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Sample records for surviving animals developed

  1. Animal reintroductions: an innovative assessment of survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muths, Erin L.; Bailey, Larissa L.; Watry, Mary Kay

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative evaluations of reintroductions are infrequent and assessments of milestones reached before a project is completed, or abandoned due to lack of funding, are rare. However, such assessments, which are promoted in adaptive management frameworks, are critical. Quantification can provide defensible estimates of biological success, such as the number of survivors from a released cohort, with associated cost per animal. It is unlikely that the global issues of endangered wildlife and population declines will abate, therefore, assurance colonies and reintroductions are likely to become more common. If such endeavors are to be successful biologically or achieve adequate funding, implementation must be more rigorous and accountable. We use a novel application of a multistate, robust design capture-recapture model to estimate survival of reintroduced tadpoles through metamorphosis (i.e., the number of individuals emerging from the pond) and thereby provide a quantitative measure of effort and success for an "in progress" reintroduction of toads. Our data also suggest that tadpoles released at later developmental stages have an increased probability of survival and that eggs laid in the wild hatched at higher rates than eggs laid by captive toads. We illustrate how an interim assessment can identify problems, highlight successes, and provide information for use in adjusting the effort or implementing a Decision-Theoretic adaptive management strategy.

  2. Robustness of survival estimates for radio-marked animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunck, C.M.; Chen, C.-L.

    1992-01-01

    Telemetry techniques are often used to study the survival of birds and mammals; particularly whcn mark-recapture approaches are unsuitable. Both parametric and nonparametric methods to estimate survival have becn developed or modified from other applications. An implicit assumption in these approaches is that the probability of re-locating an animal with a functioning transmitter is one. A Monte Carlo study was conducted to determine the bias and variance of the Kaplan-Meier estimator and an estimator based also on the assumption of constant hazard and to eva!uate the performance of the two-sample tests associated with each. Modifications of each estimator which allow a re-Iocation probability of less than one are described and evaluated. Generallv the unmodified estimators were biased but had lower variance. At low sample sizes all estimators performed poorly. Under the null hypothesis, the distribution of all test statistics reasonably approximated the null distribution when survival was low but not when it was high. The power of the two-sample tests were similar.

  3. Micro RNAs in animal development.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plasterk, R.H.A.

    2006-01-01

    Micro RNAs (miRNAs) are approximately 22 nucleotide single-stranded noncoding RNA molecules that bind to target messenger RNAs (mRNAs) and silence their expression. This Essay explores the importance of miRNAs in animal development and their possible roles in disease and evolution.

  4. Application of Survival Analysis and Multistate Modeling to Understand Animal Behavior: Examples from Guide Dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Lucy Asher; Harvey, Naomi D.; Martin Green; England, Gary C.W.

    2017-01-01

    Epidemiology is the study of patterns of health-related states or events in populations. Statistical models developed for epidemiology could be usefully applied to behavioral states or events. The aim of this study is to present the application of epidemiological statistics to understand animal behavior where discrete outcomes are of interest, using data from guide dogs to illustrate. Specifically, survival analysis and multistate modeling are applied to data on guide dogs comparing dogs that...

  5. Survival of probiotic microorganisms in the gastrointestinal tract of experimental animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Darmov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of methodology for the identification of certified probiotic microorganisms in the intestinal contents of white mice and uinea pigs and study of their survival in the gastrointestinal tract of experimental animals. Rifampicin-resistant bifidobacteria and lactobacilli were used in the experiments. Cultures of microorganisms that have retained the species features were administered orally for 14 days and the number of viable bifidobacteria and lactobacilli were determined by sowing of feces in a dense nutrient medium with rifampicin. Probiotic microorganisms administered orally to experimental animals for 14 days are detected in the feces on the second day of the experiment. Live probiotic bacteria ceases completely to be detected in the feces of animals 3 days after the termination of their oral administration. Using the developed universal method of differentiation of probiotic microorganisms entering the living organisms and strains of their own intestinal microflora a significant decrease (4–7 orders of magnitude in survival of bifidobacteria and lactobacilli in the organisms of experimental animals was shown, followed by a lack of probiotic effect.

  6. Backyard animal farming: as urban survival strategy in Obafemi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this paper is assessment of the nature of backyard animal farming in OAU, campus, Ile Ife, Osun State. In order to satisfy the objective, data were collected from 56 respondents residing in Junior Staff Quarters of the university. The analyzed data revealed that backyard animal farming is being practiced in the ...

  7. [DNA methylation and development abnormalities in cloned animals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Rong-Rong; Li, Xiang-Yun

    2007-09-01

    Most cloned animals by nuclear transfer were dead before their births, and only a few can develop to their late gestation or adulthood. Although some cloned offsprings can survive, they often have some development disfigurements and abnormal phenotypes in various degrees. DNA methylation is an important modifiable manner of epigenetic dominating the correct expression of gene. It is a main instrument of regulating genome function and plays a prominent part in the embryonic normal development. Through researching the pattern of DNA methylation, we found that there were many abnormal DNA methylation patterns in cloned animals, which might be the primary reasons for inducing premature death of cloned embryos and development abnormalities of cloned animals. This article discusses the function of DNA methylation, the aberrant DNA methylation patterns in cloned animals, and the reasons of inducing abnormal DNA methylation in cloned animals.

  8. A Child Survival and Development Revolution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, Robert

    1986-01-01

    Addresses the problems of child survival and development in developing countries by discussing the biomedical causes and the concomitant social determinants of high infant mortality rates. Describes four intervention strategies recommended by UNICEF: growth monitoring, oral rehydration therapy, breast feeding, and immunization. (HOD)

  9. Starvation physiology: reviewing the different strategies animals use to survive a common challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCue, Marshall D

    2010-05-01

    All animals face the possibility of limitations in food resources that could ultimately lead to starvation-induced mortality. The primary goal of this review is to characterize the various physiological strategies that allow different animals to survive starvation. The ancillary goals of this work are to identify areas in which investigations of starvation can be improved and to discuss recent advances and emerging directions in starvation research. The ubiquity of food limitation among animals, inconsistent terminology associated with starvation and fasting, and rationale for scientific investigations into starvation are discussed. Similarities and differences with regard to carbohydrate, lipid, and protein metabolism during starvation are also examined in a comparative context. Examples from the literature are used to underscore areas in which reporting and statistical practices, particularly those involved with starvation-induced changes in body composition and starvation-induced hypometabolism can be improved. The review concludes by highlighting several recent advances and promising research directions in starvation physiology. Because the hundreds of studies reviewed here vary so widely in their experimental designs and treatments, formal comparisons of starvation responses among studies and taxa are generally precluded; nevertheless, it is my aim to provide a starting point from which we may develop novel approaches, tools, and hypotheses to facilitate meaningful investigations into the physiology of starvation in animals. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Application of Survival Analysis and Multistate Modeling to Understand Animal Behavior: Examples from Guide Dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, Lucy; Harvey, Naomi D.; Green, Martin; England, Gary C. W.

    2017-01-01

    Epidemiology is the study of patterns of health-related states or events in populations. Statistical models developed for epidemiology could be usefully applied to behavioral states or events. The aim of this study is to present the application of epidemiological statistics to understand animal behavior where discrete outcomes are of interest, using data from guide dogs to illustrate. Specifically, survival analysis and multistate modeling are applied to data on guide dogs comparing dogs that completed training and qualified as a guide dog, to those that were withdrawn from the training program. Survival analysis allows the time to (or between) a binary event(s) and the probability of the event occurring at or beyond a specified time point. Survival analysis, using a Cox proportional hazards model, was used to examine the time taken to withdraw a dog from training. Sex, breed, and other factors affected time to withdrawal. Bitches were withdrawn faster than dogs, Labradors were withdrawn faster, and Labrador × Golden Retrievers slower, than Golden Retriever × Labradors; and dogs not bred by Guide Dogs were withdrawn faster than those bred by Guide Dogs. Multistate modeling (MSM) can be used as an extension of survival analysis to incorporate more than two discrete events or states. Multistate models were used to investigate transitions between states of training to qualification as a guide dog or behavioral withdrawal, and from qualification as a guide dog to behavioral withdrawal. Sex, breed (with purebred Labradors and Golden retrievers differing from F1 crosses), and bred by Guide Dogs or not, effected movements between states. We postulate that survival analysis and MSM could be applied to a wide range of behavioral data and key examples are provided. PMID:28804710

  11. Application of Survival Analysis and Multistate Modeling to Understand Animal Behavior: Examples from Guide Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, Lucy; Harvey, Naomi D; Green, Martin; England, Gary C W

    2017-01-01

    Epidemiology is the study of patterns of health-related states or events in populations. Statistical models developed for epidemiology could be usefully applied to behavioral states or events. The aim of this study is to present the application of epidemiological statistics to understand animal behavior where discrete outcomes are of interest, using data from guide dogs to illustrate. Specifically, survival analysis and multistate modeling are applied to data on guide dogs comparing dogs that completed training and qualified as a guide dog, to those that were withdrawn from the training program. Survival analysis allows the time to (or between) a binary event(s) and the probability of the event occurring at or beyond a specified time point. Survival analysis, using a Cox proportional hazards model, was used to examine the time taken to withdraw a dog from training. Sex, breed, and other factors affected time to withdrawal. Bitches were withdrawn faster than dogs, Labradors were withdrawn faster, and Labrador × Golden Retrievers slower, than Golden Retriever × Labradors; and dogs not bred by Guide Dogs were withdrawn faster than those bred by Guide Dogs. Multistate modeling (MSM) can be used as an extension of survival analysis to incorporate more than two discrete events or states. Multistate models were used to investigate transitions between states of training to qualification as a guide dog or behavioral withdrawal, and from qualification as a guide dog to behavioral withdrawal. Sex, breed (with purebred Labradors and Golden retrievers differing from F1 crosses), and bred by Guide Dogs or not, effected movements between states. We postulate that survival analysis and MSM could be applied to a wide range of behavioral data and key examples are provided.

