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Sample records for susan mango andrew

  1. Susan Smith

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Owner

    Soveel lesers soveel lokmiddele soveel re- sponse kan gelys word om toegang tot die lees van poësie te registreer. 'n Resep om ge- trou of in ontrou na te volg, bestaan nie. Ge- lukkig nie. Susan Smith se (debuut)bundel lok my helaas nie deur die voorblad as vertrek- punt te neem nie. Aan visuele prikkelkrag gaan.

  2. Dedication - Susan L Greenblatt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guberman, Steven L.

    2011-07-01

    Photo of Susan L Greenblatt Figure 1. Susan in May, 1994 This volume is dedicated to the memory of Susan L Greenblatt, the wife of Steven L Guberman. Susan attended 6 of the 8 dissociative recombination (DR) meetings. Her advice and wise counsel played a vital role in the organization of several of these meetings. The fifth meeting in Chicago in 2001 was her idea and it would not have occurred without her encouragement. Susan was always amused by the memory of the first group dinner at the second DR meeting at St Jacut in 1992. As we went around the dinner table identifying ourselves, it soon became her turn. Susan was a sociologist and after introducing herself she said: "I am not a chemist". A spontaneous chorus of attendees proclaimed "Neither are we!". Her husband and a few other chemists abstained. In 1983, Susan and I established the Institute for Scientific Research (ISR). The name was chosen so as to span sociology and chemical physics. Four years prior, an ophthalmologist had diagnosed a rare retinal condition of unknown origin and advised her to change her profession to one that did not involve reading. (She was able to read for the rest of her life.) Twenty years later we learned that the cause of the retinal and all her other health problems was a recently discovered rare mitochondrial mutation. Her experience with ophthalmologists and her life-long keen sense of injustice, led her to write a grant proposal to the US Department of Education to survey all ophthalmologists in the US to determine whether they were aware of and whether they told their patients about resources and aids that could help them to continue reading and participating in everyday activities. As part of the grant and based upon the survey results, she proposed to set up low-vision training programs for ophthalmology residents. We knew that the competition for funding was intense and included several well-known and more established organizations. Nevertheless, the proposal was funded

  3. Susan Flannery lahkub? / Harro Puusild

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Puusild, Harro

    2008-01-01

    Ameerika teleseriaali "Vaprad ja ilusad" Stephanie Forresteri osatäitja Susan Flannery (1943) on seriaalis mänginud algusest peale s.o. 21 aastat. Lisatud intervjuu näitlejatariga. Sama ka Teleleht nr. 15, lk. 8-9 : ill

  4. George Andrews' Game

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 2. George Andrews' Game. Jerold Mathews. General Article Volume 14 Issue 2 February 2009 pp 172-178. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/014/02/0172-0178. Keywords. Fibonacci ...

  5. George Andrew Olah

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Electron-deficient intermediates, Friedel–Crafts chemistry, carbocations, carbanions, methanol economy, anthropogenic chemical carbon cycle. Abstract. Hungarian born American chemist, George Andrew Olah wasa prolific researcher. The central theme of his career was thepursuit of structure and mechanisms ...

  6. George Andrews' Game

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Admin

    helping international students learn English. Keywords. Fibonacci numbers, Zecken- dorf's theorem, Andrew's game, greedy algorithm. T his is an expository article show ing how Zeck- endorf's T heorem (every positive integer can be represented in one and only one w ay as the sum of non-consecutive Fibonacci num bers) ...

  7. Millikan, Prof. Robert Andrews

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1935 Honorary. Millikan, Prof. Robert Andrews Nobel Laureate (Physics) - 1923. Date of birth: 22 March 1868. Date of death: 19 December 1953. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. Theory Of Evolution. Posted on 23 January 2018. Joint Statement by the ...

  8. Andrew Geddes Bain

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tom

    titelgedig, Hottentot Venus and other Poems (1979), sowel as Fugard se skitterende drama oor mense wat op die “outers” van die samelewing. 'n bestaan probeer maak, Boesman and Lena. Andrew Geddes Bain het nie net as reisiger, joernalis, pad-ingenieur en geoloog naam gemaak, soos Lister se uitgawe van sy ...

  9. In Conversation with Susan Holtz | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2010-11-26

    Nov 26, 2010 ... Susan Holtz is a private consultant and Adjunct Professor in the Environmental Planning Department of the Nova Scotia College for Art and Design. As a consultant, Ms. Holtz specializes in energy, environment, and sustainable development policy, and works on related issues as a mediator and facilitator.

  10. Roberts, Dennis C. & Komives, Susan R.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enhancing Student Learning and Development in Cross-Border Higher Education, edited by. Dennis C. Roberts and Susan R. Komives, is a book that resulted from a short-term study-abroad experience between the Universities of Maryland and San Diego with the Qatar Foundation's Education City in Doha in 2010.

  11. Design package lazy susan for the fuel retrieval system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TEDESCHI, D.J.

    1999-09-10

    This is a design package that contains the details for a Lazy Susan style small tool for the Fuel Retrieval System. The Lazy Susan tool is used to help rotate an MCO Fuel Basket when loading it. This document contains requirements, development design information, tests and test reports that pertain to the production of Lazy Susan small tool.

  12. Mortality from Hurricane Andrew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lew, E O; Wetli, C V

    1996-05-01

    Hurricane Andrew, a category 4 storm, made landfall in South Florida on August 24, 1992, and caused extensive structural and environmental damage. The Dade County Medical Examiner Department investigated 15 deaths directly related to the storm and another 15 natural deaths indirectly related to the storm. The aftermath of the hurricane continued to create circumstances that lead to 32 accidental deaths, five suicides, and four homicides over the next six months. Traffic fatalities due to uncontrolled intersections accounted for one-third of the post-storm accidental deaths. Dyadic deaths (homicide-suicide) doubled in rate for the six months following the storm. The limited number of direct hurricane deaths is attributed to advance storm warnings, its occurrence on a weekend, the storm's passage through less populated areas of the county, and the relatively modest amount of accompanying rainfall.

  13. Psychoanalytic Interpretation of Blueberries by Susan Gibb

    OpenAIRE

    Zalbidea Paniagua, Maya

    2014-01-01

    [ES] La obra de ficción digital titulada Blueberries (2009) de Susan Gibb, publicada en la ELO (Organización de literatura electrónica) invita al lector/a a viajar dentro de la mente de la protagonista para descubrir sus experiencias reales e imaginarias en las que se examinan las nociones de género, sexo, cuerpo e identidad de una mujer traumatizada. En este artículo se exploran los modos verbales y visuales en esta ficción digital breve siguiendo patrones semióticos así como se interpretan ...

  14. The McAndrews Leadership Lecture: Origins

    OpenAIRE

    Hamm, Anthony W.; Burkhart, Lori A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This article describes the origins and rationale for the McAndrews Leadership Lecture and explains why the American Chiropractic Association honors George and Jerome McAndrews. Discussion George and Jerome McAndrews? backgrounds demonstrate their leadership contributions to the chiropractic profession. Jerome McAndrews, a chiropractor, held substantial leadership roles in the chiropractic profession. George McAndrews, a lawyer, administered a permanent injunction forbidding the Amer...

  15. 75 FR 38837 - Susan Harwood Training Grant Program, FY 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-06

    ...: Notification of Funding Opportunity for Susan Harwood Training Grant Program, FY 2010. Funding Opportunity No... project performance period is $250,000. DATES: Targeted Topic training grant applications must be received... Links section, and then select ``Susan Harwood Training Grant Program''. Please note that on the Harwood...

  16. Susan Lindquist: Visionary scientist and peerless mentor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevis, Brooke J

    2017-01-02

    The science universe is dimmer after one of our brightest stars, Susan Lee Lindquist, was taken by cancer on October 27, 2016. Sue was an innovative, creative, out-of-the-box scientific thinker. She had unique biological intuition-an instinct for both the way things worked and the right questions to ask to uncover new research insights. Her wide-ranging career began with the study of protein folding and molecular chaperones, and she went on to show that protein folding can have profound and unexpected biological effects on such diverse processes as cancer, evolution, and neurodegenerative disease. As Sue's laboratory manager, I would like to offer a ground-floor perspective on what made her an exceptional scientist, mentor, and leader. She created a harmonious, collegial environment where collaborative synergy fueled meaningful progress that will impact science for decades to come. © 2017 Bevis.

  17. 7 CFR 1206.11 - Mangos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mangos. 1206.11 Section 1206.11 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MANGO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1206.11 Mangos. Mangos means all...

  18. The McAndrews Leadership Lecture: Origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Anthony W; Burkhart, Lori A

    2015-12-01

    This article describes the origins and rationale for the McAndrews Leadership Lecture and explains why the American Chiropractic Association honors George and Jerome McAndrews. George and Jerome McAndrews' backgrounds demonstrate their leadership contributions to the chiropractic profession. Jerome McAndrews, a chiropractor, held substantial leadership roles in the chiropractic profession. George McAndrews, a lawyer, administered a permanent injunction forbidding the American Medical Association's restraint of trade toward the chiropractic profession. The American Chiropractic Association has established the McAndrews Leadership Lecture to honor their contributions to the chiropractic profession.

  19. Psychoanalytic Interpretation of Blueberries by Susan Gibb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya Zalbidea Paniagua

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Blueberries (2009 by Susan Gibb, published in the ELO (Electronic Literature Organization, invites the reader to travel inside the protagonist’s mind to discover real and imaginary experiences examining notions of gender, sex, body and identity of a traumatised woman. This article explores the verbal and visual modes in this digital short fiction following semiotic patterns as well as interpreting the psychological states that are expressed through poetical and technological components. A comparative study of the consequences of trauma in the protagonist will be developed including psychoanalytic theories by Sigmund Freud, Jacques Lacan and the feminist psychoanalysts: Melanie Klein and Bracha Ettinger. The reactions of the protagonist will be studied: loss of reality, hallucinations and Electra Complex, as well as the rise of defence mechanisms and her use of the artistic creativity as a healing therapy. The interactivity of the hypermedia, multiple paths and endings will be analyzed as a literary strategy that increases the reader’s capacity of empathizing with the speaker.

  20. Susan Sontag — A Forgotten Mother?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kludia Ziewiec

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses new and republished translations of Susan Sontag’s work, recently launched by the Karakter publishing house: Regarding the Pan of Others, On Photography, and Against Interpretation and Other Essays. The article focuses on the elements of Sontag’s thought that make her a forgotten mother of feminist and gender theoreticians, as well as such influential critics as Michel Foucault and Roland Barthes. The article points out to continuations of Sontag’s thought in contemporary theoretical and social projects, and to the pertinence of her critical observations on theories based on metaphysics of presence: psychoanalysis, Marxism, or hermeneutics. The article also touches upon history of war photography and related war journalism, and upon the ambivalent quality of imaging of the misery of war. It also present historical and cultural circumstances of the development of Sontag’s thought in the intellectual milieu of New York in the 1960s. The discussion recapitulates the main statements of Sontag’s essays, relating them to a wider theoretical context, which is aimed at a reappraisal of the forgotten intelectual in the history of literature.

  1. Saving Mango Street

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Winkle, Katie

    2012-01-01

    The author first learned about cultural diversity and racial justice in Mr. Sanderson's middle school English class. They read a book called "The House on Mango Street" by Sandra Cisneros and learned about a different culture, but also about a community with striking similarities to their own. The main character in the novel, Esperanza,…

  2. The Americas and Hurricane Andrew

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    Image taken on August 25, 1992 by NOAA GOES-7 of the Americas and Hurricane Andrew.Photo Credit: Image produced by F. Hasler, M. Jentoft-Nilsen, H. Pierce, K. Palaniappan, and M. Manyin. NASA Goddard Lab for Atmospheres - Data from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

  3. Meet EPA Scientist Susan Yee, Ph.D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susan Yee, Ph.D., is an ecologist at EPA's Gulf Ecology Division. She is working on the Puerto Rico Sustainable Communities program, developing decision support tools to evaluate how alternative decisions impact coastal ecosystem goods and services

  4. Mangifera Indica (Mango)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, K. A.; Patel, M. B.; Patel, R. J.; Parmar, P. K.

    2010-01-01

    Mangifera indica, commonly used herb in ayurvedic medicine. Although review articles on this plant are already published, but this review article is presented to compile all the updated information on its phytochemical and pharmacological activities, which were performed widely by different methods. Studies indicate mango possesses antidiabetic, anti-oxidant, anti-viral, cardiotonic, hypotensive, anti-inflammatory properties. Various effects like antibacterial, anti fungal, anthelmintic, anti parasitic, anti tumor, anti HIV, antibone resorption, antispasmodic, antipyretic, antidiarrhoeal, antiallergic, immunomodulation, hypolipidemic, anti microbial, hepatoprotective, gastroprotective have also been studied. These studies are very encouraging and indicate this herb should be studied more extensively to confirm these results and reveal other potential therapeutic effects. Clinical trials using mango for a variety of conditions should also be conducted. PMID:22228940

  5. Genetic map of mango: a tool for mango breeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mango (Mangifera indica) is an economically and nutritionally important tropical/subtropical tree fruit crop, affectionately labeled the “King of Fruit”. Mango is an allotetraploid with 40 chromosomes and the size of the diploid genome is ~439 Mb. Most of the current commercial cultivars are select...

  6. Susan swan and the female grotesque Susan swan and the female grotesque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Bornéo Funck

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduced to readers as “the tallest woman freelance writer in Canada”, Susan Swan belongs to a generation of writers whose experimental, innovative fiction has proved vital in the contemporary project of de/re/constructing narrative practice. Her 1983 novel The Biggest Modern Woman of the World constitutes an excellent example of what critic Linda Hutcheon has termed “historiographic metafiction”—”fiction that is intensely, self-reflexively art, but is also grounded in historical, social, and political realities” (Canadian 13. As a conscious engagement with social and historical contexts, such fiction aims at destabilizing and subverting accepted patterns of belief by reconceptualizing and narrating possible subjectivities. By means of intertextuality, especially parody, it engages in an ideological critique in terms of both sexual and national politics. Introduced to readers as “the tallest woman freelance writer in Canada”, Susan Swan belongs to a generation of writers whose experimental, innovative fiction has proved vital in the contemporary project of de/re/constructing narrative practice. Her 1983 novel The Biggest Modern Woman of the World constitutes an excellent example of what critic Linda Hutcheon has termed “historiographic metafiction”—”fiction that is intensely, self-reflexively art, but is also grounded in historical, social, and political realities” (Canadian 13. As a conscious engagement with social and historical contexts, such fiction aims at destabilizing and subverting accepted patterns of belief by reconceptualizing and narrating possible subjectivities. By means of intertextuality, especially parody, it engages in an ideological critique in terms of both sexual and national politics.

  7. White Mango Scale, Aulacaspis tubercularis , Distribution and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mango is attacked by many insect pests which reduce the quality and productivity of the crop. Among the insect pests attacking mango plant, white mango scale is the most devastating insect pest. White mango scale, was reported since 2010 from Guto Gida district of East Wollega zone. The distribution and severity of white ...

  8. Experiences with the Mango Chain Game

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, S.A.; Zuñiga-Arias, G.; Sterrenburg, S.

    2005-01-01

    The mango chain game is a simulation game used for research purposes. It facilitated studying the bargaining power of Costa Rican mango producers in international supply chains of mango. The game simulates a simplified mango export chain in which real world local producers can play the role of

  9. Genetic Map of Mango: A Tool for Mango Breeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, David N.; Bally, Ian S. E.; Dillon, Natalie L.; Innes, David; Groh, Amy M.; Rahaman, Jordon; Ophir, Ron; Cohen, Yuval; Sherman, Amir

    2017-01-01

    Mango (Mangifera indica) is an economically and nutritionally important tropical/subtropical tree fruit crop. Most of the current commercial cultivars are selections rather than the products of breeding programs. To improve the efficiency of mango breeding, molecular markers have been used to create a consensus genetic map that identifies all 20 linkage groups in seven mapping populations. Polyembryony is an important mango trait, used for clonal propagation of cultivars and rootstocks. In polyembryonic mango cultivars, in addition to a zygotic embryo, several apomictic embryos develop from maternal tissue surrounding the fertilized egg cell. This trait has been associated with linkage group 8 in our consensus genetic map and has been validated in two of the seven mapping populations. In addition, we have observed a significant association between trait and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers for the vegetative trait of branch habit and the fruit traits of bloom, ground skin color, blush intensity, beak shape, and pulp color. PMID:28473837

  10. H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Art McKee; Pamela. Druliner

    1998-01-01

    The H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest is a world renowned center for research and education about the ecology and management of forests and streams. Located about 50 miles (80 km) east of Eugene, Oregon, the Andrews Experimental Forest lies in the Blue River Ranger District of the Willamette National Forest. Established in 1948, the Experimental Forest is administered...

  11. Collaborative Internet Projects: An Interview with Susan Silverman about Her Passion and Hobby.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strangman, Nicole

    2002-01-01

    Outlines an interview with Susan Silverman, an instructional technology integration teacher in the Comsewogue school district in Port Jefferson Station, New York. Describes Susan's transformation from technophobe to an innovator of collaborative Internet projects. (PM)

  12. Mango (Mangifera Indica) Jam Production Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Mandey, Lucia C; Mamuaja, Christine F

    2016-01-01

    Mango fuit jam is a semi-wet food products made of mango pulp processing and sucrose with or without the addition of permitted food additives. Mango fruit as other horticultural products is a food that can be easily damaged or rotten. In the harvest season mango production is very plentiful and many are not consumed, as a result, mango fruit becomes spoiled. The total spoiled mangoes can reach 35%, due to the perishable nature of this fruit cause losses to farmers and fruit sellers. The gre...

  13. Psychiatric morbidity following Hurricane Andrew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, D; Mellman, T A; Mendoza, L M; Kulick-Bell, R; Ironson, G; Schneiderman, N

    1996-07-01

    The nature of psychiatric morbidity in previously non-ill subjects from the area most affected by Hurricane Andrew was investigated at 6-12 months posthurricane. Preliminary associations of morbidity with personal and event-related risk factors were also determined. Fifty one percent (31/61) met criteria for a new-onset disorder, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in 36%, major depression (MD) in 30%, and other anxiety disorders in 20%. Thirty four subjects (56%) had significant symptoms persisting beyond 6 months. Having sustained "severe damage" was the risk factor most strongly associated with outcome. Our data underscore the range of psychiatric morbidity related to a natural disaster, and suggest a relationship to chronic stressors.

  14. Genetic characterization of mango anthracnose pathogen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Twenty-five isolates of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides causing mango anthracnose were collected from different agroclimatic zones of India. The isolates were evaluated for their pathogenic variability on mango seedlings and genetic characterization using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD molecular techniques).

  15. Susan Dicklitch. The Elusive Promise of NGO's | Heck | Uganda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Susan Dicklitch. The Elusive Promise of NGO's. Simon Heck. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/uj.v46i1.23044 · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about ...

  16. Ácaros del mango

    Science.gov (United States)

    Los ácaros constituyen un grupo abundante y diverso que ocupa diferentes hábitats en árboles frutales y la estructura y disposición del follaje y ramas del mango, contribuyen significativamente a que se presente gran diversidad de ácaros benéficos y dañinos asociados a esta especie frutal. En Colomb...

  17. A Reanalysis of Hurricane Andrew's Intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landsea, Christopher W.; Franklin, James L.; McAdie, Colin J.; Beven, John L., II; Gross, James M.; Jarvinen, Brian R.; Pasch, Richard J.; Rappaport, Edward N.; Dunion, Jason P.; Dodge, Peter P.

    2004-11-01

    Hurricane Andrew of 1992 caused unprecedented economic devastation along its path through the Bahamas, southeastern Florida, and Louisiana. Damage in the United States was estimated to be $26 billion (in 1992 dollars), making Andrew one of the most expensive natural disasters in U.S. history. This hurricane struck southeastern Florida with maximum 1-min surface winds estimated in a 1992 poststorm analysis at 125 kt (64 m s-1). This original assessment was primarily based on an adjustment of aircraft reconnaissance flight-level winds to the surface.Based on recent advancements in the understanding of the eyewall wind structure of major hurricanes, the official intensity of Andrew was adjusted upward for five days during its track across the Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico by the National Hurricane Center Best Track Change Committee. In particular, Andrew is now assessed by the National Hurricane Center to be a Saffir Simpson Hurricane Scale category-5 hurricane (the highest intensity category possible) at its landfall in southeastern Florida, with maximum 1-min winds of 145 kt (75 m s-1). This makes Andrew only the third category-5 hurricane to strike the United States since at least 1900. Implications for how this change impacts society's planning for such extreme events are discussed.

  18. Tom Fraser, Andrew Mango, Robert McNamar, The Makers of the Modern Middle East

    OpenAIRE

    AKAN, SELEN

    2013-01-01

    maneuvers did not reject his demand but kept him on hold, as Lord Kitchener recommended not alienating the Arabs (p.61). Not informing Hussein, Britain made a secret agreement with France; Sykes-Picot Agreement regarding the division of the Middle East (p.63). On the other hand, for the negotiations

  19. Cell scientist to watch - Andrew Holland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Andrew received his first degree in natural sciences from the University of Cambridge and a Masters degree from the University of Manchester, followed by a PhD with Stephen Taylor in Manchester. He then moved to California in 2007 with an EMBO long-term fellowship for his postdoctoral research with Don Cleveland at the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research. In 2013, Andrew started his own lab as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, having been named a Kimmel Scholar and a Pew-Stewart Scholar in 2014. Andrew's lab investigates the mechanisms controlling centrosome copy numbers during cell division and the links between centrosome amplification, genome instability and tumorigenesis. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  20. Congruences for the Andrews spt function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Ken

    2011-01-11

    Ramanujan-type congruences for the Andrews spt(n) partition function have been found for prime moduli 5 ≤ ℓ ≤ 37 in the work of Andrews [Andrews GE, (2008) J Reine Angew Math 624:133-142] and Garvan [Garvan F, (2010) Int J Number Theory 6:1-29]. We exhibit unexpectedly simple congruences for all ℓ≥5. Confirming a conjecture of Garvan, we show that if ℓ≥5 is prime and (-δ/ℓ) = 1, then spt[(ℓ2(ℓn+δ)+1)/24] ≡ 0 (mod ℓ). This congruence gives (ℓ - 1)/2 arithmetic progressions modulo ℓ(3) which support a mod ℓ congruence. This result follows from the surprising fact that the reduction of a certain mock theta function modulo ℓ, for every ℓ≥5, is an eigenform of the Hecke operator T(ℓ(2)).

  1. Obituary: Andrew Stephen Wilson, 1947-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veilleux, Sylvain

    2009-01-01

    On 24 May 2008, Andrew Stephen Wilson passed away at the age of 61, in his home in Silver Spring, Maryland, from complications resulting from a painful spinal illness. Andrew was arguably one of the first truly multi-wavelength astronomers of his generation. His scientific work on active galactic nuclei [AGN] spanned the entire electromagnetic spectrum from the radio to the X-rays. Andrew was born in Doncaster, Yorkshire, England, on 26 March 1947. He was the younger of two brothers whose births were separated by the Second World War. His father, Norman, came from a relatively affluent family who were coal merchants. His mother, Mary, came from a less comfortable background, one of seven children, daughter of a skilled cabinet maker/French polisher, who went through a very hard time during the depression. As a teacher, she placed enormous value on hard work and education as a way of gaining advancement in life. When Andrew was four, the family moved to Skipton, a nice market town in the Yorkshire dales. Andrew went to a small village school until age eleven when he entered Ermysted's Grammar School. He was an enthusiastic soccer and cricket player. He never lost his enthusiasm for soccer and supported the local soccer team, Leeds United, for all his life. Andrew also followed the Yorkshire county cricket team. Andrew's interest in astronomy stemmed from the fact that at Ermysted's Grammar School someone donated a four-inch refracting telescope, so he and his friends used to go back in the evenings to investigate the rings of Saturn, the moons of Jupiter, and various nebulae. While an undergraduate at Cambridge, Andrew joined the astronomy club and ground an 8-inch mirror by hand as a part of a telescope that he set up in the backyard of his parents' house. Andrew spent hours observing with this telescope, and it was the wonder of the family. At Cambridge, Andrew obtained his bachelor's degree with first-class honors in 1969. During a short visit in London with his

  2. Disinfestation of mangoes by irradiation; Desinfestacion de mango por irradiacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bustos R, M.E

    1992-05-15

    The mango is a fruit-bearing very important in the mexican economy. Mexico is between the first positions of the world like country producing with an average export volume of 40,000 annual tons in the last years. For this reason it was decided to make this investigation, which was developed according to the investigation protocols proposed by the Agricultural Research Service of the USA (ARS - US DOA). The objective is to account with the technical and scientific necessary bases to propose to the US DOA the regulation of the irradiation process like quarantine treatment for Mexican export mango. The goals are: to determine in the laboratory the minimum dose (Dmin.) to inhibit the emergency of adults of the species of the fruit flies of more importance for Mexico. To confirm the least radiation dose Dmin. for quarantine treatment based on the safety value Probit-9. To evaluate the mango quality irradiated to 2 and 2.5 times the Dmin. proposal for quarantine treatment. According to information provided by the General Direction of Vegetable Sanity, it was determined that the fly species of the fruit of more economic importance for Mexico are of the genus Anastrepha ludens, Anastrepha serpentina, Anastrepha obliqua and Ceratitis capitata. (Author)

  3. Andrew's Aftermath: Hurricane "Saves" Miami Public Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Lifer, Evan

    1994-01-01

    Examines the impact of Hurricane Andrew on the Miami-Dade Public Library System (MDPLS). Topics discussed include the community's response to the sudden lack of library services; the use of library branches as emergency relief centers and communications centers; library disaster policies; and visions for MDPLS under a new director. (LRW)

  4. Applications of an identity of Andrews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.D. Somashekara

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we give a bilateral form of an identity of Andrews, which is a generalization of the 1ψ1 summation formula of Ramanujan. Using Andrews’ identity, we deduce some new identities involving mock theta functions of second order and finally, we deduce some q-gamma, q-beta and eta function identities.

  5. Unwrapping the Thick Coat of Armor: A Conversation with Susan Albrecht

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaff, Marilyn; Teagarden, Jim; Zabel, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Susan Albrecht's career has spanned more than 40 years. During those years she has served as an English teacher, school psychologist, behavior consultant, coordinator of services, and special education faculty member. Her contributions to the field include leadership positions with the Council for Children with Behavioral Disorders. Susan shared…

  6. Practitioner Profile: An Interview with Susan Bross, AFC®

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Bross

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available

    Susan Bross is a nationally accredited financial counselor who established her private practice in 1992. She currently lives in San Rafael, California. She brings a multi-faceted background and a combination of skills to her work. As a financial counselor, she works with individuals, couples, and entrepreneurs throughout the nation to help clients develop a practical and emotionally healthy relationship with money. When asked, she will tell you that she is passionate about her work because it mirrors her own hard-won path with money. Readers of the Journal will find Ms. Bross’s approach to financial therapy inspiring. She teaches simple tools for effortless and sustainable cash flow and money management. She also guides her clients to balanced attitudes and beliefs about money and success.

  7. [The Durkheim Test. Remarks on Susan Leigh Star's Boundary Objects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gießmann, Sebastian

    2015-09-01

    The article reconstructs Susan Leigh Star's conceptual work on the notion of 'boundary objects'. It traces the emergence of the concept, beginning with her PhD thesis and its publication as Regions of the Mind in 1989. 'Boundary objects' attempt to represent the distributed, multifold nature of scientific work and its mediations between different 'social worlds'. Being addressed to several 'communities of practice', the term responded to questions from Distributed Artificial Intelligence in Computer Science, Workplace Studies and Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW), and microhistorical approaches inside the growing Science and Technology Studies. Yet the interdisciplinary character and interpretive flexibility of Star’s invention has rarely been noticed as a conceptual tool for media theory. I therefore propose to reconsider Star's 'Durkheim test' for sociotechnical media practices.

  8. Sensorial evaluation of irradiated mangoes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broisler, Paula Olhe; Cruz, Juliana Nunes da; Sabato, Susy Frey [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mails: paulabroisler@hotmail.com; juliananc@ig.com.br; sfsabato@ipen.br

    2007-07-01

    Mango (Mangifera indica L.) is a tropical fruit of great economical relevance in the world, mainly for tropical countries like Brazil. It consists in the second tropical fruit more important grown in the world. On the other hand it is a very perishable fruit and its delivery to distant points is restricted due to short shelf life at environmental temperature. Food irradiation process is applied to fruits for their preservation, once it promotes disinfestation and even maturation retard, among other mechanisms. The Brazilian legislation permits the food irradiation and does not restrict the doses to be delivered. In order to verify eventual changes, sensorial evaluation is very important to study how irradiation affects the quality of the fruit and its acceptability. Mangoes were irradiated in a Cobalto-60 source, from the Radiation Technology Center, CTR, of IPEN/CNEN-SP at doses 0,5 kGy e 0,75 kGy. The sensorial evaluation was measured through Acceptance Test where irradiated samples were offered together with control sample to the tasters who answered their perception through hedonic scale. The parameters Color, Odor, Flavor and Texture were analyzed. Statistical analysis showed that only Odor parameter was different from control (sample irradiated at 0.5 kGy). Few tasters indicated that irradiated mangoes had fewer odors in relation to non-irradiated samples. (author)

  9. Isozymetic Polymorphisms of Mango Cultivars in Bangladesh

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2012-10-30

    Oct 30, 2012 ... The isozymetic study was designed for assessing the genetic diversity among the selected mango cultivars/genotype available in Bangladesh. All the isozymes, used in the present study showed polymorphism for mango. A total of 25 different electrophoretic zymotypes were observed for three isozymes ...

  10. Mangos of Florida, country contribution: Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    The book chapter presents a review of the historical importance of mango in Florida; geographical distribution of mangos in Florida; statistical data including total and seasonal production, main cultivars and their descriptors; cultural practices (i.e. propagation, fertilization, pruning); pests an...

  11. Obituary: Andrew Lange (1957-2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamionkowski, Marc

    2011-12-01

    The worlds of physics and astrophysics were stunned to learn on 22 January 2010 that Andrew Lange, the Marvin L. Goldberger Professor of Physics at Caltech, had taken his own life the night before. He had succumbed to the severe depression that he had suffered from for many years, unbeknownst to even his closest colleagues. Lange will perhaps be best remembered as the co-leader of Boomerang, the balloon-borne experiment that provided the first high-angular-resolution map of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). And while this was certainly his most notable achievement, Andrew amassed a record of accomplishment as an instrumentalist, leader, mentor, and communicator that extended much further. Andrew was born in Urbana, Illinois on July 23, 1957, the son of an architect and a librarian, and raised primarily in Connecticut. His family and early friends remember him as a serious and extremely intelligent child and young man. Andrew Lange's lifelong interest in the CMB was nurtured as an undergraduate at Princeton University by David Wilkinson, and he recalled fondly a summer spent working with John Mather at Goddard Space Flight Center. Andrew Lange went to graduate school in physics at Berkeley where he worked in Paul Richards' group. Although his thesis project, the Berkeley-Nagoya rocket experiment, showed an anomalous sub-millimeter excess in the CMB spectrum that was shortly thereafter shown by a later flight of the same rocket and COBE-FIRAS to be incorrect, Lange's talents were recognized by the physics department at Berkeley who appointed him shortly after his PhD (1987) to their faculty. While on the Berkeley faculty, Andrew obtained early detections of the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect, upper limits to small-angle CMB fluctuations, and important infrared constraints to the interstellar medium. He also led a pioneering instrument operating 300 mK detectors for a small infrared satellite experiment. This early work showed high ambition and daring, and it pioneered

  12. A History of the Andrew File System

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Altman, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Derrick Brashear and Jeffrey Altman will present a technical history of the evolution of Andrew File System starting with the early days of the Andrew Project at Carnegie Mellon through the commercialization by Transarc Corporation and IBM and a decade of OpenAFS. The talk will be technical with a focus on the various decisions and implementation trade-offs that were made over the course of AFS versions 1 through 4, the development of the Distributed Computing Environment Distributed File System (DCE DFS), and the course of the OpenAFS development community. The speakers will also discuss the various AFS branches developed at the University of Michigan, Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Carnegie Mellon University.

  13. Andrew shortens lifetime of Louisiana Barrier Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Susan

    Because the Isles Dernieres, a series of four barrier islands off the coast of Louisiana, have one of the most rapidly eroding shorelines in the world, geologists at the U.S. Geological Survey and the Louisiana Geological Survey have been monitoring erosion activity over the last several years, said Jeff Williams of the USGS in Reston, Va. Hurricane Andrew, which struck the state on August 26, caused severe erosional damage to these islands that has shortened their lifetimes.Before Andrew struck, geologists projected that Raccoon Island would disappear below sea level by the year 2001 and that Whiskey Island would disappear by 2016. Now, due to the severe erosion from Hurricane Andrew, the scientists claim that the islands may disappear before the turn of the century, and the other islands in the Dernieres chain are expected to follow suit within 2 decades. Raccoon, Whiskey, Trinity, and East islands make up the Isles Dernieres, which existed as one island, known as the Isle Derniere, before an 1856 hurricane and subsequent erosion.

  14. Susan J. Quaal: the global and local impact of a transformational leader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlay, L D

    1998-01-01

    To be a transformational leader in nursing, one must have forever changed the course of our practice. This article highlights the qualities of a great leader, Susan J. Quaal, PhD, APRN, CVS, CCRN. Described are examples of Susan's incredible clinical expertise and also the attributes that make her such a dynamic leader in all domains of the clinical nurse specialist role: Practitioner, educator/mentor, consultant, leader/administrator, and researcher. Interwoven in this article, you will also find the threads of humility and charity that make Susan such an extraordinary human being and a blessing to all the lives she touches.

  15. Preparation and Consumer Acceptance of Indian Mango Leather and Osmo - Dehyrated Indian Mango

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyril John A. Domingo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Indian mangoes are considered highly perishable products due to high moisture content which resulted in high postharvest losses in Pangasinan, Philippines. This study exploits the potential of underutilized indian mango to value - added products. The developed i ndian mango leather and osmo - dehyrated indian mango are deh ydrated fruit products can be eaten as snacks or desserts. Indian mango leathe r was prepared by mixing fruit puree and other additives like sugar, citric acid, and sodium met abisulphite and then dehydrated them at 55 °C for 15 hours under convective oven. Osmo - dehydrated indian mang o was prepared by immer sing h alves of deseeded and deskinned pulps in 50 % (w/w sucrose solution for 20 hours f ollowed by drying initially at 50 °C then aft er one hour at 60 °C for 15 hours. Thirty - three member untrained panels were involved in consumer a ccep tance evaluation . Panelists evaluated the colo r, sweetness, sourness, texture, and overall acceptability of the osmotically - treated indian mango and indian mango leather using seven - point h edonic scale . Over - all, the indian mango leather and osmo - dehy drated indian mango developed in this study seemed to be acceptable for all the sensory parameters as indicated by high scores of greater than five (>5 .

  16. Children describe life after Hurricane Andrew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffman, S

    1994-01-01

    Hurricane Andrew, which devastated the south Florida coast in August 1992, left over 250,000 people homeless with multiple health and social problems. This nursing study explored the experiences of 17 children, ages 5 through 12, who lived in the geographic area of storm damage. Common experiences described by the children included remembering the storm, dealing with after-effects, and reestablishing a new life. In general, children described a sense of strangeness, articulated as "life is weird" after the hurricane. In addition to stressful responses, many positive reactions were described by children in the study, revealing that the disaster also had a maturing effect.

  17. Pollination Services of Mango Flower Pollinators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huda, A. Nurul; Salmah, M. R. Che; Hassan, A. Abu; Hamdan, A.; Razak, M. N. Abdul

    2015-01-01

    Measuring wild pollinator services in agricultural production is very important in the context of sustainable management. In this study, we estimated the contribution of native pollinators to mango fruit set production of two mango cultivars Mangifera indica (L). cv. ‘Sala’ and ‘Chok Anan’. Visitation rates of pollinators on mango flowers and number of pollen grains adhering to their bodies determined pollinator efficiency for reproductive success of the crop. Chok Anan failed to produce any fruit set in the absence of pollinators. In natural condition, we found that Sala produced 4.8% fruit set per hermaphrodite flower while Chok Anan produced 3.1% per flower. Hand pollination tremendously increased fruit set of naturally pollinated flower for Sala (>100%), but only 33% for Chok Anan. Pollinator contribution to mango fruit set was estimated at 53% of total fruit set production. Our results highlighted the importance of insect pollinations in mango production. Large size flies Eristalinus spp. and Chrysomya spp. were found to be effective pollen carriers and visited more mango flowers compared with other flower visitors. PMID:26246439

  18. Pollination Services of Mango Flower Pollinators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huda, A Nurul; Salmah, M R Che; Hassan, A Abu; Hamdan, A; Razak, M N Abdul

    2015-01-01

    Measuring wild pollinator services in agricultural production is very important in the context of sustainable management. In this study, we estimated the contribution of native pollinators to mango fruit set production of two mango cultivars Mangifera indica (L). cv. 'Sala' and 'Chok Anan'. Visitation rates of pollinators on mango flowers and number of pollen grains adhering to their bodies determined pollinator efficiency for reproductive success of the crop. Chok Anan failed to produce any fruit set in the absence of pollinators. In natural condition, we found that Sala produced 4.8% fruit set per hermaphrodite flower while Chok Anan produced 3.1% per flower. Hand pollination tremendously increased fruit set of naturally pollinated flower for Sala (>100%), but only 33% for Chok Anan. Pollinator contribution to mango fruit set was estimated at 53% of total fruit set production. Our results highlighted the importance of insect pollinations in mango production. Large size flies Eristalinus spp. and Chrysomya spp. were found to be effective pollen carriers and visited more mango flowers compared with other flower visitors. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Entomological Society of America.

  19. Shallow water currents during Hurricane Andrew

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keen, Timothy R.; Glenn, Scott M.

    1999-10-01

    Oceanographic measurements are used in combination with a numerical model to examine the influence of stratification on shallow water currents during the directly forced stage of a tropical cyclone (Hurricane Andrew) on the continental shelf. The following stratification-dependent coastal processes are examined: (1) turbulent mixing, (2) coastally trapped waves, (3) near-inertial oscillations, and (4) upwelling and downwelling. Turbulent mixing was strong within 1 Rw (radius of maximum winds) of the storm track, and stratification was nearly destroyed. Turbulent mixing was weak at distances greater than 2 Rw. The dominant coastal wave was a barotropic Kelvin wave generated as the storm surge relaxed after landfall. Baroclinic near-inertial oscillations were dominant at the shelf break and occurred along with a barotropic response on the middle shelf. Downwelling-favorable flow developed east of the track prior to the storm peak, and upwelling-favorable flow evolved west of the track as the eye crossed the shelf. The idealized storm flow was modified by local barotropic and baroclinic pressure gradients on the shelf. Ocean circulation during Hurricane Andrew was hindcast using both stratified and unstratified three-dimensional numerical models. For areas within 1 Rw of the storm track, the unstratified model matched the observed currents better than the stratified model, partly because of errors in the initial stratification. At distances greater than 2 Rw the influence of stratification increases, and the unstratified model does not reproduce the observed upwelling-favorable flow.

  20. A Patient Developed Painful Muscle Cramps due to Overeating Mangos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuo Abe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 79-year-old woman had a habit to eat a mango every night before sleep and experienced muscle cramps during sleep. Her muscle cramps may be resulted from potassium overload due to overeating mangos.

  1. Ribonucleoprotein purification and characterization using RNA Mango.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchapakesan, Shanker Shyam S; Ferguson, Matthew L; Hayden, Eric J; Chen, Xin; Hoskins, Aaron A; Unrau, Peter J

    2017-10-01

    The characterization of RNA-protein complexes (RNPs) is a difficult but increasingly important problem in modern biology. By combining the compact RNA Mango aptamer with a fluorogenic thiazole orange desthiobiotin (TO1-Dtb or TO3-Dtb) ligand, we have created an RNA tagging system that simplifies the purification and subsequent characterization of endogenous RNPs. Mango-tagged RNP complexes can be immobilized on a streptavidin solid support and recovered in their native state by the addition of free biotin. Furthermore, Mango-based RNP purification can be adapted to different scales of RNP isolation ranging from pull-down assays to the isolation of large amounts of biochemically defined cellular RNPs. We have incorporated the Mango aptamer into the S. cerevisiae U1 small nuclear RNA (snRNA), shown that the Mango-snRNA is functional in cells, and used the aptamer to pull down a U1 snRNA-associated protein. To demonstrate large-scale isolation of RNPs, we purified and characterized bacterial RNA polymerase holoenzyme (HE) in complex with a Mango-containing 6S RNA. We were able to use the combination of a red-shifted TO3-Dtb ligand and eGFP-tagged HE to follow the binding and release of the 6S RNA by two-color native gel analysis as well as by single-molecule fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy. Together these experiments demonstrate how the Mango aptamer in conjunction with simple derivatives of its flurophore ligands enables the purification and characterization of endogenous cellular RNPs in vitro. © 2017 Panchapakesan et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  2. 76 FR 36281 - Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order; Reapportionment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-22

    ... Service 7 CFR Part 1206 Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order; Reapportionment AGENCY... Mango Board (Board) members from 20 to 18 to reflect the elimination of two non-voting wholesaler/retailer positions. In accordance with the Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order (Order), which...

  3. 76 FR 13530 - Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order; Reapportionment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-14

    ... Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 1206 Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order... adjust the number of members on the National Mango Board (Board) from 20 to 18 to reflect the elimination of two non-voting wholesaler/retailer positions. In accordance with the Mango Promotion, Research...

  4. Reducing post-harvest losses in mango in South Asia

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    hectare per year. I feel proud that I have convinced my husband to consider my decisions related to post-harvest management and marketing after associating with the mango producers group. Mrs. Dhanalakshmi, Mango Producers'. Group, Moramadugu, Krishnagiri, Tamil Nadu. Collective marketing of mangoes through.

  5. Nature of mango anthracnose in Ghana: Implications for the control ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mango anthracnose is a major disease hampering the production of quality fruits for export in Ghana. The nature of the disease and its spread were studied in 82 mango farms in the Greater Accra, Eastern, Volta, Ashanti, Brong Ahafo and Northern regions of Ghana in 2010 and 2011. Field visits were undertaken to mango ...

  6. 7 CFR 319.56-46 - Mangoes from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mangoes from India. 319.56-46 Section 319.56-46... from India. Mangoes (Mangifera indica) may be imported into the continental United States from India only under the following conditions: (a) The mangoes must be treated in India with irradiation by...

  7. Alteration of post harvest diseases of mango Mangifera indica ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mango production in Senegal takes place over the two seasons of dry and humid conditions between April and November. The increasing demand for fresh mangoes has led to an increase in land area allocated to that crop. Mango production suffers, however, from fruit rotting due to post-harvest diseases during ripening.

  8. Hurricane Andrew and a pediatric emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, B; Baker, R; Pratt, J

    1994-04-01

    To determine the effect of Hurricane Andrew on a pediatric emergency department. A retrospective analysis of ED visits through the use of computerized records and chart review. A children's hospital in South Florida. All patients presenting to the ED during the control week and the two study weeks after the hurricane. Census, diagnoses, admission rate, and patient geographic origin and age. During week 1, there was an average daily increase of 40.7% in patient volume (P hurricane, personnel in a pediatric ED can expect to see an increased census, with more diagnoses of open wounds, gastroenteritis, and skin infections. They may also see hydrocarbon and bleach ingestions. Alerting parents to the potential for injury and accidental poisoning in their children after a hurricane may help prevent the reported morbidity.

  9. Weaver Ants to Control Fruit Fly Damage to Tanzanian Mangoes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Nina

    ’ attempts to land and oviposit on the mangoes was video filmed. The mangoes bought at the village market had a higher infestation level compared to the mangoes bought from the farmers. The infestation level in the mangoes bought from the mango picker varied depending on the postharvest treatment...... the demand it can lead to price drops and the farmers may not earn a higher income compared to the current situation. In addition to the studies described above, volatiles emitted by weaver ant infested plants were compared with plants not infested with weaver ants. A number of known deterrent compounds were...

  10. ESR study of free radicals in mango

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Masahiro; Hussain, Mohammad S.; Morishita, Norio; Ukai, Mitsuko; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Shimoyama, Yuhei

    2010-01-01

    An electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopic study of radicals induced in irradiated fresh mangoes was performed. Mangoes in the fresh state were irradiated with γ-rays, lyophilized and then crushed into a powder. The ESR spectrum of the powder showed a strong main peak at g = 2.004 and a pair of peaks centered at the main peak. The main peak was detected from both flesh and skin specimens. This peak height gradually decreased during storage following irradiation. On the other hand, the side peaks showed a well-defined dose-response relationship even at 9 days post-irradiation. The side peaks therefore provide a useful means to define the irradiation of fresh mangoes.

  11. Remote sensing for hurricane Andrew impact assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Bruce A.; Schmidt, Nicholas

    1994-01-01

    Stennis Space Center personnel flew a Learjet equipped with instrumentation designed to acquire imagery in many spectral bands into areas most damaged by Hurricane Andrew. The calibrated airborne multispectral scanner (CAMS), a NASA-developed sensor, and a Zeiss camera acquired images of these areas. The information derived from the imagery was used to assist Florida officials in assessing the devastation caused by the hurricane. The imagery provided the relief teams with an assessment of the debris covering roads and highways so cleanup plans could be prioritized. The imagery also mapped the level of damage in residential and commercial areas of southern Florida and provided maps of beaches and land cover for determination of beach loss and vegetation damage, particularly the mangrove population. Stennis Space Center personnel demonstrated the ability to respond quickly and the value of such response in an emergency situation. The digital imagery from the CAMS can be processed, analyzed, and developed into products for field crews faster than conventional photography. The resulting information is versatile and allows for rapid updating and editing. Stennis Space Center and state officials worked diligently to compile information to complete analyses of the hurricane's impact.

  12. Changes in the sensory characteristics of mango cultivars during the production of mango purée and sorbet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledeker, Christie N; Chambers, Delores H; Chambers, Edgar; Adhikari, Koushik

    2012-10-01

    The effects of processing on the flavor and texture properties of 4 mango cultivars available in the U.S. were studied. Descriptive panelists evaluated fresh mango, mango purée, and mango sorbet prepared from each cultivar. Purées were made by pulverizing mango flesh, passing it through a china cap, and heating it to 85 °C for 15 s. To prepare the sorbets, purées were diluted with water (1:1), sucrose was added to increase the total soluble solids (TSS) to 32 ± 2 °Brix, and bases were frozen in a batch-type ice cream freezer. Processing fresh mangoes into mango purée generally decreased fruity character and mango identity and led to the appearance of a cooked note. Many of the flavor distinctions among cultivars carried over from fresh to purée samples, but much of the texture variation was lost. Thermal processing had differing effects on the flavor of the cultivars, and therefore, results suggest that mango cultivars for purées should be selected based on properties after thermal treatment. Processing purées into sorbets minimized flavor variation among cultivars, although Tommy Atkins sorbet was relatively high in green and green-viney character and low in caramelized flavor compared to the other cultivars in sorbet. Based on the current study only very distinct flavor properties of mango cultivars may carry over to sorbets. Findings from the present study will help mango purée and sorbet manufacturers select appropriate cultivars for their products by understanding the transformation that mango undergoes as it is processed into mango purée and subsequently to mango sorbet. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  13. Environmental Contaminants Evaluation of St. Andrew Bay, Florida: Volume 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Between 1985 and 1997, a general survey of St. Andrew Bay, Florida, was conducted to measure chemical contaminant concentrations in the sediments and selected biota....

  14. Textual Rhetorics and Textual Carnivals: Susan Miller and the "Subjects" of Rhetoric and Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Nedra

    1991-01-01

    Reviews two books by Susan Miller: "Rescuing the Subject: A Critical Introduction to Rhetoric and the Writer" (1989) and "Textual Carnivals: The Politics of Composition" (1991). Notes how she rereads dominant histories of rhetoric and writing instruction, argues for a theory of textuality, and illustrates how attention to…

  15. Don't Take Touch for Granted: An Interview with Susan Lederman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verry, Rene

    1998-01-01

    Presents an interview with Susan Lederman that contains a fascinating and informative overview of the recent developments in neuropsychological research concerning the sense of touch. Discusses the physiological processes that support this sensory experience and reveals them to be much more flexible, intricate, and adaptive than previously…

  16. Re-Establishing Social Studies as a Core Subject: An Interview with Susan Griffin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Susan

    2014-01-01

    NCSS Executive Director Susan Griffin was chair of the Task Force of Professional Organizations that worked with the Social Studies Assessment, Curriculum, and Instruction Collaborative (SSACI) of the Council of Chief State School Officers to initiate and guide the development of the "College, Career and Civic Life (C3) Framework for Social…

  17. Teaching Students About Stereotypes, Prejudice, and Discrimination: An Interview with Susan Fiske

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackney, Amy

    2005-01-01

    Susan T. Fiske is professor of psychology, Princeton University (PhD, Harvard University; honorary doctorate, Universite Catholique de Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium). She wrote Social Cognition (with Taylor) on how people make sense of each other. Currently, she investigates emotional prejudices (pity, contempt, envy, and pride) at cultural,…

  18. Inside the Sex Ed Studio: An Interview with Susan N. Wilson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taverner, William J.

    2007-01-01

    "Inside the Sex Ed Studio" profiles leaders in the field of sexuality education. Susan N. Wilson, former Executive Coordinator of the Network for Family Life Education, long-time advocate for sexuality education, and the driving force behind New Jersey's K-12 mandate for comprehensive sexuality education was the first such leader to be…

  19. Genetic characterization of mango anthracnose pathogen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-06-28

    Jun 28, 2010 ... cause important diseases in a wide range of crops including cereals, legumes, vegetables, and fruit crops. Colletotrichum gloeosporioides is reported on a wide variety of fruits, including almond, avocado, apple, arabica coffee, guava, mango and strawberry (Agwana et al.,. 1997; Freeman et al., 1998; ...

  20. Mango ( Mangifera indica ) and Ambarella ( Spondias cytherea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Compare to commercial lime pectin with degree of methoxylation (DM) 70%, phase diagrams presenting sol-gel transition of purified pectins established as sucrose concentration (40-75 %, weight/weight) versus reduced pectin concentration (0.1-1.8 %, weight/weight) were studied at pH 3. Mango and ambarella jams were ...

  1. Antioxidant properties of fermented mango leaf extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Anna; Ku, Taekyu; Yoo, Ilsou

    2015-01-01

    Antioxidant properties of mango (Mangifera indica) leaves were evaluated. Hydroalcoholic leaf extracts that were lyophilized were subsequently fermented with either Lactobacillus casei or effective microorganisms (EM) such as probiotic bacteria and/or other anaerobic organisms. Antioxidant properties were measured as a function of the mango leaf extract concentration in the fermentation broth. Tests for radical scavenging using the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical showed higher antioxidant activity for Lactobacillus- and EM-fermented mango leaf extracts than for the synthetic antioxidant butylated hydroxytoluene. Antioxidant activity generally increased with increasing fermented extract concentration as did the fermented extracts' polyphenol and flavonoid contents. Fermented extracts reduced reactive oxygen species generation by lipopolysaccharide in RAW 264.7 cells when measured via fluorescence of dichlorodihydrofluorescein acetate treated cells using flow cytometry. RAW 264.7 cells also showed a concentration-dependent cytotoxic effect of the fermented extracts using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthialol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Inhibition of mushroom tyrosinase activity as well as nitrite scavenging by the fermented extracts increased as fermented extract concentrations increased. Tyrosinase activity was assayed with 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine as substrate. Nitrite scavenging was assessed via measurement of inhibition of chromophore production from nitrite-naphthylamine-sulfanilic acid mixtures. The antioxidant properties of fermented mango leaf extracts suggest the fermented extracts may be useful in developing health food and fermentation-based beauty products.

  2. Genetic characterization of mango anthracnose pathogen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-06-28

    Jun 28, 2010 ... coffee, guava, mango and strawberry (Agwana et al.,. 1997; Freeman et al. ... has been used to identify RAPD markers for resistance to coffee berry disease, caused by Colletotrichum kahawae, in arabica coffee. Backman et al. (1999) also ... capsicum in Korea and China, that used RAPD-PCR technique to ...

  3. Physicochemical Properties of Mango Seed Flour | Okpala ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The proximate composition, functional and antinutritional properties of flour produced from seeds of mangoes grown in Ebonyi State were studied. Two cultivars: India and Indochinese were used for the study. The aim of the study was to determine any possible potential that flour obtained from these seeds might possess.

