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Sample records for survivors undergoing 3

  1. Feasibility of a pedometer-based walking program for survivors of breast and head and neck cancer undergoing radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javaheri, Pantea Amin; Nekolaichuk, Cheryl; Haennel, Robert; Parliament, Matthew B; McNeely, Margaret L

    2015-01-01

    This pilot study assessed the feasibility and acceptability of a pedometer-based walking program for people with breast cancer and head and neck cancer (HNC) undergoing radiation therapy treatment. Participants were given a pedometer and prescribed a home-based walking program that included an individualized weekly step-count goal during the 3- to 5-week course of radiation therapy. Feasibility was determined by calculating recruitment rate, completion rate, and rate of adherence. Secondary outcomes included 6-minute walk test (6MWT) distance, step count, physical activity level, and psychological outcomes of depression, happiness, self-esteem, and sleep quality. A total of 21 participants were recruited. All participants completed the study; adherence to prescribed step counts was 91% at follow-up. Analysis found a significant improvement in happiness, as measured by the Oxford Happiness Questionnaire (mean difference 0.3, p=0.003), and a borderline significant improvement in 6MWT distance (mean difference 35 m, p=0.008). This pilot study demonstrated the feasibility of a pedometer-based walking program for survivors of breast cancer and HNC undergoing radiation therapy.

  2. 38 CFR 3.405 - Filipino veterans and their survivors; benefits at the full-dollar rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... their survivors; benefits at the full-dollar rate. 3.405 Section 3.405 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans... Compensation Effective Dates § 3.405 Filipino veterans and their survivors; benefits at the full-dollar rate... compensation at full-dollar rates to certain Filipino veterans and their survivors, are considered liberalizing...

  3. Municipal return to work management in cancer survivors undergoing cancer treatment: a protocol on a controlled intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapelfeldt, Christina M; Labriola, Merete; Jensen, Anders Bonde; Andersen, Niels Trolle; Momsen, Anne-Mette H; Nielsen, Claus Vinther

    2015-07-29

    Cancer survivors are often left on their own to deal with the challenges of resuming work during or after cancer treatment, mainly due to unclear agreements between stakeholders responsible for occupational rehabilitation. Social inequality exists in cancer risk, survival probability and continues with regard to the chance of being able to return to work. The aim is to apply an early, individually tailored occupational rehabilitation intervention to cancer survivors in two municipalities parallel with cancer treatment focusing on enhancing readiness for return to work. In a controlled trial municipal job consultants use acceptance and commitment therapy dialogue and individual-placement-and-support-inspired tools with cancer survivors to engage them in behaviour changes toward readiness for return to work. The workplace is involved in the return to work process. Patients referred to surgery, radiotherapy or chemotherapy at the Oncology Department, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark for the diagnoses; breast, colon-rectal, head and neck, thyroid gland, testicular, ovarian or cervix cancer are eligible for the study. Patients must be residents in the municipalities of Silkeborg or Randers, 18-60 years of age and have a permanent or temporary employment (with at least 6 months left of their contract) at inclusion. Patients, for whom the treating physician considers occupational rehabilitation to be unethical, or who are not reading or talking Danish are excluded. The control group has identical inclusion and exclusion criteria except for municipality of residence. Return to work is the primary outcome and is indentified in a social transfer payment register. Effect is assessed as relative cumulative incidences within 52 weeks and will be analysed in generalised linear regression models using the pseudo values method. As a secondary outcome; co-morbidity and socio-economic status is analysed as effect modifiers of the intervention effect on return to work. The

  4. Psychological outcomes of siblings of cancer survivors: a report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchbinder, David; Casillas, Jacqueline; Krull, Kevin R; Goodman, Pam; Leisenring, Wendy; Recklitis, Christopher; Alderfer, Melissa A; Robison, Leslie L; Armstrong, Gregory T; Kunin-Batson, Alicia; Stuber, Margaret; Zeltzer, Lonnie K

    2011-12-01

    To identify risk factors for adverse psychological outcomes among adult siblings of long-term survivors of childhood cancer. Cross-sectional, self-report data from 3083 adult siblings (mean age 29 years, range 18-56 years) of 5 + year survivors of childhood cancer were analyzed to assess psychological outcomes as measured by the Brief Symptom Inventory-18 (BSI-18). Sociodemographic and health data, reported by both the siblings and their matched cancer survivors, were explored as risk factors for adverse sibling psychological outcomes through multivariable logistic regression. Self-reported symptoms of psychological distress, as measured by the global severity index of the BSI-18, were reported by 3.8% of the sibling sample. Less than 1.5% of siblings reported elevated scores on two or more of the subscales of the BSI-18. Risk factors for sibling depression included having a survivor brother (OR 2.22, 95% CI 1.42-3.55), and having a survivor with impaired general health (OR 2.15, 95% CI 1.18-3.78). Siblings who were younger than the survivor reported increased global psychological distress (OR 1.81, 95% CI 1.05-3.12), as did siblings of survivors reporting global psychological distress (OR 2.32, 95% CI 1.08-4.59). Siblings of sarcoma survivors reported more somatization than did siblings of leukemia survivors (OR 2.07, 95% CI 1.05-3.98). These findings suggest that siblings of long-term childhood cancer survivors are psychologically healthy in general. There are, however, small subgroups of siblings at risk for long-term psychological impairment who may benefit from preventive risk-reduction strategies during childhood while their sibling with cancer is undergoing treatment. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Tsunami-exposed tourist survivors: signs of recovery in a 3-year perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannesson, Kerstin Bergh; Lundin, Tom; Fröjd, Thomas; Hultman, Christina M; Michel, Per-Olof

    2011-03-01

    Long-term follow-up after disaster exposure indicates increased rates of psychological distress. However, trajectories and rates of recovery in large samples of disaster-exposed survivors are largely lacking. A group of 3457 Swedish survivors temporarily on vacation in Southeast Asia during the 2004 tsunami were assessed by postal questionnaire at 14 months and 3 years after the tsunami regarding post-traumatic stress reactions (IES-R) and general mental health (GHQ-12). There was a general pattern of resilience and recovery 3 years postdisaster. Severe exposure and traumatic bereavement were associated with increased post-traumatic stress reactions and heightened risk for impaired mental health. The rate of recovery was lower among respondents exposed to life threat and among bereaved. Severe trauma exposure and bereavement seem to have considerable long-term impact on psychological distress and appear to slow down the recovery process. Readiness among health agencies for identification of symptoms and provision of interventions might facilitate optimal recovery.

  6. 38 CFR 3.505 - Filipino veterans and their survivors; benefits at the full-dollar rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... their survivors; benefits at the full-dollar rate. 3.505 Section 3.505 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans...-dollar rate. The effective date of discontinuance of compensation or dependency and indemnity... full-dollar rate under § 3.42 is physically absent from the U.S. for a total of 183 days or more during...

  7. Incidental pineal cysts in children who undergo 3-T MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitehead, Matthew T. [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Radiology, Memphis, TN (United States); Le Bonheur Children' s Hospital, Le Bonheur Neuroscience Institute, Memphis, TN (United States); Le Bonheur Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Memphis, TN (United States); Oh, Christopher C. [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Radiology, Memphis, TN (United States); Le Bonheur Children' s Hospital, Le Bonheur Neuroscience Institute, Memphis, TN (United States); Choudhri, Asim F. [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Radiology, Memphis, TN (United States); Le Bonheur Children' s Hospital, Le Bonheur Neuroscience Institute, Memphis, TN (United States); University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Pineal cysts, both simple and complex, are commonly encountered in children. More cysts are being detected with MR technology; however, nearly all pineal cysts are benign and require no follow-up. To discover the prevalence of pineal cysts in children at our institution who have undergone high-resolution 3-T MRI. We retrospectively reviewed 100 consecutive 3-T brain MRIs in children ages 1 month to 17 years (mean 6.8 {+-} 5.1 years). We evaluated 3-D volumetric T1-W imaging, axial T2-W imaging, axial T2-W FLAIR (fluid attenuated inversion recovery) and coronal STIR (short tau inversion recovery) sequences. Pineal parenchymal and cyst volumes were measured in three planes. Cysts were analyzed for the presence and degree of complexity. Pineal cysts were present in 57% of children, with a mean maximum linear dimension of 4.2 mm (range 1.5-16 mm). Of these cysts, 24.6% showed thin septations or fluid levels reflecting complexity. None of the cysts demonstrated complete T2/FLAIR signal suppression. No cyst wall thickening or nodularity was present. There was no significant difference between the ages of children with and without cysts. Cysts were more commonly encountered in girls than boys (67% vs. 52%; P = 0.043). There was a slight trend toward increasing pineal gland volume with age. Pineal cysts are often present in children and can be incidentally detected by 3-T MRI. Characteristic-appearing pineal cysts in children are benign, incidental findings, for which follow-up is not required if there are no referable symptoms or excessive size. (orig.)

  8. Astrocyte VAMP3 vesicles undergo Ca2+-independent cycling and modulate glutamate transporter trafficking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongdong; Hérault, Karine; Zylbersztejn, Kathleen; Lauterbach, Marcel A; Guillon, Marc; Oheim, Martin; Ropert, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Key points Mouse cortical astrocytes express VAMP3 but not VAMP2. VAMP3 vesicles undergo Ca2+-independent exo- and endocytotic cycling at the plasma membrane. VAMP3 vesicle traffic regulates the recycling of plasma membrane glutamate transporters. cAMP modulates VAMP3 vesicle cycling and glutamate uptake. Abstract Previous studies suggest that small synaptic-like vesicles in astrocytes carry vesicle-associated vSNARE proteins, VAMP3 (cellubrevin) and VAMP2 (synaptobrevin 2), both contributing to the Ca2+-regulated exocytosis of gliotransmitters, thereby modulating brain information processing. Here, using cortical astrocytes taken from VAMP2 and VAMP3 knock-out mice, we find that astrocytes express only VAMP3. The morphology and function of VAMP3 vesicles were studied in cultured astrocytes at single vesicle level with stimulated emission depletion (STED) and total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopies. We show that VAMP3 antibodies label small diameter (∼80 nm) vesicles and that VAMP3 vesicles undergo Ca2+-independent exo-endocytosis. We also show that this pathway modulates the surface expression of plasma membrane glutamate transporters and the glutamate uptake by astrocytes. Finally, using pharmacological and optogenetic tools, we provide evidence suggesting that the cytosolic cAMP level influences astrocytic VAMP3 vesicle trafficking and glutamate transport. Our results suggest a new role for VAMP3 vesicles in astrocytes. PMID:25864578

  9. Factors supporting cardiomyopathy screening among at-risk adult survivors of pediatric malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Cheryl L; Zhu, Liang; Ojha, Rohit P; Steen, Brenda D; Ogg, Susan; Robison, Leslie L; Hudson, Melissa M

    2017-04-01

    Anthracyclines and chest irradiation place adult survivors of childhood cancer at risk of cardiomyopathy; many survivors do not obtain the recommended screening. Based on our recent clinical trial, the addition of telephone counseling to a printed survivorship care plan more than doubled survivors' risk-based screening. Here, we sought to measure the impact of specific factors targeted in the intervention for their impact on survivors' screening participation. Study population-survivors participating in a randomized longitudinal intervention trial. Survivor questionnaires and medical records at baseline and 1-year follow-up provided the data. Within- and between-group differences in factors were assessed at baseline and follow-up; structural equation modeling (SEM) identified direct and indirect effects on screening participation. Of the 411 survivors, 55.3% were female, 89.3% white, 38.9% college graduates, and age 26-59 years (mean = 41 years, SD = 7.68 years). At follow-up, the counseling group demonstrated higher scores for intent to undergo screening (p survivors' screening participation. This finding challenges providers to reach beyond the disease treatment focus and embrace these strategies in their behavior change efforts.

  10. Resource loss, self-efficacy, and family support predict posttraumatic stress symptoms: a 3-year study of earthquake survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Lisa Marie; Gutiérrez-Doña, Benicio; Villegas Angulo, Maricela; Schwarzer, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Social support and self-efficacy are regarded as coping resources that may facilitate readjustment after traumatic events. The 2009 Cinchona earthquake in Costa Rica serves as an example for such an event to study resources to prevent subsequent severity of posttraumatic stress symptoms. At Time 1 (1-6 months after the earthquake in 2009), N=200 survivors were interviewed, assessing resource loss, received family support, and posttraumatic stress response. At Time 2 in 2012, severity of posttraumatic stress symptoms and general self-efficacy beliefs were assessed. Regression analyses estimated the severity of posttraumatic stress symptoms accounted for by all variables. Moderator and mediator models were examined to understand the interplay of received family support and self-efficacy with posttraumatic stress symptoms. Baseline posttraumatic stress symptoms and resource loss (T1) accounted for significant but small amounts of the variance in the severity of posttraumatic stress symptoms (T2). The main effects of self-efficacy (T2) and social support (T1) were negligible, but social support buffered resource loss, indicating that only less supported survivors were affected by resource loss. Self-efficacy at T2 moderated the support-stress relationship, indicating that low levels of self-efficacy could be compensated by higher levels of family support. Receiving family support at T1 enabled survivors to feel self-efficacious, underlining the enabling hypothesis. Receiving social support from relatives shortly after an earthquake was found to be an important coping resource, as it alleviated the association between resource loss and the severity of posttraumatic stress response, compensated for deficits of self-efficacy, and enabled self-efficacy, which was in turn associated with more adaptive adjustment 3 years after the earthquake.

  11. Serum omega-3 fatty acids and treatment outcomes among women undergoing assisted reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Y-H; Karmon, A E; Gaskins, A J; Arvizu, M; Williams, P L; Souter, I; Rueda, B R; Hauser, R; Chavarro, J E

    2018-01-01

    Are serum polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) concentrations, including omega-33-PUFA) and omega-6 (ω6-PUFA), related to ART outcomes? Serum levels of long-chain ω3-PUFA were positively associated with probability of live birth among women undergoing ART. Intake of ω3-PUFA improves oocyte and embryo quality in animal and human studies. However, a recent cohort study found no relation between circulating ω3-PUFA levels and pregnancy rates after ART. This analysis included a random sample of 100 women from a prospective cohort study (EARTH) at the Massachusetts General Hospital Fertility Center who underwent 136 ART cycles within one year of blood collection. Serum fatty acids (expressed as percentage of total fatty acids) were measured by gas chromatography in samples taken between Days 3 and 9 of a stimulated cycle. Primary outcomes included the probability of implantation, clinical pregnancy and live birth per initiated cycle. Cluster-weighted generalized estimating equation (GEE) models were used to analyze the association of total and specific PUFAs with ART outcomes adjusting for age, body mass index, smoking status, physical activity, use of multivitamins and history of live birth. The median [25th, 75th percentile] serum level of ω3-PUFA was 4.7% [3.8%, 5.8%] of total fatty acids. Higher levels of serum long-chain ω3-PUFA were associated with higher probability of clinical pregnancy and live birth. Specifically, after multivariable adjustment, the probability of clinical pregnancy and live birth increased by 8% (4%, 11%) and 8% (95% CI: 1%, 16%), respectively, for every 1% increase in serum long-chain ω3-PUFA levels. Intake of long-chain ω3-PUFA was also associated with a higher probability of life birth in these women, with RR of 2.37 (95% CI: 1.02, 5.51) when replacing 1% energy of long-chain ω3-PUFA for 1% energy of saturated fatty acids. Serum ω6-PUFA, ratios of ω6 and ω3-PUFA, and total PUFA were not associated with ART outcomes. The

  12. Report on the results of the thirteenth medical examination of atomic bomb survivors resident in north america

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Yasuji; Ohta, Michiya [Hiroshima Prefectural Medical Association (Japan); Urabe, Takeshi [Hiroshima Prefectural Hospital (Japan)] [and others

    2002-05-01

    The thirteenth medical examination of A-bomb survivors resident in North America was carried out from June 13th through June 27th and from July 12th through July 26th, 2001, in the cities of Los Angeles, San Francisco, Seattle, and Honolulu. The total number of those who underwent the thirteenth medical examination was 399, 53 of whom were second-generation A-bomb survivors. As the survivors in North America are advancing in age, the average age of the examinee was 69.5 years. The examination items included an interview, clinical and physical examinations, electrocardiography (E.C.G.), and blood, urine, and stool tests. The review of the medical history showed that hypertension was the most frequent in the survivors examined, with the prevalence of 39.3%. Previous history of malignant tumors was observed in 13.6% of the survivors examined, with major sites being the mammary gland, uterine, and colon. As a result of the blood test, 9.5% of the survivors examined were diagnosed as diabetic, and hypercholesterolemia was found in 32.1% of the survivors examined. Latent hypothyroidism was found in 18.5% of the survivors examined. No disease or examination finding showed a clear relation with exposure status. A report providing the results of the medical examination and necessity of undergoing closer examination and receiving medical treatment, if any, was mailed to each examinee. (author)

  13. Desert Survivors!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Jessica; Friedenstab, Steve

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a special third-grade classroom unit based on the reality show "Survivor." The goal of this engaging and interactive unit was to teach students about physical and behavioral adaptations that help animals survive in various desert biomes. The activity combines research, argument, and puppet play over one week of…

  14. The Effect of Omega-3 Supplement on Serum Lipid Profile in Patients Undergoing Hemodialysis: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jabbari Mosadegh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Some recent suggestions could show omega-3 condition deficiency following prolonged hemodialysis; however, these claims and speculations have not been well demonstrated with sufficient evidences. Hence, we attempted to assess the beneficial effects of omega-3 on lipid profile in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD undergoing hemodialysis.

  15. Surface properties of nanostructured NiO undergoing electrochemical oxidation in 3-methoxy-propionitrile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonomo, Matteo [Department of Chemistry, University of Rome “La Sapienza”, Piazzale Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy); Marrani, Andrea Giacomo, E-mail: andrea.marrani@uniroma1.it [Department of Chemistry, University of Rome “La Sapienza”, Piazzale Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy); Novelli, Vittoria [Department of Chemistry, University of Rome “La Sapienza”, Piazzale Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy); Awais, Muhammad [Department of Industrial Engineering, “King Abdulaziz” University, Rabigh (Saudi Arabia); Solar Energy Conversion Strategic Research Cluster, University College Dublin (UCD), Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Dowling, Denis P. [Solar Energy Conversion Strategic Research Cluster, University College Dublin (UCD), Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University College Dublin (UCD), Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Vos, Johannes G. [School of Chemical Sciences, Dublin City University (DCU), Glasnevin, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Dini, Danilo [Department of Chemistry, University of Rome “La Sapienza”, Piazzale Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy); Solar Energy Conversion Strategic Research Cluster, University College Dublin (UCD), Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland)

    2017-05-01

    Highlights: • NiO porous thin films were prepared via RDS technique. • NiO electrodes were characterized in a nitrile based electrochemical cell. • NiO electrodes were studied by means of XPS. • The XP spectra excluded the formation of phases other than NiO. • The presence of ClO{sub 4}{sup −} as charge balancing species was evidenced. - Abstract: Nanostructured nickel oxide (NiO) was deposited in the configuration of thin film (thickness, l = 2–6 μm) onto fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) substrates via plasma-assisted rapid discharge sintering (RDS). Electrochemical cycling of RDS NiO in 3-methoxy-propionitrile (3-MPN) revealed two characteristic peaks of NiO oxidation which were associated to the surface-confined redox processes Ni(II) → Ni(III) and Ni(III) → Ni(IV). Grazing angle X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was conducted ex-situ on NiO electrodes in both pristine and oxidized states. Oxidized NiO samples for XPS experiments were obtained in the potentiostatic mode through the polarization of NiO at its two characteristic potentials of oxidation. The XPS analysis allowed to ascertain the electronic structure of the nanoporous NiO framework, and verify the adsorption of perchlorate and chloride anions onto NiO surface due to the compensation of the charge stored in oxidized NiO. XPS also revealed that the spectrum within the region characteristic of Ni 2p ionization does not vary considerably with the state of charge of the nickel centres. This finding is in evident contrast to what has been observed for the same system when it undergoes electrochemical oxidation in aqueous electrolyte.

  16. Sonographic Assessment of Parotid and Submandibular Glands in Patients Undergoing 3D Conformal Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johari M

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate sonographic changes in parotid and submandibular salivary glands in patients undergoing radiotherapy for head and neck malignancies. In addition, salivary changes subsequent to radiotherapy were evaluated objectively and subjectively. Twenty patients(13males and 7females with head and neck malignancies, who had been referred to the Radiotherapy/Oncology Department of the Shahid Madani Hospital in Tabriz, Iran, were included in the study. Length, width, echotexture, echogenicity and margins of parotid and submandibular glands were evaluated before and after radiotherapy using sonography. Peak-systolic velocity(PSV,end-diastolic velocity(EDV and resistive index(RI were also assessed by Doppler sonography. Xerostomia subsequent to radiotherapy was evaluated with the use of two techniques: patients’ self-reported scoring and objective measurement of resting saliva. There was a significant decrease in the width of the parotid gland after radiotherapy compared to baseline(P=0.005.Although the length of the parotid gland and the dimensions of submandibular gland decrease, the differences were not significant. In addition, the echogenicity, echotexture and the margin of the glands change to hypoechoic, heterogenic and irregular, respectively, subsequent to radiotherapy. The Doppler technique showed decrease in PSV and RI and an increase in EDV; however, only the decrease in RI in the submandibular gland was statistically significant(P=0.002.The results showed a significant decrease in salivary flow after radiotherapy(P<0.001.In addition, based on the patients reports, the severity of xerostomia increased significantly after radiotherapy(P<0.001. Songraphic changes of parotid and submandibular glands after radiotherapy should be considered in ultrasound examinations. The damages to the parotid and submandibular glands had significant influence in patient post 3D-CRT.

  17. Screening for thyroid cancer in survivors of childhood and young adult cancer treated with neck radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonorezos, Emily S; Barnea, Dana; Moskowitz, Chaya S; Chou, Joanne F; Sklar, Charles A; Elkin, Elena B; Wong, Richard J; Li, Duan; Tuttle, R Michael; Korenstein, Deborah; Wolden, Suzanne L; Oeffinger, Kevin C

    2017-06-01

    The optimal method of screening for thyroid cancer in survivors of childhood and young adult cancer exposed to neck radiation remains controversial. Outcome data for a physical exam-based screening approach are lacking. We conducted a retrospective review of adult survivors of childhood and young adult cancer with a history of neck radiation followed in the Adult Long-Term Follow-Up Clinic at Memorial Sloan Kettering between November 2005 and August 2014. Eligible patients underwent a physical exam of the thyroid and were followed for at least 1 year afterwards. Ineligible patients were those with prior diagnosis of benign or malignant thyroid nodules. During a median follow-up of 3.1 years (range 0-9.4 years), 106 ultrasounds and 2277 physical exams were performed among 585 patients. Forty survivors had an abnormal thyroid physical exam median of 21 years from radiotherapy; 50% of those with an abnormal exam were survivors of Hodgkin lymphoma, 60% had radiation at ages 10-19, and 53% were female. Ultimately, 24 underwent fine needle aspiration (FNA). Surgery revealed papillary carcinoma in seven survivors; six are currently free of disease and one with active disease is undergoing watchful waiting. Among those with one or more annual visits, representing 1732 person-years of follow-up, no cases of thyroid cancer were diagnosed within a year of normal physical exam. These findings support the application of annual physical exam without routine ultrasound for thyroid cancer screening among survivors with a history of neck radiation. Survivors with a history of neck radiation may not require routine thyroid ultrasound for thyroid cancer screening. Among adult survivors of childhood and young adult cancer with a history of radiation therapy to the neck, annual physical exam is an acceptable thyroid cancer screening strategy.

  18. DBA Survivor

    CERN Document Server

    LaRock, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    DBA Survivor is a book to help new DBAs understand more about the world of database administration. More and more people are moving into the DBA profession, and many are looking for a getting-started guide. Blogs are written about how to be an exceptional DBA and what to do in your first 100 days. This book takes a different approach, injecting some humor into helping you understand how to hit the ground running, and most importantly how to survive as a DBA. And it's not just survival that matters. Author Thomas LaRock wants much more for you than mere survival. He wants you to have excellence

  19. Feasibility Study of a Randomized Controlled Trial of a Telephone-Delivered Problem Solving-Occupational Therapy Intervention to Reduce Participation Restrictions in Rural Breast Cancer Survivors Undergoing Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegel, Mark T.; Lyons, Kathleen D.; Hull, Jay G.; Kaufman, Peter; Urquhart, Laura; Li, Zhongze; Ahles, Tim A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy often experience functional effects of treatment that limit participation in life activities. The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility of conducting a randomized controlled trial (RCT) of a novel intervention for these restrictions, determine acceptability of the intervention, and preliminarily assess its effects. Methods A pilot RCT of a telephone-delivered Problem Solving and Occupational Therapy intervention (PST-OT) to improve participation restrictions in rural breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. Thirty-one participants with Stages 1-3 breast cancer were randomized to 6 weekly sessions of PST-OT (n=15) and Usual Care (n=16). The primary study outcome was the feasibility of conducting the trial. Secondary outcomes were functional, quality of life and emotional status as assessed at baseline, 6 weeks and 12 weeks. Results Of 46 patients referred 31 were enrolled (67% recruitment rate), of which 6 participants withdrew (81% retention rate). Twenty-four participants completed all study-related assessments (77%). Ninety-two percent of PST-OT participants were highly satisfied with the intervention, and 92% reported PST-OT to be helpful/very helpful for overcoming participation restrictions. Ninety-seven percent of planned PST-OT treatment sessions were completed. Completion rates for PST-OT homework tasks were high. Measures of functioning, quality of life and emotional state favored the PST-OT condition. Conclusion This pilot study suggests that an RCT of the PST-OT intervention is feasible to conduct with rural breast cancer patients undergoing adjuvant chemotherapy and that PST-OT may have positive effects on function, quality of life, and emotional state. PMID:20821373

  20. Feasibility study of a randomized controlled trial of a telephone-delivered problem-solving-occupational therapy intervention to reduce participation restrictions in rural breast cancer survivors undergoing chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegel, Mark T; Lyons, Kathleen D; Hull, Jay G; Kaufman, Peter; Urquhart, Laura; Li, Zhongze; Ahles, Tim A

    2011-10-01

    Breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy often experience functional effects of treatment that limit participation in life activities. The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility of conducting a randomized controlled trial (RCT) of a novel intervention for these restrictions, determine acceptability of the intervention, and preliminarily assess its effects. A pilot RCT of a telephone-delivered Problem-solving and Occupational Therapy intervention (PST-OT) to improve participation restrictions in rural breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. Thirty-one participants with Stages 1-3 breast cancer were randomized to 6 weekly sessions of PST-OT (n = 15) and usual care (n = 16). The primary study outcome was the feasibility of conducting the trial. Secondary outcomes were functional, quality of life and emotional status as assessed at baseline, 6 and 12 weeks. Of 46 patients referred 31 were enrolled (67% recruitment rate), of which 6 participants withdrew (81% retention rate). Twenty-four participants completed all study-related assessments (77%). Ninety-two percent of PST-OT participants were highly satisfied with the intervention, and 92% reported PST-OT to be helpful/very helpful for overcoming participation restrictions. Ninety-seven percent of planned PST-OT treatment sessions were completed. Completion rates for PST-OT homework tasks were high. Measures of functioning, quality of life, and emotional state favored the PST-OT condition. This pilot study suggests that an RCT of the PST-OT intervention is feasible to conduct with rural breast cancer patients undergoing adjuvant chemotherapy and that PST-OT may have positive effects on function, quality of life, and emotional state. 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Psychosocial Outcomes in Adult Survivors of Retinoblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Jennifer S.; Chou, Joanne F.; Sklar, Charles A.; Oeffinger, Kevin C.; Novetsky Friedman, Danielle; McCabe, Mary; Robison, Leslie L.; Kleinerman, Ruth A.; Li, Yuelin; Marr, Brian P.; Abramson, David H.; Dunkel, Ira J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Survival rates for individuals diagnosed with retinoblastoma (RB) exceed 95% in the United States; however, little is known about the long-term psychosocial outcomes of these survivors. Patients and Methods Adult RB survivors, diagnosed from 1932 to 1994 and treated in New York, completed a comprehensive questionnaire adapted from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS), by mail or telephone. Psychosocial outcomes included psychological distress, anxiety, depression, somatization, fear of cancer recurrence, satisfaction with facial appearance, post-traumatic growth, and post-traumatic stress symptoms; noncancer CCSS siblings served as a comparison group. Results A total of 470 RB survivors (53.6% with bilateral RB; 52.1% female) and 2,820 CCSS siblings were 43.3 (standard deviation [SD], 11) years and 33.2 (SD, 8.4) years old at the time of study, respectively. After adjusting for sociodemographic factors, RB survivors did not have significantly higher rates of depression, somatization, distress, or anxiety compared with CCSS siblings. Although RB survivors were more likely to report post-traumatic stress symptoms of avoidance and/or hyperarousal (both P < .01), only five (1.1%) of 470 met criteria for post-traumatic stress disorder. Among survivors, having a chronic medical condition did not increase the likelihood of psychological problems. Bilateral RB survivors were more likely than unilateral RB survivors to experience fears of cancer recurrence (P < .01) and worry about their children being diagnosed with RB (P < .01). However, bilateral RB survivors were no more likely to report depression, anxiety, or somatic complaints than unilateral survivors. Conclusion Most RB survivors do not have poorer psychosocial functioning compared with a noncancer sample. In addition, bilateral and unilateral RB survivors seem similar with respect to their psychological symptoms. PMID:26417002

  2. Recurrent trauma: Holocaust survivors cope with aging and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hantman, Shira; Solomon, Zahava

    2007-05-01

    The current study aims to determine whether elderly Holocaust survivors are affected differently from non-survivors by the adversity of aging and cancer. Holocaust survivors and non-survivors suffering from cancer, were assessed tapping PTSD, psychiatric symptomatology, psychosocial adjustment to illness and coping with the aftermath of the Holocaust. Findings indicate a significant difference between survivors and non-survivors in post-traumatic symptoms and their intensity, survivors endorsing significantly more PTSD symptoms. Survivors were classified into 3 sub-groups, namely "Victims," "Fighters," and "Those who made it". "Victims" reported the highest percentage of persons who met PTSD, psychiatric symptomatology and difficulty coping with the problems of old age. The diversity of responses points to heterogeneity of long-term adaptation and adjustment among Holocaust survivors and similar response to subsequent adversity.

  3. Sexual function in ICU survivors more than 3 years after major trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulvik, Atle; Kvåle, Reidar; Wentzel-Larsen, Tore; Flaatten, Hans

    2008-03-01

    To study sexual function in trauma patients 3-8 years after discharge from an ICU and to assess determinants of poor sex life. A postal questionnaire survey was conducted in 2006 on a cohort of 325 consecutive adult ICU trauma patients admitted to a university hospital during 1998-2003. Of 210 eligible patients 156 (74%) answered the questionnaires. Mean age was 46 years, and 124 were males. Sexual function was assessed by a self-report measure, and patients were asked to describe sexual life both currently and prior to trauma. The International Index of Erectile Function evaluated erectile function in males. At follow-up 50% reported sexual function to be unchanged, 41% impaired, and 9% to be better than preinjury status; 34% reported that the trauma impaired current sex life. Erectile dysfunction was found in 27% of men younger than 40 years and 51% of men 40 years or older. Age, being single, Injury Severity Score, and depression were associated with poor sexual function. Of 17 patients experiencing breakdown of a regular relationship 71% reported the trauma to be a significant contributor. At follow-up more than 3 years after injury one-third of our ICU trauma patients reported that the trauma impaired sexual function. Erectile dysfunction was significantly more frequent among men younger than 40 years than found in studies of the normal population. Evaluation of sexual function should be part of long-term outcome assessment after major trauma.

  4. Unemployment among adult survivors of childhood cancer: a report from the childhood cancer survivor study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchhoff, Anne C; Leisenring, Wendy; Krull, Kevin R; Ness, Kirsten K; Friedman, Debra L; Armstrong, Gregory T; Stovall, Marilyn; Park, Elyse R; Oeffinger, Kevin C; Hudson, Melissa M; Robison, Leslie L; Wickizer, Thomas

    2010-11-01

    Adult childhood cancer survivors report high levels of unemployment, although it is unknown whether this is because of health or employability limitations. We examined 2 employment outcomes from 2003 in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS): (1) health-related unemployment and (2) unemployed but seeking work. We compared survivors with a nearest-age CCSS sibling cohort and examined demographic and treatment-related risk groups for each outcome. We studied 6339 survivors and 1967 siblings ≥25 years of age excluding those unemployed by choice. Multivariable generalized linear models evaluated whether survivors were more likely to be unemployed than siblings and whether certain survivors were at a higher risk for unemployment. Survivors (10.4%) reported health-related unemployment more often than siblings (1.8%; Relative Risk [RR], 6.07; 95% Confidence Interval [CI], 4.32-8.53). Survivors (5.7%) were more likely to report being unemployed but seeking work than siblings (2.7%; RR, 1.90; 95% CI, 1.43-2.54). Health-related unemployment was more common in female survivors than males (Odds Ratio [OR], 1.73; 95% CI, 1.43-2.08). Cranial radiotherapy doses ≥25 Gy were associated with higher odds of unemployment (health-related: OR, 3.47; 95% CI, 2.54-4.74; seeking work: OR, 1.77; 95% CI, 1.15-2.71). Unemployed survivors reported higher levels of poor physical functioning than employed survivors, and had lower education and income and were more likely to be publicly insured than unemployed siblings. Childhood cancer survivors have higher levels of unemployment because of health or being between jobs. High-risk survivors may need vocational assistance.

  5. Biochemical pathways of breath ammonia (NH3) generation in patients with end-stage renal disease undergoing hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, W; Laiho, S; Vaittinen, O; Halonen, L; Ortiz, F; Forsblom, C; Groop, P-H; Lehto, M; Metsälä, M

    2016-08-12

    Breath ammonia (NH3) has been proposed as a potential biomarker in monitoring hemodialysis (HD) adequacy, since a strong correlation between blood urea and mouth-exhaled breath NH3 has been observed in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) undergoing HD. However, the biochemical pathways for breath NH3 generation from blood urea have not been demonstrated. In this study, we show a strong correlation (r s  =  0.77, p  NH3) in most of the patients. This confirms that the hydrolysis of urea by urease generates ammonia in the oral cavity. A further strong correlation between salivary ammonia and breath NH3 indicates that salivary ammonia evaporates into gas phase and turns to breath NH3. Therefore, blood urea is a major biochemical source of breath NH3. Since breath NH3 is generated predominantly in the oral cavity, the levels of breath NH3 are influenced significantly by the patient's oral condition including urease activity and salivary pH. Our results agree with previous studies that have shown a connection between salivary urea and breath NH3.

  6. Stroke survivors' experiences of rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peoples, Hanne; Satink, Ton; Steultjens, Esther

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim was to obtain the best available knowledge on stroke survivors' experiences of rehabilitation. The increase in demands for accountability in health care and acknowledgement of the importance of client participation in health decisions calls for systematic ways of integrating...... survivors' experiences of rehabilitation in a clinical setting. Data analysis entailed extracting, editing, grouping, and abstracting findings. RESULTS: Twelve studies were included. One theme, "Power and Empowerment" and six subcategories were identified: 1) Coping with a new situation, 2) Informational...... needs, 3) Physical and non-physical needs, 4) Being personally valued and treated with respect, 5) Collaboration with health care professionals and 6) Assuming responsibility and seizing control. DISCUSSION: The synthesis showed that stroke survivors' experiences of rehabilitation reflected individual...

  7. Translation and cultural adaptation of Health Utilities Index (HUI) Mark 2 (HUI2) and Mark 3 (HUI3) with application to survivors of childhood cancer in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoda, Sandra; de Camargo, Beatriz; Horsman, John; Furlong, William; Lopes, Luiz Fernando; Seber, Adriana; Barr, Ronald D

    2005-06-01

    There are few publications reporting health-related quality of life (HRQL) in developing nations. Most instruments measuring HRQL have been developed in English-speaking countries. These instruments need to be culturally adapted for use in non-English-speaking countries. The HUI2 and HUI3 are generic, preference-based systems for describing health status and HRQL. Developed in Canada, the systems have been translated into more than a dozen languages and used worldwide in hundreds of studies of clinical and general populations. The Brazilian-Portuguese translation of the HUI systems was supervised by senior HUInc staff having experience with both the HUI systems and translations. The process included two independent forward translations of the multi-attribute health status classification systems and related questionnaires, consensus between translators on a forward translation, back-translation by two independent translators of the forward translation, and review of the back-translations by original developers of the HUI. The final questionnaires were tested by surveying a sample of convenience of 50 patients recruited at the Centro de Tratamento e Pesquisa-Hospital do Cancer in São Paulo, Brazil. Fifty patients were enrolled in the study. No assessor, patient or nurse or physician, reported problems answering the HUI questionnaires. No significant differences were found in mean overall HUI2 or HUI3 utility scores among types of assessors. Variability in scores are similar to those from other studies in Latin America and Canada. Test results provide preliminary evidence that the Brazilian-Portuguese translation is acceptable, understandable, reliable and valid for assessing health-status and HRQL among survivors of cancer in childhood in Brazil.

  8. 3-D Model of Broadband Emission from Supernova Remnants Undergoing Non-linear Diffusive Shock Acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Shiu-Hang; Kamae, Tuneyoshi; Ellison, Donald C.

    2008-07-02

    We present a 3-dimensional model of supernova remnants (SNRs) where the hydrodynamical evolution of the remnant is modeled consistently with nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration occurring at the outer blast wave. The model includes particle escape and diffusion outside of the forward shock, and particle interactions with arbitrary distributions of external ambient material, such as molecular clouds. We include synchrotron emission and cooling, bremsstrahlung radiation, neutral pion production, inverse-Compton (IC), and Coulomb energy-loss. Boardband spectra have been calculated for typical parameters including dense regions of gas external to a 1000 year old SNR. In this paper, we describe the details of our model but do not attempt a detailed fit to any specific remnant. We also do not include magnetic field amplification (MFA), even though this effect may be important in some young remnants. In this first presentation of the model we don't attempt a detailed fit to any specific remnant. Our aim is to develop a flexible platform, which can be generalized to include effects such as MFA, and which can be easily adapted to various SNR environments, including Type Ia SNRs, which explode in a constant density medium, and Type II SNRs, which explode in a pre-supernova wind. When applied to a specific SNR, our model will predict cosmic-ray spectra and multi-wavelength morphology in projected images for instruments with varying spatial and spectral resolutions. We show examples of these spectra and images and emphasize the importance of measurements in the hard X-ray, GeV, and TeV gamma-ray bands for investigating key ingredients in the acceleration mechanism, and for deducing whether or not TeV emission is produced by IC from electrons or pion-decay from protons.

  9. [Efficacy of topical 0.3% ciprofloxacin application in reducing the conjunctival biota of patients undergoing cataract extraction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carron, A; Samudio, M; Laspina, F; Fariña, N; Sanabria, R R; Cibils, D; Ramirez, L; Carron, J; Mino de Kaspar, H

    2013-09-01

    To determine the efficacy of topical 0.3% ciprofloxacin in reducing conjunctival biota in patients undergoing cataract surgery. Experimental, prospective, randomized, controlled and single-blind study. Forty-six eyes of 46 patients were randomized into 2 groups, the study group (n=23) received topical 0.3% ciprofloxacin one day before surgery for six times, and on the day of the surgery one drop every 15minutes starting one hour before surgery until 3 doses were completed. The control group (n=23) did not receive any antibiotics. For both groups for the surgical field 10% povidone-iodine was applied. Samples from the conjunctiva were taken at four different times and then cultured on solid media (chocolate agar, blood agar) and enrichment broth (thioglycolate). The aqueous humor samples were also cultured in thioglycolate. The presence of bacteria was identified quantitatively and qualitatively, and the frequency of contamination was measured by considering the presence of bacteria in liquid and solid culture media. The number of colony forming units (CFU) was counted in the solid culture medium. Positive cultures were obtained in 82.6% and 78.2% of the patients in the study and control groups, respectively, before the administration of 0.3% ciprofloxacin. The administration of 0.3% ciprofloxacin significantly reduced the CFU compared to the control group (P<.05). Immediately after the use of povidone-iodine, the proportion of patients with a positive culture decreased to 21.7% in the study group, and 8.7% in the control group. At the end of the surgery, this percentage was 26% and 30.4%, respectively. The most common isolated pathogen was negative-coagulase Staphylococcus (66.7%). The administration of 0.3% ciprofloxacin reduces conjunctival bacterial load in the preoperative period. However, it was unable to eradicate the bacteria completely. The administration of povidone-iodine reduced conjunctival biota in 50%-70% of patients undergoing cataract surgery

  10. Pregnancy and Labor Complications in Female Survivors of Childhood Cancer: The British Childhood Cancer Survivor Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reulen, Raoul C; Bright, Chloe J; Winter, David L; Fidler, Miranda M; Wong, Kwok; Guha, Joyeeta; Kelly, Julie S; Frobisher, Clare; Edgar, Angela B; Skinner, Roderick; Wallace, W Hamish B; Hawkins, Mike M

    2017-11-01

    Female survivors of childhood cancer treated with abdominal radiotherapy who manage to conceive are at risk of delivering premature and low-birthweight offspring, but little is known about whether abdominal radiotherapy may also be associated with additional complications during pregnancy and labor. We investigated the risk of developing pregnancy and labor complications among female survivors of childhood cancer in the British Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (BCCSS). Pregnancy and labor complications were identified by linking the BCCSS cohort (n = 17 980) to the Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) for England. Relative risks (RRs) of pregnancy and labor complications were calculated by site of radiotherapy treatment (none/abdominal/cranial/other) and other cancer-related factors using log-binomial regression. All statistical tests were two-sided. A total of 2783 singleton pregnancies among 1712 female survivors of childhood cancer were identified in HES. Wilms tumor survivors treated with abdominal radiotherapy were at threefold risk of hypertension complicating pregnancy (relative risk = 3.29, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.29 to 4.71), while all survivors treated with abdominal radiotherapy were at risk of gestational diabetes mellitus (RR = 3.35, 95% CI = 1.41 to 7.93) and anemia complicating pregnancy (RR = 2.10, 95% CI = 1.27 to 3.46) compared with survivors treated without radiotherapy. Survivors treated without radiotherapy had similar risks of pregnancy and labor complications as the general population, except survivors were more likely to opt for an elective cesarean section (RR = 1.39, 95% CI = 1.16 to 1.70). Treatment with abdominal radiotherapy increases the risk of developing hypertension complicating pregnancy in Wilms tumor survivors, and diabetes mellitus and anemia complicating pregnancy in all survivors. These patients may require extra vigilance during pregnancy.

  11. The Effect of Omega-3 Supplement on Serum Lipid Profile in Patients Undergoing Hemodialysis: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbari, Mosadegh; Khoshnevis, Termeh; Jenabi, Aria; Yousefi, Fatemeh

    2016-12-01

    Some recent suggestions could show omega-3 condition deficiency following prolonged hemodialysis; however, these claims and speculations have not been well demonstrated with sufficient evidences. Hence, we attempted to assess the beneficial effects of omega-3 on lipid profile in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) undergoing hemodialysis. One hundred and seventeen ESRD patients who were on maintenance dialysis in Rasoul-e-Akram and Madaen Hospitals were enrolled in this randomized clinical trial. These patients were divided into two groups randomly using block randomization method (57 patients as the case group receiving omega-3 for 12 weeks and 60 as the control group). Blood sample was taken from all patients for measurement of lipid profile, serum hemoglobin, and C-reactive protein at baseline as well as after the completion of interventions (after 12 weeks). The average change in the value of HDL-C was significantly more in the patients who received omega-3 than in the control group (MD, -7 mg/dL; 95% CI, -11 to 0 p = 0.000). Also, the reduction in serum creatinine level was more in the omega-3 group than in the control group (MD, 0.7 mg/dL; 95% CI, -0.4 to 2.1 p = 0.023). The change in other indices including serum triglyceride, total cholesterol, and serum hemoglobin levels was not different between the two groups. The multivariable linear regression analysis showed no difference in serum HDL level between the two groups adjusted for sex, age, and time of dialysis, while the level of serum HDL-C could be adversely predicted by duration time. Similar regression model showed a between-group difference in serum creatinine in the presence of potential confounders. The change in serum HDL level following use of omega-3 supplement is influenced by time of dialysis, not by drug effect. However, consumption of omega-3 can significantly reduce serum creatinine.

  12. Melanoma cells undergo aggressive coalescence in a 3D Matrigel model that is repressed by anti-CD44

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Edward; Kuhl, Spencer; Buchele, Emma C.; Klemme, Michael R.; Russell, Kanoe B.; Ambrose, Joseph; Soll, Benjamin A.; Bossler, Aaron; Milhem, Mohammed; Goldman, Charles

    2017-01-01

    Using unique computer-assisted 3D reconstruction software, it was previously demonstrated that tumorigenic cell lines derived from breast tumors, when seeded in a 3D Matrigel model, grew as clonal aggregates which, after approximately 100 hours, underwent coalescence mediated by specialized cells, eventually forming a highly structured large spheroid. Non-tumorigenic cells did not undergo coalescence. Because histological sections of melanomas forming in patients suggest that melanoma cells migrate and coalesce to form tumors, we tested whether they also underwent coalescence in a 3D Matrigel model. Melanoma cells exiting fragments of three independent melanomas or from secondary cultures derived from them, and cells from the melanoma line HTB-66, all underwent coalescence mediated by specialized cells in the 3D model. Normal melanocytes did not. However, coalescence of melanoma cells differed from that of breast-derived tumorigenic cell lines in that they 1) coalesced immediately, 2) underwent coalescence as individual cells as well as aggregates, 3) underwent coalescence far faster and 4) ultimately formed long, flat, fenestrated aggregates that were extremely dynamic. A screen of 51 purified monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) targeting cell surface-associated molecules revealed that two mAbs, anti-beta 1 integrin/(CD29) and anti-CD44, blocked melanoma cell coalescence. They also blocked coalescence of tumorigenic cells derived from a breast tumor. These results add weight to the commonality of coalescence as a characteristic of tumorigenic cells, as well as the usefulness of the 3D Matrigel model and software for both investigating the mechanisms regulating tumorigenesis and screening for potential anti-tumorigenesis mAbs. PMID:28264026

  13. Predictors for permanent pacemaker implantation in patients undergoing transfemoral aortic valve implantation with the Edwards Sapien 3 valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonska, Birgid; Seeger, Julia; Keßler, Mirjam; von Keil, Alexander; Rottbauer, Wolfgang; Wöhrle, Jochen

    2017-08-01

    Predictors for the need of permanent pacemaker implantation (PPMI) in the context of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) are not well defined yet. We evaluated the impact of conduction disturbances, calcium volume of the device landing zone, oversizing and implantation depth on PPMI after TAVI with the balloon-expandable Edwards Sapien 3 (ES3). 335 consecutive patients undergoing transfemoral TAVI with the ES3 for the treatment of symptomatic severe aortic stenosis were included (clinicaltrials NCT02162069). Rate of PPMI after TAVI was 18.4%, excluding patients with permanent pacemakers prior to TAVI or valve-in-valve implantations. Patients requiring PPMI more often had first degree atrioventricular block (AVB) at baseline (48.7 vs. 16.5%, p < 0.01), preprocedural complete right bundle branch block (RBBB; 25.0 vs. 3.9%, p < 0.01) and higher calcium volume of the aortic valve (258.5 ± 317.3 vs. 163.6 ± 178.8 mm³, p < 0.01). There was a trend towards higher rate of PPMI in patients with new-onset left bundle branch block after TAVI (32.7 vs. 20.7%, p = 0.06). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that baseline first degree AVB (odds ratio 3.9, 95% confidence interval 1.73-9.10, p < 0.01) and preprocedural complete RBBB (odds ratio 4.5, 95% confidence interval 1.50-13.21, p < 0.01) were independent predictors of PPMI. Of note, neither oversizing nor implantation depth were independent predictors for need of PPMI with the ES3. In patients treated with the ES3 for symptomatic severe aortic stenosis first degree AVB and complete RBBB at baseline were independently associated with higher rates of postprocedural PPMI, whereas implantation depth and oversizing did not have an impact on PPMI.

  14. Motherhood among Incest Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Tamar

    1995-01-01

    Mothers (n=26) who were incest survivors were compared with 28 mothers with no such history for 7 areas of parenting skills: role-image, objectivity, expectations, rapport, communication, limit-setting, and role-support. Significant differences were found on all seven scales, characterized by a tendency for the incest survivors to be less skillful…

  15. Hopelessness Experience among Stroke Survivor in Semarang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawab Sawab

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hopelessness was a negative feelings about goal achievement and powerlessness feeling against an expectation. Hopelessness in stroke survivors can occur due to prolonged disability and neurologic defi cit. This condition can lead to emotional and mental disorders even a suicide action. Therefore, it was a need to explore hopelessness experience in stroke survivors. Method: This study was a qualitative descriptive phenomenology with 6 participants. Results: 7 themes were revealed in this study, (1 Physical changes as a response on hopelessness, (2 Loss response as a hopelessness stressor, (3 Dysfunction of the family process, (4 Loss of meaning of life, (5 Self support and motivation as a coping resource against hopelessness, (6 The spiritual meaning behind hopelessness, (7 Can go through a better life. Discussion: This study suggests to develop a nursing care standards in hopelessness, encourage a family support and family psychoeducation for stroke survivors. Keywords: Stroke survivor, hopelessness experiences, qualitative

  16. Polymorphisms in the genes ERCC2, XRCC3 and CD3EAP influence treatment outcome in multiple myeloma patients undergoing autologous bone marrow transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vangsted, Annette; Gimsing, Peter; Klausen, Tobias W

    2007-01-01

    Individual variations in the ability to cope with DNA damage by DNA repair may be essential for the response to chemotherapy, since cancer cells from patients with an effective DNA repair may survive treatment. We have studied the effect on time to treatment failure (TTF) and overall survival (OS......) of polymorphism in the DNA repair genes ERCC1, ERCC2 and XRCC3, and in the apoptotic genes PPP1R13L and CD3EAP in 348 patients with multiple myeloma undergoing autologous bone marrow transplantation. Carriers of the variant C-allele of ERCC2 K751Q, the variant T-allele of XRCC3 T241M and the variant A...... TTF was only seen in women (p = 0.001). Carriers of the combination of variant alleles of ERCC2 K751Q and XRCC3 T241M had 2.8-fold longer TTF (p = 0.0002). This indicates that suboptimal repair of both DNA mechanisms favors prolonged TTF and that polymorphism in ERCC2, XRCC3 and CD3EAP predicts...

  17. SECONDARY GASTROINTESTINAL MALIGNANCIES IN CHILDHOOD CANCER SURVIVORS: A COHORT STUDY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Tara O.; Oeffinger, Kevin C.; Whitton, John; Leisenring, Wendy; Neglia, Joseph; Meadows, Anna; Crotty, Catherine; Rubin, David T.; Diller, Lisa; Inskip, Peter; Smith, Susan A.; Stovall, Marilyn; Constine, Louis S.; Hammond, Sue; Armstrong, Greg T.; Robison, Leslie L.; Nathan, Paul C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Childhood cancer survivors develop gastrointestinal malignancies more frequently and at a younger age than the general population, but risk factors for their development have not been well characterized. Objective To determine the risk and associated risk factors for gastrointestinal subsequent malignant neoplasms (SMN) in childhood cancer survivors. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting The Childhood Cancer Survivor Study, a multi-center study of childhood cancer survivors diagnosed between 1970 and 1986. Patients 14,358 survivors of a malignancy diagnosed at cancer survivors than the general population (95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.5-6.1). Colorectal cancer SIR was 4.2 (95% CI: 2.8-6.3). The highest gastrointestinal SMN risk was associated with abdominal radiation (SIR=11.2, 95% CI: 7.6-16.4). However, survivors not exposed to radiation had a significantly increased risk (SIR=2.4, 95% CI-1.4-3.9). In addition to abdominal radiation, high dose procarbazine (RR=3.2, 95% CI 1.1-9.4) and platinum drugs (RR 7.6, 95% CI: 2.3-25.5) independently increased the gastrointestinal SMN risk. Limitations This cohort has not yet attained an age at which gastrointestinal malignancy risk is greatest. Conclusions Childhood cancer survivors, particularly those exposed to abdominal radiation, are at increased risk for gastrointestinal SMN. These findings suggest that surveillance of at-risk childhood cancer survivors should commence at a younger age than recommended for the general population. PMID:22665813

  18. A multi-centre phase 3 study comparing efficacy and safety of Bemfola® versus Gonal-f® in women undergoing ovarian stimulation for IVF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rettenbacher, M; Andersen, A N; Garcia-Velasco, J A

    2015-01-01

    Bemfola (follitropin alfa) (Finox AG, Switzerland), a new recombinant FSH, has a comparable pharmacological profile to that of Gonal-f (Merck Serono, Germany), the current standard for ovarian stimulation. A randomized, multi-centre, Phase 3 study in women undergoing IVF or intracytoplasmic sperm...

  19. Comparison of dosimetric parameters and toxicity in esophageal cancer patients undergoing 3D conformal radiotherapy or VMAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muench, Stefan; Aichmeier, Sylvia; Duma, Marciana-Nona; Oechsner, Markus; Habermehl, Daniel [TU Muenchen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany); Hapfelmeier, Alexander [TU Muenchen, Institute of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology (IMSE), Klinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany); Feith, Marcus [TU Muenchen, Department of Visceral Surgery, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany); Combs, Stephanie E. [TU Muenchen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany); Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, Institute of Innovative Radiotherapy (iRT), Oberschleissheim (Germany)

    2016-10-15

    Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) achieves high conformity to the planned target volume (PTV) and good sparing of organs at risk (OAR). This study compares dosimetric parameters and toxicity in esophageal cancer (EC) patients treated with VMAT and 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Between 2007 and 2014, 17 SC patients received neoadjuvant chemoradiation (CRT) with VMAT. Dose-volume histograms and toxicity were compared between these patients and 20 treated with 3D-CRT. All patients were irradiated with a total dose of 45 Gy. All VMAT patients received simultaneous chemotherapy with cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in treatment weeks 1 and 5. Of 20 patients treated with 3D-CRT, 13 (65 %) also received CRT with cisplatin and 5-FU, whereas 6 patients (30 %) received CRT with weekly oxaliplatin and cetuximab, and a continuous infusion of 5-FU (OE-7). There were no differences in baseline characteristics between the treatment groups. For the lungs, VMAT was associated with a higher V{sub 5} (median 90.1 % vs. 79.7 %; p = 0.013) and V{sub 10} (68.2 % vs. 56.6 %; p = 0.014), but with a lower V{sub 30} (median 6.6 % vs. 11.0 %; p = 0.030). Regarding heart parameters, VMAT was associated with a higher V{sub 5} (median 100.0 % vs. 91.0 %; p = 0.043), V{sub 10} (92.0 % vs. 79.2 %; p = 0.047), and D{sub max} (47.5 Gy vs. 46.3 Gy; p = 0.003), but with a lower median dose (18.7 Gy vs. 30.0 Gy; p = 0.026) and V{sub 30} (17.7 % vs. 50.4 %; p = 0.015). Complete resection was achieved in 16 VMAT and 19 3D-CRT patients. Due to systemic progression, 2 patients did not undergo surgery. The most frequent postoperative complication was anastomosis insufficiency, occurring in 1 VMAT (6.7 %) and 5 3D-CRT patients (27.8 %; p = 0.180). Postoperative pneumonia was seen in 2 patients of each group (p = 1.000). There was no significant difference in 3-year overall (65 % VMAT vs. 45 % 3D-CRT; p = 0.493) or 3-year progression-free survival (53 % VMAT vs. 35 % 3D-CRT; p = 0

  20. Impact of cardiovascular counseling and screening in Hodgkin lymphoma survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniëls, Laurien A; Krol, Stijn D G; de Graaf, Michiel A; Scholte, Arthur J H A; van 't Veer, Mars B; Putter, Hein; de Roos, Albert; Schalij, Martin J; van de Poll-Franse, Lonneke V; Creutzberg, Carien L

    2014-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the most common nonmalignant cause of death in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors, especially after mediastinal irradiation. The role of screening for CVD in HL survivors is unclear, but confrontation with risks of CVD may have a negative influence on health-related quality of life (HRQL). As part of a phase 2 screening study using computed tomography angiography (CTA) among HL survivors, an HRQL analysis was done to evaluate the emotional and practical burden and perceived benefits of screening and the effect of CVD-specific counseling on patient satisfaction. Patients who participated in the screening study also took part in the HRQL study. The impact of undergoing screening was evaluated with a 9-item questionnaire, and impact on HRQL with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Core Questionnaire C30, version 3.0. The effect of counseling of CVD on perceived provision of information was evaluated with EORTC INFO-25. All questionnaires were completed at baseline and after screening. Baseline questionnaires were received from 48 participants, and 43 completed questionnaires after screening. Mean age was 47 years, and mean time since diagnosis was 21 years. Of the total, 93% of subjects were content with participating, and 80% did not find the emphasis placed on late effects burdensome, although screening did have a small impact on social functioning and global quality of life. Perceived information on disease, medical tests, and treatment increased significantly after screening (Pinformation between patients with and without screen-detected CVD. Screening was evaluated favorably, whether CTA showed abnormalities or not. Extensive counseling resulted in substantially increased provision of information and improved information satisfaction. Screening by means of CTA and subsequent cardiac intervention was highly valued, and the benefits were felt to outweigh the emotional and practical

  1. Impact of Cardiovascular Counseling and Screening in Hodgkin Lymphoma Survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniëls, Laurien A., E-mail: l.a.daniels@lumc.nl [Department of Clinical Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Krol, Stijn D.G. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Graaf, Michiel A. de [Department of Cardiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Interuniversity Cardiology Institute of the Netherlands, Utrecht (Netherlands); Scholte, Arthur J.H.A. [Department of Cardiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Veer, Mars B. van ' t [Department of Hematology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Putter, Hein [Department of Medical Statistics and Bio-informatics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Roos, Albert de [Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Schalij, Martin J. [Department of Cardiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Poll-Franse, Lonneke V. van de [Research Department Comprehensive Cancer Center South, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Center of Research on Psychology in Somatic Diseases, Tilburg University, Tilburg (Netherlands); Creutzberg, Carien L. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the most common nonmalignant cause of death in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors, especially after mediastinal irradiation. The role of screening for CVD in HL survivors is unclear, but confrontation with risks of CVD may have a negative influence on health-related quality of life (HRQL). As part of a phase 2 screening study using computed tomography angiography (CTA) among HL survivors, an HRQL analysis was done to evaluate the emotional and practical burden and perceived benefits of screening and the effect of CVD-specific counseling on patient satisfaction. Methods and Materials: Patients who participated in the screening study also took part in the HRQL study. The impact of undergoing screening was evaluated with a 9-item questionnaire, and impact on HRQL with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Core Questionnaire C30, version 3.0. The effect of counseling of CVD on perceived provision of information was evaluated with EORTC INFO-25. All questionnaires were completed at baseline and after screening. Results: Baseline questionnaires were received from 48 participants, and 43 completed questionnaires after screening. Mean age was 47 years, and mean time since diagnosis was 21 years. Of the total, 93% of subjects were content with participating, and 80% did not find the emphasis placed on late effects burdensome, although screening did have a small impact on social functioning and global quality of life. Perceived information on disease, medical tests, and treatment increased significantly after screening (P<.01). Differences were clinically relevant. There were no differences in perceived information between patients with and without screen-detected CVD. Conclusions: Screening was evaluated favorably, whether CTA showed abnormalities or not. Extensive counseling resulted in substantially increased provision of information and improved information satisfaction. Screening by

  2. Pain in cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Matthew Rd; Ramirez, Juan D; Farquhar-Smith, Paul

    2014-11-01

    Cancer and its treatment exert a heavy psychological and physical toll. Of the myriad symptoms which result, pain is common, encountered in between 30% and 60% of cancer survivors. Pain in cancer survivors is a major and growing problem, impeding the recovery and rehabilitation of patients who have beaten cancer and negatively impacting on cancer patients' quality of life, work prospects and mental health. Persistent pain in cancer survivors remains challenging to treat successfully. Pain can arise both due to the underlying disease and the various treatments the patient has been subjected to. Chemotherapy causes painful chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN), radiotherapy can produce late effect radiation toxicity and surgery may lead to the development of persistent post-surgical pain syndromes. This review explores a selection of the common causes of persistent pain in cancer survivors, detailing our current understanding of the pathophysiology and outlining both the clinical manifestations of individual pain states and the treatment options available.

  3. School attendance in childhood cancer survivors and their siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Amy E; Tsangaris, Elena; Barrera, Maru; Guger, Sharon; Brown, Robert; Urbach, Stacey; Stephens, Derek; Nathan, Paul C

    2013-01-01

    To investigate school absenteeism among childhood cancer survivors and their siblings and examine factors related to absenteeism in survivors. A cross-sectional study was conducted among consecutive cancer survivors attending a large pediatric cancer survivor clinic. Absenteeism rates were obtained for survivors and their closest in age sibling from school report cards. Absenteeism was compared with a population control group of 167752 students using 1-sample t tests. The Child Vulnerability Scale, Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory, and Behavior Assessment System for Children were administered to survivors. Univariate and multiple regression analyses assessed variables associated with days absent. One hundred thirty-one survivors (median age at assessment: 13.4 years, range 8.0-19.2; median age at diagnosis: 9.4 years, range 4.3-17.3) and 77 siblings (median age at assessment: 13 years, age range 7-18) participated. Survivors and siblings missed significantly more school days than the population control group (mean ± SD: 9.6 ± 9.2 and 9.9 ± 9.8 vs 5.0 ± 5.6 days, respectively, P sibling pairs (N = 77), there was no difference in absenteeism (9.6 ± 9.2 vs 9.9 ± 9.8 days, P = .85). Absenteeism in survivors was significantly associated with a low Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory Physical Health Summary Score (P = .01). Parents' perception of their child's vulnerability and emotional and social functioning were not associated with absenteeism. Childhood cancer survivors and siblings miss more school than the general population. The only predictor of absenteeism in survivors is poor physical quality of health. More research should be devoted to school attendance and other outcomes in siblings of childhood cancer survivors. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Specialized survivor clinic attendance increases adherence to cardiomyopathy screening guidelines in adult survivors of childhood cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marr, Kristin C; Agha, Mohammad; Sutradhar, Rinku; Pole, Jason D; Hodgson, David; Guttmann, Astrid; Greenberg, Mark; Nathan, Paul C

    2017-10-01

    To determine if attendance at a specialized clinic for adult survivors of childhood cancer is associated with better rates of adherence to the Children's Oncology Group (COG) Long-term Follow-up (LTFU) guidelines for cardiomyopathy screening. We conducted a retrospective population-based study using administrative data in Ontario, Canada of 5-year survivors diagnosed between 1986 and 2005 at risk of therapy-related late cardiomyopathy. Patients were classified into three groups based on the recommended frequency of screening: annual, every 2 years, and every 5 years. Of 1811 eligible survivors followed for median 7.8 years (range 0-14.0), patients were adherent to screening for only 8.6% of their period of follow-up. Survivor clinic utilization had the strongest association with increased rates of adherence: when compared to no attendance, ≥ 5 clinic visits/10-year period had RR of adherence of 10.6 (95% CI 5.7-19.5) in the annual group, 3.3 (95% CI 2.3-4.8) in the every 2-year group, and 2.3 (95% CI 1.6-3.2) in the every 5-year group. Additional factors associated with increased adherence after adjusting for clinic attendance included annual assessment by a general practioner, female sex, diagnosis prior to 2003, and living in a rural area. In a model of specialized survivor care, increased clinic utilization is associated with improved patient adherence to COG LTFU cardiomyopathy screening guidelines. Specialized survivor clinics may improve health outcomes in survivors through improved adherence to screening. However, rates of adherence remain suboptimal and further multifacetted strategies need to be explored to improve overall rates of screening in adult survivors of childhood cancer.

  5. Hospitalization Rates Among Survivors of Young Adult Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Devon P; Daly, Corinne; Sutradhar, Rinku; Paszat, Lawrence F; Wilton, Andrew S; Rabeneck, Linda; Baxter, Nancy N

    2015-08-20

    There are limited data on health care use among survivors of young adult cancers. We aimed to describe patterns of hospitalization among a cohort of long-term survivors compared with noncancer controls. Persons diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 44 years with malignancies in Ontario, Canada, from 1992 to 1999, who lived at least 5 years recurrence free, were identified using the Ontario Cancer Registry and matched to noncancer controls. Hospitalizations were determined using hospital discharges, and rates were compared between survivors and controls. The absolute excess rate of hospitalizations was determined for each type of malignancy in survivors per 100 person-years of follow-up. The cohort included 20,275 survivors and 101,344 noncancer controls. During the study period, 6,948 (34.3%) survivors were admitted to the hospital and the adjusted relative rate (ARR) of hospitalizations in survivors compared with controls was 1.51 (95% CI, 1.48 to 1.54). The rate of hospitalization was highest for survivors of upper GI, leukemia, and urologic malignancies. The hospitalization rate (per person) for survivors significantly decreased from 0.22 in the first time period examined (5 to 8 years after diagnosis) to 0.15 in the last time period examined (18 to 20 years after diagnosis, P < .0001). However, at all time periods, survivors were more likely to be hospitalized than controls (ARR at 5 to 8 years, 1.67 [95% CI, 1.57 to 1.81]; ARR at 18 to 20 years, 1.22 [95% CI, 1.08 to 1.37]). Survivors of young adult cancers have an increased rate of hospitalization compared with controls. The rate of hospitalization for 20-year survivors did not return to baseline, indicating a substantial and persistent burden of late effects among this generally young population. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  6. Projective drawings: helping adult survivors of childhood abuse recognize boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaister, J A

    1994-10-01

    1. Boundary issues for adult childhood trauma survivors are complex, problematic, difficult to resolve, and occur on a level of unawareness. 2. Boundary concepts can be found in all types of projective drawings. 3. Projective drawings can facilitate awareness and understanding of boundary problems experienced by adult childhood trauma survivors.

  7. Exercise Preference Patterns, Resources, and Environment among Rural Breast Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Laura Q.; Markwell, Stephen J.; Courneya, Kerry S.; McAuley, Edward; Verhulst, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Context: Rural breast cancer survivors may be at increased risk for inadequate exercise participation. Purpose: To determine for rural breast cancer survivors: (1) exercise preference "patterns," (2) exercise resources and associated factors, and (3) exercise environment. Methods: A mail survey was sent to rural breast cancer survivors identified…

  8. Combined Immunoscore of CD103 and CD3 Identifies Long-Term Survivors in High-Grade Serous Ovarian Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bösmüller, Hans-Christian; Wagner, Philipp; Peper, Janet Kerstin; Schuster, Heiko; Pham, Deborah Lam; Greif, Karen; Beschorner, Christine; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Stevanović, Stefan; Fend, Falko; Staebler, Annette

    2016-05-01

    Increased numbers of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSC) are associated with improved clinical outcome. Intraepithelial localization of TILs might be regulated by specific homing receptors, such as CD103, which is widely expressed by intraepithelial lymphocytes. Given the emerging role of CD103 TILs, we aimed to assess their contribution to the prognostic value of immunoscoring in HGSC. The density of intratumoral CD3 and CD103 lymphocytes was examined by immunohistochemistry on a tissue microarray of a series of 135 patients with advanced HGSC and correlated with CD4, CD8, CD56, FoxP3, and TCRγ T-cell counts, as well as E-cadherin staining and conventional prognostic parameters and clinical outcome. Both the presence of CD103 cells, as well as high numbers of intraepithelial CD3 lymphocytes (CD3E), showed a significant correlation with overall survival, in the complete series, as well as in patients with optimal debulking and/or platinum sensitivity. Combining CD3 and CD103 counts improved prognostication and identified 3 major subgroups with respect to overall survival. The most pronounced effect was demonstrated for patients with optimally resected and platinum-sensitive tumors. Patients with CD3/CD103 tumors showed a 5-year survival rate at 90%, CD3/CD103 at 63%, and CD3/CD103 at 0% (P CD3 counts improves the prognostic value of TIL counts in HGSC and might identify patients with early relapse or long-term survival based on the type and extent of the immune response.

  9. Endometrial Cancer Survivors' Perceptions of Provider Obesity Counseling and Attempted Behavior Change: Are We Seizing the Moment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Leslie H; Ko, Emily M; Kernodle, Amber; Harris, Ariel; Moore, Dominic T; Gehrig, Paola A; Bae-Jump, Victoria

    2016-02-01

    To determine patients' perceptions of provider-based counseling and behavior changes made by endometrial cancer survivors. Endometrial cancer survivors (diagnosed from 2011 to 2012) from a single institution were surveyed. Exclusion criteria included persistent or recurrent disease or those actively undergoing treatment. Information collected included demographics, weight assessments, health behaviors, and physician counseling. Statistical analysis was performed using descriptive statistics, Fisher exact test, McNemar test, and the κ statistic as a measure of agreement. Of 233 surveys sent, 46% were returned. Median body mass index was 29.8 kg/m (range, 17.1-64.8 kg/m). Comparing primary care providers with gynecologic oncologists (GOs), 47% (n = 46) versus 25% (n = 23) provided dietary counseling and 62% (n = 60) versus 37% (n = 34) provided physical activity counseling (Fisher exact test, P = 0.001 and P endometrial cancer and obesity. Fifty-two percent of responders attempted weight loss after their diagnosis. Fifty-nine percent of responders reported making changes in their diet. Fifty-six percent of patients made dietary changes within 3 months of diagnosis. Forty-eight percent of responders increased physical activity, with 62% implementing changes within 3 to 6 months of their diagnosis. The responders most likely to attempt weight loss were those who received counseling by a provider. All patients reporting attempted weight loss after their cancer diagnosis report being counseled by either a primary care provider or a GO to lose weight. Weight loss counseling was significantly associated with attempting weight loss (P endometrial cancer survivors report counseling by their GO to lose weight. One half of endometrial cancer survivors reported attempted weight loss. All patients reporting weight loss counseling from their oncologist reported attempted weight loss. Most behavioral change occurred 3 to 6 months after a cancer diagnosis. Obesity in endometrial

  10. Health examination for A-bomb survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Chikako [Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Casualty Council Health Management Center (Japan)

    1996-03-01

    The health examination for A-bomb survivors by national, prefectural and city administrations was described and discussed on its general concept, history, time change of examinee number, improvement of examination, prevalence of individual diseases, significance of cancer examinations, examinees` point of view and future problems. Subjects were the survivors living in Hiroshima city: in 1994, their number was 100,188, whose ages were 63 y in average for males consisting of 39.5% and 67 y for females of 60.5%. The examination was begun in 1957 on the law for medical care for the survivors firstly and then systematically in 1961. From 1965, it was performed 4 times a year, and in 1988, one examination in the four was made for cancer. Authors` Center examined previously 90% but recently 70% of the examinees. The remainder underwent the examination in other medical facilities. Tests are blood analysis, electrocardiography and computed radiography of chest with imaging plate, of which data have been accumulated either in photodisc or in host computer. From 1973 to 1993, the cardiovascular diseases increased from 6.1% to 26.9%, metabolic and endocrinic ones like diabetes, 3.6% to 19.7%, and bowel ones, 0.9% to 12.3%. Correlations of these diseases with A-bomb irradiation are not elucidated and possibly poor. Five classes of cancer examinations are performed but the examinee rate in the survivors is as low as 7.6-21.8% (1993). The cancer of the large intestine is increasing. The overall examinee rates in the survivors were 70.6% in 1965-1967, 69.5% in 1976-1977 and 58.2% in 1990. In conclusion, how to examine the survivors, who are getting older, as many as possible is the future problem. (H.O.)