  12. Application of Survival Analysis and Multistate Modeling to Understand Animal Behavior: Examples from Guide Dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy Asher

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiology is the study of patterns of health-related states or events in populations. Statistical models developed for epidemiology could be usefully applied to behavioral states or events. The aim of this study is to present the application of epidemiological statistics to understand animal behavior where discrete outcomes are of interest, using data from guide dogs to illustrate. Specifically, survival analysis and multistate modeling are applied to data on guide dogs comparing dogs that completed training and qualified as a guide dog, to those that were withdrawn from the training program. Survival analysis allows the time to (or between a binary event(s and the probability of the event occurring at or beyond a specified time point. Survival analysis, using a Cox proportional hazards model, was used to examine the time taken to withdraw a dog from training. Sex, breed, and other factors affected time to withdrawal. Bitches were withdrawn faster than dogs, Labradors were withdrawn faster, and Labrador × Golden Retrievers slower, than Golden Retriever × Labradors; and dogs not bred by Guide Dogs were withdrawn faster than those bred by Guide Dogs. Multistate modeling (MSM can be used as an extension of survival analysis to incorporate more than two discrete events or states. Multistate models were used to investigate transitions between states of training to qualification as a guide dog or behavioral withdrawal, and from qualification as a guide dog to behavioral withdrawal. Sex, breed (with purebred Labradors and Golden retrievers differing from F1 crosses, and bred by Guide Dogs or not, effected movements between states. We postulate that survival analysis and MSM could be applied to a wide range of behavioral data and key examples are provided.

  13. Cytomegalovirus Antivirals and Development of Improved Animal Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Alistair; Choi, K. Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a ubiquitous pathogen that establishes a life long asymptomatic infection in healthy individuals. Infection of immunesuppressed individuals causes serious illness. Transplant and AIDS patients are highly susceptible to CMV leading to life threatening end organ disease. Another vulnerable population is the developing fetus in utero, where congenital infection can result in surviving newborns with long term developmental problems. There is no vaccine licensed for CMV and current antivirals suffer from complications associated with prolonged treatment. These include drug toxicity and emergence of resistant strains. There is an obvious need for new antivirals. Candidate intervention strategies are tested in controlled pre-clinical animal models but species specificity of HCMV precludes the direct study of the virus in an animal model. Areas covered This review explores the current status of CMV antivirals and development of new drugs. This includes the use of animal models and the development of new improved models such as humanized animal CMV and bioluminescent imaging of virus in animals in real time. Expert Opinion Various new CMV antivirals are in development, some with greater spectrum of activity against other viruses. Although the greatest need is in the setting of transplant patients there remains an unmet need for a safe antiviral strategy against congenital CMV. This is especially important since an effective CMV vaccine remains an elusive goal. In this capacity greater emphasis should be placed on suitable pre-clinical animal models and greater collaboration between industry and academia. PMID:21883024

  14. Moderate exercise training improves survival and ventricular remodeling in an animal model of left ventricular volume overload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachance, Dominic; Plante, Eric; Bouchard-Thomassin, Andrée-Anne; Champetier, Serge; Roussel, Elise; Drolet, Marie-Claude; Arsenault, Marie; Couet, Jacques

    2009-09-01

    Exercise training has beneficial effects in patients with heart failure, although there is still no clear evidence that it may impact on their survival. There are no data regarding the effects of exercise in subjects with chronic left ventricular (LV) volume overload. Using a rat model of severe aortic valve regurgitation (AR), we studied the effects of long-term exercise training on survival, development of heart failure, and LV myocardial remodeling. One hundred sixty male adult rats were divided in 3 groups: sham sedentary (n=40), AR sedentary (n=80), and AR trained (n=40). Training consisted in treadmill running for up to 30 minutes, 5 times per week for 9 months, at a maximal speed of 20 m/minute. All sham-operated animals survived the entire course of the protocol. After 9 months, 65% of trained animals were alive compared with 46% of sedentary ones (P=0.05). Ejection fractions remained in the normal range (all above 60%) and LV masses between AR groups were similar. There was significantly less LV fibrosis in the trained group and lower LV filling pressures and improved echocardiographic diastolic parameters. Heart rate variability was also improved by exercise. Our data show that moderate endurance training is safe, does not increase the rate of developing heart failure, and most importantly, improves survival in this animal model of chronic LV volume overload. Exercise improved LV diastolic function, heart rate variability, and reduced myocardial fibrosis.

  15. Mitochondrial-Based Treatments that Prevent Post-Traumatic Osteoarthritis in a Translational Large Animal Intraarticular Fracture Survival Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Animal Intraarticular Fracture Survival Model PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: James A. Martin, PhD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of Iowa Iowa City, IA...Post-Traumatic Osteoarthritis in a Translational Large Animal Intraarticular Fracture Survival Model 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0583 5c...traumatic osteoarthritis, large animal model, oxidative stress, mitochondria, mechanotransduction, amobarbital, n-acetyl cysteine 16. SECURITY

  16. Role of adipose-derived stromal cells in pedicle skin flap survival in experimental animal models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foroglou, Pericles; Karathanasis, Vasileios; Demiri, Efterpi; Koliakos, George; Papadakis, Marios

    2016-01-01

    The use of skin flaps in reconstructive surgery is the first-line surgical treatment for the reconstruction of skin defects and is essentially considered the starting point of plastic surgery. Despite their excellent usability, their application includes general surgical risks or possible complications, the primary and most common is necrosis of the flap. To improve flap survival, researchers have used different methods, including the use of adipose-derived stem cells, with significant positive results. In our research we will report the use of adipose-derived stem cells in pedicle skin flap survival based on current literature on various experimental models in animals. PMID:27022440

  17. Single-port unilateral transaxillary totally endoscopic thyroidectomy: A survival animal and cadaver feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique Neubarth Phillips

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Single-port unilateral axillary thyroidectomy has great potential to become a valid alternative technique for thyroid surgery. We tested the technique in a study on live animals and cadavers to evaluate the feasibility and reproducibility of the procedure. Materials and Methods: Institutional review board (IRB approval was obtained in our university by the Council of Ethics for the study in surviving animals and cadavers. Subtotal thyroidectomy using unilateral axillary single port was performed in five dogs and five cadavers. Performing incision in the axillary fossa, a disposable single port was inserted. The dissection progressed for creating a subcutaneous tunnel to the subplatysmal region; after opening the platysma muscle and separation of the strap muscles, the thyroid gland was identified. After key anatomical landmarks were identified, the dissection was started at the upper pole towards the bottom, and to the isthmus. Specimens were extracted intact through the tunnel. Clinical and laboratorial observations of the experimental study in a 15-day follow-up and intraoperative data were documented. Results: All surgeries were performed in five animals which survived 15 days without postoperative complications. In the surgeries successfully performed in five cadavers, anatomical landmarks were recognised and intraoperative dissection of recurrent nerves and parathyroid glands was performed. Mean operative time was 64 min (46-85 min in animals and 123 min (110-140 min in cadavers, with a good cosmetic outcome since the incision was situated in the axillary fold. Conclusion: The technique of single-port axillary unilateral thyroidectomy was feasible and reproducible in the cadavers and animal survival study, suggesting the procedure as an alternative to minimally invasive surgery of the neck.

  18. Hematological changes as prognostic indicators of survival: similarities between Gottingen minipigs, humans, and other large animal models.

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    Maria Moroni

    Full Text Available The animal efficacy rule addressing development of drugs for selected disease categories has pointed out the need to develop alternative large animal models. Based on this rule, the pathophysiology of the disease in the animal model must be well characterized and must reflect that in humans. So far, manifestations of the acute radiation syndrome (ARS have been extensively studied only in two large animal models, the non-human primate (NHP and the canine. We are evaluating the suitability of the minipig as an additional large animal model for development of radiation countermeasures. We have previously shown that the Gottingen minipig manifests hematopoietic ARS phases and symptoms similar to those observed in canines, NHPs, and humans.We establish here the LD50/30 dose (radiation dose at which 50% of the animals succumb within 30 days, and show that at this dose the time of nadir and the duration of cytopenia resemble those observed for NHP and canines, and mimic closely the kinetics of blood cell depletion and recovery in human patients with reversible hematopoietic damage (H3 category, METREPOL approach. No signs of GI damage in terms of diarrhea or shortening of villi were observed at doses up to 1.9 Gy. Platelet counts at days 10 and 14, number of days to reach critical platelet values, duration of thrombocytopenia, neutrophil stress response at 3 hours and count at 14 days, and CRP-to-platelet ratio were correlated with survival. The ratios between neutrophils, lymphocytes and platelets were significantly correlated with exposure to irradiation at different time intervals.As a non-rodent animal model, the minipig offers a useful alternative to NHP and canines, with attractive features including ARS resembling human ARS, cost, and regulatory acceptability. Use of the minipig may allow accelerated development of radiation countermeasures.