  4. Andrew Smith: peame leidma tee majanduskasvuni, mis põhineb säästmisel, investeeringutel ja ekspordil / Andrew Smith

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Smith, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    KPMG (UK) peaökonomist Andrew Smith vastab küsimustele, mis puudutavad majanduskriisi tekkimist, olukorra paranemist, majandusolukorda Suurbritannias, erinevusi Euroopa ja muude maailma piirkondade vahel, sarnasusi Eesti ja Suurbritannia majandusolukorra vahel ning prognoose edaspidiste arengute osas

  5. Interview: Professor Andrew Feinberg speaks to Epigenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinberg, Andrew

    2009-10-01

    Andrew Feinberg studied mathematics and humanities at Yale University (CT, USA) in the Directed Studies honors program, and he received his BA (1973) and MD (1976) from the accelerated medical program at Johns Hopkins University (MD, USA), as well as an MPH from Johns Hopkins (1981). He performed a postdoctoral fellowship in developmental biology at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD, CA, USA), clinical training in medicine and medical genetics at the University of Pennsylvania (PA, USA) and genetics research with Bert Vogelstein at Johns Hopkins, discovering altered DNA methylation in human cancer. Dr Feinberg continued to perform seminal work in cancer epigenetics as a Howard Hughes investigator at the University of Michigan (MI, USA), discovering human imprinted genes and loss of imprinting in cancer, and the molecular basis of Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome. He returned to John Hopkins in 1994 as King Fahd Professor of Medicine, Molecular Biology & Genetics and Oncology, and he holds an Adjunct Professorship at the Karolinska Institute in Sweden. Dr Feinberg is Director of the Center for Epigenetics, a National Human Genome Research Institute-designated Center of Excellence in Genome Sciences. The Center is pioneering genome-scale tools in molecular, statistical and epidemiological epigenetics, and is applying them to the study of cancer, neuropsychiatric disease and aging. As part of the center, Dr Feinberg has organized a highly innovative program to bring gifted minority high-school students into genetics and genomics. Dr Feinberg has also invented a number of widely used molecular tools, including random priming. His honors include election to the American Society for Clinical Investigation, the Association of American Physicians, the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, as well as membership on the ISI most-cited authors list, a MERIT Award of the National Cancer Institute, a

  6. Physiological and molecular mechanisms of fruitlet abscission in mango

    OpenAIRE

    Hagemann, Michael Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Compared to the typical high initial fruit set of mango (Mangifera indica L.), only a small share of those fruits reach harvest-maturity. This extensive fruitlet drop is a major yield-limiting factor, leading to substantial economic losses for mango growers world-wide. The numerous causes of fruitlet drop include infections with pests or diseases and unsuitable environmental or crop management conditions. Due to the high impact of fruitlet drop for mango production, the overall objective of t...

  7. The antioxidant activitives of mango peel among different cultivars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu-Ge; Zhang, Xiu-Mei; Ma, Fei-Yue; Fu, Qiong

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, the contents of total phenol and total flavonoid of 8 mango cultivars were determined. Their antioxidant abilities were also evaluated by 1,1-diphenyl-2-pireyhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging, trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP). Correlations between total phenol, total flavonoid and FRAP as well as TEAC were also analyzed. Results showed that mango peels were rich in natural antioxidant compounds the antioxidant abilities were different among different cultivars. The correlations between total phenol, total flavonoid and FRAP indicated phenolics represent a major part of antioxidant capacity in mango peels. This was also useful in the utilization of mango processing waste.

  8. THE PROXIMATE COMPOSITION OF AFRICAN BUSH MANGO ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BIG TIMMY

    The proximate analysis (moisture, crude protein, crude fat, mineral ash and total carbohydrates) in the kernels and flour of African Bush Mango (. ) were investigated. The results revealed that the kernels contained moisture (2.5 g/100 g), crude protein (8.9 g/100 g), crude fat (68.4 g/100 g), mineral ash (2.3 g/100 g) and total ...

  9. Mapping global potential risk of mango sudden decline disease caused by fungus Ceratocystis fimbriata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mango Sudden Decline (MSD), sometimes referred to as mango wilt, is an important disease of mango caused by one of the most significant fungal species causing disease in woody plants, Ceratocystis fimbriata. This species is mainly disseminated by the mango bark beetle, Hypocryphalus mangiferae (Steb...

  10. Mango ginger (Curcuma amada Roxb.)–A promising spice for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mango ginger (Curcuma amada Roxb.) is a unique spice having morphological resemblance with ginger but imparts a raw mango flavour. The main use of mango ginger rhizome is in the manufacture of pickles and culinary preparations. Ayurveda and Unani medicinal systems have given much importance to mango ginger ...

  11. Analysis of genetic diversity in mango ( Mangifera indica L.) using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cluster analysis through UPGMA dendogram using isozymes electrophoretic pattern provided strong information about existence of variability among the genotypes of mango. Based on Euclidean distance, a dendogram was constructed using banding pattern of 60 mango genotypes developed through three isozymes ...

  12. Detection of fungi and aflatoxin in shelved bush mango seeds ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A survey of the fungi and aflatoxin contamination of bush mango seeds (Irvingia spp.) was conducted in Akwa lbom State, Nigeria. Bush mango seeds sold at four major markets, located at Abak, Uyo, Ikot Ekpene and Itam in Akwa Ibom State were heavily contaminated with moulds. Eight different fungi were found ...

  13. Two new promising cultivars of mango for Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mango cultivars are mostly the result of random selections from open pollinated chance seedlings of indigenous or introduced germplasm. The National Germplasm Repository (genebank) at the Subtropical Horticulture Research Station (SHRS) in Miami, Florida is an important mango germplasm repository an...

  14. Physico-chemical evaluation of the “Casturi” Mango

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangifera casturi “Casturi” mango is a tropical fruit tree about 10–30 m tall which is endemic to very small area around Banjarmasin in Southern Borneo (Indonesia). The casturi mango is believed to be first introduced to Florida by Richard Campbell in early 2000 as part of the germplasm conservat...

  15. Influence of Mango Based Intercropping Systems on Soil Health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Among different intercropping systems tried, the mango + guava + cowpea system resulted in maximum improvement in bulk density, electrical conductivity, water holding capacity, organic carbon content and pH within 0 - 15 and 15 - 30 cm of soil depths. The nutrient status of orchard soil indicated that the mango + guava + ...

  16. Appraisal of biochemical and genetic diversity of mango cultivars ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mango (Mangifera indica L.) is one of the oldest fruit crops and is broadly cultivated worldwide. To determine the level of genetic diversity, a total of 13 mango genotypes have been collected from different farms of Fayoum oasis in Egypt and were analyzed using molecular (DNA) and biochemical (SDS-PAGE) markers ...

  17. Removal of heavy metals from aqueous solution by using mango ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Removal of heavy metals from aqueous solution by using mango biomass. MA Ashraf, A Wajid, K Mahmood, MJ Maah, I Yusoff. Abstract. Biosorbent and unfertilizable flowering buds of mango plant, a local agrowaste in Multan, Pakistan known as battoor is used in this study. Efficacy of the biosorbent is tested in batch for ...

  18. Evaluation of different morphotypes of mango (mangifera indica l ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of different morphotypes of mango (mangifera indica l.) for use as rootstock in seedlings production. H Baita, A Manga, Y Mustapha. Abstract. The experiment was designed to assess the growth performance of improved cultivars of Mango grafted on adapted local morphological types. Two trials were conducted ...

  19. 76 FR 65988 - Importation of Mangoes From Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-25

    ... Australia AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: We are... importation of fresh mangoes from Australia into the continental United States. As a condition of entry, the... from Australia and found free of this disease. The mangoes would have to be imported in commercial...

  20. Influence of mango mesocarp flour supplement to micronutrient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mango mesocarp flour was incorporated into wheat flour at 15, 20 and 30% levels to evaluate its micronutrients contribution and effect on the physical and organoleptic attributes of wheat-based bread. A control (100% wheat flour) was used for comparison. Proteins in wheat, mango and composite flours were found to be ...

  1. Effect of fermentation on the chemical composition of mango ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-08-20

    Aug 20, 2007 ... Key words: Mango, Magnifera indica, antinutrient, fermentation. INTRODUCTION. The mango tree is erect roughly 10 – 30 m high, with a broad rounded canopy which may with age attain 30 – 38 m in width or a more upright, oval, relatively slender crown. In deep soil, the taproot descends to a depth of 6.

  2. Genetic diversity of bitter and sweet African bush mango trees ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    When used separately, the AFLPs and cpSSRs failed to consistently discriminate the populations and type of trees. From the combined dataset, both markers differentiated geographically recognizable groups; bitter from sweet mango trees. However, Nigerian sweet mango trees clustered with the bitter ones. The suitability ...

  3. A Case of Mangoes and Oranges... Consider a basket containing ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    using very simple examples, and this concept has been further extended to describe the molecular weights of high polymers. A Case of Mangoes and Oranges ... Consider a basket containing four difIe~ent types of fruits: plums, oranges, mangoes and watermelon. Just for ease of. Zahoor Ahmad. Department of Chemistry,.

  4. 7 CFR 1206.202 - Exemption for organic mangos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... certificate provided by a USDA-accredited certifying agent as defined in the Organic Act, a signed... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Exemption for organic mangos. 1206.202 Section 1206... PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Rules and Regulations § 1206.202 Exemption for organic mangos. (a) A...

  5. Physical and chemical characteristics of off vine ripened mango ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The need to develop the best off vine mango ripening technique for both consumption and processing was investigated. Some physical and chemical measurements were performed on mature Green Dodo mangoes before and during a 3-day and 6-day ripening period by smoked pit ripening (SPR), ethylene (fruit ...

  6. Effects of composite mango ( Mangifera indica ) fruit reject meal on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The experiment was conducted to determine the effect of mango fruit reject meal on growth performance, digestibility and economics of production of growing rabbits. Mango fruit rejects were sliced such that the peel and pulp were together and the seed discarded, sun dried until it attained about 10% moisture and milled to ...

  7. Antibacterial activity of Malaysian mango kernel | Abdullah | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mango (Mangifera indica) is a fruit belonging to the genus Mangifera and family Anacardiaceae, consisting of numerous species of tropical fruiting trees in the flowering plant. Mango has been reported to have high antibacterial activity against Gram positive bacteria, aids the development of the placenta and fetus, and ...

  8. The mango-saving molecule | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    National Highway 44 crosses the subcontinent from north to south over more than 3,700 km, treating motorists who travel its length to an incredible variety of landscapes. ... India is the leading producer of mangoes in the world, with a 40% market share, but unfortunately one third of the country's mangoes are unfit for sale.

  9. Characterisation of Neofusicoccum species causing mango dieback in Italy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ismail, A.M.; Cirvilleri, G.; Lombard, L.; Crous, P.W.; Groenewald, J.Z.; Polizzi, G.

    2013-01-01

    Species of Botryosphaeriaceae are important fungal pathogens of mango worldwide. A survey of 11 mango orchards located in the provinces of Catania, Messina, Palermo and Ragusa (Sicily, southern Italy), resulted in the isolation of a large number (76) of Neofusicoccum isolates associated with decline

  10. Characterization of mango (Mangifera indica L.) transcriptome and chloroplast genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azim, M Kamran; Khan, Ishtaiq A; Zhang, Yong

    2014-05-01

    We characterized mango leaf transcriptome and chloroplast genome using next generation DNA sequencing. The RNA-seq output of mango transcriptome generated >12 million reads (total nucleotides sequenced >1 Gb). De novo transcriptome assembly generated 30,509 unigenes with lengths in the range of 300 to ≥3,000 nt and 67× depth of coverage. Blast searching against nonredundant nucleotide databases and several Viridiplantae genomic datasets annotated 24,593 mango unigenes (80% of total) and identified Citrus sinensis as closest neighbor of mango with 9,141 (37%) matched sequences. The annotation with gene ontology and Clusters of Orthologous Group terms categorized unigene sequences into 57 and 25 classes, respectively. More than 13,500 unigenes were assigned to 293 KEGG pathways. Besides major plant biology related pathways, KEGG based gene annotation pointed out active presence of an array of biochemical pathways involved in (a) biosynthesis of bioactive flavonoids, flavones and flavonols, (b) biosynthesis of terpenoids and lignins and (c) plant hormone signal transduction. The mango transcriptome sequences revealed 235 proteases belonging to five catalytic classes of proteolytic enzymes. The draft genome of mango chloroplast (cp) was obtained by a combination of Sanger and next generation sequencing. The draft mango cp genome size is 151,173 bp with a pair of inverted repeats of 27,093 bp separated by small and large single copy regions, respectively. Out of 139 genes in mango cp genome, 91 found to be protein coding. Sequence analysis revealed cp genome of C. sinensis as closest neighbor of mango. We found 51 short repeats in mango cp genome supposed to be associated with extensive rearrangements. This is the first report of transcriptome and chloroplast genome analysis of any Anacardiaceae family member.

  11. The Mental Health Counselor's Role in Hurricane Andrew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingman, Robert L.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the effects of Hurricane Andrew on disaster workers, followed by some reported experiences of workers as well as victims. Background on natural disasters in general is given, along with information about crisis intervention. Discusses mental health interventions and various skills needed by disaster mental health counselors. (Author/KW)

  12. Hurricane Andrew in Florida: Dynamics of a Disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willoughby, H. E.; Black, P. G.

    1996-03-01

    Four meteorological factors aggravated the devastation when Hurricane Andrew struck South Florida: completed replacement of the original eyewall by an outer, concentric eyewall while Andrew was still at sea; storm translation so fast that the eye crossed the populated coastline before the influence of land could weaken it appreciably, extreme wind speed, 82 m s1 winds measured by aircraft flying at 2.5 km; and formation of an intense, but nontornadic, convective vortex in the eyewall at the time of landfall. Although Andrew weakened for 12 h during the eyewall replacement, it contained vigorous convection and was reintensifying rapidly as it passed onshore. The Gulf Stream just offshore was warm enough to support a sea level pressure 20-30 hPa lower than the 922 hPa attained, but Andrew bit land before it could reach this potential. The difficult-to-predict mesoscale and vortex-scale phenomena determined the course of events on that windy morning, not a long-term trend toward worse hurricanes.

  13. Hurricane Andrew: Parent Conflict As a Moderator of Children's Adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserstein, Shari B.; La Greca, Annette M.

    1998-01-01

    Three months after Hurricane Andrew, 89 children in grades four to six who lived in two-parent families and had experienced the hurricane were tested. Children's symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder were related to their perceptions of parental conflict; this relationship was stronger for Hispanic children than for other ethnic groups.…

  14. Appreciating Unity in Diversity: An Interview with Andrew Solomon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Dane L.

    2014-01-01

    The theme of the AMS 2014 Annual Conference is "Unity in Diversity," a concept that also describes the work of conference keynote speaker Andrew Solomon. Solomon is a writer and lecturer on psychology and politics; winner of the National Book Award; and an activist for LGBT [lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender] rights, mental health,…

  15. Andrew Tracey: Performer, Scholar, Teacher, Mentor | Thram | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A Legacy to Uphold Born to follow in his father Hugh Tracey's footsteps, Andrew Tracey has inspired countless people with his knowledge of African music. This he has done through his publications and films and his teaching and performing from the early days of his career in the 1960s through his Directorship of the ...

  16. Sensory awareness and social work [Michelle Evans and Andrew Whittaker

    OpenAIRE

    Watling, Sue

    2012-01-01

    Sensory Awareness and Social Work by Michelle Evans and Andrew Whittaker; Book Review for Practice: Social Work in Action Journal, Sensory Awareness and Social Work M. Evans and A. Whittaker Exeter: Learning Matters, 2010 144 pp. £17.99 (pb), ISBN: 978 1 84445 291 0

  17. Automated mango fruit assessment using fuzzy logic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Suzanawati Abu; Kin, Teoh Yeong; Sauddin@Sa'duddin, Suraiya; Aziz, Azlan Abdul; Othman, Mahmod; Mansor, Ab Razak; Parnabas, Vincent

    2014-06-01

    In term of value and volume of production, mango is the third most important fruit product next to pineapple and banana. Accurate size assessment of mango fruits during harvesting is vital to ensure that they are classified to the grade accordingly. However, the current practice in mango industry is grading the mango fruit manually using human graders. This method is inconsistent, inefficient and labor intensive. In this project, a new method of automated mango size and grade assessment is developed using RGB fiber optic sensor and fuzzy logic approach. The calculation of maximum, minimum and mean values based on RGB fiber optic sensor and the decision making development using minimum entropy formulation to analyse the data and make the classification for the mango fruit. This proposed method is capable to differentiate three different grades of mango fruit automatically with 77.78% of overall accuracy compared to human graders sorting. This method was found to be helpful for the application in the current agricultural industry.

  18. Advances in research and development of mango industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian S. E. Bally

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available World mango production is spread over 100 countries that produce over 34.3 million tons of fruit annually. Eighty percent of this production is based in the top nine producing nations that also consume upward of 90% of their production domestically. One to 2 percent of fruit is traded internationally in to markets in the European Community, USA, Arabian Peninsula and Asia. This paper outlines some of the recent research and development advances in mango breeding and genomics, rootstock development, disease management and harvest technologies that are influencing the production and quality of mango fruit traded domestically and internationally.

  19. "A hint of it, with initials": adultery, textuality and publicity in Jane Austen's Lady Susan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Gillian

    2010-01-01

    In spite of Jane Austen's professed “eye” for an adulteress, comparatively little attention has been paid to adultery and divorce as themes and contexts of her fiction. Her unpublished epistolary novel Lady Susan has a distinctive status in Austen's oeuvre, recognized as being exemplary of her “style” and yet atypical of her later achievement. A neglected context for the novel is the extensive reporting of adultery trials in contemporary print culture and the moral panic concerning adultery in the 1780s and 1790s, focusing initially on the adulteress as the brazen woman of fashion and later as a figure of sentimentalized abjection. A particularly notorious case, that involving Lady Henrietta Grosvenor and George III's brother, the Duke of Cumberland, is directly alluded to in Lady Susan. The textual strategies of adultery trial literature, particularly its emphasis on indirection through the use of detail or “hint”, had a long-term influence on the development of Austen's fiction and her positioning of herself as a professional writer after the 1790s.

  20. Injuries and illnesses related to Hurricane Andrew--Louisiana, 1992.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-04-09

    On August 26, 1992, Hurricane Andrew struck Louisiana. On August 24, in anticipation of hurricane-related injuries and illnesses, the Office of Public Health (OPH), Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals, in cooperation with hospital emergency room (ER) and public utility personnel and coroners, established an active emergency surveillance system in 19 parishes to monitor these events. This report summarizes the findings from this emergency surveillance system.

  1. Andrew Beatty, A shadow falls; In the heart of Java.

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew Beatty; Edwin Wieringa; Michael Peletz; Pujo Semedi

    2010-01-01

    In this feature we highlight a recently launched book. We invite specialists in the field to comment on the book, and we invite the author to respond to their comments. In this issue we focus on Andrew Beatty's, A shadow falls; In the heart of Java. Those invited to comment on the book are Puja Semedi, Michael Peletz and Edwin Wieiringa. Registered readers may participate in the debate.

  2. Andrew Beatty, A shadow falls; In the heart of Java.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Beatty

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In this feature we highlight a recently launched book. We invite specialists in the field to comment on the book, and we invite the author to respond to their comments. In this issue we focus on Andrew Beatty's, A shadow falls; In the heart of Java. Those invited to comment on the book are Puja Semedi, Michael Peletz and Edwin Wieiringa. Registered readers may participate in the debate.

  3. A pioneer of tropical medicine worldwide: Andrew Balfour, of Khartoum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeel, Ahmed A A

    2013-01-01

    This is an archival account of the career of Sir Andrew Balfour in Khartoum, Sudan during the period 1902 to 1913. As the first director of the Wellcome Tropical Research Laboratories in Khartoum during the period, Andrew Balfour was tasked with establishing the laboratories and at the same time he was engaged in founding the health services in Khartoum. Balfour worked in close collaboration and support from Henry Wellcome and Reginald Wingate, the Governor General of the Sudan. The energetic and meticulous sanitary work of Balfour had a remarkable impact, with Khartoum declared mosquito-free by 1910. Establishing a research base in the laboratories was met with many challenges but eventually Balfour managed to recruit a team of dedicated researchers and to produce well-circulated publications in tropical medicine. Balfour's work in Khartoum later lead him to a distinguished career in tropical medicine. In 1923 he was appointed the first Director of London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. He was also elected President of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (1925-27). Sir Andrew Balfour, KCMG, CB, LL D (1873 -1931).

  4. Mangos of Puerto Rico, country contribution: Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technical Abstract: The book chapter presents a review of the historical importance of mango in Puerto Rico; geographical distribution; statistical data including total and seasonal production, main cultivars and their descriptors; cultural practices (i.e. propagation, fertilization, pruning); pests...

  5. Colour behaviour on mango (Mangifera indica) slices self stabilized ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-02-19

    Feb 19, 2008 ... African Journal of Biotechnology Vol. 7 (4), pp. ... terms of colour quality. Key words: Mango, colour, hurdle technology, self stabilization. .... mature green in anticipation of the processing date and were allow- ed to ripen for 4 ...

  6. Salt stress change chlorophyll fluorescence in mango

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cicero Cartaxo de Lucena

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the tolerance of mango cultivars 'Haden', 'Palmer', 'Tommy Atkins' and 'Uba' grafted on rootstock 'Imbú' to salt stress using chlorophyll fluorescence. Plants were grown in modified Hoagland solution containing 0, 15, 30, and 45 mmol L-1 NaCl. At 97 days the parameters of the chlorophyll fluorescence (F0, Fm, Fv, F0/Fm, Fv/Fm, Fv'/Fm', ΦPSII = [(Fm'-Fs/(Fm'], D = (1- Fv'/Fm' and ETR = (ΦPSII×PPF×0,84×0,5 were determined. At 100 days, the leaf emission and leaf area, toxicity and leaf abscission indexes were determined. In all cultivars evaluated, in different degree, there were decreases in photochemical efficiency of photosystem II, enhanced concentrations from 15 mmol L-1 NaCl. The decreases in the potential quantum yield of photosystem II (Fv/Fm were 27.9, 18.7, 20.5, and 27.4%, for cultivars 'Haden', 'Palmer', 'Tommy Atkins', and 'Uba', respectively, when grown in 45 mmol L-1 NaCl. It was found decreases in leaf emission and mean leaf area in all cultivars from 15 mmol L-1 NaCl. There were increases in leaf toxicity of 33.0, 67.5, 41.6 and 80.8% and in leaf abscission of 71.8, 29.2, 32.5, and 67.9% for the cultivars 'Haden', 'Palmer', 'Tommy Atkins', and 'Uba' respectively, when grown in 45 mmol L-1 NaCl. Leaf toxicity and leaf abscission were not observed in 15 mmol L-1 NaCl. The decrease in Fv/Fm ratio were accompanied by decreasing in leaf emission and increased leaf toxicity index, showing, therefore, the potential of chlorophyll fluorescence in the early detection of salt stress in mango tree.

  7. Irradiation of mangoes as a quarantine treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bustos R, M.E.; Enkerlin H, W.; Toledo A, J.; Reyes F, J.; Casimiro G, A

    1991-06-15

    This research project was conducted following guidelines of research protocols for post-harvest treatments developed by the United States Department of Agriculture CUSA. Laboratory bioassays included the irradiation of mangoes infested with third instar larvae of Anastrepha serpentina (Wied), A. ludens (Loew), A. obliqua (Macquart) and Ceratitis capitata (Wied) , at doses from 10 to 250 Gy. Irradiation doses were applied using a Co-60 AECL Model JS-7400 irradiator. The design was chosen to obtain a maximum to minimum ratio equal to, or less than, 1.025. C. capitata was the species most tolerant to irradiation. A dose of 60 Gy applied to third instar fruit fly larvae sterilized this species and prevented emergence of adults of the other three species. A dose of 250 Gy was required to prevent emergence of C. capitata. In fertility tests using emerged adults of A . Iudens, and A. obliqua a dose of 30 Gy gave 45 % and 27 % fertility, respectively. Adults of A. serpentina that emerged, died before reaching sexual maturity. The confirmatory tests, at probit-9 security level, were done at 100 Gy for the three species of Anastrepha and at 150 Gy for C. capitata. The quality of mangoes irradiated up to 1000 Gy was evaluated by chemical, physiological, and sensorial tests. The determination of vitamin C indicated that there was no loss of the nutritive value of the fruit. It also was observed that fruit metabolism was not accelerated since no significant increase in respiration or transpiration was registered and consumers accepted both treated and untreated fruit in the same way. (Author)

  8. In the postmodern mirror: intertextuality in Angels and Insects by Antonia Susan Byatt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buda Agata

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to analyse the novel Angels and Insects by Antonia Susan Byatt in terms of intertextual references. The author’s assumptions are based on the categorisation by Ryszard Nycz, who distinguishes three major types of intertexts: text versus text, text versus literary genre and text versus mimesis. Byatt uses intertextuality mainly to comment on the role of nature in the world, as well as to enhance the importance of human relationship with nature. Moreover, the writer moves towards literary criticism, discussing poems by famous artists, such as Alfred Tennyson or John Milton. In this way, the novel by Byatt is also an example of metafiction. All the narration techniques used by the English writer make the novel a typically postmodern work of art.

  9. Intermittent large amplitude internal waves observed in Port Susan, Puget Sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, J. C.; Decker, L.

    2017-07-01

    A previously unreported internal tidal bore, which evolves into solitary internal wave packets, was observed in Port Susan, Puget Sound, and the timing, speed, and amplitude of the waves were measured by CTD and visual observation. Acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) measurements were attempted, but unsuccessful. The waves appear to be generated with the ebb flow along the tidal flats of the Stillaguamish River, and the speed and width of the resulting waves can be predicted from second-order KdV theory. Their eventual dissipation may contribute significantly to surface mixing locally, particularly in comparison with the local dissipation due to the tides. Visually the waves appear in fair weather as a strong foam front, which is less visible the farther they propagate.

  10. (REREADING INDEX CARDS: THE ARCHIVIST AS INTERPRETER IN SUSAN PUI SAN LOK'S 'NEWS'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Camacho

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Looking at susan pui san lok's projects News (2005 and RoCH (2013, this paper contemplates the notions put forward by Michel-Rolph Trouillot and Jacques Derrida on the power of archivists, not solely as guardians of documents but also as their interpreters. Taking into consideration that photographic and moving image archives present unique difficulties in their cataloguing processes, I examine silences that might be generated by a thematic classification that is not impervious to archivists' biases. Moreover, I consider if the silences created by manual processes of classification and retrieval might be surpassed through digital technologies, or if it is possible that new technologies simply create different types of silencing.

  11. "I Am Not a Fairy Tale": Contextualizing Sioux Spirituality and Story Traditions in Susan Power's "The Grass Dancer"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diana, Vanessa Holford

    2009-01-01

    Standing Rock Sioux writer Susan Power's best-selling novel "The Grass Dancer" (1994) includes depictions of the supernatural and spiritual that do not conform to the Judeo-Christian or, in some cases, the atheist or rationalist worldviews of many readers. Power writes of ghost characters and haunted places, communication between the living and…

  12. 78 FR 75676 - Mark W. Dobronski and Susan K. Dobronski-Acquisition of Control Exemption-Adrian & Blissfield...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board Mark W. Dobronski and Susan K. Dobronski--Acquisition of Control Exemption... Company, Lapeer Industrial Railroad Company and Jackson & Lansing Railroad Company Mark W. Dobronski and...

  13. Prediction of posttraumatic stress symptoms in children after hurricane Andrew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernberg, E M; Silverman, W K; La Greca, A M; Prinstein, M J

    1996-05-01

    The authors used an integrative conceptual model to examine the emergence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in 568 elementary school-age children 3 months after Hurricane Andrew. The model included 4 primary factors: Exposure to Traumatic Events, Child Characteristics, Access to Social Support, and Children's Coping. Overall, 62% of the variance in children's self-reported PTSD symptoms was accounted for by the 4 primary factors, and each factor improved overall prediction of symptoms when entered in the analyses in the order specified by the conceptual model. The findings suggest that the conceptual model may be helpful to organize research and intervention efforts in the wake of natural disasters.

  14. Andrew Lees, a visionary mentored by a madman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Cardoso

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Andrew Lees, Professor of Neurology at the National Hospital Queen Square (London, UK, has been recognized as the world’s most highly-cited researcher over the 200-year history of Parkinson’s Disease. Although he remains actively involved in the investigation of movement disorders, Prof. Lees embarked on a literary career that started in 2011 with the publication of a social history of his native Liverpool. His last work is Mentored by a Madman: The William Burroughs Experiment, which is reviewed here.

  15. Development and Utilization of Technology on Indian Mango Fruit Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenda A. Bronce

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This project aimed to develop and utilize technology on Indian mango fruit processing. Chemical properties of matured unripe and ripe Indian mangoes were determined in terms of total sugar, reducing sugar, starch, titratable acidity and pH. Fermentation parameters investigated in the study were amount of sugar added (20 and 25% fermentation medium, acidity of fermentation medium (addition of 1.33 and 1.66 grams of citric acid for ripe and dilution of water for unripe, degree of ripening of Indian mango fruits (ripe and unripe and ageing period (3 and 4 months. Sixteen treatments were done in triplicates and a composite sample was taken from each treatment for sensory evaluation. Results of the preference test were subjected to statistical analysis. The physicochemical properties of Indian mango wine produced using best fermentation parameters were determined. Appropriate packaging material was selected and packaging design was developed for Indian mango wine. Project cooperators were selected and the technology was transferred through training and production runs. Results of preference test showed that the wine with best sensory properties was prepared using matured unripe Indian mango diluted with water and added with 25% sugar. According to the panel of sensory experts, the taste of Indian mango wine was strong with proper blending of sweetness and sourness, its mouth feel was smooth and good balance, aroma was hot pungent and its color and appearance was clear and light yellow. Its titratable acidity was 0.622%, pH was 5, alcohol content was 11% and brix was 5°.

  16. 78 FR 8441 - Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order; Nominations of Foreign Producers and Election...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-06

    ... Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 1206 Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order; Nominations of... rule. SUMMARY: This rule would allow foreign producers, from major countries exporting mangos to the... for appointment to the National Mango Board (Board). At this time, only foreign producer associations...

  17. 76 FR 26946 - Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order; Assessment Increase

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-10

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 1206 Mango Promotion, Research, and.... SUMMARY: This rule proposes amendment of the Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order (Order) to increase the assessment rate on first handlers and importers of mangos from one half cent per pound to...

  18. 78 FR 39564 - Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order; Nominations of Foreign Producers and Election...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-02

    ... Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 1206 Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order; Nominations of... rule. SUMMARY: This document amends the Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order (Order) to allow foreign producers, from countries exporting mangos to the United States, to nominate themselves or...

  19. Variation in Volatiles from Fruits of Mango and Marula Attractive to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A detached mature green mango fruit emitted a few esters in addition to monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes. The ripe yellow mango fruit emitted large quantities of esters and smaller proportions of terpenoids. Several esters, similar to ripe yellow mangoes, were identified in volatiles of ripe yellow marula fruits. A total of 17 ...

  20. Apple mango value chain in northern Ethiopia: case study of Mereb ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Apple mango value chain in northern Ethiopia: case study of Mereb-Leke District. ... The major problems along the mango value chain include; shortage of timely input supply, high cost of inputs, diseases of mango plant, shortage of market information, shortage of transportation facility and road infrastructure, farmers' lack of ...

  1. Mesocarp RNASeq analysis of Mango (Mangifera indica L.) identify quarantine post-harvest treatment effects on gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The United States is the world’s largest importer of mangos. Before mangos can enter the US, they must be hot water treated to eliminate the eggs of an insect pest. The National Mango Board, a USDA supported commodity group, as well as mango exporters, importers and wholesale and retail distributo...

  2. Posttraumatic stress disorder in adolescents after Hurricane Andrew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, C Z; Bryant, E S; Addy, C L; Spurrier, P G; Freedy, J R; Kilpatrick, D G

    1995-09-01

    To examine rates and correlates of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in adolescents after Hurricane Andrew. A random-digit dialing sample of 158 Hispanic, 116 black, and 104 white adolescent-parent pairs were surveyed in high- and low-impact areas within Dade County, Florida, 6 months after Hurricane Andrew. Subjects completed a structured telephone interview focused on within-disaster experiences and emotional reaction, disaster-related losses, lifetime exposure to violent or traumatic events, recent stressful experiences, and psychiatric symptomatology. Approximately 3% of males (95% confidence interval 0.4 to 5.3) and 9% of females (95% confidence interval 4.6 to 13.7) met the criteria for PTSD. Rates were highest among blacks (8.3%, 95% confidence interval 2.3 to 14.2) and Hispanics (6.1%, 95% confidence interval 2.2 to 9.9) and increased with age (odds ratio of 1.34, 95% confidence interval 1.04 to 1.72) and the number of undesirable events reported (odds ratio of 1.38, 95% confidence interval 1.21 to 1.57). While only a relatively small percentage of adolescents reported symptoms consistent with a diagnosis of PTSD, most reported some posttraumatic symptoms. Postdisaster planning should recognize that common stressful events occurring after disasters may be more strongly associated with PTSD than magnitude of contact with the actual disaster.

  3. Pharmaceutical services at a medical site after Hurricane Andrew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestor, A; Aviles, A I; Kummerle, D R; Barclay, L P; Rey, J A

    1993-09-01

    The experiences of a group of volunteer clinical pharmacists who provided pharmacy services as part of a disaster relief effort following a hurricane are reported. Hurricane Andrew left many people in southern Florida without shelter and other basic necessities, including health care services. A group of seven pharmacists volunteered to provide services at a temporary medical site set up in a community center. The pharmacy stock consisted of donated drugs. The pharmacists dispensed medications directly to patients and worked closely with other volunteer medical personnel to make sure proper medications were used. Because the pharmacy stock was limited, physicians relied upon the pharmacists for information about therapeutic interchanges, dosage conversions, and new medications. Prescriptions were often ordered and dispensed with only oral instructions. The pharmacists also provided patient counseling, although problems caused by inexperience with certain types of patients, a language barrier, and substandard living conditions after the hurricane made counseling more difficult. The contributions of seven pharmacists who provided services at an emergency medical site after Hurricane Andrew were well received by other health care personnel and by the community.

  4. Hurricane Andrew-related injuries and illnesses, Louisiana, 1992.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNabb, S J; Kelso, K Y; Wilson, S A; McFarland, L; Farley, T A

    1995-06-01

    To determine the extent and types of injuries and illnesses in Louisiana associated with or related to Hurricane Andrew, we gathered data from hospital emergency departments and coroner's offices on demographic variables, institution, nature and cause of the injury or illness, body part affected, location, and date and time of the event. A hurricane-related injury or illness was defined as one that occurred from noon on August 24, 1992, through midnight on September 21, 1992, as a direct or indirect result of the preparation for (preimpact), the impact of, or the clean-up after the hurricane (postimpact). Nineteen parishes in south-central Louisiana that were most affected by Hurricane Andrew provided data from patients seen in emergency departments and reports from coroner's offices. Active, advance surveillance of this type promotes and facilitates the reporting of disaster-related health outcomes. Future planning for hurricanes should take into account the high rate of cuts, lacerations, and puncture wounds, particularly during the postimpact phase.

  5. The Application of Tamarind Kernel Powder in the Mango Sauce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    koosamart Wayu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tamarind seed has been well-known as a perfect source of xyloglucan that has functional properties that can be applied in food products. In this research, the tamarind seeds were processed to be tamarind kernel powder (TKP and then it was added into the mango sauce as the stabilizer. The aim was to study the effects of using TKP as the stabilizer on the quality of mango sauce in comparison with the application of xanthan gum that is the common stabilizer of sauce. The mango sauce samples were determined their water activity, consistency, viscosity, color and sensorial quality. The result indicated that the addition of either TKP or xanthan gum at 0.25-0.5 %w/w could raise the viscosity and diminish consistency of mango sauce significantly whereas the water activity values were insignificantly different among samples. Furthermore, it appeared that the samples added with xanthan gum obtained less consistency values but more viscosity and sensorial scores than that of TKP. The color values of samples with TKP were significantly different from those with xanthan gum. The samples added xanthan gum became darker than the addition of TKP. Although the TKP caused the less preference in characteristics of mango sauce when comparing with xanthan gum, the better result might be achieved if TKP was processed to be more purified xyloglucan. The outcome of this work showed the possibility of utilizing the tamarind seed that is commonly by-product to be a valuable food additive for food industry.

  6. Mango seed uses: thermal behaviour of mango seed almond fat and its mixtures with cocoa butter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solís-Fuentes, J A; Durán-de-Bazúa, M C

    2004-03-01

    This paper deals with the physicochemical characterization, including thermal behaviour, by differential scanning calorimetry of mango seed almond fat (MAF), alone and in mixtures with cocoa butter (CB). Results showed that mango almond seeds contain about 5.28-11.26% (dw) of fat. The refraction index is 1.466, the saponification index 189.0 and the iodine index 41.76. Fatty acids found in MAF are oleic, stearic, and palmitic acids (40.81%, 39.07% and 9.29% (w/w), respectively) as well as smaller amounts of linoleic, with arachidic, behenic, lignoceric, and linolenic acids, among others. Calorimetric analysis showed that MAF crystallizes between 14.6 and -24.27 degrees C with a DeltaHc of 56.06 J/g and melts between -17.1 and 53.8 degrees C, with fusion maxima at 18.54 degrees C and 40.0 degrees C for the alpha and beta polymorphic forms. Their fusion enthalpies are 70.12 and 115.7 J/g. The MAF solids content profile is very similar to that of CB, both in stabilized and non-stabilized samples. The mixing compatibility was analyzed using isosolids curves of mixtures of different compositions.

  7. Evaluating sago as a functional ingredient in dietetic mango ice cream

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Ashish S.; Jana, Atanu H.; Aparnathi, Kishore D.; Pinto, Suneeta V.

    2010-01-01

    A low fat mango ice cream (2.4% milk fat) was prepared in a mechanized ‘ice and salt’ type freezer using powdered sago at 2.5% as a natural bulking agent along with sodium alginate at 0.025% as adjunct. The low fat mango ice cream was compared with control mango ice cream having 10% milk fat and 0.15% sodium alginate as stabilizer. Both control as well as experimental ice creams contained 20% mango pulp solids. To impart richness to low fat mango ice cream, flavour enhancers like Cream Plus a...

  8. On the Record: with Olly Owen and Andrew Faull | Owen | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Andrew Faull is a doctoral research student at the Centre for Criminology, University of Oxford. His research also involves an ethnographic study of police, the South African Police Service. He completed nine months of fieldwork with the SAPS in April 2013. In this frank exchange Olly and Andrew discuss their observations ...

  9. Packetizing OCP Transactions in the MANGO Network-on-Chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Tobias; Sparsø, Jens

    2006-01-01

    The scaling of CMOS technology causes a widening gap between the performance of on-chip communication and computation. This calls for a communication-centric design flow. The MANGO network-on-chip architecture enables globally asynchronous locally synchronous (GALS) system-on-chip design, while...... transactions are packetized and transmitted across the shared network, and illustrate how this affects the end-to-end performance. A high predictability of the latency of communication on shared links is shown in a MANGO-based demonstrator system...

  10. Spatial variance of physicochemical properties within mangos and the effect of initial ripeness stage on the quality of fresh-cut mangos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngamchuachit, Panita; Mitcham, Elizabeth J; Barrett, Diane M

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to assess the spatial variation in physicochemical properties within individual mangos, as well as to investigate the influence of initial ripeness level on physicochemical characteristics of fresh-cut mangos. Individual mangos were evaluated at 12 specific flesh positions in the inner and outer sides. Mango cubes of 1.5 cm prepared from three firmness stages were monitored for changes during 9 days of storage at 5 °C. Mango fruit varied significantly in firmness and color based on spatial position, with the ripening direction from the inner flesh outward and from the stem end to blossom end. Limitations to fresh-cut mango quality were 'desiccation' (dried cut surface) and 'edge or tissue damage' (cut edge damage or brown and bruise-like appearance). Firmer texture and paler yellow of inner flesh were found in less mature mango fruit (P physicochemical properties (firmness, color and SSC/TA ratio). Spatial variance and initial ripeness stage affect fresh-cut mango quality. Therefore, they must be considered by fresh-cut mango processors in order to attain optimal product quality. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. A Journey, the Pain of Others, and Historical Experience: Susan Silas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sendyka, Roma

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The author interprets Susan Silas' Helmbrechts walk (1998-2003, a unique series of forty-five photographs and supplementing visual and textual materials collected during the walk along the route of two hundred and twenty-five miles. The walk repeats the route which in 1945 had to undertake women prisoners from the concentration camp in Helmbrechts near Flossenbürg in their death march to Prachatice in Czech Republic. The pictures Silas takes, the people she meets, and finally the trees, the very materiality of the road become the factors of creating her own, individual memory of the event from the past. Silas selects an object from "the margins of the Holocaust" – a forgotten event that she re-presents by reacting to contemporary objects placed along the route of the event. Silas' work offers an opportunity to critically review the concept of memory landscapes (where is memory located in a landscape? and the phenomenon of dark tourism (is following in the footsteps of the prisoners a kind of pilgrimage, tourism, or therapy?. Silas problematises the question of memory, as well as examines different kinds of non-memory. Her camera is directed at locations that can be termed "the non-sites of memory."

  12. Food-related coping strategies after Hurricane Andrew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnus, M H

    1994-06-01

    This telephone survey examined food-related coping strategies in Floridian households after Hurricane Andrew. Approximately 137 households of university faculty and staff who lived in hurricane-damaged areas were interviewed. The average respondent was a college-educated woman between 41 and 60 years old. Prevailing food-purchasing problems included food stores that were either closed, without perishable food, distant, or crowded. In the absence of electricity and water, changes in food preparation included preparation of meals without a stove, more frequent use of grills and canned food, simpler meals, and less cooking. Changes in kitchen cleanup included using more disposables, cleaning more often, washing dishes by hand, and cleaning up less often because of damage in the kitchen. Respondents indicated that the hurricane experience taught them that they should have acquired more general supplies (eg, coolers, thermoses, propane stoves, and gas burners), more water and ice, and more nonperishable foods before the hurricane.

  13. Measurement of perceived disruption during rebuilding following Hurricane Andrew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, K; Ironson, G; Benight, C; Wynings, C; Greenwood, D; Carver, C S; Cruess, D; Baum, A; Schneiderman, N

    1997-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate a measure of perceived disruption during rebuilding following a disaster. Two eight-item scales, which measured intensity of disruption during the entire repair phase (Intensity-RP) and intensity of disruption during the past month (Intensity-PM) were developed and administered to 135 survivors of Hurricane Andrew. At 9 to 12 months postdisaster, Intensity-RP and Intensity-PM were both significantly associated with scores on the Global Severity Index of the SCL-90-R, and with scores on the Impact of Event-Intrusion Scale; Intensity-PM alone was significantly associated with PTSD scores. Regression analyses indicated that each scale contributed significant unique variance in predicting mental health symptoms, even after controlling for relevant demographic and initial disaster exposure variables.

  14. The paths of Andrew A. Benson: a radio-autobiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonomura, Arthur M; Holtz, Barry; Biel, Karl Y; Cooney, Robert; Lorimer, George; Govindjee

    2017-10-01

    Andrew A. Benson, one of the greatest biochemists of our time, is celebrated on his centennial by the authors with whom he interacted performing experiments or contemplating metabolic pathways in a wide range of biological kingdoms. He charted the chemical flow of energy in cells, tissues, organs, plants, animals, and ecosystems. Benson collaborated with hundreds of colleagues to examine the natural history of autotrophy, mixotrophy, and heterotrophy while elucidating metabolic pathways. We present here a biological perspective of his body of studies. Benson lived from September 24, 1917, to January 16, 2015. Out of over 1000 autoradiograms he produced in his life, he left a legacy of 50 labeled autoradiograms to the authors who tell the story of his life's work that resulted in Benson's Protocol (Nonomura et al., Photosynth Res 127:369-378, 2016) that has been applied, over the years, for the elucidation of major metabolic pathways by many scientists.

  15. Deaths related to Hurricane Andrew in Florida and Louisiana, 1992.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combs, D L; Parrish, R G; McNabb, S J; Davis, J H

    1996-06-01

    Information about circumstances leading to disaster-related deaths helps emergency response coordinators and other public health officials respond to the needs of disaster victims and develop policies for reducing the mortality and morbidity of future disasters. In this paper, we describe the decedent population, circumstances of death, and population-based mortality rates related to Hurricane Andrew, and propose recommendations for evaluating and reducing the public health impact of natural disasters. To ascertain the number and circumstances of deaths attributed to Hurricane Andrew in Florida and Louisiana, we contacted medical examiners in 11 Florida counties and coroners in 36 Louisiana parishes. In Florida medical examiners attributed 44 deaths to the hurricane. The mortality rate for directly-related deaths was 4.4 per 1 000 000 population and that for indirectly-related deaths was 8.5 per 1 000 000 population. In Louisiana, coroners attributed 11 resident deaths to the hurricane. Mortality rates were 0.6 per 1000 000 population for deaths directly related to the storm and 2.8 for deaths indirectly related to the storm. Six additional deaths occurred among non-residents who drowned in international waters in the Gulf of Mexico. In both Florida and Louisiana, mortality rates generally increased with age and were higher among whites and males. In addition to encouraging people to follow existing recommendations, we recommend emphasizing safe driving practices during evacuation and clean-up, equipping shelters with basic medical needs for the population served, and modifying zoning and housing legislation. We also recommend developing and using a standard definition for disaster-related deaths, and using population-based statistics to describe the public health effectiveness of policies intended to reduce disaster-related mortality.

  16. UNDERSTANDİNG SUSAN BORDO AND HER WORK; UNBEARABLE WEİGHT :FEMİNİSM, WESTERN CULTURE, BODY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ÇAĞLAR DEMİR

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Throughout history of thought, there have been many views about the women, their status in society, their struggle with patriarchy, and inequality  applied to them in all areas. There are different ways of oppression on women, such as confinement to home, inequality in wages between both sexes.  However, few scholars have written and declared their own views about how the patriarchal world and companies form women as they wish. Susan Bordo is one of  the most outstanding and distinguished feminist writers in the world who focuses on  how patriarchal capitalist understanding works on women’s body in terms of weight and weakness. According to Susan Bordo, male dominated capital world decides on women about what to wear and what to eat and women try to lose weight to be in the form men wish. State of  starving all the time leads to an illness called anorexia. The writer bases her views on the thoughts of literary critic and thinker, Foucault. The  objective of this article is to help the readers understand Susan Bordo’s views and analyse her impressive work; Unbearable Weight: Feminism, Western Culture and  the Body  and make her known in academic world.

  17. Bárbara Mujica, ed., Shakespeare and the Spanish «Comedia». Translation, Interpretation, Performance. Essays in Honor of Susan L. Fischer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro García-Reidy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Reseña de Bárbara Mujica, ed., Shakespeare and the Spanish «Comedia». Translation, Interpretation, Performance. Essays in Honor of Susan L. Fischer, Bucknell University Press, Lewisburg, 2013, 298 pp. ISBN 9781611485172.

  18. Adsorption characteristics of mango ( magnifera indica ) seed shell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adsorption characteristics of mango (Magnifera indica) seed shell activated carbon for phenol rem-oval from wastewater were examined by experimental single stage batch operation. Contact time, stirring rate, adsorbent dose, pH, initial phenol concentration, carbon particle size and impregnation ratio of ZnCl2 to the seed ...

  19. Mangifera sylvatica (Wild Mango): A new cocoa butter alternative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhter, Sayma; McDonald, Morag A.; Marriott, Ray

    2016-01-01

    Cocoa butter is the pure butter extracted from cocoa beans and is a major ingredient in the chocolate industry. Global production of cocoa is in decline due to crop failure, diseases and ageing plantations, leading to price fluctuations and the necessity for the industry to find high quality cocoa butter alternatives. This study explored the potential of a wild mango (Mangifera sylvatica), an underutilised fruit in south-east Asia, as a new Cocoa Butter Alternative (CBA). Analyses showed that wild mango butter has a light coloured fat with a similar fatty acid profile (palmitic, stearic and oleic acid) and triglyceride profile (POP, SOS and POS) to cocoa butter. Thermal and physical properties are also similar to cocoa butter. Additionally, wild mango butter comprises 65% SOS (1, 3-distearoyl-2-oleoyl-glycerol) which indicates potential to become a Cocoa Butter Improver (an enhancement of CBA). It is concluded that these attractive properties of wild mango could be prompted by a coalition of policy makers, foresters, food industries and horticulturists to promote more widespread cultivation of this wild fruit species to realise the market opportunity. PMID:27555345

  20. Evaluation of lubricity of methanolic extract of mango (Mangifera ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methanolic extract of mango seed oil (Mangifera Indica) was evaluated for suitability as lubricant for machini-ng mild steel at various speeds, feeds and depths of cut. The coefficient of friction between the tool and chip in- dicated that the methanolic extract reduced friction between the tool and work piece. The oil also ...

  1. Mango Supplementation Improves Blood Glucose in Obese Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Shirley F; Meister, Maureen; Mahmood, Maryam; Eldoumi, Heba; Peterson, Sandra; Perkins-Veazie, Penelope; Clarke, Stephen L; Payton, Mark; Smith, Brenda J; Lucas, Edralin A

    2014-01-01

    This pilot study examined the effects of freeze-dried mango (Mangifera indica L.) supplementation on anthropometrics, body composition, and biochemical parameters in obese individuals. Twenty obese adults (11 males and 9 females) ages 20- to 50-years old, received 10 g/day of ground freeze-dried mango pulp for 12 weeks. Anthropometrics, biochemical parameters, and body composition were assessed at baseline and final visits of the study. After 12 weeks, mango supplementation significantly reduced blood glucose in both male (−4.45 mg/dL, P = 0.018) and female (−3.56 mg/dL, P = 0.003) participants. In addition, hip circumference was reduced in male (−3.3 cm, P = 0.048) but not in female participants. However, there were no significant changes in body weight or composition in either gender. Our findings indicate that regular consumption of freeze-dried mango by obese individuals does not negatively impact body weight but provides a positive effect on fasting blood glucose. PMID:25210462

  2. Exploitation of Bush Mango ( Irvingia wombolu and Irvingia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was undertaken to assess the exploitation of Bush Mango Irvingia gabonensis and Irvingia wombolu (ogbono) among rural households in Enugu State, Nigeria. Interview schedule was used to collect data from 91 respondents and data were analyzed by use of descriptive statistics and factor analysis. The mean ...

  3. Molecular characterization of ten mango cultivars using simple ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    efficient values ranging from 0.075 between cluster I and II to 0.285 between clusters II and III. The dendrogram generated from the unweighted pair group arithmetic average (UPGMA) cluster analysis broadly placed 10 mango cultivars into three ...

  4. Sodicity tolerant polyembryonic mango root stock plants: A putative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The diversity of endophytic bacteria associated with leaves, stems and roots of sodicity tolerant polyembryonic mango root stock (GPL-1 and ML-2), grown at the sodic soil experiment farm (shivery farm), Central Soil Salinity Research Institute, Regional Research Station, Lucknow, India was investigated. In this study, we ...

  5. Postharvest Ripening and Shelf Life of Mango (Mangifera indica L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The mango (Mangifera indica L.) is a climacteric and highly perishable fruit that requires specialized postharvest handling to extend its storage life. The study was undertaken at Melkassa Agricultural Research Center (MARC) to evaluate the influence of 1-Methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) and polyethylene packaging (PP) on ...

  6. Postharvest Ripening and Shelf Life of Mango ( Mangifera indica L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The mango (Mangifera indica L.) is a climacteric and highly perishable fruit that requires specialized postharvest handling to extend its storage life. The study was undertaken at Melkassa Agricultural Research Center (MARC) to evaluate the influence of 1-Methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) and polyethylene packaging (PP) on ...

  7. Irreversible commitment to flowering in two mango cultivars

    Science.gov (United States)

    In recent years, the state of Nayarit, Mexico has experienced variations in rainfall distribution and warmer temperatures during the autumn-winter season which have caused erratic flowering of mango. The early-flowering cultivars, such as ‘Ataulfo’, have been less affected than tardy ones such as ‘T...

  8. Colour behaviour on mango ( Mangifera indica ) slices self ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of the syrup composition on behaviour colour of self stabilized mango slices in glass jars by hurdle technology during 180 days of storage was studied through 26-2 fractional factorial design. L* (lightness), a* (redness and greenness), and b* (yellowness and blueness) values were measured with a colorimeter ...

  9. Diversity of pectinolytic molds on major indian mango cultivars ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The diversity of pectinolytic fungi on nine major Indian mango cultivars was studied. A total of 71 moulds belonging to 10 genera and 18 species were isolated from fruit surfaces, 49 of which showed pectinase activity. Aspergillus niger was the most frequent (30%) followed by A. fumigatus, A. flavus, A. alternata, Fusarium ...