  11. Children of Holocaust Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Shirley Ann

    As a result of the Holocaust, many survivors developed long term psychosocial impairment known as the Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), which is characterized by depression, anxiety, hypocondriasis, inability to concentrate or to express anger, nightmares, insomnia, obsessive thoughts, guilt, mistrust, and alienation. The literature in this…

  12. Cardiopulmonary exercise performance is reduced in congenital diaphragmatic hernia survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojanić, Katarina; Grizelj, Ruža; Dilber, Daniel; Šarić, Dalibor; Vuković, Jurica; Pianosi, Paolo T; Driscoll, David J; Weingarten, Toby N; Pritišanac, Ena; Schroeder, Darrell R; Sprung, Juraj

    2016-12-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is associated with lung hypoplasia. CDH survivors may have pulmonary morbidity that can decrease cardiopulmonary exercise. We aimed to examine whether cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) results differ in CDH survivors versus healthy age-matched controls and whether CPET results among CDH survivors differ according to self-reported daily activity. In one medical center in Croatia, CDH survivors-patients with surgically corrected CDH who were alive at age 5 years-were invited to participate in spirometry and CPET. Values were compared with those of controls matched 2:1 by age and sex for each CDH survivor aged 7 years or older. Among 27 CDH survivors aged 5-20 years, 13 (48%) had continued symptoms or spirometric evidence of pulmonary disease. Compared with controls (n = 44), survivors (n = 22) had lower peak oxygen consumption (V˙O2 mean [SD], 35.7 [6.9] vs. 45.3 [8.2] ml/kg per min; P exercise, V˙O2/heart rate (P different (P = 0.72). Among survivors, mean (SD) V˙O2peak (ml/kg per min) differed by self-reported activity level: athletic, 40.3 (5.0); normal, 35.8 (6.5); and sedentary, 32.1 (6.8) (by ANOVA, P = 0.10 across three groups and P = 0.04 athletic vs. sedentary). More than half of CDH survivors continue to have chronic pulmonary disease. CDH survivors had lower aerobic exercise capacity than controls. Self-reporting information on daily activities may identify CDH patients with low V˙O2max who may benefit from physical training. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2016;51:1320-1329. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. The Time Profile of Pentraxin 3 in Patients with Acute ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction and Stable Angina Pectoris Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ragnhild Helseth

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. High levels of Pentraxin 3 (PTX3 are reported in acute myocardial infarction (AMI. Aim. To investigate circulating levels and gene expression of PTX3 in patients with AMI and stable angina pectoris (AP undergoing PCI. Methods. Ten patients with AP and 20 patients with AMI were included. Blood samples were drawn before PCI in the AP group and after 3 and 12 hours and days 1, 3, 5, 7, and 14 in both groups. Results. Circulating PTX3 levels were higher in AMI compared to AP at 3 and 12 hours (P<0.001 and P=0.003. Within the AMI group, reduction from 3 hours to all later time points was observed (all P≤0.001. Within the AP group, increase from baseline to 3 hours (P=0.022, followed by reductions thereafter (all P<0.05, was observed. PTX3 mRNA increased in the AMI group from 3 hours to days 7 and 14 in a relative manner of 62% and 73%, while a relative reduction from baseline to 3 and 12 hours of 29% and 37% was seen in the AP group. Conclusion. High circulating PTX3 levels shortly after PCI in AMI indicate that AMI itself influences PTX3 levels. PTX3 mRNA might be in response to fluctuations in circulating levels.

  14. Medical care in adolescents and young adult cancer survivors: what are the biggest access-related barriers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, Theresa H.M.; Tao, Li; DeRouen, Mindy C.; Wu, Xiao-Cheng; Prasad, Pinki; Lynch, Charles F.; Shnorhavorian, Margarett; Zebrack, Brad J.; Chu, Roland; Harlan, Linda C.; Smith, Ashley W.; Parsons, Helen M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer survivors experience barriers to utilizing healthcare, but the determinants of cancer-related medical care of AYAs has not been fully explored. Methods We studied factors associated with medical care utilization among 465 AYA cancer survivors in the AYA Health Outcomes and Patient Experience Study (AYA HOPE), a cohort of 15 to 39 year-olds recently diagnosed with germ cell cancer, lymphoma, sarcoma, or acute lymphocytic leukemia. Descriptive statistics and multivariate logistic regression methods were used. Results Most AYA cancer survivors (95%), who were 15–35 months post diagnosis, received medical care in the past 12 months and 17% were undergoing cancer treatment. In multivariate analyses, compared with AYAs with no cancer-related medical visits in the previous year, AYAs receiving cancer-related care were more likely to currently have health insurance (odds ratio (OR) = 4.9; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.7–13.8) or have had health insurance in the past year (OR= 4.0; 95% CI: 0.99–16.3). Cancer recurrence, lacking employment and negative changes in self-reported general health were associated with ongoing cancer treatment versus other cancer-related medical care. 11% of all AYAs and 25% of AYAs who did not receive medical care in the past 12-months lost health insurance between the initial and follow-up surveys. Conclusion AYA cancer survivors with health insurance were much more likely to receive cancer-related medical care than those without insurance. Implications for Cancer Survivors Despite the need for post-treatment medical care, lacking health insurance is a barrier to receiving any medical care among AYAs. PMID:24408440

  15. Sexual dysfunction in Nigerian stroke survivors

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    2013-09-03

    Sep 3, 2013 ... Objectives: This survey reports sexual dysfunction in Nigerian stroke survivors, and determines the influence of socio- ... Participants completed the Beck Depression Inventory, Stroke Specific Quality of Life Scale and post-stroke sexual function ..... Medical. Aspects of Human Sexuality 1979; 13: 16-30. 25.

  16. Development of a risk-screening tool for cancer survivors to participate in unsupervised moderate- to vigorous-intensity exercise: results from a survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Justin C; Ko, Emily M; Schmitz, Kathryn H

    2015-02-01

    The health benefits of exercise increase in dose-response fashion among cancer survivors. However, it is unclear how to identify cancer survivors who may require a pre-exercise evaluation before they progress from the common recommendation of walking to unsupervised moderate- to vigorous-intensity exercise. To clarify how to identify cancer survivors who should undergo a pre-exercise evaluation before they progress from the common recommendation of walking to unsupervised moderate- to vigorous-intensity exercise. Electronic survey. Forty-seven (n = 47) experts in the field of exercise physiology, rehabilitation medicine, and cancer survivorship. Not applicable. We synthesized peer-reviewed guidelines for exercise and cancer survivorship and identified 82 health factors that may warrant a pre-exercise evaluation before a survivor engages in unsupervised moderate- to vigorous-intensity exercise. The 82 health factors were classified into 3 domains: (1) clinical health factors; (2) comorbidity and device health factors; and (3) medications. We surveyed a sample of experts asking them to identify which of the 82 health factors among cancer survivors would indicate the need for a pre-exercise evaluation before they engaged in moderate- to vigorous-intensity exercise. The response rate to our survey was 75% (n = 47). Across the 3 domains of health factors, acute symptoms, comorbidities, and medications related to cardiovascular disease were agreed on to indicate a pre-exercise evaluation for survivors before they engaged in unsupervised moderate- to vigorous-intensity exercise. Other health factors in the survey included hematologic, musculoskeletal, systemic, gastrointestinal, pulmonary, and neurological symptoms and comorbidities. Eighteen experts (38%) said it was difficult to provide absolute answers because no 2 patients are alike, and their decisions are made on a case-by-case basis. The results from this expert survey will help to identify which cancer survivors

  17. Higher prevalence of osteoporosis among female Holocaust survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, E-L; Menczel, J

    2007-11-01

    The prevalence of osteoporosis was statistically significantly higher among female Holocaust survivors than among those who were not exposed to the Holocaust. These findings support the importance of nutrition and environmental conditions during childhood and adolescence on BMD in older adults. Holocaust survivors during childhood and adolescence experienced undernutrition and lack of exercise and sunlight. The study aimed to establish if Holocaust survivors have higher prevalence of osteoporosis than subjects who were not Holocaust survivors. Seventy-three female Jewish Holocaust survivors > or = 60 years old and 60 female European-born Jews > or =60 years old who were not in the Holocaust were examined. BMD was measured using DXA of the lumbar spine and hips. The Cochran-Armitage trend test was used to test for an increasing trend in decreased BMD in the Holocaust survivors versus controls. Among Holocaust survivors 54.8% had osteoporosis, 39.7% osteopenia, and 5.5% normal BMD, whereas among controls 25.0% had osteoporosis, 55.0% osteopenia, and 20.0% normal BMD (p = 0.0001). In those who were Holocaust survivors 58.0% had osteoporosis, 34.0% osteopenia, and 8.0% normal BMD, whereas among controls 20.0% had osteoporosis, 57.8% osteopenia, and 22.2% normal BMD (p = 0.0003). In those > or =17 years old in 1945, among Holocaust survivors 47.8% had osteoporosis, 52.2% osteopenia and none had normal BMD, whereas among controls 40.0% had osteoporosis, 46.7% osteopenia, and 13.3% normal BMD (p = 0.28). The prevalence of osteoporosis was significantly higher among Holocaust survivors.

  18. Extreme Sport/Adventure Activity Correlates in Gynecologic Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Jennifer J; Vallance, Jeff K; Holt, Nicholas L; Courneya, Kerry S

    2016-03-01

    We examined the demographic, medical and behavioral correlates of participation and interest in extreme sport/adventure activities (ESAA) in gynecologic cancer survivors. A random sample of 621 gynecologic cancer survivors in Alberta, Canada, completed a mailed self-report questionnaire assessing medical, demographic, and behavioral variables and participation and interest in ESAA. Multivariate analyses revealed that gynecologic cancer survivors were more likely to participate in ESAA if they met aerobic exercise guidelines (OR=1.75 [95%CI:1.02-2.99]), had better general health (OR=1.71 [95%CI: 1.01-2.90]), had cervical or ovarian cancer (OR=1.95 [95%CI:0.97-3.93]), were employed (OR=1.71 [95%CI:0.95-3.08]), and were of healthy weight (OR=1.58 [95%CI:0.93-2.68]). Moreover, gynecologic cancer survivors were more likely to be interested in trying an ESAA if they had cervical or ovarian cancer (OR=1.76 [95%CI:0.94-3.27]) and were meeting the strength exercise guidelines (OR=1.68 [95%CI:0.95-2.98]). Medical, demographic, and behavioral variables correlate with participation and interest in ESAA in gynecologic cancer survivors. The pattern of correlates suggests that gynecologic cancer survivors are more likely to participate in ESSA if they have the physical capability and financial resources. Interventions to promote ESAA in gynecologic cancer survivors need to address these 2 key barriers.

  19. Long-term survivors of childhood Ewing sarcoma: report from the childhood cancer survivor study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsberg, Jill P; Goodman, Pamela; Leisenring, Wendy; Ness, Kirsten K; Meyers, Paul A; Wolden, Suzanne L; Smith, Stephanie M; Stovall, Marilyn; Hammond, Sue; Robison, Leslie L; Oeffinger, Kevin C

    2010-08-18

    The survival of Ewing sarcoma (ES) patients has improved since the 1970s but is associated with considerable future health risks. The study population consisted of long-term (> or =5-year) survivors of childhood ES diagnosed before age 21 from 1970 to 1986. Cause-specific mortality was evaluated in eligible survivors (n = 568), and subsequent malignant neoplasms, chronic health conditions, infertility, and health status were evaluated in the subset participating in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (n = 403). Outcomes were compared with the US population and sibling control subjects (n = 3899). Logistic, Poisson, or Cox proportional hazards models, with adjustments for sex, age, race/ethnicity, and potential intrafamily correlation, were used. Statistical tests were two-sided. Cumulative mortality of ES survivors was 25.0% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 21.1 to 28.9) 25 years after diagnosis. The all-cause standardized mortality ratio was 13.3 (95% CI = 11.2 to 15.8) overall, 23.1 (95% CI = 17.6 to 29.7) for women, and 10.0 (95% CI = 7.9 to 12.5) for men. The nonrecurrence-progression non-external cause standardized mortality ratio (subsequent non-ES malignant neoplasms and cardiac and pulmonary causes potentially attributable to ES treatment) was 8.7 (95% CI = 6.2 to 12.0). Twenty-five years after ES diagnosis, cumulative incidence of subsequent malignant neoplasms, excluding nonmelanoma skin cancers, was 9.0% (95% CI = 5.8 to 12.2). Compared with siblings, survivors had an increased risk of severe, life-threatening, or disabling chronic health conditions (relative risk = 6.0, 95% CI = 4.1 to 9.0). Survivors had lower fertility rates (women: P = .005; men: P < .001) and higher rates of moderate to extreme adverse health status (P < .001). Long-term survivors of childhood ES exhibit excess mortality and morbidity.

  20. Adoption consideration and concerns among young adult female cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, Jessica R; Whitcomb, Brian W; Standridge, Daniel; Malcarne, Vanessa L; Romero, Sally A D; Roberts, Samantha A; Su, H Irene

    2017-02-01

    We compared adoption consideration between female young adult cancer survivors and women of the same age in the general US population, hypothesizing that cancer survivors who desired children would report greater interest in adoption than an age-adjusted general population sample who desired children. After age-standardizing the cancer survivor cohort to match the age distribution of the 2006-2010 National Survey for Family Growth (NSFG), we estimated adoption consideration among women age 18-35 years who wanted a (another) child in the two cohorts overall and within age groups. We assessed characteristics and concerns related to adoption consideration among cancer survivors. Among cancer survivors, 81.6 % (95 % CI 75.7-87.6) reported that they would consider adoption compared to 40.3 % (95 % CI 40.3-40.3) of women in the general population. While over 80 % of the cancer survivor sample reported that they would consider adoption, only 15 % of cancer survivors reported no concerns about adoption. The most common concerns were desire for a biological child (48 %), expense (45 %), adoption agency candidacy (41 %), and needing more information (39 %). We observed a twofold higher interest in adoption when comparing the cancer survivor with the general population, suggesting that adoption is a consideration for many young women who have survived cancer. Adoption is an important family-building option for those who want to have a child but are unable to or choose not to have a biological child. However, young adult survivors may need more support to understand and navigate this process.

  1. Worse quality of life in young and recently diagnosed breast cancer survivors compared with female survivors of other cancers: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingmei; Humphreys, Keith; Eriksson, Mikael; Dar, Huma; Brandberg, Yvonne; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila

    2016-12-01

    Literature focusing on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) by cancer site among women only is scarce. This study examines HRQoL of breast cancer (BC) survivors compared with female survivors of other cancers, and to understand which subgroups of BC survivors were particularly at risk of reduced HRQoL. We placed emphasis on young (cancer controls and 2,205 other cancer survivors in the Karma study. We examined HRQoL differences using linear regression analyses in the whole cohort and in a subset of young and recently diagnosed BC survivors (n = 242) and female survivors of other cancers (n = 140) with comparable ages at diagnosis (43.6 vs 43.6, p = 0.917) and time since diagnosis (2.3 vs 2.8 years, p cancers when women of all ages were included, young BC survivors reported significantly lower HRQoL on multiple functional scales (global quality of life, emotional, role, social and cognitive functioning) and experienced more fatigue and insomnia. BC survivors with any prior medical history of mental disorders reported poorer HRQoL than those without such a history. We also observed a close-knit relationship between tumor and treatment characteristics. BC survivors perform poorly in HRQoL in comparison with female survivors of other cancers. Our results emphasize the importance of age- and gender-appropriate comparison groups. © 2016 UICC.

  2. Survivors on Cancer: the portrayal of survivors in print news.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kromm, Elizabeth Edsall; Smith, Katherine Clegg; Singer, Rachel Friedman

    2007-12-01

    This study examines the types of news stories that include comments by everyday cancer survivors and the messages or information these individuals provide. Even though these non-celebrity survivors increasingly serve on the front lines of cancer prevention and advocacy efforts and often engage with media, the role they play in the media discourse on cancer has not been a focus of research. We conducted a thematic content analysis of print news articles of non-celebrity cancer survivors in 15 leading national daily newspapers for four consecutive months starting in June 2005 to identify the issues or events that included a survivor perspective and the messages or information conveyed by the everyday survivors. Journalists included survivor commentary primarily when covering cancer fundraising events and when focusing on individual survivorship stories. In overall news coverage involving survivors, breast and prostate cancers received the greatest attention, followed by blood and lung cancers. Survivors spoke mainly about the diagnosis experience and life post-cancer. Our analysis of survivors' comments revealed that discussions of the diagnosis experience often convey fear and a lack of confidence in cancer screening practices, while cancer is portrayed as a positive life event. While evidence of a positive and hopeful portrayal of survivorship is an encouraging finding for continued efforts to decrease stigma associated with a cancer diagnosis and for the public understanding of the disease, it is important to consider potential negative implications of an idealized and restricted media discourse on survivorship. The increasing size and capacity of the survivor community offers opportunities for the cancer advocacy community to consider how news media portrayal of cancer and survivorship may contribute in both positive and potentially detrimental ways to public understanding of this disease, its survivors and life after cancer.

  3. Male infertility in long-term survivors of pediatric cancer: a report from the childhood cancer survivor study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasilewski-Masker, K; Seidel, K D; Leisenring, W; Mertens, A C; Shnorhavorian, M; Ritenour, C W; Stovall, M; Green, D M; Sklar, C A; Armstrong, G T; Robison, L L; Meacham, L R

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of male infertility and treatment-related risk factors in childhood cancer survivors. Within the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study, 1,622 survivors and 274 siblings completed the Male Health Questionnaire. The analysis was restricted to survivors (938/1,622; 57.8 %) and siblings (174/274; 63.5 %) who tried to become pregnant. Relative risks (RR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI) for the prevalence of self-reported infertility were calculated using generalized linear models for demographic variables and treatment-related factors to account for correlation among survivors and siblings of the same family. All statistical tests were two-sided. Among those who provided self-report data, the prevalence of infertility was 46.0 % in survivors versus 17.5 % in siblings (RR = 2.64, 95 % CI 1.88-3.70, p survivors who met the definition for infertility, 37 % had reported at least one pregnancy with a female partner that resulted in a live birth. In a multivariable analysis, risk factors for infertility included an alkylating agent dose (AAD) score ≥3 (RR = 2.13, 95 % CI 1.69-2.68 for AAD ≥3 versus AAD survivors who experience infertility father their own children, suggesting episodes of both fertility and infertility. This and the novel association of infertility with bleomycin warrant further investigation. Though infertility is common, male survivors reporting infertility often father their own children. Bleomycin may pose some fertility risk.

  4. Intensive care survivor-reported symptoms: a longitudinal study of survivors' symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langerud, Anne Kathrine; Rustøen, Tone; Småstuen, Milada Cvancarova; Kongsgaard, Ulf; Stubhaug, Audun

    2018-01-01

    There is growing interest in potential long-term outcomes following intensive care, but few researchers have studied the prevalence of multiple symptoms or the association between pain and other symptoms. To investigate the prevalence of anxiety, depression, fatigue, sleep disturbance and post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) among intensive care survivors 3 months and 1 year after being discharged from an intensive care unit (ICU) and to determine whether pain is associated with higher prevalence of these symptoms 3 months and 1 year after ICU stay. Exploratory, longitudinal cohort of intensive care survivors from two mixed ICUs in a tertiary referral hospital in Norway. Intensive care survivors completed surveys at 3 months (n = 118) and 1 year (n = 89) after ICU discharge. Clinical Trials: NCT02279212. Prevalence rates of intensive care survivors' symptoms were pain 58 (49·2%), anxiety/depression 24/118 (20·8%), fatigue 18/118(15·3%), PTSS 15 (12·8%) and sleep disturbance 58/118 (49·2%) at 3 months after ICU discharge (n = 118). Prevalence rates at 1 year (n = 89) changed only slightly to pain 34 (38·2%), anxiety/depression 17 (20·0%), fatigue 12 (13·8%), PTSS 13 (15·1%) and sleep disturbance 40/89 (46·5%). Associations were strong between pain and presence of sleep disturbance, anxiety/depression, PTSS and fatigue. Intensive care survivors have multiple symptoms and the prevalence rates of these symptoms remained almost unchanged from 3 months to 1 year after ICU discharge. The presence of pain was associated with high odds for the presence of sleep disturbance, anxiety/depression, PTSS and fatigue, compared to a no-pain group. ICU survivors may benefit from targeted interventions designed to alleviate the symptom burden. Knowledge about ICU survivor's prevalence and risk for having multiple symptoms may help health care professionals to give better care, if needed, to the ICU survivors. © 2017 British Association of Critical Care

  5. Health behaviors, quality of life, and psychosocial health among survivors of adolescent and young adult cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Echo L; Nam, Gina E; Zhang, Yingying; McFadden, Molly; Wright, Jennifer; Spraker-Perlman, Holly; Kinney, Anita Y; Oeffinger, Kevin C; Kirchhoff, Anne C

    2016-04-01

    Survivors of adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer may engage in unhealthy lifestyles (e.g., smoking), potentially heightening their risk for long-term health problems. We assessed health behaviors and constructs including quality of life (QOL) and psychosocial well-being among survivors of AYA cancer compared to the general population. We used 2009 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data to evaluate health behaviors for survivors of AYA cancer compared to AYAs without cancer. Multivariable regressions assessed health behaviors (smoking, binge drinking, physical inactivity, and low fruit/vegetable intake) by sex and age between AYA survivors and controls, and among survivors to determine the effects of demographic, QOL, psychosocial, and cancer factors on behaviors. A greater proportion of female survivors of AYA cancer smoked than controls (currently aged 20-39: 27 vs. 14.3%, respectively; currently aged 40-64: 29.3 vs. 18.4%, respectively). Generally, survivors and controls were non-adherent to national health behavior guidelines. Uninsured survivors were at greater risk of smoking vs. insured (females, Relative Risk (RR) = 1.64, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.43-1.90; males, RR = 2.62, 95% CI 1.71-4.02). Poor social/emotional support was associated with smoking (RR = 1.26, 95% CI 1.07-1.48) among female survivors and was associated with low fruit/vegetable intake among male (RR = 1.12, 95% CI 1.01-1.23) and female (RR= 1.12, 95% CI 1.05-1.19) survivors. Female survivors >10 years from diagnosis had higher risk of smoking (RR = 1.26-1.91, all p < 0.01) than survivors 5-10 years from diagnosis. Unhealthy lifestyle behaviors are common in survivors of AYA cancer. AYA survivors require health behavior support.

  6. The Correlation between Intraoperative Microelectrode Recording and 3-Tesla MRI in Patients Undergoing ANT-DBS for Refractory Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möttönen, Timo; Katisko, Jani; Haapasalo, Joonas; Tähtinen, Timo; Saastamoinen, Antti; Peltola, Jukka; Öhman, Juha; Lehtimäki, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the anterior nucleus of the thalamus) (ANT) has been suggested as a treatment option in refractory epilepsy. The targeting of ANT is especially challenging due to its poor visualization in commonly used MRI sequences, lack of easily observable symptom relief during surgery and high degree of anatomical variation between individuals. To study whether intraoperative microelectrode recording (MER), a method widely used in movement disorder surgery, provides clinically relevant information during the ANT-DBS implantation procedure. A total of 186 MER samples from 5 patients and 10 thalami obtained from ANT-DBS surgery for refractory epilepsy were analyzed with respect to the signal characteristics and location in 3-tesla (3T) MRI STIR (short T1 inversion recovery) images. The location of each MER sample was calculated relative to visible borders of the ANT after correction of the sample locations according to the position of the final DBS electrode in postoperative CT-MRI fusion images. We found that the lateral aspect of the ANT lacked spiking activity consistent with the presence of white matter. The spike frequency in samples correlating with location at the ANT showed significantly lower spike frequency compared to samples correlating with location at the ventral anterior nucleus (median 3.0 and 7.0 spikes/2 s; p < 0.05), but spike bursts were morphologically similar in appearance. Trajectories entering the dorsomedial nucleus according to 3T MRI STIR images showed a yet different firing pattern with more low-amplitude regular activity. Our data suggest that MER provides clinically relevant information during implantation surgery by demonstrating both nucleus-specific neuronal firing patterns and white matter laminae between different nuclear groups. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Nature-based experiences and health of cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Heather; Jakubec, Sonya L

    2014-11-01

    Although exposure to, and interaction with, natural environments are recognized as health-promoting, little is understood about the use of nature contact in treatment and rehabilitation for cancer survivors. This narrative review summarizes the literature exploring the influence of nature-based experiences on survivor health. Key databases included CINAHL, EMBASE, Medline, Web of Science, PubMed, PsycArticles, ProQuest, and Cancerlit databases. Sixteen articles met inclusion criteria and were reviewed. Four major categories emerged: 1) Dragon boat racing may enhance breast cancer survivor quality of life, 2) Natural environment may counteract attentional fatigue in newly diagnosed breast cancer survivors, 3) Adventure programs provide a positive experience for children and adolescent survivors, fostering a sense of belonging and self-esteem, and 4) Therapeutic landscapes may decrease state-anxiety, improving survivor health. This review contributes to a better understanding of the therapeutic effects of nature-based experiences on cancer survivor health, providing a point of entry for future study. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Association Between Sarcopenia and Metabolic Syndrome in Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Su Jung; Kim, Nam Cho

    Advanced cancer treatments have improved survival from cancer, but the incidence of cardiovascular disease in survivors has recently increased. Sarcopenia and metabolic syndrome (MetS) are related to cancer survival, and sarcopenia is an emerging risk factor for cardiovascular disease. However, evidence of a relationship between sarcopenia and MetS in cancer survivors is lacking. The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of sarcopenia and MetS in cancer survivors and to investigate independent predictors of MetS in cancer survivors. From the fourth and fifth Korea National Health and Nutritional Exam Survey (2008-2011), 798 consecutive cancer survivors were analyzed. Sarcopenia was defined as the appendicular skeletal muscle mass divided by weight less than 1 SD below the sex-specific healthy population aged 20 to 39 years. Metabolic syndrome was defined using the National Cholesterol Education Program definition. Among 798 cancer survivors, the prevalence rates of sarcopenia and MetS were 23.1% and 30.0%, respectively. Survivors with sarcopenia were more likely to have a higher waist circumference, body mass index, triglyceride level, and blood pressure and to have a lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level compared with those without sarcopenia. In multivariable analysis, sarcopenia was an independent predictor of MetS (odds ratio, 2.76; 95% confidence interval, 1.92-3.97). In addition, age and type of cancer were independent predictors of MetS. Sarcopenia was associated with an increased prevalence of MetS in cancer survivors. Interventions to prevent sarcopenia may be necessary to improve cardiovascular outcome in cancer survivors.

  9. Who are the cancer survivors?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovaldt, Hanna Birkbak; Suppli, N P; Olsen, M H

    2015-01-01

    Background: No nationwide studies on social position and prevalence of comorbidity among cancer survivors exist. Methods: We performed a nationwide prevalence study defining persons diagnosed with cancer 1943-2010 and alive on the census date 1 January 2011 as cancer survivors. Comorbidity was co...

  10. Predictors of attendance at specialized survivor clinics in a population-based cohort of adult survivors of childhood cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Paul C; Agha, Mohammad; Pole, Jason D; Hodgson, David; Guttmann, Astrid; Sutradhar, Rinku; Greenberg, Mark L

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of the present study is to determine predictors of attendance at a network of publicly funded specialized survivor clinics by a population-based cohort of adult survivors of childhood cancer. We conducted a retrospective study linking data on eligible patients identified in a provincial pediatric cancer registry with health administrative databases to determine attendance at five specialized survivor clinics in the Canadian province of Ontario between 1999 and 2012. Eligible survivors were treated for cancer at ≤18 years between 1986 and 2005, had survived ≥5 years from their most recent pediatric cancer event, and contributed ≥1 year of follow-up after age 18 years. We assessed the impact of cancer type, treatment intensity, cumulative chemotherapy doses, radiation, socioeconomic status, distance to nearest clinic, and care from a primary care physician (PCP) on attendance using recurrent event multivariable regression. Of 7482 children and adolescents treated for cancer over the study period, 3972 were eligible for study inclusion, of which 3912 successfully linked to administrative health data. After a median of 7.8 years (range 0.2-14.0) of follow-up, 1695/3912 (43.3 %) had attended at least one adult survivor clinic visit. Significantly increased rates of attendance were associated with female gender, higher treatment intensity, radiation, higher alkylating agent exposure, higher socioeconomic status, and an annual exam by a PCP. Distance significantly impacted attendance with survivors living >50 km away less likely to attend than those living within 10 km (relative rate 0.77, p = 0.003). Despite free access to survivor clinics, the majority of adult survivors of childhood cancer do not attend. Alternate models of care need to be developed and assessed, particularly for survivors living far from a specialized clinic and those at lower risk of developing late effects.

  11. Survivors speak: a qualitative analysis of motivational factors influencing breast cancer survivors' participation in a sprint distance triathlon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Karen M; Piacentine, Linda B; Waltke, Leslie J; Ng, Alexander V; Tjoe, Judy A

    2016-01-01

    To examine motivational factors influencing breast cancer survivors to participate in triathlon training, complete a triathlon and maintain an exercise thereafter. Routine exercise has been shown to improve quality of life and reduce recurrence for breast cancer survivors. Yet physical and psychological factors present barriers for initiating and maintaining an exercise routine. Research is limited in exploring factors of exercise motivation from the survivor's perspective. Qualitative design using focus groups and individual follow-up phone interviews to explore motivation for exercise initiation and maintenance. One to two weeks after completing a triathlon, 11 breast cancer survivors who trained together participated in one of three focus groups to discuss their experience. Five months post triathlon 6 of the 11 participants were successfully contacted and phone interviews were conducted to explore exercise maintenance. Focus groups and interviews were analysed using content and thematic analysis. Five themes emerged (1) Champion for Exercise, (2) Part of a Team, (3) Everyone Had a Story, (4) Not Really Exercise and (5) What Do We Do Now? Overall, survivors recognised their need for lifestyle change (e.g. moving from a sedentary lifestyle to a more active one). More importantly, they identified the team approach to exercise initiation was crucial in their success in sustaining a behavioural change. Emphasis needed on developing team exercise training programmes for survivors. Nurses can play a critical role in discussing with survivors, the benefits of exercise initiation and maintenance. Breast cancer survivors are hesitant to initiate routine exercise. Training with women who share a common lived experience increases the likelihood of success. Nurses are in a position to encourage breast cancer survivors to participate in group exercise programmes as a way to improve quality of life. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Interact: A Mixed Reality Virtual Survivor for Holocaust Testimonies

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Minhua; Coward, Sarah; Walker, Chris

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present Interact---a mixed reality virtual survivor for Holocaust education. It was created to preserve the powerful and engaging experience of listening to, and interacting with, Holocaust survivors, allowing future generations of audience access to their unique stories. Interact demonstrates how advanced filming techniques, 3D graphics and natural language processing can be integrated and applied to specially-recorded testimonies to enable users to ask questions and receive...

  13. Brain tumor survivors speak out.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson-Green, Bonnie

    2009-01-01

    Although progress has been made in the treatment of childhood brain tumors,work remains to understand the complexities of disease, treatment, and contextual factors that underlie individual differences in outcome. A combination of both an idiographic approach (incorporating observations made by adult survivors of childhood brain tumors) and a nomothetic approach (reviewing the literature for brain tumor survivors as well as childhood cancer survivors) is presented. Six areas of concern are reviewed from both an idiographic and nomothetic perspective, including social/emotional adjustment, insurance, neurocognitive late effects, sexuality and relationships, employment, and where survivors accessed information about their disease and treatment and possible late effects. Guidelines to assist health care professionals working with childhood brain tumor survivors are offered with the goal of improving psychosocial and neurocognitive outcomes in this population.

  14. Sexual Function in Cervical Cancer Survivors after Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhiraj Daga

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study evaluated sexual function in cervical cancer survivors after concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Methods: Study participants comprised survivors of locally advanced cervical cancer (stages IIB-IVA who completed concurrent chemoradiotherapy along with intracavitary brachytherapy at least two years prior at Dr S.N.Medical College, Jodhpur, Rajasthan, India. We used the Female Sexual Function Index questionnaire to assess sexual function. The cut-off score of the Female Sexual Function Index that identified female sexual arousal disorder was 26.55. A score less than 26.55 indicated the presence of female sexual arousal disorder. Results:A total of 48 locally advanced cervical cancer survivors enrolled in the study. Survivors had a mean age of 46.5 years. All received chemoradiotherapy along with intracavitary brachytherapy. The average time for treatment was 53.5 days. Patients had an average score for sexual desire of 2, 2.3 for arousal, 2.3 for sexual satisfaction, and 2.1 for pain during intercourse. The overall average score was 11.84 (range: 3.2-19.5 with a cut-off of 26.55. All survivors suffered from female sexual arousal disorder. Conclusion: Cervical cancer survivors had decreased sexual function which indicated female sexual arousal disorder. Patient education and active treatment of complications related to cancer treatments is a must for improvement of sexual function among survivors. Long-term complications should be considered in terms of treatment planning and follow-up treatment to improve the quality of life of cancer survivors.

  15. Obesity management in gynecologic cancer survivors: provider practices and attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jernigan, Amelia M; Tergas, Ana I; Satin, Andrew J; Fader, Amanda N

    2013-05-01

    Obesity is associated with the development and risk of death from several women's cancers. The study objective was to describe and compare oncologic providers' attitudes and practices as they relate to obesity counseling and management in cancer survivors. Society of Gynecologic Oncology members (n = 924) were surveyed with the use of a web-based, electronic questionnaire. χ(2) and Fisher exact tests were used to analyze responses. Of the 240 respondents (30%), 92.9% were practicing gynecologic oncologists or fellows, and 5.1% were allied health professionals. Median age was 42 years; 50.8% of the respondents were female. Of the respondents, 42.7% reported that they themselves were overweight/obese and that ≥50% of their survivor patients were overweight/obese. Additionaly, 82% of the respondents believed that discussing weight would not harm the doctor-patient relationship. Most of the respondents (95%) agreed that addressing lifestyle modifications with survivors is important. Respondents believed that gynecologic oncologists (85.1%) and primary care providers (84.5%) were responsible for addressing obesity. More providers who were ≤42 years old reported undergoing obesity management training (P 42 years old (P = .017). After initial counseling, 81.5% of the respondents referred survivors to other providers for obesity interventions. Oncology provider respondents believe that addressing obesity with cancer survivors is important. Providers believed themselves to be responsible for initial counseling but believed that obesity interventions should be directed by other specialists. Further research is needed to identify barriers to care for obese cancer survivors and to improve physician engagement with obesity counseling in the "teachable moment" that is provided by a new cancer diagnosis. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Holocaust Child Survivors and Child Sexual Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lev-Wiesel, Rachel; Amir, Marianne

    2005-01-01

    This study utilized a qualitative analysis of child survivors of the Holocaust who were sexually abused during World War II. The research study aimed to give this specific group of survivors a voice and to explore the impact of multiple extreme traumas, the Holocaust and childhood sexual abuse, on the survivors. Twenty-two child survivors of the…

  17. Perceptions of body mass index (BMI) in pediatric cancer survivors and their providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elchuri, Swati V; Patterson, Briana C; Wasilewski-Masker, Karen; Mertens, Ann C; Record, Elizabeth; Meacham, Lillian R

    2014-08-01

    Abnormalities in BMI are well documented in childhood cancer survivors. Perceptions of BMI status in cancer survivors have been understudied. This study determines the accuracy of parent/survivor and provider reporting of BMI status in a cancer survivor program. This is a retrospective study. Parent/survivor assessment of BMI status was obtained from a baseline questionnaire of subjects enrolled in Children's Healthcare of Atlanta-Childhood, Adolescent, and Young Adult Cancer Survivor Study (CHOA-CAYACSS). Provider reporting of BMI was obtained from a clinic visit close in date to completion of the survey. Perceptions of BMI were compared to actual BMI status calculated from clinic visits and categorized based on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) BMI guidelines. Perceptions of BMI were collected from 290 survivors of pediatric cancer or their parents (range, 4.3-22.9 years). Nearly 5% of survivors were underweight, 19.7% overweight and 16.2% obese. High BMI was the BMI state least likely to be correctly identified by parents, survivors, and providers. Among survivors with high BMI, parents, survivors, and providers failed to identify the problem 49.4%, 66.7%, and 26.9% of the time, respectively. Providers were less likely to correctly identify overweight compared to obese status (P survivor, ethnicity, or primary cancer diagnosis. Abnormal BMI states, especially overweight, are frequently not correctly perceived by parents/survivors or providers. Assessment of BMI status and discussion about steps to normalize BMI is needed to prevent weight related morbidities in this population. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Long-Term Quality of Life in Adult Survivors of Pediatric Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nies, Marloes; Klein Hesselink, Mariëlle S; Huizinga, Gea A; Sulkers, Esther; Brouwers, Adrienne H; Burgerhof, Johannes G M; van Dam, Eveline W C M; Havekes, Bas; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M; Corssmit, Eleonora P M; Kremer, Leontien C M; Netea-Maier, Romana T; van der Pal, Heleen J H; Peeters, Robin P; Plukker, John T M; Ronckers, Cécile M; van Santen, Hanneke M; Tissing, Wim J E; Links, Thera P; Bocca, Gianni

    2017-04-01

    Little is known about long-term quality of life (QoL) of survivors of pediatric differentiated thyroid carcinoma. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate generic health-related QoL (HRQoL), fatigue, anxiety, and depression in these survivors compared with matched controls, and to evaluate thyroid cancer-specific HRQoL in survivors only. Survivors diagnosed between 1970 and 2013 at age ≤18 years, were included. Exclusion criteria were a follow-up Survivors and controls were asked to complete 3 questionnaires [Short-Form 36 (HRQoL), Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory 20 (fatigue), and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (anxiety/depression)]. Survivors completed a thyroid cancer-specific HRQoL questionnaire. Sixty-seven survivors and 56 controls. Median age of survivors at evaluation was 34.2 years (range, 18.8 to 61.7). Median follow-up was 17.8 years (range, 5.0 to 44.7). On most QoL subscales, scores of survivors and controls did not differ significantly. However, survivors had more physical problems (P = 0.031), role limitations due to physical problems (P = 0.021), and mental fatigue (P = 0.016) than controls. Some thyroid cancer-specific complaints (e.g., sensory complaints and chilliness) were present in survivors. Unemployment and more extensive disease or treatment characteristics were most frequently associated with worse QoL. Overall, long-term QoL in survivors of pediatric DTC was normal. Survivors experienced mild impairment of QoL in some domains (physical problems, mental fatigue, and various thyroid cancer-specific complaints). Factors possibly affecting QoL need further exploration.

  19. Quality of life and sexuality comparison between sexually active ovarian cancer survivors and healthy women

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Se Ik; Lee, Yumi; Lim, Myong Cheol; Joo, Jungnam; Park, KiByung; Lee, Dong Ock; Park, Sang-Yoon

    2015-01-01

    Objective compare quality of life (QoL) and sexual functioning between sexually active ovarian cancer survivors and healthy women. Methods A cross-sectional study was performed in 103 successfully treated ovarian cancer survivors and 220 healthy women. All women had engaged in sexual activity within the previous 3 months, and ovarian cancer survivors were under surveillance after primary treatment without evidence of disease. QoL and sexual functioning were assessed using three questionnaires...

  20. Atherogenic low density lipoprotein phenotype in long-term survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Malhotra, Jyoti; Tonorezos, Emily S.; Rozenberg, Marina; Vega, Gloria L.; Sklar, Charles A.; Chou, Joanne; Moskowitz, Chaya S.; Eshelman-Kent, Debra A.; Janiszewski, Peter; Ross, Robert; Oeffinger, Kevin C.

    2012-01-01

    Survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Small density lipoproteins are atherogenic but have not been studied in this population. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of 110 ALL survivors (mean age, 24.3 years) to determine prevalence of small dense LDL (pattern B) phenotype in ALL survivors and identify associated factors. Lipid subfractions were measured using Vertical Auto Profile-II. Participants with greater than 50% o...

  1. Comparison of health-related quality of life between patients with stage 3 and 4 chronic kidney disease and patients undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Suk Jeong; Son, Heesook

    2016-01-01

    This study compared health-related quality of life in patients with early to mid-stage chronic kidney disease. This study utilized a comparative descriptive design. Patients receiving continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis were recruited from a hospital in Korea. Information from patients with stage 3 and 4 chronic kidney disease was obtained from Korean national survey data. A total of 75 pairs were matched using the propensity score method. Health-related quality of life was compared using the European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions questionnaire. Only 4% of patients with stage 3 or 4 chronic kidney disease are aware of their disease. These patients have decreased mobility and ability to perform their usual activities (χ(2)  = 10.77, P = 0.001; χ(2)  = 7.22, P = 0.007, respectively). However, they have lower levels of anxiety and depression than patients undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (χ(2)  = 13.37, P chronic kidney disease. Educational intervention in asymptomatic patients is important to increase awareness and early detection of chronic kidney disease. © 2015 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  2. Conversations with Holocaust survivor residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirst, Sandra P; LeNavenec, Carole Lynne; Aldiabat, Khaldoun

    2011-03-01

    Traumatic events in one's younger years can have an impact on how an individual copes with later life. One traumatic experience for Jewish individuals was the Holocaust. Some of these people are moving into long-term care facilities. It was within this context that the research question emerged: What are Holocaust survivor residents' perceptions of a life lived as they move into a long-term care facility? For this qualitative study, Holocaust survivors were individually interviewed. Findings emphasize that nursing care needs to ensure that Holocaust survivor residents participate in activities, receive timely health care, and receive recognition of their life experiences. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  3. Increased work and social engagement is associated with increased stroke specific quality of life in stroke survivors at 3 months and 12 months post-stroke: a longitudinal study of an Australian stroke cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Tamara; Binte Yusoff, Siti Zubaidah; Churilov, Leonid; Ma, Henry; Davis, Stephen; Donnan, Geoffrey Alan; Carey, Leeanne M

    2017-09-01

    There is a relative lack of longitudinal studies investigating stroke-specific outcomes and quality of life (QOL). This study aimed to identify which factors (level of disability, cognitive functioning, depressive symptoms, physical activity, and work and social engagement) were independently associated with each stroke-specific domain of QOL, adjusting for age and gender, at 3 months and 12 months post-stroke in an Australian cohort. Survivors of ischemic stroke were recruited from 18 sites of the STroke imAging pRevention and Treatment (START) longitudinal cohort study. Survivors were assessed at 3 months (n = 185) and 12 months (n = 170) post-stroke using the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS), modified Rankin Scale (mRS), Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA), Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale, Rapid Assessment of Physical Activity, and Work and Social Adjustment Scale (WSAS). WSAS was independently associated with the SIS domains of: Physical Composite function; Participation; and Perceived Recovery at 3 months and 12 months and SIS domain of Emotion at 12 months post-stroke. The presence of depressive symptoms was independently associated with the SIS domains of: Memory and Thinking; and Emotion at 3 months. At 12 months post-stroke, mRS was independently associated with SIS domain of Physical Composite function and MoCA with SIS domain of Communication. Engaging in work and social activities is an important factor associated with stroke-specific domains of QOL over time. It is recommended that services focus on improving work and social engagement given their importance related to QOL in the first year of recovery post-stroke. Identifying and treating those with depressive symptoms may enhance QOL in the early months post-stroke. START-PrePARE Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials, www.anzctr.org.au , Registry number: ACTRN12610000987066. EXTEND ClinicalTrial.gov identifier: NCT00887328.

  4. Marriage and divorce among young adult cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchhoff, Anne C; Yi, Jaehee; Wright, Jennifer; Warner, Echo L; Smith, Ken R

    2012-12-01

    We examined marital outcomes among cancer survivors diagnosed during early adulthood from the 2009 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System dataset. Eligible participants were ages 20-39 years. Of the 74,433 eligible, N = 1,198 self-reported a cancer diagnosis between the ages of 18 and 37, were ≥2 years past diagnosis, and did not have non-melanoma skin cancer. The remaining N = 67,063 were controls. Using generalized linear models adjusted for age, gender, race, and education, we generated relative risks (RR) and 95 % confidence intervals (95 % CI) to examine survivor status on indicators of ever married, currently married, and divorced/separated. Survivors were slightly older than controls [33.0 (SD = 3.8) vs. 30.0 (SD = 4.0); p divorce/separation than controls (18 % vs. 10 %; RR = 1.77, 95 % CI 1.43-2.19). Divorce/separation risk persisted for female survivors (RR 1.83, 95 % CI 1.49-2.25), survivors ages 20-29 (RR 2.57, 95 % CI 1.53-4.34), and survivors ages 30-39 (RR 1.62, 95 % CI 1.29-2.04). The emotional and financial burdens of cancer may lead to marital stress for younger cancer survivors. Young survivors may face a higher risk of divorce; support systems are needed to assist them in the years following diagnosis.

  5. Gastric cancer in atomic bomb survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oshiro, Hisashi; Itamoto, Toshiyuki; Sumimoto, Ryo [Hiroshima Prefectural Hiroshima Hospital (Japan)] [and others

    1994-10-01

    This is a retrospective review of gastric cancer in A-bomb survivors. Firstly, surgical cases of gastric cancer (1968-88) were compared in 514 A-bomb survivors and 1,092 non-exposed persons. The average age was 63.5 years in the exposed group and 60.0 years in the non-exposed group. Although there were much more men than women in the non-exposed group (67.3% vs 32.7%), there was no great difference in the exposed group (56.0% vs 44.0%). The frequency of early gastric cancer tended to be higher in the exposed group, and thus, both the curative resection and 5-year survival rates were slightly higher. This seems to have been attributed to periodical health examination for A-bomb survivors. Secondly, the frequency of gastric cancer was examined in relation to the age at the time of A-bombing (ATA). According to the ATA, 538 A-bomb survivors (1968-89) were divided into the <19 year group (n=118), 20-29 year group (n=134), 30-39 year group (n=178), and >40 year group (n=108). The <19 year group accounted for more A-bomb survivors directly exposed to A-bombing. Using 1,138 other non-exposed patients as controls, there was no factors specific to the exposed group. Thirdly, the distance from the hypocenter was examined in 569 A-bomb survivors (1966-1990) by dividing them into the {<=}2.0 km group (n=137), >2.1 km group (n=168), and secondarily exposed group (n=264). In all three groups, well-differentiated cancer was predominant. The frequency of poorly differentiated cancer was higher in those exposed nearer the hypocenter; this was significant in both the {<=}2.0 km and >2.1 km groups than the secondarily exposed group. In directly exposed groups, the frequency of poorly differentiated cancer was high in the age group of <50 and the frequency of well differentiated cancer was high in the age group of >60. This suggests the relationship between exposure doses and poorly differentiated gastric cancer. (N.K.).

  6. Incidental Detection of Late Subsequent Intracranial Neoplasms with Magnetic Resonance Imaging Among Adult Survivors of Childhood Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabin, Noah D.; Santucci, Aimee K.; Klimo, Paul; Hudson, Melissa M.; Srivastava, Deokumar; Zhang, Nan; Kun, Larry E.; Krasin, Matthew J.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Patay, Zoltan; Reddick, Wilburn E.; Ogg, Robert J.; Hillenbrand, Claudia M.; Robison, Leslie L.; Krull, Kevin R.; Armstrong, Gregory T.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Survivors of childhood cancer are at increased risk of developing subsequent neoplasms. In long term survivors of childhood malignancies treated with and without cranial radiation therapy (CRT), undergoing unenhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain, we estimated detection of intracranial neoplasms. Methods To investigate neurocognitive outcomes, 219 survivors of childhood cancer underwent unenhanced screening MRI of the brain. 164 of the survivors had been treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) (125 received CRT), and 55 for Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) (none received CRT). MRI examinations were reviewed and systematically coded by a single neuroradiologist. Demographic and treatment characteristics were compared for survivors with and without subsequent neoplasms. Results Nineteen of the 219 survivors (8.7%) had a total of 31 subsequent intracranial neoplasms identified by neuroimaging at a median time of 25 years (range 12-46 years) from diagnosis. All neoplasms occurred after CRT, except for a single vestibular schwannoma within the cervical radiation field in a HL survivor. The prevalence of subsequent neoplasms after CRT exposure was 14.4% (18 of 125). By noncontrast MRI, intracranial neoplasms were most suggestive of meningiomas. Most patients presented with no specific, localizing neurological complaints. In addition to the schwannoma, six tumors were resected based on results of MRI screening, all of which were meningiomas on histologic review. Conclusion Unenhanced brain MRI of long-term survivors of childhood cancer detected a substantial number of intracranial neoplasms. Screening for early detection of intracranial neoplasms among aging survivors of childhood cancer who received CRT should be evaluated. Implications for Cancer Survivors The high prevalence of incidentally detected subsequent intracranial neoplasms after CRT in long-term survivors of childhood cancer and the minimal symptoms reported by those with intracranial

  7. Objectively assessed physical activity levels in Spanish cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Casado, Ana; Verdugo, Ana Soria; Solano, María J Ortega; Aldazabal, Itziar Pagola; Fiuza-Luces, Carmen; Alejo, Lidia Brea; del Hierro, Julio R Padilla; Palomo, Isabel; Aguado-Arroyo, Oscar; Garatachea, Nuria; Cebolla, Héctor; Lucia, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    To objectively assess physical activity (PA) levels in a cohort of Spanish cancer survivors. Descriptive, cross-sectional. The Hospital Universitario de Fuenlabrada and two healthcare centers in Madrid, Spain. 204 cancer survivors and 115 adults with no history of cancer. Participants wore a triaxial accelerometer for seven or more consecutive days to assess PA levels. Body mass index (BMI), indirect indicators of adiposity (waist circumference, waist-to-hip ratio), and cardiorespiratory fitness also were determined. Light, moderate, vigorous, and total PA (sum of the former). Most (94%) of the cancer survivors met international recommendations for moderate PA, but very few (3%) fulfilled those (75 minutes or more per week) for vigorous PA. Except for lower total (minute per day, p=0.048) and vigorous PA levels (p0.05). A high percentage of the survivors (33%) were obese (BMI greater than 30 kg/m2), and many also showed poor cardiorespiratory fitness (45% were below the 8 metabolic equivalent threshold). Although cancer survivors overall met international PA recommendations for a healthy lifestyle, their BMI and cardiorespiratory profiles were not within the healthy range. Cancer survivors need to be informed about healthy lifestyle habits and should be regularly monitored.

  8. Understanding the Early Support Needs of Survivors of Traumatic Events: The Example of Severe Injury Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Rachel M; Chisholm, Katherine; Terhaag, Sonia; Lau, Winnie; Forbes, David; Holmes, Alex; O'Donnell, Meaghan

    2017-05-29

    In the aftermath of a potentially traumatic event, people may experience a range of mental health outcomes, including subclinical symptoms and distress. There is growing evidence that trauma survivors with subclinical symptoms are at increased risk of developing later psychiatric disorders, and this is especially the case with severe injury survivors. There is a need to develop evidence-based, early, brief interventions for those who are at risk of developing trauma-related psychopathology. To date, interventions for this at-risk group have largely been derived from expert consensus. This study therefore aimed to understand the early psychosocial difficulties and perceived needs from the perspective of trauma survivors to further inform intervention development. Forty-three survivors of a serious injury, identified as high risk for developing trauma-related psychopathology, were interviewed and qualitative methods (Thematic Analysis) were used to synthesize the data gathered. Participants described 5 main stressors: trauma-related psychological reactions, relationship stress, unsatisfactory services and support systems, reduced functioning, and negative thoughts and emotions in relation to recovery. In addition, participants described 3 main factors that were helpful in recovery: positive coping, professional support, and social support. These findings can inform posttrauma intervention development for those at risk of later psychological symptoms. In particular, the results support approaches focusing on promoting activity, supporting social relationships, stress and arousal management, and cognitive restructuring. In addition, future interventions might helpfully target rumination, worry, and reexperiencing symptoms. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Ageing Holocaust survivors in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paratz, Elizabeth D; Katz, Benny

    2011-02-21

    In recent years, a phenomenon of "late effects of the Holocaust" has emerged, with impacts on the psychological and physical health of ageing Holocaust survivors. As Holocaust survivors age, they may experience heightened anxiety around normal processes of ageing, worsened post-traumatic stress disorder with cognitive decline, and fear of the medical system. Holocaust survivors are at increased risk of osteoporosis, cardiometabolic disease due to hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysfunction, cancer, and sequelae of Nazi medical experiments. From existing medical literature on this topic, practical principles of management are derived to create a framework for sensitive medical management of Holocaust survivors in Australia. The issues discussed are also relevant to the wider geriatric refugee or prisoner-of-war experience.

  10. Longitudinal smoking patterns in survivors of childhood cancer: An update from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Todd M; Liu, Wei; Armstrong, Gregory T; Srivastava, Deo Kumar; Hudson, Melissa M; Leisenring, Wendy M; Mertens, Ann C; Klesges, Robert C; Oeffinger, Kevin C; Nathan, Paul C; Robison, Leslie L

    2015-11-15

    Survivors of pediatric cancer have elevated risks of mortality and morbidity. Many late adverse effects associated with cancer treatment (eg, second cancers and cardiac and pulmonary disease) are also associated with cigarette smoking, and this suggests that survivors who smoke may be at high risk for these conditions. This study examined the self-reported smoking status for 9397 adult survivors of childhood cancer across 3 questionnaires (median time interval, 13 years). The smoking prevalence among survivors was compared with the smoking prevalence among siblings and the prevalence expected on the basis of age-, sex-, race-, and calendar time-specific rates in the US population. Multivariable regression models examined characteristics associated with longitudinal smoking patterns across all 3 questionnaires. At the baseline, 19% of survivors were current smokers, whereas 24% of siblings were current smokers, and 29% were expected to be current smokers on the basis of US rates. Current smoking among survivors dropped to 16% and 14% on follow-up questionnaires, with similar decreases in the sibling prevalence and the expected prevalence. Characteristics associated with consistent never-smoking included a higher household income (relative risk [RR], 1.16; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.08-1.25), higher education (RR, 1.32; 95% CI, 1.22-1.43), and receipt of cranial radiation therapy (RR, 1.08; 95% CI, 1.03-1.14). Psychological distress (RR, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.80-0.92) and heavy alcohol drinking (RR, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.58-0.71) were inversely associated. Among ever-smokers, a higher income (RR, 1.17; 95% CI, 1.04-1.32) and education (RR, 1.23; 95% CI, 1.10-1.38) were associated with quitting, whereas cranial radiation (RR, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.76-0.97) and psychological distress (RR, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.72-0.90) were associated with not having quit. The development of adverse health conditions was not associated with smoking patterns. Despite modest declines in smoking prevalence

  11. Yield of Urinalysis Screening in Pediatric Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Matthew D; Mertens, Ann C; Esiashvili, Natia; Meacham, Lillian R; Wasilewski-Masker, Karen

    2016-05-01

    The Children's Oncology Group (COG) publishes consensus guidelines with screening recommendations for early identification of treatment-related morbidities among childhood cancer survivors. We sought to estimate the yield of recommended yearly urinalysis screening for genitourinary complications as per Version 3.0 of the COG Long-Term Follow-Up Guidelines and identify possible risk factors for abnormal screening in a survivor population. A database of pediatric cancer survivors evaluated between January 2008 and March 2012 at Children's Healthcare of Atlanta was queried for survivors at risk for genitourinary late effects. The frequency of abnormal urinalyses (protein ≥1+ and/or presence of glucose and/or ≥5 red blood cells per high power field) was estimated. Risk factors associated with abnormal screening were identified. Chart review identified 773 survivors (57% male; 67% Caucasian; 60% leukemia/lymphoma survivors; mean age at diagnosis, 5.7 years [range: birth to 17.7 years]; time from diagnosis to initial screening, 7.6 years [range: 2.3 to 21.5 years]) who underwent urinalysis. Abnormal results were found in 78 (5.3%) of 1,484 total urinalyses. Multivariable analysis revealed higher dose ifosfamide (odds ratio [OR] = 6.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.9-16.0) and total body irradiation (TBI, OR = 3.0, 95% CI 1.0-8.4) as significant risk factors for abnormal initial urinalysis screening. Pediatric cancer survivors exposed to higher dose ifosfamide or TBI may be at higher risk of abnormal findings on urinalysis screening. Targeted screening of these higher risk patients should be considered. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Sexual minority cancer survivors' satisfaction with care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabson, Jennifer M; Kamen, Charles S

    2016-01-01

    Satisfaction with care is important to cancer survivors' health outcomes. Satisfaction with care is not equal for all cancer survivors, and sexual minority (i.e., lesbian, gay, and bisexual) cancer survivors may experience poor satisfaction with care. Data were drawn from the 2010 LIVESTRONG national survey. The final sample included 207 sexual minority cancer survivors and 4,899 heterosexual cancer survivors. Satisfaction with care was compared by sexual orientation, and a Poisson regression model was computed to test the associations between sexual orientation and satisfaction with care, controlling for other relevant variables. Sexual minority cancer survivors had lower satisfaction with care than did heterosexual cancer survivors (B = -0.12, SE = 0.04, Wald χ(2) = 9.25, pSexual minorities experience poorer satisfaction with care compared to heterosexual cancer survivors. Satisfaction with care is especially relevant to cancer survivorship in light of the cancer-related health disparities reported among sexual minority cancer survivors.

  13. Cognitive, behaviour, and academic functioning in adolescent and young adult survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: a report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacola, Lisa M; Edelstein, Kim; Liu, Wei; Pui, Ching-Hon; Hayashi, Robert; Kadan-Lottick, Nina S; Srivastava, Deokumar; Henderson, Tara; Leisenring, Wendy; Robison, Leslie L; Armstrong, Gregory T; Krull, Kevin R

    2016-10-01

    Survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) are at risk for neurocognitive deficits that affect development in adolescence and young adulthood, and influence educational attainment and future independence. We examined a large and diverse cohort of survivors to identify risk predictors and modifiers of these outcomes. In this cohort study, cognitive and behaviour symptoms were assessed via a standardised parent questionnaire for 1560 adolescent survivors of ALL diagnosed between 1970 and 1999. Clinically significant symptoms (≥90th percentile) and learning problems were compared between survivors and a sibling cohort. Multivariable regression models were used to examine associations with demographic and treatment characteristics. Models were adjusted for inverse probability of sampling weights to reflect undersampling of ALL survivors in the expansion cohort. In a subset of survivors with longitudinal data (n=925), we examined associations between adolescent symptoms or problems and adult educational attainment. Compared with siblings, survivors treated with chemotherapy only were more likely to demonstrate headstrong behaviour (155 [19%] of 752 survivors vs 88 [14%] of 610 siblings, p=0·010), inattention-hyperactivity (15 [19%] vs 86 [14%], p4·3 g/m2) conferred increased risk of inattention-hyperactivity (relative risk [RR] 1·53, 95% CI 1·13-2·08). Adolescent survivors with cognitive or behaviour problems and those with learning problems were less likely to graduate from college as young adults than adolescent survivors without cognitive or behaviour problems. Although modern therapy for childhood ALL has eliminated the use of cranial radiation therapy, adolescent survivors treated with chemotherapy only remain at increased risk for cognitive, behaviour, and academic problems that adversely affect adult education outcomes. National Cancer Institute, American Lebanese-Syrian Associated Charities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  14. Predictors of Grade 3 or Higher Late Bowel Toxicity in Patients Undergoing Pelvic Radiation for Cervical Cancer: Results From a Prospective Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra, Supriya, E-mail: schopra@actrec.gov.in [Department of Radiation Oncology, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer (ACTREC), Tata Memorial Centre, Kharghar, Navi Mumbai, Maharashtra (India); Dora, Tapas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer (ACTREC), Tata Memorial Centre, Kharghar, Navi Mumbai, Maharashtra (India); Chinnachamy, Anand N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tata Memorial Hospital, Tata Memorial Centre, Parel, Mumbai, Maharashtra (India); Thomas, Biji [Department of Radiation Oncology, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer (ACTREC), Tata Memorial Centre, Kharghar, Navi Mumbai, Maharashtra (India); Kannan, Sadhna [Epidemiology and Clinical Trials Unit, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer (ACTREC), Tata Memorial Centre, Kharghar, Navi Mumbai, Maharashtra (India); Engineer, Reena; Mahantshetty, Umesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tata Memorial Hospital, Tata Memorial Centre, Parel, Mumbai, Maharashtra (India); Phurailatpam, Reena; Paul, Siji N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer (ACTREC), Tata Memorial Centre, Kharghar, Navi Mumbai, Maharashtra (India); Shrivastava, Shyam Kishore [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tata Memorial Hospital, Tata Memorial Centre, Parel, Mumbai, Maharashtra (India)

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: The present study investigates relationship between dose–volume parameters and severe bowel toxicity after postoperative radiation treatment (PORT) for cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: From June 2010 to December 2012, a total of 71 patients undergoing PORT were included. Small bowel (SB) and large bowel (LB) loops were contoured 2 cm above the target volume. The volume of SB and LB that received 15 Gy, 30 Gy, and 40 Gy was calculated (V15 SB, V15 LB, V30 SB, V30 LB, V40 SB, V 40 LB). On follow-up, bowel toxicity was scored using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE), version 3.0. A reciever operating characteristic (ROC) curve identified volume thresholds that predicted for grade 3 or higher toxicity with highest specificity. All data was dichotomized across these identified cut-off values. Univariate and multivariate analysis was performed using SPSS, version 15. Results: The median patient age was 47 years (range, 35-65 years). Of the 71 patients, 46 received image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy, and 25 received conformal radiation (50 Gy in 25 fractions for 5 weeks). Overall, 63 of 71 patients received concurrent chemotherapy. On a median follow-up of 18 months (range, 8-29 months), grade 2 or higher bowel toxicity was seen in 22 of 71 patients (30.9%) and grade 3 or higher bowel toxicity was seen in 9 patients (12.6%). On univariate analysis, V15 SB <275 cc (P=.01), V30 SB <190 cc (P=.02), V40 SB <150 cc (P=.01), and V15 LB <250 cc (P=.03), and V40 LB <90 cc (P=.04) predicted for absence of grade 3 or higher toxicity. No other patient- or treatment-related factors were statistically significant. On multivariate analysis, only V15 SB (P=.002) and V15 LB (P=.03) were statistically significant. Conclusions: V 15 Gy SB and LB are independent predictors of late grade 3 or higher toxicity. Restricting V15 SB and V15 LB to <275 cc and <250 cc can reduce grade 3 or higher toxicity to less than 5%.

  15. A successful pregnancy and parturition in a patient with anuria undergoing maintenance hemodialysis for 6 years: a case report of a 3-year-follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Panxi; Diao, Wenqi; Tang, Qionglan; Jiang, Xuefeng

    2015-09-14

    Pregnancies in hemodialysis patients are uncommon and difficult to study. Although the chance of a successful pregnancy and parturition in hemodialysis women has increased over the years, it still remains extremely low with a high maternal and fetal mortality and morbidity rate. We reported a case of successful pregnancy and parturition in a 22-year-old Chinese female in uremic stage of chronic renal failure and undergoing maintenance hemodialysis (three sessions a week) for 6 years. At the 22nd gestational week, she was diagnosed as pregnant by ultrasound, and started an enhanced hemodialysis routine (Five sessions a week). At the 32nd gestational week, she got hospitalized and received hemodialysis more frequently (seven sessions a week). Based on the initial diagnoses, including uremic stage of chronic renal failure, stage-3 hypertension, single pregnancy of 32nd gestational week, single umbilical artery and polyhydramnios, a drug therapy consisting of compound amino acid, fructosediphosphate sodium, 10% L-carnitine, erythropoietin, polyferose, amlodipine, isosorbidedinitrate, low-molecular weight-heparin, multivitamins and folic acid was given, and daily examination of the mother and fetus was performed. Under the joint efforts of various departments, the patient underwent caesarean section at the 34th gestational week due to progressive uterine contraction and gave birth to a female, well-being baby weighing 1470 g. It has been more than 3 years since the parturition. The mother has returned to the previous hemodialysis routine, and the child has been growing up healthily. Although pregnancy in hemodialysis patients is rare, with a high rate of risks. Patients could still gain a good outcome, if we intensify hemodialysis and enhance the collaboration between the patient, nephrologists, obstetricians, neonatologist, nutritionists, and other departments.

  16. PU.1 target genes undergo Tet2-coupled demethylation and DNMT3b-mediated methylation in monocyte-to-osteoclast differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Rica, Lorenzo; Rodríguez-Ubreva, Javier; García, Mireia; Islam, Abul B M M K; Urquiza, José M; Hernando, Henar; Christensen, Jesper; Helin, Kristian; Gómez-Vaquero, Carmen; Ballestar, Esteban

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation is a key epigenetic mechanism for driving and stabilizing cell-fate decisions. Local deposition and removal of DNA methylation are tightly coupled with transcription factor binding, although the relationship varies with the specific differentiation process. Conversion of monocytes to osteoclasts is a unique terminal differentiation process within the hematopoietic system. This differentiation model is relevant to autoimmune disease and cancer, and there is abundant knowledge on the sets of transcription factors involved. Here we focused on DNA methylation changes during osteoclastogenesis. Hypermethylation and hypomethylation changes took place in several thousand genes, including all relevant osteoclast differentiation and function categories. Hypomethylation occurred in association with changes in 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, a proposed intermediate toward demethylation. Transcription factor binding motif analysis revealed an over-representation of PU.1, NF-κB, and AP-1 (Jun/Fos) binding motifs in genes undergoing DNA methylation changes. Among these, only PU.1 motifs were significantly enriched in both hypermethylated and hypomethylated genes; ChIP-seq data analysis confirmed its association to both gene sets. Moreover, PU.1 interacts with both DNMT3b and TET2, suggesting its participation in driving hypermethylation and hydroxymethylation-mediated hypomethylation. Consistent with this, siRNA-mediated PU.1 knockdown in primary monocytes impaired the acquisition of DNA methylation and expression changes, and reduced the association of TET2 and DNMT3b at PU.1 targets during osteoclast differentiation. The work described here identifies key changes in DNA methylation during monocyte-to-osteoclast differentiation and reveals novel roles for PU.1 in this process.

  17. Screening and surveillance for second malignant neoplasms in adult survivors of childhood cancer: A report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Paul Craig; Ness, Kirsten Kimberlie; Mahoney, Martin Christopher; Li, Zhenghong; Hudson, Melissa Maria; Ford, Jennifer Sylene; Landier, Wendy; Stovall, Marilyn; Armstrong, Gregory Thomas; Henderson, Tara Olive; Robison, Leslie L; Oeffinger, Kevin Charles

    2011-01-01

    Background Childhood cancer survivors may develop a second malignant neoplasm during adulthood and therefore require regular surveillance. Objective To examine adherence to population cancer screening guidelines by survivors at average risk of developing a second malignant neoplasm, and to cancer surveillance guidelines by survivors at high risk of developing a second malignant neoplasm. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting The Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS), a 26 center study of long-term survivors of childhood cancer who were diagnosed between 1970 and 1986. Patients 4,329 male and 4,018 female survivors of childhood cancer who completed a CCSS questionnaire assessing screening and surveillance for new cancers. Measurements Patient-reported receipt and timing of mammography, Papanicolaou smear, colonoscopy, or skin examination was categorized as adherent to the United States Preventive Services Task Force guidelines for survivors at average risk for breast or cervical cancer, or the Children’s Oncology Group guidelines for survivors at high risk for developing breast, colorectal or skin cancer as a result of their therapy. Results Among average risk female survivors, 2,743/3,392 (80.9%) reported a Papanicolaou smear within the recommended period, and 140/209 (67.0%) reported a mammogram within the recommended period. Among high risk survivors, rates of recommended mammography among females, and colonoscopy and complete skin exams among both genders were only 241/522 (46.2%), 91/794 (11.5%) and 1,290/4,850 (26.6%), respectively. Limitations Data were self report. CCSS participants are a select group of survivors and their compliance may not be representative of all childhood cancer survivors. Conclusions Female survivors at average risk for developing a second malignant neoplasm demonstrate reasonable rates of screening for cervical and breast cancer. However, surveillance for new cancers is very poor amongst survivors at highest risk for colon

  18. Trends in adherence to recommended cancer screening: The US population and working cancer survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tainya C. Clarke

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Over the past decade the United States has seen a decrease in advanced cancer diagnoses. There has also been an increase in the number of cancer survivors returning to work. Cancer screening behaviors among survivors may play an important role in their return-to-work process. Adherence to a post-treatment cancer screening protocol increases early detection of secondary tumors and reduces potentially limiting side-effects. We compared screening trends among all cancer survivors, working survivors, and the general population over the last decade.Methods: Trends in adherence to recommended screening were analyzed by site-specific cancer. We used the Healthy People goals as a measure of desired adherence. We selected participants 18+ years from 1997 to 2010 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS for years where detailed cancer screening information was available. Using the recommendations of the American Cancer Society as a guide, we assessed adherence to cancer screening across the decade. There were 174,393 participants. Analyses included 7,528 working cancer survivors representing 3.8 million US workers, and 119,374 adults representing more than 100 million working Americans with no cancer history.Results: The US population met the Healthy People 2010 goal for colorectal screening, but declined in all other recommended cancer screening. Cancer survivors met and maintained the HP2010 goal for all, except cervical cancer screening. Survivors had higher screening rates than the general population. Among survivors, white-collar and service occupations had higher screening rates than blue-collar survivors.Conclusions: Cancer survivors report higher screening rates than the general population. Nevertheless, national screening rates are lower than desired, and disparities exist by cancer history and occupation. Understanding existing disparities, and the impact of cancer screening on survivors is crucial as the number of working survivors

  19. Outcomes of infants undergoing superior cavopulmonary connection in the presence of ventricular dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Matthew J; Elias, Matthew D; Cohen, Meryl S; Quartermain, Michael D

    2012-04-01

    Outcomes in patients with ventricular dysfunction undergoing superior cavopulmonary connection (SCPC) are not well known. We reviewed records of patients undergoing SCPC at our center from December 2005 to October 2009 and studied those whose pre-SCPC echocardiograms demonstrated at least moderate systemic ventricular dysfunction. Of the 213 patients undergoing SCPC, 19 (9%) met inclusion criteria. Diagnoses were hypoplastic left heart syndrome (n = 18) and rightward unbalanced atrioventricular canal with pulmonary stenosis (n = 1). In those surviving >2 months after SCPC, ventricular function was assessed by echocardiography 4.9 (range 3.5 to 9.7) months after SCPC and was improved in ten of 17 (59%), unchanged in six of 17 (35%), and worsened in one of 17 (16%) patients. After SCPC, three patients died, and one underwent heart transplant 21.9 months after SCPC. Transplant-free survival was attained by 15 of 19 (79%) patients during follow-up of 33.0 months (range 10.8 to 51.4). Fontan completion was performed on six survivors on reaching an appropriate age. Ventricular dysfunction before SCPC is not uncommon and occurs primarily in patients with a morphologic right ventricle. Ventricular performance improves in the majority of patients after SCPC, and midterm outcomes are comparable with previous reports, suggesting that these patients remain candidates for staged palliation.

  20. Radiation, Atherosclerotic Risk Factors, and Stroke Risk in Survivors of Pediatric Cancer: A Report From the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Sabine, E-mail: muellers@neuropeds.ucsf.edu [Department of Neurology, Pediatrics and Neurosurgery, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Fullerton, Heather J. [Department of Neurology and Pediatrics, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Stratton, Kayla; Leisenring, Wendy [Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington (United States); Weathers, Rita E.; Stovall, Marilyn [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Armstrong, Gregory T. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Goldsby, Robert E. [Department of Pediatrics, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Packer, Roger J. [Children' s National Medical Center, Washington, District of Columbia (United States); Sklar, Charles A. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Bowers, Daniel C. [University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, Dallas, Texas (United States); Robison, Leslie L.; Krull, Kevin R. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To test the hypotheses that (1) the increased risk of stroke conferred by childhood cranial radiation therapy (CRT) persists into adulthood; and (2) atherosclerotic risk factors further increase the stroke risk in cancer survivors. Methods and Materials: The Childhood Cancer Survivor Study is a multi-institutional retrospective cohort study of 14,358 5-year survivors of childhood cancer and 4023 randomly selected sibling controls with longitudinal follow-up. Age-adjusted incidence rates of self-reported late-occurring (≥5 years after diagnosis) first stroke were calculated. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were used to identify independent stroke predictors. Results: During a mean follow-up of 23.3 years, 292 survivors reported a late-occurring stroke. The age-adjusted stroke rate per 100,000 person-years was 77 (95% confidence interval [CI] 62-96), compared with 9.3 (95% CI 4-23) for siblings. Treatment with CRT increased stroke risk in a dose-dependent manner: hazard ratio 5.9 (95% CI 3.5-9.9) for 30-49 Gy CRT and 11.0 (7.4-17.0) for 50+ Gy CRT. The cumulative stroke incidence in survivors treated with 50+ Gy CRT was 1.1% (95% CI 0.4-1.8%) at 10 years after diagnosis and 12% (95% CI 8.9-15.0%) at 30 years. Hypertension increased stroke hazard by 4-fold (95% CI 2.8-5.5) and in black survivors by 16-fold (95% CI 6.9-36.6). Conclusion: Young adult pediatric cancer survivors have an increased stroke risk that is associated with CRT in a dose-dependent manner. Atherosclerotic risk factors enhanced this risk and should be treated aggressively.