  19. Tumor Cells Growth and Survival Time with the Ketogenic Diet in Animal Models: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodadadi, Soheila; Sobhani, Nafiseh; Mirshekar, Somaye; Ghiasvand, Reza; Pourmasoumi, Makan; Miraghajani, Maryam; Dehsoukhteh, Somayeh Shahraki

    2017-01-01

    Recently, interest in targeted cancer therapies via metabolic pathways has been renewed with the discovery that many tumors become dependent on glucose uptake during anaerobic glycolysis. Also the inability of ketone bodies metabolization due to various deficiencies in mitochondrial enzymes is the major metabolic changes discovered in malignant cells. Therefore, administration of a ketogenic diet (KD) which is based on high in fat and low in carbohydrates might inhibit tumor growth and provide a rationale for therapeutic strategies. So, we conducted this systematic review to assess the effects of KD on the tumor cells growth and survival time in animal studies. All databases were searched from inception to November 2015. We systematically searched the PubMed, Scopus, Google Scholars, Science Direct and Cochrane Library according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement. To assess the quality of included studies we used SYRCLE's RoB tool. 268 articles were obtained from databases by primary search. Only 13 studies were eligible according to inclusion criteria. From included studies, 9 articles indicate that KD had a beneficial effect on tumor growth and survival time. Tumor types were included pancreatic, prostate, gastric, colon, brain, neuroblastoma and lung cancers. In conclusions, although studies in this field are rare and inconsistence, recent findings have demonstrated that KD can potentially inhibit the malignant cell growth and increase the survival time. Because of differences physiology between animals and humans, future studies in cancer patients treated with a KD are needed.

  20. Tumor cells growth and survival time with the ketogenic diet in animal models: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soheila Khodadadi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, interest in targeted cancer therapies via metabolic pathways has been renewed with the discovery that many tumors become dependent on glucose uptake during anaerobic glycolysis. Also the inability of ketone bodies metabolization due to various deficiencies in mitochondrial enzymes is the major metabolic changes discovered in malignant cells. Therefore, administration of a ketogenic diet (KD which is based on high in fat and low in carbohydrates might inhibit tumor growth and provide a rationale for therapeutic strategies. So, we conducted this systematic review to assess the effects of KD on the tumor cells growth and survival time in animal studies. All databases were searched from inception to November 2015. We systematically searched the PubMed, Scopus, Google Scholars, Science Direct and Cochrane Library according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement. To assess the quality of included studies we used SYRCLE's RoB tool. 268 articles were obtained from databases by primary search. Only 13 studies were eligible according to inclusion criteria. From included studies, 9 articles indicate that KD had a beneficial effect on tumor growth and survival time. Tumor types were included pancreatic, prostate, gastric, colon, brain, neuroblastoma and lung cancers. In conclusions, although studies in this field are rare and inconsistence, recent findings have demonstrated that KD can potentially inhibit the malignant cell growth and increase the survival time. Because of differences physiology between animals and humans, future studies in cancer patients treated with a KD are needed.

  1. [Prognosis of individual survival in animals with fatal and non-fatal tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krut'ko, V N; Smirnova, T M; Anisimov, V N

    1999-01-01

    Cohort analysis of life span in a uniform LIO rat population established a correlation between death cause and age-related death force parameters. It also demonstrated certain sex-related differences involved. The life span of males which had tumors at the time of death, whatever the real cause of death, was significantly longer than that in tumor-free animals. The life span of tumor-free females and those which died from cancer was shorter while the longest-surviving group bore non-fatal tumors. It is suggested that prognosis of individual survival be based on a combination of traditional procedures of mathematical evaluation of population mortality rates and complex assessment of individual health. This approach envisages formation of cohorts characterized by maximum differences in aging dynamics.

  2. Street animals, photography and urban life: three survivals in three death pictures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elane Abreu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available There is an ontological position on death in photography that is defined by its character of freezing time and mummifying index. In this paper, the issue of death appears, but suggests we think about it in a broader dialogue, in consonance with urban life, in which the photographic detail highlights expressiveness in the animal death banality on the streets. Through three photographs, we ask: how is certain aesthetic point of view expressed in the face of the urban wastes frivolity? The dead animal body here appears in an amalgam of flesh and stone of which we highlight the survival of form, matter and skin. They are three manifestations of what insists on image despite the death.

  3. [The effects of genomic imprinting on animal development and cloning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xiao-Jun; Jiao, Li-Hong; Chen, Xin; Wang, Liu

    2005-05-01

    In placental mammals, there is a small group of special genes, which are imprinted so that only one of the parental alleles is actually expressed in target cells. This epigenetic process is named genomic imprinting. Till now, about eighty genes are found to be imprinted in mice and human, and imprinting is conserved in ruminant species as well. This paper emphasized the effects of genomic imprinting on development and animal cloning, exhibited the function of imprint genes by analyzing their origin, and discussed their formation mechanism for understanding the profound effects of this epigenetic modification on development. Many imprinted genes are involved in fetal development, and may influence fetal growth and behavior. Imprinting appears to be particularly important for placental development. Epigenetic deregulation of imprinting may lead to complex diseases in human. And there is now a large body of evidence for loss of appropriate imprinting in numerous tumors. So far, nuclear transfer is a very inefficient process. The rate of cloned animals' surviving was very poor, and there were also frequent inherent anomalies. The most common abnormal phenotypes had the similar characteristics of the consequence due to deregulated expression of imprinted genes,indicating that the key factor to limite cloning efficiency might be the aberrant expression of imprinted genes.

  4. Lipid emulsion improves survival in animal models of local anesthetic toxicity: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fettiplace, Michael R; McCabe, Daniel J

    2017-08-01

    The Lipid Emulsion Therapy workgroup, organized by the American Academy of Clinical Toxicology, recently conducted a systematic review, which subjectively evaluated lipid emulsion as a treatment for local anesthetic toxicity. We re-extracted data and conducted a meta-analysis of survival in animal models. We extracted survival data from 26 publications and conducted a random-effect meta-analysis based on odds ratio weighted by inverse variance. We assessed the benefit of lipid emulsion as an independent variable in resuscitative models (16 studies). We measured Cochran's Q for heterogeneity and I2 to determine variance contributed by heterogeneity. Finally, we conducted a funnel plot analysis and Egger's test to assess for publication bias in studies. Lipid emulsion reduced the odds of death in resuscitative models (OR =0.24; 95%CI: 0.1-0.56, p = .0012). Heterogeneity analysis indicated a homogenous distribution. Funnel plot analysis did not indicate publication bias in experimental models. Meta-analysis of animal data supports the use of lipid emulsion (in combination with other resuscitative measures) for the treatment of local anesthetic toxicity, specifically from bupivacaine. Our conclusion differed from the original review. Analysis of outliers reinforced the need for good life support measures (securement of airway and chest compressions) along with prompt treatment with lipid.

  5. Why “Animal (De)liberation” survives early criticism and is pivotal to public health

    OpenAIRE

    Deckers, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Summary In 2016, the book Animal (De)liberation: Should the Consumption of Animal Products Be Banned? was published. This article aims to engage with the critique that this book has received and to clarify and reinforce its importance for human health. It is argued that the ideas developed in the book withstand critical scrutiny. As qualified moral veganism avoids the pitfalls of other moral positions on human diets, public health policies must be altered accordingly, subject to adequate poli...

  6. Increased survival of experimentally evolved antimicrobial peptide-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in an animal host

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Adam J; Purves, Joanne; Rolff, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been proposed as new class of antimicrobial drugs, following the increasing prevalence of bacteria resistant to antibiotics. Synthetic AMPs are functional analogues of highly evolutionarily conserved immune effectors in animals and plants, produced in response to microbial infection. Therefore, the proposed therapeutic use of AMPs bears the risk of ‘arming the enemy’: bacteria that evolve resistance to AMPs may be cross-resistant to immune effectors (AMPs) in their hosts. We used a panel of populations of Staphylococcus aureus that were experimentally selected for resistance to a suite of individual AMPs and antibiotics to investigate the ‘arming the enemy’ hypothesis. We tested whether the selected strains showed higher survival in an insect model (Tenebrio molitor) and cross-resistance against other antimicrobials in vitro. A population selected for resistance to the antimicrobial peptide iseganan showed increased in vivo survival, but was not more virulent. We suggest that increased survival of AMP-resistant bacteria almost certainly poses problems to immune-compromised hosts. PMID:25469169

  7. The Development of Animal Welfare in Finland and How People Perceive Animal Welfare : Case Study: Animals in Tourism: Zoos

    OpenAIRE

    Laatu, Suvi

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the thesis was to study how Finnish people perceive animal welfare in general and how they feel about animals in tourism purposes, more specifically in zoos. The thesis also contains information about Finnish animal legislation and how animal welfare has developed over time. The target group for the research was people who have visited zoos recently. The interviewed people were from different age groups. The theoretical framework consists of the following topics: people’s relations...

