive value (NPV) was 95.0% (95% CI, 89.9-97.9%), positive likelihood ratio (LR+) was 42.91 (95% CI, 14.01-131.46) and negative likelihood ratio (LR-) was 0.05 (95% CI, 0.02-0.10). For diagnosis with RWC-TVS, sensitivity was 92.7% (95% CI, 87.3-96.3%), specificity was 97.0% (95% CI, 92.6-99.2%), PPV was 97.2% (95% CI, 93.0-99.2%), NPV was 92.3% (95% CI, 86.6-96.1%), LR+ was 31.29 (95% CI, 11.90-82.25) and LR- was 0.08 (95% CI, 0.04-0.13). MR-e and RWC-TVS underestimated the size of the endometriotic nodules; for both imaging techniques the underestimation was greater for nodules with a diameter ≥ 30 mm. There was no significant difference in the mean intensity of pain experienced by the patients during the two examinations. RWC-TVS should be the first-line investigation in patients with clinical suspicion of rectosigmoid endometriosis and physicians should be trained in performing this examination. Considering that MR-e is more expensive than RWC-TVS, it should be used only when the findings of RWC-TVS are unclear. Copyright © 2016 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Copyright © 2016

  8. Real-time phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging for assessment of haemodynamics: from phantom to patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traber, Julius; Wurche, Lennart; Dieringer, Matthias A; Utz, Wolfgang; von Knobelsdorff-Brenkenhoff, Florian; Greiser, Andreas; Jin, Ning; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette

    2016-04-01

    Assessment of haemodynamics is crucial in many cardiac diseases. Phase contrast MRI (PC-MRI) can accurately access it. Arrhythmia is a major limitation in conventional segmented PC-MRI (SEG). A real-time PC-MRI sequence (RT) could overcome this. We validated RT by comparing to SEG. A prototype RT using shared velocity encoding was tested against SEG at 1.5 T in a flow phantom and consecutively included patients with (n = 55) or without (n = 59) aortic valve disease. In patients with atrial fibrillation (Afib, n = 15), only RT was applied. Phantom: PC images were acquired in front of and behind an interchangeable aortic-stenosis-like inlay. Mean velocity and flow were quantified. PC images were acquired in the ascending aorta, pulmonary trunk and superior caval vein. Peak velocity, stroke volume and regurgitant fraction were quantified. Phantom: Mean velocities (11 ± 1 to 207 ± 10 cm/s) and flow correlated closely between SEG and RT (r ≥ 0.99, ICC ≥ 0.98, p < 0.0005). Patients without AVD or with aortic regurgitation: Concordance of SEG and RT was excellent regarding peak velocities, stroke volumes (r ≥ 0.91, ICC ≥ 0.94, p < 0.0005) and regurgitant fractions (r = 0.95, ICC = 0.95, p < 0.0005). RT was feasible in all patients with Afib. The real-time sequence is accurate compared to conventional segmented PC-MRI. Its applicability in Afib was shown. Real-time PC-MRI might become a valuable tool in arrhythmia. • Assessment of haemodynamics is crucial in many cardiac diseases. • Arrhythmias are a major limitation of conventional techniques in cardiac magnetic resonance. • A real-time technique, which allows application in arrhythmia, was validated. • This real-time technique might become a valuable tool in arrhythmic patients.

  9. Contrast Media for X-ray and Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Development, Current Status and Future Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenzel, Thomas; Lawaczeck, Rüdiger; Taupitz, Matthias; Jost, Gregor; Lohrke, Jessica; Sieber, Martin A; Pietsch, Hubertus

    2015-09-01

    Over the last 120 years, the extensive advances in medical imaging allowed enhanced diagnosis and therapy of many diseases and thereby improved the quality of life of many patient generations. From the beginning, all technical solutions and imaging procedures were combined with dedicated pharmaceutical developments of contrast media, to further enhance the visualization of morphology and physiology. This symbiosis of imaging hardware and contrast media development was of high importance for the development of modern clinical radiology. Today, all available clinically approved contrast media fulfill the highest requirements for clinical safety and efficacy. All new concepts to increase the efficacy of contrast media have also to consider the high clinical safety standards and cost of goods of current marketed contrast media. Nevertheless, diagnostic imaging will contribute significantly to the progresses in medicine, and new contrast media developments are mandatory to address the medical needs of the future.

  10. Image Quality of the 3 Dimensional Phase-Contrast Technique in an Intracranial Magnetic Resonance Angiography with Artifacts Caused by Orthodontic Devices: A Comparison with 3 Dimensional Time-of-Flight Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Seong Jin; Kim, Young Soo; Hong, Hyun Sook; Kim, Dong Hun

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the degree of image distortion caused by orthodontic devices during a intracranial magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), and to determine the effectiveness of the 3 dimensional phase-contrast (3D PC). Subjects were divided into group A (n = 20) wearing a home-made orthodontic device, and group B (n = 10) with an actual orthodontic device. A 3.0T MR scanner was used, applying 3D time-of-flight (TOF) and 3D PC. Two board-certified radiologists evaluated images independently based on a four point scale classifying segments of the circle of Willis. Magnetic susceptibility variations and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) on maximum intensity projection images were measured. In group A, scores of the 3D TOF and 3D PC were 2.84 ± 0.1 vs. 2.88 ± 0.1 (before) and 1.8 ± 0.4 vs 2.83 ± 0.1 (after wearing device), respectively. In group B, the scores of 3D TOF and 3D PC were 1.86 ± 0.43 and 2.81 ± 0.15 (p = 0.005), respectively. Magnetic susceptibility variations showed meaningful results after wearing the device (p = 0.0001). CNRs of the 3D PC before and after wearing device were 142.9 ± 6.6 vs. 140.8 ± 7.2 (p = 0.7507), respectively. In the 3D TOF, CNRs were 324.8 ± 25.4 vs. 466.3 ± 41.7 (p = 0.0001). The 3D PC may be a solution method for distorted images by magnetic susceptibility in the intracranial MRA compared with 3D TOF.

  11. Value of quantitative magnetic resonance imaging T1-relaxometry in predicting contrast-enhancement in glioblastoma patients

    OpenAIRE

    Hattingen, Elke; M?ller, Andreas; Jurcoane, Alina; M?dler, Burkhard; Ditter, Philip; Schild, Hans; Herrlinger, Ulrich; Glas, Martin; Kebir, Sied

    2017-01-01

    SUMMARIZING THE IMPORTANCE OF THE STUDY The repetitive usage of gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCA) is critical for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation of tumor burden in glioblastoma patients. It is also a crucial tool for determination of radiographical response to treatment. GBCA injection, however, comes with a 2.4% rate of adverse events including life-threatening conditions such as nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF). Moreover, GBCA have been shown to be deposited in brain t...

  12. Magnetic susceptibility and spectral gamma logs in the Tithonian-Berriasian pelagic carbonates in the Tatra Mts (Western Carpathians, Poland): Palaeoenvironmental changes at the Jurassic/Cretaceous boundary

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grabowski, J.; Schnyder, J.; Sobien, K.; Koptíková, Leona; Krzemiński, L.; Pszczółkowski, A.; Hejnar, J.; Schnabl, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 43, June 2013 (2013), s. 1-17 ISSN 0195-6671 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : Berriasian * Gamma-ray spectrometry * magnetic susceptibility * palaeoenvironmental trends * Tithonian Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 2.390, year: 2013

  13. Gd-DTPA: a bowel contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging of the abdomen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlahos, L.; Gouliamos, A.; Clauss, W.; Kalovidouris, A.; Hadjiioannou, A.; Athanasopoulou, A.; Trakadas, S.; Papavasiliou, C.

    1992-01-01

    Forty patients with suspected pathology in the abdomen and pelvis have been investigated with MRI before and after administration of Gd-DTPA as an oral or rectal solution. The findings are analysed with respect to: (a) filling of the GI tract; (b) contrast in the region of interest, surrounding fat and vessels; (c) diagnostic yield in comparison to non-enhanced MRI and contrast CT. At a concentration of 1 mmol/l Gd-DTPA provided consistent positive contrast in the stomach and bowel in all cases. In 57.5% of cases we achieved complete filling of the GI tract. The opacification in the region of interest was good or satisfactory in 90% of cases. The diagnostic value of contrast MRI was better in 93% of cases than the non-enhanced MRI of the abdomen. In comparison with contrast CT, the contrast MRI was better or of the same value in 92% of cases. Despite the disadvantage of poor fat-to-bowel contrast (35% of cases were classified as poor), it is concluded that Gd-DTPA-enhanced MRI provides good delineation of organs adjacent to the bowel so this contrast agent has potential for a future role in abdominal MRI. (orig.)

  14. Accuracy of pre-contrast imaging in abdominal magnetic resonance imaging of pediatric oncology patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohd Zaki, Faizah [University of Toronto, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, The Hospital for Sick Children and Medical Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Moineddin, Rahim [University of Toronto, Department of Family and Community Medicine, Toronto, ON (Canada); Grant, Ronald [University of Toronto, Department of Hematology and Oncology, The Hospital for Sick Children and Medical Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Chavhan, Govind B. [University of Toronto, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, The Hospital for Sick Children and Medical Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2016-11-15

    Safety concerns are increasingly raised regarding the use of gadolinium-based contrast media for MR imaging. To determine the accuracy of pre-contrast abdominal MR imaging for lesion detection and characterization in pediatric oncology patients. We included 120 children (37 boys and 83 girls; mean age 8.94 years) referred by oncology services. Twenty-five had MRI for the first time and 95 were follow-up scans. Two authors independently reviewed pre-contrast MR images to note the following information about the lesions: location, number, solid vs. cystic and likely nature. Pre- and post-contrast imaging reviewed together served as the reference standard. The overall sensitivity was 88% for the first reader and 90% for the second; specificity was 94% and 91%; positive predictive value was 96% and 94%; negative predictive value was 82% and 84%; accuracy of pre-contrast imaging for lesion detection as compared to the reference standard was 90% for both readers. The difference between mean number of lesions detected on pre-contrast imaging and reference standard was not significant for either reader (reader 1, P = 0.072; reader 2, P = 0.071). There was substantial agreement (kappa values of 0.76 and 0.72 for readers 1 and 2) between pre-contrast imaging and reference standard for determining solid vs. cystic lesion and likely nature of the lesion. The addition of post-contrast imaging increased confidence of both readers significantly (P < 0.0001), but the interobserver agreement for the change in confidence was poor (kappa 0.12). Pre-contrast abdominal MR imaging has high accuracy in lesion detection in pediatric oncology patients and shows substantial agreement with the reference standard for characterization of lesions. Gadolinium-based contrast media administration cannot be completely eliminated but can be avoided in many cases, with the decision made on a case-by-case basis, taking into consideration location and type of tumor. (orig.)

  15. Magnetic susceptibility and specific heat of uranium double perovskite oxides Ba2 MUO6 (M=Co, Ni)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinatsu, Yukio; Doi, Yoshihiro

    2006-01-01

    Double perovskites Ba 2 MUO 6 (M=Co, Ni) were prepared by the solid-state reaction. X-ray diffraction measurements show that both cobalt (nickel) and uranium ions are ordered in the NaCl type over the six-coordinate B sites of the perovskite ABO 3 . Detailed magnetic susceptibility and specific heat measurements show that Ba 2 CoUO 6 and Ba 2 NiUO 6 order ferromagnetically at 9.1 and 25 K, respectively. From the analysis of the magnetic specific heat, the ground states of the Co 2+ and Ni 2+ ions were determined. - Graphical abstract: The crystal structure for Ba 2 CoUO 6 and Ba 2 NiUO 6 . They crystallize in the cubic double perovskite-type structure and order ferromagnetically at 9.1 and 25 K, respectively

  16. Static magnetic susceptibility, crystal field and exchange interactions in rare earth titanate pyrochlores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malkin, B Z; Zakirov, A R [Kazan State University, Kazan 420008 (Russian Federation); Lummen, T T A; Van Loosdrecht, P H M [Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials, University of Groningen, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands); Dhalenne, G, E-mail: boris.malkin@ksu.r [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie de L' Etat Solide, ICMMO, UMR 8182, Universite Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay (France)

    2010-07-14

    The experimental temperature dependence (T = 2-300 K) of single crystal bulk and site susceptibilities of rare earth titanate pyrochlores R{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} (R = Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Yb) is analyzed in the framework of crystal field theory and a mean field approximation. Analytical expressions for the site and bulk susceptibilities of the pyrochlore lattice are derived taking into account long range dipole-dipole interactions and anisotropic exchange interactions between the nearest neighbor rare earth ions. The sets of crystal field parameters and anisotropic exchange coupling constants have been determined and their variations along the lanthanide series are discussed.