  1. Radiation, atherosclerotic risk factors, and stroke risk in survivors of pediatric cancer: a report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Sabine; Fullerton, Heather J; Stratton, Kayla; Leisenring, Wendy; Weathers, Rita E; Stovall, Marilyn; Armstrong, Gregory T; Goldsby, Robert E; Packer, Roger J; Sklar, Charles A; Bowers, Daniel C; Robison, Leslie L; Krull, Kevin R

    2013-07-15

    To test the hypotheses that (1) the increased risk of stroke conferred by childhood cranial radiation therapy (CRT) persists into adulthood; and (2) atherosclerotic risk factors further increase the stroke risk in cancer survivors. The Childhood Cancer Survivor Study is a multi-institutional retrospective cohort study of 14,358 5-year survivors of childhood cancer and 4023 randomly selected sibling controls with longitudinal follow-up. Age-adjusted incidence rates of self-reported late-occurring (≥5 years after diagnosis) first stroke were calculated. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were used to identify independent stroke predictors. During a mean follow-up of 23.3 years, 292 survivors reported a late-occurring stroke. The age-adjusted stroke rate per 100,000 person-years was 77 (95% confidence interval [CI] 62-96), compared with 9.3 (95% CI 4-23) for siblings. Treatment with CRT increased stroke risk in a dose-dependent manner: hazard ratio 5.9 (95% CI 3.5-9.9) for 30-49 Gy CRT and 11.0 (7.4-17.0) for 50+ Gy CRT. The cumulative stroke incidence in survivors treated with 50+ Gy CRT was 1.1% (95% CI 0.4-1.8%) at 10 years after diagnosis and 12% (95% CI 8.9-15.0%) at 30 years. Hypertension increased stroke hazard by 4-fold (95% CI 2.8-5.5) and in black survivors by 16-fold (95% CI 6.9-36.6). Young adult pediatric cancer survivors have an increased stroke risk that is associated with CRT in a dose-dependent manner. Atherosclerotic risk factors enhanced this risk and should be treated aggressively. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Educational and occupational outcomes of childhood cancer survivors 30 years after diagnosis: a French cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Agnes; Berger, Claire; Auquier, Pascal; Michel, Gérard; Fresneau, Brice; Sètchéou Allodji, Rodrigue; Haddy, Nadia; Rubino, Carole; Vassal, Gilles; Valteau-Couanet, Dominique; Thouvenin-Doulet, Sandrine; Casagranda, Léonie; Pacquement, Hélène; El-Fayech, Chiraz; Oberlin, Odile; Guibout, Catherine; de Vathaire, Florent

    2016-04-26

    Although survival from childhood cancer has increased, little is known on the long-term impact of treatment late effects on occupational attainment or work ability. A total of 3512 five-year survivors treated before the age of 19 years in 10 French cancer centres between 1948 and 2000 were identified. Educational level, employment status and occupational class of survivors were assessed by a self-reported questionnaire. These outcome measures were compared with sex-age rates recorded in the French population, using indirect standardisation. Paternal occupational class was also considered to control for the role of survivors' socioeconomic background on their achievement. Multivariable analyses were conducted to explore clinical characteristics associated with the outcomes. A total of 2406 survivors responded to the questionnaire and survivors aged below 25 years were included in the current analysis. Compared with national statistics adjusted on age and sex, male survivors were more likely to be college graduates (39.2% vs 30.9% expected; Phigher achievement was not observed either for leukaemia or central nervous system (CNS) tumour survivors. Health-related unemployment was higher for survivors of CNS tumour (28.1% vs 4.3%; Phigher occupational class than expected. Survivors treated for CNS tumour or leukaemia, especially when treatment included cranial irradiation, might need support throughout their lifespan.

  3. Screening survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia for obesity, metabolic syndrome, and insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakurt, Hasan; Sarper, Nazan; Kılıç, Suar Çakı; Gelen, Sema Aylan; Zengin, Emine

    2012-09-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) survivors were screened for risk factors of cardiovascular disease. Forty-four ALL survivors in first remission were enrolled. Twenty-six also received 12-18 Gy cranial radiotherapy (RT). Patients' body mass indexes (BMIs) at dignosis and during the study were compared. Metabolic syndrome (MS) evaluation was performed in patients, parents, and siblings older than 6 years. Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA) index of the survivors was also calculated. In survivors with impaired fasting glucose levels, oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed. Thyroid functions and IGF-1 and/or IGFBP-3 levels of the survivors who received cranial RT were evaluated. Median age of the survivors was 11.5 years (6-23). At diagnosis, mean BMI percentile was 46.7 (3-95) and mean z-score was -0.09 ± 1.14; during the study, these values rose to 71.1 ± 25.6 (3-100) and 0.8 ± 0.94, respectively (P obese at diagnosis and during the study, respectively (P = .005). Survivors had significantly higher BMI percentile and BMI z-score compared to their siblings (P = .006 and P = .011, respectively). The study group was small and we could not show a correlation of the patients' obesity with RT, thyroid functions, IGF-1, and IGFBP-3 levels. In three survivors (6.8%), there was MS. Maternal and paternal MS was not found as a risk factor for MS of the survivors (P = .1, P = .5, respectively). The HOMA index revealed insulin resistance (IR) in 12 (27.2%) of the survivors, whereas OGTT revealed abnormal glucose regulation and/or IR in four. As a conclusion, ALL survivors have high risk for obesity and MS.

  4. Searching for maintenance in exercise interventions for cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowski, Catherine M; Ory, Marcia G; Friedman, Daniela B; Dwyer, Andrea; Birken, Sarah A; Risendal, Betsy

    2014-12-01

    Translating evidence-based exercise interventions into practice is important for expanding the capacity to support cancer survivors. Using the reach, efficacy/effectiveness, adoption, implementation, and maintenance (RE-AIM) framework and scoping study methodology, we addressed the research question, "What is known about the maintenance of exercise interventions for cancer survivors that would inform translation from research to practice and community settings?" Maintenance was investigated at the individual and setting level. Literature searches were performed in the PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), and Sport Discus databases for articles published from January 2009 to June 2012. Abstracts were judged using a priori criteria for the survivor population, exercise intervention, and maintenance on the individual or setting level. We included completed and planned randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and other study designs. Publications meeting the criteria were reviewed and coded. Of the 211 abstracts meeting patient and exercise criteria, 24 (19 RCTs) met the maintenance criteria. Nine of the 12 completed RCTs demonstrated maintenance of intervention outcomes after 3 to 14 months of follow-up. The planned RCTs described interventions lasting 2 to 4.5 months and maintenance intervals lasting 3 to 12 months following the active intervention. Maintenance at the setting level was reported in one publication. On the individual level, intervention outcomes were maintained in most studies, in a variety of settings and survivor subpopulations. Maintenance on the setting level was scarcely addressed. This scoping study suggests several strategies that could be taken by agencies, clinicians, and researchers to develop more effective and sustainable exercise programs for cancer survivors. Many benefits of exercise training are maintained for months after cancer survivors complete controlled research studies but relatively little is

  5. Exploration of Exercise Outcome Expectations Among Breast Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschey, Rachel; Docherty, Sharron L; Pan, Wei; Lipkus, Isaac

    Exercise is associated with decreased recurrence risk and improved survival and quality of life for breast cancer survivors. However, only an estimated 17% to 37% of survivors adhere to the American Cancer Society exercise guidelines. A critical first step to increase exercise among survivors is to understand how they believe exercise will affect them. The aim of this study is to explore common exercise outcome expectations among 20 female survivors of stage IA to IIB breast cancer who completed adjuvant treatment and an exercise intervention. A mixed-method descriptive study consisting of semistructured telephone interviews assessed exercise outcome expectations and how the experience of cancer and its treatment influenced the expected outcomes of exercise. The qualitative data were analyzed using a summative content analysis procedure; means were calculated for each item of the exercise outcome questionnaire. The qualitative and quantitative data were compared and contrasted. The sample was 70% white and 30% African American, with a mean (SD) age of 62 (8.5) years, and mean (SD) time since treatment completion of 4.2 (1.3) years. Three themes emerged from the interviews: (1) prevalence of common expectations, (2) pervasive impact of fatigue, and (3) a brighter future. Overall, findings revealed that breast cancer survivors have low levels of agreement that exercise may mitigate late and long-term cancer and treatment effects. In general, breast cancer survivors (even those who are motivated to exercise) do not hold strong beliefs that exercise will decrease late and long-term treatment effects. Clinicians can educate survivors about exercise benefits.

  6. Adverse psychological outcomes in long-term survivors of hematopoietic cell transplantation: a report from the Bone Marrow Transplant Survivor Study (BMTSS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Can-Lan; Francisco, Liton; Baker, K Scott; Weisdorf, Daniel J; Forman, Stephen J; Bhatia, Smita

    2011-10-27

    Little information exists regarding long-term psychological health of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) survivors. Using resources offered by the Bone Marrow Transplant Survivor Study (BMTSS), we evaluated adverse psychological outcomes in 1065 long-term HCT survivors and a healthy comparison group composed of siblings. Psychological health status was evaluated using the Brief Symptom Inventory-18. Twenty-two percent of the HCT survivors reported adverse psychological outcomes, compared with 8% of the siblings. Exposure to prednisone was associated with psychological distress across all domains (anxiety, depression, and somatic distress). Fifteen percent of the HCT survivors reported somatic distress, representing an almost 3-fold higher risk comparing to siblings. Among survivors, in addition to low annual household income and self-reported poor health, having severe/life-threatening conditions and presence of active chronic GVHD were associated with a 2-fold increased risk for somatic distress. Seven percent of the HCT survivors expressed suicidal ideation; patients with higher scores on depression subscale were most vulnerable. This study demonstrates that somatic distress is the biggest challenge faced by survivors long after HCT. These results identify vulnerable subpopulations and provide patients, families, and healthcare providers with necessary information to plan for post-HCT needs many years after HCT.

  7. Parenthood in Survivors of Hodgkin Lymphoma : An EORTC-GELA General Population Case-Control Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kaaij, Marleen A. E.; Heutte, Natacha; Meijnders, Paul; Abeilard-Lemoisson, Edwige; Spina, Michele; Moser, Lotte C.; Allgeier, Anouk; Meulemans, Bart; Dubois, Brice; Simons, Arnold H. M.; Lugtenburg, Pieternella J.; Aleman, Berthe M. P.; Noordijk, Evert M.; Ferme, Christophe; Thomas, Jose; Stamatoullas, Aspasia; Fruchart, Christophe; Brice, Pauline; Gaillard, Isabelle; Doorduijn, Jeanette K.; Sebban, Catherine; Smit, Wilma G. J. M.; Bologna, Serge; Roesink, Judith M.; Ong, Francisca; Andre, Marc P. E.; Raemaekers, John M. M.; Henry-Amar, Michel; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose We investigated the impact of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) on parenthood, including factors influencing parenthood probability, by comparing long-term HL survivors with matched general population controls. Patients and Methods A Life Situation Questionnaire was sent to 3,604 survivors treated from

  8. Parenthood in survivors of Hodgkin lymphoma: An EORTC-GELA general population case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A.E. van der Kaaij (Marleen A.); N. Heutte (Natacha); P. Meijnders (Paul); E. Abeilard-Lemoisson (Edwige); M. Spina (Michele); L.C. Moser (Lotte); A. Allgeier (Anouk); B. Meulemans (Bart); B. Dubois (Brice); A.H.M. Simons; P.J. Lugtenburg (Pieternella); B.M.P. Aleman (Berthe); E.M. Noordijk (Evert); C. Fermé (Christophe); J. Thomas (Jose); A. Stamatoullas (Aspasia); C. Fruchart (Christophe); P. Brice (Pauline); I. Gaillard (Isabelle); J.K. Doorduijn (Jeanette); C. Sebban (Catherine); W.G. Smit (Wilma); S. Bologna (Serge); J.M. Roesink (Judith); F. Ong (Francisca); J.-L. André (Jean-Luc); J. Raemaekers (John); M. Henry-Amar (Michel); J.C. Kluin-Nelemans (Hanneke)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: We investigated the impact of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) on parenthood, including factors influencing parenthood probability, by comparing long-term HL survivors with matched general population controls. Patients and Methods: A Life Situation Questionnaire was sent to 3,604 survivors

  9. Parenthood in survivors of Hodgkin lymphoma: an EORTC-GELA general population case-control study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaaij, M.A. van der; Heutte, N.; Meijnders, P.; Abeilard-Lemoisson, E.; Spina, M.; Moser, L.C.; Allgeier, A.; Meulemans, B.; Dubois, B.; Simons, A.H.; Lugtenburg, P.J.; Aleman, B.M.; Noordijk, E.M.; Ferme, C.; Thomas, J.; Stamatoullas, A.; Fruchart, C.; Brice, P.; Gaillard, I.; Doorduijn, J.K.; Sebban, C.; Smit, W.G.; Bologna, S.; Roesink, J.M.; Ong, F.; Andre, M.P.; Raemaekers, J.M.M.; Henry-Amar, M.; Kluin-Nelemans, H.C.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: We investigated the impact of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) on parenthood, including factors influencing parenthood probability, by comparing long-term HL survivors with matched general population controls. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A Life Situation Questionnaire was sent to 3,604 survivors treated

  10. 20 CFR 725.227 - Time of determination of relationship and dependency of survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Time of determination of relationship and dependency of survivors. 725.227 Section 725.227 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT STANDARDS ADMINISTRATION... Benefits) § 725.227 Time of determination of relationship and dependency of survivors. The determination as...

  11. Mediators of physical exercise for improvement in cancer survivors' quality of life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buffart, L.M.; Ros, W.J.G.; Chin A Paw, M.J.M.; Brug, J.; Knol, D.L.; Korstjens, I.; van Weert, E.; Mesters, I.; van den Borne, B.; Hoekstra-Weebers, J.E.H.M.; May, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Mediating mechanisms of a 12-week group-based exercise intervention on cancer survivors' quality of life (QoL) were examined to inform future exercise intervention development. Methods Two hundred nine cancer survivors3 months posttreatment (57% breast cancer) aged 49.5 (±10.4) years

  12. Immune response to a heat-inactivated hepatitis B vaccine in patients undergoing hemodialysis. Enhancement of the response by increasing the dose of hepatitis B surface antigen from 3 to 27 micrograms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lelie, P. N.; Reesink, H. W.; de Jong-van Manen, S. T.; Dees, P. J.; Reerink-Brongers, E. E.

    1985-01-01

    In a randomized trial, 227 patients undergoing hemodialysis who were seronegative for all markers of hepatitis B virus were immunized at monthly intervals with three doses of either 3 micrograms or 27 micrograms of heat-inactivated hepatitis B HB-vaccine (CLB). Five months after the first injection,

  13. Predictors of fatigue and poor sleep in adult survivors of childhood Hodgkin's lymphoma: a report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rach, Amanda M; Crabtree, Valerie McLaughlin; Brinkman, Tara M; Zeltzer, Lonnie; Marchak, Jordan Gilleland; Srivastava, Deokumar; Tynes, Brooklee; Lai, Jin-Shei; Robison, Leslie L; Armstrong, Gregory T; Krull, Kevin R

    2017-04-01

    Survivors of pediatric Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) are at risk for a number of debilitating late effects. Excessive fatigue and poor sleep quality are primary complaints of HL survivors. Understanding the emotional and physical factors that influence fatigue and sleep quality may provide opportunities for intervention to improve health-related quality of life for HL survivors. Data from 751 adult survivors of childhood HL who participated in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS) from 2000-2002 were analyzed. Multivariable logistic regression analyses investigated the demographic, psychological, and physical variables that predicted clinically significant levels of poor sleep quality, fatigue, and excessive daytime sleepiness. Survivors' self-reported level of emotional distress, pain, and physical functioning limitations did not differ from population norms. Clinically elevated levels of emotional distress (OR 8.38, 95% CI 4.28-16.42) and pain (OR 3.73, 95% CI 2.09-6.67) increased the risk for endorsing elevated levels of fatigue. Survivors with elevated levels of emotional distress (OR 6.83, 95% CI 2.71-15.90) and pain (OR 5.27, 95% CI 1.78-15.61) were more likely to report poor sleep quality. Pain (OR 2.11, 95% CI 1.39-3.34) was related to excessive daytime sleepiness. Emotional and physical factors are associated with elevated levels of fatigue, excessive daytime sleepiness, and poor sleep quality in survivors of pediatric HL. This is consistent with findings from research conducted with non-cancer survivors. These results suggest that interventions designed to target sleep and fatigue difficulties in the general population may be well suited for pediatric HL survivors as well.

  14. Unemployment among breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsen, Kathrine; Ewertz, Marianne; Dalton, Susanne Oksbjerg; Badsberg, Jens Henrik; Osler, Merete

    2014-05-01

    Though about 20% of working age breast cancer survivors do not return to work after treatment, few studies have addressed risk factors for unemployment. The majority of studies on occupational consequences of breast cancer focus on non-employment, which is a mixture of sickness absence, unemployment, retirement pensions and other reasons for not working. Unemployment in combination with breast cancer may represent a particular challenge for these women. The aim of the present study is therefore to analyze the risk for unemployment in the years following diagnosis and treatment for breast cancer. This study included 14,750 women diagnosed with breast cancer in Denmark 2001-2009 identified through a population-based clinical database and linked with information from Danish administrative population based registers for information on labour market affiliation, socio-demography and co-morbid conditions. Multivariable analyses were performed by Cox's proportional hazard models. Two years after treatment, 81% of patients were still part of the work force, 10% of which were unemployed. Increasing duration of unemployment before breast cancer was associated with an adjusted HR = 4.37 (95% CI: 3.90-4.90) for unemployment after breast cancer. Other risk factors for unemployment included low socioeconomic status and demography, while adjuvant therapy did not increase the risk of unemployment. Duration of unemployment before breast cancer was the most important determinant of unemployment after breast cancer treatment. This allows identification of a particularly vulnerable group of patients in need of rehabilitation.

  15. Emotional distress among adult survivors of childhood cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oancea, S Cristina; Brinkman, Tara M; Ness, Kirsten K; Krull, Kevin R; Smith, Webb A; Srivastava, D Kumar; Robison, Leslie L; Hudson, Melissa M; Gurney, James G

    2014-06-01

    The purposes of this study were to estimate the prevalence of emotional distress in a large cohort of adult survivors of childhood cancer and to evaluate the interrelationship of risk factors including cancer-related late effects. Adult survivors of childhood cancer (N = 1,863), median age of 32 years at follow-up, completed comprehensive medical evaluations. Clinically relevant emotional distress was assessed using the Brief Symptom Inventory 18 and was defined as T-scores ≥63. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using multivariable logistic regression models to identify risk factors for distress. Path analysis was used to examine associations among identified risk factors. Elevated global distress was reported by 15.1% of survivors. Cancer-related pain was associated with elevated distress (OR 8.72; 95% CI, 5.32-14.31). Survivors who reported moderate learning or memory problems were more likely to have elevated distress than survivors who reported no learning or memory problems (OR 3.27; 95% CI, 2.17-4.93). Path analysis implied that cancer-related pain has a direct effect on distress symptoms and an indirect effect through socioeconomic status and learning or memory problems. Similar results were observed for learning or memory problems. Childhood cancer-related morbidities including pain and learning or memory problems appear to be directly and indirectly associated with elevated distress symptoms decades after treatment. Understanding these associations may help inform intervention targets for survivors of childhood cancer experiencing symptoms of distress. A subset of long-term childhood cancer survivors experience significant emotional distress. Physical and cognitive late effects may contribute to these symptoms.

  16. Financial Hardships Experienced by Cancer Survivors: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altice, Cheryl K; Banegas, Matthew P; Tucker-Seeley, Reginald D; Yabroff, K Robin

    2017-02-01

    With rising cancer care costs, including high-priced cancer drugs, financial hardship is increasingly documented among cancer survivors in the United States; research findings have not been synthesized. We conducted a systematic review of articles published between 1990 and 2015 describing the financial hardship experienced by cancer survivors using PubMed, Embase, Scopus, and CINAHL databases. We categorized measures of financial hardship into: material conditions (eg, out-of-pocket costs, productivity loss, medical debt, or bankruptcy), psychological responses (eg, distress or worry), and coping behaviors (eg, skipped medications). We abstracted findings and conducted a qualitative synthesis. Among 676 studies identified, 45 met the inclusion criteria and were incorporated in the review. The majority of the studies (82%, n = 37) reported financial hardship as a material condition measure; others reported psychological (7%, n = 3) and behavioral measures (16%, n = 7). Financial hardship measures were heterogeneous within each broad category, and the prevalence of financial hardship varied by the measure used and population studied. Mean annual productivity loss ranged from $380 to $8236, 12% to 62% of survivors reported being in debt because of their treatment, 47% to 49% of survivors reported experiencing some form of financial distress, and 4% to 45% of survivors did not adhere to recommended prescription medication because of cost. Financial hardship is common among cancer survivors, although we found substantial heterogeneity in its prevalence. Our findings highlight the need for consistent use of definitions, terms, and measures to determine the best intervention targets and inform intervention development in order to prevent and minimize the impact of financial hardship experienced by cancer survivors. Published by Oxford University Press 2016. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  17. Satisfaction of Nigerian stroke survivors with outpatient physiotherapy care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaleye, Olubukola A; Hamzat, Talhatu K; Akinrinsade, Marvellous A

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the satisfaction of stroke survivors with outpatient physiotherapy care. Sixty stroke survivors were surveyed using the European Physiotherapy Treatment Outpatient Satisfaction Survey (EPTOPS). Focus group discussion (FGD) was also conducted with four stroke survivors from the same sample. Data were analyzed using the Kruskal Wallis test and Spearman's correlation coefficients at p = 0.05. FGD was transcribed and thematically analyzed. Nearly all the participants (98.3%) indicated one of good, very good, and excellent improvement in their clinical conditions with physiotherapy. Majority expressed satisfaction with their physiotherapy care, the modal response being very good (59.3%). Patients' satisfaction and socio-demographics were not significantly correlated (p > 0.05). Overarching themes from FGD were physiotherapy in stroke rehabilitation, satisfaction with physiotherapy care, cost, and lack of continuity of care as sources of dissatisfaction. Physiotherapists' demeanor was a facilitator of satisfaction. The stroke survivors were generally satisfied with outpatient physiotherapy care. However, lack of continuity and cost of care were sources of dissatisfaction among patients. Delivery of physiotherapy to stroke survivors in Nigeria should be structured to allow for continuity of care as this may enhance satisfaction. Implementation of inexpensive rehabilitation strategies may help reduce cost of physiotherapy.

  18. Childhood Cancer Survivor Study: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Childhood Treatment Childhood Cancer Genomics Study Findings Childhood Cancer Survivor Study: An Overview Dr. Greg Armstrong, ... Late Effects of Treatment for Childhood Cancer .) The Childhood Cancer Survivor Study ( CCSS ), funded by the National ...

  19. Detroit Research on Cancer Survivors Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    An NCI press release about the launch of the Detroit Research on Cancer Survivors (ROCS) study, which will look at factors affecting cancer progression, recurrence, mortality, and quality of life among African-American cancer survivors.

  20. Secondhand Smoke Still Plagues Some Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_166834.html Secondhand Smoke Still Plagues Some Cancer Survivors Study found they ... number of nonsmoking cancer survivors exposed to secondhand smoke is down significantly in the United States, but ...

  1. Subsequent Neoplasms in 5-Year Survivors of Childhood Cancer: The Childhood Cancer Survivor Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitton, John; Leisenring, Wendy; Mertens, Ann C.; Hammond, Sue; Stovall, Marilyn; Donaldson, Sarah S.; Meadows, Anna T.; Robison, Leslie L.; Neglia, Joseph P.

    2010-01-01

    Background The occurrence of subsequent neoplasms has direct impact on the quantity and quality of life in cancer survivors. We have expanded our analysis of these events in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS) to better understand the occurrence of these events as the survivor population ages. Methods The incidence of and risk for subsequent neoplasms occurring 5 years or more after the childhood cancer diagnosis were determined among 14 359 5-year survivors in the CCSS who were treated from 1970 through 1986 and who were at a median age of 30 years (range = 5–56 years) for this analysis. At 30 years after childhood cancer diagnosis, we calculated cumulative incidence at 30 years of subsequent neoplasms and calculated standardized incidence ratios (SIRs), excess absolute risks (EARs) for invasive second malignant neoplasms, and relative risks for subsequent neoplasms by use of multivariable Poisson regression. Results Among 14 359 5-year survivors, 1402 subsequently developed 2703 neoplasms. Cumulative incidence at 30 years after the childhood cancer diagnosis was 20.5% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 19.1% to 21.8%) for all subsequent neoplasms, 7.9% (95% CI = 7.2% to 8.5%) for second malignant neoplasms (excluding nonmelanoma skin cancer), 9.1% (95% CI = 8.1% to 10.1%) for nonmelanoma skin cancer, and 3.1% (95% CI = 2.5% to 3.8%) for meningioma. Excess risk was evident for all primary diagnoses (EAR = 2.6 per 1000 person-years, 95% CI = 2.4 to 2.9 per 1000 person-years; SIR = 6.0, 95% CI = 5.5 to 6.4), with the highest being for Hodgkin lymphoma (SIR = 8.7, 95% CI = 7.7 to 9.8) and Ewing sarcoma (SIR = 8.5, 95% CI = 6.2 to 11.7). In the Poisson multivariable analysis, female sex, older age at diagnosis, earlier treatment era, diagnosis of Hodgkin lymphoma, and treatment with radiation therapy were associated with increased risk of subsequent neoplasm. Conclusions As childhood cancer survivors progress through adulthood, risk of subsequent neoplasms

  2. Cancer survivors' experience of time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Dorte M.; Elverdam, Beth

    2007-01-01

    survivors over time to explore how perceptions and experiences change. METHODS: An exploratory study was carried out in 2002-2004 with a purposive sample of adults who had experienced various forms of cancer. Data collection included 9 weeks of participant observation at a Cancer Rehabilitation Centre...... and ethnographic interviews with 23 informants. Ten men and 13 women were interviewed twice: 2 weeks after their stay and 18 months later. FINDINGS: Data were analysed from a culture-analytical perspective. Three main themes regarding the survivors' handling and perception of time were found: (1) cancer disrupts......AIM: This paper reports a study to explore how cancer survivors talk about, experience and manage time in everyday life. BACKGROUND: There is an increasing interest in specific physical and psychosocial aspects of life after cancer diagnosis and treatment, but hardly any research follows cancer...

  3. Internet Use and Breast Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhamad, Mazanah; Afshari, Mojgan; Mohamed, Nor Aini

    2011-01-01

    A survey was administered to 400 breast cancer survivors at hospitals and support group meetings in Peninsular Malaysia to explore their level of Internet use and factors related to the Internet use by breast cancer survivors. Findings of this study indicated that about 22.5% of breast cancer survivors used Internet to get information about breast…

  4. Pregnancy-Associated Cardiomyopathy in Survivors of Childhood Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Melissa R.; Mulrooney, Daniel A.; Hudson, Melissa M.; Ness, Kirsten K.; Green, Daniel M.; Howard, Scott C.; Krasin, Matthew; Metzger, Monika L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Current information regarding pregnancy-associated cardiomyopathy among women treated for childhood cancer is insufficient to appropriately guide counseling and patient management. This study aims to characterize its prevalence within a large cohort of females exposed to cardiotoxic therapy. Methods Retrospective cohort study of female cancer survivors treated at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital between 1963 and 2006, at least 5 years from diagnosis, ≥ 13 years old at last follow-up, and with at least one successful pregnancy. Pregnancy-associated cardiomyopathy was defined as shortening fraction cardiomyopathy during or up to 5 months after completion of pregnancy. Results Among 847 female cancer survivors with 1554 completed pregnancies only 3 (0.3%) developed pregnancy-associated cardiomyopathy, 40 developed non-pregnancy-associated cardiomyopathy either 5 months post-partum (n=14), or prior to pregnancy (n=26). Among those with cardiomyopathy prior to pregnancy (n=26), cardiac function deteriorated during pregnancy in 8 patients (3 patients with normalization of cardiac function prior to pregnancy, 3 with persistently abnormal cardiac function, and 2 for whom resolution of cardiomyopathy was unknown prior to pregnancy). Patients that developed cardiomyopathy recevied a higher median dose of anthracyclines compared to those that did not (321 mg/m2 versus 164 mg/m2; pcardiomyopathy in childhood cancer survivors is rare. Implications for cancer survivors Most female childhood cancer survivors will have no cardiac complications during or after childbirth, however those with a history of cardiotoxic therapies should be followed carefully during pregnancy particularly those with a history of anthracycline exposures and if they had documented previous or current subclinical or symptomatic cardiomyopathy. Female childhood cancer survivors with a history of cardiotoxic therapies should be followed carefully during pregnancy particularly those with a

  5. Physical Activity in Child and Adolescent Cancer Survivors: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliam, Margaux B.; Schwebel, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Childhood cancer survivors are at increased risk for future health problems. As such, physical activity (PA) has been targeted as a health promotion priority in child and adolescent cancer survivors. Research indicates that a large portion of pediatric survivors do not meet PA recommendations. Using Bronfenbrenner’s ecological theory as a framework, this review presents a conceptual model to explain child and adolescent survivors’ PA. The model considers predictors of PA across six domains: (1) demographic; (2) medical; (3) cognitive/emotional; (4) behavioral; (5) social/cultural; and (6) environmental. A structured literature review found 14 empirical articles examining those predictors of PA among child and adolescent cancer survivors. Much existing research is cross-sectional, but suggests multiple factors work together to encourage or discourage PA among survivors of child/adolescent cancer. The conceptual model, which is based in empirical findings to date, can be used to understand the process through which PA is promoted and maintained, to inform the development of empirically-supported clinical interventions, and to guide future research objectives and priorities. PMID:25484907

  6. Mental health for elder A-bomb survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mine, Mariko; Honda, Sumihisa; Hata, Tomoko [Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine] [and others

    1994-12-01

    A pilot study was made, based on an interview survey, to improve mental hygiene in A-bomb survivors. The study consisted of General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) 12 items, Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI), Social Disabilities Schedule (SDS), and General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) 30 items. A majority of the subjects were those aged in their fifties, sixties, and seventies. Eighty A-bomb survivors answered GHQ 12 items, consisting of 7, 17, and 41 who were exposed at <2.0 km, 2.0-2.9 km, and {>=}3.0 km from the hypocenter, respectively, and 15 who entered the city early after A-bombing. Thirty-three A-bomb survivors answered CIDI. According to the distance from the hypocenter, the corresponding figures were 2, 10, 15, and 6 A-bomb survivors. The survey for GHQ 12 items revealed that more A-bomb survivors exposed nearer the hypocenter suffered from mental problems. In the survey for CIDI, the most common complaints were found to be physical expression disorder (n=9) and chronic pain (n=8), followed by hypochondria (n=4), panic disorder (n=2), and anxiery (n=one). According to the SDS survey, 85% were judged as having no mental disorder, and the remaining 15% as having merely mild or moderate disorder. (N.K.).

  7. Rehabilitation interventions for cancer survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Helle Ploug; Tjørnhøj-Thomsen, Tine; Johansen, Christoffer

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Today more and more people survive cancer. Cancer survivors need help to recover both from the cancer and the treatment. Rehabilitative interventions have been set up to meet their needs. However, there are studies that report no major effects following careful, targeted intervention...... parameters in rehabilitation courses for cancer survivors in Denmark. METHODS: The study was based on an ethnographic fieldwork with participant observation at nine week-long courses, on in-depth interviews and on written sources. Fieldwork is well-suited for studying interventions in context, such as social...

  8. Survivor care for pediatric cancer survivors: a continuously evolving discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Record, Elizabeth O; Meacham, Lillian R

    2015-07-01

    This article summarizes recent findings regarding the prevalence of chronic health conditions, cardiovascular and pulmonary late effects, and second malignancies in childhood cancer survivors (CCSs), and examines facilitators and barriers to survivor care. The estimated cumulative prevalence for a serious chronic disease in CCSs is 80% by age 45. The crude prevalence for cardiac conditions is 56.4% and for pulmonary dysfunction is 65.2%. Research in cardio-oncology is focused on better methods of predicting risk for cardiac dysfunction, and better methods of detection and interventions to prevent cardiac late effects. Pulmonary late effects, recognized to be a significant cause of late mortality, were detected by surveillance tests in more than 50% of CCSs but are often subclinical. Rates of subsequent malignant neoplasm continue to increase as the population ages. All of these factors make it clear that life-long surveillance is required and models of care should consider risk for late effects and socioeconomic and patient-specific factors. It is becoming clear that there is no age after which the occurrence of late effects plateaus and surveillance can be reduced. Survivors should be empowered to advocate for their survivor care and options for follow-up should be tailored to their needs.

  9. Second Neoplasms in Survivors of Childhood Cancer: Findings From the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadows, Anna T.; Friedman, Debra L.; Neglia, Joseph P.; Mertens, Ann C.; Donaldson, Sarah S.; Stovall, Marilyn; Hammond, Sue; Yasui, Yutaka; Inskip, Peter D.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To review the reports of subsequent neoplasms (SNs) in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS) cohort that were made through January 1, 2006, and published before July 31, 2008, and to discuss the host-, disease-, and therapy-related risk factors associated with SNs. Patients and Methods SNs were ascertained by survivor self-reports and subsequently confirmed by pathology findings or medical record review. Cumulative incidence of SNs and standardized incidence ratios for second malignant neoplasms (SMNs) were calculated. The impact of host-, disease-, and therapy-related risk factors was evaluated by Poisson regression. Results Among 14,358 cohort members, 730 reported 802 SMNs (excluding nonmelanoma skin cancers). This represents a 2.3-fold increase in the number of SMNs over that reported in the first comprehensive analysis of SMNs in the CCSS cohort, which was done 7 years ago. In addition, 66 cases of meningioma and 1,007 cases of nonmelanoma skin cancer were diagnosed. The 30-year cumulative incidence of SMNs was 9.3% and that of nonmelanoma skin cancer was 6.9%. Risk of SNs remains elevated for more than 20 years of follow-up for all primary childhood cancer diagnoses. In multivariate analyses, risks differ by SN subtype, but include radiotherapy, age at diagnosis, sex, family history of cancer, and primary childhood cancer diagnosis. Female survivors whose primary childhood cancer diagnosis was Hodgkin's lymphoma or sarcoma and who received radiotherapy are at particularly increased risk. Analyses of risk associated with radiotherapy demonstrated different dose-response curves for specific SNs. Conclusion Childhood cancer survivors are at a substantial and increasing risk for SNs, including nonmelanoma skin cancer and meningiomas. Health care professionals should understand the magnitude of these risks to provide individuals with appropriate counseling and follow-up. PMID:19255307

  10. Health Behaviors of Childhood Cancer Survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer S. Ford

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available There has been a dramatic increase in the number of childhood cancer survivors living to an old age due to improved cancer treatments. However, these survivors are at risk of numerous late effects as a result of their cancer therapy. Engaging in protective health behaviors and limiting health damaging behaviors are vitally important for these survivors given their increased risks. We reviewed the literature on childhood cancer survivors’ health behaviors by searching for published data and conference proceedings. We examine the prevalence of a variety of health behaviors among childhood cancer survivors, identify significant risk factors, and describe health behavior interventions for survivors.

  11. Identification and evaluation of the salient physical activity beliefs of colorectal cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speed-Andrews, Amy E; McGowan, Erin L; Rhodes, Ryan E; Blanchard, Chris M; Culos-Reed, S Nicole; Friedenreich, Christine M; Courneya, Kerry S

    2014-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) has been associated with lower risk of disease recurrence and longer survival in colorectal cancer (CRC) survivors; however, less than one-third of CRC survivors are meeting PA guidelines. Interventions to promote PA in CRC survivors need to understand the most critical beliefs that influence PA behavior. The objective of this study was to examine the strength of associations between the most common PA beliefs of CRC survivors and motivational constructs from the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) as well as PA behavior. Colorectal cancer survivors (n = 600) residing in Alberta, Canada, completed self-report questionnaires assessing medical and demographic variables, PA beliefs, constructs from the TPB, and PA behavior. Colorectal cancer survivors identified improved fitness (69.5%), family members (67.3%), and medical/health problems (8.8%) as the most prevalent behavioral, normative, and control beliefs, respectively. All PA beliefs were significantly correlated with all TPB constructs and PA. Physical activity interventions for CRC survivors should target many salient beliefs including behavioral, normative, and control beliefs. Insights into the salient beliefs for PA in CRC survivors can guide nurses in developing successful strategies to promote PA in this population and likely improve quality of life and possibly disease outcomes.

  12. Who are the support persons of haematological cancer survivors and how is their performance perceived?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Alix; Lynagh, Marita; Carey, Mariko; Sanson-Fisher, Rob; Mansfield, Elise

    2017-12-01

    To explore: (1) how haematological cancer survivors and their support persons perceive the overall performance of the support person; (2) disagreement between survivor and support person ratings; and (3) characteristics associated with support persons rating their performance poorly. This is a substudy of a larger project of Australian haematological cancer survivors and their support persons. For this substudy, haematological cancer survivors were recruited from 4 Australian population-based cancer registries and asked to pass on a questionnaire package to their support persons. Survivors who passed on a questionnaire package to their support person were asked to answer questions about the support person and how they perceived the support person's performance. Similarly, support persons answered questions on their own performance as a support person. A total of 924 haematological cancer survivors and 821 support persons were eligible for this study. Most survivors rated their support person as performing very well (84%) while less than half (48%) of support persons rated their own performance as very well. There was significant disagreement between survivor and their support person (dyad) ratings of the support person's performance. Support persons with above normal levels of depression (vs those with normal levels) had significantly higher odds of rating their own performance as "not well/somewhat well." Health care providers should consider providing additional education and skills-based interventions to support persons who experience increased symptoms of depression. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Comparison of resilience in adolescent survivors of brain tumors and healthy adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chin-Mi; Chen, Yueh-Chih; Wong, Tai-Tong

    2014-01-01

    Resilience is essential for the psychological adjustment of adolescents experiencing difficulty. Comparing differences in resilience between adolescent survivors of brain tumors and healthy adolescents may help identify factors related to resilience in adolescents. The purpose of this study was to clarify how illness impacts the normative development of adolescent survivors of brain tumors by comparing them to healthy adolescents in terms of resilience and how it is affected by various health problems. This cross-sectional, case-control study used convenience sampling to recruit 13- to 18-year-old adolescent survivors of brain tumors and healthy adolescents matched by school level, gender, and living area. Data were collected by structured questionnaires. The sample included 60 adolescent survivors and 120 healthy adolescents. Participants in both groups were predominantly male adolescents (63.3%) and junior high school students (55%). The 2 groups did not differ significantly in resilience, but survivors without emotional problems had a higher mean resilience score than did healthy adolescents and survivors with emotional problems (F = 8.65, P adolescent survivors of brain tumors and healthy adolescents. In addition, the impact of emotional problems on resilience was more severe in brain tumor survivors than in healthy adolescents. Our results suggest that pediatric oncology nurses design interdisciplinary school-based interventions to reduce the impact of emotional problems on resilience in both healthy adolescents and those who survived brain tumors.

  14. Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Rates in Young Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klosky, James L; Hudson, Melissa M; Chen, Yanjun; Connelly, James A; Wasilewski-Masker, Karen; Sun, Can-Lan; Francisco, Liton; Gustafson, Laura; Russell, Kathryn M; Sabbatini, Gina; Flynn, Jessica S; York, Jocelyn M; Giuliano, Anna R; Robison, Leslie L; Wong, F Lennie; Bhatia, Smita; Landier, Wendy

    2017-11-01

    Purpose Cancer survivors are at high risk for human papillomavirus (HPV)-related morbidities; we estimated the prevalence of HPV vaccine initiation in cancer survivors versus the US population and examined predictors of noninitiation. Methods Participants included 982 cancer survivors (9 to 26 years of age; 1 to 5 years postcompletion of therapy); we assessed HPV vaccine initiation, sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, and vaccine-specific health beliefs; age-, sex-, and year-matched US population comparisons were from the National Immunization Survey-Teen and the National Health Interview Survey (2012-2015). Results The mean age at the time of the study was 16.3 ± 4.7 years; the mean time off therapy was 2.7 ± 1.2 years; participants were 55% male and 66% non-Hispanic white; 59% had leukemia/lymphoma. Vaccine initiation rates were significantly lower in cancer survivors versus the general population (23.8%; 95% CI, 20.6% to 27.0% v 40.5%; 95% CI, 40.2% to 40.7%; P P P young adult survivors and peers (ages 18 to 26 years) was comparably low (25.3%; 95% CI, 20.9% to 29.7% v 24.2%; 95% CI, 23.6% to 24.9%). Predictors of noninitiation included lack of provider recommendation (OR, 10.8; 95% CI, 6.5 to 18.0; P P P P P < .001; comparison, 13 to 17 years). Conclusion HPV vaccine initiation rates in cancer survivors are low. Lack of provider recommendation and barriers to vaccine receipt should be targeted in vaccine promotion efforts.

  15. Psychosexual functioning of childhood cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, E M; van Dulmen-den Broeder, E; Kaspers, G J L; van Dam, E W C M; Braam, K I; Huisman, J

    2008-05-01

    The objective of the study is to explore psychosexual functioning and its relationship with quality of life in survivors of cancer in childhood. Sixty childhood cancer survivors completed two questionnaires: psychosexual and social functioning questionnaire and MOS-SF-36. Psychosexual problems were frequent. About 20% of the survivors felt a limitation in their sexual life due to their illness. Older survivors (> or =25 years) had significantly less experience with sexual intercourse than their age-matched peers in the Dutch population (p = 0.010). Survivors treated in adolescence had a delay in achieving psychosexual milestones compared with those treated in childhood: dating (ppsychosexual problems compared with survivors without these problems. In this cohort of childhood cancer survivors, psychosexual problems were frequent. Treatment in adolescence is a risk factor for a delay in psychosexual development. (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. The relationship between caregiver impacts and the unmet needs of survivors of stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew NE

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Nadine E Andrew,1 Monique F Kilkenny,1,2 Rebecca Naylor,3 Tara Purvis,1 Dominique A Cadilhac1,2 1Translational Public Health and Evaluation Division, Stroke and Ageing Research, School of Clinical Sciences at Monash Health, Monash University, Clayton, 2Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, Heidelberg, 3National Stroke Foundation, Melbourne, VIC, Australia Background: Caregivers play a crucial role in meeting the needs of survivors of stroke. Yet, little is known about how they are impacted by their caregiving role. Objectives: To describe the relationship between survivor long-term unmet needs (>12 months and caregiver impacts, and identify characteristics that are associated with reported moderate to severe impacts on caregivers. Method: This was a cross-sectional survey using data from the Australian Stroke Survivor and Carer Needs Survey. Community dwelling adults 12+ months poststroke and their caregivers participated. Caregivers and survivors were asked about the extent to which the domains of work, leisure and family, and friend and spousal relationships had been impacted using a Likert scale of responses. The extent to which survivor needs were being met was measured over the domains of health, everyday living, work, leisure, and finances, and the total number of unmet needs was calculated. The association between survivor unmet needs and caregiver impacts was assessed using multivariable logistic regression adjusted for caregiver and survivor characteristics. Results: Of the 738 completed survivor surveys, 369 contained matched caregiver data (survivors: median age, 71 years; 67% male (caregivers: median age, 64 years; 26% male. For caregivers, the domains of work, leisure, and friendships were most impacted. The odds of a caregiver experiencing moderate to extreme impacts increased with the number of reported survivor unmet needs. This was greatest for spousal (aOR [adjusted odds ratio]: 1.14; 95% CI [confidence interval

  17. Noncancer-related mortality risks in adult survivors of pediatric malignancies: the childhood cancer survivor study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Cheryl L; Nolan, Vikki G; Leisenring, Wendy; Yasui, Yutaka; Ogg, Susan W; Mertens, Ann C; Neglia, Joseph P; Ness, Kirsten K; Armstrong, Gregory T; Robison, Les L

    2014-09-01

    We sought to identify factors, other than cancer-related treatment and presence/severity of chronic health conditions, which may be associated with late mortality risk among adult survivors of pediatric malignancies. Using the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study cohort and a case-control design, 445 participants who died from causes other than cancer recurrence/progression or non-health-related events were compared with 7,162 surviving participants matched for primary diagnosis, age at baseline questionnaire, time from diagnosis to baseline questionnaire, and time at-risk. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for overall/cause-specific mortality. Independent measures included number/severity of chronic conditions, medical care, health-related behaviors, and health perceptions/concerns. Adjusting for education, income, chemotherapy/radiation exposures, and number/severity of chronic health conditions, an increased risk for all-cause mortality was associated with exercising fewer than 3 days/week (OR = 1.72, CI 1.27-2.34), being underweight (OR = 2.58, CI 1.55-4.28), increased medical care utilization (P cancer treatment and chronic health conditions modify the risk of death among adult survivors of pediatric cancer. Continued cohort observation may inform interventions to reduce mortality.

  18. Short-Term Trajectories of Depressive Symptoms in Stroke Survivors and Their Family Caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Rahul; Chei, Choy-Lye; Menon, Edward; Chow, Wai Leng; Quah, Stella; Chan, Angelique; Matchar, David Bruce

    2016-01-01

    We utilize group-based trajectory modeling (GBTM) to delineate depressive symptom trajectories among stroke survivor-caregiver dyads, to identify predictors of the delineated trajectories, and to assess the influence of time-varying covariates (stroke survivor depressive symptoms and functional disability, caregiver depressive symptoms, and foreign domestic worker [FDW] assistance) on the level of the depressive symptom trajectories. Data on 172 stroke survivor-caregiver dyads in Singapore, for whom depressive symptoms were assessed thrice (baseline/3 months/6 months), were utilized. GBTM was applied to delineate depressive symptom trajectories, and to identify their predictors and time-varying covariates. Three stroke survivor depressive symptom trajectories (low and decreasing [47.6%], low and increasing [43.1%], and high and increasing [9.3%]) and 2 caregiver depressive symptom trajectories (low and stable [71.5%] and high and decreasing [28.5%]) were delineated. Caregivers with chronic diseases were more likely (odds ratio [95% confidence interval]: 8.09[2.04-32.07]) and those caring for older stroke survivors (0.94[0.90-0.98]) were less likely to follow the high and decreasing than the low and stable depressive symptom trajectory. An increase in stroke survivor functional disability and caregiver depressive symptoms led to a rise (~worsening) in stroke survivor depressive symptom trajectories. Whereas an increase in stroke survivor depressive symptoms led to a rise in caregiver depressive symptom trajectories, FDW assistance led to a decline (~improvement). Care professionals should be mindful of heterogeneity in depressive symptom patterns over time among stroke survivor-caregiver dyads. Reciprocal association of depressive symptoms in the stroke survivor-caregiver dyad suggests that addressing mood problems in 1 member may benefit the other member, and calls for dyadic mental health interventions. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by

  19. Physical exercise and return to work: cancer survivors' experiences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groeneveld, Iris F.; de Boer, Angela G. E. M.; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.

    2013-01-01

    In this qualitative study, we aimed to explore cancer survivors' experiences with (1) return to work (RtW) and work performance, (2) a physical exercise program after treatment, and (3) the perceived link between physical exercise and work. Semi-structured individual interviews were held with ten

  20. Influenza vaccination coverage among adult survivors of pediatric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojha, Rohit P; Offutt-Powell, Tabatha N; Gurney, James G

    2014-06-01

    A large proportion of long-term survivors of childhood cancer have treatment-related adverse cardiac and pulmonary late-effects, with related mortality. Consequently, this population of approximately 379,000 individuals in the U.S. is at high risk of complications from influenza infections. To estimate influenza vaccination coverage overall and among subgroups of adult survivors of pediatric cancer aged 18-64 years and to compare coverage with the general adult U.S. population. Data from the 2009 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System were analyzed in 2013 using binomial regression to estimate influenza vaccination coverage differences (CDs) and corresponding 95% confidence limits (CLs) between adult survivors of pediatric cancer and the general U.S. population. Analyses were stratified by demographic characteristics and adjusted for design effects, non-coverage, and non-response. Influenza vaccination coverage was 37% for adult pediatric cancer survivors overall and 31% for the general adult U.S. population (CD=6.3%, 95% CL=0.04%, 13%). Dramatically lower coverage was observed for non-Hispanic black survivors (6%) than for non-Hispanic blacks in the general U.S. population (26%; CD=-18%, 95% CL=-25%, -11%). Although influenza vaccination coverage was modestly higher among adult survivors of pediatric cancer than the general U.S. population, coverage was less than desirable for a population with a high prevalence of cardiopulmonary conditions and early mortality, and far lower than the Healthy People 2010 goal of 60% or Healthy People 2020 goal of 80% for the general population. Copyright © 2014 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Survivor-Victim Status, Attachment, and Sudden Death Bereavement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Mark D.; Greenwald, Jason Y.

    1991-01-01

    Examined significance of survivor-victim relationship in understanding grief following sudden death bereavement by suicide or accident. Results showed that survivor-victim attachment was more important than survivor status (parent versus sibling/child) in explaining grief reactions. Compared to accident survivors, suicide survivors experienced…

  2. Selective attrition and bias in a longitudinal health survey among survivors of a disaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stellato Rebecca

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the response mechanisms among survivors of disasters. We studied the selective attrition and possible bias in a longitudinal study among survivors of a fireworks disaster. Methods Survivors completed a questionnaire three weeks (wave 1, 18 months (wave 2 and four years post-disaster (wave 3. Demographic characteristics, disaster-related factors and health problems at wave 1 were compared between respondents and non-respondents at the follow-up surveys. Possible bias as a result of selective response was examined by comparing prevalence estimates resulting from multiple imputation and from complete case analysis. Analysis were stratified according to ethnic background (native Dutch and immigrant survivors. Results Among both native Dutch and immigrant survivors, female survivors and survivors in the age categories 25–44 and 45–64 years old were more likely to respond to the follow-up surveys. In general, disasters exposure did not differ between respondents and non-respondents at follow-up. Response at follow-up differed between native Dutch and non-western immigrant survivors. For example, native Dutch who responded only to wave 1 reported more depressive feelings at wave 1 (59.7%; 95% CI 51.2–68.2 than Dutch survivors who responded to all three waves (45.4%; 95% CI 41.6–49.2, p p Conclusion Our results indicate that despite selective response, the complete case prevalence estimates were only somewhat biased. Future studies, both among survivors of disasters and among the general population, should not only examine selective response, but should also investigate whether selective response has biased the complete case prevalence estimates of health problems by using statistical techniques such as multiple imputation.

  3. Eating Behavior and BMI in Adolescent Survivors of Brain Tumor and Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Jennifer A.; Stancel, Heather H.; Klesges, Lisa M.; Tyc, Vida L.; Hinds, Pamela S.; Wu, Shengjie; Hudson, Melissa M.; Kahalley, Lisa S.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Elevated BMI has been reported in pediatric cancer survivors. It is unclear whether this is related to altered energy intake (via disordered eating), decreased energy expenditure (via limited exercise), or treatment-related direct/indirect changes. The aims of this study are to describe the occurrence of overweight and obesity, exercise frequency, and the extent of disordered eating patterns in this sample of survivors, and to examine relationships among BMI, eating patterns, exercise frequency and demographic and disease and treatment-related variables to identify those survivors most at risk for overweight/obesity. Methods This cross-sectional study recruited 98 cancer survivors (50 ALL, 48 Brain Tumor), aged 12-17 years and >12 months post-treatment from a large pediatric oncology hospital. Survivors completed health behavior measures assessing disordered eating patterns and physical activity. Clinical variables were obtained through medical record review. Univariate analyses were conducted to make comparisons on health behaviors by diagnosis, gender, treatment history, and BMI category. Results Fifty-two percent of ALL survivors and 41.7% of BT survivors were classified as overweight/obese. Overweight/obesity status was associated with higher Cognitive Restraint (OR=1.0, 95%CI:1.0-1.1). Only 12% of ALL survivors and 8.3% of BT survivors met CDC guidelines for physical activity. Males reported more physical activity (t(96)=2.2, psurvivors may attempt to purposefully restrict their food intake and rely less on physiological cues to regulate consumption. Survivors should be screened at follow-up for weight-related concerns. PMID:24451908

  4. Diet quality of cancer survivors and noncancer individuals: Results from a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fang Fang; Liu, Shanshan; John, Esther M; Must, Aviva; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy

    2015-12-01

    Patterns of poor nutritional intake may exacerbate the elevated morbidity experienced by cancer survivors. It remains unclear whether cancer survivors adhere to existing dietary guidelines and whether survivors' diets differ from those of individuals without cancer over the long term. The authors evaluated dietary intake and quality in 1533 adult cancer survivors who participated in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 1999 to 2010 compared with dietary intake and quality in 3075 individuals who had no history of cancer and were matched to the cancer survivors by age, sex, and race/ethnicity. Dietary intake was assessed using 24-hour dietary recalls. The 2010 Healthy Eating Index (HEI-2010) was used to evaluate diet quality. The mean ± standard deviation HEI-2010 total score was 47.2 ± 0.5 in the cancer survivors and 48.3 ± 0.4 in the noncancer group (P = .03). Compared with the noncancer group, cancer survivors had a significantly lower score for empty calories (13.6 vs 14.4; P = .001), which corresponded to worse adherence to dietary intake of calories from solid fats, alcohol, and added sugars. Cancer survivors also had significantly lower dietary intake of fiber than the noncancer group (15.0 vs 15.9 g per day; P = .02). In relation to recommended intake, survivors' mean dietary intake of vitamin D, vitamin E, potassium, fiber, and calcium was 31%, 47%, 55%, 60%, and 73%, respectively; whereas their mean dietary intake of saturated fat and sodium was 112% and 133%, respectively, of the recommended intake. Cancer survivors had poor adherence to the US Department of Agriculture 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, and their intake patterns were worse than those in the general population for empty calories and fiber. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  5. Prevalence and Predictors of Risky and Heavy Alcohol Consumption Among Adult Siblings of Childhood Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lown, E. Anne; Mertens, Ann C.; Korcha, Rachael A.; Leisenring, Wendy; Hudson, Melissa M.; Greenfield, Thomas K.; Robison, Leslie L.; Zeltzer, Lonnie K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe alcohol consumption patterns and risk factors for heavy alcohol use among siblings of childhood cancer survivors compared to survivors and national controls. Methods Secondary analysis of prospectively collected data from two national surveys was performed including a cohort of 3,034 adult siblings of childhood cancer survivors (age 18-56 years) and 10,398 adult childhood cancer survivors both from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study, plus 5,712 adult participants from the population-based National Alcohol Survey. Cancer-related experiences, self-reported current health and mental health were examined in relation to alcohol consumption patterns including heavy and risky drinking. Results Adult siblings of childhood cancer survivors were more likely to be heavy drinkers (ORadj=1.3; 1.0-1.6) and risky drinkers (ORadj=1.3; 1.1-1.6) compared to controls from a national sample. Siblings were also more likely to drink at these two levels compared to survivors. Factors associated with heavy drinking among siblings include being 18-21 years old (ORadj=2.9; 2.0-4.4), male (ORadj=2.3; 1.7-3.0), having a high school education or less (ORadj=2.4; 1.7-3.5), and drinking initiation at a young age (ORadj=5.1; 2.5-10.3). Symptoms of depression, (ORadj=2.1; 1.3-3.2), anxiety (ORadj=1.9; 1.1-3.3) and global psychiatric distress (ORadj=2.5; 1.5-4.3) were significantly associated with heavy alcohol use. Conclusions Siblings of children with cancer are more likely to be heavy drinkers as adults compared to childhood cancer survivors or national controls. Early initiation of drinking and symptoms of psychological distress should be identified during early adolescence and effective sibling-specific interventions should be developed and made available for siblings of children with cancer. PMID:22736595

  6. Report on the results of the seventh medical examination of atomic bomb survivors resident in North America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Chikako (Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Survivors Health Clinic (Japan)); Kodama, Kazunori; Sasaki, Hideo; Ishibashi, Shinzo; Dote, Keigo; Watanabe, Tadaaki; Hirata, Katsumi; Sugimoto, Sumio

    1990-02-01

    During a one-month period from June 13 through July 13, 1989, the seventh medical examination was conducted at five cities, including San Francisco, Los Angeles, Seattle, Wailuku and Honolulu, for A-bomb survivors residents in North America. Nine hundred and eighteen A-bomb survivors, including 21 living in Canada, were confirmed, consisting of 234 men and 684 women as of the end of July 1989. The number was increased by 167, compared with that as of the end of July 1987. During the past three years, there were 40 deaths; and 878 A-bomb survivors (223 men and 655 women) are still alive. Ninety percent of the survivors came from Hiroshima. U.S. nationality was seen in 61% and Japanese nationality with permanent U.S. residency rights was seen in 32%. The majority (39%) of the A-bomb survivors were in their fifties, with an average age of 59.4 years. The survivors were residing in 26 states in the USA and in 3 provinces in Canada. The acquisition rate of the A-bomb survivors' health handbook was 52%. Four hundred and six A-bomb survivors participated in the medical examination, including one male and 8 female children born to A-bomb survivors. Questionnaire survey revealed a history of surgical resection for cancer in 21 survivors. Subjective symptoms included complete exhaustion or fatigue, heat intolerance, loss of vigor, and numbness of the body. Overall evaluation revealed the necessity of medical treatment or observation in 71%. This was independent of exposure status. Hypertension was the most common (27%), followed by obesity, hyperlipidemia, heart disease, and diabetes mellitus. Malignant tumors were seen in 9 survivors, consisting of 3 with breast cancer, 2 with colorectal cancer, and single survivors with lung cancer, Hodgkin's disease, cervical cancer, or hepatoma. Only 29% of them have had finantial guarantee for their health management according to the Japanese law. (N.K.).

  7. Emotional distress and self-reported quality of life among primary caregivers of stroke survivors in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatoye, F O; Komolafe, M A; Adewuya, A O; Fatoye, G K

    2006-05-01

    To investigate emotional symptoms and domain quality of life (QOL) among primary caregivers of stroke survivors and to determine survivor-related and caregiver-related predictors of these variables. A cross-sectional study. Medical units of the two major hospitals of the Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospitals Complex, ile-Ife, Nigeria. One hundred and three matched-pairs of caregivers of stroke survivors and caregivers of mild hypertensive patients, and 103 stroke survivors. Twenty three (22.3%) and 25(24.3%) stroke caregivers were observed with clinically significant anxiety and depressive symptoms respectively compared with 12(11.7%) and 14(13.6%) subjects in the control group. Stroke caregivers were observed with significantly higher mean anxiety and depressions scores, and also, with significantly lower mean scores on the four QOL domains (physical health, psychological health, social relationships and environment). By multiple linear regression analysis, anxiety symptoms in stroke caregivers were predicted by high socioeconomic status of survivors and paresis in them. Depressive symptoms were predicted by high caregivers' age and depression in the patients. Higher QOL on one or more WHOQOL-Bref domains was predicted by intimate relationship with survivor, female gender of caregiver, longer duration of caring, higher education of survivor and higher age of survivor. Low QOL on one or more domain(s) was predicted by higher caregivers' age, carers' perception of survivor as cooperative, female gender of survivor, depression in survivor, paresis and cognitive impairment in survivor. Caregiving imposes high burden on stroke carers. Attention should be paid to their psychological needs and services should be designed for them to ameliorate the burden.

  8. Development and usability of a computer-tailored pedometer-based physical activity advice for breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cocker, K; Charlier, C; Van Hoof, E; Pauwels, E; Lechner, L; Bourgois, J; Spittaels, H; Vandelanotte, C; De Bourdeaudhuij, I

    2015-09-01

    This observational study aimed to adapt a computer-tailored step advice for the general population into a feasible advice for breast cancer survivors and to test its usability. First, several adaptations were made to the original design (adding cancer-related physical activity (PA) barriers and beliefs, and self-management strategies to improve survivors' personal control). Second, the adapted advice was evaluated in two phases: (1) a usability testing in healthy women (n = 3) and survivors (n = 6); and (2) a process evaluation during 3 weeks in breast cancer survivors (n = 8). Preliminary usability testing revealed no problems during logging-in; however, three survivors misinterpreted some questions. After refining the questionnaire and advice, survivors evaluated the advice as interesting, attractive to read, comprehensible and credible. Inactive survivors found the advice novel, but too long. The process evaluation indicated that the majority of the women (n = 5/8) reported increased steps. Monitoring step counts by using a pedometer was perceived as an important motivator to be more active. To conclude, this study provides initial support for the usability and acceptability of a computer-tailored pedometer-based PA advice for breast cancer survivors. After testing efficacy and effectiveness of this intervention, this tool can broaden the reach of PA promotion in breast cancer survivors. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Suicide Ideation and Associated Mortality in Adult Survivors of Childhood Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, Tara M.; Zhang, Nan; Recklitis, Christopher J.; Kimberg, Cara; Zeltzer, Lonnie K.; Muriel, Anna C.; Stovall, Marilyn; Srivastava, Deo Kumar; Sklar, Charles A.; Robison, Leslie L.; Krull, Kevin R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Adult survivors of childhood cancer are at-risk for suicide ideation, though longitudinal patterns and rates of recurrent suicide ideation are unknown. We investigated the prevalence of late report (i.e. post-initial assessment) and recurrent suicide ideation in adult survivors of childhood cancer, identified predictors of suicide ideation, and examined associations among suicide ideation and mortality. Methods Participants included 9,128 adult survivors of childhood cancer and 3,082 sibling controls enrolled in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study who completed a survey question assessing suicide ideation on one or more occasions between 1994 and 2010. Suicide ideation was assessed using the Brief Symptom Inventory-18. Mortality data was ascertained from the National Death Index. Results Survivors were more likely to report late (Odds Ratio (OR) =1.9; 95% Confidence Interval (CI) =1.5–2.5) and recurrent suicide ideation (OR=2.6, 95% CI=1.8–3.8) compared to siblings. Poor physical health status was associated with increased risk of suicide ideation in survivors (late report: OR=1.9, 95% CI=1.3–2.7; recurrent: OR=1.9, 95% CI=1.2–2.9). Suicide ideation was associated with increased risk for all-cause mortality (Hazard Ratio (HR) =1.3, 95% CI=1.03–1.6) and death by external causes (HR=2.4, 95% CI=1.4–4.1). Conclusion Adult survivors of childhood cancer are at-risk for late report and recurrent suicide ideation, which is associated with increased risk of mortality. Routine screening for psychological distress in adult survivors appears warranted, especially for survivors who develop chronic physical health conditions. PMID:24122148

  10. Comparison of the Effects of 3 Methods of Intrathecal Bupivacaine, Bupivacaine-Fentanyl, and Bupivacaine-Fentanyl-Magnesium Sulfate on Sensory Motor Blocks and Postoperative Pain in Patients Undergoing Lumbar Disk Herniation Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attari, Moahammad A; Najafabadi, Fereidoun Mortazavi; Talakoob, Reyhanak; Abrishamkar, Saeid; Taravati, Hosein

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of adding intrathecal (IT) fentanyl and magnesium sulfate (MgSO4) to bupivacaine on sensory motor blocks and postoperative pain in patients undergoing lumbar disk herniation surgery. In a double-blind randomized clinical trial, the patients undergoing lumbar disk herniation surgery were allocated to receive hyperbaric bupivacaine (A), or hyperbaric bupivacaine and fentanyl (B), hyperbaric bupivacaine, fentanyl and MgSO4 (C) IT. Data were collected regarding the onset of sensory block and time to regression to T10, time to complete motor block and full motor recovery, time to first analgesic requirement, postoperative pain score, and analgesic consumption and side effects. Prandomized and assigned to 3 groups (n=35 in each groups). There were no significant differences between groups in regard to time to reach the T10 level of sensory block (P=0.82), time to regression to T10 (P=0.11), and the time to complete motor block (P=0.58). Meanwhile, the time to complete recovery of motor function was significantly longer in group C (116.4±18.4, 126.4±25.5, 130.2±15.7 min, respectively, P=0.016). Time to first analgesic requirement was also significantly longer in group C (3.26±1.12, 5.57±0.92, 6.91±1.27 h, respectively, P<0.001). Total morphine consumption was significantly less in group C (14.3±4.3, 8.3±3.5, 6±3.6 mg, respectively, P<0.001). The severity of pain was significantly less in C group (P<0.001). In patients undergoing lumbar disk herniation surgery, IT MgSO4 in combination with bupivacaine-fentanyl can decrease severity of postoperative pain and analgesic consumption without additional side effect.

  11. Stroke survivors over-estimate their medication self-administration (MSA) ability, predicting memory loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, A M; Galletta, Elizabeth E; Zhang, Jun; Masmela, Jenny R; Adler, Uri S

    2014-01-01

    Medication self-administration (MSA) may be cognitively challenging after stroke, but guidelines are currently lacking for identifying high-functioning stroke survivors who may have difficulty with this task. Complicating this matter, stroke survivors may not be aware of their cognitive problems (cognitive anosognosia) and may over-estimate their MSA competence. The authors wished to evaluate medication self-administration and MSA self-awareness in 24 consecutive acute stroke survivors undergoing inpatient rehabilitation, to determine if they would over-estimate their medication self-administration and if this predicted memory disorder. Stroke survivors were tested on the Hopkins Medication Schedule and also their memory, naming mood and dexterity were evaluated, comparing their performance to 17 matched controls. The anosognosia ratio indicated MSA over-estimation in stroke survivors compared with controls--no other over-estimation errors were noted relative to controls. A strong correlation was observed between over-estimation of MSA ability and verbal memory deficit, suggesting that formally assessing MSA and MSA self-awareness may help detect cognitive deficits. Assessing medication self-administration and MSA self-awareness may be useful in rehabilitation and successful community-return after stroke.

  12. Peer support preferences among African-American breast cancer survivors and caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes-Maslow, Lindsey; Allicock, Marlyn; Johnson, La-Shell

    2017-05-01

    Breast cancer mortality rates continue to improve due to advances in cancer control and treatment. However, gains in breast cancer survival rates vary by race. Psychosocial support systems can lead to improved health outcomes among cancer survivors. This study was a part of a larger study exploring the challenges that both African-American cancer survivors and caregivers face across the cancer continuum. The objective of this paper was to explore African-American breast cancer survivors' and caregivers' preferences regarding characteristics and qualities of Peer Connect guides to inform the development of a peer support program. Forty-one African-American cancer survivors and caregivers participated in five focus groups lasting approximately 90 min. Participants were asked about what qualities or characteristics they would prefer in a peer support guide to make them feel comfortable talking with them. Focus group transcripts were analyzed using thematic content analysis, an iterative coding process. Themes were identified based on the research team's integrated and unified final codes. Twenty-two cancer survivors, 19 caregivers, and 3 individuals who were both survivors and caregivers participated in the focus groups. Participants discussed five preferences for peer support guides: (1) competency, (2) gender, (3) age, (4) cancer role status, and (5) relationship to participant. This study highlights cancer survivors' and caregivers' perceptions of characteristics needed for peer support providers that in turn can influence whether and how they participate in cancer support programs.

  13. Relationship between patterns of daily physical activity and fatigue in cancer survivors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmerman, Josien; Dekker-van Weering, Marit; Tönis, Thijs; Hermens, Hermanus J.; Vollenbroek-Hutten, Miriam Marie Rosé

    Purpose: This study investigated: (1) physical activity behaviour of cancer survivors throughout the day, (2) the relationship between objective and subjective measures of physical activity, and (3) the relationship between daily physical activity and fatigue. Method: Physical activity was measured

  14. Risk factors and surveillance for reduced bone mineral density in pediatric cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, David A; Claridy, Mechelle; Mertens, Ann; George, Elizabeth; Vangile, Kristen; Simoneaux, Stephen F; Meacham, Lillian R; Wasilewski-Masker, Karen

    2017-09-01

    Pediatric cancer survivors are at increased risk of developing low bone mineral density (BMD) due to cancer treatment. This study assessed the yield of screening for low BMD in pediatric-aged cancer survivors as per the Children's Oncology Group Long-Term Follow-Up (COG-LTFU) Guidelines, which recommend screening survivors who received steroids, methotrexate, or hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT). This is a retrospective cohort study of 475 pediatric blood cancer and noncentral nervous system solid tumor survivors screened for low BMD with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) as per the COG-LTFU Guidelines from 2003 to 2010. Risk factors for low BMD (DXA Z-score ≤-2) were evaluated by univariate and multivariate analysis. The mean DXA Z-score was -0.1 for both whole body and lumbar spine measurements. Among at-risk survivors, 8.2% (39/475) had low BMD. Multivariate analysis of survivors with low BMD showed significant association with male gender (odds ratio [OR] 3.4, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3-9.0), exposure to total body irradiation (TBI), cranial, or craniospinal radiation (OR 5.2, 95% CI, 1.8-14.9), and gonadal dysfunction (OR 4.3, 95% CI, 1.4-13.0). Methotrexate exposure was not significantly associated with low BMD. Survivors receiving HCT had a reduced risk of low BMD (OR 0.2, 95% CI, 0.1-0.9). The highest risk factors for low BMD were male gender, exposure to TBI, cranial, or craniospinal radiation, and gonadal dysfunction. Survivors receiving methotrexate or HCT therapy have the lowest risk for low BMD among those screened. Future studies should investigate risk of low BMD for survivors receiving HCT without radiation exposure. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Managing chronic pain in survivors of torture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amris, Kirstine; Williams, Amanda C de C

    2015-01-01

    and welfare problems; persistent pain in the musculoskeletal system is one of the most common. There is little specific evidence on pain in survivors of torture; the guidelines on interdisciplinary specialist management are applicable. Most of the literature on refugee survivors of torture has an exclusive...... focus on psychological disorders, with particularly poor understanding of pain problems. This article summarizes the current status of assessment and treatment of pain problems in the torture survivor....

  16. [Multidisciplinary rehabilitation can motivate obese breast cancer survivors to lose weight].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkelsen, Tina Broby; Laursen, Lene; Mark, Karen; Juul, Susanne; Svendsen, Hanne

    2014-03-17

    Accumulating evidence suggests that obesity has a negative impact on breast cancer survivors. In this project we developed and tried out a residential 6 + 3 days rehabilitation programme with focus on weight reduction for breast cancer survivors. The key focus was to work with their motivation to change habits by use of cognitive therapy tools. It seems that this residential rehabilitation stay can motivate obese breast cancer survivors to change habits and lose weight. In all the 42 women with complete data lost 6.1 kg in average.

  17. Physical performance limitations in adolescent and adult survivors of childhood cancer and their siblings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corina S Rueegg

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: This study investigates physical performance limitations for sports and daily activities in recently diagnosed childhood cancer survivors and siblings. METHODS: The Swiss Childhood Cancer Survivor Study sent a questionnaire to all survivors (≥ 16 years registered in the Swiss Childhood Cancer Registry, who survived >5 years and were diagnosed 1976-2003 aged <16 years. Siblings received similar questionnaires. We assessed two types of physical performance limitations: 1 limitations in sports; 2 limitations in daily activities (using SF-36 physical function score. We compared results between survivors diagnosed before and after 1990 and determined predictors for both types of limitations by multivariable logistic regression. RESULTS: The sample included 1038 survivors and 534 siblings. Overall, 96 survivors (9.5% and 7 siblings (1.1% reported a limitation in sports (Odds ratio 5.5, 95%CI 2.9-10.4, p<0.001, mainly caused by musculoskeletal and neurological problems. Findings were even more pronounced for children diagnosed more recently (OR 4.8, CI 2.4-9.6 and 8.3, CI 3.7-18.8 for those diagnosed <1990 and ≥ 1990, respectively; p=0.025. Mean physical function score for limitations in daily activities was 49.6 (CI 48.9-50.4 in survivors and 53.1 (CI 52.5-53.7 in siblings (p<0.001. Again, differences tended to be larger in children diagnosed more recently. Survivors of bone tumors, CNS tumors and retinoblastoma and children treated with radiotherapy were most strongly affected. CONCLUSION: Survivors of childhood cancer, even those diagnosed recently and treated with modern protocols, remain at high risk for physical performance limitations. Treatment and follow-up care should include tailored interventions to mitigate these late effects in high-risk patients.

  18. Circumstances and consequences of falls in polio survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickerstaffe, Alice; Beelen, Anita; Nollet, Frans

    2010-11-01

    Many polio survivors have symptoms that are known risk factors for falls in elderly people. This study aims to determine the: (i) frequency; (ii) consequences; (iii) circumstances; and (iv) factors associated with falls in polio survivors. A survey was conducted among 376 polio survivors. Participants completed a falls history questionnaire and additional information was obtained from their medical files. Of the 305 respondents, 74% reported at least one fall in the past year and 60% two or more. Sixteen percent of fallers described a major injury after a fall in the last year and 69% reported fear of falling. One-third of fallers had reduced the amount they walked because of their fear of falling. Most reported falls in a familiar environment (86%), during ambulation (72%) and in the afternoon (50%). Quadriceps weakness of the weakest leg (Medical Research Council (MRC) ≤ 3), fear of falling and complaints of problems maintaining balance were independently associated with both falls and recurrent falls, while increasing age and medication use were not. The high rate of falls and consequences thereof, merit the implementation of fall intervention strategies. To maximize effect, they should be tailor-made and target the fall mechanisms specific to polio survivors.

  19. Exploring Meaning in the Life of Chinese Breast Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Hao-Zhi; Gao, Lei; Yue, Hong; Shi, Bao-Xin

    2016-12-30

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women worldwide, and spiritual fulfillment such as experiencing meaning in life plays an important role in coping with the disease. The objectives of this study were to explore and understand Chinese breast cancer survivors' perspective on meaning in life. This study used Grounded Theory; 23 participants were recruited using convenience sampling, purposive sampling, and theoretical sampling. Semistructured interviews were conducted, and the data were analyzed using open coding, axial coding, and selective coding. A core category emerged as "satisfaction with my life" to explain Chinese breast cancer survivors' perspective of meaning in life, and 4 subcategories described the core category including (1) living a healthy and peaceful life, (2) having a good relationship with others, (3) achieving purpose in life, and (4) fulfilling responsibility. Chinese breast cancer survivors value physical health as well as spiritual fulfillment. The experience of adapting to life with cancer, having a good relationship with others, pursuing life goals, and fulfilling responsibility consists of a satisfying life, which makes life more meaningful. Health providers should pay more attention to survivors' experience of meaning in life and help them enhance meaning in life and improve their quality of life through building good relationship with others, achieving purpose in life, and fulfilling responsibility for family and society.

