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Sample records for survivors validating equipment

  1. Fear of movement in cancer survivors: validation of the modified Tampa scale of kinesiophobia-fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velthuis, Miranda J; Van den Bussche, Eva; May, Anne M; Gijsen, Brigitte C M; Nijs, Sara; Vlaeyen, Johan W S

    2012-07-01

    To date, there is no validated questionnaire to assess fear of movement in cancer survivors. We aim to validate the modified Tampa scale of kinesiophobia-fatigue (TSK-F) in Dutch cancer survivors participating in a rehabilitation programme. We first select the optimal model for cancer survivors. Subsequently, stability, internal consistency, and construct validity of the optimal model is tested. A sample of 658 cancer survivors participating in a rehabilitation programme was included. Out of nine models derived in chronic pain and chronic fatigue patients, the optimal model of the TSK-F was selected in a calibration sample (n1 = 329) using confirmatory factor analysis. Stability of the derived optimal model was confirmed in a validation sample (n2 = 329). Internal consistency and construct validity were assessed in the full sample. The 11-item two-factor model of the TSK-F was the best-fitting model for cancer survivors and it seemed to be invariant for sex and cancer diagnosis. Internal consistency of the model was acceptable (Cronbach's alpha between 0.62 and 0.74). Construct validity was illustrated by significant associations between TSK-F total and TSK-F somatic focus with perceived global health status (EORTC-QOL-C30) and fatigue (FACT-F) (pfear of movement in cancer survivors with an acceptable internal consistency. Further psychometric testing of the TSK-F in cancer survivors is recommended. In the future, TSK-F scores may be used to customise rehabilitation programmes in cancer survivors. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Validation of a Milk Consumption Stage of Change Algorithm among Adolescent Survivors of Childhood Cancer

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    Mays, Darren; Gerfen, Elissa; Mosher, Revonda B.; Shad, Aziza T.; Tercyak, Kenneth P.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess the construct validity of a milk consumption Stages of Change (SOC) algorithm among adolescent survivors of childhood cancer ages 11 to 21 years (n = 75). Methods: Baseline data from a randomized controlled trial designed to evaluate a health behavior intervention were analyzed. Assessments included a milk consumption SOC…

  3. Exercise training intensity prescription in breast cancer survivors: validity of current practice and specific recommendations.

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    Scharhag-Rosenberger, Friederike; Kuehl, Rea; Klassen, Oliver; Schommer, Kai; Schmidt, Martina E; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Wiskemann, Joachim; Steindorf, Karen

    2015-12-01

    Cancer survivors are recommended to perform 150 min/week of moderate or 75 min/week of vigorous aerobic exercise, but it remains unclear how moderate and vigorous intensities can be prescribed. Therefore, it was investigated whether and how intensity prescriptions for healthy adults by the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) need to be adapted for breast cancer survivors. Fifty-two breast cancer survivors (stage 0-III, age 52 ± 9 years, BMI 25.4 ± 3.5 kg/m2) performed cardiopulmonary exercise tests at the end of primary therapy. Intensity classes defined as percentages of maximal heart rate (HRmax), heart rate reserve (HRR), and maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) were compared to the ACSM's intensity classes using oxygen uptake reserve as reference. The prescriptions for moderate and vigorous exercise intensities were significantly different between breast cancer survivors and healthy adults when using VO2max (moderate 50-66 vs. 46-63 and vigorous 67-91 vs. 64-90% VO2max) or HRR (moderate 26-50 vs. 40-59 and vigorous 51-88 vs. 60-89 % HRR), but not when using HRmax (moderate 65-76 vs. 64-76 and vigorous 77-94 vs. 77-95% HRmax). In breast cancer survivors, intensity prescriptions for healthy adults result in considerably too intense training if HRR is used as guiding factor. Prescriptions using VO2max result in a slightly too low exercise intensity, whereas recommendations in percentages of HRmax appear valid. Cancer survivors should not uncritically adopt exercise intensity prescriptions for healthy adults. Specific prescriptions for the studied population are provided.

  4. Validation Testing for Automated Solubility Measurement Equipment Final Report

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    Lachut, J. S. [Washington River Protection Solutions LLC, Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-01-11

    Laboratory tests have been completed to test the validity of automated solubility measurement equipment using sodium nitrate and sodium chloride solutions (see test plan WRPS-1404441, “Validation Testing for Automated Solubility Measurement Equipment”). The sodium nitrate solution results were within 2-3% of the reference values, so the experiment is considered successful using the turbidity meter. The sodium chloride test was done by sight, as the turbidity meter did not work well using sodium chloride. For example, the “clear” turbidity reading was 53 FNU at 80 °C, 107 FNU at 55 °C, and 151 FNU at 20 °C. The sodium chloride did not work because it is granular and large; as the solution was stirred, the granules stayed to the outside of the reactor and just above the stir bar level, having little impact on the turbidity meter readings as the meter was aimed at the center of the solution. Also, the turbidity meter depth has an impact. The salt tends to remain near the stir bar level. If the meter is deeper in the slurry, it will read higher turbidity, and if the meter is raised higher in the slurry, it will read lower turbidity (possibly near zero) because it reads the “clear” part of the slurry. The sodium chloride solution results, as measured by sight rather than by turbidity instrument readings, were within 5-6% of the reference values.

  5. Validity of the SS-QOL in Germany and in survivors of hemorrhagic or ischemic stroke.

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    Ewert, Thomas; Stucki, Gerold

    2007-01-01

    The Stroke-Specific Quality of Life Scale (SS-QOL) is a recently developed measure to assess health-related quality of life in stroke patients. The objective of this study was to translate the American version of the SS-QOL and examine the validity of the German proxy version, in both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke survivors. The translation was conducted according to published guidelines. The validation was performed in consecutive adult stroke survivors. Data were obtained 1 year after discharge. To examine the dimensionality of the SS-QOL, factor analyses were conducted. The validity was examined by the associations of the subscales with the Functional Independence Measure and Short Form 36. The literal translation revealed no major changes between the American and the German versions of the SS-QOL. Three hundred seven stroke survivors were included in the study. Unlike the 1st validation study, most of the variance could be explained by 8 instead of 12 factors; therefore, the 8-factor solution was further examined. The validity of the SS-QOL total score and "observable" scales such as "activities" was shown. For the German proxy version of the SS-QOL, an 8-factor solution was found to be the most appropriate. The psychometric properties of these 8 subscales were good or excellent with respect to internal consistency. The validity of the total score was shown, but some subscales (energy, mood, and thinking) failed the hypothesized associations. Therefore, the SS-QOL needs to be further explored in other settings and populations.

  6. Validation of Malaysian translated distress thermometer with problem checklist among the breast cancer survivors in Malaysia.

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    Yong, H W; Zubaidah, J; Saidi, M; Zailina, H

    2012-03-01

    Distress thermometer (DT) is a single-item measure generated to assess the psychological distress among cancer patients. The aim of this study was to validate the translated DT as a tool to determine the psychological distress level and assess the factors associated with distress among the working breast cancer survivors and also to compare with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). 150 working breast cancer survivors were interviewed using the Malay and Chinese language translated version of DT and HADS. Based on HADS, 23.3% were anxious, 19.3% were depressed whereas 15.3% experienced both anxiety and depression. About 14.7% of the respondents reported distress (cutoff≥5) on DT. A significant association was found between the DT and HADS which indicated that both were measuring the same construct, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-T (F=71.34, pMalaysian breast cancer survivors. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Validation and Refinement of Prediction Models to Estimate Exercise Capacity in Cancer Survivors Using the Steep Ramp Test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stuiver, Martijn M.; Kampshoff, Caroline S.; Persoon, Saskia; Groen, Wim; van Mechelen, Willem; Chinapaw, Mai J. M.; Brug, Johannes; Nollet, Frans; Kersten, Marie-José; Schep, Goof; Buffart, Laurien M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To further test the validity and clinical usefulness of the steep ramp test (SRT) in estimating exercise tolerance in cancer survivors by external validation and extension of previously published prediction models for peak oxygen consumption (Vo2(peak)) and peak power output (W-peak).&

  8. Validation and refinement of prediction models to estimate exercise capacity in cancer survivors using the steep ramp test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stuiver, M.M.; Kampshoff, C.S.; Persoon, S.; Groen, W.; van Mechelen, W.; Chinapaw, M.J.M.; Brug, J.; Nollet, F.; Kersten, M.-J.; Schep, G.; Buffart, L.M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective To further test the validity and clinical usefulness of the steep ramp test (SRT) in estimating exercise tolerance in cancer survivors by external validation and extension of previously published prediction models for peak oxygen consumption (Vo2peak) and peak power output (Wpeak). Design

  9. The Concerns About Recurrence Questionnaire: validation of a brief measure of fear of cancer recurrence amongst Danish and Australian breast cancer survivors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thewes, B.; Zachariae, R.; Christensen, S.; Nielsen, T.; Butow, P.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Fear of cancer recurrence (FCR) is prevalent amongst survivors, and breast cancer survivors are particularly vulnerable. Currently, there are few well-validated brief measures of FCR and none specific to breast cancer. This manuscript describes the development and initial validation of a

  10. The Childhood Cancer Survivor Study-Neurocognitive Questionnaire (CCSS-NCQ) Revised: Item Response Analysis and Concurrent Validity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenzik, Kelly M.; Huang, I-Chan; Brinkman, Tara M.; Baughman, Brandon; Ness, Kirsten K.; Shenkman, Elizabeth A.; Hudson, Melissa M.; Robison, Leslie L.; Krull, Kevin R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Childhood cancer survivors are at risk for neurocognitive impairment related to cancer diagnosis or treatment. This study refined and further validated the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study Neurocognitive Questionnaire (CCSS-NCQ), a scale developed to screen for impairment in long-term survivors of childhood cancer. Method Items related to task efficiency, memory, organization and emotional regulation domains were examined using item response theory (IRT). Data were collected from 833 adult survivors of childhood cancer in the St. Jude Lifetime Cohort Study who completed self-report and direct neurocognitive testing. The revision process included: 1) content validity mapping of items to domains, 2) constructing a revised CCSS-NCQ, 3) selecting items within specific domains using IRT, and 4) evaluating concordance between the revised CCSS-NCQ and direct neurocognitive assessment. Results Using content and measurement properties, 32 items were retained (8 items in 4 domains). Items captured low to middle levels of neurocognitive concerns. The latent domain scores demonstrated poor convergent/divergent validity with the direct assessments. Adjusted effect sizes (Cohen's d) for agreement between self-reported memory and direct memory assessment were moderate for total recall (ES=0.66), long-term memory (ES=0.63), and short-term memory (ES=0.55). Effect sizes between self-rated task efficiency and direct assessment of attention were moderate for focused attention (ES=0.70) and attention span (ES=0.50), but small for sustained attention (ES=0.36). Cranial radiation therapy and female gender were associated with lower self-reported neurocognitive function. Conclusion The revised CCSS-NCQ demonstrates adequate measurement properties for assessing day-to-day neurocognitive concerns in childhood cancer survivors, and adds useful information to direct assessment. PMID:24933482

  11. Validation of a French adaptation of the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire among torture survivors from sub-Saharan African countries

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    Capucine de Fouchier

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: To date no validated instrument in the French language exists to screen for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD in survivors of torture and organized violence. Objective: The aim of this study is to adapt and validate the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire (HTQ to this population. Method: The adapted version was administered to 52 French-speaking torture survivors, originally from sub-Saharan African countries, receiving psychological treatment in specialized treatment centers. A structured clinical interview for DSM was also conducted in order to assess if they met criteria for PTSD. Results: Cronbach's alpha coefficient for the HTQ Part 4 was adequate (0.95. Criterion validity was evaluated using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis that generated good classification accuracy for PTSD (0.83. At the original cut-off score of 2.5, the HTQ demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity (0.87 and 0.73, respectively. Conclusion: Results support the reliability and validity of the French version of the HTQ.

  12. Validity and reliability of a home environment inventory for physical activity and media equipment

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    Pereira Mark A

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about how the home environmental supports physical activity and screen media usage. The purpose of this study was to develop and test the reliability and validity of a self-report instrument to comprehensively reflect the availability and accessibility of physical activity and screen media equipment in the home environment. Methods Ten families participated in the initial field testing to provide feedback for instrument development. Thirty one adult participants, each of whom had at least one child 10–17 years old, completed two Physical Activity and Media Inventory (PAMI instruments. The first PAMI was completed simultaneously, but independently, with a research assistant to assess validity. A second PAMI was completed by the participant one week later to assess reliability. Results The adult participants were mostly mothers/female guardians, mean age 38 ± 7.2 years, mostly Caucasian (52%, college educated (65%, living in single family homes (74%. Test-retest reliability was acceptable to strong for all summary variables (physical activity equipment, ICC = 0.76 to 0.99; media equipment, ICC = 0.72 to 0.96. For validation, reports from participants and research assistants were strongly correlated (physical activity, 0.67 – 0.98; media, 0.79 – 0.96. Compared to participants, research assistants reported a greater percentage of physical activity equipment as "in plain view and easy to get to" and a smaller percentage of items as "put away and difficult to get to". Conclusion Our results indicate strong evidence for the reliability and validity of the variables calculated from the PAMI. This self report inventory may be useful in assessing the availability of physical activity and screen media equipment in the home environment and could be used in conjunction with other home assessment tools (food availability, parenting styles and feeding practices to identify obesogenic home environments.

  13. Development and Validation of an Abbreviated Questionnaire to Easily Measure Cognitive Failure in ICU Survivors: A Multicenter Study.

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    Wassenaar, Annelies; de Reus, Jorn; Donders, A Rogier T; Schoonhoven, Lisette; Cremer, Olaf L; de Lange, Dylan W; van Dijk, Diederik; Slooter, Arjen J C; Pickkers, Peter; van den Boogaard, Mark

    2017-10-24

    To develop and validate an abbreviated version of the Cognitive Failure Questionnaire that can be used by patients as part of self-assessment to measure functional cognitive outcome in ICU survivors. A retrospective multicenter observational study. The ICUs of two Dutch university hospitals. Adult ICU survivors. None. Cognitive functioning was evaluated between 12 and 24 months after ICU discharge using the full 25-item Cognitive Failure Questionnaire (CFQ-25). Incomplete CFQ-25 questionnaires were excluded from analysis. Forward selection in a linear regression model was used in hospital A to assess which of the CFQ-25 items should be included to prevent a significant loss of correlation between an abbreviated and the full CFQ-25. Subsequently, the performance of an abbreviated Cognitive Failure Questionnaire was determined in hospital B using Pearson's correlation. A Bland-Altman plot was used to examine whether the reduced-item outcome scores of an abbreviated Cognitive Failure Questionnaire were a replacement for the full CFQ-25 outcome scores. Among 1,934 ICU survivors, 1,737 were included, 819 in hospital A, 918 in hospital B. The Pearson's correlation between the abbreviated 14-item Cognitive Failure Questionnaire (CFQ-14) and the CFQ-25 was 0.99. The mean of the difference scores was -0.26, and 95% of the difference scores fell within +5 and -5.5 on a 100-point maximum score. It is feasible to use the abbreviated CFQ-14 to measure self-reported cognitive failure in ICU survivors as this questionnaire has a similar performance as the full CFQ-25.

  14. Cantonese version of the Oxford Cognitive Screen (OCS: Validation for stroke survivors in Hong Kong

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    Pinky Hiu Ping Lam

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Stroke-induced cognitive impairments are critical predictors of poor functional outcomes. They adversely affect recovery and reduce independent performance of basic activities of daily living (ADL and instrumental ADL (Zinn et al., 2004. Choices of cognitive assessment tools specific to the Cantonese speaking stroke population in Hong Kong are limited. The Cantonese version of the Western Aphasia Battery (Cantonese-WAB was specifically developed for examining language impairments. The Cantonese version of MMSE (Cantonese-MMSE and Hong Kong Montreal Cognitive Assessment (HK-MoCA, designed to detect cognitive deficits associated with dementia, lacked important measures of writing, neglect, and praxis where impairments were commonly found in stroke. More critically, most tasks in these two screeners required relatively intact auditory comprehension and verbal responses from participants. Presence of aphasia can, therefore, lead to underestimation of cognitive abilities. Aims Extending Chan et al.’s (2013 development of a Cantonese version of the Birmingham Cognitive Screen (BCoS to be used in Hong Kong, our first aim was to validate the Oxford Cognitive Screen (OCS, built on similar principles to the BCoS test but is shorter (15 minutes and can be used in acute settings, for Cantonese-speaking stroke survivors. This tool, including assessment of aphasia, apraxia, attention, memory, and spatial neglect, was designed to be neglect- and aphasia-friendly by using multi-modal presentation, forced-choice testing procedures, and vertical layouts. The second aim was to determine which cognitive domain(s in HK-OCS would best predict functional outcomes. Procedures Seventy normal individuals were recruited to establish the normative data of HK-OCS. Norm was developed for three age groups (59 years. Direct percentile conversions for each sub-test scores were used and cut-off scores were set at the top 5th percentile. Forty six native Cantonese

  15. Perceptions of Childhood Sexual Abuse Survivors: Development and Initial Validation of a New Scale to Measure Stereotypes of Adult Survivors of Childhood Sexual Abuse

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    Zafar, Sadia; Ross, Erin C.

    2013-01-01

    The Childhood Sexual Abuse Stereotypes Scale was developed to assess stereotypes of adult survivors of childhood sexual abuse. Scale items were derived from two studies that elicited cultural and personal beliefs about, and emotions experienced towards adult childhood sexual abuse survivors among university undergraduates. Two scales, Emotions and…

  16. Validation of the Chinese Version of the Cognitive Symptom Checklist-Work-21 in Breast Cancer Survivors.

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    Cheng, Andy S K; Zeng, Yingchun; Feuerstein, Michael

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to translate the Cognitive Symptom Checklist-Work-21 (CSC-W21), into Chinese, and culturally adapt and validate the Chinese version, a measure of work-related cognitive limitations in occupationally active breast cancer survivors (BCS). The translation of the English version of the CSC-W21 followed a systematic procedure. Exploratory factor analysis was used to identify factor structures. The internal consistency of the factors was assessed by calculating the Cronbach's alpha reliability coefficients. Item- and scale-level content validity was determined. The intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to analyze test-retest reliability. A total of two hundred and twenty BCS participated in the psychometric testing of the CSC-W21-C. The construct validity of the total score of the CSC-W21-C was determined through convergent validity and an analysis of its relationship with the four subscales of the Work Limitations Questionnaire (WLQ), a measure of four types of job task difficulties. The CSC-W21-C demonstrated item- and scale-level content validity (>.80). The factor structure of the CSC-W21-C was similar to the original English version. The internal consistency of the subscales of the CSC-W21-C ranged from .84 to .95. The ICC was between .80 and .96 indicating good test-retest reliability. The CSC-W21-C was significantly correlated with the WLQ, particularly the mental-interpersonal subscale, where it accounted for 27.3 % of the total variance. The findings indicate that the CSC-W21-C has sound measurement properties that strongly suggest it can be used in future assessment and intervention research to identify cognitive limitations related to specific work tasks in BCS.

  17. Modification and Validation of an Automotive Data Processing Unit, Compessed Video System, and Communications Equipment

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    Carter, R.J.

    1997-04-01

    The primary purpose of the "modification and validation of an automotive data processing unit (DPU), compressed video system, and communications equipment" cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) was to modify and validate both hardware and software, developed by Scientific Atlanta, Incorporated (S-A) for defense applications (e.g., rotary-wing airplanes), for the commercial sector surface transportation domain (i.e., automobiles and trucks). S-A also furnished a state-of-the-art compressed video digital storage and retrieval system (CVDSRS), and off-the-shelf data storage and transmission equipment to support the data acquisition system for crash avoidance research (DASCAR) project conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). In turn, S-A received access to hardware and technology related to DASCAR. DASCAR was subsequently removed completely and installation was repeated a number of times to gain an accurate idea of complete installation, operation, and removal of DASCAR. Upon satisfactory completion of the DASCAR construction and preliminary shakedown, ORNL provided NHTSA with an operational demonstration of DASCAR at their East Liberty, OH test facility. The demonstration included an on-the-road demonstration of the entire data acquisition system using NHTSA'S test track. In addition, the demonstration also consisted of a briefing, containing the following: ORNL generated a plan for validating the prototype data acquisition system with regard to: removal of DASCAR from an existing vehicle, and installation and calibration in other vehicles; reliability of the sensors and systems; data collection and transmission process (data integrity); impact on the drivability of the vehicle and obtrusiveness of the system to the driver; data analysis procedures; conspicuousness of the vehicle to other drivers; and DASCAR installation and removal training and documentation. In order to identify any operational problems not captured by the systems

  18. Strain measurement by cardiovascular magnetic resonance in pediatric cancer survivors: validation of feature tracking against harmonic phase imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Jimmy C. [C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, University of Michigan Congenital Heart Center, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); University of Michigan, Department of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); University of Michigan, Department of Radiology, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Connelly, James A. [University of Michigan, Department of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, Division of Hematology-Oncology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Zhao, Lili [University of Michigan, Department of Biostatistics, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Agarwal, Prachi P. [University of Michigan, Department of Radiology, Division of Cardiothoracic Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Dorfman, Adam L. [University of Michigan, Department of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); University of Michigan, Department of Radiology, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Left ventricular strain may be a more sensitive marker of left ventricular dysfunction than ejection fraction in pediatric cancer survivors after anthracycline therapy, but there is limited validation of strain measurement by feature tracking on cardiovascular magnetic resonance (MR) images. To compare left ventricular circumferential and radial strain by feature tracking vs. harmonic phase imaging analysis (HARP) in pediatric cancer survivors. Twenty-six patients (20.2 ± 5.6 years old) underwent cardiovascular MR at least 5 years after completing anthracycline therapy. Circumferential and radial strain were measured at the base, midventricle and apex from short-axis myocardial tagged images by HARP, and from steady-state free precession images by feature tracking. Left ventricular ejection fraction more closely correlated with global circumferential strain by feature tracking (r = -0.63, P = 0.0005) than by HARP (r = -0.39, P = 0.05). Midventricular circumferential strain did not significantly differ by feature tracking or HARP (-20.8 ± 3.4 vs. -19.5 ± 2.5, P = 0.07), with acceptable limits of agreement. Midventricular circumferential strain by feature tracking strongly correlated with global circumferential strain by feature tracking (r = 0.87, P < 0.0001). Radial strain by feature tracking had poor agreement with HARP, particularly at higher values of radial strain. Intraobserver and interobserver reproducibility was excellent for feature tracking circumferential strain, but reproducibility was poor for feature tracking radial strain. Midventricular circumferential strain by feature tracking is a reliable and reproducible measure of myocardial deformation in patients status post anthracycline therapy, while radial strain measurements are unreliable. Further studies are necessary to evaluate potential relation to long-term outcomes. (orig.)

  19. The body image and relationships scale: development and validation of a measure of body image in female breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hormes, Julia M; Lytle, Leslie A; Gross, Cynthia R; Ahmed, Rehana L; Troxel, Andrea B; Schmitz, Kathryn H

    2008-03-10

    A self-report measure of body image in female breast cancer survivors, the Body Image and Relationships Scale (BIRS), was developed to address attitudes about appearance, health, physical strength, sexuality, relationships, and social functioning following treatment. The 32-item measure, generated by expert consensus and revised based on focus group feedback, was administered to 95 female breast cancer participants twice within 1 to 2 weeks. Test-retest reliability, internal consistency, and validity of the measure were assessed using standard-scale construction techniques. The structure of the proposed measure was evaluated using exploratory factor analysis. Associations of the resulting factors and other variables were assessed using extreme groups analyses. The BIRS had satisfactory test-retest reliability and internal consistency. Principal axis factoring revealed three factors: (1) health and strength, (2) social barriers, and (3) appearance and sexuality. Correlations of the subscales with standardized measures of related constructs were significant and in the anticipated directions. Extreme groups analyses suggested associations between less physical activity and more impairment on factors 1 and 3, premenopausal status at first diagnosis and more impairment on factor 2, and younger age at the time of survey administration and more impairment on factor 3. The proposed scale demonstrated satisfactory reliability and internal consistency. Factor analysis revealed three subscales with coherent item content and differential associations with measures of activity level, menopause status, and age. Observed relationships with other measures support convergent and divergent validity. Results suggest that the proposed scale is useful for clinical and research applications.

  20. A validated HPLC method for determining residues of a dual active ingredient anti-malarial drug on manufacturing equipment surfaces.

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    Boca, Madalina Brindusa; Apostolides, Zeno; Pretorius, Etheresia

    2005-03-09

    Analytical method validation, determining the recovery rate from the equipment surface and the stability of a potential contaminant are important steps of a cleaning validation process. A rapid, sensitive and reproducible reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic method was developed for the determination of pyrimethamine (PYR) and sulfadoxine (SUL) in cleaning validation swab samples. The active compounds can be selectively quantified in a sample matrix containing detergent and swab material as low as 0.12 microg/ml. The swabbing procedure used on stainless steel coupons was validated and the stability of PYR and SUL in the swab samples was assessed. The calculated limit of contamination values for PYR (4.99 microg/cm2) and SUL (19.14 microg/cm2) were not exceeded during four consecutive equipment cleaning trials. This confirms that the desired level of cleanliness is achieved with the current cleaning procedures, which are consequently validated.

  1. Cross-cultural adaptation, reliability and validity of the Spanish version of the Quality of Life in Adult Cancer Survivors (QLACS) questionnaire: application in a sample of short-term survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, Antonio; Trujillo-Martín, Maria del Mar; Rueda, Antonio; Pérez-Ruiz, Elisabeth; Avis, Nancy E; Bilbao, Amaia

    2015-11-16

    The aim of this study was to validate the Quality of Life in Adult Cancer Survivors (QLACS) in short-term Spanish cancer survivor's patients. Patients with breast, colorectal or prostate cancer that had finished their initial cancer treatment 3 years before the beginning of this study completed QLACS, WHOQOL, Short Form-36, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, EORTC-QLQ-BR23 and EQ-5D. Cultural adaptation was made based on established guidelines. Reliability was evaluated using internal consistency and test-retest. Convergent validity was studied by mean of Pearson's correlation coefficient. Structural validity was determined by a second-order confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and Rasch analysis was used to assess the unidimensionality of the Generic and Cancer-specific scales. Cronbach's alpha were above 0.7 in all domains and summary scales. Test-retest coefficients were 0.88 for Generic and 0.82 for Cancer-specific summary scales. QLACS generic summary scale was correlated with other generic criterion measures, SF-36 MCS (r = - 0.74) and EQ-VAS (r = - 0.63). QLACS cancer-specific scale had lower values with the same constructs. CFA provided satisfactory fit indices in all cases. The RMSEA value was 0.061 and CFI and TLI values were 0.929 and 0.925, respectively. All factor loadings were higher than 0.40 and statistically significant (P validity and reliability of QLACS questionnaire to be used in short-term cancer survivors.

  2. Reliability, Validity, and Minimal Detectable Change of Balance Evaluation Systems Test and Its Short Versions in Older Cancer Survivors: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Min H; Miller, Kara; Smith, Kristin; Fredrickson, Kayle; Shilling, Tracy

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is primarily a disease of older adults. About 77% of all cancers are diagnosed in persons aged 55 years and older. Cancer and its treatment can cause diverse sequelae impacting body systems underlying balance control. No study has examined the psychometric properties of balance assessment tools in older cancer survivors, presenting a significant challenge in the selection of outcome measures for clinicians treating this fast-growing population. This study aimed to determine the reliability, validity, and minimal detectable change (MDC) of the Balance Evaluation System Test (BESTest), Mini-Balance Evaluation Systems Test (Mini-BESTest), and Brief-Balance Evaluation Systems Test (Brief-BESTest) in community-dwelling older cancer survivors. This study was a cross-sectional design. Twenty breast and 8 prostate cancer survivors participated [age (SD) = 68.4 (8.13) years]. The BESTest and Activity-specific Balance Confidence (ABC) Scale were administered during the first session. Scores of Mini-BESTest and Brief-BESTest were extracted on the basis of the scores of BESTest. The BESTest was repeated within 1 to 2 weeks by the same rater to determine the test-retest reliability. For the analysis of the inter-rater reliability, 21 participants were randomly selected to be evaluated by 2 raters. A primary rater administered the test. The 2 raters independently and concurrently scored the performance of the participants. Each rater recorded the ratings separately on the scoring sheet. No discussion among the raters was allowed throughout the testing. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs), standard error of measurement, minimal detectable change (MDC), and Bland-Altman plots were calculated. Concurrent validity of these balance tests with the ABC Scale was examined using the Spearman correlation. The BESTest, Mini-BESTest, and Brief-BESTest had high test-retest (ICC = 0.90-0.94) and interrater reliability (ICC = 0.86-0.96), small standard error of measurement (0

  3. Reliability and Validity of a Survey to Measure Bowel Function and Quality of Life in Long-term Rectal Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendel, Christopher S.; Grant, Marcia; Herrinton, Lisa; Temple, Larissa K. F.; Hornbrook, Mark C.; McMullen, Carmit K.; Bulkley, Joanna E.; Altschuler, Andrea; Krouse, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Examine reliability and validity of a specialized health-related quality of life questionnaire for rectal cancer (RC) survivors (≥5 years post diagnosis). Methods We mailed 1,063 Kaiser Permanente (KP) RC survivors (313 ostomy, 750 anastomosis) a questionnaire containing the Modified City of Hope Quality of Life-Ostomy (mCOH-QOL-O), SF-12v2, Duke–UNC Functional Social Support Questionnaire (FSSQ), and Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center Bowel Function Index (BFI). We adapted certain BFI items for use by subjects with intestinal ostomies. We evaluated reliability for all instruments with inter-item correlations and Cronbach’s alpha. We assessed construct validity only for the BFI in the ostomy group, because such use has not been reported. Results The overall response rate was 60.5% (577 respondents/953 eligible). Compared to nonresponders, participants were on average 2 years younger and more likely non-Hispanic white, resided in educationally nondeprived areas, and had KP membership through a group. The mCOH-QOL-O, SF-12, and FSSQ were found to be highly reliable for RC survivors. In the ostomy group, BFI Urgency/Soilage and Dietary subscales were found to be reliable, but Frequency was not. Factor analysis supported the construct of Urgency/Soilage and Dietary subscales in the ostomy group, although one item had a moderate correlation with all three factors. The BFI also demonstrated good concurrent validity with other instruments in the ostomy group. Conclusions With possible exception of the BFI Frequency subscale in populations with ostomies, components of our survey can be used for the entire population of RC survivors, no matter whether they received anastomosis or ostomy. PMID:24890826

  4. ENGINEERING DESIGN OPTIMIZATION OF HEEL TESTING EQUIPMENT IN THE EXPERIMENTAL VALIDATION OF SAFE WALKING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano Fragassa

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Experimental test methods for the evaluation of the resistance of heels of ladies' shoes in the case of impact loads are fully defined by International Organization for Standardization (ISO procedures that indicate all the conditions of experiment. A first Standard (ISO 19553 specifies the test method for determining the strength of the heels in the case of single impact. The result offers a valuation of the liability to fail under the sporadic heavy blows. A second Standard (ISO 19556 details a method for testing the capability of heels of women' shoes to survive to the repetition of small impacts provoked by normal walking. These Standards strictly define the features for two different testing devices (with specific materials, geometries, weights, etc. and all the experimental procedures to be followed during tests. On the contrary, this paper describes the technical solutions adopted to design one single experimental device able to perform impact testing of heels in both conditions. Joining the accuracy of mechanic movements with the speed of an electronic control system, a new and flexible equipment for the complete characterization of heels respect to (single or fatigue impacts was developed. Moreover a new level of performances in experimental validation of heel resistance was introduced by the versatility of the user-defined software control programs, able to encode every complex time-depending cycle of impact loads. Dynamic simulations permitted to investigate the impacts on heel in different conditions of testing, optimizing the machine design. The complexity of real stresses on shoes during an ordinary walk and in other common situations (as going up and downstairs was considered for a proper dimensioning.

  5. Validation of multiple-breath washout equipment for infants and young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Anne; Yammine, Sophie; Proietti, Elena; Frey, Urs; Latzin, Philipp; Riedel, Thomas; Singer, Florian

    2015-06-01

    The new ATS/ERS consensus report recommends in vitro validation of multiple-breath inert gas washout (MBW) equipment based on a lung model with simulated physiologic conditions. We aimed to assess accuracy of two MBW setups for infants and young children using this model, and to compare functional residual capacity (FRC) from helium MBW (FRC(MBW)) with FRC from plethysmography (FRC(pleth)) in vivo. The MBW setups were based on ultrasonic flow meter technology. Sulfur hexafluoride and helium were used as tracer gases. We measured FRC in vitro for specific model settings with and without carbon dioxide and calculated differences of measured to generated FRC. For in vivo evaluation, difference between FRC(MBW) and FRC(pleth) was calculated in 20 healthy children, median age 6.1 years. Coefficient of variation (CV) was calculated per FRC. In the infant model (51 runs, FRC 80-300 ml), mean (SD) relative difference between generated and measured FRCs was 0.7 (4.7) %, median CV was 4.4% for measured FRCs. In the young child model, one setting (8 runs, FRC 400 ml) showed a relative difference of up to 13%. For the remaining FRCs (42 runs, FRC 600-1,400 ml), mean (SD) relative difference was -2.0 (3.4) %; median CV was 1.4% for measured FRCs. In vivo FRC(pleth) exceeded FRC(MBW) values by 37% on average. Both setups measure lung volumes in the intended age group reliably and reproducibly. Characteristics of different techniques should be considered when measuring lung volumes in vivo. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Validation of a Yoruba translation of the World Health Organization's quality of life scale--short form among stroke survivors in Southwest Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinpelu, A O; Maruf, F A; Adegoke, B O A

    2006-12-01

    The World Health Organization's quality of life scale - short form (WHOQOL-BREF) is a well-validated, cross-cultural tool for measuring quality of life (QOL) of patients with chronic diseases. It has been translated into over 20 languages, none of which is an indigenous Nigerianlanguage. The aim of this study was to investigate the validity of a Yoruba translated version of the WHOQOL-BREF Yoruba is the indigenous language of southwestern Nigeria. The English version of the WHOQOL-BREF was translated into Yoruba and it went through two rounds of back-translation. The English and Yoruba versions of WHOQOL-BREF were completed by 41 stroke survivors, literate in both languages. Participants were recruited through purposive sampling method from physiotherapy clinics of all tertiary health institutions in southwestern Nigeria between April and August, 2004. Data was analyzed using Spearman rank order correlation and paired t- test with the alpha level set at 0.05. Participants (24 males, 14 females) were aged 55 +/- 10.7 years and have had stroke for 28.4 +/- 6.7 months. Participants' domain scores on the Yoruba translated version of WHOQOL-BREF correlated significantly with those on its English version (r = 0.695-0.859; p = 0.000). This Yoruba version is a valid translation of the English WHOQOL-BREF and may be used for assessing QOL of stroke survivors in southwestern Nigeria.

  7. Experimental benchmark and code validation for airfoils equipped with passive vortex generators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baldacchino, D.; Manolesos, M.; Simao Ferreira, C.; Gonz?alez Salcedo, A; Aparicio, M.; Chaviaropoulos, T.; Diakakis, K.; Florentie, L.; Garci??a, M.; Papadakis, G; So?rensen, N.N.; Timmer, W.A.; Troldborg, N.; Voutsinas, S.; van Zuijlen, A.H.

    2016-01-01

    Experimental results and complimentary computations for airfoils with vortex generators are compared in this paper, as part of an e_ort within the AVATAR project to develop tools for wind turbine blade control devices. Measurements from two airfoils equipped with passive vortex generators, a 30%

  8. CFD validation by measurement of specialized ventilation equipments on duct tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sehnalek Stanislav

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes measurement of HVAC distribution box on air duct track in Laboratory of Environmental Engineering (LEE. Firstly, the paper describes the LEE and then measurement apparatus with description of calculation methods. Then follows specification of sample with introduction to newly developed equipment for positioning of the anemometer. The evaluation of results of measurements with CFD comparison follows. The article is concluded with discussion over measured data with an outline for further research.

  9. The Design and Validation of EQUIP: An Instrument to Assess Inquiry-Based Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Jeff C.; Smart, Julie; Horton, Robert M.

    2010-01-01

    To monitor and evaluate program success and to provide teachers with a tool that could support their transformation in teaching practice, we needed an effective and valid protocol to measure the quantity and quality of inquiry-based instruction being led. Existing protocols, though helpful, were either too generic or too program specific.…

  10. Study on the Rationality and Validity of Probit Models of Domino Effect to Chemical Process Equipment caused by Overpressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Dongliang; Huang, Guangtuan; Jiang, Juncheng; Zhang, Mingguang; Wang, Zhirong

    2013-04-01

    Overpressure is one important cause of domino effect in accidents of chemical process equipments. Some models considering propagation probability and threshold values of the domino effect caused by overpressure have been proposed in previous study. In order to prove the rationality and validity of the models reported in the reference, two boundary values of three damage degrees reported were considered as random variables respectively in the interval [0, 100%]. Based on the overpressure data for damage to the equipment and the damage state, and the calculation method reported in the references, the mean square errors of the four categories of damage probability models of overpressure were calculated with random boundary values, and then a relationship of mean square error vs. the two boundary value was obtained, the minimum of mean square error was obtained, compared with the result of the present work, mean square error decreases by about 3%. Therefore, the error was in the acceptable range of engineering applications, the models reported can be considered reasonable and valid.

  11. Experimental benchmark and code validation for airfoils equipped with passive vortex generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldacchino, D.; Manolesos, M.; Ferreira, C.; González Salcedo, Á.; Aparicio, M.; Chaviaropoulos, T.; Diakakis, K.; Florentie, L.; García, N. R.; Papadakis, G.; Sørensen, N. N.; Timmer, N.; Troldborg, N.; Voutsinas, S.; van Zuijlen, A.

    2016-09-01

    Experimental results and complimentary computations for airfoils with vortex generators are compared in this paper, as part of an effort within the AVATAR project to develop tools for wind turbine blade control devices. Measurements from two airfoils equipped with passive vortex generators, a 30% thick DU97W300 and an 18% thick NTUA T18 have been used for benchmarking several simulation tools. These tools span low-to-high complexity, ranging from engineering-level integral boundary layer tools to fully-resolved computational fluid dynamics codes. Results indicate that with appropriate calibration, engineering-type tools can capture the effects of vortex generators and outperform more complex tools. Fully resolved CFD comes at a much higher computational cost and does not necessarily capture the increased lift due to the VGs. However, in lieu of the limited experimental data available for calibration, high fidelity tools are still required for assessing the effect of vortex generators on airfoil performance.

  12. Experimental benchmark and code validation for airfoils equipped with passive vortex generators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baldacchino, D.; Manolesos, M.; Ferreira, Célia Maria Dias

    2016-01-01

    Experimental results and complimentary computations for airfoils with vortex generators are compared in this paper, as part of an effort within the AVATAR project to develop tools for wind turbine blade control devices. Measurements from two airfoils equipped with passive vortex generators, a 30......% thick DU97W300 and an 18% thick NTUA T18 have been used for benchmarking several simulation tools. These tools span low-to-high complexity, ranging from engineering-level integral boundary layer tools to fully-resolved computational fluid dynamics codes. Results indicate that with appropriate...... calibration, engineering-type tools can capture the effects of vortex generators and outperform more complex tools. Fully resolved CFD comes at a much higher computational cost and does not necessarily capture the increased lift due to the VGs. However, in lieu of the limited experimental data available...

  13. Burden of informal caregivers of stroke survivors: Validation of the Zarit burden interview in an African population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imarhiagbe, Frank Aiwansoba; Asemota, A U; Oripelaye, B A; Akpekpe, J E; Owolabi, A A; Abidakun, A O; Akemokwe, F M; Ogundare, V O; Azeez, A L; Osakue, J O

    2017-01-01

    Informal care giving can be burdensome particularly where the option of institutionalized informal care scarcely exist. To look at the burden of informal caregivers of stroke survivors using the Zarit burden interview (ZBI). 64 stroke survivors were assessed for demographics of age, gender, duration of follow-up since discharged from in-patient care, modified Rankin score at the time of discharge and at the time of evaluation for this study and the most important informal care giver at home was also assessed for whether care giving was telling on their health or life in any negative way. All the caregivers were subsequently assessed with the ZBI. Mean age of most important informal care givers was 40.67 ± 14.27 years and the sex distribution was 33(51.6%) female and 29(45.4%) males. 21(32.8%) reported that caregiving was a health burden. Mean ZBI scores were significantly higher (30.19 ± 14.81 vs 20.30 ± 12.96, P caregiving was telling on their health. ZBI overall rating of burden of caregiving was also significantly associated with whether caregiving was telling on the health of caregiver (P = 0.01) and also symmetrically agreed with whether the burden of caregiving was telling on health (k = 0.33, Pburden of informal caregiving of about 33% is in our opinion huge. The moderate sensitivity and specificity of the ZBI means it could be safely used in the population studied.

  14. Design and Validation of a Research-Grade Waterpipe Equipped With Puff Topography Analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, Marielle C; Kim, Hyoshin; Gordon, Sydney M; Kroeger, Robyn R; Reyes, Iza L; Deojay, Dawn M; Chitwood, Caleb; Lane, Timothy E; Clark, Pamela I

    2016-05-01

    Worldwide, commercially available waterpipes vary widely in design and durability, including differences in fabrication materials, degree of leak-tight fit, and flow path diameter. Little is known about how the components of the waterpipe may influence puffing behavior and user's exposure to toxins. To systematically evaluate exposure, it is necessary to use a standardized research-grade waterpipe (RWP) when conducting clinical and laboratory-based trials. We developed a RWP that is configured with an in-line topography system which allows real-time measurement and recording of the smoke volume drawn through the RWP. The RWP was calibrated across the flow rate range expected for waterpipe tobacco smoking and the calibration was verified for known puff volumes using a smoking machine. Operation of the RWP was qualified in a cohort of experienced waterpipe smokers, each smoker using the RWP ad libitum in a laboratory setting while smoker topography and subjective effects data were collected. RWP machine smoking was highly reproducible and yielded puff volumes that agreed well with true values. User acceptance was comparable, and puffing behavior was similar in pattern, with more frequent puffing in the beginning of the session, but significantly different in intensity from that used to estimate the majority of toxicant exposure reported in the literature. The RWP operates with known precision and accuracy and is well accepted by experienced smokers. This tool can be used to determine the extent to which puffing behaviors are affected by the waterpipe design, components, and/or accessories, tobacco nicotine content, sweet flavorings and/or additives known to increase addictiveness. This study describes a standardized RWP, equipped with a puffing topography analyzer, which can operate with known precision and accuracy, and is well-accepted by experienced smokers in terms of satisfaction and reward. The RWP is an important tool for determining if puffing behaviors, and

  15. Feasibility, reliability, and validity of the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory ™ generic core scales, cancer module, and multidimensional fatigue scale in long-term adult survivors of pediatric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Rhonda S; Paxton, Raheem J; Palla, Shana L; Yang, Grace; Askins, Martha A; Joy, Shaini E; Ater, Joann L

    2012-10-01

    Most health-related quality of life assessments are designed for either children or adults and have not been evaluated for adolescent and young adult survivors of pediatric cancer. The objective of this study was to examine the feasibility, reliability, and validity of the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL ™ Generic Core Scales, Cancer Module, and Multidimensional Fatigue Scale in adult survivors of pediatric cancer. Adult survivors (n = 64; Mean age 35 year old; >2 years after treatment) completed the PedsQL™ Generic Core Scales, Cancer Module, and Multidimensional Fatigue Scale. Feasibility was examined with floor and ceiling effects; and internal consistency was determined by Cronbach's coefficient alpha calculations. Inter-factor correlations were also assessed. Significant ceiling effects were observed for the scales of social function, nausea, procedural anxiety, treatment anxiety, and communication. Internal consistency for all subscales was within the recommended ranges (α ≥ 0.70). Moderate to strong correlations between most Cancer Module and Generic Core Scales (r = 0.25 to r = 0.76) and between the Multidimensional Fatigue Scale and Generic Core Scales (r = 0.37 to r = 0.73). The PedsQL™ Generic Core Scales, Cancer Module, and Multidimensional Fatigue Scale appear to be feasible for an older population of pediatric cancer survivors; however, some of the Cancer Module Scales (nausea, procedural/treatment anxiety, and communication) were deemed not relevant for long-term survivors. More information is needed to determine whether the issues addressed by these modules are meaningful to long-term adult survivors of pediatric cancers. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Construction of a supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) equipment: validation using annatto and fennel and extract analysis by thin layer chromatography coupled to image

    OpenAIRE

    JOHNER,Júlio Cezar Flores; MEIRELES, Maria Angela de Almeida

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The present work describes setting up a laboratory unit for supercritical fluid extraction. In addition to its construction, a survey of cost was done to compare the cost of the homemade unit with that of commercial units. The equipment was validated using an extraction of annatto seeds’ oil, and the extraction and fractionation of fennel oil were used to validate the two separators; for both systems, the solvent was carbon dioxide. The chemical profiles of annatto and fennel e...

  17. A new method to facilitate valid and consistent grading cardiac events in childhood cancer survivors using medical records.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Lieke A M Feijen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cardiac events (CEs are among the most serious late effects following childhood cancer treatment. To establish accurate risk estimates for the occurrence of CEs it is essential that they are graded in a valid and consistent manner, especially for international studies. We therefore developed a data-extraction form and a set of flowcharts to grade CEs and tested the validity and consistency of this approach in a series of patients. METHODS: The Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0 and 4.0 were used to define the CEs. Forty patients were randomly selected from a cohort of 72 subjects with known CEs that had been graded by a physician for an earlier study. To establish whether the new method was valid for appropriate grading, a non-physician graded the CEs by using the new method. To evaluate consistency of the grading, the same charts were graded again by two other non-physicians, one with receiving brief introduction and one with receiving extensive training on the new method. We calculated weighted Kappa statistics to quantify inter-observer agreement. RESULTS: The inter-observer agreement was 0.92 (95% CI 0.80-1.00 for validity, and 0.88 (0.79-0.98 and 0.99 (0.96-1.00 for consistency with the outcome assessors who had the brief introduction and the extensive training, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The newly developed standardized method to grade CEs using data from medical records has shown excellent validity and consistency. The study showed that the method can be correctly applied by researchers without a medical background, provided that they receive adequate training.

  18. Desert Survivors!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Jessica; Friedenstab, Steve

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a special third-grade classroom unit based on the reality show "Survivor." The goal of this engaging and interactive unit was to teach students about physical and behavioral adaptations that help animals survive in various desert biomes. The activity combines research, argument, and puppet play over one week of…

  19. Perception of late effects among long-term survivors after haematopoietic stem cell transplantation: Descriptive analysis and validation of the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire. A sub-study of the PROVIVO study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenta, Sabine; De Geest, Sabina; Fierz, Katharina; Beckmann, Sonja; Halter, Jörg; Schanz, Urs; Nair, Gayathri; Kirsch, Monika

    2017-04-01

    To give a first description of the perception of late effects among long-term survivors after Allogeneic Haematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT) and to validate the German Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire (BIPQ). This is a secondary analysis of data from the cross-sectional, mixed-method PROVIVO study, which included 376 survivors from two Swiss HSCT-centres. First, we analysed the sample characteristics and the distribution for each BIPQ item. Secondly, we tested three validity types following the American Educational Research Association (AERA)Standards: content validity indices (CVIs) were assessed based on an expert survey (n = 9). A confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) explored the internal structure, and correlations tested the validity in relations to other variables including data from the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), the number and burden of late effects and clinical variables. In total, 319 HSCT recipients returned completed BIPQs. For this sample, the most feared threat for post-transplant life was long lasting late effects (median = 8/10). The expert-survey revealed an overall acceptable CVI (0.82), three items-on personal control, treatment control and causal representation-yielded low CVIs (perceptions of HSCT late effects. However, as three items revealed potential problems, improvements and adaptions in translation are therefore required. Following these revisions, validity evidence should be re-examined through an in-depth patient survey. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Construction of a supercritical fluid extraction (SFE equipment: validation using annatto and fennel and extract analysis by thin layer chromatography coupled to image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlio Cezar Flores JOHNER

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The present work describes setting up a laboratory unit for supercritical fluid extraction. In addition to its construction, a survey of cost was done to compare the cost of the homemade unit with that of commercial units. The equipment was validated using an extraction of annatto seeds’ oil, and the extraction and fractionation of fennel oil were used to validate the two separators; for both systems, the solvent was carbon dioxide. The chemical profiles of annatto and fennel extracts were assessed using thin layer chromatography; the images of the chromatographic plates were processed using the free ImageJ software. The cost survey showed that the homemade equipment has a very low cost (~US$ 16,000 compared to commercial equipment. The extraction curves of annatto were similar to those obtained in the literature (yield of 3.8% oil. The separators were validated, producing both a 2.5% fraction of fennel seed extract rich in essential oils and another extract fraction composed mainly of oleoresins. The ImageJ software proved to be a low-cost tool for obtaining an initial evaluation of the chemical profile of the extracts.

  1. DBA Survivor

    CERN Document Server

    LaRock, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    DBA Survivor is a book to help new DBAs understand more about the world of database administration. More and more people are moving into the DBA profession, and many are looking for a getting-started guide. Blogs are written about how to be an exceptional DBA and what to do in your first 100 days. This book takes a different approach, injecting some humor into helping you understand how to hit the ground running, and most importantly how to survive as a DBA. And it's not just survival that matters. Author Thomas LaRock wants much more for you than mere survival. He wants you to have excellence

  2. Validity of self-reported data on pregnancies for childhood cancer survivors: a comparison with data from a nationwide population-based registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overbeek, A.; Berg, M.H. van den; Hukkelhoven, C.W.; Kremer, L.C.; Heuvel-Eibrink, M.M. van den; Tissing, W.J.; Loonen, J.J.; Versluys, A.B.; Bresters, D.; Kaspers, G.J.L.; Lambalk, C.B.; Leeuwen, F.E. van; Dulmen-den Broeder, E. van; Beerendonk, C.C.M.; Bokkerink, J.P.

    2013-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: To what degree do records registered in the Netherlands Perinatal Registry (PRN) agree with self-report in a study questionnaire on pregnancy outcomes in childhood cancer survivors (CCSs)? SUMMARY ANSWER: This study suggests that self-reported pregnancy outcomes of CCSs agree well

  3. Validity of self-reported data on pregnancies for childhood cancer survivors : a comparison with data from a nationwide population-based registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overbeek, A.; van den Berg, M. H.; Hukkelhoven, C. W. P. M.; Kremer, L. C.; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, M. M.; Tissing, W. J. E.; Loonen, J. J.; Versluys, A. B.; Bresters, D.; Kaspers, G. J. L.; Lambalk, C. B.; van Leeuwen, F. E.; van Dulmen-den Broeder, E.

    To what degree do records registered in the Netherlands Perinatal Registry (PRN) agree with self-report in a study questionnaire on pregnancy outcomes in childhood cancer survivors (CCSs)? This study suggests that self-reported pregnancy outcomes of CCSs agree well with registry data and that

  4. Validation of the production process of core-equipment HYNIC-Bombesin-Sn; Validacion del proceso de produccion del nucleo-equipo HYNIC-Bombesina-Sn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubio C, N. I. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2008-07-01

    The validation process is establishing documented evidence that provides a high degree of assurance that a specific process consistently will produce a product that will meet specifications and quality attributes preset and, therefore, ensures the efficiency and effectiveness of a product. The radiopharmaceutical {sup 99m}Tc-HYNlC-Bombesin is part of the gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) analogues of bombesin that are radiolabelled with technetium 99 metastable for molecular images obtention. Is obtained from freeze-dry formulations kits (core- equipment)) and has reported a very high stability in human serum, specific binding to receptors and rapid internalization. Biodistribution data in mice showed rapid blood clearance with predominant renal excretion and specific binding to tissues with positive response to GRP receptors. According to biokinetics studies performed on patients with breast cancer, breast show a marked asymmetry with increased uptake in neoplastic breast in healthy women and the uptake of radiopharmaceuticals is symmetrical in both breasts. No reported adverse reactions. In this paper, the prospective validation core-equipment HYNlC-Bombesin-Sn, which was shown consistently that the product meets the specifications and quality, attributes to preset from the obtained from the diagnostic radiopharmaceutical third generation: {sup 99m}Tc-HYNlC-Bombesin. The process was successfully validated and thereby ensuring the efficiency and effectiveness of this agent as a preliminary diagnostic for approval to be marketed. (Author)

  5. Development and preliminary validation of a short form of the Beck Depression Inventory for Youth (BDI-Y) in a sample of adolescent cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmon, Jaime E; Liptak, Cori; Recklitis, Christopher J

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze adolescent cancer survivors' responses to the Beck Depression Inventory for Youth (BDI-Y) to determine if a short form of the measure could be developed that would accurately identify survivors with clinically significant levels of depressive symptoms. Two hundred two adolescent survivors (mean age = 15.39 years, SD = 1.93) completed the BDI-Y at a single time point and were divided into two groups: a derivation sample (n = 105) and a replication sample (n = 97). Based on correlations with the total BDI-Y score in the derivation sample, items were selected for inclusion in three potential short forms, with 6, 8, and 11 items, respectively. These short forms were then evaluated against the full BDI-Y scale first in the derivation sample and subsequently in the replication sample (n = 97). Each of the three short forms had high correlations with the total BDI-Y scale (r > 0.95), good internal consistency (α > 0.80), and good overall discrimination compared to a standard BDI-Y cutoff score (AUC > 0.90). The eight-item short form demonstrated notable consistency across the derivation and replication samples, with high sensitivity and specificity using a cutoff score of ≥5, making it a promising tool for clinical screening. Abbreviated versions of the BDI-Y can accurately detect depression in adolescent cancer survivors. An eight-item short form demonstrates strong psychometric properties and potential for use as a screening measure in this population, while the 6- and 11-item short forms may be suited to other applications.