  17. Verification of novel magnetic nanoparticles as a contrast media for MRI-CT/SPECT imaging

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kostiv, Uliana; Laudová, B.; Lobaz, Volodymyr; Kučka, Jan; Franová, P.; Hrubý, Martin; Horák, Daniel; Šefc, L.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 1 (2017), s. 156 ISSN 1336-7242. [Zjazd chemikov /69./. 11.09.2017-15.09.2017, Horný Smokovec] Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : magnetic nanoparticles * diagnostics Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  18. Erythrocyte enrichment in hematopoietic progenitor cell cultures based on magnetic susceptibility of the hemoglobin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxia Jin

    Full Text Available Using novel media formulations, it has been demonstrated that human placenta and umbilical cord blood-derived CD34+ cells can be expanded and differentiated into erythroid cells with high efficiency. However, obtaining mature and functional erythrocytes from the immature cell cultures with high purity and in an efficient manner remains a significant challenge. A distinguishing feature of a reticulocyte and maturing erythrocyte is the increasing concentration of hemoglobin and decreasing cell volume that results in increased cell magnetophoretic mobility (MM when exposed to high magnetic fields and gradients, under anoxic conditions. Taking advantage of these initial observations, we studied a noninvasive (label-free magnetic separation and analysis process to enrich and identify cultured functional erythrocytes. In addition to the magnetic cell separation and cell motion analysis in the magnetic field, the cell cultures were characterized for cell sedimentation rate, cell volume distributions using differential interference microscopy, immunophenotyping (glycophorin A, hemoglobin concentration and shear-induced deformability (elongation index, EI, by ektacytometry to test for mature erythrocyte attributes. A commercial, packed column high-gradient magnetic separator (HGMS was used for magnetic separation. The magnetically enriched fraction comprised 80% of the maturing cells (predominantly reticulocytes that showed near 70% overlap of EI with the reference cord blood-derived RBC and over 50% overlap with the adult donor RBCs. The results demonstrate feasibility of label-free magnetic enrichment of erythrocyte fraction of CD34+ progenitor-derived cultures based on the presence of paramagnetic hemoglobin in the maturing erythrocytes.

  19. Investigation of polluted alluvial soils by magnetic susceptibility methods: a case study of the Litavka River

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dlouhá, Šárka; Petrovský, Eduard; Kapička, Aleš; Borůvka, L.; Ash, Ch.; Drábek, O.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 4 (2013), s. 151-157 ISSN 1801-5395 Institutional support: RVO:67985530 Keywords : environmental magnetism * Fluvisols * magnetite/maghemite * risk elements Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 0.615, year: 2013

  20. Agenesis of the horizontal segment of the left portal vein demonstrated by magnetic resonance imaging including phase-contrast magnetic resonance venography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevallier, P.; Oddo, F.; Diaine, B.; Padovani, B.; Baldini, E.; Peten, E.P.

    2000-01-01

    Two cases of agenesis of the horizontal segment of the left portal vein are reported. This very rare vascular anomaly probably corresponds to an embryological variation rather than to an obstruction of the left portal vein. In almost all cases liver ultrasonography is sufficient for identifying such vascular abnormalities. It shows a large aberrant vessel emerging from a right anterior segmental portal branch and running transversely in the quadrate lobe towards the teres ligamentum from which the portal supply to the left lobe arises. It is important to be able to recognize the magnetic resonance imaging features of this vascular variation, as magnetic resonance imaging may be the initial imaging study, and ultrasound may be technically challenging. To our knowledge, we present the first description of these features, including an enhanced gradient-echo T1-weighted sequence, a turbo spin-echo T2-weighted sequence with fat saturation, and a three-dimensional phase-contrast magnetic resonance portography. (orig.)

  1. Myocardial blood flow estimates from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging: three quantitative methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrazzo, Cristian; Galea, Nicola; Pacilio, Massimiliano; Altabella, Luisa; Preziosi, Enrico; Carnì, Marco; Ciolina, Federica; Vullo, Francesco; Francone, Marco; Catalano, Carlo; Carbone, Iacopo

    2018-02-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging can be used to quantitatively assess the myocardial blood flow (MBF), recovering the tissue impulse response function for the transit of a gadolinium bolus through the myocardium. Several deconvolution techniques are available, using various models for the impulse response. The method of choice may influence the results, producing differences that have not been deeply investigated yet. Three methods for quantifying myocardial perfusion have been compared: Fermi function modelling (FFM), the Tofts model (TM) and the gamma function model (GF), with the latter traditionally used in brain perfusion MRI. Thirty human subjects were studied at rest as well as under cold pressor test stress (submerging hands in ice-cold water), and a single bolus of gadolinium weighing 0.1  ±  0.05 mmol kg‑1 was injected. Perfusion estimate differences between the methods were analysed by paired comparisons with Student’s t-test, linear regression analysis, and Bland–Altman plots, as well as also using the two-way ANOVA, considering the MBF values of all patients grouped according to two categories: calculation method and rest/stress conditions. Perfusion estimates obtained by various methods in both rest and stress conditions were not significantly different, and were in good agreement with the literature. The results obtained during the first-pass transit time (20 s) yielded p-values in the range 0.20–0.28 for Student’s t-test, linear regression analysis slopes between 0.98–1.03, and R values between 0.92–1.01. From the Bland–Altman plots, the paired comparisons yielded a bias (and a 95% CI)—expressed as ml/min/g—for FFM versus TM, ‑0.01 (‑0.20, 0.17) or 0.02 (‑0.49, 0.52) at rest or under stress respectively, for FFM versus GF, ‑0.05 (‑0.29, 0.20) or  ‑0.07 (‑0.55, 0.41) at rest or under stress, and for TM versus GF, ‑0.03 (‑0.30, 0.24) or  ‑0.09 (‑0.43, 0

  2. Magnetic resonance contrast media sensing in vivo molecular imaging agents: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amanlou, Massoud; Siadat, Seyed Davar; Norouzian, Dariush; Ebrahimi, Seyed Esmaeil Sadat; Aghasadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Ghorbani, Masoud; Alavidjeh, Mohammad Shafiee; Inanlou, Davoud Nouri; Arabzadeh, Ali Jabbari; Ardestani, Mehdi Shafiee

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic imaging is commonly performed by nuclear medicine facilities such as PET or SPECT, etc. The production and biomedical applications of bio-molecular sensing in vivo MRI metabolic contrast agents has recently become of great universal research interest, which follows its great success as a potential cost effective, less radioactive, nuclear medicine alternative. Temperature, redox potential, enzyme activity, free radial/metal ion responsive and/or pH sensitive molecular metabolic MR contrast agents are among the famous instances exemplified, which basically promote MR image contrast enhancement ability to distinguish molecular metabolic/gene expression features. Overall, these MRI contrast agents provide a framework to achieve a greater degree of accuracy from MRI as a low cost, more available facility, non radioactive radiation producing and highly sensitive biomedical tool to propound as a new suggesting opponent for PET nuclear medicine imaging. In the present review, the design, development, examination and future of the above agents will be discussed in detail.

  3. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the wrist in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nusman, Charlotte M. [Emma Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lavini, Cristina; Hemke, Robert; Caan, Matthan W.A.; Maas, Mario [Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Schonenberg-Meinema, Dieneke; Berg, J.M. van den; Kuijpers, Taco W. [Emma Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Dolman, Koert M. [Sint Lucas Andreas Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Reade Institute location Jan van Breemen, Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rossum, Marion A.J. van [Reade Institute location Jan van Breemen, Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Emma Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2017-02-15

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI provides information on the heterogeneity of the synovium, the primary target of disease in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). To evaluate the feasibility of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in the wrist of children with JIA using conventional descriptive measures and time-intensity-curve shape analysis. To explore the association between enhancement characteristics and clinical disease status. Thirty-two children with JIA and wrist involvement underwent dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI with movement-registration and were classified using validated criteria as clinically active (n = 27) or inactive (n = 5). Outcome measures included descriptive parameters and the classification into time-intensity-curve shapes, which represent the patterns of signal intensity change over time. Differences in dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI outcome measures between clinically active and clinically inactive disease were analyzed and correlation with the Juvenile Arthritis Disease Activity Score was determined. Comprehensive evaluation of disease status was technically feasible and the quality of the dynamic dataset was improved by movement registration. The conventional descriptive measure maximum enhancement differed significantly between clinically active and inactive disease (P = 0.019), whereas time-intensity-curve shape analysis showed no differences. Juvenile Arthritis Disease Activity Score correlated moderately with enhancing volume (P = 0.484). Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI is a promising biomarker for evaluating disease status in children with JIA and wrist involvement. Conventional descriptive dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI measures are better associated with clinically active disease than time-intensity-curve shape analysis. (orig.)

  4. Phenols as Diamagnetic T2-Exchange Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jia; Li, Yuguo; Slania, Stephanie; Yadav, Nirbhay N; Liu, Jing; Wang, Rongfu; Zhang, Jianhua; Pomper, Martin G; van Zijl, Peter C; Yang, Xing; Liu, Guanshu

    2018-01-26

    Although T 2 -exchange (T 2ex ) NMR phenomena have been known for decades, there has been a resurgence of interest to develop T 2ex MRI contrast agents. One indispensable advantage of T 2ex MR agents is the possibility of using non-toxic and/or bio-compatible diamagnetic compounds with intermediate exchangeable protons. Herein a library of phenol-based compounds is screened and their T 2ex contrast (exchange relaxivity, r 2ex ) at 9.4 T determined. The T 2ex contrast of phenol protons allows direct detection by MRI at a millimolar concentration level. The effect of chemical modification of the phenol on the T 2ex MRI contrast through modulation of exchange rate and chemical shift was also studied and provides a guideline for use of endogenous and exogenous phenols for T 2ex MRI contrast. As a proof-of-principle application, phenol T 2ex contrast can be used to detect enzyme activity in a tyrosinase-catalyzed catechol oxidation reaction. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Validation of Perfusion Quantification with 3D Gradient Echo Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using a Blood Pool Contrast Agent in Skeletal Swine Muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Hindel

    Full Text Available The purpose of our study was to validate perfusion quantification in a low-perfused tissue by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI with shared k-space sampling using a blood pool contrast agent. Perfusion measurements were performed in a total of seven female pigs. An ultrasonic Doppler probe was attached to the right femoral artery to determine total flow in the hind leg musculature. The femoral artery was catheterized for continuous local administration of adenosine to increase blood flow up to four times the baseline level. Three different stable perfusion levels were induced. The MR protocol included a 3D gradient-echo sequence with a temporal resolution of approximately 1.5 seconds. Before each dynamic sequence, static MR images were acquired with flip angles of 5°, 10°, 20°, and 30°. Both static and dynamic images were used to generate relaxation rate and baseline magnetization maps with a flip angle method. 0.1 mL/kg body weight of blood pool contrast medium was injected via a central venous catheter at a flow rate of 5 mL/s. The right hind leg was segmented in 3D into medial, cranial, lateral, and pelvic thigh muscles, lower leg, bones, skin, and fat. The arterial input function (AIF was measured in the aorta. Perfusion of the different anatomic regions was calculated using a one- and a two-compartment model with delay- and dispersion-corrected AIFs. The F-test for model comparison was used to decide whether to use the results of the one- or two-compartment model fit. Total flow was calculated by integrating volume-weighted perfusion values over the whole measured region. The resulting values of delay, dispersion, blood volume, mean transit time, and flow were all in physiologically and physically reasonable ranges. In 107 of 160 ROIs, the blood signal was separated, using a two-compartment model, into a capillary and an arteriolar signal contribution, decided by the F-test. Overall flow in hind leg muscles

  6. Three-dimensional contrast enhanced ultrasound score and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging score in evaluating breast tumor angiogenesis: Correlation with biological factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Wan-Ru, E-mail: jiawanru@126.com [Department of Diagnostic Ultrasound, Rui Jin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 197 Rui Jin 2nd Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Chai, Wei-Min, E-mail: chai_weimin@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Radiology, Rui Jin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 197 Rui Jin 2nd Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Tang, Lei, E-mail: jessietang1003@163.com [Department of Diagnostic Ultrasound, Rui Jin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 197 Rui Jin 2nd Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Wang, Yi, E-mail: xiatian.0602@163.com [Department of Diagnostic Ultrasound, Rui Jin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 197 Rui Jin 2nd Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Fei, Xiao-Chun, E-mail: xcf0222@163.com [Department of Pathology, Rui Jin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 197 Rui Jin 2nd Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Han, Bao-San, E-mail: hanbaosan@126.com [Department of Comprehensive Breast Health Center, Rui Jin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 197 Rui Jin 2nd Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Chen, Man, E-mail: lucyjia1370@126.com [Department of Diagnostic Ultrasound, Rui Jin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 197 Rui Jin 2nd Road, Shanghai 200025 (China)

    2014-07-15

    Objective: To explore the clinical value of three-dimensional contrast enhanced ultrasound (3D-CEUS) and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) score systems in evaluating breast tumor angiogenesis by comparing their diagnostic efficacy and correlation with biological factors. Methods: 3D-CEUS was performed in 183 patients with breast tumors by Esaote Mylab90 with SonoVue (Bracco, Italy), DCE-MRI was performed on a dedicated breast magnetic resonance imaging (DBMRI) system (Aurora Dedicated Breast MRI Systems, USA) with a dedicated breast coil. 3D-CEUS and DCE-MRI score systems were created based on tumor perfusion and vascular characteristics. Microvessel density (MVD), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2, MMP-9) expression were measured by immunohistochemistry. Results: Pathological results showed 35 benign and 148 malignant breast tumors. MVD (P = 0.000, r = 0.76), VEGF (P = 0.000, r = 0.55), MMP-2 (P = 0.000, r = 0.39) and MMP-9 (P = 0.000, r = 0.41) expression were all significantly different between benignity and malignancy. Regarding 3D-CEUS 4 points as cutoff value, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 85.1%, 94.3% and 86.9%, respectively, and correlated well with MVD (P = 0.000, r = 0.50), VEGF (P = 0.000, r = 0.50), MMP-2 (P = 0.000, r = 0.50) and MMP-9 (P = 0.000, r = 0.66). Taking DCE-MRI 5 points as cutoff value, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 86.5%, 94.3% and 88.0%, respectively and also correlated well with MVD (P = 0.000, r = 0.52), VEGF (P = 0.000, r = 0.44), MMP-2 (P = 0.000, r = 0.42) and MMP-9 (P = 0.000, r = 0.35). Conclusions: 3D-CEUS score system displays inspiring diagnostic performance and good agreement with DCE-MRI scoring. Moreover, both score systems correlate well with MVD, VEGF, MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression, and thus have great potentials in tumor angiogenesis evaluation.