  20. Nutritional interventions for survivors of childhood cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jennifer E; Wakefield, Claire E; Cohn, Richard J

    2016-08-22

    Childhood cancer survivors are at a higher risk of developing health conditions such as osteoporosis, and cardiovascular disease than their peers. Health-promoting behaviour, such as consuming a healthy diet, could lessen the impact of these chronic issues, yet the prevalence rate of health-protecting behaviour amongst survivors of childhood cancer is similar to that of the general population. Targeted nutritional interventions may prevent or reduce the incidence of these chronic diseases. The primary aim of this review was to assess the efficacy of a range of nutritional interventions designed to improve the nutritional intake of childhood cancer survivors, as compared to a control group of childhood cancer survivors who did not receive the intervention. Secondary objectives were to assess metabolic and cardiovascular risk factors, measures of weight and body fat distribution, behavioural change, changes in knowledge regarding disease risk and nutritional intake, participants' views of the intervention, measures of health status and quality of life, measures of harm associated with the process or outcomes of the intervention, and cost-effectiveness of the intervention We searched the electronic databases of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2013, Issue 3), MEDLINE/PubMed (from 1945 to April 2013), and Embase/Ovid (from 1980 to April 2013). We ran the search again in August 2015; we have not yet fully assessed these results, but we have identified one ongoing trial. We conducted additional searching of ongoing trial registers - the International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number register and the National Institutes of Health register (both screened in the first half of 2013) - reference lists of relevant articles and reviews, and conference proceedings of the International Society for Paediatric Oncology and the International Conference on Long-Term Complications of Treatment of Children and Adolescents for Cancer (both 2008 to

  1. Providing written information increases patient satisfaction: a web-based questionnaire survey of Japanese cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Hitomi; Katsumata, Noriyuki; Takahashi, Miyako

    2017-07-01

    The Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the United States recommends that all cancer survivors be provided with a survivorship care plan (SCP), which includes a patient treatment summary and a follow-up care plan. However, SCPs have not been widely adopted in Japan. To provide basic data necessary for implementing SCPs in Japan, we aimed to investigate the forms of clinical and survivorship-related information that Japanese cancer survivors receive from their healthcare providers, and to examine whether written information increases their satisfaction. We performed a cross-sectional online survey of cancer survivors who underwent acute cancer treatment and had at least one follow-up with a physician in the past year. Cancer survivors provided the elements and forms (verbally and/or written) of information they received, as well as the degree of satisfaction with the information provided. Responses were obtained from 545 cancer survivors. Information elements such as surgical procedure (98.3%), surgical outcome (98.1%), and names of administered chemotherapy agents (97.8%) were commonly provided, whereas mental care resources and providers (29.7%), effects on marital relationship and sexual health (35.7%), and effects on fertility (43.4%) were less common. A large proportion of cancer survivors received verbal information only. For 18 of 20 elements, except for effects on fertility and duration of hormonal therapy, satisfaction was significantly higher when both forms of information were provided (P information can better meet the needs of Japanese cancer survivors.

  2. Factors Associated With Noncompliance With Long-term Follow-up Care Among Pediatric Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devine, Katie A; Viola, Adrienne; Capucilli, Peter; Sahler, Olle Jane Z; Andolina, Jeffrey R

    2017-04-01

    Most childhood cancer survivors do not receive risk-based care through a survivorship program, but factors associated with dropping out of care are unclear. This study aimed to identify characteristics of pediatric cancer survivors who do not return to a cancer center survivorship program for recommended care after at least 1 visit compared with those who continue to attend. Patient characteristics (demographics, school functioning, psychiatric history) and treatment characteristics (diagnosis, treatment) were abstracted from medical records for all eligible patients. Unadjusted and multivariable logistic regression analyses examined the associations among patient and treatment characteristics and nonattendance. The charts of 400 eligible patients (children below 18, n=123; adults, n=277) were reviewed. Of these, 60.3% of patients had not been seen in clinic within 1 year of their last recommended follow-up appointment. Adult-aged survivors were less likely to return to clinic than child-aged survivors (Psurvivors, longer time off treatment was associated with noncompliance with follow-up. For adult survivors, current age, nonwhite race, and longer time off treatment were associated with noncompliance. Additional methods to identify survivors at risk for noncompliance with follow-up and interventions for at-risk survivors are needed to improve survivorship care.

  3. Perceived and experienced restrictions in participation and autonomy among adult survivors of stroke in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amosun, S L; Nyante, G G; Wiredu, E K

    2013-03-01

    Many stroke survivors do not participate in everyday life activities. To assess the perceived and experienced restrictions in participation and autonomy among adult stroke survivors in Ghana. The "Impact on Participation and Autonomy Questionnaire" (IPAQ) instrument was administered in a survey of 200 adult stroke survivors to assess perceived restrictions in participation and autonomy, followed by in-depth interviews with a sub-sample on the restrictions they experienced in participation. Perceived restrictions in participation were most prevalent in the domains of education and training (3.46±0.79), paid or voluntary work (2.68±0.89), helping and supporting other people (2.20±0.82), and mobility (2.12±0.79). There were significant differences in two domains between survivors who received physiotherapy and those who received traditional rehabilitation. Over half of the survivors also perceived they would encounter severe problems in participation in the domains of paid or voluntary work, mobility, and education and training. The sub-sample of stroke survivors (n=7) mostly experienced restrictions in participation and autonomy in going outside the house, working, and in fulfilling family roles. If these perceptions and experiences are not addressed during rehabilitation, they could further inhibit the full participation and social integration of stroke survivors.

  4. The current status of follow-up services for childhood cancer survivors, are we meeting goals and expectations: a report from the Consortium for New England Childhood Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, Lisa B; Bradeen, Heather; Kadan-Lottick, Nina S; Diller, Lisa; Homans, Alan; Schwartz, Cindy L

    2011-12-01

    National guidelines for follow-up care of childhood cancer survivors have been established. It has not been determined if pediatric oncology programs have successfully incorporated these standards for long term survivor care into clinical practice. To describe survivor services available in a geographically and socio-economically diverse region of the US we surveyed all 12 academic institutions with pediatric oncology programs in the New England (NE) region. Participating sites diagnose a median of 34 (range 10-250) new pediatric cancers annually. The 12 institutions have 11 survivor clinics. Clinics are staffed by: pediatric oncologists (11/11); nurse practitioners (7/11); social workers/psychologists (9/11); RNs (5/11); primary care physicians (3/11); and sub-specialists (3/11). Most clinics recommend annual follow-up for all survivors (7/11); however, point of entry into survivor programs is variable. Treatment summaries and care plans are part of survivor care at each program. Almost all (10/11) refer to sub-specialists to manage late effects. Only 4 programs identified a policy for transitioning survivors to adult care (2 to adult survivor programs, 2 to adult primary-care) and 4 reported this as a problem. Two clinics had no designated funding for survivor services; 8/11 receive institutional support; 5/11 philanthropic. Five institutions conduct research in survivorship (1 government-funded, 2 philanthropy-funded, and 2 both). Pediatric oncology services in the NE region are making progress toward meeting follow-up care goals for childhood cancer survivors. Funding for resource intense programs, transitioning care to adult clinical services, volume of sub-specialty referral, and participation in research are common challenges. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Racial and ethnic disparities in cost-related medication non-adherence among cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Minjee; Salloum, Ramzi G

    2016-06-01

    Cancer survivors are delaying or avoiding necessary care due to costs, and medication non-adherence is an important aspect of deferred treatment. This study estimates the prevalence of cost-related medication non-adherence (CRN) by race and ethnicity and examines factors associated with CRN among cancer survivors. Using the 2006-2013 National Health Interview Survey, we examine self-reported CRN among cancer survivors compared with cancer-free controls. Descriptive statistics and multiple logistic regression models were used to identify factors associated with CRN among cancer survivors. In a nationally representative sample of 472,542 adults, 10,998 participants reported a history of cancer and 461,544 did not. Among 10,998 cancer survivors, 1397 (12.70 %) reported CRN. Among older cancer survivors, African-Americans were 2.64 times more likely (95 % confidence interval (CI), 1.73 to 4.01) and Hispanics 2.07 times more likely (95 % CI, 1.32 to 3.24) than whites to report CRN. Among younger cancer survivors, Hispanics were 1.61 times more likely (95 % CI, 1.23 to 2.10) than whites to report CRN. Significant racial and ethnic disparities in CRN were evident among cancer survivors. Older African-American and Hispanic overall survivors were more likely to report CRN in the past year compared with non-Hispanic whites. Given increasing prescription drug expenditure, it is important to closely monitor CRN in high-risk subgroups. Racial and ethnic minority groups at high risk for CRN should be counseled on the importance of medication adherence and offered support services to promote medication adherence. Further studies are warranted to establish effective policies and interventions in vulnerable populations.

  6. Parenthood in survivors of Hodgkin lymphoma: an EORTC-GELA general population case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Kaaij, Marleen A E; Heutte, Natacha; Meijnders, Paul; Abeilard-Lemoisson, Edwige; Spina, Michele; Moser, Lotte C; Allgeier, Anouk; Meulemans, Bart; Dubois, Brice; Simons, Arnold H M; Lugtenburg, Pieternella J; Aleman, Berthe M P; Noordijk, Evert M; Fermé, Christophe; Thomas, José; Stamatoullas, Aspasia; Fruchart, Christophe; Brice, Pauline; Gaillard, Isabelle; Doorduijn, Jeanette K; Sebban, Catherine; Smit, Wilma G J M; Bologna, Serge; Roesink, Judith M; Ong, Francisca; André, Marc P E; Raemaekers, John M M; Henry-Amar, Michel; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C

    2012-11-01

    We investigated the impact of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) on parenthood, including factors influencing parenthood probability, by comparing long-term HL survivors with matched general population controls. A Life Situation Questionnaire was sent to 3,604 survivors treated from 1964 to 2004 in successive clinical trials. Responders were matched with controls (1:3 or 4) for sex, country, education, and year of birth (10-year groups). Controls were given an artificial date of start of treatment equal to that of their matched case. The main end point was presence of biologic children after treatment, which was evaluated by using conditional logistic regression analysis. Logistic regression analysis was used to analyze factors influencing spontaneous post-treatment parenthood. In all, 1,654 French and Dutch survivors were matched with 6,414 controls. Median follow-up was 14 years (range, 5 to 44 years). After treatment, the odds ratio (OR) for having children was 0.77 (95% CI, 0.68 to 0.87; P < .001) for survivors compared with controls. Of 898 survivors who were childless before treatment, 46.7% achieved post-treatment parenthood compared with 49.3% of 3,196 childless controls (OR, 0.87; P = .08). Among 756 survivors with children before treatment, 12.4% became parents after HL treatment compared with 22.2% of 3,218 controls with children before treatment (OR, 0.49; P < .001). Treatment with alkylating agents, second-line therapy, and age older than 35 years at treatment appeared to reduce the chances of spontaneous post-treatment parenthood. Survivors of HL had slightly but significantly fewer children after treatment than matched general population controls. The difference concerned only survivors who had children before treatment and appears to have more personal than biologic reasons. The chance of successful post-treatment parenthood was 76%.

  7. Case of primary sideroblastic anemia observed among atomic bomb survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teratani, M.; Suzuki, J.; Kajikawa, M. (Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. for Nuclear Medicine and Biology)

    1980-05-01

    A female a-bomb survivor had anemia 18 years after the exposure to a-bomb. She was strongly suspected of developing leukemia, because she showed morphological abnormalities (erythrocytoblasts, megakaryocytes, myeloblasts, eosinocytes, and neutrocytes having 2 or 3 or 5 nuclei) and partial functional disorder extending 3 bone marrow systems and chromosome aberration. She died of hepatitis and atrioventricular block 11 years after the onset.

  8. Suboptimal Vitamin D levels among adult survivors of childhood cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise A. Rokitka

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Vitamin D plays an important role in many bodily systems, with increasing evidence suggesting its importance for the prevention of chronic diseases and cancer. The identification of vitamin D levels in childhood cancer survivors becomes, therefore, particularly relevant, given that optimizing levels may contribute to the prevention of secondary malignancies and chronic diseases.Methods: A cross - sectional analysis of serum 25 - hydroxyvitamin D levels among adult survivors of childhood cancers living in New York State and surrounding areas (n = 139 was performed. Independent variables included gender, race/ethnicity, cancer site, year of diagnosis, past medical and surgical history, prior radiation therapy; prior chemotherapy, age at diagnosis, age at last clinic visit, year of last clinic visit, height, weight, body mass index, and vitamin D supplementation.Results: Overall, 34% of survivors were vitamin D deficient (< 20 ng/ml, 39% were classified as insufficient (20 - 29 ng/ml and 27% (≥ 30 ng/ml were classified as having sufficient levels. Despite vitamin D supplementation among 41 patients, 68.3% continued to have insufficient or deficient levels. Participants with a BMI > 25 demonstrated lower levels of vitamin D (p < 0.05. Vitamin D levels did not vary by age group, race, ethnicity, diagnosis, or years since diagnosis.Conclusion: Given the growing awareness of the role of vitamin D and the documented late effects of treatment for childhood cancers, the high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency within the childhood cancer survivor population is of concern. Vitamin D represents an important target for surveillance and intervention to help improve long - term outcomes of childhood cancer survivors.

  9. Outcome of paediatric intensive care survivors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoester, Hendrika; Grootenhuis, Martha A.; Bos, Albert P.

    2007-01-01

    The development of paediatric intensive care has contributed to the improved survival of critically ill children. Physical and psychological sequelae and consequences for quality of life (QoL) in survivors might be significant, as has been determined in adult intensive care unit (ICU) survivors.

  10. Increased health care use in cancer survivors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heins, M.J.; Rijken, P.M.; Schellevis, F.G.; Hoek, L. van der; Korevaar, J.C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: As the number of cancer survivors increases and these patients often experience long-lasting consequences of cancer and its treatment, more insight into primary health care use of cancer survivors is needed. We aimed to determine how often and for which reasons do adult cancer patients

  11. Increases health care use in cancer survivors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heins, M.J.; Rijken, P.M.; Schellevis, F.G.; Hoek, L. van der; Korevaar, J.C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: As the number of cancer survivors increases and these patients often experience longlasting consequences of cancer and its treatment, more insight into primary health care use of cancer survivors is needed. Research question: How often and for which reasons do adult cancer patients

  12. Orthostatic intolerance in survivors of childhood cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terlou, Annelinde; Ruble, Kathy; Stapert, Anne F.; Chang, Ho-Choong; Rowe, Peter C.; Schwartz, Cindy L.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the prevalence and severity of orthostatic intolerance in survivors of childhood cancer and in healthy controls, and to correlate results of self-reported measures of health status with orthostatic testing in survivors of childhood cancer. Patient and methods: Thirty-nine

  13. Marriage and divorce among childhood cancer survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Susanne Vinkel; Kejs, Anne Mette Tranberg; Engholm, Gerda

    2011-01-01

    Many childhood cancer survivors have psychosocial late effects. We studied the risks for cohabitation and subsequent separation. Through the Danish Cancer Register, we identified a nationwide, population-based cohort of all 1877 childhood cancer survivors born from 1965 to 1980, and in whom cancer...

  14. Marriage and divorce among childhood cancer survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Susanne Vinkel; Kejs, Anne Mette Tranberg; Engholm, Gerda

    2011-01-01

    Many childhood cancer survivors have psychosocial late effects. We studied the risks for cohabitation and subsequent separation. Through the Danish Cancer Register, we identified a nationwide, population-based cohort of all 1877 childhood cancer survivors born from 1965 to 1980, and in whom cance...

  15. Stigma and psychological distress in suicide survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scocco, Paolo; Preti, Antonio; Totaro, Stefano; Ferrari, Alessandro; Toffol, Elena

    2017-03-01

    Suicide bereavement is frequently related to clinically significant psychological distress and affected by stigma. This study was designed to evaluate the relationship between psychological distress by psychopathological domains and stigma, in a sample of individuals bereaved by suicide (suicide survivors). The data were collected between January 2012 and December 2014 and included information on sociodemographic variables (gender, age, marital status and education level) and responses to the Stigma of Suicide Survivor scale (STOSSS) and the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI). One hundred and fifty-five suicide survivors completed the evaluation and were included in the study. Levels of psychological distress in suicide survivors, as measured by BSI, were positively related to levels of perceived stigma toward suicide survivors, as measured by STOSSS. The association was not affected by age and gender, or by marital status, education level, days from suicide or a personal history of suicide attempt. Participants with higher scores on almost all subscales of the BSI, particularly the interpersonal sensitivity and paranoid ideation subscales, reported the highest levels of perceived stigma toward suicide survivors. Levels of distress in subjects bereaved by the suicide of a relative or friend were positively associated with levels of perceived stigma toward suicide survivors. Specific interventions dedicated to the bereavement of suicide survivors might help to alleviate not only psychological distress but also stigma towards loss by suicide. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Late effects of treatment in survivors of childhood cancers: A single-centre experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachna Seth

    2017-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: Late effects were of concern; however, severe disability (Grade 3-5 was seen in only two per cent survivors. Lifelong follow up of childhood cancer survivors is required to assess cancer-related morbidity, occurrence of a secondary neoplasm, to facilitate timely diagnosis and to implement remedial or preventive interventions to optimize health outcomes. Awareness towards the existence of late effects of cancer therapy is required among parents, patients and health professionals.

  17. Predictors and outcome of grade 3 ischemia in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, S.; Heestermans, T.; Berg, J.W. Ten; Werkum, J.W. van; Suryapranata, H.; Birnbaum, Y.; Hamm, C.W.; Hof, A.W. van 't

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: Grade 3 ischemia (G3I: distortion of the terminal portion of the QRS complex) is a predictor of serious complications after acute myocardial infarction. However, less is known about which patients are more prone to present with G3I. METHODS: Patients who were enrolled in the Ongoing

  18. Thyroid abnormalities in survivors of childhood cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çağlar, Ayla Akca; Oğuz, Aynur; Pınarlı, Faruk Güçlü; Karadeniz, Ceyda; Okur, Arzu; Bideci, Aysun; Koçak, Ülker; Bora, Hüseyin

    2014-09-01

    To investigate the late side effects of childhood cancer therapy on the thyroid gland and to determine the risk factors for development of thyroid disorder among childhood cancer survivors. One hundred and twenty relapse-free survivors of childhood cancer (aged 6-30 years) were included in this study. The diagnoses of patients were lymphoma, leukemia, brain tumor, rhabdomyosarcoma and nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). The patients were divided into two groups depending on the treatment: group 1-chemotherapy (ChT) only (n=52) and group 2-combination therapy of ChT + radiotherapy (RT) (head/neck/thorax) (n=68). Thyroid function tests, urinary iodine levels, and thyroid gland ultrasound examinations were evaluated in both groups. Incidence of thyroid disease was 66% (n=79) in the survivors. The thyroid abnormalities were: hypothyroidism (HT) (n=32, 27%), thyroid nodules (n=27, 22%), thyroid parenchymal heterogeneity (n=40, 33%), autoimmune thyroiditis (n=36, 30%), and thyroid malignancy (n=3, 2%). While the incidence of HT and thyroid nodules in group 2 was significantly higher than in group 1, the incidence of thyroid parenchymal heterogeneity and autoimmune thyroiditis was similar in the two patient groups. HT and thyroid malignancy were seen only in group 2. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, a history of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), brain tumor and NPC, as well as cervical irradiation and 5000-5999 cGy doses of radiation were found to constitute risk factors for HT. History of HL and 4000-5999 cGy doses of radiation were risk factors for thyroid nodules. Head/neck irradiation and treatment with platinum derivatives were risk factors for autoimmune thyroiditis. In univariate analysis, a history of NPC, cervical + nasopharyngeal irradiation, and treatment with platinum derivatives were risk factors for thyroid parenchymal heterogeneity. Our results indicate that there is especially an increased risk of HT and thyroid nodules in patients treated with combination

  19. Fertility in male medulloblastoma survivors: closing the gaps in counseling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahata L

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Leena Nahata,1 Richard N Yu,2 Ian P Dumont,3,4 Peter E Manley,3,4 Laurie E Cohen1,3,4 1Division of Endocrinology, 2Department of Urology, Department of Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital, 3Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital, 4Department of Pediatric Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA, USA Background: Pediatric medulloblastoma patients have high survival rates and are at risk for treatment-related sequelae, including infertility, emphasizing the need for fertility counseling. This cohort is less likely to pursue higher education, marry, and live independently, which may impact fertility counseling. Our goal was to explore fertility-related concerns in medulloblastoma survivors and counseling practices among providers. Methods: This study was performed at the Dana-Farber/Children's Hospital Cancer Center in Boston, Massachusetts. Surveys were administered to male pediatric medulloblastoma survivors aged 18 years and older and pediatric neuro-oncology practitioners. Medical records were reviewed to determine treatment protocols and documentation of fertility counseling. Data analysis was descriptive. Results: Fourteen male medulloblastoma survivors and six neuro-oncology practitioners completed the study. All patients had received central nervous system irradiation and adjuvant chemotherapy with at least one alkylating agent. Five (83% practitioners stated that they discussed fertility with all survivors at most visits. Eight (57% medulloblastoma survivors stated that they had received fertility counseling at initial diagnosis. Six (43% stated that fertility had been discussed since treatment had ended. The majority (>70% of survivors reported a desire to have children and were open to learning more about their fertility status. Fertility counseling was documented in survivorship visits in only 46% of subjects. Conclusion: Most of our subjects had no documented fertility

  20. Lifestyle modification in cervical cancer survivors: an ongoing need.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlumbrecht, Matthew P; Sun, Charlotte C; Huang, Marilyn S; Zandstra, Fran; Bodurka, Diane C

    2014-03-01

    With the introduction of multimodality therapy for cervical cancer, many women will be long-term survivors in need of comprehensive surveillance care. Our goals were to evaluate patterns of obesity and smoking in a cohort of cervical cancer survivors and to assess the potential influence of these comorbidities on subsequent follow-up. We reviewed the records of patients treated for invasive cervical cancer at our institution from 2000 to 2003 who had no evidence of disease for 3 or more years. Demographic and clinical data were collected, including smoking history and anthropometric measurements. Body mass index (BMI) was categorized according to World Health Organization criteria. Logistic regression and Wilcoxon rank sum analyses were performed. Two hundred ninety-eight women had complete follow-up data at 3 years. The median age at diagnosis was 43.5 years (range, 17.6-87.1 years). At diagnosis, 31.9% had a normal BMI, 28.2% were overweight, and 34.6% were obese compared with 31.7%, 21.1%, and 30.2% at 3 years, respectively. Of the 51 women whose BMI categorization changed, 33 (64.7%) had weight gain, and 18 (35.3%) had weight loss. By paired analyses, increase in BMI was significant over the 3-year interval (P Obesity and smoking are significant comorbidities that may complicate care in cervical cancer survivors. Interventions aimed at modifying these risk factors should be routinely undertaken in this population.

  1. Erectile Dysfunction in Male Survivors of Childhood Cancer-A Report From the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritenour, Chad W M; Seidel, Kristy D; Leisenring, Wendy; Mertens, Ann C; Wasilewski-Masker, Karen; Shnorhavorian, Margarett; Sklar, Charles A; Whitton, John A; Stovall, Marilyn; Constine, Louis S; Armstrong, Gregory T; Robison, Leslie L; Meacham, Lillian R

    2016-06-01

    With survival rates higher than 80%, the number of survivors from pediatric cancer continues to increase. Late effects resulting from cancer and cancer therapy are being characterized, but little information exists on sexual health for men who have survived childhood cancer. To assess erectile dysfunction (ED) in men who survived childhood and adolescent cancers and to identify potential risk factors for ED. In total, 1,622 men and 271 eligible brothers in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study cohort completed the Male Health Questionnaire, which provided information on sexual practices and sexual function. Combined with demographic, cancer, and treatment information from medical record abstraction, results of the Male Health Questionnaire were analyzed using multivariable modeling. The International Index of Erectile Function was used to identify ED in subjects. International Index of Erectile Function. Survivors (mean age = 37.4 years, SD = 7.3 years) reported significantly lower sexual activity in the year before the survey than the brothers (mean age = 38.8 years, SD = 8.5 years) without cancer. ED was reported by 12.3% (95% CI = 10.4-14.3) of survivors and 4.2% (95% CI = 2.0-7.9) of brothers. Survivors showed significantly higher relative risk (RR) for ED (RR = 2.63, 95% CI = 1.40-4.97). In addition to older age, survivors who were exposed to higher-dose (≥10 Gy) testicular radiation (RR = 3.55, 95% CI = 1.53-8.24), had surgery on the spinal cord or nerves (RR = 2.87, 95% CI = 1.36-6.05), prostate surgery (RR = 6.56, 95% CI = 3.84-11.20), or pelvic surgery (RR = 2.28, 95% CI = 1.04-4.98) were at higher risk for ED. Men who have survived childhood cancer have a greater than 2.6-fold increased risk for ED and certain cancer-specific treatments are associated with increased risk. Attention to sexual health, with its physical and emotional implications, and opportunities for early detection and intervention in these individuals could be important

  2. Association Of Serum Pentraxin-3 And High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein With The Extent Of Coronary Stenosis In Patients Undergoing Coronary Angiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuković-Dejanović Vesna

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: We compared factors of inflammation – high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP and pentraxin-3 (PTX3, and we explored their relationship with coronary artery disease (CAD. Also, we tested the usefulness of hsCRP and PTX3 in the risk assessment of coronary stenosis development and the diagnostic ability of these biomarkers to detect disease severity.

  3. Knowledge of hepatitis C virus screening in long-term pediatric cancer survivors: a report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansdale, Meagan; Castellino, Sharon; Marina, Neyssa; Goodman, Pamela; Hudson, Melissa M; Mertens, Ann C; Smith, Stephanie M; Leisenring, Wendy; Robison, Leslie L; Oeffinger, Kevin C

    2010-02-15

    Pediatric cancer survivors who were treated before routine hepatitis C virus (HCV) screening of blood donors in 1992 have an elevated risk of transfusion-acquired HCV. To assess long-term pediatric cancer survivors' knowledge of HCV testing and blood transfusion history, a questionnaire was administered to 9242 participants in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study who are at risk for transfusion-acquired HCV after cancer therapy from 1970 to 1986. More than 70% of survivors reported either no prior HCV testing (41%) or uncertainty about testing (31%), with only 29% reporting prior testing. One half recalled having a treatment-related blood transfusion; those who recalled a transfusion were more likely to report HCV testing (39%) than those who did not (18%) or were unsure (20%). In multivariate models, survivors who reported no prior HCV testing were more likely to be older (odds ratio [OR] per 5-year increase, 1.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.0-1.1) and to report no care at a cancer center within the past 2 years (OR, 1.2; 95% CI, 1.0-1.4), no cancer treatment summary (OR, 1.3; 95% CI, 1.2-1.5), and no transfusions (OR, 2.6; 95% CI, 2.3-3.0) or uncertainty about transfusions (OR, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.9-2.6), and less likely to be racial/ethnic minorities (OR, 0.9; 95% CI, 0.8-1.0) or survivors of acute myeloid leukemia (OR, 0.7; 95% CI, 0.5-1.0). Many pediatric cancer survivors at risk for transfusion-acquired HCV are unaware of their transfusion history and prior testing for HCV and would benefit from programs to increase HCV knowledge and screening.

  4. Changes in motivational outcomes after a supervised resistance exercise training intervention in lung cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peddle-McIntyre, Carolyn J; Bell, Gordon; Fenton, David; McCargar, Linda; Courneya, Kerry S

    2013-01-01

    Short-term supervised exercise interventions improve health-related fitness in lung cancer survivors; however, sustained exercise is required to maintain the health benefits. The impact of exercise interventions on motivational outcomes may be important for long-term exercise adoption. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of a 10-week supervised progressive resistance exercise training program on lung cancer survivors' motivational outcomes based on the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB). Posttreatment lung cancer survivors were recruited to undergo a 10-week supervised resistance exercise training intervention. The 2-component model of the TPB was measured at baseline and after intervention. Fifteen participants completed assessments of TPB measures. Significant increases in self-efficacy (P = .022) and perceived controllability (P = .032) and a nonsignificant increase in affective attitude (P = .090) were observed after intervention. Intention was significantly lower at postintervention (P = .044). Significant correlates of postintervention intention were instrumental attitude (P = .001), self-efficacy (P = .004), perceived behavioral control (P = .009), and affective attitude (P = .044). At postintervention, self-efficacy was significantly correlated with planning (P resistance exercise training may improve some motivational outcomes for lung cancer survivors. Intentions appeared to be weakened after the intervention, but there are methodological explanations for this finding. Participation in short-term supervised resistance exercise may be an effective method to improve some motivational factors related to exercise in lung cancer survivors. More research is needed to examine the long-term effects of supervised resistance exercise on motivational outcomes in lung cancer survivors. Strategies to maintain motivational changes that occur following a supervised resistance exercise intervention need to be investigated.

  5. Outcome With the Repositionable and Retrievable Boston Scientific Lotus Valve Compared With the Balloon-Expandable Edwards Sapien 3 Valve in Patients Undergoing Transfemoral Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeger, Julia; Gonska, Birgid; Rottbauer, Wolfgang; Wöhrle, Jochen

    2017-06-01

    New generation devices for transfemoral aortic valve replacement were optimized on valve positioning and reduction of residual aortic regurgitation. We compared 30-day, 12-month, and 24-month outcomes of the Boston Scientific Lotus valve (Lotus) and the balloon-expandable Edwards Sapien 3 (ES3) valve. Primary end point was all-cause mortality or disabling stroke within 12 months. Between 2014 and 2016, 537 patients were enrolled at our center, and 202 patients received Lotus and 335 ES3. There was no residual moderate or severe aortic regurgitation. Rate of mild aortic regurgitation was lower with the repositionable and retrievable Lotus valve compared with the ES3. Rate of pacemaker implantation was significantly higher with the Lotus valve compared with the ES3 valve (36.1% versus 14.9%, P<0.01). Valve Academic Research Consortium-2 early safety end point at 30 days was 7.4% with both devices with no difference in all-cause mortality (Lotus, 1.9%; ES3, 1.8%; P=0.87), rate of disabling stroke (Lotus, 1.5%; ES3, 2.1%; P=0.62), or major vascular complications (Lotus, 2.9%; ES3, 2.4%; P=0.69). The primary end point at 12 months was similar between groups. In a propensity score-matched comparison, there was no difference in the primary end point within 12 months (Lotus, 15.5%; ES3, 18.6%; P=0.69) and 24 months (Lotus, 21.9%; ES3, 26.4%; P=0.49). Transfemoral aortic valve replacement with the ES3 and the Lotus were associated with similar 30-day, 12-month, and 24-month clinical outcomes. Need for permanent pacemaker implantation was significantly higher with the repositionable Lotus device. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT02162069. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Outdoor Leadership Considerations with Women Survivors of Sexual Abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitten, Denise; Dutton, Rosalind

    1993-01-01

    Emphasizes the importance of leader awareness of the discomfort and need for emotional safety that may surface for women survivors of sexual abuse during an outdoor experience. Discusses survivor's self-perception and how this affects the outdoor experience; the impact of natural elements on survivors; and how to help survivors develop coping…

  7. 20 CFR 225.21 - Survivor Tier I PIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... INSURANCE AMOUNT DETERMINATIONS PIA's Used in Computing Survivor Annuities and the Amount of the Residual Lump-Sum Payable § 225.21 Survivor Tier I PIA. The Survivor Tier I PIA is used in computing the tier I component of a survivor annuity. This PIA is determined in accordance with section 215 of the Social...

  8. Fiberoptic monitoring of central venous oxygen saturation (PediaSat in small children undergoing cardiac surgery: continuous is not continuous [v3; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/3qt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca G. Iodice

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Monitoring of superior vena cava saturation (ScvO2 has become routine in the management of pediatric patients undergoing cardiac surgery. The objective of our study was to evaluate the correlation between continuous ScvO2 by the application of a fiber-optic oximetry catheter (PediaSat and intermittent ScvO2 by using standard blood gas measurements. These results were compared to those obtained by cerebral near infrared spectroscopy (cNIRS. Setting: Tertiary pediatric cardiac intensive care unit (PCICU. Methods and main results: A retrospective study was conducted in consecutive patients who were monitored with a 4.5 or 5.5 F PediaSat catheter into the right internal jugular vein. An in vivo calibration was performed once the patient was transferred to the PCICU and re-calibration took place every 24 hours thereafter. Each patient had a NIRS placed on the forehead. Saturations were collected every 4 hours until extubation. Ten patients with a median age of 2.2 (0.13-8.5 years and a weight of 12.4 (3.9-24 kg were enrolled. Median sampling time was 32 (19-44 hours: 64 pairs of PediaSat and ScVO2 saturations showed a poor correlation (r=0.62, 95% CI 44-75; p<0.0001 and Bland Altman analysis for repeated measures showed an average difference of 0.34 with a standard deviation of 7,9 and 95% limits of agreement from -15 to 16. Thirty-six pairs of cNIRS and ScVO2 saturations showed a fair correlation (r=0.79, 95% CI 0.60-0.89; p<0.0001 an average difference of -1.4 with a standard deviation of 6 and 95% limits of agreement from -13 to 10. Analysis of median percentage differences between PediaSat and ScvO2 saturation over time revealed that, although not statistically significant, the change in percentage saturation differences was clinically relevant after the 8th hour from calibration (from -100 to +100%. Conclusion: PediaSat catheters showed unreliable performance in our cohort. It should be further investigated whether repeating

  9. Long-term outcomes after percutaneous coronary interventions in cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landes, Uri; Kornowski, Ran; Bental, Tamir; Assali, Abid; Vaknin-Assa, Hana; Lev, Eli; Iakobishvili, Zaza

    2017-01-01

    Cancer patients are mostly excluded from percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) clinical trials and oncologic history is lacking from most PCI registries. Thus, little is known about the clinical outcomes following PCI among cancer survivors. Our aim was to examine the prevalence and long-term outcome of cancer survivors among a large PCI patient cohort. We retrospectively integrated and analyzed cardiovascular and oncologic data of 12 785 consecutive patients who underwent PCI between April 2004 and October 2014. Cancer survivors were compared with pair-matched cancer-naive patients. Cancer survivors constituted 7.8% (1005) of the patients. The mean cancer diagnosis-to-PCI interval was 3.6±3.4 years and the mean post-PCI follow-up was 6.4±5.9 years. Postmatching baseline characteristics were similar between the groups. Cancer survivors were referred to the catheterization laboratory because of acute coronary syndrome and were treated with bare-metal stents more often than cancer-naive patients. Cancer survivors to cancer-naive patients' hazard ratio and 95% confidence interval were 1.46 (1.24-1.72), P value less than 0.001 for all-cause mortality and 1.41 (1.23-1.63), P value less than 0.001 for the composite of death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, target vessel revascularization, and coronary bypass surgery. Cardiac death was the leading cause of mortality in our hospital during follow-up in both groups, although more cancer survivors died of malignancy (25 vs. 5%, P<0.001). Cancer survivors constitute a high proportion of the PCI population (one in every 13 patients) and have an ∼40% increased risk for cardiovascular morbidity and death. Cardiac disease was a leading cause of in-hospital mortality among these patients.

  10. Characteristics and Long-Term Prognosis of Holocaust Survivors Presenting with Acute Myocardial Infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiyovich, Arthur; Plakht, Ygal; Belinski, Katya; Gilutz, Harel

    2016-05-01

    Catastrophic life events are associated with the occurrence of cardiovascular incidents and worsening of the clinical course followirg-such events. To evaluate the characteristics and long-term prognosis of Holocaust survivors presenting with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) compared to non-Holocaust survivors. Israeli Jews who were born before 1941 and had been admitted to a tertiary medical center due to AMI during the period 2002-2012 were studied. Holocaust survivors were compared with non-Holocaust survivor controls using individual age matching. Overall 305 age-matched pairs were followed for up to 10 years after AMI. We found a higher prevalence of depression (5.9% vs. 3.3%, P = 0.045) yet a similar rate of cardiovascular risk factors, non-cardiovascular co-morbidity, severity of coronary artery disease, and in-hospital complications in survivors compared to controls. Throughout the follow-up period, similar mortality rates (62.95% vs. 63.9%, P = 0.801) and reduced cumulative mortality (0.9 vs. 0.96, HR = 0.780, 95% CI 0.636-0.956, P = 0.016) were found among survivors compared to age-matched controls, respectively. However, in a multivariate analysis survival was not found to be an independent predictor of mortality, although some tendency towards reduced mortality was seen (AdjHR = 0.84, 95% CI 0.68-1.03, P = 0.094). Depression disorder was associated with a 77.9% increase in the risk for mortality. Holocaust survivors presenting with AMI were older and had a higher prevalence of depression than controls. No. excessive, and possibly even mildly improved, risk of mortality.was observed in survivors compared with controls presenting with AMI. Possibly, specific traits that are associated with surviving catastrophic events counter the excess risk of such events following AMI.

  11. Neural Underpinnings of Working Memory in Adult Survivors of Childhood Brain Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Tricia Z; Na, Sabrina; Mao, Hui

    2015-08-01

    Adult survivors of childhood brain tumors are at risk for cognitive performance deficits that require the core cognitive skill of working memory. Our goal was to examine the neural mechanisms underlying working memory performance in survivors. We studied the working memory of adult survivors of pediatric posterior fossa brain tumors using a letter n-back paradigm with varying cognitive workload (0-, 1-, 2-, and 3-back) and functional magnetic resonance imaging as well as neuropsychological measures. Survivors of childhood brain tumors evidenced lower working memory performance than demographically matched healthy controls. Whole-brain analyses revealed significantly greater blood-oxygen level dependent (BOLD) activation in the left superior / middle frontal gyri and left parietal lobe during working memory (2-back versus 0-back contrast) in survivors. Left frontal BOLD response negatively correlated with 2- and 3-back working memory performance, Auditory Consonant Trigrams (ACT), and Digit Span Backwards. In contrast, parietal lobe BOLD response negatively correlated with 0-back (vigilance task) and ACT. The results revealed that adult survivors of childhood posterior fossa brain tumors recruited additional cognitive control resources in the prefrontal lobe during increased working memory demands. This increased prefrontal activation is associated with lower working memory performance and is consistent with the allocation of latent resources theory.

  12. Infertility, infertility treatment, and achievement of pregnancy in female survivors of childhood cancer: a report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Sara E; Najita, Julie S; Ginsburg, Elizabeth S; Leisenring, Wendy M; Stovall, Marilyn; Weathers, Rita E; Sklar, Charles A; Robison, Leslie L; Diller, Lisa

    2013-08-01

    Previous studies have shown decreased pregnancy rates and early menopause in female cancer survivors; however, infertility rates and reproductive interventions have not been studied. We investigated infertility and time to pregnancy in female childhood cancer survivors, and analysed treatment characteristics associated with infertility and subsequent pregnancy. The Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS) is a cohort study including 5 year cancer survivors from 26 Canadian and US institutions who were younger than 21 years at the time of diagnosis between Jan 1, 1970, and Dec 31, 1986, and a sibling control group. We included women aged 18-39 years who had ever been sexually active. We gathered demographic, medical, and reproductive data via a baseline questionnaire, and quantified exposure to alkylating agents and radiation therapy. Self-reported infertility, medical treatment for infertility, time to first pregnancy in survivors and siblings, and the risk of infertility in survivors by demographic, disease, and treatment variables were analysed. 3531 survivors and 1366 female sibling controls who enrolled between Nov 3, 1992, and April 4, 2004, were included. Compared with their siblings, survivors had an increased risk (relative risk [RR] 1·48 [95% CI 1·23-1·78]; pinfertility (ie, >1 year of attempts at conception without success), which was most pronounced at early reproductive ages (RR 2·92 [95% CI 1·18-7·20], p=0·020, in participants ≤24 years; 1·61 [1·05-2·48], p=0·029, in those aged 25-29 years; and 1·37 [1·11-1·69], p=0·0035, in those aged 30-40 years). Despite being equally likely to seek treatment for infertility, survivors were less likely than were their siblings to be prescribed drugs for treatment of infertility (0·57 [95% CI 0·46-0·70], pinfertility. Although survivors had an increased time to pregnancy compared with their siblings (p=0·032), 292 (64%) of 455 participants with self-reported clinical infertility achieved a

  13. Empowerment of Cancer Survivors Through Information Technology: An Integrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groen, Wim G; Kuijpers, Wilma; Oldenburg, Hester Sa; Wouters, Michel Wjm; Aaronson, Neil K; van Harten, Wim H

    2015-11-27

    Patient empowerment may be an effective approach to strengthen the role of cancer survivors and to reduce the burden on health care. However, it is not well conceptualized, notably in oncology. Furthermore, it is unclear to what extent information technology (IT) services can contribute to empowerment of cancer survivors. We aim to define the conceptual components of patient empowerment of chronic disease patients, especially cancer survivors, and to explore the contribution of existing and new IT services to promote empowerment. Electronic databases were searched to identify theoretical and empirical articles regarding empowerment. We extracted and synthesized conceptual components of patient empowerment (ie, attributes, antecedents, and consequences) according to the integrated review methodology. We identified recent IT services for cancer survivors by examining systematic reviews and a proposed inventory of new services, and we related their features and effects to the identified components of empowerment. Based on 26 articles, we identified five main attributes of patient empowerment: (1) being autonomous and respected, (2) having knowledge, (3) having psychosocial and behavioral skills, (4) perceiving support from community, family, and friends, and (5) perceiving oneself to be useful. The latter two were specific for the cancer setting. Systematic reviews of IT services and our additional inventory helped us identify five main categories: (1) educational services, including electronic survivorship care plan services, (2) patient-to-patient services, (3) electronic patient-reported outcome (ePRO) services, (4) multicomponent services, and (5) portal services. Potential impact on empowerment included knowledge enhancement and, to a lesser extent, enhancing autonomy and skills. Newly developed services offer promising and exciting opportunities to empower cancer survivors, for instance, by providing tailored advice for supportive or follow-up care based on

  14. Employment Situation of Parents of Long-Term Childhood Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mader, Luzius; Rueegg, Corina S.; Vetsch, Janine; Rischewski, Johannes; Ansari, Marc; Kuehni, Claudia E.; Michel, Gisela

    2016-01-01

    Background Taking care of children diagnosed with cancer affects parents’ professional life. The impact in the long-term however, is not clear. We aimed to compare the employment situation of parents of long-term childhood cancer survivors with control parents of the general population, and to identify clinical and socio-demographic factors associated with parental employment. Methods As part of the Swiss Childhood Cancer Survivor Study, we sent a questionnaire to parents of survivors aged 5–15 years, who survived ≥5 years after diagnosis. Information on control parents of the general population came from the Swiss Health Survey (restricted to men and women with ≥1 child aged 5–15 years). Employment was categorized as not employed, part-time, and full-time employed. We used generalized ordered logistic regression to determine associations with clinical and socio-demographic factors. Clinical data was available from the Swiss Childhood Cancer Registry. Results We included 394 parent-couples of survivors and 3’341 control parents (1’731 mothers; 1’610 fathers). Mothers of survivors were more often not employed (29% versus 22%; ptrend = 0.007). However, no differences between mothers were found in multivariable analysis. Fathers of survivors were more often employed full-time (93% versus 87%; ptrend = 0.002), which remained significant in multivariable analysis. Among parents of survivors, mothers with tertiary education (OR = 2.40, CI:1.14–5.07) were more likely to be employed. Having a migration background (OR = 3.63, CI: 1.71–7.71) increased the likelihood of being full-time employed in mothers of survivors. Less likely to be employed were mothers of survivors diagnosed with lymphoma (OR = 0.31, CI:0.13–0.73) and >2 children (OR = 0.48, CI:0.30–0.75); and fathers of survivors who had had a relapse (OR = 0.13, CI:0.04–0.36). Conclusion Employment situation of parents of long-term survivors reflected the more traditional parenting roles

  15. Marriage and divorce among childhood cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Susanne Vinkel; Kejs, Anne Mette Tranberg; Engholm, Gerda; Møller, Henrik; Johansen, Christoffer; Schmiegelow, Kjeld

    2011-10-01

    Many childhood cancer survivors have psychosocial late effects. We studied the risks for cohabitation and subsequent separation. Through the Danish Cancer Register, we identified a nationwide, population-based cohort of all 1877 childhood cancer survivors born from 1965 to 1980, and in whom cancer was diagnosed between 1965 and 1996 before they were 20 years of age. A sex-matched and age-matched population-based control cohort was used for comparison (n=45,449). Demographic and socioeconomic data were obtained from national registers and explored by discrete-time Cox regression analyses. Childhood cancer survivors had a reduced rate of cohabitation [rate ratio (RR) 0.78; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.73-0.83], owing to lower rates among survivors of both noncentral nervous system (CNS) tumors (RR 0.88; 95% CI: 0.83-0.95) and CNS tumors (RR 0.52; 95% CI: 0.45-0.59). Male CNS tumor survivors had a nonsignificantly lower rate (RR 0.47; 95% CI: 0.38-0.58) than females (RR 0.56; 95% CI: 0.47-0.68). The rates of separation were almost identical to those of controls. In conclusion, the rate of cohabitation was lower for all childhood cancer survivors than for the population-based controls, with the most pronounced reduction among survivors of CNS tumors. Mental deficits after cranial irradiation are likely to be the major risk factor.

  16. STUDI KOMITMEN ORGANISASIONAL: PEKERJA CONTINGENT DAN SURVIVOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fenika Walani

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, contingent and survivor workers have emerged as a common reality in business activities. Unfortunately, contingent worker has high job insecurity on his employment status. On the other side, downsizing activities can result in decreasing job security of survivor worker. As a consequence, both contingent and survivor workers very potential have low organizational commitment. However, organizations still have an opportunity to give their workers an exclusive treatment for building organizational commitment without ignoring the fact that workers have other commitment foci.

  17. Participation in leisure activities after stroke: A survey of community-residing stroke survivors in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent-Onabajo, Grace; Blasu, Cephas

    2016-01-01

    Leisure provides pleasure and relaxation, and has health benefits even after a stressful and life-changing event such as a stroke. This study examined leisure participation among a sample of community-residing stroke survivors in Nigeria. Fifty-five stroke survivors undergoing rehabilitation were consecutively recruited from two government hospitals in Northern Nigeria. Data on pre- and post-stroke participation, and socio-demographic (age, sex, marital, employment, and educational status) and clinical (level of disability, post-stroke duration, stroke type and side of hemiplegia/hemiparesis) attributes of the stroke survivors were obtained. Leisure participation was assessed in four domains of recreational, social, cognitive, and productive/creative activities. Associations between leisure participation and the socio-demographic and clinical variables were examined using bivariate analysis. Mean (SD) age of the stroke survivors was 53.55 (14.39) years. Prevalence of leisure participation was 89.1%. Participation in specific leisure domains however varied thus: social (83.6%), cognitive (60%), recreational (41.8%), productive/creative activities (30.9%). Significant associations were observed between participation in cognitive, productive/creative, and recreational leisure activities, and specific socio-demographic and clinical attributes. Leisure participation was high in a general sense but marginal in recreational and productive/creative activities. The observed socio-demographic and clinical associations with post-stroke leisure participation may assist in providing effective leisure rehabilitation strategies.

  18. The influence of antineoplastic treatment on the weight of survivors of childhood cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Ferrari Carneiro Teixeira

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose: Obesity is a late effect in survivors of childhood cancer and correlates with chronic complications. Survivors of leukemia, brain tumors, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation are more likely to develop obesity resulting from treatment modalities such as radiotherapy and glucocorticoids. This paper analyzes and integrates the current data available to health professionals in order to clarify strategies that can be used to treat and prevent obesity in childhood cancer survivors. Sources: This is a literature review from on scientifically reliable electronic databases. We selected articles published in the last five years and earlier articles of great scientific importance. Data synthesis: The mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of obesity in cancer survivors are not completely understood, but it is believed that damage to the hypothalamus and endocrine disorders such as insulin resistance, leptin resistance, and hormone deficiency may be involved. The body composition of this group includes a predominance of adipose tissue, especially in those undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplant and total body irradiation. The use of body mass index in these patients may lead to an underestimation of individuals' risk for metabolic complications. Conclusion: Early identification of groups using accurate anthropometric assessments, interventional treatment, and/or preventative measures and counseling is essential to minimize the adverse effects of treatment. Physical activity and healthy eating to promote adequacy of weight in the whole population should be encouraged.

  19. The influence of antineoplastic treatment on the weight of survivors of childhood cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Julia Ferrari Carneiro; Maia-Lemos, Priscila Dos Santos; Cypriano, Mônica Dos Santos; Pisani, Luciana Pellegrini

    Obesity is a late effect in survivors of childhood cancer and correlates with chronic complications. Survivors of leukemia, brain tumors, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation are more likely to develop obesity resulting from treatment modalities such as radiotherapy and glucocorticoids. This paper analyzes and integrates the current data available to health professionals in order to clarify strategies that can be used to treat and prevent obesity in childhood cancer survivors. This is a literature review from on scientifically reliable electronic databases. We selected articles published in the last five years and earlier articles of great scientific importance. The mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of obesity in cancer survivors are not completely understood, but it is believed that damage to the hypothalamus and endocrine disorders such as insulin resistance, leptin resistance, and hormone deficiency may be involved. The body composition of this group includes a predominance of adipose tissue, especially in those undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplant and total body irradiation. The use of body mass index in these patients may lead to an underestimation of individuals' risk for metabolic complications. Early identification of groups using accurate anthropometric assessments, interventional treatment, and/or preventative measures and counseling is essential to minimize the adverse effects of treatment. Physical activity and healthy eating to promote adequacy of weight in the whole population should be encouraged. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  20. Urinary incontinence and other pelvic floor disorders after radiation therapy in endometrial cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Saya; John, Gabriella; Sammel, Mary; Andy, Uduak Umoh; Chu, Christina; Arya, Lily A; Brown, Justin; Schmitz, Kathryn

    2017-11-01

    To investigate radiation therapy as a risk factor for urinary or fecal incontinence, pelvic organ prolapse, and sexual dysfunction in endometrial cancer survivors. We performed a retrospective cohort study of endometrial cancer survivors. Data were collected using a mailed survey and the medical record. Validated questionnaires were used to generate rates of urinary incontinence and other pelvic floor disorders. The incidence rates of pelvic floor disorders were compared across groups with different exposures to radiation. Of the 149 endometrial cancer survivors, 41% received radiation therapy. Fifty-one percent of women reported urine leakage. The rates of urinary incontinence in women exposed and not exposed to vaginal brachytherapy (VBT) or whole-pelvis radiation were 48% and 58%, respectively (p=0.47). The incidence of fecal incontinence did not differ between groups, but the score for overall sexual function was significantly higher in women who did not undergo radiation therapy. On multivariable analysis, significant risk factors for urinary incontinence were age (AOR 1.06 95% CI 1.02, 1.10) and BMI (AOR 1.07 95% CI 1.02, 1.11), but treatment with radiation was not significantly associated with urinary incontinence, or fecal incontinence (p>0.05). Age, BMI, and radiation exposure were independent predictors of decreased sexual function score (pincontinence, but may contribute to sexual dysfunction in endometrial cancer survivors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Dietary intake after treatment in child cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jennifer; Wakefield, Claire E; Fleming, Catharine A K; Gawthorne, Rebecca; Tapsell, Linda C; Cohn, Richard J

    2012-05-01

    Childhood cancer survivors (CCS) are at increased risk of complications such as obesity, diabetes, and osteoporosis which have the potential to, in part, be controlled with dietary interventions. To allow the development of appropriate dietary interventions for younger cancer survivors data on their dietary intake as well as information on parental nutrition views and practices need to be assessed. Dietary intake of 50 CCS was assessed with a 3-day food diary (parent report). Parent child feeding practices were assessed with the Child Feeding Questionnaire (CFQ). Historical and anthropometric data was extracted from medical records. Survivors were less than 13 years old and less than 5 years after treatment completion. Twenty percent of participating CCS was overweight or obese and 54% were consuming above their estimated energy requirements. Fifty, 32% and 44% of children did not meet requirements for folate, calcium, and iron respectively. There was a significant trend for increasing BMI percentiles from diagnosis to time of assessment (56.29 vs. 67.17, P = 0.01). Results from the CFQ showed that parents were more likely to monitor (3.99) and use a restrictive form of parenting (3.43) to control their child's food intake rather than pressure their child to eat (2.77) (P = 0.001). This group displayed excessive energy intake (kilojoules) and poor dietary habits. Parents' restrictive feeding style may be contributing to these habits. Early interventions targeting the dietary intake of young survivors and associated parent feeding practices may prevent some of the deleterious long-term effects associated with childhood cancer therapy. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Education, employment and marriage in long-term survivors of teenage and young adult cancer compared with healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mader, Luzius; Vetsch, Janine; Christen, Salome; Baenziger, Julia; Roser, Katharina; Dehler, Silvia; Michel, Gisela

    2017-03-21

    Teenage and young adult (TYA) cancer patients are faced with the diagnosis during a challenging period of psychosocial development that may affect social outcomes in the long term. Therefore, we aimed to: (1) determine differences in social outcomes between long-term TYA cancer survivors and healthy controls and (2) identify factors associated with adverse social outcomes. We sent a questionnaire to TYA cancer survivors (aged 16-25 years at diagnosis, 5 years after diagnosis) registered in the Cancer Registry Zurich and Zug. Information on controls was obtained from the Swiss Health Survey 2012. We assessed educational achievement, employment status, marital status and life partnership (survivors only), and compared these outcomes between survivors and controls. We used logistic regression to identify sociodemographic and cancer-related factors associated with social outcomes. We included 160 TYA cancer survivors and 999 controls. Educational achievement of survivors differed significantly from controls (p = 0.012): more survivors than controls reported upper secondary education (33 vs 27%) and fewer survivors reported university education (12 vs 21%). No significant differences were found for employment (p = 0.515) and marital status (p = 0.357). The majority of survivors (91%) and controls (90%) were employed, and 37% of survivors were married, compared with 41% of controls. There were no cancer-related factors associated with having only basic education. Unemployment was associated with younger age at diagnosis (odds ratio [OR] 5.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.3-30.8) and self-reported late effects (OR 4.7, 95% CI 1.3-19.5). Survivors of younger age at diagnosis were more likely not to be married (OR 2.7, 95% CI 1.3-5.7) and not to have a life partner (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.0-5.2). Our findings indicate that TYA cancer survivors completed applied higher education rather than a university education. Future studies including larger samples of TYA cancer survivors

  3. Morbidity and mortality in long-term survivors of Hodgkin lymphoma: a report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, Ann M.; Mertens, Ann C.; Leisenring, Wendy M.; Tooze, Janet A.; Goodman, Pam; Stovall, Marilyn; Robison, Leslie L.; Hudson, Melissa M.

    2011-01-01

    The contribution of specific cancer therapies, comorbid medical conditions, and host factors to mortality risk after pediatric Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is unclear. We assessed leading morbidities, overall and cause-specific mortality, and mortality risks among 2742 survivors of HL in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study, a multi-institutional retrospective cohort study of survivors diagnosed from 1970 to 1986. Excess absolute risk for leading causes of death and cumulative incidence and standardized incidence ratios of key medical morbidities were calculated. Cox regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of risks for overall and cause-specific mortality. Substantial excess absolute risk of mortality per 10 000 person-years was identified: overall 95.5; death due to HL 38.3, second malignant neoplasms 23.9, and cardiovascular disease 13.1. Risks for overall mortality included radiation dose ≥ 3000 rad ( ≥ 30 Gy; supra-diaphragm: HR, 3.8; 95% CI, 1.1-12.6; infradiaphragm + supradiaphragm: HR, 7.8; 95% CI, 2.4-25.1), exposure to anthracycline (HR, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.6-4.3) or alkylating agents (HR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.2-2.5), non–breast second malignant neoplasm (HR, 2.6; 95% CI 1.4-5.1), or a serious cardiovascular condition (HR, 4.4; 95% CI 2.7-7.3). Excess mortality from second neoplasms and cardiovascular disease vary by sex and persist > 20 years of follow-up in childhood HL survivors. PMID:21037086

  4. Mobility and safety in the multiple myeloma survivor: survivorship care plan of the International Myeloma Foundation Nurse Leadership Board.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rome, Sandra I; Jenkins, Bonnie S; Lilleby, Kathryn E

    2011-08-01

    As in many other cancers, survivorship of multiple myeloma involves handling treatment, recovery from therapeutic interventions, the effects of the disease, and ongoing therapies. Although mobility challenges vary among survivors of multiple myeloma, these patients have an increased risk of impaired mobility because of side effects of therapy and the pathology of the disease, as well as other factors (e.g., increasing age). Health maintenance increasingly is becoming a part of the cancer control continuum, and nurses have the opportunity to help survivors of multiple myeloma optimize their functional mobility and safety, thereby preserving quality of life. The purpose of these practice recommendations is to provide the healthcare professional with information on mobility, fall risk, and planned activity as an integral part of the plan of care for patients with multiple myeloma. Tools for nurses and physicians for assessing and evaluating the newly diagnosed patient, the patient undergoing treatment, and the long-term survivor of multiple myeloma will be provided.

  5. Nonenhanced peripheral MR-angiography (MRA) at 3 Tesla: evaluation of quiescent-interval single-shot MRA in patients undergoing digital subtraction angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Moritz; Knobloch, Gesine; Gielen, Martin; Lauff, Marie-Teres; Romano, Valentina; Hamm, Bernd; Kröncke, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Quiescent-interval single-shot MRA (QISS-MRA) is a promising nonenhanced imaging technique for assessment of peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Previous studies at 3 Tesla included only very limited numbers of patients for correlation of QISS-MRA with digital subtraction angiography (DSA) as standard of reference (SOR). The aim of this prospective institutional review board-approved study was to compare QISS-MRA at 3 Tesla with DSA in a larger patient group. Our study included 32 consecutive patients who underwent QISS-MRA, contrast-enhanced MRA (CE-MRA), and DSA. Two readers independently performed a per-segment evaluation of QISS-MRA and CE-MRA for image quality and identification of non-significant stenosis (Tesla showed similar diagnostic accuracy in the assessment of PAD. A limitation of QISS-MRA was the lower rate of assessable vessel segments compared to CE-MRA.

  6. "Passive victim - strong survivor"? Perceived meaning of labels applied to women who were raped.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papendick, Michael; Bohner, Gerd

    2017-01-01

    Three experiments (total N = 464) were conducted in parallel with English- and German-speaking participants to examine the perceived meanings and effects of the labels "victim" versus "survivor" (and their German equivalents) when applied to a woman who was raped. In Study 1 (N = 179), participants read a rape vignette and then rated the meaning of the label it contained (either "victim" or "survivor") on a 15-item semantic differential. Independent of language and participant gender, "survivor" was perceived more positively overall (e.g., as strong, brave, active) than was "victim" (weak, passive, but also innocent). In Study 2 (N = 95), labels were varied within items assessing judgments of an acquaintance-rape case (e.g., "Does the victim [survivor] … carry a certain responsibility for what happened?"), focusing on short-term outcomes. Significant interaction effects of label and participants' gender emerged on case-related judgments. Participants in both language samples judged "survivor" to be a less appropriate term than "victim". In Study 3 (N = 190), participants read a text in which a woman who had been raped labeled herself as either "victim" or "survivor", focusing on the coping with sexual violence. As in Study 2, German-language participants showed no significant effects of the label on their case judgments but rejected the term "survivor" as inappropriate; English-language participants, by contrast, perceived the woman describing herself as "survivor" to be more psychologically stable and regarded the use of both labels as appropriate. Results are discussed in terms of their applied relevance for communicating about sexual violence.

  7. "Passive victim – strong survivor"? Perceived meaning of labels applied to women who were raped

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papendick, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Three experiments (total N = 464) were conducted in parallel with English- and German-speaking participants to examine the perceived meanings and effects of the labels "victim" versus "survivor" (and their German equivalents) when applied to a woman who was raped. In Study 1 (N = 179), participants read a rape vignette and then rated the meaning of the label it contained (either "victim" or "survivor") on a 15-item semantic differential. Independent of language and participant gender, "survivor" was perceived more positively overall (e.g., as strong, brave, active) than was "victim" (weak, passive, but also innocent). In Study 2 (N = 95), labels were varied within items assessing judgments of an acquaintance-rape case (e.g., "Does the victim [survivor] … carry a certain responsibility for what happened?"), focusing on short-term outcomes. Significant interaction effects of label and participants’ gender emerged on case-related judgments. Participants in both language samples judged "survivor" to be a less appropriate term than "victim". In Study 3 (N = 190), participants read a text in which a woman who had been raped labeled herself as either "victim" or "survivor", focusing on the coping with sexual violence. As in Study 2, German-language participants showed no significant effects of the label on their case judgments but rejected the term "survivor" as inappropriate; English-language participants, by contrast, perceived the woman describing herself as "survivor" to be more psychologically stable and regarded the use of both labels as appropriate. Results are discussed in terms of their applied relevance for communicating about sexual violence. PMID:28493976

  8. Quality of life and symptoms in pediatric brain tumor survivors: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macartney, Gail; Harrison, Margaret B; VanDenKerkhof, Elizabeth; Stacey, Dawn; McCarthy, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the quality of life of children and youth under the age of 20 who have completed treatment for a pediatric brain tumor. This systematic review was conducted to (a) describe the health-related quality of life (HRQL) outcomes in pediatric brain tumor survivors, (b) identify instruments used to measure HRQL, and (c) determine the relationship between symptoms and HRQL. Using a systematic search and review methodology, databases searched included CINAHL, Medline, Embase, and PsycInfo. No date restrictions were used. Search results elicited 485 articles, of which16 met the inclusion criteria. Compared with their healthy peers, pediatric brain tumor survivors did worse on most measures of physical, psychosocial, social, and cognitive domains of HRQL. Compared with other cancer patients, survivors scored themselves significantly lower on the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL) social functioning scale, and parents of brain tumor survivors reported lower PedsQL social and total functioning scores for their children. Other variables that were associated with decreased HRQL were degree of hypothalamic tumor involvement, osteopenia, need for special education, older age at diagnosis, greater than 1 year since treatment, and radiation treatment. In these studies, pediatric brain tumor survivors fared worse compared with other cancer survivors or healthy peers on several HRQL domains. Only 3 studies explored the relationship between symptoms, including pain or fatigue, and HRQL in pediatric brain tumor survivors. The relationship between symptoms and HRQL was not well elucidated. More research is needed to explore the multidimensional symptom experience and HRQL outcomes in pediatric brain tumor survivors.

  9. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use Among Overweight and Obese Cancer Survivors in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojukwu, Mary; Mbizo, Justice; Leyva, Bryan; Olaku, Oluwadamilola; Zia, Farah

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use among US cancer survivors; examine whether use varies by underweight/normal weight, overweight, and obese body mass index status; determine reasons for use; and document disclosure rates of CAM use to medical professionals. Data for 1785 cancer survivors were obtained from the 2007 National Health Interview Survey and CAM supplement. The prevalence and associations of CAM use in the previous 12 months were compared among underweight/normal weight, overweight, and obese adult cancer survivors. Nearly 90% of cancer survivors used at least one type of CAM therapy in the 12 months preceding the survey. Those who were overweight, but not obese, were more likely to use a CAM modality compared to normal/underweight respondents. Over two thirds (71%) reported using CAM therapy for general health and wellness and 39.3% used CAM because a health care provider recommended it. Disclosure rates of CAM use to conventional medical professionals varied widely by CAM modality. An overwhelming majority of US cancer survivors use CAM for a variety of reasons. Overweight cancer survivors may be more likely to use CAM than those who are underweight, normal weight, or obese. Cancer survivors should be screened by medical providers for the use of CAM therapies; furthermore, prospective clinical research evaluating the efficacy and safety of biologically based CAM therapies, often used by cancer survivors, is important and necessary for the well-being of this population. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Quality of life and sexuality comparison between sexually active ovarian cancer survivors and healthy women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Se Ik; Lee, Yumi; Lim, Myong Cheol; Joo, Jungnam; Park, Kibyung; Lee, Dong Ock; Park, Sang Yoon

    2015-04-01

    compare quality of life (QoL) and sexual functioning between sexually active ovarian cancer survivors and healthy women. A cross-sectional study was performed in 103 successfully treated ovarian cancer survivors and 220 healthy women. All women had engaged in sexual activity within the previous 3 months, and ovarian cancer survivors were under surveillance after primary treatment without evidence of disease. QoL and sexual functioning were assessed using three questionnaires; the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 30 (EORTC QLQ-C30), Ovarian Cancer Module (EORTC QLQ-OV28), and the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI). Propensity score matching was used to adjust covariates between the ovarian cancer survivor and healthy women groups. In total, 73 ovarian cancer survivors and 73 healthy women were compared. Poorer social functioning (mean, 82.4 vs. 90.9; p=0.010) and more financial difficulties (mean, 16.4 vs. 7.8; p=0.019) were observed among ovarian cancer survivors than among healthy women. Sexuality, both in terms of desire, arousal, lubrication, orgasm, satisfaction, and pain and in terms of interest in sex, sexual activity, and enjoyment of sex (EORTC QLQ-OV28) were similar between the groups. However, vaginal dryness was more problematic in ovarian cancer survivors, with borderline statistical significance (p=0.081). Sexuality was not impaired in ovarian cancer survivors who were without evidence of disease after primary treatment and having sexual activities, compared with healthy women, whereas social functioning and financial status did deteriorate. Prospective cohort studies are needed.

  11. Scaffold-Free Tubular Tissues Created by a Bio-3D Printer Undergo Remodeling and Endothelialization when Implanted in Rat Aortae

    OpenAIRE

    Itoh, Manabu; Nakayama, Koichi; Noguchi, Ryo; Kamohara, Keiji; Furukawa, Kojirou; Uchihashi, Kazuyoshi; Toda, Shuji; Oyama, Jun-ichi; Node, Koichi; Morita, Shigeki

    2015-01-01

    Background Small caliber vascular prostheses are not clinically available because synthetic vascular prostheses lack endothelial cells which modulate platelet activation, leukocyte adhesion, thrombosis, and the regulation of vasomotor tone by the production of vasoactive substances. We developed a novel method to create scaffold-free tubular tissue from multicellular spheroids (MCS) using a “Bio-3D printer”-based system. This system enables the creation of pre-designed three-dimensional struc...

  12. ASTRONAUT ALDRIN UNDERGOES SPACESUIT CHECKS

    Science.gov (United States)

    1969-01-01

    ASTRONAUT ALDRIN UNDERGOES SPACESUIT CHECKS KSC-69PC-0374 69-HC-742,S-266,ARCHIVE-00337 White undergoing spacesuit checks, Apollo 11 lunar module pilot Edwin E. Aldrin, Jr., watches Astronauts Neil A. Armstrong and Michael Collins suit up for launch.

  13. Understanding topics and sentiment in an online cancer survivor community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portier, Kenneth; Greer, Greta E; Rokach, Lior; Ofek, Nir; Wang, Yafei; Biyani, Prakhar; Yu, Mo; Banerjee, Siddhartha; Zhao, Kang; Mitra, Prasenjit; Yen, John

    2013-12-01

    Online cancer communities help members support one another, provide new perspectives about living with cancer, normalize experiences, and reduce isolation. The American Cancer Society's 166000-member Cancer Survivors Network (CSN) is the largest online peer support community for cancer patients, survivors, and caregivers. Sentiment analysis and topic modeling were applied to CSN breast and colorectal cancer discussion posts from 2005 to 2010 to examine how sentiment change of thread initiators, a measure of social support, varies by discussion topic. The support provided in CSN is highest for medical, lifestyle, and treatment issues. Threads related to 1) treatments and side effects, surgery, mastectomy and reconstruction, and decision making for breast cancer, 2) lung scans, and 3) treatment drugs in colon cancer initiate with high negative sentiment and produce high average sentiment change. Using text mining tools to assess sentiment, sentiment change, and thread topics provides new insights that community managers can use to facilitate member interactions and enhance support outcomes.

  14. Clinical Guidelines for the Care of Childhood Cancer Survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily S. Tonorezos

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The Long-Term Follow-Up Guidelines for survivors of childhood, adolescent, and young adult cancers are evidence- and consensus-based guidelines that have been developed and published by the Children’s Oncology Group (COG Late Effects Committee, Nursing Discipline, and the Patient Advocacy Committee. Originally published in 2004, the guidelines are currently in version 3.0. While the COG guidelines have been praised as a model for providing risk-based survivorship care, adherence has not been uniform. Reasons for this gap include unawareness on the part of the survivor and/or care team as well as disagreement about the individual recommendations. In some cases, the burden of testing (such as annual echocardiography or repeat pulmonary function testing may be too great. A small number of intervention studies have documented improved adherence to guideline recommendations with dissemination of informational material. Future studies should focus on individualizing screening recommendations, as well as identifying unnecessary testing.

  15. Personality disorders in young adult survivors of pediatric burn injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Christopher R; Russell, William; Robert, Rhonda S; Holzer, Charles E; Blakeney, Patricia; Meyer, Walter J

    2012-04-01

    Life experience shapes personality and chronic trauma in childhood has been associated with risk for development of subsequent personality disorder. The purpose of this study is to determine the prevalence and character of personality disorders and traits in young adult survivors of severe pediatric burn injury. METHOD.: SCID-II and 16PF were completed by 98 young adult survivors of pediatric burn trauma. 48 (49%) met criteria for one or more personality disorders. The most frequent personality disorders were Paranoid (19.4%), Passive Aggressive (18.4%), Antisocial (17.3%), Depressive (11.2%), and Borderline (9.2%). Diagnosis with a personality disorder was associated with comorbid Axis I diagnoses and strongly correlated with personality traits as measured by the 16PF. Pediatric burn trauma is similar to other chronic traumas of childhood in significant correlation with subsequent personality disorder.

  16. Cancer survivors' uptake and adherence in diet and exercise intervention trials: an integrative data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Rebecca N; Mosher, Catherine E; Blair, Cindy K; Snyder, Denise C; Sloane, Richard; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    The health benefits of diet and exercise interventions for cancer survivors are well documented. However, little is known regarding demographic and medical predictors of survivors' willingness to participate in diet and exercise intervention trials, study enrollment, intervention adherence, and study completion. To assist in interpreting the generalizability of trial findings and to improve the design of future trials, this study examined predictors of these process measures. An integrative data analysis was performed on data from 3 of the largest home-based diet and exercise intervention trials for cancer survivors (n = 23,841). Demographic and medical factors (ie, sex, race, age, time since diagnosis, and cancer type) were examined as predictors of willingness to participate, study enrollment, intervention adherence, and study completion in the pooled sample. A 99% confidence interval was used to determine statistical significance. Across trials, 11.1% of contacted survivors were willing to participate, and 5.7% were eligible and enrolled. Among enrollees, 53.4% demonstrated ≥75% adherence to the intervention, and 91.1% completed the study. Race (Caucasian vs others), age, time since diagnosis, and cancer type predicted survivors' willingness to participate (P Cancer survivors' demographic and medical characteristics predicted their interest and participation in diet and exercise intervention trials. These findings have implications for the generalizability of results and can help to guide procedures used in future trials to enhance patient representation. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  17. Speaking legibly: Qualitative perceptions of altered voice among oral tongue cancer survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genevieve Philiponis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Treatment for oral tongue cancer poses unique challenges to restoring and maintaining personally acceptable, intelligible speech. Methods: We report how oral tongue cancer survivors describe their speech after treatment in a qualitative descriptive approach using constant comparative technique to complete a focal analysis of interview data from a larger grounded theory study of oral tongue cancer survivorship. Interviews were completed with 16 tongue cancer survivors 3 months to 12 years postdiagnosis with stage I-IV disease and treated with surgery alone, surgery and radiotherapy, or chemo-radiation. All interview data from the main study were analyzed for themes describing perceptions of speech as oral tongue cancer survivors. Results: Actual speech impairments varied among survivors. None experienced severe impairments that inhibited their daily lives. However, all expressed some level of concern about speech. Concerns about altered speech began when survivors heard their treatment plans and continued through to survivorship without being fully resolved. The overarching theme, maintaining a pattern and character of speech acceptable to the survivor, was termed "speaking legibly" using one survivor′s vivid in vivo statement. Speaking legibly integrate the sub-themes of "fears of sounding unusual," "learning to talk again," "problems and adjustments," and "social impact." Conclusions: Clinical and scientific efforts to further understand and address concerns about speech, personal presentation, and identity among those diagnosed with oral tongue are important to improving care processes and patient-centered experience.