  6. Cleaning verification: A five parameter study of a Total Organic Carbon method development and validation for the cleaning assessment of residual detergents in manufacturing equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue; Ahmad, Imad A Haidar; Tam, James; Wang, Yan; Dao, Gina; Blasko, Andrei

    2018-02-05

    A Total Organic Carbon (TOC) based analytical method to quantitate trace residues of clean-in-place (CIP) detergents CIP100® and CIP200® on the surfaces of pharmaceutical manufacturing equipment was developed and validated. Five factors affecting the development and validation of the method were identified: diluent composition, diluent volume, extraction method, location for TOC sample preparation, and oxidant flow rate. Key experimental parameters were optimized to minimize contamination and to improve the sensitivity, recovery, and reliability of the method. The optimized concentration of the phosphoric acid in the swabbing solution was 0.05M, and the optimal volume of the sample solution was 30mL. The swab extraction method was 1min sonication. The use of a clean room, as compared to an isolated lab environment, was not required for method validation. The method was demonstrated to be linear with a correlation coefficient (R) of 0.9999. The average recoveries from stainless steel surfaces at multiple spike levels were >90%. The repeatability and intermediate precision results were ≤5% across the 2.2-6.6ppm range (50-150% of the target maximum carry over, MACO, limit). The method was also shown to be sensitive with a detection limit (DL) of 38ppb and a quantitation limit (QL) of 114ppb. The method validation demonstrated that the developed method is suitable for its intended use. The methodology developed in this study is generally applicable to the cleaning verification of any organic detergents used for the cleaning of pharmaceutical manufacturing equipment made of electropolished stainless steel material. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Demonstration of the validity of the SF-36 for measurement of the temporal recovery of quality of life outcomes in burns survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgar, Dale; Dawson, Alana; Hankey, Genevieve; Phillips, Michael; Wood, Fiona

    2010-11-01

    Outcome assessment after burn is complex. Determination of quality of life is often measured using the Burns Specific Health Scale (BSHS), a validated tool in the burn population. The SF-36 is a generic quality of life questionnaire that is validated for numerous populations, but not in burns. The aim of the study was to examine the validity of SF-36, using the BSHS as a reference. 280 burn patients were recruited at Royal Perth Hospital. Each completed SF-36 and BSHS-B at regular intervals to 2 years after burn. Regression modelling was used to assess the temporal validity and the relative sensitivity of the measures. SF-36 domains and BSHS-B demonstrated significant associations at all time points (r=0.37-0.76, pSF-36 domains: role physical; bodily pain; social function and role emotional outperformed BSHS-B total score and domain scores. Greater measurement sensitivity was demonstrated in all SF-36 summary and subscales measures (except General Health) when compared to BSHS-B and sub-domains. This study demonstrated SF-36 as a valid measure of recovery of quality of life in the burn patient population. The data suggests that SF-36 components were more sensitive to change than the BSHS-B from ∼1 month after injury. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  8. The Sense-City equipment project: insight into the prototyping and validation of environmental micro- and nanosensors for a sustainable urbanization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebental, Bérengère; Angelescu, Dan; Bourouina, Tarik; Bourquin, Frédéric; Cojocaru, Costel-Sorin; Derkx, François; Dumoulin, Jean; Ha, Thi-Lan; Robine, Enric; Van Damme, Henri

    2013-04-01

    While today's galloping urbanization weighs heavily on both People and Environment, the massive instrumentation of urban spaces appears a landmark toward sustainability. Collecting massively distributed information requires the use of high-performance communication systems as well as sensors with very small ecological footprint. Because of their high sensitivity, the wide range of their observables, their energetic self-sufficiency and their low cost, micro- and nano- sensors are particularly well suited to urban metrology. A 8 years, 9 M€ equipment project funded by the French "Programme d'Investissement d'Avenir" starting in 2012, the Sense-City project will offer a suite of high-quality facilities for the design, prototyping and performance assessment of micro- and nanosensors devoted to sustainable urbanization. The scientific program of Sense-City is built around four programs, environmental monitoring, structural health monitoring, energy performances monitoring and people health and exposure monitoring. We present the activities of the consortium partners, IFSTTAR, ESIEE-Paris, CSTB, LPICM, and the prospects brought by Sense-City equipment in terms of sensor prototyping, benchmarking and operation validation. We discuss how the various sensors developed by LPICM and ESIEE (for instance conformable chemical and gas microsensors using nanomaterials at LPICM, miniaturized gas chromatographs or microfluidic lab-on-chip for particles analysis at ESIEE-Paris) can be integrated by IFSTTAR into sensors networks tested by IFSTTAR and CSTB in both lab and urban settings. The massively distributed data are interpreted using advanced physical models and inverse methods in order to monitor water, air or soil quality, infrastructure and network safety, building energy performances as well as people health and exposure. We discuss the shortcomings of evaluating the performances of sensors only in lab conditions or directly in real, urban conditions. As a solution, Sense

  9. Validity of anthropometric measurements for characterizing obesity among adult survivors of childhood cancer: A report from the St. Jude Lifetime Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlage, Robyn E; Wilson, Carmen L; Zhang, Nan; Kaste, Sue; Green, Daniel M; Armstrong, Gregory T; Robison, Leslie L; Chemaitilly, Wassim; Srivastava, Deo Kumar; Hudson, Melissa M; Ness, Kirsten K

    2015-06-15

    Childhood cancer survivors (CCSs) are at risk for obesity. The purpose of this project was to determine which clinical measures of body composition are most accurate among CCSs in comparison with dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA). The agreement between the body mass index (BMI), skinfold percent body fat, and waist-to-height ratio (WHtR) and DXA was evaluated among 1361 CCSs (mean age, 32.4 ± 7.7 years) 10 or more years after the diagnosis. The sensitivity and specificity of BMI, skinfold, and WHtR obesity classifications were calculated with respect to DXA. Log-binomial regression, stratified by sex, was used to evaluate treatment-related factors for misclassification as nonobese by BMI, skinfolds, and WHtR. The mean body fat values were 23.3% ± 7.7% (males) and 32.3% ± 8.1% (females) for skinfolds and 26.9% ± 7.4% (males) and 38.4% ± 7.7% (females) for DXA. Pearson correlations between skinfolds and DXA were high (R = 0.83 for males, R = 0.84 for females). Skinfolds incorrectly classified 34.5% of obese males and 27.3% of obese females. BMI measures were the least sensitive with false-negative rates of 46.4% (males) and 53.1% (females). Males exposed to abdominal/pelvic radiation were at increased risk for misclassification as nonobese by BMI (relative risk, 1.57; 95% confidence interval, 1.25-1.95). The percentages classified as obese were highest with DXA (males, 63.1%; females, 84.8%) and lowest with BMI (males, 35.7%; females, 39.7%). Although skinfolds and WHtR underestimated the percentage classified as obese in comparison with DXA, the differences were not as large. Findings suggest that skinfolds and WHtR are better than BMI for obesity classification in CCSs. Clinicians should be aware of the high risk of misclassifying obese CCSs as nonobese. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  10. Motherhood among Incest Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Tamar

    1995-01-01

    Mothers (n=26) who were incest survivors were compared with 28 mothers with no such history for 7 areas of parenting skills: role-image, objectivity, expectations, rapport, communication, limit-setting, and role-support. Significant differences were found on all seven scales, characterized by a tendency for the incest survivors to be less skillful…

  11. Development and validation of the smart management strategy for health assessment tool-short form (SAT-SF) in cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Young Ho; Jung, Ju Youn; Sim, Jin Ah; Lee, JongMog; Noh, Dong-Young; Han, Wonshik; Park, Kyu Joo; Jeong, Seung-Yong; Park, Ji Won; Wu, Hong-Gyun; Chie, Eui Kyu; Kim, Hak Jae; Jung, Kyung Hae; Zo, Jae-Ill; Kim, Sung; Lee, Jeong Eon; Nam, Seok Jin; Lee, Eun Sook; Oh, Jae Hwan; Kim, Young-Woo; Kim, Young Tae; Shim, Young Mog

    2017-10-30

    The aim of this study was to develop and validate a short form (SF) of the Smart Management Strategy for Health Assessment Tool (SAT) for cancer patients. Data for item reduction were derived from cancer patient data (n = 300) previously used to develop the original SAT. We used regression methods to select and score the new SAT-SF. To assess the instrument's reliability and validity, we recruited another 354 cancer patients from the same hospitals who were older than 18 years and accustomed to using the web. All results were compared with that of the long-form SAT (original SAT). The SAT-SF used is the shorter version, a 30-item (from the original 91-item) instrument, to measure cancer patient's health. The 30-item SAT-SF explained 97.7% of total variance of the full 91-item long-form SAT. All SAT-SF subscales demonstrated a high reliability with good internal consistency compared with the original SAT. The total short-form scores of the three SAT sets (SAT-Core, SAT-Preparation, SAT-Implementation) differentiated participant groups according to their stage of goal implementation and percentage of actions taken in the 10 Rules for Highly Effective Health Behavior. We found acceptable correlations between the three SAT-SF sets and the additional assessment tools compared with the original SAT. The 30-item SAT-SF had a satisfactory internal consistency and validity for cancer patients with minimal loss of information compared with the original SAT.

  12. Pain in cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Matthew Rd; Ramirez, Juan D; Farquhar-Smith, Paul

    2014-11-01

    Cancer and its treatment exert a heavy psychological and physical toll. Of the myriad symptoms which result, pain is common, encountered in between 30% and 60% of cancer survivors. Pain in cancer survivors is a major and growing problem, impeding the recovery and rehabilitation of patients who have beaten cancer and negatively impacting on cancer patients' quality of life, work prospects and mental health. Persistent pain in cancer survivors remains challenging to treat successfully. Pain can arise both due to the underlying disease and the various treatments the patient has been subjected to. Chemotherapy causes painful chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN), radiotherapy can produce late effect radiation toxicity and surgery may lead to the development of persistent post-surgical pain syndromes. This review explores a selection of the common causes of persistent pain in cancer survivors, detailing our current understanding of the pathophysiology and outlining both the clinical manifestations of individual pain states and the treatment options available.

  13. Equipment repaired is equipment gained

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Srinivasan

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available According to WHO, at any one time, around 50 per cent of medical equipment in low- and middle-income countries cannot be used because of lack of maintenance or spare parts. We have found that unwillingness or inability to repair equipment and put it back in use is also a major cause.

  14. Uncovering high rates of unsafe injection equipment reuse in rural Cameroon: validation of a survey instrument that probes for specific misconceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Unsafe reuse of injection equipment in hospitals is an on-going threat to patient safety in many parts of Africa. The extent of this problem is difficult to measure. Standard WHO injection safety assessment protocols used in the 2003 national injection safety assessment in Cameroon are problematic because health workers often behave differently under the observation of visitors. The main objective of this study is to assess the extent of unsafe injection equipment reuse and potential for blood-borne virus transmission in Cameroon. This can be done by probing for misconceptions about injection safety that explain reuse without sterilization. These misconceptions concern useless precautions against cross-contamination, i.e. "indirect reuse" of injection equipment. To investigate whether a shortage of supply explains unsafe reuse, we compared our survey data against records of purchases. Methods All health workers at public hospitals in two health districts in the Northwest Province of Cameroon were interviewed about their own injection practices. Injection equipment supply purchase records documented for January to December 2009 were compared with self-reported rates of syringe reuse. The number of HIV, HBV and HCV infections that result from unsafe medical injections in these health districts is estimated from the frequency of unsafe reuse, the number of injections performed, the probability that reused injection equipment had just been used on an infected patient, the size of the susceptible population, and the transmission efficiency of each virus in an injection. Results Injection equipment reuse occurs commonly in the Northwest Province of Cameroon, practiced by 44% of health workers at public hospitals. Self-reported rates of syringe reuse only partly explained by records on injection equipment supplied to these hospitals, showing a shortage of syringes where syringes are reused. Injection safety interventions could prevent an estimated 14-336 HIV

  15. Uncovering high rates of unsafe injection equipment reuse in rural Cameroon: validation of a survey instrument that probes for specific misconceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okwen, Mbah P; Ngem, Bedes Y; Alomba, Fozao A; Capo, Mireille V; Reid, Savanna R; Ewang, Ebong C

    2011-02-07

    Unsafe reuse of injection equipment in hospitals is an on-going threat to patient safety in many parts of Africa. The extent of this problem is difficult to measure. Standard WHO injection safety assessment protocols used in the 2003 national injection safety assessment in Cameroon are problematic because health workers often behave differently under the observation of visitors. The main objective of this study is to assess the extent of unsafe injection equipment reuse and potential for blood-borne virus transmission in Cameroon. This can be done by probing for misconceptions about injection safety that explain reuse without sterilization. These misconceptions concern useless precautions against cross-contamination, i.e. "indirect reuse" of injection equipment. To investigate whether a shortage of supply explains unsafe reuse, we compared our survey data against records of purchases. All health workers at public hospitals in two health districts in the Northwest Province of Cameroon were interviewed about their own injection practices. Injection equipment supply purchase records documented for January to December 2009 were compared with self-reported rates of syringe reuse. The number of HIV, HBV and HCV infections that result from unsafe medical injections in these health districts is estimated from the frequency of unsafe reuse, the number of injections performed, the probability that reused injection equipment had just been used on an infected patient, the size of the susceptible population, and the transmission efficiency of each virus in an injection. Injection equipment reuse occurs commonly in the Northwest Province of Cameroon, practiced by 44% of health workers at public hospitals. Self-reported rates of syringe reuse only partly explained by records on injection equipment supplied to these hospitals, showing a shortage of syringes where syringes are reused. Injection safety interventions could prevent an estimated 14-336 HIV infections, 248-661 HBV

  16. Solar Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    A medical refrigeration and a water pump both powered by solar cells that convert sunlight directly into electricity are among the line of solar powered equipment manufactured by IUS (Independent Utility Systems) for use in areas where conventional power is not available. IUS benefited from NASA technology incorporated in the solar panel design and from assistance provided by Kerr Industrial Applications Center.

  17. Children of Holocaust Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Shirley Ann

    As a result of the Holocaust, many survivors developed long term psychosocial impairment known as the Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), which is characterized by depression, anxiety, hypocondriasis, inability to concentrate or to express anger, nightmares, insomnia, obsessive thoughts, guilt, mistrust, and alienation. The literature in this…

  18. A theory for aftercare of human trafficking survivors for nursing practice in low resource settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, R L; Naidoo, J R; Mchunu, G

    2017-06-01

    Research on aftercare for human trafficking survivors highlights the limited knowledge of the needs of survivors; the evaluation of current aftercare; and the process of recovery navigated by the survivor in aftercare (Oram et al., 2012; Locke, 2010; Hacker & Cohen, 2012). Furthermore there has been a transition in aftercare where the victim or survivor, who before was seen as a passive victim of circumstance of their life and in need of therapeutic intervention, is now seen as having an active role in their recovery, thus facilitating recovery (Hacker & Cohen, 2012). The need for a theory grounded in survivor's voices therefore motivated this grounded theory study underpinned by Freire's (1970) Pedagogy of the oppressed. The aim of the theory is to inform nursing care of human trafficking survivors in low resource settings. The findings elicit a theoretical model of the renewed self, and the conditions that facilitate this process in care of human trafficking survivors. The recommendations of this paper may improve the nursing care provided to human trafficking survivors and equip nurses and other health professionals with the knowledge and skills to promote the renewing of human trafficking survivors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The distress thermometer in survivors of gynaecological cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Mette L.; Hansen, Merete K.; Hansson, Helena

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Unrecognised psychological distress among cancer survivors may be identified using short screening tools. We validated the accuracy of the distress thermometer (DT) to detect psychological distress on the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) among early stage gynaecological cancer...... survivors and whether the women’s DT and HADS scores were associated with the need of an individualised supportive intervention. Methods: One hundred sixty-five gynaecological cancer survivors answered DT and HADS before randomisation in a trial testing a nurse-led, person-centred intervention using...... supportive conversations. The number of conversations was decided in the woman-nurse dyad based on the woman’s perceived need. Nurses were unaware of the women’s DT and HADS scores. We validated DT’s accuracy for screening using HADS as gold standard and receiver operating characteristic curves. Associations...

  20. Determination of the worst case for cleaning validation of equipment used in the radiopharmaceutical production of lyophilized reagents for {sup 99m}Tc labelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porto, Luciana Valeria Ferrari Machado; Fukumori, Neuza Taeko Okasaki; Matsuda, Margareth Mie Nakamura, E-mail: luciana.porto@anvisa.gov.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Radiofarmacia

    2016-01-15

    Cleaning validation, a requirement of the current Good Manufacturing Practices (cGMP) for Drugs, consists of documented evidence that cleaning procedures are capable of removing residues to predetermined acceptance levels. This report describes a strategy for the selection of the worst case product for the production of lyophilized reagents (LRs) for labeling with {sup 99m}Tc from the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/Sao Paulo). The strategy is based on the calculation of a 'worst case index' that incorporates information about drug solubility, cleaning difficulty, and occupancy rate in the production line. It allowed a reduction in the required number of validations considering the possible manufacturing flow of a given product and the subsequent flow, thus facilitating the process by reducing operation time and cost. The products identified as 'worst case' were LRs PUL-TEC and MIBI-TEC. (author). (author)

  1. Survivors on Cancer: the portrayal of survivors in print news.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kromm, Elizabeth Edsall; Smith, Katherine Clegg; Singer, Rachel Friedman

    2007-12-01

    This study examines the types of news stories that include comments by everyday cancer survivors and the messages or information these individuals provide. Even though these non-celebrity survivors increasingly serve on the front lines of cancer prevention and advocacy efforts and often engage with media, the role they play in the media discourse on cancer has not been a focus of research. We conducted a thematic content analysis of print news articles of non-celebrity cancer survivors in 15 leading national daily newspapers for four consecutive months starting in June 2005 to identify the issues or events that included a survivor perspective and the messages or information conveyed by the everyday survivors. Journalists included survivor commentary primarily when covering cancer fundraising events and when focusing on individual survivorship stories. In overall news coverage involving survivors, breast and prostate cancers received the greatest attention, followed by blood and lung cancers. Survivors spoke mainly about the diagnosis experience and life post-cancer. Our analysis of survivors' comments revealed that discussions of the diagnosis experience often convey fear and a lack of confidence in cancer screening practices, while cancer is portrayed as a positive life event. While evidence of a positive and hopeful portrayal of survivorship is an encouraging finding for continued efforts to decrease stigma associated with a cancer diagnosis and for the public understanding of the disease, it is important to consider potential negative implications of an idealized and restricted media discourse on survivorship. The increasing size and capacity of the survivor community offers opportunities for the cancer advocacy community to consider how news media portrayal of cancer and survivorship may contribute in both positive and potentially detrimental ways to public understanding of this disease, its survivors and life after cancer.

  2. Assessing Dietary Intake in Childhood Cancer Survivors: Food Frequency Questionnaire Versus 24-Hour Diet Recalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fang Fang; Roberts, Susan B; Must, Aviva; Wong, William W; Gilhooly, Cheryl H; Kelly, Michael J; Parsons, Susan K; Saltzman, Edward

    2015-10-01

    Cancer diagnosis and treatment may influence dietary intake. The validity of using self-reported methods to quantify dietary intake has not been evaluated in childhood cancer survivors. We validated total energy intake (EI) reported from Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) and repeated 24-hour diet recalls (24HRs) against total energy expenditure (TEE) measured using the doubly labeled water method in 16 childhood cancer survivors. Dietary underreporting, assessed by (EI-TEE)/TEE × 100%, was 22% for FFQ and 1% for repeated 24HRs. FFQ significantly underestimates dietary intake and should not be used to assess the absolute intake of foods and nutrients in childhood cancer survivors.

  3. Evaluation of the Quality of Life in Adult Cancer Survivors (QLACS scale for long-term cancer survivors in a sample of breast cancer survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foley Kristie

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper evaluates psychometric properties of a recently developed measure focusing on the health-related quality of life (HRQL of long-term cancer survivors, the Quality of Life in Adult Survivors scale (QLACS, in a sample of breast cancer survivors. This represents an important area of study, given the large number of breast cancer patients surviving many years post diagnosis. Methods Analyses are based on an 8-year follow-up of a sample of breast cancer survivors who participated in an earlier study conducted in 1995. Participants were re-contacted in 2003 and those who were reachable and agreed to participate (n = 94 were surveyed using a variety of measures including the QLACS. Additional follow-up surveys were conducted 2 weeks and one year later. Psychometric tests of the QLACS included test-retest reliability, concurrent and retrospective validity, and responsiveness. Results The QLACS domain and summary scores showed good test-retest reliability (all test-retest correlations were above .7 and high internal consistency. The Generic Summary Score showed convergent validity with other measures designed to assess generic HRQL. The Cancer-Specific Summary score exhibited divergent validity with generic HRQL measures, but not a cancer-related specific measure. The QLACS Cancer-Specific Summary Score demonstrated satisfactory predictive validity for factors that were previously shown to be correlated with HRQL. The QLACS generally demonstrated a high level of responsiveness to life changes. Conclusion The QLACS may serve as a useful measure for assessing HRQL among long-term breast cancer survivors that are not otherwise captured by generic measures or those specifically designed for newly diagnosed patients.

  4. Who are the cancer survivors?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovaldt, Hanna Birkbak; Suppli, N P; Olsen, M H

    2015-01-01

    Background: No nationwide studies on social position and prevalence of comorbidity among cancer survivors exist. Methods: We performed a nationwide prevalence study defining persons diagnosed with cancer 1943-2010 and alive on the census date 1 January 2011 as cancer survivors. Comorbidity was co...

  5. Brain tumor survivors speak out.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson-Green, Bonnie

    2009-01-01

    Although progress has been made in the treatment of childhood brain tumors,work remains to understand the complexities of disease, treatment, and contextual factors that underlie individual differences in outcome. A combination of both an idiographic approach (incorporating observations made by adult survivors of childhood brain tumors) and a nomothetic approach (reviewing the literature for brain tumor survivors as well as childhood cancer survivors) is presented. Six areas of concern are reviewed from both an idiographic and nomothetic perspective, including social/emotional adjustment, insurance, neurocognitive late effects, sexuality and relationships, employment, and where survivors accessed information about their disease and treatment and possible late effects. Guidelines to assist health care professionals working with childhood brain tumor survivors are offered with the goal of improving psychosocial and neurocognitive outcomes in this population.

  6. Cleaning supplies and equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000443.htm Cleaning supplies and equipment To use the sharing features on this page, ... to clean supplies and equipment. Disinfecting Supplies and Equipment Start by wearing the right personal protective equipment ( ...

  7. Aquatic Equipment Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sova, Ruth

    Equipment usually used in water exercise programs is designed for variety, intensity, and program necessity. This guide discusses aquatic equipment under the following headings: (1) equipment design; (2) equipment principles; (3) precautions and contraindications; (4) population contraindications; and (5) choosing equipment. Equipment is used…

  8. Holocaust Child Survivors and Child Sexual Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lev-Wiesel, Rachel; Amir, Marianne

    2005-01-01

    This study utilized a qualitative analysis of child survivors of the Holocaust who were sexually abused during World War II. The research study aimed to give this specific group of survivors a voice and to explore the impact of multiple extreme traumas, the Holocaust and childhood sexual abuse, on the survivors. Twenty-two child survivors of the…

  9. Excessive Daytime Sleepiness in Stroke Survivors: An Integrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Qinglan; Whittemore, Robin; Redeker, Nancy

    2016-07-01

    Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) is a prevalent symptom among stroke survivors. This symptom is an independent risk factor for stroke and may reduce stroke survivors' quality of life, cognitive functioning, and daytime functional performance. The lack of a universally accepted definition of EDS makes it difficult to measure EDS and synthesize research. The purpose of this integrative review is to describe poststroke EDS, ascertain conceptual and operational definitions of EDS, identify factors that contribute to EDS in stroke survivors, and explore outcomes associated with EDS in stroke survivors. We searched the following databases: PubMed and MEDLINE (OvidSP 1946-April; Week 2, 2015), Embase (OvidSP 1974-March; Week 1, 2015), and PsycINFO (OvidSP 1967-April; Week 2, 2015). Our search yielded 340 articles, 27 of which met inclusion criteria. The literature reveals EDS to be a multidimensional construct that is operationalized with both subjective and objective measures. Choosing measures that can quantify both the objective and subjective components is useful for gaining a comprehensive understanding of EDS. The antecedents of EDS are stroke, sleep-disordered breathing, reversed Robin Hood syndrome, and depression. The outcomes associated with EDS in stroke patients are serious and negative. Via synthesis of this research, we propose a possible framework for poststroke EDS, which may be of use in clinical practice and in research to identify valid quantifying methods for EDS as well as to prevent harmful outcomes in stroke survivors. © The Author(s) 2016.

  10. Conversations with Holocaust survivor residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirst, Sandra P; LeNavenec, Carole Lynne; Aldiabat, Khaldoun

    2011-03-01

    Traumatic events in one's younger years can have an impact on how an individual copes with later life. One traumatic experience for Jewish individuals was the Holocaust. Some of these people are moving into long-term care facilities. It was within this context that the research question emerged: What are Holocaust survivor residents' perceptions of a life lived as they move into a long-term care facility? For this qualitative study, Holocaust survivors were individually interviewed. Findings emphasize that nursing care needs to ensure that Holocaust survivor residents participate in activities, receive timely health care, and receive recognition of their life experiences. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Ageing Holocaust survivors in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paratz, Elizabeth D; Katz, Benny

    2011-02-21

    In recent years, a phenomenon of "late effects of the Holocaust" has emerged, with impacts on the psychological and physical health of ageing Holocaust survivors. As Holocaust survivors age, they may experience heightened anxiety around normal processes of ageing, worsened post-traumatic stress disorder with cognitive decline, and fear of the medical system. Holocaust survivors are at increased risk of osteoporosis, cardiometabolic disease due to hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysfunction, cancer, and sequelae of Nazi medical experiments. From existing medical literature on this topic, practical principles of management are derived to create a framework for sensitive medical management of Holocaust survivors in Australia. The issues discussed are also relevant to the wider geriatric refugee or prisoner-of-war experience.

  12. Sexual minority cancer survivors' satisfaction with care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabson, Jennifer M; Kamen, Charles S

    2016-01-01

    Satisfaction with care is important to cancer survivors' health outcomes. Satisfaction with care is not equal for all cancer survivors, and sexual minority (i.e., lesbian, gay, and bisexual) cancer survivors may experience poor satisfaction with care. Data were drawn from the 2010 LIVESTRONG national survey. The final sample included 207 sexual minority cancer survivors and 4,899 heterosexual cancer survivors. Satisfaction with care was compared by sexual orientation, and a Poisson regression model was computed to test the associations between sexual orientation and satisfaction with care, controlling for other relevant variables. Sexual minority cancer survivors had lower satisfaction with care than did heterosexual cancer survivors (B = -0.12, SE = 0.04, Wald χ(2) = 9.25, pSexual minorities experience poorer satisfaction with care compared to heterosexual cancer survivors. Satisfaction with care is especially relevant to cancer survivorship in light of the cancer-related health disparities reported among sexual minority cancer survivors.

  13. Development and preliminary testing of an instrument to measure healthiness of lifestyle among breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsiu-Ho; Chung, Ue-Lin; Tsay, Shiow-Luan; Hsieh, Pi-Ching; Su, Hui-Fang; Lin, Kuan-Chia

    2015-12-01

    Monitoring lifestyle to maintain health is an important issue for breast cancer survivors. No multidimensional instrument has previously been available specifically for assessing overall healthiness of lifestyle among breast cancer survivors. This study aims (i) to establish the Healthy Lifestyle Instrument for Breast Cancer Survivors (HLI-BCS) and (ii) to examine the reliability and validity of the established scale. A quantitative cross-sectional design was used. This project was conducted in four phases. In phase I, using the Health-Promoting Lifestyle Profile as the core concept, we created 50 preliminary measurement items. In phase II, we invited 10 breast cancer survivors and five professional experts to conduct a content validity assessment. In phases III and IV, a total of 220 breast cancer survivors were enrolled to assess the construct validity and the internal consistency and reliability. The final HLI-BCS contains 20 items across five domains: dietary habits, environment and physiology, health responsibility and stress management, social and interpersonal relations and spiritual growth. Through the information presented in the HLI-BCS, breast cancer survivors can assess their lifestyles on multiple dimensions and subsequently adjust their lifestyles to enhance their recovery and quality of life. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  14. Disorganizing experiences in second- and third-generation holocaust survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharf, Miri; Mayseless, Ofra

    2011-11-01

    Second-generation Holocaust survivors might not show direct symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder or attachment disorganization, but are at risk for developing high levels of psychological distress. We present themes of difficult experiences of second-generation Holocaust survivors, arguing that some of these aversive experiences might have disorganizing qualities even though they do not qualify as traumatic. Based on in-depth interviews with 196 second-generation parents and their adolescent children, three themes of disorganizing experiences carried across generations were identified: focus on survival issues, lack of emotional resources, and coercion to please the parents and satisfy their needs. These themes reflect the frustration of three basic needs: competence, relatedness, and autonomy, and this frustration becomes disorganizing when it involves stability, potency, incomprehensibility, and helplessness. The findings shed light on the effect of trauma over the generations and, as such, equip therapists with a greater understanding of the mechanisms involved.

  15. Childhood Cancer Survivor Study: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Childhood Treatment Childhood Cancer Genomics Study Findings Childhood Cancer Survivor Study: An Overview Dr. Greg Armstrong, ... Late Effects of Treatment for Childhood Cancer .) The Childhood Cancer Survivor Study ( CCSS ), funded by the National ...

  16. Detroit Research on Cancer Survivors Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    An NCI press release about the launch of the Detroit Research on Cancer Survivors (ROCS) study, which will look at factors affecting cancer progression, recurrence, mortality, and quality of life among African-American cancer survivors.

  17. Secondhand Smoke Still Plagues Some Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_166834.html Secondhand Smoke Still Plagues Some Cancer Survivors Study found they ... number of nonsmoking cancer survivors exposed to secondhand smoke is down significantly in the United States, but ...

  18. Informal education and health promoting approaches in adult cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argyriou, A A; Ifanti, A A; Kalofonos, H

    2011-01-01

    This review looks at the available data relating to the informal education aspects and other health promoting approaches applied by adult cancer survivors to reduce the risk of cancer. The implications of such behavioral interventions on oncology practice are discussed. We also highlight areas of future research to pursue. Available data show that many cancer survivors remain engaged in risky health behaviors post-diagnosis, which are associated with an increased risk of disease's recurrence. However, over the last years patients seem to increasingly receive adequate risk-based medical care. The application of appropriate informal education approaches, such as diet, exercise, and cessation of former unhealthy habits, such as smoking and alcohol has facilitated behavioral changes in cancer survivors, thoroughly improving their well being and overall quality of life (QOL). Most of the research studies published to date have applied structured lifestyle interventions on intensive, individualized counseling sessions delivered by trained personnel or psychosocial-based mediations and reported that these approaches are largely effective in promoting the adoption of a healthier lifestyle in cancer survivors. These interventions have been reported to reduce the risk of cancer recurrence and thus to obtain an obvious positive impact on their well-being and overall QOL. However, there is still insufficient evidence to conclude and support with confidence the effectiveness of any of these behavioral interventions and therefore future interventions should be initiated to assess the long-term effects and validating outcomes of lifestyle and other psychosocial interventions.

  19. Stroke survivors' experiences of rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peoples, Hanne; Satink, Ton; Steultjens, Esther

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim was to obtain the best available knowledge on stroke survivors' experiences of rehabilitation. The increase in demands for accountability in health care and acknowledgement of the importance of client participation in health decisions calls for systematic ways of integrating...... survivors' experiences of rehabilitation in a clinical setting. Data analysis entailed extracting, editing, grouping, and abstracting findings. RESULTS: Twelve studies were included. One theme, "Power and Empowerment" and six subcategories were identified: 1) Coping with a new situation, 2) Informational...... needs, 3) Physical and non-physical needs, 4) Being personally valued and treated with respect, 5) Collaboration with health care professionals and 6) Assuming responsibility and seizing control. DISCUSSION: The synthesis showed that stroke survivors' experiences of rehabilitation reflected individual...

  20. Cancer survivors' experience of time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Dorte M.; Elverdam, Beth

    2007-01-01

    survivors over time to explore how perceptions and experiences change. METHODS: An exploratory study was carried out in 2002-2004 with a purposive sample of adults who had experienced various forms of cancer. Data collection included 9 weeks of participant observation at a Cancer Rehabilitation Centre...... and ethnographic interviews with 23 informants. Ten men and 13 women were interviewed twice: 2 weeks after their stay and 18 months later. FINDINGS: Data were analysed from a culture-analytical perspective. Three main themes regarding the survivors' handling and perception of time were found: (1) cancer disrupts......AIM: This paper reports a study to explore how cancer survivors talk about, experience and manage time in everyday life. BACKGROUND: There is an increasing interest in specific physical and psychosocial aspects of life after cancer diagnosis and treatment, but hardly any research follows cancer...

  1. Internet Use and Breast Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhamad, Mazanah; Afshari, Mojgan; Mohamed, Nor Aini

    2011-01-01

    A survey was administered to 400 breast cancer survivors at hospitals and support group meetings in Peninsular Malaysia to explore their level of Internet use and factors related to the Internet use by breast cancer survivors. Findings of this study indicated that about 22.5% of breast cancer survivors used Internet to get information about breast…

  2. Sexual functioning of cervical cancer survivors: a review with a female perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammerink, Ellen A G; de Bock, Geertruida H; Pras, Elisabeth; Reyners, Anna K L; Mourits, Marian J E

    2012-08-01

    Sex is an important, often deteriorated, dimension of quality of life after cancer treatment. We conducted a systematic review on sexual functioning of cervical cancer survivors. Studies between January 1988 and April 2010 were rated on their internal validity. Results were analyzed focusing on four major categories of sexual functioning: desire, arousal, orgasm, pain. Comparisons were made between healthy controls versus cervical cancer survivors, survivors before versus after treatment and between different treatment modalities. Twenty studies were included. Most studies showed no differences in the ability to achieve an orgasm. Cervical cancer survivors reported more dyspareunia than healthy controls and dyspareunia was more frequent and lasted longer after radiotherapy. Lack of lubrication was more frequent in cervical cancer survivors and a significant decrease in sexual interest and activity after treatment was found. Cervical cancer survivors are at risk for sexual pain disorders, while sexual satisfaction (orgasm) is not impaired and radiotherapy negatively influenced sexual pain disorders. Health care providers should inform cervical cancer survivors about the possible risk of developing sexual pain disorders after cervical cancer treatment, especially after radiotherapy. As sexual satisfaction per se is not impaired, we suggest that prevention and treatment of sexual dysfunction should focus on painless and satisfactory sex instead of on resuming intercourse. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Rehabilitation interventions for cancer survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Helle Ploug; Tjørnhøj-Thomsen, Tine; Johansen, Christoffer

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Today more and more people survive cancer. Cancer survivors need help to recover both from the cancer and the treatment. Rehabilitative interventions have been set up to meet their needs. However, there are studies that report no major effects following careful, targeted intervention...... parameters in rehabilitation courses for cancer survivors in Denmark. METHODS: The study was based on an ethnographic fieldwork with participant observation at nine week-long courses, on in-depth interviews and on written sources. Fieldwork is well-suited for studying interventions in context, such as social...

  4. Survivor care for pediatric cancer survivors: a continuously evolving discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Record, Elizabeth O; Meacham, Lillian R

    2015-07-01

    This article summarizes recent findings regarding the prevalence of chronic health conditions, cardiovascular and pulmonary late effects, and second malignancies in childhood cancer survivors (CCSs), and examines facilitators and barriers to survivor care. The estimated cumulative prevalence for a serious chronic disease in CCSs is 80% by age 45. The crude prevalence for cardiac conditions is 56.4% and for pulmonary dysfunction is 65.2%. Research in cardio-oncology is focused on better methods of predicting risk for cardiac dysfunction, and better methods of detection and interventions to prevent cardiac late effects. Pulmonary late effects, recognized to be a significant cause of late mortality, were detected by surveillance tests in more than 50% of CCSs but are often subclinical. Rates of subsequent malignant neoplasm continue to increase as the population ages. All of these factors make it clear that life-long surveillance is required and models of care should consider risk for late effects and socioeconomic and patient-specific factors. It is becoming clear that there is no age after which the occurrence of late effects plateaus and surveillance can be reduced. Survivors should be empowered to advocate for their survivor care and options for follow-up should be tailored to their needs.

  5. Health Behaviors of Childhood Cancer Survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer S. Ford

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available There has been a dramatic increase in the number of childhood cancer survivors living to an old age due to improved cancer treatments. However, these survivors are at risk of numerous late effects as a result of their cancer therapy. Engaging in protective health behaviors and limiting health damaging behaviors are vitally important for these survivors given their increased risks. We reviewed the literature on childhood cancer survivors’ health behaviors by searching for published data and conference proceedings. We examine the prevalence of a variety of health behaviors among childhood cancer survivors, identify significant risk factors, and describe health behavior interventions for survivors.

  6. Psychosexual functioning of childhood cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, E M; van Dulmen-den Broeder, E; Kaspers, G J L; van Dam, E W C M; Braam, K I; Huisman, J

    2008-05-01

    The objective of the study is to explore psychosexual functioning and its relationship with quality of life in survivors of cancer in childhood. Sixty childhood cancer survivors completed two questionnaires: psychosexual and social functioning questionnaire and MOS-SF-36. Psychosexual problems were frequent. About 20% of the survivors felt a limitation in their sexual life due to their illness. Older survivors (> or =25 years) had significantly less experience with sexual intercourse than their age-matched peers in the Dutch population (p = 0.010). Survivors treated in adolescence had a delay in achieving psychosexual milestones compared with those treated in childhood: dating (ppsychosexual problems compared with survivors without these problems. In this cohort of childhood cancer survivors, psychosexual problems were frequent. Treatment in adolescence is a risk factor for a delay in psychosexual development. (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Exercise Equipment: Neutral Buoyancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shackelford, Linda; Valle, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Load Bearing Equipment for Neutral Buoyancy (LBE-NB) is an exercise frame that holds two exercising subjects in position as they apply counter forces to each other for lower extremity and spine loading resistance exercises. Resistance exercise prevents bone loss on ISS, but the ISS equipment is too massive for use in exploration craft. Integrating the human into the load directing, load generating, and motion control functions of the exercise equipment generates safe exercise loads with less equipment mass and volume.

  8. Nutritional interventions for survivors of childhood cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jennifer E; Wakefield, Claire E; Cohn, Richard J

    2016-08-22

    2012). We included all randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared the effects of a nutritional intervention with a control group which did not receive the intervention in this review. Participants were childhood cancer survivors of any age, diagnosed with any type of cancer when less than 18 years of age. Participating childhood cancer survivors had completed their treatment with curative intent prior to the intervention. Two review authors independently selected and extracted data from each identified study, using a standardised form. We assessed the validity of each identified study using the criteria outlined in the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. We used the GRADE criteria to assess the quality of each trial. Three RCTs were eligible for review. A total of 616 participants were included in the analysis. One study included participants who had been treated for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) (275 participants). Two studies included participants who had all forms of paediatric malignancies (266 and 75 participants). All participants were less than 21 years of age at study entry. The follow-up ranged from one month to 36 months from the initial assessment. All intended outcomes were not evaluated by each included study. All studies looked at different interventions, and so we were unable to pool results. We could not rule out the presence of bias in any of the studies.There was no clear evidence of a difference in calcium intake at one month between those who received the single, half-day, group-based education that focused on bone health, and those who received standard care (mean difference (MD) 111.60, 95% confidence interval (CI) -258.97 to 482.17; P = 0.56, low quality evidence). A regression analysis, adjusting for baseline calcium intake and changes in knowledge and self-efficacy, showed a significantly greater calcium intake for the intervention as compared with the control group at the one-month follow-up (beta

  9. Survivor-Victim Status, Attachment, and Sudden Death Bereavement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Mark D.; Greenwald, Jason Y.

    1991-01-01

    Examined significance of survivor-victim relationship in understanding grief following sudden death bereavement by suicide or accident. Results showed that survivor-victim attachment was more important than survivor status (parent versus sibling/child) in explaining grief reactions. Compared to accident survivors, suicide survivors experienced…

  10. Psychosocial Outcomes in Adult Survivors of Retinoblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Jennifer S.; Chou, Joanne F.; Sklar, Charles A.; Oeffinger, Kevin C.; Novetsky Friedman, Danielle; McCabe, Mary; Robison, Leslie L.; Kleinerman, Ruth A.; Li, Yuelin; Marr, Brian P.; Abramson, David H.; Dunkel, Ira J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Survival rates for individuals diagnosed with retinoblastoma (RB) exceed 95% in the United States; however, little is known about the long-term psychosocial outcomes of these survivors. Patients and Methods Adult RB survivors, diagnosed from 1932 to 1994 and treated in New York, completed a comprehensive questionnaire adapted from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS), by mail or telephone. Psychosocial outcomes included psychological distress, anxiety, depression, somatization, fear of cancer recurrence, satisfaction with facial appearance, post-traumatic growth, and post-traumatic stress symptoms; noncancer CCSS siblings served as a comparison group. Results A total of 470 RB survivors (53.6% with bilateral RB; 52.1% female) and 2,820 CCSS siblings were 43.3 (standard deviation [SD], 11) years and 33.2 (SD, 8.4) years old at the time of study, respectively. After adjusting for sociodemographic factors, RB survivors did not have significantly higher rates of depression, somatization, distress, or anxiety compared with CCSS siblings. Although RB survivors were more likely to report post-traumatic stress symptoms of avoidance and/or hyperarousal (both P < .01), only five (1.1%) of 470 met criteria for post-traumatic stress disorder. Among survivors, having a chronic medical condition did not increase the likelihood of psychological problems. Bilateral RB survivors were more likely than unilateral RB survivors to experience fears of cancer recurrence (P < .01) and worry about their children being diagnosed with RB (P < .01). However, bilateral RB survivors were no more likely to report depression, anxiety, or somatic complaints than unilateral survivors. Conclusion Most RB survivors do not have poorer psychosocial functioning compared with a noncancer sample. In addition, bilateral and unilateral RB survivors seem similar with respect to their psychological symptoms. PMID:26417002

  11. Space Heating Equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafferty, Kevin D.

    1998-01-01

    The performance evaluation of space heating equipment for a geothermal application is generally considered from either of two perspectives: (a) selecting equipment for installation in new construction, or (b) evaluating the performance and retrofit requirements of an existing system. With regard to new construction, the procedure is relatively straightforward. Once the heating requirements are determined, the process need only involve the selection of appropriately sized hot water heating equipment based on the available water temperature. It is important to remember that space heating equipment for geothermal applications is the same equipment used in non-geothermal applications. What makes geothermal applications unique is that the equipment is generally applied at temperatures and flow rates that depart significantly from traditional heating system design. This chapter presents general considerations for the performance of heating equipment at non-standard temperature and flow conditions, retrofit of existing systems, and aspects of domestic hot water heating.

  12. Renewal of radiological equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    In this century, medical imaging is at the heart of medical practice. Besides providing fast and accurate diagnosis, advances in radiology equipment offer new and previously non-existing options for treatment guidance with quite low morbidity, resulting in the improvement of health outcomes and quality of life for the patients. Although rapid technological development created new medical imaging modalities and methods, the same progress speed resulted in accelerated technical and functional obsolescence of the same medical imaging equipment, consequently creating a need for renewal. Older equipment has a high risk of failures and breakdowns, which might cause delays in diagnosis and treatment of the patient, and safety problems both for the patient and the medical staff. The European Society of Radiology is promoting the use of up-to-date equipment, especially in the context of the EuroSafe Imaging Campaign, as the use of up-to-date equipment will improve quality and safety in medical imaging. Every healthcare institution or authority should have a plan for medical imaging equipment upgrade or renewal. This plan should look forward a minimum of 5 years, with annual updates. Teaching points • Radiological equipment has a definite life cycle span, resulting in unavoidable breakdown and decrease or loss of image quality which renders equipment useless after a certain time period.• Equipment older than 10 years is no longer state-of-the art equipment and replacement is essential. Operating costs of older equipment will be high when compared with new equipment, and sometimes maintenance will be impossible if no spare parts are available.• Older equipment has a high risk of failure and breakdown, causing delays in diagnosis and treatment of the patient and safety problems both for the patient and the medical staff.• Every healthcare institution or authority should have a plan for medical imaging equipment upgrade or replacement. This plan should look forward a

  13. Patterns of unmet needs in adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer survivors: in their own words.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Alex W K; Chang, Ting-Ting; Christopher, Katrina; Lau, Stephen C L; Beaupin, Lynda K; Love, Brad; Lipsey, Kim L; Feuerstein, Michael

    2017-12-01

    Categorization of the needs of AYA cancer survivors is primarily based on quantitative analyses of epidemiological and observational research. The present study classified the phenomenological experiences of AYA survivors based on their own language. A systematic approach for selecting qualitative studies of unmet needs in AYA cancer survivors was used. Following selection based on quality, survivor statements were entered verbatim and thematic analysis was conducted using NVivo qualitative research software. A total of 1993 AYA cancer survivors (post-treatment) were included in 58 studies (78% individual interviews). Mean age was 27.6 with an average of 8.6 years post-primary treatment. The organizational framework reported in this study was based on a heterogeneous group of cancer types. Thirteen themes including symptoms, function, reproductive health, emotional well-being, health management, health care system, social interaction, romantic relationships, cancer disclosure, normalcy, career development and employment, and school and fiscal concerns were identified. Forty-eight subthemes were also identified covering such areas as fertility, integrative health services, advice for cancer disclosure, family interaction, and insurance challenges. Direct analysis of text identified many common unmet needs similarly reported in the quantitative literature. The phenomenological data also provided a breakdown of unmet needs into subthemes or elements of unmet needs. This information can help form the basis for a personalized, valid, and reliable evaluation tool of the range of unmet needs in AYA survivors.

  14. Daily life physical activity in long-term survivors of nephroblastoma and neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Waas, Marjolein; Wijnen, Mark; Hartman, Annelies; de Vries, Andrica C H; Pieters, Rob; Neggers, Sebastian J C M M; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M

    2013-07-01

    The risk of metabolic late effects after childhood cancer, such as obesity, hypertension, and diabetes, can be positively influenced by a healthy lifestyle with sufficient physical activity. Nevertheless, studies on physical activity in adult survivors of childhood cancer are scarce and involve different and often nonvalidated questionnaires. We used the Short QUestionnaire to ASsess Health-enhancing physical activity (SQUASH), which was developed and validated to assess daily life physical activity in the Dutch adult population. The aim of the study was to assess daily life physical activity in Dutch adult long-term nephroblastoma and neuroblastoma survivors. Sixty-seven nephroblastoma and 36 neuroblastoma survivors (median age, 30 y; range, 18 to 51 y) and 60 sociodemographically similar healthy control subjects (median age, 32 y; range, 18 to 62 y) were asked to complete the SQUASH during their regular follow-up visit. The adjusted mean physical activity score in male neuroblastoma survivors (mean, 7155; P=0.004) was significantly lower than in male controls (mean, 10,574), whereas it was not significantly lower in male nephroblastoma survivors (mean, 9122; P=0.108). Adjusted means for physical activity scores in females were not different from their controls. In conclusions, male neuroblastoma survivors were identified as performing less daily physical activity.

  15. Managing chronic pain in survivors of torture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amris, Kirstine; Williams, Amanda C de C

    2015-01-01

    and welfare problems; persistent pain in the musculoskeletal system is one of the most common. There is little specific evidence on pain in survivors of torture; the guidelines on interdisciplinary specialist management are applicable. Most of the literature on refugee survivors of torture has an exclusive...... focus on psychological disorders, with particularly poor understanding of pain problems. This article summarizes the current status of assessment and treatment of pain problems in the torture survivor....

  16. Sexual Function and Health-Related Quality of Life in Long-Term Rectal Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Virginia; Grant, Marcia; Wendel, Christopher S; McMullen, Carmit K; Bulkley, Joanna E; Herrinton, Lisa J; Hornbrook, Mark C; Krouse, Robert S

    2016-07-01

    Sexual dysfunction is a treatment sequela in survivors of rectal cancer (RC). Differences in health-related quality of life (HRQOL) can occur based on ostomy status (permanent ostomy vs anastomosis). To describe alterations in sexual function and HRQOL based on ostomy status in long-term (≥5 years) survivors of RC. Survivors of RC with an ostomy (n = 181) or anastomosis (n = 394) were surveyed using validated HRQOL and functional status tools. We compared sexuality outcomes between the ostomy and anastomosis groups and reported differences adjusted for clinical and demographic characteristics. Qualitative data from one open-ended question on survivors' greatest challenges since their surgery were analyzed to explore sexuality, symptoms, and relationships. Whether sexually active, satisfaction with sexual activity, and select sexual dysfunction items from the Modified City of Hope Quality of Life-Colorectal. Survivors with a permanent ostomy were more likely to have been sexually inactive after surgery if it occurred before 2000 and experience dissatisfaction with appearance, interference with personal relationships and intimacy, and lower overall HRQOL. Female survivors of RC with an ostomy were more likely to have problems with vaginal strictures and vaginal pain after surgery that persisted at the time of the survey (≥5 years later). Radiation treatment, tumor stage, soilage of garments in bed, and higher Charlson-Deyo comorbidity scores were negatively associated with outcomes. Six qualitative themes emerged: loss of and decreased sexual activity, psychological issues with sexual activity, physical issues with sexual activity, partner rejection, ostomy interference with sexual activity, and positive experiences with sexuality. Sexual dysfunction is a common long-term sequela of RC treatment, with more problems observed in survivors with a permanent ostomy. This warrants widespread implementation of targeted interventions to manage sexual dysfunction and

  17. Medical equipment management

    CERN Document Server

    Willson, Keith; Tabakov, Slavik

    2013-01-01

    Know What to Expect When Managing Medical Equipment and Healthcare Technology in Your Organization As medical technology in clinical care becomes more complex, clinical professionals and support staff must know how to keep patients safe and equipment working in the clinical environment. Accessible to all healthcare professionals and managers, Medical Equipment Management presents an integrated approach to managing medical equipment in healthcare organizations. The book explains the underlying principles and requirements and raises awareness of what needs to be done and what questions to ask. I

  18. The Cancer Worry Scale: detecting fear of recurrence in breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custers, José A E; van den Berg, Sanne W; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W M; Bleiker, Eveline M A; Gielissen, Marieke F M; Prins, Judith B

    2014-01-01

    In 9% to 34% of cancer patients, the fear of cancer recurrence becomes so overwhelming that it affects quality of life. Clinicians need a brief questionnaire with a cutoff point that is able to differentiate between high- and low-fearful survivors. This study investigated if the Cancer Worry Scale (CWS) could serve as an instrument to detect high levels of fear of recurrence in female breast cancer survivors. One hundred ninety-four female breast cancer patients were assessed up to 11 years after their primary treatment for cancer. The women returned the questionnaires including the 8-item CWS, 2 items of the Cancer Acceptance Scale, the Checklist Individual Strength-Fatigue subscale, and the Cancer Empowerment Questionnaire. A cutoff score of 13 versus 14 (low: ≤13, high: ≥14) on the CWS was optimal for detecting severe levels of fear of recurrence. A cutoff score of 11 versus 12 (low: ≤11, high: ≥12) was optimal for screening. The Cronbach α coefficient of the CWS was .87; evidence to support the convergent and divergent validity of the CWS was also obtained. The CWS is able to detect high levels of fear of recurrence. The CWS is a reliable and valid questionnaire to assess fear of recurrence in breast cancer survivors. With the CWS, it is possible for nurses to screen breast cancer survivors for severe levels of fear of cancer recurrence. Thereby, nurses can screen and assist survivors in accessing appropriate and available support.

  19. Sexual functioning of cervical cancer survivors : A review with a female perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammerink, Ellen A. G.; de Bock, Geertruida H.; Pras, Elisabeth; Reyners, Anna K. L.; Mourits, Marian J. E.

    Objective: Sex is an important, often deteriorated, dimension of quality of life after cancer treatment. We conducted a systematic review on sexual functioning of cervical cancer survivors. Methods: Studies between January 1988 and April 2010 were rated on their internal validity. Results were

  20. The Use of Line Poetry as a Therapeutic Technique in Sexual Assault Survivors Support Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiney, Teresa J.

    2001-01-01

    Focuses on the use of line poetry as a therapeutic technique in a support group for survivors of sexual assault. Finds line poetry, a group activity in which members contribute lines to a collective poem, to be helpful in developing a bond among members, validating feelings, and offering a powerful outlet for self-expression. (SG)

  1. Cooling of electronic equipment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A. Kristensen, Anders Schmidt

    2003-01-01

    Cooling of electronic equipment is studied. The design size of electronic equipment decrease causing the thermal density to increase. This affect the cooling which can cause for example failures of critical components due to overheating or thermal induced stresses. Initially a pin fin heat sink...

  2. Interface transfer of equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashton, I.J.

    1989-04-01

    This article details the interface transfer of heavy-duty face equipment from 5's to 6's face in the Great Row Seam at Silverdale Colliery, British Coal, Western Area. The salvaged face was roofbolted using leg-mounted Wombat drilling rigs. All heavy-duty equipment was transported by FSV's. 5 figs.

  3. Outcome of paediatric intensive care survivors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoester, Hendrika; Grootenhuis, Martha A.; Bos, Albert P.

    2007-01-01

    The development of paediatric intensive care has contributed to the improved survival of critically ill children. Physical and psychological sequelae and consequences for quality of life (QoL) in survivors might be significant, as has been determined in adult intensive care unit (ICU) survivors.

  4. Increased health care use in cancer survivors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heins, M.J.; Rijken, P.M.; Schellevis, F.G.; Hoek, L. van der; Korevaar, J.C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: As the number of cancer survivors increases and these patients often experience long-lasting consequences of cancer and its treatment, more insight into primary health care use of cancer survivors is needed. We aimed to determine how often and for which reasons do adult cancer patients

  5. Increases health care use in cancer survivors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heins, M.J.; Rijken, P.M.; Schellevis, F.G.; Hoek, L. van der; Korevaar, J.C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: As the number of cancer survivors increases and these patients often experience longlasting consequences of cancer and its treatment, more insight into primary health care use of cancer survivors is needed. Research question: How often and for which reasons do adult cancer patients

  6. Orthostatic intolerance in survivors of childhood cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terlou, Annelinde; Ruble, Kathy; Stapert, Anne F.; Chang, Ho-Choong; Rowe, Peter C.; Schwartz, Cindy L.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the prevalence and severity of orthostatic intolerance in survivors of childhood cancer and in healthy controls, and to correlate results of self-reported measures of health status with orthostatic testing in survivors of childhood cancer. Patient and methods: Thirty-nine

  7. Marriage and divorce among childhood cancer survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Susanne Vinkel; Kejs, Anne Mette Tranberg; Engholm, Gerda

    2011-01-01

    Many childhood cancer survivors have psychosocial late effects. We studied the risks for cohabitation and subsequent separation. Through the Danish Cancer Register, we identified a nationwide, population-based cohort of all 1877 childhood cancer survivors born from 1965 to 1980, and in whom cancer...

  8. Marriage and divorce among childhood cancer survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Susanne Vinkel; Kejs, Anne Mette Tranberg; Engholm, Gerda

    2011-01-01

    Many childhood cancer survivors have psychosocial late effects. We studied the risks for cohabitation and subsequent separation. Through the Danish Cancer Register, we identified a nationwide, population-based cohort of all 1877 childhood cancer survivors born from 1965 to 1980, and in whom cance...