  7. Differentiation of brain abscesses from glioblastomas and metastatic brain tumors: comparisons of diagnostic performance of dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced perfusion MR imaging before and after mathematic contrast leakage correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Cheng Hong; Wei, Kuo-Chen; Chang, Chen-Nen; Ng, Shu-Hang; Wong, Ho-Fai; Lin, Ching-Po

    2014-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic performance of dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced perfusion MRI before and after mathematic contrast leakage correction in differentiating pyogenic brain abscesses from glioblastomas and/or metastatic brain tumors. Cerebral blood volume (CBV), leakage-corrected CBV and leakage coefficient K2 were measured in enhancing rims, perifocal edema and contralateral normal appearing white matter (NAWM) of 17 abscesses, 19 glioblastomas and 20 metastases, respectively. The CBV and corrected CBV were normalized by dividing the values in the enhancing rims or edema to those of contralateral NAWM. For each study group, a paired t test was used to compare the K2 of the enhancing rims or edema with those of NAWM, as well as between CBV and corrected CBV of the enhancing rims or edema. ANOVA was used to compare CBV, corrected CBV and K2 among three lesion types. The diagnostic performance of CBV and corrected CBV was assessed with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. The CBV and correction CBV of enhancing rim were 1.45±1.17 and 1.97±1.01 for abscesses, 3.85±2.19 and 4.39±2.33 for glioblastomas, and 2.39±0.90 and 2.97±0.78 for metastases, respectively. The CBV and corrected CBV in the enhancing rim of abscesses were significantly lower than those of glioblastomas and metastases (P = 0.001 and P = 0.007, respectively). In differentiating abscesses from glioblastomas and metastases, the AUC values of corrected CBV (0.822) were slightly higher than those of CBV (0.792). Mathematic leakage correction slightly increases the diagnostic performance of CBV in differentiating pyogenic abscesses from necrotic glioblastomas and cystic metastases. Clinically, DSC perfusion MRI may not need mathematic leakage correction in differentiating abscesses from glioblastomas and/or metastases.

  8. Gadolinium-based magnetic resonance contrast agents at 7 Tesla: in vitro T1 relaxivities in human blood plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noebauer-Huhmann, Iris M; Szomolanyi, Pavol; Juras, Vladimír; Kraff, Oliver; Ladd, Mark E; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2010-09-01

    PURPOSE/INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to determine the T1 relaxivities (r1) of 8 gadolinium (Gd)-based MR contrast agents in human blood plasma at 7 Tesla, compared with 3 Tesla. Eight commercially available Gd-based MR contrast agents were diluted in human blood plasma to concentrations of 0, 0.25, 0.5, 1, and 2 mmol/L. In vitro measurements were performed at 37 degrees C, on a 7 Tesla and on a 3 Tesla whole-body magnetic resonance imaging scanner. For the determination of T1 relaxation times, Inversion Recovery Sequences with inversion times from 0 to 3500 ms were used. The relaxivities were calculated. The r1 relaxivities of all agents, diluted in human blood plasma at body temperature, were lower at 7 Tesla than at 3 Tesla. The values at 3 Tesla were comparable to those published earlier. Notably, in some agents, a minor negative correlation of r1 with a concentration of up to 2 mmol/L could be observed. This was most pronounced in the agents with the highest protein-binding capacity. At 7 Tesla, the in vitro r1 relaxivities of Gd-based contrast agents in human blood plasma are lower than those at 3 Tesla. This work may serve as a basis for the application of Gd-based MR contrast agents at 7 Tesla. Further studies are required to optimize the contrast agent dose in vivo.

  9. Gadolinium Contrast Agent is of Limited Value for Magnetic Resonance Imaging Assessment of Synovial Hypertrophy in Hemophiliacs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundin, B.; Berntorp, E.; Pettersson, H.; Wirestam, R.; Jonsson, K.; Staahlberg, F.; Ljung, R. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ Hospital of Lund, Lund (Sweden)

    2007-07-15

    Purpose: To examine the influence of different doses of gadolinium contrast agent on synovial enhancement, to compare magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of synovial hypertrophy and radiographic joint changes in hemophiliacs, and to investigate the value of gadolinium in MRI assessment of synovial hypertrophy in hemophiliacs using dynamic MRI and MRI scoring. Material and Methods: Twenty-one hemophiliacs on prophylactic factor treatment without recent bleeds were subjected to radiography and gadolinium contrast-enhanced dynamic and static MRI of the knee using a standard dose of 0.1 mmol/kg b.w. gadoteridol. In 17 of the patients, the MRI procedure was repeated after a triple dose of gadoteridol. Results: MRI findings of synovial hypertrophy were significantly correlated with Pettersson radiographic scores. In 19 of the 21 MRI investigated joints, administration of contrast agent did not alter the result of the evaluation of synovial hypertrophy. Conclusion: The optimal time interval for volume assessment of synovial hypertrophy after injection of gadolinium contrast agent is dose dependent. Hemophiliacs without recent bleeds have minor to abundant synovial hypertrophy in joints with pronounced radiographic changes. Dynamic MRI is not useful for evaluating hemophilic arthropathy, and gadolinium contrast agent is not routinely indicated for MRI scoring of joints in hemophiliacs.

  10. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of the Breast at 3T: Pre- and Post-Contrast Evaluation for Breast Lesion Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Kousi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To determine whether in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 3T can provide accurate breast lesion characterization, and to determine the effect of gadolinium on the resonance of tCho. Methods. Twenty-four positive-mammogram patients were examined on a 3T MR scanner. 1H-MRS was performed before and after gadolinium administration. tCho peak was qualitatively evaluated before and after contrast injection. Results. Fourteen out of 27 lesions proved to be malignant after histopathological diagnosis. Using 1H-MRS, before contrast injection, 6/14 confirmed malignancies and 11/13 benign lesions were correctly classified; while, after contrast injection, 11/14 confirmed malignancies and 12/13 benign processes were correctly classified. Post gadolinium 1H-MRS proved useful in picking up tCho signal, improving the overall accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity by 35%, 83%, and 9%, respectively. Conclusion. 1H-MRS overall accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity in detecting breast lesion’s malignancy were increased after gadolinium administration. It is prudent to perform 1H-MRS before contrast injection in large breast lesions to avoid choline underestimation. In cases of small or non-mass lesions, it is recommended to perform 1H-MRS after contrast injection for better voxel prescription to enable a reliable preoperative diagnosis.

  11. Out-of-phase susceptibility and viscous magnetization: alternative tools for magnetic granulometry of sediments and soils

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chadima, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 6, Special issue (2016) ISSN 2007-9656. [Biennial Meeting Latinmag /4./. 23.11.2015-27.11.2015, Sao Paulo] Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : palaeomagnetism * sediments * soils Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography http://www. geofisica .unam.mx/LatinmagLetters/LL16-01-SP/D/D07.pdf

  12. [Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging of brain iron deposition: comparison between quantitative susceptibility mapping and transverse relaxation rate (R2*) mapping].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Ji-Jing; Feng, Yan-Qiu

    2018-03-20

    To evaluate the accuracy and sensitivity of quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) and transverse relaxation rate (R2*) mapping in the measurement of brain iron deposition. Super paramagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) phantoms and mouse models of Parkinson's disease (PD) related to iron deposition in the substantia nigra (SN) underwent 7.0 T magnetic resonance (MR) scans (Bruker, 70/16) with a multi-echo 3D gradient echo sequence, and the acquired data were processed to obtain QSM and R2*. Linear regression analysis was performed for susceptibility and R2* in the SPIO phantoms containing 5 SPIO concentrations (30, 15, 7.5, 3.75 and 1.875 µg/mL) to evaluate the accuracy of QSM and R2* in quantitative iron analysis. The sensitivities of QSM and R2* mapping in quantitative detection of brain iron deposition were assessed using mouse models of PD induced by 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahy-dropyridine (MPTP) in comparison with the control mice. In SPIO phantoms, QSM provided a higher accuracy than R2* mapping and their goodness-of-fit coefficients (R 2 ) were 0.98 and 0.89, respectively. In the mouse models of PD and control mice, the susceptibility of the SN was significantly higher in the PD models (5.19∓1.58 vs 2.98∓0.88, n=5; Pbrain iron deposition than R2*, and the susceptibility derived by QSM can be a potentially useful biomarker for studying PD.

  13. Development of Gd(III) porphyrin-conjugated chitosan nanoparticles as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jahanbin, Tania [Université Paul Sabatier, Toulouse III, INSERM U825, CHU Purpan, 31059 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Sauriat-Dorizon, Hélène [Institut de Chimie Moléculaire et des Matériaux d' Orsay, UMR CNRS 8182, ECBB, Université Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay (France); Spearman, Peter [Faculty of Science, Engineering and Computing, University of Kingston, Penrhyn Road Kingston upon Thames Surrey KT1 2EE, London (United Kingdom); Benderbous, Soraya, E-mail: soraya.benderbous@univ-tlse3.fr [Université Paul Sabatier, Toulouse III, INSERM U825, CHU Purpan, 31059 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Korri-Youssoufi, Hafsa, E-mail: hafsa.korri-youssoufi@u-psud.fr [Institut de Chimie Moléculaire et des Matériaux d' Orsay, UMR CNRS 8182, ECBB, Université Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay (France)

    2015-07-01

    A novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent based on gadolinium meso-tetrakis(4-pyridyl)porphyrin [Gd(TPyP)] conjugated with chitosan nanoparticles has been developed. The chitosan nanoparticles were synthesized following an ionic gelation method and the conditions optimized to generate small nanoparticles (CNs) with a narrow size distribution of 35–65 nm. The gadolinium meso-tetrakis(4-pyridyl)porphyrin [Gd(TPyP)] was loaded into chitosan nanoparticles by passive adsorption. The interaction of chitosan with Gd(TPyP) has been examined by UV–visible, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopies (FT-IR) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), which indicate the successful association of Gd(TPyP) without any structural distortion throughout the chitosan nanoparticles. The potential of Gd(TPyP)-CNs as MRI contrast agent has been investigated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in-vitro. Relaxivities of Gd(TPyP)-CNs obtained from T{sub 1}-weighted images, increased with Gd concentration and attained an optimum r{sub 1} of 38.35 mM{sup −1} s{sup −1}, which is 12-fold higher compared to commercial Gd-DOTA (~ 4 mM{sup −1} s{sup −1} at 3T). The combination of such strong MRI contrast with the known properties of porphyrins in photodynamic therapy and biocompatibility of chitosan, presents a new perspective in using these compounds in cancer theranostics. - Highlights: • Synthesis of chitosan nanoparticles with small size • Study of loading properties with gadolinium porphyrins • In vitro properties of the conjugated complex as contrast agent for MRI imaging • Comparison of MRI properties with commercial contrast agent Gd-DOTA.

  14. Antibiofouling polymer-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as potential magnetic resonance contrast agents for in vivo cancer imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Haerim; Lee, Eunhye; Kim, Do Kyung; Jang, Nam Kyu; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Jon, Sangyong

    2006-06-07

    We report the fabrication and characterization of antifouling polymer-coated magnetic nanoparticles as nanoprobes for magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agents. Magnetite superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) were coated with the protein- or cell-resistant polymer, poly(TMSMA-r-PEGMA), to generate stable, protein-resistant MR probes. Coated magnetic nanoparticles synthesized using two different preparation methods (in situ and stepwise, respectively) were both well dispersed in PBS buffer at a variety of pH conditions (pH 1-10). In addition, dynamic light scattering data revealed that their sizes were not altered even after 24 h of incubation in 10% serum containing cell culture medium, indicative of a lack of protein adsorption on their surfaces. When the antibiofouling polymer-coated SPION were incubated with macrophage cells, uptake was significantly lower in comparison to that of the popular contrast agent, Feridex I.V., suggesting that the polymer-coated SPION can be long-circulated in plasma by escaping from uptake by the reticular endothelial system (RES) such as macrophages. Indeed, when the coated SPION were administered to tumor xenograft mice by intravenous injection, the tumor could be detected in T2-weighted MR images within 1 h as a result of the accumulation of the nanomagnets within the tumor site. Although the poly(TMSMA-r-PEGMA)-coated SPION do not have any targeting ligands on their surface, they are potentially useful for cancer diagnosis in vivo.

  15. In Vivo 3T Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using a Biologically Specific Contrast Agent for Prostate Cancer: A Nude Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Brian Abraham

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We characterized in vivo a functional superparamagnetic iron-oxide magnetic resonance contrast agent that shortens the T2 relaxation time in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of prostate cancer xenografts. The agent was developed by conjugating Molday ION™ carboxyl-6 (MIC6, with a deimmunized mouse monoclonal antibody (muJ591 targeting prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA. This functional contrast agent could be used as a noninvasive method to detect prostate cancer cells that are PSMA positive and more readily differentiate them from surrounding tissues for treatment. The functional contrast agent was injected intravenously into mice and its effect was compared to both MIC6 (without conjugated antibody and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS injection controls. MR imaging was performed on a clinical 3T MRI scanner using a multiecho spin echo (MESE sequence to obtain T2 relaxation time values. Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy was used to confirm an increase in elemental iron in injected mice tumours relative to controls. Histological examination of H&E stained tissues showed normal morphology of the tissues collected.