  18. Hot flashes, fatigue, treatment exposures and work productivity in breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavigne, Jill E; Griggs, Jennifer J; Tu, Xin M; Lerner, Debra J

    2008-12-01

    While fatigue has been associated with work limitations the combined influence of specific diagnosis and treatment exposures based on medical records on work limitations in breast cancer survivors is currently unknown. Since symptom burden and perceived health can interfere with work, the present study investigated the relationship among these variables and work outcomes. Medical chart abstraction, demographic measures, SF 36, the Work Limitations Questionnaire (WLQ) and measures of symptom burden, including hot flushes were obtained in 83 breast cancer survivors a mean of three years post treatment. OLS and poisson regression were used to determine the relationship of these factors to work productivity and work absences. Breast cancer survivors reported a mean reduction in productivity of 3.1% below the healthy worker norm. This amounts to a loss of 2.48 hours of work over two weeks of full time employment. Stages 1 and 2 were related to work limitations. After controlling for stage, fatigue and hot flashes were each associated with work performance losses of 1.6% (p = 0.05) and 2.2% (p work productivity in breast cancer survivors even at three years post treatment. IMPLICATIONS FOR SURVIVORS: Therapy for hot flashes should be given serious consideration in breast cancer survivors who are experiencing work limitations.

  19. Neurocognitive outcome and white matter anisotropy in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia survivors treated with different protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ElAlfy, Mohsen; Ragab, Iman; Azab, Inas; Amin, Shaimaa; Abdel-Maguid, Marwa

    2014-03-01

    Neurocognitive outcome affects the quality of life of ALL survivors. This study is aimed to assess the prevalence of neurocognitive dysfunction by psychometric and imaging tools in survivors of childhood ALL, treated with 3 different protocols and the effect of time elapsed since the end of chemotherapy. Sixty-two ALL survivors aged 6-18 years and treated in the period 1997-2007 and 60 healthy age and sex matched controls were subjected to neurocognitive testing using Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, Benton visual retention (BVRT) and Trail Making test (TMT), followed by diffusion weighed and diffusion tensor MRI for calculation of fraction anisotropy (FA). Survivors underwent revision of protocol and type of CNS therapy. Three different protocols were used: modified BFM 83, BFM 90, and CCG. Survivors treated with modified CCG protocol showed a significant decrease in all cognitive tests compared to control (ptests between BFM 83 and control group. Frontal FA was lower in CCG treated group compared to control, BFM 90 and BFM 83 groups (pchildhood ALL survivors.

  20. Perceptions of parenting versus parent-child interactions among incest survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Monica M; Shipman, Kimberly L; Jackson, Joan L; McMahon, Robert J; Hanley, Honora M

    2005-06-01

    Although women with histories of child sexual abuse (CSA) perceive themselves as less competent mothers and report greater parenting difficulties than nonabused women, few investigators have actually observed the parenting behaviors of CSA survivors. The primary aim of this study was to examine whether incest history was related to maternal perceptions of parenting efficacy and interactional patterns with their children. The secondary aim of this study was to explore the constructs of internal working models of relationships and maternal psychological adjustment as potential mediators of the relation between incest history and parenting. A community sample of 17 incest survivors, 18 nonabused women and their 3-6 year-old children participated. Mothers completed self-report measures of parenting efficacy, parental bonding (i.e., internal working models of relationships), and psychological adjustment. In addition, mothers interacted with their children in a problem-solving task. Although incest survivors reported less parenting self-efficacy than did nonabused mothers, their interactional styles with their children were positive overall and comparable to those of nonabused mothers. Specifically, survivors displayed moderate to high levels of support, assistance, and confidence, and their children showed high levels of affection towards their mothers. Incest survivors reported less bonding with their own mothers in childhood and poorer current psychological adjustment. Findings suggest that incest survivors' perceptions of their parenting abilities may be more negative than their actual parenting behaviors.

  1. Community reintegration of stroke survivors: the effect of a community navigation intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Phyllis; Jermyn, Darren; Bailey, Patricia; Nangia, Parveen; Egan, Mary; Mossey, Sharolyn

    2015-01-01

    The overall aim of the proposed study is to examine a newly implemented navigation intervention intended to support stroke survivors' community integration during the first year following hospital discharge in four regions of Ontario, Canada. Stroke is a leading cause of disability worldwide. Stroke survivors living in the community require regular, ongoing follow-up to assess recovery, prevent deterioration and maximize health outcomes. Internationally published evidence, often conducted in large urban centres, suggests that community reintegration services are an important component of the continuum of care for stroke survivors. This evidence, however, often does not address the particular challenges inherent in smaller urban and rural contexts. The design of this 2-year mixed-method study will use cohort and focused ethnography. The three stages of this study include: (1) collection of quantitative data to profile the health status, support and extent of community reintegration of stroke survivors; (2) collection of qualitative data from stroke survivors and their care partners about community reintegration and navigation; and following triangulation of findings (3) knowledge translation activities. This study was ethically approved by the academic Research Ethics Board and clinical Research Ethics Board (Sudbury, Ontario) and funded by the Ontario Stroke Network (Canada). Results will describe experiences and outcomes of a community navigation intervention. Engagement of multiple stakeholders has the potential to develop a shared understanding of community reintegration and generate evidence informed recommendations for service enhancement at critical points in stroke recovery to support survivor and community well-being. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Patients Undergoing Dacryocystorhinostomy Surgery in Northern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    such as age, and gender, clinical findings, history of surgery, etc., extracted from archived files of the patients undergoing ... between gender and dacryocystitis rate, it was high among female (P = 0.02( Most of the patients complained of ... at 3 months after surgery and a healed patent neo-ostium with a free flow of tears from ...

  3. Unemployment among breast cancer survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Kathrine; Ewertz, Marianne; Dalton, Susanne Oksbjerg

    2014-01-01

    AIM: Though about 20% of working age breast cancer survivors do not return to work after treatment, few studies have addressed risk factors for unemployment. The majority of studies on occupational consequences of breast cancer focus on non-employment, which is a mixture of sickness absence......, unemployment, retirement pensions and other reasons for not working. Unemployment in combination with breast cancer may represent a particular challenge for these women. The aim of the present study is therefore to analyze the risk for unemployment in the years following diagnosis and treatment for breast...... cancer. METHOD: This study included 14,750 women diagnosed with breast cancer in Denmark 2001-2009 identified through a population-based clinical database and linked with information from Danish administrative population based registers for information on labour market affiliation, socio...

  4. Scaffold-Free Tubular Tissues Created by a Bio-3D Printer Undergo Remodeling and Endothelialization when Implanted in Rat Aortae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manabu Itoh

    Full Text Available Small caliber vascular prostheses are not clinically available because synthetic vascular prostheses lack endothelial cells which modulate platelet activation, leukocyte adhesion, thrombosis, and the regulation of vasomotor tone by the production of vasoactive substances. We developed a novel method to create scaffold-free tubular tissue from multicellular spheroids (MCS using a "Bio-3D printer"-based system. This system enables the creation of pre-designed three-dimensional structures using a computer controlled robotics system. With this system, we created a tubular structure and studied its biological features.Using a "Bio-3D printer," we made scaffold-free tubular tissues (inner diameter of 1.5 mm from a total of 500 MCSs (2.5× 104 cells per one MCS composed of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (40%, human aortic smooth muscle cells (10%, and normal human dermal fibroblasts (50%. The tubular tissues were cultured in a perfusion system and implanted into the abdominal aortas of F344 nude rats. We assessed the flow by ultrasonography and performed histological examinations on the second (n = 5 and fifth (n = 5 day after implantation. All grafts were patent and remodeling of the tubular tissues (enlargement of the lumen area and thinning of the wall was observed. A layer of endothelial cells was confirmed five days after implantation.The scaffold-free tubular tissues made of MCS using a Bio-3D printer underwent remodeling and endothelialization. Further studies are warranted to elucidate the underlying mechanism of endothelialization and its function, as well as the long-term results.

  5. Scaffold-Free Tubular Tissues Created by a Bio-3D Printer Undergo Remodeling and Endothelialization when Implanted in Rat Aortae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Manabu; Nakayama, Koichi; Noguchi, Ryo; Kamohara, Keiji; Furukawa, Kojirou; Uchihashi, Kazuyoshi; Toda, Shuji; Oyama, Jun-Ichi; Node, Koichi; Morita, Shigeki

    2015-01-01

    Small caliber vascular prostheses are not clinically available because synthetic vascular prostheses lack endothelial cells which modulate platelet activation, leukocyte adhesion, thrombosis, and the regulation of vasomotor tone by the production of vasoactive substances. We developed a novel method to create scaffold-free tubular tissue from multicellular spheroids (MCS) using a "Bio-3D printer"-based system. This system enables the creation of pre-designed three-dimensional structures using a computer controlled robotics system. With this system, we created a tubular structure and studied its biological features. Using a "Bio-3D printer," we made scaffold-free tubular tissues (inner diameter of 1.5 mm) from a total of 500 MCSs (2.5× 104 cells per one MCS) composed of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (40%), human aortic smooth muscle cells (10%), and normal human dermal fibroblasts (50%). The tubular tissues were cultured in a perfusion system and implanted into the abdominal aortas of F344 nude rats. We assessed the flow by ultrasonography and performed histological examinations on the second (n = 5) and fifth (n = 5) day after implantation. All grafts were patent and remodeling of the tubular tissues (enlargement of the lumen area and thinning of the wall) was observed. A layer of endothelial cells was confirmed five days after implantation. The scaffold-free tubular tissues made of MCS using a Bio-3D printer underwent remodeling and endothelialization. Further studies are warranted to elucidate the underlying mechanism of endothelialization and its function, as well as the long-term results.

  6. Telephone intervention with family caregivers of stroke survivors after rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Joan S; Elliott, Timothy R; Weaver, Michael; Bartolucci, Alfred A; Giger, Joyce Newman

    2002-08-01

    Social problem-solving therapy shows promise as an intervention to improve the well-being of family caregivers. There is some evidence that training in problem solving may be effectively delivered by telephone. The purpose of this study was to quantify the impact of social problem-solving telephone partnerships on primary family caregiver outcomes after stroke survivors are discharged home from a rehabilitation facility. Using a randomized 3-group repeated-measures experimental design, 74 stroke survivors with an admitting diagnosis of ischemic stroke and their primary family caregivers were entered into the study. The intervention consisted of an initial 3-hour home visit between a trained nurse and the family caregiver within 1 week after discharge to begin problem-solving skill training. This initial session was followed by weekly (the first month) and biweekly (the second and third month) telephone contacts. Compared with the sham intervention and control groups, family caregivers who participated in the social problem-solving telephone partnership intervention group had better problem-solving skills; greater caregiver preparedness; less depression; and significant improvement in measures of vitality, social functioning, mental health, and role limitations related to emotional problems. There were no significant differences among the groups in caregiver burden. Satisfaction with healthcare services decreased over time in the control group while remaining comparable in the intervention and sham intervention groups. These results indicate that problem-solving training may be useful for family caregivers of stroke survivors after discharge from rehabilitative facilities.

  7. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and mortality among cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Justin C; Harhay, Michael O; Harhay, Meera N

    2017-06-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) may foster a tumor microenvironment that promotes cancer recurrence and progression. We examined the relationship between NAFLD and mortality among a sample of cancer survivors. Ultrasonography was used to assess hepatic steatosis, and standardized algorithms were used to define NAFLD. Study endpoints included all-cause, cancer-specific, and cardiovascular-specific mortality. Among 387 cancer survivors, 17.6% had NAFLD. During a median of 17.9 years of follow up, we observed 196 deaths from all causes. In multivariable-adjusted regression models, NAFLD was associated with an increased risk of all-cause mortality [HR: 2.52, 95% CI: 1.47-4.34; P=0.001]. We observed 86 cancer-specific deaths. In multivariable-adjusted regression models, NAFLD was associated with an increased risk of cancer-specific mortality [HR: 3.21, 95% CI: 1.46-7.07; P=0.004]. We observed 46 cardiovascular-specific deaths. In multivariable-adjusted regression models, NAFLD was not associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular-specific mortality [HR: 1.04, 95% CI: 0.30-3.64, P=0.951]. NAFLD is associated with an increased risk of all-cause and cancer-specific mortality among cancer survivors. This novel observation warrants replication. Evaluating the efficacy of interventions, such as lifestyle modification through weight loss and exercise, to improve NAFLD in this population may be considered. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Cognitive tasks challenging brain tumor survivors at work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Courtney; Gehrke, Amanda; Feuerstein, Michael

    2013-12-01

    To identify problematic work tasks involving cognitive function in employed brain tumor survivors. Work tasks involving cognitive functions were compared between employed brain tumor survivors (n = 137) and a disease-free group (n = 96). Multivariable logistic regressions were conducted. In the brain tumor survivors, 44% (26/59) of work tasks were more likely to be problematic. Top five problematic work tasks included were as follows: following the flow of events (odds ratio [OR] = 11.72; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 3.19 to 43.07), remembering train of thought while speaking (OR = 11.70; 95% CI = 5.25 to 26.10), putting together materials for a task (OR = 10.90; 95% CI = 2.80 to 42.38), shifting between tasks (OR = 10.71; 95% CI = 3.62 to 31.74), and following written instructions (OR = 9.96; 95% CI = 2.65 to 37.41). Findings identified problematic work tasks involving major domains of cognitive function.

  9. KAT6B Is a Tumor Suppressor Histone H3 Lysine 23 Acetyltransferase Undergoing Genomic Loss in Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simó-Riudalbas, Laia; Pérez-Salvia, Montserrat; Setien, Fernando; Villanueva, Alberto; Moutinho, Catia; Martínez-Cardús, Anna; Moran, Sebastian; Berdasco, Maria; Gomez, Antonio; Vidal, Enrique; Soler, Marta; Heyn, Holger; Vaquero, Alejandro; de la Torre, Carolina; Barceló-Batllori, Silvia; Vidal, August; Roz, Luca; Pastorino, Ugo; Szakszon, Katalin; Borck, Guntram; Moura, Conceição S; Carneiro, Fátima; Zondervan, Ilse; Savola, Suvi; Iwakawa, Reika; Kohno, Takashi; Yokota, Jun; Esteller, Manel

    2015-09-15

    Recent efforts to sequence human cancer genomes have highlighted that point mutations in genes involved in the epigenetic setting occur in tumor cells. Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive tumor with poor prognosis, where little is known about the genetic events related to its development. Herein, we have identified the presence of homozygous deletions of the candidate histone acetyltransferase KAT6B, and the loss of the corresponding transcript, in SCLC cell lines and primary tumors. Furthermore, we show, in vitro and in vivo, that the depletion of KAT6B expression enhances cancer growth, while its restoration induces tumor suppressor-like features. Most importantly, we demonstrate that KAT6B exerts its tumor-inhibitory role through a newly defined type of histone H3 Lys23 acetyltransferase activity. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  10. Healthcare Needs, Experiences and Satisfaction after Terrorism: A Longitudinal Study of Survivors from the Utøya Attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stene, Lise E; Wentzel-Larsen, Tore; Dyb, Grete

    2016-01-01

    Background: Public health outreach programs have been developed in order to ensure that needs are met after disasters. However, little is known about survivors' experiences with post-terror healthcare. In the present study, our objectives were to (1) describe survivors' experiences with post-terror healthcare, (2) identify factors associated with reports of unmet healthcare needs, and (3) examine the relationship between socio-demographic characteristics, healthcare experiences and satisfaction. Methods: Our study comprised three waves of semi-structured interviews with 261/490 (53%) survivors of the Utøya mass shooting. We applied Pearson's chi-squared tests (categorical variables) and independent t-tests (continuous variables) to compare survivors by whether or not they reported higher perceived needs than received help for psychological reactions and physical health problems, respectively. Ordinal regression analyses were applied to examine whether socio-demographic characteristics and healthcare experiences were associated with dissatisfaction. Results: Altogether 127 (49%) survivors reported very high/high help needs for psychological reactions, and 43 (17%) for attack-related physical health problems. Unmet healthcare needs were associated with higher levels of posttraumatic stress, psychological distress, somatic symptoms and less social support. Survivors with immigrant backgrounds and injured survivors who were not admitted to hospital reported unmet needs for physical health problems more often. After adjustments for socio-demographic characteristics, immigrant origin was associated with dissatisfaction with post-terror healthcare. After additionally adjusting for healthcare experiences, poor rating of the overall organization and accessibility of healthcare remained significantly associated with dissatisfaction. Conclusions: Most survivors were satisfied with the post-terror healthcare they received, yet our findings indicate that increased attention to

  11. Pilot initiative in India to explore the gonadal function and fertility outcomes of a cohort of childhood cancer survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puneet Rana Arora

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Steady improvement in childhood cancer outcomes has led to a growing number of survivors, many of who develop long-term sequelae. There is limited data about these sequelae (including those related to fertility on childhood cancer survivors from India. AIMS: We undertook a prospective pilot study on childhood cancer survivors from India to assess their gonadal function and fertility. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: A pediatric oncologist and a reproductive medicine specialist assessed 21 childhood cancer survivors. The risk of infertility was established using disease and treatment variables. Current status of puberty, sexuality, and fertility were assessed using clinical and biochemical parameters. Outcomes were correlated with risk group of infertility. Information was also ascertained on counseling with regards to risk of infertility. RESULTS: The cohort included 21 survivors (71% males with a median age of 18 years who were off treatment for a median age of 7 years. Ten (48% survivors were at low risk for infertility, 9 (43% at medium risk and 2 (9% at high risk. Gonadal dysfunction was seen in 3 (14% survivors: 0/10 (0% low risk, 1/9 (11% medium risk, and 2/2 (100% high risk. None of the survivors, who are at high risk or medium risk of infertility, received any counseling before treatment. CONCLUSIONS: This prospective pilot study of a cohort of childhood cancer survivors from India demonstrates a deficiency in the information provided and counseling of patients/families at the time of diagnosis with regards to the risk of infertility. Fertility outcomes of childhood cancer survivors were congruent with recognized risk groups for infertility. Future action points have been identified.

  12. Developmental exposure to 2,3,7,8 tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin attenuates capacity of hematopoietic stem cells to undergo lymphocyte differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahrenhoerster, Lori S.; Tate, Everett R.; Lakatos, Peter A. [Joseph J. Zilber School of Public Health, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (United States); Program in Environmental and Occupational Health, Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States); Wang, Xuexia [Joseph J. Zilber School of Public Health, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (United States); Program in Biostatistics, Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States); Laiosa, Michael D., E-mail: laiosa@uwm.edu [Joseph J. Zilber School of Public Health, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (United States); Program in Environmental and Occupational Health, Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States)

    2014-06-01

    The process of hematopoiesis, characterized by long-term self-renewal and multi-potent lineage differentiation, has been shown to be regulated in part by the ligand-activated transcription factor known as the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR). 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), a ubiquitous contaminant and the most potent AHR agonist, also modulates regulation of adult hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSC/HPC) homeostasis. However, the effect of developmental TCDD exposure on early life hematopoiesis has not been fully explored. Given the inhibitory effects of TCDD on hematopoiesis and lymphocyte development, we hypothesized that in utero exposure to TCDD would alter the functional capacity of fetal HSC/HPCs to complete lymphocyte differentiation. To test this hypothesis, we employed a co-culture system designed to facilitate the maturation of progenitor cells to either B or T lymphocytes. Furthermore, we utilized an innovative limiting dilution assay to precisely quantify differences in lymphocyte differentiation between HSC/HPCs obtained from fetuses of dams exposed to 3 μg/kg TCDD or control. We found that the AHR is transcribed in yolk sac hematopoietic cells and is transcriptionally active as early as gestational day (GD) 7.5. Furthermore, the number of HSC/HPCs present in the fetal liver on GD 14.5 was significantly increased in fetuses whose mothers were exposed to TCDD throughout pregnancy. Despite this increase in HSC/HPC cell number, B and T lymphocyte differentiation is decreased by approximately 2.5 fold. These findings demonstrate that inappropriate developmental AHR activation in HSC/HPCs adversely impacts lymphocyte differentiation and may have consequences for lymphocyte development in the bone marrow and thymus later in life.

  13. The Survivor Syndrome: Aftermath of Downsizing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelbaum, Steven H.; Delage, Claude; Labib, Nadia; Gault, George

    1997-01-01

    Downsizing can result in remaining staff developing "survivor syndrome," experiencing low morale, stress, and other psychosocial problems. If downsizing is necessary, precautions include managing perceptions and communications and empowering employees to take career ownership. (SK)

  14. Symptomatic and Palliative Care for Stroke Survivors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Creutzfeldt, Claire J; Holloway, Robert G; Walker, Melanie

    2012-01-01

    ... care needs of stroke survivors. Some of the most common and disabling post-stroke symptoms that are reviewed here include central post-stroke pain, hemiplegic shoulder pain, painful spasticity, fatigue, incontinence, post-stroke...

  15. Long-term non-cancer mortality in pediatric and young adult cancer survivors in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Pinki K; Signorello, Lisa B; Friedman, Debra L; Boice, John D; Pukkala, Eero

    2012-03-01

    Excess late mortality has been reported among pediatric cancer survivors, but there is a need to further establish risk profiles for non-cancer death and to examine cause-specific mortality among survivors of young adult cancers. In a nationwide record linkage study in Finland, we identified 9,245 5-year cancer survivors diagnosed before age 35 and treated between 1966 and 1999, and followed them for mortality endpoints from 1971 to 2008. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated to compare the observed number of deaths with those expected in the general Finnish population. Primary endpoints included death from cardiovascular and respiratory diseases; death from malignant diseases was excluded. Non-malignant disease mortality in the cohort was 90% higher (SMR=1.9, 95% CI: 1.7-2.2) than expected, with SMRs for circulatory and respiratory disease similarly elevated (SMR=1.9, 95% CI: 1.5-2.3 and SMR=2.3, 95% CI: 1.3-3.8, respectively). Important differences were noted amongst patient subgroups, with risk greatest for survivors of central nervous system (CNS) cancer, Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). The SMR's for circulatory disease were 6.6 (95% CI: 4.8-8.9) for HL and 4.8 (95% CI: 2.6-8.1) for NHL for the entire population; but these risks remained elevated for survivors diagnosed between 15 and 34 years of age. Previous studies have shown that there is an elevated risk of non-cancer mortality in childhood cancer survivors; this is one of the first studies that show an increase in cardiovascular and respiratory mortality in long-term survivors of adolescent and young adult cancers. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Economic Burden of Chronic Conditions Among Survivors of Cancer in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guy, Gery P; Yabroff, K Robin; Ekwueme, Donatus U; Rim, Sun Hee; Li, Rui; Richardson, Lisa C

    2017-06-20

    Purpose The prevalence of cancer survivorship and chronic health conditions is increasing. Limited information exists on the economic burden of chronic conditions among survivors of cancer. This study examines the prevalence and economic effect of chronic conditions among survivors of cancer. Methods Using the 2008 to 2013 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, we present nationally representative estimates of the prevalence of chronic conditions (heart disease, high blood pressure, stroke, emphysema, high cholesterol, diabetes, arthritis, and asthma) and multiple chronic conditions (MCCs) and the incremental annual health care use, medical expenditures, and lost productivity for survivors of cancer attributed to individual chronic conditions and MCCs. Incremental use, expenditures, and lost productivity were evaluated with multivariable regression. Results Survivors of cancer were more likely to have chronic conditions and MCCs compared with adults without a history of cancer. The presence of chronic conditions among survivors of cancer was associated with substantially higher annual medical expenditures, especially for heart disease ($4,595; 95% CI, $3,262 to $5,927) and stroke ($3,843; 95% CI, $1,983 to $5,704). The presence of four or more chronic conditions was associated with increased annual expenditures of $10,280 (95% CI, $7,435 to $13,125) per survivor of cancer. Annual lost productivity was higher among survivors of cancer with other chronic conditions, especially stroke ($4,325; 95% CI, $2,687 to $5,964), and arthritis ($3,534; 95% CI, $2,475 to $4,593). Having four or more chronic conditions was associated with increased annual lost productivity of $9,099 (95% CI, $7,224 to $10,973) per survivor of cancer. The economic impact of chronic conditions was similar among survivors of cancer and individuals without a history of cancer. Conclusion These results highlight the importance of ensuring access to lifelong personalized screening, surveillance, and chronic

  17. Brief Report: Proteasomal Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase Degradation Reduces the Immunosuppressive Potential of Clinical Grade-Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Undergoing Replicative Senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loisel, Séverine; Dulong, Joëlle; Ménard, Cédric; Renoud, Marie-Laure; Meziere, Nadine; Isabelle, Bezier; Latour, Maëlle; Bescher, Nadège; Pedeux, Rémy; Bertheuil, Nicolas; Flecher, Erwan; Sensebé, Luc; Tarte, Karin

    2017-05-01

    Owing to their immunosuppressive properties, mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) obtained from bone marrow (BM-MSCs) or adipose tissue (ASCs) are considered a promising tool for cell therapy. However, important issues should be considered to ensure the reproducible production of efficient and safe clinical-grade MSCs. In particular, high expansion rate, associated with progressive senescence, was recently proposed as one of the parameters that could alter MSC functionality. In this study, we directly address the consequences of replicative senescence on BM-MSC and ASC immunomodulatory properties. We demonstrate that MSCs produced according to GMP procedures inhibit less efficiently T-cell, but not Natural Killer (NK)- and B-cell, proliferation after reaching senescence. Senescence-related loss-of-function is associated with a decreased indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) activity in response to inflammatory stimuli. In particular, although STAT-1-dependent IDO expression is transcriptionally induced at a similar level in senescent and nonsenescent MSCs, IDO protein is specifically degraded by the proteasome in senescent ASCs and BM-MSCs, a process that could be reversed by the MG132 proteasome inhibitor. These data encourage the use of appropriate quality controls focusing on immunosuppressive mechanisms before translating clinical-grade MSCs in the clinic. Stem Cells 2017;35:1431-1436. © 2017 AlphaMed Press.

  18. Outcome of paediatric intensive care survivors

    OpenAIRE

    Knoester, Hendrika; Grootenhuis, Martha A; Bos, Albert P.

    2007-01-01

    The development of paediatric intensive care has contributed to the improved survival of critically ill children. Physical and psychological sequelae and consequences for quality of life (QoL) in survivors might be significant, as has been determined in adult intensive care unit (ICU) survivors. Awareness of sequelae due to the original illness and its treatment may result in changes in treatment and support during and after the acute phase. To determine the current knowledge on physical and ...

  19. Increased health care use in cancer survivors.

    OpenAIRE

    Heins, M.J.; Rijken, P.M.; Schellevis, F.G.; Hoek, L. van der; Korevaar, J.C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: As the number of cancer survivors increases and these patients often experience long-lasting consequences of cancer and its treatment, more insight into primary health care use of cancer survivors is needed. We aimed to determine how often and for which reasons do adult cancer patients contact their Primary Care Physician (PCP) 2-5 years after diagnosis. Methods: Using data from the Netherlands Information Network of Primary Care (LINH), we determined the volume and diagnoses made...

  20. Increases health care use in cancer survivors.

    OpenAIRE

    Heins, M.J.; Rijken, P.M.; Schellevis, F.G.; Hoek, L. van der; Korevaar, J.C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: As the number of cancer survivors increases and these patients often experience longlasting consequences of cancer and its treatment, more insight into primary health care use of cancer survivors is needed. Research question: How often and for which reasons do adult cancer patients contact their Primary Care Physician (PCP) 2-5 years after diagnosis. Methods: Using data from the Netherlands Information Network of Primary Care (LINH), we determined the volume and diagnoses made dur...

  1. Survivor-Reaktionen im Downsizing-Kontext

    OpenAIRE

    Dietrich, Kristina

    2013-01-01

    Diese Arbeit untersucht die Reaktionen der nach einem Personalabbau (Downsizing) verbleibenden Mitarbeiter (Survivors) eines Unternehmens. Dabei werden die für die Ausbildung von positiven und negativen Survivor-Reaktionen als relevant angenommenen Antezedenzien in einem integrativen Rahmenmodell dargestellt und in ihren Zusammenhängen untersucht. Besonders ist dabei der metaanalytische Untersuchungsansatz, der statistisch fundierte und verlässliche Aussagen zu zentralen Zusammenhängen von Ev...

  2. Hopelessness Experience Among Stroke Survivor in Semarang

    OpenAIRE

    Sawab Sawab; Moch Bahrudin; Novy Helena Catharina Daulima

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Hopelessness was a negative feelings about goal achievement and powerlessness feeling against an expectation. Hopelessness in stroke survivors can occur due to prolonged disability and neurologic defi cit. This condition can lead to emotional and mental disorders even a suicide action. Therefore, it was a need to explore hopelessness experience in stroke survivors. Method: This study was a qualitative descriptive phenomenology with 6 participants. Results: 7 themes were revealed...

  3. Preoperative medical treatment in patients undergoing diabetic foot surgery with a Wagner Grade-3 or higher ulcer: a retrospective analysis of 52 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Korkmaz

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic foot ulcers (DFU are one of the most important complications in people with diabetes mellitus. The present study was aimed to retrospectively review the efficacy of at least 1-week medical treatment before any surgical intervention in patients with Grade-3 and higher DFU according to Wagner's classification. A total of 52 patients (36 males and 16 females hospitalized and treated between June 2006 and February 2009 and had initially received therapeutic treatment (local wound care, antibiotic therapy and blood glucose regulation for a period of at least 1 week were included in the study. The level of amputation, rates of reulceration and mortality in both groups were recorded in the following period of 2 years. Group 1 (did not respond to preoperative medical intervention included 16 patients where a surgical debridement, flap or skin graft surgery was performed in 2 (12.5% patients, major amputation was performed in another 2 (12.5% patients and minor amputation was performed in the remaining 12 (75% patients. Of 36 patients in Group 2 (did respond to preoperative medical intervention, 5 (13.9% patients underwent the surgical debridement, flap or skin graft surgery, 8 (22.2% patients had a major amputation and the remaining 23 (63.9% patients lead to a minor amputation. The ulcer recurrence and mortality rates were obtained as 2 (12.5% and 2 (12.5% in Group 1 and 2 (5.6% and 1 (2.8% in Group 2, respectively. Despite the lower rates of ulcer recurrence and mortality in patients having adequate responses to initial treatment before surgical procedures were performed, no statistically significant difference was observed between the 2 groups. In addition, there was no statistically significant difference between the levels of amputation in both groups.

  4. Proteomic profiles in acute respiratory distress syndrome differentiates survivors from non-survivors.

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    Maneesh Bhargava

    Full Text Available Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS continues to have a high mortality. Currently, there are no biomarkers that provide reliable prognostic information to guide clinical management or stratify risk among clinical trial participants. The objective of this study was to probe the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF proteome to identify proteins that differentiate survivors from non-survivors of ARDS. Patients were divided into early-phase (1 to 7 days and late-phase (8 to 35 days groups based on time after initiation of mechanical ventilation for ARDS (Day 1. Isobaric tags for absolute and relative quantitation (iTRAQ with LC MS/MS was performed on pooled BALF enriched for medium and low abundance proteins from early-phase survivors (n = 7, early-phase non-survivors (n = 8, and late-phase survivors (n = 7. Of the 724 proteins identified at a global false discovery rate of 1%, quantitative information was available for 499. In early-phase ARDS, proteins more abundant in survivors mapped to ontologies indicating a coordinated compensatory response to injury and stress. These included coagulation and fibrinolysis; immune system activation; and cation and iron homeostasis. Proteins more abundant in early-phase non-survivors participate in carbohydrate catabolism and collagen synthesis, with no activation of compensatory responses. The compensatory immune activation and ion homeostatic response seen in early-phase survivors transitioned to cell migration and actin filament based processes in late-phase survivors, revealing dynamic changes in the BALF proteome as the lung heals. Early phase proteins differentiating survivors from non-survivors are candidate biomarkers for predicting survival in ARDS.

  5. Proteomic Profiles in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Differentiates Survivors from Non-Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, Maneesh; Becker, Trisha L.; Viken, Kevin J.; Jagtap, Pratik D.; Dey, Sanjoy; Steinbach, Michael S.; Wu, Baolin; Kumar, Vipin; Bitterman, Peter B.; Ingbar, David H.; Wendt, Christine H.

    2014-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) continues to have a high mortality. Currently, there are no biomarkers that provide reliable prognostic information to guide clinical management or stratify risk among clinical trial participants. The objective of this study was to probe the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) proteome to identify proteins that differentiate survivors from non-survivors of ARDS. Patients were divided into early-phase (1 to 7 days) and late-phase (8 to 35 days) groups based on time after initiation of mechanical ventilation for ARDS (Day 1). Isobaric tags for absolute and relative quantitation (iTRAQ) with LC MS/MS was performed on pooled BALF enriched for medium and low abundance proteins from early-phase survivors (n = 7), early-phase non-survivors (n = 8), and late-phase survivors (n = 7). Of the 724 proteins identified at a global false discovery rate of 1%, quantitative information was available for 499. In early-phase ARDS, proteins more abundant in survivors mapped to ontologies indicating a coordinated compensatory response to injury and stress. These included coagulation and fibrinolysis; immune system activation; and cation and iron homeostasis. Proteins more abundant in early-phase non-survivors participate in carbohydrate catabolism and collagen synthesis, with no activation of compensatory responses. The compensatory immune activation and ion homeostatic response seen in early-phase survivors transitioned to cell migration and actin filament based processes in late-phase survivors, revealing dynamic changes in the BALF proteome as the lung heals. Early phase proteins differentiating survivors from non-survivors are candidate biomarkers for predicting survival in ARDS. PMID:25290099

  6. Psychosocial aspects of childhood cancer survivors

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    Jong Jin Seo

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The majority of childhood cancer survivors and their families will be psychologically healthy, but may desire and benefit from preventive care. A significant portion of the survivor population will be psychosocially distressed in various aspects by their harsh experience of long cancer treatment, and may warrant professional intervention and treatment. Pediatricians should be aware of the late psychological effects that can occur a year or 2 after treatment, possibly in many aspects of a survivor's life. Not only the cancer diagnosis, but also treatments such as chemotherapy, irradiation, and surgical intervention may exert different long-term effects on the psychosocial outcomes of survivors. Pediatricians need to be more concerned with maintaining and improving the psychological health of this growing number of childhood cancer survivors through long-term follow-up clinics, community support, or self-help groups. Research on all of the psychosocial aspects of childhood cancer survivors is important to recognize the reality and problems they face in Korea.

  7. Health Behaviors of Minority Childhood Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolley, Melinda R.; Sharp, Lisa K.; Tangney, Christy; Schiffer, Linda; Arroyo, Claudia; Kim, Yoonsang; Campbell, Richard; Schmidt, Mary Lou; Breen, Kathleen; Kinahan, Karen E.; Dilley, Kim; Henderson, Tara; Korenblit, Allen D.; Seligman, Katya

    2015-01-01

    Background Available data suggest that childhood cancer survivors (CCSs) are comparable to the general population on many lifestyle parameters. However, little is known about minority CCSs. This cross-sectional study describes and compares the body mass index (BMI) and health behaviors of African-American, Hispanic and White survivors to each other and to non-cancer controls. Methods Participants included 452 adult CCS (150 African-American, 152 Hispanic, 150 white) recruited through four childhood cancer treating institutions and 375 ethnically-matched non-cancer controls (125 in each racial/ethnic group) recruited via targeted digit dial. All participants completed a 2-hour in-person interview. Results Survivors and non-cancer controls reported similar health behaviors. Within survivors, smoking and physical activity were similar across racial/ethnic groups. African-American and Hispanic survivors reported lower daily alcohol use than whites, but consumed unhealthy diets and were more likely to be obese. Conclusions This unique study highlights that many minority CCSs exhibit lifestyle profiles that contribute to increased risk for chronic diseases and late effects. Recommendations for behavior changes must consider the social and cultural context in which minority survivors may live. PMID:25564774

  8. Mental health status of adolescent cancer survivors

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    Mertens AC

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ann C Mertens, Jordan Gilleland Marchak Aflac Cancer and Blood Disorder Center, Department of Pediatrics, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA Abstract: Due to the successful treatment of children with cancer, overall 5-year survival rates now exceed 80%. Because of this success in treating childhood cancer, concerns are now focusing on the potential risk of both physical and psychosocial late effects in these cancer survivors. There is limited data available for clinicians and researchers on the mental health of adolescent survivors of childhood cancers. The goal of this review is to provide a concise evaluation of the content and attributes of literature available on this often overlooked, yet vulnerable, population. Overall, studies on psychological outcomes in adolescent survivors of pediatric cancer suggest that the majority are mentally healthy and do not report significant levels of psychological distress. Several factors were recognized as playing an important role in adverse psychosocial outcomes in these adolescent cancer survivors: to include the diagnosis of a tumor in the central nervous system, central nervous system-directed cancer treatment, and physical late effects. To identify the subset of survivors who may benefit from systematic psychological services, systematic psychological screening of all adolescent cancer survivors during follow-up oncology visits is recommended. Further research into this critical area is needed to help identify other potential risk factors and guide the development of evidence-based support for these vulnerable adolescents. Keywords: adolescents, psychological, psychosocial, screening recommendations

  9. Long-term psychiatric outcomes in pediatric brain tumor survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Sumedh Subodh; Dellarole, Anna; Peterson, Eric Cecala; Bregy, Amade; Komotar, Ricardo; Harvey, Philip D; Elhammady, Mohamed Samy

    2015-05-01

    The increased efficacy of cancer treatments has led to a greater survival rate of patients with pediatric brain cancers. Therefore, it is imperative to explore the long-term consequences of therapies employed to treat pediatric brain tumors. The goal of this study was to provide a review of literature regarding the downstream psychological and psychiatric consequences experienced by adult survivors of pediatric brain cancer as a result of treatment, tumor type, or tumor location. A PubMed MeSH search and additional online database searches were conducted to include pertinent studies that discussed psychological deficits in childhood brain cancer survivors. The studies included were subjected to data extraction to quantify relevant information for further analysis. A total of 17 papers with 5320 pediatric brain tumor patients were incorporated in our review. Mean age at diagnosis (8.13 ± 0.77 years), mean follow-up time (9.98 ± 3.05 years), and male-to-female ratios (1.08:1) were compiled from studies reporting this information. Incidences of depression (19 %), anxiety (20 %), suicidal ideation (10.9 %), schizophrenia and its related psychoses (9.8 %), and behavioral problem (28.7 %) were higher among pediatric brain cancer survivors than in the normal population. Craniospinal radiotherapy and/or surgery corresponded to an increased likelihood of developing adverse deficits. Astrocytomas or other glial tumors were linked to poorer outcomes. Physicians treating pediatric brain tumor patients should be aware of the possible consequences associated with treatment. Psychiatric monitoring is warranted in survivors of pediatric brain tumors, but further investigation is needed to elucidate late outcomes regarding tumor type and location.

  10. Taste and smell dysfunction in childhood cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jennifer; Laing, David G; Wilkes, Fiona J; Chan, Ada; Gabriel, Melissa; Cohn, Richard J

    2014-04-01

    Reduced or altered taste and smell function may occur as a side-effect of cancer therapy. This can lead to altered nutrient and energy intake. Some studies have suggested that taste and smell dysfunction can persist many years after treatment completion but this has not been previously assessed in survivors of childhood cancer. The aim of this study is to determine if taste and smell dysfunction is present in childhood cancer survivors (CCS). Food preference and Quality of Life was also assessed. Fifty-one child cancer survivors (mean age: 19.69±7.09years), more than five years since treatment completion, (mean: 12.4years) were recruited from the long term follow-up clinics at two Sydney-based children's hospitals. Taste function was assessed using a 25 sample taste identification test comprising five concentrations each of sweet, salty, sour and bitter tastes and water. Smell function was assessed by determining the ability of participants to identify 16 common odorants. The participants' Quality of Life was assessed using the Functional Assessment of Anorexia Cachexia scale and food preferences were assessed using a 94-item food liking tool. Taste dysfunction was found in 27.5% of participants (n=14), and smell dysfunction in 3.9% (n=2) of participants. The prevalence of taste dysfunction was higher than that seen in the non-cancer population. The child cancer survivors' appeared to "like" the less healthy food groups such as flavoured beverages, takeaway and snacks over healthier food groups such as vegetables and salad. No correlation was found between those with a taste dysfunction and their food "likes". A high level of taste dysfunction was found in CCS though there did not appear to be an issue with smell dysfunction. Further work is also needed to assess whether a taste dysfunction do play a role in the dietary habits of CCS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Executive functioning deficits in young adult survivors of bronchopulmonary dysplasia.

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    Gough, Aisling; Linden, Mark A; Spence, Dale; Halliday, Henry L; Patterson, Christopher C; McGarvey, Lorcan

    2015-01-01

    To assess long-term impairments of executive functioning in adult survivors of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Participants were assessed on measures of executive functioning, health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and social functioning. Survivors of BPD (n = 63; 34 males; mean age 24.2 years) were compared with groups comprising preterm (without BPD) (executive functioning relating to problem solving (OR: 5.1, CI: 1.4-19.3), awareness of behavior (OR: 12.7, CI: 1.5-106.4) and organization of their environment (OR: 13.0, CI: 1.6-107.1). Birth weight, HRQoL and social functioning were predictive of deficits in executive functioning. This study represents the largest sample of survivors into adulthood of BPD and is the first to show that deficits in executive functioning persist. Children with BPD should be assessed to identify cognitive impairments and allow early intervention aimed at ameliorating their effects. Implications for Rehabilitation Adults born preterm with very-low birth weight, and particularly those who develop BPD, are at increased risk of exhibiting defects in executive functioning. Clinicians and educators should be made aware of the impact that BPD can have on the long-term development of executive functions. Children and young adults identified as having BPD should be periodically monitored to identify the need for possible intervention.

  12. Exercise training improves mean arterial pressure in breast cancer survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert C. Mills

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Currently, many breast cancer survivors worldwide live with treatment-related side effects, including cardiovascular health problems. This study examined effects of a 5-month exercise intervention on non-invasive markers of cardiovascular health in breast cancer survivors. Relationships between these markers and commonly used markers of overall health were also explored. Fifty-two survivors completed the exercise training at a rehabilitation center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill between 2008-2011. A combined aerobic and resistance exercise intervention (3 times/week for 1h at intensities progressing from low (40% to moderate (65-70% of VO2max for aerobic and 8-12 repetitions max for the resistance exercise were implemented. Significant reduction in mean arterial pressure (MAP was observed from baseline to final assessment. A significant correlation was found between MAP and Body Mass Index (BMI. In conclusion, 5-months combined aerobic and resistance exercise intervention positively improved MAP which was, in part, attributed to changes in BMI.

  13. Secondary salutogenic effects in veterans whose parents were Holocaust survivors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekel, Sharon; Solomon, Zahava; Rozenstreich, Eyal

    2013-02-01

    Addressing the ongoing controversy over inter-generational transmission of trauma, we examined the impact of the Nazi Holocaust on PTSD course and co-morbid symptoms (e.g., depression, anxiety) among offspring of survivors following their own adversity in two longitudinal studies. Two samples of Israeli war veterans included Second Generation Holocaust (i.e., SGH) survivors and comparable veterans with no such family history (i.e., not-SGH). Study I: 1982 Lebanon War veterans (N = 669) were assessed 1, 3, and 20 years after the war. Study II: 1973 Yom Kippur War veterans (N = 343) were followed up 18, 30, and 35 years after the war. Results indicated that SGH endorsed higher PTSD and co-morbid symptoms criteria rates than not-SGH veterans in the initial post-war years but this pattern was reversed in the long-term, that is, lower rates were evident among SGH in later follow-ups. These findings suggest the development of a complex trauma reaction among offspring of trauma survivors. Possibly there is a transmission of positive trauma outcomes from one generation to the next rather than merely negative ones. Future studies are therefore warranted to re-evaluate the notion of inter-generational transmission of trauma and examine its components. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Quality of life in caregivers of severely disabled war survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavi, Batool; Seyed Hoseini Davarani, Seyed Hosein; Soroush, Mohammadreza; Jamali, Arsia; Khateri, Shahriar; Talebi, Morteza; Montazeri, Ali

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate quality of life (QOL) of caregivers of severely disabled war survivors and identify variables threatening caregivers' QOL. A cross-sectional study was performed on 532 caregivers of Iran-Iraq war related injured survivors by using Persian version of 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36). Caregivers had lower QOL compared to the Iranian female population (p < .001). Caregivers of amputees had better SF-36 scores compared to caregivers of two groups of chemical warfare survivors (p ranging from .01 to <.001). Caregiving to chemical warfare and being married at the time of trauma were the independent predictors of poor QOL in both the physical component summary (OR = 5.08, 95% CI = 3.35-7.7; OR = 0.57, 95% CI = 0.37-0.89) and the mental component summary (OR = 4.12, 95% CI = 2.68-6.32; OR = 0.63, 95% CI = 0.40-0.98). Caregivers of war veterans suffer from poor QOL. Chemical warfare agents contribute to more persistent poor QOL in caregivers than the injuries caused by conventional weapons. © 2014 Association of Rehabilitation Nurses.

  15. Health status and psychological distress among in-hospital cardiac arrest survivors in relation to gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israelsson, Johan; Bremer, Anders; Herlitz, Johan; Axelsson, Åsa B; Cronberg, Tobias; Djärv, Therese; Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena; Larsson, Ing-Marie; Lilja, Gisela; Sunnerhagen, Katharina S; Wallin, Ewa; Ågren, Susanna; Åkerman, Eva; Årestedt, Kristofer

    2017-05-01

    To describe health status and psychological distress among in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) survivors in relation to gender. This national register study consists of data from follow-up registration of IHCA survivors 3-6 months post cardiac arrest (CA) in Sweden. A questionnaire was sent to the survivors, including measurements of health status (EQ-5D-5L) and psychological distress (HADS). Between 2013 and 2015, 594 IHCA survivors were included in the study. The median values for EQ-5D-5L index and EQ VAS among survivors were 0.78 (q1-q3=0.67-0.86) and 70 (q1-q3=50-80) respectively. The values were significantly lower (p<0.001) in women compared to men. In addition, women reported more problems than men in all dimensions of EQ-5D-5L, except self-care. A majority of the respondents reported no problems with anxiety (85.4%) and/or symptoms of depression (87.0%). Women reported significantly more problems with anxiety (p<0.001) and symptoms of depression (p<0.001) compared to men. Gender was significantly associated with poorer health status and more psychological distress. No interaction effects for gender and age were found. Although the majority of survivors reported acceptable health status and no psychological distress, a substantial proportion reported severe problems. Women reported worse health status and more psychological distress compared to men. Therefore, a higher proportion of women may be in need of support. Health care professionals should make efforts to identify health problems among survivors and offer individualised support when needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Employment status, social function decline and caregiver burden among stroke survivors. A South Indian study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreedharan, Sapna Erat; Unnikrishnan, J P; Amal, M G; Shibi, B S; Sarma, Sankara; Sylaja, P N

    2013-09-15

    Stroke leaves at least 60% of the survivors with moderate to severe disability limiting their employment status and social functioning leading to high levels of caregiver burden. We sought to study the employment status and level of change of social functioning of stroke survivors and their principal caregiver and correlate it with severity of stroke, functional disability, and anxiety and depression scores. One hundred and fifty stroke survivors and principal caregivers (3 months-2 years post-stroke) were recruited for the study. The employment status pre- and post-stroke was assessed. The social function of the patient and caregiver was analyzed using a 6 item social function scale developed for the study, encompassing culturally relevant questions. A 20 point scale adapted from Burden assessment schedule was used to assess the caregiver burden. Mean age of the study group was 54.37±12.072 (range 22-75 years), with 116 males and 34 females. Spouse was the principal caregiver for 142/150 patients (94.6%). In the stroke survivors, compared to the pre-stroke employment status of 62.7%, only 20.7% were employed post-stroke with half having change of job. But the employment status of caregiver was not reduced post-stroke (34.7% vs 33.3%). Employment loss in stroke survivors had a statistically significant association with severity of functional disability, male gender and presence of limb weakness (p values 0.037, 0.0001 and 0.043 respectively). There was an overall decline in social functions among the 6 parameters assessed in both the stroke survivors and caregivers. Of the caregiver burden, financial burden was more among female and older caregivers. The functional status and motor weakness of the stroke survivors did not tend to worsen the overall caregiver burden. Loss of occupation among stroke survivors is high. The decline in social function among stroke survivors and caregivers was significant. Even though functional disability contributed to employment loss

  17. Examining posttraumatic stress symptoms in a national sample of homicide survivors: prevalence and comparison to other violence victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinzow, Heidi M; Rheingold, Alyssa A; Byczkiewicz, Michelle; Saunders, Benjamin E; Kilpatrick, Dean G

    2011-12-01

    The present study examined posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms among friends and family members of homicide victims (homicide survivors). Out of a national sample of 1,753 young adults who completed follow-up interviews after participating in the National Survey of Adolescents, 268 homicide survivors and 653 victims of other interpersonal violence were selected for the study. Participants completed structured telephone interviews that covered the loss of a family member or close friend to homicide, violence exposure, and PTSD symptomatology. Findings indicated that 39% of homicide survivors met criteria for all 3 symptom clusters and 30% of homicide survivors met criteria for 2 PTSD clusters (functional impairment was not assessed). Multivariate logistic regression analyses demonstrated that homicide survivors were more likely than victims of other violence to meet criteria for all 3 PTSD symptom clusters (OR = 1.91, p homicide survivors. Results suggest that homicide survivors are at elevated risk for PTSD symptoms in comparison to victims of other interpersonal violence. Copyright © 2011 International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies.

  18. Renal carcinoma after childhood cancer: a report from the childhood cancer survivor study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Carmen L; Ness, Kirsten K; Neglia, Joseph P; Hammond, Sue; Shnorhavorian, Margarett; Leisenring, Wendy L; Stovall, Marilyn; Robison, Leslie L; Armstrong, Gregory T

    2013-04-03

    Adult survivors of childhood cancer are known to be at increased risk of subsequent malignancy, but only limited data exist describing the incidence and risk factors for secondary renal carcinoma. Among 14 358 5-year survivors diagnosed between 1970 and 1986, we estimated standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) for subsequent renal carcinoma and identified associations with primary cancer therapy using Poisson regression. Twenty-six survivors were diagnosed with renal carcinoma (median = 22.6 years from diagnosis; range = 6.3-35.7 years), reflecting a statistically significant excess (SIR = 8.0, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 5.2 to 11.7) compared with the general population. Highest risk was observed among neuroblastoma survivors (SIR = 85.8, 95% CI = 38.4 to 175.2) and, in multivariable analyses, with renal-directed radiotherapy of 5 Gy or greater (relative risk [RR] = 3.8, 95% CI = 1.6 to 9.3) and platinum-based chemotherapy (RR = 3.5, 95% CI = 1.0 to 11.2). To our knowledge, this is the first report of an association between cisplatin and subsequent renal carcinoma among survivors of childhood cancer.

  19. Factors associated with self-concept in adolescent survivors of an 8.0-magnitude earthquake in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dongmei; Jiang, Xiaolian; Ho, Kit-Wan; Duan, Lijuan; Zhang, Weiqing

    2014-01-01

    Experiencing a major natural disaster is a stressful event that challenges survival and sense of self. Adolescents are undergoing rapid developmental change in self-concept, and their sense of self is particularly susceptible to such stressful events. Although many studies have investigated adolescent self-concept, few have examined self-concept in relation to experiencing a natural disaster. Following the Great Wenchuan Earthquake in Sichuan Province, China, in 2008, this study aimed to (a) describe disaster experiences; (b) describe social support, coping, and self-support; and (c) identify disaster experiences, social support, and coping factors associated with self-concept of adolescent survivors 3 months after the earthquake. This was a large-scale cross-sectional study. A total of 1,976 adolescents living where the earthquake caused the most severe damage took part. The Tennessee Self-Concept Scale; Coping Styles Scale; and Internality, Powerful Others, and Chance Scales were used to assess self-concept, coping strategy, and locus of control, respectively. Sociodemographic characteristics, earthquake experiences, and social support were also obtained by self-report. Three months after the disaster, adolescent self-concept was generally positive. Locus of control centered on powerful others was the strongest predictor of total self-concept. The negative coping strategy, "abreacting," was a positive predictor of negative self-concept (self-criticism). Close attention to adolescents who use negative coping strategies and who tend to lack a sense of control is needed after major disaster events. Studies that examine long-term relationships between earthquake and other major disaster experiences and self-concept of adolescent survivors are needed.

  20. Psychological Distress among Ebola Survivors Discharged from an Ebola Treatment Unit in Monrovia, Liberia - A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabelo, Ionara; Lee, Virginia; Fallah, Mosoka P; Massaquoi, Moses; Evlampidou, Iro; Crestani, Rosa; Decroo, Tom; Van den Bergh, Rafael; Severy, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    A consequence of the West Africa Ebola outbreak 2014-2015 was the unprecedented number of Ebola survivors discharged from the Ebola Treatment Units (ETUs). Liberia alone counted over 5,000 survivors. We undertook a qualitative study in Monrovia to better understand the mental distress experienced by survivors during hospitalization and reintegration into their community. Purposively selected Ebola survivors from ELWA3, the largest ETU in Liberia, were invited to join focus group discussions. Verbal-informed consent was sought. Three focus groups with a total of 17 participants were conducted between February and April 2015. Thematic analysis approach was applied to analyze the data. The main stressors inside the ETU were the daily exposure to corpses, which often remained several hours among the living; the patients' isolation from their families and worries about their well-being; and sometimes, the perception of disrespect by ETU staff. However, most survivors reported how staff motivated patients to drink, eat, bathe, and walk. Additionally, employing survivors as staff fostered hope, calling patients by their name increased confidence and familiarity, and organizing prayer and singing activities brought comfort. When Ebola virus disease survivors returned home, the experience of being alive was both a gift and a burden. Flashbacks were common among survivors. Perceived as contagious, many were excluded from their family, professional, and social life. Some survivors faced divorce, were driven out of their houses, or lost their jobs. The subsequent isolation prevented survivors from picking up daily life, and the multiple losses affected their coping mechanisms. However, when available, the support of family, friends, and prayer enabled survivors to cope with their mental distress. For those excluded from society, psychosocial counseling and the survivor's network were ways to give a meaning to life post-Ebola. Exposure to death in the ETU and stigma in the

  1. Long-term outcome in survivors of neonatal tetanus following specialist intensive care in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trieu, Huynh T; Anh, Nguyen Thi Kim; Vuong, Huynh Ngoc Thien; Dao, T T M; Hoa, Nguyen Thi Xuan; Tuong, Vo Ngoc Cat; Dinh, Pham Tam; Wills, Bridget; Qui, Phan Tu; Van Tan, Le; Yen, Lam Minh; Sabanathan, Saraswathy; Thwaites, Catherine Louise

    2017-09-25

    Neonatal tetanus continues to occur in many resource-limited settings but there are few data regarding long-term neurological outcome from the disease, especially in settings with critical care facilities. We assessed long-term outcome following neonatal tetanus in infants treated in a pediatric intensive care unit in southern Vietnam. Neurological and neurodevelopmental testing was performed in 17 survivors of neonatal tetanus and 18 control children from the same communities using tools previously validated in Vietnamese children. The median age of children assessed was 36 months. Eight neonatal tetanus survivors and 9 community control cases aged < 42 months were tested using the Bayley III Scales of Infant and Toddler Development (Bayley III-VN) and 8 neonatal tetanus survivors and 9 community controls aged ≥42 months were tested using the Movement Assessment Battery for Children. No significant reductions in growth indices or neurodevelopmental scores were shown in survivors of neonatal tetanus compared to controls although there was a trend towards lower scores in neonatal tetanus survivors. Neurological examination was normal in all children except for two neonatal tetanus survivors with perceptive deafness and one child with mild gross motor abnormality. Neonatal tetanus survivors who had expienced severe disease (Ablett grade ≥ 3) had lower total Bayley III-VN scores than those with mild disease (15 (IQR 14-18) vs 24 (IQR 19-27), p = 0.05) with a significantly lower cognitive domain score (3 (IQR 2-6) severe disease vs 7 (IQR 7-8) mild disease, p = 0.02). Neonatal tetanus is associated with long-term sequelae in those with severe disease. In view of these findings, prevention of neonatal tetanus should remain a priority.

  2. The metabolic syndrome in survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia in Isfahan, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisi, Nahid; Azhir, Afshin; Hashemipour, Mahin; Raeissi, Pouran; Amini, Abasgholi; Moafi, Alireza

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To determine the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in survivors of childhood leukemia in Isfahan, Iran. METHODS: During a 4-year period (2003 to 2007), 55 children (33 male and 22 female) diagnosed with ALL at Unit of Hematology/ Oncology, Department of Pediatrics, Isfahan University of Medical Science, were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. Metabolic syndrome was defined using the modified version of Adult Treatment Panel (ATP III) crite-ria. Insulin resistance was defined based on the homeostasis model assessment index (HOMA-IR). RESULTS: The mean age of participates was 10.4 years (range 6-19 years) and the mean interval since completion of chemotherapy was 35 months. Twenty percent (11/55) of survivors (10 male, 1 female) met criteria for diagnosis of metabolic syndrome. Obesity was observed in one forth of patients and nearly 3/4 of obese patients had metabolic syndrome. High serum insulin levels were found in 16% of participants and in 63% of obese survivors. The mean insulin levels in survivors with metabolic syndrome was three-times more than those without (28.3 mu/l vs. 9.57 mu/l, p = 0.004). Insulin resistance was detected in 72.7% of survivors with metabolic syndrome and it was positively correlated with serum triglycerides (0.543, p ≤ 0.001), systolic and diastolic BP (0.348, p = 0.01 and 0.368, p = 006 respectively), insulin levels (0.914, p < 0.001) and blood sugar (0.398, p = 003). CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in survivors of childhood leukemia in Iran is higher than developed countries. Nearly all of the obese patients had metabolic syndrome. Weight control and regular physical exercise are recommended to the survivors. PMID:21772869

  3. Cognitive function and discontinuation of adjuvant hormonal therapy in older breast cancer survivors: CALGB 369901 (Alliance).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluethmann, Shirley M; Alfano, Catherine M; Clapp, Jonathan D; Luta, George; Small, Brent J; Hurria, Arti; Cohen, Harvey J; Sugarman, Steven; B Muss, Hyman; Isaacs, Claudine; Mandelblatt, Jeanne S

    2017-10-01

    To investigate the effects of cognitive function on discontinuation of hormonal therapy in breast cancer survivors ages 65+ ("older"). Older breast cancer survivors with invasive, non-metastatic disease, and no reported cognitive difficulties were recruited from 78 Alliance sites between 2004 and 2011. Eligible survivors (n = 1280) completed baseline interviews; follow-up was conducted annually for up to 7 years. Survivors with estrogen-receptor-positive (ER+) cancers who initiated hormonal therapy (n = 990) were included. Self-reported cognitive function was measured using the EORTC-QLQ30 scale; a difference of eight points on the 0-100 scale was considered clinically significant. Based on varying rates of discontinuation over time, discontinuation was evaluated separately for three time periods: early (3-5 years). Cox models for each time period were used to evaluate the effects of cognition immediately preceding discontinuation, controlling for age, chemotherapy, and other covariates. Survivors were 65-91 years old (mean 72.6 years), and 79% had stages 1 or 2A disease. Overall, 43% discontinued hormonal therapy before 5 years. Survivors who reported lower cognitive function in the period before discontinuation had greater hazards of discontinuing therapy at the treatment midpoint (HR 1.22 per 8-point difference, CI 1.09-1.40, p cognition was not related to discontinuation in the other periods. Self-reported cognitive problems were a significant risk factor for discontinuation of hormonal therapy 1-3 years post-initiation. Additional research is needed on the temporality of cognitive effects and hormonal therapy to support survivorship care needs of older survivors.

  4. Anxiety and depression among out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilja, G; Nilsson, G; Nielsen, N; Friberg, H; Hassager, C; Koopmans, M; Kuiper, M; Martini, A; Mellinghoff, J; Pelosi, P; Wanscher, M; Wise, M P; Östman, I; Cronberg, T

    2015-12-01

    Survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) may experience psychological distress but the actual prevalence is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate anxiety and depression within a large cohort of OHCA-survivors. OHCA-survivors randomized to targeted temperature of 33 °C or 36 °C within the Target Temperature Management trial (TTM-trial) attended a follow-up after 6 months that included the questionnaire Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). A control group with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) completed the same follow-up. Correlations to variables assumed to be associated with anxiety and depression in OHCA-survivors were tested. At follow-up 278 OHCA-survivors and 119 STEMI-controls completed the HADS where 24% of OHCA-survivors (28% in 33 °C group/22% in 36 °C group, p=0.83) and 19% of the STEMI-controls reported symptoms of anxiety (OR 1.32; 95% CI (0.78-2.25), p=0.30). Depressive symptoms were reported by 13% of OHCA-survivors (equal in both intervention groups, p=0.96) and 8% of STEMI-controls (OR 1.76; 95% CI (0.82-3.79), p=0.15). Anxiety and depression among OHCA-survivors correlated to Health-Related Quality-of-Life, and subjectively reported cognitive deterioration by patient or observer. In addition, depression was associated with a poor neurological outcome. One fourth of OHCA-survivors reported symptoms of anxiety and/or depression at 6 months which was similar to STEMI-controls and previous normative data. Subjective cognitive problems were associated with an increased risk for psychological distress. Since psychological distress affects long-term prognosis of cardiac patients in general it should be addressed during follow-up of survivors with OHCA due to a cardiac cause. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01020916/NCT01946932. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Early outreach to survivors of the shootings in Norway on the 22nd of July 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grete Dyb

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Under-treatment and unmet needs among survivors have been documented years after terror attacks. Improved early and proactive outreach strategies, including targeted interventions for individuals in need, are required. After the terrorist attacks in Norway on 22 July 2011, a national, proactive outreach strategy was developed and implemented to help those who were directly affected. Objectives: The aims of this study were threefold: (1 to investigate whether the survivors at the island of Utøya had received proactive outreach from the municipalities, (2 to examine the relationships between received health services and the survivors’ level of exposure and post-trauma health problems, and (3 to explore the level of unmet needs among survivors 5 months post-terror. Methods: Three hundred and twenty five survivors (M age=19.4, SD=4.6, 47.1% females, response rate 66% of the 2011 massacre on Utøya Island, Norway, were interviewed face-to-face 4–5 months post-terror. The survivors were asked if they had received proactive outreach from their municipality, and what type of health services they had received. Survivors’ level of peri-trauma exposure, loss and injury, posttraumatic stress reactions, symptoms of anxiety and depression, somatic health problems, and sick leave, were assessed. Results: Most participants (87% reported that they had received early and proactive outreach, and most (84% had a contact person. In addition a majority of the survivors has received support from their general practitioner (63%, or other municipal help services (66%. Specialized mental health services by psychiatrists or psychologists had been provided to 73.1% of the survivors. Survivors who had been referred to specialized mental health services reported higher levels of exposure to trauma, posttraumatic stress reactions, depression and anxiety, and somatic health problems, compared to non-receivers of such services. Forty-three survivors (14

  6. Cancer survivors in Switzerland: a rapidly growing population to care for

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Cancer survivors are a heterogeneous group with complex health problems. Data concerning its total number and growing dynamics for Switzerland are scarce and outdated. Methods Population and mortality data were retrieved from the Swiss Federal Statistical Office (FSO). Incidence and relative survival for invasive cancers were computed using data from the cancer registries Geneva (1970–2009), St. Gallen - Appenzell (1980–2010), Grisons & Glarus (1989–2010), and Valais (1989–2010). We estimated prevalence for 1990–2010 using the Prevalence, Incidence Approach MODel (PIAMOD) method. We calculated trends in prevalence estimates by Joinpoint analysis. Projections were extrapolated using the above models and based on time trends of the period 2007–2010. Results The estimated number of cancer survivors increased from 139′717 in 1990 (2.08% of the population) to 289′797 persons in 2010 (3.70%). The growth rate shows an exponential shape and was 3.3% per year in the period 2008 to 2010. Almost half of the survivors have a history of breast, prostate or colorectal cancer. Among cancer survivors, 55% are women but the increases have been more marked in men (p Switzerland. Conclusions There is a rapidly growing population of cancer survivors in Switzerland whose needs and concerns are largely unknown. PMID:23764068

  7. Breast Cancer Risk in Childhood Cancer Survivors Without a History of Chest Radiotherapy: A Report From the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Tara O; Moskowitz, Chaya S; Chou, Joanne F; Bradbury, Angela R; Neglia, Joseph Phillip; Dang, Chau T; Onel, Kenan; Novetsky Friedman, Danielle; Bhatia, Smita; Strong, Louise C; Stovall, Marilyn; Kenney, Lisa B; Barnea, Dana; Lorenzi, Elena; Hammond, Sue; Leisenring, Wendy M; Robison, Leslie L; Armstrong, Gregory T; Diller, Lisa R; Oeffinger, Kevin C

    2016-03-20

    Little is known about the breast cancer risk among childhood cancer survivors who did not receive chest radiotherapy. We sought to determine the magnitude of risk and associated risk factors for breast cancer among these women. We evaluated cumulative breast cancer risk in 3,768 female childhood cancer survivors without a history of chest radiotherapy who were participants in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study. With median follow up of 25.5 years (range, 8 to 39 years), 47 women developed breast cancer at a median age of 38.0 years (range, 22 to 47 years) and median of 24.0 years (range, 10 to 34 years) from primary cancer to breast cancer. A four-fold increased breast cancer risk (standardized incidence ratio [SIR] = 4.0; 95% CI, 3.0 to 5.3) was observed when compared with the general population. Risk was highest among sarcoma and leukemia survivors (SIR = 5.3; 95% CI, 3.6 to 7.8 and SIR = 4.1; 95% CI, 2.4 to 6.9, respectively). By the age of 45 years, the cumulative incidence of breast cancer in sarcoma and leukemia survivors was 5.8% (95% CI, 3.7 to 8.4) and 6.3% (95% CI, 3.0 to 11.3), respectively. No other primary cancer diagnosis was associated with an elevated risk. Alkylators and anthracyclines were associated with an increased breast cancer risk in a dose-dependent manner (P values from test for trend were both radiotherapy who survive childhood sarcoma or leukemia have an increased risk of breast cancer at a young age. The data suggest high-dose alkylator and anthracycline chemotherapy increase the risk of breast cancer. This may suggest a possible underlying gene-environment interaction that warrants further study. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  8. Health-related quality of life and utility scores in short-term survivors of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Litsenburg, Raphaële R L; Huisman, Jaap; Raat, Hein; Kaspers, Gertjan J L; Gemke, Reinoud J B J

    2013-04-01

    Increase of survival in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has made outcomes such as health-related quality of life (HRQL) and economic burden more important. To make informed decisions on the use of healthcare resources, costs as well as utilities need to be taken into account. Among the preference-based HRQL instruments, the Health Utilities Index (HUI) is the most employed in pediatric cancer. Information on utility scores during ALL treatment and in long-term survivors is available, but utility scores in short-term survivors are lacking. This study assesses utility scores, health state, and HRQL in short-term (6 months to 4 years) ALL survivors. Cross-sectional single-center cohort study of short-term ALL survivors using HUI3 proxy assessments. Thirty-three survivors (median 1.5 years off treatment) reported 14 unique health states. The majority of survivors (61 %) enjoyed a perfect health, but 21 % had three affected attributes. Overall, HRQL was nonsignificantly lower compared to the norm, although the difference was large and may be clinically relevant. Cognition was significantly impaired (p = 0.03). Although 61 % of short-term survivors of ALL report no impairment, the health status of the other patients lead to a clinically important impaired HRQL compared to norms. Prospective studies assessing utility scores associated with pediatric ALL should be performed, enabling valid and reliable cost-utility analyses for policy makers to make informed decisions.

  9. Late effects of treatment in survivors of childhood cancer from a tertiary cancer center in South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rejiv Rajendranath

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Improved survival after childhood cancer is attributed to intensive, aggressive therapy, adverse sequelae of which can manifest months to years after completion of treatment. There is little information about the late adverse effects of both childhood cancer and its therapy in survivors in India. Aim: To determine the long-term sequelae associated with therapy in childhood cancer survivors attending a tertiary cancer center in India. Materials and Methods: We studied 155 consecutive survivors of childhood cancer who were ≤14 years at the time of diagnosis and had completed 3 years of follow-up. The study included a complete history and clinical examination, with specific investigations to detect organ toxicity. Quality of life (QOL was assessed from responses to a standardized questionnaire. Neurocognitive assessment was carried out in 20 survivors with an adaptation of the revised Wechsler adult intelligence scale for adults and the Malins intelligence scale for children. Results: The late effects included impaired fertility in 38 patients (24.5%, impaired growth pattern in 7 (4.5%, endocrine dysfunction in 7 (4.5% and second malignancy in 2 (1.2%. Three of the 20 patients assessed had severe neurocognitive impairment. A high QOL was reported by 60% of survivors and an "average" QOL by 38%. Conclusion: Our study showed that most survivors had a good QOL and our results will help clinicians to better monitor childhood cancer survivors in countries with limited resources.

  10. Hormone replacement therapy in cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biglia, Nicoletta; Gadducci, Angelo; Ponzone, Riccardo; Roagna, Riccardo; Sismondi, Piero

    2004-08-20

    Thousands of women are treated each year for cancer; many of these are already in menopause, while other younger patients will go into early menopause due to surgery, or chemotherapy, or the need for radiotherapy to the pelvic region. In most cases the oncologist and the gynaecologist would advise these women against the use of HRT. The purpose of this paper is to review biological and clinical evidences in favour and against HRT use in the different tumours and to propose an algorithm that can help choosing the treatment for the single woman. We performed a systematic literature review through April 2002 concerning: (1) biological basis of hormonal modulation of tumour growth; (2) epidemiological data on the impact of HRT on different cancers risk in healthy women; (3) safety of HRT use in cancer survivors; (4) alternatives to HRT. With the exception of meningioma, breast and endometrial cancer, there is no biological evidence that HRT may increase recurrence risk. In women with previous breast and endometrial cancer HRT is potentially hazardous on a biological basis, even if published data do not show any worsening of prognosis. Even if a cautious approach to hormonal-dependent neoplasias is fully comprehensible and the available alternative treatment should be taken into greater consideration, the reticence to prescribe HRT in women previously treated for other non hormone-related tumours has neither a biological nor a clinical basis. An algorithm based on present knowledge is proposed.

  11. Weight Trajectories of Israeli Pediatric Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Marilyn; Bachar, Eytan; Ronen Ackerman, Eyal; Rancourt, Diana; Bonne, Omer; Weintraub, Michael

    2017-06-01

    Cross-national replication of the high rates of overweight/obesity among U.S. pediatric cancer survivors (PCS) is limited. Predictors of weight trajectories of Israeli PCS were examined from diagnosis and end of active cancer treatment to 3 years posttreatment. World Health Organization-derived body mass index (z-BMI) values were calculated at each time point from medical records of 135 Israeli PCS ( M diagnosis age = 11.4). A three-section piecewise multilevel model including age, ethnicity, gender, treatment length, and diagnosis as predictors was used to estimate z-BMI trajectories. Most participants remained at a healthy weight at all time points. Differing weight trajectories emerged for PCS diagnosed with lymphoma/leukemia versus other cancer diagnoses from diagnosis to end of treatment, but similar weight change patterns were observed posttreatment. Replication of U.S. PCS weight trajectories was not observed in Israeli PCS, suggesting the importance of exploring environmental risk factors contributing to obesity among PCS.

  12. Twenty-year survivors of kidney transplantation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Traynor, C

    2012-12-01

    There have been few studies of patients with renal allografts functioning for more than 20 years. We sought to identify clinical factors associated with ultra long-term (>20 year) renal allograft survival and to describe the clinical features of these patients. We performed a retrospective analysis of the Irish Renal Transplant Database and included 1174 transplants in 1002 patients. There were 255 (21.74%) patients with graft function for 20 years or more. Multivariate analysis identified recipient age (HR 1.01, CI 1.01-1.02), gender (male HR 1.25, CI 1.08-1.45), acute rejection (HR 1.26, CI 1.09-1.45) and transplant type (living related donor vs. deceased donor) (HR 0.52, CI 0.40-0.66) as significantly associated with long-term graft loss. Median serum creatinine was 115 μmol\\/L. The 5-year graft survival in 20-year survivors was 74.7%. The mean age at death was 62.7 years (±10.6). The most common causes of death were cardiovascular disease and malignancy. The two major causes of graft loss were death (with function) and interstitial fibrosis\\/tubular atrophy. Comorbidities included skin cancer (36.1%), coronary heart disease (17.3%) and other malignancies (14.5%). This study identifies factors associated with long-term allograft survival and a high rate of morbidity and early mortality in long-term transplant recipients.