  8. A developing country perspective on recent developments in animal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The challenge for developing countries is to guard against bio-piracy of their indigenous animal genetic resources, and to safeguard technologies that they have been using. A second concern is the export of genetic material to countries that did not ratify the Convention on Biodiversity. The first operational conflict resulted ...

  9. Development of a Summarized Health Index (SHI for use in predicting survival in sea turtles.

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    Tsung-Hsien Li

    Full Text Available Veterinary care plays an influential role in sea turtle rehabilitation, especially in endangered species. Physiological characteristics, hematological and plasma biochemistry profiles, are useful references for clinical management in animals, especially when animals are during the convalescence period. In this study, these factors associated with sea turtle surviving were analyzed. The blood samples were collected when sea turtles remained alive, and then animals were followed up for surviving status. The results indicated that significantly negative correlation was found between buoyancy disorders (BD and sea turtle surviving (p < 0.05. Furthermore, non-surviving sea turtles had significantly higher levels of aspartate aminotranspherase (AST, creatinine kinase (CK, creatinine and uric acid (UA than surviving sea turtles (all p < 0.05. After further analysis by multiple logistic regression model, only factors of BD, creatinine and UA were included in the equation for calculating summarized health index (SHI for each individual. Through evaluation by receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve, the result indicated that the area under curve was 0.920 ± 0.037, and a cut-off SHI value of 2.5244 showed 80.0% sensitivity and 86.7% specificity in predicting survival. Therefore, the developed SHI could be a useful index to evaluate health status of sea turtles and to improve veterinary care at rehabilitation facilities.

  10. Development of cereals for animal feed technology

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    A. N. Ostrikov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The technological process of cereals production used in the production of feed stuff, which includes the following basic steps: grain moistening; binning of moistened grain for redistribution of moisture in the bulk of kernel; steaming of moistened grain; rolling of steamed grain; drying and cooling of flakes – is developed. In the production of flakes from scoured barley and oat grain before feeding to the rolling line film removal from the grain of these crops and the separation of the husks is carried out by one the existing methods: the method of grinding, followed by sifting and eventilation of films from tail fractions or a method of peeling on special machines with a separation of films. Wet-heat treatment of grain, followed by rolling helps to improve taste and palatability of feed, improves the nutritional value of carbohydrate and protein complexes, reduces the exertion of the body to digest food nutrients, allows to inactivate antinutritional substances and free the grain from the pathogenic and other microorganisms. In the duration of rolling process splitting of complex carbohydrates occurs, starch loses its original structure and is easier exposed to enzymes. The dried and cooled flakes have satisfactory flowability, do not set up. Humidity of flakes is not more than 14%, the temperature is not more than 10 °C above the ambient temperature, bulk density is 350–400 kg/m3. Developed set of equipment allows producing cereal flakes, the use of which in feed stuff and rations of young cattle and pigs increases the productivity of animals by 15–20% while reducing feed costs by 12–15%. Cereal flakes are used in the manufacture of complete feed for piglets (pigs at the age of 10 to 60 days, feed concentrates for pigs under the age of 4 months, the calves under the age of 115 days, high-producing cows, sporting and trained horses and lactating mares.

  11. Animal Migraine Models for Drug Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen-Olesen, Inger; Tfelt-Hansen, Peer; Olesen, Jes

    2013-01-01

    for headache has almost come to a standstill partly because of a lack of valid animal models. Here we review previous models with emphasis on optimal characteristics of a future model. In addition to selection of animal species, the method of induction of migraine-like changes and the method of recording...... responses are likely to be behavioral, allowing multiple experiments in each individual animal. Distinction is made between acute and prophylactic models and how to validate each of them. Modern insight into neurobiological mechanisms of migraine is so good that it is only a question of resources...

  12. The Importance of Animal Models in Tuberculosis Vaccine Development

    OpenAIRE

    Acosta, Armando; Norazmi, Mohd Nor; Hernandez-Pando, Rogelio; Alvarez, Nadine; Borrero, Reinier; Infante, Juan F; Sarmiento, Maria E

    2011-01-01

    Research, development, and production of vaccines are still highly dependent on the use of animal models in the various evaluation steps. Despite this fact, there are strong interests and ongoing efforts to reduce the use of animals in vaccine development. Tuberculosis vaccine development is one important example of the complexities involved in the use of animal models for the production of new vaccines. This review summarises some of the general aspects related with the use of animals in vac...

  13. The development of laboratory animal science and animal care of legislation and the consummation

    OpenAIRE

    Shizhong, Zhou

    2012-01-01

    Laboratory animal science is the use of non-human animals in experiments to obtain new knowledge and new technologies in biomedical research and testing. In order to develop science and technology, the human carried out a large number of animal experiments, these experiments greatly expanded the vision of related research field, and make a great contribution to human beings. Meanwhile, animal experiments also bring us a certain extent of negative effects. Countries around the world have adopt...

  14. Why “Animal (De)liberation” survives early criticism and is pivotal to public health

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Summary In 2016, the book Animal (De)liberation: Should the Consumption of Animal Products Be Banned? was published. This article aims to engage with the critique that this book has received and to clarify and reinforce its importance for human health. It is argued that the ideas developed in the book withstand critical scrutiny. As qualified moral veganism avoids the pitfalls of other moral positions on human diets, public health policies must be altered accordingly, subject to adequate political support for its associated vegan project. PMID:28776902

  15. Character animation fundamentals developing skills for 2D and 3D character animation

    CERN Document Server

    Roberts, Steve

    2012-01-01

    Expand your animation toolkit and remain competitive in the industry with this leading resource for 2D and 3D character animation techniques. Apply the industry's best practices to your own workflows and develop 2D, 3D and hybrid characters with ease. With side by side comparisons of 2D and 3D character design, improve your character animation and master traditional principles and processes including weight and balance, timing and walks. Develop characters inspired by humans, birds, fish, snakes and four legged animals. Breathe life into your character and develop a characters personality w

  16. Fun, animal welfare or community development? Understanding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper explores the impact of young travellers' value orientations on their choice for a wildlife tourism package. On the basis of existing literature, four different packages were designed: one mirroring the traditional offer of wildlife tourism as a hedonic experience; one enhancing the animal welfare aspect and intended ...

  17. Socio- economic development and child survival

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof Ezechukwu

    2011-12-06

    Dec 6, 2011 ... Strengthening regional economic integration for Af- rica's development: This would help build stronger and more resilient economies promote African econo- mies. Increased South-South collaboration: offers new op- portunities for transforming African economies linking up with China, Brazil, and India.

  18. Experimental animal modelling for TB vaccine development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pere-Joan Cardona

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Research for a novel vaccine to prevent tuberculosis is an urgent medical need. The current vaccine, BCG, has demonstrated a non-homogenous efficacy in humans, but still is the gold standard to be improved upon. In general, the main indicator for testing the potency of new candidates in animal models is the reduction of the bacillary load in the lungs at the acute phase of the infection. Usually, this reduction is similar to that induced by BCG, although in some cases a weak but significant improvement can be detected, but none of candidates are able to prevent establishment of infection. The main characteristics of several laboratory animals are reviewed, reflecting that none are able to simulate the whole characteristics of human tuberculosis. As, so far, no surrogate of protection has been found, it is important to test new candidates in several models in order to generate convincing evidence of efficacy that might be better than that of BCG in humans. It is also important to investigate the use of “in silico” and “ex vivo” models to better understand experimental data and also to try to replace, or at least reduce and refine experimental models in animals.

  19. Developing and Evaluating Animations for Teaching Quantum Mechanics Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohnle, Antje; Douglass, Margaret; Edwards, Tom J.; Gillies, Alastair D.; Hooley, Christopher A.; Sinclair, Bruce D.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we describe animations and animated visualizations for introductory and intermediate-level quantum mechanics instruction developed at the University of St Andrews. The animations aim to help students build mental representations of quantum mechanics concepts. They focus on known areas of student difficulty and misconceptions by…

  20. The idea of animal welfare - developments and tensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandøe, Peter; Jensen, Karsten Klint

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on developments and tensions within the idea of animal welfare. There is divergence among those who believe in the idea of animal welfare. First, we discuss what it takes for farm animal welfare to be good enough. How far should society go beyond the starting point...... of the Brambell Committee, which was to prevent avoidable suffering? Secondly, we turn to the tricky question of how welfare should be distributed between animals. Here, a tension within the concept of animal welfare, between a focus on the indivudual animal and on the herd, flock or shoal, is pointed out....... Finally, the role of economic considerations is considered, given that animal production takes place in a global market with free trade between countries with various standards of animal welfare....

  1. Survival

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data provide information on the survival of California red-legged frogs in a unique ecosystem to better conserve this threatened species while restoring...

  2. Development of Animal Models of Otitis Media

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Moo Kyun; Lee, Byung Don

    2013-01-01

    Otitis media is defined as inflammation of the middle ear, including the auditory ossicles and the Eustachian tube. Otitis media is a major health problem in many societies. The causes of otitis media includes infection and anatomic/physiologic, host, and environmental factors. In general, otitis media is a childhood disease, and anatomic and physiologic changes have great effects on its development. Thus, in vitro or human experimental studies of otitis media are difficult. Several experimen...