  16. Applying the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility technique to the study of the tectonic evolution of the West Spitsbergen Fold-and-Thrust Belt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Dudzisz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate the use of the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS method to determine the orientation of the principal tectonic strain directions developed during the formation of the West Spitsbergen Fold-and-Thrust Belt (WSFTB. The AMS measurements and extensive rock-magnetic studies of the Lower Triassic rocks reported here were focused on the recognition of the magnetic fabric, the identification of ferromagnetic minerals and an estimation of the influence of ferro- and paramagnetic minerals on magnetic susceptibility. At most sites, the paramagnetic minerals controlled the magnetic susceptibility, and at only one site the impact of ferromagnetic minerals was higher. The AMS technique documented the presence of different types of magnetic fabrics within the sampled sites. At two sites, a normal (Kmin perpendicular to the bedding magnetic fabric of sedimentary origin was detected. This was associated with a good clustering of the maximum AMS axes imposed by tectonic strain. The Kmax magnetic lineation directions obtained here parallel the general NNW–SSE trend of the WSFTB fold axial traces and thrust fronts. The two other investigated sites possessed mixed and inverted fabrics, the latter of which appear to reflect the presence of iron-bearing carbonates.

  17. Astrocytic tumour grading: a comparative study of three-dimensional pseudocontinuous arterial spin labelling, dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced perfusion-weighted imaging, and diffusion-weighted imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, Hua-Feng; Chen, Zhi-Ye; Wang, Yu-Lin; Wang, Yan; Ma, Lin; Lou, Xin; Gui, Qiu-Ping; Shi, Kai-Ning; Zhou, Zhen-Yu; Zheng, Dan-Dan

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesized that three-dimensional pseudocontinuous arterial spin labelling (pCASL) may have similar efficacy in astrocytic tumour grading as dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced perfusion-weighted imaging (DSC-PWI), and the grading accuracy may be further improved when combined with apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values. Forty-three patients with astrocytic tumours were studied using diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), pCASL, and DSC-PWI. Histograms of ADC and normalized tumour cerebral blood flow values (nCBF on pCASL and nrCBF on DSC-PWI) were measured and analyzed. The mean 10 % ADC value was the DWI parameter that provided the best differentiation between low-grade astrocytoma (LGA) and high-grade astrocytoma (HGA). The nCBF and nrCBF (1.810 ± 0.979 and 2.070 ± 1.048) in LGA were significantly lower than those (4.505 ± 2.270 and 5.922 ± 2.630) in HGA. For differentiation between LGA and HGA, the cutoff values of 0.764 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s for mean 10 % ADC, 2.374 for nCBF, and 3.464 for nrCBF provided the optimal accuracy (74.4 %, 86.1 %, and 88.6 %, respectively). Combining the ADC values with nCBF or nrCBF could further improve the grading accuracy to 97.7 % or 95.3 %, respectively. pCASL is an alternative to DSC-PWI for astrocytic tumour grading. The combination of DWI and contrast-free pCASL offers a valuable choice in patients with risk factors. (orig.)

  18. Astrocytic tumour grading: a comparative study of three-dimensional pseudocontinuous arterial spin labelling, dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced perfusion-weighted imaging, and diffusion-weighted imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Hua-Feng [302 Hospital of Chinese People' s Liberation Army, Department of Radiology, Beijing (China); Chen, Zhi-Ye; Wang, Yu-Lin; Wang, Yan; Ma, Lin [People' s Liberation Army General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Beijing (China); Lou, Xin [People' s Liberation Army General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Beijing (China); University of California, Department of Neurology, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Gui, Qiu-Ping [People' s Liberation Army General Hospital, Department of Pathology, Beijing (China); Shi, Kai-Ning; Zhou, Zhen-Yu; Zheng, Dan-Dan [General Electric Healthcare (China) Co., Ltd., Beijing; Wang, Danny J.J. [University of California, Department of Neurology, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-12-15

    We hypothesized that three-dimensional pseudocontinuous arterial spin labelling (pCASL) may have similar efficacy in astrocytic tumour grading as dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced perfusion-weighted imaging (DSC-PWI), and the grading accuracy may be further improved when combined with apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values. Forty-three patients with astrocytic tumours were studied using diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), pCASL, and DSC-PWI. Histograms of ADC and normalized tumour cerebral blood flow values (nCBF on pCASL and nrCBF on DSC-PWI) were measured and analyzed. The mean 10 % ADC value was the DWI parameter that provided the best differentiation between low-grade astrocytoma (LGA) and high-grade astrocytoma (HGA). The nCBF and nrCBF (1.810 ± 0.979 and 2.070 ± 1.048) in LGA were significantly lower than those (4.505 ± 2.270 and 5.922 ± 2.630) in HGA. For differentiation between LGA and HGA, the cutoff values of 0.764 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s for mean 10 % ADC, 2.374 for nCBF, and 3.464 for nrCBF provided the optimal accuracy (74.4 %, 86.1 %, and 88.6 %, respectively). Combining the ADC values with nCBF or nrCBF could further improve the grading accuracy to 97.7 % or 95.3 %, respectively. pCASL is an alternative to DSC-PWI for astrocytic tumour grading. The combination of DWI and contrast-free pCASL offers a valuable choice in patients with risk factors. (orig.)

  19. Slope and Land Use Changing Effects on Soil Properties and Magnetic Susceptibility in Hilly Lands, Yasouj Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    rouhollaah vafaeezadeh

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Land use changes are the most reasons which affect natural ecosystem protection. Forest soils have high organic matter and suitable structure, but their land use management change usually affects soil properties and decreases soil quality. There are several outcomes of such land use changes and intensification: accelerated soil erosion and decline of soil nutrient conditions, change of hydrological regimes and sedimentation and loss of primary forests and their biodiversity. Establishing effects of land use and land cover changes on soil properties have implications for devising management strategies for sustainable use. Forest land use change in Yasouj caused soil losses and decreased soil quality. The objectives of this study were to assess some soil physical and chemical properties and soil magnetic susceptibility changes in different land uses and slope position. Materials and Methods: Soil samples were taken from natural forest, degraded forest and dryland farm from different slops (0-10, 10-20 and 20-30 percent in sout east of Yasouj. They were from 0–10 cm depth in a completely randomized design with five replications. Soil moisture and temperature regimes in the study area are xeric and mesic, respectively. Particle size distribution was determined by the hydrometer method and soil organic matter, CaCO3 equivalent and bulk density was determined using standard procedures described in Methods of Soil Analysis book. Magnetic susceptibility was measured at low and high frequency of 0.46 kHz (χlf and 4.6 kHz (χHf respectively with a Bartington MS2D meter using approximately 20 g of soil held in a four-dram clear plastic vial. Frequency dependent susceptibility (χfd is expressed as the difference between the high and the low frequency measurements as a percentage of χ at low frequency. Results and Discussion: Soil texture was affected by land use change from silty clay loam in forest to silty loam in dry land farm

  20. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for the detection of acute haemorrhagic necrotizing pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piironen, A.; Kivisaari, R.; Pitkaeranta, P.; Poutanen, V.P.; Laippala, P.; Laurila, P.; Kivisaari, L.

    1997-01-01

    Eleven piglets with haemorrhagic necrotizing pancreatitis and nine piglets with oedematous pancreatitis were imaged using a multi-breath-hold TurboFLASH (TR 6.5 ms, TE 3 ms, TI 300 ms, flip angle 8 , three slices) pre-excited T1-weighted sequence with an IV bolus injection of gadopentetate dimeglumine (Gd-DTPA, 0.3 mmol/kg) as a contrast agent to show dynamic contrast enhancement of the pancreas by MRI. All piglets were imaged according to the same protocol before inducing the disease. Following the IV Gd-DTPA bolus, time-enhancement curve of the pancreas during haemorrhagic necrotizing pancreatitis was significantly lower than during oedematous pancreatitis. The enhancement curves for the healthy piglets and piglets with oedematous pancreatitis did not differ significantly. Each piglet served as its own control. Because the results of this initial study are similar to those obtained with contrast-enhanced CT, we conclude that our results may encourage further clinical trials, and contrast-enhanced dynamic MRI may be an alternative to the established method of CT for diagnosing acute haemorrhagic necrotizing pancreatitis. (orig.). With 3 figs

  1. Magnetic resonance angiography of the carotid arteries: comparison of unenhanced and contrast enhanced techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, Harald; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Reiser, Maximilian F. [Ludwig Maximilians University, Department of Clinical Radiology, University Hospitals Munich, Grosshadern Campus, Munich (Germany); Runge, Val M. [University of Texas Medical Branch, Department of Radiology, Galveston, TX (United States); Morelli, John N.; Williams, Kenneth D.; Naul, L.G. [Scott and White Memorial Hospital, Department of Radiology, Temple, TX (United States); Wintersperger, Bernd J. [Ludwig Maximilians University, Department of Clinical Radiology, University Hospitals Munich, Grosshadern Campus, Munich (Germany); University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, UHN, MSH and WCH, Toronto (Canada)

    2011-08-15

    To compare different techniques for carotid imaging including contrast-enhanced, unenhanced and dynamic techniques to find an alternative to contrast-enhanced MRA. 43 patients referred for imaging of the carotids were enrolled in this IRB-approved study. Imaging included dark-blood, time-of-flight, ECG-gated SSFP and dynamic and static contrast-enhanced MRA. Two radiologists evaluated all datasets in terms of image quality (vessel lumen, signal homogeneity, diagnostic confidence, preferred technique) on a four-point Likert-scale and in measuring the vessel area. Of the 43 included patients the first 8 subjects served for protocol optimisation and 4 individuals discontinued the examination. Thus 31 datasets served for evaluation. CE-MRA revealed best results for delineation of vessel lumen, signal homogeneity and diagnostic confidence with values of 3.61, 3.42 and 3.77. It was also rated as the most preferred technique. SSFP-MRA was rated second in all categories with values of 3.1, 2.9 and 3.11. This unenhanced technique was the only one showing non-significantly different results in quantitative analysis. SSFP-MRA, an unenhanced form of MRA, represents an alternative to CE-MRA, particularly in patients where administration of gadolinium for CE-MRA may be contraindicated. In contrast to other techniques, SSFP-MRA serves with not significant different results compared to standard CE-MRA. (orig.)

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in degenerative disease of the lumbar spine: Fat Saturation technique and contrast medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Aprile, Paola; Nasuto, Michelangelo; Tarantino, Alfredo; Cornacchia, Samantha; Guglielmi, Giuseppe; Jinkins, J Randy

    2018-01-19

    To examine both anterior and posterior elements of the lumbar spine in patients with low back pain using MRI T2-weighted sequences with Fat Saturation (FS) and contrast enhanced T1-weighted sequences with FS. Two thousand eight hundred and twenty (2820) patients (1628 male, 1192 female, mean age 54) presenting low back pain underwent MRI standard examination (Sagittal T1w TSE and T2w TSE, axial T1 SE) with the addition of sagittal and axial T2w Fat Sat (FS) sequences. Among all the patients, 987 (35%) have been studied adding Contrast Enhanced (CE) T1w FS sequences after administration of contrast medium. Among 987 patients studied with contrast medium, we found: active-inflammatory intervertebral osteochondrosis in 646 (65%) patients; degenerative-inflammatory changes in facet joints (facet joint effusion, synovitis, synovial cysts) in 462 (47%); spondylolysis in 69 (7%); degenerative-inflammatory changes of the flava, interspinous and supraspinous ligaments in 245 (25%); inflammatory changes of posterior perispinal muscles in 84 (8%) patients. In patients with suspected no-disc-related low back pain, the implementation of T2w FS and CE T1w FS sequences to the standard MR protocol could allow a better identification of degenerative-inflammatory changes more likely associated to the pain.

  3. [Contrast enhanced ultrasound can show symptomatic carotid lesions not visualized with magnetic resonance angiography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baud, J-M; Becker, F; Maurizot, A; Pico, F

    2013-12-01

    We report the cases of two patients who presented symptoms focused on a wall of the common carotid: carotidodynia in one patient and a transient ischemic attack in the other. The B-mode ultrasound showed an enlarged thickened medio-adventitial echostructure with a slightly heterogeneous and iso or hypoechoic appearance. There was no narrowing. Injection of ultrasound contrast led to significant enhancement in the wall reflecting neovascularization secondary to inflammation. Other imaging methods (MR and CT angiography) found no abnormality. At the 3-month follow-up visit, the surface area of the lesions was greatly decreased and the ultrasound contrast enhancement had disappeared. These two cases illustrate how focal lesions of the carotid wall missed on MR and CT angiography can be detected and visualized with B-mode ultrasound contrast enhancement. Contrast enhanced ultrasound leads to the concept of "active lesions" resulting from inflammatory processes that can be readily monitored without radiation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Three-dimensional anisotropy contrast (3DAC) magnetic resonance imaging of the human brain. Application to assess Wallerian degeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igarashi, Hironaka; Katayama, Yasuo; Tsuganezawa, Toshikazu; Yamamuro, Manabu; Terashi, Akiro; Owan, Chojin

    1998-01-01

    Three-dimensional anisotropy contrast (3DAC) magnetic resonance imaging is a new algorithm for the treatment of apparent diffusion tensor using the three primary colors. To determine if 3DAC has a clinical application for human brain, six normal volunteers and twenty patients with supratentorial cerebrovascular accidents were examined using clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and the changes in the 3DAC images associated with Wallerian degeneration of the pyramidal tract were evaluated. The 3DAC images exhibited impressive anatomical resolution. In all chronic stage patients with hemiparesis, the colors in the pyramidal tract were faded. Patients examined during the acute stage who later recovered from hemiparesis had no visible changes of the 3DAC image, whereas patients who recovered poorly showed distinct color fading in the pyramidal tract within 14 days following stroke. In conclusion, very fine anatomical structures are visible on 3DAC images, and it can be used as a diagnostic tool for the human brain. (author)

  5. Gd3+-ESR and magnetic susceptibility of GdCu4Al8 and GdMn4Al8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coldea, R.; Coldea, M.; Pop, I.