  13. Cancer Survivors in the United States: A Review of the Literature and a Call to Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivieso, Manuel; Kujawa, Ann M.; Jones, Tisha; Baker, Laurence H.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The number of cancer survivors in the U.S. has increased from 3 million in 1971, when the National Cancer Act was enacted, to over 12 million today. Over 70% of children affected by cancer survive more than 10 years, and most are cured. Most cancer survivors are adults, with two-thirds of them 65 years of age or older and two-thirds alive at five years. The most common cancer diagnoses among survivors include breast, prostate and colorectal cancers. This review was conducted to better appreciate the challenges associated with cancer survivors and the opportunities healthcare providers have in making a difference for these patients. Methods: Comprehensive review of literature based on PubMed searches on topics related to cancer survivorship, and associated physical, cognitive, socio-economic, sexual/behavioral and legal issues. Results: At least 50% of cancer survivors suffer from late treatment-related side effects, often including physical, psychosocial, cognitive and sexual abnormalities, as well as concerns regarding recurrence and/or the development of new malignancies. Many are chronic in nature and some are severe and even life-threatening. Survivors also face issues involving lack of appropriate health maintenance counseling, increased unemployment rate and workplace discrimination. Conclusions: Advances in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer will lead to more survivors and better quality of life. However, tools to recognize potentially serious long-lasting side effects of cancer therapy earlier in order to treat and/or prevent them must be developed. It is incumbent upon our health care delivery systems to make meeting these patients' needs a priority. PMID:22275855

  14. Are the Psychological Needs of Adolescent Survivors of Pediatric Cancer Adequately Identified and Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahalley, Lisa S.; Wilson, Stephanie J.; Tyc, Vida L.; Conklin, Heather M.; Hudson, Melissa M.; Wu, Shengjie; Xiong, Xiaoping; Stancel, Heather H.; Hinds, Pamela S.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To describe the psychological needs of adolescent survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) or brain tumor (BT), we examined: (a) the occurrence of cognitive, behavioral, and emotional concerns identified during a comprehensive psychological evaluation, and (b) the frequency of referrals for psychological follow-up services to address identified concerns. Methods Psychological concerns were identified on measures according to predetermined criteria for 100 adolescent survivors. Referrals for psychological follow-up services were made for concerns previously unidentified in formal assessment or not adequately addressed by current services. Results Most survivors (82%) exhibited at least one concern across domains: behavioral (76%), cognitive (47%), and emotional (19%). Behavioral concerns emerged most often on scales associated with executive dysfunction, inattention, learning, and peer difficulties. CRT was associated with cognitive concerns, χ2(1,N=100)=5.63, psurvivors, t(47)=3.28, psurvivors, t(48)=2.93, psurvivors with concerns, 38% were referred for psychological follow-up services. Lower-income ALL survivors received more referrals for follow-up, χ2(1,N=41)=8.05, psurvivors had more concerns across domains than non-referred survivors, ALL: t(39)=2.96, psurvivors may be at risk for experiencing unaddressed cognitive needs. Conclusions Many adolescent survivors of cancer experience psychological difficulties that are not adequately managed by current services, underscoring the need for long-term surveillance. In addition to prescribing regular psychological evaluations, clinicians should closely monitor whether current support services appropriately meet survivors’ needs, particularly for lower-income survivors and those treated with CRT. PMID:22278930

  15. Cancer survivors in the United States: a review of the literature and a call to action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivieso, Manuel; Kujawa, Ann M; Jones, Tisha; Baker, Laurence H

    2012-01-01

    The number of cancer survivors in the U.S. has increased from 3 million in 1971, when the National Cancer Act was enacted, to over 12 million today. Over 70% of children affected by cancer survive more than 10 years, and most are cured. Most cancer survivors are adults, with two-thirds of them 65 years of age or older and two-thirds alive at five years. The most common cancer diagnoses among survivors include breast, prostate and colorectal cancers. This review was conducted to better appreciate the challenges associated with cancer survivors and the opportunities healthcare providers have in making a difference for these patients. Comprehensive review of literature based on PubMed searches on topics related to cancer survivorship, and associated physical, cognitive, socio-economic, sexual/behavioral and legal issues. At least 50% of cancer survivors suffer from late treatment-related side effects, often including physical, psychosocial, cognitive and sexual abnormalities, as well as concerns regarding recurrence and/or the development of new malignancies. Many are chronic in nature and some are severe and even life-threatening. Survivors also face issues involving lack of appropriate health maintenance counseling, increased unemployment rate and workplace discrimination. Advances in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer will lead to more survivors and better quality of life. However, tools to recognize potentially serious long-lasting side effects of cancer therapy earlier in order to treat and/or prevent them must be developed. It is incumbent upon our health care delivery systems to make meeting these patients' needs a priority.

  16. Feasibility and usability of a wearable orthotic for stroke survivors with hand impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshminarayanan, Kishor; Wang, Fa; Webster, John G; Seo, Na Jin

    2017-02-01

    The concept of a vibrating wristband, to improve dextrous hand function of stroke survivors, was recently proposed with clinical results and is referred to as 'TheraBracelet' in this paper. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate feasibility of a portable, wearable TheraBracelet, and to apply usability evaluation techniques to assess potential demands of TheraBracelet and to identify critical improvement needs of the prototype. A prototype was developed with a vibrating element housed in an elastic wristband and connected to a wearable electronics box via a cable. Expectation for TheraBracelet and evaluation of the prototype were obtained from 10 chronic stroke survivors using surveys before and after using the prototype and House of Quality analysis. The survey for expectation showed stroke survivors' willingness to try out TheraBracelet at a low cost. The survey evaluating the prototype showed that the current prototype was overall satisfactory with a mean rating of 3.7 out of 5. The House of Quality analysis revealed that the priority improvement needs for the prototype are to improve clinical knowledge on long-term effectiveness, reduce cost, ease donning/doffing and waterproof. This study presents a potential for a low-cost wearable hand orthotic likable by stroke survivors. Implications for Rehabilitation Feasibility for a portable wearable wristband-type hand orthotic was demonstrated. The survey showed stroke survivors are willing to try such an orthotic at low cost. The current prototype was rated overall satisfactory by stroke survivors. This study provides a potential for a low-cost wearable hand orthotic likable by stroke survivors.

  17. Health and well-being in adolescent survivors of early childhood cancer: a report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, Ann C; Brand, Sarah; Ness, Kirsten K; Li, Zhenghong; Mitby, Pauline A; Riley, Anne; Patenaude, Andrea Farkas; Zeltzer, Lonnie

    2014-03-01

    With the growing number of childhood cancer survivors in the US, it is important to assess the well-being of these individuals, particularly during the transitional phase of adolescence. Data about adolescent survivors' overall health and quality of life will help identify survivor subgroups most in need of targeted attention to successfully transition to adulthood. This ancillary study to the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study focused on children 15-19 years of age who had been diagnosed with cancer before the age of 4 years. A cohort of siblings of pediatric cancer survivors of the same ages served as a comparison sample. Adolescent health was assessed using the Child Health and Illness Profile-Adolescent Edition (CHIP-AE) survey. The teen survey was sent to 444 survivor teens and 189 siblings. Of these, 307(69%) survivors and 97 (51%) siblings completed and returned the survey. The overall health profiles of siblings and survivors were similar. Among survivors, females scored significantly below males on satisfaction, discomfort, and disorders domains. Survivors diagnosed with central nervous system tumors scored less favorably than leukemia survivors in the global domains of satisfaction and disorders. In general, adolescent survivors fare favorably compared to healthy siblings. However, identification of the subset of pediatric cancer survivors who are more vulnerable to medical and psychosocial disorders in adolescence provides the opportunity for design and implementation of intervention strategies that may improve quality of life. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Recovering from Opioid Overdose: Resources for Overdose Survivors & Family Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    SAMHSA Opioid Overdose Prevention TOOLKIT: Recovering From Opioid Overdose – Resources for Overdose Survivors & Family Members TABLE OF CONTENTS Recovering From Opioid Overdose Recovering from Opioid Overdose. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Resources for Overdose Survivors ...

  19. Patterns and predictors of clustered risky health behaviors among adult survivors of childhood cancer: A report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lown, E Anne; Hijiya, Nobuko; Zhang, Nan; Srivastava, Deo Kumar; Leisenring, Wendy M; Nathan, Paul C; Castellino, Sharon M; Devine, Katie A; Dilley, Kimberley; Krull, Kevin R; Oeffinger, Kevin C; Hudson, Melissa M; Armstrong, Gregory T; Robison, Leslie L; Ness, Kirsten K

    2016-09-01

    Health complications related to childhood cancer may be influenced by risky health behaviors (RHBs), particularly when RHBs co-occur. To the authors' knowledge, only limited information is available describing how RHBs cluster among survivors of childhood cancer and their siblings and the risk factors for co-occurring RHBs. Latent class analysis was used to identify RHB clusters using longitudinal survey data regarding smoking, alcohol use, and physical activity from adult survivors (4184 survivors) and siblings (1598 siblings) in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study. Generalized logistic regression was used to evaluate associations between demographic characteristics, treatment exposures, psychological distress, health conditions, and cluster membership. Three RHB clusters were identified: a low-risk cluster, an insufficiently active cluster, and a high-risk cluster (tobacco and risky alcohol use and insufficient activity). Compared with siblings, survivors were more likely to be in the insufficiently active cluster (adjusted odds ratio [ORadj ], 1.17; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.06-1.27) and were less likely to be in the high-risk cluster (ORadj , 0.79; 95% CI, 0.69-0.88). Risk factors for membership in the high-risk cluster included psychological distress (ORadj , 2.76; 95% CI, 1.98-3.86), low educational attainment (ORadj , 7.49; 95% CI, 5.15-10.88), income education or income, being obese or overweight, female sex, nonwhite race/ethnicity, single marital status, cranial radiation, and cisplatin exposure. RHBs co-occur in survivors of childhood cancer and their siblings. Economic and educational disadvantages and psychological distress should be considered in screening and interventions to reduce RHBs. Cancer 2016. © 2016 American Cancer Society. Cancer 2016;122:2747-2756. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  20. [Why were they numb again? About the psychological condition of Holocaust survivors and attitudes of society and therapists].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steier, Shmuel Tommy

    2009-04-01

    During the first year after Israel's declaration of independence, 350,000 Holocaust survivors immigrated to Israel, about 1/3 of the country's population at that time. Their poor public image ("soap", "avac adam"--shadow of a man) and the Zionist--pioneer attitude of rejecting the "diasporal mentality", led to arrogance and disrespect towards the survivors. The attitude of therapists towards the victims has been influenced by the public atmosphere and their problems did not receive the attention they deserved. This fact caused an additional trauma--"secondary victimization", which, in turn, was one of the causes for the "conspiracy of silence". This silence lasted for many years and caused HoLocaust survivors to become more vulnerable at an older age. A review of the complex psychological condition of Holocaust survivors in the community is characterized by a combination of toughness and vulnerability and other aspects such as: the frequency of PTSD among Holocaust survivors and its characteristics as well as therapists' difficulties in coping with the post-traumatic state. The sequence of traumatic events in their Lives caused a feeling of vulnerability in some survivors. Furthermore, insult and fear of exposure, that throughout the years prevented them from demanding their rights, was contrary to the normative behaviour in Israeli society. The interest and the number of studies concerning the Holocaust and Holocaust survivors increases as the number of survivors decreases and as we move further in time from the horrors of that war. To implement a policy of positive discrimination (affirmative action) for survivors in the Israeli health system.

  1. Nonlinear analysis of electromyogram following gait training with myoelectrically triggered neuromuscular electrical stimulation in stroke survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Anirban; Khattar, Bhawna; Banerjee, Alakananda

    2012-12-01

    Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) facilitates ambulatory function after paralysis by activating the muscles of the lower extremities. The NMES-assisted stepping can either be triggered by a heel-switch (switch-trigger), or by an electromyogram (EMG)-based gait event detector (EMG-trigger). The command sources—switch-trigger or EMG-trigger—were presented to each group of six chronic (>6 months post-stroke) hemiplegic stroke survivors. The switch-trigger group underwent transcutaneous NMES-assisted gait training for 1 h, five times a week for 2 weeks, where the stimulation of the tibialis anterior muscle of the paretic limb was triggered with a heel-switch detecting heel-rise of the same limb. The EMG-trigger group underwent transcutaneous NMES-assisted gait training of the same duration and frequency where the stimulation was triggered with surface EMG from medial gastrocnemius (MG) of the paretic limb in conjunction with a heel-switch detecting heel-rise of the same limb. During the baseline and post-intervention surface EMG assessment, a total of 10 s of surface EMG was recorded from bilateral MG muscle while the subjects tried to stand steady on their toes. A nonlinear tool—recurrence quantification analysis (RQA)—was used to analyze the surface EMG. The objective of this study was to find the effect of NMES-assisted gait training with switch-trigger or EMG-trigger on two RQA parameters—the percentage of recurrence (%Rec) and determinism (%Det), which were extracted from surface EMG during fatiguing contractions of the paretic muscle. The experimental results showed that during fatiguing contractions, (1) %Rec and %Det have a higher initial value for paretic muscle than the non-paretic muscle, (2) the rate of change in %Rec and %Det was negative for the paretic muscle but positive for the non-paretic muscle, (3) the rate of change in %Rec and %Det significantly increased from baseline for the paretic muscle after EMG-triggered NMES

  2. [Early endocrine complications in childhood cancer survivors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez González, Cristina; Andrades Toledo, Mónica; Cárdeno Morales, Álvaro; Gutiérrez Carrasco, Ignacio; Ramírez Villar, Gema Lucía; Pérez Hurtado, José María; García García, Emilio

    2016-10-21

    The treatment of childhood cancers has increased survival rates, but also the risk of sequelae, such as endocrine complications. The objective of this study is to evaluate the endocrine disorders in survivors of childhood malignant tumors within the first years after treatment and analyze the variables related to their appearance. A retrospective medical record review of patients referred to pediatric endocrinology after treatment of malignancy. Outcome measures were frequency and types of endocrine dysfunction and new-onset obesity. Clinical and laboratory evaluations were performed every 6 months. Statistics tests were: chi square and multiple logistic regression. Fifty five patients (26 women) were included with an age at diagnosis of tumour (mean±standard deviation) 6.0±4.4 years and followed up for 6.8±3.6 years. Thirty endocrine disorders were diagnosed in 26 patients (47.3%), 17 women (P=.01). Eleven adolescents had primary hypogonadism (26.2% to 0.6±0.5 years of follow-up) in relation to local irradiation (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 3.99, P=.005). Eleven patients had a pituitary disorder (20.0%) 5.2±2.4 years after diagnosis in relation to brain irradiation (OR 1.54, P=.039). Six children (10.9%) had primary hypothyroidism from 3.2±1.0 years of follow-up. Two children developed obesity. Endocrine disorders are frequently seen within the first years after diagnosis of a childhood cancer, so hormonal evaluation should start early and be repeated periodically. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Breast cancer survivors of different sexual orientations: which factors explain survivors' quality of life and adjustment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehmer, U; Glickman, M; Winter, M; Clark, M A

    2013-06-01

    Little is known about differences by sexual orientation in explanatory factors of breast cancer survivors' quality of life, anxiety, and depression. Survivors were recruited from a cancer registry and additional survivors recruited through convenience methods. Data were collected via telephone survey from all 438 survivors, who were disease free and diagnosed with non-metastatic breast cancer an average of 5 years earlier. To explain quality of life, anxiety, and depression, we focused on sexual orientation as the primary independent factors, in addition, considering demographic, psychosocial, clinical, and functional factors as correlates. Sexual orientation had indirect associations with each of the outcomes, through disease-related and demographic factors as well as psychosocial and coping resources. The various explanatory models explain between 36% and 50% of the variance in outcomes and identified areas of strengths and vulnerabilities in sexual minority compared with heterosexual survivors. This study's findings of strengths among specific subgroups of sexual minority compared with heterosexual survivors require further explorations to identify the reasons for this finding. Most of the identified vulnerabilities among sexual minority compared with heterosexual survivors of breast cancer are amenable to change by interventions.

  4. Sinus bradycardia during hypothermia in comatose survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jakob Hartvig; Hassager, Christian; Bro-Jeppesen, John

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bradycardia is a common finding in patients undergoing therapeutic hypothermia (TH) following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), presumably as a normal physiological response to low body temperature. We hypothesized that a normal physiological response with sinus bradycardia (SB...... the hypothermia phase of TH had a 17% 180-day mortality rate compared to 38% in no-SB patients (phypothermia was directly associated with lower odds of unfavorable...... neurological outcome (ORunadjusted=0.42 (0.23-0.75, phypothermia is independently associated with a lower 180-day mortality rate and may thus be a novel, early marker of favorable outcome in comatose survivors of OHCA....

  5. Importance of updating family cancer history in childhood cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Selena; Warby, Meera; Tucker, Katherine M; Wakefield, Claire E; Cohn, Richard J

    2017-10-01

    Estimates of the number of childhood cancers with a genetic basis range from 5-8.5% found in germline samples to 29% based on clinical criteria. Family history-taking practice is a fundamental first step in detecting at risk individuals and families. This study focused on Li-Fraumeni Syndrome (LFS), a highly penetrant cancer syndrome. Reported family history in a cohort of 648 of cancer survivor cohort (CCS) was examined. Eligible CCS were: (i) aged up to 14 years at diagnosis; (ii) more than 5 years postdiagnosis; (iii) treated for a childhood cancer at the study hospitals in NSW, Australia; (iv) in remission for more than 3 years. CCS completed self-administered questionnaires. Medical records confirmed diagnosis and treatment-related information. Our findings reveal an increased cancer risk among sibling and relatives of CCS. 91% of siblings diagnosed with cancer were diagnosed under the age of 40 and about 30% diagnosed under the aged of 15 revealing a 5- (RR = 5.1; 95% CI, 3.3-7.9) and 44-fold (RR = 44.6; 95% CI, 18.4-108.3) increased risked of cancer compared with the Australian population, respectively. About 2% of CCS reported that they had been diagnosed with a genetic cancer syndrome. However, 11% of survivors described a family history pattern which met Chompret criteria for screening for TP53 mutations associated with LFS. Our data suggests that familial cancer predispositions may be initially overlooked. Aperiodic and accurate ascertainment of family cancer history of childhood cancer patients and survivors is therefore recommended.

  6. Factors associated with physical activity among adolescent and young adult survivors of early childhood cancer: A report from the childhood cancer survivor study (CCSS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devine, Katie A; Mertens, Ann C; Whitton, John A; Wilson, Carmen L; Ness, Kirsten K; Gilleland Marchak, Jordan; Leisenring, Wendy; Oeffinger, Kevin C; Robison, Leslie L; Armstrong, Gregory T; Krull, Kevin R

    2018-02-01

    To evaluate concurrent and longitudinal associations between psychosocial functioning and physical activity in adolescent and young adult survivors of early childhood cancer. Adolescent survivors of early childhood cancer (diagnosed before age four) participating in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study completed the Coping Health and Illness Profile-Adolescent Edition (CHIP-AE; n = 303; mean age at survey: 17.6 years). A subset of these survivors (n = 248) completed a follow-up survey an average of 6.0 years later (range: 4-10). Logistic regression identified associations between psychosocial functioning in adolescence and physical activity levels in adolescence and young adulthood. Survivors reported low physical activity as adolescents (46.1% scored below CHIP-AE cut-point) and young adults (40.8% below Centers for Disease Control guidelines). Poor physical activity during adolescence was associated with female sex (OR = 2.06, 95% CI, 1.18-3.68), parents with less than a college education (OR = 1.91, 95% CI, 1.11-3.32), previous treatment with cranial radiation (OR = 3.35, 95% CI, 1.69-6.88), TV time (OR = 1.77, 95% CI, 1.00-3.14), and limitations of activity due to health or mobility restrictions (OR = 8.28, 95% CI, 2.87-30.34). Poor diet (OR = 1.84, 95% CI, 1.05-3.26) and low self-esteem (OR = 1.80, 95% CI, 0.99-3.31) during adolescence were associated with lower odds of meeting Centers for Disease Control physical activity guidelines in young adulthood. These findings provide targets for future interventional studies to improve physical activity in this high-risk population. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Psychological status in childhood cancer survivors: a report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeltzer, Lonnie K; Recklitis, Christopher; Buchbinder, David; Zebrack, Bradley; Casillas, Jacqueline; Tsao, Jennie C I; Lu, Qian; Krull, Kevin

    2009-05-10

    Psychological quality of life (QOL), health-related QOL (HRQOL), and life satisfaction outcomes and their associated risk factors are reviewed for the large cohort of survivors and siblings in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS). This review includes previously published manuscripts that used CCSS data focused on psychological outcome measures, including the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI-18), the Medical Outcomes Survey Short Form-36 (SF-36), the Cantril Ladder of Life, and other self-report questionnaires. Comparisons and contrasts are made between siblings and survivors, and to normative data when available, in light of demographic/health information and abstracted data from the medical record. These studies demonstrate that a significant proportion of survivors report more symptoms of global distress and poorer physical, but not emotional, domains of HRQOL. Other than brain tumor survivors, most survivors report both good present and expected future life satisfaction. Risk factors for psychological distress and poor HRQOL are female sex, lower educational attainment, unmarried status, annual household income less than $20,000, unemployment, lack of health insurance, presence of a major medical condition, and treatment with cranial radiation and/or surgery. Cranial irradiation impacted neurocognitive outcomes, especially in brain tumor survivors. Psychological distress also predicted poor health behaviors, including smoking, alcohol use, fatigue, and altered sleep. Psychological distress and pain predicted use of complementary and alternative medicine. Overall, most survivors are psychologically healthy and report satisfaction with their lives. However, certain groups of childhood cancer survivors are at high risk for psychological distress, neurocognitive dysfunction, and poor HRQOL, especially in physical domains. These findings suggest targeting interventions for groups at highest risk for adverse outcomes and examining the positive growth that remains

  8. Implementing the Exercise Guidelines for Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolin, Kathleen Y.; Schwartz, Anna L.; Matthews, Charles E.; Courneya, Kerry S.; Schmitz, Kathryn H.

    2013-01-01

    In 2009, the American College of Sports Medicine convened an expert roundtable to issue guidelines on exercise for cancer survivors. This multidisciplinary group evaluated the strength of the evidence for the safety and benefits of exercise as a therapeutic intervention for survivors. The panel concluded that exercise is safe and offers myriad benefits for survivors including improvements in physical function, strength, fatigue, quality of life (QOL), and possibly recurrence and survival. Recommendations for situations in which deviations from the US Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans are appropriate were provided. Here, we outline a process for implementing the guidelines in clinical practice, and provide recommendations for how the oncology care provider can interface with the exercise and physical therapy community. PMID:22579268

  9. Holocaust survivors: three waves of resilience research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Roberta R; Hantman, Shira; Sharabi, Adi; Cohen, Harriet

    2012-01-01

    Three waves of resilience research have resulted in resilience-enhancing educational and therapeutic interventions. In the first wave of inquiry, researchers explored the traits and environmental characteristics that enabled people to overcome adversity. In the second wave, researchers investigated the processes related to stress and coping. In the third wave, studies examined how people grow and are transformed following adverse events, often leading to self-actualize, client creativity and spirituality. In this article the authors examined data from a study, "Forgiveness, Resiliency, and Survivorship among Holocaust Survivors" funded by the John Templeton Foundation ( Greene, Armour, Hantman, Graham, & Sharabi, 2010 ). About 65% of the survivors scored on the high side for resilience traits. Of the survivors, 78% engaged in processes considered resilient and felt they were transcendent or had engaged in behaviors that help them grow and change over the years since the Holocaust, including leaving a legacy and contributing to the community.

  10. Predictors of Suboptimal Follow-up in Pediatric Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Leana; Schwartz, David D; Frugé, Ernest; Laufman, Larry; Holm, Suzanne; Kamdar, Kala; Harris, Lynnette; Brackett, Julienne; Unal, Sule; Tanyildiz, Gulsah; Bryant, Rosalind; Suzawa, Hilary; Dreyer, Zoann; Okcu, M Fatih

    2017-04-01

    Attendance to follow-up care after completion of cancer treatment is an understudied area. We examined demographic, clinical, and socioeconomic predictors of follow-up by pediatric cancer patients at a large center in 442 newly diagnosed patients using multivariable logistic regression analyses. Patients who did not return to clinic for at least 1000 days were considered lost to follow-up. Two hundred forty-two (54.8%) patients were lost. In multivariable analyses, the following variables were independent predictors of being lost to follow-up: treatment with surgery alone (odds ratio [OR]=6.7; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.1-14.9), older age at diagnosis (reference, 0 to 4; ages, 5 to 9: OR=1.8, 95% CI, 1.1-3; ages, 10 to 14: OR=3.3; CI, 1.8-6.1; and ages, 15 and above: OR=4.8; CI, 2.1-11.7), lack of history of stem cell transplantation (OR=2, 95% CI, 1.04-3.7) and lack of insurance (OR=3.4; CI, 1.2-9.2). Hispanic patients had the best follow-up rates (53.7%) compared to whites and blacks (P=0.03). Attendance to long-term follow-up care is suboptimal in childhood cancer survivors. Predictors that were associated with nonattendance can be used to design targeted interventions to improve follow-up care for survivors of pediatric cancer.

  11. Humidifier disinfectant-associated children's interstitial lung disease: Computed tomographic features, histopathologic correlation and comparison between survivors and non-survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hee Mang; Lee, Jin Seong; Do, Kyung-Hyun; Jung, Ah Young; Yoon, Chong Hyun; Cho, Young Ah [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Eun; Hong, Soo-Jong [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seon-Ok [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Se-Jin [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Departments of Pathology, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    To report radiologic findings with histopathologic correlations of humidifier disinfectant-associated children's interstitial lung disease (HD-chILD) and to compare computed tomography (CT) findings between survivors and non-survivors. Forty-seven children with HD-chILD (27.4 ± 12.4 months old) were categorized as survivors (n = 25) and non-survivors (n = 22). The patterns, distributions, and chronological changes in lung lesions at follow-up CT were investigated. Histopathologic correlations were performed in 23 patients. CT features were characterized by chronological changes, from consolidation to centrilobular opacities, and lesions eventually became faint centrilobular nodules. Histopathologic features were bronchocentric-distributed fibro-inflammatory lesions, which were more profound in the advanced stage than the early stage. Consolidation ≥30 % [hazard ratio (HR), 2.932], centrilobular opacities ≥60 % of the total lung volume (TLV; HR, 0.206) and spontaneous air leaks (HR, 3.457) were significant factors associated with patient survival, as per univariate analysis. Consolidation ≥30 % (HR, 3.519), centrilobular opacities ≥60 % (HR, 0.205) and diffuse ground glass opacity (GGO) ≥70 % of the TLV (HR, 3.521) were significant factors associated with patient survival, as determined via multivariate analysis. Distinctive chronological CT features were observed in the HD-chILD images. Spontaneous air leaks, consolidation, GGO, and centrilobular opacities were prognostic factors. (orig.)

  12. Daily physical activity patterns in cancer survivors: a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmerman, Josien; Kurvers, R.; Bloo, H.; Hermens, Hermanus J.; Vollenbroek-Hutten, Miriam Marie Rosé

    2011-01-01

    In cancer survivors physical activity levels are measured primarily with questionnaires. As a result, insight in actual physical activity patterns of cancer survivors is lacking. Activity monitoring with accelerometers revealed that cancer survivors have lower levels of physical activity in the

  13. Participants' Perception of Therapeutic Factors in Groups for Incest Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Inese; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Investigated member-perceived curative factors in an incest-survivor group, comparing therapeutic factors reported in closed, time-limited incest survivor group to those in Bonney et al.'s open, long-term survivor group and to Yalom's therapy groups. Findings suggest that relative importance of curative factors may be related to group stages.…

  14. Counseling Survivors of Suicide: Implications for Group Postvention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Maureen M.; Freeman, Stephen J.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses bereavement and mourning and reviews group applications for the resolution of uncomplicated grief. Presents studies that describe grief experiences of suicide survivors and community reaction to survivors. Argues that a structured group experience, where support is provided by other survivors, gives optimal help to people bereaved by…

  15. Cancer survivor identity shared in a social media intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hayeon; Nam, Yujung; Gould, Jessica; Sanders, W Scott; McLaughlin, Margaret; Fulk, Janet; Meeske, Kathleen A; Ruccione, Kathleen S

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates how cancer survivors construct their identities and the impact on their psychological health, as measured by depression and survivor self-efficacy. Fourteen young adult survivors of pediatric cancer participated in a customized social networking and video blog intervention program, the LIFECommunity, over a 6-month period. Survivors were asked to share their stories on various topics by posting video messages. Those video blog postings, along with survey data collected from participants, were analyzed to see how cancer survivors expressed their identities, and how these identities are associated with survivors' psychosocial outcomes. In survivors who held negative stereotypes about cancer survivors, there was a positive relationship with depression while positive stereotypes had a marginal association with cancer survivor efficacy. Findings indicate that although pediatric cancer survivors often do not publicly discuss a "cancer survivor identity," they do internalize both positive and negative stereotypes about cancer survivorship. It is important for practitioners to be aware of the long-term implications of cancer survivor identity and stereotypes.

  16. Severe acute kidney injury following cardiac surgery: short-term outcomes in patients undergoing continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pistolesi, Valentina; Di Napoli, Anteo; Fiaccadori, Enrico; Zeppilli, Laura; Polistena, Francesca; Sacco, Maria Itala; Regolisti, Giuseppe; Tritapepe, Luigi; Pierucci, Alessandro; Morabito, Santo

    2016-04-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) represents a major complication of cardiac surgery. Our aim was to evaluate, in patients undergoing continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) for cardiac surgery-associated AKI (CS-AKI), prognostic factors related to in-hospital survival and renal function recovery to independence from RRT. We conducted a retrospective analysis in patients with severe CS-AKI who underwent CRRT for at least 48 h. The sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score was calculated on a daily basis to evaluate illness severity throughout the intensive care unit (ICU) stay. In 264 patients (age 66.4 ± 11.7 years, 192 males), 30-day survival was 57.6 % while survival to discharge from the hospital was 40.5 %. Renal function recovery occurred in 96.3 % of survivors and in 13.4 % of non-survivors (p CRRT (SOFA-max) as independent prognostic factors for failure to recover renal function. Female gender was associated with a higher probability of survival, while higher serum creatinine at the start of CRRT, oliguria, sepsis and SOFA-max were independently associated with mortality. The subgroup of patients with a day-1 SOFA score above the median (≥10) showed a lower probability of survival and a lower cumulative incidence of renal function recovery. In a selected population of patients with severe CS-AKI requiring RRT, short-term outcomes appear strongly associated with the worst grade of illness severity during the first week of CRRT, thus reflecting the sequential occurrence of additional major complications during ICU stay. Renal function recovery and in-hospital survival appear mutually linked, sharing oliguria, sepsis and SOFA score as the main determinants of both outcomes.

  17. Late new morbidity in survivors of adolescent and young-adulthood brain tumors in Finland: a registry-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, Mirja Erika; Malila, Nea; Lähdesmäki, Tuire; Arola, Mikko; Grönroos, Marika; Matomäki, Jaakko; Lähteenmäki, Päivi Maria

    2015-10-01

    Brain tumors (BTs) in adolescence and young adulthood (AYA) differ from those in childhood or late adulthood. However, research concerning late effects in this particular survivor group is limited. This study evaluates late morbidity of survivors diagnosed in AYAs. We identified from the Finnish Cancer Registry all survivors diagnosed with BT at the ages 16-24 years between 1970 and 2004 (N = 315) and used data from the Hospital Discharge Registry to evaluate their late (≥5 y after diagnosis) morbidity requiring treatment in a specialized health care setting. A sibling cohort of BT patients diagnosed before the age of 25 years was used as a comparison cohort (N = 3615). The AYA BT survivors had an increased risk for late-appearing endocrine diseases (HR, 2.9; 95% CI, 1.1-8.0), psychiatric disorders (HR, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.2-3.2), diseases of the nervous system (HR, 9; 95% CI, 6.6-14.0), disorders of vision/hearing loss (HR, 3.6; 95% CI, 1.5-8.5), diseases of the circulatory system (HR, 4.9; 95% CI, 2.9-8.1), and diseases of the kidney (HR, 5.9; 95% CI, 2.5-14.1). Survivors with irradiation had an increased risk for diseases of the nervous system compared with non-irradiated survivors (HR, 3.3; 95% CI, 1.8-6.2). The cumulative prevalence for most of the diagnoses remained significantly increased for survivors even 20 years after cancer diagnosis. The AYA BT survivors have an increased risk of morbidity for multiple new outcomes for ≥5 years after their primary diagnosis. This emphasizes the need for structured late-effect follow-up for this patient group. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. The unmet emotional, care/support, and informational needs of adult survivors of pediatric malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Cheryl L; Zhu, Liang; Ojha, Rohit P; Li, Chenghong; Srivastava, Deo Kumar; Riley, Barth B; Hudson, Melissa M; Robison, Les L

    2016-08-01

    This study describes the prevalence and predisposing factors for potentially modifiable unmet emotional, care/support, and information needs among adult survivors of childhood malignancies. A randomly selected/stratified sample of participants in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS) responded to the CCSS-Needs Assessment Questionnaire (CCSS-NAQ) (n = 1189; mean [SD] current age, 39.7 [7.7], range = 26-61 years; 60.9 % women; mean [SD] years since diagnosis, 31.6 [4.7]). Survivors self-reported demographic information, health concerns, and needs; diagnosis/treatment data were obtained from medical records. Adjusted proportional risk ratios (prevalence ratios, PRs) were used to evaluate 77 separate needs. Fifty-four percent of survivors reported unmet psycho-emotional, 41 % coping, and 35 % care/support needs; 51, 35, and 33 %, respectively, reported unmet information needs related to cancer/treatment, the health care system, and surveillance. Female sex and annual income cancer-related anxiety/fear was associated with all needs, including a >6-fold increased prevalence for help dealing with "worry" (PR = 6.06; 95 % confidence interval [CI], 3.79-9.69) and anxiety (PR = 6.10; 95 % CI, 3.82-9.72) and a >5-fold increased prevalence for "needing to move on with life" (PR = 5.56; 95 % CI, 3.34-9.25) and dealing with "uncertainty about the future" (PR = 5.50; 95 % CI, 3.44-8.77). Radiation exposure and perceived health status were related to 42 and 29 needs, respectively. Demographic factors, disease/treatment characteristics, and intrapersonal factors can be used to profile survivors' unmet emotional, care/support, and information needs. These data can be used to enhance provider-survivor communication, identify at-risk subsamples, and appraise core intervention content.

  19. Reading skill in adult survivors of childhood brain tumor: a theory-based neurocognitive model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kristen M; King, Tricia Z; Jayakar, Reema; Morris, Robin D

    2014-05-01

    This study investigated the relationship between word reading and white matter (WM) integrity within a neuroanatomical-based reading system comparing adult survivors of childhood brain tumors and controls. It was predicted that the association between WM integrity and word reading would be mediated by processing speed, and this indirect effect would be moderated by group. Thirty-seven adult survivors of childhood brain tumor and typically developing adults participated (age M = 24.19 ± 4.51 years, 62% female). DTI Tractography identified the WM tract for 3 of the reading system connections: inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFOF), arcuate fasciculus (AF), and parietotemporal-occipitotemporal connection (PT-OT). Fractional anisotropy values (FA) of the PT-OT tract were significantly correlated with word reading in survivors and controls (r = .45, .58, respectively; p reading in survivors only (r = .59, p reading system in adults. The finding that processing speed was the mechanism by which WM was associated with reading in survivors is in alignment with the developmental cascade model. Current findings bolster the existing theory-based models of reading using innovative diffusion tensor imaging and moderated mediation statistical neurodevelopmental model, establishing the role of processing speed and specific WM pathway integrity in word reading skill.

  20. Influence of achieved paternity on quality of life in testicular cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoehr, Brigitte; Schachtner, Lydia; Pichler, Renate; Holzner, Bernhard; Giesinger, Johannes; Oberguggenberger, Anne; Leonhartsberger, Nicolai; Horninger, Wolfgang; Steiner, Hannes

    2013-04-01

    To investigate the influence of achieved/non-achieved paternity on quality of life (QoL) in testicular cancer (TC) survivors. We invited TC survivors treated at our department between 1989 and 2006 to complete a QoL assessment, including the European Organisation for the Research and Treatment of Cancer QoL questionnaire, EORTC QLQ-C30 (version 3.0©)/+ TC26, and follow-up questions. A total of 311 TC survivors answered the questionnaire, of whom 207 patients who did not desire paternity were excluded. The remaining 104 patients who stated a desire for paternity after TC treatment were further divided in group A (TC survivors who achieved paternity; n = 51) and group B (TC survivors who did not achieve paternity; n = 53). The data obtained were statistically analysed. Significant differences between groups regarding QoL were detected for social functioning (P = 0.002), emotional functioning (P = 0.001), general QoL (P = 0.018), fatigue (P = 0.025), pain (P = 0.01), sleeping problems (P = 0.024), treatment satisfaction (P = 0.039), financial aspects (P = 0.006), sexual problems (P = 0.017), body image problems (P paternity. Counselling patients early at diagnosis as well as using cryopreservation of semen in all potential patients before treatment (only excluding patients definitely claiming they do not wish to achieve paternity) should therefore be regarded as the standard of care. © 2012 BJU INTERNATIONAL.

  1. Balance Performance in Irradiated Survivors of Nasopharyngeal Cancer with and without Tai Chi Qigong Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley S. M. Fong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This cross-sectional exploratory study aimed to compare the one-leg-stance time and the six-minute walk distance among TC Qigong-trained NPC survivors, untrained NPC survivors, and healthy individuals. Twenty-five survivors of NPC with TC Qigong experience, 27 survivors of NPC without TC Qigong experience, and 68 healthy individuals formed the NPC-TC Qigong group, NPC-control group, and healthy-control group, respectively. The one-leg-stance (OLS timed test was conducted to assess the single-leg standing balance performance of the participants in four conditions: (1 standing on a stable surface with eyes open, (2 standing on a compliant surface with eyes open, (3 standing on a stable surface with eyes closed, and (4 standing on a compliant surface with eyes closed. The six-minute walk test (6MWT was used to determine the functional balance performance of the participants. Results showed that the NPC-control group had a shorter OLS time in all of the visual and supporting surface conditions than the healthy control group (P0.05. TC Qigong may be a rehabilitation exercise that improves somatosensory function and OLS balance performance among survivors of NPC.

  2. Fertility and cancer--a qualitative study of Australian cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penrose, Rebecca; Beatty, Lisa; Mattiske, Julie; Koczwara, Bogda

    2012-06-01

    This study aims to assess the fertility concerns among cancer survivors aged 50 and under as part of a larger study investigating the survivors' concerns regarding fertility, sexuality and parenting. Cancer survivors who were at least 1 month post-treatment were invited to a recorded interview. The patients were identified from an oncology database and invited to participate via letter or during clinic consultation. The participants were recruited until saturation of themes was achieved. Transcripts were coded thematically, with greater emphasis given to frequently raised themes. Twenty-five survivors (19 women) were interviewed. The median age was 37 (range 24-50). Median time since completion of treatment was 7 months. Twenty were married or in a relationship; 18 had children at the time of diagnosis. Two became pregnant after treatment. Four themes were identified: (1) Fertility represents more than child-bearing capacity: potential fertility loss was a concern for participants, irrespective of their desire for future children; (2) Assumed infertility: There was a tendency for participants to assume that they were infertile; (3) Lack of information regarding decision-making and fertility: The respondents reported a perceived lack of consideration of fertility at diagnosis by medical professionals, and this impacted upon the decision-making process; and (4) Participant recommendations: The respondents wanted more information and for support services to be offered. Fertility is an important concern for young cancer survivors. There is a need for strategies regarding information provision and support for cancer patients with regard to these concerns.

  3. Lottery ticket was more effective than a prize draw in increasing questionnaire response among cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, Frances J; O'Leary, Eamonn; Sharp, Linda

    2015-07-01

    Compare the effect of financial incentives on response to a cancer survivors' postal questionnaire. Prostate cancer survivors in Ireland, 1.5-18 years after diagnosis, were randomized to the (1) "lottery" arm [a € 1 lottery scratch card sent with the questionnaire (n = 2,413)] or (2) "prize" arm [entry into a draw on return of a completed questionnaire (n = 2,407)]. Impact of interventions on response overall and by survival period ("short term": lottery compared with the prize arm [multivariate relative risk (RR) = 1.06; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.00, 1.11]. When stratified by survival period, higher response in the lottery arm was only observed among long-term survivors (multivariate RR = 1.10; 95% CI: 1.02, 1.19; short-term survivors: RR = 1.01; 95% CI: 0.94, 1.09). Costs per completed questionnaire were € 4.54 and € 3.57 for the lottery and prize arms, respectively. Compared with the prize arm, cost per additional questionnaire returned in the lottery arm was € 25.65. Although more expensive, to optimize response to postal questionnaires among cancer survivors, researchers might consider inclusion of a lottery scratch card. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Return to work and work-related disability among AML survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samadi, Osai; Breunis, Henriette; Sandoval, Joanna; Akilan, Kosalan; Timilshina, Narhari; Alibhai, Shabbir M H

    2017-10-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive, acute-onset hematological malignancy. Greater use of intensive chemotherapy (IC), supportive care, and stem cell transplantation have led to an increasing number of long-term survivors. Few studies have examined employment issues among AML survivors and to our knowledge, no study has examined the long-term effects of treatment on return to work. This study is the first to utilize a validated measure of work-related limitation and productivity (WLQ-16) to assess the long-term effects of AML treatment on employment rates, work-related limitations, and overall productivity. We examined RTW issues in 111 adult AML 1-year survivors after conventional IC. We found that, over time, the number of employed survivors increased (to 54% by 36 months) while the number of unemployed, retired, and sick leave patients decreased. Among those employed, the majority were employed full time. Employed individuals reported few work-related limitations and productivity loss scores were low, ranging from 3.47% at 18 months to 2.34% at 36 months. These data suggest that, over time, over half of AML survivors who underwent IC regain social, emotional, cognitive, and physical function sufficient to RTW with few limitations.

  5. [Long-term analysis of disability pensions in survivors of the Holocaust: somatic and psychiatric diagnoses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biermann, T; Sperling, W; Müller, H; Schütz, P; Kornhuber, J; Reulbach, U

    2010-12-01

    Survivors of the Holocaust are known to suffer more often from mental as well as somatic consequential illness. The assessment of the degree of disability and invalidity due to the persecution complies with the interaction of directly Holocaust-related mental and somatic primary injuries as well as physical, psychical and psychosocial disadvantages and illnesses acquired later on. The presented descriptive as well as multivariate analyses included complete reports (expertise, medical records, physicians' assessments, witnessed hand-written notes of the patients) of 56 survivors of the Holocaust (36 women and 20 men). The disability pension reports of 56 Holocaust survivors (36 women and 20 men) were analysed referring to the diagnostic groups and socio-demographic aspects. In 92.3 % a psychiatric illness could be diagnosed within the first year after liberation. In a separate analysis of somatic diagnoses, gastrointestinal diseases were statistically significant more often in Holocaust survivors with a degree of disability of more than 30 % (chi-square χ (2) = 4.0; df = 1; p = 0.046). The question of an aggravation of psychiatrically relevant and persecution-associated symptomatology is mainly the objective of the expert opinion taking into account endogenous and exogenous factors such as so-called life events. Above all, newly acquired somatic diseases seem to be responsible for an aggravation of persecution-associated psychiatric symptoms, at least in the presented sample of Holocaust survivors. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. The impact of BMI on quality of life in obese endometrial cancer survivors: does size matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, Anke; Lopes, Alberto; Das, Nagindra; Bekkers, Ruud; Galaal, Khadra

    2014-01-01

    Survivorship and quality of life issues are becoming increasingly relevant in endometrial cancer as a result of the marked increase in incidence of the disease combined with excellent and improving long term survival. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of obesity on quality of life (QoL) in endometrial cancer survivors. Participants were endometrioid endometrial cancer survivors diagnosed between 2008 and 2013. Quality of life was measured through the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) quality of life questionnaire (QLQ-C30, version 3.0). Associations between BMI and quality of life were determined by means of multivariate analyses. 322 women diagnosed with endometrioid endometrial cancer were invited to participate. Excluded were 15 women with unknown BMI, 40 with non-endometrioid histology and 10 with concurrent cancer. The QLQ-C30 questionnaire was completed by 158 (61.5%) women, of which 63 women (40%) were obese (BMI ≥ 30-39.9), and 30 women (19%) were morbidly obese (BMI ≥ 40). Morbidly obese women reported worse physical, role and social functioning and more somatic complaints. Morbid obesity is associated with poorer quality of life in endometrial cancer survivors. Life style interventions such as exercise programs and diet interventions could be viable means to improve the quality of life of obese endometrial cancer survivors. Future research should focus on means to improve quality of life in obese endometrial cancer survivors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Conscious Sedation Efficacy of 0.3 and 0.5 mg/kg Oral Midazolam for Three to Six Year-Old Uncooperative Children Undergoing Dental Treatment: A Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Fallahinejad Ghajari

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Midazolam with variable dosages has been used to induce sedation in pediatric dentistry. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of two dosages of oral midazolam for conscious sedation of children undergoing dental treatment.Materials and Methods: In this randomized crossover double blind clinical trial, 20 healthy children (ASA I aged three to six years with negative or definitely negative Frankl behavioral rating scale were evaluated. Half of the children received 0.5mg/kg oral midazolam plus 1mg/kg hydroxyzine (A orally in the first session and 0.3mg/kg oral midazolam plus 1mg/kg hydroxyzine (B in the next session. The other half received the drugs on a reverse order. Sedation degree by Houpt sedation rating scale, heart rate and level of SpO2 were assessed at the beginning and after 15 and 30 minutes. The data were analyzed using SPSS 19 and Wilcoxon Signed Rank and McNemar’s tests.Results: The results showed that although administration of 0.5mg/kg oral midazolam was slightly superior to 0.3mg/kg oral midazolam in terms of sedation efficacy, the differences were not significant (P>0.05. The difference in treatment success was not significant either (P>0.05. Heart rate, oxygen saturation (SpO2 and respiratory rate were within the normal range and did not show a significant change (P>0.05.Conclusions: The overall success rate of the two drug combinations namely 0.5mg/kg oral midazolam plus hydroxyzine and 0.3mg/kg oral midazolam plus hydroxyzine was not significantly different for management of pediatric patients.Keywords: Conscious Sedation; Pediatric Dentistry; Midazolam; Hydroxyzine

  8. Profile and health-related quality of life of Ghanaian stroke survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donkor, Eric S; Owolabi, Mayowa O; Bampoh, Patrick O; Amoo, Philip K; Aspelund, Thor; Gudnason, Vilmundur

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of mortality with a major effect on health-related quality of life (HRQoL). There are no previous studies exploring HRQoL among stroke survivors in Ghana, despite the increasing public health significance of the disease in this country. Here we describe the profile of and factors associated with HRQoL among stroke survivors in Ghana. This was a cross-sectional study involving 156 stroke survivors and 156 age- and sex-matched, apparently healthy controls. A robust HRQoL questionnaire involving seven domains was used to collect data from the study participants. Clinical epidemiology data were also collected from stroke survivors on parameters such as stroke severity and risk factors. Statistical analyses were performed on the interrelationships among the study variables. The mean ages of the stroke survivors and healthy controls were 58.0 (standard deviation, 11.4) and 57.6 (standard deviation, 12.0) years, respectively. Fifty-three percent (86) of the stroke survivors had mild stroke and 35.3% (55) had moderate stroke, whereas 12.2% (19) had severe stroke. Ischemic infarction was the prevalent stroke subtype (78.1%). Hypertension was the most common risk factor (89%) among the stroke survivors, followed by diabetes (29%). HRQoL scores ranged from 57.7% (cognitive domain) to 80.0% (spirit domain) for stroke survivors, whereas HRQoL scores of the control group ranged from 65.6% (cognitive domain) to 85.2% (soul domain). For each HRQoL domain, significantly higher scores were observed for the control group compared with the stroke survivors, at Panalysis included age, stroke severity, poststroke duration, stroke recurrence, frequency of laughter, and negative emotions. The most affected HRQoL domains are of the physical, psychoemotional, and cognitive domains. Rehabilitation of stroke patients in this region should include interventions targeted at these domains and modifying the statistical determinants of HRQoL where possible.

  9. Myotonic dystrophy mimicking postpolio syndrome in a polio survivor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jae-Young; Kim, Kyoung-Eun; Choe, Gheeyoung

    2009-02-01

    We describe a 38-yr-old polio survivor with newly developed weakness from myotonic dystrophy. He suffered muscle atrophy and weakness in his legs as a result of poliomyelitis at the age of 3 yrs. After a stable interval of about 30 yrs, he felt new weakness and fatigue in his legs. Electromyography revealed generalized myotonic discharges, early recruitment, and findings of chronic denervation in his left leg. Genetic testing was consistent with myotonic dystrophy type 1. A biopsy from the right gastrocnemius revealed findings of both myotonic dystrophy and chronic denervation. This case report shows the importance of considering other uncommon conditions in the differential diagnoses of postpolio syndrome.

  10. Profiles of resilient survivors of institutional abuse in Ireland

    OpenAIRE

    Flanagan, Edel; CARR, ALAN; Dooley, Barbara A.; Fitzpatrick, Mark; Flanagan-Howard, Roisín; Shevlin, Mark; Tierney, Kevin; White, Megan; Daly, Margaret; EGAN, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    In a group of 247 survivors of institutional abuse in Ireland, 45 cases (18%) did not meet the diagnostic criteria for common DSM IV axis I or II disorders. This resilient group was compared with a poorly adjusted group of 119 participants who met the criteria for 1-3 DSM IV axis I or II diagnoses, and a very poorly adjusted group of 83 participants who had 4 or more disorders. Compared with the very poorly adjusted group, the resilient group was older and of higher socio-economic status; had...

  11. Health status and health resource use among long-term survivors of breast, colorectal and prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, Tàrsila; Aliste, Luisa; Valverde, Montserrat; Fernández, M Paz; Ballano, Concepción; Borràs, Josep M

    2014-01-01

    The growing number of long-term cancer survivors poses a new challenge to health care systems. In Spain, follow-up is usually carried out in oncology services, but knowledge of cancer survivors' health care needs in this context is limited. The purpose of this study was to ascertain the health status of long-term survivors of breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer and to characterize their use of health care services. Retrospective multicenter cohort study. We collected data from patients' clinical histories and through telephone interviews, using a specially designed questionnaire that included the SF-36v2 Quality of Life and Nottingham Health Profile scales. The questionnaire was completed by 51.2% (n= 583) of the potential sample. No significant differences were observed between 5-year and 10-year survivors. Overall, more than 80% of respondents were undergoing drug treatment for morbidity related to advanced age. Quality of life was good in most patients, and cancer-related morbidity was low and of little complexity. For the most part, participants reported using primary care services for care of chronic diseases and opportunistic treatment of sequelae related to the cancer treatment. Oncological follow-up was centralized at the hospital. Survivors of breast, prostate and colorectal cancer with tumoral detection at an early stage and without recurrences or second neoplasms experienced little morbidity and enjoyed good quality of life. This study proposes exploration of a follow-up model in the Spanish health system in which primary care plays a more important role than is customary in cancer survivors in Spain. Copyright © 2013 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Analysis of Risk Factors for Abnormal Pulmonary Function in Pediatric Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Record, Elizabeth; Williamson, Rebecca; Wasilewski-Masker, Karen; Mertens, Ann C; Meacham, Lillian R; Popler, Jonathan

    2016-07-01

    Childhood cancer survivors are at increased risk for pulmonary-related morbidity and mortality. The Children's Oncology Group Long-Term Follow-Up (COG-LTFU) guidelines recommend pulmonary function testing after treatment with bleomycin, busulfan, carmustine, lomustine, thoracic radiation, bone marrow transplant, or pulmonary surgery. The aim of this analysis was to determine the prevalence of pulmonary function abnormalities in a pediatric survivor cohort. Patients ≥5 years old seen in our survivor clinic with at least one exposure outlined by COG-LFTU Guidelines were included. Original pulmonary function test (PFT) results were obtained and blindly reinterpreted by a single reviewer. Demographic, diagnosis, treatment factors, and clinical and/or patient-reported symptoms of cough, wheeze, and/or dyspnea were abstracted from their medical record. Overall, 143 (63.3%) survivors had PFT results available; 55.2% were male, 49.7% were white, and the mean age was 14.1 ± 4.8 years. Abnormal PFTs were found in 65.0% (n = 93) with 21.0% having multiple abnormalities. Specifically, 41.3% had hyperinflation, 25.9% had obstructive, and 13.3% had restrictive disease. Patients diagnosed at pulmonary abnormality (P = 0.04); a majority of those diagnosed pulmonary surgery or thoracic radiation. Regardless of the presence of a PFT abnormality, more than 80% of survivors were asymptomatic (82.9% vs.81.5%; P-value = 0.54). Almost two-thirds of survivors screened per the COG-LTFU Guidelines had an abnormal PFT but a majority reported no clinical symptoms. Hyperinflation was the most prevalent abnormality. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Benzodiazepine Use in Breast Cancer Survivors: Findings from a Consecutive Series of 1,000 Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Rakhee; Sood, Richa; Karlin, Nina; Jatoi, Aminah

    2011-01-01

    Objective This study reports the percentage of breast cancer survivors receiving ongoing benzodiazepines and the circumstances surrounding their usage. Methods The medical records of 1,000 consecutive breast cancer survivors who were no longer receiving adjuvant chemotherapy were reviewed. Results Among those patients, 7.9% (95% confidence interval 6.2–9.6; higher than the 3% rate in the general population) were receiving benzodiazepines. Lorazepam was most commonly prescribed. Sixty-eight patients were cancer free at their last visit, and 51 had not been taking benzodiazepines prior to their cancer diagnosis. Anxiety was the single most frequent reason for initiating and continuing benzodiazepines. Conclusion Anxiety appears to be a common explanation for relatively high rates of benzodiazepine use in breast cancer survivors. This finding merits further study. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel PMID:21894050

  14. Risk factors of posttraumatic stress disorder among survivors after the 512 Wenchuan earthquake in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuqing Zhang

    Full Text Available This study investigated the psychological reactions of survivors of the 512 Wenchuan earthquake in China and the risk factors associated with those reactions. The Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R, Type D Scale-14 (DS14, a self-developed trauma experience questionniare, and a demographic questionnaire were administered to 956 earthquake survivors (389 males and 567 females in Mianzhu, one of the cities most affected by the earthquake. The results showed that postraumatic stress disorder (PTSD symptoms affected 84.8% of survivors one to two months after the earthquake. Significant risk factors associated with PTSD symptoms included: (1 being female; (2 older age; (3 higher exposure to traumatic events during the earthquake; and (4 negative affect in Type-D personality.

  15. Risk factors of posttraumatic stress disorder among survivors after the 512 Wenchuan earthquake in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuqing; Ho, Samuel M Y

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the psychological reactions of survivors of the 512 Wenchuan earthquake in China and the risk factors associated with those reactions. The Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R), Type D Scale-14 (DS14), a self-developed trauma experience questionniare, and a demographic questionnaire were administered to 956 earthquake survivors (389 males and 567 females) in Mianzhu, one of the cities most affected by the earthquake. The results showed that postraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms affected 84.8% of survivors one to two months after the earthquake. Significant risk factors associated with PTSD symptoms included: (1) being female; (2) older age; (3) higher exposure to traumatic events during the earthquake; and (4) negative affect in Type-D personality.

  16. Prevalence and demographic distribution of adult survivors of child abuse in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuboi, Satoshi; Yoshida, Honami; Ae, Ryusuke; Kojo, Takao; Nakamura, Yosikazu; Kitamura, Kunio

    2015-03-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted with a national epidemiological survey to investigate the prevalence and demographic distribution of adult survivors of child abuse in Japan. A self-administered questionnaire was used to measure the history of child abuse and the demographic characteristics. The participants reported the following 4 types of child abuse: physical abuse (3%), sexual abuse (0.6%), neglect (0.8%), and psychological abuse (4%). Significant unequal distribution of child abuse was found to be associated with sex, living region, marital status, job status, and educational status. We determined the prevalence of adult survivors of child abuse in Japan and found that their demographic characteristics were unequally distributed. Policy makers and public health providers should take these demographic disparities into account in considering effective public health interventions for survivors of child abuse. © 2013 APJPH.

  17. Two-year outcomes in initial survivors with acute liver failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fontana, Robert J; Ellerbe, Caitlyn; Durkalski, Valerie E

    2015-01-01

    likely to be employed and have a higher educational level (P relate to pre-existing medical comorbidities. Spontaneous survivors with APAP overdose......BACKGROUND & AIMS: The long-term clinical outcomes in initial survivors with acute liver failure (ALF) are not well known. The aim of this study was to provide an overview of the 2-year clinical outcomes among initial survivors and liver transplant (LT) recipients that were alive 3 weeks after...... enrolment in the Acute Liver Failure Study Group (ALFSG). METHODS: Outcomes in adult ALFSG patients that were enrolled between 1998 and 2010 were reviewed. RESULTS: Two-year patient survival was significantly higher in the 262 LT recipients (92.4%) compared to the 306 acetaminophen (APAP) spontaneous...

  18. Breast Cancer Survivors, Common Markers of Inflammation, and Exercise: A Narrative Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Robert Coleman

    2017-01-01

    Exercise may help positively improve inflammatory marker levels, therefore promoting better outcomes in breast cancer survivors. This narrative review is intended to provide an overview between inflammation and breast cancer, in addition to the effects exercise may have on common inflammatory markers that have been examined in both healthy populations and breast cancer survivors throughout the literature. The inconsistencies and gaps in the literature addressed may be important for future research to further understand the relationship between exercise and inflammation, as well as the underlying biological mechanisms that are responsible for these changes. For the purpose of organization, this review is structured into the following sections: (1) Breast Cancer Facts, Treatment-Related Side Effects, and General Exercise Benefits; (2) Effects of Exercise on Markers of Inflammation in Cancer-Free Populations; (3) Cancer and Markers of Inflammation; (4) Effects of Exercise on Markers of Inflammation in Breast Cancer Survivors; and (5) Conclusions. PMID:29434469

  19. Knowledge, Awareness, Perceptions, and Use of Emergency Contraceptives among Survivors of Intimate Partner Violence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen J. Wilder

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The study examines emergency contraception (EC knowledge, awareness, perceptions, and prior use and identifies predictors of EC use among a sample of survivors of intimate partner violence (IPV. The majority (66.2% of 154 survivors at risk of pregnancy reported EC awareness, only 15.3% reported prior EC use. Logistic regression identified perceived abusive intimate partner approval (OR = 2.25; 95% CI = 1.15–4.41 and lack of moral/religious objections (OR = 12.83; 95% CI = 5.48–30.03 as the strongest predictors of EC use. Health care provider interventions acknowledging barriers to EC use, such as partner approval, and education that improves awareness of and knowledge about EC, may have the impact of empowering survivors in their reproductive choices, reducing unwanted pregnancies.

  20. Knowledge, Awareness, Perceptions, and Use of Emergency Contraceptives among Survivors of Intimate Partner Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder, Kathleen J.; Guise, Jeane-Marie; Perrin, Nancy A.; Hanson, Ginger C.; Hernandez, Rebecca; Glass, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    The study examines emergency contraception (EC) knowledge, awareness, perceptions, and prior use and identifies predictors of EC use among a sample of survivors of intimate partner violence (IPV). The majority (66.2%) of 154 survivors at risk of pregnancy reported EC awareness, only 15.3% reported prior EC use. Logistic regression identified perceived abusive intimate partner approval (OR = 2.25; 95% CI = 1.15–4.41) and lack of moral/religious objections (OR = 12.83; 95% CI = 5.48–30.03) as the strongest predictors of EC use. Health care provider interventions acknowledging barriers to EC use, such as partner approval, and education that improves awareness of and knowledge about EC, may have the impact of empowering survivors in their reproductive choices, reducing unwanted pregnancies. PMID:19960056

  1. Infradiaphragmatic irradiation and high procarbazine doses increase colorectal cancer risk in Hodgkin lymphoma survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Eggermond, Anna M; Schaapveld, Michael; Janus, Cécile Pm

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors are at increased risk of second malignancies, but few studies have assessed colorectal cancer (CRC) risk after HL treatment. We assessed long-term, subsite-specific CRC risk associated with specific radiation fields and chemotherapy regimens. METHODS...... a hazard ratio of 6.8 (95%CI: 3.0-15.6) compared with patients receiving neither treatment, which is significantly higher than an additive joint effect (Padditivity=0.004). CONCLUSIONS: Colorectal cancer surveillance should be considered for HL survivors who received Infradiaphragmatic radiotherapy......: In a Dutch cohort of 3121 5-year HL survivors treated between 1965 and 1995, subsite-specific CRC incidence was compared with general population rates. Treatment effects were quantified by Cox regression analyses. RESULTS: After a median follow-up of 22.9 years, 55 patients developed CRC. The standardized...

  2. Knowledge, Awareness, Perceptions, and Use of Emergency Contraceptives among Survivors of Intimate Partner Violence

    OpenAIRE

    Wilder, Kathleen J.; Jeane-Marie Guise; Perrin, Nancy A.; Hanson, Ginger C; Rebecca Hernandez; Nancy Glass

    2009-01-01

    The study examines emergency contraception (EC) knowledge, awareness, perceptions, and prior use and identifies predictors of EC use among a sample of survivors of intimate partner violence (IPV). The majority (66.2%) of 154 survivors at risk of pregnancy reported EC awareness, only 15.3% reported prior EC use. Logistic regression identified perceived abusive intimate partner approval (OR = 2.25; 95% CI = 1.15–4.41) and lack of moral/religious objections (OR = 12.83; 95% CI = 5.48–30.03) as t...

  3. Educational achievement, employment, smoking, marital, and insurance statuses in long-term survivors of childhood malignant solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yağci-Küpeli, Begül; Yalçin, Bilgehan; Küpeli, Serhan; Varan, Ali; Akyüz, Canan; Kutluk, Tezer; Büyükpamukçu, Münevver

    2013-03-01

    Survivors of childhood cancer experience many social adaptation problems. We aimed to identify social, educational, and occupational issues of this growing population. Survivors treated for childhood malignant solid tumors who were older than 18 years and in remission for at least 3 years were surveyed. The educational achievement, employment, type of habitation, marital status, parenthood, social insurance, and smoking status of the patients were inquired and recorded. Two hundred one patients (126 male patients/75 female patients) were included in the study between 2007 and 2009. The median ages at the time of diagnosis and at the time of study were 10 years (range, 0 to 19 y) and 23 years (range, 18 to 39 y), respectively. The median follow-up duration was 13.5 years (range, 3 to 31 y). Nearly half of the participants were lymphoma survivors. One hundred eleven (55.5%) survivors were high school graduates and 47 (23%) were university graduates. Unemployment rate was 36.8%. Public social insurance rate was 90.5%. Fifty-three (26.4%) survivors had independent habitation. Thirty percent of survivors were married and 7.5% had at least 1 child. Marriage rates were significantly higher in survivors who were older than 23 years, had a follow-up duration of >13 years, had a job, and lived independently (for each parameter P=0.001). University degree was significantly lower in survivors who were treated for central nervous system tumors. Our results have drawn a more marked picture with lower educational achievement and marital rates when compared with the results of large survivorship studies conducted in developed countries. However, they can be interpreted as intriguing when limited resources are taken into account.

  4. SUBSEQUENT NEOPLASMS OF THE CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM AMONG SURVIVORS OF CHILDHOOD CANCER: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Daniel C.; Nathan, Paul C.; Constine, Louis; Woodman, Catherine; Bhatia, Smita; Keller, Karen; Bashore, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Childhood cancer survivors are at risk for development of subsequent neoplasms of the central nervous system (CNS). Better understanding of the rates, risk factors for and outcomes of subsequent neoplasms of the CNS among survivors of childhood cancer may lead to the development of more informed screening guidelines. Two independent investigators independently performed a systematic search of studies from the MEDLINE and EMBASE databases (1966 – 2012) for studies examining subsequent neoplasms of the CNS among childhood cancer survivors. Articles were selected to answer 3 questions: What is the risk of CNS tumors following radiation to the cranium for a pediatric cancer as compared with the general population? What are the outcomes in children with subsequent neoplasms of the CNS who have been treated with CNS directed radiation for a pediatric cancer? Are outcomes of subsequent neoplasms different from primary neoplasms of the same histology? Our search identified 72 reports, of which 18 publications were included in this review. These studies reported that childhood cancer survivors have an 8.1 – 52.3 times higher incidence of subsequent CNS neoplasms compared with the general population. Nearly all cancer survivors who developed a CNS neoplasm had been exposed to cranial radiation; some studies demonstrate a correlation between radiation dose and risk of subsequent CNS tumors. Five year survival rates for subsequent high-grade gliomas and meningiomas range from 0 – 19.5% and 73 – 100%, respectively, which are similar to those observed in patients with primary gliomas or meningiomas. The quality of evidence was limited by variation in study design, heterogeneity of details regarding treatment and outcomes, limited follow-up and relatively small sample sizes. We concluded that survivors of childhood cancer who were treated with cranial radiation therapy have an elevated risk for subsequent CNS neoplasms. The current literature is insufficient to comment

  5. Follow-up care of young childhood cancer survivors: attendance and parental involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetsch, Janine; Rueegg, Corina S; Mader, Luzius; Bergstraesser, Eva; Rischewski, Johannes; Kuehni, Claudia E; Michel, Gisela

    2016-07-01

    Despite recommendations, only a proportion of long-term childhood cancer survivors attend follow-up care. We aimed to (1) describe the follow-up attendance of young survivors aged 11-17 years; (2) describe the parental involvement in follow-up, and (3) investigate predictors of follow-up attendance and parental involvement. As part of the Swiss Childhood Cancer Survivor Study, a follow-up questionnaire was sent to parents of childhood cancer survivors aged 11-17 years. We assessed follow-up attendance of the child, parents' involvement in follow-up, illness perception (Brief IPQ), and sociodemographic data. Clinical data was available from the Swiss Childhood Cancer Registry. Of 309 eligible parents, 189 responded (67 %; mean time since diagnosis 11.3 years, range 6.8-17.2) and 75 % (n = 141) reported that their child still attended follow-up. Of these, 83 % (n = 117) reported ≥1 visit per year and 17 % (n = 23) reported survivors saw pediatric oncologists (n = 111; 79 % of 141), followed by endocrinologists (n = 24, 17 %) and general practitioners (n = 22, 16 %). Most parents (92 %) reported being involved in follow-up (n = 130). In multivariable and Cox regression analyses, longer time since diagnosis (p = 0.025) and lower perceived treatment control (assessed by IPQ4: how much parents thought follow-up can help with late effects; p = 0.009) were associated with non-attendance. Parents' overall information needs was significantly associated with parental involvement in the multivariable model (p = 0.041). Educating survivors and their parents on the importance and effectiveness of follow-up care might increase attendance in the longer term.

  6. Holocaust survivors: the pain behind the agony. Increased prevalence of fibromyalgia among Holocaust survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablin, J N; Cohen, H; Eisinger, M; Buskila, D

    2010-01-01

    To assess the frequency of fibromyalgia among a population of Holocaust survivors in Israel as well as the occurrence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and concurrent psychiatric symptoms, including depression and anxiety among survivors. Eighty-three survivors of the Nazi Holocaust and 65 age-matched individuals not exposed to Nazi occupation were recruited. Physical examination and manual tender point assessment was performed for the establishment of the diagnosis of fibromyalgia and information was collected regarding quality of life (SF-36), physical function and health (FIQ), psychiatric symptoms (SCL-90) and PTSD symptoms (CAPS). Significantly increased rates of fibromyalgia were identified among Holocaust survivors compared with controls (23.81% vs. 10.94, p<0.05). Significantly increased rates of posttraumatic symptoms and measures of mental distress were also identified among survivors. The results indicate a significantly increased prevalence of fibromyalgia among Holocaust survivors six decades after the end of the Second World War. This finding furthers our knowledge regarding the long-term effect of stress on the development of fibromyalgia.

  7. Adult survivors of childhood sexual abuse: survivor's disclosure and nurse therapist's response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, P L; Varvaro, F F; Connors, R; Regan-Kubinski, M J

    1994-12-01

    Recent literature pertinent to adult survivors suggests that childhood sexual abuse is a serious problem, and that disclosure is on the rise. The aftereffects of childhood sexual abuse can cause dysfunction in various aspects of the survivor's physical and mental health. Understanding the traumagenic dynamics of childhood sexual abuse and its aftereffects provides direction for the nurse therapist during both the client's disclosure and intervention planning. This knowledge assists the therapist in promoting mental health and healing, as well as providing comfort for the therapist. The nurse therapist's reactions to the client's disclosure can affect the way the client feels about disclosure and the therapeutic relationship. If a negative message is conveyed to the survivor at the time of disclosure, the feelings of betrayal, stigmatization, and powerlessness that the survivor experienced as a child will be replicated. This can damage the therapeutic relationship and delay the healing process. When disclosure is received and acted upon in a sensitive, therapeutic manner, the survivor is empowered and can enter with the nurse therapist into an effective therapeutic alliance. Nurse therapists should gain awareness of the types of emotional responses that can be engendered in the health professional during disclosure. Awareness of these emotional reactions can lead to the identification of coping strategies useful to both the therapist and the adult survivor. Coping strategies useful to the therapist include maintaining adequate boundaries, understanding oneself and one's responses to sexual-abuse issues, utilizing ongoing consultation or supervision, and preventing burnout.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Financial Burden in Survivors of Childhood Cancer: A Report From the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nipp, Ryan D; Kirchhoff, Anne C; Fair, Douglas; Rabin, Julia; Hyland, Kelly A; Kuhlthau, Karen; Perez, Giselle K; Robison, Leslie L; Armstrong, Gregory T; Nathan, Paul C; Oeffinger, Kevin C; Leisenring, Wendy M; Park, Elyse R

    2017-10-20

    Purpose Survivors of childhood cancer may experience financial burden as a result of health care costs, particularly because these patients often require long-term medical care. We sought to evaluate the prevalence of financial burden and identify associations between a higher percentage of income spent on out-of-pocket medical costs (≥ 10% of annual income) and issues related to financial burden (jeopardizing care or changing lifestyle) among survivors of childhood cancer and a sibling comparison group. Methods Between May 2011 and April 2012, we surveyed an age-stratified, random sample of survivors of childhood cancer and a sibling comparison group who were enrolled in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study. Participants reported their household income, out-of-pocket medical costs, and issues related to financial burden (questions were adapted from national surveys on financial burden). Logistic regression identified associations between participant characteristics, a higher percentage of income spent on out-of-pocket medical costs, and financial burden, adjusting for potential confounders. Results Among 580 survivors of childhood cancer and 173 siblings, survivors of childhood cancer were more likely to have out-of-pocket medical costs ≥ 10% of annual income (10.0% v 2.9%; P report spending a higher percentage of their income on out-of-pocket medical costs, which may influence their health-seeking behavior and potentially affect health outcomes. Our findings highlight the need to address financial burden in this population with long-term health care needs.

  9. Community reintegration among stroke survivors in Osun ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background Stroke is a major neurological problem and a leading cause of disability in the elderly in Nigeria. The incidence is increasing due to increasing risk factors, but many stroke victims now survive because of improved medical care. These survivors become community-dwellers after inpatient rehabilitation. Aims To ...

  10. Survivors of Downsizing: Helpful and Hindering Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amundson, Norman E.; Borgen, William A.; Jordan, Sharalyn; Erlebach, Anne C.

    2004-01-01

    Thirty-one downsizing survivors from both the private and public sector were interviewed to determine incidents that either helped or hindered their transition through 1 or more organizational downsizings. A critical incident technique was used to analyze and organize the data around themes that emerged, themes were represented by both positive…

  11. Esophageal atresia: comparison between survivors and mortality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The places of study were Bahrami Hospital and Children's Medical Center, two referral centers for pediatric surgery in Tehran. The duration of the study was 2 years, starting from April 1999. Survivors and mortality cases were compared with regard to sex, type of surgery, suture material, and technique of anastomosis.

  12. Subsequent Reproductive Performance in Survivors of Complicated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There were 2 cases of postpartum hemorrhage. 103 (44%) of the subjects who still desired pregnancy were yet unable to conceive. Conclusions The subsequent reproductive performance in survivors of complicated abortion appears to be largely characterized by a high rate of sub-fertility, fetal wastage and preterm ...

  13. The survivors of childhood solid tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, M.C.; Thompson, E.I.; Simone, J.V. (St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (USA))

    1991-04-01

    With the improvement in cancer therapy in recent years, the number of cancer survivors is rapidly increasing. Potential late medical and psychosocial sequelae of cancer therapy are reviewed. A practical guide for the primary health care giver is provided. 161 refs.

  14. Differentiating incest survivors who self-mutilate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turell, S C; Armsworth, M W

    2000-02-01

    This study was an exploratory analysis of the variables which differentiated incest survivors who self-mutilate from those who do not. A sample of women incest survivors (N = 84) were divided into two groups based on the presence or absence of self-mutilation. Participants included both community and clinical populations. A packet consisting of a demographic questionnaire, Sexual Attitudes Survey, Diagnostic Inventory of Personality and Symptoms, Dissociative Events Scale and the Beck Depression Inventory was completed by each participant. Demographic, incest, and family of origin variables distinguished the self-mutilating women from those who did not. These include ethnicity and educational experiences; duration, frequency, and perpetrator characteristics regarding the incest; and multiple abuses, instability, birth order, and loss of mother in one's family of origin. Psychological and physical health concerns also differentiated between the two groups. Many variables may differentiate between women incest survivors who self-mutilate from those who do not. A rudimentary checklist to describe the lives of incest survivors who self-mutilate resulted from these findings. The importance of the concept of embodiment is also discussed.