  10. mobilization of iron from soil recalcitrant fractions by using mango

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    Abstract. This study has been carried out to investigate the speciation of iron in the various, plant available and non-available, soil fractions and the efficiency of the Mango. (Mangifera indica) plant leaf extract in mobilizing iron from the strongly-bound soil fractions of cultivated, forest and water logged soil samples which ...

  11. APPLE MANGO VALUE CHAIN IN NORTHERN ETHIOPIA: CASE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-09-03

    Sep 3, 2015 ... the districts of northern Ethiopia based on its apple mango production performance. In the second stage, ... value added by farmers, wholesalers and retailers was 1583.65, 330.5 and 497 birr/qt, respectively. The major problems along the ... oilseeds, vegetables, root crops, fruit crops, stimulant crops and ...

  12. Effect of fermentation on the chemical composition of mango ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ripe mango peels (Mangifera indica R) was naturally fermented for 96 h at room temperature (30oC). ... Three species of fungi (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Aspergillus flavus and Rhizopus oryzae) and five bacteria (Aerobacter clocae, Leuconostoc Micrococcus luteus, Streptococcus mutans and staphylococcus aureus) ...

  13. Economic incentives for improving mango quality in Costa Rica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuniga Arias, G.; Ruben, R.; Verkerk, R.; Boekel, van T.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose

    – The purpose of the paper is to present an integrated methodology for identifying effective economic incentives to enhance quality performance by mango producers in Costa Rica.

    Design/methodology/approach

    – The study analyses the relationship between intrinsic

  14. Molecular Characterization of Cocoa, Mango, Banana and Yam ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of 25 fungal isolates were sampled from cocoa, mango, banana and yam within four geographical regions of Ghana. The isolates were developed into pure single-spore cultures on Potato Dextrose Agar (PDA). Single-spore cultures of the 25 B. theobromae isolates from the four crops were grown in V8 juice medium ...

  15. 35 Patterns of Mango Tree Trauma in Juba Teaching Hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2006-12-02

    Dec 2, 2006 ... study, included splenic rapture (3 patients), severe head injury (3 patients) and spinal injury (2 patients). One patient died of severe head injury, one patient had post traumatic epilepsy and the patients with spinal injury were discharged from the hospital on wheel chair. Conclusion: Mango tree injury is a ...

  16. Patterns of mango tree trauma in Juba Teaching Hospital | Lado ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: Mango tree injury is a phenomenon which we can compare to a traffic road injuries, where the pattern of injury is not predictable or reproducible, as this depends on the nature of the impact and its severity. The low mortality is due to predominance of limbs injuries, contrary to road traffic crushes in which head, ...

  17. Variation in fruit chilling injury among mango cultivars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phakawatmongkol, W.; Ketsa, S.; Doorn, van W.G.

    2004-01-01

    Mango(Mangifera indica L.) fruit of six cultivars ('Kaew', 'Rad', 'Okrong', 'Tongdum', 'Nam Dok Mai' and 'Nungklangwun') were stored at 4, 8 and 12degreesC (85-90% RH) and randomly sampled every 5 days. Chilling injury was manifested initially as a gray to brown discoloration of the peel, followed

  18. Ovipositional behaviour of two mango fruit fly species (Diptera ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The tritrophic interactions between mangoes (Mangifera indica), two frugivorous fly species of great economic significance, Bactrocera invadens and Ceratitis cosyra, and weaver ants (Oecophylla longinoda) were studied in Benin. We investigated whether Oecophylla cues affect B. invadens and C. cosyra oviposition ...

  19. Effect of fermentation on the chemical composition of mango ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-08-20

    Aug 20, 2007 ... proximate composition as well as the anti-nutritional content. ... The fungi iso- lates were Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Aspergillus flavus and Rhizopus oryzae. The changes in pH in fermenting mango peels are shown in Table 1. There was decrease ... The levels of tannin and phytate which the plant proba-.

  20. Utility of avocado pear seed ( Persea Americana ), mango seed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The proximate composition and amino acid profile of three plant materials, Avocado pear seed (Persea americana), mango seed (Magifera indica) and bean seed coat (Phaseolus vulgaris) were determined. Crude protein varied from 2.0 ± 0.06% in Magifera indica to 3.73 ± 0.08% in Persea americana. Generally, the amino ...

  1. Physico-Chemical Characteristics of Storage-Ripened Mango ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two mango (Mangifera indica L.) fruit varieties, Dodo and Viringe, from two localities of Eastern Tanzania, (Muheza in Tanga and Ifakara in Morogoro), were harvested as mature green fruits during early, mid and late season and allowed to ripen while stored at room temperature. The fruits were analyzed for their proximate ...

  2. Comparison of Pawpaw ( Carica Papaya ) and Mango ( Mangifera ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These studies aimed at confirming our former work on antitrypanosomal effects of Mangifera indica (mango) and Carica papya (Pawpaw) leaves in experimental animals infected with T. brucei and identify which one of them is superior as an antiparasitic agent. It was also designed to carry out further fractionation of the ...

  3. Molecular characterization of ten mango cultivars using simple ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DEAN

    2013-11-20

    Nov 20, 2013 ... Molecular characterization of ten mango cultivars using simple sequences repeat (SSR) markers. M. Kumar1*, V. Ponnuswami1, P. Nagarajan2, P. Jeyakumar3 and N. Senthil2. 1Horticultural College and Research Institute, Periyakulam, Tamil Nadu, 625604, India. 2Centre for Plant Molecular Biology, ...

  4. Alteration of post harvest diseases of mango Mangifera indica ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2007-05-02

    May 2, 2007 ... diseases during ripening. These diseases reduce the fruit quality and ... Alternaria sp., Botryodiplodia theobromae, Dothiorella sp., Aspergillus niger and non-identified fungi were responsible for mango rotting. ... nation of fungal quiescence on climacteric fruits like man- goes appears to be related to the ...

  5. Mangifera sylvatica (Wild Mango): A new cocoa butter alternative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhter, Sayma; McDonald, Morag A.; Marriott, Ray

    2016-08-01

    Cocoa butter is the pure butter extracted from cocoa beans and is a major ingredient in the chocolate industry. Global production of cocoa is in decline due to crop failure, diseases and ageing plantations, leading to price fluctuations and the necessity for the industry to find high quality cocoa butter alternatives. This study explored the potential of a wild mango (Mangifera sylvatica), an underutilised fruit in south-east Asia, as a new Cocoa Butter Alternative (CBA). Analyses showed that wild mango butter has a light coloured fat with a similar fatty acid profile (palmitic, stearic and oleic acid) and triglyceride profile (POP, SOS and POS) to cocoa butter. Thermal and physical properties are also similar to cocoa butter. Additionally, wild mango butter comprises 65% SOS (1, 3-distearoyl-2-oleoyl-glycerol) which indicates potential to become a Cocoa Butter Improver (an enhancement of CBA). It is concluded that these attractive properties of wild mango could be prompted by a coalition of policy makers, foresters, food industries and horticulturists to promote more widespread cultivation of this wild fruit species to realise the market opportunity.

  6. Podróż, cudze cierpienie i doświadczenie historyczne: Susan Silas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sendyka, Roma

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Autorka interpretuje pracę Susan Silas Helmbrechts walk (1998-2003, szczególny cykl czterdziestu pięciu zdjęć i dołączonych do nich materiałów wizualnych oraz tekstowych zbudowany podczas przejścia trasy dwustu dwudziestu pięciu mil, które w 1945 roku musiały przebyć kobiety pędzone w marszu śmierci z Helmbrecht koło Flossenbürga do czeskich Prachatic. Wykonywane zdjęcia, napotykani ludzie, w końcu – drzewa, sama materialność drogi stają się czynnikami wytwarzania własnej, indywidualnej pamięci wydarzenia sprzed lat. Silas wybiera szczególny obiekt "z marginesów Zagłady" – zapomniane zdarzenie, które przedstawia obserwując współczesne obiekty położone wzdłuż trasy tego zdarzenia. Praca Silas pozwala przyjrzeć się krytycznie koncepcji memory landscapes (gdzie w krajobrazie umiejscawia się pamięć? i zjawisku dark tourism (czy podążanie śladami więźniarek to pielgrzymka, turystyka czy terapia?. Silas problematyzuje nie tylko kwestię pamięci, bada również rodzaje nie-pamiętania. Jej kamera zostaje zwrócona ku lokalizacjom, które można nazwać "nie-miejscami pamięci".

  7. Treasure Your Exceptions: An Interview with 2017 George Beadle Award Recipient Susan A. Gerbi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbi, Susan A

    2017-12-01

    THE Genetics Society of America's (GSA) George W. Beadle Award honors individuals who have made outstanding contributions to the community of genetics researchers and who exemplify the qualities of its namesake. The 2017 recipient is Susan A. Gerbi, who has been a prominent leader and advocate for the scientific community. In the course of her research on DNA replication, Gerbi helped develop the method of Replication Initiation Point (RIP) mapping to map replication origins at the nucleotide level, improving resolution by two orders of magnitude. RIP mapping also provides the basis for the now popular use of λ-exonuclease to enrich nascent DNA to map replication origins genome-wide. Gerbi's second area of research on ribosomal RNA revealed a conserved core secondary structure, as well as conserved nucleotide elements (CNEs). Some CNEs are universally conserved, while other CNEs are conserved in all eukaryotes but not in archaea or bacteria, suggesting a eukaryotic function. Intriguingly, the majority of the eukaryotic-specific CNEs line the tunnel of the large ribosomal subunit through which the nascent polypeptide exits. Gerbi has promoted the fly Sciara coprophila as a model organism ever since she used its enormous polytene chromosomes to help develop the method of in situ hybridization during her Ph.D. research in Joe Gall's laboratory. The Gerbi laboratory maintains the Sciara International Stock Center and manages its future, actively spreading Sciara stocks to other laboratories. Gerbi has also served in many leadership roles, working on issues of science policy, women in science, scientific training, and career preparation. This is an abridged version of the interview. The full interview is available on the Genes to Genomes blog, at genestogenomes.org/gerbi. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  8. Anticarcinogenic effects of polyphenolics from mango (Mangifera indica) varieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noratto, Giuliana D; Bertoldi, Michele C; Krenek, Kimberley; Talcott, Stephen T; Stringheta, Paulo C; Mertens-Talcott, Susanne U

    2010-04-14

    Many polyphenolics contained in mango have shown anticancer activity. The objective of this study was to compare the anticancer properties of polyphenolic extracts from several mango varieties (Francis, Kent, Ataulfo, Tommy Atkins, and Haden) in cancer cell lines, including Molt-4 leukemia, A-549 lung, MDA-MB-231 breast, LnCap prostate, and SW-480 colon cancer cells and the noncancer colon cell line CCD-18Co. Cell lines were incubated with Ataulfo and Haden extracts, selected on the basis of their superior antioxidant capacity compared to the other varieties, where SW-480 and MOLT-4 were statistically equally most sensitive to both cultivars followed by MDA-MB-231, A-549, and LnCap in order of decreasing efficacy as determined by cell counting. The efficacy of extracts from all mango varieties in the inhibition of cell growth was tested in SW-480 colon carcinoma cells, where Ataulfo and Haden demonstrated superior efficacy, followed by Kent, Francis, and Tommy Atkins. At 5 mg of GAE/L, Ataulfo inhibited the growth of colon SW-480 cancer cells by approximately 72% while the growth of noncancer colonic myofibroblast CCD-18Co cells was not inhibited. The growth inhibition exerted by Ataulfo and Haden polyphenolics in SW-480 was associated with an increased mRNA expression of pro-apoptotic biomarkers and cell cycle regulators, cell cycle arrest, and a decrease in the generation of reactive oxygen species. Overall, polyphenolics from several mango varieties exerted anticancer effects, where compounds from Haden and Ataulfo mango varieties possessed superior chemopreventive activity.

  9. Bioactive components, antioxidative properties and inhibition of Fe2+-induced lipid peroxidation of mango peel as affected by the storage of mango fruit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adetuyi O. Foluso

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This study sought to evaluate the bioactive components (total phenolics, vitamin C and flavonoid, antioxidant properties (FRAP, and hydroxyl, DPPH and ABTS radical scavenging abilities and inhibition of Fe2+-induced lipid peroxidation of the peel of mango fruit stored at refrigeration temperature and room temperature. The peel of mango fruit stored at room temperature had significantly (P ≤ 0.05 higher contents of total phenolic (13.61 mg GAE/g, vitamin C (12.98 mg AAE/g, total flavonoid (4.49 mg QE/g and non-flavonoid (9.12 mg Qe/g than the peel of freshly harvested mango fruit and the peel of mango fruit stored at refrigeration temperature. In consonance with the bioactive components, the peel of mango fruit stored at room temperature had a higher FRAP, and hydroxyl, DPPH and ABTS radical scavenging abilities than the others. The peel of mango fruit stored at room temperature showed stronger inhibition of Fe2+ induced lipid peroxidation by exhibiting the least IC50 (1.44 mg/ml in brain, (1.43 mg/ml in pancreas and (1.88 mg/ml in kidney. Thus freshly harvested, matured, edible and just ripe mango fruit (Sheri Mango could be stored at room temperature and be consumed with the peel.

  10. Psychological effects of Hurricane Andrew on an elementary school population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, J A; Applegate, B; Tanner, S; Perez, D; Rothe, E; Campo-Bowen, A E; Lahey, B L

    1995-09-01

    To explore the prevalence and progression of posttraumatic symptomatology (PTS), using emotional and behavioral indices of psychopathology in school-age children in the pathway of Hurricane Andrew (HI-IMPACT) and in a comparison group north of Miami (LO-IMPACT). Pynoos' Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Reaction Index and Achenbach's Teacher's Report Form (TRF) were administered 8 weeks and 32 weeks after the hurricane. In addition, 21 measures of disruptive behavior cataloged by Dade County Public Schools were aggregated and compared by grading period between pre- and posthurricane school years. There were no statistically significant differences between the two schools in PTS at 8 weeks after the hurricane, although the children in the HI-IMPACT school were more likely to have severe PTS. TRF findings at 8 weeks revealed that children in the HI-IMPACT school evidenced lower means on the eight TRF scales and on the broader Internalizing and Externalizing measures. Analysis of the disruptive behavior revealed a drop in the marking period immediately after the hurricane in the HI-IMPACT area, but an opposite effect was observed in the LO-IMPACT area. After the hurricane there was an initial increase in PTS and a concomitant decrease in other measures of behavior and psychopathology. PTS remained relatively high throughout the school year, but there was a rebound and subsequent normalization of the measures of disruptive behavior.

  11. Cloud-to-ground lightning in Hurricane Andrew

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinari, John; Moore, Paul K.; Idone, Vincent P.; Henderson, Ronald W.; Saljoughy, Arsalan B.

    1994-08-01

    The spatial and temporal distribution of cloud-to-ground lightning was examined in Hurricane Andrew of 1992. Lightning locations available from the National Lightning Detection Network were superimposed on infrared satellite images to relate lightning activity to hurricane cloud structure. A distinct radial variation occurred in time-averaged flash density, with a weak maximum in the eye wall, a region of near-zero flash density 40 to 100 km from the center, and a steady increase to a large maximum in the outer rainbands 190 km from the center. This radial distribution is consistent with the convective structure of mature hurricanes. Eye wall lightning tended to be episodic, occurring almost exclusively prior to and during periods of intensification of the storm. During these periods, negative flashes occurred several kilometers inward from the highest eye wall cloud tops, in the region of the largest radar reflectivity. Positive eye wall flashes, while small in number, tended to occur directly under the highest cloud tops. The results are suggestive of a normal dipole in sign but outwardly tilted along the sloping eye wall. In general, hurricane flash characteristics resembled those for a background data set of nonhurricane flashes from the same area. The exception occurred for negative flashes in the eye wall, which had a much smaller mean peak current than the background (25.3 kA versus 44.9 kA).

  12. Andrew Liehr and the structure of Jahn-Teller surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chibotaru, Liviu F.; Iwahara, Naoya

    2017-05-01

    The present article is an attempt to draw attention to a seminal work by Andrew Liehr “Topological aspects of conformational stability problem” [1, 2] issued more than half century ago. The importance of this work stems from two aspects of static Jahn-Teller and pseudo-Jahn-Teller problems fully developed by the author. First, the work of Liehr offers an almost complete overview of adiabatic potential energy surfaces for most known Jahn-Teller problems including linear, quadratic and higher-order vibronic couplings. Second, and most importantly, it identifies the factors defining the structure of Jahn-Teller surfaces. Among them, one should specially mention the minimax principle stating that the distorted Jahn-Teller systems tend to preserve the highest symmetry consistent with the loss of their orbital degeneracy. We believe that the present short reminiscence not only will introduce a key Jahn-Teller scientist to the young members of the community but also will serve as a vivid example of how a complete understanding of a complex problem, which the Jahn-Teller effect certainly was in the beginning of 1960s, can be achieved.

  13. Optimizing Microwave-assisted Crude Butter Extraction from Carabao Mango (Mangifera indica) Kernels

    OpenAIRE

    Edgardo V. Casas; Von Jansen G. Comedia; Arni G. Gilbuena; Kevin F. Yaptenco

    2015-01-01

    Carabao mangoes are among the highly produced fruit crops in the Philippines. The processing and consumption of carabao mangoes leave a significant amount of waste seeds. Mango kernel butter extracted from waste seed kernels is a potential additive to cosmetic products or as a cocoa butter substitute. This study determined the pretreatment conditions that produce optimum yield prior to the mechanical extraction of the crude butter. Moreover, this study provided a general sensory evaluation of...

  14. EDA's post-disaster assistance program after hurricane Andrew : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-03-01

    Hurricane Andrew devastated parts of South Florida in August 1992, causing $20 billion in property damage, killing at least 41 people, and injuring many more. EDA joined other federal agencies in the disaster recovery process by promptly sending a te...

  15. Mida mõtleb professor Andrew Mayo? / Anne-Mari Ernesaks

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ernesaks, Anne-Mari

    2005-01-01

    PARE koordinaator tutvustab tuntud inimkapitali ideoloogi Andrew Mayo raamatut "Ettevõtte inimväärtus". Raamatu autori hinnangul on tänapäeva organisatsioonides juhtimise olulisim ülesanne inimese juhtimine varana. Lisa: Konverents

  16. Sensibility Study of St Andrew Bay Rapid Response System for Naval Applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pauly, Patrice

    2005-01-01

    .... For the physical part, time constraint may limit to using the barotropic mode. But because rain can be significant in St Andrew Bay system, Florida, fresh water, even when rivers lack, is a prevailing salinity regulator through ground seepage...

  17. In-Line Sorting of Harumanis Mango Based on External Quality Using Visible Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Firdaus Ibrahim

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The conventional method of grading Harumanis mango is time-consuming, costly and affected by human bias. In this research, an in-line system was developed to classify Harumanis mango using computer vision. The system was able to identify the irregularity of mango shape and its estimated mass. A group of images of mangoes of different size and shape was used as database set. Some important features such as length, height, centroid and parameter were extracted from each image. Fourier descriptor and size-shape parameters were used to describe the mango shape while the disk method was used to estimate the mass of the mango. Four features have been selected by stepwise discriminant analysis which was effective in sorting regular and misshapen mango. The volume from water displacement method was compared with the volume estimated by image processing using paired t-test and Bland-Altman method. The result between both measurements was not significantly different (P > 0.05. The average correct classification for shape classification was 98% for a training set composed of 180 mangoes. The data was validated with another testing set consist of 140 mangoes which have the success rate of 92%. The same set was used for evaluating the performance of mass estimation. The average success rate of the classification for grading based on its mass was 94%. The results indicate that the in-line sorting system using machine vision has a great potential in automatic fruit sorting according to its shape and mass.

  18. General Plan Environmental Assessment for Joint Base Andrews-Naval Air Facility, Washington, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    bat species are also known to be present at Andrews (AAFB 2009c). Reptiles present at Andrews include the Eastern garter snake (Thamnophis sirtalis...black rat snake (Elaphe obsolete), fence lizard (Sceloporus undulatus), and Eastern box turtle (Terrapene carolina). Fish species in the Base Lake...1290 Auto Garage F 3285 AFOSI F 1353 OPG Storage F 3286 Gas Station F 1384 BOQ Navy #1 – Coral Sea F 3296 BE Storage Shed F 1385 BOQ Navy #1

  19. IMPACT INJURY DIAGNOSIS IN MANGO THROUGH STARCH DEGRADATION INDEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FRANCISCO DE ASSIS DE SOUSA

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the use of starch degradation index (SDI in the diagnosis of areas of impact injuries in 'Tommy Atkins' mango, in different maturation stages. The experiment layout was a fully randomized factorial design (5 x 2, represented by five maturation stages and two handlings, with and without impact, with four replicates. SDI was determined through a subjective scale of scores indicating mango pulp darkened areas by reaction with iodine-potassium iodide solution. Subsequently, these scores were correlated with physicochemical quality variables. The results showed no influence of impact on fruit quality, in any of the studied maturation stages. Moreover, soluble solid contents increased throughout maturation stages, regardless of whether the fruits suffered impact or not. As a result, SDI is unsuitable to indicate fruit impact injury. However, there is a good correlation between SDI and pulp color, vitamin C, pH, titratable acidity, soluble solids, SS/ TA ratio and non-reducing sugars.

  20. Maturity assessment of harumanis mango using thermal camera sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa'ad, F. S. A.; Shakaff, A. Y. Md.; Zakaria, A.; Abdullah, A. H.; Ibrahim, M. F.

    2017-03-01

    The perceived quality of fruits, such as mangoes, is greatly dependent on many parameters such as ripeness, shape, size, and is influenced by other factors such as harvesting time. Unfortunately, a manual fruit grading has several drawbacks such as subjectivity, tediousness and inconsistency. By automating the procedure, as well as developing new classification technique, it may solve these problems. This paper presents the novel work on the using Infrared as a Tool in Quality Monitoring of Harumanis Mangoes. The histogram of infrared image was used to distinguish and classify the level of ripeness of the fruits based on the colour spectrum by week. The approach proposed thermal data was able to achieve 90.5% correct classification.

  1. Active morbidity surveillance after Hurricane Andrew--Florida, 1992.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, L E; Fonseca, V; Brett, K M; Sanchez, J; Mullen, R C; Quenemoen, L E; Groseclose, S L; Hopkins, R S

    1993-08-04

    To describe the health status of and to detect disease outbreaks in the population affected by Hurricane Andrew in south Dade County, Florida. The Florida Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services and the US Army conducted active surveillance for gastrointestinal illness, respiratory illness, injury, and other index conditions by monitoring civilian and service member visits to care sites (civilian and military free care sites and hospital emergency departments) from August 30 (1 week after the hurricane's landfall) through September 30, 1992. South Dade County, Florida. Proportional morbidity: the number of daily visits for each index condition divided by the total number of visits, expressed as a percentage. Morbidity rate: the total number of daily visits by service members divided by the total number of service members, expressed as a percentage. Six index conditions accounted for 41.3% of visits to civilian free care sites: diarrhea (4.7%), cough (4.7%), other infection (9.6%), rash (5.4%), animal bite (1.2%), and injury (15.7%). At military free care sites, five index conditions accounted for 75.7% of civilian visits: injury (23.7%), dermatologic illness (12.4%), respiratory illness (9.9%), gastrointestinal illness (5.3%), and other medical conditions (24.4%). Two index conditions accounted for 54.1% of service member visits: injury (36.2%) and dermatologic illness (17.9%). During the 5 weeks after the hurricane, proportional morbidity from injury decreased; proportional morbidity from respiratory illness increased; and proportional morbidity from diarrhea was stable. No infectious disease outbreaks occurred. Injuries were an important source of morbidity throughout the surveillance period, especially among service members. Enteric and respiratory agents did not cause disease outbreaks, despite alarming rumors to the contrary.

  2. Residues of {sup 14}C-paclobutrazol in mangoes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Maria A.; Tornisielo, Valdemar L.; Castanho, Giuliane M., E-mail: macosta@cena.usp.b [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Ecotoxicologia

    2009-07-01

    Paclobutrazol (PBZ) is a growth regulator used in agricultural systems whose purpose is the control of vegetative growth, stimulating the reproductive capacity of plants. This growth regulator remains active in soil for a long time and its half-life varies with the type of soil and climatic conditions, can severely affect the development of crops. This work aimed to study the residues / metabolites of {sup 14}C-PBZ in mango pulp Tommy Atkins. The tests were performed with mangoes grown in pots stainless steel and application of {sup 14}C-PBZ was performed by the soil projection of the crown, and the mangoes tested in two periods, one year and two years after application. To evaluate the levels of residues of {sup 14}C-PBZ was realize the burning of 200 mg of pulp on biological oxidized and detached {sup 14}CO{sub 2} was detected by liquid scintillation spectrophotometer. The results were 1.65 % of residue of PBZ on fruit collected after two years of application and 4.30 % of residue of PBZ collected on fruit after a year of application and also can see that the product remained in the soil for more than one year, is translocated to the plant and reach the edible part, the pulp fruit. The identification of residual {sup 14}C- PBZ/metabolites by thin-layer chromatography did not reveal any pattern of PBZ / metabolites due to the low activity detected in the samples. Therefore, another procedure was performed for extraction and then analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) for detection of metabolites in the PBZ of mango pulp. (author)

  3. Transcriptome and proteomic analysis of mango (Mangifera indica Linn) fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hong-xia; Jia, Hui-min; Ma, Xiao-wei; Wang, Song-biao; Yao, Quan-sheng; Xu, Wen-tian; Zhou, Yi-gang; Gao, Zhong-shan; Zhan, Ru-lin

    2014-06-13

    Here we used Illumina RNA-seq technology for transcriptome sequencing of a mixed fruit sample from 'Zill' mango (Mangifera indica Linn) fruit pericarp and pulp during the development and ripening stages. RNA-seq generated 68,419,722 sequence reads that were assembled into 54,207 transcripts with a mean length of 858bp, including 26,413 clusters and 27,794 singletons. A total of 42,515(78.43%) transcripts were annotated using public protein databases, with a cut-off E-value above 10(-5), of which 35,198 and 14,619 transcripts were assigned to gene ontology terms and clusters of orthologous groups respectively. Functional annotation against the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes database identified 23,741(43.79%) transcripts which were mapped to 128 pathways. These pathways revealed many previously unknown transcripts. We also applied mass spectrometry-based transcriptome data to characterize the proteome of ripe fruit. LC-MS/MS analysis of the mango fruit proteome was using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) in an LTQ Orbitrap Velos (Thermo) coupled online to the HPLC. This approach enabled the identification of 7536 peptides that matched 2754 proteins. Our study provides a comprehensive sequence for a systemic view of transcriptome during mango fruit development and the most comprehensive fruit proteome to date, which are useful for further genomics research and proteomic studies. Our study provides a comprehensive sequence for a systemic view of both the transcriptome and proteome of mango fruit, and a valuable reference for further research on gene expression and protein identification. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Proteomics of non-model organisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Artificial wounds implication for the development of mango ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anthracnose is the most important post-harvest disease of mango caused by Colletotrichum gloeosporioïdes in Côte d'Ivoire. This study was conducted to evaluate the pathogenicity of 5 isolates (CA1, CA2, CB2, CB3 and CK2) of C. gloeosporioïdes. The isolates were obtained from naturally infected fruits of varieties ...

  5. Mangifera sylvatica (Wild Mango): A new cocoa butter alternative

    OpenAIRE

    Sayma Akhter; Morag A. McDonald; Ray Marriott

    2016-01-01

    Cocoa butter is the pure butter extracted from cocoa beans and is a major ingredient in the chocolate industry. Global production of cocoa is in decline due to crop failure, diseases and ageing plantations, leading to price fluctuations and the necessity for the industry to find high quality cocoa butter alternatives. This study explored the potential of a wild mango (Mangifera sylvatica), an underutilised fruit in south-east Asia, as a new Cocoa Butter Alternative (CBA). Analyses showed that...

  6. Bioactive Compound From Mangoes Leaves Extract as Potential Soil Bioherbicide to Control Amaranth Weed (Amaranthus Spinosus Linn.)

    OpenAIRE

    Syahri, Rifauldin; Widaryanto, Eko; Wicaksono, Karuniawan Puji

    2017-01-01

    Bioherbicide is important approach for sustainable farming practices. One of plant that has potentially as bioherbicide, which is environmentally safe, is mango. Mango leaf extract is useful as bioherbicide because it produces allelochemical compounds, which could inhibit the weed growth. This research was designed to study the effect of several mangoes species leaves extract to control dominant weed (amaranth). Split plot design was implemented using mango species (S) as the main plot; S1 (M...

  7. Bioactive compound from mangoes leaves extract as potential soil bioherbicide to control amaranth weed (Amaranthus spinosus Linn.)

    OpenAIRE

    Rifauldin Syahri; Eko Widaryanto; Karuniawan Puji Wicaksono

    2017-01-01

    Bioherbicide is important approach for sustainable farming practices. One of plant that has potentially as bioherbicide, which is environmentally safe, is mango. Mango leaf extract is useful as bioherbicide because it produces allelochemical compounds, which could inhibit the weed growth. This research was designed to study the effect of several mangoes species leaves extract to control dominant weed (amaranth). Split plot design was implemented using mango species (S) as the main plot; S1 (M...

  8. Detection of artificially ripened mango using spectrometric analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mithun, B. S.; Mondal, Milton; Vishwakarma, Harsh; Shinde, Sujit; Kimbahune, Sanjay

    2017-05-01

    Hyperspectral sensing has been proven to be useful to determine the quality of food in general. It has also been used to distinguish naturally and artificially ripened mangoes by analyzing the spectral signature. However the focus has been on improving the accuracy of classification after performing dimensionality reduction, optimum feature selection and using suitable learning algorithm on the complete visible and NIR spectrum range data, namely 350nm to 1050nm. In this paper we focus on, (i) the use of low wavelength resolution and low cost multispectral sensor to reliably identify artificially ripened mango by selectively using the spectral information so that classification accuracy is not hampered at the cost of low resolution spectral data and (ii) use of visible spectrum i.e. 390nm to 700 nm data to accurately discriminate artificially ripened mangoes. Our results show that on a low resolution spectral data, the use of logistic regression produces an accuracy of 98.83% and outperforms other methods like classification tree, random forest significantly. And this is achieved by analyzing only 36 spectral reflectance data points instead of the complete 216 data points available in visual and NIR range. Another interesting experimental observation is that we are able to achieve more than 98% classification accuracy by selecting only 15 irradiance values in the visible spectrum. Even the number of data needs to be collected using hyper-spectral or multi-spectral sensor can be reduced by a factor of 24 for classification with high degree of confidence

  9. 75 FR 52712 - Notice of Decision To Issue Permits for the Importation of Fresh Mango Fruit From Pakistan Into...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-27

    ... Fresh Mango Fruit From Pakistan Into the Continental United States AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health... issuing permits for the importation into the continental United States of fresh mango fruit from Pakistan... weeds via the importation of fresh mango fruit from Pakistan. DATES: Effective Date: August 27, 2010...

  10. Using the Andrews Plotss to Visualize Multidimensional Data in Multi-criteria Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Groshev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, issues on processing of large data volumes are of great importance. Initially, the Andrews plots have been proposed to show multidimensional statistics on the plane. But as the Andrews plots retain information on the average values of the represented values, distances, and dispersion, the distances between the plots linearly indicate distances between the data points, and it becomes possible to use the plots under consideration for the graphical representation of multi-dimensional data of various kinds. The paper analyses a diversity of various mathematical apparatus for Andrews plotting to visualize multi-dimensional data.The first section provides basic information about the Andrews plots, as well as about a test set of multidimensional data in Iris Fischer’s literature. Analysis of the Andrews plot properties shows that they provide a limitlessly many one-dimensional projections on the vectors and, furthermore, the plots, which are nearer to each other, correspond to nearly points. All this makes it possible to use the plots under consideration for multi-dimensional data representation. The paper considers the Andrews plot formation based on Fourier transform functions, and from the analysis results of plotting based on a set of the test, it draws a conclusion that in this way it is possible to provide clustering of multidimensional data.The second section of the work deals with research of different ways to modify the Andrews plots in order to improve the perception of the graphical representation of multidimensional data. Different variants of the Andrews plot projections on the coordinate planes and arbitrary subspaces are considered. In addition, the paper studies an effect of the Andrews plot scaling on the visual perception of multidimensional data.The paper’s third section describes Andrews plotting based on different polynomials, in particular, Chebyshev and Legendre polynomials. It is shown that the resulting image is

  11. De-novo assembly of mango fruit peel transcriptome reveals mechanisms of mango response to hot water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luria, Neta; Sela, Noa; Yaari, Mor; Feygenberg, Oleg; Kobiler, Ilana; Lers, Amnon; Prusky, Dov

    2014-11-05

    The mango belongs to the genus Mangifera, consisting of numerous tropical fruiting trees in the flowering plant family, Anacardiaceae. Postharvest treatment by hot water brushing (HWB) for 15-20 s was introduced commercially to improve fruit quality and reduce postharvest disease. This treatment enabled successful storage for 3-4 weeks at 12°C, with improved color and reduced disease development, but it enhanced lenticel discoloration on the fruit peel. We investigated global gene expression induced in fruit peel by HWB treatment, and identified key genes involved in mechanisms potentially associated with fruit resistance to pathogens, peel color improvement, and development of lenticel discoloration; this might explain the fruit's phenotypic responses. The mango transcriptome assembly was created and characterized by application of RNA-seq to fruit-peel samples. RNA-seq-based gene-expression profiling identified three main groups of genes associated with HWB treatment: 1) genes involved with biotic and abiotic stress responses and pathogen-defense mechanisms, which were highly expressed; 2) genes associated with chlorophyll degradation and photosynthesis, which showed transient and low expression; and 3) genes involved with sugar and flavonoid metabolism, which were highly expressed. We describe a new transcriptome of mango fruit peel of cultivar Shelly. The existence of three main groups of genes that were differentially expressed following HWB treatment suggests a molecular basis for the biochemical and physiological consequences of the postharvest HWB treatment, including resistance to pathogens, improved color development, and occurrence of lenticel discoloration.

  12. Assessing the peel colour behaviour of mango 'Nam Dok Mai See Thong' during cool storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Penchaiya, P.; Tijskens, L.M.M.

    2017-01-01

    Mango 'Nam Dok Mai See Thong' recently became the number-one exported mango of Thailand. It has an attractive appearance, with a golden-yellow peel colour at harvest and slight colour development during ripening. Its peel colour could possibly be used as an indicator for ripeness. Assessing the

  13. Varietal differences in the supply chain of two mango varieties in South India

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sudha, M.; Kruijssen, F.

    2008-01-01

    India accounts for approximately 38% of the world mango production and is a natural home for over 1,000 cultivars in this species. Among over 20 commercial cultivars, 'Totapuri' has the largest share, accounting for half of the mango area in South India. Due to a specific demand for each of these

  14. Protective effect of mango (Mangifera indica L.) against UVB-induced skin aging in hairless mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jae Hyoung; Bae, Eun Young; Choi, Goya; Hyun, Jin Won; Lee, Mi Young; Lee, Hye Won; Chae, Sungwook

    2013-04-01

    Mangifera indica L. (Anacardiaceae) is a medicinal plant whose extracts have been described as an antioxidant with anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory activities. Skin aging is a consequence of chronic sun exposure to the sun and therefore ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Naturally occurring antioxidants are known to reduce skin aging. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the protective role of mango extract against UVB-induced skin aging in hairless mice. HR-1 hairless male mice (6 weeks old) were divided into three groups: control (n = 5), UVB-treated vehicle (n = 5), and UVB-treated mango extract (n = 5) groups. UVB-irradiated mice from the mango extract group were orally administered 0.1 ml of water containing 100 mg of mango extract/kg body weight per day. The inhibitory activity of mango extract on wrinkle formation was determined by the analysis of the skin replica, epidermal thickness based on histological examination, and damage to collagen fiber. The mean length of wrinkles in UVB-treated vehicle group significantly improved after the oral administration of mango extract, which significantly inhibited the increase in epidermal thickness and epidermal hypertrophy (P mango extract by Masson's trichrome staining. These results indicate that mango extract showed anti-photoaging activity in UVB-irradiated hairless mice. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  15. A genetic map and germplasm diversity estimation of Mangifera indica (mango) with SNPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mango (Mangifera indica) is often referred to as the “King of Fruits”. As the first steps in developing a mango genomics project, we genotyped 582 individuals comprising six mapping populations with 1054 SNP markers. The resulting consensus map had 20 linkage groups defined by 726 SNP markers with...

  16. Fungal pathogen complexes associated with rambutan, longan and mango diseases in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Different fungi have been associated with diseased inflorescences, leaves, and fruits of mango, rambutan and longan. During a fungal disease survey conducted between 2008 and 2013 at six orchards of rambutan and longan, and one orchard of mango in Puerto Rico, symptoms such as fruit rot, infloresc...

  17. First report of mango malformation disease caused by Fusarium pseudocircinatum in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mango (Mangifera indica L.) malformation disease (MMD) is one of the most important diseases affecting this crop worldwide, causing severe economic loss due to reduction of yield. Subsequent to the first report in India in 1891 (3), MMD has spread worldwide to most mango-growing regions. Several spe...

  18. Effects of replacing maize with graded levels of mango-seed kernel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It was, therefore, concluded that mango seed-kernel meal could be utilized by broiler chicks during the starter and finisher phases and it could serve as an alternative energy source to maize in broiler starter and finisher diets. Key words: broiler, mango seed-kernel meal, performance, alternative energy source.

  19. Mango fruit aroma volatile production following quarantine hot water treatment and subsequent ripening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangos are an important tropical fruit crop worldwide that are appreciated for their attractive peel and flesh colors, juicy texture, sweetness, and unique aroma. Mangos exported to the U.S. receive quarantine hot water treatment (QHWT) at 46.1 °C for 65 to 110 min (depending on fruit shape and size...

  20. Valorisation of mango seed via extraction of starch: preliminary techno-economic analysis

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tesfaye, T

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available % of the starch used in the country. Consequently, it is imperative to find additional sources of starch that could substitute for the amount of starch that is currently being imported. Mango seeds, a waste material that is disposed of after consumption of mangos...

  1. Phylogeny and pathogenicity of Lasiodiplodia species associated with dieback of mango in Peru

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodríguez-Gálvez, Edgar; Guerrero, Pakita; Barradas, Carla; Crous, Pedro W.; Alves, Artur

    Abstract Mango, which is an important tropical fruit crop in the region of Piura (Peru), is known to be prone to a range of diseases caused by Lasiodiplodia spp. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence and prevalence of mango dieback in the region of Piura, and to identify the species of

  2. Bargaining power and revenue distribution in the Costa Rican mango supply chain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zúñiga-Arias, G.; Meijer, S.A.; Ruben, R.; Hofstede, G.J.

    2007-01-01

    By the time a European consumer eats a Costa Rican mango, the product has been traded in several transactions between producers, traders, retailers and consumers. This paper investigates the position of Costa Rican smallholders in the mango supply chain in terms of bargaining power and revenue

  3. Mangifera indica L. (the mango plant) of Anacardiaceae is a large ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mangifera indica L. (the mango plant) of Anacardiaceae is a large spreading evergreen tree with simple leaves and small reddish white or yellowish green flowers borne on much-branched inflorescences. More than 500 varieties of mango are cultivated in Indiafor their large, sweet, edible fruits which are of high economic ...

  4. The current status of mango farming business in Ghana: A case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... most mango farmers. Nonetheless, the mango business is perceived to have good prospects because the crop has high demand and good local and export market that can improve and, thus, with support from stakeholders, including government, NGOs and industry, the crop can become a big export produce for Ghana.

  5. Does phenology distinguish bitter and sweet African bush mango trees (Irvingia spp., Irvingiaceae)?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vihotogbe, R.; Berg, van den R.G.; Bongers, F.; Sinsin, B.; Sosef, M.S.M.

    2014-01-01

    Key message This phenological analysis of bitter and sweet bush mango trees is part of their biosystematics. It supports the species distinction hypothesis postulated by Harris (Bull J Bot Nat Belg 65(1-2):143-196, 1996 ) and Lowe et al. (Mol Ecol 9:831-841, 2000 ). African Bush Mango trees are

  6. Mango (Mangifera indica L.) by-products and their valuable components: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahurul, M H A; Zaidul, I S M; Ghafoor, Kashif; Al-Juhaimi, Fahad Y; Nyam, Kar-Lin; Norulaini, N A N; Sahena, F; Mohd Omar, A K

    2015-09-15

    The large amount of waste produced by the food industries causes serious environmental problems and also results in economic losses if not utilized effectively. Different research reports have revealed that food industry by-products can be good sources of potentially valuable bioactive compounds. As such, the mango juice industry uses only the edible portions of the mangoes, and a considerable amount of peels and seeds are discarded as industrial waste. These mango by-products come from the tropical or subtropical fruit processing industries. Mango by-products, especially seeds and peels, are considered to be cheap sources of valuable food and nutraceutical ingredients. The main uses of natural food ingredients derived from mango by-products are presented and discussed, and the mainstream sectors of application for these by-products, such as in the food, pharmaceutical, nutraceutical and cosmetic industries, are highlighted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. In vitro fermentation of chewed mango and banana: particle size, starch and vascular fibre effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Dorrain Y; Williams, Barbara A; D'Arcy, Bruce R; Flanagan, Bernadine M; Gidley, Michael J

    2015-08-01

    Fruits (and vegetables) contain cellular structures that are not degraded by human digestive enzymes. Therefore, the structure of the insoluble fraction of swallowed fruits is mostly retained until intestinal microbial fermentation. In vitro fermentation of mango and banana cell structures, which survived in vivo mastication and in vitro gastrointestinal digestion, were incubated with porcine faecal inoculum and showed intensive metabolic activity. This included degradation of cell walls, leading to the release of encapsulated cell contents for further microbial metabolism. Production of cumulative gas, short chain fatty acids and ammonia were greater for mango than for banana. Microscopic and spectroscopic analyses showed this was due to a major fermentation-resistant starch fraction present in banana, that was absent in mango. This study demonstrated distinctive differences in the fermentability of banana and mango, reflecting a preferential degradation of (parenchyma) fleshy cell walls over resistant starch in banana, and the thick cellulosic vascular fibres in mango.

  8. Addition of dried ‘Ataulfo’ mango (Mangifera indica L) by-products as a source of dietary fiber and polyphenols in starch molded mango snacks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Blancas-Benitez, Francisco Javier; de Jesús Avena-Bustillos, Roberto; Montalvo-González, Efigenia; Sáyago-Ayerdi, Sonia Guadalupe; H. McHugh, Tara

    2015-01-01

    .... On the industrial processing of mango, 35–60 % of this fruit is discarded as waste, which originate significant amounts of by-products, mainly from seeds, peels, and paste, which are a source of DF and bioactive compounds...

  9. Study Effect of Irradiation 0.75 Kgy Dose on Chilling Injury Symptoms of Mango CV Gedong During Stored

    OpenAIRE

    Sugianti, Cicih -

    2014-01-01

    Low temperature storage may cause mango experience the chilling injury. Study on the chilling injury symptoms of mango stored under low temperature storage and effect on mango irradiated 0,75 kGy will be very important in order to understand better method to reduction of chilling injury. This research objective was to study the effect of irradiation gamma rays on the chilling injury symptopms of mango fruits stored at 8, 13°C and room temperature. The quality of mango during storage were eval...

  10. Susan Magoffin’s Santa Fe Days in 1846: The Value of Testimony Les journées de Santa Fé en 1846 de Susan Magoffin : la valeur du témoignage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Berthier-Foglar

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Susan Magoffin, la jeune épouse d’un commerçant de la piste de Santa Fe, accompagna son mari en 1846 pour un voyage où la caravane suivait de près l’Armée de l’Ouest et pendant lequel elle tint un journal. Cet article traite des 37 jours que dura la pause de la caravane à Santa Fe et aborde plus spécifiquement la façon dont l’auteur appréhendait l’altérité dans un environnement inhabituel et parfois dangereux. Pour apprécier la valeur du témoignage, je combine une analyse du discours avec une évaluation statistique du contenu. La description, parfois naïve, de Santa Fe sous l’occupation américaine illustre les raisons de la guerre contre le Mexique. En tant qu’agent de la destinée manifeste, Susan Magoffin admirait le général Kearny en lui attribuant des qualités surhumaines et en participant à ses efforts de propagande. Alors qu’elle était enracinée dans sa classe et sa culture, elle voyait la population mexicaine et les Amérindiens avec un esprit ouvert bien que ses motifs pour apprendre l’espagnol, ainsi que le métier de commerçante, avaient une fonction plus prosaïque.

  11. Preliminary report: medical examiner reports of deaths associated with Hurricane Andrew--Florida, August 1992.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-09-04

    On August 24, 1992, at 1:40 a.m. eastern daylight time (EDT), rain bands associated with Hurricane Andrew reached the eastern coast of Florida. At 4:45 a.m. EDT, Hurricane Andrew made landfall 35 miles southeast of Miami at Homestead, with sustained winds of 145 miles per hour (mph) and gusts of 164 mph. These winds extended 45 miles outward of the storm center. The storm moved across the state at 18 mph toward the Gulf of Mexico (Figure 1). The tidal surge on the eastern coast was estimated at 7-19 feet. During the storm, approximately 2.5 million Florida residents were left without electrical power, and approximately 56,000 family dwelling units were destroyed or severely damaged. This report presents preliminary data from Florida medical examiner (ME) offices about deaths attributed to Hurricane Andrew.

  12. Analyzing after-action reports from Hurricanes Andrew and Katrina: repeated, modified, and newly created recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, Claire Connolly

    2013-01-01

    Thirteen years after Hurricane Andrew struck Homestead, FL, Hurricane Katrina devastated the Gulf Coast of Mississippi, Alabama, and southeastern Louisiana. Along with all its destruction, the term "catastrophic" was redefined. This article extends the literature on these hurricanes by providing a macrolevel analysis of The Governor's Disaster Planning and Response Review Committee Final Report from Hurricane Andrew and three federal after-action reports from Hurricane Katrina, as well as a cursory review of relevant literature. Results provide evidence that previous lessons have not been learned or institutionalized with many recommendations being repeated or modified. This article concludes with a discussion of these lessons, as well as new issues arising during Hurricane Katrina.

  13. First evidence of ethylene production by Fusarium mangiferae associated with mango malformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Mohammad Wahid; Shukla, Alok; Pant, Ramesh Chandra; Tuteja, Narendra

    2013-01-01

    Malformation is arguably the most crucial disease of mango (Mangifera indica L.) at present. It is receiving great attention not only because of its widespread and destructive nature but also because of its etiology and control is not absolutely understood. Recently, Fusarium mangiferae is found to be associated with mango malformation disease. There are indications that stress ethylene production could be involved in the disease. Here we have shown the first direct evidence of production of ethylene in pure culture of F. mangiferae obtained from mango. The study also revealed that all the isolates dissected from mango acquire morphological features of F. mangiferae showing most similarity to the features of species with accepted standard features. The isolates of F. mangiferae from mango were observed to produce ethylene in significant amounts, ranging from 9.28–13.66 n mol/g dry wt/day. The findings presented here suggest that F. mangiferae could contribute to the malformation of mango by producing ethylene and probably stimulating stress ethylene production in malformed tissue of mango. Ethylene might be produced through 2-oxoglutarate-dependent oxygenase-type ethylene-forming-enzyme (EFE) pathway in Fusarium sp, which needs to be investigated. PMID:23221756

  14. Evaluating sago as a functional ingredient in dietetic mango ice cream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ashish S; Jana, Atanu H; Aparnathi, Kishore D; Pinto, Suneeta V

    2010-10-01

    A low fat mango ice cream (2.4% milk fat) was prepared in a mechanized 'ice and salt' type freezer using powdered sago at 2.5% as a natural bulking agent along with sodium alginate at 0.025% as adjunct. The low fat mango ice cream was compared with control mango ice cream having 10% milk fat and 0.15% sodium alginate as stabilizer. Both control as well as experimental ice creams contained 20% mango pulp solids. To impart richness to low fat mango ice cream, flavour enhancers like Cream Plus and Butter Buds were used at levels of 0.2% and 0.05%, respectively. The dietetic low fat ice creams compared well in sensory colour and appearance, flavour, body and texture, and melting quality to that of control ice cream. Incorporation of 2.5% powdered sago and 0.2% Cream Plus as flavour adjunct is recommended in the manufacture of 'low-fat' mango ice cream. The energy values for control and dietetic mango ice cream was 202.8 and 142.9 kcal/100 g, respectively, which represents about 30% reduction in calorie. The cost of ice cream per liter was Rs 39.9, Rs 37.6 and Rs 49.7 for experimental ice creams containing Cream Plus and Butter Bud, and control, respectively.

  15. Potential contribution of mangoes to reduction of vitamin A deficiency in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muoki, Penina N; Makokha, Anselimo O; Onyango, Christine A; Ojijo, Nelson K O

    2009-01-01

    The β-carotene content of fresh and dried mangoes commonly consumed in Kenya was evaluated and converted to retinol equivalent (RE). Mango fruits of varieties Ngowe, Apple, and Tommy Atkins were harvested at mature green, partially ripe, and ripe stages and their β-carotene content analyzed. The stability of β-carotene in sun dried mangoes was also studied over 6 months under usual marketing conditions used in Kenya. The effect of using simple pretreatment methods prior to drying of mango slices on retention of β-carotene was as well evaluated. In amounts acceptable to children and women, fresh and dried mangoes can supply 50% or more of the daily required retinol equivalent for children and women. Stage of ripeness, variety, postharvest holding temperature, method of drying, and storage time of dried mango slices affected β-carotene content and consequently vitamin A value of the fruits. Apple variety grown in Machakos had the highest β-carotene. It exceeded the daily RE requirements by 11.8% and 21.5% for women and children respectively. Fresh or dried mangoes are a significant provitamin A source and should be included in food-based approaches aiming to reduce vitamin A deficiency.

  16. Evaluation of the proximate composition, antioxidant potential, and antimicrobial activity of mango seed kernel extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutua, Jane K; Imathiu, Samuel; Owino, Willis

    2017-03-01

    After pulp extraction in fruit processing industry, a significant quantity of mango seed kernels are discarded as solid wastes. These seed kernels can be ideal raw materials for obtaining extracts rich in bioactive compounds with good antioxidant properties. The conversion of these wastes into utilizable food ingredients would help in reducing environmental problems associated with processing waste disposal. In order to determine their potential use, this study evaluated some of the biochemical characteristics and antimicrobial potential of mango seed kernel extracts on medically important human bacterial and fungal pathogens. Four mango varieties (Apple, Ngowe, Kent and Sabine) from Makueni and Embu counties in Kenya were used for this study. The analyzed mango seed kernel powders were found to contain on average, 6.74-9.20% protein content. Apple and Ngowe mango seed kernels had significantly higher fat content of 13.04 and 13.08, respectively, while Sabine from Makueni had the least fat content of 9.84%. The ash, fiber, and carbohydrate contents ranged from 1.78 to 2.87%, 2.64 to 3.71% and 72.86 to 75.92%, respectively. The mean percentage scavenging ability of mango kernel extracts at the concentration of 20 mg/mL was 92.22%. Apple and Sabine mango kernel extracts had significantly high inhibition zones of 1.93 and 1.73 compared to Kent and Ngowe with 1.13 and 1.10, respectively, against E. coli. For C. albicans, the inhibition of Kent mango kernel extract, 1.63, was significantly lower than that of Ngowe, Apple, and Sabine with 2.23, 2.13, and 1.83, respectively. This study demonstrates that mango seed powder is an abundant and cost-effective potential natural antibiotic and antifungal that can be utilized in addressing the challenge of food poisoning and infections caused by pathogenic microorganisms in the food industry.