    1994-01-01

    Gd ESR of GdCu 4 Al 8 and GdMn 4 Al 8 and magnetic susceptibility of GdCu 4 Al 8 , GdMn 4 Al 8 , and YMn 4 Al 8 were measured in the temperature range of 290K--460K and 90K--1050K, respectively. The occurrence of the Mn moment in YMn 4 Al 8 and GdMn 4 Al 8 is strongly correlated with the critical value of d∼2.6 angstrom of the Mn-Mn distance below which the Mn moment is not stable. The experimental data for GdMn 4 Al 8 , compared with the data for the isostructural compounds GdCu 4 Al 8 and YMn 4 Al 8 , show that near the critical value of d, the existence of Mn moment depends not only on the value of d, but also on the local magnetic surroundings. It has been revealed that the magnetic character of Mn moment in YMn 4 Al 8 and GdMn 4 Al 8 changes from an itinerant electron type to a local-moment type with increasing temperature

  6. The relation between anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) and mineral filling of foraminifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzhikova, Anastasia; Grishchenko, Vladimir; Surinsky, Arseny; Tselmovich, Vladimir

    2017-04-01

    The comparison of bio- and magnetostratigraphic data in four sections of Jurassic-Cretaceous sediments of Mountain Crimea and Saratov region (Russia) detected the presence of correlation between the AMS parameter T and the amount of foraminifers in rock sample: disk-shaped magnetic particles dominance is connected with high quantity of foraminifers and therefore, cigar-shaped particles signify low foraminifer content. Parameter T (shape parameter) representing the magnetic particle form: T values close to 1 indicate the plain (disc-shaped) form of magnetic particles, T values close to (-1) highlight the prolate (cigar-shaped) form. To understand the nature of this interrelation a few disc-shaped foraminifers were studied using microprobe analysis. The results of this study have shown that inner spaces of foraminifers are completely filled by pyrite, which grains are covered with thin magnetite tape (the thickness of the tape is less than 200 nanometers). We suppose that this magnetite tape provides the main influence to anisotropy's character. In the Maastrichtian of Mountain Crimea the relation between AMS and amount of foraminifers appears to be more significant after the heating of samples in the muffle furnace till 500°C during 1 hour. Primary magnetic texture was nearly chaotic, but after the heating it acquired the view peculiar to rocks containing plain ferromagnetic particles, formed in calm hydrodynamic environment. This event may be explained by transition (at the temperature of 450°C) of non-magnetic pyrite, fulfilling the inner structure of foraminifers, to the high-magnetic magnetite. The relations between petromagnetic parameters and special aspects of micropaleontological complexes involve studies that are more special because they gain much interest and perspectives in the area of sedimentological and paleoecological reconstructions. The finance part of the study was supported by RFBR: Russian Foundation for Basic Research (projects №№ 16

  7. Differentiation between early rheumatoid arthritis patients and healthy persons by conventional and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsen, Mette Bjørndal; Ejbjerg, B J; Hetland, M L

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To identify the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) parameter that best differentiates healthy persons and patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and to investigated responsiveness to treatment of various MRI parameters. METHOD: Conventional MRI and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE......), the initial rate of enhancement (IRE), the maximum enhancement (ME), ME×Nvoxel, and IRE×Nvoxel were calculated for wrist and 2nd-5th metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints. Conventional MR images were evaluated using the RA MRI scoring system (RAMRIS) synovitis score. RESULTS: Using DCE-MRI, enhancement...

  8. Characterization of the enhancing lesions on dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in patients with interstitial mammoplasty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Yun [Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Hun, E-mail: rad-ksh@catholic.ac.kr [Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Bong Joo [Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyeon Sook [Department of Radiology, St. Paul Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Eun Suk [Department of Radiology, Ewha Womans University, School of Medicine, Mokdong Hospital (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ji Youn [Department of Radiology, Yeouido St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea (Korea, Republic of); Song, Byung Joo [Department of Surgery, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to categorize the morphologic and kinetic features of enhancing lesions in breasts with interstitial mammoplasty using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and to assess factors predictive of breast cancer. Materials and methods: We retrospectively reviewed the clinical and radiological data of 21 enhancing lesions in 19 patients with interstitial mammoplasty, who underwent breast magnetic resonance imaging and biopsy or an operation in our hospital from September 2008 to July 2012. These lesions were sorted by morphological and kinetic features and final assessment category according to the BI-RADS lexicon. Results: Nine cases were confirmed to be ductal carcinoma in situ (n = 2) and invasive ductal carcinoma (n = 7), and the remaining 12 cases were fibrocystic disease (n = 2), fibroadenoma (n = 2), fat necrosis (n = 1), foreign body granuloma (n = 3) and silicone mastitis (n = 1). Common features of malignancy included irregular shape (50.0%), spiculated margins (75.0%), heterogeneous enhancement (50.0%) and type III kinetic pattern (87.5%). The correlations of margins and kinetic curve pattern with benignity and malignancy approached statistical significance (p = 0.02, respectively). We found no correlation for shape (p = 0.33) or internal enhancement (p = 0.42) between lesion types. The malignancy rate of enhancing lesions was 42.8% (9/21). The sensitivity and specificity of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging were 100% and 16.67%, respectively. The positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging were 47.38%, 100% and 52.38%. Overall inter-observer agreement for the kinetic curve pattern was good (κ = 0.67). Moderate agreement was seen in describing the shape, margin, enhancement and assessing the final category (κ = 0.59, 0.46, 0.58 and 0.49, respectively). Conclusion: Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging had a high

  9. Contrasting magnetism in dilute and supersaturated cobalt-fullerene mixture films

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lavrentiev, Vasyl; Stupakov, Alexandr; Pokorný, Jan; Lavrentieva, Inna; Vacík, Jiří; Dejneka, Alexandr; Barchuk, M.; Čapková, P.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 33 (2015), s. 335002 ISSN 0022-3727 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389005 Keywords : cobalt * fullerene * nanomagnetism * nanostructure * self-organization Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders; BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism (FZU-D) Impact factor: 2.772, year: 2015

  10. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography in carotid artery disease: does automated image registration improve image quality?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menke, Jan; Larsen, Joerg

    2009-01-01

    Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) is a noninvasive imaging alternative to digital subtraction angiography (DSA) for patients with carotid artery disease. In DSA, image quality can be improved by shifting the mask image if the patient has moved during angiography. This study investigated whether such image registration may also help to improve the image quality of carotid MRA. Data from 370 carotid MRA examinations of patients likely to have carotid artery disease were prospectively collected. The standard nonregistered MRAs were compared to automatically linear, affine and warp registered MRA by using three image quality parameters: the vessel detection probability (VDP) in maximum intensity projection (MIP) images, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in MIP images, and contrast-to-noise ratio in three-dimensional image volumes. A body shift of less than 1 mm occurred in 96.2% of cases. Analysis of variance revealed no significant influence of image registration and body shift on image quality (p > 0.05). In conclusion, standard contrast-enhanced carotid MRA usually requires no image registration to improve image quality and is generally robust against any naturally occurring body shift. (orig.)

  11. Magnetic susceptibility of optimally doped HgBa2CuO4 +δ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Yutaka; Machi, Takato; Yamamoto, Ayako

    2017-12-01

    The magnitude of the powder spin susceptibility of an optimally doped superconductor HgBa2CuO4 +δ (Hg1201) in the normal state is found to be nearly the same as that of La2 -xSrxCuO4 near the optimally doped level. The Stoner enhancement factor of Hg1201 is larger than that of La2 -xSrxCuO4 . The magnitude correlation of the Stoner enhancement factor is inconsistent with the effect of the recent theoretical Coulomb repulsion between 3 d electrons and that of the superexchange interaction of a charge transfer type.

  12. Using magnetic susceptibility mapping for assessing soil degradation due to water erosion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jakšík, O.; Kodešová, R.; Kapička, Aleš; Klement, A.; Fér, M.; Nikodém, A.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 2 (2016), s. 105-113 ISSN 1801-5395 R&D Projects: GA MZe QJ1230319 Institutional support: RVO:67985530 Keywords : arable land * geomorphologically diverse areas * Chernozem Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 0.934, year: 2016

  13. Magnesium sulfate as an oral contrast medium in magnetic resonance imaging of the small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Hao; Liu, Cun; Ding, Hong Yu; Li, Chun Wei

    2012-03-01

    To explore the use of magnesium sulfate (MgSO4) as an oral contrast medium (CM) in MRI of the small intestine. By comparing MgSO4 SNRs at different concentrations, we determined that 2.5% MgSO4 is the ideal concentration for small bowel MRI. Twenty volunteers underwent MRI after drinking 2.5% MgSO4. Thirty-one patients with clinical suspicion of small intestinal pathology underwent both MRI and the air-barium contrast examination. The patient's tolerance, side effects and complications were noted. 2.5% MgSO4 can decrease the absorption of water and fully fill the enteric cavity, thereby increasing the contrast between the intestinal wall and lumen and facilitating radiographic examination of the small bowel. The mean diameter of the small intestine was 19.8±1.21 mm in the 20 volunteers consuming 2.5% MgSO4 and 12.7±0.84 mm in the 20 volunteers given water. There was a significant difference (P0.05) in side effects between MgSO4 and water groups. Small intestinal MRI was successfully performed in all 31 patients, who were also examined by the double contrast barium, which gave almost identical diagnoses to MRI in all cases except for 1 patient with small intestinal hemorrhage. MRI with 2.5% MgSO4 can demonstrate intestinal abnormalities. Therefore, 2.5% MgSO4 solution is an ideal oral CM for small bowel MRI. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging dynamic contrast enhancement (DCE) characteristics of healed myocardial infarction differ from viable myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfarb, James W; Zhao, Wenguo

    2014-12-01

    To determine whether healed myocardial infarction alters dynamic contrast-enhancement (DCE) curve shapes as well as late gadolinium-enhancement (LGE). Twenty patients with chronic myocardial infarction underwent MR imaging at 1.5 T with blood and myocardial T1 measurements before and after contrast administration for forty minutes. Viable and infarcted myocardial partition coefficients were calculated using multipoint slope methods for ten different DCE sampling intervals and windows. Partition coefficients and coefficients of determination were compared with paired statistical tests to assess the linearity of DCE curve shapes over the 40 min time period. Calculated partition coefficients did not vary significantly between methods (p=0.325) for viable myocardium but did differ for infarcted myocardium (pinfarcted DCE. There was a significant difference between viable and infarcted myocardial partition coefficients estimates for all methods with the exception of methods that included measurements during the first 10 min after contrast agent administration. Myocardial partition coefficients calculated from a slope calculation vary in healed myocardial infarction based on the selection of samples due to non-linear DCE curve shapes. Partition coefficient calculations are insensitive to data sampling effects in viable myocardium due to linear DCE curve shapes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Glioblastoma Presenting with Steroid-Induced Pseudoregression of Contrast Enhancement on Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus D. Mazur

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Corticosteroid-induced reduction in contrast enhancement on radiographic imaging is most commonly associated with lymphoma but has been reported in other entities, including glioma. This finding may represent a diagnostic dilemma. Concern that steroid-induced cytotoxicity obscures histological diagnosis of suspected lymphoma may lead to postponement of a biopsy. If glioma is not considered in the differential diagnosis, reduction in tumor contrast enhancement may be misinterpreted as disease regression rather than a transient radiographic change. We report a case of a patient with an enhancing right temporoparietal mass adjacent to the atrium of the lateral ventricle. After treatment with dexamethasone was started, the mass exhibited marked reduction in contrast enhancement, with symptom improvement. The clinical course suggested lymphoma, and surgery was not performed. Subsequent screening for extra-axial lymphoma was negative. Two weeks later, the patient developed worsening symptoms, and repeat T1-weighted imaging showed interval increase in size and enhancement. The findings suggested a possible diagnosis of malignant glioma. The patient underwent a stereotactic-guided craniotomy for excision of the right temporoparietal mass lesion. Final histological diagnosis was glioblastoma multiforme, World Health Organization grade IV.