  15. A Spiritual Framework in Incest Survivors Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beveridge, Kelli; Cheung, Monit

    2004-01-01

    Through an examination of recent incest treatment development, this article emphasizes the theoretical concept of "integration" within the treatment process for female adult incest survivors. Spirituality as a therapeutic foundation is discussed with examples of therapeutic techniques. A case study illustrates the psycho-spiritual process of…

  16. Endocrine sequelae in childhood cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casano Sancho, Paula

    2017-11-01

    Thanks to the advances in cancer treatment, the five-year survival rate after childhood cancer has increased up to 80%. Therefore 1/500 young adults will be a survivor. Endocrine sequelae are most common, affecting 40-60% of survivors. The most frequent sequelae include growth failure and gonadal and thyroid diseases. Sequelae occur more frequently in survivors from central nervous system tumors, leukemia, and lymphoma. Their development will depend on the type of cancer, its location, age at diagnosis, and treatment administered. Treatments associated to more endocrine sequels are cranial radiotherapy and hematopoietic cell transplantation. Because of the high prevalence of endocrine sequelae, international guidelines recommend endocrinologists to prospectively evaluate the survivors. As some of these endocrine changes will not develop until adult life, transition programs should be implemented, and active investigation should be made to decrease the endocrine consequences of cancer treatment. Copyright © 2017 SEEN y SED. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Ebola Survivor and Her Pregnancy Outcome

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-12-14

    Dr. Moon Kim, a medical epidemiologist at the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health, discusses an Ebola virus disease survivor and the delivery of her baby.  Created: 12/14/2016 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 12/14/2016.

  18. The effects of yoga and self-esteem on menopausal symptoms and quality of life in breast cancer survivors-A secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Anna K; Rabsilber, Sybille; Lauche, Romy; Kümmel, Sherko; Dobos, Gustav; Langhorst, Jost; Cramer, Holger

    2017-11-01

    Previous research has found that yoga can enhance quality of life and ease menopausal symptoms of breast cancer survivors. The study examined whether self-esteem mediated the effects of yoga on quality of life, fatigue and menopausal symptoms, utilizing validated outcome measures. This is a secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial comparing the effects of yoga with those of usual care in 40 breast cancer survivors who suffered from menopausal symptoms. All participants completed all 3 assessments (week 0, week 12, and week 24) and provided full data. Outcomes were measured using self-rating instruments. Mediation analyses were performed using SPSS. Self-esteem mediated the effect of yoga on total menopausal symptoms (B=-2.11, 95% BCI [-5.40 to -0.37]), psychological menopausal symptoms (B=-0.94, 95% BCI [-2.30 to -0.01]), and urogenital menopausal symptoms (B=-0.66, 95% BCI [-1.65 to -0.15]), quality of life (B=8.04, 95% BCI [3.15-17.03]), social well-being (B=1.80, 95% BCI [0.54-4.21]), emotional well-being (B=1.62, 95% BCI [0.70-3.34]), functional well-being (B=1.84, 95% BCI [0.59-4.13]), and fatigue (B=4.34, 95% BCI [1.28-9.55]). Self-esteem had no effect on somatovegetative menopausal symptoms (B=-0.50, 95% BCI n.s.) or on physical well-being (B=0.79, 95% BCI n.s.). Findings support the assumption that self-esteem plays a vital role in the beneficial effect of yoga and that yoga can have long-term benefits for women diagnosed with breast cancer and undergoing menopausal transition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Impact of chronic disease on emotional distress in adult survivors of childhood cancer: A report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuotto, Stefanie C; Krull, Kevin R; Li, Chenghong; Oeffinger, Kevin C; Green, Daniel M; Patel, Sunita K; Srivastava, Deokumar; Stovall, Marilyn; Ness, Kirsten K; Armstrong, Gregory T; Robison, Leslie L; Brinkman, Tara M

    2017-02-01

    The current study was performed to examine associations between childhood cancer therapies, chronic health conditions, and symptoms of emotional distress in adult survivors of childhood cancer. Participants included 5021 adult survivors of childhood cancer (mean age, 32.0 years [standard deviation, 7.6 years] with a time since diagnosis of 23.2 years [standard deviation, 4.5 years]) who completed measures assessing symptoms of anxiety, depression, and posttraumatic stress. Cardiac, pulmonary, and endocrine conditions were graded using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (version 4.03; grades 1-4). Structural equation modeling was used to examine hypothesized pathways between cancer treatment exposures, chronic health conditions, and symptoms of emotional distress. Multivariable models were used to estimate relative risks (RRs) for associations between chronic health conditions and distress. Survivors with cardiovascular, endocrine, or pulmonary conditions were found to have a significantly higher prevalence of emotional distress symptoms. In path analyses and multivariable models, significant effects were observed between endocrine (β = .12 [P = .002] and RR, 1.3 [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.1-1.6]) and pulmonary (β = .13 [Pcancer therapies contribute to emotional distress in adult survivors. Targeted mental health screening efforts in this at-risk population appear warranted. Therapeutic approaches should consider the complex interplay between chronic health conditions and symptoms of emotional distress. Cancer 2017;123:521-528. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  20. Jejunostomy tube feeding in patients undergoing esophagectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinathan, Sadeesh K; Hamin, Tamara; Walter, Stephen; Tan, A Lawrence; Unruh, Helmut W; Guyatt, Gordon

    2013-12-01

    Surgical jejunostomy tubes are a routine part of elective esophagectomies in patients with carcinomas and provide a route for nutritional support in those who experience complications. We wished to determine how frequently oral intake is delayed and the amount of nutrition delivered via the jejunostomy tube. We reviewed the charts of all adults undergoing esophagectomy for carcinoma between January 2000 and June 2008. We determined the proportion of patients unable to resume oral nutrition after 8 days and the amount of nutrition delivered in each of the 8 days. In all, 111 patients underwent elective esophagectomy for carcinoma, and 103 had a jejunostomy tube placed. The mean age was 67 ± 10.8 years. The median time to oral intake was 7 (interquartile range 7-11) days. Seventy-four (67%) patients resumed oral intake within 8 days. The mean nutrition delivered by jejunostomy within the first 8 days as a percentage of the target was 45.6% (95% confidence interval 41.2%-49.9%). Six (5.4%) patients experienced complications attributable solely to the jejunostomy tube; 3 (2.9%) required surgery. Forty (38.8%) patients had abdominal issues serious enough to warrant delaying the progression of feeding. Two-thirds of patients undergoing elective esophagectomy were tolerating oral intake by the end of the eighth postoperative day, and less than half of the target nutrition was delivered over the first 8 days. We now selectively place surgical jejunostomy tubes in patients undergoing elective esophagectomies.

  1. Tuberculosis in children undergoing hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gargah Tahar

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Gargah Tahar1, Goucha-Louzir Rim2, Lakhoua Mohamed Rachid11Department of Pediatric Nephrology, 2Department of Nephrology, Charles Nicolle Hospital, Tunis, TunisiaAbstract: Tuberculosis (TB remains a public health problem in Tunisia. Its incidence is higher in immunocompromised hosts than in the general population. In children and during hemodialysis, TB is characterized by the frequency of extrapulmonary localizations and diagnostic difficulties. The aim of this retrospective study is to evaluate the incidence of TB in Tunisian children undergoing hemodialysis and to determine its clinical features as well as the results of chemotherapy.Method: This retrospective study includes seven TB children among 112 children on hemodialysis at the pediatric nephrology department in Charles Nicolle Hospital from 2002 to 2008. The diagnosis of TB was established by a combination of clinical, radiological, biochemical, microbiological, and histological examinations. Treatment with anti-TB drugs, the results of therapy, and the outcome of patients were noted.Results: There were four girls and three boys aged 10 to 16 years (mean, 13 years. They had been on hemodialysis for 2 to 5 years (mean, 3 years. Noted clinical features were weight loss and fever in five cases, chest pain in one case, cervical lymph node in one case, and spinal pain in one case. The organ systems involved were pleural in two cases, pulmonary in one case, peritoneal in one case, cervical lymphatic in one case, and spinal in one case. One patient was treated empirically with a good response. Diagnosis was made by isolation of mycobacterium TB in three cases, by specific histological signs observed in a lymph node biopsy in one case, in peritoneal biopsy in one case, and in discovertebral biopsy in one case. In the remaining patient, the clinical and radiological presentations were compatible with pulmonary TB. All patients received four anti-TB drugs: isoniazid, rifampicin, pyrazinamide

  2. Psychosocial and Neurocognitive Outcomes in Adult Survivors of Adolescent and Early Young Adult Cancer: A Report From the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Pinki K; Hardy, Kristina K; Zhang, Nan; Edelstein, Kim; Srivastava, Deokumar; Zeltzer, Lonnie; Stovall, Marilyn; Seibel, Nita L; Leisenring, Wendy; Armstrong, Gregory T; Robison, Leslie L; Krull, Kevin

    2015-08-10

    To characterize psychological and neurocognitive function in long-term cancer survivors diagnosed during adolescence and early young adulthood (AeYA). Six thousand one hundred ninety-two survivors and 390 siblings in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study completed the Brief Symptom Inventory-18 and a Neurocognitive Questionnaire. Treatment and demographic predictors were examined, and associations with social attainment (employment, education, and living independently) were evaluated. Logistic regression models were used to compute odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% CIs. Among survivors, 2,589 were diagnosed when AeYA (11 to 21 years old). Adjusted for current age and sex, these survivors, compared with siblings, self-reported higher rates of depression (11.7% v 8.0%, respectively; OR, 1.55; 95% CI, 1.04 to 2.30) and anxiety (7.4% v 4.4%, respectively; OR, 2.00; 95% CI, 1.17 to 3.43) and more problems with task efficiency (17.2% v 10.8%, respectively; OR, 1.72; 95% CI, 1.21 to 2.43), emotional regulation (19.1% v 14.1%, respectively; OR, 1.74; 95% CI, 1.26 to 2.40), and memory (25.9% v 19.0%, respectively; OR, 1.44; 95% CI, 1.09 to 1.89). Few differences were noted between survivors diagnosed with leukemia or CNS tumor before 11 years old versus during later adolescence, although those diagnosed with lymphoma or sarcoma during AeYA were at reduced risk for self-reported psychosocial and neurocognitive problems. Unemployment was associated with self-reports of impaired task efficiency (OR, 2.93; 95% CI, 2.28 to 3.77), somatization (OR, 2.29; 95% CI, 1.77 to 2.98), and depression (OR, 1.94; 95% CI, 1.43 to 2.63). We demonstrated that risk for poor functional outcome is not limited to survivors' diagnoses in early childhood. AeYA is a critical period of development, and cancer during this period can impact neurocognitive and emotional function and disrupt vocational attainment. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  3. Addressing fear of recurrence: improving psychological care in cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomei, Christina; Lebel, Sophie; Maheu, Christine; Mutsaers, Brittany

    2016-07-01

    Fear of cancer recurrence (FCR) is defined as "the fear or worry that the cancer will return or progress in the same area or another part of the body." FCR is associated with impaired functioning and lower quality of life in cancer patients. A cognitive-existential (CE) manualized group intervention for women with FCR showed a moderate effect size in reducing FCR, cancer-specific distress, and maladaptive coping. However, it appears that no individual intervention for FCR exists for both men and women. Therefore, the group intervention was adapted to an individual format. This study was conducted to determine the feasibility, acceptability, and satisfaction of the individual intervention. The intervention was pilot-tested on n = 3 cancer survivors. The 6-week sessions included cognitive restructuring, structured exercises, and relaxation techniques. Participants completed questionnaire packages during a 4-week baseline period and throughout the 6-week intervention. Participants completed exit interviews following the intervention. General trends in baseline and intervention stages were compared. Based on the line graphs, the individual intervention appears to help survivors lower their elevated FCR and cancer-specific distress. Qualitative exit interviews conducted with the study participants demonstrated that the intervention was acceptable and satisfactory. This clinical intervention allows researchers to systematically focus on evidence-based treatments for managing FCR, and displays the availability of treatment options in different therapeutic modalities. However, further research is needed to identify the active therapeutic ingredients and mechanisms of change in the intervention. Overall, intervention studies suggest it is possible to help cancer survivors manage their FCR.

  4. Physical and psychological health in rare cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horick, Nora K; Manful, Adoma; Lowery, Jan; Domchek, Susan; Moorman, Patricia; Griffin, Constance; Visvanathan, Kala; Isaacs, Claudine; Kinney, Anita Y; Finkelstein, Dianne M

    2017-02-01

    Registries provide a unique tool for tracking quality of life in rare cancer survivors, whose survivorship experience is less known than for common cancers. This paper reports on these outcomes in 321 patients enrolled in the Rare Cancer Genetics Registry diagnosed with rare gastrointestinal, genitourinary, gynecologic, sarcoma, head/neck, or hematologic cancers. Four outcomes were assessed, reflecting registrants' self-reported physical and mental health, psychological distress, and loneliness. Combining all patients into a single analysis, regression was used to evaluate the association between outcomes and socio-demographic and clinical factors. Median time since diagnosis was 3 years (range 0-9); 69 % were no longer in treatment. Poorer physical health was reported in registrants who were older at diagnosis, unmarried, and still in treatment. Poorer mental status was associated with younger diagnosis age and unmarried status. Psychological distress varied by cancer type and was higher among currently treated and unmarried registrants. Greater loneliness was reported in registrants with gynecological cancers, and those who were less educated or unmarried. The physical and mental health profile of rare cancer survivors is similar to what is reported for common cancers. Unmarried participants reported poorer outcomes on all measures of quality of life. Furthermore, physical and mental health were not significantly different by cancer type after adjustment for diagnosis age, whether currently in treatment and marital status. Thus, the combined analysis performed here is a useful way to analyze outcomes in less common diseases. Our findings could be valuable in guiding evaluation and intervention for issues impacting quality of life. Rare cancer survivors, particularly those without spousal support, should be monitored for challenges to the physical as well as psychological aspects of quality of life.

  5. [Aerobic fitness and cardiorespiratory function of pediatric cancer survivors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubnov-Raz, Gal; Azar, Meital; Reuveny, Ronen; Constantini, Naama W; Katz, Uriel

    2012-02-01

    Overall, more than 80% of children diagnosed with cancer will survive their immediate disease. This growing group of childhood cancer survivors is at an increased risk for several chronic diseases and increased mortality. Physical activity is a well-known and powerful means to reduce such complications, yet many children are not active as recommended. Furthermore, the complex treatments might adversely affect the heart and lungs, possibly limiting physical performance. To measure aerobic fitness among childhood cancer survivors, while assessing maximal cardiac and respiratory functions. Eighteen children (mean age 11.5 +/- 2.1 years, 50% males) who had completed medical treatment for cancer, and 16 healthy children, performed a cardiorespiratory exercise test on a bicycle ergometer until exhaustion. Peak oxygen uptake, O2 pulse and several ventilatory parameters were measured and compared between the groups. The mean maximal load obtained by the cancer survivor group was lower than expected, compared with controls (89% +/- 19 vs. 101/% +/- 18, p = 0.055). Peak oxygen consumption was also lower, with a marginal statistical significance (33.3 +/- 7.5 vs. 38.9 +/- 9.7 ml O2/kg/min, p = 0.075), yet was significantly lower when expressed as a percent of age- and sex- appropriate norms [78% +/- 15 vs. 94% +/- 16, p = 0.0081. Cardiac and respiratory functions were normal in all children, with no between-group differences. We conclude that aerobic fitness is lower in children who have survived cancer, with no evidence of significant cardiac or lung damage. Given the importance of regular physical activity for this at-risk population, it should be continuously encouraged, while administering a personally tailored exercise prescription.

  6. Changing support needs of survivors of complex critical illness and their family caregivers across the care continuum: a qualitative pilot study of Towards RECOVER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerwonka, Anna I; Herridge, Margaret S; Chan, Linda; Chu, Leslie Michele; Matte, Andrea; Cameron, Jill I

    2015-04-01

    Survivors of complex critical illness and their family caregivers require support during their recovery, rehabilitation, and return to community living; however, the nature of these supports and how they may change over time remain unclear. Using the Timing It Right framework as a conceptual guide, this qualitative pilot study explored survivors' and caregivers' needs during the episode of critical illness through their return to independent living. Five survivors and seven family caregivers were recruited and consented from the main Towards RECOVER pilot study, designed to characterize the long term outcomes of survivors of the ICU who have been mechanically ventilated for more than one week. Using the Timing It Right framework, we prospectively conducted qualitative interviews to explore participants' experiences and needs for information, emotional support, and training at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after intensive care unit (ICU) discharge. We completed 26 interviews, which were audio recorded, professionally transcribed, checked for accuracy, and analyzed using framework methodology. In this small pilot sample, caregiver and patient perspectives were related and, therefore, are presented together. We identified 1 overriding theme: survivors do not experience continuity of medical care during recovery after critical illness. Three subthemes highlighted the following: (1) informational needs change across the care continuum, (2) fear and worry exist when families do not know what to expect, and (3) survivors transition from dependence to independence. Interventions designed to improve family outcomes after critical illness should address both survivors' and caregivers' support needs as they change across the illness and recovery trajectory. Providing early intervention and support and clarifying expectations for transitions in care and recovery may decrease fears of the unknown for both caregivers and survivors. Ongoing family-centered follow-up programs may also

  7. Predictors of adherence to an exercise program for shoulder pain and dysfunction in head and neck cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeely, Margaret L; Parliament, Matthew B; Seikaly, Hadi; Jha, Naresh; Magee, David J; Haykowsky, Mark J; Courneya, Kerry S

    2012-03-01

    Achieving acceptable levels of adherence to exercise may be a challenge with head and neck cancer (HNC) survivors given the high morbidity associated with treatment. The purpose of the present trial was to identify the key predictors of adherence during our shoulder exercise rehabilitation trial. Fifty-two HNC survivors were randomly assigned to a 12-week progressive resistance exercise training protocol (n = 27) or a standardized therapeutic exercise protocol (n = 25) that was prescribed to address shoulder pain and dysfunction. Baseline data were collected on standard demographic, medical, behavioral, symptom, psychosocial, and motivational variables from the theory of planned behavior. The exercise adherence rate for the trial was 91%. In multivariate analysis, the independent predictors of reduced adherence were undergoing a more extensive neck dissection procedure (β = -0.361; P = 0.007) and reporting daily alcohol consumption (β = -0.298; P = 0.031). Higher exercise adherence was achieved by HNC participants who had undergone nerve sparing neck dissection procedures and who were not regular drinkers. Excellent adherence to exercise was achieved in the trial despite high morbidity associated with HNC treatment. The high adherence achieved was likely due to the select and highly motivated sample of HNC survivors as well as to factors associated with trial design such as the support offered to participants. The findings of this trial need to be further explored and confirmed in a larger study that includes a more diverse sample of HNC survivors.

  8. Field Cancerisation of the Upper Aerodigestive Tract: Screening for Second Primary Cancers of the Oesophagus in Cancer Survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Güllü Cataldegirmen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Tobacco, alcohol, and betel quid are the main causes of squamous cell cancers of the upper aerodigestive tract. These substances can cause multifocal carcinogenesis leading to multiple synchronous or metachronous cancers of the oesophagus, head and neck region, and lungs (‘field cancerisation’. Globally there are several million people who have survived either head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC or lung cancer (LC. HNSCC and LC survivors are at increased risk of developing second primary malignancies, including second primary cancers of the oesophagus. The risk of second primary oesophageal squamous cell cancer (OSCC ranges from 8-30% in HNSCC patients. LC and HNSCC survivors should be offered endoscopic surveillance of the oesophagus. Lugol chromoendoscopy is the traditional and best evaluated screening method to detect early squamous cell neoplasias of the oesophagus. More recently, narrow band imaging combined with magnifying endoscopy has been established as an alternative screening method in Asia. Low-dose chest computed tomography (CT is the best evidencebased screening technique to detect (second primary LC and to reduce LC-related mortality. Low-dose chest CT screening is therefore recommended in OSCC, HNSCC, and LC survivors. In addition, OSCC survivors should undergo periodic pharyngolaryngoscopy for early detection of second primary HNSCC. Secondary prevention aims at quitting smoking, betel quid chewing, and alcohol consumption. As field cancerisation involves the oesophagus, the bronchi, and the head and neck region, the patients at risk are best surveilled and managed by an interdisciplinary team.

  9. New approach to evaluate late arm impairment and effects of dragon boat activity in breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchiorri, Giovanni; Viero, Valerio; Triossi, Tamara; Sorge, Roberto; Tancredi, Virginia; Cafaro, Domenico; Andreis, Caterina; Vulpiani, Maria Chiara; Saraceni, Vincenzo Maria

    2017-11-01

    To verify the applicability of a new approach based on the strength curves (SCs) methodology in late arm impairment in breast cancer (BC) survivors and to evaluate the effects of dragon boat (DB) activity on the late regaining of the muscle strength, upper limb impairment, and quality of life in patients undergoing surgery for BC.Retrospective observational study on 64 subjects (54.5 ± 9.7 years), 47 of them had undergone unilateral mastectomy surgery and were evaluated for late arm impairment. A clinical evaluation of the shoulder and compilation of functional assessment (DASH, Rowe, Constant-Murley) and quality of life (SF-36) scales were carried out. Assessment of muscle strength with SC obtained with isometric assessments and serratus anterior muscle test were performed.Differences between the SC are evident between healthy and operated subjects. Among the 3 groups of operated subjects the difference in strength is maximum at 0°. Statistically significant difference was found between operated and nonoperated only in SF-36 scale. No significant difference was found between groups for shoulder instability and winged scapula.The SC can be used in the study of upper limb impairment after surgery for BC: measurements carried out at 1st degrees of the range of motion are more useful for clinicians. DB activity is useful to reduce the late arm impairment.

  10. Development and Implementation of an Internet-Based Survivorship Care Program for Cancer Survivors Treated with Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrjala, Karen L.; Stover, Allison C.; Yi, Jean C.; Artherholt, Samantha B.; Romano, Eleni M.; Schoch, Gary; Stewart, Susan; Flowers, Mary E.D.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The internet provides a widely accessible modality for meeting survivorship care needs of cancer survivors. In this paper we describe the development and implementation of an internet site designed as a base from which to conduct a randomized controlled trial to meet psycho-educational needs of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) survivors. Methods A cross-disciplinary team designed, wrote content and programmed an internet site for online study registration, consent, assessment, and study implementation. All 3–18 year survivors of HSCT for hematologic malignancy treated at one transplant center were approached by mail for participation. All study activities could be conducted without study staff contact. However, participants had options for phone or email contact with study staff as desired. Results Of 1775 participants approached for the study, 775 (58% of those eligible) consented and completed baseline assessment. Mean age was 51.7 (SD=12.5, age range 18–79), with 56% male. 57% required staff contact one or more times; a majority were for minor technical issues or delays in completion of enrollment or baseline assessment. Discussions/Conclusions This study demonstrated the potential for providing internet-based survivorship care to long-term survivors of HSCT. Although building a survivorship internet site requires a team with diverse expertise, once built, these resources can be implemented rapidly with large numbers of survivors. Implications for Cancer Survivors While internet-based services will not meet all the needs of cancer survivors, this methodology represents an important modality for augmenting onsite clinical services as a method for meeting psycho-educational, information and resource needs of cancer survivors. PMID:21544671

  11. Healthcare Needs, Experiences and Satisfaction after Terrorism: A Longitudinal Study of Survivors from the Utøya Attack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lise Eilin Stene

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Public health outreach programs have been developed in order to ensure that needs are met after disasters. However, little is known about survivors’ experiences with post-terror healthcare. In the present study, our objectives were to 1 describe survivors’ experiences with post-terror healthcare, 2 identify factors associated with reports of unmet healthcare needs, and 3 examine the relationship between socio-demographic characteristics, healthcare experiences and satisfaction.Methods: Our study comprised three waves of semi-structured interviews with 261/490 (53% survivors of the Utøya mass shooting. We applied Pearson’s chi-squared tests (categorical variables and independent t-tests (continuous variables to compare survivors by whether or not they reported higher perceived needs than received help for psychological reactions and physical health problems, respectively. Ordinal regression analyses were applied to examine whether socio-demographic characteristics and healthcare experiences were associated with dissatisfaction. Results: Altogether 127 (49% survivors reported very high/high help needs for psychological reactions, and 43 (17% for attack-related physical health problems. Unmet healthcare needs were associated with higher levels of posttraumatic stress, psychological distress, somatic symptoms and less social support. Survivors with immigrant backgrounds and injured survivors who were not admitted to hospital reported unmet needs for physical health problems more often. After adjustments for socio-demographic characteristics, immigrant origin was associated with dissatisfaction with post-terror healthcare. After additionally adjusting for healthcare experiences, poor rating of the overall organization and accessibility of healthcare remained significantly associated with dissatisfaction.Conclusions: Most survivors were satisfied with the post-terror healthcare they received, yet our findings indicate that increased

  12. Randomized controlled pilot study of a SystemCHANGE™ weight management intervention in stroke survivors: rationale and protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plow, Matthew; Moore, Shirley M; Kirwan, John P; Frost, Fredrick; Katzan, Irene; Jaeger, Sue; Alberts, Jay

    2013-05-07

    Over 65% of stroke survivors are either overweight or obese and have multiple cardiovascular risk factors. However, few studies have examined the effects of comprehensive lifestyle behavior interventions to promote weight loss and control cardiovascular risk factors in stroke survivors. Thus, the purpose of this study is to examine a novel behavior change approach--SystemCHANGE™--to promote weight loss and improve health and function in stroke survivors. SystemCHANGE™ focuses on redesigning the social environment to achieve a specific goal. We will conduct a randomized controlled pilot study to examine the efficacy, feasibility, and safety of the SystemCHANGE™ weight management program in overweight and obese stroke survivors. The central hypothesis of the study is that the SystemCHANGE™ intervention will help overweight and obese stroke survivors lose 5% of their body weight, thereby improving health and function. Thirty-five stroke survivors will be randomized into either the 6-month SystemCHANGE™ intervention or a contact-control intervention. Outcome measures will be assessed at baseline and again at 3 and 6 months after the interventions. Body composition will be assessed using a Bod Pod. Patient-reported outcomes will be the Stroke Impact Scale and Reintegration to Normal Living Index. Objective outcomes will include the 6-Minute Walking Test and Rivermead Motor Assessment. This study will be the first randomized controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a weight management intervention in stroke survivors using the SystemCHANGE™ approach. Furthermore, it will be the first empirically-examined comprehensive lifestyle intervention designed to target physical activity, nutrition, and sleep to promote weight loss in stroke survivors. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01776034.

  13. Engaging Latina Cancer Survivors, their Caregivers, and Community Partners in a Randomized Controlled Trial: Nueva Vida Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rush, Christina L.; Darling, Margaret; Elliott, Maria Gloria; Febus-Sampayo, Ivis; Kuo, Charlene; Muñoz, Juliana; Duron, Ysabel; Torres, Migdalia; Galván, Claudia Campos; Gonzalez, Florencia; Caicedo, Larisa; Nápoles, Anna; Jensen, Roxanne E.; Anderson, Emily; Graves, Kristi D.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Few studies have evaluated interventions to improve quality of life (QOL) for Latina breast cancer survivors and caregivers. Following best practices in community-based participatory research (CBPR), we established a multi-level partnership among Latina survivors, caregivers, community-based organizations (CBOs), clinicians and researchers to evaluate a survivor-caregiver QOL intervention. Methods A CBO in the mid-Atlantic region, Nueva Vida, developed a patient-caregiver program called Cuidando a mis Cuidadores (Caring for My Caregivers), to improve outcomes important to Latina cancer survivors and their families. Together with an academic partner, Nueva Vida and 3 CBOs established a multi-level team of researchers, clinicians, Latina cancer survivors, and caregivers to conduct a national randomized trial to compare the patient-caregiver program to usual care. Results Incorporating team feedback and programmatic considerations, we adapted the prior patient-caregiver program into an 8-session patient- and caregiver-centered intervention that includes skill-building workshops such as managing stress, communication, self-care, social well-being, and impact of cancer on sexual intimacy. We will measure QOL domains with the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS), dyadic communication between the survivor and caregiver, and survivors’ adherence to recommended cancer care. To integrate the intervention within each CBO, we conducted interactive training on the protection of human subjects, qualitative interviewing, and intervention delivery. Conclusion The development and engagement process for our QOL intervention study is innovative because it is both informed by and directly impacts underserved Latina survivors and caregivers. The CBPR-based process demonstrates successful multi-level patient engagement through collaboration among researchers, clinicians, community partners, survivors and caregivers. PMID:25377349

  14. Screening adherence and cancer risk perceptions in colorectal cancer survivors with Lynch-like syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, L H; Burton-Chase, A M; Advani, S; Fellman, B; Polivka, K M; Yuan, Y; Lynch, P M; Peterson, S K

    2016-03-01

    Cancer screening recommendations for patients with Lynch-like syndrome (LLS) are not well defined. We evaluated adherence to Lynch syndrome (LS) screening recommendations, cancer risk perceptions, and communication within the families among colorectal cancer (CRC) survivors with LLS. Thirty-four participants with LLS completed a questionnaire about risk perception, adherence to LS screening recommendations, and communication with relatives. Clinical data were obtained from medical records. Most participants (76%) believed they should undergo colonoscopy every 1-2 years. Only 41% correctly interpreted their genetic tests as uninformative negative or as variant of unknown significance for LS. Less than half had had an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy for screening purpose. Among female participants, 86% had been screened for endometrial cancer (EC) and 71% for ovarian cancer. Most participants had informed relatives about the CRC diagnosis and advised them to undergo CRC screening, but only 50% advised female relatives to be screened for EC and only one-third advised relatives to have genetic counseling. Most CRC survivors with LLS follow the same cancer screening recommended for LS patients but do not understand the meaning of LLS. Greater care must be devoted to communicating the implications of nondiagnostic germline mutation testing among patients with LLS. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Predictors of Posttraumatic Stress and Posttraumatic Growth in Childhood Cancer Survivors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Koutná, Veronika; Jelínek, Martin; Blatný, Marek; Kepák, T.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 3 (2017), s. 1-11, č. článku 26. ISSN 2072-6694 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP407/11/2421 Institutional support: RVO:68081740 Keywords : posttraumatic stress * posttraumatic growth * benefit finding * childhood cancer survivors Subject RIV: AN - Psychology OBOR OECD: Psychology (including human - machine relations)

  16. Interest in Health Behavior Intervention Delivery Modalities Among Cancer Survivors: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Emily C; Basen-Engquist, Karen; Cox, Matthew G; Lyons, Elizabeth J; Carmack, Cindy L; Blalock, Janice A; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy

    2016-02-11

    Effective, broad-reaching channels are important for the delivery of health behavior interventions in order to meet the needs of the growing population of cancer survivors in the United States. New technology presents opportunities to increase the reach of health behavior change interventions and therefore their overall impact. However, evidence suggests that older adults may be slower in their adoption of these technologies than the general population. Survivors' interest for more traditional channels of delivery (eg, clinic) versus new technology-based channels (eg, smartphones) may depend on a variety of factors, including demographics, current health status, and the behavior requiring intervention. The aim of this study was to determine the factors that predict cancer survivors' interest in new technology-based health behavior intervention modalities versus traditional modalities. Surveys were mailed to 1871 survivors of breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer. Participants' demographics, diet and physical activity behaviors, interest in health behavior interventions, and interest in intervention delivery modalities were collected. Using path analysis, we explored the relationship between four intervention modality variables (ie, clinic, telephone, computer, and smartphone) and potential predictors of modality interest. In total, 1053 respondents to the survey (56.3% response rate); 847 provided complete data for this analysis. Delivery channel interest was highest for computer-based interventions (236/847, 27.9% very/extremely interested) and lowest for smartphone-based interventions (73/847, 8.6%), with interest in clinic-based (147/847, 17.3%) and telephone-delivered (143/847, 16.9%) falling in between. Use of other technology platforms, such as Web cameras and social networking sites, was positively predictive of interest in technology-based delivery channels. Older survivors were less likely to report interest in smartphone-based diet interventions

  17. Impact of Acute Intermittent Exercise on Natural Killer Cells in Breast Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Elizabeth S; Hackney, A C; McMurray, Robert G; Randell, Scott H; Muss, Hyman B; Deal, Allison M; Battaglini, Claudio L

    2015-09-01

    Current research examining the effect of exercise on immune responses in cancer survivors is limited. The aim of this pilot study was to examine the effect of 1 bout of intermittent exercise on natural killer (NK) cell numbers in breast cancer survivors. A total of 9 women with stage I to III invasive breast cancer who were 3 to 6 months posttreatment and 9 sedentary women without a history of cancer completed 10 three-minute intervals of aerobic exercise on the cycle ergometer at 60% of VO2peak (peak oxygen uptake). Whole blood samples were taken pre-exercise, immediately postexercise, and at 2 hours and 24 hours postexercise. NK cell counts were assessed using flow cytometry. In both groups, NK cell counts significantly increased immediately postexercise compared with pre-exercise (P = .004-.008) and returned to near pre-exercise levels during recovery (P = .129-.547). Absolute NK cell counts were significantly lower in breast cancer survivors immediately postexercise when compared with controls (P = .046). The breast cancer survivor group exhibited NK cell responses to 30 minutes of moderate-intensity intermittent aerobic exercise that were comparable with that in the group of physically similar women without a history of cancer. Immune changes related to cancer treatments may be related to the lower absolute NK cell counts observed in the breast cancer survivor group. Although the results of this study are preliminary in nature, they suggest that this type of exercise does not disrupt this aspect of innate immunity in recent breast cancer survivors, thereby supporting current exercise recommendations for this population. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Exercise training intensity prescription in breast cancer survivors: validity of current practice and specific recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharhag-Rosenberger, Friederike; Kuehl, Rea; Klassen, Oliver; Schommer, Kai; Schmidt, Martina E; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Wiskemann, Joachim; Steindorf, Karen

    2015-12-01

    Cancer survivors are recommended to perform 150 min/week of moderate or 75 min/week of vigorous aerobic exercise, but it remains unclear how moderate and vigorous intensities can be prescribed. Therefore, it was investigated whether and how intensity prescriptions for healthy adults by the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) need to be adapted for breast cancer survivors. Fifty-two breast cancer survivors (stage 0-III, age 52 ± 9 years, BMI 25.4 ± 3.5 kg/m2) performed cardiopulmonary exercise tests at the end of primary therapy. Intensity classes defined as percentages of maximal heart rate (HRmax), heart rate reserve (HRR), and maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) were compared to the ACSM's intensity classes using oxygen uptake reserve as reference. The prescriptions for moderate and vigorous exercise intensities were significantly different between breast cancer survivors and healthy adults when using VO2max (moderate 50-66 vs. 46-63 and vigorous 67-91 vs. 64-90% VO2max) or HRR (moderate 26-50 vs. 40-59 and vigorous 51-88 vs. 60-89 % HRR), but not when using HRmax (moderate 65-76 vs. 64-76 and vigorous 77-94 vs. 77-95% HRmax). In breast cancer survivors, intensity prescriptions for healthy adults result in considerably too intense training if HRR is used as guiding factor. Prescriptions using VO2max result in a slightly too low exercise intensity, whereas recommendations in percentages of HRmax appear valid. Cancer survivors should not uncritically adopt exercise intensity prescriptions for healthy adults. Specific prescriptions for the studied population are provided.

  19. Screening for psychological distress in very long-term adult survivors of childhood cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Laage, Astrid; Allodji, Rodrigue; Dauchy, Sarah; Rivollet, Sophie; Fayech, Chiraz; Fresneau, Brice; Oberlin, Odile

    2016-08-01

    This study evaluated the prevalence of psychological distress (PD) in a cohort of 348 adult childhood cancer survivors with a very long-term follow-up and assessed the characteristics associated with this distress (cancer type, treatment, sex, age at diagnosis, self-reported late effects, social support, type of remembrance, time since the diagnosis, age at evaluation), assuming that with time since the diagnosis, the PD of survivors will approximate that of the general population. Before attending a long-term follow-up consultation, survivors were sent 3 questionnaires: the Brief Symptom Inventory-18, the Impact of Event Scale, and the Illness Worry Scale (IWS). During the visit, they were administered the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) by a psychologist. The mean age of the survivors was 38.5 years (18.1-65.8) at consultation, 7 years (0.0-18.0) at cancer diagnosis, and mean time since diagnosis was 31.5 years (8.8-56.1). Multiple regression analyses of the data collected from self-administered questionnaires confirmed that being female, living alone, and self-reported late effects were associated with the high scores for all scales. Negative remembrances and being accompanied to the clinic were associated with higher IWS scores. Unlike the initial hypothesis, the MINI showed that, compared with controls, survivors experienced a higher prevalence of anxiety and mood disorders even after a very long time since the diagnosis. These findings show that a substantial subset of survivors experiment a high prevalence of PD, higher than the general population, and should be screened for PD whatever the time since the diagnosis.

  20. Objectively measured sedentary time is related to quality of life among cancer survivors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie M George

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: While exercise has been shown to be beneficial in improving health-related quality of life (HRQOL among cancer survivors, evidence is limited on the independent role of sedentary behavior. We examined how objectively measured sedentary time was associated with HRQOL among long-term cancer survivors. METHODS: This cross-sectional study included 54 cancer survivors, on average 3.4 years postdiagnosis, who were enrolled into an exercise trial designed to improve cognitive function. At baseline, we measured sedentary time and moderate-vigorous intensity physical activity with the ActivPal, cardiorespiratory fitness with treadmill testing, and self-reported HRQOL with an established scale (SF-36. In multivariate models, we regressed HRQOL on sedentary time (percent of waking time spent sitting and lying. RESULTS: Survivors with higher sedentary time had significantly poorer physical functioning (β = -0.50, p = 0.028, general health (β = -0.75, ptrend = 0.004, and physical summary scores (β = -0.34, p = 0.003. We did not observe associations between sedentary time and role-physical (p = 0.342, bodily-pain (p = 0.117, vitality (p = 0.095, social functioning (p = 0.407, role-emotional (p = 0.509, mental health (p = 0.494, or mental summary scores (p = 0.527. CONCLUSION: In this cross-sectional study of cancer survivors, we observed deleterious associations between sedentary time and aspects of physical HRQOL. Future prospective studies of sedentary time and HRQOL are needed to establish temporality and to facilitate the design of effective health promotion interventions for cancer survivors.

  1. Barriers and facilitators to work reintegration and burn survivors' perspectives on educating work colleagues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Ngoc Tram; Lorrain, Mélyssa; Pognon-Hanna, Joe Nayima; Elfassy, Caroline; Calva, Valerie; de Oliveira, Ana; Nedelec, Bernadette

    2016-11-01

    Work reintegration constitutes a major milestone in the rehabilitation process of adults who have sustained a burn. Research studies with other conditions demonstrated that open, explicit communication about the worker's condition and potential limitations may facilitate this transition. However, the best approach to enable this discussion to occur has yet to be described. The aim of this exploratory qualitative study was to investigate burn survivors' and clinicians' perspectives of the barriers and facilitators to work reintegration that could be addressed through education of work colleagues, which information to communicate to the workplace and the most effective method to disseminate this knowledge. Five semi-structured focus groups were conducted with three groups of informants including: (1) 13 burn survivors who had already returned to work; (2) 7 who were planning on returning; and (3) 9 burn care professionals. Qualitative data were inductively analyzed employing constant comparative techniques. Key barriers and facilitators that were identified included residual impairments, individual characteristics, support from the social environment, work accommodations and resources from the healthcare and compensation systems. Burn survivors agreed that return to work efforts were not adequately supported and that education should be provided to work colleagues about the burn and rehabilitation process, but that information on residual impairments should be communicated judiciously as it may be used prejudiciously against those seeking new employment. In the latter case, it is preferable to inform the workplace of their strengths and abilities. Extensive literature demonstrating the benefits of educational programs for the peers and teachers of pediatric burn survivors when they return to school already exists. This study provides evidence that there is a need for a similar process for adult burn survivors returning to work. The educational material must be

  2. Attitudes among medical and nonmedical university students toward the survivors of childhood abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandemir, Eyup; Yilmaz, Yasin; Ozmansur, Elif Nurdan; Gunaydin, Hilal; Demirel, Omer Faruk; Berber, Gurol; Kantarci, Nabi; Aliustaoglu, Suheyla; Emul, Murat

    2012-08-01

    Childhood sexual abuse (CSA) is increasing, and current studies should address issues such as stigmas and casual attitudes that may be amenable to intervention. Thus, we aimed to investigate the effects of education on the attitudes of medical students toward CSA survivors. We divided medical students into 2 groups: preclinical and clinical medical students. We compare the attitudes of nonmedical students with the attitudes of medical students with respect to survivors of CSA. All participants were asked to complete a questionnaire about stigmatization. There were 572 students in our study, 347 of whom were enrolled in medical school. Of the 347 medical students, 151 were from the preclinical group, and 196 were from the clinical practice group. The remainder of the participants (n = 225) were in other fields of university. Of the medical students, 68.3% responded negatively about "asking a survivor of abuse to supervise their child for a few hours," whereas 62.7% of the nonmedical students responded negatively. When asked, "What would you think if your child wanted to marry a survivor of sexual abuse?", 72.9% of the medical students and 59.1% of the nonmedical students displayed negative attitudes toward that idea. Our research also found that significantly more preclinical students than clinical students would not want to be in a companionship/friendship with a CSA survivor at work (P = .015) or in their neighborhoods (P = .034). Both medical and nonmedical students seem to have negative thoughts about sexual abuse survivors, particularly when the issue involves their own children and/or social situations. Thus, the medical professionals must be careful and should avoid over interpretations of findings on childhood abuse studies that may lead to stigmatization. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Relationship between nutritional status, physical activity and quality of life among gastrointestinal cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalina, A Z; Lee, V C; Kandiah, M

    2012-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between nutritional status, physical activity and quality of life among gastrointestinal cancer survivors. A cross-sectional study was conducted among gastrointestinal cancer survivors attending the oncology outpatient clinic in Hospital Selayang, Malaysia. A total of 70 gastrointestinal cancer survivors with a mean age of 52.54 +/- 14.59 years (95% CI: 47.48 - 57.60) were included in this study. Results showed that 40% of the patients were classified as having low physical activity. The mean Patient Generated Subjective Global Assessment (PGSGA) score was 10.27 +/- 7.36 (95% CI: 8.23-12.31) and nearly half the patients (48.6%) were identified as severely malnourished (Stage C). Mean Gastrointestinal Quality of Life Index (GQLFI) score was 103.57 +/- 23.85 (95% CI: 92.94-114.20), and about 24.3% of the patients were classified as having a low quality of life. Pearson's correlation test showed a highly significant negative relationship between nutritional status and quality of life (r = -0.661, pnutritional status (low total mean score of PGSGA), the better the quality of life of the survivors (high total mean score of GQLFI). There was a significant negative relationship between physical activity level and nutritional status score (r = -0.309, pnutritional status (low total mean score of PGSGA). This study shows a significant relationship between nutritional status, physical activity and quality of life among gastrointestinal cancer survivors. Those low in nutritional status have a low quality of life while survivors with higher nutritional status have a better quality of life.

  4. Anticipatory fear and helplessness predict PTSD and depression in domestic violence survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salcioglu, Ebru; Urhan, Sevim; Pirinccioglu, Tugba; Aydin, Sule

    2017-01-01

    Embracing the conceptual framework of contemporary learning theory, this study tested the hypothesis that anticipatory fear due to a sense of ongoing threat to safety and sense of helplessness in life would be the strongest determinants of PTSD and depression in domestic violence survivors. Participants were 220 domestic violence survivors recruited consecutively from 12 shelters for women in Turkey (response rate 70%). They were assessed with the Semi-Structured Interview for Survivors of Domestic Violence, Traumatic Stress Symptom Checklist, Depression Rating Scale, and Fear and Sense of Control Scale. Survivors were exposed to 21 (SD = 6.7) physical, psychological, and sexual violence stressors over 11.3 (SD = 8.8) years. They reported high levels of peritrauma perceived distress of and lack of control over stressor events. Approximately 10 months after trauma, many feared reliving the same domestic violence events, felt helpless, feared for their life, and felt in danger. PTSD and depression rates were 48.2% and 32.7%, respectively. The strongest predictors of PTSD and depression were fear due to a sense of ongoing threat to safety and sense of helplessness in life, which explained the largest amount of variances in these psychiatric conditions. The findings support the contemporary learning theory of traumatic stress and are consistent with findings of studies involving earthquake, war, and torture survivors. They imply that trauma-focused interventions designed to overcome fear, reduce helplessness, and restore sense of control over one's life would be effective in PTSD and depression in domestic violence survivors. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. Specialized survivor clinic attendance is associated with decreased rates of emergency department visits in adult survivors of childhood cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutradhar, Rinku; Agha, Mohammad; Pole, Jason D; Greenberg, Mark; Guttmann, Astrid; Hodgson, David; Nathan, Paul C

    2015-12-15

    Survivors of childhood cancer are at considerable risk of experiencing treatment-related adverse health outcomes. To provide survivors with specialized care focused on these risks during adulthood, the government of Ontario funded a provincial network of specialized survivor clinics in 1999. The aim of this study was to determine whether prior attendance at survivor clinics by adult survivors of childhood cancer was associated with rates of emergency department (ED) visits. This was a population-based, retrospective cohort study using multiple linked administrative health databases. The cohort consisted of all adult survivors of childhood cancer diagnosed between January 1, 1986 and December 31, 2005 in Ontario, Canada. A recurrent event regression model was used to evaluate the association between prior attendance at survivor clinics and the rate of ED visits; adjustments were made for individual, demographic, treatment, and provider characteristics. The study consisted of 3912 adult survivors of childhood cancer. Individuals who had at least 1 prior visit to a survivor clinic had a 19% decreased rate of ED visits in comparison with individuals who had not visited a survivor clinic (adjusted relative rate, 0.81; 95% confidence interval, 0.78-0.85). Each additional prior visit to a survivor clinic was associated with a 5% decrease in the rate of ED visits (adjusted relative rate, 0.95; 95% confidence interval, 0.93-0.96). These results were independent of whether or not survivors received care from a primary care physician. Attendance at a specialized survivor clinic was significantly associated with decreased ED visits among adult survivors of childhood cancer. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  6. The longitudinal and dyadic effects of mutuality on perceived stress for stroke survivors and their spousal caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godwin, Kyler M; Swank, Paul R; Vaeth, Patrice; Ostwald, Sharon K

    2013-01-01

    Functional impairment resulting from a stroke frequently requires the care of a family caregiver, often the spouse. This change in the relationship can be stressful for the couple. Thus, this study examined the longitudinal, dyadic relationship between caregivers' and stroke survivors' mutuality and caregivers' and stroke survivors' perceived stress. This secondary data analysis of 159 stroke survivors and their spousal caregivers utilized a cross-lagged, mixed models analysis with the actor-partner interdependence model to examine the dyadic relationship between mutuality and perceived stress over the first year post-discharge from inpatient rehabilitation. Caregivers' mutuality showed an actor effect (β = -3.82, p perceived stress but not the stroke survivors' perceived stress. Stroke survivors' perceived stress showed a partner effect and affected caregivers' perceived stress (β = 0.13, p = 0.047). Caregivers' perceived stress did not show a partner effect and did not significantly affect stroke survivors' perceived stress. These findings highlight the interpersonal nature of stress in the context of caregiving for a spouse. Caregivers are especially influenced by perceived stress in the spousal relationship. Couples should be encouraged to focus on positive aspects of the caregiving relationship to mitigate stress.

  7. The present state of the medical record data base for the A-bomb survivors in Nagasaki University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Hiroyuki; Mine, Mariko; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Okumura, Yutaka (Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1992-03-01

    It has been 13 years since the operation of medical record data base for A-bomb survivors was started in the Scientific Data Center for Atomic Bomb Disaster at the Nagasaki University. This paper presents the basic data in handling the data base. The present data base consists of the following 6 items: (1) 'fundamental data' for approximately 120,000 A-bomb survivors having an A-bomb survivors' handbook who have been living in Nagasaki City; (2) 'Nagasaki Atomic Bomb Hospital's data', covering admission medical records in the ward of internal medicine; (3) 'pathological data', covering autopsy records in Nagasaki City; (4) 'household data reconstructed by the survey data'; (5) 'second generation A-bomb survivors data', including the results of mass screening since 1979, and (6) 'address data'. Based on the data, the number of A-bomb survivors, diagnosis records at the time of death, the number of A-bomb survivors' participants in health examination, tumor registration, records of admission to the internal ward in Nagasaki Atomic Bomb Hospital, autopsy records, and household records are tabulated in relation to annual changes, age at the time of A-bombing, distance from the hypocenter, or sex. (N.K.).

  8. Physical exercise and return to work: cancer survivors' experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groeneveld, Iris F; de Boer, Angela G E M; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W

    2013-06-01

    In this qualitative study, we aimed to explore cancer survivors' experiences with (1) return to work (RtW) and work performance, (2) a physical exercise program after treatment, and (3) the perceived link between physical exercise and work. Semi-structured individual interviews were held with ten cancer survivors of working age who had been treated with chemotherapy and had afterwards completed a group-based supervised physical exercise program. The interviews were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim. MaxQDA was used for coding and analysis. A second assessor was involved in coding two of the interviews. Eight participants returned to work. Most said that they had suffered cognitive deficits that impaired their work performance. According to half of the participants, the support in RtW from their occupational physician had been insufficient. Overall, the majority of participants enjoyed the exercise program. The main perceived effects were "improved fitness" and "renewed energy." Most participants thought that physical exercise had likely contributed to their ability to return to work, primarily by increasing energy levels. Some believed that physical exercise had enhanced their work performance by improving their ability to cope with demanding work. Some respondents found that a supportive work environment stimulated their continuation of physical exercise. Cancer survivors experienced a positive influence of physical exercise on RtW and work performance and a positive influence of RtW on physical exercise. By stimulating and facilitating physical exercise during and after RtW, the time to lasting RtW may be shortened, work performance may be optimized, and sustained participation in physical exercise may be achieved. Stimulating and facilitating physical exercise before and during the process of RtW may enhance fitness and energy levels and may lower fatigue and cognitive symptoms during work. An integrated rehabilitation strategy combining physical exercise and

  9. Sexual and gender based violence against men in the Democratic Republic of Congo: effects on survivors, their families and the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Mervyn; Safari, Octave; Ramazani, Paul; Burnham, Gilbert; Glass, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    Media and service provider reports of sexual and gender based violence (SGBV) perpetrated against men in armed conflicts have increased. However, response to these reports has been limited, as existing evidence and programs have primarily focused on prevention and response to women and girl survivors of SGBV. This study aims to contribute to the evidence of SGBV experienced by males by advancing our understanding of the definition and characteristics of male SGBV and the overlap of health, social and economic consequences on the male survivor, his family and community in conflict and post-conflict settings. The qualitative study using purposive sampling was conducted from June-August 2010 in the South Kivu province of Eastern DRC, an area that has experienced over a decade of armed conflict. Semi structured individual interviews and focus group discussions were conducted with adult male survivors of SGBV, the survivors' wife and/or friend, health care and service providers, community members and leaders. This study found that SGBV against men, as for women, is multi-dimensional and has significant negative physical, mental, social and economic consequences for the male survivor and his family. SGBV perpetrated against men and boys is likely common within a conflict-affected region but often goes unreported by survivors and others due to cultural and social factors associated with sexual assaults, including survivor shame, fear of retaliation by perpetrators and stigma by community members. All key stakeholders in our study advocated for improvements and programs in several areas: (1) health care services, including capacity to identify survivors and increased access to clinical care and psychosocial support for male survivors; (2) economic development initiatives, including microfinance programs, for men and their families to assist them to regain their productive role in the family; (3) community awareness and education of SGBV against men to reduce stigma and

  10. Supplemental security income and social security disability insurance coverage among long-term childhood cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchhoff, Anne C; Parsons, Helen M; Kuhlthau, Karen A; Leisenring, Wendy; Donelan, Karen; Warner, Echo L; Armstrong, Gregory T; Robison, Leslie L; Oeffinger, Kevin C; Park, Elyse R

    2015-06-01

    Supplemental security income (SSI) and social security disability insurance (DI) are federal programs that provide disability benefits. We report on SSI/DI enrollment in a random sample of adult, long-term survivors of childhood cancer (n = 698) vs a comparison group without cancer (n = 210) from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study who completed a health insurance survey. A total of 13.5% and 10.0% of survivors had ever been enrolled on SSI or DI, respectively, compared with 2.6% and 5.4% of the comparison group. Cranial radiation doses of 25 Gy or more were associated with a higher risk of current SSI (relative risk [RR] = 3.93, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.05 to 7.56) and DI (RR = 3.65, 95% CI = 1.65 to 8.06) enrollment. Survivors with severe/life-threatening conditions were more often enrolled on SSI (RR = 3.77, 95% CI = 2.04 to 6.96) and DI (RR = 2.73, 95% CI = 1.45 to 5.14) compared with those with mild/moderate or no health conditions. Further research is needed on disability-related financial challenges after childhood cancer. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. A Congolese community-based health program for survivors of sexual violence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohli Anjalee

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many survivors of gender based violence (GBV in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC report barriers to access health services including, distance, cost, lack of trained providers and fear of stigma. In 2004, Foundation RamaLevina (FORAL, a Congolese health and social non-governmental organization, started a mobile health program for vulnerable women and men to address the barriers to access identified by GBV survivors and their families in rural South Kivu province, Eastern DRC. FORAL conducted a case study of the implementation of this program between July 2010-June 2011 in 6 rural villages. The case study engaged FORAL staff, partner health care providers, community leaders and survivors in developing and implementing a revised strategy with the goal of improving and sustaining health services. The case study focused on: (1 Expansion of mobile clinic services and visit schedule; (2 Clinical monitoring and evaluation system; and (3 Recognition, documentation and brief psychosocial support for symptoms suggestive of anxiety, depression and PTSD. During this period, FORAL treated 772 women of which 85% reported being survivors of sexual violence. Almost half of the women (45% reported never receiving health services after the last sexual assault. The majority of survivors reported symptoms consistent with STI. Male partner adherence to STI treatment was low (41%. The case study demonstrated areas of strengths in FORAL’s program, including improved access to health care by survivors and their male partner, enhanced quality of health education and facilitated regular monitoring, follow-up care and referrals. In addition, three critical areas were identified by FORAL that needed further development: provision of health services to young, unmarried women in a way that reduces possibility of future stigma, engaging male partners in health education and clinical care and strengthening linkages for referral of survivors and their partners

  12. The association between physical activity and health-related quality of life among breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Woo-Kyoung; Song, Sihan; Jung, So-Youn; Lee, Eunsook; Kim, Zisun; Moon, Hyeong-Gon; Noh, Dong-Young; Lee, Jung Eun

    2017-06-30

    The quality of life for breast cancer survivors has become increasingly important because of their high survival rate and prolonged life expectancy. The purpose of this study was to examine the association of physical activity following diagnosis and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in breast cancer survivors. We conducted a cross-sectional study of breast cancer survivors. A total of 231 women aged 21-78 years who had been diagnosed with stages I to III breast cancer and had breast cancer surgery at least 6 months prior were recruited from three hospitals between September 2012 and April 2015 and were included in this study. We asked participants about their HRQOL and engagement in physical activity using structured questionnaires. We examined the association between HRQOL levels and physical activity using a generalized linear model. Breast cancer survivors in the high physical activity group (3rd tertile) were more likely to have lower scores for fatigue (p for trend = 0.001) and pain (p for trend = 0.02) and higher scores for sexual function (p for trend = 0.007) than those in the low physical activity group (1st tertile). When we stratified participants by stage, we found increasing scores for physical functioning (p for trend =0.01) and decreasing scores for fatigue (p for trend = 0.02) with increasing levels of physical activity in breast cancer survivors with stage I breast cancer. In survivors with stages II and III, we found statistically significant associations with fatigue (p for trend = 0.02) and sexual functioning (p for trend = 0.001). In conclusion, engagement in physical activity was related to better health-related quality of life among breast cancer survivors. Our findings may warrant further prospective and intervention studies to support the benefit of physical activity in improving the quality of life and survival of Korean breast cancer survivors.

  13. Metabolic syndrome in breast cancer survivors with high carbohydrate consumption: The first report in community setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Boyoung; Kong, Sun-Young; Lee, Eun Kyung; Lee, Moo Hyun; Lee, Eun Sook

    2017-10-01

    This study was conducted to examine the prevalence of and lifestyle factors associated with the metabolic syndrome in breast cancer survivors and to compare those factors with controls without cancer in a community setting. This study included 584 female breast cancer survivors3 years after the initial diagnosis and 2336 age-matched cancer-free female controls from 39 community health examination centers located in 14 urban areas in Korea. The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome is shown. Factors associated with the metabolic syndrome were analyzed as odds ratios (ORs) in cancer survivors and controls; differences between the two groups in the ORs of associated factors were evaluated by calculating p-heterogeneity values. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in breast cancer survivors and age-matched controls were 26.8% and 26.9%, respectively. Higher percentage of caloric intake from carbohydrates was associated with increased metabolic syndrome only in the breast cancer survivors (OR for the highest vs. lowest quartile for survivors = 2.48 [95% CI = 1.20-5.14]; OR for controls = 1.11 [95% CI = 0.81-1.51]; P-heterogeneity = 0.046). Sweat-inducing exercise for ≥150 min/week was associated with a lower risk of metabolic syndrome only in controls (controls: OR = 0.72 [95% CI = 0.58-0.89]; survivors: OR = 0.88 [95% CI = 0.57-1.36]). Older age, higher body mass index, and a lower education level (≤12 years) was associated with an increased prevalence of metabolic syndrome in both groups. Our results suggest that, in regions with excess carbohydrate intake, the association of the metabolic syndrome with percentage of caloric intake from carbohydrate might be more prominent than exercise in breast cancer survivors, compared with general population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  14. Risk of hospitalization among survivors of childhood and adolescent acute lymphoblastic leukemia compared to siblings and a general population sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Judy Y; Smits-Seemann, Rochelle R; Kaul, Sapna; Fluchel, Mark N; Sweeney, Carol; Kirchhoff, Anne C

    2017-08-01

    Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) has a high survival rate, but cancer-related late effects in the early post-treatment years need documentation. Hospitalizations are an indicator of the burden of late effects. We identify rates and risk factors for hospitalization from five to ten years after diagnosis for childhood and adolescent ALL survivors compared to siblings and a matched population sample. 176 ALL survivors were diagnosed at ≤22 years between 1998 and 2008 and treated at an Intermountain Healthcare facility. The Utah Population Database identified siblings, an age- and sex-matched sample of the Utah population, and statewide inpatient hospital discharges. Sex- and birth year-adjusted Poisson models with Generalized Estimating Equations and robust standard errors calculated rates and rate ratios. Cox proportional hazards models identified demographic and clinical risk factors for hospitalizations among survivors. Hospitalization rates for survivors (Rate:3.76, 95% CI=2.22-6.36) were higher than siblings (Rate:2.69, 95% CI=1.01-7.18) and the population sample (Rate:1.87, 95% CI=1.13-3.09). Compared to siblings and population comparisons, rate ratios (RR) were significantly higher for survivors diagnosed between age 6 and 22 years (RR:2.87, 95% CI=1.03-7.97 vs siblings; RR:2.66, 95% CI=1.17-6.04 vs population comparisons). Rate ratios for diagnosis between 2004 and 2008 were significantly higher compared to the population sample (RR:4.29, 95% CI=1.49, 12.32), but not siblings (RR:2.73, 95% CI=0.54, 13.68). Survivors originally diagnosed with high-risk ALL did not have a significantly higher risk than siblings or population comparators. However, high-risk ALL survivors (Hazard ratio [HR]:3.36, 95% CI=1.33-8.45) and survivors diagnosed from 2004 to 2008 (HR:9.48, 95% CI=1.93-46.59) had the highest risk compared to their survivor counterparts. Five to ten years after diagnosis is a sensitive time period for hospitalizations in the ALL population. Survivors of

  15. The use of tonometry to predict mortality in patients undergoing abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soong, C V; Halliday, M I; Hood, J M; Rowlands, B J; Barros D'Sa, A A

    1998-01-01

    To assess the reliability of intramucosal pH (pHi) of the sigmoid colon, IL-6 concentration and the APACHE II score in predicting outcome in patients undergoing elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Prospective study. In 42 patients, measurements were made of the sigmoid pHi with the silicone tonometer and plasma IL-6 by enzyme linked immuno-sorbent assay (ELISA). The daily postoperative APACHE II scores were also calculated. In 29 patients a preoperative left ventricular ejection fraction was determined by gated radionuclide angiography. Four out of 42 patients who were studied died. The lowest perioperative pHi, the peak postoperative IL-6 concentration and APACHE II scores were significantly different in the survivors in comparison to the non-survivors. In the non-survivors, the fall in pHi preceded the time of patient's demise by at least 4 days. Significant correlations were observed between changes in pHi, IL-6 and APACHE II. Using receiver operating characteristic curves, pHi was shown to be the most predictive of mortality compared to the other variables. The simplicity, speed and practicality of using the tonometer adds to its superiority over the latter measurements. No relationship was found between ventricular ejection fraction, pHi and outcome. Although the number of patients is small, these results support pHi as a valuable predictor of outcome and also suggest a role for the gut in initiating the IL-6 and physiological responses.

  16. Employment status and occupational level of adult survivors of childhood cancer in Great Britain: The British childhood cancer survivor study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frobisher, Clare; Lancashire, Emma R; Jenkinson, Helen; Winter, David L; Kelly, Julie; Reulen, Raoul C; Hawkins, Michael M

    2017-06-15

    The British Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (BCCSS) provides the first detailed investigation of employment and occupation to be undertaken in a large population-based cohort. Previous studies have been limited by design issues such as using small numbers of survivors with specific diagnoses, and involved limited assessment of employment status and occupational level. The BCCSS includes 17,981 5-year survivors of childhood cancer. Employment status and occupational level were ascertained by questionnaire from eligible survivors (n = 14,836). Multivariate logistic regression was used to explore factors associated with employment and occupation, and to compare survivors to their demographic peers in the general population. Employment status was available for 10,257 survivors. Gender, current age, cancer type, radiotherapy, age at diagnosis and epilepsy were consistently associated with being: employed; unable to work; in managerial or non-manual occupations. Overall, survivors were less likely to be working than expected (OR (99% CI): 0.89 (0.81-0.98)), and this deficit was greatest for irradiated CNS neoplasm survivors (0.34 (0.28-0.41)). Compared to the general population, survivors were fivefold more likely to be unable to work due to illness/disability; the excess was 15-fold among CNS neoplasm survivors treated with radiotherapy. Overall survivors were less likely to be in managerial occupations than expected (0.85 (0.77-0.94)). However, bone sarcoma survivors were more likely to be in these occupations than expected (1.37 (1.01-1.85)) and also similarly for non-manual occupations (1.90 (1.37-2.62)). Survivors of retinoblastoma (1.55 (1.20-2.01)) and 'other' neoplasm group (1.62 (1.30-2.03)) were also more likely to be in non-manual occupations than expected. © 2017 The Authors International Journal of Cancer published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of UICC.

  17. PTSD prevalence among Polish World War II survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lis-Turlejska, Maja; Łuszczyńska, Aleksandra; Szumiał, Szymon

    2016-10-31

    Over the past decade research has been published in several Western European countries on the prevalence of PTSD among World War II survivors, mostly civilians. Prevalence rates ranged from 1.9% to 10.8 %. The aim of the study was to measure the frequency of PTSD occurrence among Polish WWII survivors. Data from 96 persons: 59 women and 37 men, aged 70-96 were analyzed. All participants were born before 1945. They completed Polish adaptations of: Posttraumatic Diagnostic Scale (PDS), Impact of Events Scale (IES), Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI) and WWII trauma related questionnaire. Prevalence rate of potential PTSD was 32,3% Mean values of both number and severity of symptoms of PTSD were significantly higher for respondents with at least one war related trauma comparing to the participants who did note relate any such trauma. Comparing to other studies on WWII related PTSD the prevalence rate of possible PTSD was very high. Looking for possible explanation of such results seems to be an important challenge.

  18. Who are happy survivors? Physical, psychosocial, and spiritual factors associated with happiness of breast cancer survivors during the transition from cancer patient to survivor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Danbee; Kim, Im-Ryung; Choi, Eun-Kyung; Yoon, Jung Hee; Lee, Se-Kyung; Lee, Jeong Eon; Nam, Seok Jin; Han, Wonshik; Noh, Dong-Young; Cho, Juhee

    2017-02-24

    This study aims to evaluate physical, psychosocial, and spiritual factors associated with happiness in breast cancer survivors during the reentry period. It is a cross-sectional study with 283 nonmetastatic breast cancer survivors who completed treatment within 1 year. We included survivors who completed questionnaires on happiness and health-related quality of life (QoL) 2 years after cancer diagnosis. Happiness and QoL was measured using the Subjective Happiness Scale and EORTC QLQ-C30, respectively. Multivariable logistic regression was used to find factors associated with happiness. The mean age of the study participants was 48.5 ± 7.8 years. Among the 283 survivors, 14.5%, 43.8%, 32.5%, and 2.1% reported being "very happy," "happy," "neutral," and "not happy at all," respectively. Happy survivors reported a better general health status and QoL (67.6 vs 49.6; P Happy survivors were more likely to feel certain about the future (27.2% vs 11.9%, P happiness. During the reentry period, breast cancer survivors who are hopeful and have a clear purpose in life are more likely to be happy than those who are not. Setting proper life goals might be beneficial to help breast cancer survivors who experience persistent QoL issues. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Factors associated with alcohol drinking behavior of cancer survivors: The Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Hyeonyoung; Song, Yun-Mi; Shin, Jin-Young

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the factors associated with drinking behavior of cancer survivors after cancer diagnosis. The study subjects were 906 adult cancer survivors who had reportedly drunk alcohol before cancer diagnosis and participated in the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys conducted from 2007 to 2013. Among them, 360 abstained from alcohol drinking after cancer diagnosis. We categorized remaining 546 persistent drinkers into high-risk drinker (consuming≥7 glasses of alcohol for men and≥5 glasses of alcohol for women at one sitting at the frequency of at least once a month) or moderate drinker. We used multiple logistic regression analysis to evaluate risk factors associated with drinking behavior. The high-risk drinkers occupied 27.1% (148 survivors) of the persistent alcohol drinking survivors. Age increase (OR=0.96; 95% CI 0.93-0.99), female sex (OR=0.15; 95% CI 0.08-0.28), and increase of time lapse (by 1-year) after cancer diagnosis (OR=0.94; 95% CI 0.92-0.97) were associated with a lower risk of high-risk drinking as compared with moderate drinking. Meanwhile,≤9years of education (OR=1.99; 95% CI 1.10-3.60), alcohol-related cancer (OR=2.09; 95% CI 1.23-3.56), and current smoking (OR=1.92; 95% CI 1.03-3.59) were associated with increased risk of high-risk drinking of cancer survivors. These findings suggest that greater efforts for preventing high-risk drinking should be laid on the cancer survivors, with consideration of individual sociodemographic characteristics, especially when the survivors had been diagnosed with alcohol-related cancer. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Smokeless and Dual Tobacco Use among Males Surviving Childhood Cancer: A report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klosky, James L.; Hum, Ashley M.; Zhang, Nan; Ali, Khatidja S.; Srivastava, D. Kumar; Klesges, Robert C.; Emmons, Karen M.; Ness, Kirsten K.; Stovall, Marilyn; Robison, Leslie L.; Hudson, Melissa M.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer survivors experience treatment-related complications that can be exacerbated by tobacco use. This study reports the prevalence of smokeless (ST) and dual tobacco (DT) use, compares these rates to the US population, and examines tobacco risk factors among males surviving childhood cancer. Data from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS) 2007 survey were used (N = 3378). Standardized incidence ratios (SIR) were obtained by comparing CCSS data to the National Survey on Drug Use and Health. Logistic regression was used to evaluate associations between risk factors and tobacco use. Among male survivors, 8.3% and 2.3% were current ST and DT users, respectively. Survivors were less likely than population males to report ST (SIR = 0.64, 95% CI = 0.57 – 0.72) or DT (SIR = 0.37, CI = 0.29 – 0.46) use; however, non-white survivors aged 35–49 years were more likely to use ST (SIR = 2.32, CI = 1.27 – 3.90). ST use was associated (p < 0.05) with younger age at diagnosis, lower education, being married or divorced/separated, and not living in the Northeastern US, while history of cardiovascular- and/or pulmonary-toxic treatment was protective. DT use was associated with younger age at diagnosis, lower education, divorce/separation, and high psychological distress. Having active heart or circulatory conditions was protective. Although ST/DT use is generally low among childhood cancer survivors, these findings suggest that tobacco use screening should be expanded to include ST use and that ST-specific education and cessation interventions should be provided to users. Screening and intervening for ST/DT use in childhood cancer survivors will reduce tobacco-related morbidity and mortality. PMID:23580700

  1. Yoga of Awareness program for menopausal symptoms in breast cancer survivors: results from a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, James W; Carson, Kimberly M; Porter, Laura S; Keefe, Francis J; Seewaldt, Victoria L

    2009-10-01

    Breast cancer survivors have limited options for the treatment of hot flashes and related symptoms. Further, therapies widely used to prevent recurrence in survivors, such as tamoxifen, tend to induce or exacerbate menopausal symptoms. The aim of this preliminary, randomized controlled trial was to evaluate the effects of a yoga intervention on menopausal symptoms in a sample of survivors of early-stage breast cancer (stages IA-IIB). Thirty-seven disease-free women experiencing hot flashes were randomized to the 8-week Yoga of Awareness program (gentle yoga poses, meditation, and breathing exercises) or to wait-list control. The primary outcome was daily reports of hot flashes collected at baseline, posttreatment, and 3 months after treatment via an interactive telephone system. Data were analyzed by intention to treat. At posttreatment, women who received the yoga program showed significantly greater improvements relative to the control condition in hot-flash frequency, severity, and total scores and in levels of joint pain, fatigue, sleep disturbance, symptom-related bother, and vigor. At 3 months follow-up, patients maintained their treatment gains in hot flashes, joint pain, fatigue, symptom-related bother, and vigor and showed additional significant gains in negative mood, relaxation, and acceptance. This pilot study provides promising support for the beneficial effects of a comprehensive yoga program for hot flashes and other menopausal symptoms in early-stage breast cancer survivors.

  2. Physical activity and psychological health in breast cancer survivors: an application of basic psychological needs theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Diane E; Meldrum, Lindsay S; Wilson, Philip M; Sabiston, Catherine M

    2013-11-01

    The role of psychological need satisfaction in terms of understanding the mechanisms through which leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) is associated with psychological health in breast cancer survivors who have recently completed treatment was examined. Adopting a longitudinal two-wave design, female breast cancer survivors (N = 144) completed self-report instruments of LTPA, psychological need satisfaction, and psychological health at two points separated by 3 months. The first test administration period was 6 months following the completion of primary treatment. Change score analyses demonstrated that greater LTPA across the 3-month period was associated with greater perceptions of well-being (rs ranged from .17 to .20) and lower ill-being (rs ranged from -.06 to -.21). Results of multiple mediation analyses demonstrated that psychological need fulfillment underpinned the LTPA-well-being relationship only. Collectively these findings indicate that increased engagement in LTPA represents one factor associated with greater psychological health in breast cancer survivors, with fulfilling the psychological need for relatedness most salient in understanding this relationship. Continued investigation into the mechanisms associated with reductions in ill-being in breast cancer survivors appear justified. © 2013 The International Association of Applied Psychology.

  3. A pilot study of expressive writing intervention among Chinese-speaking breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qian; Zheng, Dianhan; Young, Lucy; Kagawa-Singer, Marjorie; Loh, Alice

    2012-09-01

    Little attention has been focused on Asian American breast cancer survivor's psychological needs. No outcome-based psychosocial interventions have been reported to target at this population. Expressive writing interventions have been previously shown to improve health outcomes among non-Hispanic White breast cancer populations. This pilot study aimed to test the cultural sensitivity, feasibility, and potential health benefits of an expressive writing intervention among Chinese-speaking breast cancer survivors. Participants (N = 19) were asked to write about their deepest thoughts and feelings, their coping efforts, and positive thoughts and feelings regarding their experience with breast cancer each week for 3 weeks. Health outcomes were assessed at baseline, 3, and 6 months after the intervention. A Community-Based Participatory Research Approach (CBPR) is used. Expressive writing was associated with medium and large effect sizes (η(p)² = 0.066∼0.208) in improving multiple health outcomes (quality of life, fatigue, posttraumatic stress, intrusive thoughts, and positive affect) at follow-ups. Participants perceived the study to be valuable. The study yielded high compliance and completion rates. Expressive writing is associated with long-term improvement of health outcomes among Chinese breast cancer survivors and has the potential to be utilized as a support strategy for minority cancer survivors. In addition, CBPR is valuable in improving feasibility and cultural sensitivity of the intervention in understudied populations. Future studies employing randomized, controlled trial designs are warranted. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  4. Statistics: Number of Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 5 million), gynecologic (8%, 1.3 million) and melanoma (8%, 1.2 million).* 2, 3 For additional ... For Researchers For Health Care Professionals For Advocates Definitions, Statistics and Graphs Definitions Statistics Graphs Funding History ...