  9. Stigma and psychological distress in suicide survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scocco, Paolo; Preti, Antonio; Totaro, Stefano; Ferrari, Alessandro; Toffol, Elena

    2017-03-01

    Suicide bereavement is frequently related to clinically significant psychological distress and affected by stigma. This study was designed to evaluate the relationship between psychological distress by psychopathological domains and stigma, in a sample of individuals bereaved by suicide (suicide survivors). The data were collected between January 2012 and December 2014 and included information on sociodemographic variables (gender, age, marital status and education level) and responses to the Stigma of Suicide Survivor scale (STOSSS) and the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI). One hundred and fifty-five suicide survivors completed the evaluation and were included in the study. Levels of psychological distress in suicide survivors, as measured by BSI, were positively related to levels of perceived stigma toward suicide survivors, as measured by STOSSS. The association was not affected by age and gender, or by marital status, education level, days from suicide or a personal history of suicide attempt. Participants with higher scores on almost all subscales of the BSI, particularly the interpersonal sensitivity and paranoid ideation subscales, reported the highest levels of perceived stigma toward suicide survivors. Levels of distress in subjects bereaved by the suicide of a relative or friend were positively associated with levels of perceived stigma toward suicide survivors. Specific interventions dedicated to the bereavement of suicide survivors might help to alleviate not only psychological distress but also stigma towards loss by suicide. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Health-related quality of life and utility scores in short-term survivors of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Litsenburg, Raphaële R L; Huisman, Jaap; Raat, Hein; Kaspers, Gertjan J L; Gemke, Reinoud J B J

    2013-04-01

    Increase of survival in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has made outcomes such as health-related quality of life (HRQL) and economic burden more important. To make informed decisions on the use of healthcare resources, costs as well as utilities need to be taken into account. Among the preference-based HRQL instruments, the Health Utilities Index (HUI) is the most employed in pediatric cancer. Information on utility scores during ALL treatment and in long-term survivors is available, but utility scores in short-term survivors are lacking. This study assesses utility scores, health state, and HRQL in short-term (6 months to 4 years) ALL survivors. Cross-sectional single-center cohort study of short-term ALL survivors using HUI3 proxy assessments. Thirty-three survivors (median 1.5 years off treatment) reported 14 unique health states. The majority of survivors (61 %) enjoyed a perfect health, but 21 % had three affected attributes. Overall, HRQL was nonsignificantly lower compared to the norm, although the difference was large and may be clinically relevant. Cognition was significantly impaired (p = 0.03). Although 61 % of short-term survivors of ALL report no impairment, the health status of the other patients lead to a clinically important impaired HRQL compared to norms. Prospective studies assessing utility scores associated with pediatric ALL should be performed, enabling valid and reliable cost-utility analyses for policy makers to make informed decisions.

  11. [Medical Equipment Maintenance Methods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongbin

    2015-09-01

    Due to the high technology and the complexity of medical equipment, as well as to the safety and effectiveness, it determines the high requirements of the medical equipment maintenance work. This paper introduces some basic methods of medical instrument maintenance, including fault tree analysis, node method and exclusive method which are the three important methods in the medical equipment maintenance, through using these three methods for the instruments that have circuit drawings, hardware breakdown maintenance can be done easily. And this paper introduces the processing methods of some special fault conditions, in order to reduce little detours in meeting the same problems. Learning is very important for stuff just engaged in this area.

  12. Education, employment and marriage in long-term survivors of teenage and young adult cancer compared with healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mader, Luzius; Vetsch, Janine; Christen, Salome; Baenziger, Julia; Roser, Katharina; Dehler, Silvia; Michel, Gisela

    2017-03-21

    Teenage and young adult (TYA) cancer patients are faced with the diagnosis during a challenging period of psychosocial development that may affect social outcomes in the long term. Therefore, we aimed to: (1) determine differences in social outcomes between long-term TYA cancer survivors and healthy controls and (2) identify factors associated with adverse social outcomes. We sent a questionnaire to TYA cancer survivors (aged 16-25 years at diagnosis, 5 years after diagnosis) registered in the Cancer Registry Zurich and Zug. Information on controls was obtained from the Swiss Health Survey 2012. We assessed educational achievement, employment status, marital status and life partnership (survivors only), and compared these outcomes between survivors and controls. We used logistic regression to identify sociodemographic and cancer-related factors associated with social outcomes. We included 160 TYA cancer survivors and 999 controls. Educational achievement of survivors differed significantly from controls (p = 0.012): more survivors than controls reported upper secondary education (33 vs 27%) and fewer survivors reported university education (12 vs 21%). No significant differences were found for employment (p = 0.515) and marital status (p = 0.357). The majority of survivors (91%) and controls (90%) were employed, and 37% of survivors were married, compared with 41% of controls. There were no cancer-related factors associated with having only basic education. Unemployment was associated with younger age at diagnosis (odds ratio [OR] 5.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.3-30.8) and self-reported late effects (OR 4.7, 95% CI 1.3-19.5). Survivors of younger age at diagnosis were more likely not to be married (OR 2.7, 95% CI 1.3-5.7) and not to have a life partner (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.0-5.2). Our findings indicate that TYA cancer survivors completed applied higher education rather than a university education. Future studies including larger samples of TYA cancer survivors

  13. Unemployment among adult survivors of childhood cancer: a report from the childhood cancer survivor study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchhoff, Anne C; Leisenring, Wendy; Krull, Kevin R; Ness, Kirsten K; Friedman, Debra L; Armstrong, Gregory T; Stovall, Marilyn; Park, Elyse R; Oeffinger, Kevin C; Hudson, Melissa M; Robison, Leslie L; Wickizer, Thomas

    2010-11-01

    Adult childhood cancer survivors report high levels of unemployment, although it is unknown whether this is because of health or employability limitations. We examined 2 employment outcomes from 2003 in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS): (1) health-related unemployment and (2) unemployed but seeking work. We compared survivors with a nearest-age CCSS sibling cohort and examined demographic and treatment-related risk groups for each outcome. We studied 6339 survivors and 1967 siblings ≥25 years of age excluding those unemployed by choice. Multivariable generalized linear models evaluated whether survivors were more likely to be unemployed than siblings and whether certain survivors were at a higher risk for unemployment. Survivors (10.4%) reported health-related unemployment more often than siblings (1.8%; Relative Risk [RR], 6.07; 95% Confidence Interval [CI], 4.32-8.53). Survivors (5.7%) were more likely to report being unemployed but seeking work than siblings (2.7%; RR, 1.90; 95% CI, 1.43-2.54). Health-related unemployment was more common in female survivors than males (Odds Ratio [OR], 1.73; 95% CI, 1.43-2.08). Cranial radiotherapy doses ≥25 Gy were associated with higher odds of unemployment (health-related: OR, 3.47; 95% CI, 2.54-4.74; seeking work: OR, 1.77; 95% CI, 1.15-2.71). Unemployed survivors reported higher levels of poor physical functioning than employed survivors, and had lower education and income and were more likely to be publicly insured than unemployed siblings. Childhood cancer survivors have higher levels of unemployment because of health or being between jobs. High-risk survivors may need vocational assistance.

  14. Long-term outcome in survivors of neonatal tetanus following specialist intensive care in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trieu, Huynh T; Anh, Nguyen Thi Kim; Vuong, Huynh Ngoc Thien; Dao, T T M; Hoa, Nguyen Thi Xuan; Tuong, Vo Ngoc Cat; Dinh, Pham Tam; Wills, Bridget; Qui, Phan Tu; Van Tan, Le; Yen, Lam Minh; Sabanathan, Saraswathy; Thwaites, Catherine Louise

    2017-09-25

    Neonatal tetanus continues to occur in many resource-limited settings but there are few data regarding long-term neurological outcome from the disease, especially in settings with critical care facilities. We assessed long-term outcome following neonatal tetanus in infants treated in a pediatric intensive care unit in southern Vietnam. Neurological and neurodevelopmental testing was performed in 17 survivors of neonatal tetanus and 18 control children from the same communities using tools previously validated in Vietnamese children. The median age of children assessed was 36 months. Eight neonatal tetanus survivors and 9 community control cases aged < 42 months were tested using the Bayley III Scales of Infant and Toddler Development (Bayley III-VN) and 8 neonatal tetanus survivors and 9 community controls aged ≥42 months were tested using the Movement Assessment Battery for Children. No significant reductions in growth indices or neurodevelopmental scores were shown in survivors of neonatal tetanus compared to controls although there was a trend towards lower scores in neonatal tetanus survivors. Neurological examination was normal in all children except for two neonatal tetanus survivors with perceptive deafness and one child with mild gross motor abnormality. Neonatal tetanus survivors who had expienced severe disease (Ablett grade ≥ 3) had lower total Bayley III-VN scores than those with mild disease (15 (IQR 14-18) vs 24 (IQR 19-27), p = 0.05) with a significantly lower cognitive domain score (3 (IQR 2-6) severe disease vs 7 (IQR 7-8) mild disease, p = 0.02). Neonatal tetanus is associated with long-term sequelae in those with severe disease. In view of these findings, prevention of neonatal tetanus should remain a priority.

  15. Sexual Function and Health-Related Quality of Life in Long-Term Rectal Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Virginia; Grant, Marcia; Wendel, Christopher S.; McMullen, Carmit K.; Bulkley, Joanna E.; Herrinton, Lisa J.; Hornbrook, Mark C.; Krouse, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Sexual dysfunction is a treatment sequela in rectal cancer (RC) survivors. Differences in health-related quality of life (HRQOL) may occur based on ostomy status (permanent ostomy versus anastomosis). Aim To describe alterations in sexual function and HRQOL based on ostomy status in long-term (≥ 5 years) RC survivors. Methods RC survivors with an ostomy (N=181) or anastomosis (N=394) were surveyed using validated HRQOL and functional status tools. We compared sexuality outcomes between the ostomy and anastomosis group, and reported differences adjusted for clinical and demographic characteristics. Qualitative data from one open-ended question on survivors’ greatest challenges since their surgery were analyzed to explore sexuality, symptoms, and relationships. Main Outcome Measures Whether sexually active, satisfaction with sexual activity, and select sexual dysfunction items from the Modified City of Hope Quality of Life-Ostomy (mCOH-QOL-O). Results Survivors with a permanent ostomy were more likely to have been sexually inactive after surgery if it occurred before year 2000, and experience dissatisfaction with appearance, interference with personal relationships and intimacy, and lower overall HRQOL. Female RC survivors with an ostomy were more likely to have problems with vaginal strictures and vaginal pain after surgery that persisted at the time of survey (5+ years later). Radiation treatment, tumor stage, soilage of garments in bed, and higher Charlson-Deyo co-morbidity scores were negatively associated with outcomes. Six qualitative themes emerged: loss of and decreased sexual activity; psychological issues with sexual activity, physical issues with sexual activity; partner rejection; ostomy interference with sexual activity; and positive experiences with sexuality. Conclusions Sexual dysfunction is a common long-term sequela of RC treatment, with more problems observed in survivors with a permanent ostomy. This warrants widespread

  16. Outdoor Leadership Considerations with Women Survivors of Sexual Abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitten, Denise; Dutton, Rosalind

    1993-01-01

    Emphasizes the importance of leader awareness of the discomfort and need for emotional safety that may surface for women survivors of sexual abuse during an outdoor experience. Discusses survivor's self-perception and how this affects the outdoor experience; the impact of natural elements on survivors; and how to help survivors develop coping…

  17. 20 CFR 225.21 - Survivor Tier I PIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... INSURANCE AMOUNT DETERMINATIONS PIA's Used in Computing Survivor Annuities and the Amount of the Residual Lump-Sum Payable § 225.21 Survivor Tier I PIA. The Survivor Tier I PIA is used in computing the tier I component of a survivor annuity. This PIA is determined in accordance with section 215 of the Social...

  18. Association of Attention Deficit Disorder With Bedside Anti-saccades in Survivors of Childhood Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Raja B; Hudson, Melissa M; Ness, Kirsten K; Liang, Zhu; Srivastava, Deokumar; Krull, Kevin R

    2016-02-01

    Impaired attention is well recognized in childhood cancer survivors. We prospectively evaluated 162 long-term survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia to study an association between presence of neurologic soft signs as measured by Zurich Neuromotor Scale, bedside evaluation of anti-saccades, and attention deficit disorder. Attention deficit disorder was recognized in 10.5% of the study cohort. We did not find an association of attention deficit with presence of any soft sign. However, there was an association between presence of abnormal anti-saccades and attention deficit (P = .04). These results will require further validation and if confirmed may introduce a quick bedside method of assessing impaired attention in cancer survivors. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. Electronic equipment packaging technology

    CERN Document Server

    Ginsberg, Gerald L

    1992-01-01

    The last twenty years have seen major advances in the electronics industry. Perhaps the most significant aspect of these advances has been the significant role that electronic equipment plays in almost all product markets. Even though electronic equipment is used in a broad base of applications, many future applications have yet to be conceived. This versatility of electron­ ics has been brought about primarily by the significant advances that have been made in integrated circuit technology. The electronic product user is rarely aware of the integrated circuits within the equipment. However, the user is often very aware of the size, weight, mod­ ularity, maintainability, aesthetics, and human interface features of the product. In fact, these are aspects of the products that often are instrumental in deter­ mining its success or failure in the marketplace. Optimizing these and other product features is the primary role of Electronic Equipment Packaging Technology. As the electronics industry continues to pr...

  20. How health care providers help battered women: the survivor's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbert, B; Abercrombie, P; Caspers, N; Love, C; Bronstone, A

    1999-01-01

    This qualitative study aimed to describe, from the perspective of domestic violence survivors, what helped victims in health care encounters improve their situation and thus their health, and how disclosure to and identification by health care providers were related to these helpful experiences. Semi-structured, open-ended interviews were conducted with a purposeful sample of survivors in the San Francisco Bay Area. Data were analyzed using constant comparative techniques and interpretative processes. Twenty-five women were interviewed, the majority being white and middle-class, with some college education. Two overlapping phenomena related to helpful experiences emerged: (1) the complicated dance of disclosure by victims and identification by health care providers, and (2) the power of receiving validation (acknowledgment of abuse and confirmation of patient worth) from a health care provider. The women described a range of disclosure and identification behaviors from direct to indirect or tacit. They also described how-with or without direct identification or disclosure-validation provided "relief," "comfort," "planted a seed," and "started the wheels turning" toward changing the way they perceived their situations, and moving them toward safety. Our data suggest that if health care providers suspect domestic violence, they should not depend on direct disclosure, but rather assume that the patient is being battered, acknowledge that battering is wrong, and confirm the patient's worth. Participants described how successful validation may take on tacit forms that do not jeopardize patient safety. After validating the patient's situation and worth, we suggest health care providers document the abuse and plan with the patient for safety, while offering ongoing validation, support, and referrals.

  1. Marriage and divorce among childhood cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Susanne Vinkel; Kejs, Anne Mette Tranberg; Engholm, Gerda; Møller, Henrik; Johansen, Christoffer; Schmiegelow, Kjeld

    2011-10-01

    Many childhood cancer survivors have psychosocial late effects. We studied the risks for cohabitation and subsequent separation. Through the Danish Cancer Register, we identified a nationwide, population-based cohort of all 1877 childhood cancer survivors born from 1965 to 1980, and in whom cancer was diagnosed between 1965 and 1996 before they were 20 years of age. A sex-matched and age-matched population-based control cohort was used for comparison (n=45,449). Demographic and socioeconomic data were obtained from national registers and explored by discrete-time Cox regression analyses. Childhood cancer survivors had a reduced rate of cohabitation [rate ratio (RR) 0.78; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.73-0.83], owing to lower rates among survivors of both noncentral nervous system (CNS) tumors (RR 0.88; 95% CI: 0.83-0.95) and CNS tumors (RR 0.52; 95% CI: 0.45-0.59). Male CNS tumor survivors had a nonsignificantly lower rate (RR 0.47; 95% CI: 0.38-0.58) than females (RR 0.56; 95% CI: 0.47-0.68). The rates of separation were almost identical to those of controls. In conclusion, the rate of cohabitation was lower for all childhood cancer survivors than for the population-based controls, with the most pronounced reduction among survivors of CNS tumors. Mental deficits after cranial irradiation are likely to be the major risk factor.

  2. Return to work and work-related disability among AML survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samadi, Osai; Breunis, Henriette; Sandoval, Joanna; Akilan, Kosalan; Timilshina, Narhari; Alibhai, Shabbir M H

    2017-10-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive, acute-onset hematological malignancy. Greater use of intensive chemotherapy (IC), supportive care, and stem cell transplantation have led to an increasing number of long-term survivors. Few studies have examined employment issues among AML survivors and to our knowledge, no study has examined the long-term effects of treatment on return to work. This study is the first to utilize a validated measure of work-related limitation and productivity (WLQ-16) to assess the long-term effects of AML treatment on employment rates, work-related limitations, and overall productivity. We examined RTW issues in 111 adult AML 1-year survivors after conventional IC. We found that, over time, the number of employed survivors increased (to 54% by 36 months) while the number of unemployed, retired, and sick leave patients decreased. Among those employed, the majority were employed full time. Employed individuals reported few work-related limitations and productivity loss scores were low, ranging from 3.47% at 18 months to 2.34% at 36 months. These data suggest that, over time, over half of AML survivors who underwent IC regain social, emotional, cognitive, and physical function sufficient to RTW with few limitations.

  3. STUDI KOMITMEN ORGANISASIONAL: PEKERJA CONTINGENT DAN SURVIVOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fenika Walani

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, contingent and survivor workers have emerged as a common reality in business activities. Unfortunately, contingent worker has high job insecurity on his employment status. On the other side, downsizing activities can result in decreasing job security of survivor worker. As a consequence, both contingent and survivor workers very potential have low organizational commitment. However, organizations still have an opportunity to give their workers an exclusive treatment for building organizational commitment without ignoring the fact that workers have other commitment foci.

  4. About Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Equipment for Infection Control Questions About Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... Print Q1. How do manufacturers ensure personal protective equipment (PPE) is safe and effective? A1. To help ...

  5. EPA’s Response Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA maintains a variety of equipment to respond to hazardous substance emergencies such as releases or oil spills regardless of their nature, size, or location. This include ASPECT, PHILIS, Equipment Module (EM), and personal protective equipment.

  6. Unemployment among breast cancer survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Kathrine; Ewertz, Marianne; Dalton, Susanne Oksbjerg

    2014-01-01

    AIM: Though about 20% of working age breast cancer survivors do not return to work after treatment, few studies have addressed risk factors for unemployment. The majority of studies on occupational consequences of breast cancer focus on non-employment, which is a mixture of sickness absence......, unemployment, retirement pensions and other reasons for not working. Unemployment in combination with breast cancer may represent a particular challenge for these women. The aim of the present study is therefore to analyze the risk for unemployment in the years following diagnosis and treatment for breast...... cancer. METHOD: This study included 14,750 women diagnosed with breast cancer in Denmark 2001-2009 identified through a population-based clinical database and linked with information from Danish administrative population based registers for information on labour market affiliation, socio...

  7. Prioritizing equipment for replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capuano, Mike

    2010-01-01

    It is suggested that clinical engineers take the lead in formulating evaluation processes to recommend equipment replacement. Their skill, knowledge, and experience, combined with access to equipment databases, make them a logical choice. Based on ideas from Fennigkoh's scheme, elements such as age, vendor support, accumulated maintenance cost, and function/risk were used.6 Other more subjective criteria such as cost benefits and efficacy of newer technology were not used. The element of downtime was also omitted due to the data element not being available. The resulting Periop Master Equipment List and its rationale was presented to the Perioperative Services Program Council. They deemed the criteria to be robust and provided overwhelming acceptance of the list. It was quickly put to use to estimate required capital funding, justify items already thought to need replacement, and identify high-priority ranked items for replacement. Incorporating prioritization criteria into an existing equipment database would be ideal. Some commercially available systems do have the basic elements of this. Maintaining replacement data can be labor-intensive regardless of the method used. There is usually little time to perform the tasks necessary for prioritizing equipment. However, where appropriate, a clinical engineering department might be able to conduct such an exercise as shown in the following case study.

  8. The Survivor Syndrome: Aftermath of Downsizing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelbaum, Steven H.; Delage, Claude; Labib, Nadia; Gault, George

    1997-01-01

    Downsizing can result in remaining staff developing "survivor syndrome," experiencing low morale, stress, and other psychosocial problems. If downsizing is necessary, precautions include managing perceptions and communications and empowering employees to take career ownership. (SK)

  9. Symptomatic and Palliative Care for Stroke Survivors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Creutzfeldt, Claire J; Holloway, Robert G; Walker, Melanie

    2012-01-01

    ... care needs of stroke survivors. Some of the most common and disabling post-stroke symptoms that are reviewed here include central post-stroke pain, hemiplegic shoulder pain, painful spasticity, fatigue, incontinence, post-stroke...

  10. Hopelessness Experience among Stroke Survivor in Semarang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawab Sawab

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hopelessness was a negative feelings about goal achievement and powerlessness feeling against an expectation. Hopelessness in stroke survivors can occur due to prolonged disability and neurologic defi cit. This condition can lead to emotional and mental disorders even a suicide action. Therefore, it was a need to explore hopelessness experience in stroke survivors. Method: This study was a qualitative descriptive phenomenology with 6 participants. Results: 7 themes were revealed in this study, (1 Physical changes as a response on hopelessness, (2 Loss response as a hopelessness stressor, (3 Dysfunction of the family process, (4 Loss of meaning of life, (5 Self support and motivation as a coping resource against hopelessness, (6 The spiritual meaning behind hopelessness, (7 Can go through a better life. Discussion: This study suggests to develop a nursing care standards in hopelessness, encourage a family support and family psychoeducation for stroke survivors. Keywords: Stroke survivor, hopelessness experiences, qualitative

  11. Equipment Operational Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenwalt, B; Henderer, B; Hibbard, W; Mercer, M

    2009-06-11

    The Iraq Department of Border Enforcement is rich in personnel, but poor in equipment. An effective border control system must include detection, discrimination, decision, tracking and interdiction, capture, identification, and disposition. An equipment solution that addresses only a part of this will not succeed, likewise equipment by itself is not the answer without considering the personnel and how they would employ the equipment. The solution should take advantage of the existing in-place system and address all of the critical functions. The solutions are envisioned as being implemented in a phased manner, where Solution 1 is followed by Solution 2 and eventually by Solution 3. This allows adequate time for training and gaining operational experience for successively more complex equipment. Detailed descriptions of the components follow the solution descriptions. Solution 1 - This solution is based on changes to CONOPs, and does not have a technology component. It consists of observers at the forts and annexes, forward patrols along the swamp edge, in depth patrols approximately 10 kilometers inland from the swamp, and checkpoints on major roads. Solution 2 - This solution adds a ground sensor array to the Solution 1 system. Solution 3 - This solution is based around installing a radar/video camera system on each fort. It employs the CONOPS from Solution 1, but uses minimal ground sensors deployed only in areas with poor radar/video camera coverage (such as canals and streams shielded by vegetation), or by roads covered by radar but outside the range of the radar associated cameras. This document provides broad operational requirements for major equipment components along with sufficient operational details to allow the technical community to identify potential hardware candidates. Continuing analysis will develop quantities required and more detailed tactics, techniques, and procedures.

  12. Outcome of paediatric intensive care survivors

    OpenAIRE

    Knoester, Hendrika; Grootenhuis, Martha A; Bos, Albert P.

    2007-01-01

    The development of paediatric intensive care has contributed to the improved survival of critically ill children. Physical and psychological sequelae and consequences for quality of life (QoL) in survivors might be significant, as has been determined in adult intensive care unit (ICU) survivors. Awareness of sequelae due to the original illness and its treatment may result in changes in treatment and support during and after the acute phase. To determine the current knowledge on physical and ...

  13. Increased health care use in cancer survivors.

    OpenAIRE

    Heins, M.J.; Rijken, P.M.; Schellevis, F.G.; Hoek, L. van der; Korevaar, J.C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: As the number of cancer survivors increases and these patients often experience long-lasting consequences of cancer and its treatment, more insight into primary health care use of cancer survivors is needed. We aimed to determine how often and for which reasons do adult cancer patients contact their Primary Care Physician (PCP) 2-5 years after diagnosis. Methods: Using data from the Netherlands Information Network of Primary Care (LINH), we determined the volume and diagnoses made...

  14. Increases health care use in cancer survivors.

    OpenAIRE

    Heins, M.J.; Rijken, P.M.; Schellevis, F.G.; Hoek, L. van der; Korevaar, J.C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: As the number of cancer survivors increases and these patients often experience longlasting consequences of cancer and its treatment, more insight into primary health care use of cancer survivors is needed. Research question: How often and for which reasons do adult cancer patients contact their Primary Care Physician (PCP) 2-5 years after diagnosis. Methods: Using data from the Netherlands Information Network of Primary Care (LINH), we determined the volume and diagnoses made dur...

  15. Survivor-Reaktionen im Downsizing-Kontext

    OpenAIRE

    Dietrich, Kristina

    2013-01-01

    Diese Arbeit untersucht die Reaktionen der nach einem Personalabbau (Downsizing) verbleibenden Mitarbeiter (Survivors) eines Unternehmens. Dabei werden die für die Ausbildung von positiven und negativen Survivor-Reaktionen als relevant angenommenen Antezedenzien in einem integrativen Rahmenmodell dargestellt und in ihren Zusammenhängen untersucht. Besonders ist dabei der metaanalytische Untersuchungsansatz, der statistisch fundierte und verlässliche Aussagen zu zentralen Zusammenhängen von Ev...

  16. Hopelessness Experience Among Stroke Survivor in Semarang

    OpenAIRE

    Sawab Sawab; Moch Bahrudin; Novy Helena Catharina Daulima

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Hopelessness was a negative feelings about goal achievement and powerlessness feeling against an expectation. Hopelessness in stroke survivors can occur due to prolonged disability and neurologic defi cit. This condition can lead to emotional and mental disorders even a suicide action. Therefore, it was a need to explore hopelessness experience in stroke survivors. Method: This study was a qualitative descriptive phenomenology with 6 participants. Results: 7 themes were revealed...

  17. Brief self-report measure of work-related cognitive limitations in breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottati, Alicia; Feuerstein, Michael

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop a brief, reliable self-report measure of work-related cognitive limitations in occupationally active breast cancer survivors. A pooled dataset of working breast cancer survivors (n = 228) completed a self-report measure of work-related cognitive limitations, the Cognitive Symptom Checklist-Work-59 (CSC-W59). A cross-validation technique was employed such that the pooled participants were randomized into two separate groups in order to conduct exploratory factor analysis (EFA) of the CSC-W59 with one group (n = 114) and confirm the results with the second group (n = 114). EFA of the CSC-W59 identified 21 items with a consistent factor loading of .4 or higher on three separate subscales (Working Memory, Executive Function, and Task Completion). These findings resulted in a 21-item, self-report measure referred to as the Cognitive Symptom Checklist-Work-21 (CSC-W21). The CSC-W21 demonstrated internal reliability (α = .88). Construct validity of the CSC-W21 is supported by significant positive correlations with cancer stage, job stress, and affective state. Brief, valid, internally reliable self-report measures such as the CSC-W21 may be used to quickly assess work-related cognitive problems for breast cancer survivors at work. A brief measure is available to help identify tasks that present problems for breast cancer survivors who are at work. This measure can be used to facilitate research to improve the understanding and mitigation of cognitive challenges in breast cancer survivors in the work setting.

  18. Development and validation of a real-time TaqMan assay for the detection and enumeration of Pseudomonas fluorescens ATCC 13525 used as a challenge organism in testing of food equipments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Ratul; Bestervelt, Lorelle L; Donofrio, Robert S

    2012-02-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens ATCC 13525 is used as the challenge organism to evaluate the efficacy of the clean-in-place (CIP) process of food equipment (automatic ice-maker) as per NSF/ANSI Standard 12. Traditional culturing methodology is presently used to determine the concentration of the challenge organism, which takes 48 h to confirm the cell density. Storage of the challenge preparation in the refrigerator might alter the cell density as P. fluorescens is capable of growing at 4 °C. Also, background organism can grow on the Pseudomonas F agar (PFA) used for the recovery of P. fluorescens thus affecting the results of the test. Real-time TaqMan assay targeting the cpn60 gene was developed for the enumeration and the identification of P. fluorescens because of its specificity, accuracy, and shorter turnaround time. The TaqMan primer-probe pair developed using the Allele ID® 7.0 probe design software was highly specific and sensitive for the target organism. The sensitivity of the assay was 10 colony forming units (CFU)/mL. The assay was also successful in determining the concentration of the challenge preparation within 2 h. Based on these observations, TaqMan assay targeting the cpn60 gene can be efficiently used for strain level identification and enumeration of bacteria. Pseudomonas fluorescens ATCC 13525 is used as a challenge organism in the efficacy testing of clean-in-place process of food equipments. Currently, culturing technique is used for its identification and estimation, which is not only time-consuming but also prone to error. Real-time TaqMan assay is more specific, sensitive, and accurate along with a shorter turnaround time compared to culturing techniques, thereby increasing the overall quality of the testing methodology to evaluate the clean-in-place process critical for the food industry to protect public health and safety. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  19. Proteomic profiles in acute respiratory distress syndrome differentiates survivors from non-survivors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maneesh Bhargava

    Full Text Available Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS continues to have a high mortality. Currently, there are no biomarkers that provide reliable prognostic information to guide clinical management or stratify risk among clinical trial participants. The objective of this study was to probe the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF proteome to identify proteins that differentiate survivors from non-survivors of ARDS. Patients were divided into early-phase (1 to 7 days and late-phase (8 to 35 days groups based on time after initiation of mechanical ventilation for ARDS (Day 1. Isobaric tags for absolute and relative quantitation (iTRAQ with LC MS/MS was performed on pooled BALF enriched for medium and low abundance proteins from early-phase survivors (n = 7, early-phase non-survivors (n = 8, and late-phase survivors (n = 7. Of the 724 proteins identified at a global false discovery rate of 1%, quantitative information was available for 499. In early-phase ARDS, proteins more abundant in survivors mapped to ontologies indicating a coordinated compensatory response to injury and stress. These included coagulation and fibrinolysis; immune system activation; and cation and iron homeostasis. Proteins more abundant in early-phase non-survivors participate in carbohydrate catabolism and collagen synthesis, with no activation of compensatory responses. The compensatory immune activation and ion homeostatic response seen in early-phase survivors transitioned to cell migration and actin filament based processes in late-phase survivors, revealing dynamic changes in the BALF proteome as the lung heals. Early phase proteins differentiating survivors from non-survivors are candidate biomarkers for predicting survival in ARDS.

  20. Proteomic Profiles in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Differentiates Survivors from Non-Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, Maneesh; Becker, Trisha L.; Viken, Kevin J.; Jagtap, Pratik D.; Dey, Sanjoy; Steinbach, Michael S.; Wu, Baolin; Kumar, Vipin; Bitterman, Peter B.; Ingbar, David H.; Wendt, Christine H.

    2014-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) continues to have a high mortality. Currently, there are no biomarkers that provide reliable prognostic information to guide clinical management or stratify risk among clinical trial participants. The objective of this study was to probe the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) proteome to identify proteins that differentiate survivors from non-survivors of ARDS. Patients were divided into early-phase (1 to 7 days) and late-phase (8 to 35 days) groups based on time after initiation of mechanical ventilation for ARDS (Day 1). Isobaric tags for absolute and relative quantitation (iTRAQ) with LC MS/MS was performed on pooled BALF enriched for medium and low abundance proteins from early-phase survivors (n = 7), early-phase non-survivors (n = 8), and late-phase survivors (n = 7). Of the 724 proteins identified at a global false discovery rate of 1%, quantitative information was available for 499. In early-phase ARDS, proteins more abundant in survivors mapped to ontologies indicating a coordinated compensatory response to injury and stress. These included coagulation and fibrinolysis; immune system activation; and cation and iron homeostasis. Proteins more abundant in early-phase non-survivors participate in carbohydrate catabolism and collagen synthesis, with no activation of compensatory responses. The compensatory immune activation and ion homeostatic response seen in early-phase survivors transitioned to cell migration and actin filament based processes in late-phase survivors, revealing dynamic changes in the BALF proteome as the lung heals. Early phase proteins differentiating survivors from non-survivors are candidate biomarkers for predicting survival in ARDS. PMID:25290099

  1. Pregnancy and Labor Complications in Female Survivors of Childhood Cancer: The British Childhood Cancer Survivor Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reulen, Raoul C; Bright, Chloe J; Winter, David L; Fidler, Miranda M; Wong, Kwok; Guha, Joyeeta; Kelly, Julie S; Frobisher, Clare; Edgar, Angela B; Skinner, Roderick; Wallace, W Hamish B; Hawkins, Mike M

    2017-11-01

    Female survivors of childhood cancer treated with abdominal radiotherapy who manage to conceive are at risk of delivering premature and low-birthweight offspring, but little is known about whether abdominal radiotherapy may also be associated with additional complications during pregnancy and labor. We investigated the risk of developing pregnancy and labor complications among female survivors of childhood cancer in the British Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (BCCSS). Pregnancy and labor complications were identified by linking the BCCSS cohort (n = 17 980) to the Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) for England. Relative risks (RRs) of pregnancy and labor complications were calculated by site of radiotherapy treatment (none/abdominal/cranial/other) and other cancer-related factors using log-binomial regression. All statistical tests were two-sided. A total of 2783 singleton pregnancies among 1712 female survivors of childhood cancer were identified in HES. Wilms tumor survivors treated with abdominal radiotherapy were at threefold risk of hypertension complicating pregnancy (relative risk = 3.29, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.29 to 4.71), while all survivors treated with abdominal radiotherapy were at risk of gestational diabetes mellitus (RR = 3.35, 95% CI = 1.41 to 7.93) and anemia complicating pregnancy (RR = 2.10, 95% CI = 1.27 to 3.46) compared with survivors treated without radiotherapy. Survivors treated without radiotherapy had similar risks of pregnancy and labor complications as the general population, except survivors were more likely to opt for an elective cesarean section (RR = 1.39, 95% CI = 1.16 to 1.70). Treatment with abdominal radiotherapy increases the risk of developing hypertension complicating pregnancy in Wilms tumor survivors, and diabetes mellitus and anemia complicating pregnancy in all survivors. These patients may require extra vigilance during pregnancy.

  2. Testimonial therapy. A pilot project to improve psychological wellbeing among survivors of torture in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agger, Inger; Raghuvanshi, Lenin; Shabana, Shirin; Polatin, Peter; Laursen, Laila K

    2009-01-01

    In developing countries where torture is perpetrated, there are few resources for the provision of therapeutic assistance to the survivors. The testimonial method represents a brief cross-cultural psychosocial approach to trauma, which is relatively easy to master. The method was first described in Chile in 1983 and has since been used in many variations in different cultural contexts. In this project the method has been supplemented by culture-specific coping strategies (meditation and a delivery ceremony). A pilot training project was undertaken between Rehabilitation and Research Centre for Torture victims (RCT) in Copenhagen, Denmark, and People's Vigilance Committee for Human Rights (PVCHR) in Varanasi, India, to investigate the usefulness of the testimonial method. The project involved the development of a community-based testimonial method, training of twelve PVCHR community workers, the development of a manual, and a monitoring and evaluation (M&E) system comparing results of measures before the intervention and two to three months after the intervention. Twenty-three victims gave their testimonies under supervision. In the two first sessions the testimony was written and in the third session survivors participated in a delivery ceremony. The human rights activists and community workers interviewed the survivors about how they felt after the intervention. After testimonial therapy, almost all survivors demonstrated significant improvements in overall WHO-five Well-being Index (WHO-5) score. Four out of the five individual items improved by at least 40%. Items from the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) showed less significant change, possibly because the M&E questionnaire had not been well understood by the community workers, or due to poor wording, formulation and/or validation of the questions. All survivors expressed satisfaction with the process, especially the public delivery ceremony, which apparently became a

  3. Psychosocial aspects of childhood cancer survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Jin Seo

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The majority of childhood cancer survivors and their families will be psychologically healthy, but may desire and benefit from preventive care. A significant portion of the survivor population will be psychosocially distressed in various aspects by their harsh experience of long cancer treatment, and may warrant professional intervention and treatment. Pediatricians should be aware of the late psychological effects that can occur a year or 2 after treatment, possibly in many aspects of a survivor's life. Not only the cancer diagnosis, but also treatments such as chemotherapy, irradiation, and surgical intervention may exert different long-term effects on the psychosocial outcomes of survivors. Pediatricians need to be more concerned with maintaining and improving the psychological health of this growing number of childhood cancer survivors through long-term follow-up clinics, community support, or self-help groups. Research on all of the psychosocial aspects of childhood cancer survivors is important to recognize the reality and problems they face in Korea.

  4. Health Behaviors of Minority Childhood Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolley, Melinda R.; Sharp, Lisa K.; Tangney, Christy; Schiffer, Linda; Arroyo, Claudia; Kim, Yoonsang; Campbell, Richard; Schmidt, Mary Lou; Breen, Kathleen; Kinahan, Karen E.; Dilley, Kim; Henderson, Tara; Korenblit, Allen D.; Seligman, Katya

    2015-01-01

    Background Available data suggest that childhood cancer survivors (CCSs) are comparable to the general population on many lifestyle parameters. However, little is known about minority CCSs. This cross-sectional study describes and compares the body mass index (BMI) and health behaviors of African-American, Hispanic and White survivors to each other and to non-cancer controls. Methods Participants included 452 adult CCS (150 African-American, 152 Hispanic, 150 white) recruited through four childhood cancer treating institutions and 375 ethnically-matched non-cancer controls (125 in each racial/ethnic group) recruited via targeted digit dial. All participants completed a 2-hour in-person interview. Results Survivors and non-cancer controls reported similar health behaviors. Within survivors, smoking and physical activity were similar across racial/ethnic groups. African-American and Hispanic survivors reported lower daily alcohol use than whites, but consumed unhealthy diets and were more likely to be obese. Conclusions This unique study highlights that many minority CCSs exhibit lifestyle profiles that contribute to increased risk for chronic diseases and late effects. Recommendations for behavior changes must consider the social and cultural context in which minority survivors may live. PMID:25564774

  5. Mental health status of adolescent cancer survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mertens AC

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ann C Mertens, Jordan Gilleland Marchak Aflac Cancer and Blood Disorder Center, Department of Pediatrics, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA Abstract: Due to the successful treatment of children with cancer, overall 5-year survival rates now exceed 80%. Because of this success in treating childhood cancer, concerns are now focusing on the potential risk of both physical and psychosocial late effects in these cancer survivors. There is limited data available for clinicians and researchers on the mental health of adolescent survivors of childhood cancers. The goal of this review is to provide a concise evaluation of the content and attributes of literature available on this often overlooked, yet vulnerable, population. Overall, studies on psychological outcomes in adolescent survivors of pediatric cancer suggest that the majority are mentally healthy and do not report significant levels of psychological distress. Several factors were recognized as playing an important role in adverse psychosocial outcomes in these adolescent cancer survivors: to include the diagnosis of a tumor in the central nervous system, central nervous system-directed cancer treatment, and physical late effects. To identify the subset of survivors who may benefit from systematic psychological services, systematic psychological screening of all adolescent cancer survivors during follow-up oncology visits is recommended. Further research into this critical area is needed to help identify other potential risk factors and guide the development of evidence-based support for these vulnerable adolescents. Keywords: adolescents, psychological, psychosocial, screening recommendations

  6. Recurrent trauma: Holocaust survivors cope with aging and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hantman, Shira; Solomon, Zahava

    2007-05-01

    The current study aims to determine whether elderly Holocaust survivors are affected differently from non-survivors by the adversity of aging and cancer. Holocaust survivors and non-survivors suffering from cancer, were assessed tapping PTSD, psychiatric symptomatology, psychosocial adjustment to illness and coping with the aftermath of the Holocaust. Findings indicate a significant difference between survivors and non-survivors in post-traumatic symptoms and their intensity, survivors endorsing significantly more PTSD symptoms. Survivors were classified into 3 sub-groups, namely "Victims," "Fighters," and "Those who made it". "Victims" reported the highest percentage of persons who met PTSD, psychiatric symptomatology and difficulty coping with the problems of old age. The diversity of responses points to heterogeneity of long-term adaptation and adjustment among Holocaust survivors and similar response to subsequent adversity.

  7. Decreased health-related quality of life in disease-free survivors of differentiated thyroid cancer in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Kwang-Won

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Concern regarding the health-related quality of life (HRQOL of long-term survivors of thyroid cancer has risen due to the rapid increase in the incidence of thyroid cancer, which generally has an excellent prognosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the status of HRQOL in disease-free survivors of differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC and to evaluate the important determinants of HRQOL. Methods This was a cross-sectional study in which we interviewed consecutive disease-free survivors of DTC. Three different validated questionnaires ("EORTC QLQ-C30" for various functional domains, the "brief fatigue inventory (BFI" and the "hospital anxiety and depression scale" (HADS were used. Data from a large, population based survey of 1,000 people were used as a control. Results The response rate for the questionnaires was 78.9% (316/401. Disease-free survivors of DTC showed a decreased HRQOL in all five functional domains (physical, role, cognitive, emotional, and social on the EORTC QLQ-C30 compared with controls (P P Conclusions Although disease-free survivors of DTC are expected to have disease-specific survival comparable to the general population, they experience a significantly decreased HRQOL. Anxiety, depression, and fatigue were the major determinants of the decreased HRQOL. Supportive psychological care should be integrated into the management of long-term survivors of DTC.

  8. Shipboard and laboratory equipment

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shyamprasad, M.; Ramaswamy, V.

    bed, and a digital clock and a transponder helped to locate the camera. Equipment for the analysis of the nodules such as x-ray fluorescence and atomic absorption spectrophotometers were installed aboard MV Skandi Surveyor and MV Fernella and MV G A...

  9. A methodological review of the Short Form Health Survey 36 (SF-36) and its derivatives among breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treanor, Charlene; Donnelly, Michael

    2015-02-01

    A systematic review of the validity, reliability and sensitivity of the Short Form (SF) health survey measures among breast cancer survivors. We searched a number of databases for peer-reviewed papers. The methodological quality of the papers was assessed using the COnsenus-based Standards for the selection of health Measurement INstruments (COSMIN). The review identified seven papers that assessed the psychometric properties of the SF-36 (n = 5), partial SF-36 (n = 1) and SF-12 (n = 1) among breast cancer survivors. Internal consistency scores for the SF measures ranged from acceptable to good across a range of language and ethnic sub-groups. The SF-36 demonstrated good convergent validity with respective subscales of the Functional Assessment of Cancer Treatment-General scale and two lymphedema-specific measures. Divergent validity between the SF-36 and Lymph-ICF was modest. The SF-36 demonstrated good factor structure in the total breast cancer survivor study samples. However, the factor structure appeared to differ between specific language and ethnic sub-groups. The SF-36 discriminated between survivors who reported or did not report symptoms on the Breast Cancer Prevention Trial Symptom Checklist and SF-36 physical sub-scales, but not mental sub-scales, discriminated between survivors with or without lymphedema. Methodological quality scores varied between and within papers. Short Form measures appear to provide a reliable and valid indication of general health status among breast cancer survivors though the limited data suggests that particular caution is required when interpreting scores provided by non-English language groups. Further research is required to test the sensitivity or responsiveness of the measure.

  10. Impact of healthy eating practices and physical activity on quality of life among breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Shooka; Sulaiman, Suhaina; Koon, Poh Bee; Amani, Reza; Hosseini, Seyed Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Following breast cancer diagnosis, women often attempt to modify their lifestyles to improve their health and prevent recurrence. These behavioral changes typically involve diet and physical activity modification. The aim of this study was to determine association between healthy eating habits and physical activity with quality of life among Iranian breast cancer survivors. A total of 100 Iranian women, aged between 32 to 61 years were recruited to participate in this cross-sectional study. Eating practices were evaluated by a validated questionnaire modified from the Women's Healthy Eating and Living (WHEL) study. Physical activity was assessed using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ). A standardized questionnaire by the European Organization of Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life and its breast cancer module (EORTC QLQ-C30/+BR-23) were applied to determine quality of life. Approximately 29% of the cancer survivors were categorized as having healthy eating practices, 34% had moderate eating practices and 37% had poor eating practices based on nutrition guidelines. The study found positive changes in the decreased intake of fast foods (90%), red meat (70%) and increased intake of fruits (85%) and vegetables (78%). Generally, breast cancer survivors with healthy eating practices had better global quality of life, social, emotional, cognitive and role functions. Result showed that only 12 women (12%) met the criteria for regular vigorous exercise, 22% had regular moderate-intensity exercise while the majority (65%) had low-intensity physical activity. Breast cancer survivors with higher level of physical activity had better emotional and cognitive functions. Healthy eating practices and physical activity can improve quality of life of cancer survivors. Health care professionals should promote good dietary habits and physical activity to improve survivors' health and quality of life.

  11. Challenges experienced by service providers in the delivery of medico-legal services to survivors of sexual violence in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajema, C; Mukoma, W; Kilonzo, N; Bwire, B; Otwombe, K

    2011-05-01

    While much discussion has been devoted to defining the standards of care required when offering services to survivors of sexual violence, much less attention has been given to procedures for evidence collection to allow the successful prosecution of perpetrators. In Kenya there are no comprehensive guidelines that outline the roles of the survivor, the community, health care workers, and the police with regard to the handling of forensic evidence, a deficit that contributes to delays in prosecuting, or even a failure to prosecute sex offenders. This study examines some of the obstacles in Kenya to the adequate handling of forensic evidence in sexual violence cases. It was based on in-depth interviews with respondents drawn from health facilities, police stations, civil society organizations and with the Government Chemist in three Kenyan provinces. The study's objective was to examine the existing policy requirements regarding the maintenance of an evidence chain by the health and criminal justice systems, and how effectively they are being implemented. The findings indicate that the quality of the evidence obtained by the health care workers was often deficient, depending on the time elapsed before the rape survivor reports to the health facility; the equipment available at the health facility; the age of the survivor; and the level of knowledge of the service provider regarding the types of evidence to be collected from survivors of sexual violence. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  12. Psychological outcomes of siblings of cancer survivors: a report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchbinder, David; Casillas, Jacqueline; Krull, Kevin R; Goodman, Pam; Leisenring, Wendy; Recklitis, Christopher; Alderfer, Melissa A; Robison, Leslie L; Armstrong, Gregory T; Kunin-Batson, Alicia; Stuber, Margaret; Zeltzer, Lonnie K

    2011-12-01

    To identify risk factors for adverse psychological outcomes among adult siblings of long-term survivors of childhood cancer. Cross-sectional, self-report data from 3083 adult siblings (mean age 29 years, range 18-56 years) of 5 + year survivors of childhood cancer were analyzed to assess psychological outcomes as measured by the Brief Symptom Inventory-18 (BSI-18). Sociodemographic and health data, reported by both the siblings and their matched cancer survivors, were explored as risk factors for adverse sibling psychological outcomes through multivariable logistic regression. Self-reported symptoms of psychological distress, as measured by the global severity index of the BSI-18, were reported by 3.8% of the sibling sample. Less than 1.5% of siblings reported elevated scores on two or more of the subscales of the BSI-18. Risk factors for sibling depression included having a survivor brother (OR 2.22, 95% CI 1.42-3.55), and having a survivor with impaired general health (OR 2.15, 95% CI 1.18-3.78). Siblings who were younger than the survivor reported increased global psychological distress (OR 1.81, 95% CI 1.05-3.12), as did siblings of survivors reporting global psychological distress (OR 2.32, 95% CI 1.08-4.59). Siblings of sarcoma survivors reported more somatization than did siblings of leukemia survivors (OR 2.07, 95% CI 1.05-3.98). These findings suggest that siblings of long-term childhood cancer survivors are psychologically healthy in general. There are, however, small subgroups of siblings at risk for long-term psychological impairment who may benefit from preventive risk-reduction strategies during childhood while their sibling with cancer is undergoing treatment. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Unemployment among breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsen, Kathrine; Ewertz, Marianne; Dalton, Susanne Oksbjerg; Badsberg, Jens Henrik; Osler, Merete

    2014-05-01

    Though about 20% of working age breast cancer survivors do not return to work after treatment, few studies have addressed risk factors for unemployment. The majority of studies on occupational consequences of breast cancer focus on non-employment, which is a mixture of sickness absence, unemployment, retirement pensions and other reasons for not working. Unemployment in combination with breast cancer may represent a particular challenge for these women. The aim of the present study is therefore to analyze the risk for unemployment in the years following diagnosis and treatment for breast cancer. This study included 14,750 women diagnosed with breast cancer in Denmark 2001-2009 identified through a population-based clinical database and linked with information from Danish administrative population based registers for information on labour market affiliation, socio-demography and co-morbid conditions. Multivariable analyses were performed by Cox's proportional hazard models. Two years after treatment, 81% of patients were still part of the work force, 10% of which were unemployed. Increasing duration of unemployment before breast cancer was associated with an adjusted HR = 4.37 (95% CI: 3.90-4.90) for unemployment after breast cancer. Other risk factors for unemployment included low socioeconomic status and demography, while adjuvant therapy did not increase the risk of unemployment. Duration of unemployment before breast cancer was the most important determinant of unemployment after breast cancer treatment. This allows identification of a particularly vulnerable group of patients in need of rehabilitation.

  14. Assessment of Symptoms in Adult Survivors of Incest: A Factor Analytic Study of the Responses to Childhood Incest Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Patrick W.; Donaldson, Mary Ann

    1989-01-01

    A study of the construction and factor validity of the Response to Child Incest Questionnaire, a self-report instrument for assessing commonly reported symptoms of adult survivors of incest, is reported. The instrument's usefulness as a pre- and post-treatment measure and further research needs are discussed. (MSE)

  15. MODERNIZATION OF CUPOLA EQUIPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Rovin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an automated cupola complex, developed by scientific-production enterprise «Technolit» together with GSTU named after P. O. Sukhoi, launched in the spring of 2015 at the plant «Stroiex» in the city of Chelyabinsk (the Russian Federation. The old cupolas (open type have been replaced by the new cupolas of the closed type, equipped with automatic control and management system and multistage wet gas treatment system. Cupolas are equipped with systems of post-combustion gases and the batch charging, the separate systems of air blast, systems of sludge removal and recirculation of water, the slag granulation installations, mechanized cleaning of cupola furnace and automatic safety system. These activities allowed the company to increase production and improve the quality of cast iron, reduce the coke consumption by 20% and reducing emissions of pollutants into the atmosphere almost 30 times.

  16. Methodology for assessing laser-based equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelegrina-Bonilla, Gabriel; Hermsdorf, Jörg; Thombansen, Ulrich; Abels, Peter; Kaierle, Stefan; Neumann, Jörg

    2017-10-01

    Methodologies for the assessment of technology's maturity are widely used in industry and research. Probably the best known are technology readiness levels (TRLs), initially pioneered by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). At the beginning, only descriptively defined TRLs existed, but over time, automated assessment techniques in the form of questionnaires emerged in order to determine TRLs. Originally TRLs targeted equipment for space applications, but the demands on industrial relevant equipment are partly different in terms of, for example, overall costs, product quantities, or the presence of competitors. Therefore, we present a commonly valid assessment methodology with the aim of assessing laser-based equipment for industrial use, in general. The assessment is carried out with the help of a questionnaire, which allows for a user-friendly and easy accessible way to monitor the progress from the lab-proven state to the application-ready product throughout the complete development period. The assessment result is presented in a multidimensional metric in order to reveal the current specific strengths and weaknesses of the equipment development process, which can be used to direct the remaining development process of the equipment in the right direction.

  17. Sensitive Equipment Decontamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    permeable and porous materials of equipment, such as rubbers, plastic and paints , due to their solvating powers. Such absorption can cause changes to...substrates (e.g., polymers, paints ). TECHNICAL PART STO-TR-HFM-233 3 - 39 N°- Requirement Technical Specifications Capability (efficacy...needed. Environmental aspects Toxicity of nanoparticles has to be studied. Operational parameters Unknown. Shelf-life parameters Depends on

  18. Soviet equipment flies in

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1978-01-01

    End of February 1977 a Soviet Ilyushin-76 heavy freight aircraft landed at Cointrin airport having on board fifty large wire proprtional chambers and associated apparatus, together weighing 10 tons, supplied by the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, USSR. The equipment was for the CERN- Dubna-Munich-Saclay experiment NA4 on deep inelastic muon scattering being set up in the North Area of SPS. See Weekly Bulletin 11/78.

  19. Bridges and Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-15

    the Trilateral Design and Test Code, paragraph 4.2.11, refers to a 15-percent impact factor for bending moment and deflection for crossing vehicle...speeds of 25 km/hr (15 mph). Since the BCS is equipped with both strain and load control features, the impact factor of each vehicle load and speed...can be determined. BCS testing to date has revealed that wheeled vehicle impact factors are approximately 10 percent and tracked vehicle impact

  20. Equipment Obsolescence Management Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redmond, J.

    2014-07-01

    Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) Operators are challenged with securing reliable supply channels for safety related equipment due to equipment obsolescence. Many Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) have terminated production of spare parts and product life-cycle support. The average component life cycles are much shorter than the NPP design life, which means that replacement components and parts for the original NPP systems are not available for the complete design life of the NPPs. The lack or scarcity of replacement parts adversely affects plant reliability and ultimately the profitability of the affected NPPs. This problem is further compounded when NPPs pursue license renewal and approval for plant-life extension. A reliable and predictable supply of replacement co components is necessary for NPPs to remain economically competitive and meet regulatory requirements and guidelines. Electrical and I and C components, in particular, have short product life cycles and obsolescence issues must be managed pro actively and not reactively in order to mitigate the risk to the NPP to ensure reliable and economic NPP operation. (Author)

  1. Equipping the stockyard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-04-01

    Good stockyard management has become an important feature in the coal supply chain. Today, virtually all suppliers and consumers make use of at least one stockyard when moving coal. The type of handling equipment that is best for a particular situation is consequently of wide interest. The value of coal stored in stockpiles can form a significant part of the end user's costs, as pointed out in a recent IEA Coal Research report 'Management of coal stockpiles'. Better blending is becoming a key factor in optimising both power plant and blast furnace performance. It is important to match the materials handling equipment to a facility's needs. Good stockpile management involves processing coal quality within the pile and controlling dust. Decisions must be made on appropriate methods of stacking coal, in longitudinal or circular bed. The article goes on to describe recent contracts for stockyard equipment by such manufacturers as UK-based Strachan and Henshaw and Spain's TAIM TFG. 3 photos.

  2. Health and well-being in adolescent survivors of early childhood cancer: a report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, Ann C; Brand, Sarah; Ness, Kirsten K; Li, Zhenghong; Mitby, Pauline A; Riley, Anne; Patenaude, Andrea Farkas; Zeltzer, Lonnie

    2014-03-01

    With the growing number of childhood cancer survivors in the US, it is important to assess the well-being of these individuals, particularly during the transitional phase of adolescence. Data about adolescent survivors' overall health and quality of life will help identify survivor subgroups most in need of targeted attention to successfully transition to adulthood. This ancillary study to the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study focused on children 15-19 years of age who had been diagnosed with cancer before the age of 4 years. A cohort of siblings of pediatric cancer survivors of the same ages served as a comparison sample. Adolescent health was assessed using the Child Health and Illness Profile-Adolescent Edition (CHIP-AE) survey. The teen survey was sent to 444 survivor teens and 189 siblings. Of these, 307(69%) survivors and 97 (51%) siblings completed and returned the survey. The overall health profiles of siblings and survivors were similar. Among survivors, females scored significantly below males on satisfaction, discomfort, and disorders domains. Survivors diagnosed with central nervous system tumors scored less favorably than leukemia survivors in the global domains of satisfaction and disorders. In general, adolescent survivors fare favorably compared to healthy siblings. However, identification of the subset of pediatric cancer survivors who are more vulnerable to medical and psychosocial disorders in adolescence provides the opportunity for design and implementation of intervention strategies that may improve quality of life. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Recovering from Opioid Overdose: Resources for Overdose Survivors & Family Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    SAMHSA Opioid Overdose Prevention TOOLKIT: Recovering From Opioid Overdose – Resources for Overdose Survivors & Family Members TABLE OF CONTENTS Recovering From Opioid Overdose Recovering from Opioid Overdose. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Resources for Overdose Survivors ...