  17. Mango (Mangifera indica L.) germplasm diversity based on single nucleotide polymorphisms derived from the transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Amir; Rubinstein, Mor; Eshed, Ravit; Benita, Miri; Ish-Shalom, Mazal; Sharabi-Schwager, Michal; Rozen, Ada; Saada, David; Cohen, Yuval; Ophir, Ron

    2015-11-14

    Germplasm collections are an important source for plant breeding, especially in fruit trees which have a long duration of juvenile period. Thus, efforts have been made to study the diversity of fruit tree collections. Even though mango is an economically important crop, most of the studies on diversity in mango collections have been conducted with a small number of genetic markers. We describe a de novo transcriptome assembly from mango cultivar 'Keitt'. Variation discovery was performed using Illumina resequencing of 'Keitt' and 'Tommy Atkins' cultivars identified 332,016 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 1903 simple-sequence repeats (SSRs). Most of the SSRs (70.1%) were of trinucleotide with the preponderance of motif (GGA/AAG)n and only 23.5% were di-nucleotide SSRs with the mostly of (AT/AT)n motif. Further investigation of the diversity in the Israeli mango collection was performed based on a subset of 293 SNPs. Those markers have divided the Israeli mango collection into two major groups: one group included mostly mango accessions from Southeast Asia (Malaysia, Thailand, Indonesia) and India and the other with mainly of Floridian and Israeli mango cultivars. The latter group was more polymorphic (FS=-0.1 on the average) and was more of an admixture than the former group. A slight population differentiation was detected (FST=0.03), suggesting that if the mango accessions of the western world apparently was originated from Southeast Asia, as has been previously suggested, the duration of cultivation was not long enough to develop a distinct genetic background. Whole-transcriptome reconstruction was used to significantly broaden the mango's genetic variation resources, i.e., SNPs and SSRs. The set of SNP markers described in this study is novel. A subset of SNPs was sampled to explore the Israeli mango collection and most of them were polymorphic in many mango accessions. Therefore, we believe that these SNPs will be valuable as they recapitulate and

  18. Is Mango genetically prone to Zinc deficiency : An investigation in Peninsular India

    OpenAIRE

    Muthaia, Edward Raja Dr

    2009-01-01

    Productivity of mango in India is low at 6.5 t/ha. Among field crops Zn deficiency is the most important disorder and in mango also it was widespread. A survey of the mango orchards of India to identify cause for Zn deficiency indicated that widespread visible zinc deficiencies were noticed in all the four agro-climatic zones in the acid, neutral and high pH alfisols of all the states (pH range 4.8 to pH 7.8). But the analysis of soil indicated adequate DTPA extractable Zn level of 0.75 to 2...

  19. Nutritive value and nutrient digestibility of ensiled mango by-products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sompong Sruamsiri

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Mango canning by-products (seed and peel together with ensiled mango peel were subjected to analysis of dry matter (DM, ash, crude protein (CP, crude fibre (CF, ether extract (EE, nitrogen-free extract (NFE, gross energy (GE, neutral detergent fibre (NDF and acid detergent fibre (ADF. In vitro digestibility of DM (IVDMD, ADF (IVADFD and NDF (IVNDFD was determined after digesting the by-products in buffered rumen fluid for 24 or 48 h in an incubator. CP content in peel, seed and peel silage is 4.68, 4.19 and 5.27% respectively. As expected, mango seed has a higher fibre content than mango peel and peel silage as indicated by NDF (53.01 vs 25.87 and 27.56% respectively and ADF (31.02 vs 19.14 and 17.68% respectively. However, mango seed also has greater GE than mango peel and peel silage (4,070 vs 3,827 and 3,984 kcal/g DM respectively, probably due partly to its high fat content.Four head of male native cattle were used to determine nutrient digestibility of ensiled mango by-products by randomly allowing them to receive ensiled mango peel with rice straw (EMPR and different levels of Leucaena leaves. Treatments consisted of: 1 ensiled mango peel + rice straw (90:10; 2 ensiled mango peel + rice straw + Leucaena leaves (85:10:5; 3 ensiled mango peel + rice straw + Leucaena leaves (80:10:10; and 4 ensiled mango peel + rice straw + Leucaena leaves (75:10:15. Addition of Leucaena leaves to silage increased apparent digestibility of DM (53.84, 55.43, 59.04 and 58.69% for the four formulations above respectively, probably because of increasing amounts of CP from Leucaena leaves, resulting in greater digestibility of NDF (39.11, 44.47, 47.12 and 43.32% for the four formulations above respectively. Total digestible nutrients (TDN and digestible energy (DE showed the same trends as apparent digestibility of DM.

  20. Soil salinity and yield of mango fertigated with potassium sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio A. Carneiro

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Irrigated fruit crops have an important role in the economic and social aspects in the region of the Sub-middle São Francisco River Valley. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate soil salinity and the productive aspects of the mango crop, cv. Tommy Atkins, fertigated with doses of potassium chloride (KCl and potassium sulfate (K2SO4 during two crop cycles (from January to March 2014 and from January to March 2015. The experiment was carried out in a strip-split-plot design and five potassium doses (50, 75, 100, 125 and 150% of the recommended dose as plots and two potassium sources (KCl and K2SO4 as subplots, with four replicates. Soil electrical conductivity (EC, exchangeable sodium (Na+ and potassium (K+ contents and pH were evaluated. In addition, the number of commercial fruits and yield were determined. The fertilization with KCl resulted in higher soil EC compared with K2SO4 fertigation. Soil Na+ and K+ contents increased with increasing doses of fertilizers. K2SO4 was more efficient for the production per plant and yield than KCl. Thus, under the conditions of this study, the K2SO4 dose of 174.24 g plant-1 (24.89 kg ha-1 or 96.8% of recommendation, spacing of 10 x 7 m was recommended for a yield of 23.1 t ha-1 of mango fruits, cv. Tommy Atkins.

  1. Influence of different drying techniques on drying parameters of mango

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazmi IZLI

    Full Text Available Abstract This research inspected the effects of freeze, microwave (120 and 350 W and hot air (60, 70 and 80 °C drying techniques on the color, drying characteristics, antioxidant capacity and total phenolic content of mango slices. Midilli et al., Two-term and Page models which exemplify drying characteristics are superior than alternative models. All of the color values (a, b, L, C, α and ΔE were altered notably based on the used drying technique and colors nearest to the fresh sample were attained with freeze drying. In comparison to the fresh sample, the dried samples showed a decrease of 18.4-54.6% in antioxidant capacity. The total phenolic content value was notably highest one for the microwave dried sample at 350 W and the lowest one for a hot air dried sample at 80 °C (P<0.05. This research showed that microwave drying at 350 W is able to yield high-quality mango slices with the extra advantage of shortened drying time in relation to hot air and freeze drying.

  2. A sarabande of tropical fruit proteomics: Avocado, banana, and mango.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righetti, Pier Giorgio; Esteve, Clara; D'Amato, Alfonsina; Fasoli, Elisa; Luisa Marina, María; Concepción García, María

    2015-05-01

    The present review highlights the progress made in plant proteomics via the introduction of combinatorial peptide ligand libraries (CPLL) for detecting low-abundance species. Thanks to a novel approach to the CPLL methodology, namely, that of performing the capture both under native and denaturing conditions, identifying plant species in the order of thousands, rather than hundreds, is now possible. We report here data on a trio of tropical fruits, namely, banana, avocado, and mango. The first two are classified as "recalcitrant" tissues since minute amounts of proteins (in the order of 1%) are embedded on a very large matrix of plant-specific material (e.g., polysaccharides and other plant polymers). Yet, even under these adverse conditions we could report, in a single sweep, from 1000 to 3000 unique gene products. In the case of mango the investigation has been extended to the peel too, since this skin is popularly used to flavor dishes in Far East cuisine. Even in this tough peel 330 proteins could be identified, whereas in soft peels, such as in lemons, one thousand unique species could be detected. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Airborne Videography and GPS for Assessment of Forest Damage in Southern Louisiana from Hurricane Andrew

    Science.gov (United States)

    D.M. Jacobs; Susan Eggen-McIntosh

    1993-01-01

    Abstract: One week after Hurricane Andrew made landfall in Louisiana in August 1992, an airborne videography system, with a global positioning system (GPS) receiver, was used to assess timberland damage across a 1.7 million-ha (4.2 million-acre) study area. Ground observations were made to identify different intensities of timber damage and then...

  4. Posttraumatic Stress, Depression, and Social Support among College Students after Hurricane Andrew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickens, Jeffrey; And Others

    1995-01-01

    One month after Hurricane Andrew, surveyed students who reported experiencing the most severe impact damage from the storm also reported experiencing the most stress, anxiety, and depressive symptoms. Regression analyses revealed that material and emotional social support were significant predictors of anxiety and depression scores after the…

  5. Stressing Memory: Long-Term Relations among Children's Stress, Recall and Psychological Outcome following Hurricane Andrew

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales, Jessica McDermott; Fivush, Robyn; Parker, Janat; Bahrick, Lorraine

    2005-01-01

    We examined relations among stress, children's recall, and psychological functioning following Hurricane Andrew. Thirty-five children from mixed socioeconomic backgrounds were divided into low-, moderate-, and high-stress groups and were interviewed about the hurricane immediately after the storm and 6 years later. Our primary interest, stemming…

  6. News of Hurricane Andrew: The Agenda of Sources and the Sources' Agendas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salwen, Michael B.

    1995-01-01

    Studies quotations in newspaper coverage of Hurricane Andrew, showing that individuals who were not affiliated with government or business were quoted most often. Shows that most sources were quoted as experts, with individuals represented as suffering victims, providing the news media with human interest quotations. Notes that most sources…

  7. Crisis Intervention with Survivors of Natural Disaster: Lessons from Hurricane Andrew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelby, Janine S.; Tredinnick, Michael G.

    1995-01-01

    Crisis intervention has typically been conceptualized as seeking a return of clients to a state of equilibrium. Personal work experience with Hurricane Andrew survivors has led to an appreciation of the importance of several considerations. Develops a proactive approach, attempting to recognize and extend clients' preexisting strengths. Offers…

  8. 75 FR 10457 - Andrew Pickens Ranger District; South Carolina; AP Loblolly Pine Removal and Restoration Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-08

    ... The Andrew Pickens Ranger District proposes the following treatments: Regeneration Harvest, With... species (sprouts and seedlings) within 1-2 years after the initial post-harvest prescribed burn. These... manual and mechanical treatment. Woodlands are forests with relatively low tree densities of 25-60...

  9. Joshua Rodda: Public Religious Disputations in England 1558–1626, St Andrews Studies in Reformation History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim Schwend

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This contribution offers a review of Joshua Rodda's Public Religious Disputations in England 1558–1626, St Andrews Studies in Reformation History. Farnham, Surrey: Ashgate, 2014. 252 pages, regular price £ 70, 234 x 156 mm, ISBN 978–1–4724–1555–4.

  10. Visions and Vanities: John Andrew Rice of Black Mountain College. Southern Biography Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Katherine Chaddock

    This biography presents the life of John Andrew Rice, who founded Black Mountain College (North Carolina) in 1933 to implement his philosophy of education, including the centrality of artistic experience and emotional development to learning in all disciplines and the need for democratic governance shared between faculty and students. Born in…

  11. Research publications of the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest, Cascade Range, Oregon: 1988 supplement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    T. Blinn; F.J. Swanson; A. McKee

    1988-01-01

    This bibliography updates the list of publications, abstracts, theses, and unpublished reports included in "Research Publications of the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest, Cascade Range, Oregon, 1948 to 1986," General Technical Report PNW-GTR-201. Citations are referenced under appropriate keywords.

  12. Research publications of the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest, Cascade Range, Oregon: 1948 to 1986.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. McKee; G.M. Stonedahl; J.F. Franklin; F.J. Swanson

    1987-01-01

    A list of publications resulting from research at th H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest, Willamette National Forest, Oregon, from 1948 to 1986 is presented. Nearly 600 publications are listed, including papers, theses, and abstracts. An index is provided that cross-references the listings under appropriate keywords.

  13. Building a "cyber forest" in complex terrain at the Andrews Experimental Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald L. Henshaw; Fred Bierlmaier; Barbara J. Bond; Kari B. O' Connell

    2008-01-01

    Our vision for a future "cyber forest" at the Andrews Experimental Forest foresees high performance wireless communications enhancing connectivity among remote field research locations, station headquarters, and beyond to the university and outside world. New sensor technologies and collaboration tools foretell exponential increases in data and information...

  14. 78 FR 78349 - Andrew Peklo III; Notice of Availability of Draft Environmental Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-26

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Andrew Peklo III; Notice of Availability of Draft Environmental Assessment In accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 and ] the Federal Energy Regulatory... a draft Environmental Assessment (EA). The draft EA contains the staff's analysis of the potential...

  15. Fast Measurement of Soluble Solid Content in Mango Based on Visible and Infrared Spectroscopy Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jiajia; He, Yong

    Mango is a kind of popular tropical fruit, and the soluble solid content is an important in this study visible and short-wave near-infrared spectroscopy (VIS/SWNIR) technique was applied. For sake of investigating the feasibility of using VIS/SWNIR spectroscopy to measure the soluble solid content in mango, and validating the performance of selected sensitive bands, for the calibration set was formed by 135 mango samples, while the remaining 45 mango samples for the prediction set. The combination of partial least squares and backpropagation artificial neural networks (PLS-BP) was used to calculate the prediction model based on raw spectrum data. Based on PLS-BP, the determination coefficient for prediction (Rp) was 0.757 and root mean square and the process is simple and easy to operate. Compared with the Partial least squares (PLS) result, the performance of PLS-BP is better.

  16. Romance With America: Americanization in the Bluest Eye and The House on Mango Street

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bronson, Niko

    2000-01-01

    .... Reading Toni Morrison's The Bluest Eye and Sandra Cisneros' The House on Mango Street in a comparative context allows an investigation of parallel identity issues that are represented through cultural specificity.

  17. Fruit fly infestation in mango: A threat to the Horticultural sector in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    collected fruits; namely Bactrocera invadens, Ceratitis cosyra, Ceratitis rosa and Ceratitis capitata. Bactrocera invadens was the most prevalent species (98%), while C. capitata was the populous. A total of 73% of the mango fruit samples collected ...

  18. MANGO ( Mangifera indica ) AND AMBARELLA ( Spondias cytherea ) PEEL EXTRACTED PECTINS IMPROVE VISCOELASTIC PROPERTIES OF DERIVED JAMS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Koubala, BB; Kansci, G; Garnier, C; Ralet, MC; Thibault, JF

    2012-01-01

    Food industries in developing countries are faced with the problem of inadequate supply of additives which can be met by proper utilization of local pectin sources. Mango ( Mangifera indica ) and ambarella ( Spondias cytherea...

  19. Influence of irrigation during the growth stage on yield and quality in mango (Mangifera indica L).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Junya; Liu, Guoyin; Liu, Debing; Chen, Yeyuan

    2017-01-01

    Although being one of the few drought-tolerant plants, mango trees are irrigated to ensure optimum and consistent productivity in China. In order to better understand the effects of soil water content on mango yield and fruit quality at fruit growth stage, irrigation experiments were investigated and the object was to determine the soil water content criteria at which growth and quality of mango would be optimal based on soil water measured by RHD-JS water-saving irrigation system through micro-sprinkling irrigation. Five soil water content treatments (relative to the percentage of field water capacity) for irrigation (T1:79%-82%, T2:75%-78%, T3:71%-74%, T4: 65%-70%, T5:63%-66%) were compared in 2013. Amount of applied irrigation water for different treatments varied from 2.93m3 to 1.08 m3. The results showed that mango fruit production and quality at fruit growth stage were significantly affected under different irrigation water amounts. Variation in soil water content not only had effects on fruit size, but also on fruit yield. The highest fruit yield and irrigation water use efficiency were obtained from the T4 treatment. Irrigation water amount also affected fruit quality parameters like fruit total soluble solids, soluble sugar, starch, titratable acid and vitamin C content. Comprehensive evaluation of the effect of indexs of correlation on irrigation treatment by subordinate function showed that when the soil moisture content were controlled at about 65-70% of the field water moisture capacity, water demand in the growth and development of mango could be ensured, and maximum production efficiency of irrigation and the best quality of fruit could be achieved. In conclusion, treatment T4 was the optimum irrigation schedule for growing mango, thus achieving efficient production of mango in consideration of the compromise among mango yield, fruit quality and water use efficiency.

  20. Plastic fats from sal, mango and palm oil by lipase catalyzed interesterification

    OpenAIRE

    Shankar Shetty, Umesha; Sunki Reddy, Yella Reddy; Khatoon, Sakina

    2011-01-01

    Speciality plastic fats with no trans fatty acids suitable for use in bakery and as vanaspati substitute were prepared by interesterification of blends of palm stearin (PSt) with sal and mango fats using Lipozyme TLIM lipase as catalyst. The blends containing PSt/sal or PSt/mango showed short melting range and hence are not suitable as bakery shortenings. Lipase catalysed interesterification extended the plasticity or melting range of all the blends. The blends containing higher proportion of...

  1. Sequence diversity and differential expression of major phenylpropanoid-flavonoid biosynthetic genes among three mango varieties

    OpenAIRE

    Hoang, L.T.; Innes, David J.; Shaw, P. Nicholas; Monteith, Gregory R; Gidley, Michael J; Dietzgen, Ralf G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Mango fruits contain a broad spectrum of phenolic compounds which impart potential health benefits; their biosynthesis is catalysed by enzymes in the phenylpropanoid-flavonoid (PF) pathway. The aim of this study was to reveal the variability in genes involved in the PF pathway in three different mango varieties Mangifera indica L., a member of the family Anacardiaceae: Kensington Pride (KP), Irwin (IW) and Nam Doc Mai (NDM) and to determine associations with gene expression and man...

  2. Chromoplast morphology and beta-carotene accumulation during postharvest ripening of Mango Cv. 'Tommy Atkins'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez-Caicedo, Ana Lucía; Heller, Annerose; Neidhart, Sybille; Carle, Reinhold

    2006-08-09

    Accumulation of beta-carotene and trans-cis isomerization of ripening mango mesocarp were investigated as to concomitant ultrastructural changes. Proceeding postharvest ripening was shown by relevant starch degradation, tissue softening, and a rising sugar/acid ratio, resulting in a linear decrease (R (2) = 0.89) of a ripening index (RPI(KS)) with increasing ripening time. A modest accumulation of all-trans-beta-carotene and its cis isomers resulted in a slight pigmentation of the mango chromoplasts, because ambient temperatures of 18.2-19.5 degrees C provided suboptimal ripening conditions, affecting color development and beta-carotene biosynthesis. The ultrastructures of chromoplasts from mango mesocarp and carrot roots were comparatively studied by means of light and transmission electron microscopy. Irrespective of the ripening stage, mango chromoplasts showed numerous plastoglobuli varying in size and electron density. They comprised the main part of carotenoids, thus supporting the partial solubilization of the pigments in lipid droplets. However, because different pigment-carrying tubular membrane structures were also observed, mango chromoplasts were assigned to the globular and reticulotubular types, whereas the crystalline type was confirmed for carrot chromoplasts. The large portions of naturally occurring cis-beta-carotene in mango fruits contrasted with the predominance of the all-trans isomer characteristic of carrots, indicating that the nature of the structure where carotenoids are deposited and the physical state of the pigments are crucial for the stability of the all-trans configuration.

  3. Determining Sala mango qualities with the use of RGB images captured by a mobile phone camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahaya, Ommi Kalsom Mardziah; Jafri, Mohd Zubir Mat; Aziz, Azlan Abdul; Omar, Ahmad Fairuz

    2015-04-01

    Sala mango (Mangifera indicia) is one of the Malaysia's most popular tropical fruits that are widely marketed within the country. The degrees of ripeness of mangoes have conventionally been evaluated manually on the basis of color parameters, but a simple non-destructive technique using the Samsung Galaxy Note 1 mobile phone camera is introduced to replace the destructive technique. In this research, color parameters in terms of RGB values acquired using the ENVI software system were linked to detect Sala mango quality parameters. The features of mango were extracted from the acquired images and then used to classify of fruit skin color, which relates to the stages of ripening. A multivariate analysis method, multiple linear regression, was employed with the purpose of using RGB color parameters to estimate the pH, soluble solids content (SSC), and firmness. The relationship between these qualities parameters of Sala mango and its mean pixel values in the RGB system is analyzed. Findings show that pH yields the highest accuracy with a correlation coefficient R = 0.913 and root mean square of error RMSE = 0.166 pH. Meanwhile, firmness has R = 0.875 and RMSE = 1.392 kgf, whereas soluble solid content has the lowest accuracy with R = 0.814 and RMSE = 1.218°Brix with the correlation between color parameters. Therefore, this non-invasive method can be used to determine the quality attributes of mangoes.

  4. Phylogeny and pathogenicity of Lasiodiplodia species associated with dieback of mango in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Gálvez, Edgar; Guerrero, Pakita; Barradas, Carla; Crous, Pedro W; Alves, Artur

    2017-04-01

    Mango, which is an important tropical fruit crop in the region of Piura (Peru), is known to be prone to a range of diseases caused by Lasiodiplodia spp. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence and prevalence of mango dieback in the region of Piura, and to identify the species of Lasiodiplodia associated with the disease and evaluate their pathogenicity towards mango. Mango dieback was present in all orchards surveyed but incidence varied with location. Identification of fungal isolates was based on morphological and cultural characteristics as well as sequence data of the rDNA internal transcribed spacer region (ITS) and translation elongation factor 1-alpha gene (tef1-α). The following Lasiodiplodia species were identified: Lasiodiplodia brasiliense, Lasiodiplodia egyptiacae (for which the new combination Lasiodiplodia laeliocattleyae is introduced), Lasiodiplodia iraniensis, Lasiodiplodia pseudotheobromae, Lasiodiplodia theobromae, and a Lasiodiplodia sp. Individual and combined gene genealogies suggest that this Lasiodiplodia sp. is possibly a hybrid of Lasiodiplodia citricola and Lasiodiplodia parva. Apart from Lasiodiplodia theobromae, which was the most prevalent species, all other species are newly reported from Peru. Moreover, L. iraniensis is reported for the first time on mango. Inoculation trials of mango plants confirmed Koch's postulates, and revealed differences in aggressiveness among species and isolates. Copyright © 2016 British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Behavior of Thiophanate Methyl and Propiconazole in Grape and Mango Fruits Under the Egyptian Field Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Amira Sh; Helmy, Rania M A; Nasr, Islam N; Abbas, Mohamed S; Mahmoud, Hend A; Jiang, Wayne

    2017-05-01

    This research aims at determining residues of thiophanate methyl and propiconazole in grape and mango fruits as an indication for their persistence in this environmental compartment. Fruit extracts were analyzed for thiophanate methyl using High Performance Liquid Chromatography and using Gas Chromatography Electron Capture Detector (GC/ECD), respectively. The results indicated that propiconazole had a less environmental impact since propiconazole had shorter residue half-lives which were 1.24 and 1.19 days in grape and mango fruits, respectively, while thiophanate methyl had half-lives of 2.49 and 2.64 days in mango and grape, respectively. The degradation rates of propiconazole in grape and mango fruits did not change significantly and neither did those of thiophanate methyl. According to the maximum residue level, the pre-harvest intervals of propiconazole were set to be 3 and 7 days for grape and mango fruits, respectively, and the pre-harvest intervals for thiophanate methyl were 15 days for both grape and mango fruits. Propiconazole was generally considered to be less hazardous to humans and will leave the environment less altered because of its faster degradation than that of thiophanate methyl.

  6. Effect of Blanching Techniques and Treatments on Nutritional Quality of Dried Mango Slices During Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulzar Asad

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The present invention was undertaken to study and determine the effect of potassium metabisulphite (6% and potassium sorbate (350 ppm treatments on the nutritional quality of osmotically-dehydrated, infrared- and microwave-blanched dried mango slices (local cultivars “Chaunsa” and “Fajri” stored for the period of 6 months under ambient conditions. The studied parameters included physical characteristics such as water activity, non-enzymatic browning, and color values, chemical parameters such as moisture, ash, fiber, acidity and content of proteins, sugars, vitamin C, total carotenoids, and sensory attributes such as appearance, flavor and texture. Vitamin C content in osmotically-dried mango slices was higher than that of IR and MW blanched dried mango slices but the content of vitamin C of both cultivars was lower than of the fresh mango samples (Chaunsa: 135 mg/100 g, Fajri: 94 mg/100 g. Significant loss was noticed in total carotenoids content of both the cultivars with passage of time because of their susceptibility to oxidative loss caused by dry heat. No growth of yeast and mold was detected in potassium sorbate-treated dried mango slices due to their preservative effect. From the point of view of the composition and sensory quality, dried mango slices of both the cultivars have excellent nutritional qualities.

  7. Potassium-modulated physiological performance of mango plants infected by Ceratocystis fimbriata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaias Severino Cacique

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Mango wilt, caused by the fungus Ceratocystis fimbriata, is an important disease affecting mango production. In view of the beneficial effects of potassium (K in other profitable crops and the lack of information about the effect of macronutrients on mango wilt development, the present study aimed to evaluate how mango plants supplied with K respond physiologically when infected by C. fimbriata. Mango plants (» 3 years old from cultivar Ubá were grown in plastic pots containing 58 mg of K·dm−3 (original K level based on the chemical analysis of the substrate or in plastic pots with substrate amended with a solution of 0.5 M potassium chloride (KCl to achieve the rate of 240 mg K·dm−3. Disease symptoms were more pronounced in inoculated plants grown at the lower K level. Substantial declines in stomatal conductance, in line with decreases in the internal-to-ambient CO2 concentration ratio and the absence of detectable changes in the chlorophyll a fluorescence parameters, suggest that the decrease in the net carbon assimilation rate is due, at least initially, to stomatal limitations. High concentrations of K and manganese were found in the stem tissues of inoculated plants and supplied with the highest K rate, most likely due to the involvement of these tissues in the local development of defense mechanisms. The results of this study suggest that the supply of K favored the physiological performance of mango plants and their resistance against C. fimbriata infection.

  8. PCR-Based Identification and Characterization of Fusarium sp. Associated with Mango Malformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Arif

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mango malformation is the most serious disease of mango causing considerable damage to the mango orchards worldwide. It is a major threat for mango cultivation in north Indian belt. In recent years, Fusarium sp. is finding wide acceptability in scientific community as a causal agent of this disease. However, little information is known about the variability in Fusarium isolates from malformed mango tissues. Therefore, the major objective of present study was the identification and analysis of genetic diversity among Fusarium isolates collected from malformed mango tissues. Two texon selective primers, ITS-Fu-f and ITS-Fu-r, were used for quick identification of Fusarium spp. The fungal genomic DNA was extracted from using CTAB method and was utilized as template for PCR amplification. Total 224 bands were amplified by 18 RAPD primers at an average of 12.44 bands per primer. The size of the obtained amplicons ranged from 0.264 kb (minimum to 3.624 kb (maximum. Data scored from 25 isolates of Fusarium sp. with 18 RAPD primers were used to generate similarity coefficients. The similarity coefficient ranged from 0.17 to 0.945. Based on DNA fingerprints, all isolates were categorized into two major clusters. This study indicated a wide variability among different isolates of Fusarium.

  9. Isolation and Characterization of Fusarium moniliforme var. subglutinans from Malformed Mango

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.P. Akhtar

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Mango malformation occurs in most mango growing regions of the world. Floral and vegetative malformation have been reported. There is general agreement that the fungal pathogen Fusarium moniliforme var. subglutinans or Fusarium subglutinans is the causal agent. Healthy and malformed samples of both floral and vegetative tissues were collected from different varieties of mango grown in several locations to verify the association of F.moniliforme with mango malformation disease in Pakistan. The fungus was isolated and cultured. Frequency of fungal association with the disease ranged between 90- 94%, There was less recovery of fungus from asymptomatic tissue (12- 15%. There was no difference among the commercial mango varieties in the level of susceptibility to this disease. However, seedling germplasm and land races showing resistance to mango malformation were identified. The in vitro growth characters of the fungus were determined on different culture media, at varying temperatures, light and pH conditions. Mycelial growth on potato dextrose agar was better than nine other media tested. At pH 7.00, the ideal temperature for growth was between 25-30° C. Normally, the malformation is not controlled by fungicide application. The in vitro sensitivity of fungus to six fungicides at three concentrations was determined to seek potential means of chemical control.

  10. Transcriptome Analysis of Mango (Mangifera indica L.) Fruit Epidermal Peel to Identify Putative Cuticle-Associated Genes

    OpenAIRE

    Tafolla-Arellano, Julio C.; Yi Zheng; Honghe Sun; Chen Jiao; Eliel Ruiz-May; Miguel A. Hernández-Oñate; Alberto González-León; Reginaldo Báez-Sañudo; Zhangjun Fei; David Domozych; Rose, Jocelyn K. C.; Martín E. Tiznado-Hernández

    2017-01-01

    Mango fruit (Mangifera indica L.) are highly perishable and have a limited shelf life, due to postharvest desiccation and senescence, which limits their global distribution. Recent studies of tomato fruit suggest that these traits are influenced by the expression of genes that are associated with cuticle metabolism. However, studies of these phenomena in mango fruit are limited by the lack of genome-scale data. In order to gain insight into the mango cuticle biogenesis and identify putative c...

  11. Physical properties of wild mango fruit and nut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehiem, J. C.; Simonyan, K. J.

    2012-02-01

    Physical properties of two wild mango varieties were studied at 81.9 and 24.5% moisture (w.b.) for the fruits and nuts, respectively. The shape and size of the fruit are the same while that of nuts differs at P = 0.05. The mass, density and bulk density of the fruits are statistically different at P = 0.05 but the volume is the same. The shape and size, volume and bulk density of the nuts are statistically the same at P = 0.05. The nuts of both varieties are also the same at P = 0.05 in terms of mass and density. The packing factor for both fruits and nut of the two varieties are the same at 0.95. The relevant data obtained for the two varieties would be useful for design and development of machines and equipment for processing and handling operations.

  12. Antioxidant and hepatoprotective activities of thai mango seed kernel extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nithitanakool, Saruth; Pithayanukul, Pimolpan; Bavovada, Rapepol

    2009-08-01

    Three polyphenolic principles, 1,2,3,4,6-penta- O-galloyl-beta-D-glucopyranose (PGG), methyl gallate (MG), and gallic acid (GA), were isolated from the ethanolic extract of seed kernels of Thai mango (MSKE) ( MANGIFERA INDICA L. cv. "Fahlun") and quantified using a TLC scanning densitometric method. The MSKE and its isolates were investigated by studying their antioxidant capacities using four different methods, by determining their IN VITRO anti-inflammatory activities, and by evaluating their hepatoprotective potential against liver injury in rats induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl (4)). The hepatoprotective effect of MSKE is clearly supported by its polyphenolic nature of the main principle, PGG, which exhibited potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart.New York.

  13. Aqueous extracts of mango and orange peel as green inhibitors for carbon steel in hydrochloric acid solution

    OpenAIRE

    Rocha, Janaina Cardozo da; Gomes, José Antônio da Cunha Ponciano; D'Elia, Eliane

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, aqueous extracts of mango and orange peels were shown to be good corrosion inhibitors for carbon steel in a 1 mol L- 1 HCl solution. The inhibition efficiency increased as the extract concentration increased over a concentration range of 200-600 mg L- 1, varying from 79 to 96% (mango) and 84 to 91% (orange) using Tafel plots and from 69 to 94% (mango) and 76 to 90% (orange) using electrochemical impedance. In the presence of 400 mg L- 1 of mango and orange peel ...

  14. ‘Speaking Kleinian’: Susan Isaacs as Ursula Wise and the Inter-War Popularisation of Psychoanalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapira, Michal

    2017-01-01

    How did the complex concepts of psychoanalysis become popular in early twentieth-century Britain? This article examines the contribution of educator and psychoanalyst Susan Isaacs (1885–1948) to this process, as well as her role as a female expert in the intellectual and medical history of this period. Isaacs was one of the most influential British psychologists of the inter-war era, yet historical research on her work is still limited. The article focuses on her writing as ‘Ursula Wise’, answering the questions of parents and nursery nurses in the popular journal Nursery World, from 1929 to 1936. Researched in depth for the first time, Isaacs’ important magazine columns reveal that her writing was instrumental in disseminating the work of psychoanalyst Melanie Klein in Britain. Moreover, Isaacs’ powerful rebuttals to behaviourist, disciplinarian parenting methods helped shift the focus of caregivers to the child’s perspective, encouraging them to acknowledge children as independent subjects and future democratic citizens. Like other early psychoanalysts, Isaacs was not an elitist; she was in fact committed to disseminating her ideas as broadly as possible. Isaacs taught British parents and child caregivers to ‘speak Kleinian’, translating Klein’s intellectual ideas into ordinary language and thus enabling their swift integration into popular discourse. PMID:28901872

  15. Sequence diversity and differential expression of major phenylpropanoid-flavonoid biosynthetic genes among three mango varieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Van L T; Innes, David J; Shaw, P Nicholas; Monteith, Gregory R; Gidley, Michael J; Dietzgen, Ralf G

    2015-07-30

    Mango fruits contain a broad spectrum of phenolic compounds which impart potential health benefits; their biosynthesis is catalysed by enzymes in the phenylpropanoid-flavonoid (PF) pathway. The aim of this study was to reveal the variability in genes involved in the PF pathway in three different mango varieties Mangifera indica L., a member of the family Anacardiaceae: Kensington Pride (KP), Irwin (IW) and Nam Doc Mai (NDM) and to determine associations with gene expression and mango flavonoid profiles. A close evolutionary relationship between mango genes and those from the woody species poplar of the Salicaceae family (Populus trichocarpa) and grape of the Vitaceae family (Vitis vinifera), was revealed through phylogenetic analysis of PF pathway genes. We discovered 145 SNPs in total within coding sequences with an average frequency of one SNP every 316 bp. Variety IW had the highest SNP frequency (one SNP every 258 bp) while KP and NDM had similar frequencies (one SNP every 369 bp and 360 bp, respectively). The position in the PF pathway appeared to influence the extent of genetic diversity of the encoded enzymes. The entry point enzymes phenylalanine lyase (PAL), cinnamate 4-mono-oxygenase (C4H) and chalcone synthase (CHS) had low levels of SNP diversity in their coding sequences, whereas anthocyanidin reductase (ANR) showed the highest SNP frequency followed by flavonoid 3'-hydroxylase (F3'H). Quantitative PCR revealed characteristic patterns of gene expression that differed between mango peel and flesh, and between varieties. The combination of mango expressed sequence tags and availability of well-established reference PF biosynthetic genes from other plant species allowed the identification of coding sequences of genes that may lead to the formation of important flavonoid compounds in mango fruits and facilitated characterisation of single nucleotide polymorphisms between varieties. We discovered an association between the extent of sequence variation and

  16. Geologic impact of Hurricane Andrew on Everglades coast of southwest Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, R. A.

    1995-04-01

    Hurricane Andrew, one of the strongest storms of the century, crossed the southern part of the Florida peninsula on 24 August 1992. Its path crossed the Florida Everglades and exited in the national park across a mangrove-dominated coast onto the shallow, low-energy, inner shelf. The storm caused extensive breakage and defoliation in the mangrove community; full recovery will take decades. It produced no extensive sedimentation unit; only local and ephemeral ebb-surge deposits. The discontinuous shelly storm beach ridge was breached at multiple locations, and it moved landward a few meters. After seven months, there was little geologic indication that the storm had passed. It is likely that the stratigraphic record in this area will not contain any recognizable features of the passage of Hurricane Andrew.

  17. Impact of an extreme event on the sediment budget: Hurricane Andrew in the Louisiana barrier islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    List, Jeffrey H.; Hansen, Mark E.; Sallenger,, Asbury H.; Jaffe, Bruce E.; Edge, B.L

    1997-01-01

    This paper examines the influence of Hurricane Andrew on the sediment budget of an 80-kilometer section of the Louisiana barrier islands west of the modern Mississippi delta. Because long-term bathymetric change has been extensively studied in this area, excellent baseline data are available for evaluating the impact of Hurricane Andrew. Results show that despite the high intensity of the storm and a storm track optimally positioned to impact the study area, the storm did not have an overwhelming influence on the sediment budget when compared to the changes occurring over the previous 50 years. For the Louisiana barrier islands, a 50-year record appears to be adequate for averaging the long-term contributions of both major and minor storm events to the sediment budget.

  18. Rapid health needs assessment following hurricane Andrew--Florida and Louisiana, 1992.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-09-18

    Following the impact phase of Hurricane Andrew in Florida (August 24) and Louisiana (August 26) (Figure 1), the primary objectives of the public health response have been to address the health and medical needs of residents in the storm-damaged areas and to provide data for relief interventions and decision-making. This report presents the combined findings from rapid health needs assessment surveys conducted by state health departments with CDC assistance 3-10 days postimpact.

  19. Video produced for Andrew Lankford's talk at Google's Zeitgeist event on 2010.

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Experiment

    2011-01-01

    A video made for the ATLAS talk at Google's Zeitgeist event during fall 2010, given by deputy spokesperson Andrew Lankford. The event, organized by Google, invited leaders of our time to discuss perspectives on global issues. For more information about the event go to http://www.zeitgeistminds.com/about/. The recording of the talk is available at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VjIJS8zUimU

  20. Andrew Fletcher : bridging the gap between early modern and civic republicanism

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Clairelouise

    2012-01-01

    This thesis explores the progress of contemporary republican theory from its civic roots to its modern conception. Republicanism is a paradigm of liberty, and the transformation of this theory of liberty from concepts of self-government and civic virtue through to contemporary ideas of non-domination and political autonomy will be examined. Using Andrew Fletcher's particular brand of civic-humanist republicanism as a critical model, this thesis will show that republicanism is vital for add...

  1. Urban Entanglements in three African Canadian Plays: Lorena Gale's Angelique, George Boyd's Consecrated Ground, and Andrew Moodie's Riot

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tompkins, Joanne

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the ways in which three African Canadian plays--Andrew Moodie's Riot, Lorena Gale's Angelique, and George Boyd's Consecrated Ground--rehearse moments of racism regarding the African Canadian diaspora...

  2. The Role of the Beetle Hypocryphalus mangiferae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in the Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Mango Wilt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galdino, Tarcísio Visintin da Silva; Ferreira, Dalton de Oliveira; Santana Júnior, Paulo Antônio; Arcanjo, Lucas de Paulo; Queiroz, Elenir Aparecida; Sarmento, Renato Almeida; Picanço, Marcelo Coutinho

    2017-06-01

    The knowledge of the spatiotemporal dynamics of pathogens and their vectors is an important step in determining the pathogen dispersion pattern and the role of vectors in disease dynamics. However, in the case of mango wilt little is known about its spatiotemporal dynamics and the relationship of its vector [the beetle Hypocryphalus mangiferae (Stebbing 1914)] to these dynamics. The aim of this work was to determine the spatial-seasonal dynamic of H. mangiferae attacks and mango wilt in mango orchards and to verify the importance of H. mangiferae in the spatiotemporal dynamics of the disease. Two mango orchards were monitored during a period of 3 yr. The plants in these orchards were georeferenced and inspected monthly to quantify the number of plants attacked by beetles and the fungus. In these orchards, the percentage of mango trees attacked by beetles was always higher than the percentage infected by the fungus. The colonization of mango trees by beetles and the fungus occurred by colonization of trees both distant and proximal to previously attacked trees. The new plants attacked by the fungus emerged in places where the beetles had previously begun their attack. This phenomenon led to a large overlap in sites of beetle and fungal occurrence, indicating that establishment by the beetle was followed by establishment by the fungus. This information can be used by farmers to predict disease infection, and to control bark beetle infestation in mango orchards. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Addition of dried 'Ataulfo' mango (Mangifera indica L) by-products as a source of dietary fiber and polyphenols in starch-molded mango snacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    The increasing demand of healthier foods favors the consumption of natural bioactive compounds such as antioxidants and dietary fiber (DF) that confers protection against cardiovascular diseases and other degenerative diseases. On the industrial processing of mango, 35-60 % of this fruit is discarde...

  4. Diasporic Reconciliations of Politics, Love and Trauma: Susan Abulhawa’s Quest for Identity in Mornings in Jenin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman M Abu-Shomar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Negotiating human conditions is an emblematic critical impetus of diaspora informed by multiple cultural possibilities practiced through the creation of multiple spaces that cross the realm of the ‘self’ to that of the ‘other’. It offers a locale to cross from the oppressed ‘self’ to an understanding of an oppressor ‘other’. Yet, diasporic negotiation is politically involved in the most responsible manner; it engages the contextual social realities in order to enable creative possibilities for overcoming the logic of the politics altogether. It invites a kind of political involvement that assures the ‘situatedness of the ethical’ in a framework of moral humanistic realisations. The realisation of diasporic negotiations is dialogically engaged in manners that will give birth to new possibilities for human togetherness. In this essay, I trace the signs of diasporic negotiations of politics, love and trauma in Susan Abulhawa’s Mornings in Jenin by focusing on the Diasporic identity of Amal (the central character. I consider the intersections between diaspora, dislocation of identity and the creation of negotiating spaces that qualify an 'epistemology of Diaspora' against essentialised and ethnocentric construction of realities. I argue that Abulhawa creates diasporic spaces and immense moral scenes to transcend a particular stance of politics via transcending love in opposition to suffering and tribulation. I contend that Abulhawa’s conceptualisation of Diasporic negotiations enables her to depict and gauge two extreme human sentiments: love and trauma, yet, without yielding or compromising the right of just resistance and dissent. Keywords: Diaspora, humanism, Trauma, identity, negotiating difference, and 'Otherness'

  5. Large-scale confirmatory tests of a phytosanitary irradiation treatment against Sternochetus frigidus (F.) in Philippine mango

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mango pulp weevil, Sternochetus frigidus (F.) is an important quarantine pest preventing the export of mangoes from the Philippines to the United States and other countries. Previously, a radiation dose of 100 Gy was proposed for phytosanitary treatment of S. frigidus based on dose-response stud...

  6. Development of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers from the mango (Mangiferaindica) transcriptome for mapping and estimation of genetic diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    The development of resources for genomic studies in Mangifera indica (mango) will allow marker-assisted selection and identification of genetically diverse germplasm, greatly aiding mango breeding programs. We report here a first step in developing such resources, our identification of thousands una...

  7. Evaluation of mango saponin in broilers: effects on growth performance, carcass characteristics, meat quality and plasma biochemical indices

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhang, Y. N; Wang, J; Qi, B; Wu, S. G; Chen, H. R; Luo, H. Y; Yin, D. J; Lu, F. J; Zhang, H. J; Qi, G. H

    2017-01-01

    ..., and gallotannins [6]. It has been reported that the mango leave extract is rich in potent antioxidant phenolic compounds [7] and has a high antioxidant activity, which is higher than that of [beta]-carotene [8]. Moreover, the mango leave extract has been demonstrated to have analgesic, anti-diarrheal, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and antifungal activiti...

  8. Evaluation of yellow sticky traps for monitoring the population of thrips (Thysanoptera) in a mango orchard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliakbarpour, Hamaseh; Rawi, Che Salmah Md

    2011-08-01

    Populations of several thrips species were estimated using yellow sticky traps in an orchard planted with mango, Mangifera indica L. during the dry and wet seasons beginning in late 2008-2009 on Penang Island, Malaysia. To determine the efficacy of using sticky traps to monitor thrips populations, we compared weekly population estimates on yellow sticky traps with thrips population sizes that were determined (using a CO(2) method) directly from mango panicles. Dispersal distance and direction of thrips movement out of the orchard also were studied using yellow sticky traps placed at three distances from the edge of the orchard in four cardinal directions facing into the orchard. The number of thrips associated with the mango panicles was found to be correlated with the number of thrips collected using the sticky trap method. The number of thrips captured by the traps decreased with increasing distance from the mango orchard in all directions. Density of thrips leaving the orchard was related to the surrounding vegetation. Our results demonstrate that sticky traps have the potential to satisfactorily estimate thrips populations in mango orchards and thus they can be effectively employed as a useful tactic for sampling thrips.

  9. Detection and Management of Mango Dieback Disease in the United Arab Emirates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Esam Eldin; Sham, Arjun; A. Al Shurafa, Khawla; S. Al Naqbi, Tahra; Iratni, Rabah; El-Tarabily, Khaled; F. AbuQamar, Synan

    2017-01-01

    Mango is affected by different decline disorders causing significant losses to mango growers. In the United Arab Emirates (UAE), the pathogen was isolated from all tissues sampled from diseased trees affected by Lasiodiplodia theobromae. Symptoms at early stages of the disease included general wilting appearance of mango trees, and dieback of twigs. In advanced stages, the disease symptoms were also characterized by the curling and drying of leaves, leading to complete defoliation of the tree and discolouration of vascular regions of the stems and branches. To substantially reduce the devastating impact of dieback disease on mango, the fungus was first identified based on its morphological and cultural characteristics. Target regions of 5.8S rRNA (ITS) and elongation factor 1-α (EF1-α) genes of the pathogen were amplified and sequenced. We also found that the systemic chemical fungicides, Score®, Cidely® Top, and Penthiopyrad®, significantly inhibited the mycelial growth of L. theobromae both in vitro and in the greenhouse. Cidely® Top proved to be a highly effective fungicide against L. theobromae dieback disease also under field conditions. Altogether, the morphology of the fruiting structures, molecular identification and pathogenicity tests confirm that the causal agent of the mango dieback disease in the UAE is L. theobromae. PMID:29053600

  10. Status of Bactrocera invadens (Diptera: Tephritidae) in Mango-Producing Areas of Arba Minch, Southwestern Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massebo, Fekadu; Tefera, Zenebe

    2015-01-01

    Bactrocera invadens, the Asian fruit fly, was first reported in Kenya in 2003, and it spread fast to most tropical countries in Africa. To our knowledge, there is no detailed data on the fruit damage and status of fruit flies in Arba Minch and elsewhere in Ethiopia. Hence, information on the species composition and pest status of the fruit fly species is urgent to plan management strategies in the area. Fruit flies were captured using male parapheromone-baited traps. Matured mango (Mangifera indica) fruits were collected from randomly selected mango trees and incubated individually in cages (15 by 15 by 15 cm) with sandy soil. B. invadens was the predominant (96%; 952 of 992) captured species and the only fruit fly species emerging from mango fruits incubated in the laboratory. The mean number of adult B. invadens emerging per mango fruit was 35.25, indicating that the species is the most devastating mango fruit fly in the area. The loss due to this species would be serious if no management strategies are implemented. PMID:25612742

  11. Behavior of beta cyfluthrin and imidacloprid in/on mango (Mangifera indica L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Soudamini; Deepa, M; Jagadish, G K

    2011-08-01

    Residue persistence of beta cyfluthrin and imidacloprid on mango was carried out after giving spray application of the combination formulation, beta cyfluthrin 9% + imidacloprid 21% (Solomon 300 OD) 3 times at the fruit formation stage. The treatments were, untreated control, standard dose of 75 g a.i. ha(-1) and double dose of 150 g a.i. ha(-1). Initial residues of beta cyfluthrin on mango fruits were 0.04 and 0.12 mg kg(-1) from treatments at the standard and double doses, respectively. The residues dissipated with the half-life of 2.4 and 2.6 days and persisted for 5 days only. Initial residues of imidacloprid on mango fruits were 0.14 and 0.18 mg kg(-1) from treatments at the standard and double doses, respectively. Imidacloprid residues degraded with the half-life of 3.06 and 4.16 days, respectively and persisted for 10 days. Mature mango fruits at harvest were free from residues of both insecticides. A safe pre-harvest interval of 8 days is recommended for consumption of mango fruits after treatment of the combination formulation.

  12. Mango Supplementation Has No Effects on Inflammatory Mediators in Obese Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Shirley F; Beebe, Maureen; Mahmood, Maryam; Janthachotikun, Sawanya; Eldoumi, Heba; Peterson, Sandra; Payton, Mark; Perkins-Veazie, Penelope; Smith, Brenda J; Lucas, Edralin A

    2017-01-01

    This pilot study examined the effects of freeze-dried mango (Mangifera indica L.) supplementation on anthropometric measurements, lipid parameters, and inflammatory mediators in obese individuals. A total of 20 obese (body mass index [BMI]: 30-35 kg/m2) adults (11 men and 9 women), aged 20 to 50 years, received 10 g/d of ground freeze-dried mango pulp for 12 weeks. Anthropometrics, lipids, and inflammatory mediators were assessed at baseline and after 12 weeks of mango supplementation. There were no differences between baseline and final visits in inflammatory mediators, lipids, diet, physical activity, and anthropometrics. Relationships were present at baseline and final visits between adiponectin and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and between leptin and fat mass. Correlations were found after 12 weeks of mango supplementation between leptin and the following variables: waist-to-height ratio, BMI, percent fat, and fat mass. Our findings demonstrate that 12-week consumption of freeze-dried mango by obese individuals has no impact on obesity-related inflammation. PMID:28983188

  13. Effects of nisin-incorporated films on the microbiological and physicochemical quality of minimally processed mangoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Ana Andréa Teixeira; Silva de Araújo, Hyrla Grazielle; Matos, Patrícia Nogueira; Carnelossi, Marcelo Augusto Guitierrez; Almeida de Castro, Alessandra

    2013-06-17

    The aim of this study is to examine the effects of nisin-incorporated cellulose films on the physicochemical and microbiological qualities of minimally processed mangoes. The use of antimicrobial films did not affect the physicochemical characteristics of mangoes and showed antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris and Bacillus cereus. The mango slices were inoculated with S. aureus and L. monocytogenes (10(7)CFU/g), and the viable cell numbers remained at 10(5) and 10(6)CFU/g, respectively, after 12days. In samples packed with antimicrobial films, the viable number of L. monocytogenes cells was reduced below the detection level after 4days. After 6days, a reduction of six log units was observed for S. aureus. In conclusion, nisin showed antimicrobial activity in mangoes without interfering with the organoleptic characteristics of the fruit. This result suggests that nisin could potentially be used in active packing to improve the safety of minimally processed mangoes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Isolation and evaluation of biocontrol agents in controlling anthracnose disease of mango in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rungjindamai Nattawut

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The agricultural based economy is a core business in Thailand and food export is one of the main sources of income for the Thai population. However, pesticides are overused and misused. As a result there is an urgent need to reduce the use of synthetic chemicals. Biological control offers an alternative to the use of pesticides. Mango (Mangifera indica L. is widely planted in Thailand and is one of the major cash crops for international export. However, mango suffers from various diseases especially anthracnose, a fungal disease caused by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides. One hundred and twelve isolates of epiphytic microbes were isolated from healthy leaves and fruits of mangoes; this included 93 and 19 isolates of epiphytic bacteria and yeasts, respectively. They were screened for bioactivity against a pathogenic strain of C. gloeosporioides isolated from diseased mangoes using a dual culture technique. Out of 112 isolates, eight isolates exhibited at least 60% inhibition. These isolates were further screened for their inhibition on mango using fruit inoculation. Two isolates reduced the lesion sizes caused by C. gloeosporioides compared to control treatment. These two isolates, based on phenotypical and biochemical tests, were identified as Bacillus sp. MB61 and Bacillus sp. LB72.

  15. Evolution of carbohydrates of pre-cut mango slices subjected to osmotic dehydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovar, Beatríz; García, Hugo S; Mata, Miguel

    2005-12-01

    Haden mango slices (non-osmotic dehydrated, NOD) were immersed in calcium chloride (2 g/l), citric acid (5 g/l), hydrogen peroxide (25 ml/l) and sodium benzoate (20 g/l) solutions. Slices to be treated with osmotic dehydration (OD) were first immersed in calcium, then placed in the osmotic solution (sucrose 65 degrees Bx, 30 degrees C) and 211 mbar vacuum was applied for 30 min. After the osmotic treatment, the slices were immersed in the same solutions as for NOD slices. All the slices were stored in sterile chambers at 24, 13 or 5 degrees C. Both OD and NOD slices displayed sucrose synthesis (SS) during storage, which was highest in NOD slices that were kept at 13 degrees C. Sucrose synthesis was the most significant change during ripening of whole mangoes (WM). Starch breakdown could not supply the necessary substrates for sucrose synthesis in either whole mangoes or slices. Injured tissues from mango slices sustained sucrose synthesis, which was highest at 13 degrees C in NOD slices, but the osmotic treatment decreased sucrose formation. Storage at 5 degrees C for 12 days affected sucrose content of Haden mangoes. Glucose and fructose concentrations remained low in all treatments.

  16. Effect of osmotic dehydration and vacuum-frying parameters to produce high-quality mango chips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Yolanda; Moreira, Rosana G

    2009-09-01

    Mango (Mangifera indica L.) is a fruit rich in flavor and nutritional values, which is an excellent candidate for producing chips. The objective of this study was to develop high-quality mango chips using vacuum frying. Mango ("Tommy Atkins") slices were pretreated with different maltodextrin concentrations (40, 50, and 65, w/v), osmotic dehydration times (45, 60, and 70 min), and solution temperatures (22 and 40 degrees C). Pretreated slices were vacuum fried at 120, 130, and 138 degrees C and product quality attributes (oil content, texture, color, carotenoid content) determined. The effect of frying temperatures at optimum osmotic dehydration times (65 [w/v] at 40 degrees C) was assessed. All samples were acceptable (scores > 5) to consumer panelists. The best mango chips were those pretreated with 65 (w/v) concentration for 60 min and vacuum fried at 120 degrees C. Mango chips under atmospheric frying had less carotenoid retention (32%) than those under vacuum frying (up to 65%). These results may help further optimize vacuum-frying processing of high-quality fruit-based snacks.