  5. Management of Unexplained Symptoms in Survivors of Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuerstein, Michael; Bruns, Gina L.; Pollman, Courtney; Todd, Briana L.

    2010-01-01

    Quality health care for survivors of cancer must evaluate and manage symptoms that are reported at the surveillance visit but are not linked to a cancer recurrence or a new cancer. At present, this does not always occur. This article analyzes quality of health care for survivors of cancer, taking empirical evidence and clinical expertise into consideration. Although emotional distress on the part of the survivor of cancer may exacerbate or even explain the presence of experienced symptoms, there are other potential explanations as well. When survivors present with persistent symptoms (even if unexplained) after cancer diagnosis and treatment, the symptoms can impact the survivor's function and well-being. Oncologists and other providers need to assess and directly target these symptoms for appropriate triage to those who can best help these survivors reduce the symptoms and their impact. PMID:21358961

  6. THE PREVENTION PROGRAMS OF PHYSICAL REHABILITATION FOR CHERNOBYL DISASTER SURVIVORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korobeynikov G.V.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study: approbation of the prevention program of physical rehabilitation for Chernobyl disaster survivors in lifestyle aspects. Sixty persons who were disaster survivors and workers of Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant aged 32-60 have rehabilitation during 21 days. The complex of training prevention programs of physical and psycho-emotional rehabilitation methods was elaborated. The study of efficacy of training prevention programs among Chernobyl disaster survivors. The results showed the improvement of psycho-emotional status and normalization of cardiovascular vegetative regulation after training prevention programs in Chernobyl disasters survivors. The studies show that the preventive programs for Chernobyl disaster survivors in lifestyle aspects had the high effect. This displays the decrease of tempo of aging and the improving of physical and psychological health status of Chernobyl disaster survivors during preventive course.

  7. The epidemiology of long- and short-term cancer survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jarlbæk, Lene; Christensen, Linda; Bruera, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    , 2.4% lung cancer. Short-term survivors: 21% lung cancer, 7.2% breast cancer. Chemotherapy was provided to 15% of all patients, and to 10% of the 60 + year olds. Discussion. The epidemiology of long- and short-term survivors shows significant differences with regard to age at TOCD, cancer types......' difference in age at TOCD was seen between long- and short-term survivors, with median ages of 60 versus 72 years, respectively. Females comprised 64% of long-term, and 46% of short-term survivors. The proportion of breast and lung cancers differed between the groups: Long-term survivors: 31% breast cancer......Introduction. In this study, we present data from a population-based cohort of incident cancer patients separated in long- and short-term survivors. Our aim was to procure denominators for use in the planning of rehabilitation and palliative care programs. Material and methods. A registry...

  8. Providing services to trafficking survivors: Understanding practices across the globe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Jordan J; Kynn, Jamie; Stylianou, Amanda M; Postmus, Judy L

    2018-01-01

    Human trafficking is a global issue, with survivors representing all genders, ages, races, ethnicities, religions, and countries. However, little research exists that identifies effective practices in supporting survivors of human trafficking. The research that does exist is Western-centric. To fill this gap in the literature, the goal of this research was to understand practices used throughout the globe with adult human trafficking survivors. A qualitative approach was utilized. Providers from 26 countries, across six different continents, were interviewed to allow for a comprehensive and multi-faceted understanding of practices in working with survivors. Participants identified utilizing an empowerment-based, survivor, and human life-centered approach to working with survivors, emphasized the importance of engaging in community level interventions, and highlighted the importance of government recognition of human trafficking. Findings provide information from the perspective of advocates on best practices in the field that can be used by agencies to enhance human trafficking programming.

  9. Mental distress and health care use among survivors of adolescent and young adult cancer: A cross-sectional analysis of the National Health Interview Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Sapna; Avila, Jaqueline C; Mutambudzi, Miriam; Russell, Heidi; Kirchhoff, Anne C; Schwartz, Cindy L

    2017-03-01

    The current study was conducted to examine the prevalence and correlates of mental distress among survivors of adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer and a comparison group. A total of 875 AYA cancer survivors who were diagnosed between the ages of 15 and 39 years and who were at least 5 years from their initial diagnosis were identified from the 2013 and 2014 National Health Interview Surveys. A comparison group was created. The Kessler nonspecific mental/psychological distress scale was used to examine none/low, moderate, and severe distress. The issues of whether individuals talked to mental health professionals within the previous year and if they could afford mental health care also were examined. Variables (ie, demographics, behavioral [eg, smoking status], comorbidity, and mental health visits) associated with distress among the 2 groups were identified using multinomial logistic regressions. Survivors reported mental distress more often than the comparison group (moderate: 23.2% vs 16.9%; and severe: 8.4% vs 3.0% [Pmental health care more often (6.4% vs 2.3%; P = .002). Moreover, 74.7% and 52.2% of survivors, respectively, with moderate and severe distress had not talked to a mental health professional. Contrary to the comparison group, survivors who were current smokers reported severe distress more often compared with nonsmokers (relative risk, 3.59; 95% confidence interval, 1.46-8.84 [P = .01]). Having public and no insurance versus private insurance and report of sleep-related trouble within the previous week were found to be associated with greater distress among survivors. AYA cancer survivors are more likely to demonstrate mental distress than individuals without cancer. Nevertheless, few survivors may be receiving professional mental health services. Survivors need greater access to mental health screening and counseling to address the current gaps in care delivery. Cancer 2017;123:869-78. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American

  10. Reduced male fertility in childhood cancer survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Hee Lee

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available With advances in cancer treatment, more pediatric cancer patients have increased their life expectancy. Because cancer-related therapy causes various physical and psychological problems, many male survivors experience later problems with thyroid and sexual functions, and with growth. As outcomes have improved, more survivors need to maintain their reproductive function to maximize their long-term quality of life. Cancer and cancer-related treatment can impair fertility by damage to the testes, to the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, or to the genitourinary organs. Prior radiation therapy to the testes, the use of alkylating agents, and central hypogonadism further impair fertility in male survivors of childhood cancer. Following any course of chemotherapy, peripubertal maturation, any testicular volume changes, and symptoms of androgen deficiency should be monitored systematically. If patients request fertility testing, spermatogenesis status can be evaluated either directly by semen analysis or indirectly by determination of the levels of testosterone/gonadotropins and by monitoring any changes in testicular volume. According to the patient's condition, semen cryopreservation, hormonal therapy, or assisted reproduction technologies should be provided.

  11. Process theology's relevance for older survivors of domestic violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowland, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    Pastoral work with survivors of domestic violence may reveal theological struggles. Understandings of scripture that reinforce a sense of powerlessness and alienation from God may contribute to an impaired relationship and limit resources for healing. One framework for re-imaging a relationship with God is process theology. This framework was applied to a case study for one survivor. The application resulted in a line of inquiry that may assist survivors in their healing process.

  12. Physical Activity in Child and Adolescent Cancer Survivors: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Gilliam, Margaux B.; Schwebel, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Childhood cancer survivors are at increased risk for future health problems. As such, physical activity (PA) has been targeted as a health promotion priority in child and adolescent cancer survivors. Research indicates that a large portion of pediatric survivors do not meet PA recommendations. Using Bronfenbrenner’s ecological theory as a framework, this review presents a conceptual model to explain child and adolescent survivors’ PA. The model considers predictors of PA across six domains: (...

  13. Rehabilitation in cancer survivors - with focus on physical activity

    OpenAIRE

    Gjerset, Gunhild Maria

    2012-01-01

    The number of cancer survivors in the Western world has markedly increased over the last few decades. With the growing number of survivors, it has become relevant to address the health of cancer survivors and how to improve it. The malignancy, and more often the cancer treatment, might have negative effects upon physical and psychological aspects of the survivors’ health. For those who experience such adverse effects, professional assistance in addition to their own efforts might be needed in...

  14. THE PREVENTION PROGRAMS OF PHYSICAL REHABILITATION FOR CHERNOBYL DISASTER SURVIVORS

    OpenAIRE

    Korobeynikov G.V.; Drojjin V.U.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study: approbation of the prevention program of physical rehabilitation for Chernobyl disaster survivors in lifestyle aspects. Sixty persons who were disaster survivors and workers of Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant aged 32-60 have rehabilitation during 21 days. The complex of training prevention programs of physical and psycho-emotional rehabilitation methods was elaborated. The study of efficacy of training prevention programs among Chernobyl disaster survivors. The results...

  15. Chronic pain in breast cancer survivors: comparison of psychosocial, surgical, and medical characteristics between survivors with and without pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schou Bredal, Inger; Smeby, Nina A; Ottesen, Stig; Warncke, Torhild; Schlichting, Ellen

    2014-11-01

    According to the literature, 25%-60% of women treated for breast cancer, regardless of the stage, experience pain. Many risk factors have been suggested, with many possible confounding factors. The aim was to investigate psychosocial, surgical, and medical factors associated with chronic pain by comparing breast cancer survivors with chronic pain with survivors without chronic pain. In addition, we investigated the prevalence, intensity, and body location of chronic pain after breast cancer treatment nationwide. A nationwide postal survey of 1332 women who received surgery and adjuvant therapy for breast cancer in Norway two to six years before the onset of this study. A total of 832 women (63%) returned the questionnaires, and 41% reported pain, of which 51% had mild, 41% moderate, and 8% severe pain. Among the women who experienced pain, 33.8% reported symptoms and signs of neuropathic pain. Young age (odds ratio [OR], 0.95; 95% CI, 0.93-0.98; P pain (OR, 2.37; 95% CI, 1.72-3.26; P chronic pain. Young age, previous comorbidities (such as back pain, arthritis, arthrosis, and fibromyalgia), and combined treatment with axillary lymph node dissection, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy were risk factors for chronic pain. Whether depression or anxiety is a risk factor for chronic pain remains unclear. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Moderators of the effects of group-based physical exercise on cancer survivors' quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalter, Joeri; Buffart, Laurien M; Korstjens, Irene; van Weert, Ellen; Brug, Johannes; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M; Mesters, Ilse; van den Borne, Bart; Hoekstra-Weebers, Josette E H M; Ros, Wynand J G; May, Anne M

    2015-09-01

    This study explored demographic, clinical, and psychological moderators of the effect of a group-based physical exercise intervention on global quality of life (QoL) among cancer survivors who completed treatment. Cancer survivors were assigned to a 12-week physical exercise (n = 147) or a wait-list control group (n = 62). The main outcome measure was global QoL, assessed with the EORTC QLQ-C30 at baseline and 12 weeks later. Potential moderators were age, gender, education level, marital status, employment status, type of treatment, time since treatment, the presence of comorbidities, fatigue, general self-efficacy, depression, and anxiety. Linear regression analyses were used to test effect modification of the intervention by each moderator variable using interaction tests (p ≤ 0.10). The physical exercise intervention effect on global QoL was larger for cancer survivors who received radiotherapy (β = 10.3, 95 % confidence interval (CI) = 4.4; 16.2) than for cancer survivors who did not receive radiotherapy (β = 1.8, 95 % CI = -5.9; 9.5, p interaction = 0.10), larger for cancer survivors who received a combination of chemoradiotherapy (β = 13.0, 95 % CI = 6.0; 20.1) than for those who did not receive this combination of treatments (β = 2.5, 95 % CI = -3.7; 8.7, p interaction = 0.02), and larger for cancer survivors with higher baseline levels of fatigue (β = 12.6, 95 % CI = 5.7; 19.6) than for those with lower levels (β = 2.4, 95 % CI = -3.9; 8.7, p interaction = 0.03). No other moderating effects were found. This study suggests that cancer treatment modality and baseline fatigue levels moderate the effect of a physical exercise program on cancer survivors'global QoL.

  17. Health Behaviors and Associated Sociodemographic Factors in Cervical Cancer Survivors Compared with Matched Non-Cancer Controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Boyoung; Kim, Se Ik; Seo, Sang-Soo; Kang, Sokbom; Park, Sang-Yoon; Lim, Myong Cheol

    2016-01-01

    We explored the prevalence of smoking, alcohol consumption, physical activity, and obesity in cervical cancer survivors and examined associations between sociodemographic factors and each health behavior. We studied 448 cervical cancer survivors ≥2 years after their initial diagnosis who had completed treatment. The total sample consisted of these survivors, and 4,480 cancer-free controls who were grouped into 5-year age cohorts and matched to the survivors in terms of both education and monthly household income. The prevalence of current smoking, current alcohol consumption, physical inactivity, and obesity in cervical cancer survivors (2.68, 23.88, 62.02, and 32.81%, respectively) did not differ significantly from those of matched non-cancer controls. Age (younger), marital status (married), and education (≥college) were associated with lower probabilities of current alcohol consumption (odds ratio [OR] = 0.91, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.88-0.95; OR = 0.42, 95% CI = 0.23-0.78; OR = 0.49, 95% CI = 0.25-0.97, respectively). A monthly household income ≥$2,000, being employed, and self-rated health status (less healthy) were associated with physical inactivity (OR = 0.61, 95% CI = 0.37-0.99; OR = 2.16, 95% CI = 1.36-3.42; OR = 1.94, 95% CI = 1.23-3.05, respectively). Both age and number of years since diagnosis were associated with obesity (OR = 1.04, 95% CI = 1.01-1.08; OR = 0.38; 95% CI = 0.20-0.72, respectively). The health behaviors of cervical cancer survivors did not differ from those of matched cancer-free controls. As health behaviors are modifiable, identification of cervical cancer survivors who are at risk of an unhealthy lifestyle would allow individual- and population-based intervention programs to more effectively use their limited resources.

  18. Prevalence, risk factors, and response to treatment for hypersomnia of central origin in survivors of childhood brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Raja B; Merchant, Thomas E; Sadighi, Zsila S; Bello, Mercedes S; Lu, Zhaohua; Sykes, April; Wise, Merrill S; Crabtree, Valerie M; Zabrowski, Jennifer; Simmons, Andrea; Clark, Mary E; Mandrell, Belinda N

    2018-01-01

    Daytime sleepiness is recognized in childhood brain tumor survivors. Our objective was to determine prevalence, risk factors for PSG/MLST proven hypersomnia/narcolepsy, and response to stimulants in childhood brain tumor survivors. Standard PSG/MSLT criteria were used to diagnose hypersomnia/narcolepsy. Medical records of brain tumor survivors having undergone a PSG/MSLT were reviewed for the diagnostic code of hypersomnia/narcolepsy. Survivors with hypersomnia/narcolepsy were matched with 2-3 survivors without reported hypersomnia/narcolepsy by age at tumor diagnosis, gender, and time from tumor diagnosis. Between January 2000 to April 2015, 39 of the 2336 brain tumor patients treated at our institution were diagnosed with hypersomnia/narcolepsy for a prevalence rate of 1670/100,000. Hypersomnia/narcolepsy was diagnosed at a median of 6.1 years (range 0.4-13.2) from tumor diagnosis and 4.7 years (range - 1.5 to 10.4) from cranial radiation. Midline tumor location (OR 4.6, CI 1.7-12.2, p = 0.002) and anti-epilepsy drug (AED) use (OR 11, CI 2.4-54) correlated with hypersomnia/narcolepsy while radiation dose > 30 Gray trended towards significance (OR 1.8, CI 0.9-3.6); posterior fossa tumor location reduced the risk (OR 0.1, CI 0.04-0.5, p = 0.002). AED use also correlated with midline tumor location. Thirty-seven survivors were treated with stimulants and reported improved wakefulness and school performance [response rate CI 0.97 (0.86-0.99) and 0.83 (0.65-0.94)]. Prevalence of hypersomnia/narcolepsy among childhood brain tumor survivors was higher than the general population. Tumor location and radiation dose were possible risk factors, and stimulants were reported to be beneficial.

  19. Characterizing neurocognitive late effects in childhood leukemia survivors using a combination of neuropsychological and cognitive neuroscience measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Der Plas, Ellen; Erdman, Lauren; Nieman, Brian J; Weksberg, Rosanna; Butcher, Darci T; O'connor, Deborah L; Aufreiter, Susanne; Hitzler, Johann; Guger, Sharon L; Schachar, Russell J; Ito, Shinya; Spiegler, Brenda J

    2017-10-10

    Knowledge about cognitive late effects in survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is largely based on standardized neuropsychological measures and parent reports. To examine whether cognitive neuroscience paradigms provided additional insights into neurocognitive and behavioral late effects in ALL survivors, we assessed cognition and behavior using a selection of cognitive neuroscience tasks and standardized measures probing domains previously demonstrated to be affected by chemotherapy. 130 ALL survivors and 158 control subjects, between 8 and 18 years old at time of testing, completed the n-back (working memory) and stop-signal (response inhibition) tasks. ALL survivors also completed standardized measures of intelligence (Wechsler Intelligence Scales [WISC-IV]), motor skills (Grooved Pegboard), math abilities (WIAT-III), and executive functions (Delis-Kaplan Executive Function System). Parents completed behavioral measures of executive functions (Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function [BRIEF]) and attention (Conners-3). ALL survivors exhibited deficiencies in working memory and response inhibition compared with controls. ALL survivors also exhibited deficits on WISC-IV working memory and processing speed, Grooved Pegboard, WIAT-III addition and subtraction fluency, and numerical operations, as well as DKEFS number-letter switching. Parent reports suggested more attention deficits (Conners-3) and behavioral difficulties (BRIEF) in ALL survivors compared with referenced norms. Low correspondence between standardized and experimental measures of working memory and response inhibition was noted. The use of cognitive neuroscience paradigms complements our understanding of the cognitive deficits evident after treatment of ALL. These measures could further delineate cognitive processes involved in neurocognitive late effects, providing opportunities to explore their underlying mechanisms.

  20. Lost Productivity in Stroke Survivors: An Econometrics Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Manav V; Hackam, Daniel G; Silver, Frank L; Laporte, Audrey; Kapral, Moira K

    2016-01-01

    Stroke leads to a substantial societal economic burden. Loss of productivity among stroke survivors is a significant contributor to the indirect costs associated with stroke. We aimed to characterize productivity and factors associated with employability in stroke survivors. We used the Canadian Community Health Survey 2011-2012 to identify stroke survivors and employment status. We used multivariable logistic models to determine the impact of stroke on employment and on factors associated with employability, and used Heckman models to estimate the effect of stroke on productivity (number of hours worked/week and hourly wages). We included data from 91,633 respondents between 18 and 70 years and identified 923 (1%) stroke survivors. Stroke survivors were less likely to be employed (adjusted OR 0.39, 95% CI 0.33-0.46) and had hourly wages 17.5% (95% CI 7.7-23.7) lower compared to the general population, although there was no association between work hours and being a stroke survivor. We found that factors like older age, not being married, and having medical comorbidities were associated with lower odds of employment in stroke survivors in our sample. Stroke survivors are less likely to be employed and they earn a lower hourly wage than the general population. Interventions such as dedicated vocational rehabilitation and policies targeting return to work could be considered to address this lost productivity among stroke survivors. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Life satisfaction in adult survivors of childhood brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crom, Deborah B; Li, Zhenghong; Brinkman, Tara M; Hudson, Melissa M; Armstrong, Gregory T; Neglia, Joseph; Ness, Kirsten K

    2014-01-01

    Adult survivors of childhood brain tumors experience multiple, significant, lifelong deficits as a consequence of their malignancy and therapy. Current survivorship literature documents the substantial impact such impairments have on survivors' physical health and quality of life. Psychosocial reports detail educational, cognitive, and emotional limitations characterizing survivors as especially fragile, often incompetent, and unreliable in evaluating their circumstances. Anecdotal data suggest some survivors report life experiences similar to those of healthy controls. The aim of our investigation was to determine whether life satisfaction in adult survivors of childhood brain tumors differs from that of healthy controls and to identify potential predictors of life satisfaction in survivors. This cross-sectional study compared 78 brain tumor survivors with population-based matched controls. Chi-square tests, t tests, and linear regression models were used to investigate patterns of life satisfaction and identify potential correlates. Results indicated that life satisfaction of adult survivors of childhood brain tumors was similar to that of healthy controls. Survivors' general health expectations emerged as the primary correlate of life satisfaction. Understanding life satisfaction as an important variable will optimize the design of strategies to enhance participation in follow-up care, reduce suffering, and optimize quality of life in this vulnerable population. © 2014 by Association of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Nurses.

  2. Objectively measured physical activity and cognitive functioning in breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinac, Catherine R; Godbole, Suneeta; Kerr, Jacqueline; Natarajan, Loki; Patterson, Ruth E; Hartman, Sheri J

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to explore the relationship between objectively measured physical activity and cognitive functioning in breast cancer survivors. Participants were 136 postmenopausal breast cancer survivors. Cognitive functioning was assessed using a comprehensive computerized neuropsychological test. Seven-day physical activity was assessed using hip-worn accelerometers. Linear regression models examined associations of minutes per day of physical activity at various intensities on individual cognitive functioning domains. The partially adjusted model controlled for primary confounders (model 1), and subsequent adjustments were made for chemotherapy history (model 2) and body mass index (BMI) (model 3). Interaction and stratified models examined BMI as an effect modifier. Moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was associated with information processing speed. Specifically, 10 min of MVPA was associated with a 1.35-point higher score (out of 100) on the information processing speed domain in the partially adjusted model and a 1.29-point higher score when chemotherapy was added to the model (both p activity was not significantly associated with any of the measured domains of cognitive function. MVPA may have favorable effects on information processing speed in breast cancer survivors, particularly among overweight or obese women. Interventions targeting increased physical activity may enhance aspects of cognitive function among breast cancer survivors.

  3. Human papillomavirus vaccination and the primary prevention of cancer: implications for survivors of childhood cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klosky, James L; Foster, Rebecca H; Hodges, Jason; Peasant, Courtney; Gamble, Heather; McDermott, Michael J; Rao, Preeti

    2012-01-01

    Effective vaccination is now available to prevent human papillomavirus (HPV), the most common sexually transmitted infection and the cause of cervical cancer, the second most common cancer among women worldwide. HPV vaccine uptake is particularly important for females surviving cancer, who are at high risk for HPV-related complication due to the direct and indirect effects of cancer therapy. Thus, Version 3.0 of the Children's Oncology Group Long-Term Follow-Up Guidelines for Survivors of Childhood, Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer recommends HPV vaccination for all eligible females surviving childhood cancer. Because this vaccine was only FDA approved in 2006, little is known about the complexity of vaccination uptake among those surviving childhood cancer. This chapter describes HPV vaccination and its usefulness in survivors of childhood cancer, provides a rationale for describing survivors as being at increased risk for HPV-related complication, identifies factors that are predictive of HPV vaccination, and discusses the utilization of these predictors in designing strategies to promote adherence to the HPV vaccination recommendations among survivors.

  4. Relationship of Self-reported Attentional Fatigue to Perceived Work Ability in Breast Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Ah, Diane; Storey, Susan; Crouch, Adele; Johns, Shelley A; Dodson, Jill; Dutkevitch, Sarah

    Breast cancer survivors (BCSs) have identified attentional fatigue, a decrease in the ability to focus, as a persistent daily challenge; however, little is known regarding its impact on work ability. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between attentional fatigue and perceived work ability in BCSs controlling for the known covariates of age, education, household income, and time posttreatment. A cross-sectional, descriptive design was used. Breast cancer survivors who were currently employed and at least 1 year post-adjuvant treatment participated. Breast cancer survivors completed the Attentional Function Index and Work Ability Index questionnaires. Descriptive statistics, linear regression, and Fisher exact test were used for analysis. Sixty-eight female BCSs, ranging from 29 to 68 years of age (mean, 52.1 [SD, 8.6]) and on average 4.97 (SD, 3.36) years posttreatment, participated. More than one-fourth of BCSs (26.5%) reported poor to moderate perceived work ability, indicating substantial concerns regarding work performance. Attentional fatigue was found to significantly predict perceived work ability (P work ability. Attentional fatigue is a prevalent symptom posttreatment that is negatively related to perceived work ability in BCSs. Nurses are in a prime position to assess and intervene to alleviate attentional fatigue to improve work ability. Findings suggest a need for individual, comprehensive survivorship care plans to effectively address symptoms that impact work ability and, ultimately, the quality of life of cancer survivors.

  5. Quality of life concerns and depression among hematopoietic stem cell transplant survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosher, Catherine E; DuHamel, Katherine N; Rini, Christine; Corner, Geoffrey; Lam, Joanne; Redd, William H

    2011-09-01

    This study examined quality of life, transplant-related concerns, and depressive symptoms and their demographic and medical correlates at 1 to 3 years following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). HSCT survivors (N=406) completed telephone-administered questionnaires that assessed demographic variables, functional status, quality of life, transplant-related concerns, and depressive symptoms. The most prevalent concerns among HSCT survivors included physical symptoms (e.g., fatigue and pain), maintaining current health status and employment, changes in appearance, and lack of sexual interest and satisfaction. In addition, almost one-third (32%) of survivors age 40 years and younger reported concern about their ability to have children. Unemployed survivors and those with lower incomes and worse functional status were more likely to experience poorer quality of life in multiple domains. Fifteen percent of the sample reported moderate to severe depressive symptoms, and these symptoms were higher among allogeneic transplant recipients and those with lower functional status. Results suggest that interventions are needed to address physical symptoms, coping with an uncertain future, infertility, and sexual issues during the early phase of HSCT survivorship.

  6. Yoga for Persistent Fatigue in Breast Cancer Survivors: Results of a Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julienne E. Bower

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Approximately one-third of breast cancer survivors experiences persistent fatigue for months or years after successful treatment completion. There is a lack of evidence-based treatments for cancer-related fatigue, particularly among cancer survivors. This single-arm pilot study evaluated the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of a yoga intervention for fatigued breast cancer survivors based on the Iyengar tradition. Iyengar yoga prescribes specific poses for individuals with specific medical problems and conditions; this trial emphasized postures believed to be effective for reducing fatigue among breast cancer survivors, including inversions and backbends performed with the support of props. Twelve women were enrolled in the trial, and 11 completed the full 12-week course of treatment. There was a significant improvement in fatigue scores from pre- to post-intervention that was maintained at the 3-month post-intervention followup. Significant improvements were also observed in measures of physical function, depressed mood, and quality of life. These results support the acceptability of this intervention and suggest that it may have beneficial effects on persistent post-treatment fatigue. However, results require replication in a larger randomized controlled trial.

  7. Long-term follow-up of retinoblastoma survivors: Experience from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachna Seth

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Retinoblastoma (Rb is the most common primary intraocular tumor of infancy and childhood. Survivors' ocular and visual problems and increased risk for subsequent malignancy are well documented, but data on long-term health status of Rb survivors are limited, this being particularly true for India. Methodology: Children who had completed treatment for Rb at least 2 years ago before and were under follow-up at the after cancer treatment clinic were evaluated. Results: In our series of 213 patients, the median age was 29 months, there was a male preponderance, and majority had unilateral disease. Enucleation was done in almost three-fourth and 3% underwent bilateral enucleation. Majority of the patients received chemotherapy, and few received radiation. Growth was affected in about one-third and majority were those who had received radiation. Diminished vision was noticed in about one-sixth. Orbital hypoplasia and contracted socket were seen in 14.1% cases. 2.7% were hearing impaired. About one-sixth had a global intelligence delay. Second neoplasms were seen in 0.01%. No other abnormalities were seen. Conclusions: Common late effects in our Rb survivors include diminished vision in the salvage eye, intellectual disability, and contracted socket; there is a need for timely institution of prosthesis to avoid late effects such as hypoplasia, contracted sockets, and better cosmesis and enhanced self-esteem. Second neoplasm is a concern. Lifelong follow-up and counseling of a healthy lifestyle are needed for Rb survivors.

  8. Breast and cervical cancer screening behaviours among colorectal cancer survivors in Nova Scotia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corkum, M.; Urquhart, R.; Kephart, G.; Hayden, J.A.; Porter, G.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We analyzed patterns and factors associated with receipt of breast and cervical cancer screening in a cohort of colorectal cancer survivors. Methods Individuals diagnosed with colorectal cancer in Nova Scotia between January 2001 and December 2005 were eligible for inclusion. Receipt of breast and cervical cancer screening was determined using administrative data. General-population age restrictions were used in the analysis (breast: 40–69 years; cervical: 21–75 years). Kaplan–Meier and Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess time to first screen. Results Of 318 and 443 colorectal cancer survivors eligible for the breast and cervical cancer screening analysis respectively, 30.1% [95% confidence interval (ci): 21.2% to 39.0%] never received screening mammography, and 47.9% (95% ci: 37.8% to 58.0%) never received cervical cancer screening during the study period. Receipt of screening before the colorectal cancer diagnosis was strongly associated with receipt of screening after diagnosis (hazard ratio for breast cancer screening: 4.71; 95% ci: 3.42 to 6.51; hazard ratio for cervical cancer screening: 6.83; 95% ci: 4.58 to 10.16). Conclusions Many colorectal cancer survivors within general-population screening age recommendations did not receive breast and cervical cancer screening. Future research should focus on survivors who meet age recommendations for population-based cancer screening. PMID:25302037

  9. Worry in Head and Neck Cancer Caregivers: The Role of Survivor Factors, Care-Related Stressors, and Loneliness in Predicting Fear of Recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Rebecca; Hanly, Paul; Balfe, Myles; Timmons, Aileen; Hyland, Philip; O'Sullivan, Eleanor; Butow, Phyllis; Sharp, Linda

    Fear of recurrence (FOR) is a primary concern for both cancer survivors and their caregivers, yet little is known about what care-related factors exacerbate this worry. This study aimed to establish the role of care-related stressors-as distinct from survivor characteristics-in predicting FOR in head and neck cancer caregivers. HNC survivor-caregiver dyads took part in a mailed survey. Survivors provided information on health and quality of life (using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy Questionnaire). Caregivers provided sociodemographic information, impact of caring on their time and finances, as well as their level of social support (Oslo Support Scale), loneliness (3-point loneliness scale), and completed the Worry of Cancer Scale (to measure FOR). Data from 180 dyads were available for analysis. Multiple regression analysis was used to examine the role of caregiver stressors, social support, and loneliness while controlling for caregiver and survivor characteristics. The model explained 28% of the variance in Worry of Cancer scores (FOR). Caregivers who reported more loneliness, spent more time caring, and had greater financial stress from caring had higher scores on Worry of Cancer (FOR). Female caregivers, those caring for younger survivors, and those with survivors who had undergone less extensive forms of surgery also reported higher FOR. A combination of factors place caregivers at greater risk of cancer-related worry, paving the way for designing interventions aimed at reducing FOR in caregivers of patients with head and neck cancers.

  10. The metabolic syndrome in survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia in Isfahan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Reisi

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available

    • BACKGROUND: To determine the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in survivors of childhood leukemia in Isfahan, Iran.
    • METHODS: During a 4-year period (2003 to 2007, 55 children (33 male and 22 female diagnosed with ALL at Unit of Hematology/ Oncology, Department of Pediatrics, Isfahan University of Medical Science, were enrolled in this crosssectional study. Metabolic syndrome was defined using the modified version of Adult Treatment Panel (ATP III criteria. Insulin resistance was defined based on the homeostasis model assessment index (HOMA-IR.
    • RESULTS: The mean age of participates was 10.4 years (range 6-19 years and the mean interval since completion of chemotherapy was 35 months. Twenty percent (11/55 of survivors (10 male, 1 female met criteria for diagnosis of metabolic syndrome. Obesity was observed in one forth of patients and nearly 3/4 of obese patients had metabolic syndrome. High serum insulin levels were found in 16% of participants and in 63% of obese survivors. The mean insulin levels in survivors with metabolic syndrome was three-times more than those without (28.3 mu/l vs. 9.57 mu/l, p = 0.004. Insulin resistance was detected in 72.7% of survivors with metabolic syndrome and it was  ositively correlated with serum triglycerides (0.543, p < 0.001, systolic and diastolic BP (0.348, p = 0.01 and 0.368, p = 006 respectively, insulin levels (0.914, p < 0.001 and blood sugar (0.398, p = 003.
    • CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in survivors of childhood leukemia in Iran is higher than developed countries. Nearly all of the obese patients had metabolic syndrome. Weight control and regular physical exercise are recommended to the survivors.
    • KEYWORDS: Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, metabolic syndrome, obesity, children.

  11. Long-term hospitalisation rates among 5-year survivors of Hodgkin lymphoma in adolescence or young adulthood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rugbjerg, Kathrine; Maraldo, Maja; Aznar, Marianne C

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, we report on the full range of physical diseases acquired by survivors of Hodgkin lymphoma diagnosed in adolescence or young adulthood. In a Danish nationwide population-based cohort study, 1,768 five-year survivors of Hodgkin lymphoma diagnosed at ages 15-39 years during 1943...... for nonmalignant haematological conditions (RR: 2.6; 3.1 and 9.7), malignant neoplasms (RR: 3.2; 2.5 and 4.7) and all infections combined (RR: 2.5; 2.2 and 5.3). Survivors of Hodgkin lymphoma in adolescence or young adulthood are at increased risk for a wide range of diseases that require hospitalisation. The risk...

  12. Impact of Radiation and Chemotherapy on Risk of Dental Abnormalities: A Report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaste, Sue C.; Goodman, Pamela; Leisenring, Wendy; Stovall, Marilyn; Hayashi, Robert; Yeazel, Mark; Beiraghi, Soraya; Hudson, Melissa M.; Sklar, Charles A.; Robison, Leslie L.; Baker, K. Scott

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Describe frequencies and risk factors of altered oral health and odontogenesis in childhood cancer survivors. Patients and Methods 9308 survivors, diagnosed between 1970–1986, and 2951 siblings from Childhood Cancer Survivor Study completed a survey containing oral-dental health information. We analyzed treatment impact, socioeconomic data and patient demographics on dental outcomes using univariate and multivariate logistic regression models to estimate odds ratios (OR). Results In multivariate analysis, survivors more likely reported microdontia (OR 3.0, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.4–3.8), hypodontia (OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.4–2.0), root abnormalities (OR 3.0, 95% CI 2.2–4.0), abnormal enamel (OR 2.4, 95% CI 2.0–2.9), teeth loss ≥6 (OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.9–3.6), severe gingivitis (OR 1.2, 95% CI 1.0–1.5), xerostomia (OR 9.7, 95% CI 4.8–19.7). Controlling for chemotherapy and socio-economic factors, radiation exposure of ≥20Gy to dentition was significantly associated with increased risk of ≥1 dental abnormality. Dose-dependent alkylating agent therapy significantly increased risk ≥1 anatomic/developmental dental abnormalities in survivors diagnosed <5 years of age (OR 1.7, 2.7, 3.3 for alkylating agent score of 1, 2, 3, respectively). Conclusion Radiation and chemotherapy are independent risk factors for adverse oral-dental sequelae among childhood cancer survivors. Patients receiving alkylating agents at < 5 years should be closely monitored. PMID:19834960

  13. Stroke Survivors' Experiences of Physical Rehabilitation: A Systematic Review of Qualitative Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luker, Julie; Lynch, Elizabeth; Bernhardsson, Susanne; Bennett, Leanne; Bernhardt, Julie

    2015-09-01

    To report and synthesize the perspectives, experiences, and preferences of stroke survivors undertaking inpatient physical rehabilitation through a systematic review of qualitative studies. MEDLINE, CINAHL, Embase, and PsycINFO were searched from database inception to February 2014. Reference lists of relevant publications were searched. All languages were included. Qualitative studies reporting stroke survivors' experiences of inpatient stroke rehabilitation were selected independently by 2 reviewers. The search yielded 3039 records; 95 full-text publications were assessed for eligibility, and 32 documents (31 studies) were finally included. Comprehensiveness and explicit reporting were assessed independently by 2 reviewers using the consolidated criteria for reporting qualitative research framework. Discrepancies were resolved by consensus. Data regarding characteristics of the included studies were extracted by 1 reviewer, tabled, and checked for accuracy by another reviewer. All text reported in studies' results sections were entered into qualitative data management software for analysis. Extracted texts were inductively coded and analyzed in 3 phases using thematic synthesis. Nine interrelated analytical themes, with descriptive subthemes, were identified that related to issues of importance to stroke survivors: (1) physical activity is valued; (2) bored and alone; (3) patient-centered therapy; (4) recreation is also rehabilitation; (5) dependency and lack of control; (6) fostering autonomy; (7) power of communication and information; (8) motivation needs nurturing; and (9) fatigue can overwhelm. The thematic synthesis provides new insights into stroke survivors' experiences of inpatient rehabilitation. Negative experiences were reported in all studies and include disempowerment, boredom, and frustration. Rehabilitation could be improved by increasing activity within formal therapy and in free time, fostering patients' autonomy through genuinely patient

  14. Intolerance of uncertainty, cognitive complaints, and cancer-related distress in prostate cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Stacy A; Kurita, Keiko; Taylor-Ford, Megan; Agus, David B; Gross, Mitchell E; Meyerowitz, Beth E

    2015-02-01

    Prostate cancer survivors have reported cognitive complaints following treatment, and these difficulties may be associated with survivors' ongoing cancer-related distress. Intolerance of uncertainty may exacerbate this hypothesized relationship by predisposing individuals to approach uncertain situations such as cancer survivorship in an inflexible and negative manner. We investigated whether greater cognitive complaints and higher intolerance of uncertainty would interact in their relation to more cancer-related distress symptoms. This cross-sectional, questionnaire-based study included 67 prostate cancer survivors who were 3 to 5 years post treatment. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses tested the extent to which intolerance of uncertainty, cognitive complaints, and their interaction were associated with cancer-related distress (measured with the Impact of Event Scale-Revised; IES-R) after adjusting for age, education, physical symptoms, and fear of cancer recurrence. Intolerance of uncertainty was positively associated with the IES-R avoidance and hyperarousal subscales. More cognitive complaints were associated with higher scores on the IES-R hyperarousal subscale. The interaction of intolerance of uncertainty and cognitive complaints was significantly associated with IES-R intrusion, such that greater cognitive complaints were associated with greater intrusive thoughts in survivors high in intolerance of uncertainty but not those low in it. Prostate cancer survivors who report cognitive difficulties or who find uncertainty uncomfortable and unacceptable may be at greater risk for cancer-related distress, even 3 to 5 years after completing treatment. It may be beneficial to address both cognitive complaints and intolerance of uncertainty in psychosocial interventions. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Quality of life in long-term survivors of early stage endometrial cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bożena Dobrzycka

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Endometrial cancer (EC is the most common gynaecological malignancy in developed countries. Effective treatment of the early stage of the disease is achieved by surgery alone. An increasing number of patients with EC become long-term survivors; therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the quality-of-life (QOL of EC survivors. Materials and Method. A total of 328 survivors who had completed cancer treatment more than 3 years ago, and had previously completed questionnaires concerning QOL – European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30 and depression – Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II. Patients were grouped into those with surgery alone or surgery with adjuvant radiotherapy. Responses were compared with 284 healthy women who were seen for standard gynaecologic screening examinations. Results. According to the presented results, the QOL of women with EC after surgical treatment was equal to that of healthy women in the control group. Treatment with adjuvant radiotherapy influenced the QOL, with the exception of emotional functioning (p=0.028. No statistically significant differences were found in scores on the BDI-II between groups for the cognitive-affective factor, the somatic factor, or the total sum score. Conclusions. The quality of life in EC survivors approximates that of healthy controls after 3 years post-surgical treatment. Patients treated for early stage EC should be informed about the anticipated good prognosis and the low risk of psychosocial and physical long-term effects. Cancer survivors who are treated by surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy may be especially at risk for emotional functioning problems.

  16. Advancing Survivors' Knowledge (ASK) about skin cancer study: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Casey L; Armstrong, Gregory T; Keske, Robyn R; Davine, Jessica A; McDonald, Aaron J; Sprunck-Harrild, Kim M; Coleman, Catherine; Haneuse, Sebastien J; Mertens, Ann C; Emmons, Karen M; Marghoob, Ashfaq A; Elkin, Elena B; Dusza, Stephen W; Robison, Leslie L; Geller, Alan C

    2015-03-24

    Advances in treatment have increased childhood cancer 5-year survival rates to greater than 80%. However, children previously treated with radiation are at significantly increased risk of developing subsequent neoplasms, the most common of which are skin cancers. The National Cancer Institute and Children's Oncology Group have issued recommendations for survivors treated with radiation to perform monthly skin self-examinations and receive a physician skin examination at least annually, as early detection has demonstrated markedly improved outcomes in the diagnosis and treatment of skin cancers. The goal of the present study is to increase rates of skin self-examinations and clinical skin examinations among adult survivors of childhood cancer treated with radiation. This randomized controlled trial uses a 3-group comparative effectiveness design comparing: (1) Patient Activation and Education (PAE) including text messaging, print and web-based tutorials over 12 months; (2) PAE plus physician activation (PAE + MD) adding physician activation/educational materials about survivors' increased skin cancer risk and conducting full-body skin exams; and (3) PAE plus physician activation, plus teledermoscopy (PAE + MD + TD) adding participant receipt of a dermatoscope intended to empower them to photograph suspect moles or lesions for review by the study dermatologist. The current study addresses barriers to screening in this population by providing educational and motivational information for both survivors and physicians regarding the value of periodic skin examinations. It also utilizes innovative mobile health technology to encourage and motivate (that is activate) survivors to conduct skin self-examinations, request physician exams, and obtain treatment when worrisome lesions are found. Finally, as a comparative effectiveness trial, this study isolates the effects of adding specific components to the patient activation intervention to test the most effective

  17. Profile and health-related quality of life of Ghanaian stroke survivors

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    Donkor ES

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Eric S Donkor,1,2 Mayowa O Owolabi,3 Patrick O Bampoh,4 Philip K Amoo,5 Thor Aspelund,2,6 Vilmundur Gudnason2,61College of Health Sciences, University of Ghana, Accra, Ghana; 2Centre for Public Health Sciences, University of Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland; 3Department of Medicine, University of Ibadan and University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria; 4Tamale Central Hospital, Tamale, Ghana; 5Public Health Unit, Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital, Accra, Ghana; 6Icelandic Heart Association Research Institute, Kopavogur, IcelandBackground: Stroke is a leading cause of mortality with a major effect on health-related quality of life (HRQoL. There are no previous studies exploring HRQoL among stroke survivors in Ghana, despite the increasing public health significance of the disease in this country. Here we describe the profile of and factors associated with HRQoL among stroke survivors in Ghana.Methods: This was a cross-sectional study involving 156 stroke survivors and 156 ­age- and sex-matched, apparently healthy controls. A robust HRQoL questionnaire involving seven domains was used to collect data from the study participants. Clinical epidemiology data were also collected from stroke survivors on parameters such as stroke severity and risk factors. Statistical analyses were performed on the interrelationships among the study variables. Results: The mean ages of the stroke survivors and healthy controls were 58.0 (standard deviation, 11.4 and 57.6 (standard deviation, 12.0 years, respectively. Fifty-three percent (86 of the stroke survivors had mild stroke and 35.3% (55 had moderate stroke, whereas 12.2% (19 had severe stroke. Ischemic infarction was the prevalent stroke subtype (78.1%. ­Hypertension was the most common risk factor (89% among the stroke survivors, followed by diabetes (29%. HRQoL scores ranged from 57.7% (cognitive domain to 80.0% (spirit domain for stroke survivors, whereas HRQoL scores of the control group ranged from 65.6% (cognitive

  18. The failing right heart: implications and evolution in high-risk patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, Luca; Latib, Azeem; De Marco, Federico; De Carlo, Marco; Fiorina, Claudia; Barbanti, Marco; Montone, Rocco A; Agnifili, Mauro; Petronio, Anna Sonia; Ettori, Federica; Klugmann, Silvio; Tamburino, Corrado; Brambilla, Nedy; Colombo, Antonio; Bedogni, Francesco

    2016-12-20

    Right ventricular dysfunction (RVdy) is negatively associated with survival after left heart valve surgery. It is unclear whether RVdy has the same impact in patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). We sought to evaluate the prognostic impact of different grades of RVdy on TAVI, with and without concomitant left ventricular dysfunction (LVdy), and the possible impact of TAVI on RVdy. Among 870 consecutive patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis undergoing TAVI, 226 patients (26%) presented with a concomitant diagnosis of RVdy. Patients were divided into three groups, Group 1: normal RV systolic function, i.e., tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE) >16 mm (n=644, 74%); Group 2: mild-to-moderate RVdy, i.e., TAPSE 10-16 mm (n=180, 20.6%); Group 3: severe RVdy, i.e., TAPSE HR 1.5 [0.84-2.2], p=0.09), respectively. Compared to Groups 1 and 2, patients in Group 3 showed a significantly higher overall mortality at one month (22%, OR 3.3 [1.8-4.1], pHR 2.6 [2.1-3.45], pHR 1.9 [1.5-2.7], p=0.02), respectively. Pulmonary hypertension >60 mmHg (HR 1.5 [1.1-2.2], p=0.03), AF (HR 1.6 [1.1-2.4], p=0.01), creatinine clearance HR 1.92 [1.3-2.5], p=0.003), LVEF HR 1.5 [1.1-2.9], p=0.03), severe RVdy (HR 2.9 [2.7-3.3], p=0.002), severe RV dilation (HR 1.7 [1.2-2.2], p=0.005) and severe biventricular dysfunction (HR 3.9 [2.7-4.1], p=0.002) were independent predictors of one-year mortality. Among survivors, the majority of patients in Groups 2 and 3 experienced a significant improvement in NYHA class. Severe RVdy limits the expected benefit of TAVI. In current risk scores right heart failure is not considered. The present study advocates the evaluation of this strong predictor in a more complete pre-procedural work-up.

  19. Fear of recurrence or progression as a link between somatic symptoms and perceived stress among cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Daniel L; Lennes, Inga T; Pirl, William F; Friedman, Emily R; Park, Elyse R

    2017-05-01

    Many cancer survivors report experiencing somatic symptoms as well as elevated stress. Theoretical models have suggested that physical symptoms generate subjective stress via fears of recurrence or progression. To date, this indirect effect has not been established empirically. This study aimed to provide preliminary evidence as to whether fear of recurrence or progression is an intermediary between somatic symptom severity and perceived stress among heterogeneous cancer survivors. Adult cancer survivors (N = 67; median 2.4 years since diagnosis; 34% male) presenting at a hospital survivorship clinic completed measures assessing somatic symptom severity (Patient Health Questionnaire-15 (PHQ-15)), perceived stress (four-item Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-4)), and fear of recurrence or progression (Assessment of Survivor Concerns (ASC)). Interrelatedness among variables was assessed using Pearson correlations. Indirect effects were modeled using 5000-iteration bootstrapping. Survivors endorsed a range of somatic symptom severity (29% minimal, 39% low, 18% medium, and 14% high). Somatic symptoms, perceived stress, and fear of recurrence or progression were all significantly positively correlated (rs 0.29 to 0.47). Controlling for time since diagnosis, there was a significant indirect effect of somatic symptom severity on stress via fear of recurrence or progression [B = 0.06, SE = 0.04 (95% CI 0.01-0.16)]. The model accounted for more than one third of the variance in perceived stress [R 2 = 0.35, F(3,54) = 9.59, p stress, due in part to elevated fears of recurrence or progression. Our findings support concerns about recurrence or progression as a mechanism underlying stress states in cancer survivors. Efforts to assist survivors with stress management should teach strategies for managing cancer-related uncertainties stemming from somatic symptoms.

  20. Human papillomavirus-associated subsequent malignancies among long-term survivors of pediatric and young adult cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohit P Ojha

    Full Text Available Long-term survivors of pediatric and young adult (PAYA cancers have a high incidence of subsequent neoplasms, but few risk factors other than cancer treatment have been identified. We aimed to describe the burden of human papillomavirus (HPV-associated malignancies among survivors of PAYA cancers to assess whether HPV infections might be a reasonable area of future etiologic research on subsequent malignancies in this population. We used longitudinal data from 9 population-based registries of the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program collected between 1973 and 2010 to assemble a cohort of individuals who were diagnosed with any cancer between the ages of 0 and 29 years and survived at least 5 years post-diagnosis. We estimated sex-specific standardized incidence ratios (SIRs with corresponding 95% confidence limits (CL of HPV-associated subsequent malignancies (cervical, vaginal, vulvar, penile, anal, tongue, tonsillar, and oropharyngeal. Our study population comprised 64,547 long-term survivors of PAYA cancers diagnosed between 1973 and 2010. Compared with females in the general US population, female PAYA cancer survivors had a 40% relative excess of HPV-associated malignancies overall (SIR = 1.4, 95% CL: 1.2, 1.8. Compared with males in the general US population, male PAYA cancer survivors had a 150% relative excess of HPV-associated malignancies overall (SIR = 2.5, 95% CL: 1.9, 3.4. Our findings suggest an excess of HPV-associated malignancies among PAYA cancer survivors compared with the general US population. We hypothesize that a portion of subsequent malignancies among PAYA cancer survivors may be directly attributable to HPV infection. This hypothesis warrants exploration in future studies.

  1. Preferences for the organization of long-term follow-up in adolescent and young adult cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christen, Salome; Vetsch, Janine; Mader, Luzius; Dehler, Silvia; Korol, Dimitri; Kuehni, Claudia; Rueegg, Corina S; Michel, Gisela

    2016-08-01

    As survival rates of adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer patients increase, a growing number of AYA cancer survivors need follow-up care. However, there is little research on their preferences for follow-up care. We aimed to (1) describe AYA cancer survivors' preferences for the organization and content of follow-up care, (2) describe their preferences for different models of follow-up, and (3) investigate clinical and sociodemographic characteristics associated with preferences for the different models. AYA cancer survivors (diagnosed with cancer at age 16-25 years; ≥5 years after diagnosis) were identified through the Cancer Registry Zurich and Zug. Survivors completed a questionnaire on follow-up attendance, preferences for organizational aspects of follow-up care (what is important during follow-up, what should be included during appointments, what specialists should be involved, location), models of follow-up (telephone/questionnaire, general practitioner (GP), pediatric oncologist, medical oncologist, multidisciplinary team), and sociodemographic characteristics. Information on tumor and treatment was available through the Cancer Registry Zurich and Zug. Of 389 contacted survivors, 160 (41.1 %) participated and 92 (57.5 %) reported still attending follow-up. Medical aspects of follow-up care were more important than general aspects (p cancer survivors valued medical content of follow-up and showed a preference for medical oncologist-led follow-up. Implementation of different models of follow-up care might improve accessibility and attendance among AYA cancer survivors.

  2. Informal caregivers' burden and stress in caring for stroke survivors with spatial neglect: an exploratory mixed-method study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peii; Fyffe, Denise C; Hreha, Kimberly

    2017-01-01

    Spatial neglect prolongs stroke survivors' recovery to independence. However, little is known about the impact of spatial neglect on caregivers of stroke survivors. To explore the factors associated with burden and stress among informal caregivers of stroke survivors with spatial neglect. Following the previous study of 108 stroke survivors, we reached 24 stroke survivors' caregivers, and 20 caregivers (age: M±SD=56.9±12.7 years; 12 females) completed the study. 10 survivors had symptoms of spatial neglect, and 10 did not (i.e., SN+ or SN-, respectively) at the time when discharged from inpatient rehabilitation, which was 9.3±6.2 months before the present study. Via a semi-structured telephone interview, we assessed caregivers' burden and stress qualitatively and quantitatively. No difference was observed across caregiver groups in cognitive function, depressive mood, or community mobility. In comparison, caregivers of the SN+ group allocated more time to care, controlling for survivors' disability (adjusted effective size d = 1.80). Their self-perceived burden and stress were more severe than the other group (adjusted d = .99). Qualitative analysis indicated caregivers of the SN+ group were more likely to describe economic stressors and undesirable changes in career and vacation planning. While 80% of participants preferred their care recipients to receive additional motor or mobility therapy, caregivers of the SN+ group were more likely to suggest additional therapy for cognitive impairment. This exploratory study suggests that spatial neglect may heighten caregivers' burden and stress levels. Future studies with a large sample size are required.

  3. Social networks and physical activity behaviors among cancer survivors: data from the 2005 Health Information National Trends Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bang Hyun; Wallington, Sherrie F; Makambi, Kepher H; Adams-Campbell, Lucile L

    2015-01-01

    The study examined the relation between social networks and physical activity behaviors among cancer survivors. The authors examined 873 cancer survivors (596 women, 277 men) 50 years of age or older who participated in the 2005 Health Information National Trends Survey. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that survivors who talked about health with friends/family were more likely to pay attention to new physical activity recommendations (OR = 2.89, CI [1.01, 8.33]). Female survivors were more likely to pay attention to new physical activity recommendations (OR = 2.65, CI [1.55, 4.53]) and more likely to have seen, heard, or read physical activity/exercise and cancer information within the past 12 months (OR = 2.09, CI [1.13, 3.85]) compared with their male counterparts. For male survivors, those who were a member of at least one community organization were more likely to pay attention to new physical activity/exercise recommendations (OR = 5.31, CI [1.32, 21.22]) than the men who were not members. Overall, cancer survivors with a social network (i.e., talking to family/friends about health) were more likely to pay attention to new exercise recommendations compared with those who did not have a social network. Significant differences were also observed by gender with physical activity levels, knowledge, and attitudes. Social networking is an important component in cancer survivorship and further research is needed to encourage social networking strategies that might facilitate in increasing physical activity behaviors among cancer survivors.

  4. Evaluating long-term patient-centered outcomes following prostate cancer treatment: findings from the Michigan Prostate Cancer Survivor study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwish-Yassine, May; Berenji, Manijeh; Wing, Diane; Copeland, Glenn; Demers, Raymond Y; Garlinghouse, Carol; Fagerlin, Angela; Newth, Gail E; Northouse, Laurel; Holmes-Rovner, Margaret; Rovner, David; Sims, Jerry; Wei, John T

    2014-03-01

    Advances in screening and treatment of prostate cancer have dramatically increased the number of survivors in the US population. Yet the effect of screening is controversial, and in some instances may not be beneficial. Previous studies have typically only reported outcomes of treatment and symptoms within a short time frame following treatment. The persistence of such symptoms over time necessitates an improvement of survivor care so that the medical and support needs of these patients are met. This study aims to perform a patient-centered survey of prostate cancer survivors in the Michigan Cancer Registry to identify treatment side effect rates, evaluate survivors' access to preventive care services post-prostate cancer treatment, and assess the informational needs of these survivors regarding their prostate cancer. Linking case files of the Michigan Cancer Registry with records from the National Death Index, we identified prostate cancer patients diagnosed between 1985 and 2004 and alive on 31 December 2005. Participants were selected using a stratified cross-sectional sampling strategy to ensure adequate inclusion of survivors based upon race and ethnicity, urban versus rural location, and number of years since diagnosis of prostate cancer. A total of 2,499 surveys were completed and returned. (1) Physical symptoms--assessing bowel, sexual, urinary, and vitality symptoms by treatment modality. (2) Access to care--identifying whether diagnostic tests for prostate cancer (prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and digital rectal examination) were performed. Determining whether the survivors had knowledge of the "watchful waiting" paradigm for prostate cancer surveillance. (3) Informational needs--assessing whether the informational needs of patients were addressed by providers. Evaluating the significant predictors associated with seeking information about prostate cancer from any other source. Identifying what factors influenced a person to actively seek out

  5. Depression, anxiety and quality of life in stroke survivors and their family caregivers: A pilot study using an actor/partner interdependence model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan-Fei, Khaw; Hassan, Syed Tajuddin Syed; Sann, Lye Munn; Ismail, Siti Irma Fadhilah; Raman, Rosna Abdul; Ibrahim, Faisal

    2017-08-01

    Depression and anxiety are common in stroke survivors as well as their family caregivers. However, it is not known whether each person's emotional distress contributes to their partner's quality of life (QOL). This study aimed to examine the effect of depression and anxiety on QOL in stroke survivor-caregiver dyads using dyadic analysis technique - the Actor-Partner Interdependence Model (APIM). This was a cross-sectional pilot study with a total of 30 participating dyads (30 stroke survivors and 30 family caregivers) from Hospital Rehabilitasi Cheras, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. This pilot study was conducted over a period of 3 months, between December 2014 and February 2015. Depression and anxiety were assessed using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). QOL was assessed using the Short Form-12 Health Survey (SF-12). All analyses were carried out using IBM SPSS version 22. Dyadic data were analysed using multilevel modelling (MLM). Depression was uniquely associated with an individual's own QOL. Survivors and caregivers with higher depression had poorer physical component summary (PCS) scores and mental component summary (MCS) scores. Stroke survivor's depression exerted a significant actor effect on their PCS (b=-1.42, p=0.001) and MCS (b=-1.52, pactor effect on their PCS (b=-2.53, p<0.001) and MCS (b=-1.51, p=0.004). Caregivers' anxiety negatively influenced their own MCS (b=-0.58, p=0.031). Furthermore, depression exerted a significant partner effect on PCS in stroke survivors (b=-1.19, p=0.003). Caregivers' depression was also related to their stroke survivors' poorer QOL, particularly PCS. The findings suggest that depression affects the QOL of both stroke survivors and caregivers, not only emotionally but also physically. This dyadic study also has evidence pointing to depression in caregivers and its association with stroke survivors' physical QOL.

  6. Weight Change and Associated Factors in Long-Term Breast Cancer Survivors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye-Yeon Koo

    Full Text Available Weight gain often occurs after breast cancer diagnosis and significantly impacts the general health of cancer survivors. While the number of breast cancer survivors is increasing, few studies have reported data on weight change beyond 5 years post-diagnosis. We investigated weight change and associated factors in long-term survivors of breast cancer.Medical records were reviewed on 1363 breast cancer patients and a total of 822 women who had survived beyond 5 years since diagnosis were included in the final analysis. The association between demographic, anthropometric, lifestyle, cancer related factors (including time since diagnosis, treatment modality, pathologic stage, and hormone receptor status, and weight-change over 5 years were examined.During an average 8.2 years of follow-up time, mean weight gain was 0.32kg (p = 0.017. 175 (21.3% patients had gained more than 5% of their weight at diagnosis and their average gain was 5.55kg. Body mass index (BMI at diagnosis, age at diagnosis, aromatase inhibitor (AI use, heavy drinking, and type of surgery were associated with relative weight gain (≥5% in univariate analysis (all p-values<0.05. Patients who were non-obese at diagnosis showed weight gain, while those who were obese at diagnosis lost weight (0.78kg,-1.11kg, respectively, p<0.001. In multivariate analysis, the non-obese group showed odds ratio of 2.7 (p = 0.001 relative to the obese group. Younger age group (age 18-54 years showed odds ratio of 1.9 (p = 0.021 relative to the older age group (age 55-75 years, and patients who did not use AI showed odds ratio of 2.2 (p = 0.006 relative to women who did.Long-term breast cancer survivors who were non-obese at diagnosis are more likely to gain weight than obese survivors. Younger survivors and survivors who have never used AI are also likely to gain weight.

  7. Survivorship education for Latina breast cancer survivors: Empowering Survivors through education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juarez, Gloria; Mayorga, Lina; Hurria, Arti; Ferrell, Betty

    2013-01-01

    Nueva Luz is an English and Spanish quality of life (QOL) intervention developed to address the educational needs of Latina breast cancer survivors and provide strategies to assist in their transition into survivorship. A qualitative approach was used to evaluate the English and Spanish educational intervention (Nueva Luz). A purposive sample of eight Latina breast cancer survivors was selected from the group who received the intervention to participate in a digitally recorded interview. Data was analyzed using thematic analysis. Findings provide evidence that the one-on-one tailored approach is a feasible and acceptable method of providing a bilingual psychosocial intervention. The provision of printed bilingual information along with the verbal instruction from a bilingual and culturally competent health care provider can be effective in helping Latina breast cancer survivor's transition successfully into survivorship, improve QOL and contribute to better patient outcomes. The study informs our understanding of the cultural context in patient education content and delivery of psychosocial interventions. The findings may also have relevance for other ethnic minority cancer survivors.

  8. Medium-term assessment of cardiac function in pediatric cancer survivors. Comparison of different echocardiographic methods, cardiac MRI and cardiac biomarker testing in adolescent cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Sanket S; McClellan, Wendy; Knowlton, Joshua Q; Mehta, Jeet; Goudar, Suma; Ferguson, Angela; Sherman, Ashley; Shirali, Girish; Fulbright, Joy

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and correlation of 3D echocardiography (echo) and cardiac biomarkers with cardiac MRI, in surveillance of cardiac function for cancer survivors. Subjects ≥10 years of age who have survived >2 years after completion of cancer treatment from a single center were enrolled. Cardiac MRI and 3D echo images were obtained on the same day when routine echo was obtained. On the same day, along with annual routine blood test, cardiac biomarkers N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide levels (NT-proBNP) and troponin-I levels were also measured. Cardiac MRI was feasible in all 50 subjects. Three-dimensional echo and 2D echo images were of poor quality in four subjects. With a median duration of remission of 10 years, there were four subjects with mild LV dysfunction (cardiac MRI LV EF ofcancer survivors, and it correlates well with MRI. Further large-scale research is required in assessing utility of cardiac biomarkers in pediatric cancer survivors. © 2016, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Never ending stories: visual diarizing to recreate autobiographical memory of intensive care unit survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewens, Beverley A; Hendricks, Joyce M; Sundin, Deb

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the potential use of visual diarizing to enable intensive care unit (ICU) survivors to create their story of recovery. An ICU experience can have deleterious psychological and physical effects on survivors leading to reductions in quality of life which for some may be of significant duration. Although there has been exploration of many interventions to support recovery in this group, service provision for survivors remains inconsistent and inadequate. A qualitative interpretive biographical exploration of the ICU experience and recovery phase of ICU survivors using visual diarizing as method. This paper is a component of a larger study and presents an analyses of one participant's visual diary in detail. Data collection was twofold. The participant was supplied with visual diary materials at 2 months post-hospital discharge and depicted his story in words and pictures for a 3-month period, after which he was interviewed. The interview enabled the participant and researcher to interpret the visual diary and create a biographical account of his ICU stay and recovery journey. The analysis of one participant's visual diary yielded a wealth of information about his recovery trajectory articulated through the images he chose to symbolize his story. The participant confirmed feelings of persecution whilst in ICU and was unprepared for the physical and psychological disability which ensued following his discharge from hospital. However, his story was one of hope for the future and a determination that good would come out of his experience. He considered using the visual diary enhanced his recovery. The participant perceived that visual diarizing enhanced his recovery trajectory by enabling him to recreate his story using visual imagery in a prospective diary. Prospective visual diarizing with ICU survivors may have potential as an aid to recovery. © 2014 British Association of Critical Care Nurses.

  10. Association between race and physical functioning limitations among breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallicchio, Lisa; Calhoun, Carla; Helzlsouer, Kathy J

    2014-04-01

    The goal of this study was to examine differences in physical functioning limitations among African-American and white breast cancer survivors. Data were analyzed from 115 African-American and 712 white breast cancer survivors who responded to a hospital registry-based survey. Physical functioning limitations were assessed using a series of eight questions in which individuals were asked about their ability to perform a physical task such as walking a quarter of a mile. A four-category summary score, representing overall severity of limitation, was created using participant responses to the eight questions. Ordinal logistic regression was used to estimate the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for the association between race and physical functioning limitation adjusted for potential confounders. In the unadjusted model, the African-American breast cancer survivors were more than twice as likely to have a greater degree of physical functioning limitation compared to their white counterparts (OR 2.31; 95% CI 1.59, 3.38). After adjustment for covariates, including body mass index (BMI), the race OR was attenuated and no longer statistically significant (OR 1.44; 95% CI 0.92, 2.27). Findings from this study showed that African-American breast cancer survivors were more likely to have worse physical functioning limitations than their white counterparts; however, much of this disparity was due to racial differences in other variables such as BMI. Future research should focus on effective interventions targeting modifiable risk factors of physical functioning limitations among breast cancer survivors with the goal of improving quality of life.

  11. An Exploratory Analysis of Fear of Recurrence among African-American Breast Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Teletia R.; Huntley, Edward D.; Sween, Jennifer; Makambi, Kepher; Mellman, Thomas A.; Williams, Carla D.; Carter-Nolan, Pamela; Frederick, Wayne

    2013-01-01

    Background Fear of recurrence (FOR) is a psychological concern that has been studied extensively in cancer survivors but has not been adequately examined in African-American breast cancer survivors. Purpose This exploratory study describes the extent and nature of FOR in African-American breast cancer survivors. FOR is examined in relation to socio-demographic characteristics, treatment-related characteristics, psychological distress, and quality of life (QOL). Methods Participants completed questionnaires assessing FOR, psychological distress, QOL, and demographic and treatment characteristics. Pearson r correlations, t tests, and ANOVAs were used to determine the association between FOR and demographic and treatment-related characteristics. Hierarchical multiple regression models were performed to investigate the degree to which FOR dimensions account for the variance in QOL and psychological distress. Results Fifty-one African-American breast cancer survivors participated in this study. The mean age of participants was 64.24 (SD = 12.3). Overall fears as well as concerns about death and health were rated as low to moderate. Role worries and womanhood worries were very low. Inverse relationships were observed between age and FOR dimensions. FOR was positively correlated with measures of psychological distress and negatively correlated with QOL. FOR significantly accounted for a portion of the variance in QOL and distress after controlling for other variables. Conclusions This study suggests that African-American women in this sample demonstrated some degree of FOR. Results indicate that FOR among African-American breast cancer survivors decreases with age and time since diagnosis and co-occurs with psychological distress as well as diminished quality of life. PMID:21915625

  12. Breast cancer survivors willingness to participate in an acupuncture clinical trial: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schapira, Marilyn M; Mackenzie, Elizabeth R; Lam, Regina; Casarett, David; Seluzicki, Christina M; Barg, Frances K; Mao, Jun J

    2014-05-01

    Acupuncture is a complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) modality that shows promise as a component of supportive breast cancer care. Lack of robust recruitment for clinical trial entry has limited the evidence base for acupuncture as a treatment modality among breast cancer survivors. The objective of this study is to identify key decision-making factors among breast cancer survivors considering entry into an acupuncture clinical trial for treatment of symptoms. Semistructured interviews were conducted among African-American (n=12) and Caucasian (n=13) breast cancer survivors. Verbatim transcripts were made and analyzed by two or more independent coders using NVivo software. Major recurring themes were identified and a theoretical framework developed. Six themes emerged reflecting key attributes of the decision to enter a clinical trial: (1) symptom appraisal, (2) practical barriers (e.g., distance and travel), (3) beliefs about the interventions (e.g., fear of needles and dislike of medications), (4) comfort with elements of clinical trial design (e.g., randomization, the nature of the control intervention, and blinding), (5) trust, and (6) altruism. African-American and Caucasian women weighed similar attributes but differed in the information sources sought regarding clinical trial entry and in concerns regarding the use of a placebo in a clinical trial. Our findings contribute to the development of a theoretical model of decision making for breast cancer survivors considering participation in a CAM clinical trial. Insights regarding the decision making process can inform interventions to support informed decision making and robust recruitment to CAM trials among cancer survivors.

  13. Pediatric quality of life in long-term survivors of childhood cancer treated with anthracyclines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryerson, A Blythe; Wasilewski-Masker, Karen; Border, William L; Goodman, Michael; Meacham, Lillian; Austin, Harland; Marchak, Jordan Gilleland; Mertens, Ann C

    2016-12-01

    Anthracyclines are a common class of drugs used to treat pediatric cancer. While much attention is given to their cardiotoxicity, little is known about the relationship between the use of anthracyclines and health-related quality-of-life (HRQoL) outcomes. This study examines the association of anthracycline cardiotoxicity risk status and Pediatric Quality-of-Life (PedsQL) Inventory TM scores in childhood cancer METHODS: Pediatric cancer survivors aged 8-21 who were at least 5 years posttreatment were recruited from a Cancer Survivor Clinic. Participants completed the PedsQL 4.0 Generic Core Scales and a health behavior survey. Linear regression was used to evaluate the association between PedsQL scores and anthracycline cardiotoxicity risk status and to assess whether self-reported physical activity modified the association. Eighty survivors participated and were characterized by cardiotoxicity risk status (high: 12; moderate: 23, low: 24, no risk: 21) as defined by the Children's Oncology Group (COG). Measures in all PedsQL domains tended to be slightly lower for survivors exposed to anthracyclines as compared to the unexposed. The largest difference in unadjusted mean scores was for social functioning (96.0% for unexposed vs. 91.3% for exposed, P = 0.0068). There was also an inverse dose-response relation between adjusted PedsQL scores and increasing anthracycline cardiotoxicity risk; this association was not modified by physical activity level. These data indicate that regular psychosocial assessments, such as those currently recommended by the COG, may be especially important for survivors treated with anthracyclines. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Younger age distribution of cervical cancer incidence among survivors of pediatric and young adult cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojha, Rohit P; Jackson, Bradford E; Tota, Joseph E; Offutt-Powell, Tabatha N; Hudson, Melissa M; Gurney, James G

    2014-08-01

    Pediatric and young adult (PAYA) cancer survivors may have an earlier onset of chronic diseases compared with the general population. We compared the age at cervical cancer diagnosis between PAYA cancer survivors and females in the general US population. We used longitudinal data from 9 population-based registries of the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program collected between 1973 and 2010. PAYA cancer survivors were females diagnosed with any cancer before age 30 years, survived at least 5 years post-diagnosis, and were subsequently diagnosed with invasive cervical cancer (n=46). The general US population comprised females who were diagnosed with invasive cervical cancer as the primary malignancy (n=26,956). We estimated the difference in median age at diagnosis (ß₅₀) and bootstrap 95% confidence limits (CL) of invasive cervical cancer after adjustment for year of diagnosis and race. The median age at diagnosis of invasive cervical cancer was 33 years for female PAYA cancer survivors and 40 years for females in the general US population (ß50=-7.0, 95% CL: -11, -3.2). Similar differences were observed across subgroups of stage and histologic subtype of invasive cervical cancer. Our results suggest that PAYA cancer survivors are diagnosed with invasive cervical cancer at a substantially younger age compared with females without a prior cancer diagnosis in the general US population. This issue warrants further study, and could have implications for determining age at initiation or frequency of cervical cancer screening if younger age at diagnosis is attributable to an underlying biological phenomenon. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Proactive Aging Among Holocaust Survivors: Striving for the Best Possible Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elran-Barak, Roni; Barak, Adi; Lomranz, Jacob; Benyamini, Yael

    2016-10-14

    To investigate methods that older Holocaust survivors and their age peers use in order to maintain the best possible life and to examine associations between these methods and subjective well-being. Participants were 481 older Israelis (mean age 77.4 ± 6.7 years): Holocaust survivors (n = 164), postwar immigrants (n = 183), and prewar immigrants (n = 134). Measures included sociodemographics and indicators of health and well-being. Respondents were asked to answer an open-ended question: "What are the methods you use to maintain the best possible life?". Answers were coded into eight categories. Holocaust survivors were significantly less likely to mention methods coded as "Enjoyment" (32.3%) relative to postwar (43.7%) and prewar (46.2%) immigrants and significantly more likely to mention methods coded as "Maintaining good health" (39.0%) relative to postwar (27.9%) and prewar (21.6%) immigrants. Controlling for sociodemographics and health status, Holocaust survivors still differed from their peers. Aging Holocaust survivors tended to focus on more essential/fundamental needs (e.g., health), whereas their peers tended to focus on a wider range of needs (e.g., enjoyment) in their effort to maintain the best possible life. Our findings may add to the proactivity model of successful aging by suggesting that aging individuals in Israel use both proactive (e.g., health) and cognitive (e.g., accepting the present) adaptation methods, regardless of their reported history during the war. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Survivors of Political Violence: Conceptualizations, Empirical Findings, and Ecological Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanciu, Elena Amalia; Rogers, Jennifer L.

    2011-01-01

    There is a vast body of literature on survivors of political violence that has emerged over the past several decades. Most studies focus on the psychological effects of political violence on survivors, as understood within the Western framework of mental health. Studies that conceptualize and examine models that account for the complexity of the…

  17. Comparison of trauma on survivors of sexual assault and intimate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-06-20

    Jun 20, 2014 ... Background: Gender-based violence is a challenge in South Africa, despite available interventions. Caring for the survivors of both forms of violence is critical for ensuring their speedy recovery. Objectives: To compare the effects of trauma on female survivors of sexual assault versus those experienced by ...

  18. Daily physical activity patterns in cancer survivors: a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmerman, Josien; van Weering, Marit; Kurvers, Roel; Tönis, Thijs; Hermens, Hermanus J.; Vollenbroek-Hutten, Miriam Marie Rosé

    2013-01-01

    In cancer survivors activity levels have been studied primarily by means of questionnaires, while objective information on actual daily activity levels and their distribution throughout the day is lacking. The findings of this study suggest that especially cancer survivors who received chemotherapy

  19. Rape survivor care crisis – mines the worst?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The dire need for better healthcare worker training in rape forensics and safe survivor care has never been better illustrated than by the horrifying rape statistics Médecins. Sans Frontières (MSF) presented last month from the platinum-mining boom town of. Rustenburg. Promising to increase its rape survivor care and ...

  20. Gait characteristics of hemiparetic stroke survivors in Osun State ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stroke is one of the leading causes of severe handicap. Deficiencies in walking may present significant challenges to mobility, resulting in abnormal and inefficient gait patterns in stroke survivors. This study compared the gait characteristics of hemiparetic stroke survivors