  4. Breast cancer survivors of different sexual orientations: which factors explain survivors' quality of life and adjustment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehmer, U; Glickman, M; Winter, M; Clark, M A

    2013-06-01

    Little is known about differences by sexual orientation in explanatory factors of breast cancer survivors' quality of life, anxiety, and depression. Survivors were recruited from a cancer registry and additional survivors recruited through convenience methods. Data were collected via telephone survey from all 438 survivors, who were disease free and diagnosed with non-metastatic breast cancer an average of 5 years earlier. To explain quality of life, anxiety, and depression, we focused on sexual orientation as the primary independent factors, in addition, considering demographic, psychosocial, clinical, and functional factors as correlates. Sexual orientation had indirect associations with each of the outcomes, through disease-related and demographic factors as well as psychosocial and coping resources. The various explanatory models explain between 36% and 50% of the variance in outcomes and identified areas of strengths and vulnerabilities in sexual minority compared with heterosexual survivors. This study's findings of strengths among specific subgroups of sexual minority compared with heterosexual survivors require further explorations to identify the reasons for this finding. Most of the identified vulnerabilities among sexual minority compared with heterosexual survivors of breast cancer are amenable to change by interventions.

  5. Psychological status in childhood cancer survivors: a report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeltzer, Lonnie K; Recklitis, Christopher; Buchbinder, David; Zebrack, Bradley; Casillas, Jacqueline; Tsao, Jennie C I; Lu, Qian; Krull, Kevin

    2009-05-10

    Psychological quality of life (QOL), health-related QOL (HRQOL), and life satisfaction outcomes and their associated risk factors are reviewed for the large cohort of survivors and siblings in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS). This review includes previously published manuscripts that used CCSS data focused on psychological outcome measures, including the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI-18), the Medical Outcomes Survey Short Form-36 (SF-36), the Cantril Ladder of Life, and other self-report questionnaires. Comparisons and contrasts are made between siblings and survivors, and to normative data when available, in light of demographic/health information and abstracted data from the medical record. These studies demonstrate that a significant proportion of survivors report more symptoms of global distress and poorer physical, but not emotional, domains of HRQOL. Other than brain tumor survivors, most survivors report both good present and expected future life satisfaction. Risk factors for psychological distress and poor HRQOL are female sex, lower educational attainment, unmarried status, annual household income less than $20,000, unemployment, lack of health insurance, presence of a major medical condition, and treatment with cranial radiation and/or surgery. Cranial irradiation impacted neurocognitive outcomes, especially in brain tumor survivors. Psychological distress also predicted poor health behaviors, including smoking, alcohol use, fatigue, and altered sleep. Psychological distress and pain predicted use of complementary and alternative medicine. Overall, most survivors are psychologically healthy and report satisfaction with their lives. However, certain groups of childhood cancer survivors are at high risk for psychological distress, neurocognitive dysfunction, and poor HRQOL, especially in physical domains. These findings suggest targeting interventions for groups at highest risk for adverse outcomes and examining the positive growth that remains

  6. Validation of the Korean version of the thyroid cancer-specific quality of life questionnaire

    OpenAIRE

    Jeong, Youjin; Choi, Jaekyung; Ahn, Ah-Leum; Oh, Eun-Jung; Oh, Hee-Kyung; Cho, Dong-Yung; Kweon, Hyuk-Jung; Park, Kyoung Sik

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The increasing incidence of thyroid cancer worldwide has drawn attention to the needs for assessing and managing health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of thyroid cancer survivors. We conducted this study to validate the Korean version of the thyroid cancer-specific quality of life (THYCA-QoL) questionnaire. Methods Data obtained from 227 thyroid cancer survivors were analyzed using standard validity and reliability analysis techniques. Reliability was assessed by measuring internal c...

  7. Exploring measurement invariance by gender in the profile of mood states depression subscale among cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jihye; Smith, Tenbroeck

    2017-01-01

    The Profile of Mood States-Short Form (POMS-SF) is a well-validated tool commonly used in medical/clinical research. Less attention has been paid to the measurement invariance of the POMS-the degree to which the structure and items behave similarly for different groups (e.g., women and men). This study investigated the measurement invariance of the POMS Depression subscale across gender groups in a sample of cancer survivors. The POMS Depression subscale has 8 items (Unhappy, Sad, Blue, Hopeless, Discouraged, Miserable, Helpless, and Worthless). Invariance was measured using multigroup confirmatory factor analysis. This study used data from American Cancer Society Studies of Cancer Survivors-II, a population-based survey of adult cancer survivors (n = 9170). We found factor structures and factor loadings were invariant for gender groups, but moderate differential item functioning (DIF) in the question containing the word blue. With regard to cancer survivors' gender, we found the Depression subscale of the POMS-SF had configural invariance, and partial metric and scalar invariance. This suggests that results should be interpreted with caution, especially when gender is considered important. More broadly, our finding suggests that questions with the word blue may introduce DIF into other measures of depressive mood. More research is needed to replicate these findings in other samples and with other instruments.

  8. Urinary incontinence and other pelvic floor disorders after radiation therapy in endometrial cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Saya; John, Gabriella; Sammel, Mary; Andy, Uduak Umoh; Chu, Christina; Arya, Lily A; Brown, Justin; Schmitz, Kathryn

    2017-11-01

    To investigate radiation therapy as a risk factor for urinary or fecal incontinence, pelvic organ prolapse, and sexual dysfunction in endometrial cancer survivors. We performed a retrospective cohort study of endometrial cancer survivors. Data were collected using a mailed survey and the medical record. Validated questionnaires were used to generate rates of urinary incontinence and other pelvic floor disorders. The incidence rates of pelvic floor disorders were compared across groups with different exposures to radiation. Of the 149 endometrial cancer survivors, 41% received radiation therapy. Fifty-one percent of women reported urine leakage. The rates of urinary incontinence in women exposed and not exposed to vaginal brachytherapy (VBT) or whole-pelvis radiation were 48% and 58%, respectively (p=0.47). The incidence of fecal incontinence did not differ between groups, but the score for overall sexual function was significantly higher in women who did not undergo radiation therapy. On multivariable analysis, significant risk factors for urinary incontinence were age (AOR 1.06 95% CI 1.02, 1.10) and BMI (AOR 1.07 95% CI 1.02, 1.11), but treatment with radiation was not significantly associated with urinary incontinence, or fecal incontinence (p>0.05). Age, BMI, and radiation exposure were independent predictors of decreased sexual function score (pincontinence, but may contribute to sexual dysfunction in endometrial cancer survivors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Implementing the Exercise Guidelines for Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolin, Kathleen Y.; Schwartz, Anna L.; Matthews, Charles E.; Courneya, Kerry S.; Schmitz, Kathryn H.

    2013-01-01

    In 2009, the American College of Sports Medicine convened an expert roundtable to issue guidelines on exercise for cancer survivors. This multidisciplinary group evaluated the strength of the evidence for the safety and benefits of exercise as a therapeutic intervention for survivors. The panel concluded that exercise is safe and offers myriad benefits for survivors including improvements in physical function, strength, fatigue, quality of life (QOL), and possibly recurrence and survival. Recommendations for situations in which deviations from the US Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans are appropriate were provided. Here, we outline a process for implementing the guidelines in clinical practice, and provide recommendations for how the oncology care provider can interface with the exercise and physical therapy community. PMID:22579268

  10. Holocaust survivors: three waves of resilience research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Roberta R; Hantman, Shira; Sharabi, Adi; Cohen, Harriet

    2012-01-01

    Three waves of resilience research have resulted in resilience-enhancing educational and therapeutic interventions. In the first wave of inquiry, researchers explored the traits and environmental characteristics that enabled people to overcome adversity. In the second wave, researchers investigated the processes related to stress and coping. In the third wave, studies examined how people grow and are transformed following adverse events, often leading to self-actualize, client creativity and spirituality. In this article the authors examined data from a study, "Forgiveness, Resiliency, and Survivorship among Holocaust Survivors" funded by the John Templeton Foundation ( Greene, Armour, Hantman, Graham, & Sharabi, 2010 ). About 65% of the survivors scored on the high side for resilience traits. Of the survivors, 78% engaged in processes considered resilient and felt they were transcendent or had engaged in behaviors that help them grow and change over the years since the Holocaust, including leaving a legacy and contributing to the community.

  11. Daily physical activity patterns in cancer survivors: a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmerman, Josien; Kurvers, R.; Bloo, H.; Hermens, Hermanus J.; Vollenbroek-Hutten, Miriam Marie Rosé

    2011-01-01

    In cancer survivors physical activity levels are measured primarily with questionnaires. As a result, insight in actual physical activity patterns of cancer survivors is lacking. Activity monitoring with accelerometers revealed that cancer survivors have lower levels of physical activity in the

  12. Participants' Perception of Therapeutic Factors in Groups for Incest Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Inese; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Investigated member-perceived curative factors in an incest-survivor group, comparing therapeutic factors reported in closed, time-limited incest survivor group to those in Bonney et al.'s open, long-term survivor group and to Yalom's therapy groups. Findings suggest that relative importance of curative factors may be related to group stages.…

  13. Counseling Survivors of Suicide: Implications for Group Postvention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Maureen M.; Freeman, Stephen J.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses bereavement and mourning and reviews group applications for the resolution of uncomplicated grief. Presents studies that describe grief experiences of suicide survivors and community reaction to survivors. Argues that a structured group experience, where support is provided by other survivors, gives optimal help to people bereaved by…

  14. Cancer survivor identity shared in a social media intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hayeon; Nam, Yujung; Gould, Jessica; Sanders, W Scott; McLaughlin, Margaret; Fulk, Janet; Meeske, Kathleen A; Ruccione, Kathleen S

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates how cancer survivors construct their identities and the impact on their psychological health, as measured by depression and survivor self-efficacy. Fourteen young adult survivors of pediatric cancer participated in a customized social networking and video blog intervention program, the LIFECommunity, over a 6-month period. Survivors were asked to share their stories on various topics by posting video messages. Those video blog postings, along with survey data collected from participants, were analyzed to see how cancer survivors expressed their identities, and how these identities are associated with survivors' psychosocial outcomes. In survivors who held negative stereotypes about cancer survivors, there was a positive relationship with depression while positive stereotypes had a marginal association with cancer survivor efficacy. Findings indicate that although pediatric cancer survivors often do not publicly discuss a "cancer survivor identity," they do internalize both positive and negative stereotypes about cancer survivorship. It is important for practitioners to be aware of the long-term implications of cancer survivor identity and stereotypes.

  15. Highway Maintenance Equipment Operator. Specialized Equipment. Training Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perky, Sandra Dutreau; And Others

    This curriculum guide provides instructional materials to assist in training equipment operators in the safe and effective use of highway maintenance equipment. It includes 18 units of instruction covering the large equipment used in maintenance operations. Each unit of instruction consists of eight basic components: performance objectives,…

  16. Highway Maintenance Equipment Operator. Miscellaneous Equipment. Training Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perky, Sandra Dutreau; And Others

    This curriculum guide provides instructional materials to assist in training equipment operators in the safe and effective use of highway maintenance equipment. It includes six units of instruction covering the small, specialized equipment used in maintenance operations. Each unit of instruction consists of eight basic components: performance…

  17. Health examination for A-bomb survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Chikako [Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Casualty Council Health Management Center (Japan)

    1996-03-01

    The health examination for A-bomb survivors by national, prefectural and city administrations was described and discussed on its general concept, history, time change of examinee number, improvement of examination, prevalence of individual diseases, significance of cancer examinations, examinees` point of view and future problems. Subjects were the survivors living in Hiroshima city: in 1994, their number was 100,188, whose ages were 63 y in average for males consisting of 39.5% and 67 y for females of 60.5%. The examination was begun in 1957 on the law for medical care for the survivors firstly and then systematically in 1961. From 1965, it was performed 4 times a year, and in 1988, one examination in the four was made for cancer. Authors` Center examined previously 90% but recently 70% of the examinees. The remainder underwent the examination in other medical facilities. Tests are blood analysis, electrocardiography and computed radiography of chest with imaging plate, of which data have been accumulated either in photodisc or in host computer. From 1973 to 1993, the cardiovascular diseases increased from 6.1% to 26.9%, metabolic and endocrinic ones like diabetes, 3.6% to 19.7%, and bowel ones, 0.9% to 12.3%. Correlations of these diseases with A-bomb irradiation are not elucidated and possibly poor. Five classes of cancer examinations are performed but the examinee rate in the survivors is as low as 7.6-21.8% (1993). The cancer of the large intestine is increasing. The overall examinee rates in the survivors were 70.6% in 1965-1967, 69.5% in 1976-1977 and 58.2% in 1990. In conclusion, how to examine the survivors, who are getting older, as many as possible is the future problem. (H.O.)

  18. Californium-252 Program Equipment Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chattin, Fred Rhea [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wilson, Kenton [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ezold, Julie G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-12-01

    To successfully continue the 252Cf production and meet the needs of the customers, a comprehensive evaluation of the Building 7920 processing equipment was requested to identify equipment critical to the operational continuity of the program.

  19. I Keep my Problems to Myself: Negative Social Network Orientation, Social Resources, and Health-Related Quality of Life in Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symes, Yael; Campo, Rebecca A.; Wu, Lisa M.; Austin, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Background Cancer survivors treated with hematopoietic stem cell transplant rely on their social network for successful recovery. However, some survivors have negative attitudes about using social resources (negative social network orientation) that are critical for their recovery. Purpose We examined the association between survivors’ social network orientation and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and whether it was mediated by social resources (network size, perceived support, and negative and positive support-related social exchanges). Methods In a longitudinal study, 255 survivors completed validated measures of social network orientation, HRQoL, and social resources. Hypotheses were tested using path analysis. Results More negative social network orientation predicted worse HRQoL (p social exchanges. Conclusions Survivors with negative social network orientation may have poorer HRQoL in part due to deficits in several key social resources. Findings highlight a subgroup at risk for poor transplant outcomes and can guide intervention development. PMID:26693932

  20. Specialized survivor clinic attendance increases adherence to cardiomyopathy screening guidelines in adult survivors of childhood cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marr, Kristin C; Agha, Mohammad; Sutradhar, Rinku; Pole, Jason D; Hodgson, David; Guttmann, Astrid; Greenberg, Mark; Nathan, Paul C

    2017-10-01

    To determine if attendance at a specialized clinic for adult survivors of childhood cancer is associated with better rates of adherence to the Children's Oncology Group (COG) Long-term Follow-up (LTFU) guidelines for cardiomyopathy screening. We conducted a retrospective population-based study using administrative data in Ontario, Canada of 5-year survivors diagnosed between 1986 and 2005 at risk of therapy-related late cardiomyopathy. Patients were classified into three groups based on the recommended frequency of screening: annual, every 2 years, and every 5 years. Of 1811 eligible survivors followed for median 7.8 years (range 0-14.0), patients were adherent to screening for only 8.6% of their period of follow-up. Survivor clinic utilization had the strongest association with increased rates of adherence: when compared to no attendance, ≥ 5 clinic visits/10-year period had RR of adherence of 10.6 (95% CI 5.7-19.5) in the annual group, 3.3 (95% CI 2.3-4.8) in the every 2-year group, and 2.3 (95% CI 1.6-3.2) in the every 5-year group. Additional factors associated with increased adherence after adjusting for clinic attendance included annual assessment by a general practioner, female sex, diagnosis prior to 2003, and living in a rural area. In a model of specialized survivor care, increased clinic utilization is associated with improved patient adherence to COG LTFU cardiomyopathy screening guidelines. Specialized survivor clinics may improve health outcomes in survivors through improved adherence to screening. However, rates of adherence remain suboptimal and further multifacetted strategies need to be explored to improve overall rates of screening in adult survivors of childhood cancer.

  1. Holocaust survivors: the pain behind the agony. Increased prevalence of fibromyalgia among Holocaust survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablin, J N; Cohen, H; Eisinger, M; Buskila, D

    2010-01-01

    To assess the frequency of fibromyalgia among a population of Holocaust survivors in Israel as well as the occurrence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and concurrent psychiatric symptoms, including depression and anxiety among survivors. Eighty-three survivors of the Nazi Holocaust and 65 age-matched individuals not exposed to Nazi occupation were recruited. Physical examination and manual tender point assessment was performed for the establishment of the diagnosis of fibromyalgia and information was collected regarding quality of life (SF-36), physical function and health (FIQ), psychiatric symptoms (SCL-90) and PTSD symptoms (CAPS). Significantly increased rates of fibromyalgia were identified among Holocaust survivors compared with controls (23.81% vs. 10.94, p<0.05). Significantly increased rates of posttraumatic symptoms and measures of mental distress were also identified among survivors. The results indicate a significantly increased prevalence of fibromyalgia among Holocaust survivors six decades after the end of the Second World War. This finding furthers our knowledge regarding the long-term effect of stress on the development of fibromyalgia.

  2. Adult survivors of childhood sexual abuse: survivor's disclosure and nurse therapist's response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, P L; Varvaro, F F; Connors, R; Regan-Kubinski, M J

    1994-12-01

    Recent literature pertinent to adult survivors suggests that childhood sexual abuse is a serious problem, and that disclosure is on the rise. The aftereffects of childhood sexual abuse can cause dysfunction in various aspects of the survivor's physical and mental health. Understanding the traumagenic dynamics of childhood sexual abuse and its aftereffects provides direction for the nurse therapist during both the client's disclosure and intervention planning. This knowledge assists the therapist in promoting mental health and healing, as well as providing comfort for the therapist. The nurse therapist's reactions to the client's disclosure can affect the way the client feels about disclosure and the therapeutic relationship. If a negative message is conveyed to the survivor at the time of disclosure, the feelings of betrayal, stigmatization, and powerlessness that the survivor experienced as a child will be replicated. This can damage the therapeutic relationship and delay the healing process. When disclosure is received and acted upon in a sensitive, therapeutic manner, the survivor is empowered and can enter with the nurse therapist into an effective therapeutic alliance. Nurse therapists should gain awareness of the types of emotional responses that can be engendered in the health professional during disclosure. Awareness of these emotional reactions can lead to the identification of coping strategies useful to both the therapist and the adult survivor. Coping strategies useful to the therapist include maintaining adequate boundaries, understanding oneself and one's responses to sexual-abuse issues, utilizing ongoing consultation or supervision, and preventing burnout.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Financial Burden in Survivors of Childhood Cancer: A Report From the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nipp, Ryan D; Kirchhoff, Anne C; Fair, Douglas; Rabin, Julia; Hyland, Kelly A; Kuhlthau, Karen; Perez, Giselle K; Robison, Leslie L; Armstrong, Gregory T; Nathan, Paul C; Oeffinger, Kevin C; Leisenring, Wendy M; Park, Elyse R

    2017-10-20

    Purpose Survivors of childhood cancer may experience financial burden as a result of health care costs, particularly because these patients often require long-term medical care. We sought to evaluate the prevalence of financial burden and identify associations between a higher percentage of income spent on out-of-pocket medical costs (≥ 10% of annual income) and issues related to financial burden (jeopardizing care or changing lifestyle) among survivors of childhood cancer and a sibling comparison group. Methods Between May 2011 and April 2012, we surveyed an age-stratified, random sample of survivors of childhood cancer and a sibling comparison group who were enrolled in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study. Participants reported their household income, out-of-pocket medical costs, and issues related to financial burden (questions were adapted from national surveys on financial burden). Logistic regression identified associations between participant characteristics, a higher percentage of income spent on out-of-pocket medical costs, and financial burden, adjusting for potential confounders. Results Among 580 survivors of childhood cancer and 173 siblings, survivors of childhood cancer were more likely to have out-of-pocket medical costs ≥ 10% of annual income (10.0% v 2.9%; P report spending a higher percentage of their income on out-of-pocket medical costs, which may influence their health-seeking behavior and potentially affect health outcomes. Our findings highlight the need to address financial burden in this population with long-term health care needs.

  4. Community reintegration among stroke survivors in Osun ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background Stroke is a major neurological problem and a leading cause of disability in the elderly in Nigeria. The incidence is increasing due to increasing risk factors, but many stroke victims now survive because of improved medical care. These survivors become community-dwellers after inpatient rehabilitation. Aims To ...

  5. Survivors of Downsizing: Helpful and Hindering Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amundson, Norman E.; Borgen, William A.; Jordan, Sharalyn; Erlebach, Anne C.

    2004-01-01

    Thirty-one downsizing survivors from both the private and public sector were interviewed to determine incidents that either helped or hindered their transition through 1 or more organizational downsizings. A critical incident technique was used to analyze and organize the data around themes that emerged, themes were represented by both positive…

  6. Esophageal atresia: comparison between survivors and mortality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The places of study were Bahrami Hospital and Children's Medical Center, two referral centers for pediatric surgery in Tehran. The duration of the study was 2 years, starting from April 1999. Survivors and mortality cases were compared with regard to sex, type of surgery, suture material, and technique of anastomosis.

  7. Subsequent Reproductive Performance in Survivors of Complicated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There were 2 cases of postpartum hemorrhage. 103 (44%) of the subjects who still desired pregnancy were yet unable to conceive. Conclusions The subsequent reproductive performance in survivors of complicated abortion appears to be largely characterized by a high rate of sub-fertility, fetal wastage and preterm ...

  8. The survivors of childhood solid tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, M.C.; Thompson, E.I.; Simone, J.V. (St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (USA))

    1991-04-01

    With the improvement in cancer therapy in recent years, the number of cancer survivors is rapidly increasing. Potential late medical and psychosocial sequelae of cancer therapy are reviewed. A practical guide for the primary health care giver is provided. 161 refs.

  9. Differentiating incest survivors who self-mutilate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turell, S C; Armsworth, M W

    2000-02-01

    This study was an exploratory analysis of the variables which differentiated incest survivors who self-mutilate from those who do not. A sample of women incest survivors (N = 84) were divided into two groups based on the presence or absence of self-mutilation. Participants included both community and clinical populations. A packet consisting of a demographic questionnaire, Sexual Attitudes Survey, Diagnostic Inventory of Personality and Symptoms, Dissociative Events Scale and the Beck Depression Inventory was completed by each participant. Demographic, incest, and family of origin variables distinguished the self-mutilating women from those who did not. These include ethnicity and educational experiences; duration, frequency, and perpetrator characteristics regarding the incest; and multiple abuses, instability, birth order, and loss of mother in one's family of origin. Psychological and physical health concerns also differentiated between the two groups. Many variables may differentiate between women incest survivors who self-mutilate from those who do not. A rudimentary checklist to describe the lives of incest survivors who self-mutilate resulted from these findings. The importance of the concept of embodiment is also discussed.

  10. A Spiritual Framework in Incest Survivors Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beveridge, Kelli; Cheung, Monit

    2004-01-01

    Through an examination of recent incest treatment development, this article emphasizes the theoretical concept of "integration" within the treatment process for female adult incest survivors. Spirituality as a therapeutic foundation is discussed with examples of therapeutic techniques. A case study illustrates the psycho-spiritual process of…

  11. Endocrine sequelae in childhood cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casano Sancho, Paula

    2017-11-01

    Thanks to the advances in cancer treatment, the five-year survival rate after childhood cancer has increased up to 80%. Therefore 1/500 young adults will be a survivor. Endocrine sequelae are most common, affecting 40-60% of survivors. The most frequent sequelae include growth failure and gonadal and thyroid diseases. Sequelae occur more frequently in survivors from central nervous system tumors, leukemia, and lymphoma. Their development will depend on the type of cancer, its location, age at diagnosis, and treatment administered. Treatments associated to more endocrine sequels are cranial radiotherapy and hematopoietic cell transplantation. Because of the high prevalence of endocrine sequelae, international guidelines recommend endocrinologists to prospectively evaluate the survivors. As some of these endocrine changes will not develop until adult life, transition programs should be implemented, and active investigation should be made to decrease the endocrine consequences of cancer treatment. Copyright © 2017 SEEN y SED. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Sexual dysfunction in Nigerian stroke survivors

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    2013-09-03

    Sep 3, 2013 ... Objectives: This survey reports sexual dysfunction in Nigerian stroke survivors, and determines the influence of socio- ... Participants completed the Beck Depression Inventory, Stroke Specific Quality of Life Scale and post-stroke sexual function ..... Medical. Aspects of Human Sexuality 1979; 13: 16-30. 25.

  13. Ebola Survivor and Her Pregnancy Outcome

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-12-14

    Dr. Moon Kim, a medical epidemiologist at the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health, discusses an Ebola virus disease survivor and the delivery of her baby.  Created: 12/14/2016 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 12/14/2016.

  14. Validação inicial do índice de necessidade de atenção à saúde bucal para as equipes de saúde bucal na estratégia de saúde da família Initial validation of the index of oral healtcare needs for oral health teams in the family healthcare strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Carnut

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho objetivou validar o Índice de Necessidade de Atenção à Saúde Bucal (INASB, a partir de um algoritmo pré-definido baseado nas condições sociais das famílias. Utilizaram-se informações obtidas na ficha A do sistema de informação da atenção básica. A validação do índice foi realizada através da validação de face e de construto, e nesta foram coletados dados de experiência de cárie, dor de dente e acesso aos serviços de saúde bucal através de uma amostra aleatória, estratificada e baseada no índice de 412 crianças nas faixas etárias 3-5 e 7-12 anos em Recife-PE. Para análise foi utilizado o nível de significância de 5%. O índice foi considerado adequado na validação de face. Na validação de construto convergente foi associado ao componente cariado do ceo-d (p = 0,03 e CPO-D (p = 0,01; e na divergente foi associado ao acesso ao dentista (p = 0,001 e ao componente obturado do ceo-d (p = 0,05 não sendo associado ao componente obturado do CPO-D. O Índice de Necessidade de Atenção à Saúde Bucal demonstrou possuir uma boa validade inicial podendo ser usado como instrumento de programação para as equipes de saúde bucal da família.This survey set out to validate the Index of Oral Healthcare Needs (IOHN, based on a pre-defined algorithm of the social status of families. The validation process was divided into two phases, namely a face validation and a construct validation. In the latter, data on caries experience, toothache and access to oral health services was collected. To validate the index a random, stratified sample of 412 children aged 3-5 and 7-12 was obtained, based on the IOHCN algorithm, all the children being from the areas of Recife covered by the family healthcare program. The analysis consisted of a descriptive and an analytical phase, adopting a 5% level of significance. The index was considered by an expert committee to have good face validity. The convergent construct validation

  15. Chapter 12. Space Heating Equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafferty, Kevin D.

    1998-01-01

    The performance evaluation of space heating equipment for a geothermal application is generally considered from either of two perspectives: (a) selecting equipment for installation in new construction, or (b) evaluating the performance and retrofit requirements of an existing system. With regard to new construction, the procedure is relatively straightforward. Once the heating requirements are determined, the process need only involve the selection of appropriately sized hot water heating equipment based on the available water temperature. It is important to remember that space heating equipment for geothermal applications is the same equipment used in non-geothermal applications. What makes geothermal applications unique is that the equipment is generally applied at temperatures and flow rates that depart significantly from traditional heating system design. This chapter presents general considerations for the performance of heating equipment at non-standard temperature and flow conditions, retrofit of existing systems, and aspects of domestic hot water heating.

  16. Study of the use of personal equipment in low coal. Use of personal equipment in low coal: A review of the personal equipment literature. Phase I report. Open file report 19 Jun 78-30 Dec 78

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanders, M.S.; Beith, B.; Blake, T.

    1978-12-30

    The objective of this study was to determine optimal personal equipment design for use in low coal based on ergonomic, biomechanic, and safety considerations. To accomplish this, three principal tasks were to (1) summarize the state-of-the-art with respect to personal equipment and its use in low seam coal mines, (2) empirically validate alternative designs for personal equipment, and (3) make recommendations on redesign of personal equipment for low seam coal mines. The report is a summary of the literature dealing with personal protective equipment that is now, or could be used in the underground mining environment. Recommendations for further research and development are included.

  17. Socio-demography and medical history as predictors of health-related quality of life of breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadas, Amutha; Qureshi, Ahmad Munir; Dominic, Nisha Angela; Botross, Nevein Philip; Riad, Amgad; Thirunavuk Arasoo, Valliammai Jayanthi; Elangovan, Soman

    2015-01-01

    Even after completion of conventional treatment, breast cancer survivors continue to exhibit a variety of psychological and physical symptoms, affecting their quality of life. The study aimed to investigate the relationship between socio-demography, medical characteristics and health-related quality of life (HR-QOL) of a sample of breast cancer survivors in Malaysia. This pilot cross-sectional survey was conducted among breast cancer survivors (n=40) who were members of Breast Cancer Support Group Centre Johor Bahru. A validated self-administered questionnaire was used to identify the relationships between socio-demography, medical characteristics and HR-QOL of the participants. Living with family and completion of treatment were significant predictive factors of self-rated QOL, while living with family and ever giving birth significantly predicted satisfaction with health and physical health. Psychological health had moderate correlations with number of children and early cancer stage. Survivors' higher personal income (>MYR4,500) was the only significant predictor of social relationship, while age, income more than MYR4,500 and giving birth significantly predicted environment domain score. The findings suggested the survivors coped better in all four HR-QOL domains if they were married, lived with family, had children and were employed.

  18. A Grounded Theory Investigation into the Psychosexual Unmet Needs of Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobinson, Katherine A; Hoyt, Michael A; Seidler, Zac E; Beaumont, Amelia L; Hullmann, Stephanie E; Lawsin, Catalina R

    2016-06-01

    For many adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with cancer, psychosexual well-being is compromised due to the onset of illness at a vulnerable stage of sexual development. To date, prior studies have focused on the psychosexual well-being of older adult survivors, largely ignoring AYAs. Furthermore, the few studies investigating AYA psychosexual well-being have been prematurely quantitative in nature, limited by a lack of in-depth exploration regarding the unique psychosexual experiences of AYA survivors. Qualitative research is required to better identify and understand the unique complexities surrounding psychosexual needs among AYAs with cancer. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 11 AYA cancer survivors (aged 15-45 years at the time of diagnosis). Transcripts were coded using a grounded theory methodology. Constant comparison data analysis gave rise to the Pathways to Problems model, denoting the pathways to psychosexual unmet needs among AYA survivors. Participants experienced identity conflict, whereby an incongruity occurred between their chronological age and their self-perceived age. The experience of identity conflict, combined with changes to intimate relationships, shifts in priorities, physicians' assumptions, and inadequate support, contributed to the onset of psychosexual unmet needs. Six areas of psychosexual unmet needs were identified: fertility concerns, sexual communication, dealing with side effects, dating and disclosure, relating to other AYAs, and reconciling identity conflict. The present findings provide evidence for shared and unique psychosexual unmet needs among AYA survivors. Practical implications include the need for validation and incorporation of unique AYA unmet needs into screening tools and care plans, as well as peer support.

  19. Exergame Grading Scheme: Concept Development and Preliminary Psychometric Evaluations in Cancer Survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiao-Lan Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The challenge of using exergames to promote physical activity among cancer survivors lies in the selection of the exergames that match their fitness level. There is a need for a standardized grading scheme by which to judge an exergame’s capacity to address specific physical fitness attributes with different levels of physical engagement. The study aimed to develop an Exergame Grading Scheme and preliminarily evaluate its psychometric properties. Fourteen (14 items were created from the human movement and exergame literature. The content validity index (CVI was rated by content experts with two consecutive rounds (N=5 and N=3 independently. The interrater reliability (IRR was determined by two raters who used the Exergame Grading Scheme to determine the grading score of the five exergames performed by two cancer survivors (N=10. Each item had a score of 1 for item-level CVI and 1 for k. For IRR, 9 items had rho values of 1, 1 item had 0.93, and 4 items had between 0.80 and 0.89. This valid and reliable Exergame Grading Scheme makes it possible to develop a personalized physical activity program using any type of exergame or fitness mobile application in rehabilitation practice to meet the needs of cancer survivors.

  20. Aerobic exercise equipment preferences among older adults: a preliminary investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looney, Marilyn A; Rimmer, James H

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an instrument that would measure the aerobic exercise equipment preferences of a frail older population and to see, despite a small sample size, if a many-facet Rasch analysis would provide useful information concerning the construct validity of the instrument and the equipment preferences of the sample. Sixteen ambulatory seniors (M = 82.0 yr +/- 6.6; 4 males and 12 females), who resided in a local retirement community and were involved in a structured fitness program, evaluated the following exercise equipment: Schwinn Air-Dyne, Nu-Step Recumbent Stepper; Monark bicycle ergometer; Stairmaster; and PTS Turbo Recumbent Bicycle. Participants used the equipment for 5 min. and then completed the survey via a structured interview technique. Test-retest reliability coefficients indicated the participants' responses were stable across days for each piece of exercise equipment (proportions of agreement >.83; km >.77). A many-facet (equipment, items, participants) Rasch analysis verified that 12 closed format items defined a linear construct of equipment preference (separation = 1.8; reliability =.77). The pieces of equipment were placed on the linear continuum according to their equipment preference measures (separation = 3.21; reliability =.91) derived from the participants' response patterns to the items (separation = 1.43; reliability =.67). Although the MNSQ infit and outfit statistics were acceptable for each facet, the items did not target the equipment very well. Suggested changes to the instrument include converting questions to statements to use with Likert response categories; converting negative wording to positive phrasing, and adding items related to seat comfort, foot pedal placement, and visibility of display panel. The Nu-Step and Schwinn were the most preferred pieces of equipment while the Stairmaster was the least preferred. This preliminary investigation illustrates how useful information can be obtained from a

  1. Specialized survivor clinic attendance is associated with decreased rates of emergency department visits in adult survivors of childhood cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutradhar, Rinku; Agha, Mohammad; Pole, Jason D; Greenberg, Mark; Guttmann, Astrid; Hodgson, David; Nathan, Paul C

    2015-12-15

    Survivors of childhood cancer are at considerable risk of experiencing treatment-related adverse health outcomes. To provide survivors with specialized care focused on these risks during adulthood, the government of Ontario funded a provincial network of specialized survivor clinics in 1999. The aim of this study was to determine whether prior attendance at survivor clinics by adult survivors of childhood cancer was associated with rates of emergency department (ED) visits. This was a population-based, retrospective cohort study using multiple linked administrative health databases. The cohort consisted of all adult survivors of childhood cancer diagnosed between January 1, 1986 and December 31, 2005 in Ontario, Canada. A recurrent event regression model was used to evaluate the association between prior attendance at survivor clinics and the rate of ED visits; adjustments were made for individual, demographic, treatment, and provider characteristics. The study consisted of 3912 adult survivors of childhood cancer. Individuals who had at least 1 prior visit to a survivor clinic had a 19% decreased rate of ED visits in comparison with individuals who had not visited a survivor clinic (adjusted relative rate, 0.81; 95% confidence interval, 0.78-0.85). Each additional prior visit to a survivor clinic was associated with a 5% decrease in the rate of ED visits (adjusted relative rate, 0.95; 95% confidence interval, 0.93-0.96). These results were independent of whether or not survivors received care from a primary care physician. Attendance at a specialized survivor clinic was significantly associated with decreased ED visits among adult survivors of childhood cancer. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  2. 21 CFR 866.4520 - Immunofluorometer equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunology Laboratory Equipment and Reagents § 866.4520 Immunofluorometer equipment. (a) Identification. Immunofluorometer equipment for clinical use with...

  3. The Association Between Motor Skills and Academic Achievement Among Pediatric Survivors of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsamo, Lyn M; Sint, Kyaw J; Neglia, Joseph P; Brouwers, Pim; Kadan-Lottick, Nina S

    2016-04-01

    Assess the association between fine motor (FM) and visual-motor integration (VMI) skills and academic achievement in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) survivors. In this 28-site cross-sectional study of 256 children in first remission, a mean of 8.9 ± 2.2 years after treatment for standard-risk precursor-B ALL, validated measures of FM, VMI, reading, math, and intelligence were administered at mean follow-up age of 12.8 ± 2.5 years.   VMI was significantly associated with written math calculation ability (p achievement. These findings suggest that VMI is associated with aspects of math and reading achievement in leukemia survivors. These skills may be amenable to intervention. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Intergenerational families of holocaust survivors: designing and piloting a family resilience template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isserman, Nancy; Greene, Roberta R; Bowen, Sheryl Perlmutter; Hollander-Goldfein, Bea; Cohen, Harriet

    2014-01-01

    Researchers from the Templeton study, "Forgiveness, Resiliency, and Survivorship Among Holocaust Survivors," and the Transcending Trauma Project, combined efforts to examine six transcripts of interviews with survivors of the Nazi Holocaust. The researchers focused on the nature of parent-child family dynamics before, during, and after the Holocaust. They refined a Family Resilience Template (FRT) originally based on an ecological-systems design, adding an attachment theory component and a quantitative methodology. The goal of the research project was to pilot the FRT by further defining terms and adding a Quality of Family Dynamics Paradigm to encompass an intergenerational dimension. The researchers arrived at a consensus of item definitions, establishing the initial face validity of the FRT.

  5. Long-term survivors of childhood Ewing sarcoma: report from the childhood cancer survivor study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsberg, Jill P; Goodman, Pamela; Leisenring, Wendy; Ness, Kirsten K; Meyers, Paul A; Wolden, Suzanne L; Smith, Stephanie M; Stovall, Marilyn; Hammond, Sue; Robison, Leslie L; Oeffinger, Kevin C

    2010-08-18

    The survival of Ewing sarcoma (ES) patients has improved since the 1970s but is associated with considerable future health risks. The study population consisted of long-term (> or =5-year) survivors of childhood ES diagnosed before age 21 from 1970 to 1986. Cause-specific mortality was evaluated in eligible survivors (n = 568), and subsequent malignant neoplasms, chronic health conditions, infertility, and health status were evaluated in the subset participating in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (n = 403). Outcomes were compared with the US population and sibling control subjects (n = 3899). Logistic, Poisson, or Cox proportional hazards models, with adjustments for sex, age, race/ethnicity, and potential intrafamily correlation, were used. Statistical tests were two-sided. Cumulative mortality of ES survivors was 25.0% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 21.1 to 28.9) 25 years after diagnosis. The all-cause standardized mortality ratio was 13.3 (95% CI = 11.2 to 15.8) overall, 23.1 (95% CI = 17.6 to 29.7) for women, and 10.0 (95% CI = 7.9 to 12.5) for men. The nonrecurrence-progression non-external cause standardized mortality ratio (subsequent non-ES malignant neoplasms and cardiac and pulmonary causes potentially attributable to ES treatment) was 8.7 (95% CI = 6.2 to 12.0). Twenty-five years after ES diagnosis, cumulative incidence of subsequent malignant neoplasms, excluding nonmelanoma skin cancers, was 9.0% (95% CI = 5.8 to 12.2). Compared with siblings, survivors had an increased risk of severe, life-threatening, or disabling chronic health conditions (relative risk = 6.0, 95% CI = 4.1 to 9.0). Survivors had lower fertility rates (women: P = .005; men: P < .001) and higher rates of moderate to extreme adverse health status (P < .001). Long-term survivors of childhood ES exhibit excess mortality and morbidity.

  6. Gastric cancer in atomic bomb survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oshiro, Hisashi; Itamoto, Toshiyuki; Sumimoto, Ryo [Hiroshima Prefectural Hiroshima Hospital (Japan)] [and others

    1994-10-01

    This is a retrospective review of gastric cancer in A-bomb survivors. Firstly, surgical cases of gastric cancer (1968-88) were compared in 514 A-bomb survivors and 1,092 non-exposed persons. The average age was 63.5 years in the exposed group and 60.0 years in the non-exposed group. Although there were much more men than women in the non-exposed group (67.3% vs 32.7%), there was no great difference in the exposed group (56.0% vs 44.0%). The frequency of early gastric cancer tended to be higher in the exposed group, and thus, both the curative resection and 5-year survival rates were slightly higher. This seems to have been attributed to periodical health examination for A-bomb survivors. Secondly, the frequency of gastric cancer was examined in relation to the age at the time of A-bombing (ATA). According to the ATA, 538 A-bomb survivors (1968-89) were divided into the <19 year group (n=118), 20-29 year group (n=134), 30-39 year group (n=178), and >40 year group (n=108). The <19 year group accounted for more A-bomb survivors directly exposed to A-bombing. Using 1,138 other non-exposed patients as controls, there was no factors specific to the exposed group. Thirdly, the distance from the hypocenter was examined in 569 A-bomb survivors (1966-1990) by dividing them into the {<=}2.0 km group (n=137), >2.1 km group (n=168), and secondarily exposed group (n=264). In all three groups, well-differentiated cancer was predominant. The frequency of poorly differentiated cancer was higher in those exposed nearer the hypocenter; this was significant in both the {<=}2.0 km and >2.1 km groups than the secondarily exposed group. In directly exposed groups, the frequency of poorly differentiated cancer was high in the age group of <50 and the frequency of well differentiated cancer was high in the age group of >60. This suggests the relationship between exposure doses and poorly differentiated gastric cancer. (N.K.).

  7. Information technology equipment cooling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Mark D.

    2014-06-10

    According to one embodiment, a system for removing heat from a rack of information technology equipment may include a sidecar indoor air to liquid heat exchanger that cools warm air generated by the rack of information technology equipment. The system may also include a liquid to liquid heat exchanger and an outdoor heat exchanger. The system may further include configurable pathways to connect and control fluid flow through the sidecar heat exchanger, the liquid to liquid heat exchanger, the rack of information technology equipment, and the outdoor heat exchanger based upon ambient temperature and/or ambient humidity to remove heat from the rack of information technology equipment.

  8. Negotiating optimum capital equipment acquisitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pols, A L

    1999-06-01

    Healthcare organizations planning capital equipment acquisitions should negotiate with more than one equipment vendor and determine the equipment purchase price, service agreement price, and financing or leasing option rate separately to avoid hidden costs. The purchase price should be negotiated first. A long-term service agreement should be locked in, or service insurance purchased, for the length of the financing or lease agreement. The equipment vendor's financing agreement should be compared with offers from third parties, who may have more beneficial financing options or more flexible lease arrangements.

  9. Employment status and occupational level of adult survivors of childhood cancer in Great Britain: The British childhood cancer survivor study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frobisher, Clare; Lancashire, Emma R; Jenkinson, Helen; Winter, David L; Kelly, Julie; Reulen, Raoul C; Hawkins, Michael M

    2017-06-15

    The British Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (BCCSS) provides the first detailed investigation of employment and occupation to be undertaken in a large population-based cohort. Previous studies have been limited by design issues such as using small numbers of survivors with specific diagnoses, and involved limited assessment of employment status and occupational level. The BCCSS includes 17,981 5-year survivors of childhood cancer. Employment status and occupational level were ascertained by questionnaire from eligible survivors (n = 14,836). Multivariate logistic regression was used to explore factors associated with employment and occupation, and to compare survivors to their demographic peers in the general population. Employment status was available for 10,257 survivors. Gender, current age, cancer type, radiotherapy, age at diagnosis and epilepsy were consistently associated with being: employed; unable to work; in managerial or non-manual occupations. Overall, survivors were less likely to be working than expected (OR (99% CI): 0.89 (0.81-0.98)), and this deficit was greatest for irradiated CNS neoplasm survivors (0.34 (0.28-0.41)). Compared to the general population, survivors were fivefold more likely to be unable to work due to illness/disability; the excess was 15-fold among CNS neoplasm survivors treated with radiotherapy. Overall survivors were less likely to be in managerial occupations than expected (0.85 (0.77-0.94)). However, bone sarcoma survivors were more likely to be in these occupations than expected (1.37 (1.01-1.85)) and also similarly for non-manual occupations (1.90 (1.37-2.62)). Survivors of retinoblastoma (1.55 (1.20-2.01)) and 'other' neoplasm group (1.62 (1.30-2.03)) were also more likely to be in non-manual occupations than expected. © 2017 The Authors International Journal of Cancer published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of UICC.

  10. Who are happy survivors? Physical, psychosocial, and spiritual factors associated with happiness of breast cancer survivors during the transition from cancer patient to survivor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Danbee; Kim, Im-Ryung; Choi, Eun-Kyung; Yoon, Jung Hee; Lee, Se-Kyung; Lee, Jeong Eon; Nam, Seok Jin; Han, Wonshik; Noh, Dong-Young; Cho, Juhee

    2017-02-24

    This study aims to evaluate physical, psychosocial, and spiritual factors associated with happiness in breast cancer survivors during the reentry period. It is a cross-sectional study with 283 nonmetastatic breast cancer survivors who completed treatment within 1 year. We included survivors who completed questionnaires on happiness and health-related quality of life (QoL) 2 years after cancer diagnosis. Happiness and QoL was measured using the Subjective Happiness Scale and EORTC QLQ-C30, respectively. Multivariable logistic regression was used to find factors associated with happiness. The mean age of the study participants was 48.5 ± 7.8 years. Among the 283 survivors, 14.5%, 43.8%, 32.5%, and 2.1% reported being "very happy," "happy," "neutral," and "not happy at all," respectively. Happy survivors reported a better general health status and QoL (67.6 vs 49.6; P Happy survivors were more likely to feel certain about the future (27.2% vs 11.9%, P happiness. During the reentry period, breast cancer survivors who are hopeful and have a clear purpose in life are more likely to be happy than those who are not. Setting proper life goals might be beneficial to help breast cancer survivors who experience persistent QoL issues. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. NT-proBNP as Early Marker of Subclinical Late Cardiotoxicity after Doxorubicin Therapy and Mediastinal Irradiation in Childhood Cancer Survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal Zidan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Childhood cancer survivors treated with anthracyclines and mediastinal irradiation are at risk for late onset cardiotoxicity. Aims of the Study. To assess the role of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP and tissue Doppler imaging (TDI as early predictors of late onset cardiotoxicity in asymptomatic survivors of childhood cancer treated with doxorubicin with or without mediastinal irradiation. Methods. A cross-sectional study on 58 asymptomatic survivors of childhood cancer who received doxorubicin in their treatment protocols and 32 asymptomatic Hodgkin’s lymphoma survivors who received anthracycline and mediastinal irradiation. Levels of NT-proBNP, TDI, and conventional echocardiography were determined. Results. Thirty percent of survivors had abnormal NT-proBNP levels. It was significantly related to age at diagnosis, duration of follow-up, and cumulative dose of doxorubicin. TDI detected myocardial affection in 20% more than conventional echocardiography. Furthermore, abnormalities in TDI and NT-pro-BNP levels were more common in Hodgkin lymphoma survivors receiving both chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Conclusions. TDI could detect early cardiac dysfunction even in those with normal conventional echocardiography. Measurement of NT-proBNP represents an interesting strategy for detecting subclinical cardiotoxicity. We recommend prospective and multicenter studies to validate the role of NT-proBNP as an early marker for late onset doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity.

  12. Management of Unexplained Symptoms in Survivors of Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuerstein, Michael; Bruns, Gina L.; Pollman, Courtney; Todd, Briana L.

    2010-01-01

    Quality health care for survivors of cancer must evaluate and manage symptoms that are reported at the surveillance visit but are not linked to a cancer recurrence or a new cancer. At present, this does not always occur. This article analyzes quality of health care for survivors of cancer, taking empirical evidence and clinical expertise into consideration. Although emotional distress on the part of the survivor of cancer may exacerbate or even explain the presence of experienced symptoms, there are other potential explanations as well. When survivors present with persistent symptoms (even if unexplained) after cancer diagnosis and treatment, the symptoms can impact the survivor's function and well-being. Oncologists and other providers need to assess and directly target these symptoms for appropriate triage to those who can best help these survivors reduce the symptoms and their impact. PMID:21358961

  13. THE PREVENTION PROGRAMS OF PHYSICAL REHABILITATION FOR CHERNOBYL DISASTER SURVIVORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korobeynikov G.V.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study: approbation of the prevention program of physical rehabilitation for Chernobyl disaster survivors in lifestyle aspects. Sixty persons who were disaster survivors and workers of Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant aged 32-60 have rehabilitation during 21 days. The complex of training prevention programs of physical and psycho-emotional rehabilitation methods was elaborated. The study of efficacy of training prevention programs among Chernobyl disaster survivors. The results showed the improvement of psycho-emotional status and normalization of cardiovascular vegetative regulation after training prevention programs in Chernobyl disasters survivors. The studies show that the preventive programs for Chernobyl disaster survivors in lifestyle aspects had the high effect. This displays the decrease of tempo of aging and the improving of physical and psychological health status of Chernobyl disaster survivors during preventive course.

  14. The epidemiology of long- and short-term cancer survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jarlbæk, Lene; Christensen, Linda; Bruera, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    , 2.4% lung cancer. Short-term survivors: 21% lung cancer, 7.2% breast cancer. Chemotherapy was provided to 15% of all patients, and to 10% of the 60 + year olds. Discussion. The epidemiology of long- and short-term survivors shows significant differences with regard to age at TOCD, cancer types......' difference in age at TOCD was seen between long- and short-term survivors, with median ages of 60 versus 72 years, respectively. Females comprised 64% of long-term, and 46% of short-term survivors. The proportion of breast and lung cancers differed between the groups: Long-term survivors: 31% breast cancer......Introduction. In this study, we present data from a population-based cohort of incident cancer patients separated in long- and short-term survivors. Our aim was to procure denominators for use in the planning of rehabilitation and palliative care programs. Material and methods. A registry...

  15. Providing services to trafficking survivors: Understanding practices across the globe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Jordan J; Kynn, Jamie; Stylianou, Amanda M; Postmus, Judy L

    2018-01-01

    Human trafficking is a global issue, with survivors representing all genders, ages, races, ethnicities, religions, and countries. However, little research exists that identifies effective practices in supporting survivors of human trafficking. The research that does exist is Western-centric. To fill this gap in the literature, the goal of this research was to understand practices used throughout the globe with adult human trafficking survivors. A qualitative approach was utilized. Providers from 26 countries, across six different continents, were interviewed to allow for a comprehensive and multi-faceted understanding of practices in working with survivors. Participants identified utilizing an empowerment-based, survivor, and human life-centered approach to working with survivors, emphasized the importance of engaging in community level interventions, and highlighted the importance of government recognition of human trafficking. Findings provide information from the perspective of advocates on best practices in the field that can be used by agencies to enhance human trafficking programming.

  16. 23 CFR 140.910 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Equipment. 140.910 Section 140.910 Highways FEDERAL... Railroad Work § 140.910 Equipment. (a) Company owned equipment. Cost of company-owned equipment may be... equipment. Where company owned equipment is not available, reimbursement will be limited to the amount of...

  17. Reduced male fertility in childhood cancer survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Hee Lee

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available With advances in cancer treatment, more pediatric cancer patients have increased their life expectancy. Because cancer-related therapy causes various physical and psychological problems, many male survivors experience later problems with thyroid and sexual functions, and with growth. As outcomes have improved, more survivors need to maintain their reproductive function to maximize their long-term quality of life. Cancer and cancer-related treatment can impair fertility by damage to the testes, to the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, or to the genitourinary organs. Prior radiation therapy to the testes, the use of alkylating agents, and central hypogonadism further impair fertility in male survivors of childhood cancer. Following any course of chemotherapy, peripubertal maturation, any testicular volume changes, and symptoms of androgen deficiency should be monitored systematically. If patients request fertility testing, spermatogenesis status can be evaluated either directly by semen analysis or indirectly by determination of the levels of testosterone/gonadotropins and by monitoring any changes in testicular volume. According to the patient's condition, semen cryopreservation, hormonal therapy, or assisted reproduction technologies should be provided.

  18. Process theology's relevance for older survivors of domestic violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowland, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    Pastoral work with survivors of domestic violence may reveal theological struggles. Understandings of scripture that reinforce a sense of powerlessness and alienation from God may contribute to an impaired relationship and limit resources for healing. One framework for re-imaging a relationship with God is process theology. This framework was applied to a case study for one survivor. The application resulted in a line of inquiry that may assist survivors in their healing process.

  19. School attendance in childhood cancer survivors and their siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Amy E; Tsangaris, Elena; Barrera, Maru; Guger, Sharon; Brown, Robert; Urbach, Stacey; Stephens, Derek; Nathan, Paul C

    2013-01-01

    To investigate school absenteeism among childhood cancer survivors and their siblings and examine factors related to absenteeism in survivors. A cross-sectional study was conducted among consecutive cancer survivors attending a large pediatric cancer survivor clinic. Absenteeism rates were obtained for survivors and their closest in age sibling from school report cards. Absenteeism was compared with a population control group of 167752 students using 1-sample t tests. The Child Vulnerability Scale, Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory, and Behavior Assessment System for Children were administered to survivors. Univariate and multiple regression analyses assessed variables associated with days absent. One hundred thirty-one survivors (median age at assessment: 13.4 years, range 8.0-19.2; median age at diagnosis: 9.4 years, range 4.3-17.3) and 77 siblings (median age at assessment: 13 years, age range 7-18) participated. Survivors and siblings missed significantly more school days than the population control group (mean ± SD: 9.6 ± 9.2 and 9.9 ± 9.8 vs 5.0 ± 5.6 days, respectively, P sibling pairs (N = 77), there was no difference in absenteeism (9.6 ± 9.2 vs 9.9 ± 9.8 days, P = .85). Absenteeism in survivors was significantly associated with a low Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory Physical Health Summary Score (P = .01). Parents' perception of their child's vulnerability and emotional and social functioning were not associated with absenteeism. Childhood cancer survivors and siblings miss more school than the general population. The only predictor of absenteeism in survivors is poor physical quality of health. More research should be devoted to school attendance and other outcomes in siblings of childhood cancer survivors. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Hospitalization Rates Among Survivors of Young Adult Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Devon P; Daly, Corinne; Sutradhar, Rinku; Paszat, Lawrence F; Wilton, Andrew S; Rabeneck, Linda; Baxter, Nancy N

    2015-08-20

    There are limited data on health care use among survivors of young adult cancers. We aimed to describe patterns of hospitalization among a cohort of long-term survivors compared with noncancer controls. Persons diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 44 years with malignancies in Ontario, Canada, from 1992 to 1999, who lived at least 5 years recurrence free, were identified using the Ontario Cancer Registry and matched to noncancer controls. Hospitalizations were determined using hospital discharges, and rates were compared between survivors and controls. The absolute excess rate of hospitalizations was determined for each type of malignancy in survivors per 100 person-years of follow-up. The cohort included 20,275 survivors and 101,344 noncancer controls. During the study period, 6,948 (34.3%) survivors were admitted to the hospital and the adjusted relative rate (ARR) of hospitalizations in survivors compared with controls was 1.51 (95% CI, 1.48 to 1.54). The rate of hospitalization was highest for survivors of upper GI, leukemia, and urologic malignancies. The hospitalization rate (per person) for survivors significantly decreased from 0.22 in the first time period examined (5 to 8 years after diagnosis) to 0.15 in the last time period examined (18 to 20 years after diagnosis, P < .0001). However, at all time periods, survivors were more likely to be hospitalized than controls (ARR at 5 to 8 years, 1.67 [95% CI, 1.57 to 1.81]; ARR at 18 to 20 years, 1.22 [95% CI, 1.08 to 1.37]). Survivors of young adult cancers have an increased rate of hospitalization compared with controls. The rate of hospitalization for 20-year survivors did not return to baseline, indicating a substantial and persistent burden of late effects among this generally young population. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  1. Physical Activity in Child and Adolescent Cancer Survivors: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Gilliam, Margaux B.; Schwebel, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Childhood cancer survivors are at increased risk for future health problems. As such, physical activity (PA) has been targeted as a health promotion priority in child and adolescent cancer survivors. Research indicates that a large portion of pediatric survivors do not meet PA recommendations. Using Bronfenbrenner’s ecological theory as a framework, this review presents a conceptual model to explain child and adolescent survivors’ PA. The model considers predictors of PA across six domains: (...