  16. Targeted gadolinium-loaded dendrimer nanoparticles for tumor-specific magnetic resonance contrast enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott D Swanson

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Scott D Swanson1, Jolanta F Kukowska-Latallo2, Anil K Patri5, Chunyan Chen6, Song Ge4, Zhengyi Cao3, Alina Kotlyar3, Andrea T East7, James R Baker31Department of Radiology, The University of Michigan Medical School, 2Department of Internal Medicine, The University of Michigan Medical School, 3Michigan Nanotechnology Institute for Medicine and Biological Sciences, The University of Michigan, 4Applied Physics, The University of Michigan, MD, USA; 5Present address: National Cancer Institute at Frederick (Contractor, MD, USA; 6Present address: Intel Corporation, Chandler, AZ, USA; 7Present address: Stritch School of Medicine, Chicago, ILL, USAAbstract: A target-specific MRI contrast agent for tumor cells expressing high affinity folate receptor was synthesized using generation five (G5 of polyamidoamine (PAMAM dendrimer. Surface modified dendrimer was functionalized for targeting with folic acid (FA and the remaining terminal primary amines of the dendrimer were conjugated with the bifunctional NCS-DOTA chelator that forms stable complexes with gadolinium (Gd III. Dendrimer-DOTA conjugates were then complexed with GdCl3, followed by ICP-OES as well as MRI measurement of their longitudinal relaxivity (T1 s−1 mM−1 of water. In xenograft tumors established in immunodeficient (SCID mice with KB human epithelial cancer cells expressing folate receptor (FAR, the 3D MRI results showed specific and statistically significant signal enhancement in tumors generated with targeted Gd(III-DOTA-G5-FA compared with signal generated by non-targeted Gd(III-DOTA-G5 contrast nanoparticle. The targeted dendrimer contrast nanoparticles infiltrated tumor and were retained in tumor cells up to 48 hours post-injection of targeted contrast nanoparticle. The presence of folic acid on the dendrimer resulted in specific delivery of the nanoparticle to tissues and xenograft tumor cells expressing folate receptor in vivo. We present the specificity of the dendrimer

  17. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain revisited with dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasali, N.; Cubuk, R.; Aricak, M.; Ozarar, M.; Saydam, B.; Nur, H.; Tuncbilek, N.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We aimed to assess the contrast enhancement patterns of the retrodiscal tissue with dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging (DCE-MRI) with respect to different temporomandibular joint disc pathologies. Additionally, we questioned the relationship between the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain and the contrast enhancement pattern of the retrodiscal tissue regardless of the TMJ disc position. Materials and methods: 52 joints of 26 patients (4 males and 22 females) who have pain in at least at one of their TMJ were included in this study. For the qualitative analysis, the joints were divided into four groups in terms of their disc positions: normal (1), partially displaced with or without reduction (2), totally dislocated with reduction (3) and totally dislocated without reduction (4). Besides, two different joint groups were constituted, namely the painful group and painless group according to the clinical findings without taking the TMJ disc positions into account. Quantitative analyses were made by means of measuring signal intensity ratios (SI) ratio at the retrodiscal tissue (from internal side and external side of the each joint) using DCE-MRI and these measurements were analyzed with paired samples t test to define the difference between the measurements. At the second stage, the time-dependent arithmetical mean values of the SI ratios were calculated for each joint group and significant differences between the groups were questioned using analysis of variance (ANOVA) test. Besides, painful and painless groups which were classified on the basis of the clinical data were compared according to the mean SI ratios found for each joint and the significant differences between these two groups were assessed by means of Student's T test. The results were assessed in 95% confidence interval where the significance level was p < 0.05. Results: A significant difference was observed between the internal and external contrast enhancement of the joints with partial

  18. Conjugation Magnetic PAEEP-PLLA Nanoparticles with Lactoferrin as a Specific Targeting MRI Contrast Agent for Detection of Brain Glioma in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Binhua; Wang, Siqi; Rao, Rong; Liu, Xuhan; Xu, Haibo; Wu, Yun; Yang, Xiangliang; Liu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis of malignant brain gliomas is largely based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with contrast agents. In recent years, nano-sized contrast agents have been developed for improved MRI diagnosis. In this study, oleylamine-coated Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (OAM-MNPs) were synthesized with thermal decomposition method and encapsulated in novel amphiphilic poly(aminoethyl ethylene phosphate)/poly(L-lactide) (PAEEP-PLLA) copolymer nanoparticles. The OAM-MNP-loaded PAEEP-PLLA nanopar...

  19. 4-D flow magnetic resonance imaging: blood flow quantification compared to 2-D phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging and Doppler echocardiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabbour, Maya [Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Medical Imaging 9, Chicago, IL (United States); Schnell, Susanne [Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Jarvis, Kelly [Northwestern University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, McCormick School of Engineering, Evanston, IL (United States); Robinson, Joshua D. [Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Chicago, IL (United States); Markl, Michael [Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, McCormick School of Engineering, Evanston, IL (United States); Rigsby, Cynthia K. [Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Medical Imaging 9, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Doppler echocardiography (echo) is the reference standard for blood flow velocity analysis, and two-dimensional (2-D) phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered the reference standard for quantitative blood flow assessment. However, both clinical standard-of-care techniques are limited by 2-D acquisitions and single-direction velocity encoding and may make them inadequate to assess the complex three-dimensional hemodynamics seen in congenital heart disease. Four-dimensional flow MRI (4-D flow) enables qualitative and quantitative analysis of complex blood flow in the heart and great arteries. The objectives of this study are to compare 4-D flow with 2-D phase-contrast MRI for quantification of aortic and pulmonary flow and to evaluate the advantage of 4-D flow-based volumetric flow analysis compared to 2-D phase-contrast MRI and echo for peak velocity assessment in children and young adults. Two-dimensional phase-contrast MRI of the aortic root, main pulmonary artery (MPA), and right and left pulmonary arteries (RPA, LPA) and 4-D flow with volumetric coverage of the aorta and pulmonary arteries were performed in 50 patients (mean age: 13.1 ± 6.4 years). Four-dimensional flow analyses included calculation of net flow and regurgitant fraction with 4-D flow analysis planes similarly positioned to 2-D planes. In addition, 4-D flow volumetric assessment of aortic root/ascending aorta and MPA peak velocities was performed and compared to 2-D phase-contrast MRI and echo. Excellent correlation and agreement were found between 2-D phase-contrast MRI and 4-D flow for net flow (r = 0.97, P < 0.001) and excellent correlation with good agreement was found for regurgitant fraction (r = 0.88, P < 0.001) in all vessels. Two-dimensional phase-contrast MRI significantly underestimated aortic (P = 0.032) and MPA (P < 0.001) peak velocities compared to echo, while volumetric 4-D flow analysis resulted in higher (aortic: P = 0.001) or similar (MPA: P = 0.98) peak

  20. Magnetic field perturbation in proton MR imaging - A study of a contrast agent and of distortions due to metallic implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsson, M.

    1992-01-01

    Perturbations of the static magnetic field in proton MR imaging (NMR imaging, MRI, MRT) result in image distortion and/or signal loss. An investigation of a superparamagnetic contrast agent for MR imaging has been performed. Magnetite particles were embedded in biodegradable starch spheres with a diameter of one micrometer. Animal experiments showed that the agent was quickly accumulated in the reticulo-endothelial system (RES), causing a decrease in signal intensity in this region. Diffusion within the locally generated magnetic field perturbation is responsible for signal loss in spin-echo images. Furthermore, the magnetic properties of various aneurysm clips were investigated to determine which clips could be used safely in a clinical MR investigation. MR artifacts caused by the metallic clips were studied using a geometric phantom. Non-ferromagnetic clips were concluded to be safe for examinations with medium field (0.3 tesla) MR imaging systems. A comparison study between MR and CT was performed on patients harbouring intracranial, nonferromagnetic aneurysm clips. The artifacts close to the clips were equally serve for MR and CT, but at some distance, the MR images were much less affected than the CT images. Finally, a computer program capable of simulating any realistic MR imaging situation has been developed. Raw data matrices are obtained by solving the Bloch equations. Corrections for intravascular spin behaviour have been implemented together with efficient algorithms. A quantitative investigation of signal displacement and signal loss, caused by small metallic implants, has been performed by computer simulation. An exact expression for the magnetic field outside a homogeneous ellipsoid in an external magnetic field has been derived. Distortions in MR images, caused by perturbing ellipsoids of different shapes and orientations, were studied. (30 refs.) (au)

  1. Phase contrast image simulations for electron holography of magnetic and electric fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beleggia, Marco; Pozzi, Giulio

    2013-06-01

    The research on flux line lattices and pancake vortices in superconducting materials, carried out within a long and fruitful collaboration with Akira Tonomura and his group at the Hitachi Advanced Research Laboratory, led us to develop a mathematical framework, based on the reciprocal representation of the magnetic vector potential, that enables us to simulate realistic phase images of fluxons. The aim of this paper is to review the main ideas underpinning our computational framework and the results we have obtained throughout the collaboration. Furthermore, we outline how to generalize the approach to model other samples and structures of interest, in particular thin ferromagnetic films, ferromagnetic nanoparticles and p-n junctions.

  2. The effect of pressure on the magnetic susceptibility of RInCu4 (R = Gd, Er and Yb)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svechkarev, I. V.; Panfilov, A. S.; Dolja, S. N.; Nakamura, H.; Shiga, M.

    1999-06-01

    The magnetic susceptibility of the intermetallic compounds RInCu4 (R = Gd, Er and Yb) was measured under helium gas pressure up to 2 kbar at the fixed temperatures 78, 150 and 300 K. For YbInCu4, which exhibits a first-order valence phase transition at TVicons/Journals/Common/simeq" ALT="simeq" ALIGN="TOP"/>40 K, the Grüneisen parameter for the Kondo energy, icons/Journals/Common/Omega" ALT="Omega" ALIGN="TOP"/>Kicons/Journals/Common/equiv" ALT="equiv" ALIGN="TOP"/>-dlnTK/dlnV = -32, is large and typical for Ce-based heavy-fermion systems in magnitude but opposite in sign. The effect of atomic disorder is discussed on the basis of the data for a chemically disordered sample; the pressure effect at T = 78 K is strongly enhanced due to the spatial dispersion of pressure-sensitive TV, and hence dTV/dP = -2.0 K kbar-1 is obtained by assuming a Gaussian distribution of TV. On the basis of an extrapolation of the experimental pressure dependence, a (P,T) phase diagram is proposed for YbInCu4. Reference compounds with stable f moments, GdInCu4 and ErInCu4, show negligible pressure dependences of the susceptibility.

  3. Contribution of magnetic susceptibility effects to transmembrane chemical shift differences in the 31P NMR spectra of oxygenated erythrocyte suspensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirk, K.; Kuchel, P.W.

    1988-01-01

    Triethyl phosphate, dimethyl methylphosphonate, and the hypophosphite ion all contain the phosphoryl functional group. When added to an oxygenated erythrocyte suspension, the former compound gives rise to a single 31 P NMR resonance, whereas the latter compounds give rise to separate intra- and extracellular 31 P NMR resonances. On the basis of experiments with intact oxygenated cell suspensions (in which the hematocrit was varied) and with oxygenated cell lysates (in which the lysate concentration was varied) it was concluded that the chemical shifts of the intra- and extracellular populations of triethyl phosphate differ as a consequence of the diamagnetic susceptibility of intracellular oxyhemoglobin but that this difference is averaged by the rapid exchange of the compound across the cell membrane. The difference is the magnetic susceptibility of the intra- and extracellular compartments contributes to the observed separation of the intra- and extracellular resonances of dimethyl methylphosphonate and hypophosphite. The magnitude of this contribution is, however, substantially less than that calculated using a simple two-compartment model and varies with the hematocrit of the suspension. Furthermore, it is insufficient to fully account for the transmembrane chemical shift differences observed for dimethyl methylphosphonate and hypophosphite. An additional effect is operating to move the intracellular resonances of these compounds to a lower chemical shift. The effect is mediated by an intracellular component, and the magnitude of the resultant chemical shift variations depends upon the chemical structure of the phosphoryl compound involved

  4. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility analysis of the Cantera Ignimbrite, San Luis Potosi, México: flow source recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero-Miranda, C. I.; Torres-Hernández, J. R.; Alva-Valdivia, L. M.

    2009-01-01

    Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) was selected as the key technique to find the source of the widespread Cantera Ignimbrite and to seek its possible relationship with the San Luis Potosí Caldera. Eighteen sites (372 specimens from 155 cores) from the Oligocene Cantera Ignimbrite were sampled. AMS was measured on a KLY2 Kappabridge. AMS data were processed with Anisoft 3 software using Jelinek statistics as well as `SpheriStat' principal components and density distribution. Mean susceptibilities range from 290 to 5026 × 10-6 SI (average = 2526 × 10-6 SI). The anisotropy degree ( P j) ranges from 1.005 to 1.055, with only one site displaying a value of 1.134 ( P j average = 1.031). AMS ellipsoid shapes are mostly oblate, with the T-factor ranging from 0.843 to 0.144 ( T average = 0.529), although one site is mainly prolate ( T = -0.005), and three additional sites have an important proportion of prolate specimens. Magnetic fabrics of most sites shows k3 axes around nearly circular distributions and k 1- k 2 axes around elongated-girdle distributions defining sub-horizontal foliation planes; exceptions to this are related to sites with a significant percentage of prolate specimens. Flow directions inferred from AMS analysis indicate several ignimbrite sources located along selected NW-SE linear features (faults and fractures such as El Potosino Fault) as well as along the rim of the caldera structure. The geometry of volcanic outcrops, the NW-SE faulting-fracture system, as well as the AMS results suggest that this is a caldera structure resembling the trapdoor-type (Lipman, 1997).