  17. Mango Supplementation Has No Effects on Inflammatory Mediators in Obese Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley F Evans

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This pilot study examined the effects of freeze-dried mango ( Mangifera indica L. supplementation on anthropometric measurements, lipid parameters, and inflammatory mediators in obese individuals. A total of 20 obese (body mass index [BMI]: 30-35 kg/m 2 adults (11 men and 9 women, aged 20 to 50 years, received 10 g/d of ground freeze-dried mango pulp for 12 weeks. Anthropometrics, lipids, and inflammatory mediators were assessed at baseline and after 12 weeks of mango supplementation. There were no differences between baseline and final visits in inflammatory mediators, lipids, diet, physical activity, and anthropometrics. Relationships were present at baseline and final visits between adiponectin and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and between leptin and fat mass. Correlations were found after 12 weeks of mango supplementation between leptin and the following variables: waist-to-height ratio, BMI, percent fat, and fat mass. Our findings demonstrate that 12-week consumption of freeze-dried mango by obese individuals has no impact on obesity-related inflammation.

  18. Status of Bactrocera invadens (Diptera: Tephritidae) in mango-producing areas of Arba Minch, southwestern Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massebo, Fekadu; Tefera, Zenebe

    2015-01-01

    Bactrocera invadens, the Asian fruit fly, was first reported in Kenya in 2003, and it spread fast to most tropical countries in Africa. To our knowledge, there is no detailed data on the fruit damage and status of fruit flies in Arba Minch and elsewhere in Ethiopia. Hence, information on the species composition and pest status of the fruit fly species is urgent to plan management strategies in the area. Fruit flies were captured using male parapheromone-baited traps. Matured mango (Mangifera indica) fruits were collected from randomly selected mango trees and incubated individually in cages (15 by 15 by 15 cm) with sandy soil. B. invadens was the predominant (96%; 952 of 992) captured species and the only fruit fly species emerging from mango fruits incubated in the laboratory. The mean number of adult B. invadens emerging per mango fruit was 35.25, indicating that the species is the most devastating mango fruit fly in the area. The loss due to this species would be serious if no management strategies are implemented. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Entomological Society of America.

  19. Residue levels and dissipation behaviors for trifloxystrobin and tebuconazole in mango fruit and soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Soudamini

    2015-03-01

    An evaluation of residue levels of trifloxystrobin and tebuconazole was carried out on mango fruits after treatments with the combined formulation, trifloxystrobin (25 % w/w) and tebuconazole (50 % w/w), at standard and double doses of 250 + 500 and 500 + 1000 g a.i. ha(-1), respectively. Extraction and purification of the mango fruit samples were carried out by the QuEChERS method after validating the analytical parameters. Determination of the fungicides was carried out by gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The limits of detection (LOD) and limits of quantification (LOQ) for both fungicides were 0.015 μg mL(-1) and 0.05 mg kg(-1), respectively. The residue levels of trifloxystrobin for standard and double-dose treatments were 0.492 and 0.901 mg kg(-1) and for tebuconazole were 0.535 and 1.124 mg kg(-1), respectively. A faster dissipation of tebuconazole in mango fruit was observed compared with that for tebuconazole. Dissipation of trifloxystrobin and tebuconazole in mango followed first-order kinetics, and the half-lives were 9 and 6 days, respectively. The preharvest intervals (PHI), the time taken for the combined residues of trifloxystrobin and tebuconazole to dissipate to their permissible levels (maximum residue limits), were 14 and 20 days for standard and double doses, respectively. At harvest, mature mango fruit and soil were free from fungicide residues.

  20. Processing 'Ataulfo' Mango into Juice Preserves the Bioavailability and Antioxidant Capacity of Its Phenolic Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirós-Sauceda, Ana Elena; Chen, C-Y Oliver; Blumberg, Jeffrey B; Astiazaran-Garcia, Humberto; Wall-Medrano, Abraham; González-Aguilar, Gustavo A

    2017-09-29

    The health-promoting effects of phenolic compounds depend on their bioaccessibility from the food matrix and their consequent bioavailability. We carried out a randomized crossover pilot clinical trial to evaluate the matrix effect (raw flesh and juice) of 'Ataulfo' mango on the bioavailability of its phenolic compounds. Twelve healthy male subjects consumed a dose of mango flesh or juice. Blood was collected for six hours after consumption, and urine for 24 h. Plasma and urine phenolics were analyzed by electrochemical detection coupled to high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC-ECD). Five compounds were identified and quantified in plasma. Six phenolic compounds, plus a microbial metabolite (pyrogallol) were quantified in urine, suggesting colonic metabolism. The maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) occurred 2-4 h after consumption; excretion rates were maximum at 8-24 h. Mango flesh contributed to greater protocatechuic acid absorption (49%), mango juice contributed to higher chlorogenic acid absorption (62%). Our data suggests that the bioavailability and antioxidant capacity of mango phenolics is preserved, and may be increased when the flesh is processed into juice.

  1. Alkaloids and phenolics biosynthesis increases mango resistance to infection by Ceratocystis fimbriata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Araujo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Mango wilt, caused by Ceratocystis fimbriata, is one of the most important diseases affecting mango yields in Brazil. Information regarding the biochemical mechanisms involved in mango resistance against C. fimbriata is absent in the literature. Thus, the present study determined and quantified alkaloids and phenolics in the stem tissue of mango plants from Palmer (susceptible and Ubá (resistant cultivars. Furthermore, it was examined the effect of these secondary metabolites against C. fimbriata growth in vitro. The high-performance liquid chromatography revealed that the concentration of two alkaloids (theobromine and 7-methylxanthine and six phenolic compounds (caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid, gallic acid, protocatechuic acid, catechin and epicatechin in the inoculated plants from cv. Ubá was higher in comparison with inoculated plants from cv. Palmer. The concentration of the secondary metabolites was higher in the non-inoculated plants from cv. Palmer than in the inoculated ones, while the opposite was observed for plants of cv. Ubá. Peaks in the concentrations of secondary metabolites in the inoculated plants from both cultivars occurred at 7 and 14 days after inoculation. The different concentrations (10 to 30 mg∙mL−1 of secondary metabolites added to the Petri dishes greatly inhibited C. fimbriata growth over time. These results suggest that secondary metabolites played an important role in the resistance of mango plants against C. fimbriata infection.

  2. Vozvrashtshenije "Ekzorsista" / Susan Howard

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Howard, Susan

    2001-01-01

    William Friedkini 1973.a. valminud õudusfilm "Exorcist", selle järjed ja selle hiljuti restaureeritud ja taas ekraanile paisatud versioon ning nende mõju näitlejanna Linda Blair'i elukäigule, kes filmis mängis saatanast vaevatud teistmelist

  3. Development of mango (Mangifera indica L. energy drinks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Julio Márquez Cardozo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of two hydrocolloids, pectin and carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC, was evaluated in mango beverage stability (Mangifera indica L. formulated and developed with caffeine at a concentration of 30 mg/100 mL. The physico-chemical and sensory characteristics of color, acidity, viscosity, total soluble solids, pH, flavor, aroma and texture were studied every three days over a 12-day period. The beverages were packaged in high-density polyethylene containers with a 250 mL capacity and were stored at 5 °C and 90% RH for the duration of the experimentation period. The drinks with added pectin showed greater stability and lower acidity values than the control, but higher values than those prepared with CMC. The drinks made with CMC had a significantly higher viscosity at a 95% confidence level than those made with pectin or the control beverages. The treatment that showed the lowest browning index was the one added with pectin. Concerning the sensory evaluation, the drinks showed significant differences at a 95% confidence level; the drink made with pectin was the most widely accepted. It was concluded that the most stable drinks were those made with pectin because they presented the lowest height in millimeters of precipitate solids over the storage period. No off-flavors in beverages were perceived by the judges.

  4. CONSTITUYENTES VOLÁTILES DEL MANGO DE AZÚCAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar Bautista.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Empleando Extracción de Volátiles por Espacio de Cabeza Dinámico y Extracción Líquido-Líquido, se estudió el aroma del mango de azúcar (Mangifera indica L, variedad nativa Colombiana apreciada por su exquisito aroma y sabor. Estos dos métodos complementarios permifieron la identificación, por Cromatografía de Gases de Alta resolución y Cromatografía de Gases de Alta Resolución - Espectrometría de Masas, de 52 coinponentes, entre los cuales sobresalieron como mayoritarios el 3-careno, el butanoato de etilo, el ácido butanóico y el a-pineno. Aunque la composición porcentual en peso de volátiles varió según el método de extracción, el grupo predominante en ambos sistemas de extracción es el de los terpenos, seguido de los esteres. El aroma de los extractos obtenidos fue evaluado por Cromatografía de Gases de Alta Resolución-Olfatometría.

  5. Emerging resistance against different fungicides in Lasiodiplodia theobromae, the cause of mango dieback in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rehman ur Ateeq

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dieback of mango caused by Lasiodiplodia theobromae is among several diseases responsible for low crop production in Pakistan. To further complicate the issue, resistance in L. theobromae is emerging against different fungicides. L. theobromae was isolated from diseased samples of mango plants collected from various orchards in the Multan District. The efficacy of different fungicides viz. copper oxychloride, diethofencarb, pyrachlostrobin, carbendazim, difenoconazole, mancozeb, and thiophanate-methyl was evaluated in vitro using a poison food technique. Thiophanate-methyl at all concentrations was found to be the most effective among five systemic fungicides against L. theobromae, followed by carbendazim, difenoconazole and diethofencarb. The fungicides, i.e., thiophanate-methyl, difenoconazole, carbendazim and diethofencarb showed maximum efficacy with increasing concentration. The isolates of L. theobromae showed some resistance development against the tested fungicides when compared with previous work. These investigations provide new information about chemical selection for the control of holistic disease in mango growing zones of Pakistan.

  6. Chemical profile of mango (Mangifera indica L.) using electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (ESI-MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Bruno G; Costa, Helber B; Ventura, José A; Kondratyuk, Tamara P; Barroso, Maria E S; Correia, Radigya M; Pimentel, Elisângela F; Pinto, Fernanda E; Endringer, Denise C; Romão, Wanderson

    2016-08-01

    Mangifera indica L., mango fruit, is consumed as a dietary supplement with purported health benefits; it is widely used in the food industry. Herein, the chemical profile of the Ubá mango at four distinct maturation stages was evaluated during the process of growth and maturity using negative-ion mode electrospray ionisation Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI(-)FT-ICR MS) and physicochemical characterisation analysis (total titratable acidity (TA), total soluble solids (TSS), TSS/TA ratio, and total polyphenolic content). Primary (organic acids and sugars) and secondary metabolites (polyphenolic compounds) were mostly identified in the third maturation stage, thus indicating the best stage for harvesting and consuming the fruit. In addition, the potential cancer chemoprevention of the secondary metabolites (phenolic extracts obtained from mango samples) was evaluated using the induction of quinone reductase activity, concluding that fruit polyphenols have the potential for cancer chemoprevention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Molecular diversity of Pakistani mango (Mangifera indica L.) varieties based on microsatellite markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazish, T; Shabbir, G; Ali, A; Sami-Ul-Allah, S; Naeem, M; Javed, M; Batool, S; Arshad, H; Hussain, S B; Aslam, K; Seher, R; Tahir, M; Baber, M

    2017-04-05

    Understanding the genetic diversity of different Pakistani mango varieties is important for germplasm management and varietal characterization. Microsatellites are efficient and highly polymorphic markers for comparative genome mapping, and were used in the present study to determine the genetic relatedness and variability among 15 indigenous mango cultivars (Mangifera indica L.). Overall, 181 bands were produced using 12 simple sequence repeat (SSR) primers. Out of the 12 primers used, 10 were polymorphic and two were monomorphic. Genetic relatedness among cultivars was assessed by constructing a dendrogram using the unweighted pair group method of arithmetic means. The accessions exhibited coefficients of similarity ranging from 75 to 100%, indicating the frequent use of only a few parent cultivars and the presence of inbreeding. The primers used in the present study were found to be valuable for identifying genetic relationships among mango cultivars.

  8. Phytochemical extraction, characterisation and comparative distribution across four mango (Mangifera indica L.) fruit varieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Jean T; Monteith, Gregory R; Roberts-Thomson, Sarah J; Dietzgen, Ralf G; Gidley, Michael J; Shaw, Paul N

    2014-04-15

    In this study we determined the qualitative composition and distribution of phytochemicals in peel and flesh of fruits from four different varieties of mango using mass spectrometry profiling following fractionation of methanol extracts by preparative HPLC. Gallic acid substituted compounds, of diverse core structure, were characteristic of the phytochemicals extracted using this approach. Other principal compounds identified were from the quercetin family, the hydrolysable tannins and fatty acids and their derivatives. This work provides additional information regarding mango fruit phytochemical composition and its potential contribution to human health and nutrition. Compounds present in mango peel and flesh are likely subject to genetic control and this will be the subject of future studies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Determination of mango fruit from binary image using randomized Hough transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizon, Mohamed; Najihah Yusri, Nurul Ain; Abdul Kadir, Mohd Fadzil; bin Mamat, Abd. Rasid; Abd Aziz, Azim Zaliha; Nanaa, Kutiba

    2015-12-01

    A method of detecting mango fruit from RGB input image is proposed in this research. From the input image, the image is processed to obtain the binary image using the texture analysis and morphological operations (dilation and erosion). Later, the Randomized Hough Transform (RHT) method is used to find the best ellipse fits to each binary region. By using the texture analysis, the system can detect the mango fruit that is partially overlapped with each other and mango fruit that is partially occluded by the leaves. The combination of texture analysis and morphological operator can isolate the partially overlapped fruit and fruit that are partially occluded by leaves. The parameters derived from RHT method was used to calculate the center of the ellipse. The center of the ellipse acts as the gripping point for the fruit picking robot. As the results, the rate of detection was up to 95% for fruit that is partially overlapped and partially covered by leaves.

  10. Interaction of post harvest disease control treatments and gamma irradiation on mangoes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, G.I.; Cooke, A.W. (Department of Primary Industries, Indooroopilly (Australia)); Boag, T.S. (Riverina-Murray Inst. of Higher Education, Wagga Wagga (Australia). School of Agriculture); Izard, M. (Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights (Australia)); Panitz, M. (Committee of Direction of Fruit Marketing, Brisbane Markets (Australia)); Sangchote, S. (Kasetsart Univ., Bangkok (Thailand))

    1990-04-01

    The effects of gamma irradiation and disease control treatments on disease severity and post harvest quality of several mango cultivars were investigated. In mangoes cv. Kensington Pride, irradiation doses ranging from 300-1200 Gy reduced disease, but the level of control was not commercially acceptable. Hot benomyl immediately followed by irradiation provided effective control of anthracnose (Colletotrichum gloeosporioides) and stem end rot (Dothiorella dominicana) during short-term storage (15 days at 20degC). The effects of the two treatments were additive. Satisfactory disease control was achieved during long-term controlled atmosphere storage when mangoes were treated with hot benomyl followed by prochloraz and then irradiated. Effects of fungicide treatment and irradiation were additive. Fungicide, or irradiation treatments alone, were unsatisfactory. Irradiation of cv. Kensington Pride at doses in excess of 600 Gy caused unacceptable surface damage. (author).

  11. Identification and characterization of Fusarium mangiferae as pathogen of mango malformation in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep Kumar

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Fusarium mangiferae (=F. subglutinans isolates collect from malformed samples from major mango-growing area of North India. Molecular identification and characterization of eleven most virulent isolates of F. mangiferae, based on pathogenicity tests used for the present study. Species-specific, genus specific ITS-PCR and PCR-RFLP performed for the accurate and easy detection of F. mangiferae. The rDNA-ITS 28S region sequences used for phylogenetic analysis of Fusarium isolates from India and other countries for homology search between them. The phylogenetic tree divided the isolates into three clades (i.e., American, Asian and African and showed the high level of sequence based similarity (69-99% among all Fusarium sequences from Asia. Thus, claimed Fusarium mangiferae as dominant pathogen of mango malformation. Furthermore, we conclude that exploiting the nested PCR coupled with PCR-RFLP will help in rapid and accurate detection of F. mangiferae pathogen of mango malformation.

  12. Custom auroral electrojet indices calculated by using MANGO value-added services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargatze, L. F.; Moore, W. B.; King, T. A.

    2009-12-01

    A set of computational routines called MANGO, Magnetogram Analysis for the Network of Geophysical Observatories, is utilized to calculate customized versions of the auroral electrojet indices, AE, AL, and AU. MANGO is part of an effort to enhance data services available to users of the Heliophysics VxOs, specifically for the Virtual Magnetospheric Observatory (VMO). The MANGO value-added service package is composed of a set of IDL routines that decompose ground magnetic field observations to isolate secular, diurnal, and disturbance variations of magnetic field disturbance, station-by-station. Each MANGO subroutine has been written in modular fashion to allow "plug and play"-style flexibility and each has been designed to account for failure modes and noisy data so that the programs will run to completion producing as much derived data as possible. The capabilities of the MANGO service package will be demonstrated through their application to the study of auroral electrojet current flow during magnetic substorms. Traditionally, the AE indices are calculated by using data from about twelve ground stations located at northern auroral zone latitudes spread longitudinally around the world. Magnetogram data are corrected for secular variation prior to calculating the standard version of the indices but the data are not corrected for diurnal variations. A custom version of the AE indices will be created by using the MANGO routines including a step to subtract diurnal curves from the magnetic field data at each station. The custom AE indices provide more accurate measures of auroral electrojet activity due to isolation of the sunstorm electrojet magnetic field signiture. The improvements in the accuracy of the custom AE indices over the tradition indices are largest during the northern hemisphere summer when the range of diurnal variation reaches its maximum.

  13. Characterization of Brazilian mango kernel fat before and after gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aquino, Fabiana da Silva; Ramos, Clecio Souza, E-mail: fasiaquino@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: clecio@dcm.ufrpe.br [Universidade Federal Rural de Pernambuco (UFRPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Aquino, Katia Aparecida da Silva, E-mail: aquino@ufpe.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Mangifera indica Linn (family of Anacardiaceae) is a tree indigenous to India, whose both unripe and ripe fruits (mangoes) are widely used by the local population. After consumption or industrial processing of the fruits, considerable amounts of mango seeds are discarded as waste. The kernel inside the seed represents from 45% to 75% of the seed and about 20% of the whole fruit and lipid composition of mango seed kernels has attracted the attention of researches because of their unique physical and chemical characteristics. Our study showed that fat of the mango kernel obtained by Soxhlet extraction with hexane had a solid consistency at environmental temperature (27 deg C) because it is rich in saturated acid. The fat contents of the seed of Mangifera indica was calculated to 10% and are comparable to the ones for commercial vegetable oils like soybean (11-25%). One problem found in the storage of fast and oils is the attack by microorganisms and the sterilization process becomes necessary. Samples of kernel fat were irradiated with gamma radiation ({sup 60}Co) at room temperature and air atmosphere at 5 and 10 kGy (sterilization doses). The data of GC-MS analysis revealed the presence of four major fatty acids in the sample of mango kernel examined and that the chemical profile of the sample not altered after being irradiated. Moreover, analysis of Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR H{sup 1}) was used to obtain the mango kernel fat parameters before and after gamma irradiation. The data interpretation of RMN H{sup 1} indicated that there are significant differences in the acidity and saponification indexes of fat. However, it was found an increase of 14% in iodine index of fat after irradiation. This result means that some double bonds were formed on the irradiation process of the fat. (author)

  14. Ameliorating effects of Mango (Mangifera indica L.) fruit on plasma ethanol level in a mouse model assessed with H-NMR based metabolic profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, So-Hyun; K Cho, Somi; Min, Tae-Sun; Kim, Yujin; Yang, Seung-Ok; Kim, Hee-Su; Hyun, Sun-Hee; Kim, Hana; Kim, Young-Suk; Choi, Hyung-Kyoon

    2011-05-01

    The ameliorating effects of Mango (Mangifera indica L.) flesh and peel samples on plasma ethanol level were investigated using a mouse model. Mango fruit samples remarkably decreased mouse plasma ethanol levels and increased the activities of alcohol dehydrogenase and acetaldehyde dehydrogenase. The (1)H-NMR-based metabolomic technique was employed to investigate the differences in metabolic profiles of mango fruits, and mouse plasma samples fed with mango fruit samples. The partial least squares-discriminate analysis of (1)H-NMR spectral data of mouse plasma demonstrated that there were clear separations among plasma samples from mice fed with buffer, mango flesh and peel. A loading plot demonstrated that metabolites from mango fruit, such as fructose and aspartate, might stimulate alcohol degradation enzymes. This study suggests that mango flesh and peel could be used as resources for functional foods intended to decrease plasma ethanol level after ethanol uptake.

  15. Ameliorating effects of Mango (Mangifera indica L.) fruit on plasma ethanol level in a mouse model assessed with 1H-NMR based metabolic profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, So-Hyun; K. Cho, Somi; Min, Tae-Sun; Kim, Yujin; Yang, Seung-Ok; Kim, Hee-Su; Hyun, Sun-Hee; Kim, Hana; Kim, Young-Suk; Choi, Hyung-Kyoon

    2011-01-01

    The ameliorating effects of Mango (Mangifera indica L.) flesh and peel samples on plasma ethanol level were investigated using a mouse model. Mango fruit samples remarkably decreased mouse plasma ethanol levels and increased the activities of alcohol dehydrogenase and acetaldehyde dehydrogenase. The 1H-NMR-based metabolomic technique was employed to investigate the differences in metabolic profiles of mango fruits, and mouse plasma samples fed with mango fruit samples. The partial least squares-discriminate analysis of 1H-NMR spectral data of mouse plasma demonstrated that there were clear separations among plasma samples from mice fed with buffer, mango flesh and peel. A loading plot demonstrated that metabolites from mango fruit, such as fructose and aspartate, might stimulate alcohol degradation enzymes. This study suggests that mango flesh and peel could be used as resources for functional foods intended to decrease plasma ethanol level after ethanol uptake. PMID:21562641

  16. Physico-chemical and antioxidant properties of four mango (Mangifera indica L.) cultivars in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng-Xia; Fu, Shu-Fang; Bi, Xiu-Fang; Chen, Fang; Liao, Xiao-Jun; Hu, Xiao-Song; Wu, Ji-Hong

    2013-05-01

    Four principal mango cultivars (Tainong No.1, Irwin, JinHwang and Keitt) grown in southern China were selected, and their physico-chemical and antioxidant properties were characterized and compared. Of all the four cultivars, Tainong No.1 had highest content of total phenols, ρ-coumaric acid, sinapic acid, quercetin, titratable acidity, citric acid, malic acid, fructose, higher antioxidant activities (DPPH, FRAP) and L(*), lower pH, PPO activity and individual weight. Keitt mangoes showed significantly (pmangoes exhibited significantly (pmango cultivars to be differentiated clearly based on all these physico-chemical and antioxidant properties determined in the study. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Nutritive value and nutrient digestibility of ensiled mango by-products

    OpenAIRE

    Sompong Sruamsiri

    2009-01-01

    Mango canning by-products (seed and peel) together with ensiled mango peel were subjected to analysis of dry matter (DM), ash, crude protein (CP), crude fibre (CF), ether extract (EE), nitrogen-free extract (NFE), gross energy (GE), neutral detergent fibre (NDF) and acid detergent fibre (ADF). In vitro digestibility of DM (IVDMD), ADF (IVADFD) and NDF (IVNDFD) was determined after digesting the by-products in buffered rumen fluid for 24 or 48 h in an incubator. CP content in peel, seed and p...

  18. An oxidoreductase from ‘Alphonso’ mango catalyzing biosynthesis of furaneol and reduction of reactive carbonyls

    OpenAIRE

    Kulkarni, R; Chidley, H.; Deshpande, A; Schmidt, A.; Pujari, K.; Giri, A; Gershenzon, J.; Gupta, V

    2013-01-01

    Two furanones, furaneol (4-hydroxy-2,5-dimethyl-3(2H)-furanone) and mesifuran (2,5-dimethyl-4-methoxy-3(2H)-furanone), are important constituents of flavor of the Alphonso cultivar of mango (Mangifera indica). To get insights into the biosynthesis of these furanones, we isolated an enone oxidoreductase gene from the Alphonso mango. It has high sequence similarity to an alkenal/one oxidoreductase from cucumber (79% identity) and enone oxidoreductases from tomato (73% identity) and strawberry (...

  19. CERATOCYSTIS WILT IN ‘UBÁ’ AND ‘DURA’ MANGO TREES UNDER WATER DEFICIT

    OpenAIRE

    SILVA, SAULO DAVID REZENDE DA; Siqueira,Dalmo Lopes de; SALOMÃO, LUIS CARLOS CHAMHUM; Cecon, Paulo Roberto; Alfenas,Acelino Couto

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The occurrence of water stress in mango trees grown in orchards located in semi-arid climates in Brazil is frequent. Water stress caused to plants may predispose them to the incidence of fungal diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of water deficit on the incidence and severity of Ceratocystis wilt in mango trees considered resistant. Seedlings of ‘Ubá’ and ‘Dura’ were kept in pots and submitted to different water stress levels and inoculated with Ceratocystis f...

  20. Promising features of mango (Mangifera indica L.) kernel oil: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Nadeem, Muhammad; Imran, Muhammad; Khalique, Anjum

    2016-01-01

    Mango kernel contains about 15 % good quality edible oil, that is comparable to soybean and cottonseed, which contain about 18–20 % oil. Mango kernel oil (MKO) has lower free fatty acids, carotenoid content and peroxide value, and is usually used without any processing, which is otherwise mandatory for commercial vegetable oils. Palmitic, stearic and oleic acids are the major fatty acids, triglyceride composition and fatty acid profile suggest wide range of trans free options. With 32–36 °C m...

  1. MANGO - A Magnetogram Analysis Service for Enhancement of the Heliophysics Data Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargatze, L. F.

    2011-12-01

    The Heliophysics Data Environment Enhancement program supports efforts to integrate data services for conducting research of solar-terrestrial interactions. MANGO, Magnetogram Analysis for the Network of Geophysical Observatories, is a service that is directed at Heliophysics researchers interested in processing magnetic field data from ground magnetometers. Ground magnetograms are essential for monitoring the response of the magnetosphere to solar wind coupling. For instance, it is difficult to understand how spacecraft particle and field variations fit in context of activity throughout the global magnetospheric system without using ground magnetic field data. The MANGO service package allows one to decompose ground magnetic field variations and estimate the relative contributions from secular, diurnal, ring current, and auroral current systems. The MANGO service package leverages the SPASE metadata registries of the Virtual Magnetospheric Observatory (VMO) to compile a list of available magnetogram data products. Currently, MANGO provides access to over 900 data products from about 350 ground magnetic field stations located around the globe. The VMO SPASE Granule registry contains ~150,000 files that comprise the MANGO relevant data products. And, the VMO Granule registry count is steadily increasing as more data products are described and ingested. Data selection from the distributed network of stations is naturally aided by using a world map to display the set of observatories. The MANGO web site (http://mango.igpp.ucla.edu), plots stations on a map that have data products, which meet user-defined criteria based on time of observation, station location, time cadence, magnetometer chain, etc. Note that Many of the ground magnetogram and geomagnetic index data products relevant to the MANGO effort are only available from their data providers in formats that allow the data to be packed. The formats used, and there are many types, save time in file retrieval and

  2. Detection and characterization of mango malformation and its causal agent in Spain

    OpenAIRE

    Crespo Palomo, María

    2014-01-01

    El mango (Mangifera indica L.) es un árbol originario de la región indobirmana, laderas del Himalaya y Sri Lanka, donde aún existen poblaciones silvestres y ha sido cultivado desde la antigüedad en la India como atestiguan las sagradas escrituras hindúes, los libros de los Vedas, redactadas entre el 1500 y el 1000 a. C. (Galán-Saúco, 2009). La dispersión del mango fue muy rápida por el subcontinente de la India y el archipiélago malayo con la apertura del comercio entre Asia y Europa. El mang...

  3. Emergency mosquito control associated with Hurricane Andrew--Florida and Louisiana, 1992.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-04-09

    Hurricane Andrew crossed south Florida on August 24, 1992 entered the Gulf of Mexico, and struck the Louisiana coast on August 26. In Florida, an estimated 25,000 housing units were destroyed and 37,000 severely damaged in a 200,000-acre area in the southern portion of Dade County; in Louisiana, an estimated 25,000 housing units were destroyed or severely damaged by the storm, primarily in the coastal sections of the 36-parish disaster area. Initial assessment of the disaster areas indicated a need for vector surveillance and control (1). This report summarizes actions to assess and alleviate mosquito-related problems in Florida and Louisiana.

  4. Ground-water data for the Riley and Andrews Resource Areas, southeastern Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townley, Paul J.; Soja, Constance M.; Sidle, W.C.

    1980-01-01

    Appraisals of the resources of selected management areas in eastern Oregon are being made by the U.S. Bureau of Land Mangement. To provide needed hydrologic information, the Bureau of Land Management requested the U.S. Geological Survey to inventory ground-water data for the Riley and Andrews Resource Areas. The inventory included field location of selected wells and springs; measurement of ground-water levels, temperatures, specific conductance, and pH; and the collection of ground-water samples from selected sources to determine dissolved chemical constituents.

  5. Rosa gallica l. var. officinalis (hort. ex Andrews) Ser. en el norte de Alicante (Comunidad Valenciana)

    OpenAIRE

    Ríos Ruiz, Segundo; Martinez-Frances, Vanessa

    2015-01-01

    Se ha localizado en el margen de la carretera comarcal CV 795 en su kilómetro 17 próximo a Ulls de Canals y dentro del término de Banyeres de Mariola, una buena población asilvestrada de Rosa gallica L. var. officinalis (hort. ex Andrews) Ser., que corresponde a la segunda población localizada en Alicante, puesto que se conocía una población pero situada próxima al litoral en la comarca de la Marina Alta. La llamada rosa de Provins o provincialis (de Provenza) es una de las rosas cultivadas e...

  6. Dennis C. Roberts & Susan R. Komives (Eds. (2016. Enhancing Student Learning and Development in Cross-Border Higher Education. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munita Dunn-Coetzee

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Enhancing Student Learning and Development in Cross-Border Higher Education, edited by Dennis C. Roberts and Susan R. Komives, is a book that resulted from a short-term study-abroad experience between the Universities of Maryland and San Diego with the Qatar Foundation’s Education City in Doha in 2010. This partnership challenged the way in which higher education internalisation was viewed – in such a way that the visit was replicated in 2012 and this book was authored.

  7. Transcriptome Analysis of Mango (Mangifera indica L.) Fruit Epidermal Peel to Identify Putative Cuticle-Associated Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafolla-Arellano, Julio C; Zheng, Yi; Sun, Honghe; Jiao, Chen; Ruiz-May, Eliel; Hernández-Oñate, Miguel A; González-León, Alberto; Báez-Sañudo, Reginaldo; Fei, Zhangjun; Domozych, David; Rose, Jocelyn K C; Tiznado-Hernández, Martín E

    2017-04-20

    Mango fruit (Mangifera indica L.) are highly perishable and have a limited shelf life, due to postharvest desiccation and senescence, which limits their global distribution. Recent studies of tomato fruit suggest that these traits are influenced by the expression of genes that are associated with cuticle metabolism. However, studies of these phenomena in mango fruit are limited by the lack of genome-scale data. In order to gain insight into the mango cuticle biogenesis and identify putative cuticle-associated genes, we analyzed the transcriptomes of peels from ripe and overripe mango fruit using RNA-Seq. Approximately 400 million reads were generated and de novo assembled into 107,744 unigenes, with a mean length of 1,717 bp and with this information an online Mango RNA-Seq Database (http://bioinfo.bti.cornell.edu/cgi-bin/mango/index.cgi) which is a valuable genomic resource for molecular research into the biology of mango fruit was created. RNA-Seq analysis suggested that the pathway leading to biosynthesis of the cuticle component, cutin, is up-regulated during overripening. This data was supported by analysis of the expression of several putative cuticle-associated genes and by gravimetric and microscopic studies of cuticle deposition, revealing a complex continuous pattern of cuticle deposition during fruit development and involving substantial accumulation during ripening/overripening.

  8. Transcriptome Analysis of Mango (Mangifera indica L.) Fruit Epidermal Peel to Identify Putative Cuticle-Associated Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafolla-Arellano, Julio C.; Zheng, Yi; Sun, Honghe; Jiao, Chen; Ruiz-May, Eliel; Hernández-Oñate, Miguel A.; González-León, Alberto; Báez-Sañudo, Reginaldo; Fei, Zhangjun; Domozych, David; Rose, Jocelyn K. C.; Tiznado-Hernández, Martín E.

    2017-04-01

    Mango fruit (Mangifera indica L.) are highly perishable and have a limited shelf life, due to postharvest desiccation and senescence, which limits their global distribution. Recent studies of tomato fruit suggest that these traits are influenced by the expression of genes that are associated with cuticle metabolism. However, studies of these phenomena in mango fruit are limited by the lack of genome-scale data. In order to gain insight into the mango cuticle biogenesis and identify putative cuticle-associated genes, we analyzed the transcriptomes of peels from ripe and overripe mango fruit using RNA-Seq. Approximately 400 million reads were generated and de novo assembled into 107,744 unigenes, with a mean length of 1,717 bp and with this information an online Mango RNA-Seq Database (http://bioinfo.bti.cornell.edu/cgi-bin/mango/index.cgi) which is a valuable genomic resource for molecular research into the biology of mango fruit was created. RNA-Seq analysis suggested that the pathway leading to biosynthesis of the cuticle component, cutin, is up-regulated during overripening. This data was supported by analysis of the expression of several putative cuticle-associated genes and by gravimetric and microscopic studies of cuticle deposition, revealing a complex continuous pattern of cuticle deposition during fruit development and involving substantial accumulation during ripening/overripening.

  9. Impacts of Hurricane Andrew on carbonate platform environments, northern Great Bahama Bank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boss, Stephen K.; Neumann, A. Conrad

    1993-10-01

    The northern (most energetic) quadrant of Hurricane Andrew (August 1992) passed over leeward-margin sand waves, bank-top sand shoals, reefs, and low islands of Great Bahama Bank for which an extensive prestorm data base exists. A reconnaissance survey seven weeks after Hurricane Andrew evaluated storm impacts on these bank-top settings. Resurveyed seismic profiles showed that positions, dimensions, and orientations of platform sand bodies were unchanged relative to fixed bedrock features. Surveys of reef communities indicated only minor storm-related disturbance. Coral bleaching may be due to storm-induced environmental stress. In addition, storm-wave plucking of boulders from emergent rocky cays resulted in localized crushing of reef biota. On low islands, beach erosion and storm surge were insignificant, and storm damage to Casuarina forests was minor and substrate-specific. Observed minimal hurricane impacts on northern Great Bahama Bank environments lying 10-75 km from the hurricane eye are reconciled by analysis of meteorological data, which show significant weakening of the storm (expressed as a rise in central barometric pressure of ˜20 mbar) during passage across the bank-top. This study demonstrates the importance of specific dynamic aspects of hurricanes (e.g., varying intensity, strength, size, forward speed, duration) which influence their geologic potential, even over relatively short distances along the storm track of an individual hurricane.

  10. Demographic effects of natural disasters: a case study of Hurricane Andrew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S K; McCarty, C

    1996-05-01

    Many studies have considered the economic, social, and psychological effects of hurricanes, earthquakes, floods, tornadoes, and other natural disasters, but few have considered their demographic effects. In this paper we describe and evaluate a method for measuring the effects of Hurricane Andrew on the housing stock and population distribution in Dade County, Florida. Using information collected through sample surveys and from other data sources, we investigate the extent of housing damages, the number of people forced out of their homes, where they went, how long they stayed, and whether they returned to their prehurricane residences. We conclude that more than half the housing units in Dade County were damaged by Hurricane Andrew; that more than 353,000 people were forced to leave their homes, at least temporarily; and that almost 40,000 people left the county permanently as a direct result of the hurricane. We believe that this study will provide methodological guidance to analysts studying the demographic effects of other large-scale natural disasters.

  11. Sleep disturbance and its relationship to psychiatric morbidity after Hurricane Andrew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellman, T A; David, D; Kulick-Bell, R; Hebding, J; Nolan, B

    1995-11-01

    Sleep disturbance is an important dimension of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), but most of the limited available data were obtained years after the original traumatic event. This study provides information on sleep disturbance and its relationship to posttraumatic morbidity from evaluations done within a year after the trauma. Sleep and psychiatric symptoms of 54 victims (12 men and 42 women) of Hurricane Andrew who had no psychiatric illness in the 6 months before the hurricane were evaluated. A subset of hurricane victims with active psychiatric morbidity (N = 10) and nine comparison subjects who were unaffected by the hurricane were examined in a sleep laboratory. A broad range of sleep-related complaints were rated as being greater after the hurricane, and psychiatric morbidity (which was most commonly PTSD, followed by depression) had a significant effect on most of the subjective sleep measures. In addition, subjects with active morbidity endorsed greater frequencies of "bad dreams" and general sleep disturbances before the hurricane. Polysomnographic results for the hurricane victims revealed a greater number of arousals and entries into stage 1 sleep. REM density correlated positively with both the PTSD symptom of reexperiencing trauma and global distress. Subjects affected by Hurricane Andrew reported sleep disturbances, particularly those subjects with psychiatric morbidity. Tendencies to experience bad dreams and interrupted sleep before a trauma appear to mark vulnerability to posttraumatic morbidity. Results of sleep laboratory evaluations suggested brief shifts toward higher arousal levels during sleep for PTSD subjects and a relationship of REM phasic activity and symptom severity.

  12. Delayed tree mortality in the Atchafalaya Basin of Southern Louisiana following Hurricane Andrew

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeland, B.D.; Gorham, L.E.

    2009-01-01

    Hurricanes can damage trees in forested wetlands, and the potential for mortality related to these storms exists due to the effects of tree damage over time. In August 1992, Hurricane Andrew passed through the forested wetlands of southern Louisiana with winds in excess of 225 kph. Although more than 78 of the basal area was destroyed in some areas, most trees greater than 2.5 cm dbh were alive and resprouting prolifically the following year (98.8). Survival of most tree species was similarly high two years after the hurricane, but mortality rates of some species increased dramatically. For example, Populus heterophylla (swamp cottonwood) mortality increased from 7.8 to 59.2 (n 76) and Salix interior (sandbar willow) mortality increased from 4.5 to 57.1 (n 21). Stem sprouts on many up-rooted hardwood trees of other species were still alive in 1998, 6 years after the hurricane. Due to the understory tree species composition, regeneration, and high levels of resprouting, there was little change in species composition or perhaps a slight shift toward more shade and flood tolerant species six years following the hurricane event. Triadica sebifera (Chinese tallow) was found on some of the sites heavily disturbed by Hurricane Andrew, and may proliferate at the expense of native tree species. ?? 2009 The Society of Wetland Scientists.

  13. Specific features of basalts from the western part of Andrew Bain Fault, Southwest Indian Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyve, A. A.; Skolotnev, S. G.

    2017-12-01

    This paper reports original data on the composition of volcanic rocks in the western part of the Andrew Bain Fault of the South-West Indian Ridge obtained in the 23rd voyage of R/V Akademik Nikolai Strakhov. In accordance with high La/Th and low Nb/U ratios, the basalt compositions of stations S2317, S2318, and S2330 could result from melting of the DM-type source with HIMU traces. Meanwhile, the enriched samples of station S2326 correspond to a mantle source with a considerable contribution of recycled sediments (EM). Sample S2326/35, which is composed of a melt almost completely depleted in EM material, corresponds to the volcanic rocks of the Marion and Prince Edward islands. The obtained and available data on the SWIR segment from Bouvet Island to Andrew Bain Fault are indicative of small mantle heterogeneities in this region. Two possible variants of their origin are considered: either preservation of the enriched material fragments in the depleted mantle during the split of Gondwana or "contamination" of the mantle with plume material with the formation of vein irregularities before opening of the ocean in this region. In the latter case, the plume material could cover a huge area not constrained by the young plume magmatism regions on Bouvet, Marion, and Prince Edward islands.

  14. ANDREWES'S CHRISTMAS FAIRY TALE: ATYPICAL THINKING ABOUT CANCER AETIOLOGY IN 1935.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaran, Neeraja; van Helvoort, Ton

    2016-06-20

    This paper uses a short 'Christmas fairy-story for oncologists' sent by Christopher Andrewes with a 1935 letter to Peyton Rous as the centrepiece of a reflection on the state of knowledge and speculation about the viral aetiology of cancer in the 1930s. Although explicitly not intended for public circulation at the time, the fairy-story merits publication for its significance in the history of ideas about viruses, which are taken for granted today. Andrewes and Rous were prominent members of the international medical research community and yet faced strong resistance to their theory that viruses could cause such tumours as chicken sarcomas and rabbit papillomas. By looking at exchanges between these men among themselves and other proponents of their theories and with their oncologist detractors, we highlight an episode in the behind-the-scenes workings of medical science and show how informal correspondence helped keep alive a vital but then heterodox idea about the role of viruses in causing cancer.

  15. William Horner Andrews (1887-1953)- first professor of physiology at Onderstepoort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verwoerd, D W; Andrews, W J H

    2011-03-01

    W H Andrews qualified as a veterinarian in London in 1908 and was recruited soon after, in 1909, by Sir Arnold Theiler to join the staff of the newly established veterinary laboratory at Onderstepoort. After initial studies on the treatment of trypanosomosis and on snake venoms he was deployed by Theiler in 1911 to start research on lamsiekte (botulism)at a field station on the farm Kaffraria near Christiana, where he met and married his wife Doris. After a stint as Captain in the SA Veterinary Corps during World War I he succeeded D T Mitchell as head of the Allerton Laboratory in 1918, where he excelled in research on toxic plants, inter alia identifying Matricaria nigellaefolia as the cause of staggers in cattle. When the Faculty of Veterinary Science was established in 1920 he was appointed as the first Professor of Physiology. After the graduation of the first class in 1924, and due to health problems, he returned to the UK, first to the Royal Veterinary College and then to the Weybridge Veterinary Laboratories of which he became Director in 1927. After his retirement in 1947 he returned to South Africa as a guest worker at Onderstepoort where he again became involved in teaching physiology when Prof. Quin unexpectedly died in 1950. Andrews died in Pretoria in 1953 and was buried in the Rebecca Street Cemetery.

  16. Ecological evaluation of proposed dredged material from St. Andrew Bay, Florida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayhew, H.L.; Word, J.Q.; Kohn, N.P.; Pinza, M.R.; Karle, L.M.; Ward, J.A. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1993-10-01

    The US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Mobile District, requested that the Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) conduct field sampling and chemical and biological testing to determine the suitability of potential dredged material for open ocean disposal. Sediment from St. Andrew Bay was chemically characterized and evaluated for biological toxicity and bioaccumulation of contaminants. The Tier III guidance for ocean disposal testing requires tests of water column effects (following dredged material disposal), deposited sediment toxicity, and bioaccumulation of contaminants from deposited sediment (dredged material). To meet these requirements, the MSL conducted suspended-particulate-phase (SPP) toxicity tests, solid-phase toxicity tests, and bioaccumulation testing on sediment representing potential dredged material from Panama City Harbor. Physical and chemical characterization of sediment to support toxicity and bioaccumulation results was also conducted on both the test and reference sediments. The MSL collected sediment samples from five sites in St. Andrew Bay and one reference site near Lands End Peninsula. The five test sediments and the reference sediment were analyzed for physical and chemical sediment characteristics, SPP chemical contaminants, solid-phase toxicity, SPP toxicity, and bioaccumulation of contaminants.

  17. Effect of irradiation on the biochemical and organoleptic changes during the ripening of papaya and mango fruits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacroix, M.; Bernard, L.; Jobin, M.; Milot, S.; Gagnon, M. (Centre d' Irradiation du Canada, Laval, Quebec (Canada))

    1990-01-01

    Papaya and mango rot caused by fungi is a major problem during storage and marketing. Gamma irradiation treatment was used to determine its effect on the quality of papayas and mangoes irradiated at 0,5 to 0,95 kGy. The level of respiration, soluble solids, texture, vitamin C and the sensorial evaluation were effectuated. The results indicate that irradiation treatment reduces significantly (p{le}0,001) weakens the texture of mangoes. The content of soluble solids and vitamin C are not significantly affected by the irradiation. The sensory evaluation indicates that up to 0,95 kGy the sensorial quality is not changed. (author).

  18. Intestinal Permeability and Cellular Antioxidant Activity of Phenolic Compounds from Mango (Mangifera indica cv. Ataulfo Peels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramón Pacheco-Ordaz

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Mango (Mangifera indica cv. Ataulfo peel contains bound phenolics that may be released by alkaline or acid hydrolysis and may be converted into less complex molecules. Free phenolics from mango cv. Ataulfo peel were obtained using a methanolic extraction, and their cellular antioxidant activity (CAA and permeability were compared to those obtained for bound phenolics released by alkaline or acid hydrolysis. Gallic acid was found as a simple phenolic acid after alkaline hydrolysis along with mangiferin isomers and quercetin as aglycone and glycosides. Only gallic acid, ethyl gallate, mangiferin, and quercetin were identified in the acid fraction. The acid and alkaline fractions showed the highest CAA (60.5% and 51.5% when tested at 125 µg/mL. The value of the apparent permeability coefficient (Papp across the Caco-2/HT-29 monolayer of gallic acid from the alkaline fraction was higher (2.61 × 10−6 cm/s than in the other fractions and similar to that obtained when tested pure (2.48 × 10−6 cm/s. In conclusion, mango peels contain bound phenolic compounds that, after their release, have permeability similar to pure compounds and exert an important CAA. This finding can be applied in the development of nutraceuticals using this important by-product from the mango processing industry.

  19. Effect of high hydrostatic pressure on antioxidant content of 'Ataulfo' mango during postharvest maturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviana Guadalupe Ortega

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of pressurization on the concentration of some antioxidant compounds and the antiradical efficiency during the ripening process of 'Ataulfo' mango. The fruits at physiological maturity stage were pressurized at 15, 30, or 60 MPa for 10 or 20 min. Control fruits were not pressurized. The fruits were stored at 25 °C and changes in the concentration of ascorbic acid, total phenols, total flavonoids, total carotenoids, and antiradical efficiency were evaluated. It was demonstrated that in 'Ataulfo' mango high hydrostatic pressure treatments at 60 and 30 MPa for 20 minutes induced the synthesis of ascorbic acid during storage maybe as a consequence of physiological changes and possible structural modification of the cells, while the fruits pressurized at 15 MPa showed no effect on this parameter. On the other hand, the use of 15 MPa for 10 minutes increased the synthesis of phenols, flavonoids, carotenoids, and antiradical efficiency in 'Ataulfo' mango compared to that of the control fruit. In conclusion, this behavior seemed to be due to the low hydrostatic pressure treatments (15 Mpa, which stimulated the synthesis of antioxidants in the mango fruit and ripening was not inhibited.

  20. Bio-ecological studies of the mango stone weevil in southern Ghana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... to suggest that flowers may provide food and breeding sites. Infestation by the weevil did not affect fruit quality despite the high potential to disrupt the export trade in mangoes. The low quarantine rejection threshold of one fruit in 40 set in the export market suggests that solution to the problem posed by the weevil requires ...

  1. Effectiveness of neem, cashew and mango trees in the uptake of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effectiveness of neem, cashew and mango trees in the uptake of heavy metals in mechanic village, Nigeria. ZO Ojekunle, DR Ubani, RO Sangowusi. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  2. The species composition of thrips (insecta: thysanoptera) inhabiting mango orchards in pulau pinang, malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliakbarpour, Hamaseh; Rawi, Che Salmah Md

    2012-05-01

    A field study was conducted at two localities on Pulau Pinang, Malaysia, during two consecutive mango flowering seasons in 2009 to identify variations in the species composition of thrips infesting treated and untreated mango (Mangifera indica L.) orchards. The CO2 immobilisation technique and the cutting method were used to recover different thrips species from mango panicles and weed host plants, respectively. The mango panicles and various weed species within the treated orchard were found to harbour four thrips species from the family Thripidae. These species were identified as Thrips hawaiiensis (Morgan), Scirtothrips dorsalis (Hood), Frankliniella schultzei (Trybom) and Megalurothrips usitatus (Bagnall). The weed species Mimosa pudica, Cleome rutidosperma, Echinochloa colonum, Borreria laevicaulis, Veronia cinerea and Asystasia coromandeliana served as additional hosts to these thrips. Six thrips species were found in the untreated orchard. These species included Thrips palmi (Karny), Haplothrips sp. (Amyot and Serville) and the four thrips species found in the treated orchard. A brief description of the larvae for each genus is provided.

  3. Differential leaf gas exchange performance of mango cultivars infected by different isolates of Ceratocystis fimbriata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilka Messner da Silva Bispo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Caused by the vascular fungus Ceratocystis fimbriata, mango wilt is considered to be one of the most serious threats in mango-producing regions worldwide. However, changes in leaf gas exchange level and the mechanisms underlying host responses to this fungal infection remain poorly described. This study aimed to evaluate potential changes in the leaf gas exchange of different mango cultivars (Ubá, Espada, Haden and Tommy Atkins in response to two Brazilian isolates of C. fimbriata (CEBS15 and MSAK16 to non-invasively assess cultivar variability in relation to the basal level of resistance to mango wilt. Both isolates, regardless of the cultivar, caused reductions in stomatal conductance and, thus, a reduction in CO2 assimilation via diffusive limitations. Taking into account the full length of the internal lesion and the radial colonization of the stem tissues, both isolates showed equivalent aggressiveness when inoculated into the Haden and Tommy Atkins cultivars. Conversely, when compared to the CEBS15 isolate of C. fimbriata, the MSAK16 isolate was more aggressive in cv. Espada and less aggressive in cv. Ubá.

  4. Modelling and experimental validation of thin layer indirect solar drying of mango slices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dissa, A.O.; Bathiebo, J.; Kam, S.; Koulidiati, J. [Laboratoire de Physique et de Chimie de l' Environnement (LPCE), Unite de Formation et de Recherche en Sciences Exactes et Appliquee (UFR/SEA), Universite de Ouagadougou, Avenue Charles de Gaulle, BP 7021 Kadiogo (Burkina Faso); Savadogo, P.W. [Laboratoire Sol Eau Plante, Institut de l' Environnement et de Recherches Agricoles, 01 BP 476, Ouagadougou (Burkina Faso); Desmorieux, H. [Laboratoire d' Automatisme et de Genie des Procedes (LAGEP), UCBL1-CNRS UMR 5007-CPE Lyon, Bat.308G, 43 bd du 11 Nov. 1918 Villeurbanne, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon1, Lyon (France)

    2009-04-15

    The thin layer solar drying of mango slices of 8 mm thick was simulated and experimented using a solar dryer designed and constructed in laboratory. Under meteorological conditions of harvest period of mangoes, the results showed that 3 'typical days' of drying were necessary to reach the range of preservation water contents. During these 3 days of solar drying, 50%, 40% and 5% of unbound water were eliminated, respectively, at the first, second and the third day. The final water content obtained was about 16 {+-} 1.33% d.b. (13.79% w.b.). This final water content and the corresponding water activity (0.6 {+-} 0.02) were in accordance with previous work. The drying rates with correction for shrinkage and the critical water content were experimentally determined. The critical water content was close to 70% of the initial water content and the drying rates were reduced almost at 6% of their maximum value at night. The thin layer drying model made it possible to simulate suitably the solar drying kinetics of mango slices with a correlation coefficient of r{sup 2} = 0.990. This study thus contributed to the setting of solar drying time of mango and to the establishment of solar drying rates' curves of this fruit. (author)

  5. Response of Albino Rats to Dietary Levels of Mango Seed Cake ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mangifera indica (Mango) seed kernel from Nigeria containing about 44% moisture, 6% Protein, 12.8% fat, 32.8% carbohydrate, 2% ash and 0.39% tannin, was defatted by petroleum ether, detoxified by ethanol, thoroughly sundried, then ground and used as supplementary animal diet ingredient. Feed conversion ratio of ...

  6. Residues of acephate and its metabolite methamidophos in/on mango fruit (Mangifera indica L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Soudamini; Ahuja, A K; Deepa, M; Sharma, Debi

    2011-01-01

    Mango, the major fruit crop of India is affected by stone weevil, which can cause serious damage to the fruits. Acephate gives good control of mango stone weevil. Residues of acephate and its major metabolite, methamidophos were evaluated on mango fruits following repeated spray applications at the recommended dose (0.75 kg a.i. ha⁻¹) and double the recommended dose (1.5 kg a.i. ha⁻¹). Acephate residues mostly remained on the fruit peel which persisted up to 30 days. Movement of residues to the fruit pulp was detected after 1 day of application, increased to maximum of 0.14 and 0.26 mg kg⁻¹ after 3 days and reached to below detectable level (BDL) after 20 days. Methamidophos, a metabolite of acephate, was detected from 3rd day onwards in both peel and pulp and persisted up to 15 days. The residues (acephate + methamidophos) dissipated with the half-life of 5 days in peel and pulp. A safe pre-harvest interval of 30 days is recommended for consumption of mango fruits following treatment of acephate at the recommended dose of 0.75 kg a.i. ha⁻¹.