  3. Measuring general animal health status: Development of an animal health barometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depoorter, Pieter; Van Huffel, Xavier; Diricks, Herman; Imberechts, Hein; Dewulf, Jeroen; Berkvens, Dirk; Uyttendaele, Mieke

    2015-03-01

    The development of an animal health barometer, an instrument to measure the general health of the Belgian livestock population on a yearly basis and to monitor its evolution over time, is described. The elaboration of a set of 13 animal health indicators (AHIs) as the basis for the animal health barometer is discussed. These indicators were weighted by experts - including scientists, policy makers and agro-industrial representatives - to determine their relative weight in the barometer. The result of the barometer is expressed as a comparison with a previous year. Based on the results of the 13 AHIs, it is concluded that general animal health in Belgium shows a positive evolution since 2008. The animal health barometer provides a composite view of the status of livestock health in Belgium and is a tool to communicate in an intelligible, comprehensible manner on aspects of animal health to consumers and professional stakeholders in the animal production and food chain. Together with the food safety barometer (Baert et al., 2011. Food Res. Int. 44, 940) and the plant health barometer (Wilmart et al., 2014. Eur. J. Plant Pathol. doi: 10.1007/s10658-014-0547-x), the animal health barometer is one of the three instruments to provide a holistic view on the overall status of the safety of the food chain in Belgium. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Perspective: Socio-economic development and child survival | Onike ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Perspective: Socio-economic development and child survival. ... Nigerian Journal of Paediatrics ... Soon after independence in the 1950's and 60's many African countries suffered political unrest, social upheaval and economic instability with military coups and or civil wars, leaving 20 million internally displaced or refugees, ...

  5. Effects of early starvation on the development and survival of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Macrobrachium vollenhovenii (Herklots) has been identified as a crustacean species with great culture potential. The effects of starvation on development and survival of early larval stages of the African river prawn M. vollenhovenii were investigated. As an aspect of the ongoing effort to determine the culturability of the ...

  6. Survival and development of Bactrocera oleae Gmelin (Diptera ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bactrocera oleae Gmelin (Diptera:Tephritidae) is the most important and widespread pest in the olive growing countries in the Mediterranean basin. The development and survival of olive fruit fly, B. oleae from egg to adult stage was studied in the laboratory at 16, 22, 27 and 35°C. The objective of the study was to get ...

  7. Recent advances in the development of new transgenic animal technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Xiangyang

    2013-03-01

    Transgenic animal technology is one of the fastest growing biotechnology areas. It is used to integrate exogenous genes into the animal genome by genetic engineering technology so that these genes can be inherited and expressed by offspring. The transgenic efficiency and precise control of gene expression are the key limiting factors in the production of transgenic animals. A variety of transgenic technologies are available. Each has its own advantages and disadvantages and needs further study because of unresolved technical and safety issues. Further studies will allow transgenic technology to explore gene function, animal genetic improvement, bioreactors, animal disease models, and organ transplantation. This article reviews the recently developed animal transgenic technologies, including the germ line stem cell-mediated method to improve efficiency, gene targeting to improve accuracy, RNA interference-mediated gene silencing technology, zinc-finger nuclease gene targeting technology and induced pluripotent stem cell technology. These new transgenic techniques can provide a better platform to develop transgenic animals for breeding new animal varieties and promote the development of medical sciences, livestock production, and other fields.

  8. Pioglitazone treatment increases survival and prevents body weight loss in tumor-bearing animals: possible anti-cachectic effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beluzi, Mércia; Peres, Sidney B; Henriques, Felipe S; Sertié, Rogério A L; Franco, Felipe O; Santos, Kaltinaitis B; Knobl, Pâmela; Andreotti, Sandra; Shida, Cláudio S; Neves, Rodrigo X; Farmer, Stephen R; Seelaender, Marília; Lima, Fábio B; Batista, Miguel L

    2015-01-01

    Cachexia is a multifactorial syndrome characterized by profound involuntary weight loss, fat depletion, skeletal muscle wasting, and asthenia; all symptoms are not entirely attributable to inadequate nutritional intake. Adipose tissue and skeletal muscle loss during cancer cachexia development has been described systematically. The former was proposed to precede and be more rapid than the latter, which presents a means for the early detection of cachexia in cancer patients. Recently, pioglitazone (PGZ) was proposed to exhibit anti-cancer properties, including a reduction in insulin resistance and adipose tissue loss; nevertheless, few studies have evaluated its effect on survival. For greater insight into a potential anti-cachectic effect due to PGZ, 8-week-old male Wistar rats were subcutaneously inoculated with 1 mL (2×107) of Walker 256 tumor cells. The animals were randomly assigned to two experimental groups: TC (tumor + saline-control) and TP5 (tumor + PGZ/5 mg). Body weight, food ingestion and tumor growth were measured at baseline and after removal of tumor on days 7, 14 and 26. Samples from different visceral adipose tissue (AT) depots were collected on days 7 and 14 and stored at -80o C (5 to 7 animals per day/group). The PGZ treatment showed an increase in the survival average of 27.3% (P< 0.01) when compared to TC. It was also associated with enhanced body mass preservation (40.7 and 56.3%, p< 0.01) on day 14 and 26 compared with the TC group. The treatment also reduced the final tumor mass (53.4%, p<0.05) and anorexia compared with the TC group during late-stage cachexia. The retroperitoneal AT (RPAT) mass was preserved on day 7 compared with the TC group during the same experimental period. Such effect also demonstrates inverse relationship with tumor growth, on day 14. Gene expression of PPAR-γ, adiponectin, LPL and C/EBP-α from cachectic rats was upregulated after PGZ. Glucose uptake from adipocyte cells (RPAT) was entirely re-established due to

  9. Pioglitazone treatment increases survival and prevents body weight loss in tumor-bearing animals: possible anti-cachectic effect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mércia Beluzi

    Full Text Available Cachexia is a multifactorial syndrome characterized by profound involuntary weight loss, fat depletion, skeletal muscle wasting, and asthenia; all symptoms are not entirely attributable to inadequate nutritional intake. Adipose tissue and skeletal muscle loss during cancer cachexia development has been described systematically. The former was proposed to precede and be more rapid than the latter, which presents a means for the early detection of cachexia in cancer patients. Recently, pioglitazone (PGZ was proposed to exhibit anti-cancer properties, including a reduction in insulin resistance and adipose tissue loss; nevertheless, few studies have evaluated its effect on survival. For greater insight into a potential anti-cachectic effect due to PGZ, 8-week-old male Wistar rats were subcutaneously inoculated with 1 mL (2×107 of Walker 256 tumor cells. The animals were randomly assigned to two experimental groups: TC (tumor + saline-control and TP5 (tumor + PGZ/5 mg. Body weight, food ingestion and tumor growth were measured at baseline and after removal of tumor on days 7, 14 and 26. Samples from different visceral adipose tissue (AT depots were collected on days 7 and 14 and stored at -80o C (5 to 7 animals per day/group. The PGZ treatment showed an increase in the survival average of 27.3% (P< 0.01 when compared to TC. It was also associated with enhanced body mass preservation (40.7 and 56.3%, p< 0.01 on day 14 and 26 compared with the TC group. The treatment also reduced the final tumor mass (53.4%, p<0.05 and anorexia compared with the TC group during late-stage cachexia. The retroperitoneal AT (RPAT mass was preserved on day 7 compared with the TC group during the same experimental period. Such effect also demonstrates inverse relationship with tumor growth, on day 14. Gene expression of PPAR-γ, adiponectin, LPL and C/EBP-α from cachectic rats was upregulated after PGZ. Glucose uptake from adipocyte cells (RPAT was entirely re

  10. Survival of weed seeds and animal parasites as affected by anaerobic digestion at meso- and thermophilic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Anders; Nielsen, Henrik B; Hansen, Christian M; Andreasen, Christian; Carlsgart, Josefine; Hauggard-Nielsen, Henrik; Roepstorff, Allan

    2013-04-01

    Anaerobic digestion of residual materials from animals and crops offers an opportunity to simultaneously produce bioenergy and plant fertilizers at single farms and in farm communities where input substrate materials and resulting digested residues are shared among member farms. A surplus benefit from this practice may be the suppressing of propagules from harmful biological pests like weeds and animal pathogens (e.g. parasites). In the present work, batch experiments were performed, where survival of seeds of seven species of weeds and non-embryonated eggs of the large roundworm of pigs, Ascaris suum, was assessed under conditions similar to biogas plants managed at meso- (37°C) and thermophilic (55°C) conditions. Cattle manure was used as digestion substrate and experimental units were sampled destructively over time. Regarding weed seeds, the effect of thermophilic conditions (55°C) was very clear as complete mortality, irrespective of weed species, was reached after less than 2 days. At mesophilic conditions, seeds of Avena fatua, Sinapsis arvensis, Solidago canadensis had completely lost germination ability, while Brassica napus, Fallopia convolvulus and Amzinckia micrantha still maintained low levels (~1%) of germination ability after 1 week. Chenopodium album was the only weed species which survived 1 week at substantial levels (7%) although after 11 d germination ability was totally lost. Similarly, at 55°C, no Ascaris eggs survived more than 3h of incubation. Incubation at 37°C did not affect egg survival during the first 48 h and it took up to 10 days before total elimination was reached. In general, anaerobic digestion in biogas plants seems an efficient way (thermophilic more efficient than mesophilic) to treat organic farm wastes in a way that suppresses animal parasites and weeds so that the digestates can be applied without risking spread of these pests. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Evolution and development in cave animals: from fish to crustaceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protas, Meredith; Jeffery, William R.