  2. Rehabilitation in cancer survivors - with focus on physical activity

    OpenAIRE

    Gjerset, Gunhild Maria

    2012-01-01

    The number of cancer survivors in the Western world has markedly increased over the last few decades. With the growing number of survivors, it has become relevant to address the health of cancer survivors and how to improve it. The malignancy, and more often the cancer treatment, might have negative effects upon physical and psychological aspects of the survivors’ health. For those who experience such adverse effects, professional assistance in addition to their own efforts might be needed in...

  3. THE PREVENTION PROGRAMS OF PHYSICAL REHABILITATION FOR CHERNOBYL DISASTER SURVIVORS

    OpenAIRE

    Korobeynikov G.V.; Drojjin V.U.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study: approbation of the prevention program of physical rehabilitation for Chernobyl disaster survivors in lifestyle aspects. Sixty persons who were disaster survivors and workers of Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant aged 32-60 have rehabilitation during 21 days. The complex of training prevention programs of physical and psycho-emotional rehabilitation methods was elaborated. The study of efficacy of training prevention programs among Chernobyl disaster survivors. The results...

  4. Food Service Equipment and Appurtenances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Sanitation Foundation, Ann Arbor, MI.

    Equipment design specifications are presented relating to tables of all kinds, counters, sinks and drainboards, bins, shelves, drawers, hoods and similar kitchen appurtenances, not including baking, roasting, toasting, broiling or frying equipment, food preparation machinery such as slicers, choppers, and cutters, mixers and grinders, steam…

  5. Genetic and clinical factors associated with obesity among adult survivors of childhood cancer: a report from the St. Jude Lifetime cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Carmen L.; Liu, Wei; Yang, Jun J.; Kang, Guolian; Ojha, Rohit P.; Neale, Geoffrey; Srivastava, Deo Kumar; Gurney, James G.; Hudson, Melissa M.; Robison, Leslie L.; Ness, Kirsten K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We aimed to identify treatment and genetic factors associated with obesity among childhood cancer survivors. Methods Participants included 1996 survivors previously treated for cancer at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital who survived ≥10 years from diagnosis (median age at diagnosis 7.2 years, median age at follow-up 32.4 years). Obesity was defined as a body mass index ≥30kg/m2. Factors associated with adult obesity were identified by subgroup-specific (cranial radiation (CRT) exposure status) multivariable logistic regression. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with obesity were identified by subgroup-specific exploratory genome-wide association analyses (two-stage resampling approach with type I error rate=5×10−6). Results Forty-seven percent and 29.4% of survivors treated with or without receive CRT were obese at evaluation, respectively. In multivariable analyses, abdominal/pelvic radiation exposure was associated with decreased prevalence of obesity among survivors regardless of cranial radiation (pobesity were increased among survivors treated with CRT who had also received glucocorticoids (p=0.014), or who were younger at diagnosis (p=0.013). Among survivors treated with CRT, 166 SNPs were associated with obesity. The strongest association was observed with rs35669975 (p=3.3×10−8) on 13q33.3, approximately 30kb downstream of FAM155A. SNPs within GLRA3, and near SOX11 and CDH18 were also identified. These genes have been implicated in neural growth, repair, and connectivity. Conclusion Obesity in childhood cancer survivors remains associated with previous CRT and glucocorticoid exposures. Genetic variants related to neural connectivity may modify the risk of obesity among survivors treated with cranial radiation. Validation of our findings in independent cohorts is required. PMID:25963547

  6. Influence of kitesurf equipment on injury rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumbach, Sebastian F; Stawinski, Tanja; Schmitz, Daniel; Schoeneberg, Carsten; Jäger, Marcus; Wedemeyer, Christian; Kauther, Max D

    2017-07-24

    Various injuries in kitesurfing (KS) have been reported so far. The aim of this study was to validate the effect of different kite designs and safety equipment on the injury rate compared to older studies. A retrospective epidemiological study based on an anonymous face-to-face survey was conducted amongst active kitesurfers. The questionnaire consisted of 66 questions focusing on the equipment used, injury rates, overuse injuries and gender differences. A stepwise Poisson- Model was used to identify injury-associated factors. A total of 202 kitesurfers with a mean age of 31.8±9.1 years and 698.2±931.5 hours of KS experience were included. 2613 injuries were recorded (18.5/1000 hours KS). Almost 50% were haematomas, bruises or cuts. 3.9% of all injuries (0.71/1,000 hours KS) were time-loss injuries of more than one week. Female kitesurfers had a significantly greater injury rate, were less experienced and fewer of them used C-Kites. Height, weight, primary kite spot, experience, physical activity, warm-up/stretching, the type of kite and control bar used, and the use of a board leash were independent factors associated to injury rate. The lower extremity, the elbow, thorax and abdomen were at risk for overuse injuries. An influence of equipment on injuries could be statistically shown. The overall injury rate in KS did not decline in the last decades, but time-loss injuries did.

  7. Information technology equipment cooling method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Mark D.

    2015-10-20

    According to one embodiment, a system for removing heat from a rack of information technology equipment may include a sidecar indoor air to liquid heat exchanger that cools air utilized by the rack of information technology equipment to cool the rack of information technology equipment. The system may also include a liquid to liquid heat exchanger and an outdoor heat exchanger. The system may further include configurable pathways to connect and control fluid flow through the sidecar heat exchanger, the liquid to liquid heat exchanger, the rack of information technology equipment, and the outdoor heat exchanger based upon ambient temperature and/or ambient humidity to remove heat generated by the rack of information technology equipment.

  8. Lost Productivity in Stroke Survivors: An Econometrics Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Manav V; Hackam, Daniel G; Silver, Frank L; Laporte, Audrey; Kapral, Moira K

    2016-01-01

    Stroke leads to a substantial societal economic burden. Loss of productivity among stroke survivors is a significant contributor to the indirect costs associated with stroke. We aimed to characterize productivity and factors associated with employability in stroke survivors. We used the Canadian Community Health Survey 2011-2012 to identify stroke survivors and employment status. We used multivariable logistic models to determine the impact of stroke on employment and on factors associated with employability, and used Heckman models to estimate the effect of stroke on productivity (number of hours worked/week and hourly wages). We included data from 91,633 respondents between 18 and 70 years and identified 923 (1%) stroke survivors. Stroke survivors were less likely to be employed (adjusted OR 0.39, 95% CI 0.33-0.46) and had hourly wages 17.5% (95% CI 7.7-23.7) lower compared to the general population, although there was no association between work hours and being a stroke survivor. We found that factors like older age, not being married, and having medical comorbidities were associated with lower odds of employment in stroke survivors in our sample. Stroke survivors are less likely to be employed and they earn a lower hourly wage than the general population. Interventions such as dedicated vocational rehabilitation and policies targeting return to work could be considered to address this lost productivity among stroke survivors. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. SECONDARY GASTROINTESTINAL MALIGNANCIES IN CHILDHOOD CANCER SURVIVORS: A COHORT STUDY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Tara O.; Oeffinger, Kevin C.; Whitton, John; Leisenring, Wendy; Neglia, Joseph; Meadows, Anna; Crotty, Catherine; Rubin, David T.; Diller, Lisa; Inskip, Peter; Smith, Susan A.; Stovall, Marilyn; Constine, Louis S.; Hammond, Sue; Armstrong, Greg T.; Robison, Leslie L.; Nathan, Paul C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Childhood cancer survivors develop gastrointestinal malignancies more frequently and at a younger age than the general population, but risk factors for their development have not been well characterized. Objective To determine the risk and associated risk factors for gastrointestinal subsequent malignant neoplasms (SMN) in childhood cancer survivors. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting The Childhood Cancer Survivor Study, a multi-center study of childhood cancer survivors diagnosed between 1970 and 1986. Patients 14,358 survivors of a malignancy diagnosed at cancer survivors than the general population (95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.5-6.1). Colorectal cancer SIR was 4.2 (95% CI: 2.8-6.3). The highest gastrointestinal SMN risk was associated with abdominal radiation (SIR=11.2, 95% CI: 7.6-16.4). However, survivors not exposed to radiation had a significantly increased risk (SIR=2.4, 95% CI-1.4-3.9). In addition to abdominal radiation, high dose procarbazine (RR=3.2, 95% CI 1.1-9.4) and platinum drugs (RR 7.6, 95% CI: 2.3-25.5) independently increased the gastrointestinal SMN risk. Limitations This cohort has not yet attained an age at which gastrointestinal malignancy risk is greatest. Conclusions Childhood cancer survivors, particularly those exposed to abdominal radiation, are at increased risk for gastrointestinal SMN. These findings suggest that surveillance of at-risk childhood cancer survivors should commence at a younger age than recommended for the general population. PMID:22665813

  10. Life satisfaction in adult survivors of childhood brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crom, Deborah B; Li, Zhenghong; Brinkman, Tara M; Hudson, Melissa M; Armstrong, Gregory T; Neglia, Joseph; Ness, Kirsten K

    2014-01-01

    Adult survivors of childhood brain tumors experience multiple, significant, lifelong deficits as a consequence of their malignancy and therapy. Current survivorship literature documents the substantial impact such impairments have on survivors' physical health and quality of life. Psychosocial reports detail educational, cognitive, and emotional limitations characterizing survivors as especially fragile, often incompetent, and unreliable in evaluating their circumstances. Anecdotal data suggest some survivors report life experiences similar to those of healthy controls. The aim of our investigation was to determine whether life satisfaction in adult survivors of childhood brain tumors differs from that of healthy controls and to identify potential predictors of life satisfaction in survivors. This cross-sectional study compared 78 brain tumor survivors with population-based matched controls. Chi-square tests, t tests, and linear regression models were used to investigate patterns of life satisfaction and identify potential correlates. Results indicated that life satisfaction of adult survivors of childhood brain tumors was similar to that of healthy controls. Survivors' general health expectations emerged as the primary correlate of life satisfaction. Understanding life satisfaction as an important variable will optimize the design of strategies to enhance participation in follow-up care, reduce suffering, and optimize quality of life in this vulnerable population. © 2014 by Association of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Nurses.

  11. Equipe de trabalho

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Gerber Hornink

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available   Equipe de Trabalho 2014 1. Equipe editorial Editor-Chefe Bayardo Bapstista Torres, Instituto de Química - USP, Brasil Eduardo Galembeck, Departamento de Bioquímica Instituto de Biologia UNICAMP, Brasil   Editores Gabriel Gerber Hornink, Depto. Bioquímica, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, Universidade - Federal de Alfenas - Unifal-MG, Brasil Vera Maria Treis Trindade, Instituto de Ciências Básicas da Saúde, Departamento de Bioquímica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil   Corpo Editorial Adriana Cassina, Departamento de Bioquímica, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de la República, Uruguai Angel Herráez, Departamento de Bioquímica y Biología molecular, Universidad de Alcalá de Henares, Madrid, Espanha André Amaral Gonçalves Bianco, Universidade Federal de São Paulo (Unifesp, Brasil Denise Vaz de Macedo, Departamento de Bioquímica, Instituto de Biologia, Universidade Estadual de Campinas - Unicamp, Brasil Eneida de Paula, Departamento de Bioquímica, Instituto de Biologia, Universidade Estadual de Campinas - Unicamp, Brasil Guilherme Andrade Marson, Instituto de Química - USP, Brasil Jose Antonio Martinez Oyanedel, Universidad de Concepción, Chile Josep Maria Fernández Novell, Dept. Bioquímica i Biologia Molecular Universitat de Barcelona, Espanha Leila Maria Beltramini, Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade Estadual de São Paulo - USP, Brasil Manuel João da Costa, Escola de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade do Minho, Portugal Maria Lucia Bianconi, Instituto de Bioquímica Médica Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ, Brasil María Noel Alvarez, Departamento de Bioquímica, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de la República, Uruguai Miguel Ángel Medina Torres, Department of Molecular Biology & Biochemistry Faculty of Sciences University of Málaga, Espanha Nelma Regina Segnini Bossolan, Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo - USP, Brasil Paulo De Avila

  12. Clinical and Genetic Risk Prediction of Subsequent CNS Tumors in Survivors of Childhood Cancer: A Report From the COG ALTE03N1 Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuexia; Sun, Can-Lan; Hageman, Lindsey; Smith, Kandice; Singh, Purnima; Desai, Sunil; Hawkins, Douglas S; Hudson, Melissa M; Mascarenhas, Leo; Neglia, Joseph P; Oeffinger, Kevin C; Ritchey, A Kim; Robison, Leslie L; Villaluna, Doojduen; Landier, Wendy; Bhatia, Smita

    2017-10-04

    Purpose Survivors of childhood cancer treated with cranial radiation therapy are at risk for subsequent CNS tumors. However, significant interindividual variability in risk suggests a role for genetic susceptibility and provides an opportunity to identify survivors of childhood cancer at increased risk for these tumors. Methods We curated candidate genetic variants from previously published studies in adult-onset primary CNS tumors and replicated these in survivors of childhood cancer with and without subsequent CNS tumors (82 participants and 228 matched controls). We developed prediction models to identify survivors at high or low risk for subsequent CNS tumors and validated these models in an independent matched case-control sample (25 participants and 54 controls). Results We demonstrated an association between six previously published single nucleotide polymorphisms (rs15869 [ BRCA2], rs1805389 [ LIG4], rs8079544 [ TP53], rs25489 [ XRCC1], rs1673041 [ POLD1], and rs11615 [ ERCC1]) and subsequent CNS tumors in survivors of childhood cancer. Including genetic variants in a Final Model containing age at primary cancer, sex, and cranial radiation therapy dose yielded an area under the curve of 0.81 (95% CI, 0.76 to 0.86), which was superior ( P = .002) to the Clinical Model (area under the curve, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.66 to 0.80). The prediction model was successfully validated. The sensitivity and specificity of predicting survivors of childhood cancer at highest or lowest risk of subsequent CNS tumors was 87.5% and 83.5%, respectively. Conclusion It is possible to identify survivors of childhood cancer at high or low risk for subsequent CNS tumors on the basis of genetic and clinical information. This information can be used to inform surveillance for early detection of subsequent CNS tumors.

  13. Intensive care survivor-reported symptoms: a longitudinal study of survivors' symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langerud, Anne Kathrine; Rustøen, Tone; Småstuen, Milada Cvancarova; Kongsgaard, Ulf; Stubhaug, Audun

    2018-01-01

    There is growing interest in potential long-term outcomes following intensive care, but few researchers have studied the prevalence of multiple symptoms or the association between pain and other symptoms. To investigate the prevalence of anxiety, depression, fatigue, sleep disturbance and post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) among intensive care survivors 3 months and 1 year after being discharged from an intensive care unit (ICU) and to determine whether pain is associated with higher prevalence of these symptoms 3 months and 1 year after ICU stay. Exploratory, longitudinal cohort of intensive care survivors from two mixed ICUs in a tertiary referral hospital in Norway. Intensive care survivors completed surveys at 3 months (n = 118) and 1 year (n = 89) after ICU discharge. Clinical Trials: NCT02279212. Prevalence rates of intensive care survivors' symptoms were pain 58 (49·2%), anxiety/depression 24/118 (20·8%), fatigue 18/118(15·3%), PTSS 15 (12·8%) and sleep disturbance 58/118 (49·2%) at 3 months after ICU discharge (n = 118). Prevalence rates at 1 year (n = 89) changed only slightly to pain 34 (38·2%), anxiety/depression 17 (20·0%), fatigue 12 (13·8%), PTSS 13 (15·1%) and sleep disturbance 40/89 (46·5%). Associations were strong between pain and presence of sleep disturbance, anxiety/depression, PTSS and fatigue. Intensive care survivors have multiple symptoms and the prevalence rates of these symptoms remained almost unchanged from 3 months to 1 year after ICU discharge. The presence of pain was associated with high odds for the presence of sleep disturbance, anxiety/depression, PTSS and fatigue, compared to a no-pain group. ICU survivors may benefit from targeted interventions designed to alleviate the symptom burden. Knowledge about ICU survivor's prevalence and risk for having multiple symptoms may help health care professionals to give better care, if needed, to the ICU survivors. © 2017 British Association of Critical Care

  14. Content Analysis of a Participant-Directed Intervention to Optimize Activity Engagement of Older Adult Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Kathleen Doyle; Newman, Robin; Adachi-Mejia, Anna M; Whipple, Jessica; Hegel, Mark T

    2018-01-01

    Many older adult cancer survivors reduce their activity level during and after cancer treatment. Occupational therapy interventions need to flexibly address various obstacles to occupational engagement that survivors may face. The aim of this analysis was to describe the content of a participant-directed occupational therapy intervention for older adults with cancer. Content analysis was used to describe the treatment session data from the experimental arm of a pilot randomized controlled trial in terms of activities addressed, obstacles reported, and treatment strategies utilized. Participants predominantly used the intervention to increase exercise engagement or address instrumental activities of daily living. The most common obstacles to occupational engagement included fatigue, finding time, weather, and pain. Regarding treatment strategies, 77% of participants chose to practice the activity with the occupational therapist, 42% requested a piece of equipment, and 11% modified the environment to increase activity engagement. Overall, the participant-directed intervention appears flexible enough to address various activities and obstacles to occupational engagement.

  15. Prediction of hygiene in food processing equipment using flow modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Alan; Jensen, Bo Boye Busk

    2002-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has been applied to investigate the design of closed process equipment with respect to cleanability. The CFD simulations were validated using the standardized cleaning test proposed by the European Hygienic Engineering and Design Group. CFD has been proven as a ...

  16. Development of a short version of the Dutch version of the Spielberger STAI Trait Anxiety Scale in women suspected of breast cancer and breast cancer survivors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, J.; van Heck, G.L.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to develop a short form of the Dutch version of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) Trait scale and to provide initial validation data in a sample of breast cancer patients and survivors. This short trait anxiety (A-Trait) scale was designed to reduce time

  17. Fear of cancer recurrence in adult cancer survivors: a systematic review of quantitative studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simard, Sébastien; Thewes, Belinda; Humphris, Gerry; Dixon, Mélanie; Hayden, Ceara; Mireskandari, Shab; Ozakinci, Gozde

    2013-09-01

    Fear of cancer recurrence (FCR) is among the most commonly reported problems and one of the most prevalent areas of unmet needs for cancer survivors and their carers. This review aims to provide a comprehensive overview of current scientific knowledge on FCR and to formulate recommendations for future research. A systematic review was undertaken to identify quantitative studies associated with FCR. Relevant studies were identified via Medline, CINAHL, PsycINFO and AMED databases from 1996 through December 2011. Data from 130 eligible papers were extracted and summarized following a systematic scheme. Multiple FCR assessment methods were identified. Survivors reported low to moderate level of FCR but considered it as one of the top greatest concerns and the most frequently endorsed unmet need. FCR remains stable over the survivorship trajectory. Younger age, presence and severity of physical symptoms, psychological distress and lower quality of life were associated with higher FCR. Health behaviours, psychological reactions and functional impairments were identified as FCR consequences. Carers reported higher FCR than the patients. Limited data on interventions were available. FCR research has expanded somewhat haphazardly over the last 20 years. Adopted consensual definition and used well-validated measures will be necessary. Longitudinal research examining the longer-term development and impact of FCR is clearly needed. The proposal and evaluation of theoretical models of FCR is a priority. Identifying the key features of FCR will stimulate the research and the development of targeted interventions for cancer survivors and their carers.

  18. Unmet needs of gynaecological cancer survivors: implications for developing community support services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beesley, Vanessa; Eakin, Elizabeth; Steginga, Suzanne; Aitken, Joanne; Dunn, Jeff; Battistutta, Diana

    2008-04-01

    After treatment completion, gynaecological cancer survivors may face long-term challenges and late effects, specific to this disease. Available research on supportive care needs of women with gynaecological cancer is limited. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and correlates of unmet needs within a population of gynaecological cancer survivors. Eight hundred and two women participated in a population-based mail survey in 2004 (56% response rate). The questionnaire included a validated instrument to assess 45 need items across multiple supportive care domains, and a range of measures to evaluate related correlates consistent with a social-ecological perspective. Forty-three per cent of respondents reported having at least one moderate- or high-level unmet need. The five highest included needing help with fear about the cancer spreading (17%), concerns about the worries of those close to them (15%), uncertainty about the future (14%), lack of energy/tiredness (14%), and not being able to do things they used to do (14%). Subgroups of women with higher odds of reporting 'some' unmet needs across multiple supportive care domains include those who, are not in remission, live with lymphoedema or are unable to work due to illness. Odds were also higher for women who had undergone more recent treatment, and who lived in rural or remote locations. Further assistance with the top specific concerns of gynaecological cancer survivors is recommended. Identified subgroups with higher needs are important targets for support. Copyright 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Randomized controlled trial of mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) for survivors of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengacher, Cecile A; Johnson-Mallard, Versie; Post-White, Janice; Moscoso, Manolete S; Jacobsen, Paul B; Klein, Thomas W; Widen, Raymond H; Fitzgerald, Shirley G; Shelton, Melissa M; Barta, Michelle; Goodman, Matthew; Cox, Charles E; Kip, Kevin E

    2009-12-01

    Considerable morbidity persists among survivors of breast cancer (BC) including high levels of psychological stress, anxiety, depression, fear of recurrence, and physical symptoms including pain, fatigue, and sleep disturbances, and impaired quality of life. Effective interventions are needed during this difficult transitional period. We conducted a randomized controlled trial of 84 female BC survivors (Stages 0-III) recruited from the H. Lee Moffitt Cancer and Research Institute. All subjects were within 18 months of treatment completion with surgery and adjuvant radiation and/or chemotherapy. Subjects were randomly assigned to a 6-week Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) program designed to self-regulate arousal to stressful circumstances or symptoms (n=41) or to usual care (n=43). Outcome measures compared at 6 weeks by random assignment included validated measures of psychological status (depression, anxiety, perceived stress, fear of recurrence, optimism, social support) and psychological and physical subscales of quality of life (SF-36). Compared with usual care, subjects assigned to MBSR(BC) had significantly lower (two-sided pMBSR tended to experience greater improvements in measures of energy and physical functioning. Among BC survivors within 18 months of treatment completion, a 6-week MBSR(BC) program resulted in significant improvements in psychological status and quality of life compared with usual care.

  20. Model-based equipment diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, David J.; Strojwas, Andrzej J.; Mozumder, P. K.

    1994-09-01

    A versatile methodology is described in which equipment models have been incorporated into a single process diagnostic system for the PECVD of silicon nitride. The diagnosis system has been developed and tested with data collected using an Applied Materials Precision 5000 single wafer reactor. The parametric equipment diagnosis system provides the basis for optimal control of multiple process responses by the classification of potential sources of equipment faults without the assistance of in-situ sensor data. The basis for the diagnosis system is the use of tuned empirical equipment models which have been developed using a physically-based experimental design. Nine individual site-specific models were used to provide an effective method of modeling the spatially-dependent process variations across the wafer with better sensitivity than mean-based models. The diagnostic system has been tested using data that was produced by adjusting the actual equipment controls to artificially simulate a variety of possible subtle equipment drifts and shifts. Statistical algorithms have been implemented which detect equipment drift, shift and variance stability faults using the difference between the predicted process responses to the off-line measured process responses. Fault classification algorithms have been developed to classify the most likely causes for the process drifts and shifts using a pattern recognition system based upon flexible discriminant analysis.

  1. An interdepartmental, standardized equipment pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahlstrøm, Elisabeth; Grimnes, Sverre; Johannejen, Nann Helene

    2006-03-01

    To solve problems concerning patient equipment with emphasis on patient care, nursing quality and better nursing management. A monitoring system, designed to follow the patient around in the hospital was discovered. Based on this concept a special, standardized pool system managed by the Clinical Engineering Department was developed. An all-department standardization of monitors and pumps was tried. With pumps it was a success. With monitors, two of 21 departments preferred non-standardized equipment. The equipment pool has successfully been run for 5 years. An evaluation showed that nursing care is better and that only 2% of those asked disapproved of the system. The pool eliminated problems like lack of equipment when needed, the wrong type of equipment found, lack of fitting disposables, the items that could be found being out of order or too dirty to be used. Nurses no longer waste time searching for equipment ready for use. Bedside equipment in working order can always be found in one of the storerooms. As a result, patient safety was greatly enhanced. We also show that this is economically a good system.

  2. Joint Equipment Support Task Assignment Model and Simulation Based on Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ying Ma Hai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With the transformation of the war pattern under the information conditions, the corresponding object of equipment support also changes from “equipment-oriented” to “warfare-oriented”, and the equipment implement the joint support. Based on the characteristics of the equipment support task under the system combat conditions, the Joint Equipment Support task assignment model with the shortest transition time is established, and a model algorithm based on genetic algorithm is proposed. The validity and accuracy of the model and the algorithm are verified by the example simulation.

  3. Research on the Emergence Modeling of Equipment System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Xin-Hua

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Under the conditions of information, the network-centric system and the confrontation in the system has developed into a major combat style. But the traditional line of sexual assessment method is difficult to accurately assess the information equipment system combat capability. Therefore, this paper studies the effective evaluation method of the operational capability of the information equipment system from the perspective of emerge. Based on the simulation modeling and evaluation method, building the capability model of the weapon equipment system to evaluate the operational capability of the information weapon weaponry equipment. Through the example analysis, the validity of the simulation model and the practicability of the evaluation system is analyzed by analyzing the examples.

  4. Comprehensive framework for preventive maintenance priority of medical equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Neven; Balestra, Gabriella

    2015-08-01

    Throughout the medical equipment life cycle, preventive maintenance is considered one of the most important stages that should be managed properly. However, the need for better management and control by giving a reasonable prioritization for preventive maintenance becomes essential. The purpose of this study is to develop a comprehensive framework for preventive maintenance priority of medical equipment using Quality Function Deployment (QFD) and Fuzzy Logic (FL). The quality function deployment is proposed in order to identify the most important criteria that could impact preventive maintenance priority decision; meanwhile the role of the fuzzy logic is to generate a priority index of the list of equipment considering those criteria. The model validation was carried out on 140 pieces of medical equipment belonging to two hospitals. In application, we propose to classify the priority index into five classes. The results indicate that the strong correlation existence between risk-based criteria and preventive maintenance priority decision.

  5. Breast cancer survivors: return to work and wage loss in selected hospitals in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, T T; Azzani, M; Tan, F L; Loh, S Y

    2017-12-05

    This study aimed, firstly, to assess the determinants of return to work (RTW), secondly, to explore the amount of annual wage loss, and finally, to discover the determinants of wage loss among breast cancer (BC) survivors. A cross-sectional study design was used in this research. The data was collected via interview using a validated questionnaire. Logistic regression models were developed to discover the significant determinants of RTW and of wage loss among BC survivors. A total of 256 BC survivors were included in this study. The analysis showed that there was a 21% loss of or reduction in mean income within 1 year after diagnosis. The significant predictors of RTW are being a government employee, having reduced wages or wage loss, and if the case had been diagnosed 1 year or more ago. Being a private sector employee and having a late stage of cancer was a barrier to RTW. The main risk factors for reduced wages or wage loss were belonging to the age group of 40-59 years, being of Chinese or Indian ethnicity, having low educational status, and not returning to work. However, belonging to the higher monthly income group (earning > RM 2000) is a protective factor against the risk of reduced wages or wage loss. Non-RTW and wage loss after diagnosis of BC may result in the survivors experiencing a significant financial burden. Assessment of these patients is becoming more crucial because more women participate in the workforce in Malaysia nowadays and because BC is managed using multiple treatment modalities with their consequences could lead to long absences from work.

  6. Survivorship education for Latina breast cancer survivors: Empowering Survivors through education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juarez, Gloria; Mayorga, Lina; Hurria, Arti; Ferrell, Betty

    2013-01-01

    Nueva Luz is an English and Spanish quality of life (QOL) intervention developed to address the educational needs of Latina breast cancer survivors and provide strategies to assist in their transition into survivorship. A qualitative approach was used to evaluate the English and Spanish educational intervention (Nueva Luz). A purposive sample of eight Latina breast cancer survivors was selected from the group who received the intervention to participate in a digitally recorded interview. Data was analyzed using thematic analysis. Findings provide evidence that the one-on-one tailored approach is a feasible and acceptable method of providing a bilingual psychosocial intervention. The provision of printed bilingual information along with the verbal instruction from a bilingual and culturally competent health care provider can be effective in helping Latina breast cancer survivor's transition successfully into survivorship, improve QOL and contribute to better patient outcomes. The study informs our understanding of the cultural context in patient education content and delivery of psychosocial interventions. The findings may also have relevance for other ethnic minority cancer survivors.

  7. Understanding the Early Support Needs of Survivors of Traumatic Events: The Example of Severe Injury Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Rachel M; Chisholm, Katherine; Terhaag, Sonia; Lau, Winnie; Forbes, David; Holmes, Alex; O'Donnell, Meaghan

    2017-05-29

    In the aftermath of a potentially traumatic event, people may experience a range of mental health outcomes, including subclinical symptoms and distress. There is growing evidence that trauma survivors with subclinical symptoms are at increased risk of developing later psychiatric disorders, and this is especially the case with severe injury survivors. There is a need to develop evidence-based, early, brief interventions for those who are at risk of developing trauma-related psychopathology. To date, interventions for this at-risk group have largely been derived from expert consensus. This study therefore aimed to understand the early psychosocial difficulties and perceived needs from the perspective of trauma survivors to further inform intervention development. Forty-three survivors of a serious injury, identified as high risk for developing trauma-related psychopathology, were interviewed and qualitative methods (Thematic Analysis) were used to synthesize the data gathered. Participants described 5 main stressors: trauma-related psychological reactions, relationship stress, unsatisfactory services and support systems, reduced functioning, and negative thoughts and emotions in relation to recovery. In addition, participants described 3 main factors that were helpful in recovery: positive coping, professional support, and social support. These findings can inform posttrauma intervention development for those at risk of later psychological symptoms. In particular, the results support approaches focusing on promoting activity, supporting social relationships, stress and arousal management, and cognitive restructuring. In addition, future interventions might helpfully target rumination, worry, and reexperiencing symptoms. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Developing and Validating the Scale of Economic Self-Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoge, Gretchen L; Stylianou, Amanda M; Hetling, Andrea; Postmus, Judy L

    2017-05-01

    Experiencing intimate partner violence (IPV) and financial hardship are often intertwined. The dynamics of an abusive relationship may include economic abuse tactics that compromise a survivor's ability to work, pursue education, have access to financial resources, and establish financial skills, knowledge, and security. An increasingly common goal among programs serving IPV survivors is increasing financial empowerment through financial literacy. However, providing financial education alone may not be enough to improve financial behaviors. Psychological factors also play a role when individuals make financial choices. Economic self-efficacy focuses on the individual's perceived ability to perform economic or financial tasks, and may be considered a primary influence on one's ability to improve financial decisions and behaviors. The current study tests the reliability and validity of a Scale of Economic Self-Efficacy with a sample of female survivors of IPV. This study uses a calibration and validation analysis model including full and split-sample exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses, assesses for internal consistency, and examines correlation coefficients between economic self-efficacy, economic self-sufficiency, financial strain, and difficulty living with income. Findings indicate that the 10-item, unidimensional Scale of Economic Self-Efficacy demonstrates strong reliability and validity among this sample of IPV survivors. An ability to understand economic self-efficacy could facilitate individualized service approaches and allow practitioners to better support IPV survivors on their journey toward financial empowerment. Given the increase in programs focused on assets, financial empowerment, and economic well-being, the Scale of Economic Self-Efficacy has potential as a very timely and relevant tool in the design, implementation, and evaluation of such programs, and specifically for programs created for IPV survivors.

  9. EMR Measurements on NDA Equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macdonell, Alexander Thomas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Meierbachtol, Krista Cruse [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Evans, James Walter Jr. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mayo, Douglas R. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-07-10

    Electromagnetic radiation (EMR) emission strength measurements were performed on a suite of passive non-destructive assay (NDA) radiation detection equipment. Data were collected from 9 kHz up to 6 GHz on each of the assembled systems.

  10. EAS Equipment Authorization Grantee Registrations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Communications Commission — EAS (Equipment Authorization System). Radio Frequency (RF) devices are required to be properly authorized under 47 CFR Part 2 prior to being marketed or imported...

  11. ENERGY STAR Certified Imaging Equipment

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 2.0 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Imaging Equipment that are effective as of...

  12. Longitudinal smoking patterns in survivors of childhood cancer: An update from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Todd M; Liu, Wei; Armstrong, Gregory T; Srivastava, Deo Kumar; Hudson, Melissa M; Leisenring, Wendy M; Mertens, Ann C; Klesges, Robert C; Oeffinger, Kevin C; Nathan, Paul C; Robison, Leslie L

    2015-11-15

    Survivors of pediatric cancer have elevated risks of mortality and morbidity. Many late adverse effects associated with cancer treatment (eg, second cancers and cardiac and pulmonary disease) are also associated with cigarette smoking, and this suggests that survivors who smoke may be at high risk for these conditions. This study examined the self-reported smoking status for 9397 adult survivors of childhood cancer across 3 questionnaires (median time interval, 13 years). The smoking prevalence among survivors was compared with the smoking prevalence among siblings and the prevalence expected on the basis of age-, sex-, race-, and calendar time-specific rates in the US population. Multivariable regression models examined characteristics associated with longitudinal smoking patterns across all 3 questionnaires. At the baseline, 19% of survivors were current smokers, whereas 24% of siblings were current smokers, and 29% were expected to be current smokers on the basis of US rates. Current smoking among survivors dropped to 16% and 14% on follow-up questionnaires, with similar decreases in the sibling prevalence and the expected prevalence. Characteristics associated with consistent never-smoking included a higher household income (relative risk [RR], 1.16; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.08-1.25), higher education (RR, 1.32; 95% CI, 1.22-1.43), and receipt of cranial radiation therapy (RR, 1.08; 95% CI, 1.03-1.14). Psychological distress (RR, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.80-0.92) and heavy alcohol drinking (RR, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.58-0.71) were inversely associated. Among ever-smokers, a higher income (RR, 1.17; 95% CI, 1.04-1.32) and education (RR, 1.23; 95% CI, 1.10-1.38) were associated with quitting, whereas cranial radiation (RR, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.76-0.97) and psychological distress (RR, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.72-0.90) were associated with not having quit. The development of adverse health conditions was not associated with smoking patterns. Despite modest declines in smoking prevalence

  13. Survivors of Political Violence: Conceptualizations, Empirical Findings, and Ecological Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanciu, Elena Amalia; Rogers, Jennifer L.

    2011-01-01

    There is a vast body of literature on survivors of political violence that has emerged over the past several decades. Most studies focus on the psychological effects of political violence on survivors, as understood within the Western framework of mental health. Studies that conceptualize and examine models that account for the complexity of the…

  14. Comparison of trauma on survivors of sexual assault and intimate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-06-20

    Jun 20, 2014 ... Background: Gender-based violence is a challenge in South Africa, despite available interventions. Caring for the survivors of both forms of violence is critical for ensuring their speedy recovery. Objectives: To compare the effects of trauma on female survivors of sexual assault versus those experienced by ...

  15. Daily physical activity patterns in cancer survivors: a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmerman, Josien; van Weering, Marit; Kurvers, Roel; Tönis, Thijs; Hermens, Hermanus J.; Vollenbroek-Hutten, Miriam Marie Rosé

    2013-01-01

    In cancer survivors activity levels have been studied primarily by means of questionnaires, while objective information on actual daily activity levels and their distribution throughout the day is lacking. The findings of this study suggest that especially cancer survivors who received chemotherapy

  16. Rape survivor care crisis – mines the worst?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The dire need for better healthcare worker training in rape forensics and safe survivor care has never been better illustrated than by the horrifying rape statistics Médecins. Sans Frontières (MSF) presented last month from the platinum-mining boom town of. Rustenburg. Promising to increase its rape survivor care and ...

  17. Gait characteristics of hemiparetic stroke survivors in Osun State ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stroke is one of the leading causes of severe handicap. Deficiencies in walking may present significant challenges to mobility, resulting in abnormal and inefficient gait patterns in stroke survivors. This study compared the gait characteristics of hemiparetic stroke survivors and those of healthy individuals and determined the ...

  18. Comparison of trauma on survivors of sexual assault and intimate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-06-20

    Jun 20, 2014 ... a psychologist by the survivor support officer (SSO), who is a trauma counsellor. Within the context of Limpopo Province, survivors who reported sexual assault at the clinic had experienced stranger rape and rape by non-strangers who were not intimate partners, whilst those who reported physical assault ...

  19. Adult height and age at menarche in childhood cancer survivors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noorda, E. M.; Somers, R.; van Leeuwen, F. E.; Vulsma, T.; Behrendt, H.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the long-term effects of cancer treatments on adult height and age at menarche in survivors of various types of childhood cancer. 285 childhood cancer survivors (161 men and 124 women), at least 18 years old and having been off treatment for at least 5 years, were

  20. Impact of cardiovascular counseling and screening in Hodgkin lymphoma survivors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daniëls, L.A.; Krol, S.D.G.; de Graaf, M.A.; Scholte, A.J.H.A.; van 't Veer, M.B.; Putter, H.; de Roos, A.; Schalij, M.J.; van de Poll-Franse, L.; Creutzberg, C.L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the most common nonmalignant cause of death in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors, especially after mediastinal irradiation. The role of screening for CVD in HL survivors is unclear, but confrontation with risks of CVD may have a negative influence on

  1. Ethical Issues in Counseling Adult Survivors of Incest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniluk, Judith C. and Haverkamp, Beth E.

    1993-01-01

    Counseling adult survivors of childhood sexual abuse raises ethical issues which include maintaining client confidentiality when the situations have been both immoral and illegal or working with survivors without appropriate training. Principles such as autonomy, fidelity, justice, beneficence and nonmaleficence, and self-interest are examined, as…

  2. Projective drawings: helping adult survivors of childhood abuse recognize boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaister, J A

    1994-10-01

    1. Boundary issues for adult childhood trauma survivors are complex, problematic, difficult to resolve, and occur on a level of unawareness. 2. Boundary concepts can be found in all types of projective drawings. 3. Projective drawings can facilitate awareness and understanding of boundary problems experienced by adult childhood trauma survivors.

  3. Posttraumatic stress symptoms in adult survivors of childhood cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langeveld, N. E.; Grootenhuis, M. A.; Voûte, P. A.; de Haan, R. J.

    2004-01-01

    Background. Previous research suggests that posttraurnatic stress disorder (PTSD) is present in survivors of childhood cancer. The aim of the current study was to explore posttraurnatic stress symptoms in a sample of young adult survivors of childhood cancer. In addition, the impact of demographic,

  4. Quality of life in young adult survivors of childhood cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langeveld, N. E.; Stam, H.; Grootenhuis, M. A.; Last, B. F.

    2002-01-01

    In recent years the necessity of measuring quality of life in childhood cancer survivors has been stressed. This paper gives an overview of the results of studies into the quality of life (QL) of young adult survivors of childhood cancer and suggest areas for future research. The review located 30

  5. No excess fatigue in young adult survivors of childhood cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langeveld, N. E.; Grootenhuis, M. A.; Voûte, P. A.; de Haan, R. J.; van den Bos, C.

    2003-01-01

    Clinical reports suggest that many survivors of childhood cancer experience fatigue as a long-term effect of their treatment. To investigate this issue further, we assessed the level of fatigue in young adult survivors of childhood cancer. We compared the results with a group of young adults with no

  6. Learning Profiles of Survivors of Pediatric Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkon, Beverly

    2009-01-01

    By 2010 it is predicted that one in 900 adults will be survivors of some form of pediatric cancer. The numbers are somewhat lower for survivors of brain tumors, though their numbers are increasing. Schools mistakenly believe that these children easily fit pre-existing categories of disability. Though these students share some of the…

  7. Cancer survivors' rehabilitation needs in a primary health care context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Thorbjørn; Søndergaard, Jens; Sokolowski, Ineta

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies of cancer survivors' rehabilitation needs have mostly addressed specific areas of needs, e.g. physical aspects and/or rehabilitation needs in relation to specific cancer types. OBJECTIVE: To assess cancer survivors' perceived need for physical and psychosocial rehabilitation, ...

  8. Emergency mental health and psychosocial support for survivors of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To describe the design and delivery of emergency mental health and psychosocial support services for the survivors of Post-Election Violence in Eldoret, Kenya. Design: A longitudinal intervention. Setting: The North Rift Valley region in western Kenya. Subjects: A total of 80,772 survivors received mental health ...

  9. Family Survivors of Suicide and Accidental Death: Consequences for Widows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNiel, Dale E.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Examined the impact of completed suicide on the surviving family, comparing widows (N=13) whose husbands had died through suicide to widows (N=13) whose husbands had died in accidents. Found suicide survivors showed no more family dysfunction, life stress, or psychiatric symptomatology than accident survivors. (Author/ABL)

  10. Poststroke spasticity: sequelae and burden on stroke survivors and caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorowitz, Richard D; Gillard, Patrick J; Brainin, Michael

    2013-01-15

    Among the estimated 20% to 40% of stroke survivors who develop spasticity, the burden of this condition on patients, caregivers, and society is substantial. Stroke survivors with spasticity may experience reductions in their ability to perform activities of daily living and in their health-related quality of life. The occurrence of spasticity in stroke survivors may also result in an increased burden on their caregivers, who exhibit poorer physical and emotional health as compared with the general population. The responsibilities that caregivers have to the stroke survivor--in terms of providing medical care, protecting from falls, and assisting with feeding and hygiene, among other tasks of daily living--must be balanced with their responsibilities to other family members and to themselves. Caregivers of stroke survivors often report a feeling of confinement with little opportunity for relief, and although social support can be helpful, it is frequently limited in its availability. In terms of the socioeconomic burden of spasticity after stroke, recent data point to a 4-fold increase in health care costs associated with stroke survivors with spasticity compared with stroke survivors without spasticity. Thus, it is important to reduce the burden of spasticity after stroke. Consequently, effective spasticity treatment that reduces spasticity and the level of disability experienced by stroke survivors will likely increase their functioning and their health-related quality of life and will also result in a diminished burden on their caregivers.

  11. Health Information Needs of Childhood Cancer Survivors and Their Family

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knijnenburg, Sebastiaan L.; Kremer, Leontien C.; van den Bos, Cor; Braam, Katja I.; Jaspers, Monique W. M.

    2010-01-01

    Background. Knowledge about past disease, treatment, and possible late effects has previously been shown to be low in survivors of childhood cancer and their relatives. This study investigated the information needs of childhood cancer survivors and their parents and explored possible determinants

  12. Work disability assessment of cancer survivors: insurance physicians ' perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Muijen, P.; Duijts, S.F.A.; van der Aa, D.A.; van der Beek, A.J.; Anema, J.R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Assessing work disability in cancer survivors is a complex decision-making process. In the Netherlands, physicians employed by the Dutch Social Security Agency (SSA) play a key role in assessing work disability of cancer survivors on long-term sick leave. Aims: To investigate the aspects

  13. Adult Adjustment of Survivors of Institutional Child Abuse in Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Alan; Dooley, Barbara; Fitzpatrick, Mark; Flanagan, Edel; Flanagan-Howard, Roisin; Tierney, Kevin; White, Megan; Daly, Margaret; Egan, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To document the adult adjustment of survivors of childhood institutional abuse. Method: Two hundred and forty-seven adult survivors of institutional abuse with a mean age of 60 were interviewed with a protocol that included the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire, modules from the Structured Clinical Interview for Axis I Disorders of DSM IV…

  14. Perceived control, adjustment, and communication problems in laryngeal cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blood, G W; Dineen, M; Kauffman, S M; Raimondi, S C; Simpson, K C

    1993-12-01

    Health locus of control, adjustment to cancer, and communication experiences after a laryngectomy were investigated in 63 laryngeal cancer survivors. Survivors who showed internal control also scored as better adjusted and had fewer communication problems. Scales were intercorrelated (.68 to .92).

  15. CIRCUMSTANCES AND CONSEQUENCES OF FALLS IN POLIO SURVIVORS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bickerstaffe, Alice; Beelen, Anita; Nollet, Frans

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Many polio survivors have symptoms that are known risk factors for falls in elderly people. This study aims to determine the: (i) frequency; (ii) consequences; (iii) circumstances; and (iv) factors associated with falls in polio survivors. Methods: A survey was conducted among 376 polio

  16. Why Rape Survivors Participate in the Criminal Justice System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Debra; Campbell, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    After a rape, survivors may seek help from multiple community organizations including the criminal justice system (CJS). Research has found that few survivors report their assaults to the police and of those who do report, many withdraw their participation during the investigation. However, relatively little is known about the factors that lead…

  17. ECHN honors cancer survivors with fun, food and inspirational stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botvin, Judith D

    2005-01-01

    A nostalgia theme was fully explored by Eastern Connecticut Health Network (ECHN), Manchester, Conn., in its celebration of Cancer Survivors Day, June 6. The observance is sponsored by the national Cancer Survivors Day organization. This year more than 700 facilities across the country observed the occasion.

  18. Executive function and coping in stroke survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegel, Jessica; Dux, Moira; Macko, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of disability and sequelae may include physical, emotional, and cognitive impairments. The methods employed to cope with distress, both emotional and cognitive, have not been evaluated in individuals post-stroke. However, research in traumatic brain injury (TBI) suggests that executive function is positively correlated with adaptive coping and negatively correlated with maladaptive coping strategies (Krpan et al., 2007). Examination of these constructs post-stroke may assist with enriching our understanding of cognitive and emotional symptomatology and optimize rehabilitation strategies. The present study aimed to assess the association between executive function and coping strategies in a sample of chronic stroke survivors. The researchers hypothesized that executive function would be positively correlated with adaptive coping strategies and negatively correlated with maladaptive coping strategies. Fifteen stroke survivors were administered a battery of cognitive tests assessing executive function and also completed the Ways of Coping Questionnaire (WAYS), a self-report coping measure. Analyses indicated that executive function deficits were related to increased avoidant coping. Contrary to expectations, executive function was not significantly related to active coping. In addition, post hoc analyses revealed that executive function was a significant predictor of avoidant coping after controlling for demographics. Our data, in accordance with prior work in TBI, suggests that executive function and aspects of coping are associated. Rehabilitation strategies that improve executive function may also lead to utilization of adaptive coping strategies. Research has shown that aerobic exercise increases activation in the frontal lobe and improves executive function (Colcombe & Kramer, 2003; Colcombe et al., 2004). Future studies should examine whether aerobic exercise positively affects executive function and coping in stroke survivors.

  19. Deconditioning, fatigue and impaired quality of life in long-term survivors after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirou, Stéphanie; Chambellan, Arnaud; Chevallier, Patrice; Germaud, Patrick; Lamirault, Guillaume; Gourraud, Pierre-Antoine; Perrot, Bastien; Delasalle, Béatrice; Forestier, Bastien; Guillaume, Thierry; Peterlin, Pierre; Garnier, Alice; Magnan, Antoine; Blanc, François-Xavier; Lemarchand, Patricia

    2017-12-21

    Long-term survivors after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) are at high risk for treatment-related adverse events, that may worsen physical capacity and may induce fatigue and disability. The aims of this prospective study were to evaluate exercise capacity in allotransplant survivors and its relationship with fatigue and disability. Patient-reported outcomes and exercise capacity were evaluated in 71 non-relapse patients 1 year after allo-HSCT, using validated questionnaires, cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) with measure of peak oxygen uptake (peakVO 2 ) and deconditioning, pulmonary function testing, echocardiography and 6-min walk test. A high proportion (75.4%) of allo-HSCT survivors showed abnormal cardiopulmonary exercise testing parameters as compared to predicted normal values, including 49.3% patients who exhibited moderate to severe impairment in exercise capacity and 37.7% patients with physical deconditioning. PeakVO 2 values were not accurately predicted by 6-min walk distances (r = 0.53). Disability and fatigue were strongly associated with decreased peakVO 2 values (p = 0.002 and p = 0.008, respectively). Exercise capacity was reduced in most allo-HSCT long-term survivors. Because reduced exercise capacity was associated with fatigue, disability and a decrease in quality of life, cardiopulmonary exercise testing should be performed in every patient who reports fatigue and disability.

  20. Community-Based Recreational Football: A Novel Approach to Promote Physical Activity and Quality of Life in Prostate Cancer Survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ditte Marie Bruun

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available As the number of cancer survivors continues to increase, there is an increasing focus on management of the long-term consequences of cancer including health promotion and prevention of co-morbidity. Prostate cancer is the most frequent type of cancer type in men and causes increased risk of heart disease, diabetes and osteoporosis. Epidemiological evidence points to a positive effect of regular physical activity on all-cause and prostate cancer mortality and current clinical evidence supports the use of exercise in cancer rehabilitation. However, the external validity of existing exercise studies is limited and the majority of prostate cancer survivors remain sedentary. Hence, novel approaches to evaluate and promote physical activity are warranted. This paper presents the rationale behind the delivery and evaluation of community-based recreational football offered in existing football clubs under the Danish Football Association to promote quality of life and physical activity adherence in prostate cancer survivors. The RE-AIM framework will be applied to evaluate the impact of the intervention including outcomes both at the individual and organizational level. By introducing community-based sport environments, the study offers a novel approach in the strive towards sustained physical activity adherence and accessibility in prostate cancer survivors.

  1. Impact of obesity on body image dissatisfaction and social integration difficulty in adolescent and young adult burn injury survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chondronikola, Maria; Sidossis, Labros S; Richardson, Lisa M; Temple, Jeff R; van den Berg, Patricia A; Herndon, David N; Meyer, Walter J

    2013-01-01

    Burn injury deformities and obesity have been associated with social integration difficulty and body image dissatisfaction. However, the combined effects of obesity and burn injury on social integration difficulty and body image dissatisfaction are unknown. Adolescent and young adult burn injury survivors were categorized as normal weight (n = 47) or overweight and obese (n = 21). Burn-related and anthropometric information were obtained from patients' medical records, and validated questionnaires were used to assess the main outcomes and possible confounders. Analysis of covariance and multiple linear regressions were performed to evaluate the objectives of this study. Obese and overweight burn injury survivors did not experience increased body image dissatisfaction (12 ± 4.3 vs 13.1 ± 4.4; P = .57) or social integration difficulty (17.5 ± 6.9 vs 15.5 ± 5.7; P = .16) compared with normal weight burn injury survivors. Weight status was not a significant predictor of social integration difficulty or body image dissatisfaction (P = .19 and P = .24, respectively). However, mobility limitations predicted greater social integration difficulty (P = .005) and body image dissatisfaction (P body image dissatisfaction (P = .05). Obese and overweight adolescents and young adults, who sustained major burn injury as children, do not experience greater social integration difficulty and body image dissatisfaction compared with normal weight burn injury survivors. Mobility limitations and higher weight status at burn are likely more important factors affecting the long-term social integration difficulty and body image dissatisfaction of these young people.

  2. Fertility in female childhood cancer survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Bruin, Marie L; Van Dulmen-den Broeder, Eline; Van den Berg, Marleen H

    2009-01-01

    chemotherapy and radiotherapy may have an adverse effect on ovarian function, ovarian reserve and uterine function, clinically leading to sub-fertility, infertility, premature menopause and/or adverse pregnancy outcomes. Here we will first address normal female fertility and methods to detect decreased...... fertility. Hence we will focus on direct effects as well as late fertility-related adverse effects caused by chemotherapy and radiotherapy, and we will conclude with a summary of current options for fertility preservation in female childhood cancer survivors....

  3. 21 CFR 225.30 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Equipment. 225.30 Section 225.30 Food and Drugs... Equipment § 225.30 Equipment. (a) Equipment which is designed to perform its intended function and is properly installed and used is essential to the manufacture of medicated feeds. Such equipment permits...

  4. 46 CFR 154.1430 - Equipment locker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Equipment locker. 154.1430 Section 154.1430 Shipping... FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Safety Equipment § 154.1430 Equipment locker. One of each item of equipment under §§ 154.1400 and 154.1420 must be...

  5. 7 CFR 550.38 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Equipment. 550.38 Section 550.38 Agriculture... Equipment/property Standards § 550.38 Equipment. (a) The Cooperator shall not use equipment acquired with... the Federal Government retains an interest in the equipment. (b) The Cooperator shall use the...

  6. 21 CFR 226.30 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Equipment. 226.30 Section 226.30 Food and Drugs... Facilities and Equipment § 226.30 Equipment. Equipment used for the manufacture, processing, packaging, bulk... facilitate maintenance and operation for its intended purpose. The equipment shall: (a) Be so constructed...

  7. 40 CFR 63.1003 - Equipment identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equipment identification. 63.1003...) National Emission Standards for Equipment Leaks-Control Level 1 § 63.1003 Equipment identification. (a) General equipment identification. Equipment subject to this subpart shall be identified. Identification of...

  8. Peer Support Services for Bereaved Survivors: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartone, Paul T; Bartone, Jocelyn V; Violanti, John M; Gileno, Zaneta M

    2017-01-01

    This systematic literature review assesses the evidence regarding benefits of peer support services for bereaved survivors of sudden or unexpected death. Reports were included that addressed peer support services for adults who experienced death of a family member, close friend, or coworker. Of the 32 studies meeting all inclusion criteria, most showed evidence that peer support was helpful to bereaved survivors, reducing grief symptoms and increasing well-being and personal growth. Studies also showed benefits to providers of peer support, including increased personal growth and positive meaning in life. Several studies addressed the growing trend of Internet-based peer support programs, finding that these are beneficial in part due to their easy accessibility. Peer support appears to be especially valuable for survivors of suicide loss, a result that may be related to stigma and lack of support from family and friends experienced by many suicide survivors. The reviewed studies provide consistent evidence that peer support is beneficial to bereaved survivors.

  9. Second-generation Holocaust survivors: Psychological, theological, and moral challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juni, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Drawing from trauma theory, psychodynamic conceptualization, developmental psychology, clinical data, and personal experience, this article portrays a life haunted by tragedy predating its victims. Healthy child development is outlined, with particular attention to socialization and theological perspectives. Key characteristics of trauma are delineated, highlighting the nuances of trauma that are most harmful. As is the case with general trauma, Holocaust survivors are described as evincing survivor's guilt and paranoia in response to their experiences. Divergent disorders resulting from the Holocaust are described for 1st-generation and 2nd-generation survivors, respectively. Primary trauma responses and pervasive attitudes of survivors are shown to have harmful ramifications on their children's personality and worldview as well as on their interpersonal and theistic object relations. These limitations translate into problems in the adult lives of second generation survivors.