  5. Value of quantitative magnetic resonance imaging T1-relaxometry in predicting contrast-enhancement in glioblastoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattingen, Elke; Müller, Andreas; Jurcoane, Alina; Mädler, Burkhard; Ditter, Philip; Schild, Hans; Herrlinger, Ulrich; Glas, Martin; Kebir, Sied

    2017-08-08

    The repetitive usage of gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCA) is critical for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation of tumor burden in glioblastoma patients. It is also a crucial tool for determination of radiographical response to treatment. GBCA injection, however, comes with a 2.4% rate of adverse events including life-threatening conditions such as nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF). Moreover, GBCA have been shown to be deposited in brain tissue of patients even with an intact blood-brain barrier (BBB). The present study explores quantitative T1 relaxometry as an alternative non-invasive imaging technique detection of tumor burden and determination of radiographical response. This technique exploits specific properties of brain tissue with impaired BBB. With a sensitivity and specificity as high as 86% and 80%, respectively, quantitative T1-relaxometry allows for detecting contrast-enhancing areas without the use of GBCA. This method could make it unnecessary to subject patients to the risk of adverse events associated with the use of GBCA. Nonetheless, a large-scale analysis is needed to confirm our findings. Gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCA) are crucial for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based evaluation of tumor burden in glioblastoma (GBM). Serious adverse events of GBCA, even though uncommon, and gadolinium deposition in brain tissue could be avoided by novel imaging techniques not requiring GBCA. Altered tissue composition in areas with impaired blood-brain-barrier also alters the quantified T1 relaxation time (qT1), so that qT1 analysis could replace GBCA-based MRI for the analysis of tumor burden and response. As a part of a prospective pilot MRI-relaxometry trial, patients with newly-diagnosed GBM who relapsed under standard radiochemotherapy were selected for this study. At recurrence, subtraction of qT1 maps pre and post-GBCA application (ΔqT1 maps) was used to determine areas of contrast-enhancement. With the contrast

  6. Fluorine cardiovascular magnetic resonance angiography in vivo at 1.5 T with perfluorocarbon nanoparticle contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, Anne M; Caruthers, Shelton D; Hockett, Franklin D; Cyrus, Tillman; Robertson, J David; Allen, J Stacy; Williams, Todd D; Fuhrhop, Ralph W; Lanza, Gregory M; Wickline, Samuel A

    2007-01-01

    While the current gold standard for coronary imaging is X-ray angiography, evidence is accumulating that it may not be the most sensitive technique for detecting unstable plaque. Other imaging modalities, such as cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR), can be used for plaque characterization, but suffer from long scan and reconstruction times for determining regions of stenosis. We have developed an intravascular fluorinated contrast agent that can be used for angiography with cardiovascular magnetic resosnace at clinical field strengths (1.5 T). This liquid perfluorocarbon nanoparticle contains a high concentration of fluorine atoms that can be used to generate contrast on 19F MR images without any competing background signal from surrounding tissues. By using a perfluorocarbon with 20 equivalent fluorine molecules, custom-built RF coils, a modified clinical scanner, and an efficient steady-state free procession sequence, we demonstrate the use of this agent for angiography of small vessels in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo. The surprisingly high signal generated with very short scan times and low doses of perfluorocarbon indicates that this technique may be useful in clinical settings when coupled with advanced imaging strategies.

  7. Iron oxide nanoparticles for use in contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Elisa M.N. de; Rocha, Maximiliano S. da; Caimi, Priscila de A.; Basso, Nara R. de S.; Zanini, Mara L.; Papaleo, Ricardo M.

    2015-01-01

    In this work were carried out synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles coated with dextran, comparing the results of using different concentrations of dextran, iron salts, temperature and reaction time. The compounds were analyzed by DLS, XRD, TGA, TEM, FTIR, Zeta Potential and relaxivity. Nanoparticles with dispersion around 10-15 nm and average hydrodynamic diameters of 16-50 nm, with superparamagnetic behavior were obtained. The ratio of the relaxivities (r2/r1) in aqueous solutions was 5.30, close to value of the commercially available iron oxide contrast agents. (author)

  8. Shoulder Magnetic Resonance Arthrography: A Prospective Randomized Study of Anterior and Posterior Ultrasonography-Guided Contrast Injections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koivikko, M.P.; Mustonen, A.O.T.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography is an accurate imaging method for internal shoulder derangements and rotator cuff pathologies. Both anterior and posterior contrast injection techniques, under palpatory, fluoroscopic, or ultrasonographic guidance have been described in the literature. However, clinical comparisons of the injection techniques remain few. Purpose: To compare the performance of anterior and posterior ultrasonography (US)-guided arthrography injections of the shoulder regarding patient discomfort and influence on diagnostic MR reading, and to illustrate the typical artifacts resulting from contrast leakage in the respective techniques. Material and Methods: 43 MR arthrographies were prospectively randomized into anterior and posterior US-guided contrast injections and performed by two radiologists, with the study of artifacts from contrast leakage. Pain from the injections was assessed by a survey utilizing a 100-mm visual analogue scale (VAS). Results: Of the 23 anterior injections, nine caused contrast artifacts in the subscapular tendon, and in three the leakage extended further anteriorly. Of the 20 posterior injections, 12 showed injection artifacts of the rotator cuff, extending outside the cuff in seven. Two of the anterior and none of the posterior artifacts compromised diagnostic quality. In posterior injections, the leakage regularly occurred at the caudal edge of the infraspinatus muscle and was easily distinguishable from rotator cuff tears. All patients completed the pain survey. Mean VAS scores were 25.0 (median 18, SD 22) for anterior, and 25.4 (median 16, SD 25) for posterior injections. The two radiologists achieved different mean VAS scores but closely agreed as to anterior and posterior VAS scores. Conclusion: Arthrography injections were fairly simple to perform under US guidance. Patient discomfort for anterior and posterior injections was equally minor. A tailored approach utilizing anterior or posterior injections

  9. Shoulder Magnetic Resonance Arthrography: A Prospective Randomized Study of Anterior and Posterior Ultrasonography-Guided Contrast Injections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koivikko, M.P.; Mustonen, A.O.T. (Dept. of Radiology, Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland))

    2008-10-15

    Background: Magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography is an accurate imaging method for internal shoulder derangements and rotator cuff pathologies. Both anterior and posterior contrast injection techniques, under palpatory, fluoroscopic, or ultrasonographic guidance have been described in the literature. However, clinical comparisons of the injection techniques remain few. Purpose: To compare the performance of anterior and posterior ultrasonography (US)-guided arthrography injections of the shoulder regarding patient discomfort and influence on diagnostic MR reading, and to illustrate the typical artifacts resulting from contrast leakage in the respective techniques. Material and Methods: 43 MR arthrographies were prospectively randomized into anterior and posterior US-guided contrast injections and performed by two radiologists, with the study of artifacts from contrast leakage. Pain from the injections was assessed by a survey utilizing a 100-mm visual analogue scale (VAS). Results: Of the 23 anterior injections, nine caused contrast artifacts in the subscapular tendon, and in three the leakage extended further anteriorly. Of the 20 posterior injections, 12 showed injection artifacts of the rotator cuff, extending outside the cuff in seven. Two of the anterior and none of the posterior artifacts compromised diagnostic quality. In posterior injections, the leakage regularly occurred at the caudal edge of the infraspinatus muscle and was easily distinguishable from rotator cuff tears. All patients completed the pain survey. Mean VAS scores were 25.0 (median 18, SD 22) for anterior, and 25.4 (median 16, SD 25) for posterior injections. The two radiologists achieved different mean VAS scores but closely agreed as to anterior and posterior VAS scores. Conclusion: Arthrography injections were fairly simple to perform under US guidance. Patient discomfort for anterior and posterior injections was equally minor. A tailored approach utilizing anterior or posterior injections

  10. Scaling Laws at the Nano Size: The Effect of Particle Size and Shape on the Magnetism and Relaxivity of Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Contrast Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolensky, Eric D; Park, Hee-Yun E; Zhou, Yue; Rolla, Gabriele A; Marjańska, Małgorzata; Botta, Mauro; Pierre, Valérie C

    2013-06-14

    The magnetic properties of iron oxide nanoparticles govern their relaxivities and efficacy as contrast agents for MRI. These properties are in turn determined by their composition, size and morphology. Herein we present a systematic study of the effect of particle size and shape of magnetite nanocrystals synthesized by thermal decompositions of iron salts on both their magnetism and their longitudinal and transverse relaxivities, r 1 and r 2 , respectively. Faceted nanoparticles demonstrate superior magnetism and relaxivities than spherical nanoparticles of similar size. For faceted nanoparticles, but not for spherical ones, r 1 and r 2 further increase with increasing particle size up to a size of 18 nm. This observation is in accordance with increasing saturation magnetization for nanoparticles increasing in size up to 12 nm, above which a plateau is observed. The NMRD (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Dispersion) profiles of MIONs (Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles) display an increase in longitudinal relaxivity with decreasing magnetic field strength with a plateau below 1 MHz. The transverse relaxivity shows no dependence on the magnetic field strength between 20 MHz and 500 MHz. These observations translate to phantom MR images: in T 1 -weighted SWIFT (SWeep imaging with Fourier Transform) images MIONs have a positive contrast with little dependence on particle size, whereas in T 2 -weighted gradient-echo images MIONs create a negative contrast which increases in magnitude with increasing particle size. Altogether, these results will enable the development of particulate MRI contrast agents with enhanced efficacy for biomedical and clinical applications.

  11. Gadolinium- and manganite-based contrast agents with fluorescent probes for both magnetic resonance and fluorescence imaging of pancreatic islets: a comparative study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Berková, Z.; Jirák, D.; Zacharovová, K.; Lukeš, I.; Kotková, Z.; Kotek, J.; Kačenka, M.; Kaman, Ondřej; Řehoř, I.; Hájek, M.; Saudek, F.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 4 (2013), s. 614-621 ISSN 1860-7179 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : contrast agents * gadolinium * magnetic resonance imaging * manganite * pancreatic islets Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.046, year: 2013

  12. Magnetic fabric and flow direction in the Ediacaran Imider dyke swarms (Eastern Anti-Atlas, Morocco), inferred from the Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility (AMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otmane, Khadija; Errami, Ezzoura; Olivier, Philippe; Berger, Julien; Triantafyllou, Antoine; Ennih, Nasser

    2018-03-01

    Located in the Imiter Inlier (Eastern Saghro, Anti-Atlas, Morocco), Ediacaran volcanic dykes have been studied for their petrofabric using Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility (AMS) technique. Four dykes, namely TF, TD, FF and FE show andesitic compositions and are considered to belong to the same dyke swarm. They are oriented respectively N25E, N40E, N50E, and N10E and have been emplaced during a first tectonic event. The dyke FW, oriented N90E displays a composition of alkali basalt and its emplacement is attributed to a subsequent tectonic event. These rocks are propylitized under greenschist facies conditions forming a secondary paragenesis constituted by calcite, chlorite, epidote and sericite. The dykes TF, TD, FF and FE are sub-volcanic calc-alkaline, typical of post-collisional basalts/andesites, belonging to plate margin andesites. The FW dyke shows a within-plate basalt signature; alkaline affinity reflecting a different petrogenetic process. The thermomagnetic analyses show a dominantly ferromagnetic behaviour in the TF dyke core carried by single domain Ti-poor magnetite, maghemite and pyrrhotite. The dominantly paramagnetic susceptibilities in TF dyke rims and TD, FE, FF and FW dykes are controlled by ilmenite, amphibole, pyroxene and chlorite. The magnetic fabrics of the Imider dykes, determined by our AMS study, allows us to reconstitute the tectonic conditions which prevailed during the emplacement of these two generations of volcanic dykes. The first tectonic event was characterized by a roughly NE-SW compression and the second tectonic event is characterized by an E-W shortening followed by a relaxation recording the end of the Pan-African orogeny in the eastern Anti-Atlas.

  13. Non-contrast magnetic resonance angiography in renal transplantation and renal donation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blankholm, Anne Dorte

    2015-01-01

    Renal transplantation is the treatment of choice in cases of severe renal disease. The majority of candidates for kidney transplantation have arteriosclerosis to some extent; thus, preoperative imaging of the vessels is needed. Different imaging modalities are available and are used for this purp......Renal transplantation is the treatment of choice in cases of severe renal disease. The majority of candidates for kidney transplantation have arteriosclerosis to some extent; thus, preoperative imaging of the vessels is needed. Different imaging modalities are available and are used...... contrast agents before kidney transplantation and kidney donation. Study I is a review of NCMRA techniques and clinical applications. In study II, we searched for an NCMRA method with consistently good image quality for the examination of the pelvic vessels in patients with severe renal disease. Five...... different NCMRA sequences were compared with respect to the difference in contrast between the vessels and the surrounding tissue, diagnostic performance and artefacts. We found that the oldest and best-known sequences used for NCMRA, remained the most robust sequences with respect to the measured...

  14. Improved visualization of intracranial vessels by gradient moment nulling in hybrid of opposite-contrast magnetic resonance angiography (HOP MRA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azuma, Toshiya; Kodama, Takao; Yano, Takanori; Suzuki, Masayuki; Kimura, Tokunori; Tamaribuchi, Youko

    2010-01-01

    Hybrid of opposite-contrast (HOP) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) is a new method that combines the advantages of 3-dimensional (3D) time-of-flight (TOF) MRA and black-blood (BB) MRA without prolonging acquisition time. In phantom and clinical studies, we focused on image differences when we applied gradient moment nulling (GMN) to 2 or 3 axes in the first echo. We made an original phantom with a semicircular tube of 3- and 5-mm internal diameter, with flow rate in the tube of 0, 20, 60, 80, or 120 cm/s. In original images of the phantom obtained with TOF MRA and flow-sensitive BB MRA and in filter frequency-weighted subtraction (FWS) processed images acquired with HOP MRA, we measured the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of both the inside and outside of the tubes. In FWS processed images with GMN applied to 2 axes, the CNR was high at various flow rates in both straight and bending portions of the tubes in comparison with TOF images. In a clinical study in 15 patients, we evaluated vessel visualization in images obtained using conventional TOF MRA with magnetization transfer contrast (MTC) and HOP MRA. In clinical studies, visualization scores of HOP MRA were equivalent to those of conventional TOF MRA in the bilateral internal carotid arteries (ICA) and inferior in the basilar arteries. However, visualization of the peripheral portion of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) improved significantly in HOP MRA with GMN applied to 2 and 3 axes. Visualization of the main trunk of the ICA and MCA was superior in HOP MRA with GMN applied to 2 axes. HOP MRA with 2-axis GMN may be useful for excellent visualization of both major arteries and peripheral vessels in the head. (author)

  15. Imaging in Vivo Extracellular pH with a Single Paramagnetic Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanshu Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of extracellular pH (pHe has potential utility for cancer diagnoses and for assessing the therapeutic effects of pH-dependent therapies. A single magnetic resonance imaging (MRI contrast agent that is detected through paramagnetic chemical exchange saturation transfer (PARACEST was designed to measure tumor pHe throughout the range of physiologic pH and with magnetic resonance saturation powers that are not harmful to a mouse model of cancer. The chemical characterization and modeling of the contrast agent Yb3+-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7-triacetic acid, 10-o-aminoanilide (Yb-DO3A-oAA suggested that the aryl amine of the agent forms an intramolecular hydrogen bond with a proximal carboxylate ligand, which was essential for generating a practical chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST effect from an amine. A ratio of CEST effects from the aryl amine and amide was linearly correlated with pH throughout the physiologic pH range. The pH calibration was used to produce a parametric pH map of a subcutaneous flank tumor on a mouse model of MCF-7 mammary carcinoma. Although refinements in the in vivo CEST MRI methodology may improve the accuracy of pHe measurements, this study demonstrated that the PARACEST contrast agent can be used to generate parametric pH maps of in vivo tumors with saturation power levels that are not harmful to a mouse model of cancer.