    2013-01-01

    Cave animals are excellent models to study the general principles of evolution as well as the mechanisms of adaptation to a novel environment: the perpetual darkness of caves. In this article, two of the major model systems used to study the evolution and development (evo–devo) of cave animals are described: the teleost fish Astyanax mexicanus and the isopod crustacean Asellus aquaticus. The ways in which these animals match the major attributes expected of an evo–devo cave animal model system are described. For both species, we enumerate the regressive and constructive troglomorphic traits that have evolved during their adaptation to cave life, the developmental and genetic basis of these traits, the possible evolutionary forces responsible for them, and potential new areas in which these model systems could be used for further exploration of the evolution of cave animals. Furthermore, we compare the two model cave animals to investigate the mechanisms of troglomorphic evolution. Finally, we propose a few other cave animal systems that would be suitable for development as additional models to obtain a more comprehensive understanding of the developmental and genetic mechanisms involved in troglomorphic evolution. PMID:23580903

  12. Assessing Veterinary and Animal Science Students' Moral Judgment Development on Animal Ethics Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrinder, Joy M; Phillips, Clive J C

    2015-01-01

    Little has been done to assess veterinarians' moral judgment in relation to animal ethics issues. Following development of the VetDIT, a new moral judgment measure for animal ethics issues, this study aimed to refine and further validate the VetDIT, and to identify effects of teaching interventions on moral judgment and changes in moral judgment over time. VetDIT-V1 was refined into VetDIT-V2, and V3 was developed as a post-intervention test to prevent repetition. To test these versions for comparability, veterinary and animal science students (n=271) were randomly assigned to complete different versions. The VetDIT discriminates between stages of moral judgment, condensed into three schemas: Personal Interest (PI), Maintaining Norms (MN), and Universal Principles (UP). There were no differences in the scores for MN and UP between the versions, and we equated PI scores to account for differences between versions. Veterinary science students (n=130) who completed a three-hour small-group workshop on moral development theory and ethical decision making increased their use of UP in moral reasoning, whereas students (n=271) who received similar information in a 50-minute lecture did not. A longitudinal comparison of matched first- and third-year students (n=39) revealed no moral judgment development toward greater use of UP. The VetDIT is therefore useful for assessing moral judgment of animal and human ethics issues in veterinary and other animal-related professions. Intensive small-group workshops using moral development knowledge and skills, rather than lectures, are conducive to developing veterinary students' moral judgment.

  13. Application of Survival Analysis and Multistate Modeling to Understand Animal Behavior: Examples from Guide Dogs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lucy Asher; Naomi D. Harvey; Martin Green; Gary C. W. England

    2017-01-01

    .... The aim of this study is to present the application of epidemiological statistics to understand animal behavior where discrete outcomes are of interest, using data from guide dogs to illustrate...

  14. One hundred years of statistical developments in animal breeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianola, Daniel; Rosa, Guilherme J M

    2015-01-01

    Statistical methodology has played a key role in scientific animal breeding. Approximately one hundred years of statistical developments in animal breeding are reviewed. Some of the scientific foundations of the field are discussed, and many milestones are examined from historical and critical perspectives. The review concludes with a discussion of some future challenges and opportunities arising from the massive amount of data generated by livestock, plant, and human genome projects.

  15. Large animal models for vaccine development and testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerdts, Volker; Wilson, Heather L; Meurens, Francois; van Drunen Littel-van den Hurk, Sylvia; Wilson, Don; Walker, Stewart; Wheler, Colette; Townsend, Hugh; Potter, Andrew A

    2015-01-01

    The development of human vaccines continues to rely on the use of animals for research. Regulatory authorities require novel vaccine candidates to undergo preclinical assessment in animal models before being permitted to enter the clinical phase in human subjects. Substantial progress has been made in recent years in reducing and replacing the number of animals used for preclinical vaccine research through the use of bioinformatics and computational biology to design new vaccine candidates. However, the ultimate goal of a new vaccine is to instruct the immune system to elicit an effective immune response against the pathogen of interest, and no alternatives to live animal use currently exist for evaluation of this response. Studies identifying the mechanisms of immune protection; determining the optimal route and formulation of vaccines; establishing the duration and onset of immunity, as well as the safety and efficacy of new vaccines, must be performed in a living system. Importantly, no single animal model provides all the information required for advancing a new vaccine through the preclinical stage, and research over the last two decades has highlighted that large animals more accurately predict vaccine outcome in humans than do other models. Here we review the advantages and disadvantages of large animal models for human vaccine development and demonstrate that much of the success in bringing a new vaccine to market depends on choosing the most appropriate animal model for preclinical testing. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute for Laboratory Animal Research. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Efficacy of Re-188-labelled sulphur colloid on prolongation of survival time in melanoma-bearing animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, F.D.; Hsieh, B.T. E-mail: bthsieh@iner.gov.tw; Wang, H.E.; Ou, Y.H.; Yang, W.K.; Whang-Peng, J.; Liu, R.S.; Knapp, F.F.; Ting, G.; Yen, S.H

    2001-10-01

    In this study, the effectiveness of a {sup 188}Re labeled sulfur colloid with two particle size ranges was used to evaluate the effectiveness of this agent on melanoma tumors in mice in terms of animal lifespan. Methods: Two separate group of animals were used for investigating biodistribution and survival time. A total of 188 B16F10-melanoma-bearing BDF{sub 1} mice were injected intraperitoneally with 3.7 MBq (0.1mCi)/2mL of radiolabeled sulfur colloid ten days after intraperitoneal inoculation of 5x10{sup 5} B16F10 melanoma cells/2ml. For group 1, 30 mice were sacrificed at 1, 4, 24, 48 and 72 hours for biodistribution studies. In group 2, 158 mice were divided into 9 groups (n=16{approx}18/groups)each receiving respectively tumor alone, tumor with normal saline, cold colloid or hot colloid with 16, 23, 31, 46, 62, or 124 MBq activity. Each of these colloid groups was further divided into two groups, one receiving smaller particle sizes (<3{mu}m:80.4 {+-}7.2%, colloid 1) and the other receiving larger particle sizes (<3{mu}m:12.3{+-}1.0%, colloid 2). The animals were checked daily until death and their survival recorded. Results: Colloid 2 showed higher accumulation in almost all tissues, the highest accumulation organ was tumor ({approx} 40%), then spleen ({approx}20%), stomach ({approx}15%), diaphragm ({approx}3%), and liver ({approx}2%). There was a significant increase in survival time with increasing amount of the larger-particle-size colloid. Administered levels of 16-31 MBq/mouse were most efficacious and with higher amounts the survival times decreased significantly below that of the controls. There was a significant difference in the dose-response curves for the two preparations. Protection factors (1/Relative-risk) of nearly 5 were achieved using the larger colloid size, and nearly 30 using the smaller colloid size. An amount of 16-31 MBq of the colloid 2 was the optimal activity in these studies. On the one hand, the survival data agreed well with the

  17. Oak mast production and animal impacts on acorn survival in the central hardwoods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenneth F. Kellner; Jeffery K. Riegel; Nathanael I. Lichti; Robert K. Swihart

    2013-01-01

    As part of the Hardwood Ecosystem Experiment we measured mast production in white (Quercus alba) and black (Q. velutina) oak, and quantified the impacts of seed predators on acorn survival over a 3-year period. Specifically, we measured the proportion of acorns of each species infested with weevils (Curculio spp...

  18. Animal models for dengue vaccine development and testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Woonsung; Yeom, Minjoo; Choi, Il-Kyu; Yook, Heejun; Song, Daesub

    2017-07-01

    Dengue fever is a tropical endemic disease; however, because of climate change, it may become a problem in South Korea in the near future. Research on vaccines for dengue fever and outbreak preparedness are currently insufficient. In addition, because there are no appropriate animal models, controversial results from vaccine efficacy assessments and clinical trials have been reported. Therefore, to study the mechanism of dengue fever and test the immunogenicity of vaccines, an appropriate animal model is urgently needed. In addition to mouse models, more suitable models using animals that can be humanized will need to be constructed. In this report, we look at the current status of model animal construction and discuss which models require further development.

  19. Animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skuterud, L.; Strand, P. [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (Norway); Howard, B.J. [Inst. of Terrestrial Ecology (United Kingdom)

    1997-10-01

    The radionuclides of most concern with respect to contamination of animals after a nuclear accident are radioiodine, radiocaesium and radiostrontium (ICRP 30, 1979). Of the other significant anthropogenic radionuclides likely to be released in most accidents, only small proportions of that ingested will be absorbed in an animals gut, and the main animal products, milk and meat, will not normally be contaminated to a significant extent. Animal products will mostly be contaminated as a result of ingestion of contaminated feed and possibly, but to a much lesser extent, from inhalation (for radioiodine only). Direct external contamination of animals is of little or no consequence in human food production. Radioiodine and radiostrontium are important with respect to contamination of milk; radiocaesium contaminates both milk and meat. The physical and chemical form of a radionuclide can influence its absorption in the animal gut. For example, following the Chernobyl accident radiocaesium incorporated into vegetation by root uptake was more readily absorbed than that associated with the original deposit. The transfer of radiocaesium and radiostrontium to animals will be presented both as transfer coefficients and aggregated transfer coefficients. For most animal meat products, only radiocaesium is important as other radionuclides do not significantly contaminate muscle. Farm animal products are the most important foodstuff determining radiocaesium intake by the average consumer in the Nordic countries. The major potential source of radioiodine and radiostrontium to humans is milk and milk products. Of the different species, the smaller animals have the highest transfer of radiocaesium from fodder to meat and milk. (EG). 68 refs.