  10. Fear of Progression in Cancer Patients and Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinkel, Andreas; Herschbach, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Fear of progression (or fear of recurrence) is an appropriate, adequate response to the real threat of cancer. However, elevated levels of fear of progression can become dysfunctional, affecting well-being, quality of life, and social functioning. Research has shown that fear of progression is one of the most frequent distress symptoms of patients with cancer. As a clear consensus concerning clinically relevant states of fear of progression is still lacking, it is difficult to provide a valid estimate of the rate of cancer patients who clearly suffer from fear of progression. Current evidence suggests that probably 50% of cancer survivors experience moderate to severe fear of progression. Furthermore, many patients express unmet needs in dealing with the fear of cancer spreading. These results underscore the need to provide effective psychological treatments for clinical states of fear of progression. Some psychosocial interventions for treating fear of progression have been developed. Our own, targeted intervention study showed that clinical fear of progression can be effectively treated with brief group therapy.

  11. Cognitive problems among breast cancer survivors: loneliness enhances risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaremka, Lisa M; Peng, Juan; Bornstein, Robert; Alfano, Catherine M; Andridge, Rebecca R; Povoski, Stephen P; Lipari, Adele M; Agnese, Doreen M; Farrar, William B; Yee, Lisa D; Carson, William E; Kiecolt-Glaser, Janice K

    2014-12-01

    Cancer survivors often experience cognitive difficulties after treatment completion. Although chemotherapy enhances risk for cognitive problems, it is likely only one piece of a complex puzzle that explains survivors' cognitive functioning. Loneliness may be one psychosocial risk factor. The current studies included both subjective and objective cognitive measures and tested whether lonelier breast cancer survivors would have more concentration and memory complaints and experience more concentration difficulties than their less lonely counterparts. The relationship between loneliness and cognitive function was tested among three samples of breast cancer survivors. Study 1 was a sample of breast cancer survivors (n = 200) who reported their concentration and memory problems. Study 2a was a sample of breast cancer survivors (n = 185) and noncancer controls (n = 93) who reported their concentration and memory problems. Study 2b was a subsample of Study 2a breast cancer survivors (n = 22) and noncancer controls (n = 21) who completed a standardized neuropsychological test assessing concentration. Studies 1 and 2a revealed that lonelier women reported more concentration and memory problems than less lonely women. Study 2b utilized a standardized neuropsychological continuous performance test and demonstrated that lonelier women experienced more concentration problems than their less lonely counterparts. These studies demonstrated that loneliness is linked to concentration and memory complaints and the experience of concentration problems among breast cancer survivors. The results were also highly consistent across three samples of breast cancer survivors. These data suggest that loneliness may be a risk factor for cognitive difficulties among cancer survivors. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Higher prevalence of osteoporosis among female Holocaust survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, E-L; Menczel, J

    2007-11-01

    The prevalence of osteoporosis was statistically significantly higher among female Holocaust survivors than among those who were not exposed to the Holocaust. These findings support the importance of nutrition and environmental conditions during childhood and adolescence on BMD in older adults. Holocaust survivors during childhood and adolescence experienced undernutrition and lack of exercise and sunlight. The study aimed to establish if Holocaust survivors have higher prevalence of osteoporosis than subjects who were not Holocaust survivors. Seventy-three female Jewish Holocaust survivors > or = 60 years old and 60 female European-born Jews > or =60 years old who were not in the Holocaust were examined. BMD was measured using DXA of the lumbar spine and hips. The Cochran-Armitage trend test was used to test for an increasing trend in decreased BMD in the Holocaust survivors versus controls. Among Holocaust survivors 54.8% had osteoporosis, 39.7% osteopenia, and 5.5% normal BMD, whereas among controls 25.0% had osteoporosis, 55.0% osteopenia, and 20.0% normal BMD (p = 0.0001). In those who were Holocaust survivors 58.0% had osteoporosis, 34.0% osteopenia, and 8.0% normal BMD, whereas among controls 20.0% had osteoporosis, 57.8% osteopenia, and 22.2% normal BMD (p = 0.0003). In those > or =17 years old in 1945, among Holocaust survivors 47.8% had osteoporosis, 52.2% osteopenia and none had normal BMD, whereas among controls 40.0% had osteoporosis, 46.7% osteopenia, and 13.3% normal BMD (p = 0.28). The prevalence of osteoporosis was significantly higher among Holocaust survivors.

  13. Cardiopulmonary exercise performance is reduced in congenital diaphragmatic hernia survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojanić, Katarina; Grizelj, Ruža; Dilber, Daniel; Šarić, Dalibor; Vuković, Jurica; Pianosi, Paolo T; Driscoll, David J; Weingarten, Toby N; Pritišanac, Ena; Schroeder, Darrell R; Sprung, Juraj

    2016-12-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is associated with lung hypoplasia. CDH survivors may have pulmonary morbidity that can decrease cardiopulmonary exercise. We aimed to examine whether cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) results differ in CDH survivors versus healthy age-matched controls and whether CPET results among CDH survivors differ according to self-reported daily activity. In one medical center in Croatia, CDH survivors-patients with surgically corrected CDH who were alive at age 5 years-were invited to participate in spirometry and CPET. Values were compared with those of controls matched 2:1 by age and sex for each CDH survivor aged 7 years or older. Among 27 CDH survivors aged 5-20 years, 13 (48%) had continued symptoms or spirometric evidence of pulmonary disease. Compared with controls (n = 44), survivors (n = 22) had lower peak oxygen consumption (V˙O2 mean [SD], 35.7 [6.9] vs. 45.3 [8.2] ml/kg per min; P exercise, V˙O2/heart rate (P different (P = 0.72). Among survivors, mean (SD) V˙O2peak (ml/kg per min) differed by self-reported activity level: athletic, 40.3 (5.0); normal, 35.8 (6.5); and sedentary, 32.1 (6.8) (by ANOVA, P = 0.10 across three groups and P = 0.04 athletic vs. sedentary). More than half of CDH survivors continue to have chronic pulmonary disease. CDH survivors had lower aerobic exercise capacity than controls. Self-reporting information on daily activities may identify CDH patients with low V˙O2max who may benefit from physical training. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2016;51:1320-1329. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Co-operation Equipment Qualification for Safety grade I and C Equipment between Russia and Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ham, J. K.; Lee, D. H.; Park, J. W.; Jeong, M. H.; Choi, Y. H.; Suh, J. J.; Jang, T. H. [Korea Testing Laboratory, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-06-15

    Equipment Qualification technology for I and C system on nuclear grade have been approved with accurate and safe for verifying and validation. It contributes to acknowledge of reliability and to review of user approval. Also it did not completely satisfied the requirement of Russia, it can be satisfied by bit of modification on design. It is expected to support the export of safety PLC to nuclear power plant. Proven EQ technology is required on the further markets of nuclear. Therefore, comparison test with foreign country is necessary to support the mutual accreditation of EQ for export of domestic products.

  15. 14 CFR 25.1415 - Ditching equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment Safety Equipment § 25.1415 Ditching equipment. (a... preservers, there must be an approved flotation means for each occupant. This means must be within easy reach...

  16. Psychological Adjustment in Breast Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Annette L; Bower, Julienne E

    2015-01-01

    Women living with a diagnosis of breast cancer constitute more than 20 % of the cancer survivor population in the United States. Research on trajectories of psychological adjustment in women recently diagnosed with breast suggests that the largest proportion of women evidences relatively low psychological distress either from the point of diagnosis or after a period of recovery. Substantial heterogeneity exists, however, and some women are at risk for lingering depression, anxiety, fear of cancer recurrence and other long-term psychological effects. Most women diagnosed with breast cancer also report a number of benefits that arise from their experience of cancer. Longitudinal studies have illuminated risk and protective factors for psychological adjustment in breast cancer survivors, which we describe in this chapter. Effective psychosocial interventions, as evidenced in randomized controlled trials, also are available for bolstering breast cancer-related adjustment. We offer directions for research to deepen the understanding of biological, psychological, and social contributors to positive adjustment in the context of breast cancer, as well as suggestions for the development of optimally efficient evidence-based psychosocial interventions for women living with the disease.

  17. "We are survivors and not a virus:" Content analysis of media reporting on Ebola survivors in Liberia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayrhuber, Elisabeth Anne-Sophie; Niederkrotenthaler, Thomas; Kutalek, Ruth

    2017-08-01

    The Ebola virus disease epidemic between 2013 and 2016 in West Africa was unprecedented. It resulted in approximately 28.000 cases and 10.000 Ebola survivors. Many survivors face social, economic and health-related predicaments and media reporting is crucially important in infectious disease outbreaks. However, there is little research on reporting of the social situation of Ebola survivors in Liberia. The study used a mixed methods approach and analysed media reports from the Liberian Daily Observer (DOL), a daily newspaper available online in English. We were interested to know how the situation of Ebola survivors was portrayed; in what way issues such as stigma and discrimination were addressed; and which stigma reduction interventions were covered and how. We included all articles on the situation of Ebola survivors in the quantitative and in-depth qualitative analysis published between April 2014 and March 2016. The DOL published 148 articles that portrayed the social situation of Ebola survivors between the 24 months observation period. In these articles, Ebola survivors were often defined beyond biological terms, reflecting on a broader social definition of survivorship. Survivorship was associated with challenges such as suffering from after-effects, social and economic consequences and psychological distress. Almost 50% of the articles explicitly mentioned stigmatisation in their reporting on Ebola survivors. This was contextualised in untrustworthiness towards international responses and the local health care system and inconclusive knowledge on cures and transmission routes. In the majority of DOL articles stigma reduction and engaging survivors in the response was reported as crucially important. Reporting in the DOL was educational-didactical and well-balanced in terms of disseminating available medical knowledge and reflecting the social situation of Ebola survivors. While the articles contextualised factors contributing to stigmatisation throughout

  18. "We are survivors and not a virus:" Content analysis of media reporting on Ebola survivors in Liberia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Anne-Sophie Mayrhuber

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The Ebola virus disease epidemic between 2013 and 2016 in West Africa was unprecedented. It resulted in approximately 28.000 cases and 10.000 Ebola survivors. Many survivors face social, economic and health-related predicaments and media reporting is crucially important in infectious disease outbreaks. However, there is little research on reporting of the social situation of Ebola survivors in Liberia.The study used a mixed methods approach and analysed media reports from the Liberian Daily Observer (DOL, a daily newspaper available online in English. We were interested to know how the situation of Ebola survivors was portrayed; in what way issues such as stigma and discrimination were addressed; and which stigma reduction interventions were covered and how. We included all articles on the situation of Ebola survivors in the quantitative and in-depth qualitative analysis published between April 2014 and March 2016.The DOL published 148 articles that portrayed the social situation of Ebola survivors between the 24 months observation period. In these articles, Ebola survivors were often defined beyond biological terms, reflecting on a broader social definition of survivorship. Survivorship was associated with challenges such as suffering from after-effects, social and economic consequences and psychological distress. Almost 50% of the articles explicitly mentioned stigmatisation in their reporting on Ebola survivors. This was contextualised in untrustworthiness towards international responses and the local health care system and inconclusive knowledge on cures and transmission routes. In the majority of DOL articles stigma reduction and engaging survivors in the response was reported as crucially important.Reporting in the DOL was educational-didactical and well-balanced in terms of disseminating available medical knowledge and reflecting the social situation of Ebola survivors. While the articles contextualised factors contributing to

  19. Fear of recurrence and disease progression in long-term (≥ 5 years) cancer survivors--a systematic review of quantitative studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, L; Jansen, L; Brenner, H; Arndt, V

    2013-01-01

    Increasing proportions of patients diagnosed with cancer will become long-term survivors (≥ 5 years post-diagnosis). However, survivors may continue to experience negative effects of cancer and/or treatment, including fear of recurrence (FoR). This review aims to provide an overview of current knowledge on FoR, including determinants and consequences in long-term cancer survivors, and to outline methodological and conceptual challenges that should be addressed in future research. Multiple databases including PUBMED, EMBASE, and PsycINFO were searched to identify relevant articles. Seventeen articles were included. Data were extracted by two reviewers and summarized following a systematic scheme. Even years after initial diagnosis, cancer survivors suffer from FoR. Most studies report low or moderate mean FoR scores, suggesting that FoR is experienced in modest intensity by most survivors. Studies including long-term and short-term survivors indicate no significant change of FoR over time. Lower level of education, lower level of optimism, and being Hispanic or White/Caucasian were found to be associated with higher levels of FoR. Significant negative associations were reported between FoR and quality of life as well as psychosocial well-being. All but three studies were conducted in the USA. General cut-offs for severity/clinical significance have not been defined yet. FoR at modest intensity is experienced by most long-term cancer survivors. Future studies should address determinants and consequences of FoR in more detail. Validated instruments providing cut-offs for severity/clinical significance of FoR should be developed and utilized. Efficient interventions should be implemented to reduce detrimental effects of FoR. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Meaningful Use of an Electronic Personal Health Record (ePHR) among Pediatric Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Rebecca S; Cherven, Brooke O; Gilleland Marchak, Jordan; Edwards, Paula; Palgon, Michael; Escoffery, Cam; Meacham, Lillian R; Mertens, Ann C

    2017-03-15

    Background and Objectivs: Survivors of pediatric and adolescent cancer are at an increased risk of chronic and debilitating health conditions and require life-long specialized care. Stand-alone electronic personal health records (ePHRs) may aid their self-management. This analysis characterizes young adult survivors and parents who meaningfully use an ePHR, Cancer SurvivorLink TM , designed for survivors of pediatric and adolescent cancer. This was a retrospective observational study of patients seen at a pediatric survivor clinic for annual survivor care. Young adult survivors and/or parent proxies for survivors survivors/parents registered and 38% of registrants used SurvivorLink meaningfully. Young adult registrants who transferred to adult care during the study period were more likely to be meaningful users (aOR: 2.6 (95% CI: 1.1, 6.1)) and used the ePHR twice as frequently as those who continued to receive care in our institution's pediatric survivor clinic. Among survivors who continued to receive care at our institution, being a registrant was associated with having an annual follow-up visit (aOR: 2.6 (95% CI: 1.2, 5.8)). While ePHRs may not be utilized by all survivors, SurvivorLink is a resource for a subset and may serve as an important bridge for patients who transfer their care. Using SurvivorLink was also associated with receiving recommended annual survivor care.

  1. Aeration equipment for small depths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sluše Jan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Deficit of air in water causes complications with cyanobacteria mainly in the summer months. Cyanobacteria is a bacteria that produces poison called cyanotoxin. When the concentration of cyanobacteria increases, the phenomena „algal bloom“ appears, which is very toxic and may kill all the organisms. This article describes new equipment for aeration of water in dams, ponds and reservoirs with small depth. This equipment is mobile and it is able to work without any human factor because its control is provided by a GPS module. The main part of this equipment consists of a floating pump which pumps water from the surface. Another important part of this equipment is an aerator where water and air are blended. Final aeration process runs in the nozzles which provide movement of all this equipment and aeration of the water. Simulations of the flow are solved by multiphase flow with diffusion in open source program called OpenFOAM. Results will be verified by an experiment.

  2. Subsequent Neoplasms in 5-Year Survivors of Childhood Cancer: The Childhood Cancer Survivor Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitton, John; Leisenring, Wendy; Mertens, Ann C.; Hammond, Sue; Stovall, Marilyn; Donaldson, Sarah S.; Meadows, Anna T.; Robison, Leslie L.; Neglia, Joseph P.

    2010-01-01

    Background The occurrence of subsequent neoplasms has direct impact on the quantity and quality of life in cancer survivors. We have expanded our analysis of these events in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS) to better understand the occurrence of these events as the survivor population ages. Methods The incidence of and risk for subsequent neoplasms occurring 5 years or more after the childhood cancer diagnosis were determined among 14 359 5-year survivors in the CCSS who were treated from 1970 through 1986 and who were at a median age of 30 years (range = 5–56 years) for this analysis. At 30 years after childhood cancer diagnosis, we calculated cumulative incidence at 30 years of subsequent neoplasms and calculated standardized incidence ratios (SIRs), excess absolute risks (EARs) for invasive second malignant neoplasms, and relative risks for subsequent neoplasms by use of multivariable Poisson regression. Results Among 14 359 5-year survivors, 1402 subsequently developed 2703 neoplasms. Cumulative incidence at 30 years after the childhood cancer diagnosis was 20.5% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 19.1% to 21.8%) for all subsequent neoplasms, 7.9% (95% CI = 7.2% to 8.5%) for second malignant neoplasms (excluding nonmelanoma skin cancer), 9.1% (95% CI = 8.1% to 10.1%) for nonmelanoma skin cancer, and 3.1% (95% CI = 2.5% to 3.8%) for meningioma. Excess risk was evident for all primary diagnoses (EAR = 2.6 per 1000 person-years, 95% CI = 2.4 to 2.9 per 1000 person-years; SIR = 6.0, 95% CI = 5.5 to 6.4), with the highest being for Hodgkin lymphoma (SIR = 8.7, 95% CI = 7.7 to 9.8) and Ewing sarcoma (SIR = 8.5, 95% CI = 6.2 to 11.7). In the Poisson multivariable analysis, female sex, older age at diagnosis, earlier treatment era, diagnosis of Hodgkin lymphoma, and treatment with radiation therapy were associated with increased risk of subsequent neoplasm. Conclusions As childhood cancer survivors progress through adulthood, risk of subsequent neoplasms

  3. Screening for neurocognitive impairment in pediatric cancer long-term survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krull, Kevin R; Okcu, M Fatih; Potter, Brian; Jain, Neelam; Dreyer, ZoAnn; Kamdar, Kala; Brouwers, Pim

    2008-09-01

    Recent studies suggest that up to 40% of childhood cancer survivors may experience neurocognitive problems, a finding that has led the Children's Oncology Group to recommend regular evaluation. However, for a variety of reasons, including costs, time restraints, health insurance, and access to professional resources, these guidelines are often difficult to implement. We report reliability and validity data on a brief neurocognitive screening method that could be used to routinely screen patients in need of comprehensive follow-up. Two hundred forty consecutive patients were screened during their annual visits to a long-term survivor clinic using standard neurocognitive measures and brief parent rating. From this total, 48 patients had a second screening, and 52 patients had a comprehensive follow-up evaluation. Test-retest reliability and predictive and discriminative validity were examined. Good test-retest reliability was demonstrated, with an overall r = 0.72 and all individual subtest correlations greater than r = 0.40. Although means tended to improve from first to second testing, no significant changes were detected (all P > .10). The screen accurately predicted global intellect (F(6,45) = 11.81, P reading skills (F(6,45) = 4.74, P < .001), and mathematics (F(6,45) = 3.35, P < .008). Parent rating was a marginal indicator of global intellect only. The brief neurocognitive screening was a better predictor of child functioning than specific parent rating. This brief measure, which can be completed in 30 minutes, is a practical and reliable method to identify cancer survivors in need of further neurocognitive follow-up.

  4. A Person-Centered Approach to Examining Heterogeneity and Subgroups Among Survivors of Sexual Assault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, N. Tatiana; Stappenbeck, Cynthia A.; Kaysen, Debra; Kajumulo, Kelly F.; Davis, Kelly Cue; George, William H.; Norris, Jeanette; Heiman, Julia R.

    2015-01-01

    This study identified subgroups of female sexual assault survivors based on characteristics of their victimization experiences, validated the subgroup structure in a second cohort of women recruited identically to the first, and examined subgroups' differential associations with sexual risk/safety behavior, heavy episodic drinking (HED), psychological distress symptomatology, incarceration, transactional sex, and experiences with controlling and violent partners. The community sample consisted of 667 female survivors of adolescent or adult sexual assault who were 21 to 30 years old (M=24.78, SD=2.66). Eligibility criteria included having unprotected sex within the past year, other HIV/STI risk factors, and some experience with HED, but without alcohol problems or dependence. Latent class analyses (LCA) were used to identify subgroups of women with similar victimization experiences. Three groups were identified and validated across two cohorts of women using multiple-group LCA: Contact or Attempted assault (17% of the sample), Incapacitated assault (52%), and Forceful Severe assault (31%). Groups did not differ in their sexual risk/safety behavior. Women in the Forceful Severe category had higher levels of anxiety, depression, and trauma symptoms, higher proportions of incarceration and transactional sex, and more experiences with controlling and violent partners than did women in the other two groups. Women in the Forceful Severe category also reported a higher frequency of HED than women in the Incapacitated category. Different types of assault experiences appear to be differentially associated with negative outcomes. Understanding heterogeneity and subgroups among sexual assault survivors has implications for improving clinical care and contributing to recovery. PMID:26052619

  5. Another donation of computer equipment

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2014-01-01

    On Thursday 27 February, CERN was pleased to donate computer equipment to a physics institute in the Philippines.   H.E. Leslie J. Baja and Rolf Heuer. Following donations of computer equipment to institutes in Morocco, Ghana, Bulgaria, Serbia and Egypt, CERN is to send 50 servers and 4 network switches to the National Institute of Physics at the University of the Philippines Diliman. CERN’s Director-General Rolf Heuer and the Ambassador of the Philippines to Switzerland and Lichtenstein, H.E. Leslie J. Baja, spoke of their enthusiasm for the project during an official ceremony. The equipment will be used for various high energy physics research programmes in the Philippines and for the University’s development of digital resources for science.

  6. Heavy Equipment Operator: General Equipment Operator. Instructional Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrix, Laborn J.; Sawatzky, Joyce

    Developed through close coordination between contractors, construction workers, and vocational educators, this instructor's manual is designed to help heavy equipment instructors present materials in a systematic format. The instructional materials in the manual are written in terms of student performance, using measurable behavioral objectives.…

  7. Increased risk of attempted suicide among aging holocaust survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barak, Yoram; Aizenberg, Dov; Szor, Henry; Swartz, Marnina; Maor, Rachel; Knobler, Haim Y

    2005-08-01

    Suicide rates are higher in elderly persons than in those at other phase of the life-cycle. The majority of World War II (WWII) veterans and Holocaust survivors still define their war experiences as being the "most significant stressor" of their lives. Aging of survivors is frequently associated with depression, reactivation of traumatic syndromes, physical disorders, loss, and psychological distress, possibly increasing the risk of suicide. The aim of the present study was to investigate, among a large cohort of elderly Holocaust survivors, whether their WWII experiences confer an increased risk of suicidal behavior. All medical records of elderly patients admitted to a psychiatric hospital in Israel during a 5-year period were retrospectively evaluated. Suicidal patients were compared with patients who had not attempted suicide. Of 921 eligible patients, 374 were Holocaust survivors; 135 (14.6%) had attempted suicide in the month before admission. Ninety Holocaust survivors (24%) had attempted suicide, versus 45 of the 502 patients (8.2%) with no WWII experience. The risk of attempted suicide among Holocaust survivors was significantly increased. Although these findings are from a highly selected sample, we suggest that aging Holocaust survivors are at increased risk of attempting suicide. The growth of the elderly population, of whom many had had traumatic life experiences, emphasizes the need to implement preventive strategies so that suicidal risk may be contained.

  8. Life experiences after stroke among Iranian stroke survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalvandi, A; Heikkilä, K; Maddah, S S B; Khankeh, H R; Ekman, S L

    2010-06-01

    Stroke is a major cause of disability worldwide. It is a life-threatening and life-altering event, which leaves many physical and mental disabilities, thus creating major social and economic burdens. Experiencing a stroke and its aftermath can be devastating for patients and their families. In Iran, many services are not available for those who lack property; this may result in many difficulties and long-term problems for stroke survivors and their family members who are usually the main caregivers in Iranian cultural. Despite its effect on their lives, little is known about how the survivors perceive stroke in the Iranian context, therefore, knowing more about this process may enhance problem identification and problem solving. To illuminate how stroke survivors experience and perceive life after stroke. A grounded theory approach was recruited using semi-structured interviews with 10 stroke survivors. The survivors perceived that inadequate social and financial support, lack of an educational plan, lack of access to rehabilitative services, physical and psychological problems led them to functional disturbances, poor socio-economical situation and life disintegration. The core concept of life after stroke was functional disturbances. The study shows the need to support the stroke survivors in their coping process with their new situation by providing appropriate discharge plans, social and financial support, social insurances and training programmes for the stroke survivors and their families.

  9. Survivor in the cancer context: a concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebdon, Megan; Foli, Karen; McComb, Sara

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this analysis was to define survivor in the cancer context. Cancer survivor has been used in the cancer lexicon, but may not represent the individuals it defines. This concept analysis was completed according to Walker and Avant's method. PubMed, PsychInfo, CINAHL, JSTOR, Google and medical and public health websites. Thirty sources from multiple disciplines, published between 1987-2013, were analysed for recurrent themes and conceptual meaning. Critical attributes, antecedents and consequences were extrapolated. Model, related and contrary cases were developed based on an amalgamation of clinical observations. Illegitimate, borderline and invented cases were excluded for this reason. Survivor in the cancer context is an individual with a history of malignancy, who has lived through a personalized challenge and has ongoing positive and negative consequences. Not all cancer survivors would identify themselves using the term survivor. This contributes to the paradigm shift of cancer as a chronic disease as it establishes the unique nature of the cancer experience while highlighting the long-term concerns related to this set of diseases. The Theory of Uncertainty in Illness provides a framework to understand the individualized nature of being a cancer survivor. Nursing research and practice should address the personal experiences of cancer survivors while still focusing on general survivorship needs. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Accelerated aging among cancer survivors: from pediatrics to geriatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Tara O; Ness, Kirsten K; Cohen, Harvey Jay

    2014-01-01

    There are almost 14-million cancer survivors in the United States and the population is growing. Almost two-thirds of these survivors are age 65 or older. Given this, it is imperative to understand the impact of cancer and its therapies on the aging process. Childhood cancer survivors, diagnosed with cancer at age 21 or younger, particularly females, have rates of frailty similar to rates in older adults. This phenomenon appears to start early, suggesting an aging phenotype. Frailty among childhood cancer survivors increases risk for chronic disease and mortality. Adults diagnosed with cancer are faced with the effects of cancer and its therapies compounded by the issues of multiple morbidities that occur with the typical aging process. Intervention studies to date have focused on smoking cessation, diet, and exercise, as well as improving rates of late effects surveillance in childhood cancer survivors. No intervention studies have specifically addressed the issue of frailty or multiple morbidities in cancer survivors. Concerted efforts must continue to create and disseminate survivorship care plans to all cancer survivors.

  11. Obesity in Childhood Cancer Survivors: Call for Early Weight Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fang Fang; Parsons, Susan K

    2015-09-01

    A high prevalence of obesity and cardiometabolic conditions has been increasingly recognized in childhood cancer survivors. In particular, survivors of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia have been found to be at risk of becoming overweight or obese early in treatment, with increases in weight maintained throughout treatment and beyond. Nutrition plays an important role in the etiology of obesity and cardiometabolic conditions and is among the few modifiable factors that can prevent or delay the early onset of these chronic conditions. However, nutritional intake in childhood cancer survivors has not been adequately examined and the evidence is built on data from small cohorts of survivors. In addition, the long-term impact of cancer diagnosis and treatment on survivors' nutritional intake as well as how survivors' nutritional intake is associated with chronic health conditions have not been well quantified in large-scale studies. Promoting family-based healthy lifestyles, preferably at a sensitive window of unhealthy weight gain, is a priority for preventing the early onset of obesity and cardiometabolic conditions in childhood cancer survivors. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  12. Screening for vitamin D insufficiency in pediatric cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esbenshade, Adam J; Sopfe, Jenna; Zhao, Zhiguo; Li, Zeda; Campbell, Kristin; Simmons, Jill H; Friedman, Debra L

    2014-04-01

    Corticosteroids increase risk for decreased bone mineral density, which can be worsened by vitamin D insufficiency (VDI) or deficiency (VDD). In the Vanderbilt cancer survivorship clinic, we obtained screening total 25-hydroxy vitamin D levels (VDL) in 171 cancer survivors cancer, and compared this group to a control group of 97 healthy pediatric patients. VDD was diagnosed in 15.8% and VDI in 34.5% of cancer survivors and VDD/VDI combined was associated with body mass index (BMI) >85th percentile (Odds ratio [OR] = 5.4; P survivor/control group multivariable analysis, cancer diagnosis did not increase VDI/VDD risk, but significant associations persisted with elevated BMI (P pediatric cancer survivors treated with corticosteroids and healthy children. The impact of VDD/VDI in cancer survivors may be greater due to risk for impaired bone health superimposed on that conferred from corticosteroid exposure. Thus, screening VDLs should be obtained in pediatric cancer survivors treated with corticosteroids, particularly in those with elevated BMI, older age, or non-Caucasian race. Prospective studies evaluating the impact of interventions to minimize VDD/VDI on long-term bone health in survivors are required. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Nature-based experiences and health of cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Heather; Jakubec, Sonya L

    2014-11-01

    Although exposure to, and interaction with, natural environments are recognized as health-promoting, little is understood about the use of nature contact in treatment and rehabilitation for cancer survivors. This narrative review summarizes the literature exploring the influence of nature-based experiences on survivor health. Key databases included CINAHL, EMBASE, Medline, Web of Science, PubMed, PsycArticles, ProQuest, and Cancerlit databases. Sixteen articles met inclusion criteria and were reviewed. Four major categories emerged: 1) Dragon boat racing may enhance breast cancer survivor quality of life, 2) Natural environment may counteract attentional fatigue in newly diagnosed breast cancer survivors, 3) Adventure programs provide a positive experience for children and adolescent survivors, fostering a sense of belonging and self-esteem, and 4) Therapeutic landscapes may decrease state-anxiety, improving survivor health. This review contributes to a better understanding of the therapeutic effects of nature-based experiences on cancer survivor health, providing a point of entry for future study. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Achieving value in mobile health applications for cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Sharon Watkins; Oakley-Girvan, Ingrid

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to identify appropriate development and testing strategies for mobile health applications for cancer survivors. In January of 2016, we conducted a PubMed search for mobile applications for cancer survivors. A total of 32 articles were selected for inclusion, including 13 review articles, and 19 articles describing an mHealth application or intervention. We assessed mobile app development and testing strategies and standards as described in these articles. We identified seven elements of patient empowerment applications for cancer survivors, strategies for application development that take advantage of smartphone capabilities, issues for consideration in developing new applications, and steps for creating user-centered mobile health applications that provide meaningful value for cancer survivors. However, few mobile health apps implemented empowerment elements, underwent rigorous design approaches, or included assessment of use in the cancer survivor population. There is tremendous potential for mobile health apps to benefit cancer survivors. However, there are specific issues for consideration in developing new applications and steps for creating user-centered applications which are not routinely used. This diminishes the value for the cancer survivor population but could be easily addressed through standardized development and testing procedures. Smartphone applications have the potential to improve the cancer survivorship experience, but users should look for evidence that the application was appropriately developed and tested.

  15. Extreme Sport/Adventure Activity Correlates in Gynecologic Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Jennifer J; Vallance, Jeff K; Holt, Nicholas L; Courneya, Kerry S

    2016-03-01

    We examined the demographic, medical and behavioral correlates of participation and interest in extreme sport/adventure activities (ESAA) in gynecologic cancer survivors. A random sample of 621 gynecologic cancer survivors in Alberta, Canada, completed a mailed self-report questionnaire assessing medical, demographic, and behavioral variables and participation and interest in ESAA. Multivariate analyses revealed that gynecologic cancer survivors were more likely to participate in ESAA if they met aerobic exercise guidelines (OR=1.75 [95%CI:1.02-2.99]), had better general health (OR=1.71 [95%CI: 1.01-2.90]), had cervical or ovarian cancer (OR=1.95 [95%CI:0.97-3.93]), were employed (OR=1.71 [95%CI:0.95-3.08]), and were of healthy weight (OR=1.58 [95%CI:0.93-2.68]). Moreover, gynecologic cancer survivors were more likely to be interested in trying an ESAA if they had cervical or ovarian cancer (OR=1.76 [95%CI:0.94-3.27]) and were meeting the strength exercise guidelines (OR=1.68 [95%CI:0.95-2.98]). Medical, demographic, and behavioral variables correlate with participation and interest in ESAA in gynecologic cancer survivors. The pattern of correlates suggests that gynecologic cancer survivors are more likely to participate in ESSA if they have the physical capability and financial resources. Interventions to promote ESAA in gynecologic cancer survivors need to address these 2 key barriers.

  16. A qualitative synthesis of trials promoting physical activity behaviour change among post-treatment breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Camille E; James, Erica L; Stacey, Fiona; Plotnikoff, Ronald C

    2013-12-01

    Health outcome trials have provided strong evidence that participating in regular physical activity can improve the quality of life and health of post-treatment breast cancer survivors. Focus is now needed on how to promote changes in physical activity behaviour among this group. This systematic review examines the efficacy of behavioural interventions for promoting physical activity among post-treatment breast cancer survivors. Behavioural intervention studies published up until July 2012 were identified through a systematic search of two databases: MEDLINE and CINAHL, and by searching reference lists of relevant publications and scanning citation libraries of project staff. Eight out of the ten identified studies reported positive intervention effects on aerobic physical activity behaviour, ranging from during the intervention period to 6 months post-intervention. Only two studies reported intervention effect sizes. The identification of factors related to efficacy was not possible because of the limited number and heterogeneity of studies included, as well as the lack of effect sizes reported. Nonetheless, an examination of the eight studies that did yield significant intervention effects suggests that 12-week interventions employing behaviour change techniques (e.g., self-monitoring and goal setting) derived from a variety of theories and delivered in a variety of settings (i.e., one-on-one, group or home) can be effective at changing the aerobic physical activity behaviour of breast cancer survivors in the mid- to long terms. Behavioural interventions do hold promise for effectively changing physical activity behaviour among breast cancer survivors. However, future research is needed to address the lack of studies exploring long-term intervention effects, mediators of intervention effects and interventions promoting resistance-training activity, and to address issues impacting on validity, such as the limited use of objective physical activity measures and

  17. Sexual self-schemas of female child sexual abuse survivors: relationships with risky sexual behavior and sexual assault in adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niehaus, Ashley F; Jackson, Joan; Davies, Stephanie

    2010-12-01

    Childhood sexual trauma has been demonstrated to increase survivors' risk for engaging in unrestricted sexual behaviors and experiencing adolescent sexual assault. The current study used the sexual self-schema construct to examine cognitive representations of sexuality that might drive these behavioral patterns. In Study 1 (N = 774), we attempted to improve the content validity of the Sexual Self Schema Scale for child sexual abuse (CSA) survivors, introducing a fourth sexual self-schema factor titled the "immoral/irresponsible" factor. In Study 2 (N = 1150), the potential differences in sexual self-views, as assessed by the four sexual self-schema factors, between CSA survivors and non-victims were explored. In addition, Study 2 evaluated how these sexual self-schema differences may contribute to participation in unrestricted sexual behaviors and risk for sexual assault in adolescence. Results indicated that a history of CSA impacted the way women viewed themselves as a sexual person on each of the four factors. CSA survivors were found to view themselves as more open and possessing more immoral/irresponsible cognitions about sexuality as compared to women who did not have a CSA history. In addition, the CSA survivors endorsed less embarrassment and passionate/romantic views of their sexual selves. The interaction of CSA severity and the sexual self-schemas explained variance in adolescent sexual assault experiences above and beyond the severity of CSA history and participation in risky sexual behaviors. The findings suggest that sexual self-views may serve to moderate the relationship between CSA and adolescent sexual assault. Implications of these findings and directions for future research are discussed.

  18. Mechanical (turbines and auxiliary equipment)

    CERN Document Server

    Sherry, A; Cruddace, AE

    2013-01-01

    Modern Power Station Practice, Volume 3: Mechanical (Turbines and Auxiliary Equipment) focuses on the development of turbines and auxiliary equipment used in power stations in Great Britain. Topics covered include thermodynamics and steam turbine theory; turbine auxiliary systems such as lubrication systems, feed water heating systems, and the condenser and cooling water plants. Miscellaneous station services, and pipework in power plants are also described. This book is comprised of five chapters and begins with an overview of thermodynamics and steam turbine theory, paying particular attenti

  19. Adoption consideration and concerns among young adult female cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, Jessica R; Whitcomb, Brian W; Standridge, Daniel; Malcarne, Vanessa L; Romero, Sally A D; Roberts, Samantha A; Su, H Irene

    2017-02-01

    We compared adoption consideration between female young adult cancer survivors and women of the same age in the general US population, hypothesizing that cancer survivors who desired children would report greater interest in adoption than an age-adjusted general population sample who desired children. After age-standardizing the cancer survivor cohort to match the age distribution of the 2006-2010 National Survey for Family Growth (NSFG), we estimated adoption consideration among women age 18-35 years who wanted a (another) child in the two cohorts overall and within age groups. We assessed characteristics and concerns related to adoption consideration among cancer survivors. Among cancer survivors, 81.6 % (95 % CI 75.7-87.6) reported that they would consider adoption compared to 40.3 % (95 % CI 40.3-40.3) of women in the general population. While over 80 % of the cancer survivor sample reported that they would consider adoption, only 15 % of cancer survivors reported no concerns about adoption. The most common concerns were desire for a biological child (48 %), expense (45 %), adoption agency candidacy (41 %), and needing more information (39 %). We observed a twofold higher interest in adoption when comparing the cancer survivor with the general population, suggesting that adoption is a consideration for many young women who have survived cancer. Adoption is an important family-building option for those who want to have a child but are unable to or choose not to have a biological child. However, young adult survivors may need more support to understand and navigate this process.

  20. Awareness of Dietary and Alcohol Guidelines Among Colorectal Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Nikki A; Berkowitz, Zahava; Rodriguez, Juan L

    2015-12-01

    Although dietary habits can affect colorectal cancer (CRC) survivors' health, it is unclear how familiar survivors are with dietary guidelines, what they believe about healthy eating and alcohol consumption, and what hinders healthy dietary habits after cancer. This study assessed CRC survivors' familiarity with dietary guidelines, their eating and drinking habits, and perceived facilitators and barriers to healthy eating after cancer, including social support and self-efficacy for maintaining a healthy diet and limiting alcohol. A total of 593 individuals (50% female; mean age, 74 years) diagnosed with CRC approximately 6 years prior to study entry in early 2010 were identified through California Cancer Registry records and participated in a cross-sectional mailed survey assessing health behavior after cancer (46% adjusted response rate). Analyses were conducted in 2014-2015. Survivors were most familiar with-and most likely to follow-recommendations to choose low-fat foods; 15% had never heard of recommendations to limit alcohol. Survivors were more aware of recommendations involving messages to limit/avoid versus approach/choose certain foods. The most common barrier to a healthy diet involved the effort required (26%). Survivors received more family/friend support and provider recommendations for healthy eating than limiting alcohol. Results provide an overview of awareness of and adherence to dietary recommendations among CRC survivors, highlighting the need for increasing awareness of recommendations that are especially relevant for survivors. Suggestions are made for modifying diet-related messages to facilitate comprehension and recall among CRC survivors, and increasing awareness among groups with the lowest awareness levels. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Association Between Sarcopenia and Metabolic Syndrome in Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Su Jung; Kim, Nam Cho

    Advanced cancer treatments have improved survival from cancer, but the incidence of cardiovascular disease in survivors has recently increased. Sarcopenia and metabolic syndrome (MetS) are related to cancer survival, and sarcopenia is an emerging risk factor for cardiovascular disease. However, evidence of a relationship between sarcopenia and MetS in cancer survivors is lacking. The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of sarcopenia and MetS in cancer survivors and to investigate independent predictors of MetS in cancer survivors. From the fourth and fifth Korea National Health and Nutritional Exam Survey (2008-2011), 798 consecutive cancer survivors were analyzed. Sarcopenia was defined as the appendicular skeletal muscle mass divided by weight less than 1 SD below the sex-specific healthy population aged 20 to 39 years. Metabolic syndrome was defined using the National Cholesterol Education Program definition. Among 798 cancer survivors, the prevalence rates of sarcopenia and MetS were 23.1% and 30.0%, respectively. Survivors with sarcopenia were more likely to have a higher waist circumference, body mass index, triglyceride level, and blood pressure and to have a lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level compared with those without sarcopenia. In multivariable analysis, sarcopenia was an independent predictor of MetS (odds ratio, 2.76; 95% confidence interval, 1.92-3.97). In addition, age and type of cancer were independent predictors of MetS. Sarcopenia was associated with an increased prevalence of MetS in cancer survivors. Interventions to prevent sarcopenia may be necessary to improve cardiovascular outcome in cancer survivors.

  2. Complementary and alternative medicine use among US cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Gabriella M; Hershman, Dawn L; Falci, Laura; Shi, Zaixing; Tsai, Wei-Yann; Greenlee, Heather

    2016-10-01

    US cancer survivors commonly use vitamins/minerals and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). We compare use of vitamins/minerals and CAM between adult cancer survivors and cancer-free adults and estimate annual out-of-pocket expenses. Data on self-reported vitamin/mineral and CAM use in the past 12 months from the cross-sectional 2012 US National Health Interview Survey were used to estimate prevalence of use and out-of-pocket expenditures. The cohort included adults with (n = 2977) and without (n = 30,551) a self-reported cancer diagnosis. Approximately 79 % of cancer survivors and 68 % of cancer-free adults reported using ≥1 vitamins/minerals and/or CAM modality in the past year. Compared to cancer-free adults, cancer survivors were more likely to report use of vitamin/minerals (75 vs. 61 %, P alternative medical systems (5 vs. 4 %, P = 0.04). Adult cancer survivors and cancer-free adults spent an annual estimated $6.7 billion and $52 billion out-of-pocket, respectively, on vitamins/minerals and CAM. Survivors spent 60 % of the total on vitamins/minerals ($4 billion), 18 % ($1.2 billion) on non-vitamin/mineral natural products, and 7 % ($0.5 billion) on massage. Compared with cancer-free adults, a higher proportion of cancer survivors report vitamin/mineral and CAM use. Cancer survivors, who accounted for 6.9 % of the total population, accrued more than 11.4 % of the annual out-of-pocket costs on vitamins/minerals and CAM spent by US adults. Given the high use of vitamins/minerals and CAM in cancer survivors, studies are needed to analyze health outcomes and the cost/benefit ratio of such use.

  3. Total antioxidant status (TAS in childhood cancer survivors Total antioxidant status (TAS in childhood cancer survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryna Krawczuk-Rybak

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Total antioxidant status (TAS, and the influence of treatment and correlation between TAS and parameters
    involved in metabolic syndrome (MS in pediatric cancer survivors were evaluated. One hundred children
    and adolescents were studied. Twenty-five survivors received radiotherapy, 12 were obese or overweight.
    Additionally, we analyzed TAS in eight children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL at diagnosis and
    during treatment after remission induction. The control group consisted of 22 healthy children. Serum concentrations
    of TAS, glucose, cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides, fibrinogen and insulin were measured. In
    cancer survivors, independently of diagnosis and kind of treatment (radiotherapy anthracyclines administration,
    the mean serum TAS did not differ significantly from the control group. No correlations were observed
    with age at the time of diagnosis or interval after the end of treatment. TAS values did not correlate with traits of
    the metabolic syndrome. In a group of eight patients with ALL at diagnosis and after induction of remission,
    TAS values were lower than in the control and cancer survivor groups. Antioxidant status was not found to be
    deteriorated in children after anticancer treatment, irrespective of diagnosis or kind of treatment, which might
    indicate sufficient antioxidant prevention. However, the possibility of the development of MS and cardiovascular
    disease in adulthood indicates the need for future studies.Total antioxidant status (TAS, and the influence of treatment and correlation between TAS and parameters
    involved in metabolic syndrome (MS in pediatric cancer survivors were evaluated. One hundred children
    and adolescents were studied. Twenty-five survivors received radiotherapy, 12 were obese or overweight.
    Additionally, we analyzed TAS in eight children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL at diagnosis and
    during

  4. Predictors of successful use of a web-based healthcare document storage and sharing system for pediatric cancer survivors: Cancer SurvivorLink™.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Rebecca; Meacham, Lillian; Cherven, Brooke; Hassen-Schilling, Leann; Edwards, Paula; Palgon, Michael; Espinoza, Sofia; Mertens, Ann

    2014-09-01

    Cancer SurvivorLink™, www.cancersurvivorlink.org , is a patient-controlled communication tool where survivors can electronically store and share documents with healthcare providers. Functionally, SurvivorLink serves as an electronic personal health record-a record of health-related information managed and controlled by the survivor. Recruitment methods to increase registration and the characteristics of registrants who completed each step of using SurvivorLink are described. Pediatric cancer survivors were recruited via mailings, survivor clinic, and community events. Recruitment method and Aflac Survivor Clinic attendance was determined for each registrant. Registration date, registrant type (parent vs. survivor), zip code, creation of a personal health record in SurvivorLink, storage of documents, and document sharing were measured. Logistic regression was used to determine the characteristics that predicted creation of a health record and storage of documents. To date, 275 survivors/parents have completed registration: 63 were recruited via mailing, 99 from clinic, 56 from community events, and 57 via other methods. Overall, 66.9 % registrants created a personal health record and 45.7 % of those stored a health document. There were no significant predictors for creating a personal health record. Attending a survivor clinic was the strongest predictor of document storage (p survivor clinic is the biggest predictor of registering and using SurvivorLink. Many survivors must advocate for their survivorship care. Survivor Link provides educational material and supports the dissemination of survivor-specific follow-up recommendations to facilitate shared clinical care decision making.

  5. Health Literacy in Adolescents and Young Adults: Perspectives from Australian Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Merry; Sansom-Daly, Ursula M; Wakefield, Claire E; McGill, Brittany C; Cohn, Richard J

    2017-03-01

    Health literacy is a critical determinant of health and an emerging public health concern. Little is known about the health literacy of adolescents and young adults (AYAs) or about the ability of young patients to communicate health needs and critically evaluate information. We used qualitative methods to investigate the three aspects of health literacy (functional, communicative, and critical) in Australian AYA cancer survivors. Forty Australian AYA cancer survivors, aged 15-29 either at diagnosis or recruitment, participated in semistructured interviews. Participants were asked about sources of information and ability to understand information, communicate questions, and critically evaluate the validity, reliability, and relevancy of information to their situation. Self-reported adherence levels and advice for AYA-specific care was also obtained. Interviews were coded and analyzed for emergent themes using QSR NVivo 10. Almost all AYAs named their doctor as the primary source of information. Most AYAs reported no difficulties with understanding, communicating, or assessing relevancy of information. Conversely, few AYAs reported confidence in assessment of validity and reliability of information. The doctor-patient relationship appeared to be an influential factor in all aspects of health literacy. AYAs frequently reported having a good understanding and communication around health information; however, few AYAs described engaging in critical evaluations of this information. The potential impact of the doctor-patient relationship across several domains of health literacy suggests that more focus could be placed on promoting health literacy at physician, community, and societal levels, in addition to promoting individual skills.

  6. Second Neoplasms in Survivors of Childhood Cancer: Findings From the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadows, Anna T.; Friedman, Debra L.; Neglia, Joseph P.; Mertens, Ann C.; Donaldson, Sarah S.; Stovall, Marilyn; Hammond, Sue; Yasui, Yutaka; Inskip, Peter D.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To review the reports of subsequent neoplasms (SNs) in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS) cohort that were made through January 1, 2006, and published before July 31, 2008, and to discuss the host-, disease-, and therapy-related risk factors associated with SNs. Patients and Methods SNs were ascertained by survivor self-reports and subsequently confirmed by pathology findings or medical record review. Cumulative incidence of SNs and standardized incidence ratios for second malignant neoplasms (SMNs) were calculated. The impact of host-, disease-, and therapy-related risk factors was evaluated by Poisson regression. Results Among 14,358 cohort members, 730 reported 802 SMNs (excluding nonmelanoma skin cancers). This represents a 2.3-fold increase in the number of SMNs over that reported in the first comprehensive analysis of SMNs in the CCSS cohort, which was done 7 years ago. In addition, 66 cases of meningioma and 1,007 cases of nonmelanoma skin cancer were diagnosed. The 30-year cumulative incidence of SMNs was 9.3% and that of nonmelanoma skin cancer was 6.9%. Risk of SNs remains elevated for more than 20 years of follow-up for all primary childhood cancer diagnoses. In multivariate analyses, risks differ by SN subtype, but include radiotherapy, age at diagnosis, sex, family history of cancer, and primary childhood cancer diagnosis. Female survivors whose primary childhood cancer diagnosis was Hodgkin's lymphoma or sarcoma and who received radiotherapy are at particularly increased risk. Analyses of risk associated with radiotherapy demonstrated different dose-response curves for specific SNs. Conclusion Childhood cancer survivors are at a substantial and increasing risk for SNs, including nonmelanoma skin cancer and meningiomas. Health care professionals should understand the magnitude of these risks to provide individuals with appropriate counseling and follow-up. PMID:19255307

  7. Tobacco Use Among Siblings of Childhood Cancer Survivors: A Report From the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchbinder, David; Oeffinger, Kevin; Franco-Villalobos, Conrado; Yasui, Yutaka; Alderfer, Melissa A; Armstrong, Gregory T; Casillas, Jacqueline; Ford, Jennifer; Krull, Kevin R; Leisenring, Wendy; Recklitis, Christopher; Robison, Leslie L; Zeltzer, Lonnie K; Lown, E Anne

    2016-02-01

    Having a brother or sister with childhood cancer may influence health behaviors during adulthood. The aim of this study was to compare tobacco use in siblings of survivors with peers and to identify factors associated with sibling tobacco use. A retrospective cohort study was conducted using adult siblings (N = 1,974) of 5+ year cancer survivors in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS) and participants (N = 24,105, weighted to match CCSS) in the 2007 National Health Interview Survey. Self-reported tobacco use, sociodemographic, and cancer-related risk factors were analyzed. Siblings were equally likely to have ever smoked compared to their peers (odds ratio [OR] 1.02, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.93-1.12). Siblings were less likely to be current smokers (OR 0.83, 95%CI 0.73-0.94), but more likely to be former smokers (OR 1.21, 95%CI 1.08-1.35). Siblings with low education were more likely to ever smoke (OR 1.51, 95%CI 1.15-2.00) and be current smokers (OR 1.67, 95%CI 1.24-2.26) compared to their peers. Among siblings, risk factors for current tobacco use included the following: low income Siblings of survivors take up smoking at similar rates to their peers, but are more likely to quit. Efforts are needed to address disparities by providing greater psychosocial support and education for the lowest socioeconomic status families facing childhood cancer. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Thyroid abnormalities in survivors of childhood cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çağlar, Ayla Akca; Oğuz, Aynur; Pınarlı, Faruk Güçlü; Karadeniz, Ceyda; Okur, Arzu; Bideci, Aysun; Koçak, Ülker; Bora, Hüseyin

    2014-09-01

    To investigate the late side effects of childhood cancer therapy on the thyroid gland and to determine the risk factors for development of thyroid disorder among childhood cancer survivors. One hundred and twenty relapse-free survivors of childhood cancer (aged 6-30 years) were included in this study. The diagnoses of patients were lymphoma, leukemia, brain tumor, rhabdomyosarcoma and nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). The patients were divided into two groups depending on the treatment: group 1-chemotherapy (ChT) only (n=52) and group 2-combination therapy of ChT + radiotherapy (RT) (head/neck/thorax) (n=68). Thyroid function tests, urinary iodine levels, and thyroid gland ultrasound examinations were evaluated in both groups. Incidence of thyroid disease was 66% (n=79) in the survivors. The thyroid abnormalities were: hypothyroidism (HT) (n=32, 27%), thyroid nodules (n=27, 22%), thyroid parenchymal heterogeneity (n=40, 33%), autoimmune thyroiditis (n=36, 30%), and thyroid malignancy (n=3, 2%). While the incidence of HT and thyroid nodules in group 2 was significantly higher than in group 1, the incidence of thyroid parenchymal heterogeneity and autoimmune thyroiditis was similar in the two patient groups. HT and thyroid malignancy were seen only in group 2. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, a history of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), brain tumor and NPC, as well as cervical irradiation and 5000-5999 cGy doses of radiation were found to constitute risk factors for HT. History of HL and 4000-5999 cGy doses of radiation were risk factors for thyroid nodules. Head/neck irradiation and treatment with platinum derivatives were risk factors for autoimmune thyroiditis. In univariate analysis, a history of NPC, cervical + nasopharyngeal irradiation, and treatment with platinum derivatives were risk factors for thyroid parenchymal heterogeneity. Our results indicate that there is especially an increased risk of HT and thyroid nodules in patients treated with combination

  9. Establishing equivalence of a Chinese version of the stroke specific quality of life measure for stroke survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Suzanne Hoi Shan; Chang, Anne Marie; Chau, Janita Pak Chun

    2017-06-01

    The Stroke Specific Quality of Life Scale is a stroke-specific measure of health-related quality of life. However, there has been no Chinese (Hong Kong) version of the scale. A descriptive study was conducted to examine the reliability, validity and factor structure of the translated version (SSQOL-C) among stroke survivors. Participants completed SSQOL-C, and the Chinese versions of the Medical Outcomes Study Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36), Stroke Self-Efficacy Questionnaire (SSEQ-C) and Frenchay Activities Index (FAI). Thirty of these participants completed the same questionnaires after 4 weeks. A total of 135 stroke survivors (mean age 58.90 ± 9.75) were recruited. SSQOL-C had good internal consistency with Cronbach's alphas for each domain ranging from 0.63 to 0.90. Most domains had moderate to high correlations with similar dimensions of SF-36, SSEQ-C, FAI and Barthel ADL Index total scores (Spearman's rho: 0.40-0.77, p life. More studies are needed to confirm the 11-factor model of the scale. Implications for rehabilitation The translated Chinese version of the Stroke Specific Quality of Life Scale is a reliable and valid tool for measuring Chinese stroke survivors' health-related quality of life. An 11-factor model in contrast to the 12-factor model for the original scale with six new factors emerging and five original factors retained.

  10. Cancer Survivors: The Success Story That's Straining Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Summer E

    2017-01-01

    Since President Richard Nixon declared a "War on Cancer" in 1971, the number of cancer survivors in the United States has quadrupled [1] and is still rising. Thanks to advance in cancer detection and treatment, the almost 15 million cancer survivors in the United States today could grow to some 19 million by 2024 [2]. Increasing survival rates have resulted in a shift: cancer is often treated as a chronic illness rather than a death sentence. However, having so many cancer survivors to monitor, track, and treat has led to growing pains for healthcare providers-forcing them to develop new ways to treat this increasing yet still vulnerable population.

  11. Noncancer-related mortality risks in adult survivors of pediatric malignancies: the childhood cancer survivor study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Cheryl L; Nolan, Vikki G; Leisenring, Wendy; Yasui, Yutaka; Ogg, Susan W; Mertens, Ann C; Neglia, Joseph P; Ness, Kirsten K; Armstrong, Gregory T; Robison, Les L

    2014-09-01

    We sought to identify factors, other than cancer-related treatment and presence/severity of chronic health conditions, which may be associated with late mortality risk among adult survivors of pediatric malignancies. Using the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study cohort and a case-control design, 445 participants who died from causes other than cancer recurrence/progression or non-health-related events were compared with 7,162 surviving participants matched for primary diagnosis, age at baseline questionnaire, time from diagnosis to baseline questionnaire, and time at-risk. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for overall/cause-specific mortality. Independent measures included number/severity of chronic conditions, medical care, health-related behaviors, and health perceptions/concerns. Adjusting for education, income, chemotherapy/radiation exposures, and number/severity of chronic health conditions, an increased risk for all-cause mortality was associated with exercising fewer than 3 days/week (OR = 1.72, CI 1.27-2.34), being underweight (OR = 2.58, CI 1.55-4.28), increased medical care utilization (P cancer treatment and chronic health conditions modify the risk of death among adult survivors of pediatric cancer. Continued cohort observation may inform interventions to reduce mortality.