  16. Preoperative Grading of Glioma Using Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast MRI: Relative Cerebral Blood Volume Analysis of Intra-tumoural and Peri-tumoural Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Radwa K; Gamal, Sara A; Essa, Abdel-Hakeem A; Othman, Mostafa H

    2018-04-01

    To assess the usefulness of intra-tumor and peri-tumoral relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) in preoperative glioma grading. 21 patients with histopathologically confirmed glioma were included. Imaging was achieved on a 1.5T MRI scanner. Dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) MRI was performed using T2* weighted gradient echo-planner imaging (EPI). Multiple regions of interest (ROIs) have been drawn in the hotspots regions, the highest ROI has been selected to represent the rCBV of each intra-tumoral and peri-tumoral regions. Based on histopathology, tumors were subdivided into low grade and high grade. Receiver operating characteristic analysis (ROC) of rCBV, of both intra-tumoral and peri-tumoral regions, was performed to find cut-off values between high and low-grade tumors. The resulting sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy were calculated. Based on the histopathology, high-grade glioma (HGG) represented 76.2% whereas low-grade glioma (LGG) represented 23.8%. Both intra-tumoral and peri-tumoral rCBV of HGG were significantly higher than those of LGG. A cut-off value >2.9 for intra-tumoral rCBV provided sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 80%, 100%, and 85.7% respectively to differentiate between HGG and LGG. Additionally, the cut-off value >0.7 for peri-tumoral rCBV provided sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 100%, 66.6%, and 90.5% respectively to differentiate between HGG and LGG. rCBV of each of intra-tumoral and peri-tumoral rCBV are significantly reliable for the preoperative distinction between HGG and LGG. Combined intra-tumoral and peri-tumoral rCBV provides overall better diagnostic accuracy and helps to decrease the invasive intervention for non-surgical candidates. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Application of orthorhombic standardization in magnetic susceptibility studies of localized spin models with S=1, 3/2, 2, 5/2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pełka, Robert, E-mail: Robert.Pelka@ifj.edu.pl [H. Niewodniczański Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, E. Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Kraków (Poland); Rudowicz, Czesław [Faculty of Chemistry, A. Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 89B, 61-614 Poznań (Poland)

    2016-09-15

    The standardization idea is nowadays tacitly accepted in EMR area, however, its usefulness in magnetism studies has not been fully recognized as yet. This idea arises due to intrinsic features of orthorhombic Hamiltonians of any physical nature, including the crystal (ligand) field (CF/LF) Hamiltonians or the zero-field splitting (ZFS) ones. Standardization limits the ratio of the orthorhombic parameter to the axial one to a fixed range between 0 and a specific value that depends on the notation used. For the ZFS parameters expressed in the conventional spin Hamiltonian (SH) notation the ratio λ=E/D can always be limited to the range (0, ±1/3) by appropriate choice of coordinate system. Implications of standardization of orthorhombic spin Hamiltonians for interpretation of experimental magnetic susceptibility data are considered. Using a numerical example, we show the existence of alternative solutions for ZFS parameters potentially obtainable from fitting experimental magnetic data and discuss their importance. For the first time algebraic applications of the standardization to the expressions for magnetic susceptibility tensor derived earlier for localized spin models with S=1, 3/2, 2, 5/2 and with rhombic anisotropy are explored. The numerical and algebraic results allow us to formulate an 'invariance principle'. These considerations facilitate interpretation of experimental magnetic data and provide an additional check of correctness of analytical magnetic susceptibility expressions.

  18. Assessment of colon and bladder crosstalk in an experimental colitis model using contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towner, R A; Smith, N; Saunders, D; Van Gordon, S B; Tyler, K R; Wisniewski, A B; Greenwood-Van Meerveld, B; Hurst, R E

    2015-11-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) consists of two chronic remitting-relapsing inflammatory disorders in the colon referred to as ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease (CD). Inflammatory bowel disease affects about 1.4 million Americans. 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis is a widely used model of experimental intestinal inflammation with characteristic transmural and segmental lesions that are similar to CD. Here, we report on the use of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI) to monitor in vivo bladder permeability changes resulting from bladder crosstalk following colon TNBS exposure, and TNBS-induced colitis. Changes in MRI signal intensities and histology were evaluated for both colon and bladder regions. Uptake of contrast agent in the colon demonstrated a significant increase in signal intensity (SI) for TNBS-exposed rats (p colon TNBS-exposed rats (p colon was observed, however, bladder histology indicated a normal urothelium in rats with TNBS-induced colitis, despite increased permeability seen by CE-MRI. Contrast-enhanced MRI was able to quantitatively measure inflammation associated with TNBS-induced colitis, and assess bladder crosstalk measured as an increase in urothelial permeability. Although CE-MRI is routinely used to assess inflammation with IBD, currently there is no diagnostic test to assess bladder crosstalk with this disease, and our developed method may be useful in providing crosstalk information between organ and tissue systems in IBD patients, in addition to colitis. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Evaluation of articular cartilage degeneration with contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujioka, Mikihiro

    1994-01-01

    The evaluation of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) concentration is important in the clinical diagnosis of articular cartilage degeneration. Glycosaminoglycan provides a large number of fixed negative charges. When manganese ion (Mn 2+ ) is administered to the cartilage matrix, this cation diffuses into the matrix and accumulates in accordance with the distribution of fixed negative charges owing to the electrostatic interaction. The accumulation of Mn 2+ causes a shortening of the relaxation times, resulting in high signal intensity in the MR image, when a T 1 -weighted image is obtained. The present study applied this new method to the articular cartilage to evaluate the degree of the cartilage degeneration. Small pieces of articular cartilage were dissected from the knee joints of young chickens. Experimentally degenerated articular cartilage was obtained by treating the specimen with various concentrations of papain solution. Then specimens were soaked in manganese solution until they obtained equilibrium and served for MR microimaging. The fixed charge density (FCD), the concentration of Mn 2+ and Na + , T 1 and T 2 relaxation times were also measured. In degenerated cartilage, lower accumulation of Mn 2+ due to lower GAG density caused a lower than normal signal intensity. Thus, administration of Mn 2+ enhances the biochemical change in the cartilage matrix in terms of differences in the relaxation time. The actual signal intensity on MRI of each specimen corresponded to the theoretical signal intensity, which was calculated from the FCD. It was concluded that MR images taken with contrast enhancement by Mn 2+ give direct visual information about the GAG density in the articular cartilage. MRI with cationic contrast agent could develop into a new method for early non-invasive diagnosis of cartilage dysfunction and degeneration. (author)

  20. Baseline correction of phase-contrast images in congenital cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai Wyman W

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One potential source of error in phase contrast (PC congenital CMR flow measurements is caused by phase offsets due to local non-compensated eddy currents. Phantom correction of these phase offset errors has been shown to result in more accurate measurements of blood flow in adults with structurally normal hearts. We report the effect of phantom correction on PC flow measurements at a clinical congenital CMR program. Results Flow was measured in the ascending aorta, main pulmonary artery, and right and left pulmonary arteries as clinically indicated, and additional values such as Qp/Qs were derived from these measurements. Phantom correction in our study population of 149 patients resulted in clinically significant changes in 13% to 48% of these phase-contrast measurements in patients with known or suspected heart disease. Overall, 640 measurements or calculated values were analyzed, and clinically significant changes were found in 31%. Larger vessels were associated with greater phase offset errors, with 22% of the changes in PC flow measurements attributed to the size of the vessel measured. In patients with structurally normal hearts, the pulmonary-to-systemic flow ratio after phantom correction was closer to 1.0 than before phantom correction. There was no significant difference in the effect of phantom correction for patients with tetralogy of Fallot as compared to the group as a whole. Conclusions Phantom correction often resulted in clinically significant changes in PC blood flow measurements in patients with known or suspected congenital heart disease. In laboratories performing clinical CMR with suspected phase offset errors of significance, the routine use of phantom correction for PC flow measurements should be considered.

  1. Studies of. gamma. -ray irradiation effects on tris(. beta. -diketonato)iron(III) and cobalt(III) coordination compounds by means of Moessbauer spectroscopy and magnetic susceptibility measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, Y.; Endo, K.; Sano, H. (Tokyo Metropolitan Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Science)

    1981-06-01

    Both absorption Moessbauer spectroscopy and magnetic susceptibility measurements on tris(..beta..-diketonato)iron(III) and cobalt(III) compounds indicate that ligands which have phenyl group as a substituent are more stable to ..gamma..-ray radiolysis, in accordance with previous results of emission Moessbauer spectroscopic studies of /sup 57/Co-labelled tris (..beta..-diketonato)cobalt(III) compounds.

  2. Geochemical normalization of magnetic susceptibility – a simple tool for distinction the sediment provenance and post-depositional processes in floodplain sediments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Faměra, Martin; Matys Grygar, Tomáš; Elznicová, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 19, APR (2017) ISSN 1607-7962. [EGU General Assembly 2017. 23.04.2017-28.04.2017, Vienna] Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : Magnetic susceptibility Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry http://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EGU2017/EGU2017-2797.pdf

  3. High-Resolution Magnetic Susceptibility Stratigraphy Spanning Late Devonian Global Change from a New Scientific Drillcore in Canning Basin, Northwest Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, M. R.; Raub, T. D.; Kirschvink, J. L.; Playton, T. E.; Hocking, R. M.; Haines, P.; Tulipani, S.

    2010-12-01

    New shallow scientific drillcore has been recovered through the Frasnian-Famennian extinction boundary in northwest Australia’s Canning Basin. Previous work in the McWhae Ridge outcrop belt has identified patterns of turnover in trilobites and other fauna, change from sponge- and coral-dominated reefs to post-extinction microbial-dominated reefs, apparent sea level changes, and carbon isotopic evidence of late Devonian crisis. Continuous magnetic susceptibility (MS) stratigraphy yields highly structured oscillations spanning ~42 m of reef-slope carbonate. These oscillations appear to identify late Frasnian “Kellwasser” events and they may record sedimentary response to orbital variations, establishing a high-resolution relative chronostratigraphy of late Devonian global change. Magnetic susceptibility stratigraphy has been proposed as a generally useful chronometer for late Devonian time. Most of fifteen published MS stratigraphies crossing the Frasnian-Famennian boundary appear to share major excursions with the new McWhae Ridge result. Although upland tectonism in Canning Basin may be a caveat to straightforward eustatic interpretation of magnetic susceptibility variations, we suggest the higher-resolution and fresh drillcore context of this result prioritizes it as a standard for Frasnian-Famennian magnetic susceptibility variation.

  4. Distribution of Heavy-Metal Contamination in Regulated River-Channel Deposits: a Magnetic Susceptibility and Grain-Size Approach; River Morava, Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Famera, M.; Bábek, O.; Matys Grygar, Tomáš; Nováková, Tereza

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 224, č. 5 (2013), 1525-1-1525-18 ISSN 0049-6979 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAAX00130801 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : Fluvial transport * Fly-ash spherules * Geochemical background * Heavy metals * Lithology * Magnetic susceptibility Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry Impact factor: 1.685, year: 2013

  5. The elimination of magnetic susceptibility artifacts in the micro-image of liquid-solid interfaces: internal gradient modulation by the CPMG RF train.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duh, Andrej; Mohoric, Ales; Stepisnik, Janez; Sersa, Igor

    2003-01-01

    Distortions of magnetic resonance images near solid-liquid interface appear as the result of the restriction to spin self-diffusion in the proximity of impermeable boundary as well as of a susceptibility difference. The spectral analysis of spin echo enables to resolve, in a simple way, how various RF-gradient pulse sequences reduce the effect of the internal magnetic field induced by the susceptibility difference at interfaces. The 1D diffusion-weighted imaging of water in the narrow notch tested efficiency of some sequence. The notch was milled in a piece of Plexiglas. The method can be used to distinguish the susceptibility effect from the effects of applied gradients when investigating the transport of fluid through a porous structure.

  6. Evolution of fabric in Chitradurga granite (south India) - A study based on microstructure, anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) and vorticity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Tridib Kumar

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, the fabric in massive granite ( 2.6 Ga) from the Chitradurga