  20. Anti-apoptotic pro-survival effect of clotrimazole in a normothermic ischemia reperfusion injury animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannelli, Antonio; de Sousa, George; Zucchini, Nathalie; Saint-Paul, Marie Christine; Gugenheim, Jean; Rahmani, Roger

    2011-11-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that apoptosis plays a critical role in ischemia reperfusion (IR)-mediated liver injury. Clotrimazole (CTZ) is a potent antimycotic drug that also has a free radical scavenger activity. This study investigated the possible anti-apoptotic, pro-survival role of CTZ in hepatic IR injury in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups: sham, control, and CTZ-treated (n = 10 each). Control and CTZ-treated animals were subjected to 60 min of normothermic ischemia of the left lateral lobe of the liver followed by 6 h of reperfusion. Animals were then sacrificed, the liver excised, and blood samples collected. CTZ induced a significant increase in expression of anti-apoptotic Bcl-xL protein. Serum levels of aspartate transaminase and alanine transaminase were significantly lower in CTZ-treated animals than in controls. Histopathologically, tissue damage in the form of apoptosis was significantly lower in CTZ-treated animals than in controls. Expression of the activated form of caspase-3 and the cleaved form of its substrate, poly-ADP-ribose polymerase, decreased significantly in the CTZ-treated group compared with controls. CTZ increased the expression of phospho-p 44/42 ERK1/2 and decreased the phosphorylated form of JNK, without affecting p38 MAPK. CTZ protects the liver against IR apoptosis in rats through overexpression of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-xL. Other pro-survival pathways such as phospho-p 44/42 ERK1/2 kinase are also activated while JNK is down-regulated. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Survival and development of chicken ascarid eggs in temperate pastures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thapa, Sundar; Thamsborg, Stig Milan; Meyling, Nicolai Vitt

    2017-01-01

    Eggs of chicken ascarids (Ascaridia galli and Heterakis spp.) are believed to be hardy and survive for long periods. However, this has not been evaluated quantitatively and our study therefore aimed to determine development and recovery of chicken ascarid eggs after burying in pasture soil....... Unembryonated eggs were mixed with soil, placed in sealed nylon bags and buried at 7 cm depth in pasture plots April (spring, n = 72) and December 2014 (winter, n = 72). Eight randomly selected bags per season were used to estimate pre-burial egg recovery [0 week post-burial (wpb)]. Eight random bags were...... removed at 5, 12, 23, 38, 52, 71 wpb per season and additionally at 104 wpb for spring burial. The content of each bag was analysed for numbers and development stages of eggs. Eggs buried in spring were fully embryonated within 12 wpb. In contrast, eggs buried in winter were developing between 23 and 38...

  2. Establishing the pig as a large animal model for vaccine development against human cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Nana Haahr; Frøsig, Thomas Mørch; Welner, Simon

    2015-01-01

    and the porcine immunome is closer related to the human counterpart, we here introduce pigs as a supplementary large animal model for human cancer vaccine development. IDO and RhoC, both important in human cancer development and progression, were used as vaccine targets and 12 pigs were immunized with overlapping......C-derived peptides across all groups with no adjuvant being superior. These findings support the further use of pigs as a large animal model for vaccine development against human cancer.......Immunotherapy has increased overall survival of metastatic cancer patients, and cancer antigens are promising vaccine targets. To fulfill the promise, appropriate tailoring of the vaccine formulations to mount in vivo cytotoxic T cell (CTL) responses toward co-delivered cancer antigens is essential...

  3. The development of animal personality : relevance, concepts and perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stamps, Judy; Groothuis, Ton G.G.

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies of animal personality have focused on its proximate causation and its ecological and evolutionary significance, but have mostly ignored questions about its development, although an understanding of the latter is highly relevant to these other questions. One possible reason for this

  4. Scientific Knowledge and Technology, Animal Experimentation, and Pharmaceutical Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinter, Lewis B; DeGeorge, Joseph J

    2016-12-01

    Human discovery of pharmacologically active substances is arguably the oldest of the biomedical sciences with origins >3500 years ago. Since ancient times, four major transformations have dramatically impacted pharmaceutical development, each driven by advances in scientific knowledge, technology, and/or regulation: (1) anesthesia, analgesia, and antisepsis; (2) medicinal chemistry; (3) regulatory toxicology; and (4) targeted drug discovery. Animal experimentation in pharmaceutical development is a modern phenomenon dating from the 20th century and enabling several of the four transformations. While each transformation resulted in more effective and/or safer pharmaceuticals, overall attrition, cycle time, cost, numbers of animals used, and low probability of success for new products remain concerns, and pharmaceutical development remains a very high risk business proposition. In this manuscript we review pharmaceutical development since ancient times, describe its coevolution with animal experimentation, and attempt to predict the characteristics of future transformations. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute for Laboratory Animal Research. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Development of an animal model of selective coronary atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mihaylov, D; van Luyn, MJA; Rakhorst, G

    Background Atherosclerosis causes over 40% of all deaths in the USA and Western Europe. Although several hypotheses have been proposed, the etiology and pathogenesis of the atherosclerosis remain unknown. Objective To develop a model of selective coronary atherosclerosis in pigs. Design An animal

  6. When Humans Become Animals: Development of the Animal Category in Early Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Patricia A.; Medin, Douglas L.; Waxman, Sandra R.

    2012-01-01

    The current study examines 3- and 5-year-olds' representation of the concept we label "animal" and its two nested concepts--"animal"[subscript contrastive] (including only non-human animals) and "animal"[subscript inclusive] (including both humans and non-human animals). Building upon evidence that naming promotes object categorization, we…

  7. Political Mechanisms for Long-Range Survival and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, W.

    As the first species aware of extinction and capable of proactively ensuring our long-term survival and development, it is striking that we do not do so with the rigor, formality, and foresight it requires. Only from a reactive posture have we responded to the challenges of global warfare, human rights, environmental concerns, and sustainable development. Despite our awareness of the possibility for extinction and apocalyptic set-backs to our evolution, and despite the existence of long-range studies-which must still be dramatically increased-proactive global policy implementation regarding our long-term survival and development is arguably non-existent. This lack of long-term policy making can be attributed in part to the lack of formal political mechanisms to facilitate longer-range policy making that extends 30 years or more into the future. Political mechanisms for infusing long-range thinking, research, and strategic planning into the policy-making process can help correct this shortcoming and provide the motivation needed to adequately address long-term challenges with the political rigor required to effectively establish and implement long-term policies. There are some efforts that attempt to address longer-range issues, but those efforts often do not connect to the political process, do not extend 30 or more years into the future, are not well-funded, and are not sufficiently systemic. Political mechanisms for long-range survival and prosperity could correct these inadequacies by raising awareness, providing funding, and most importantly, leveraging political rigor to establish and enforce long-range strategic planning and policies. The feasibility of such mechanisms should first be rigorously studied and assessed in a feasibility study, which could then inform implementation. This paper will present the case for such a study and suggest some possible political mechanisms that should be investigated further in the proposed study. This work is being further

  8. Clinical Strategies and Animal Models for Developing Senolytic Agents

    OpenAIRE

    Kirkland, James L.; Tchkonia, Tamara

    2014-01-01

    Aging is associated with increasing predisposition to multiple chronic diseases. One fundamental aging process that is often operative at sites of the pathology underlying chronic age-related diseases is cellular senescence. Small molecule senolytic agents are being developed. For successful drug development: 1) appropriate animal models of human age-related diseases need to be devised. 2) Models have to be made in which it can be proven that beneficial phenotypic effects are actually caused ...

  9. Development of animal models for hepatobiliary nuclear imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jin Hee; Park, Yun Hee; Ryu, Yeon Mi; Shin, Eun Kyung; Kim, Meyoung Kon [Korea University Medical College, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-07-01

    Animal models for hepatobiliary disorders were classified into 2 different types: parenchymal hepatotoxicity and biliary-tract cholestasis. The purpose of this study was to develop animal models for hepatobiliary scintigraphy in evaluating a novel agents, such as {sup 99m}Tc-mercaptoacetyl triglycine(MAG3)-biocytin. Animal models were prepared by use of female Balb/c mice. Those were treated with 0.1, 0.5, and 2.5 ml/kg of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) intraperitoneally for hepatotoxicity and with 30, 150, and 750 mg/kg of {alpha}-naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT) to induce cholestasis. Dose of optimum was 0.5 ml/kg and 150 mg/kg for each model but lower (0.1 ml/kg and 30 mg/kg) and higher (2.5ml/kg and 750 mg/kg)were not be compatible for hepatobiliary models. Using these hepatobiliary models, {sup 99m}Tc-MAG3-biocytin scintigraphy was successfully carried out by using 4 parameters, e.g., peak liver/heat ratio (Rmax), peak ratio time (Tmax), half clearance time (HCT), and hepatic extraction fraction (HEF) for hepatotoxicity and cholestasis. Additionally, biochemical and histological analysis also resulted in confirming these animal models. Thus, we concluded that these animal models were highly likely to be efficient in evaluating hepatobiliary scintigraphic agent such as {sup 99m}Tc-MAG3-biocytin.