  7. Leaving Mango Street: Speech, Action and the Construction of Narrative in Britton's Spectator Stance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford-Garrett, Katherine

    2009-01-01

    This paper attempts to unite "The House on Mango Street" by Sandra Cisneros with the participant and spectator theories of James Britton and D. W. Harding in the hopes that such a union will provide new insights into each. In particular, this article explores how the speech acts of Esperanza, the novel's protagonist, are indicative of a shifting…

  8. Mango Street and Malnourished Readers: Politics and Realities in an "At-Risk" Middle School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, M. Alayne

    2007-01-01

    This article presents results of a literature-response study conducted with at-risk middle school students of Latino, African American, and Caucasian backgrounds. The study was guided by an assumption of students' ability to read and coherently assimilate elements of "The House on Mango Street," by Sandra Cisneros (1984). Although centered in…

  9. Adsorption of basic Red 46 using sea mango (Cerbera odollam) based activated carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azmi, Nur Azira Iqlima; Zainudin, Nor Fauziah; Ali, Umi Fazara Md

    2015-05-01

    Sea mango or Cerbera Odollam is another source of carbonaceous material that can be found abundantly in Malaysia. In this research, it is used as a new agricultural source of activated carbon. Sea mango activated carbon was prepared by chemical activation using potassium hydroxide (KOH). The sea mango was soaked in KOH at impregnation ratio of 1:1 and followed by carbonization at temperature of 600°C for 1 hour. The sample was then characterized using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) for surface morphology, while Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) was used to study the surface area. The result shown that sea mango activated carbon (SMAC) developed new pores on its surface and the BET surface area measured was 451.87 m2/g. The SMAC performance was then tested for the removal of Basic Red 46 in batch process. The removal of Basic Red 46 (50 mg/L, natural pH, 0.1 g SMAC) was more than 99% in 15 minutes where it reached equilibrium in 30 minutes.

  10. Measurement of mango firmness by non-destructive limited compression technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Penchaiya, P.; Uthairatanakij, A.; Srilaong, V.; Kanlayanarat, S.; Tijskens, L.M.M.; Tansakul, A.

    2015-01-01

    Thai mango 'Nam Dok Mai Si-Thong' has an attractive golden yellow skin colour even in immature fruit, not ready for consumption. Firmness becomes an important quality attribute to assess the ripening stage of the fruit during storage. In this study, the possibility of a non-destructive method

  11. Adsorption of basic Red 46 using sea mango (Cerbera odollam) based activated carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azmi, Nur Azira Iqlima; Zainudin, Nor Fauziah [School of Bioprocess Engineering, Universiti Malaysia Perlis, Kompleks Pusat Pengajian Jejawi 3, 02600 Arau, Perlis (Malaysia); Ali, Umi Fazara Md [School of Environmental Engineering, Universiti Malaysia Perlis, Kompleks Pusat Pengajian Jejawi 3, 02600 Arau, Perlis (Malaysia)

    2015-05-15

    Sea mango or Cerbera Odollam is another source of carbonaceous material that can be found abundantly in Malaysia. In this research, it is used as a new agricultural source of activated carbon. Sea mango activated carbon was prepared by chemical activation using potassium hydroxide (KOH). The sea mango was soaked in KOH at impregnation ratio of 1:1 and followed by carbonization at temperature of 600°C for 1 hour. The sample was then characterized using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) for surface morphology, while Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) was used to study the surface area. The result shown that sea mango activated carbon (SMAC) developed new pores on its surface and the BET surface area measured was 451.87 m{sup 2}/g. The SMAC performance was then tested for the removal of Basic Red 46 in batch process. The removal of Basic Red 46 (50 mg/L, natural pH, 0.1 g SMAC) was more than 99% in 15 minutes where it reached equilibrium in 30 minutes.

  12. Tolerance of mango cv. ´Ataulfo' to irradiation with Co-60 vs. hydrothermal phytosanitary treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Simuta, Y.; Hernández, Emilio; Aceituno-Medina, Marysol; Liedo, Pablo; Escobar-López, Arseny; Montoya, Pablo; Bravo, Bigail; Hallman, Guy J.; Bustos, M. Emilia; Toledo, Jorge

    2017-10-01

    The use of ionizing irradiation or the use of hot water treatment (HWT) has been demonstrated as a successful commercial phytosanitary treatment during the past two decades. Several countries currently use this technology for commercial treatments to meet plant quarantine requirements. However, hydrothermal treatment has been found to significantly affect the firmness of ;Ataulfo; mango fruit, the susceptibility to damage by cold and it also accelerates their maturation. In this study, we focused on the effect of irradiation doses on the sensorial quality and the physiochemical properties of mango cv ;Ataulfo; compared with the traditional hot water treatment. We found that doses of 150 Gy and 300 Gy of gamma radiation can be applied successfully as well as the hot water treatment. There was no significant difference in between irradiation treatments in terms of weight loss, external and internal color, pH, soluble solids, titratable acidity and firmness, and consumer's acceptance. There was no adverse effect of color appearance, odor and flavor, indicating that consumers will have the willingness to buy and consume irradiated mangoes. Irradiation of mangoes can be a successful post-harvest treatment as an alternative to the hot water treatment.

  13. Pulsed electric field and combination processing of mango nectar: effect on volatile compounds and HMF formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Bawa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mango nectar is a commercially familiar and preferred product. The traditional processing of mango nectar has been by thermal processing which resulted in the alteration of the flavour of the product due to the effect of high temperature. The thermal processing of the nectar also resulted in the production of byproducts of non-enzymatic browning such as 5- hydroxy methyl furfural (HMF. These process induced effects, affect both the nutritive and sensory attributes of the fruit product, making it less preferable. With the growing interest and awareness about the benefits of alternative non-thermal technologies, such as pulsed electric field (PEF, the present work was proposed to use PEF to minimize the loss of volatiles and formation of HMF. The study involves thermal (96 ºC for 300 s and 600 s, PEF (24 µs, 120 Hz and 38 kV/cm and combination processing (PEF + Thermal (96 ºC for 90 s of mango nectar. The effect of these treatments on the volatile composition of mango nectar has been analysed using GC-MS technique. The reduction in the volatile compounds was significant (p 0.05 different from unprocessed sample, proving the fresh-like character of the product.

  14. Social capital and mango marketing in Odo-oba and Fiditi markets of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study evaluated the role of social capital in marketing of mango fruits in order to improve the marketing services and efficiency of the marketers in Oyo State, Nigeria. Primary data for the study were collected using structured questionnaire. Descriptive statistics and least square regression were used to analyze ...

  15. A Case Study of a Decision Support System on Mango Fruit Maturity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walsh, K.B.; Subedi, P.; Tijskens, L.M.M.

    2015-01-01

    Mango fruit maturity can be difficult to determine from external attributes. Assessment of parameters of fruit on tree (dry matter, internal flesh colour) relevant to estimation of fruit maturity was undertaken with a handheld (near infrared spectroscopic) system. Measurement error on dry matter was

  16. Biotechnological advances in mango (Mangifera indica L.) and their future implication in crop improvement: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Hare; Singh, S K

    2007-01-01

    Biotechnology can complement conventional breeding and expedite the mango improvement programmes. Studies involving in vitro culture and selection, micropropagation, embryo rescue, genetic transformation, marker-assisted characterization and DNA fingerprinting, etc. are underway at different centers worldwide. In vitro culture and somatic embryogenesis of several different genotypes have been achieved. The nucellus excised from immature fruitlets is the appropriate explant for induction of embryogenic cultures. High frequency somatic embryogenesis has been achieved in some genotypes; however, some abnormalities can occur during somatic embryo germination. Embryo rescue from young and dropped fruitlets can improve the hybridization success in a limited flowering season. Protocols for protoplast culture and regeneration have also been developed. In vitro selections for antibiotic tolerance and fungal toxin resistance have been very promising for germplasm screening. Genetic transformation using Agrobacterium tumefaciens has been reported. Genes that are involved with fruit ripening have been cloned and there have been attempts to deliver these genes into plants. DNA fingerprinting and studies on genetic diversity of mango cultivars and Mangifera species are also being conducted at several research stations. The purpose of this review is to focus upon contemporary information on biotechnological advances made in mango. It also describes some ways of overcoming the problems encountered during in vitro propagation of mango.

  17. The effect of dietary inclusion of mango ( Magnifera indica L.) fruit ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Animal response trials aimed at investigating the effect of different levels of mango fruit waste (MFW) on growth performance and carcass characteristics of Cobb-500 broiler chickens were carried out. One-hundred sixty day-old chicks with similar body weight were randomly distributed to four treatment diets each with four ...

  18. Effect of high hydrostatic pressure on the physiology of Manila mango.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Ortiz, M A; De la Cruz-Medina, J; de Los Monteros, J J Espinosa; Oliart-Ros, R M; Rebolledo-Martinez, A; Ramírez, J A; García, H S

    2013-06-01

    Manila mangoes (Mangifera indica L.) have sensory characteristics that make them attractive for consumption as a fresh fruit. A large portion of the annual yield of this fruit is infested by the Mexican fruit fly (Anastrepha ludens), adversely impacting the quality of the crop. Hence, it is necessary to develop economically viable postharvest treatments to reduce the damage caused by this insect. Currently, high hydrostatic pressures are used to guarantee the safety of many processed foods. The objective of this work was to assess the effects of high hydrostatic pressure on mangoes at their physiological maturity. High hydrostatic pressures were applied to mangoes at three levels: 50, 100 and 200 megapascals applied for four different time periods (0, 5, 10 and 20 min). Physiologically mature mangoes were more resistant to changes in response to the pressure of 50 MPa. Reduction of physiological activity by application of high hydrostatic pressure opens a new avenue for the research on treatments intended to enhance preservation of whole fresh fruit.

  19. Applications of Mango's light hydrocarbon parameters to petroleum from Tarim basin, NW China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chunming Zhang [Yangtze Univ., Jingzhou, Hubei (China). Dept. of Geochemistry; Yangtze Univ., Jingzhou, Hubei (China). Key Lab. of Exploration Technologies for Oil and Gas Resources; Sitian Li [China Univ. of Geosciences, Beijing (China). Dept. of Energy Resources; Hongjing Zhao; Jun Zhang [Yangtze Univ., Jingzhou, Hubei (China). Dept. of Geochemistry

    2005-03-01

    Light hydrocarbons in oils from the Tarim basin, NW China, were analyzed by GC. The light hydrocarbon parameters proposed by Mango revealed the distributions of the oils as two main types, marine and terrigenous sources. The Mango parameter K{sub 1} not only displays a remarkable invariance ({approx} 1) in most of the oils, but also shows significant variations (ranging from 1.20 to 1.54) in the oils occurring in the eastern part of the Tazhong Fault Uplift (EPTFU) located in the center of the Tarim basin. This variation of the K{sub 1} value may indicate different petroleum systems in the areas which are superimposed in the EPTFU. Parameter K{sub 2} proposed by Mango shows a significant variation between the two main oil types. The marine oils are characterized by relatively low values of K{sub 2} (average 0.23) and the terrigenous oils by relatively high K{sub 2} values (average 0.35), with general invariance within the same oil set. A plot of (P{sub 3} + P{sub 2} + N{sub 2}) vs. (N{sub 1}{sup 6}) based on the model proposed by Mango can be used not only to discriminate between the two main genetic oils from the Tarim basin, but also to classify the marine oils from the Lunnan area into two sub-types, which may indicate two sub-petroleum systems existing in the area. (author)

  20. Mango butter emulsion gels as cocoa butter equivalents: physical, thermal, and mechanical analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagiri, Sai S; Sharma, Vijeta; Basak, Piyali; Pal, Kunal

    2014-11-26

    The search for cocoa butter equivalents in food and pharmaceutical industries has been gaining importance. In the present study, mango butter was explored as cocoa butter equivalent. Aqueous gelatin solution (20% w/w) containing cocoa butter and mango butter water-in-oil (fat) type emulsion gels were prepared by hot emulsification method. XRD and DSC melting profiles suggested the presence of unstable polymorphic forms (α and β') of fats in the emulsion gels. The crystal size and solid fat content analyses suggested that the presence of aqueous phase might have hindered the transformation of unstable polymorphic forms to stable polymorphic form (β) in the emulsion gels. Fat crystals in the emulsion gels were formed by instantaneous nucleation via either uni- or bidimensional growth (Avrami analysis). The viscoelastic nature of the emulsion gels was evaluated by modified Peleg's analysis (stress relaxation study). Results inferred that the physical, thermal, and mechanical properties of mango butter emulsion gels are comparable to those of cocoa butter emulsion gels. On the basis of preliminary studies, it was suggested that the mango butter emulsion gels may have potential to be used as cocoa butter equivalents.

  1. [In vitro and in vivo effects of mango pulp (Mangifera indica cv. Azucar) in colon carcinogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrales-Bernal, Andrea; Amparo Urango, Luz; Rojano, Benjamín; Maldonado, Maria Elena

    2014-03-01

    Mango pulp contains ascorbic acid, carotenoids, polyphenols, terpenoids and fiber which are healthy and could protect against colon cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antiproliferative and preventive capacity of an aqueous extract of Mangifera indica cv. Azúcar on a human colon adenocarcinoma cell line (SW480) and in a rodent model of colorectal cancer, respectively. The content of total phenolics, flavonoids and carotenoids were also analyzed in the extract. SW480 cell growth was inhibited in a dose and time dependent manner by 22.3% after a 72h exposure to the extract (200 µg/ mL). Colon carcinogenesis was initiated in Balb/c mice by two intra-peritoneal injections of azoxymethane (AOM) at the third and fourth week of giving mango in drinking water (0.3%, 0.6%, 1.25%). After 10 weeks of treatment, in the colon of mice receiving 0.3% mango, aberrant crypt foci formation was inhibited more than 60% (p=0,05) and the inhibition was dose-dependent when compared with controls receiving water. These results show that mango pulp, a natural food, non toxic, part of human being diet, contains bioactive compounds able to reduce growth of tumor cells and to prevent the appearance of precancerous lesions in colon during carcinogenesis initiation.

  2. Detrimental Effects of Mango Stem Bark on the Histology of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Various degrees of architectural disruptions and degeneration were also noticed in the histological sections of the prefrontal cortex, which were nd more pronounced in the pups exposed to the extract during the 2nd trimester. The use of concoction of Mango stem bark should be discouraged, and more importantly during ...

  3. Development of an efficient protocol for genomic DNA extraction from mango (Mangifera indica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MOHAMMAD AHSANUL KABIR

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Majumder DAN, Hassan L, Rahim MA, Kabir MA. 2011. Development of an efficient protocol for genomic DNA extraction from mango (Mangifera indica. Nusantara Bioscience 3: 105-111. A simple and efficient method for genomic DNA extraction from woody fruit crops containing high polysaccharide levels has been described here. In the present study, three kinds of plant DNA extraction protocols were studied and the target was to establish the water-saturated ether (WSE with 1.25 M NaCl method as the most efficient protocol for removing the highly concentrated polysaccharides from genomic DNA of woody fruit crops. This method involves the modified CTAB or SDS procedure employing a purification step to remove polysaccharides using the WSE method. Precipitation with an equal volume of isopropanol caused a DNA pellet to form. After being washed with 70% ethyl alcohol, the pellet became easily dissolved in TE buffer. Using these three methods, DNA was extracted from samples of 60 mango genotypes, including young, mature, old, frosted old and withered old leaves. Compared with the three studied DNA extraction protocols of mango, it was found that the WSE method with NaCl had the highest value of average percentage (85.44% in DNA content of the mango genotypes. The average yield of DNA ranged from 5.05 µg/µL to11.28 µg/µL. DNA was suitable for PCR and RAPD analyses and long-term storage for further use.

  4. Calcium carbide (CaC2): Effect on fruit set and yield of mango ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reviewer

    place in periodic cycles is termed as flushesgrowth. Vegetative growth through flushes .... Effect of different levels of wax-coated CaC2 with NPK on vegetative, reproductive, physical, physiological and biochemical attributes of mango ..... performance of potato (solanum tuberosum) tubers. New Zealand J. crop. Hort. Sci.

  5. A comparison of the kinetics of mango drying in open-air, solar, and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was undertaken to investigate and compare the kinetics of mango drying using three basic drying methods: open-air drying on wire mesh racks; solar drying in a prototype dryer equipped with solar-powered exhaust fans; and forced-air drying in an Armfield Model UOP8 laboratory-scale tray dryer. Results could ...

  6. A comparative study of direct and indirect solar drying of mango ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this work, direct and indirect solar drying parameters of two mango varieties were estimated and compared using direct and indirect solar dryers under the same meteorological conditions. For both drying methods, drying curves were established and fitted using 10 semi-empirical models, drying rate and drying efficiency ...

  7. Characteristic of Fermented Drink from Whey Cheese with Addition of Mango (Mangifera x odorata) Juice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desnilasari, D.; Kumalasari, R.

    2017-12-01

    Whey cheese could be utilized become product such as fermented drink which is added by mango kweni juice to improve their acceptance. The aim of this research was to characterized physicochemical, sensory, and microbiology of fermented drink based on whey cheese with addition different concentration mango kweni juice of (0%, 5%, 10%, and 15%) by Lactobacillus casei. Color scale, viscosity, pH, total soluble solid, total free acid, fat, protein, total L. casei and sensory evaluation from panelist were examined after 24 hour of fermentation. Result showed that addition mango juice significantly affects the color scale, viscosity, pH, protein and number of L. casei of the product. The color of the product becomes more dark, red, and yellow. The product becomes more viscous. pH of the product become more acid and reduces protein content. Respectively total number of L. casei of the product increased 1 log. But addition of mango juice significantly did not affect sensory acceptance, total soluble solid, total free acid, and fat of the product. Sensory acceptance of the product range in dislike slightly and slightly like score that means formulation of the product need to be improved again.

  8. Molecular Cloning and Characterization of O-Methyltransferase from Mango Fruit (Mangifera indica cv. Alphonso).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chidley, Hemangi G; Oak, Pranjali S; Deshpande, Ashish B; Pujari, Keshav H; Giri, Ashok P; Gupta, Vidya S

    2016-05-01

    Flavour of ripe Alphonso mango is invariably dominated by the de novo appearance of lactones and furanones during ripening. Of these, furanones comprising furaneol (4-hydroxy-2,5-dimethyl-3(2H)-furanone) and mesifuran (2,5-dimethyl-4-methoxy-3(2H)-furanone) are of particular importance due to their sweet, fruity caramel-like flavour characters and low odour detection thresholds. We isolated a 1056 bp complete open reading frame of a cDNA encoding S-adenosyl-L-methionine-dependent O-methyltransferase from Alphonso mango. The recombinantly expressed enzyme, MiOMTS showed substrate specificity towards furaneol and protocatechuic aldehyde synthesizing mesifuran and vanillin, respectively, in an in vitro assay reaction. A semi-quantitative PCR analysis showed fruit-specific expression of MiOMTS transcripts. Quantitative real-time PCR displayed ripening-related expression pattern of MiOMTS in both pulp and skin of Alphonso mango. Also, early and significantly enhanced accumulation of its transcripts was detected in pulp and skin of ethylene-treated fruits. Ripening-related and fruit-specific expression profile of MiOMTS and substrate specificity towards furaneol is a suggestive of its involvement in the synthesis of mesifuran in Alphonso mango. Moreover, a significant trigger in the expression of MiOMTS transcripts in ethylene-treated fruits point towards the transcriptional regulation of mesifuran biosynthesis by ethylene.

  9. Haiti Start-Up mission design cold chain mango-avocado

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostewechel, René; Régis, Yves-Laurent; Brouwers, Jan

    2018-01-01

    This report shares the findings of the first start-up mission to Haiti, exploring all relevant elements pertaining to the design of the mango and avocado cold chain for fruit export to the USA, with the possibility to extend logistics services to other fruits like pineapple. Findings of the mission

  10. 77 FR 21843 - Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order; Assessment Increase

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-12

    ... on U.S. mango demand was conducted by Dr. Ronald Ward of the University of Florida (2010 economic..., including whether to pass back the cost of assessments to producers, are made by handlers and importers... is favored by organizations in Mexico, Peru, Guatemala, Haiti, Ecuador and Brazil. In order to...

  11. Farmers' knowledge, perceptions and practices in mango pest management in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mele, van P.; Cuc, N.T.T.; Huis, van A.

    2001-01-01

    A survey of mango farmers' knowledge, perceptions and practices in pest management was conducted during the dry season of 1998 in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam. Identification and control of pests was often based on damage symptoms, rather than on recording of causal agents. Damage caused by the

  12. Study on Disinfestation of Fruit Fly (Bactrocera dorsalis using Vapor Heat Treatment on Gedong Gincu Mango

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rokhani Hasbullah

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Since the prohibition of chemical method for insect disinfestations processes such as ethylene dibromide in 1984, heat treatment method was developed as quarantine technology. One of the heat treatment methods is vapor heat treatment (VHT. The objectives of this research were to study mortality of fruit fly (Bactrocera dorsalis and to study the responses of VHT on quality of gedong gincu mango. Fruit fly mortality due to heat has been investigated by immersing fruit fly eggs into heated water at temperatures of 40, 43, 46 and 49OC for 30 minutes immersed, also at temperature of 46OC for 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 minutes. Gedong gincu mangoes were treated at temperature 46.5OC for 0, 10, 20, and 30 minutes. The results showed that mortality has been achieved 100% at temperature more than and equal to 43OC for 30 minutes and at temperature 46OC for more than and equal to 10 minutes. The VHT has significantly and fungi population although without adversely affecting to the fruit quality and there were no significant change in the fruit weight loss, hardness, color, soluble solid content, water content, vitamin C and organoleptic test. VHT at temperature 46.5OC for 20 up to 30 minutes were effective to kill fruit flies inside mangoes and were able to maintaining mango quality during storage.

  13. Mango ginger (Curcuma amada Roxb.)–A promising spice for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    known curcumin, demethoxy curcumin and bis-demethoxy curcumin (figure 3) are the major constituents from acetone extract of C. amada (Gupta et al. 1999). 4.3 Phenolic content in mango ginger extracts. The free phenolic acids (figure 4) present ...

  14. Calcium carbide (CaC2): Effect on fruit set and yield of mango ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Calcium carbide (CaC2): Effect on fruit set and yield of mango ( Mangifera indica L.) cv. ... photosynthetic rate, final fruit drop, yield per plant, fruit weight, fruit volume, pulp weight, peel weight, juice weight and fruit skin color were significantly affected by the calcium carbide treatment while number of new flushes per branch, ...

  15. Characterization and pathogenicity of Fusarium species associated with leaf spot of mango (Mangifera indica L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Nurul Husna; Mohd, Masratulhawa; Mohamed Nor, Nik Mohd Izham; Zakaria, Latiffah

    2017-12-09

    Leaf spot diseases are mainly caused by fungi including Fusarium. In the present study several species of Fusarium were isolated from the leaf spot lesion of mango (Mangifera indica L.) Based on morphological characteristics, TEF-1α sequences and phylogenetic analysis, five species were identified as F. proliferatum, F. semitectum, F. mangiferae, F. solani and F. chlamydosporum. Pathogenicity test indicated that representative isolates of F. proliferatum, F. semitectum and F. chlamydosporum were pathogenic on mango leaves causing leaf spot with low to moderate virulence. Nevertheless, abundance of spots on the leaf can disrupt photosynthesis which in turn reduced growth, and lead to susceptibility to infection by opportunistic pathogens due to weakening of the plant. Fusarium solani and F. mangiferae were non-pathogenic and it is possible that both species are saprophyte which associated with nutrient availability on the surface of the leaf through decaying leave tissues. The occurrence of Fusarium spp. on the leaf spot lesion and the effect from the disease needs to be considered when developing disease management method of mango cultivation as numerous spot on the leaves could effect the photosynthesis process and finally giving low yield and less quality of mango. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Interaction of Aceria mangiferae with Fusarium mangiferae, the causal agent of mango malformation disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    The study examines the role of the mango bud mite, Aceria mangiferae, in carrying Fusarium mangiferae’s conidia, vectoring them into the penetration sites and assisting fungal penetration and dissemination. Conidia that were exposed to a green fluorescent protein (gfp)-marked isolate of F. mangifer...

  17. Fruit fly infestation in mango: A threat to the Horticultural sector in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    Fruit flies (Diptera: Tephtritidae) are one of the most important insect pests to fruits worldwide. In Uganda, fruit flies have inflicted considerable yield losses especially in mangos (Mangifera indica L.), However, there has been no recent assessment of the associated economic damage impact despite the outcries from the ...

  18. Optimizing Microwave-assisted Crude Butter Extraction from Carabao Mango (Mangifera indica Kernels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgardo V. Casas

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Carabao mangoes are among the highly produced fruit crops in the Philippines. The processing and consumption of carabao mangoes leave a significant amount of waste seeds. Mango kernel butter extracted from waste seed kernels is a potential additive to cosmetic products or as a cocoa butter substitute. This study determined the pretreatment conditions that produce optimum yield prior to the mechanical extraction of the crude butter. Moreover, this study provided a general sensory evaluation of the finished product. Microwave power (160, 500, and 850 W, microwave exposure time (2.0, 3.5, and 5.0 min, and size levels (1.5, 3.0, and 4.5 mm were tested for their effects on the yield of the mechanically extracted crude butter in wet basis percentage. The optimization procedures resulted to optimum pretreatment conditions of 160 W, 4.25 min, and 1.5 mm. Size level was the most significant factor in the crude butter yield. Sensory evaluation of the crude butter extracted at optimum pretreatment conditions through acceptance test by a test panel resulted to below neutral scores in visual appearance and odor, and above neutral score in texture, indicating the potential of mango butter as a good substitute to cocoa butter in cosmetic products.

  19. Use of HPLC- and GC-QTOF to determine hydrophilic and lipophilic phenols in mango fruit (Mangifera indica L.) and its by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Cobo, Ana; Verardo, Vito; Diaz-de-Cerio, Elixabet; Segura-Carretero, Antonio; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Alberto; Gómez-Caravaca, Ana M

    2017-10-01

    Mango industry processing generates high quantities of mango by-products such as peels and seeds (35%-60% of the fruit). Indeed, it is known that mango and its by-products contain different families of bioactive compounds that possess several health benefits. Thus, the aim of this study has been the determination of different families of phenolic derivatives (free and bound phenolic compounds and alk(en)ylresorcinols (ARs)) in mango edible part and its by-products (peel, seed and seed husk) from three different cultivars. This is the first study that evaluates the phenolic compounds and ARs in the four fractions of mango of three different cultivars. Special attention has been paid to the determination of anthocyanins and ARs, because these families of compounds had not been studied in depth in mango. In fact, petunidin rutinoside-(p-coumaric acid) gallate was found in mango pulp, peel, seed and seed husk of the three cultivars and, it had never been described in mango before. It is also important to highlight that this is the first time that the identification and quantification of ARs have been performed in mango seed and seed husk; besides, four and five out of eleven alk(en)ylresorcinols detected in peel and pulp, respectively, were identified for the first time in these mango fractions. Furthermore, antioxidant activity was measured by ABTS and FRAP assays. Seed free and bound phenolic extracts showed the highest antioxidant capacity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A Long-term Ring Current Measure Created by Using the VMO MANGO Service Package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargatze, L. F.; King, T. A.

    2008-12-01

    A set of computational routines called MANGO (Magnetogram Analysis for the Network of Geomagnetic Observatories) is utilized to calculate a new measure of magnetic storm activity for the years 1932 to the near present. The MANGO routines are part of an effort to enhance data services available to users of the Heliophysics VxOs, specifically for the Virtual Magnetospheric Observatory (VMO). The community can utilize MANGO to derive value-added data products and images suitable for publication via the VMO web site. MANGO routines will be demonstrated through their application to study magnetic storms, a field of research that began in 1828 when von Humboldt launched an investigation of observations taken simultaneously from magnetic field stations spread around the Earth. The defining signature of magnetic storms is a worldwide decrease of the horizontal component of the magnetic field caused by fluctuations in the strength of the ring current. In the 1940's, Bartel pushed for deriving an index to measure the strength of magnetic storms. Progress intensified during the International Geophysical Year leading to the definition of the Dst index. The definitive Dst index is calculated at WDC-C2 for Geomagnetism in Kyoto by using a derivation scheme certified by Division V of IAGA. The Dst index time series spans the years 1957 to present with a cadence equal to 1-hr. The new data set we will present is a magnetic storm measure that is similar to the Dst index though it is calculated by using MANGO and a method that differs slightly from the official scheme. The MANGO data service package is based on a set of IDL routines that decompose ground magnetic field observations to isolate secular, diurnal, and disturbance variations of the magnetic field station-by-station. Each MANGO subroutine has been written in modular fashion to allow "plug and play"- style flexibility and each has been designed to account for failure modes and noisy data so that the programs will run to

  1. Effect of quarantine treatments on the carbohydrate and organic acid content of mangoes (cv. Tommy Atkins)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, J. N.; Soares, C. A.; Fabbri, A. D. T.; Cordenunsi, B. R.; Sabato, S. F.

    2012-08-01

    Brazil is one of the largest mango producers and the third largest mango exporter worldwide. Irradiation treatment and its commercial feasibility have been studied in our country to make it possible to develop new markets and, consequently, to compete with the major exporters of mangoes, Mexico and India. This work was designed to compare irradiation treatment with the hot water dip treatment in mangoes cv. Tommy Atkins for export and to verify that the main attributes for acceptance, color and texture, as well as carbohydrate and organic acid contents, were maintained. In this study, the fruit was divided into groups: control, hot water dip-treated (46 °C for 90 min), and irradiation-treated at doses of 0.4 kGy and 1.0 kGy. The fruit was stored at low temperature (11 °C±2) for 14 days and then at room temperature (23 °C±2) until the end of the study. The results indicated that the fruit given a dose of 1.0 kGy remained in a less advanced stage of ripening (stage 3) throughout the storage period, but experienced a greater loss of texture in the beginning of the experiment. It was noted that only the control group had higher levels of citric acid and succinic acid on the last day of the experiment. There were no significant differences in the total sugar content between any treatment groups. Gamma radiation can be used as a quarantine treatment and does not interfere negatively with the quality attributes of mangoes.

  2. Behavioral pattern of physicochemical constituents of the postharvest mango (Mangifera indica L.) influenced by storage stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Khairul

    2013-12-15

    An investigation was carried at the laboratory of the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh during the period from May, 2010 to September, 2011 to study the behavioral pattern of some physicochemical constituents of the mango pulp. The experiment was comprised of two popular mango cultivars in Bangladesh (viz., Langra and Khirshapat) and six storage stimuli, namely control, paraffin coating, perforated polyethylene cover, unperforated polyethylene cover, hot water (55 +/- 1 degree C) and low temperature (4 +/- 1 degree C). The two factors experiment was assigned in randomized complete block design with tree replicates. The varieties had profound variation in terms of most of the characters studied in the laboratory condition. Initially the Langra significantly enriched a greater amount of vitamin C (151.23 mg/100 g) and titratable acidity (4.31%) and these were decreased gradually with the progress of storage period. The Khirshapat showed higher pulp pH (5.83); produced enormous amount of TSS (18.00%) and sugar (TS = 17.62%, RS = 6.51% and NRS = 11.06%) content at 12th day of storage. The pH, TSS, sugar (TS, RS and NRS) content of mango pulp was rapidly increased, whereas vitamin C and titratable acidity decreased drastically from the untreated mangoes. On the other hand, low temperature retarded the changes. The Langra using low temperature (4 +/- 1 degree C) exhibited lower diminishing tendency in vitamin C and titratable acidity and also using no treatment slightly increased TSS; enriched enormous amount of sugar (TS, RS and NRS). Therefore, low temperature (4 +/- 1 degree C) was found satisfactory for delay ripening and postharvest changes of mango in storage condition.

  3. Effects of 1-methylcyclopropene and hot water quarantine treatment on quality of "Keitt" mangos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngamchuachit, Panita; Barrett, Diane M; Mitcham, Elizabeth J

    2014-04-01

    The optimal 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) treatment to slow ripening of whole "Keitt" mangos, either alone or in combination with hot water treatment (HWT) (prior to or post 1-MCP) was identified. USDA-APHIS mandates that HWT can be used for control of fruit flies, but this may affect fruit response to 1-MCP. Mangos were evaluated by repeated measurement of nondestructive firmness, peel color, and ethylene production on the same mango fruits during 2 wk of ripening at 20 °C after treatment. The magnitude of ethylene production increased as a result of both 1-MCP and HWT. With softer mangos (65 N), treatment with 1-MCP alone delayed fruit softening and extended the number of days to full-ripeness (25 N) from 5 d in untreated fruit to 11 d. For these riper fruit, application of 1-MCP prior to HWT extended the days to full-ripeness to 9 d compared with 7 d when 1-MCP was applied after HWT. With firmer mangos (80 N), 1-MCP treatments alone prolonged the days to full-ripeness to 13 d as compared to 11 d for the untreated fruit. There was no significant concentration effect on firmness retention among 1-MCP treatments (0.5, 1.0, or 10.0 μL/L). HWT resulted in a faster rate of fruit softening, taking only 7 d to reach full-ripeness. Combining 1-MCP with HWT reduced the rate of softening compared to HWT alone, resulting in 9 to 11 d to full-ripeness. Application of 1-MCP before HWT showed a greater ability to reduce the rate of fruit softening compared with 1-MCP treatment after HWT. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  4. Chemical composition, digestibility, and voluntary feed intake of mango residues by sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanon, Hadja Oumou; Kanwe, Augustin B; Millogo, Alain; Ledin, Inger

    2013-02-01

    The chemical composition, digestibility, and voluntary feed intake by sheep of mango by-products were studied in an experiment with five dietary treatments consisting of mango peels and seed kernels, offered individually or together with urea block and a control. The mango residues were offered with rice straw and the control diet was straw only. Five groups of five male sheep of Djallonké type, 12-18 months old and weighing on average 18.6 kg were allocated randomly to the diets to assess the voluntary feed intake. Apparent digestibility of the same diets was measured using four sheep per diet. The mango residues were low in crude protein, 67 and 70 g/kg dry matter for the peels and the seed kernels, respectively. The content of neutral detergent fiber varied from 306 to 388 g/kg dry matter (DM) for the kernel and the peels, respectively. The kernel had relatively high level of fat (105 g/kg DM) and tannins (29 and 40 g/kg DM of hydrolysable and total tannins, respectively). The highest intake was observed with the diet containing both residues and urea block (741 g/day). The intake of kernels was lower in all diets when offered with the peels than when offered with rice straw alone. Apparent digestibility of the diets containing mango residues was 0.60-0.65. The peels and kernels had high digestibility coefficients (0.74 and 0.70, respectively). Based on the results above, it can be concluded that it would be interesting to test the residues in a growth experiment.

  5. Mango starch degradation. II. The binding of alpha-amylase and beta-amylase to the starch granule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peroni, Fernanda Helena Gonçalves; Koike, Claudia; Louro, Ricardo Pereira; Purgatto, Eduardo; do Nascimento, João Roberto Oliveira; Lajolo, Franco Maria; Cordenunsi, Beatriz Rosana

    2008-08-27

    During mango ripening, soluble sugars that account for mango sweetening are accumulated through carbon supplied by both photosynthesis and starch degradation. The cultivar Keitt has a characteristic dependence on sugar accumulation during starch degradation, which takes place during ripening, only a few days after detachment from the tree. Most knowledge about starch degradation is based on seeds and leaves currently used as models. However, information about the mango fruit is scarce. This work presents the evaluation of alpha- and beta-amylases in the starch granule surface during fruit development and ripening. Extractable proteins were assayed for amylase activity and detected by immunofluorescence microscopy and correlated to gene expression. The results suggest that both amylases are involved in starch degradation during mango ripening, probably under the dependence of another signal triggered by the detachment from the mother-plant.

  6. Total phenolics, antioxidant activity, and functional properties of 'Tommy Atkins' mango peel and kernel as affected by drying methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sogi, Dalbir Singh; Siddiq, Muhammad; Greiby, Ibrahim; Dolan, Kirk D

    2013-12-01

    Mango processing produces significant amount of waste (peels and kernels) that can be utilized for the production of value-added ingredients for various food applications. Mango peel and kernel were dried using different techniques, such as freeze drying, hot air, vacuum and infrared. Freeze dried mango waste had higher antioxidant properties than those from other techniques. The ORAC values of peel and kernel varied from 418-776 and 1547-1819 μmol TE/g db. The solubility of freeze dried peel and kernel powder was the highest. The water and oil absorption index of mango waste powders ranged between 1.83-6.05 and 1.66-3.10, respectively. Freeze dried powders had the lowest bulk density values among different techniques tried. The cabinet dried waste powders can be potentially used in food products to enhance their nutritional and antioxidant properties. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Urinary metabolites from mango (Mangifera indica L. cv. Keitt) galloyl derivatives and in vitro hydrolysis of gallotannins in physiological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Ryan C; Krenek, Kimberly A; Meibohm, Bernd; Mertens-Talcott, Susanne U; Talcott, Stephen T

    2016-03-01

    The absorption, metabolism, and excretion of mango galloyl derivatives (GD) has not yet been investigated in humans, and studies investigating repeated dosages of polyphenols are limited. In this human pilot trial, healthy volunteers (age = 21-38 y, n = 11) consumed 400 g/day of mango-pulp (cv. Keitt) for 10 days, and seven metabolites of gallic acid (GA) were characterized and quantified in urine excreted over a 12 h period. Pyrogallol-O-sulfate and deoxypyrogallol-O-sulfate were found to be significantly more excreted between days 1 and 10 (p mango consumption. Mango GTs were also found to release free GA in conditions similar to the intestines. GTs may serve as a pool of pro-GA compounds that can be absorbed or undergo microbial metabolism. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Beyond the borderland: Incursion of the State-Nation, NAFTA and external control within the Mexican-American mango industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert R. Álvarez

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Using the case of the US-Mexico Mango Industry this paper explores the engagement of the nation-state in transnational activity through the activities of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA. US control and certification of mangos imported into the United States is part of a broader system that includes NAFTA and historic labor immigration inducing new markets for “ethnic products”. This is part of a broader hemispheric system linked to US prerogatives. Although the USDA (like other border agencies controls the entrance of commodities at the US-Mexico geopolitical border, the encroachment of this agency into Mexico and its offshore control of commodity production and deistribution is not often a subject of investigation. This paper traces the development of the current USDA certification of mangos for US import, focusing on the hot water treatment of mangos and its controlling effects at local sites of production and distribution.

  9. Characterization of colletotrichum isolates from tamarillo, passiflora, and mango in Colombia and identification of a unique species from the genus

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Afanador-Kafuri, Lucia; Minz, Dror; Maymon, Marcel; Freeman, Stanley

    2003-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study was conducted to identify the species of Colletotrichum infecting tamarillo, mango, and passiflora in Colombia and to assess whether cross-infection between host species is occurring...

  10. Large-scale confirmatory tests of a phytosanitary irradiation treatment against Sternochetus frigidus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in Philippine mango.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obra, Glenda B; Resilva, S S; Follett, P A; Lorenzana, L R J

    2014-02-01

    The mango pulp weevil, Sternochetus frigidus (F.), is an important quarantine pest preventing the export of mangoes from the Philippines to the United States and other countries. Previously, a radiation dose of 100 Gy was proposed for phytosanitary treatment of S. frigidus based on dose-response studies with larvae, pupae, and adult weevils. To validate an irradiation treatment, large-scale confirmatory tests were conducted with adults (the most radiation-tolerant stage) in mangoes at 100 and 150 Gy. After treatment, adults were removed from fruit, sexed, and mated in pairs to observe any reproduction. At 100 Gy, adults laid a small number of eggs but none of the eggs hatched. At 150 Gy (measured doses 96.7-164.1 Gy),4,559 treated weevils laid no eggs, indicating that this dose caused complete sterility. Irradiation treatment with a minimum absorbed dose of 165 Gy will therefore provide quarantine security for S. frigidus in exported Philippine mangoes.

  11. Evaluation of mass trapping and bait stations to control Anastrepha (Diptera: Tephritidae) fruit flies in mango orchards of Chiapas, Mexico

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Salvador Flores; Enoc Gómez; Sergio Campos; Fredy Gálvez; Jorge Toledo; Pablo Liedo; Rui Pereira; Pablo Montoya

    2017-01-01

    ...) and Anastrepha ludens (Loew) (Diptera: Tephritidae) in mango orchards in Chiapas, Mexico. Among the bait stations evaluated, we found that a wide-mouth 2 L plastic bottle baited with Cera Trap...

  12. Damage Survey of Hurricane Andrew and Its Relationship to the Eyewall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakimoto, Roger M.; Black, Peter G.

    1994-02-01

    A damage map documenting Hurricane Andrew's destructive land fall over southern Florida is presented. Vectors that represent the direction of winds causing damage to trees and structures are shown along with an F-scale rating in order to assess the strength of the near-surface winds. It is hypothesized that increased surface roughness once the hurricane made landfall may have contributed to a surface wind enhancement resulting in the strongest winds ever estimated (F3) for a landfall hurricane. This intense damage occurred primarily during the "second" period of strong winds associated with the east side of the eyewall. For the first time, a well-defined circulation in the damage pattern by the second wind was documented. A superposition of radar data from Miami and Key West on top of the damage map provides the first detailed examination of the relationship between the eyewall and the surface flow field as estimated from the damage vectors.

  13. Children's predisaster functioning as a predictor of posttraumatic stress following Hurricane Andrew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Greca, A M; Silverman, W K; Wasserstein, S B

    1998-12-01

    This study examined (a) children's predisaster behavioral and academic functioning as a predictor of posttraumatic stress (PTS) following Hurricane Andrew and (b) whether children who were exposed to the disaster would display a worsening of prior functioning. Fifteen months before the disaster, 92 4th through 6th graders provided self-reports of anxiety; peers and teachers rated behavior problems (anxiety, inattention, and conduct) and academic skills. Measures were repeated 3 months postdisaster; children also reported PTS symptoms and hurricane-related experiences (i.e., exposure). PTS symptoms were again assessed 7 months postdisaster. At 3 months postdisaster, children's exposure to the disaster, as well as predisaster ratings of anxiety, inattention, and academic skills, predicted PTS symptoms. By 7 months, only exposure, African American ethnicity, and predisaster anxiety predicted PTS. Prior anxiety levels also worsened as a result of exposure to the disaster. The findings have implications for identifying and treating children at risk for stress reactions following a catastrophic disaster.

  14. Symptoms of posttraumatic stress in children after Hurricane Andrew: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Greca, A; Silverman, W K; Vernberg, E M; Prinstein, M J

    1996-08-01

    The authors examined symptoms of posttraumatic stress in 3rd-5th grade children during the school year after Hurricane Andrew. From a conceptual model of the effects of traumatic events, 442 children were evaluated 3, 7, and 10 months postdisaster with respect to (a) their exposure to traumatic events during and after the disaster, (b) their preexisting demographic characteristics, (c) the occurrence of major life stressors, (d) the availability of social support, and (e) the type of coping strategies used to cope with disaster-related distress. Although symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) declined over time, a substantial level of symptomatology was observed up to 10 months after the disease. All 5 factors in the conceptual model were predictive of children's PTSD symptoms 7 and 10 months postdisaster. Findings are discussed in terms of the potential utility of the model for organizing thinking about factors that predict the emergence and persistence of PTSD symptoms in children.

  15. Comprehensive assessment of health needs 2 months after Hurricane Andrew--Dade County, Florida, 1992.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-06-11

    On August 24, 1992, Hurricane Andrew struck southern Florida. More than 28,000 houses, mobile homes, and apartment buildings were destroyed, and approximately 107,000 additional dwellings sustained major damage. An estimated 180,000 persons were left homeless; insured damages were estimated at $15.5 billion and total damages at more than $30 billion. During the recovery period, many private and public health-care facilities damaged or destroyed in the storm were not functional. During November 3-13, to help prioritize health needs and direct public health resources, the Dade County Public Health Unit of the Florida Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services conducted a survey to assess health needs and the availability of health-care services during the recovery phase with funds provided by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). This report summarizes the results of the survey.

  16. Stability and change in stress, resources, and psychological distress following natural disaster: Findings from hurricane Andrew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, F H; Perilla, J L; Riad, J K; Kaniasty, K; Lavizzo, E A

    1999-01-01

    Abstract The stress, resource, and symptom levels of 241 residents of southern Dade County, Florida were assessed 6 and 30 months after Hurricane Andrew. Percentages meeting study criteria for depression and PTSD did not change over time. Whereas mean levels of intrusion and arousal decreased, depressive symptoms remained stable, and avoidance/numbing symptoms actually increased. Intrusion and arousal were associated more strongly with pre-disaster factors (gender, ethnicity) and within-disaster factors (injury, property loss) than with post-disaster factors (stress, resources), but the reverse was true for depression and avoidance. Changes over time in symptoms were largely explained by changes over time in stress and resources. The findings indicate that ongoing services are needed to supplement the crisis-oriented assistance typically offered to disaster victims.

  17. Memorial Camels and Design by Committee: St Andrews Black Saturday Memorials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SueAnne Ware

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines a work in progress, the St Andrews Bushfire Memorial, which commemorates victims of the 7 February 2009 bushfires in Victoria, Australia. The paper’s intent is threefold: to describe and reflect on a current and ongoing memorial design project; to frame this project within a larger series of design discourses; and to examine the processes by which this memorial, but also many other grassroots or ‘bottom-up’ memorials, come into being. By examining the design process, I aim to open up various memorialisation and consultation methods for review. More importantly, however, by framing this project in contemporary discussions regarding socially engaged design practices, I offer a critique of the dictator–democrat binaries mentioned above and offer another way forward.

  18. Changes in amylase activity starch and sugars contents in mango fruits pulp cv. Tommy Atkins with spongy tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Luiz Carlos de Oliveira Lima; Adimilson Bosco Chitarra; Chitarra,Maria Isabel F.

    2001-01-01

    Changes in amylase activity, starch and reducing and non-reducing sugars contents were monitored during ripening of mango fruits (Mangifera indica L.). The climateric raising in mango fruit is marked by an appreciable increase in the activity of amylase, reducing and non-reducing sugars contents and decrease in the starch content. The fruit affected with spongy tissue exhibited much lower amylase activity and reducing and non-reducing sugars, but exhibited much higher starch content during st...

  19. Improvements in Thermal Performance of Mango Hot-water Treatment Equipments: Data Analysis, Mathematical Modelling and Numerical-computational Simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Mendoza Orbegoso, Elder M.; Paul Villar-Yacila; Daniel Marcelo; Justo Oquelis

    2017-01-01

    Mango is one of the most popular and best paid tropical fruits in worldwide markets, its exportation is regulated within a phytosanitary quality control for killing the “fruit fly”. Thus, mangoes must be subject to hot-water treatment process that involves their immersion in hot water over a period of time. In this work, field measurements, analytical and simulation studies are developed on available hot-water treatment equipment called “Original” that only complies wi...

  20. Physicochemical evaluation, nutraceutical composition and HPLC-UV fingerprint of Helicanthus elastica (Desr.) Danser (Indian Mango Mistletoe)

    OpenAIRE

    K N Sunil Kumar; R Shakila; S Amerjothy

    2014-01-01

    Background: Helicanthus elastica (Desr.) Danser (Loranthaceae) is less-known Indian medicinal mistletoe growing commonly on mango trees as hemiparsites. It is used to prevent abortion, in vescical calculi and kidney affections. These groups of plants are medicinally important as they are potential sources of anticancer, immunomodulatory, hepatoprotective, antimicrobial and antioxidant molecules. Materials and Methods: In the current study whole plant of H. elastica growing on mango trees is c...

  1. Comparative Analysis of the Effects of Cashew and Mango Extracts on the Rheological Properties of Water Based Mud

    OpenAIRE

    Omotioma M; Ejikeme P. C. N

    2014-01-01

    Comparative analysis of the effects of cashew and mango extracts on the rheological properties of water based mud is presented. To control corrosion of drilling materials, corrosion inhibitor is usually used as one of the drilling mud additives. Such inhibitive substance can only be applied when it improves the rheological properties of the drilling mud. In this work, the mud samples were formulated in the absence and presence of various concentrations of cashew and mango extr...

  2. Posttraumatic stress symptoms, intrusive thoughts, loss, and immune function after Hurricane Andrew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ironson, G; Wynings, C; Schneiderman, N; Baum, A; Rodriguez, M; Greenwood, D; Benight, C; Antoni, M; LaPerriere, A; Huang, H S; Klimas, N; Fletcher, M A

    1997-01-01

    To examine the impact of and relationship between exposure to Hurricane Andrew, a severe stressor, posttraumatic stress symptoms and immune measures. Blood draws and questionnaires were taken from community volunteer subjects living in the damaged neighborhoods between 1 and 4 months after the Hurricane. The sample exhibited high levels of posttraumatic stress symptoms by questionnaire (33% overall; 76% with at least one symptom cluster), and 44% scored in the high impact range on the Impact of Events (IES) scale. A substantial proportion of variance in posttraumatic stress symptoms could be accounted for by four hurricane experience variables (damage, loss, life threat, and injury), with perceived loss being the highest correlate. Of the five immune measures studied Natural Killer Cell Cytotoxicity (NKCC) was the only measure that was meaningfully related (negatively) to both damage and psychological variables (loss, intrusive thoughts, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). White blood cell counts (WBCs) were significantly positively related with the degree of loss and PTSD experienced. Both NKCC (lower) and WBC were significantly related to retrospective self-reported increase of somatic symptoms after the hurricane. Overall, the community sample was significantly lower in NKCC, CD4 and CD8 number, and higher in NK cell number compared to laboratory controls. Finally, evidence was found for new onset of sleep problems as a mediator of the posttraumatic symptom-NKCC relationship. Several immune measures differed from controls after Hurricane Andrew. Negative (intrusive) thoughts and PTSD were related to lower NKCC. Loss was a key correlate of both posttraumatic symptoms and immune (NKCC, WBC) measures.

  3. Physical symptoms of chronic fatigue syndrome are exacerbated by the stress of Hurricane Andrew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutgendorf, S K; Antoni, M H; Ironson, G; Fletcher, M A; Penedo, F; Baum, A; Schneiderman, N; Klimas, N

    1995-01-01

    This study examined the effects of Hurricane Andrew on physical symptoms and functional impairments in a sample of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) patients residing in South Florida. In the months after Hurricane Andrew (September 15-December 31, 1992), 49 CFS patients were assessed for psychosocial and physical functioning with questionnaires, interviews, and physical examinations. This sample was made up of 25 CFS patients living in Dade county, a high impact area, and 24 patients in Broward and Palm Beach counties, areas less affected by the hurricane. Based on our model for stress-related effects on CFS, we tested the hypothesis that the patients who had the greatest exposure to this natural disaster would show the greatest exacerbation in CFS symptoms and related impairments in activities of daily living (illness burden). In support of this hypothesis, we found that the Dade county patients showed significant increases in physician-rated clinical relapses and exacerbations in frequency of several categories of self-reported CFS physical symptoms as compared to the Broward/Palm Beach county patients. Illness burden, as measured on the Sickness Impact Profile, also showed a significant increase in the Dade county patients. Although extent of disruption due to the storm was a significant factor in predicting relapse, the patient's posthurricane distress response was the single strongest predictor of the likelihood and severity of relapse and functional impairment. Additionally, optimism and social support were significantly associated with lower illness burden after the hurricane, above and beyond storm-related disruption and distress responses. These findings provide information on the impact of environmental stressors and psychosocial factors in the exacerbation of CFS symptoms.

  4. Invertebrates of The H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest, Western Cascades, Oregon: III. The Orthoptera (Grasshoppers and Crickets).

    Science.gov (United States)

    David C. Lightfoot

    1986-01-01

    An inventory of Orthoptera (grasshoppers and crickets) at the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest, near Blue River, Oregon, was conducted to determine the species present and ecological relationships. A key for identification and an annotated list are presented. From qualitative assessments of successional habitat relationships, generalized species associations of forest...

  5. Invertebrates of the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest, western Cascades, Oregon II. an annotated checklist of caddisflies (Trichoptera)

    Science.gov (United States)

    N.H. Anderson; G.M. Cooper; D.G Denning

    1982-01-01

    At least 99 species, representing 14 families of Trichoptera, are recorded from the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest, near Blue River, Oregon. The collecting sites include a wide diversity of environmental conditions in a 6000-hectare watershed of the western Cascade Range (from 400 to 1 630 meters in altitude and from 1st- to 7th-order streams).

  6. Invertebrates of The H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest, Western Cascade Mountains, Oregon: IV. The Oribatid Mites (Acari: Cryptostigmata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew Moldenke; Becky. Fichter

    1988-01-01

    A fully illustrated key is presented for identifying genera of oribatid mites known from or suspected of occurring in the Pacific Northwest. The manual includes an introduction detailing sampling methodology; an illustrated glossary of all terminology used; two color plates of all taxa from the H. J. Andrews Experimental Forest; a diagrammatic key to the 16 major...