  12. Exercise training in childhood cancer survivors with subclinical cardiomyopathy who were treated with anthracyclines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Webb A; Ness, Kirsten K; Joshi, Vijaya; Hudson, Melissa M; Robison, Leslie L; Green, Daniel M

    2013-11-06

    Childhood cancer survivors (CCS) treated with anthracyclines are at risk for cardiomyopathy. This case series evaluated the response of anthracycline exposed CCS with subclinical cardiomyopathy to aerobic and strength training. Body composition, strength and cardiopulmonary fitness were evaluated before and after the 12-week intervention. All equipment and materials were provided to five 10+ year CCS (3 males, mean age 38.0 ± 3.3 years) for a guideline-based home exercise program. All five completed the study with no adverse events. Compliance with exercise was 86%. These results suggest that exercise training may improve exercise capacity of CCS with subclinical cardiomyopathy. Pediatr Blood Cancer. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Preventive Maintenance Handbook. Audiovisual Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Educational Products Information Exchange Inst., Stony Brook, NY.

    The preventive maintenance system for audiovisual equipment presented in this handbook is designed by specialists so that it can be used by nonspecialists in school sites. The report offers specific advice on saftey factors and also lists major problems that should not be handled by nonspecialists. Other aspects of a preventive maintenance system…

  14. Lifting operations and lifting equipment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douwes, M.

    2013-01-01

    Lifting operations are inherent to many occupations in the construction industry. They can be performed manually or using lifting equipment. Both manual lifting and mechanical lifting operations can put construction workers at great risk of injury or health symptoms causing sick leave or disability.

  15. Predictors of attendance at specialized survivor clinics in a population-based cohort of adult survivors of childhood cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Paul C; Agha, Mohammad; Pole, Jason D; Hodgson, David; Guttmann, Astrid; Sutradhar, Rinku; Greenberg, Mark L

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of the present study is to determine predictors of attendance at a network of publicly funded specialized survivor clinics by a population-based cohort of adult survivors of childhood cancer. We conducted a retrospective study linking data on eligible patients identified in a provincial pediatric cancer registry with health administrative databases to determine attendance at five specialized survivor clinics in the Canadian province of Ontario between 1999 and 2012. Eligible survivors were treated for cancer at ≤18 years between 1986 and 2005, had survived ≥5 years from their most recent pediatric cancer event, and contributed ≥1 year of follow-up after age 18 years. We assessed the impact of cancer type, treatment intensity, cumulative chemotherapy doses, radiation, socioeconomic status, distance to nearest clinic, and care from a primary care physician (PCP) on attendance using recurrent event multivariable regression. Of 7482 children and adolescents treated for cancer over the study period, 3972 were eligible for study inclusion, of which 3912 successfully linked to administrative health data. After a median of 7.8 years (range 0.2-14.0) of follow-up, 1695/3912 (43.3 %) had attended at least one adult survivor clinic visit. Significantly increased rates of attendance were associated with female gender, higher treatment intensity, radiation, higher alkylating agent exposure, higher socioeconomic status, and an annual exam by a PCP. Distance significantly impacted attendance with survivors living >50 km away less likely to attend than those living within 10 km (relative rate 0.77, p = 0.003). Despite free access to survivor clinics, the majority of adult survivors of childhood cancer do not attend. Alternate models of care need to be developed and assessed, particularly for survivors living far from a specialized clinic and those at lower risk of developing late effects.

  16. Male infertility in long-term survivors of pediatric cancer: a report from the childhood cancer survivor study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasilewski-Masker, K; Seidel, K D; Leisenring, W; Mertens, A C; Shnorhavorian, M; Ritenour, C W; Stovall, M; Green, D M; Sklar, C A; Armstrong, G T; Robison, L L; Meacham, L R

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of male infertility and treatment-related risk factors in childhood cancer survivors. Within the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study, 1,622 survivors and 274 siblings completed the Male Health Questionnaire. The analysis was restricted to survivors (938/1,622; 57.8 %) and siblings (174/274; 63.5 %) who tried to become pregnant. Relative risks (RR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI) for the prevalence of self-reported infertility were calculated using generalized linear models for demographic variables and treatment-related factors to account for correlation among survivors and siblings of the same family. All statistical tests were two-sided. Among those who provided self-report data, the prevalence of infertility was 46.0 % in survivors versus 17.5 % in siblings (RR = 2.64, 95 % CI 1.88-3.70, p survivors who met the definition for infertility, 37 % had reported at least one pregnancy with a female partner that resulted in a live birth. In a multivariable analysis, risk factors for infertility included an alkylating agent dose (AAD) score ≥3 (RR = 2.13, 95 % CI 1.69-2.68 for AAD ≥3 versus AAD survivors who experience infertility father their own children, suggesting episodes of both fertility and infertility. This and the novel association of infertility with bleomycin warrant further investigation. Though infertility is common, male survivors reporting infertility often father their own children. Bleomycin may pose some fertility risk.

  17. Survivors speak: a qualitative analysis of motivational factors influencing breast cancer survivors' participation in a sprint distance triathlon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Karen M; Piacentine, Linda B; Waltke, Leslie J; Ng, Alexander V; Tjoe, Judy A

    2016-01-01

    To examine motivational factors influencing breast cancer survivors to participate in triathlon training, complete a triathlon and maintain an exercise thereafter. Routine exercise has been shown to improve quality of life and reduce recurrence for breast cancer survivors. Yet physical and psychological factors present barriers for initiating and maintaining an exercise routine. Research is limited in exploring factors of exercise motivation from the survivor's perspective. Qualitative design using focus groups and individual follow-up phone interviews to explore motivation for exercise initiation and maintenance. One to two weeks after completing a triathlon, 11 breast cancer survivors who trained together participated in one of three focus groups to discuss their experience. Five months post triathlon 6 of the 11 participants were successfully contacted and phone interviews were conducted to explore exercise maintenance. Focus groups and interviews were analysed using content and thematic analysis. Five themes emerged (1) Champion for Exercise, (2) Part of a Team, (3) Everyone Had a Story, (4) Not Really Exercise and (5) What Do We Do Now? Overall, survivors recognised their need for lifestyle change (e.g. moving from a sedentary lifestyle to a more active one). More importantly, they identified the team approach to exercise initiation was crucial in their success in sustaining a behavioural change. Emphasis needed on developing team exercise training programmes for survivors. Nurses can play a critical role in discussing with survivors, the benefits of exercise initiation and maintenance. Breast cancer survivors are hesitant to initiate routine exercise. Training with women who share a common lived experience increases the likelihood of success. Nurses are in a position to encourage breast cancer survivors to participate in group exercise programmes as a way to improve quality of life. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. The Piper Fatigue Scale-12 (PFS-12): psychometric findings and item reduction in a cohort of breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeve, Bryce B; Stover, Angela M; Alfano, Catherine M; Smith, Ashley Wilder; Ballard-Barbash, Rachel; Bernstein, Leslie; McTiernan, Anne; Baumgartner, Kathy B; Piper, Barbara F

    2012-11-01

    Brief, valid measures of fatigue, a prevalent and distressing cancer symptom, are needed for use in research. This study's primary aim was to create a shortened version of the revised Piper Fatigue Scale (PFS-R) based on data from a diverse cohort of breast cancer survivors. A secondary aim was to determine whether the PFS captured multiple distinct aspects of fatigue (a multidimensional model) or a single overall fatigue factor (a unidimensional model). Breast cancer survivors (n = 799; stages in situ through IIIa; ages 29-86 years) were recruited through three SEER registries (New Mexico, Western Washington, and Los Angeles, CA) as part of the Health, Eating, Activity, and Lifestyle (HEAL) study. Fatigue was measured approximately 3 years post-diagnosis using the 22-item PFS-R that has four subscales (Behavior, Affect, Sensory, and Cognition). Confirmatory factor analysis was used to compare unidimensional and multidimensional models. Six criteria were used to make item selections to shorten the PFS-R: scale's content validity, items' relationship with fatigue, content redundancy, differential item functioning by race and/or education, scale reliability, and literacy demand. Factor analyses supported the original 4-factor structure. There was also evidence from the bi-factor model for a dominant underlying fatigue factor. Six items tested positive for differential item functioning between African-American and Caucasian survivors. Four additional items either showed poor association, local dependence, or content validity concerns. After removing these 10 items, the reliability of the PFS-12 subscales ranged from 0.87 to 0.89, compared to 0.90-0.94 prior to item removal. The newly developed PFS-12 can be used to assess fatigue in African-American and Caucasian breast cancer survivors and reduces response burden without compromising reliability or validity. This is the first study to determine PFS literacy demand and to compare PFS-R responses in African

  19. Viraemia and Ebola virus secretion in survivors of Ebola virus disease in Sierra Leone: a cross-sectional cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Edward; Hunt, Luke; Ross, J C Gareth; Nissen, Nina Marie; Curran, Tanya; Badhan, Anjna; Sutherland, Katherine A; Richards, Jade; Lee, James S; Allen, Samuel H; Laird, Steven; Blackman, Mandy; Collacott, Ian; Parker, Paul A; Walbridge, Andrew; Phillips, Rebecca; Sellu, Sia Jammie; Dama, Agnes; Sheriff, Alpha Karim; Zombo, Joseph; Ngegba, Doris; Wurie, Alieh H; Checchi, Francesco; Brooks, Timothy J

    2016-09-01

    In survivors of Ebola virus disease, clinical sequelae including uveitis, arthralgia, and fatigue are common and necessitate systematic follow-up. However, the infection risk to health-care providers is poorly defined. Here we report Ebola virus RT-PCR data for body site and fluid samples from a large cohort of Ebola virus survivors at clinic follow-up. In this cross-sectional cohort study, consecutive survivors of Ebola virus disease attending Kerry Town survivor clinic (Freetown, Sierra Leone), who had been discharged from the Kerry Town Ebola treatment unit, were invited to participate. We collected and tested axillary, blood, conjunctival, forehead, mouth, rectal, semen, urine, and vaginal specimens for presence of Ebola virus using RT-PCR. We regarded samples to be positive for Ebola virus disease if the cycle threshold was 40 or lower. We collected demographic data from survivors of their age, sex, time since discharge from the treatment unit, and length of acute admission in the Ebola treatment unit using anonymised standard forms. Between April 2, and June 16, 2015, of 151 survivors of Ebola virus disease invited to participate, 112 (74%) provided consent. The median age of participants was 21·5 years (IQR 14-31·5) with 34 (30%) participants younger than 16 years. 50 (45%) of 112 participants were male. We tested a total of 555 specimens: 103 from the axilla, 93 from blood, 92 from conjunctiva, 54 from forehead, 105 from mouth, 17 from the rectum, one from semen, 69 from urine, and 21 from the vagina. The median time from Ebola treatment unit discharge to specimen collection was 142 days (IQR 127-159). 15 participants had a total of 74 swabs taken less than 100 days from discharge. The semen sample from one participant tested positive for Ebola virus at 114 days after discharge from the treatment unit; specimens taken from the axilla, blood, conjunctiva, forehead, mouth, rectum, and urine of the same participant tested negative. All specimens from the

  20. Survivor from asphyxiation due to helium inhalation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Etteri

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this rare case report we describe a 27- year-old white man survived to suicide by asphyxiation using the so-called suicide bag (or exit bag filled with helium supplied through a plastic tube. He had no previous psychiatric or organic illnesses. At the time of presentation to our Emergency Department he was awake and reported severe dyspnea with a clinical pattern of acute respiratory failure. Imaging studies showed pulmonary edema and the patient was treated with non-invasive ventilation in Intensive Care Unit. After 15 days the patient was discharged from hospital in optimal conditions. These rare cases of survivor might suggest the possible causes of death from inhaling helium.

  1. Resilience in Elderly Survivors of Child Maltreatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Rodin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Resilience is a multifaceted construct that refers to the positive adaptation of individuals, despite exposure to adversity. This study of resilience in older individuals who have experienced adversity was conducted to deepen the understanding of the factors that contribute to resilience in this population. This qualitative study used purposive and homogeneous sampling criteria to recruit nine participants above the age of 65 with a past history of childhood maltreatment who were judged by their health care professionals to be unusually resilient. Resilience was found to be highly evident in this sample, despite earlier trauma and the subsequent challenges of old age. The authors found active engagement in relationships and in valued activities to be the most often mentioned contributors to resilience in these older survivors of childhood maltreatment. These findings have important implications for public policy and social interventions to preserve the well-being of older individuals who have experienced adversity.

  2. Mortality of atomic bomb survivors in Nagasaki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mine, Mariko; Honda, Sumihisa; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Yokota, Kenichi; Tomonaga, Masao; Okumura, Yutaka [Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki Univ. School of Medicine, Nagasaki (Japan)

    1999-09-01

    We analyzed the risk in 2,743 atomic bomb survivors by using a new dosimetry system. From the database, we selected 2,743 exposed persons and a total of three times 2,743 age-matched controls who were living far from the center of the A-bomb radiation in Nagasaki at the time of the explosion and who were still alive in 1971. The mortalities from all causes for male subjects exposed were slightly lower than, or almost equal to, those of unexposed persons. Death from cancer, however, increased in both sexes after all levels of irradiation except in males exposed to 0.01-0.49 Gy. In males, the risk was showed significant reduction in death from all diseases other than cancer classified according to 0.31-0.40 Gy. (author)

  3. 46 CFR 108.701 - Sounding equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Sounding equipment. 108.701 Section 108.701 Shipping... EQUIPMENT Miscellaneous Equipment § 108.701 Sounding equipment. Each self-propelled unit must have a mechanical or electronic sounding apparatus. ...

  4. 40 CFR 160.61 - Equipment design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equipment design. 160.61 Section 160... LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS Equipment § 160.61 Equipment design. Equipment used in the generation... appropriate design and adequate capacity to function according to the protocol and shall be suitably located...

  5. 40 CFR 792.61 - Equipment design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Equipment design. 792.61 Section 792.61...) GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS Equipment § 792.61 Equipment design. Equipment used in the... of appropriate design and adequate capacity to function according to the protocol and shall be...

  6. 21 CFR 58.61 - Equipment design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Equipment design. 58.61 Section 58.61 Food and... PRACTICE FOR NONCLINICAL LABORATORY STUDIES Equipment § 58.61 Equipment design. Equipment used in the... of appropriate design and adequate capacity to function according to the protocol and shall be...

  7. 32 CFR 32.34 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equipment. 32.34 Section 32.34 National Defense... ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Property Standards § 32.34 Equipment. (a) Title to equipment acquired by a... recipient shall not use equipment acquired with Federal funds to provide services to non-Federal outside...

  8. 10 CFR 600.134 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Equipment. 600.134 Section 600.134 Energy DEPARTMENT OF... Nonprofit Organizations Post-Award Requirements § 600.134 Equipment. (a) Title to equipment acquired by a... recipient shall not use equipment acquired with Federal funds to provide services to non-Federal outside...

  9. 45 CFR 2543.34 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Equipment. 2543.34 Section 2543.34 Public Welfare... Requirements Property Standards § 2543.34 Equipment. (a) Title to equipment acquired by a recipient with... not use equipment acquired with Federal funds to provide services to non-Federal outside organizations...

  10. 7 CFR 3019.34 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Equipment. 3019.34 Section 3019.34 Agriculture....34 Equipment. (a) Title to equipment acquired by a recipient with Federal funds shall vest in the recipient, subject to conditions of this section. (b) The recipient shall not use equipment acquired with...

  11. 20 CFR 435.34 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Equipment. 435.34 Section 435.34 Employees...-Award Requirements Property Standards § 435.34 Equipment. (a) Title to equipment acquired by a recipient... may not use equipment acquired with Federal funds to provide services to non-Federal outside...

  12. 28 CFR 70.34 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equipment. 70.34 Section 70.34 Judicial... Post-Award Requirements Property Standards § 70.34 Equipment. (a) Title to equipment acquired by a... recipient must not use equipment acquired with Federal funds to provide services to non-Federal outside...

  13. 49 CFR 19.34 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Equipment. 19.34 Section 19.34 Transportation... Requirements Property Standards § 19.34 Equipment. (a) Title to equipment acquired by a recipient with Federal... use equipment acquired with Federal funds to provide services to non-Federal outside organizations for...

  14. 15 CFR 14.34 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Equipment. 14.34 Section 14.34... ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Property Standards § 14.34 Equipment. (a) Title to equipment acquired by a... recipient shall not use equipment acquired with Federal funds to provide services to non-Federal outside...

  15. 21 CFR 225.130 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Equipment. 225.130 Section 225.130 Food and Drugs... CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR MEDICATED FEEDS Facilities and Equipment § 225.130 Equipment. Equipment shall be capable of producing a medicated feed of intended potency and purity, and shall be...

  16. 46 CFR 153.484 - Prewash equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Prewash equipment. 153.484 Section 153.484 Shipping... BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Design and Equipment for Pollution Control § 153.484 Prewash equipment. Unless the ship operator shows that the prewash...

  17. 34 CFR 74.34 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equipment. 74.34 Section 74.34 Education Office of the... Equipment. (a) Title to equipment acquired by a recipient with Federal funds shall vest in the recipient, subject to conditions of this section. (b) The recipient may not use equipment acquired with Federal funds...

  18. 33 CFR 142.48 - Eyewash equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Eyewash equipment. 142.48 Section... CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES WORKPLACE SAFETY AND HEALTH Personal Protective Equipment § 142.48 Eyewash equipment. Portable or fixed eyewash equipment providing emergency relief must be immediately available near...

  19. 29 CFR 95.34 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Equipment. 95.34 Section 95.34 Labor Office of the Secretary... Equipment. (a) Title to equipment acquired by a recipient with Federal funds shall vest in the recipient, subject to conditions of this section. (b) The recipient shall not use equipment acquired with Federal...

  20. 18 CFR 367.57 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Equipment. 367.57... Property Instructions § 367.57 Equipment. (a) The cost of equipment chargeable to the service company property accounts, unless otherwise indicated in the text of an equipment account, includes the related net...

  1. 22 CFR 518.34 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Equipment. 518.34 Section 518.34 Foreign... Property Standards § 518.34 Equipment. (a) Title to equipment acquired by a recipient with Federal funds... equipment acquired with Federal funds to provide services to non-Federal outside organizations for a fee...

  2. 46 CFR 197.460 - Diving equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Diving equipment. 197.460 Section 197.460 Shipping COAST... GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Periodic Tests and Inspections of Diving Equipment § 197.460 Diving equipment. The diving supervisor shall insure that the diving equipment designated for use...

  3. 40 CFR 46.225 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equipment. 46.225 Section 46.225... After the Fellowship § 46.225 Equipment. (a) If EPA authorizes you to purchase equipment (see § 46.140(b)) and the equipment retains a fair market value of more than $5,000, you must request disposition...

  4. 27 CFR 19.272 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Equipment. 19.272 Section... THE TREASURY LIQUORS DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Construction, Equipment and Security § 19.272 Equipment. The proprietor shall provide equipment suitable for the operations conducted on the distilled spirits...

  5. 43 CFR 12.934 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Equipment. 12.934 Section 12.934 Public....934 Equipment. (a) Title to equipment acquired by a recipient with Federal funds shall vest in the recipient, subject to conditions of this section. (b) The recipient shall not use equipment acquired with...

  6. 50 CFR 260.102 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Equipment. 260.102 Section 260.102... Basis 1 § 260.102 Equipment. All equipment used for receiving, washing, segregating, picking, processing... and effective bactericidal treatment. Insofar as is practicable, all such equipment shall be made of...

  7. 45 CFR 74.34 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Equipment. 74.34 Section 74.34 Public Welfare... COMMERCIAL ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Property Standards § 74.34 Equipment. (a) Title to equipment... section. (b)(1) The recipient shall not use equipment acquired with HHS funds to provide services to non...

  8. "To All Stroke Survivors - Never, Ever Give Up"

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Stroke Rehabilitation "To All Stroke Survivors – Never, Ever Give Up." Past Issues / Spring ... have for other Americans who are recovering from strokes and other serious health challenges? What about their ...

  9. Analysis of Activity Patterns and Performance in Polio Survivors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Klein, Mary

    2006-01-01

    The goals of this project were: 1) to study the temporal relationship between activity level and health status in polio survivors and to compare the results with those obtained from an age-matched control population and 2...

  10. Analysis of Activity Patterns and Performance in Polio Survivors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Klein, Mary

    2004-01-01

    The goals of this project are: 1) to study the temporal relationship between activity level and health status in polio survivors and to compare the results with those obtained from an age-matched control population and 2...

  11. The Right Balance: Helping Cancer Survivors Achieve a Healthy Weight

    Science.gov (United States)

    An article about interventions that aim to help survivors maintain a healthy weight to reduce the risk of cancer recurrence and death and decrease the likelihood of chronic and late effects of cancer treatment.

  12. Correlates of Return to Work for Breast Cancer Survivors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reynard R. Bouknight; Cathy J. Bradley; Zhehui Luo

    2006-01-01

    To identify correlates of return to work for employed breast cancer survivors. Patients included 416 employed women with newly diagnosed breast cancer identified from the Metropolitan Detroit Cancer Surveillance System...

  13. Attentional bias to violent images in survivors of dating violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong-Ha; Lee, Jang-Han

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the time-course characteristics of attentional bias, such as vigilance and maintenance, towards violent stimuli in dating violence (DV) survivors. DV survivors with PTSD symptoms (DV-PTSD group; n=14), DV survivors without PTSD symptoms (Trauma Control group; n=14), and individuals who were never exposed to dating violence (NDV group; n=15) viewed slides that presented four categories of images (violent, dysphoric, positive, and neutral) per slide, for ten seconds. Our results revealed that the DV-PTSD group spent more time on violent stimuli than did the Trauma Control or NDV groups. The DV survivors, both with and without PTSD symptoms, spent more time on dysphoric stimuli and less time on happy stimuli than did the NDV group. In addition to the effects of PTSD, researchers should also be considering the effects of simple traumatic exposure.

  14. Need For Improved Skin Cancer Surveillance in Pediatric Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Divya; Lee, Thomas; Friedman, Adam J; Redbord, Kelley Pagliai

    2017-04-01

    Survivors of pediatric cancer are at increased risk of developing secondary malignancies, with non-melanoma skin cancer being the most common. These patients are also at increased risk of melanoma. Currently, guidelines provided by the National Cancer Institute and Children's Oncology Group emphasize the importance of annual clinical examination for skin cancer screening; however, the literature reports that less than one-third of survivors of pediatric cancer have ever had a clinical skin exam by a physician. In this article, we review the risk factors for skin cancer in survivors of pediatric cancer as well as the current evidence and recommendations for their care. We suggest that dermatologists collectively establish guidelines for skin cancer surveillance in survivors of pediatric cancer.

  15. Cardiovascular Effects in Childhood Cancer Survivors Treated with Anthracyclines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian I. Franco

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Anthracyclines are commonly used to treat childhood leukemias and lymphomas, as well as other malignancies, leading to a growing population of long-term childhood cancer survivors. However, their use is limited by cardiotoxicity, increasing survivors' vulnerability to treatment-related complications that can markedly affect their quality of life. Survivors are more likely to suffer from heart failure, coronary artery disease, and cerebrovascular accidents compared to the general population. The specific mechanisms of anthracycline cardiotoxicity are complex and remain unclear. Hence, determining the factors that may increase susceptibility to cardiotoxicity is of great importance, as is monitoring patients during and after treatment. Additionally, treatment and prevention options, such as limiting cumulative dosage, liposomal anthracyclines, and dexrazoxane, continue to be explored. Here, we review the cardiovascular complications associated with the use of anthracyclines in treating malignancies in children and discuss methods for preventing, screening, and treating such complications in childhood cancer survivors.

  16. Chromosomal Abnormalities in Offspring of Young Cancer Survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Betina Frydenlund; Schmidt, Anne Aarslev; Mulvihill, John J

    2018-01-01

    Danish cancer survivors and 40 859 offspring (40 794 live-born children and 65 fetuses) of 19 536 siblings. Chromosomal abnormalities include numeric and structural abnormalities. Odds ratios were estimated by multiple logistic regression models comparing the risk of chromosomal abnormalities among...... compared with their siblings' offspring (odds ratio = 0.99, 95% confidence interval = 0.67 to 1.44, two-sided P = .94), with similar risk between male and female survivors. Cancer survivors were not more likely than their siblings to have children with a chromosomal abnormality.......To examine whether cancer survivors diagnosed before age 35 years are more likely to have offspring with chromosomal abnormalities than their siblings, chromosomal abnormalities were determined in a population-based cohort of 14 611 offspring (14 580 live-born children and 31 fetuses) of 8945...

  17. What Prostate Cancer Survivors Need to Know about Osteoporosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What Prostate Cancer Survivors Need to Know About Osteoporosis The Impact of Prostate Cancer The National Cancer ... Management Strategies Resources For Your Information Facts About Osteoporosis Osteoporosis is a condition in which bones become ...

  18. Healthcare Professionals' Attitudes to Rehabilitation Programming for Male Cancer Survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handberg, Charlotte; Midtgaard, Julie; Nielsen, Claus Vinther

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to describe and interpret the attitudes and conduct of hospital healthcare professionals (HCPs) in association with male cancer survivors and their municipal rehabilitation participation. Design: Ethnographic fieldwork was conducted, consisting of participant...

  19. Restoring rape survivors: justice, advocacy, and a call to action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koss, Mary P

    2006-11-01

    Rape results in mental and physical health, social, and legal consequences. For the latter, restorative justice-based programs might augment community response, but they generate controversy among advocates and policy makers. This article identifies survivors' needs and existing community responses to them. Survivors feel their legal needs are most poorly met due to justice system problems that can be summarized as attrition, retraumatization, and disparate treatment across gender, class, and ethnic lines. Empirical data support each problem and the conclusion that present justice options are inadequate. The article concludes by identifying common ground in advocacy and restorative justice goals and calls for a holistic approach to the needs of rape survivors that includes advocating for expanded justice alternatives. A call to action is issued to implement restorative alternatives to expand survivor choice and offender accountability. Conventional and restorative justice are often viewed as mutually exclusive whereas the author argues they are complementary.

  20. Family function and health behaviours of stroke survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si-Si Jiang

    2014-09-01

    Conclusions: Family function and health behaviours in stroke survivors are related, and need further improvement. Healthcare workers should pay close attention to patients' family function and health behaviours and find the reasons which may be influence their level.

  1. Relationships and Recovery for Young Adult Lymphoma Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Donate Donate Now Fundraise for LRF Planned Giving Relationships and Recovery for Young Adult Lymphoma Survivors By ... like this? The simple answer is with: "I love you..." and then go from there; because if ...

  2. Cancer Survivors: Managing Your Emotions After Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... self-conscious about your body. Changes in skin color, weight gain or loss, the loss of a ... other cancer survivors who are having the same emotions you are. Contact your local chapter of the ...

  3. Class, race and ethnicity and information avoidance among cancer survivors

    OpenAIRE

    McCloud, R F; Jung, M.; Gray, S W; Viswanath, K.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Information seeking may increase cancer survivors' ability to make decisions and cope with the disease, but many also avoid cancer information after diagnosis. The social determinants and subsequent communication barriers that lead to avoidance have not been explored. The purpose of this study is to examine the influence of social determinants on information avoidance among cancer survivors. Methods: We examined how health information avoidance is associated with structural and in...

  4. Interact: A Mixed Reality Virtual Survivor for Holocaust Testimonies

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Minhua; Coward, Sarah; Walker, Chris

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present Interact---a mixed reality virtual survivor for Holocaust education. It was created to preserve the powerful and engaging experience of listening to, and interacting with, Holocaust survivors, allowing future generations of audience access to their unique stories. Interact demonstrates how advanced filming techniques, 3D graphics and natural language processing can be integrated and applied to specially-recorded testimonies to enable users to ask questions and receive...

  5. Marriage and divorce among young adult cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchhoff, Anne C; Yi, Jaehee; Wright, Jennifer; Warner, Echo L; Smith, Ken R

    2012-12-01

    We examined marital outcomes among cancer survivors diagnosed during early adulthood from the 2009 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System dataset. Eligible participants were ages 20-39 years. Of the 74,433 eligible, N = 1,198 self-reported a cancer diagnosis between the ages of 18 and 37, were ≥2 years past diagnosis, and did not have non-melanoma skin cancer. The remaining N = 67,063 were controls. Using generalized linear models adjusted for age, gender, race, and education, we generated relative risks (RR) and 95 % confidence intervals (95 % CI) to examine survivor status on indicators of ever married, currently married, and divorced/separated. Survivors were slightly older than controls [33.0 (SD = 3.8) vs. 30.0 (SD = 4.0); p divorce/separation than controls (18 % vs. 10 %; RR = 1.77, 95 % CI 1.43-2.19). Divorce/separation risk persisted for female survivors (RR 1.83, 95 % CI 1.49-2.25), survivors ages 20-29 (RR 2.57, 95 % CI 1.53-4.34), and survivors ages 30-39 (RR 1.62, 95 % CI 1.29-2.04). The emotional and financial burdens of cancer may lead to marital stress for younger cancer survivors. Young survivors may face a higher risk of divorce; support systems are needed to assist them in the years following diagnosis.

  6. Sexual Function in Cervical Cancer Survivors after Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhiraj Daga

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study evaluated sexual function in cervical cancer survivors after concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Methods: Study participants comprised survivors of locally advanced cervical cancer (stages IIB-IVA who completed concurrent chemoradiotherapy along with intracavitary brachytherapy at least two years prior at Dr S.N.Medical College, Jodhpur, Rajasthan, India. We used the Female Sexual Function Index questionnaire to assess sexual function. The cut-off score of the Female Sexual Function Index that identified female sexual arousal disorder was 26.55. A score less than 26.55 indicated the presence of female sexual arousal disorder. Results:A total of 48 locally advanced cervical cancer survivors enrolled in the study. Survivors had a mean age of 46.5 years. All received chemoradiotherapy along with intracavitary brachytherapy. The average time for treatment was 53.5 days. Patients had an average score for sexual desire of 2, 2.3 for arousal, 2.3 for sexual satisfaction, and 2.1 for pain during intercourse. The overall average score was 11.84 (range: 3.2-19.5 with a cut-off of 26.55. All survivors suffered from female sexual arousal disorder. Conclusion: Cervical cancer survivors had decreased sexual function which indicated female sexual arousal disorder. Patient education and active treatment of complications related to cancer treatments is a must for improvement of sexual function among survivors. Long-term complications should be considered in terms of treatment planning and follow-up treatment to improve the quality of life of cancer survivors.

  7. NAS Automation Equipment Operating Cost Estimates, FY 1978-1984,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-06-01

    the most essential data - the position of each aircraft. A few ARTS III sites ’.ave an additional off-line equipment for adaptation and assembly of...reinforced with validated beacon replies. Target messages are sent to the Data Receiver Group at the ARTCC via Telco and/or RML. The Azimuth, Range and Timing...Data Transmission Group has three high speed channels for sending the digital output via Telco to the ARTCC and two low speed channels. System

  8. Quality of life and sexuality in disease-free survivors of cervical cancer after radical hysterectomy alone: A comparison between total laparoscopy and laparotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Meizhu; Gao, Huiqiao; Bai, Huimin; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the possible differences between total laparoscopy and laparotomy regarding their impact on postoperative quality of life and sexuality in disease-free cervical cancer survivors who received radical hysterectomy (RH) and/or lymphadenectomy alone and were followed for >1 year.We reviewed all patients with cervical cancer who had received surgical treatment in our hospital between January 2001 and March 2014. Consecutive sexually active survivors who received RH and/or lymphadenectomy for early stage cervical cancer were enrolled and divided into 2 groups based on surgical approach. Survivors were interviewed and completed validated questionnaires, including the European Organization for Research Treatment of Cancer Quality-of-Life Core Questionnaire including 30 items, the Cervical Cancer-Specific Module of European Organization for Research Treatment of Cancer Quality-of-Life Questionnaire including 24 items (EORTC QLQ-CX24), and the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI).In total, 273 patients with histologically confirmed cervical cancer were retrospectively reviewed. However, only 64 patients had received RH and/or lymphadenectomy alone; 58 survivors meeting the inclusion criteria were enrolled, including 42 total laparoscopy cases and 16 laparotomy cases, with an average follow-up of 46.1 and 51.2 months, respectively. The survivors in the 2 groups obtained good and similar scores on all items of the European Organization for Research Treatment of Cancer Quality-of-Life Core Questionnaire including 30 items and Cervical Cancer-Specific Module of European Organization for Research Treatment of Cancer Quality-of-Life Questionnaire including 24 items, without significant differences after controlling for covariate background characteristics. To the date of submission, 21.4% (9/42) of cases in the total laparoscopy group and 31.2% (5/16) of cases in the laparotomy group had not resumed sexual behavior after RH. Additionally

  9. Assessing Walking Strategies Using Insole Pressure Sensors for Stroke Survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Munoz-Organero

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Insole pressure sensors capture the different forces exercised over the different parts of the sole when performing tasks standing up such as walking. Using data analysis and machine learning techniques, common patterns and strategies from different users to achieve different tasks can be automatically extracted. In this paper, we present the results obtained for the automatic detection of different strategies used by stroke survivors when walking as integrated into an Information Communication Technology (ICT enhanced Personalised Self-Management Rehabilitation System (PSMrS for stroke rehabilitation. Fourteen stroke survivors and 10 healthy controls have participated in the experiment by walking six times a distance from chair to chair of approximately 10 m long. The Rivermead Mobility Index was used to assess the functional ability of each individual in the stroke survivor group. Several walking strategies are studied based on data gathered from insole pressure sensors and patterns found in stroke survivor patients are compared with average patterns found in healthy control users. A mechanism to automatically estimate a mobility index based on the similarity of the pressure patterns to a stereotyped stride is also used. Both data gathered from stroke survivors and healthy controls are used to evaluate the proposed mechanisms. The output of trained algorithms is applied to the PSMrS system to provide feedback on gait quality enabling stroke survivors to self-manage their rehabilitation.

  10. Cancer survivors' experiences of discharge from hospital follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, S E; Watson, E K; Ward, A M; Khan, N F; Turner, D; Adams, E; Forman, D; Roche, M F; Rose, P W

    2012-05-01

    Discharge from hospital follow-up is a key time point in the cancer journey. With recommendations for earlier discharge of cancer survivors, attention to the discharge process is likely to become increasingly important. This study explored cancer survivors' experiences of discharge from hospital follow-up. Survivors of breast, colorectal and prostate cancer (n= 1275), 5-16 years post diagnosis were approached to take part in a questionnaire survey. The questionnaire included questions about discharge status, provision of time/information prior to discharge, feelings at discharge and satisfaction with how discharge was managed. Completed questionnaires were returned by 659 survivors (51.7%). Approximately one-third of respondents were not discharged from follow-up 5-16 years post diagnosis. Of those discharged, a substantial minority reported insufficient time (27.9%), information (24.5-45.0%) or adverse emotions (30.9%) at the time of discharge. However, 90.6% of respondents reported satisfaction with how discharge from hospital follow-up was managed. Despite high levels of satisfaction, discharge of cancer survivors from hospital follow-up could be improved with the provision of additional time, information and support. Better structuring of the final hospital appointment or a review appointment in primary care at this time could help to ensure that discharge from hospital follow-up is managed optimally for cancer survivors. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Surveillance and Care of the Gynecologic Cancer Survivor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faubion, Stephanie S; MacLaughlin, Kathy L; Long, Margaret E; Pruthi, Sandhya; Casey, Petra M

    2015-11-01

    Care of the gynecologic cancer survivor extends beyond cancer treatment to encompass promotion of sexual, cardiovascular, bone, and brain health; management of fertility, contraception, and vasomotor symptoms; and genetic counseling. This is a narrative review of the data and guidelines regarding care and surveillance of the gynecologic cancer survivor. We searched databases including PubMed, Cochrane, and Scopus using the search terms gynecologic cancer, cancer surveillance, and cancer survivor and reached a consensus for articles chosen for inclusion in the review based on availability in the English language and publication since 2001, as well as key older articles, consensus statements, and practice guidelines from professional societies. However, we did not undertake an extensive systematic search of the literature to identify all potentially relevant studies, nor did we utilize statistical methods to summarize data. We offer clinical recommendations for the management of gynecologic cancer survivors based on review of evidence and our collective clinical experience. Key messages include the limitations of laboratory studies, including CA-125, and imaging in the setting of gynecologic cancer surveillance, hormonal and non-hormonal management of treatment-related vasomotor symptoms and genitourinary syndrome of menopause, as well as recommendations for general health screening, fertility preservation, and contraception. A holistic approach to care extending beyond cancer treatment alone benefits gynecologic cancer survivors. In addition to surveillance for cancer recurrence and late treatment side effects, survivors benefit from guidance on hormonal, contraceptive, and fertility management and promotion of cardiovascular, bone, brain, and sexual health.

  12. Infertility Education: Experiences and Preferences of Childhood Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherven, Brooke O; Mertens, Ann; Wasilewski-Masker, Karen; Williamson, Rebecca; Meacham, Lillian R

    2016-07-01

    The majority of children diagnosed with cancer will become long-term survivors; however, many will suffer late effects of treatment, including infertility. Educating patients about potential risk for infertility is important, yet little is known regarding when patients would like to hear this information. The purpose of this study was to assess young adult survivors' previous experience in receiving education about their risk for infertility and determine their preferences for infertility education at various time points during and after treatment. Only 36% of survivors report receiving education about risk for infertility at diagnosis, 39% at end of therapy, and 72% in long-term follow-up/survivor clinic visits. Survivors consistently identified their oncologist as a preferred educator at each time point. Although almost all participants identified wanting education at diagnosis, this time point alone may not be sufficient. End of therapy and survivorship may be times this message should be repeated and adapted for the survivor's needs and developmental stage: conversations about the impact of cancer treatment on future fertility should be ongoing. © 2015 by Association of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Nurses.

  13. Objectively assessed physical activity levels in Spanish cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Casado, Ana; Verdugo, Ana Soria; Solano, María J Ortega; Aldazabal, Itziar Pagola; Fiuza-Luces, Carmen; Alejo, Lidia Brea; del Hierro, Julio R Padilla; Palomo, Isabel; Aguado-Arroyo, Oscar; Garatachea, Nuria; Cebolla, Héctor; Lucia, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    To objectively assess physical activity (PA) levels in a cohort of Spanish cancer survivors. Descriptive, cross-sectional. The Hospital Universitario de Fuenlabrada and two healthcare centers in Madrid, Spain. 204 cancer survivors and 115 adults with no history of cancer. Participants wore a triaxial accelerometer for seven or more consecutive days to assess PA levels. Body mass index (BMI), indirect indicators of adiposity (waist circumference, waist-to-hip ratio), and cardiorespiratory fitness also were determined. Light, moderate, vigorous, and total PA (sum of the former). Most (94%) of the cancer survivors met international recommendations for moderate PA, but very few (3%) fulfilled those (75 minutes or more per week) for vigorous PA. Except for lower total (minute per day, p=0.048) and vigorous PA levels (p0.05). A high percentage of the survivors (33%) were obese (BMI greater than 30 kg/m2), and many also showed poor cardiorespiratory fitness (45% were below the 8 metabolic equivalent threshold). Although cancer survivors overall met international PA recommendations for a healthy lifestyle, their BMI and cardiorespiratory profiles were not within the healthy range. Cancer survivors need to be informed about healthy lifestyle habits and should be regularly monitored.

  14. Home-Based Psychoeducational Intervention for Breast Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şengün İnan, Figen; Üstün, Besti

    2017-03-15

    It is important to manage psychological distress and improve the quality of life (QOL) in patients after breast cancer treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a home-based, psychoeducational program on distress, anxiety, depression, and QOL in breast cancer survivors. The study was a single-group pretest and posttest quasi-experimental design. The data were collected using the Distress Thermometer, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and the Turkish version of the World Health Organization Quality of Life Instrument, short form. The home-based, individual, face-to-face psychoeducational program was structured according to breast cancer survivors' needs and the Neuman Systems Model. A total of 32 Turkish breast cancer survivors participated in this study. There were statistically significant differences in the mean scores for distress, anxiety, and depression in the breast cancer survivors over 4 measurements. The mean scores for all subscales of the QOL at 6 months postintervention were significantly higher than the mean scores at baseline. The results indicated that the psychoeducational program may be effective in reducing distress, anxiety, and depression and in improving the QOL in breast cancer survivors. Psychoeducational programs may be effective and should be considered as part of the survivorship care for breast cancer survivors.

  15. Sexual violence in post-conflict Liberia: survivors and their care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayler-Smith, K; Zachariah, R; Hinderaker, S G; Manzi, M; De Plecker, E; Van Wolvelaer, P; Gil, T; Goetghebuer, S; Ritter, H; Bawo, L; Davis-Worzi, C

    2012-11-01

    Using routine data from three clinics offering care to survivors of sexual violence (SV) in Monrovia, Liberia, we describe the characteristics of SV survivors and the pattern of SV and discuss how the current approach could be better adapted to meet survivors' needs. There were 1500 survivors seeking SV care between January 2008 and December 2009. Most survivors were women (98%) and median age was 13 years (Interquartile range: 9-17 years). Sexual aggression occurred during day-to-day activities in 822 (55%) cases and in the survivor's home in 552 (37%) cases. The perpetrator was a known civilian in 1037 (69%) SV events. Only 619 (41%) survivors sought care within 72 h. The current approach could be improved by: effectively addressing the psychosocial needs of child survivors, reaching male survivors, targeting the perpetrators in awareness and advocacy campaigns and reducing delays in seeking care. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Social, demographic, and medical influences on physical activity in child and adolescent cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliam, Margaux B; Madan-Swain, Avi; Whelan, Kimberly; Tucker, Diane C; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Schwebel, David C

    2012-03-01

    This study evaluated associations between social, environmental, demographic, and medical predictors, and child and adolescent survivors' physical activity (PA). A structured telephone survey was conducted with 105 caregiver-survivor (aged 8-16 years) pairs and 36 caregivers of younger survivors (aged 6-7 years) alone. Participants completed measures assessing survivor PA and proposed predictors of PA including demographic, medical, social, and environmental influences. Social influences, including family PA, family support for PA, and peer support for PA, emerged as unique predictors of survivor PA. These variables predicted PA after controlling for demographic and medical factors. Child survivors' PA was more strongly predicted by family influences while adolescent survivors' PA was more strongly influenced by family and peer influences. Child and adolescent survivors' PA is strongly influenced by social factors. This finding parallels results with healthy children. PA interventions should focus on family and peer support to increase survivors' PA behaviors.

  17. Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bigum, Marianne Kristine Kjærgaard; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2011-01-01

    Waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) is one of the fastest growing special waste types with an estimated growth of 3–5% per year (Cui and Forssberg, 2003). WEEE is a very heterogeneous waste type that contains many compounds that are considered to be harmful to both humans and the env...... and the environment, as well as many metals that have the potential of being recycled and reused. This makes the waste fraction (WEEE) very interesting as it is a problematic waste as well as an important secondary resource.......Waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) is one of the fastest growing special waste types with an estimated growth of 3–5% per year (Cui and Forssberg, 2003). WEEE is a very heterogeneous waste type that contains many compounds that are considered to be harmful to both humans...

  18. ST-HM equipment consolidation

    OpenAIRE

    Rühl, I; Caldérone, A

    2003-01-01

    In general all kind of equipment must be maintained if it is to fulfil its function for a useful life. This can be achieved using one of the four key maintenance strategies - on failure maintenance, fixed time maintenance, condition based maintenance and design out maintenance. Each of these strategies has a place within an optimised maintenance plan. The first three maintenance strategies are mostly applied and implemented in the various ST maintenance plans. The fourth strategy in contrast,...

  19. TERA for Rotating Equipment Selection

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Raja S. R.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis looks at creating a multidisciplinary simulation tool for rotating plant equipment selection, specifically gas turbines, for the liquefaction of natural gas (LNG). This is a collaborative project between Shell Global Solutions and Cranfield University in the UK. The TERA LNG tool uses a Techno-economic, Environmental and Risk Analysis (TERA) approach in order to satisfy the multidisciplinary nature of the investigation. The benefits of the tool are to act as an aid ...

  20. Equipment life cycle costs minimised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuligowski, Sharon

    2004-11-01

    With the cost of energy now a major component of building operating costs, NHS Trust managers increasingly focus on estimating total life cycle costs of equipment such as boiler room and heat, steam and incineration plant. "Life cycle costing" is a broad term and encompasses a wide range of techniques that take into account both initial and future costs as well as the savings of an investment over a period of time.

  1. CERN computing equipment for Senegal

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2014-01-01

    On 26 May, CERN once again had the honour of donating computing equipment to a foreign institute.   This time, around 100 servers and five network hubs were sent to Senegal, making it the seventh country, after Morocco, Ghana, Bulgaria, Serbia, Egypt and the Philippines, to receive a donation of computing equipment from the Organization. The official ceremony was held at CERN on 26 May in the presence of the Director-General, Rolf Heuer, and Senegal's ambassador to Geneva, Fodé Seck, who both expressed their enthusiasm for the project. The equipment is intended for Cheikh Anta Diop University (UCAD) in Dakar and will be of particular use to students attending the African School of Fundamental Physics and its Applications (ASP 2014) taking place from 3 to 23 August, for which CERN is a partner. The ASP allows a large number of African students to hone their skills in high-energy physics and to forge professional links with fellow physicists in Africa and Europe. ...

  2. Used energy-related laboratory equipment grant program for institutions of higher learning. Eligible equipment catalog

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-01

    This is a listing of energy related equipment available through the Energy-Related Laboratory Equipment Grant Program which grants used equipment to institutions of higher education for energy-related research. Information included is an overview of the program, how to apply for a grant of equipment, eligibility requirements, types of equipment available, and the costs for the institution.

  3. Expressive writing among Chinese American breast cancer survivors: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qian; Wong, Celia Ching Yee; Gallagher, Matthew W; Tou, Reese Y W; Young, Lucy; Loh, Alice

    2017-04-01

    Despite the significant size of the Asian American population, few studies have been conducted to improve cancer survivorship in this underserved group. Research has demonstrated that expressive writing interventions confer physical and psychological benefits for a variety of populations, including Non-Hispanic White cancer survivors. The study aims to evaluate the health benefits of an expressive writing intervention among Chinese-speaking breast cancer survivors in the U.S. It was hypothesized that expressive writing would increase health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Ninety-six Chinese breast cancer survivors were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 writing conditions: a self-regulation group, an emotional disclosure group, or a cancer-fact group. The self-regulation group wrote about one's deepest feelings and coping efforts in addition to finding benefits from their cancer experience. The emotional disclosure group wrote about one's deepest thoughts and feelings. The cancer-fact group wrote about facts relevant to their cancer experience. HRQOL was assessed by FACT-B at baseline, 1, 3, and 6-month follow-ups. Effect sizes and residual zed change models were used to compare group differences in HRQOL. Contrary to expectations, the cancer-fact group reported the highest level of overall quality of life at the 6-month follow-up. The self-regulation group had higher emotional well-being compared to the emotional disclosure group. The study challenges the implicit assumption that psychosocial interventions validated among Non-Hispanic Whites could be directly generalized to other populations. It suggests that Asians may benefit from writing instructions facilitating more cognitive than emotional processes. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. Clinical and genetic determinants of cardiomyopathy risk among hematopoietic cell transplantation survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leger, Kasey J.; Cushing-Haugen, Kara; Hansen, John A.; Fan, Wenhong; Leisenring, Wendy M.; Martin, Paul J.; Zhao, Lue P.; Chow, Eric J.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiomyopathy has been recognized as a complication after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Using a nested case-cohort design, we examined the relationships between demographic, therapeutic, and selected cardiovascular disease risk factors among 1-year HCT survivors who developed cardiomyopathy before (n=43) or after (n=89) one year from HCT as compared to a randomly selected subcohort of survivors without cardiomyopathy (n=444). Genomic data were available for 79 cases and 267 non-cases. Clinical and genetic covariates were examined for association with the risk of early or late cardiomyopathy. Clinical risk factors associated with both early and late-onset cardiomyopathy included anthracycline exposure ≥250 mg/m2 and pre-existing hypertension. Among late-onset cardiomyopathy cases, the development of diabetes and ischemic heart disease further increased risk. We replicated several previously reported genetic associations among early-onset cardiomyopathy cases, including rs1786814 in CELF4, rs2232228 in HAS3, and rs17863783 in UGT1A6. None of these markers were associated with risk of late-onset cardiomyopathy. A combination of demographic, treatment, and clinical covariates predicted early-onset cardiomyopathy with reasonable accuracy (AUC 0.76, 95% CI 0.68–0.83), but prediction of late cardiomyopathy was poor (AUC 0.59, 95% CI 0.53–0.67). The addition of replicated genetic polymorphisms did not enhance prediction for either early or late-onset cardiomyopathy. Conventional cardiovascular risk factors influence the risk of both early and late-onset cardiomyopathy in HCT survivors. While certain genetic markers may influence the risk of early-onset disease, further work is required to validate previously reported findings and to determine how genetic information should be incorporated into clinically useful risk prediction models. PMID:26968791

  5. Psychosexual development and satisfaction in long-term survivors of childhood cancer : Neurotoxic treatment intensity as a risk indicator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lehmann, Vicky; Tuinman, Marrit; Keim, Madelaine C.; Winning, Adrien M.; Olshefski, Randal S.; Bajwa, Rajinder P. S.; Hagedoorn, Mariet; Gerhardt, Cynthia A.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUNDRisk factors for impairment in psychosexual development and satisfaction among adult survivors of childhood cancer are poorly understood. The authors compared psychosexual outcomes between survivors and healthy controls, and tested whether at-risk survivors can be identified by 1)

  6. Gauging the Effects of Self-efficacy, Social Support, and Coping Style on Self-management Behaviors in Chinese Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Zhaohui; Ogbolu, Yolanda; Wang, Jichuan; Hinds, Pamela S; Qian, Huijuan; Yuan, Changrong

    2018-02-14

    Better self-management control in cancer survivors would benefit their functional status, quality of life, and health service utilization. Factors such as self-efficacy, social support, and coping style are important predictors of self-management behaviors of cancer survivors; however, the impact of these factors on self-management behaviors has not yet been empirically tested in Chinese cancer survivors. The aim of this study was to examine how self-efficacy, social support, and coping style affect specific self-management behaviors. A secondary data analysis was completed from a cross-sectional study. A total of 764 cancer survivors were recruited in the study. Validated instruments were used to assess patients' self-efficacy, social support, and coping style. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to test the hypothesis. The SEM model fits the data very well, with root mean square error of approximation (RMSEA) of 0.034; close-fit test cannot reject the hypothesis of root mean square error of approximation of 0.05 or less, comparative fit index of 0.91, Tucker-Lewis index of 0.90, and weighted root mean square residual of 0.82. For the measurement models in the SEM, all items loaded highly on their underlying first-order factors, and the first-order factors loaded highly on their underlying second-order factors (self-efficacy and social support, respectively). The model demonstrated that self-efficacy and social support directly and indirectly, via coping style, affect 3 self-management behaviors (ie, communication, exercise, and information seeking). Our results provide evidence that self-efficacy and social support impose significant direct effects, as well as indirect effects via copying style, on the self-management of cancer survivors. Our findings may help nurses to further improve their care of cancer survivors in terms of their self-management behaviors, specifically communication, exercise, and information seeking.

  7. Searching for maintenance in exercise interventions for cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowski, Catherine M; Ory, Marcia G; Friedman, Daniela B; Dwyer, Andrea; Birken, Sarah A; Risendal, Betsy

    2014-12-01

    Translating evidence-based exercise interventions into practice is important for expanding the capacity to support cancer survivors. Using the reach, efficacy/effectiveness, adoption, implementation, and maintenance (RE-AIM) framework and scoping study methodology, we addressed the research question, "What is known about the maintenance of exercise interventions for cancer survivors that would inform translation from research to practice and community settings?" Maintenance was investigated at the individual and setting level. Literature searches were performed in the PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), and Sport Discus databases for articles published from January 2009 to June 2012. Abstracts were judged using a priori criteria for the survivor population, exercise intervention, and maintenance on the individual or setting level. We included completed and planned randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and other study designs. Publications meeting the criteria were reviewed and coded. Of the 211 abstracts meeting patient and exercise criteria, 24 (19 RCTs) met the maintenance criteria. Nine of the 12 completed RCTs demonstrated maintenance of intervention outcomes after 3 to 14 months of follow-up. The planned RCTs described interventions lasting 2 to 4.5 months and maintenance intervals lasting 3 to 12 months following the active intervention. Maintenance at the setting level was reported in one publication. On the individual level, intervention outcomes were maintained in most studies, in a variety of settings and survivor subpopulations. Maintenance on the setting level was scarcely addressed. This scoping study suggests several strategies that could be taken by agencies, clinicians, and researchers to develop more effective and sustainable exercise programs for cancer survivors. Many benefits of exercise training are maintained for months after cancer survivors complete controlled research studies but relatively little is

  8. Exploration of Exercise Outcome Expectations Among Breast Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschey, Rachel; Docherty, Sharron L; Pan, Wei; Lipkus, Isaac

    Exercise is associated with decreased recurrence risk and improved survival and quality of life for breast cancer survivors. However, only an estimated 17% to 37% of survivors adhere to the American Cancer Society exercise guidelines. A critical first step to increase exercise among survivors is to understand how they believe exercise will affect them. The aim of this study is to explore common exercise outcome expectations among 20 female survivors of stage IA to IIB breast cancer who completed adjuvant treatment and an exercise intervention. A mixed-method descriptive study consisting of semistructured telephone interviews assessed exercise outcome expectations and how the experience of cancer and its treatment influenced the expected outcomes of exercise. The qualitative data were analyzed using a summative content analysis procedure; means were calculated for each item of the exercise outcome questionnaire. The qualitative and quantitative data were compared and contrasted. The sample was 70% white and 30% African American, with a mean (SD) age of 62 (8.5) years, and mean (SD) time since treatment completion of 4.2 (1.3) years. Three themes emerged from the interviews: (1) prevalence of common expectations, (2) pervasive impact of fatigue, and (3) a brighter future. Overall, findings revealed that breast cancer survivors have low levels of agreement that exercise may mitigate late and long-term cancer and treatment effects. In general, breast cancer survivors (even those who are motivated to exercise) do not hold strong beliefs that exercise will decrease late and long-term treatment effects. Clinicians can educate survivors about exercise benefits.