  7. The role of the U.S. Army Medical Department in domestic disaster assistance operations - lessons learned from hurricane Andrew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Hurricane Andrew, which struck South Dade County, Florida on the morning of 24 August 1992, was the "worst natural disaster ever to hit the United States..." The capabilities of the local and state governments to respond to the disaster were quickly ...

  8. Hurricane Andrew Damage in Relation to Wood Decay Fungi and Insects in Bottomland Hardwoods of the Atchafalaya Basin, Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodor D. Leininger; A. Dan Wilson; Donald G. Lester

    1997-01-01

    Hurricane Andrew caused damage to more than 780 sq.km of bottomland hardwood and cypress-tupelo forests in the Atchafalaya Basin of Louisiana in August 1992. Trees in bottomland hardwood sites were examined, in early May 1994, for signs and symptoms of wood decay fungi, and for insect damage, ostensibly present before the hurricane, which may have predisposed trees to...

  9. Invertebrates of The H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest, Western Cascades, Oregon: I. An annotated checklist of fleas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert E. Lewis; Chris. Maser

    1981-01-01

    During a trapping survey of small mammals (approximately 3,000 individuals), species of fleas (1,632 specimens) were collected in the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest, Western Cascades, Oregon. Host mammals were represented by 15 species—6 insectivores and 9 rodents captured from June through September. The collections extend our knowledge of the fauna of Oregon.

  10. Climatic summaries and documentation for the primary meteorological station, H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest, 1972 To 1984.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick A. Bierlmaler; Arthur. McKee

    1989-01-01

    This report describes the primary meteorological station at the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest (elev. 426 m, lat. 44°15' N., long. 122°10' W.) in the Willamette National Forest, the automatic digital data logger, sensors, and data-processing procedures used in measuring air temperature, dewpoint temperature, windspeed, precipitation, and solar radiation....

  11. The Psychological Effects of Hurricane Andrew on Ethnic Minority and Caucasian Children and Adolescents: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Russell T.; Frary, Robert; Cunningham, Phillippe; Weddle, J. David; Kaiser, Lisa

    2001-01-01

    Several measures of children's reactions to disasters were employed with 212 elementary and middle school students 6 months after experiencing Hurricane Andrew. Higher levels of intrusive symptomatology were found for girls and for elementary school children. Discusses lack of findings concerning race and implications for future research.…

  12. Final Environmental Assessment for FY07-11 BRAC Construction Requirements at Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    vegetation typically adapted for life in saturated soil conditions” (33 CFR Part 338). The ROI for water resources in this EA includes Andrew AFB. 0...latifolia), highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum), and Christmas fern (Polystichium acrostichoides) (USAF 2001). Approximately 720 acres of...and social adaptation and development. These periods are the Paleo-Indian, Archaic, and Woodland. The Archaic and Woodland periods are further

  13. Mould and mycotoxin exposure assessment of melon and bush mango seeds, two common soup thickeners consumed in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezekiel, Chibundu N; Sulyok, Michael; Somorin, Yinka; Odutayo, Foluke I; Nwabekee, Stella U; Balogun, Afeez T; Krska, Rudolf

    2016-11-21

    An examination of the mould and fungal metabolite pattern in melon and bush mango seeds locally produced in Nigeria was undertaken in order to understand the mycotoxicological risk posed to consumers of both of these important and commonly consumed soup thickeners. The variation in mycotoxin levels in graded categories of both foodstuffs were also determined. Aspergillus, Fusarium, Penicillium, Mucorales and Trichoderma were the recovered fungi from the foodstuffs with Aspergillus species dominating (melon=97.8%; bush mango=89.9%). Among the Aspergillus species identified Aspergillus section Flavi dominated (melon: 72%; bush mango: 57%) and A. flavus, A. parasiticus, A. parvisclerotigenus and A. tamarii were the recovered species. About 56% and 73% of the A. flavus isolates from melon and bush mango seed samples, respectively were aflatoxigenic. Thirty-four and 59 metabolites including notable mycotoxins were found in the melon and bush mango seeds respectively. Mean aflatoxin levels (μg/kg) in melon (aflatoxin B1 (AFB1)=37.5 and total aflatoxins=142) and bush mango seeds (AFB1=68.1 and total aflatoxins=61.7) were higher than other mycotoxins, suggesting potential higher exposure for consumer populations. Significantly (pacid, HT-2 toxin, moniliformin, mycophenolic acid, T-2 toxin and tenuazonic acid occurrence, and (3) mycotoxin exposure assessment of both foodstuffs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Solar drying of mangoes: preservation of an important source of vitamin A in French-speaking West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankins, Jenice; Sathe, Shridhar K; Spicer, Maria T

    2008-06-01

    Vitamin A deficiency, which is especially widespread among children younger than age 5 years, is a major barrier to reducing child mortality rates in French-speaking West Africa. A large amount of an indigenous plant source of provitamin A carotenoids are lost to postharvest waste. For example, the postharvest loss of mangoes in the region exceeds an annual total of 100,000 metric tons. In our study, 3.75 metric tons of fresh mangoes were dried using a solar dryer to a final moisture content of 10% to 12%, yielding a total of 360 kg dried mango. The product analysis revealed 4,000+/-500 microg beta carotene/100 g and 3,680+/-150 microg beta carotene/100 g after 2 and 6 months of storage, respectively. Thus, one greenhouse solar dryer is capable of reducing postharvest mango waste by 3.75 tons providing up to 1.15 million retinol activity equivalents of dietary vitamin A. The use of this technology that requires solar energy and manpower has the potential of increasing dietary vitamin A supply by up to 27,000-fold, compared to the currently available vitamin A in the region. Moreover, mango is a fruit that is well-liked by the population in this geographic area increasing the likelihood of its ready acceptance. Reducing postharvest loss of mangoes by using greenhouse model solar dryers is a promising strategy to help combat vitamin A deficiency in French-speaking West Africa.

  15. Phytochemical, pharmacological and ethnobotanical studies in mango ginger (Curcuma amada Roxb.; Zingiberaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jatoi, Shakeel Ahmad; Kikuchi, Akira; Gilani, Syed Abdullah; Watanabe, Kazuo N

    2007-06-01

    Curcuma amada Roxb. is an important species known as mango ginger due to its characteristic raw-mango aroma. It has a long history of traditional uses ranging from folk medicine to several culinary preparations. The phytochemical, pharmacological and ethnobotanical studies of C. amada are reviewed. The rhizome is rich in essential oils, and more than 130 chemical constituents with biomedical significance have been isolated from it. Its antibacterial, insecticidal, antifungal and antioxidant properties have been investigated. The conservation of indigenous knowledge by proper documentation is suggested. The chemotaxonomy, allelopathy and genetic diversity of C. amada have not yet been explored, and many such studies are possible. This review was compiled to provide consolidated information covering different aspects of the plant, to provide a basis on which to plan future studies and to promote sustainable use of C. amada. (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Ultrasound-assisted extraction of Mangiferin from Mango (Mangifera indica L.) leaves using response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Tang-Bin; Xia, En-Qin; He, Tai-Ping; Huang, Ming-Yuan; Jia, Qing; Li, Hua-Wen

    2014-01-27

    Mangiferin is a xanthone widely distributed in higher plants showing antioxidative, antiviral, anticancer, antidiabetic, immunomodulatory, hepatoprotective and analgesic effects. In the present study, an ultrasonic-assisted extraction method was developed for the effective extraction of mangiferin from mango leaves. Some parameters such as ethanol concentration, liquid-to-solid ratio, extraction temperature, and extraction time were optimized by single-factor experiment and response surface methodology. The optimal extraction conditions were 44% ethanol, the liquid-to-solid ratio was 38:1, and extraction for 19.2 min at 60 °C under ultrasound irradiation of 200 W. Under optimal conditions, the yield of mangiferin was 58.46 ± 1.27 mg/g. The results obtained are helpful for the full utilization of mango leaves, and also indicated that ultrasonic-assisted extraction is a very useful method for the extraction of mangiferin from plant materials.

  17. Development of new microsatellite markers from Mango (Mangifera indica) and cross-species amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravishankar, Kundapura Venkataramana; Mani, Bellam Hanumantha-Reddy; Anand, Lalitha; Dinesh, Makki Ramachandra

    2011-04-01

    Microsatellite markers were developed and characterized to assess the genetic diversity among mango (Mangifera indica) cultivars and to test their amplification in closely related species. Thirty-six microsatellite (simple sequence repeats; SSR) loci were isolated by a microsatellite-enriched partial genomic library method. Primers designed for these loci were characterized using 30 diverse mango cultivars. The number of alleles ranged from 3 to 19 with an average of 9.2 alleles per locus. Polymorphic information content values ranged from 0.185 to 0.920 with a mean of 0.687. The total value for the probability of identity was 2.42 × 10(-31). The newly identified SSRs would be useful in genetic diversity studies, finger-printing, and mapping. Loci from five related species, M. odorata, M. anadamanica, M. zeylanica, M. camptosperma, and M. griffithii, were successfully amplified using these SSR primers, showing their potential utility across species.

  18. Mathematical modelling of the thin layer solar drying of banana, mango and cassava

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koua, Kamenan Blaise; Fassinou, Wanignon Ferdinand; Toure, Siaka [Laboratoire d' Energie Solaire, Universite de Cocody- Abidjan, 22 BP 582 Abidjan 22 (Ivory Coast); Gbaha, Prosper [Laboratoire d' Energie Nouvelle et Renouvelable, Institut National Polytechnique, Felix HOUPHOUET - BOIGNY de Yamoussoukro (Ivory Coast)

    2009-10-15

    The main objectives of this paper are firstly to investigate the behaviour of the thin layer drying of plantain banana, mango and cassava experimentally in a direct solar dryer and secondly to perform mathematical modelling by using thin layer drying models encountered in literature. The variation of the moisture content of the products studied and principal drying parameters are analysed. Seven statistical models, which are empirical or semi-empirical, are tested to validate the experimental data. A non-linear regression analysis using a statistical computer program is used to evaluate the constants of the models. The Henderson and Pabis drying model is found to be the most suitable for describing the solar drying curves of plantain banana, mango and cassava. The drying data of these products have been analysed to obtain the values of the effective diffusivity during the falling drying rate phase. (author)

  19. Fluorogenic RNA Mango aptamers for imaging small non-coding RNAs in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autour, Alexis; C Y Jeng, Sunny; D Cawte, Adam; Abdolahzadeh, Amir; Galli, Angela; Panchapakesan, Shanker S S; Rueda, David; Ryckelynck, Michael; Unrau, Peter J

    2018-02-13

    Despite having many key roles in cellular biology, directly imaging biologically important RNAs has been hindered by a lack of fluorescent tools equivalent to the fluorescent proteins available to study cellular proteins. Ideal RNA labelling systems must preserve biological function, have photophysical properties similar to existing fluorescent proteins, and be compatible with established live and fixed cell protein labelling strategies. Here, we report a microfluidics-based selection of three new high-affinity RNA Mango fluorogenic aptamers. Two of these are as bright or brighter than enhanced GFP when bound to TO1-Biotin. Furthermore, we show that the new Mangos can accurately image the subcellular localization of three small non-coding RNAs (5S, U6, and a box C/D scaRNA) in fixed and live mammalian cells. These new aptamers have many potential applications to study RNA function and dynamics both in vitro and in mammalian cells.

  20. A Review on Ethnopharmacological Applications, Pharmacological Activities, and Bioactive Compounds of Mangifera indica (Mango

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meran Keshawa Ediriweera

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mangifera indica (family Anacardiaceae, commonly known as mango, is a pharmacologically, ethnomedically, and phytochemically diverse plant. Various parts of M. indica tree have been used in traditional medicine for the treatment of different ailments, and a number of bioactive phytochemical constituents of M. indica have been reported, namely, polyphenols, terpenes, sterols, carotenoids, vitamins, and amino acids, and so forth. Several studies have proven the pharmacological potential of different parts of mango trees such as leaves, bark, fruit peel and flesh, roots, and flowers as anticancer, anti-inflammatory, antidiabetic, antioxidant, antibacterial, antifungal, anthelmintic, gastroprotective, hepatoprotective, immunomodulatory, antiplasmodial, and antihyperlipemic. In the present review, a comprehensive study on ethnopharmacological applications, pharmacological activities, and bioactive compounds of M. indica has been described.

  1. Transport simulation of mangoes irradiated for exportation; Simulacao do transporte de mangas irradiadas para exportacao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broisler, Paula Olhe

    2007-07-01

    It had been studied the effect of the ionizing radiation (gamma) in mangoes for exportation, simulating the stage of preservation of the fruit during its transport, through the refrigeration in cold chamber. In a first stage they had been analyzed through loss of weight, pH, treatable acidity, soluble solid, texture and decomposition. Later, sensorial analyses had been become fulfilled (alterations of color, odor, flavor, texture). The assays had been carried through in two stadiums of maturation of the fruits, that is, 2 and 3, with the intention of studying optimum point of harvest for the best dosage of irradiation. The results disclose together that the treatment of the mangoes Tommy Atkins in the dose of 0,75 kGy was significant, with the fruit in stadium 2, for the retardation of the matureness and consequent profit of time for the exportation. (author)

  2. Viability of bacteria (starter and probiotics in beverages made with yogurt and mango pulp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula de Paula Menezes Barbosa

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to develop two formulations (F1 and F2 of probiotic mango smoothie with fermented milk, and to evaluate the microbiological viability and physicochemical (pH, acidity and desorption characteristics under refrigerated storage. The formulation F1 was prepared with addition of 30% of mango pulp and 10% of sugar, and in F2 was added 40% of pulp and 8% of sugar. The hygienic sanitary quality was satisfactory, and the samples were safe for consumption. The samples did not differ in pH, titratable acidity, syneresis and viability of the microorganisms along the refrigerated storage, therefore, the sugar and pulp levels did not significantly influence the formulations. Probiotic levels remained within the dose considered therapeutic. Therefore, these beverages F1 and F2 may be considered appropriate vehicles for incorporation of probiotics and a new functional product may be made available to the market.

  3. Comparison of quarantine treatments on skin and pulp color of mangoes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz, Juliana Nunes da; Caruso, Marcel Wilke; Sabato, Susy Frey, E-mail: juliananc@ig.com.b, E-mail: macaruso_98@hotmail.co, E-mail: sfsabato@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The mango (Mangifera indica L.) has shown the highest growth rates among the fruit exported by Brazil. This exportation implies specific treatments to attend phytosanitary requirements to attend USA and Europe market. Among them there are thermal treatments (hot water dip or vapor treatment) or irradiation witch it has ability to promote disinfestations and delaying the ripening of the mango. The main objective of this paper was to report the color behavior among treatments covering irradiation alone, thermal treatment combined with irradiation and control. The mangoes were irradiated in a Multipurpose Gamma Source from the Radiation Technology Center, CTR, of IPEN/CNEN-SP and divided in four groups - the control (C) , dose 0,75 KGy (I), dose 0,75 KGy with hot water dip (46 deg C during 70 min) (2A) and dose 0,75KGy with hot water dip (52 deg C during 5 min) (2B). All fruits were stored at 11 deg C in acclimatized chamber during 14 days, after this period the fruits were kept at environmental conditions (25 deg C) during more 14 days. The results showed that the group 2A had the color of the skin delayed by treatment, not reaching stage 4 on the 26th. This group showed significant difference compared to groups C (p <= 0.05) however there was no difference among the others groups (2B and I). In general, these results indicate that the group 2A showed satisfactory results, concluding that combined treatment was beneficial for the mango, prolonging the process of development of its color. (author)

  4. Persistence behavior of imidacloprid and carbosulfan in mango (Mangifera indica L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacherjee, A K

    2013-02-01

    Imidacloprid was sprayed on mango cv. Dashehari at 0.3 mL L(-1) of water during pre-bloom stage with 6-8 cm panicle size (first week of March) to control hopper and carbosulfan was sprayed at 2.0 mL L(-1) of water in the trees of mango hybrid (H-1000) during fruit development stage (first week of May) to control leaf webber. Residues of both the insecticides were analysed in peel, pulp and fruit at different stages of fruit development and maturity. The initial residues of imidacloprid, after 30 days of spraying, were 1.21, 0.56 and 1.77 mg kg(-1) in peel, pulp and whole fruit, respectively. The residues persisted in peel for 60 days and in pulp for 50 days and dissipated with a half-life of 38 days. Mature Dashehari fruits at harvest (after 85 days of spraying) were free from imidacloprid residues. Carbosulfan in mango peel dissipated from 5.30 mg kg(-1) (after 1 h of spraying) to 0.05 mg kg(-1) at the time of harvest (after 45 days of spraying). Carbosulfan residue in pulp was very low (0.08 mg kg(-1)) after 1 h of spraying, which increased gradually to 0.90 mg kg(-1) after 10 days and finally came down to 0.04 mg kg(-1) after 26 days of spraying. The insecticide residue was not detected in the pulp at the time of harvest. The residues persisted in pulp for 26 days and in peel for 45 days and degraded with a half-life of 7 days. The dissipation of both imidacloprid and carbosulfan followed first order rate kinetics in whole fruit (peel + pulp). Therefore, the safe pre-harvest intervals were suggested to be 55 days for imidacloprid and 46 days for carbosulfan before consumption of mango fruits after spraying of these insecticides.

  5. Transcriptome Dynamics in Mango Fruit Peel Reveals Mechanisms of Chilling Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivankalyani, Velu; Sela, Noa; Feygenberg, Oleg; Zemach, Hanita; Maurer, Dalia; Alkan, Noam

    2016-01-01

    Cold storage is considered the most effective method for prolonging fresh produce storage. However, subtropical fruit is sensitive to cold. Symptoms of chilling injury (CI) in mango include red and black spots that start from discolored lenticels and develop into pitting. The response of ‘Keitt’ mango fruit to chilling stress was monitored by transcriptomic, physiological, and microscopic analyses. Transcriptomic changes in the mango fruit peel were evaluated during optimal (12°C) and suboptimal (5°C) cold storage. Two days of chilling stress upregulated genes involved in the plant stress response, including those encoding transmembrane receptors, calcium-mediated signal transduction, NADPH oxidase, MAP kinases, and WRKYs, which can lead to cell death. Indeed, cell death was observed around the discolored lenticels after 19 days of cold storage at 5°C. Localized cell death and cuticular opening in the lumen of discolored lenticels were correlated with increased general decay during shelf-life storage, possibly due to fungal penetration. We also observed increased phenolics accumulation around the discolored lenticels, which was correlated with the biosynthesis of phenylpropanoids that were probably transported from the resin ducts. Increased lipid peroxidation was observed during CI by both the biochemical malondialdehyde method and a new non-destructive luminescent technology, correlated to upregulation of the α-linolenic acid oxidation pathway. Genes involved in sugar metabolism were also induced, possibly to maintain osmotic balance. This analysis provides an in-depth characterization of mango fruit response to chilling stress and could lead to the development of new tools, treatments and strategies to prolong cold storage of subtropical fruit. PMID:27812364

  6. Quality and sensorial characteristics of osmotically dehydrated mango with syrups of inverted sugar and sucrose

    OpenAIRE

    Bernardi,Sabrina; Bodini,Renata B.; Marcatti,Bruna; Petrus,Rodrigo Rodrigues; Favaro-Trindade,Carmen Sílvia

    2009-01-01

    Osmotic dehydration is becoming more popular as a complementary treatment in the processing of dehydrated foods, since it presents some advantages such as minimising heat damage to the colour and flavour, inhibiting enzymatic browning and thus dispensing the addition of sulphite and, mainly, reducing energy costs. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of using inverted sugar and sucrose syrups as osmotic agents in the dehydration of mango. The conditions used in the de...

  7. Extraction yield, antioxidant activity andphenolics from grape, mango and peanut agro-industrial by-products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto Costa Braga

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to determine and correlate the extraction yields, antioxidant activity, total phenolics and total flavonoids from grape, mango and peanut agro-industrial by-products. The β-carotene/linoleic acid autoxidation system and scavenging capacity for DPPH and ABTS free radicals assays were used. The results were expressed in terms of lyophilized sample or dry extract. Mango bagasse exhibited the highest extraction yield (37.07% followed by peanut skin (15.17% and grape marc (7.92%. In terms of lyophilized sample, total phenolics did not vary significantly among the residues evaluated (average of 60.33mg EAG g-1; however, when they were expressed as dry extract grape marc exhibited the highest total phenolic (768.56±116.35mg GAE g-1, followed by peanut skin (404.40±13.22mg GAE g-1 and mango bagasse (160.25±4.52mg GAE g-1, Peanut skin exhibited the highest content of total flavonoids (2.44mg QE g-1, while grape marc (1.76mg QE g-1 and mango bagasse (1.70 mg QE g-1 showed no significant differences. The extraction yield showed strong negative linear correlation with total phenolic and total flavonoid. This study showed that peanut skin was the sample with the highest antioxidant activity and it was strongly influenced by total flavonoids. All extracts of byproducts showed antioxidant activity comparable to α-tocopherol, and they can be a source of natural compounds with potential to replace synthetic antioxidants such as BHT.

  8. Development of protein fortified mango based ready-to-serve beverage

    OpenAIRE

    Yadav, Deep N.; Vishwakarma, R. K.; Borad, Sanket; Bansal, Sangita; Jaiswal, Arvind K.; Sharma, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Fruit drinks contain negligible amount of protein as nutritional component. Fortification of fruit drinks with protein is a challenge due to protein stability in acidic and ionic environment. Mango ready-to-serve (RTS) beverage was fortified with modified whey protein and its rheological properties were studied. Whey protein was hydrolysed with papain to improve its stability in acidic medium. The water holding capacity of whey protein increased about two times after hydrolysis. Hydrolysed an...

  9. Molecular Docking Studies and Anti−Snake Venom Metalloproteinase Activity of Thai Mango Seed Kernel Extract

    OpenAIRE

    Pimolpan Pithayanukul; Jiraporn Leanpolchareanchai; Patchreenart Saparpakorn

    2009-01-01

    Snakebite envenomations cause severe local tissue necrosis and the venom metalloproteinases are thought to be the key toxins involved. In this study, the ethanolic extract from seed kernels of Thai mango (Mangifera indica L. cv. ‘Fahlun’) (Anacardiaceae) and its major phenolic principle (pentagalloylglucopyranose) exhibited potent and dose−dependent inhibitory effects on the caseinolytic and fibrinogenolytic activities of Malayan pit viper and Thai cobra venoms in in vitro tests. molecular do...

  10. Microbial Spoilage, Actions of Preservatives and Phytochemical Screening of Mango (Mangifera indica Seed Powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musa Olusegun AREKEMASE

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The work was carried out to determine the organisms responsible for the microbial spoilage of kernels of Mangifera indica. A specialized kit was employed to confirm the Gram negative organisms present in the spoilt kernels of M. indica. The effects of chemical preservatives such as sodium benzoate, sodium acetate, citric acid and sodium chloride at different concentrations on the microbial counts and pH of mango seed powder stored at room temperature over a period of 12 weeks were studied. The mango seed kernel powder (MSK was screened for phytochemicals. The bacteria isolated include: Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterobacter clocae, Enterobacter asburiae and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. The Gram negative organisms confirmed were Enterobacter clocae, Enterobacter asburiae and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. The isolated fungus was Aspergillus niger. In the analysis of different chemical preservatives on mango seed powder, the most effective preservative was 3.0% sodium benzoate followed by 5% sodium acetate and 5% common salt. Citric acid was the least effective of all the preservatives used at equal concentrations. Sodium benzoate at 3% had the least bacterial count of 0.8 x 103 CFU/ml which was maintained from the 8th week to the last week of storage. Citric acid at 0.1% and 1.0% concentrations had bacterial counts of 3.50 x 103 CFU/ml and 2.0 x 103 CFU/ml respectively at the end of the 12 weeks of storage. The pH of the chemically preserved powdered kernels of M. indica from the 1st to the 12th week ranged from 2.70-6.01. The phytochemicals present in the mango seed powder included tannins, saponnins, polyphenol, alkaloids, flavonoids, cardiac glycosides and steroids.

  11. GROWTH OF MACROBRACHIUM ROSENBERGII FED WITH MANGO SEED KERNEL, BANANA PEEL AND PAPAYA PEEL INCORPORATED FEEDS

    OpenAIRE

    P Aarumugam; P. Saravana Bhavan; Muralisankar, T.; N. Manickam; V. Srinevasan; Radhakrishnan, S.

    2013-01-01

    The growth promoting potential of fruits wastes, mango seed kernel, banana peel and papaya peel on the freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii post larvae (PL) was evaluated. Basal diet equated to 35% protein was prepared by using soybean meal, groundnut oilcake, horse gram and wheat flour. Each fruit waste powder was separately incorporated with basal diet at a proportion of 10%. Sunflower oil was used as lipid source. Egg albumin and tapioca flour were used as binding agents. Vitamin B-...

  12. Molecular Docking Studies and Anti-Tyrosinase Activity of Thai Mango Seed Kernel Extract

    OpenAIRE

    Patchreenart Saparpakorn; Rapepol Bavovada; Pimolpan Pithayanukul; Saruth Nithitanakool

    2009-01-01

    The alcoholic extract from seed kernels of Thai mango (Mangifera indica L. cv. ‘Fahlun’) (Anacardiaceae) and its major phenolic principle (pentagalloylglucopyranose) exhibited potent, dose-dependent inhibitory effects on tyrosinase with respect to L-DOPA. Molecular docking studies revealed that the binding orientations of the phenolic principles were in the tyrosinase binding pocket and their orientations were located in the hydrophobic binding pocket surrounding the binuclear coppe...

  13. Evaluation of the proximate composition, antioxidant potential, and antimicrobial activity of mango seed kernel extracts

    OpenAIRE

    Mutua, Jane K.; Imathiu, Samuel; Owino, Willis

    2016-01-01

    Abstract After pulp extraction in fruit processing industry, a significant quantity of mango seed kernels are discarded as solid wastes. These seed kernels can be ideal raw materials for obtaining extracts rich in bioactive compounds with good antioxidant properties. The conversion of these wastes into utilizable food ingredients would help in reducing environmental problems associated with processing waste disposal. In order to determine their potential use, this study evaluated some of the ...

  14. PRODUCTION AND PARTIAL CHARACTERIZATION OF PECTINASES FROM MANGO PEELS BY Aspergillus tamarii

    OpenAIRE

    Tivkaa Amande; Bukola Adebayo-Tayo; Uduak Ndubuisi-Nnaji; Benjamin Ado

    2013-01-01

    Pectinases are a group of enzymes that are able to breakdown or transform pectin. Sources of pectinase comprise a wide variety of bacteria, yeast and filamentous fungi, especially Aspergillus sp. In this study pectinases (polygalacturonase and pectin lyase) were produced from mango peels by Aspergillus tamarii in solid state fermentation and a fraction of the crude enzyme solution obtained by ultracentrifugation was used for partial characterization assay. The maximum polygalacturonase produc...

  15. High hydrostatic pressure processing reduces the glycemic index of fresh mango puree in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elizondo-Montemayor, Leticia; Hernández-Brenes, Carmen; Ramos-Parra, Perla A; Moreno-Sánchez, Diana; Nieblas, Bianca; Rosas-Pérez, Aratza M; Lamadrid-Zertuche, Ana C

    2015-04-01

    Dietary guidelines recommend the daily consumption of fruits; however, healthy and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) subjects receive conflicting messages regarding ingestion of fruits, such as mango, because of its sugar content. We investigated the effects of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) processing of fresh mango puree (MP) on the glycemic indexes (GIs) and postprandial glycemic responses of 38 healthy Mexican subjects in a randomized cross-over clinical trial. Physicochemical characterization of MP included sugar profiles by HPLC-ELSD, starch, fibers, moisture, viscosity, swelling capacity and solubility properties of alcohol insoluble residue (AIR). The mean GI for HHP-MP was significantly lower (32.7 ± 13.4) than that of unprocessed-MP (42.7 ± 19.5). A significantly higher proportion of subjects showed a low GI following the consumption of HHP-MP compared to unprocessed-MP and none of them showed a high GI for the HHP-MP, compared to a significantly higher proportion for the unprocessed-MP. The viscosity and AIR solubility values of HHP-MP samples were significantly higher, which influenced glucose peaking later (Tmax) at 45 minutes and induced 20% lower AUC values than unprocessed-MP, corresponding to greater retardation indexes. The study findings support data stating that low GI fruits are appropriate for glycemic control and that mango may be included as part of healthy subjects' diets and potentially T2DM subjects' diets. Furthermore, HHP processing of mango may offer additional benefits for glycemic control, as its performance regarding GI, AUC and Tmax was significantly better than that of the unprocessed-MP. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the impact of this commercial non-thermal pasteurization technology on glucose metabolism.

  16. Mango varieties “espada”, “rosa” and tommy atkins: bioactive compounds and antioxidant potential

    OpenAIRE

    Cristiane Rodrigues de Araújo; Enayde de Almeida Melo

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the amount of ascorbic acid, total phenolics and carotenoids and evaluate the antioxidant potential of mango varieties “Espada”, “Rosa” and Tommy Atkins. The fruits were ground to obtain the fresh pulp and waste resulting was dried, crushed to pass through sieve. Hydroacetone, hydromethanolic and aqueous extracts, obtained through sequential extraction procedure from pulp and dehydrated waste were screened for their antioxidant activity by DPPH free radic...

  17. Use of autochthonous lactic acid bacteria starters to ferment mango juice for promoting its probiotic roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Xue-Yi; Guo, Li-Qiong; Ye, Zhi-Wei; Qiu, Ling-Yan; Gu, Feng-Wei; Lin, Jun-Fang

    2016-05-18

    Strains of Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Pediococcus pentosaceus, and Lactobacillus brevis were identified from mango fruits by partial 16S rDNA gene sequence. Based on the ability of producing mannitol and diacetyl, Leuconostoc mesenteroides MPL18 and MPL39 were selected within the lactic acid bacteria isolates, and used as mixed starters to ferment mango juice (MJ). Both the autochthonous strains grew well in fermented mango juice (FMJ) and remained viable at 9.81 log cfu mL(-1) during 30 days of storage at 4°C. The content of total sugar of FMJ was lower than that of MJ, while the concentration of mannitol was higher than that of MJ, and the concentration of diacetyl was 3.29 ± 0.12 mg L(-1). Among detected organic acids including citric acid, gallic acid, lactic acid, and acetic acid, only citric acid and gallic acid were found in MJ, while all detected organic acids were found in FMJ. The concentration of lactic acid of FMJ was the highest (78.62 ± 13.66 mM) among all detected organic acids. The DPPH radical scavenging capacity of FMJ was higher than that of MJ. Total phenolic compounds were better preserved in FMJ. The acidity and sweetness had a noticeable impact on the overall acceptance of the treated sample.

  18. Species composition and population dynamics of thrips (Thysanoptera) in mango orchards of northern peninsular Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliakbarpour, H; Che Salmah, M R; Dieng, H

    2010-10-01

    Thrips are key pests of mango, Mangifera indica (L.), in Malaysia, including the Northern Peninsular. As Penang has year-round equatorial climate and high of rainfall, the populations of thrips may be subject to variations in composition and size. With a goal of developing an appropriate control strategy, a survey was conducted in Penang to determine species composition and abundance in relation to some environmental factors. Sprayed and unsprayed orchards were sampled on weekly basis through two flowering seasons of 2009 using CO(2) collection technique. Larval population falling into the ground to pupate and adults emerging from the soil were investigated in both orchards. Thrips hawaiiensis (Morgan) and Scirtothrips dorsalis (Hood) were the most prevalent species in the sprayed and the unsprayed orchards, respectively. The abundance of thrips was high during the flowering period of the dry season and decreased during the flowering period of the rainy season. This latter period coincided with decreased temperature and increased relative humidity. Percentage of adult emergence from the soil was lower in the rainy season than recorded in the dry season in both orchards. Taken together, these observations suggest that T. hawaiiensis and S. dorsalis are the main thrips species pests of mango panicles in Penang. Direct control with insecticides focusing on these two species may help to reduce cosmetic injuries and other damages on mango fruits.

  19. Consumptive water use associated with food waste: case study of fresh mango in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridoutt, B. G.; Juliano, P.; Sanguansri, P.; Sellahewa, J.

    2009-07-01

    In many parts of the world, freshwater is already a scarce and overexploited natural resource, raising concerns about global food security and damage to freshwater ecosystems. This situation is expected to intensify with the FAO estimating that world food production must double by 2050. Food chains must therefore become much more efficient in terms of consumptive water use. For the small and geographically well-defined Australian mango industry, having an average annual production of 44 692 t of marketable fresh fruit, the average virtual water content (sum of green, blue and gray water) at orchard gate was 2298 l kg-1. However, due to wastage in the distribution and consumption stages of the product life cycle, the average virtual water content of one kg of Australian-grown fresh mango consumed by an Australian household was 5218 l. This latter figure compares to an Australian-equivalent water footprint of 217 l kg-1, which is the volume of direct water use by an Australian household having an equivalent potential to contribute to water scarcity. Nationally, distribution and consumption waste in the food chain of Australian-grown fresh mango to Australian households represented an annual waste of 26.7 Gl of green water and 16.6 Gl of blue water. These findings suggest that interventions to reduce food chain waste will likely have as great or even greater impact on freshwater resource availability as other water use efficiency measures in agriculture and food production.

  20. Bioethanol production from leafy biomass of mango (Mangifera indica) involving naturally isolated and recombinant enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Saprativ P; Ravindran, Rajeev; Deka, Deepmoni; Jawed, Mohammad; Das, Debasish; Goyal, Arun

    2013-01-01

    The present study describes the usage of dried leafy biomass of mango (Mangifera indica) containing 26.3% (w/w) cellulose, 54.4% (w/w) hemicellulose, and 16.9% (w/w) lignin, as a substrate for bioethanol production from Zymomonas mobilis and Candida shehatae. The substrate was subjected to two different pretreatment strategies, namely, wet oxidation and an organosolv process. An ethanol concentration (1.21 g/L) was obtained with Z. mobilis in a shake-flask simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) trial using 1% (w/v) wet oxidation pretreated mango leaves along with mixed enzymatic consortium of Bacillus subtilis cellulase and recombinant hemicellulase (GH43), whereas C. shehatae gave a slightly higher (8%) ethanol titer of 1.31 g/L. Employing 1% (w/v) organosolv pretreated mango leaves and using Z. mobilis and C. shehatae separately in the SSF, the ethanol titers of 1.33 g/L and 1.52 g/L, respectively, were obtained. The SSF experiments performed with 5% (w/v) organosolv-pretreated substrate along with C. shehatae as fermentative organism gave a significantly enhanced ethanol titer value of 8.11 g/L using the shake flask and 12.33 g/L at the bioreactor level. From the bioreactor, 94.4% (v/v) ethanol was recovered by rotary evaporator with 21% purification efficiency.

  1. Comparison of microwave-assisted and conventional extraction of mangiferin from mango (Mangifera indica L.) leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Tangbin; Wu, Hongfu; Li, Huawen; Jia, Qing; Song, Gang

    2013-10-01

    Mangiferin is the main bioactive component in mango leaves, which possesses anti-inflammatory, antioxidative, antidiabetic, immunomodulatory, and antitumor activities. In the present study, a microwave-assisted extraction method was developed for the extraction of mangiferin from mango leaves. Some parameters such as ethanol concentration, liquid-to-solid ratio, microwave power, and extraction time were optimized by single-factor experiments and response surface methodology. The optimal extraction conditions were 45% ethanol, liquid-to-solid ratio of 30:1 (mL/g), and extraction time of 123 s under microwave irradiation of 474 W. Under optimal conditions, the yield of mangiferin was 36.10 ± 0.72 mg/g, significantly higher than that of conventional extraction. The results obtained are beneficial for the full utilization of mango leaves and also indicate that microwave-assisted extraction is a very useful method for extracting mangiferin from plant materials. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Vinegar production from Togolese local variety Mangovi of Mango mangifera indica Linn. (Anacardiaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameyapoh, Y; Leveau, Jean-Yves; Karou, Simplice D; Bouix, M; Sossou, Seyram K; De Souza, C

    2010-02-01

    The present study aimed to access for the physiochemical parameters of vinegar production through Togolese local variety Mangovi of mango Mangifera indica juice fermentation. The juice was fermented successively by Saccharomyces cerevisisae and acetic bacteria. The levels of ethanol and acetic acid in the juice during the production of vinegar were monitored by gas chromatography and titrimetry methods, respectively. The physiological state of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae L2056 was determined by flow cytometry using a dual fluorescent labeling of diacetate carboxy-fluorescein (CFDA) and propidium iodide. The results indicated that 200 mL of mango juice, sugar content 20 Brix, set in alcoholic fermentation with 10(6) yeast cells produced 22.4 g L(-1) ethanol in 72 h. Acetic fermentation transformed 93% of this ethanol to acetic acid in 288 h. Twenty-four hours after the beginning of alcoholic fermentation, 91% of cells were viable, 8.85% were stressed and 0.05% died. After 24 h of acetic fermentation, viable, stressed and dead cells were 45, 12 and 39%, respectively; corresponding to the passage of acetic vinegar level from 0.9 to 2.1 degrees. At the end of the acetic fermentation, dead cells were estimated to 98% at and acetic acid to 4.7 degrees. Using consecutive fermentations is suitable technique for vinegar production from mango juice. The application of the present results may contribute to avoid fruits post harvest losses.

  3. Evaluation of quality of mango cultivar Tommy Atkins radiated with greater degree of maturity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Josenilda M. da, E-mail: jmnilda@cnen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Santos, Marilia C.G. dos; Maciel, Maria Ines S., E-mail: marines@ufrpe.br [Universidade Federal Rural de Pernambuco (UFRPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Villar, Heldio P., E-mail: hpvillar@cnen.gov.br [Escola Politecnica de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The effects of ionizing radiation at doses of 0.5 and 1.0 kGy were evaluated in mango cultivar Tommy Atkins when harvested at maturation stage showing yellow flesh and skin color more red than green, representing four degree of maturation at commercial scale. The fruits were stored for 21 days at 12 degree C and sensory evaluated after that period as its external appearance, internal appearance, acidic taste, sweet taste, mellow flavor, aroma, texture and succulence of the flesh, by a team of ten trained judges. Physic chemical analysis of the main characteristics of fruits quality were also performed in the pulp at the end of storage. The results of sensory analysis revealed that the doses used did not damaged the sensory characteristics of mango fruit and that they received a dose of 0.5 kGy showed higher acceptance for most sensory attributes evaluated. The physic chemical characteristics showed no significant differences between the doses, except the amount of ascorbic acid that decreased progressively with increasing doses. Application of this method is viable for mango cultivar Tommy Atkins when taken with a higher degree of maturity and was safe for the external market and sensory acceptable. (author)

  4. Image Based Mango Fruit Detection, Localisation and Yield Estimation Using Multiple View Geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madeleine Stein

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel multi-sensor framework to efficiently identify, track, localise and map every piece of fruit in a commercial mango orchard. A multiple viewpoint approach is used to solve the problem of occlusion, thus avoiding the need for labour-intensive field calibration to estimate actual yield. Fruit are detected in images using a state-of-the-art faster R-CNN detector, and pair-wise correspondences are established between images using trajectory data provided by a navigation system. A novel LiDAR component automatically generates image masks for each canopy, allowing each fruit to be associated with the corresponding tree. The tracked fruit are triangulated to locate them in 3D, enabling a number of spatial statistics per tree, row or orchard block. A total of 522 trees and 71,609 mangoes were scanned on a Calypso mango orchard near Bundaberg, Queensland, Australia, with 16 trees counted by hand for validation, both on the tree and after harvest. The results show that single, dual and multi-view methods can all provide precise yield estimates, but only the proposed multi-view approach can do so without calibration, with an error rate of only 1.36% for individual trees.

  5. Mango resistance to fruit flies. II - resistance of the alfa cultivar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossetto, C.J.; Bortoletto, N., E-mail: rossetto@iac.sp.gov.b [Agencia Paulista de Tecnologia dos Agronegocios (APTA), Votuporanga, SP (Brazil). Polo Regional do Noroeste Paulista; Walder, J.M.M.; Mastrangelo, T. de A., E-mail: jmwalder@cena.usp.b [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Carvalho, C.R.L.; Castro, J.V. de, E-mail: climonta@iac.sp.gov.b, E-mail: josalba@iac.sp.gov.b [Instituto Agronomico de Campinas, SP (Brazil); Pinto, A.C. de Q. [EMBRAPA, Brasilia, DF (Brazil); Cortelazzo, A.L., E-mail: angelo@unicamp.b [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Biologia

    2006-07-01

    The percentage of infested mango fruits of five selected mango varieties was evaluated during three years under field conditions. Three varieties with field resistance to fruit flies had less then 10% of fruits infested. Tommy Atkins, the susceptible commercial check, had 42,9% and the susceptible check had 98.9 % of infested fruits. The three field resistant varieties plus the susceptible commercial check, Tommy Atkins, were further tested in laboratory, under caged conditions, with artificial infestation of Anastrepha obliqua. The attempts of oviposition and the number of pupae developed from each fruit were evaluated. Under caged conditions, the cultivar Alfa maintained its field resistance and Espada Stahl and IAC 111 lost the field resistance and were as susceptible as Tommy Atkins. The attempts of oviposition were positively and highly correlated with the number of pupae developed in the fruits. Non preference for oviposition was confirmed as the main mechanism of resistance of mango fruits to fruit flies. In the absence of a more susceptible variety (no choice test) the cultivar Alfa has kept the resistance (author)

  6. Benzophenones from Mango Leaves Exhibit α-Glucosidase and NO Inhibitory Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jing; Yi, Xiaomin; Wang, Yihai; Chen, Guisi; He, Xiangjiu

    2016-10-12

    Mango (Mangifera indica L.) is a succulent tropical fruit. Bioactive phytochemical investigation has been carried out to the leaves of mango. Three new benzophenone glycosides, along with 14 known compounds, were purified and identified. The novel benzophenones were elucidated to be 2,4,4',6-tetrahydroxy-3'-methoxybenzophenone-3-C-β-d-glucopyranoside (1), 4,4',6-trihydroxybenzophenone-2-O-α-l-arabinofuranoside (7), and 4',6-dihydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone-2-O-(2″),3-C-(1″)-1″-desoxy-α-l-fructofuranoside (11). The α-glucosidase inhibitory, NO production inhibitory, and antioxidant activities were assessed for the purified benzophenones and triterpenoids. Some benzophenones showed moderate α-glucosidase and NO inhibitory activities. The IC50 value of the α-glucosidase inhibitory of isolated compounds 1, 13, and 14 were 284.93 ± 20.29, 239.60 ± 25.00, and 297.37 ± 8.12 μM, respectively. Most compounds showed moderate effects to reduce the NO content in 50 and 100 μM. The above results of bioactivity powerfully demonstrated the phytochemicals from mango, especially benzophenones, probably partially rational for its antidiabetes and anti-inflammatory.

  7. IRRIGATION DEFICIT STRATEGIES ON PHYSIOLOGICAL AND PRODUCTIVE PARAMETERS OF 'TOMMY ATKINS' MANGO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARCELO ROCHA DOS SANTOS

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the gas exchange, leaf temperature, yield and water use efficiency in 'Tommy Atkins' mango under irrigation deficit strategies. The experimental design was randomized block, with seven treatments with regulated deficit irrigation (RDI under micro - spray and five treatments with partial root - zone drying (PRD under drip irrigation. The treatments on RDI consisted of application of 100, 75 and 50% of ETc at the stages S1 (beginning of flowering to fruit set S2 (fruit development and S3 (fruit physiological maturation. The treatments on PRD consisted of application of 100, 80, 60 and 40% of ETc, in the same three stages, alternating the irrigation side every 15 days. The regulated deficit irrigation causes less negative interference in gas exchange than the partial root - zone drying, and the climate factors affect the gas exchange and leaf temperature of 'Tommy Atkins' mango more than the regulated deficit irrigation. The partial root - zone drying irrigation with 60 and 40% of ETc causes a decrease in the 'Tommy Atkins' mango yield. The regulated deficit irrigation up to 50% of ETc, applied at the fruit maturation stage, maintain the yield and water use efficiency.

  8. Plastic fats from sal, mango and palm oil by lipase catalyzed interesterification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar Shetty, Umesha; Sunki Reddy, Yella Reddy; Khatoon, Sakina

    2014-02-01

    Speciality plastic fats with no trans fatty acids suitable for use in bakery and as vanaspati substitute were prepared by interesterification of blends of palm stearin (PSt) with sal and mango fats using Lipozyme TLIM lipase as catalyst. The blends containing PSt/sal or PSt/mango showed short melting range and hence are not suitable as bakery shortenings. Lipase catalysed interesterification extended the plasticity or melting range of all the blends. The blends containing higher proportion of PSt with sal fat (50/50) were harder having high solids at and above body temperature and hence cannot be used as bakery shortenings. The blends with PSt/sal (30-40/60-70) after interesterification showed melting profiles similar to those of commercial hydrogenated bakery fats. Similarly, the blends containing PSt/mango (30-40/60-70) after interesterification also showed melting profiles similar to those of commercial hydrogenated shortenings. The slip melting point and solidification characteristics also confirm the plastic nature of these samples. The improvement in plasticity after interesterification is due to formation of higher melting as well as lower melting triglycerides during lipase catalysed interesterification.

  9. An oxidoreductase from 'Alphonso' mango catalyzing biosynthesis of furaneol and reduction of reactive carbonyls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Ram; Chidley, Hemangi; Deshpande, Ashish; Schmidt, Axel; Pujari, Keshav; Giri, Ashok; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Gupta, Vidya

    2013-01-01

    Two furanones, furaneol (4-hydroxy-2,5-dimethyl-3(2H)-furanone) and mesifuran (2,5-dimethyl-4-methoxy-3(2H)-furanone), are important constituents of flavor of the Alphonso cultivar of mango (Mangifera indica). To get insights into the biosynthesis of these furanones, we isolated an enone oxidoreductase gene from the Alphonso mango. It has high sequence similarity to an alkenal/one oxidoreductase from cucumber (79% identity) and enone oxidoreductases from tomato (73% identity) and strawberry (72% identity). The complete open reading frame was expressed in E. coli and the (his)6-tagged recombinant protein was purified by affinity chromatography. The purified protein assayed with NADH as a reducing agent converted D-fructose-1,6-diphosphate into furaneol, the immediate precursor of mesifuran. The enzyme was also able to convert two highly reactive carbonyls, 3-buten-2-one and 1-penten-3-one, produced by lipid peroxidation in plants, into their saturated derivatives. Expression profiling in various ripening stages of Alphonso fruits depicted an expression maxima at 10 days after harvest stage, shortly before the appearance of the maximum amount of furanones (completely ripe stage, 15 days after harvest). Although no furanones were detected at the 0 day after harvest stage, significant expression of this gene was detected in the fruits at this stage. Overall, the results suggest that this oxidoreductase plays important roles in Alphonso mango fruits.

  10. Natural Enemies of the Frankliniella Complex Species (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) in Ataulfo Mango Agroecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Franklin H; Infante, Francisco; Castillo, Alfredo; Ibarra-Nuñez, Guillermo; Goldarazena, Arturo; Funderburk, Joe E

    2015-01-01

    A field survey was conducted in Ataulfo mango (Mangifera indica L.) orchards in Chiapas, Mexico, with the objective of determining the natural enemies of the Frankliniella complex species (Thysanoptera: Thripidae). Seven species of this genus feed and reproduce in large numbers during the mango flowering. Two representative orchards were selected: the orchard "Tres A" characterized by an intensive use of agrochemicals directed against thrips, and the orchard "La Escondida" that did not spray insecticides. During mango flowering, five inflorescences were randomly collected every 5 d in both orchards, for a total of 18 sampling dates. Results revealed the presence of 18 species of arthropods that were found predating on Frankliniella. There were 11 species in the families Aeolothripidae, Phlaeothripidae, Formicidae, Anthocoridae and Chrysopidae; and seven species of spiders in the families Araneidae, Tetragnathidae, and Uloboridae. Over 88% of predators were anthocorids, including, Paratriphleps sp. (Champion), Orius insidiosus (Say), Orius tristicolor (White), and O. perpunctatus (Reuter). The orchard that did not spray insecticides had a significantly higher number of predators suggesting a negative effect of the insecticides on the abundance of these organisms. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Entomological Society of America.

  11. Antimicrobial activity of vanillin against spoilage microorganisms in stored fresh-cut mangoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngarmsak, Manatchaya; Delaquis, Pascal; Toivonen, Peter; Ngarmsak, Tipvanna; Ooraikul, Buncha; Mazza, G

    2006-07-01

    The antimicrobial activity of vanillin against four bacteria (Pantoea agglomerans, Aeromonas enteropelogenes, Micrococcus lylae, and Sphingobacterium spiritovorun), four fungi (Alternaria sp., Aspergillus sp., Penicillium sp., and Fusarium sp.), and three unidentified yeasts isolated from spoiling fresh-cut mango slices was verified in laboratory media adjusted to pH 5.0. MICs of vanillin against the fungi (12.5 to 13.3 mM), bacteria (10 to 13.3 mM), and yeasts (5.0 to 6.7 mM) indicated that all the test species were sensitive to the antimicrobial effects of vanillin. Fresh-cut mango slices were dipped for 1 min in solutions containing 40 and 80 mM vanillin before being packaged in rigid trays and stored at 5 and 10 degrees C to verify the effects of vanillin on the development of the spoilage microflora. Microbiological analysis for up to 14 days of storage revealed that treatment with 80 mM vanillin significantly delayed (P < 0.05) the development of total aerobic bacteria and yeast and mold populations. Vanillin may be a practical preservative for processing fresh-cut mango.

  12. Morphological and organoleptic description of mango fruits (Mangifera indica L. cultivated in Jipijapa canton in Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel-Ortega Julio

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In the year 2016, seventeen cultivars of mango (Mangifera indica L. were collected in local markets and farmers' field of Jipijapa Canton, Ecuador, with the aim of describing and analyzing mango fruits due to their morphological characteristics of sugars (°Brix and total solids. Collections were carried out by stu-dents and teachers of the Research Methodologies course of the Agricultural Engineering Career, of the Southern State University of Manabí (UNESUM. The fruits were characterized by using 16 qualitative and quantitative variables for fruit and seed recommended by UPOV and IPGRI. The percentage of total solids and Brix grades of each harvested crop were also analyzed in the UNESUM bromatology laboratory. Results showed that in the Jipijapa Canton, Ecuador, there is a great biodiversity of native mangoes, which were not characterized. Fruit shapes, pulp color and variable fiber contents were observed. The length of fruit was 6.33 to 12.50 cm, and the width was 5.27 to 8.50 cm, with a length/width ratio between 0.77 and 1.83 cm. The fruit weight was 63.3 to 500 g. No significant differences were observed in the sugars content (°Brix. Finally, it was observed that the range of consumable pulp was 63 to 94% in native cultivars and 86% to 97% in the improved ones.

  13. Describing Quality and Sensory Attributes of 3 Mango (Mangifera indica L.) Cultivars at 3 Ripeness Stages Based on Firmness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassur, Rita de Cássia Mirela Resende; González-Moscoso, Sara; Crisosto, Gayle M; Lima, Luiz Carlos de Oliveira; Vilas Boas, Eduardo Valério de Barros; Crisosto, Carlos H

    2015-09-01

    To determine the ideal ripening stage for consumption of the mango cultivars, "Ataulfo," "Haden," and "Tommy Atkins"; fruits at 3 flesh firmness levels (ripeness stages) were evaluated by a trained panel using descriptive analysis after instrumental measurements were made. After harvest, all fruits were ripened to allow softening and quality and sensory attribute changes. Ripening changes during softening of Ataulfo mangos were expressed by a characteristic increase in the perception of "tropical fruit" and "peach" aromas, an increase in "juiciness," "sweetness," and "tropical fruit" flavor, while "fibrousness," "chewiness," and "sourness" decreased. Similar desirable sensory changes were also detected during softening of Haden mangos; an increase in tropical fruit and peach aromas, sweetness and tropical fruit flavor, and a decrease in chewiness, sourness, and bitterness. Softening of Tommy Atkins mangos was followed by reduced chewiness and sourness and increased peach aroma. Softening of all cultivars was followed by decreased sourness and titratable acidity (TA) and increased soluble solids concentration (SSC) and SSC:TA ratio. The results indicate that mango ripening leads to increased expression of sensory attributes such as tropical fruit and peach aromas, tropical flavor, and sweetness that have been related to improved eating quality and these final changes in sensory quality attributes are specific for each cultivar. For example, Ataulfo and Haden mangos had greater improvement in quality and sensory attributes related to fruit eating quality during ripening-softening than Tommy Atkins. In our consumer test, these quality-sensory attributes expressed during ripening that were perceived by the trained panel were also validated, supporting the need for a controlled ripening protocol in mangos. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  14. Mango modulates body fat and plasma glucose and lipids in mice fed a high-fat diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Edralin A; Li, Wenjia; Peterson, Sandra K; Brown, Angela; Kuvibidila, Solo; Perkins-Veazie, Penny; Clarke, Stephen L; Smith, Brenda J

    2011-11-01

    Consumption of fruits and vegetables has been investigated for their role in the prevention of many chronic conditions. Among the fruits, mango provides numerous bioactive compounds such as carotenoids, vitamin C and phenolic compounds, which have been shown to have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. The present study examined the effects of dietary supplementation of freeze-dried mango pulp, in comparison with the hypolipidaemic drug, fenofibrate, and the hypoglycaemic drug, rosiglitazone, in reducing adiposity and alterations in glucose metabolism and lipid profile in mice fed a high-fat (HF) diet. Male C57BL/6J mice were randomly divided into six treatment groups (eight to nine/group): control (10 % energy from fat); HF (60 % energy from fat); HF+1 or 10 % freeze-dried mango (w/w); HF+fenofibrate (500 mg/kg diet); HF+rosiglitazone (50 mg/kg diet). After 8 weeks of treatment, mice receiving the HF diet had a higher percentage body fat (P = 0·0205) and epididymal fat mass (P = 0·0037) compared with the other treatment groups. Both doses of freeze-dried mango, similar to fenofibrate and rosiglitazone, prevented the increase in epididymal fat mass and the percentage of body fat. Freeze-dried mango supplementation at the 1 % dose improved glucose tolerance as shown by approximately 35 % lower blood glucose area under the curve compared with the HF group. Moreover, freeze-dried mango lowered insulin resistance, as indicated by the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, to a similar extent as rosiglitazone and modulated NEFA. The present findings demonstrate that incorporation of freeze-dried mango in the diet of mice improved glucose tolerance and lipid profile and reduced adiposity associated with a HF diet.

  15. The effect of blow flies (Diptera: Calliphoridae) on the size and weight of mangos (Mangifera indica L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Shafqat; Naqqash, Muhammad Nadir; Jaleel, Waqar; Saeed, Qamar; Ghouri, Fozia

    2016-01-01

    Pollination has a great effect on the yield of fruit trees. Blow flies are considered as an effective pollinator compared to hand pollination in fruit orchards. Therefore, this study was designed to evaluate the effect of different pollination methods in mango orchards. The impact of pollination on quantity and quality of mango yield by blow flies was estimated by using three treatments, i.e., open pollinated trees, trees were covered by a net in the presence of blow flies for pollination, and trees were covered with a net but without insects. The maximum number of flowers was recorded in irregular types of inflorescence, i.e., 434.80 flowers/inflorescence. Fruit setting (bud) was higher in open pollinated mango trees (i.e. 37.00/inflorescence) than enclosed pollination by blow flies (i.e. 22.34/inflorescence). The size of the mango fruit was the highest (5.06 mm) in open pollinated tree than those pollinated by blow flies (3.93 mm) and followed by without any pollinator (3.18 mm) at marble stage. We found that the maximum weight of mango fruit (201.19 g) was in open pollinated trees. The results demonstrated that blow flies can be used as effective mango pollinators along with other flies and bees. The blow flies have shown a positive impact on the quality and quantity of mango. This study will be helpful in future and also applicable at farm level to use blow flies as pollinators that are cheap and easy to rear.

  16. Low-Dose Irradiation With Modified Atmosphere Packaging for Mango Against the Oriental Fruit Fly (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srimartpirom, Monnipa; Burikam, Intawat; Limohpasmanee, Wanich; Kongratarporn, Titima; Thannarin, Thodsapon; Bunsiri, Apita; Follett, Peter A

    2017-12-27

    Irradiation is used to disinfest the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) (Diptera: Tephritidae) and other pests on mango fruits before export from Thailand to foreign markets. Modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) used during export of mangoes creates a low-oxygen environment that may reduce the efficacy of quarantine irradiation treatment against B. dorsalis. 'Nam Dok Mai' mangoes infested with third-instar larvae of B. dorsalis, wrapped with three different kinds of MAP bags (CF1, FF5, and H34M) or no MAP, were treated with gamma radiation at 0 (control), 30, 60, 90, 120, and 150 Gy. The average O2 and CO2 concentrations in MAP bags with mangos were 7.2 and 8.7% in the H34M bag, 8.6 and 21.2% in the CF1 bag, and 9.6 and 26.7% in the FF5 bag, respectively. The use of MAP on infested mangoes significantly increased mortality of B. dorsalis under irradiation treatment. The estimated lethal doses to cause 99% mortality (LD99) for no MAP and MAP (CF1, FF5, and H34M bags) treatments were 58.1, 41.6, 43.8, and 47.4 Gy, respectively. Therefore, MAP acted as an additional stressor rather than providing radioprotection in irradiated B. dorsalis. Large-scale confirmatory testing of 35,000 B. dorsalis larvae treated at a radiation dose of 150 Gy in mangoes with H34M MAP bags produced no survivors to the adult stage. Commercial use of MAP producing the O2 levels that we observed for mangos in this study will not reduce the efficacy of the approved 150 Gy quarantine irradiation treatment for B. dorsalis. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  17. Use of a modified cluster sampling method to perform rapid needs assessment after Hurricane Andrew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlady, W G; Quenemoen, L E; Armenia-Cope, R R; Hurt, K J; Malilay, J; Noji, E K; Wurm, G

    1994-04-01

    To rapidly obtain population-based estimates of needs in the early aftermath of Hurricane Andrew in South Florida. We used a modified cluster-sampling method (the Expanded Programme on Immunization [EPI] method) for three surveys. We selected a systematic sample of 30 quarter-mile square clusters for each survey and, beginning from a random start, interviewed members of seven consecutive occupied households in each cluster. Two surveys were of the most affected area (1990 population, 32,672) at three and ten days after the hurricane struck; one survey was of a less affected area (1990 population, 15,576) seven days after the hurricane struck. Results were available within 24 hours of beginning each survey. Initial findings emphasized the need for restoring utilities and sanitation and helped to focus medical relief on primary care and preventive services. The second survey of the most affected area showed improvement in the availability of food, water, electricity, and sanitation (P < or = .05). There was no evidence of disease outbreaks. For the first time, the EPI method provided population-based information to guide and evaluate relief operations after a sudden-impact natural disaster. An improvement over previous approaches, the EPI method warrants further evaluation as a needs assessment tool in acute disasters.

  18. Long-term effects of Hurricane Andrew: revisiting mental health indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnell, S; Troiano, R P; Barker, N; Noji, E; Hlady, W G; Hopkins, R

    1995-09-01

    Two population-based surveys of South Dade County, Florida, were conducted after Hurricane Andrew to compare hurricane-related symptoms of mental distress and describe the impact of mental health outreach teams. Households were selected by three-stage cluster sampling and findings from the two surveys, 13 months apart, were compared. Response rates were 75 per cent and 84 per cent. The prevalence of symptoms of mental distress decreased over time. However, in the households contacted by the teams (25 per cent of sample), the prevalence of symptoms (50 per cent) did not differ from households not contacted (43 per cent). Households contacted by teams that reported symptoms were just as likely to have been referred for help by the teams (72 per cent) as those without symptoms (68 per cent). Households reporting symptoms were equally likely to get counselling regardless of whether the teams visited. Mental health teams had no significant impact on mental health symptoms or the use of mental health services. Alternative approaches to mental health outreach teams need to be explored.

  19. Weathering the storm: children's long-term recall of Hurricane Andrew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fivush, Robyn; Sales, Jessica McDermott; Goldberg, Amy; Bahrick, Lorraine; Parker, Janat

    2004-01-01

    Children who experienced a highly stressful natural disaster, Hurricane Andrew, were interviewed within a few months of the event, when they were 3-4 years old, and again 6 years later, when they were 9-10 years old. Children were grouped into low, moderate, or high stress groups depending on the severity of the experienced storm. All children were able to recall this event in vivid detail 6 years later. In fact, children reported over twice as many propositions at the second interview as at the first. At the initial interview, children in the high stress group reported less information than children in the moderate stress group, but 6 years later, children in all three stress groups reported similar amounts of information. However children in the high stress group needed more questions and prompts than children in the other stress groups. Yet children in the high stress group also reported more consistent information between the two interviews, especially about the storm, than children in the other stress groups. Implications for children's developing memory of stressful events are discussed.

  20. Analysis of medical treatment at a field hospital following Hurricane Andrew, 1992.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alson, R; Alexander, D; Leonard, R B; Stringer, L W

    1993-11-01

    To determine what medical care was required of a special operations response team by a community devastated by a major hurricane. Retrospective analysis of 1,544 patient encounter forms generated at a field hospital set up in Homestead, Florida, after Hurricane Andrew in August 1992 and staffed by the special operations response team from Forsyth County, North Carolina. All persons presenting for treatment. One thousand two hundred three adult patients and 336 pediatric patients were seen by the special operations response team. Only five of the injuries treated were due directly to the hurricane, whereas 285 of the treated injuries were sustained during clean-up activities. Most of the care provided was routine medical care denied the citizens due to the loss of their physicians' offices and clinics. Supplies of tetanus toxoid, antibiotics, and insulin were depleted in 24 hours. Resupplying these items and acquiring other medication to refill prescriptions constituted a pressing problem. The primary function of medical personnel responding to an area hit by a major hurricane will be to provide general medical care. Any trauma encountered will be primarily due to clean-up activities and not due to the hurricane itself. Responding medical personnel should plan on providing their own food and water for the first 72 hours and be well stocked with antibiotics, tetanus toxoid, and insulin.

  1. The generation of internal waves on the continental shelf by Hurricane Andrew

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keen, Timothy R.; Allen, Susan E.

    2000-11-01

    Observed currents, temperature, and salinity from moored instruments on the Louisiana continental slope and shelf reveal multiple baroclinic oscillations during Hurricane Andrew in August 1992. These measurements are supplemented by numerical models in order to identify possible internal wave generation mechanisms. The Princeton Ocean Model is run with realistic topography, stratification, and wind forcing to extend the observations to Mississippi Canyon and other areas on the shelf. A two-layer isopycnal model is used with idealized topography and spatially uniform winds to isolate internal waves generated in and around the canyon. The combination of the observations and the results from the numerical models indicates several possible mechanisms for generating long internal waves: (1) near-inertial internal waves were generated across the slope and shelf by dislocation of the thermocline by the wind stress; (2) interaction of inertial flow with topography generated internal waves along the shelf break, which bifurcated into landward and seaward propagating phases; (3) downwelling along the coast depressed the thermocline; after downwelling relaxes, an internal wave front propagates as a Kelvin wave; and (4) Poincaré waves generated within Mississippi Canyon propagate seaward while being advected westward over the continental slope. These processes interact to produce a three-dimensional internal wave field, which was only partly captured by the observations.

  2. Wind damage effects of Hurricane Andrew on mangrove communities along the southwest coast of Florida, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, T.W.; Smith, T. J.; Robblee, M.B.

    1995-01-01

    On August 24, 1992, Hurricane Andrew downed and defoliated an extensive swath of mangrove trees across the lower Florida peninsula. Permanent field sites were established to assess the extent of forest damage and to monitor the rate and process of forest recovery. Canopy trees suffered the highest mortality particularly for sites within and immediately north of the storm's eyewall. The type and extent of site damage, windthrow, branch loss, and defoliation generally decreased exponentially with increasing distance from the storm track. Forest damage was greater for sites in the storm's right quadrant than in the left quadrant tor the same given distance from the storm center. Stand exposure, both horizontally and vertically, increased the susceptibility and probability of forest damage and accounted for much of the local variability. Slight species differences were found. Laguncularia racemosa exceeded Avicennia germinans and Rhizophora mangle in damage tendency under similar wind conditions. Azimuths of downed trees were strongly correlated with maximum wind speed and vector based on a hurricane simulation of the storm. Lateral branch loss and leaf defoliation on sites without windthrow damage indicated a degree of crown thinning and light penetration equivalent to treefall gaps under normally intact forest conditions. Mangrove species and forests are susceptible to catastrophic disturbance by hurricanes; the impacts of which are significant to changes in forest structure and function.

  3. The post-disaster negative health legacy: pregnancy outcomes in Louisiana after Hurricane Andrew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antipova, Anzhelika; Curtis, Andrew

    2015-10-01

    Disasters and displacement increasingly affect and challenge urban settings. How do pregnant women fare in the aftermath of a major disaster? This paper investigates the effect of pregnancies in disaster situations. The study tests a hypothesis that pregnant women residing in hurricane-prone areas suffer higher health risks. The setting is Louisiana in the Gulf Coast, United States, a state that continually experiences hurricane impacts. The time period for the analysis is three years following the landfall of Hurricane Andrew in 1992. We analysed low birth weight and preterm deliveries before and after landfall, as a whole and by race. Findings support an association between hazards and health of a community and indicate that pregnant women in the affected area, irrespective of race, are more likely to experience preterm deliveries compared to pre-event births. Results suggest there is a negative health legacy impact in Louisiana as a result of hurricane landfall. © 2015 The Author(s). Disasters © Overseas Development Institute, 2015.

  4. Storm-tide elevations produced by Hurricane Andrew along the southern Florida coasts, August 24, 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Mitchell H.

    1994-01-01

    On August 24, 1992, Hurricane Andrew crossed southern peninsular Florida. The combined effects of storm surge from the hurricane and astronomical tide, referred to as storm tide, caused flooding over a large part of southern Florida. Subsequent to the flooding, many high-water marks were identified, described, and surveyed along the south- eastern coast of Florida (Miami to Key Largo) and at selected areas along the southwestern coast of Florida (Flamingo to Goodland). Descriptions of these 336 high-water makrs are presented in tabular form in this report and their locations are plotted on nineteen 7.5-minute topographic quadrangle maps. For the southeastern coast, north-south profiles of the high-water makrs along the outher and inner barrier islands and the western shoreline of Biscayne Bay are presented. Average storm-tide elevations (relative to sea level) ranged from 4 to 6 feet in northern Biscayne Bay, were as much as 17 feet on the western shoreline near the center of the bay and ranged from 3 to 6 feet in southern Biscayne Bay and Barnes Sound. Storm-tide elevations along the southwestern coast ranged from 4 to 5 feet at Flamingo and 5 to 7 feet at Goodland in the Ten Thousand Islands area.

  5. Tilting at wave beams: a new perspective on the St. Andrew's Cross

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akylas, Triantaphyllos; Kataoka, Takeshi; Peacock, Thomas; Ghaemsaidi, Sasan; Holzenberger, Nils

    2017-04-01

    The generation of internal gravity waves by a vertically oscillating cylinder that is tilted to the horizontal in a uniformly stratified fluid of constant buoyancy frequency, is investigated. This variant of the widely-studied horizontal configuration-where a cylinder aligned horizontally with a plane of constant gravitational potential induces four wave beams forming a cross pattern known as St. Andrew's Cross-brings out certain unique features of radiated internal waves from a line source tilted to the horizontal. Specifically, for a given tilt of the cylinder, there is a cut-off frequency below which there is no longer a radiated wave field. Furthermore, three-dimensional effects due to the finite length of the cylinder, which are minor in the horizontal configuration, become a significant factor and eventually dominate the wave field as the cut-off frequency is approached. These results follow from simple kinematic analysis and are confirmed by supporting laboratory experiments. The kinematic analysis, moreover, suggests a resonance phenomenon near the cut-off frequency, where nonlinear and viscous effects are likely to play a part. This scenario is examined by an asymptotic model which predicts transfer of energy to a horizontal mean flow component. Experimental evidence of such an induced mean flow near cut-off is also presented.

  6. Business closure and relocation: a comparative analysis of the Loma Prieta earthquake and Hurricane Andrew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasileski, Gabriela; Rodríguez, Havidán; Diaz, Walter

    2011-01-01

    The occurrence of a number of large-scale disasters or catastrophes in recent years, including the Indian Ocean tsunami (2004), the Kashmir earthquake (2005), Hurricane Katrina (2005) and Hurricane Ike (2008), have raised our awareness regarding the devastating effects of disasters on human populations and the importance of developing mitigation and preparedness strategies to limit the consequences of such events. However, there is still a dearth of social science research focusing on the socio-economic impact of disasters on businesses in the United States. This paper contributes to this research literature by focusing on the impact of disasters on business closure and relocation through the use of multivariate logistic regression models, specifically focusing on the Loma Prieta earthquake (1989) and Hurricane Andrew (1992). Using a multivariate model, we examine how physical damage to the infrastructure, lifeline disruption and business characteristics, among others, impact business closure and relocation following major disasters. © 2011 The Author(s). Disasters © Overseas Development Institute, 2011.

  7. Andrew Taylor Still and the birth of osteopathy (Baldwin, Kansas, USA, 1855).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamonet, Claude

    2003-02-01

    Osteopathy has gained ground in recent years and has been seeking recognition in France. Physicians often lack the information needed to answer patients who have derived from the media, advertisements, and other patients what they believe is a clear idea of osteopathy and its twin sister chiropractic. My academic activities led me to the heart of the United States, to Kansas, where settlers and Indians once stood face to face and where wagon trains left daily for the Western territories. There, in Baldwin, Andrew Taylor Still "discovered" osteopathy. I conducted an in-depth study of the birth of osteopathy and of the ideological and cultural influences that shaped this doctrine. The circumstances that surrounded the development of osteopathy deserve to be widely known because they explain how contemporary osteopaths work. Indeed, although the terms are different, the ideology that underlies osteopathy seems unchanged. The history of osteopathy emphasizes the importance of logical thinking in medicine, of the principle of pathophysiological foundation, of diagnostic hypotheses, and of careful treatment selection complying with the rules of deontology and ethics. Osteopathy is without doubt a product of society and perhaps also of vogue. It cannot leave physicians indifferent.

  8. William Horner Andrews (1887–1953 – First Professor of Physiology at Onderstepoort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. W. Verwoerd

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available WHAndrews qualified as a veterinarian in London in 1908 and was recruited soon after, in 1909, by Sir Arnold Theiler to join the staff of the newly established veterinary laboratory at Onderstepoort. After initial studies on the treatment of trypanosomosis and on snake venoms he was deployed by Theiler in 1911 to start research on lamsiekte (botulismat a field station on the farm Kaffraria near Christiana, where he met and married his wife Doris. After a stint as Captain in the SA Veterinary Corps during World War I he succeeded D T Mitchell as head of the Allerton Laboratory in 1918, where he excelled in research on toxic plants, inter alia identifying Matricaria nigellaefolia as the cause of staggers in cattle.Whenthe Faculty ofVeterinary Science was established in 1920 he was appointed as the first Professor of Physiology. After the graduation of the first class in 1924, and due to health problems, he returned to the UK, first to the Royal Veterinary College and then to the Weybridge Veterinary Laboratories of which he became Director in 1927.After his retirement in 1947 he returned to South Africa as a guest worker at Onderstepoort where he again became involved in teaching physiologywhenProf. Quin unexpectedly died in 1950. Andrews died in Pretoria in 1953 and was buried in the Rebecca Street Cemetery.

  9. Predicting the Path to Recovery from Hurricane Katrina through the Lens of Hurricane Andrew and the Rodney King Riots

    OpenAIRE

    Robert Baade; Robert Baumann; Victor Matheson

    2005-01-01

    Hurricane Katrina caused the greatest damage of any hurricane in American history. We look at the rebuilding effort in New Orleans through the lens of two other disasters that occurred in 1992: Hurricane Andrew in Miami and the Rodney King riots in Los Angeles. The rebuilding effort in New Orleans shares similarities with both events, combining the impact of a hurricane on infrastructure and private businesses, and the prospect of an uneven recovery biased against racial minorities and the ec...

  10. Commentary on "The Perception and Cognition of Time in Balinese Music" by Andrew Clay McGraw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Cross

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available We review the paper by Andrew Clay McGraw, noting that it represents an interesting and valuable contribution to the study of music in cognition in its informed exploration of non-western musical perceptions. We raise a number of concerns about the methods used, and make suggestions as to how the issues that were empirically addressed in the paper might have been tackled in ways that would have enhanced the interpretability of its findings.

  11. Evaluation of processed green and ripe mango peel and pulp flours (Mangifera indica var. Chokanan) in terms of chemical composition, antioxidant compounds and functional properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Aziz, Noor Aziah; Wong, Lee Min; Bhat, Rajeev; Cheng, Lai Hoong

    2012-02-01

    Mango is a highly perishable seasonal fruit and large quantities are wasted during the peak season as a result of poor postharvest handling procedures. Processing surplus mango fruits into flour to be used as a functional ingredient appears to be a good preservation method to ensure its extended consumption. In the present study, the chemical composition, bioactive/antioxidant compounds and functional properties of green and ripe mango (Mangifera indica var. Chokanan) peel and pulp flours were evaluated. Compared to commercial wheat flour, mango flours were significantly low in moisture and protein, but were high in crude fiber, fat and ash content. Mango flour showed a balance between soluble and insoluble dietary fiber proportions, with total dietary fiber content ranging from 3.2 to 5.94 g kg⁻¹. Mango flours exhibited high values for bioactive/antioxidant compounds compared to wheat flour. The water absorption capacity and oil absorption capacity of mango flours ranged from 0.36 to 0.87 g kg⁻¹ and from 0.18 to 0.22 g kg⁻¹, respectively. Results of this study showed mango peel flour to be a rich source of dietary fiber with good antioxidant and functional properties, which could be a useful ingredient for new functional food formulations. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  12. Nondestructive assessment of fruit biological age in Brazilian mangoes by time-resolved reflectance spectroscopy in the 540-900 nm spectral range

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spinelli, L.; Rizzolo, A.; Vanoli, M.; Grassi, M.; Eccher Zerbini, P.C.; Meirelles de Azevedo Pementel, A.; Torricelli, A.

    2013-01-01

    Time-resolved Reflectance Spectroscopy (TRS) in the 540–900 nm spectral range has been tested in order to assess nondestructively the biological age of Brazilian mangoes. To this purpose a TRS set-up has been used to measure absorption and scattering coefficients of 60 intact mango fruits (cultivar

  13. Identification and Characterization of a Unique Fusarium sp. nov. ex Mangifera indica L. Causing Mango Malformation Disease in México

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study we characterized fusaria that were associated with mango malformation disease (MMD) in México. From 2002 to 2009, 141 strains were isolated from symptomatic mango inflorescences and vegetative tissues from various cultivars in eight geographically diverse states. Initially, isolates ...

  14. Effect of Resin Ducts and Sap Content on Infestation and Development of Immature Stages of Anastrepha obliqua and Anastrepha ludens (Diptera: Tephritidae) in Four Mango (Sapindales: Anacardiaceae) Cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillén, Larissa; Adaime, Ricardo; Birke, Andrea; Velázquez, Olinda; Angeles, Guillermo; Ortega, Fernando; Ruíz, Eliel; Aluja, Martín

    2017-04-01

    We determined the influence of resin ducts, sap content, and fruit physicochemical features of four mango cultivars (Criollo, Manila, Ataulfo, and Tommy Atkins) on their susceptibility to the attack of the two most pestiferous fruit fly species infesting mangoes in Mexico: Anastrepha ludens (Loew) and Anastrepha obliqua (Macquart). We performed three studies: 1) analysis of resin ducts in mango fruit exocarp to determine the density and area occupied by resin ducts in each mango cultivar, 2) assessment of mango physicochemical features including fruit sap content, and 3) a forced infestation trial under field conditions using enclosed fruit-bearing branches to expose mangoes to gravid A. ludens or A. obliqua females. Infestation rates, development time from egg to prepupae and pupae, pupal weight, and percent of adult emergence, were assessed. 'Ataulfo' and 'Tommy Atkins' cultivars exhibited the highest resin duct density and sap content, the lowest infestation rate, and had a negative effect on immature development and pupal weight. In sharp contrast, 'Manila' and 'Criollo' cultivars, with the lowest resin duct density and sap content, were highly susceptible to A. ludens and A. obliqua attack. We conclude that sap content and the number, size, and distribution of resin ducts as well as firmness in mango fruit exocarp are all involved in the resistance of mango to A. ludens and A. obliqua attack. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Anti-diabetic effect of dietary mango (Mangifera indica L.) peel in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondi, Mahendranath; Basha, Shaik Akbar; Bhaskar, Jamuna J; Salimath, Paramahans V; Rao, Ummiti J S Prasada

    2015-03-30

    In the present study, the composition of mango peel powder (MPP) collected from the mango pulp industry was determined and the effect of MPP on ameliorating diabetes and its associated complications was studied. Mango peel was rich in polyphenols, carotenoids and dietary fibre. Peel extract contained various bioactive compounds and was found to be rich in soluble dietary fibre. Peel extract exhibited antioxidant properties and protected against DNA damage. Therefore, the effect of peel on ameliorating diabetes was investigated in a rat model of diabetes. A significant increase in urine sugar, urine volume, fasting blood glucose, total cholesterol, triglycerides and low density lipoprotein, and decrease in high density lipoprotein were observed in the rats; however, these parameters were ameliorated in diabetic rats fed with diet supplemented with mango peel at 5% and 10% levels in basal diet. Treatment of diabetic rats with MPP increased antioxidant enzyme activities and decreased lipid peroxidation in plasma, kidney and liver compared to untreated diabetic rats. Glomerular filtration rate and microalbuminuria levels were ameliorated in MPP treated diabetic group. Mango peel, a by-product, can be used as an ingredient in functional and therapeutic foods. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  16. Expressed Sequence Tag-Simple Sequence Repeat (EST-SSR Marker Resources for Diversity Analysis of Mango (Mangifera indica L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie L. Dillon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a collection of 24,840 expressed sequence tags (ESTs generated from five mango (Mangifera indica L. cDNA libraries was mined for EST-based simple sequence repeat (SSR markers. Over 1,000 ESTs with SSR motifs were detected from more than 24,000 EST sequences with di- and tri-nucleotide repeat motifs the most abundant. Of these, 25 EST-SSRs in genes involved in plant development, stress response, and fruit color and flavor development pathways were selected, developed into PCR markers and characterized in a population of 32 mango selections including M. indica varieties, and related Mangifera species. Twenty-four of the 25 EST-SSR markers exhibited polymorphisms, identifying a total of 86 alleles with an average of 5.38 alleles per locus, and distinguished between all Mangifera selections. Private alleles were identified for Mangifera species. These newly developed EST-SSR markers enhance the current 11 SSR mango genetic identity panel utilized by the Australian Mango Breeding Program. The current panel has been used to identify progeny and parents for selection and the application of this extended panel will further improve and help to design mango hybridization strategies for increased breeding efficiency.

  17. Effect of pulsed electric field and pasteurisation treatments on the rheological properties of mango nectar (Mangifera indica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Manjunatha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The rheological behaviour of pulsed electric field (PEF processed and thermally pasteurised mango nectar (Mangifera indica was evaluated using controlled stress rheometer. The mango nectar was subjected to pulsed electric field (PEF as well as thermal processing. The rheological parameter shear stress was measured up to the shear rate of 750 s-1 using co-axial cylinder attachment at wide range of temperatures from 10 to 70 °C. The investigation showed that pulsed electric field (PEF processed and thermally pasteurised mango nectar behaved like a pseudo plastic (shear thinning fluid and obeyed Herschel-Bulkley model (0.9780 0.893, p < 0.05 and flow activation energy (Ea was significantly (p < 0.05 affected by processing conditions. The results indicated that the pulsed electric field (PEF and thermal processing condition has affected the rheological properties of mango nectar. The combined equation relating to shear stress (τ with temperature and shear rate of mango nectar was established.

  18. Processing ‘Ataulfo’ Mango into Juice Preserves the Bioavailability and Antioxidant Capacity of Its Phenolic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirós-Sauceda, Ana Elena; Chen, C.-Y. Oliver; González-Aguilar, Gustavo A.

    2017-01-01

    The health-promoting effects of phenolic compounds depend on their bioaccessibility from the food matrix and their consequent bioavailability. We carried out a randomized crossover pilot clinical trial to evaluate the matrix effect (raw flesh and juice) of ‘Ataulfo’ mango on the bioavailability of its phenolic compounds. Twelve healthy male subjects consumed a dose of mango flesh or juice. Blood was collected for six hours after consumption, and urine for 24 h. Plasma and urine phenolics were analyzed by electrochemical detection coupled to high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC-ECD). Five compounds were identified and quantified in plasma. Six phenolic compounds, plus a microbial metabolite (pyrogallol) were quantified in urine, suggesting colonic metabolism. The maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) occurred 2–4 h after consumption; excretion rates were maximum at 8–24 h. Mango flesh contributed to greater protocatechuic acid absorption (49%), mango juice contributed to higher chlorogenic acid absorption (62%). Our data suggests that the bioavailability and antioxidant capacity of mango phenolics is preserved, and may be increased when the flesh is processed into juice. PMID:28961171

  19. Bioactive compound from mangoes leaves extract as potential soil bioherbicide to control amaranth weed (Amaranthus spinosus Linn.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rifauldin Syahri

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Bioherbicide is important approach for sustainable farming practices. One of plant that has potentially as bioherbicide, which is environmentally safe, is mango. Mango leaf extract is useful as bioherbicide because it produces allelochemical compounds, which could inhibit the weed growth. This research was designed to study the effect of several mangoes species leaves extract to control dominant weed (amaranth. Split plot design was implemented using mango species (S as the main plot; S1 (Mangifera odorata Griff., S2 (Mangifera foetida Lour and S3 (Mangifera indica L.. While the sub plots were concentrations of mango’s leaf extract (K, that included 0, 500, 1000, 1500, and 2000 ppm. Results of the research showed that all parameters of weed growth (amaranth were inhibited along with the increase of concentration of the mango’s leaf extract. The results also showed the significant inhibition of amaranth’s dry weight. Among three species of mangoes, M. indica L. showed the best inhibition mechanism to the amaranth weed, which significantly suppressed the weed growth on just 1000 ppm concentration.

  20. Processing ‘Ataulfo’ Mango into Juice Preserves the Bioavailability and Antioxidant Capacity of Its Phenolic Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Elena Quirós-Sauceda

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The health-promoting effects of phenolic compounds depend on their bioaccessibility from the food matrix and their consequent bioavailability. We carried out a randomized crossover pilot clinical trial to evaluate the matrix effect (raw flesh and juice of ‘Ataulfo’ mango on the bioavailability of its phenolic compounds. Twelve healthy male subjects consumed a dose of mango flesh or juice. Blood was collected for six hours after consumption, and urine for 24 h. Plasma and urine phenolics were analyzed by electrochemical detection coupled to high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC-ECD. Five compounds were identified and quantified in plasma. Six phenolic compounds, plus a microbial metabolite (pyrogallol were quantified in urine, suggesting colonic metabolism. The maximum plasma concentration (Cmax occurred 2–4 h after consumption; excretion rates were maximum at 8–24 h. Mango flesh contributed to greater protocatechuic acid absorption (49%, mango juice contributed to higher chlorogenic acid absorption (62%. Our data suggests that the bioavailability and antioxidant capacity of mango phenolics is preserved, and may be increased when the flesh is processed into juice.

  1. Cassava starch coating and citric acid to preserve quality parameters of fresh-cut "Tommy Atkins" mango.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiumarelli, Marcela; Pereira, Leila M; Ferrari, Cristhiane C; Sarantópoulos, Claire I G L; Hubinger, Miriam D

    2010-06-01

    Combination of citric acid dipping (5 g/L) and cassava starch coating (10 g/L), with and without glycerol (10 g/L), was studied to verify the effectiveness of these treatments to inhibit enzymatic browning, to reduce respiration rate, and to preserve quality parameters of "Tommy Atkins" fresh-cut mangoes during storage at 5 degrees C. Color characteristics (L and C), mechanical properties (stress at failure), weight loss, beta-carotene content, sensory acceptance, and microbial growth of fruits were evaluated during 15 d. The respiration rate of fruit subjected to the treatments was also analyzed. Nontreated fresh-cut mango was used as a control sample. Cassava starch edible coatings and citric acid dipping promoted a decrease in respiration rate of mango slices, with values up to 41% lower than the control fruit. This treatment also promoted better preservation of texture and color characteristics of mangoes and delayed carotenoid formation and browning reactions during storage. Moreover, the treated fruit showed great sensory acceptance by consumers throughout the whole storage period. However, the use of glycerol in the coating formulation was not efficient in the maintenance of quality parameters of fresh-cut mangoes, promoting a higher weight loss of samples, impairing fruit texture characteristics, increasing carotenogenesis, and favoring microbial growth during storage.

  2. National Status and Trends: Bioeffects Program - Magnitude and Extent of Sediment Toxicity in Four Bays of the Florida Panhandle: Pensacola, Choctawhatchee, St. Andrew and Apalachicola

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The toxicity of sediments in Pensacola, Choctawhatchee, St. Andrew and Apalachicola Bays was determined as part of bioeffects assessments performed by NOAA's...

  3. Cinema and the Great War - Andrew Kelly, 1997. History by Hollywood. The use and abuse of the American past - Robert Brant Toplin, 1996

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kester, Bernadette

    1998-01-01

    textabstractReview of: Cinema and the Great War. Andrew Kelly, Londen, New York (Routledge), 1997, 219 p.History by Hollywood. The use and abuse of the American past. Robert Brant Toplin, Chicago (Urbana), 1996, 267 p.

  4. Twenty-one-month follow-up study of school-age children exposed to Hurricane Andrew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, J A; Applegate, B; Schorr, C

    1996-03-01

    To explore the 21-month course of posttraumatic stress symptomatology (PTSS) and psychological morbidity in 30 school-age children (7 to 13 years) after exposure to Hurricane Andrew. Pynoos' Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Reaction Index and Achenbach's Teacher's Report Form were administered at 8 and 21 months after Hurricane Andrew. At 21 months 70% of the children endorsed moderate-severe PTSS. The reduction in PTSS was greater for boys than girls. Psychopathology as measured by the Teacher's Report Form increased over the 19-month period. Boys demonstrated significant increases in internalizing symptoms and in Withdrawn, Anxious/Depressed, Social Problems, and Attention Problems scales, and girls showed a significant increase in the Anxious/Depressed scale. Twenty-one months after exposure to Hurricane Andrew, there were continuing high levels of PTSS and evidence of increasing emotional and behavioral problems. While girls sustained higher levels of PTSS, boys demonstrated higher indices of other psychopathology. The enduring effects of disaster associated with secondary stressors and "traumatic reminders" continue to be etiologically important for continuing psychological morbidity.

  5. Enhancing antioxidant activity, microbial and sensory quality of mango (Mangifera indica L.) juice by γ-irradiation and its in vitro radioprotective potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naresh, Kondapalli; Varakumar, Sadineni; Variyar, Prasad Shekhar; Sharma, Arun; Reddy, Obulam Vijaya Sarathi

    2015-07-01

    Gamma irradiation is an effective method currently being used for microbial decontamination and insect disinfestations of foods. In the present study, mango (Mangifera indica L.) juice was irradiated at doses of 0, 1.0, 3.0 and 5.0 kGy and microbial load, total polyphenols, flavonoids, ascorbic acid content, antioxidant activities, colour and sensory properties were evaluated immediately after irradiation and also during storage. Microbiological assay of the fresh and stored mango juice showed better quality after γ-irradiation. The total polyphenols and flavonoids were significantly (p mango juice without any adverse changes in the sensory qualities. Significant in vitro plasmid DNA protection was observed in the presence of mango juice against radiation induced damage, even at the dose of 5 kGy. This study confirmed the potential of γ-irradiation as a method for microbial decontamination and improving the quality of the mango juice without compromising on the sensory attributes.

  6. Puntos críticos en el manejo integral de mango: floración, antracnosis y residuos industriales Critical aspects on the integral management of mango: flowering, anthracnosis and industrial waste

    OpenAIRE

    Sergio de los Santos-Villalobos; Stefan de Folter; John Paul Délano-Frier; Miguel Ángel Gómez-Lim; Doralinda Asunción Guzmán-Ortiz; Prometeo Sánchez-García; Juan José Peña-Cabriales

    2011-01-01

    A nivel mundial, México se ubica como un participante importante en la producción y comercio de mango fresco, destacando como productor (2*10(6) t año-1) y exportador (2*10(5) t año-1) de dicho fruto e importador de cantidades mínimas con respecto a su producción y exportación. La actividad económica en torno al mango, está integrada por un conjunto de etapas que van desde la producción del fruto hasta su consumo, a la cual se le ha llamado cadena de valor de mango; con base en el conocimient...

  7. Preharvest bagging with wavelength-selective materials enhances development and quality of mango (Mangifera indica L.) cv. Nam Dok Mai #4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chonhenchob, Vanee; Kamhangwong, Damrongpol; Kruenate, Jittiporn; Khongrat, Krittaphat; Tangchantra, Nantavat; Wichai, Uthai; Singh, S Paul

    2011-03-15

    Preharvest bagging has been shown to improve development and quality of fruits. Different light transmittance bags showed different effects on fruit quality. This study presents the benefits of using newly developed plastic bagging materials with different wavelength-selective characteristics for mangoes (cv. Nam Dok Mai #4). Mangoes were bagged at 45 days after full bloom (DAFB) and randomly harvested at 65, 75, 85, 95, and 105 DAFB. The bags were removed on the harvest days. The wavelength-selective bags (no pigment, yellow, red, blue/violet, blue) were compared with the Kraft paper bag with black paper liner, which is currently used commercially for several fruits, and with non-bagging as a control. Bagging significantly (p⩽0.05) reduced diseases and blemishes. Mango weight at 95 DAFB was increased approximately 15% by VM and V plastic bagging, as compared to paper bagging and control. Plastic bagging accelerated mango ripening as well as growth. Plastic-bagged mangoes reached maturity stage at 95 DAFB, while non-bagged mangoes reached maturity stage at 105 DAFB. Paper bagging resulted in a pale-yellow peel beginning at 65 DAFB, while plastic bagging improved peel glossiness. Preharvest bagging with different wavelength-selective materials affected mango development and quality. Bagging mangoes with VM and V materials could reduce peel defects and diseases, increase weight, size, and sphericity, improve peel appearance, and shorten the development periods of mangoes. The results suggest a favorable practice using the newly developed VM and V plastic bags in the production of mangoes, and possibly other fruits as well. Copyright © 2010 Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. Changes in amylase activity starch and sugars contents in mango fruits pulp cv. Tommy Atkins with spongy tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lima Luiz Carlos de Oliveira

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Changes in amylase activity, starch and reducing and non-reducing sugars contents were monitored during ripening of mango fruits (Mangifera indica L.. The climateric raising in mango fruit is marked by an appreciable increase in the activity of amylase, reducing and non-reducing sugars contents and decrease in the starch content. The fruit affected with spongy tissue exhibited much lower amylase activity and reducing and non-reducing sugars, but exhibited much higher starch content during storage at 12 ± 2° C and 90 ± 5% RH for 28 days, when compared to healthy tissue of ?Tommy Atkins?. Whether this is caused due to adverse effects on certain enzyme activities during ripening is not clearly known. These dates showed that carbohydrate metabolism is an important feature during ripening of mango.

  9. Effect of irradiation on the biochemical and organoleptic changes during the ripening of papaya and mango fruits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacroix, Monique; Bernard, Linda; Jobin, Michele; Milot, Sylvain; Gagnon, Marcel

    Papaya and mango rot caused by fungi is a major problem during storage and marketing. Gamma irradiation treatment was used to determine its effect on the quality of papayas and mangoes irradiated at 0,5 to 0,95 kGy. The level of respiration, soluble solids, texture, vitamin C and the sensorial evaluation were effectuated. The results indicate that irradiation treatment reduces significantly (p ⪕ 0,001) the level of respiration and significantly (p ⪕ 0,001) weakens the texture of mangoes. The content of soluble solids and vitamin C are not significantly affected by the irradiation. The sensory evaluation indicates that up to 0,95 kGy the sensorial quality is not changed.

  10. Glass Cathedral: Gay Novel or Liberation Theology? An Interview with Andrew Koh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angus Whitehead

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Singaporean Andrew Koh was a founding member of the groundbreaking Necessary Stage theatre company in 1987. In Singapore he is best remembered as the author of Glass Cathedral (1995, Singapore's second gay novel[la], which won the 1994 Singapore Literature Prize Commendation Award and was subsequently shortlisted for the 1996 Commonwealth Writers Prize for the Best First Novel Regional Awards. A collection of poetry, Hybrid from the East, was published in the UK in 1997. A second novel awaits publication. After initially leaving Singapore for London in the mid-1990s he now lives in Sydney as a healthcare worker and qualified Chinese medicine practitioner. Sixteen years after its initial publication, Glass Cathedral the novel is finally receiving attention and reappraisal in the wake of its Glass Cathedral's republication by Epigram Books as a Singapore Classic, alongside works such as Goh Poh Seng's The Immolation, Robert Yeo's The Adventures of Holden Heng and Lloyd Fernando's Scorpion Orchid. The interview took place on 8 November 2011 at a restaurant on the site of Koh's alma mater St Joseph's Institution, Bras Basah Road, Singapore, just days after Koh returned to the city-state and gave a spirited reading from and talk about Glass Cathedral at the Singapore Writers Festival. In this interview Koh discusses his Catholic upbringing, and his employment as a policeman during Singapore's policy of entrapment of homosexual men during the 1990s. Koh goes on to discuss how he came to write Glass Cathedral, his leaving Singapore in response to the nation-state's repressive climate and unsympathetic response to queer writing. In the second half of the interview Koh discusses homophobia in Singapore, the Catholic Church, and elsewhere and its roots in misogyny. Koh also draws attention to other issues explored in Glass Cathedral: the marginalisation of minorities in a supposedly multicultural nation state and the impact of Singapore's secret history

  11. Incidence of childhood cancer in Kingston and St Andrew, Jamaica, 1983-2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, K L; Hanchard, B; Gibson, T N; Lowe, D; McNaughton, D; Waugh, N; Akinbebe, A

    2013-09-01

    There have been several modifications to the classification of childhood cancers since the first report (1968-1981) specific to the Jamaican paediatric population was published in 1988. This paper reports on paediatric cancer incidence in Kingston and St Andrew, Jamaica, for the 20-year period 1983-2002 based on these modifications. All cases of cancer diagnosed in children (0-14 years), between 1983 and 2002 were extracted from the Jamaica Cancer Registry archives and classified using the International Classification of Childhood Cancer, third edition. Incidence figures were calculated as per the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) reporting format for childhood cancer. There were 272 cases (133 males, 139 females) of childhood cancer identified in the 20-year period. The overall age standardized rate (ASR) was 69.4 per million; that for males was 67.8 per million, and for females, 70.9 per million. The three most common malignancies overall were leukaemia (21.3%), lymphoma (15.8%) and brain and spinal neoplasms (14.0%). In males, the highest ASRs were seen for leukaemia (14.8 per million), lymphoma (12.7 per million), and brain and spinal neoplasms (8.2 per million), and in females, leukaemia (14.4 per million), nephroblastoma (11.3 per million), and brain and spinal neoplasms (10.6 per million). The rankings of the most common childhood malignancies in Jamaica (leukaemia, brain and spinal neoplasms and lymphomas) have shown few changes since the last review. However, there are differences in frequency and gender distribution of nephroblastoma and brain and spinal neoplasms.

  12. Low-Frequency Response Following the Passage of Hurricane Andrew on the Texas-Louisiana Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, S. M.; Smith, D. C.; Dimarco, S. F.

    2009-12-01

    During August 24th through 27th in 1992, Hurricane Andrew passed through the Gulf Of Mexico almost directly over several moorings on the easternmost Louisiana shelf portion of the Texas-Louisiana Shelf (LATEX) coastal ocean monitoring program. Examination of the current meter time-series showed the existence of fast moving, long shelf waves over the entire Texas-Louisiana shelf west of the storm passage for up to 12 days after direct forcing ceased. The LATEX program featured 31 moorings each with 3 current meters over the 10, 20, 50, and 200 meter isobaths in 5 cross sectional lines with additional coverage on the 200 meter isobath from the Louisiana-Mississippi River delta, to Corpus Christi, Texas. Additionally, several pressure records from LATEX and several NOAA historical coastal tide gauge data from Sabine Pass to Port Isabella, Texas were incorporated. Raw, 3-hour low pass filtered, and 40-hour low pass filtered versions of the current data were analyzed. The pressure data used were detided using a least squares fit, and the tidal records were detided using the NOAA predicted tides for that location. All data were analyzed using a wavelet analysis to determine the spectra over time. The analyzed data shows that the shelf response was largely dominated in the internal Kelvin wave mode. The wave propagated towards the west on the shelf at approximately 400 km/day. These results are contrasted and compared with wave modes predicted for coastal trapped wave solutions. The output of a coastal ocean model simulation using a forced wind field similar to the storm are also contrasted and compared with the observed data.

  13. Grower Perception of the Significance of Weaver Ants as a Fruit Fly Deterrent in Tanzanian Smallholder Mango Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Nina; Msogoya, Theodosy; Offenberg, Hans Joachim

    2017-01-01

    Managed populations of weaver ants in mango trees have been used successfully in Australia, SE Asia and parts of Western Africa to deter fruit flies from ovipositing in ripening fruits. The presence of indigenous weaver ants in mango trees of smallholder growers in Tanzania offers the possibility...... in their trees and were sceptical of any likely value as a biological control technique. Additionally, fruit fly infestation was not seen as a priority problem and subsequent enquiry and investigation showed that, fortuitously, traditional, local practices for storage and enhancing ripening prevented...

  14. Effects of replacing maize with mango seed kernel meal on performance, carcass characteristics and economic of production of weaner rabbits

    OpenAIRE

    Saleh, N.; K.M. Bello

    2015-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to examine the effect of replacing maize with mango seed kernel meal (MSKM) in the diets of Weaner rabbit on performance, carcass characteristics and economic of production. Twenty mongrel rabbits were randomly allocated to four diets in which mango seed kernel meal replaced maize at 0, 33.33, 66.67 and 100% level designed as diets 1, 2, 3 and 4 respectively. The daily feed intake (42.75-49.76), daily weight gain (8.75-9.72) and feed conversion ratio (4.64-5.19) ob...

  15. Simple models for predicting leaf area of mango (Mangifera indica L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Ghoreishi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mango (Mangifera indica L., one of the most popular tropical fruits, is cultivated in a considerable part of southern Iran. Leaf area is a valuable parameter in mango research, especially plant physiological and nutrition field. Most of available methods for estimating plant leaf area are difficult to apply, expensive and destructive which could in turn destroy the canopy and consequently make it difficult to perform further tests on the same plant. Therefore, a non-destructive method which is simple, inexpensive, and could yield an accurate estimation of leaf area will be a great benefit to researchers. A regression analysis was performed in order to determine the relationship between the leaf area and leaf width, leaf length, dry and fresh weight. For this purpose 50 mango seedlings of local selections were randomly took from a nursery in the Hormozgan province, and different parts of plants were separated in laboratory. Leaf area was measured by different method included leaf area meter, planimeter, ruler (length and width and the fresh and dry weight of leaves were also measured. The best regression models were statistically selected using Determination Coefficient, Maximum Error, Model Efficiency, Root Mean Square Error and Coefficient of Residual Mass. Overall, based on regression equation, a satisfactory estimation of leaf area was obtained by measuring the non-destructive parameters, i.e. number of leaf per seedling, length of the longest and width of widest leaf (R2 = 0.88 and also destructive parameters, i.e. dry weight (R2 = 0.94 and fresh weight (R2= 0.94 of leaves.

  16. Molecular identification and characterization of Colletotrichum spp isolates from tahiti lime, tamarillo, and mango

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Sanabria

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Anthracnose is a very limiting disease affecting production, as well as postharvest quality of numerous fruit crops in Colombia. The current management practices for this disease are partially effective due to limited information about the etiology, the inoculum sources, population structure and variation of the pathogen. A total of 293 Colletotrichum isolates were obtained from symptomatic tissues collected from Tahiti lime, tamarillo and mango orchards. To determine the Colletotrichum species causing the symptoms, amplification, and PCR product analysis for intergenic regions of the ribosomal DNA were conducted. Genetic diversity of the fungal population was assessed with Random Amplified Microsatellites (RAMS. Results of this study indicated that anthracnose in Tahiti lime and tamarillo are caused by Colletotrichun acutatum whereas symptoms on mango were induced by the species Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, which was also fund in few citrus samples. RAMS data analysis indicated the existence of two distinct species groups, with a low similarity index (35%. RAM profiles also showed a clear host differentiation of isolates. The C. acutatum population originated from tamarillo exhibited a narrow and homogeneous genetic base, while the C. acutatum population from Tahiti lime was more heterogeneous and genetically complex, as determined by the analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA and of Ni-Li coefficient. The C. gloeosporioides population originated from mango and Tahiti lime was heterogeneous and highly diverse, with clear host differentiation according to RAM profiles. Collectively, the results from this study provide new insight into the general characteristics of Colletotrichum populations on various hosts; this type of knowledge will prove useful in designing more effective management practices.

  17. COBERTERAS VIVAS PARA EL MANEJO DE MALEZAS EN MANGO (Mangifera indica L. cv. MANILA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Rebolledo-Martínez

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available El uso constante de agroquímicos ha impactado fuertemente a ecosistemas, por lo que es necesario modificar los paradigmas productivos empleando metodologías sustentables que garanticen la protección de los recursos naturales y los seres vivos. El objetivo del estudio fue comparar dos coberteras del suelo vivas (Mucuna pruriens L. y Clitoria ternatea L. y una plástica para el manejo de malezas, y su impacto en la conservación de la macrofauna y microflora del suelo en mango. Se utilizó una huerta de mango de 3.5 años, con densidad de 1250 árboles ha-1. Se empleó un diseño de bloques al azar, con arreglo de tratamientos en parcelas divididas. Las variables fueron porcentaje de maleza y cobertera viva, altura de maleza y cobertera viva, macrofauna y microflora del suelo. Los resultados indicaron que M. pruriens tuvo 80 % de eficiencia en el control de malezas, mientras que en C. ternatea ésta fue de 60 %. En altura de cobertera viva, M. pruriens presentó mayor crecimiento longitudinal que C. ternatea. En cuanto a macrofauna, M. pruriens incrementó las poblaciones de individuos m-2 con 225 individuos, y las poblaciones de hongos fueron de 9.5x107 UFM g-1. El uso de coberteras vivas entre las hileras de mango es una alternativa para suprimir la maleza y mejorar las condiciones biológicas del suelo.

  18. Implementation of Guaranteed Services in the MANGO Clockless Network-on-Chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Tobias; Sparsø, Jens

    2006-01-01

    Shared, segmented, on-chip interconnection networks, known as networks-on-chip (NoC), may become the preferred way of interconnecting intellectual property (IP) cores in future giga-scale system-on-chip (SoC) designs. A NoC can provide the required communication bandwidth while accommodating...... the effects of scaling microchip technologies. Equally important, a NoC facilitates a truly modular and scalable design flow. The MANGO (message-passing asynchronous network-on-chip providing guaranteed services over open core protocol (OCP) interfaces) NoC is presented, and how its key characteristics...

  19. Conversion of mango kernel starch to glucose syrups by enzymatic hydrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velan, M. [Anna Univ., Alagappa Coll. of Technology, Madras (India). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Krishnan, M.R.V. [Anna Univ., Alagappa Coll. of Technology, Madras (India). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Lakshmanan, C.M. [Anna Univ., Alagappa Coll. of Technology, Madras (India). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1995-05-01

    In the present investigation, the possibility of utilizing the starch present in mango seed (which are thrown away as waste) kernels for the production of glucose syrups by enzyme-enzyme hydrolysis has been studied. Under the conditions of operation, particles less than 90 microns in size showed maximum conversion at (i) {alpha}-amylase concentration = 0.06% (v/v), pH = 6.5 and temperature 95 C and (ii) glucoamylase concentration = 0.8% (v/v), pH = 4.5 and temperature = 60 C. (orig.)

  20. Molecular docking studies and anti-tyrosinase activity of Thai mango seed kernel extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nithitanakool, Saruth; Pithayanukul, Pimolpan; Bavovada, Rapepol; Saparpakorn, Patchreenart

    2009-01-07

    The alcoholic extract from seed kernels of Thai mango (Mangifera indica L. cv. 'Fahlun') (Anacardiaceae) and its major phenolic principle (pentagalloylglucopyranose) exhibited potent, dose-dependent inhibitory effects on tyrosinase with respect to L-DOPA. Molecular docking studies revealed that the binding orientations of the phenolic principles were in the tyrosinase binding pocket and their orientations were located in the hydrophobic binding pocket surrounding the binuclear copper active site. The results indicated a possible mechanism for their anti-tyrosinase activity which may involve an ability to chelate the copper atoms which are required for the catalytic activity of tyrosinase.