  9. Quality of life of adult retinoblastoma survivors in the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cohen-Kettenis Peggy T

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To assess the quality of life (QoL and predictors thereof in Dutch adult hereditary and non-hereditary retinoblastoma (RB survivors. Methods In this population-based cross-sectional study, a generic QoL questionnaire (SF-36 and a disease-specific interview were administered to 87 adult RB survivors aged 18 to 35 years. Their QoL data were compared with those of a Dutch healthy reference group. Among the RB hereditary/non-hereditary survivors, the QoL was compared and predictors for QoL were identified by linear multiple regression analyses. Results As a group, RB survivors scored significantly lower than the reference group on the SF-36 subscale 'mental health' (t = -27, df = 86, p Conclusion In this exploratory study, it appears that the group of adult RB survivors experience a relatively good overall but slightly decreased QoL compared with the reference group. However, they report more problems with regard to their mental health (anxiety, feelings of depression, and loss of control. Hereditary RB survivors differ significantly from non-hereditary RB survivors only in 'general health'. Bullying in childhood and subjective experience of impairment are the main predictors of a worse QoL. In order to prevent worsening of QoL, or perhaps to improve it, clinicians should make an inventory of these issues at an early stage. We recommend further research to assess the specific psychological factors that may lead to mental health problems in this population.

  10. Emotional distress among adult survivors of childhood cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oancea, S Cristina; Brinkman, Tara M; Ness, Kirsten K; Krull, Kevin R; Smith, Webb A; Srivastava, D Kumar; Robison, Leslie L; Hudson, Melissa M; Gurney, James G

    2014-06-01

    The purposes of this study were to estimate the prevalence of emotional distress in a large cohort of adult survivors of childhood cancer and to evaluate the interrelationship of risk factors including cancer-related late effects. Adult survivors of childhood cancer (N = 1,863), median age of 32 years at follow-up, completed comprehensive medical evaluations. Clinically relevant emotional distress was assessed using the Brief Symptom Inventory 18 and was defined as T-scores ≥63. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using multivariable logistic regression models to identify risk factors for distress. Path analysis was used to examine associations among identified risk factors. Elevated global distress was reported by 15.1% of survivors. Cancer-related pain was associated with elevated distress (OR 8.72; 95% CI, 5.32-14.31). Survivors who reported moderate learning or memory problems were more likely to have elevated distress than survivors who reported no learning or memory problems (OR 3.27; 95% CI, 2.17-4.93). Path analysis implied that cancer-related pain has a direct effect on distress symptoms and an indirect effect through socioeconomic status and learning or memory problems. Similar results were observed for learning or memory problems. Childhood cancer-related morbidities including pain and learning or memory problems appear to be directly and indirectly associated with elevated distress symptoms decades after treatment. Understanding these associations may help inform intervention targets for survivors of childhood cancer experiencing symptoms of distress. A subset of long-term childhood cancer survivors experience significant emotional distress. Physical and cognitive late effects may contribute to these symptoms.

  11. Fear of cancer recurrence in prostate cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Wal, Marieke; van Oort, Inge; Schouten, Joost; Thewes, Belinda; Gielissen, Marieke; Prins, Judith

    2016-07-01

    Background High fear of cancer recurrence (FCR) is an understudied topic in prostate cancer (PCa) survivors. This study aimed to detect the prevalence, consequences and characteristics associated with high FCR in PCa survivors. Material and methods This cross-sectional study included patients diagnosed with localized PCa and treated with curative radical prostatectomy between 1992 and 2012. We administered the Cancer Worry Scale (CWS) to assess FCR severity (primary outcome measure). Secondary outcomes included distress, quality of life (QOL), post-traumatic symptoms, and multidimensional aspects of FCR. χ(2)-tests, t-tests and Pearson's correlations examined the relationship between FCR and medical/demographic characteristics. MANOVA analyses and χ2-tests identified differences between PCa survivors with high and low FCR. Results Two hundred eighty-three PCa survivors (median age of 70.0 years) completed the questionnaires a median time of 7.1 years after surgery. About a third (36%) of all PCa survivors experienced high FCR. High FCR was associated with lower QOL, more physical problems, higher distress and more post-traumatic stress symptoms. PCa survivors with high FCR reported disease-related triggers (especially medical examinations), felt helpless and experienced problems in social relationships. High FCR was associated with a younger age and having received adjuvant radiotherapy. Conclusions Results illustrate that FCR is a significant problem in PCa survivors. Younger men and those treated with adjuvant radiotherapy are especially at risk. Those with high FCR experience worse QOL and higher symptom burden. Health care providers should pay specific attention to this problem and provide appropriate psychosocial care when needed.

  12. Yield of Urinalysis Screening in Pediatric Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Matthew D; Mertens, Ann C; Esiashvili, Natia; Meacham, Lillian R; Wasilewski-Masker, Karen

    2016-05-01

    The Children's Oncology Group (COG) publishes consensus guidelines with screening recommendations for early identification of treatment-related morbidities among childhood cancer survivors. We sought to estimate the yield of recommended yearly urinalysis screening for genitourinary complications as per Version 3.0 of the COG Long-Term Follow-Up Guidelines and identify possible risk factors for abnormal screening in a survivor population. A database of pediatric cancer survivors evaluated between January 2008 and March 2012 at Children's Healthcare of Atlanta was queried for survivors at risk for genitourinary late effects. The frequency of abnormal urinalyses (protein ≥1+ and/or presence of glucose and/or ≥5 red blood cells per high power field) was estimated. Risk factors associated with abnormal screening were identified. Chart review identified 773 survivors (57% male; 67% Caucasian; 60% leukemia/lymphoma survivors; mean age at diagnosis, 5.7 years [range: birth to 17.7 years]; time from diagnosis to initial screening, 7.6 years [range: 2.3 to 21.5 years]) who underwent urinalysis. Abnormal results were found in 78 (5.3%) of 1,484 total urinalyses. Multivariable analysis revealed higher dose ifosfamide (odds ratio [OR] = 6.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.9-16.0) and total body irradiation (TBI, OR = 3.0, 95% CI 1.0-8.4) as significant risk factors for abnormal initial urinalysis screening. Pediatric cancer survivors exposed to higher dose ifosfamide or TBI may be at higher risk of abnormal findings on urinalysis screening. Targeted screening of these higher risk patients should be considered. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Financial Hardships Experienced by Cancer Survivors: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altice, Cheryl K; Banegas, Matthew P; Tucker-Seeley, Reginald D; Yabroff, K Robin

    2017-02-01

    With rising cancer care costs, including high-priced cancer drugs, financial hardship is increasingly documented among cancer survivors in the United States; research findings have not been synthesized. We conducted a systematic review of articles published between 1990 and 2015 describing the financial hardship experienced by cancer survivors using PubMed, Embase, Scopus, and CINAHL databases. We categorized measures of financial hardship into: material conditions (eg, out-of-pocket costs, productivity loss, medical debt, or bankruptcy), psychological responses (eg, distress or worry), and coping behaviors (eg, skipped medications). We abstracted findings and conducted a qualitative synthesis. Among 676 studies identified, 45 met the inclusion criteria and were incorporated in the review. The majority of the studies (82%, n = 37) reported financial hardship as a material condition measure; others reported psychological (7%, n = 3) and behavioral measures (16%, n = 7). Financial hardship measures were heterogeneous within each broad category, and the prevalence of financial hardship varied by the measure used and population studied. Mean annual productivity loss ranged from $380 to $8236, 12% to 62% of survivors reported being in debt because of their treatment, 47% to 49% of survivors reported experiencing some form of financial distress, and 4% to 45% of survivors did not adhere to recommended prescription medication because of cost. Financial hardship is common among cancer survivors, although we found substantial heterogeneity in its prevalence. Our findings highlight the need for consistent use of definitions, terms, and measures to determine the best intervention targets and inform intervention development in order to prevent and minimize the impact of financial hardship experienced by cancer survivors. Published by Oxford University Press 2016. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  14. Concentration, working speed and memory: cognitive problems in young childhood cancer survivors and their siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wengenroth, L; Rueegg, C S; Michel, G; Gianinazzi, M E; Essig, S; von der Weid, N X; Grotzer, M; Kuehni, Claudia E

    2015-05-01

    Cognitive problems can have a negative effect on a person's education, but little is known about cognitive problems in young childhood cancer survivors (survivors). This study compared cognitive problems between survivors and their siblings, determined if cognitive problems decreased during recent treatment periods and identified characteristics associated with the presence of a cognitive problem in survivors. As part of the Swiss Childhood Cancer Survivor Study, a questionnaire was sent to all survivors, aged 8-20 years, registered in the Swiss Childhood Cancer Registry, diagnosed at age siblings. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify characteristics associated with cognitive problems in survivors. Data from 840 survivors and 247 siblings were analyzed. More often than their siblings, survivors reported problems with concentration (12% vs. 6%; P = 0.020), slow working speed (20% vs. 8%; P = 0.001) or memory (33% vs. 15%; P siblings. Survivors of CNS tumors (OR = 2.82 compared to leukemia survivors, P < 0.001) and those who had received cranial irradiation (OR = 2.10, P = 0.010) were most severely affected. Childhood cancer survivors, even those treated recently (2001-2005), remain at risk to develop cognitive problems, suggesting a need to improve therapies. Survivors with cognitive problems should be given the opportunity to enter special education programs. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Does caregiver well-being predict stroke survivor depressive symptoms? A mediation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Joan S; Clay, Olivio J; Keltner, Norman L; Haley, William E; Wadley, Virginia G; Perkins, Martinique M; Roth, David L

    2013-01-01

    Studies suggest that family caregiver well-being (ie, depressive symptoms and life satisfaction) may affect stroke survivor depressive symptoms. We used mediation analysis to assess whether caregiver well-being might be a factor explaining stroke survivor depressive symptoms, after controlling for demographic factors and stroke survivor impairments and problems. Caregiver/stroke participant dyads (N = 146) completed measures of stroke survivor impairments and problems and depressive symptoms and caregiver depressive symptoms and life satisfaction. Mediation analysis was used to examine whether caregiver well-being mediated the relationship between stroke survivor impairments and problems and stroke survivor depressive symptoms. As expected, more stroke survivor problems and impairments were associated with higher levels of stroke survivor depressive symptoms (P symptoms (32.95%). Although these measures combined to account for 40.50% of the relationship between survivor problems and impairments and depressive symptoms, the direct effect remained significant. Findings indicate that stroke survivor impairments and problems may affect family caregivers and stroke survivors and a high level of caregiver distress may result in poorer outcomes for stroke survivors. Results highlight the likely importance of intervening with both stroke survivors and family caregivers to optimize recovery after stroke.

  16. Hormone replacement therapy in cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biglia, Nicoletta; Gadducci, Angelo; Ponzone, Riccardo; Roagna, Riccardo; Sismondi, Piero

    2004-08-20

    Thousands of women are treated each year for cancer; many of these are already in menopause, while other younger patients will go into early menopause due to surgery, or chemotherapy, or the need for radiotherapy to the pelvic region. In most cases the oncologist and the gynaecologist would advise these women against the use of HRT. The purpose of this paper is to review biological and clinical evidences in favour and against HRT use in the different tumours and to propose an algorithm that can help choosing the treatment for the single woman. We performed a systematic literature review through April 2002 concerning: (1) biological basis of hormonal modulation of tumour growth; (2) epidemiological data on the impact of HRT on different cancers risk in healthy women; (3) safety of HRT use in cancer survivors; (4) alternatives to HRT. With the exception of meningioma, breast and endometrial cancer, there is no biological evidence that HRT may increase recurrence risk. In women with previous breast and endometrial cancer HRT is potentially hazardous on a biological basis, even if published data do not show any worsening of prognosis. Even if a cautious approach to hormonal-dependent neoplasias is fully comprehensible and the available alternative treatment should be taken into greater consideration, the reticence to prescribe HRT in women previously treated for other non hormone-related tumours has neither a biological nor a clinical basis. An algorithm based on present knowledge is proposed.

  17. Weight Trajectories of Israeli Pediatric Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Marilyn; Bachar, Eytan; Ronen Ackerman, Eyal; Rancourt, Diana; Bonne, Omer; Weintraub, Michael

    2017-06-01

    Cross-national replication of the high rates of overweight/obesity among U.S. pediatric cancer survivors (PCS) is limited. Predictors of weight trajectories of Israeli PCS were examined from diagnosis and end of active cancer treatment to 3 years posttreatment. World Health Organization-derived body mass index (z-BMI) values were calculated at each time point from medical records of 135 Israeli PCS ( M diagnosis age = 11.4). A three-section piecewise multilevel model including age, ethnicity, gender, treatment length, and diagnosis as predictors was used to estimate z-BMI trajectories. Most participants remained at a healthy weight at all time points. Differing weight trajectories emerged for PCS diagnosed with lymphoma/leukemia versus other cancer diagnoses from diagnosis to end of treatment, but similar weight change patterns were observed posttreatment. Replication of U.S. PCS weight trajectories was not observed in Israeli PCS, suggesting the importance of exploring environmental risk factors contributing to obesity among PCS.

  18. Healthy Lifestyle Behaviors of Breast Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeNysschen, Carol; Brown, Jean K; Baker, Mark; Wilding, Gregory; Tetewsky, Sheldon; Cho, Maria H; Dodd, Marylin J

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this secondary analysis was to describe the extent to which women with breast cancer, who participated in a randomized control trial on exercise, adopted American Cancer Society (ACS) guidelines for healthy lifestyle behaviors. Women in the study exercised during cancer treatment and for 6 months after completion of treatment. The sample included 106 women, average age 50.7 years (SD = 9.6). Adherence to guidelines for 5 servings of fruits and vegetables ranged from 36% (n = 28) to 39% (n = 36). Adherence with alcohol consumption guidelines was 71% (n = 28) to 83% (n = 30). Adherence with meeting a healthy weight ranged from 52% (n = 33) to 61% (n = 31). Adherence with physical activity guidelines ranged from 13% (n = 30) to 31% (n = 35). Alcohol and healthy weight guidelines were followed by more than half of the participants, but physical activity and dietary guidelines were followed by far fewer women. Further prospective clinical studies are indicated to determine whether interventions are effective in producing a healthy lifestyle in cancer survivors. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. Twenty-year survivors of kidney transplantation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Traynor, C

    2012-12-01

    There have been few studies of patients with renal allografts functioning for more than 20 years. We sought to identify clinical factors associated with ultra long-term (>20 year) renal allograft survival and to describe the clinical features of these patients. We performed a retrospective analysis of the Irish Renal Transplant Database and included 1174 transplants in 1002 patients. There were 255 (21.74%) patients with graft function for 20 years or more. Multivariate analysis identified recipient age (HR 1.01, CI 1.01-1.02), gender (male HR 1.25, CI 1.08-1.45), acute rejection (HR 1.26, CI 1.09-1.45) and transplant type (living related donor vs. deceased donor) (HR 0.52, CI 0.40-0.66) as significantly associated with long-term graft loss. Median serum creatinine was 115 μmol\\/L. The 5-year graft survival in 20-year survivors was 74.7%. The mean age at death was 62.7 years (±10.6). The most common causes of death were cardiovascular disease and malignancy. The two major causes of graft loss were death (with function) and interstitial fibrosis\\/tubular atrophy. Comorbidities included skin cancer (36.1%), coronary heart disease (17.3%) and other malignancies (14.5%). This study identifies factors associated with long-term allograft survival and a high rate of morbidity and early mortality in long-term transplant recipients.

  20. The efficacy of problem solving therapy to reduce post stroke emotional distress in younger (18-65) stroke survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmers, Charlotte; Leathem, Janet; Bennett, Simon; McNaughton, Harry; Mahawish, Karim

    2017-11-26

    To investigate the efficacy of problem solving therapy for reducing the emotional distress experienced by younger stroke survivors. A non-randomized waitlist controlled design was used to compare outcome measures for the treatment group and a waitlist control group at baseline and post-waitlist/post-therapy. After the waitlist group received problem solving therapy an analysis was completed on the pooled outcome measures at baseline, post-treatment, and three-month follow-up. Changes on outcome measures between baseline and post-treatment (n = 13) were not significantly different between the two groups, treatment (n = 13), and the waitlist control group (n = 16) (between-subject design). The pooled data (n = 28) indicated that receiving problem solving therapy significantly reduced participants levels of depression and anxiety and increased quality of life levels from baseline to follow up (within-subject design), however, methodological limitations, such as the lack of a control group reduce the validity of this finding. The between-subject results suggest that there was no significant difference between those that received problem solving therapy and a waitlist control group between baseline and post-waitlist/post-therapy. The within-subject design suggests that problem solving therapy may be beneficial for younger stroke survivors when they are given some time to learn and implement the skills into their day to day life. However, additional research with a control group is required to investigate this further. This study provides limited evidence for the provision of support groups for younger stroke survivors post stroke, however, it remains unclear about what type of support this should be. Implications for Rehabilitation Problem solving therapy is no more effective for reducing post stroke distress than a wait-list control group. Problem solving therapy may be perceived as helpful and enjoyable by younger stroke survivors. Younger stroke

  1. Towards an evidence-based model of fear of cancer recurrence for breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custers, José A E; Gielissen, Marieke F M; de Wilt, Johannes H W; Honkoop, Aafke; Smilde, Tineke J; van Spronsen, Dick-Johan; van der Veld, William; van der Graaf, Winette T A; Prins, Judith B

    2017-02-01

    In order to understand the multidimensional mechanism of fear of cancer recurrence (FCR) and to identify potential targets for interventions, it is important to empirically test the theoretical model of FCR. This study aims at assessing the validity of Lee-Jones et al.'s FCR model. A total of 1205 breast cancer survivors were invited to participate in this study. Participants received a questionnaire booklet including questionnaires on demographics and psychosocial variables including FCR. Data analysis consisted of the estimation of direct and indirect effects in mediator models. A total of 460 women (38 %) participated in the study. Median age was 55.8 years (range 32-87). Indirect effects of external and internal cues via FCR were found for all mediation models with limited planning for the future (R (2) = .28) and body checking (R (2) = .11-.15) as behavioral response variables, with the largest effects for limited planning for the future. A direct relation was found between feeling sick and seeking professional advice, not mediated by FCR. In the first tested models of FCR, all internal and external cues were associated with higher FCR. In the models with limited planning for the future and body checking as behavioral response, an indirect effect of cues via FCR was found supporting the theoretical model of Lee-Jones et al. An evidence-based model of FCR may facilitate the development of appropriate interventions to manage FCR in breast cancer survivors.

  2. Experimental avoidance and high-risk sexual behavior in survivors of child sexual abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batten, S V; Follette, V M; Aban, I B

    2001-01-01

    While many long-term correlates of child sexual abuse (CSA) have been identified, theories to explain the development of these correlates have received little empirical validation. The process of experiential avoidance is one theory that has been proposed to account for many of the correlates of CSA. The purpose of the current study was twofold: (1) To attempt to develop a more complex measure of experiential avoidance in women with and without a CSA history, and (2) to explore variables related to two of the long-term correlates of CSA, general psychological distress and high risk sexual behavior. Levels of current distress, high-risk sex, and experiential avoidance were examined in 257 undergraduate females (mean age 20.0) using self-report questionnaires. The results of the current study indicate that CSA survivors report higher levels of experiential avoidance and high-risk sexual behavior with persons other than their primary partners. Implications of these findings for theory development, therapy with CSA survivors, and HIV prevention programs are discussed.

  3. Work satisfaction and quality of life in cancer survivors in the first year after oncological rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehnert, Anja; Koch, Uwe

    2013-01-01

    Since a growing number of patients are likely to return to work (RTW) after cancer diagnosis and treatment, there is an increasing recognition of the work situation, and the physical as well as psychosocial functioning among those survivors who returned to work. To prospectively examine Health Related quality of Life (HRQoL) and different aspects of work satisfaction in cancer survivors. N=702 employed cancer patients (85% women) were recruited on average 11 months post diagnosis and assessed at the beginning (t_1), the end (t_2) and 12 months after cancer rehabilitation program (t_3). Participants completed validated measures assessing work satisfaction, working conditions, job strain and HRQoL. Participants showed a high work satisfaction and were most satisfied with job related activities and least satisfied with work organization and leadership. Total work satisfaction was significantly associated with older age, higher monthly income, higher school education, and HRQoL, but not with any cancer- or treatment related characteristics. No significant changes in work satisfaction over time were observed except for a significant deterioration in satisfaction with job related activities (p=0.002; η ^2 =0.019), professional acknowledgement (p=0.036; η ^2 =0.009), and overall work satisfaction (p ^2 =0.087) with small to moderate effect sizes. Our findings emphasize the need for comprehensive cancer rehabilitation programs and specific vocational interventions.

  4. Three-year follow-up of survivors of a mass shooting episode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, Carol S; McCutcheon, Vivia; Spitznagel, Edward L; Smith, Elizabeth M

    2002-09-01

    This report describes a 3-year follow-up study of survivors of a mass shooting incident. Acute-phase and 1-year follow-up data from this incident have been previously reported. The Diagnostic Interview Schedule/Disaster Supplement was used to assess 116 survivors at 1-2 months and again 1 and 3 years later, with an 85% reinterview rate. Examining the course of postdisaster posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and major depression in individuals allowed detailed consideration of remissions and delayed detection of disorders not possible from data presenting overall rates across different time frames. Only about one half of the PTSD cases identified at any time over 3 years were in remission at the 3-year follow-up. Those who did not recover from PTSD diverged from those who recovered at 3 years by reporting increased numbers of symptoms over time, especially avoidance and numbing symptoms. Although women and people with preexisting disorders were at greater risk for the development of PTSD, these variables did not predict chronicity. Chronicity of PTSD was predicted by functional impairment and seeking mental health treatment at baseline. Chronicity of major depression was predicted by report of family history of depression and treatment for paternal alcohol problems. No delayed cases of PTSD were identified. Studies are needed to compare these characteristics of the course of PTSD with other populations, using consistent methodology to allow valid comparison.

  5. Personality and Major Depression among Directly Exposed Survivors of the Oklahoma City Bombing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol S. North

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Few disaster studies have specifically examined personality and resilience in association with disaster exposure, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD, and major depression. Methods. 151 directly-exposed survivors of the Oklahoma City bombing randomly selected from a bombing survivor registry completed PTSD, major depression, and personality assessments using the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for DSM-IV and the Temperament and Character Inventory, respectively. Results. The most prevalent postdisaster psychiatric disorder was bombing-related PTSD (32%; major depression was second in prevalence (21%. Bombing-related PTSD was associated with the combination of low self-directedness and low cooperativeness and also with high self-transcendence and high harm avoidance in most configurations. Postdisaster major depression was significantly more prevalent among those with (56% than without (5% bombing-related PTSD (P<.001 and those with (72% than without (14% predisaster major depression (P<.001. Incident major depression was not associated with the combination of low self-directedness and low cooperativeness. Conclusions. Personality features can distinguish resilience to a specific life-threatening stressor from general indicators of well-being. Unlike bombing-related PTSD, major depression was not a robust marker of low resilience. Development and validation of measures of resilience should utilize well-defined diagnoses whenever possible, rather than relying on nonspecific measures of psychological distress.

  6. Avoid heat transfer equipment vibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganapathy, V.

    1987-06-01

    Tube bundles in heat exchangers, boilers, superheaters and heaters are often subject to vibration and noise problems. Vibration can lead to tube thinning and wear, resulting in tube failures. Excessive noise can be a problem to plant operating personnel. Large gas pressure drop across the equipment is also a side effect, which results in large operating costs. With the design checks presented in this paper, one can predict during design if problems associated with noise and vibration are likely to occur in petroleum refineries.

  7. 40 CFR 51.358 - Test equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... methods for preventing multiple initial tests, subject to approval by the Administrator. (3) (4) On-board diagnostic test equipment requirements. The test equipment used to perform on-board diagnostic inspections...

  8. Equipment Manufacturers, Importers, and Exporters: Frequent Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    As the US continues to phase out HCFCs, equipment manufacturers, importers, and exporters will need to adapt to the changing market demand for equipment. This page provides these groups with information on their responsibilities under the regulations.

  9. EPA USDA Agricultural Equipment Statement of Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Agricultural Equipment Statement of Principles was developed jointly between EPA and USDA at the request of agriculture industry stakeholders seeking support for programs to assist farmers looking to invest in cleaner agricultural equipment

  10. 29 CFR 1926.952 - Mechanical equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... of each shift during which the equipment is to be used to determine that the brakes and operating... being performed. (3) Equipment or material shall not be passed between a pole or structure and an aerial...

  11. Electrical Ground Support Equipment Fabrication, Specification for

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denson, Erik C.

    2014-01-01

    This document specifies parts, materials, and processes used in the fabrication, maintenance, repair, and procurement of electrical and electronic control and monitoring equipment associated with ground support equipment (GSE) at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC).

  12. Radiation, Atherosclerotic Risk Factors, and Stroke Risk in Survivors of Pediatric Cancer: A Report From the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Sabine, E-mail: muellers@neuropeds.ucsf.edu [Department of Neurology, Pediatrics and Neurosurgery, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Fullerton, Heather J. [Department of Neurology and Pediatrics, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Stratton, Kayla; Leisenring, Wendy [Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington (United States); Weathers, Rita E.; Stovall, Marilyn [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Armstrong, Gregory T. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Goldsby, Robert E. [Department of Pediatrics, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Packer, Roger J. [Children' s National Medical Center, Washington, District of Columbia (United States); Sklar, Charles A. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Bowers, Daniel C. [University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, Dallas, Texas (United States); Robison, Leslie L.; Krull, Kevin R. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To test the hypotheses that (1) the increased risk of stroke conferred by childhood cranial radiation therapy (CRT) persists into adulthood; and (2) atherosclerotic risk factors further increase the stroke risk in cancer survivors. Methods and Materials: The Childhood Cancer Survivor Study is a multi-institutional retrospective cohort study of 14,358 5-year survivors of childhood cancer and 4023 randomly selected sibling controls with longitudinal follow-up. Age-adjusted incidence rates of self-reported late-occurring (≥5 years after diagnosis) first stroke were calculated. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were used to identify independent stroke predictors. Results: During a mean follow-up of 23.3 years, 292 survivors reported a late-occurring stroke. The age-adjusted stroke rate per 100,000 person-years was 77 (95% confidence interval [CI] 62-96), compared with 9.3 (95% CI 4-23) for siblings. Treatment with CRT increased stroke risk in a dose-dependent manner: hazard ratio 5.9 (95% CI 3.5-9.9) for 30-49 Gy CRT and 11.0 (7.4-17.0) for 50+ Gy CRT. The cumulative stroke incidence in survivors treated with 50+ Gy CRT was 1.1% (95% CI 0.4-1.8%) at 10 years after diagnosis and 12% (95% CI 8.9-15.0%) at 30 years. Hypertension increased stroke hazard by 4-fold (95% CI 2.8-5.5) and in black survivors by 16-fold (95% CI 6.9-36.6). Conclusion: Young adult pediatric cancer survivors have an increased stroke risk that is associated with CRT in a dose-dependent manner. Atherosclerotic risk factors enhanced this risk and should be treated aggressively.

  13. Radiation, atherosclerotic risk factors, and stroke risk in survivors of pediatric cancer: a report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Sabine; Fullerton, Heather J; Stratton, Kayla; Leisenring, Wendy; Weathers, Rita E; Stovall, Marilyn; Armstrong, Gregory T; Goldsby, Robert E; Packer, Roger J; Sklar, Charles A; Bowers, Daniel C; Robison, Leslie L; Krull, Kevin R

    2013-07-15

    To test the hypotheses that (1) the increased risk of stroke conferred by childhood cranial radiation therapy (CRT) persists into adulthood; and (2) atherosclerotic risk factors further increase the stroke risk in cancer survivors. The Childhood Cancer Survivor Study is a multi-institutional retrospective cohort study of 14,358 5-year survivors of childhood cancer and 4023 randomly selected sibling controls with longitudinal follow-up. Age-adjusted incidence rates of self-reported late-occurring (≥5 years after diagnosis) first stroke were calculated. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were used to identify independent stroke predictors. During a mean follow-up of 23.3 years, 292 survivors reported a late-occurring stroke. The age-adjusted stroke rate per 100,000 person-years was 77 (95% confidence interval [CI] 62-96), compared with 9.3 (95% CI 4-23) for siblings. Treatment with CRT increased stroke risk in a dose-dependent manner: hazard ratio 5.9 (95% CI 3.5-9.9) for 30-49 Gy CRT and 11.0 (7.4-17.0) for 50+ Gy CRT. The cumulative stroke incidence in survivors treated with 50+ Gy CRT was 1.1% (95% CI 0.4-1.8%) at 10 years after diagnosis and 12% (95% CI 8.9-15.0%) at 30 years. Hypertension increased stroke hazard by 4-fold (95% CI 2.8-5.5) and in black survivors by 16-fold (95% CI 6.9-36.6). Young adult pediatric cancer survivors have an increased stroke risk that is associated with CRT in a dose-dependent manner. Atherosclerotic risk factors enhanced this risk and should be treated aggressively. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Using big data from health records from four countries to evaluate chronic disease outcomes : a study in 114 364 survivors of myocardial infarction

    OpenAIRE

    Rapsomaniki, E; Thuresson, M.; Yang, E.; Blin, P.; Hunt, P; Chung, S-C; Stogiannis, D; Pujades Rodriguez, MDM; Timmis, A; Denaxas, SC; Danchin, N.; Stokes, M.; Thomas-Delecourt, F; Emmas, C; Hasvold, P

    2016-01-01

    Aims: to assess the international validity of using hospital record data to compare long-term outcomes in heart attack survivors. Methods and results: we used samples of national, ongoing, unselected record sources to assess three outcomes: cause death; a composite of myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, and all-cause death; and hospitalized bleeding. Patients aged 65 years and older entered the study 1 year following the most recent discharge for acute MI in 2002–11 [n = 54 841 (Sweden), 53 9...

  15. Carbon Absorber Retrofit Equipment (CARE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Eric [Neumann Systems Group, Incorporated, Colorado Springs, CO (United States)

    2015-12-23

    During Project DE-FE0007528, CARE (Carbon Absorber Retrofit Equipment), Neumann Systems Group (NSG) designed, installed and tested a 0.5MW NeuStream® carbon dioxide (CO2) capture system using the patented NeuStream® absorber equipment and concentrated (6 molal) piperazine (PZ) as the solvent at Colorado Springs Utilities’ (CSU’s) Martin Drake pulverized coal (PC) power plant. The 36 month project included design, build and test phases. The 0.5MW NeuStream® CO2 capture system was successfully tested on flue gas from both coal and natural gas combustion sources and was shown to meet project objectives. Ninety percent CO2 removal was achieved with greater than 95% CO2product purity. The absorbers tested support a 90% reduction in absorber volume compared to packed towers and with an absorber parasitic power of less than 1% when configured for operation with a 550MW coal plant. The preliminary techno-economic analysis (TEA) performed by the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) predicted an over-the-fence cost of $25.73/tonne of CO2 captured from a sub-critical PC plant.

  16. Liquid-Liquid Extraction Equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jack D. Law; Terry A. Todd

    2008-12-01

    Solvent extraction processing has demonstrated the ability to achieve high decontamination factors for uranium and plutonium while operating at high throughputs. Historical application of solvent extraction contacting equipment implies that for the HA cycle (primary separation of uranium and plutonium from fission products) the equipment of choice is pulse columns. This is likely due to relatively short residence times (as compared to mixer-settlers) and the ability of the columns to tolerate solids in the feed. Savannah River successfully operated the F-Canyon with centrifugal contactors in the HA cycle (which have shorter residence times than columns). All three contactors have been successfully deployed in uranium and plutonium purification cycles. Over the past 20 years, there has been significant development of centrifugal contactor designs and they have become very common for research and development applications. New reprocessing plants are being planned in Russia and China and the United States has done preliminary design studies on future reprocessing plants. The choice of contactors for all of these facilities is yet to be determined.

  17. [Design of a medical equipment purchasing system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Li; Chen, Xiao-hua

    2008-09-01

    This paper introduces the network data dynamic exchange technology applied to the design of the medical equipment purchase system according to the process of the medical equipment purchasing. The new system adopts B/S structure based on .net technology, to realize the medical equipment purchasing information's dynamic management of network purchase application and verification, suppliers qualification examination and the contact file inquiry etc.

  18. Load Bearing Equipment for Bone and Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shackelford, Linda; Griffith, Bryan

    2015-01-01

    Resistance exercise on ISS has proven effective in maintaining bone mineral density and muscle mass. Exploration missions require exercise with similar high loads using equipment with less mass and volume and greater safety and reliability than resistance exercise equipment used on ISS (iRED, ARED, FWED). Load Bearing Equipment (LBE) uses each exercising person to create and control the load to the partner.

  19. 14 CFR 121.605 - Airplane equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplane equipment. 121.605 Section 121.605..., FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Dispatching and Flight Release Rules § 121.605 Airplane equipment. No person may dispatch or release an airplane unless it is airworthy and is equipped as prescribed in § 121...

  20. Find Funds for Wellness Assessment Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Marilyn M.; Kirkpatrick, Beth

    1995-01-01

    Many physical education teachers have difficulty finding ways to purchase wellness assessment equipment. The article provides strategies to help them find the money for needed equipment, highlighting the physical education budget, the computer equipment budget, grants, local businesses, statewide organizations, universities, and national…

  1. 46 CFR 184.220 - Cooking equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cooking equipment. 184.220 Section 184.220 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) VESSEL CONTROL AND MISCELLANEOUS SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Cooking and Heating § 184.220 Cooking equipment...

  2. 46 CFR 184.210 - Heating equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Heating equipment. 184.210 Section 184.210 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) VESSEL CONTROL AND MISCELLANEOUS SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Cooking and Heating § 184.210 Heating equipment...

  3. 30 CFR 77.1914 - Electrical equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    .... (b) The insulation of all electric conductors employed below the collar of any slope or shaft during... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Electrical equipment. 77.1914 Section 77.1914... Shaft Sinking § 77.1914 Electrical equipment. (a) Electric equipment employed below the collar of a...

  4. 46 CFR 153.208 - Ballast equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ballast equipment. 153.208 Section 153.208 Shipping... BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment General Vessel Requirements § 153.208 Ballast equipment. (a) Except for the arrangement described in paragraph (b) of this...

  5. 46 CFR 169.247 - Firefighting equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Firefighting equipment. 169.247 Section 169.247 Shipping... Inspection and Certification Inspections § 169.247 Firefighting equipment. (a) At each inspection for... equipment is inspected to ensure it is in suitable condition. Tests may be necessary to determine the...

  6. 46 CFR 153.466 - Electrical equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Electrical equipment. 153.466 Section 153.466 Shipping... BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Special Requirements for Flammable Or Combustible Cargoes § 153.466 Electrical equipment. A tankship carrying a...

  7. 29 CFR 97.32 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Equipment. 97.32 Section 97.32 Labor Office of the Secretary... GOVERNMENTS Post-Award Requirements Changes, Property, and Subawards § 97.32 Equipment. (a) Title. Subject to the obligations and conditions set forth in this section, title to equipment acquired under a grant or...

  8. 14 CFR 1273.32 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Equipment. 1273.32 Section 1273.32..., Property, and Subawards § 1273.32 Equipment. (a) Title. Subject to the obligations and conditions set forth in this section, title to equipment acquired under a grant or subgrant will vest upon acquisition in...

  9. 41 CFR 105-71.132 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equipment. 105-71.132...-Award Requirements/Changes, Property, and Subawards § 105-71.132 Equipment. (a) Title. Subject to the obligations and conditions set forth in this section, title to equipment acquired under a grant or subgrant...

  10. 14 CFR 1260.134 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Equipment. 1260.134 Section 1260.134..., Hospitals, and Other Non-Profit Organizations Property Standards § 1260.134 Equipment. (a) For grants and... research to not vest title in the recipient as exempt, equipment shall vest in the recipient subject to...

  11. 24 CFR 84.34 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Equipment. 84.34 Section 84.34... NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Property Standards § 84.34 Equipment. (a) Title to equipment acquired by a recipient with Federal funds shall vest in the recipient, subject to conditions of...

  12. 34 CFR 80.32 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equipment. 80.32 Section 80.32 Education Office of the... Equipment. (a) Title. Subject to the obligations and conditions set forth in this section, title to equipment acquired under a grant or subgrant will vest upon acquisition in the grantee or subgrantee...

  13. 15 CFR 24.32 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Equipment. 24.32 Section 24.32..., Property, and Subawards § 24.32 Equipment. (a) Title. Subject to the obligations and conditions set forth in this section, title to equipment acquired under a grant or subgrant will vest upon acquisition in...

  14. 44 CFR 208.25 - Obsolete equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Obsolete equipment. 208.25... Cooperative Agreements § 208.25 Obsolete equipment. (a) The Assistant Administrator will periodically identify obsolete items on the Equipment Cache List and provide such information to Sponsoring Agencies. (b) Neither...

  15. 32 CFR 33.32 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equipment. 33.32 Section 33.32 National Defense... Requirements Changes, Property, and Subawards § 33.32 Equipment. (a) Title. Subject to the obligations and conditions set forth in this section, title to equipment acquired under a grant or subgrant will vest upon...

  16. 10 CFR 600.232 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Equipment. 600.232 Section 600.232 Energy DEPARTMENT OF... Equipment. (a) Title. Subject to the obligations and conditions set forth in this section, title to equipment acquired under a grant or subgrant will vest upon acquisition in the grantee or subgrantee...

  17. 24 CFR 85.32 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Equipment. 85.32 Section 85.32... TRIBAL GOVERNMENTS Post-Award Requirements Changes, Property, and Subawards § 85.32 Equipment. (a) Title. Subject to the obligations and conditions set forth in this section, title to equipment acquired under a...

  18. 44 CFR 13.32 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Equipment. 13.32 Section 13... LOCAL GOVERNMENTS Post-Award Requirements Changes, Property, and Subawards § 13.32 Equipment. (a) Title. Subject to the obligations and conditions set forth in this section, title to equipment acquired under a...

  19. 2 CFR 215.34 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Equipment. 215.34 Section 215.34 Grants and... ORGANIZATIONS (OMB CIRCULAR A-110) Post Award Requirements Property Standards § 215.34 Equipment. (a) Title to equipment acquired by a recipient with Federal funds shall vest in the recipient, subject to conditions of...

  20. 46 CFR 169.245 - Lifesaving equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lifesaving equipment. 169.245 Section 169.245 Shipping... Inspection and Certification Inspections § 169.245 Lifesaving equipment. At each inspection for certification and periodic inspection the following tests and inspections of lifesaving equipment will be conducted...

  1. 46 CFR 169.839 - Firefighting equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Firefighting equipment. 169.839 Section 169.839 Shipping... Operations Tests, Drills, and Inspections § 169.839 Firefighting equipment. (a) The master or person in charge shall ensure that the vessel's firefighting equipment is at all times ready for use and that all...

  2. 36 CFR 1207.32 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equipment. 1207.32 Section... Post-Award Requirements Changes, Property, and Subawards § 1207.32 Equipment. (a) Title. Subject to the obligations and conditions set forth in this section, title to equipment acquired under a grant or subgrant...

  3. 22 CFR 145.34 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Equipment. 145.34 Section 145.34 Foreign..., HOSPITALS, AND OTHER NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Property Standards § 145.34 Equipment. (a) Title to equipment acquired by a recipient with Federal funds shall vest in the recipient...

  4. 29 CFR 1470.32 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equipment. 1470.32 Section 1470.32 Labor Regulations... Changes, Property, and Subawards § 1470.32 Equipment. (a) Title. Subject to the obligations and conditions set forth in this section, title to equipment acquired under a grant or subgrant will vest upon...

  5. 22 CFR 226.34 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Equipment. 226.34 Section 226.34 Foreign... ORGANIZATIONS Post-award Requirements Property Standards § 226.34 Equipment. (a) Unless the agreement provides otherwise, title to equipment acquired by a recipient with Federal funds shall vest in the recipient...

  6. 22 CFR 135.32 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Equipment. 135.32 Section 135.32 Foreign... Equipment. (a) Title. Subject to the obligations and conditions set forth in this section, title to equipment acquired under a grant or subgrant will vest upon acquisition in the grantee or subgrantee...

  7. 17 CFR 256.307 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Equipment. 256.307 Section 256... COMPANY ACT OF 1935 Service Company Property Accounts § 256.307 Equipment. This account shall include the cost of equipment owned by the service company and used in rendering services such as micro-wave...

  8. 38 CFR 49.34 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equipment. 49.34 Section... NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Property Standards § 49.34 Equipment. (a) Title to equipment acquired by a recipient with Federal funds shall vest in the recipient, subject to conditions of...

  9. 41 CFR 105-72.404 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equipment. 105-72.404... NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS 72.40-Post-Award Requirements/Property Standards § 105-72.404 Equipment. (a) Title to equipment acquired by a recipient with Federal funds shall vest in the recipient, subject to...

  10. 46 CFR 169.705 - Mooring equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Mooring equipment. 169.705 Section 169.705 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Vessel Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment § 169.705 Mooring equipment. Each vessel must be fitted with...

  11. 29 CFR 1926.1090 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equipment. 1926.1090 Section 1926.1090 Labor Regulations...) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Diving Equipment Procedures and Requirements § 1926.1090 Equipment. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under this section are identical to those...

  12. 23 CFR 1200.21 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Equipment. 1200.21 Section 1200.21 Highways NATIONAL... Implementation and Management of the Highway Safety Program § 1200.21 Equipment. (a) Title. Except as provided in paragraphs (e) and (f) of this section, title to equipment acquired under the Section 402 program will vest...

  13. 40 CFR 31.32 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equipment. 31.32 Section 31.32... Requirements Changes, Property, and Subawards § 31.32 Equipment. (a) Title. Subject to the obligations and conditions set forth in this section, title to equipment acquired under a grant or subgrant will vest upon...

  14. 36 CFR 1210.34 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equipment. 1210.34 Section..., HOSPITALS, AND OTHER NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Property Standards § 1210.34 Equipment. (a) Title to equipment acquired by a recipient with NHPRC funds shall vest in the recipient, subject...

  15. 49 CFR 18.32 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Equipment. 18.32 Section 18.32 Transportation... Equipment. (a) Title. Subject to the obligations and conditions set forth in this section, title to equipment acquired under a grant or subgrant will vest upon acquisition in the grantee or subgrantee...

  16. 45 CFR 92.32 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Equipment. 92.32 Section 92.32 Public Welfare..., Property, and Subawards § 92.32 Equipment. (a) Title. Subject to the obligations and conditions set forth in this section, title to equipment acquired under a grant or subgrant will vest upon acquisition in...

  17. 47 CFR 32.2123 - Office equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Office equipment. 32.2123 Section 32.2123... FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions for Balance Sheet Accounts § 32.2123 Office equipment. This account shall include the original cost of office equipment in offices, shops and all other...

  18. 13 CFR 143.32 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Equipment. 143.32 Section 143.32..., and Subawards § 143.32 Equipment. (a) Title. Subject to the obligations and conditions set forth in this section, title to equipment acquired under a grant or subgrant will vest upon acquisition in the...

  19. 47 CFR 32.2232 - Circuit equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Circuit equipment. 32.2232 Section 32.2232... FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions for Balance Sheet Accounts § 32.2232 Circuit equipment. (a) This account shall include the original cost of equipment which is used to reduce the number of...

  20. 38 CFR 43.32 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equipment. 43.32 Section... Requirements Changes, Property, and Subawards § 43.32 Equipment. (a) Title. Subject to the obligations and conditions set forth in this section, title to equipment acquired under a grant or subgrant will vest upon...

  1. 21 CFR 1403.32 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Equipment. 1403.32 Section 1403.32 Food and Drugs... Equipment. (a) Title. Subject to the obligations and conditions set forth in this section, title to equipment acquired under a grant or subgrant will vest upon acquisition in the grantee or subgrantee...

  2. 7 CFR 3016.32 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Equipment. 3016.32 Section 3016.32 Agriculture... GOVERNMENTS Post-Award Requirements Changes, Property, and Subawards § 3016.32 Equipment. (a) Title. Subject to the obligations and conditions set forth in this section, title to equipment acquired under a...

  3. 20 CFR 437.32 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Equipment. 437.32 Section 437.32 Employees... Equipment. (a) Title. Subject to the obligations and conditions set forth in this section, title to equipment acquired under a grant or subgrant will vest upon acquisition in the grantee or subgrantee...

  4. 43 CFR 12.72 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Equipment. 12.72 Section 12.72 Public... to State and Local Governments Changes, Property, and Subawards § 12.72 Equipment. (a) Title. Subject to the obligations and conditions set forth in this section, title to equipment acquired under a...

  5. 28 CFR 66.32 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equipment. 66.32 Section 66.32 Judicial... Equipment. (a) The Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968, as amended, Public Law 90-351, section 808, requires that the title to all equipment and supplies purchased with section 403 or 1302...

  6. 45 CFR 602.32 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Equipment. 602.32 Section 602.32 Public Welfare....32 Equipment. (a) Title. Subject to the obligations and conditions set forth in this section, title to equipment acquired under a grant or subgrant will vest upon acquisition in the grantee or...

  7. 45 CFR 2541.320 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Equipment. 2541.320 Section 2541.320 Public... Changes, Property and Subawards § 2541.320 Equipment. (a) Title. Subject to the obligations and conditions set forth in this section, title to equipment acquired under a grant or subgrant will vest upon...

  8. 21 CFR 1271.200 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Equipment. 1271.200 Section 1271.200 Food and... CELLULAR AND TISSUE-BASED PRODUCTS Current Good Tissue Practice § 1271.200 Equipment. (a) General. To prevent the introduction, transmission, or spread of communicable diseases, equipment used in the...

  9. 40 CFR 30.34 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equipment. 30.34 Section 30.34... NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Property Standards § 30.34 Equipment. (a) Title to equipment acquired by a recipient with Federal funds shall vest in the recipient, subject to conditions of...

  10. 7 CFR 58.319 - Printing equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Printing equipment. 58.319 Section 58.319 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....319 Printing equipment. All printing equipment shall be designed so as to adequately protect the...

  11. Data center equipment location and monitoring system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    A data center equipment location system includes both hardware and software to provide for location, monitoring, security and identification of servers and other equipment in equipment racks. The system provides a wired alternative to the wireless RFID tag system by using electronic ID tags...

  12. Data Center Equipment Location and Monitoring System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: Data center equipment location systems include hardware and software to provide information on the location, monitoring, and security of servers and other equipment in equipment racks. The systems provide a wired alternative to the wireless RFID tag system by using electronic ID tags...

  13. Benefits of Attending a Weekend Childhood Cancer Survivor Family Retreat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashore, Lisa; Bender, Joyce

    2017-09-01

    To explore the long-term benefits to families of childhood cancer survivors who attended a weekend childhood cancer survivor family retreat. Descriptive-qualitative study including families who had attended the weekend retreat at least once but not in the past 12 months, and who attend a large pediatric hematology and oncology cancer survivorship program in Texas. A semistructured interview guide was used during three audio-taped focus groups to explore the benefits of having attended a weekend retreat. Descriptive qualitative analysis was used to analyze the focus groups' transcripts. Seven families participated in the focus groups, and the themes identified were reconnecting (with others or family), putting life in perspective, and changing outlook on life. Retreats offer families of cancer survivors opportunities to reconnect with others and their own family members in a therapeutic environment. These reconnections in a therapeutic environment enriched the families' positive outlooks on life and changed their perspectives. Families of childhood cancer survivors report a lack of support following the completion of therapy. Retreats in a nonclinical therapeutic setting optimize family-perceived support, relationship building, and reconnecting survivor families. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  14. Pursuing Normality: Reflections on Cancer Survivorship Care of Lymphoma Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Louise S; Handberg, Charlotte

    2018-01-16

    The present study explored the reflections on cancer survivorship care of lymphoma survivors in active treatment. Lymphoma survivors have survivorship care needs, yet their participation in cancer survivorship care programs is still reported as low. The aim of this study was to understand the reflections on cancer survivorship care of lymphoma survivors to aid the future planning of cancer survivorship care and overcome barriers to participation. Data were generated in a hematological ward during 4 months of ethnographic fieldwork, including participant observation and 46 semistructured interviews with 9 lymphoma survivors. Interpretive description methodology and social practice theory guided the analytical framework. "Pursuing normality" was an overall finding and was comprised of 2 overarching patterns, "future prospects" and "survivorship care perceptions," both implying an influence on whether to participate in cancer survivorship care programs. Because of "pursuing normality," 8 of 9 participants opted out of cancer survivorship care programming due to prospects of "being cured" and perceptions of cancer survivorship care as "a continuation of the disease." The findings add to our understanding of possible barriers for participation in cancer survivorship care and outline important aspects to account for in the practice of health professionals. The study findings may guide practice to establish a systematic approach for providing information to cancer survivors regarding the possible management of their symptoms and of the content and purpose of cancer survivorship care.

  15. Media participation and mental health in terrorist attack survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoresen, Siri; Jensen, Tine K; Dyb, Grete

    2014-12-01

    Terrorism and disasters receive massive media attention, and victims are often approached by reporters. Not much is known about how terror and disaster victims perceive the contact with media and whether such experiences influence mental health. In this study, we describe how positive and negative experiences with media relate to posttraumatic stress (PTS) reactions among survivors of the 2011 Utøya Island terrorist attack in Norway. Face-to-face interviews were conducted with 285 survivors (47.0% female and 53.0% male) 14-15 months after the terrorist attack. Most survivors were approached by reporters (94%), and participated in media interviews (88%). The majority of survivors evaluated their media contact and participation as positive, and media participation was unrelated to PTS reactions. Survivors who found media participation distressing had more PTS reactions (quite distressing: B = 0.440, extremely distressing: B = 0.611, p = .004 in adjusted model). Perceiving media participation as distressing was slightly associated with lower levels of social support (r = -.16, p = .013), and regretting media participation was slightly associated with feeling let down (r = .18, p = .004). Reporters should take care when interviewing victims, and clinicians should be aware of media exposure as a potential additional strain on victims. Copyright © 2014 International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies.

  16. [A childhood and adolescence cancer survivors' association: Les Aguerris].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Kai Yan; Vélius, Élodie; Pitot, Maxime; Rivieri, Lionel; Dupont, Morvan

    2015-01-01

    In France, we can estimate that 50,000 adults are childhood or adolescence cancer survivors. Not all of them will experience late effects but they should be informed about their previous disease and should get a detailed summary of treatment information including a personal plan for late effects screening. They also should have access to appropriate follow-up care including detection and treatment of late effects and provision of support and advice. From a follow-up clinic experience, the need of a survivor association has emerged and "Les Aguerris" has been created with several objectives: to improve the quality of life of survivors providing them information about the possible physical, social and psychological consequences of childhood cancer, to raise awareness of public authorities and other actors on questions regarding the need of long-term follow-up of the patients in dedicated clinics, to support researches about late effects of cancer and treatments and to create a network of adult survivors of childhood cancer in relation with other European survivors or parents associations. This paper describes the activities of the association to fulfill its objectives and the annual national meetings they are organizing. Copyright © 2015 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Class, race and ethnicity and information avoidance among cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCloud, R F; Jung, M; Gray, S W; Viswanath, K

    2013-05-28

    Information seeking may increase cancer survivors' ability to make decisions and cope with the disease, but many also avoid cancer information after diagnosis. The social determinants and subsequent communication barriers that lead to avoidance have not been explored. The purpose of this study is to examine the influence of social determinants on information avoidance among cancer survivors. We examined how health information avoidance is associated with structural and individual factors in a mail-based survey of 519 cancer survivors. Factor analysis was conducted to determine barriers to obtaining cancer information, and multivariable logistic regression models by gender were run to analyze social determinants of avoidance from an intersectional approach. Participants who were younger, female, had greater debt and lower income, and had difficulty finding suitable information were more likely to avoid information. The probability of information avoidance increased when survivors reported barriers to information use or comprehension. These results indicate that survivors' information avoidance may be driven, in part, by social determinants, particularly among those at the intersection of multiple social status categories. Customized strategies are needed that maximize the likelihood that information will be used by vulnerable groups such as those from a lower socioeconomic position.

  18. Pain in Survivors of Pediatric Cancer: Applying a Prevention Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Amanda L; Karlson, Cynthia W; Heathcote, Lauren C; Rosenberg, Abby R; Palermo, Tonya M

    2017-08-31

    To apply a biopsychosocial framework to understand factors influencing pain in survivors of pediatric cancer to inform pain prevention efforts and highlight the need for interdisciplinary care. This topical review draws from both pediatric cancer survivorship research and chronic noncancer pain research to illustrate how components of a preventative model can be applied to pain in survivorship. Pain is a common experience among long-term survivors of pediatric cancer. The pain experience in survivorship can be conceptualized in terms of biological disease and treatment factors, cognitive and affective factors, and social and contextual factors. We review literature pertinent to each of these biopsychosocial factors and tailor an existing public health prevention framework for pain in survivors of pediatric cancer. Classifying survivors of pediatric cancer into pain risk categories based on their daily experiences of pain, pain-related functional impairment, and distress could help guide the implementation of pain-related prevention and intervention strategies in this population. Future research is needed to establish the efficacy of screening measures to identify patients in need of psychosocial pain and pain-related fear management services, and interdisciplinary pediatric chronic pain management programs in survivors of pediatric cancer.

  19. Satisfaction of Nigerian stroke survivors with outpatient physiotherapy care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaleye, Olubukola A; Hamzat, Talhatu K; Akinrinsade, Marvellous A

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the satisfaction of stroke survivors with outpatient physiotherapy care. Sixty stroke survivors were surveyed using the European Physiotherapy Treatment Outpatient Satisfaction Survey (EPTOPS). Focus group discussion (FGD) was also conducted with four stroke survivors from the same sample. Data were analyzed using the Kruskal Wallis test and Spearman's correlation coefficients at p = 0.05. FGD was transcribed and thematically analyzed. Nearly all the participants (98.3%) indicated one of good, very good, and excellent improvement in their clinical conditions with physiotherapy. Majority expressed satisfaction with their physiotherapy care, the modal response being very good (59.3%). Patients' satisfaction and socio-demographics were not significantly correlated (p > 0.05). Overarching themes from FGD were physiotherapy in stroke rehabilitation, satisfaction with physiotherapy care, cost, and lack of continuity of care as sources of dissatisfaction. Physiotherapists' demeanor was a facilitator of satisfaction. The stroke survivors were generally satisfied with outpatient physiotherapy care. However, lack of continuity and cost of care were sources of dissatisfaction among patients. Delivery of physiotherapy to stroke survivors in Nigeria should be structured to allow for continuity of care as this may enhance satisfaction. Implementation of inexpensive rehabilitation strategies may help reduce cost of physiotherapy.

  20. Perceived health benefits from yoga among breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Puymbroeck, Marieke; Burk, Brooke N; Shinew, Kimberly J; Cronan Kuhlenschmidt, Megan; Schmid, Arlene A

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the health benefits reported by breast cancer survivors following an 8-week yoga intervention. This phenomenological study employed three focus groups with six breast cancer survivors each (n = 18) following the yoga intervention. The focus groups and yoga classes were conducted in a large hospital in a midsized town in the Midwest. Eighteen female breast cancer survivors who were at least 9 months posttreatment participated in the focus groups following the 8-week yoga intervention. An 8-week yoga intervention designed specifically for this population was led by a yoga therapist. A semistructured interview guide was utilized to guide each focus group. Interpretative phenomenological analysis methods were employed to explore breast cancer survivors' experiences after participating in an 8-week yoga intervention. The findings revealed that the women in the study found health promoting benefits in the areas of physical health and healing, mental health and healing, and social health and healing. Yoga may be an important tool in the healing process for breast cancer survivors.