  10. The development of animal personality: relevance, concepts and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamps, Judy; Groothuis, Ton G G

    2010-05-01

    Recent studies of animal personality have focused on its proximate causation and its ecological and evolutionary significance, but have mostly ignored questions about its development, although an understanding of the latter is highly relevant to these other questions. One possible reason for this neglect is confusion about many of the concepts and terms that are necessary to study the development of animal personality. Here, we provide a framework for studying personality development that focuses on the properties of animal personality, and considers how and why these properties may change over time. We specifically focus on three dimensions of personality: (1) contextual generality at a given age or time, (2) temporal consistency in behavioural traits and in relationships between traits, and (3) the effects of genes and experience on the development of personality at a given age or life stage. We advocate using a new approach, contextual reaction norms, to study the contextual generality of personality traits at the level of groups, individuals and genotypes, show how concepts and terms borrowed from the literature on personality development in humans can be used to study temporal changes in personality at the level of groups and individuals, and demonstrate how classical developmental reaction norms can provide insights into the ways that genes and experiential factors interact across ontogeny to affect the expression of personality traits. In addition, we discuss how correlations between the effects of genes and experience on personality development can arise as a function of individuals' control over their own environment, via niche-picking or niche-construction. Using this framework, we discuss several widely held assumptions about animal personality development that still await validation, identify neglected methodological issues, and describe a number of promising new avenues for future research.

  11. IAN family critically regulates survival and development of T lymphocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Nitta

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The IAN (immune-associated nucleotide-binding protein family is a family of functionally uncharacterized GTP-binding proteins expressed in vertebrate immune cells and in plant cells during antibacterial responses. Here we show that all eight IAN family genes encoded in a single cluster of mouse genome are predominantly expressed in lymphocytes, and that the expression of IAN1, IAN4, and IAN5 is significantly elevated upon thymic selection of T lymphocytes. Gain-of-function experiments show that the premature overexpression of IAN1 kills immature thymocytes, whereas short hairpin RNA-mediated loss-of-function studies show that IAN4 supports positive selection. The knockdown of IAN5 perturbs the optimal generation of CD4/CD8 double-positive thymocytes and reduces the survival of mature T lymphocytes. We also show evidence suggesting that IAN4 and IAN5 are associated with anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, whereas IAN1 is associated with pro-apoptotic Bax. Thus, the IAN family is a novel family of T cell-receptor-responsive proteins that critically regulate thymic development and survival of T lymphocytes and that potentially exert regulatory functions through the association with Bcl-2 family proteins.

  12. A developing country perspective on recent developments in animal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The first operational conflict resulted from a patent on a “Method of Bovine Herd Management”. The patent claims rights to a practice that has been public knowledge for nearly 100 years. The novel idea within the patent is the specific mathematical model and procedures developed for analysis of test day yields. Monsanto ...

  13. Genetic Animal Models of Malformations of Cortical Development and Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Michael; Roper, Steven N.

    2015-01-01

    Malformations of cortical development constitute a variety of pathological brain abnormalities that commonly cause severe, medically-refractory epilepsy, including focal lesions, such as focal cortical dysplasia, hetereotopias, and tubers of tuberous sclerosis complex, and diffuse malformations, such as lissencephaly. Although some cortical malformations result from environmental insults during cortical development in utero, genetic factors are increasingly recognized as primary pathogenic factors across the entire spectrum of malformations. Genes implicated in causing different cortical malformations are involved in a variety of physiological functions, but many are focused on regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, and neuronal migration. Advances in molecular genetic methods have allowed the engineering of increasingly sophisticated animal models of cortical malformations and associated epilepsy. These animal models have identified some common mechanistic themes shared by a number of different cortical malformations, but also revealed the diversity and complexity of cellular and molecular mechanisms that lead to the development of the pathological lesions and resulting epileptogenesis. PMID:25911067

  14. Clinical strategies and animal models for developing senolytic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkland, James L; Tchkonia, Tamara

    2015-08-01

    Aging is associated with increasing predisposition to multiple chronic diseases. One fundamental aging process that is often operative at sites of the pathology underlying chronic age-related diseases is cellular senescence. Small molecule senolytic agents are being developed. For successful drug development: 1) appropriate animal models of human age-related diseases need to be devised. 2) Models have to be made in which it can be proven that beneficial phenotypic effects are actually caused through clearing senescent cells by putative senolytic agents, as opposed to "off-target" effects of these agents on non-senescent cells. 3) Models are needed to test efficacy of drugs and to uncover potential side effects of senolytic agents. Development of the optimal animal models and clinical trial paradigms for senolytic agents warrants an intensive effort, since senolytic agents, if successful in delaying, preventing, alleviating, or reversing age-related diseases as a group would be transformative. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Administration of sucralfate prolongs survival of animals with experimental peptic ulceration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mall, A; Fourie, J; McLeod, H; Muschol, A; Campbell, J A; Hickman, R

    1991-08-08

    Ligation of the pig bile duct (BDL) results in 100% incidence of pars esophageal ulceration within 48 hours of the procedure. Usually such ulceration is uniformly fatal unless a highly selective vagotomy is performed simultaneously with the BDL. The administration of sucralfate to pigs with BDL prolonged their survival for up to 7 days, with evidence of healing of the ulcer on macroscopic and histologic observations. An increase in cell proliferation in the squamous epithelium of the ulcerated area was also seen in this sucralfate group. These features were not seen in controls, pigs with BDL only, or pigs with BDL and with magaldrate (Riopone), colloidal bismuth subcitrate (DeNol), or carbenoxolone. Analysis by Sepharose 2B gel filtration showed that there was no significant difference in the amounts of polymeric mucin in any group, with a wide scatter of the data seen especially for pigs in the untreated BDL-only group. This study suggests that sucralfate may enhance healing in this experimental pig ulcer model via a mechanism independent of the stimulation of mucus secretion. We propose that coating the mucosa with sucralfate provides a temporary substitute barrier that creates a microenvironment conducive to wound repair by mucosal proliferation.

  16. Development of the micro-CT system for small animal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, K. Y.; Lim, J. H.; Jung, Y. J.; Kim, K. W.; Park, J. G.; Yoon, K. H.

    2005-09-01

    The micro-CT system has been developed for small animal imaging. The system is mainly composed of CCD detector coupled with CsI (Tl) phosphor, X-ray source with micro focal spot, linearly moving couch, and rotation gantry. This system was developed as a gantry rotation type and designed to get CT images of small living animals. In this paper, the requirements of main parts of the system to acquire micro spatial resolution are described. The characteristics of the system, such as field of view, geometries of main components, gantry movement, and X-ray analysis are mainly considered. Resolution of the CT system was evaluated under variable conditions. Typically, the spatial resolution of the CT system was obtained about 37 micron at 10% of MTF curve.

  17. Pneumococcal meningitis: development of a new animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Benjamin P C; Shepherd, Robert K; Robins-Browne, Roy M; Clark, Graeme M; O'Leary, Stephen J

    2006-09-01

    The rat is a suitable animal to establish a model for the study of pneumococcal meningitis postcochlear implantation. There has been an increase in the number of cases of cochlear implant-related meningitis. The most common organism identified was Streptococcus pneumoniae. Whether cochlear implantation increases the risk of pneumococcal meningitis in healthy subjects without other risk factors remains to be determined. Previous animal studies do not focus on the pathogenesis and risk of pneumococcal meningitis postimplantation and are based on relatively small animal numbers, making it difficult to assess the cause-and-effect relationship. There is, therefore, a need to develop a new animal model allowing direct examination of the pathogenesis of meningitis in the presence of a cochlear implant. Eighteen nonimplanted rats were infected with 1 x 10 and 1 x 10 colony-forming units (CFU) of a clinical isolate of S. pneumoniae via three different inoculation routes (middle ear, inner ear, and i.p.) to examine for evidence of meningitis during 24 hours. Six implanted rats were infected with the highest amount of bacteria possible for each route of inoculation (4 x 10 CFU i.p., 3 x 10 CFU middle ear, and 1 x 10 CFU inner ear) to examine for evidence of meningitis with the presence of an implant. The histological pattern of cochlear infections for each of the three different inoculating routes were examined. Pneumococcal meningitis was evident in all 6 implanted animals for each of the three different routes of inoculation. Once in the inner ear, bacteria were found to enter the central nervous system via either the cochlear aqueduct or canaliculi perforantes of the osseous spiral lamina, reaching the perineural and perivascular space then the internal acoustic meatus. The rate, extent, and pattern of infection within the cochleae depended on the route of inoculation. Finally, there was no evidence of pneumococcal meningitis observed in 18 nonimplanted rats inoculated at

  18. Development of a Summarized Health Index (SHI) for Use in Predicting Survival in Sea Turtles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tsung-Hsien; Chang, Chao-Chin; Cheng, I-Jiunn; Lin, Suen-Chuain

    2015-01-01

    Veterinary care plays an influential role in sea turtle rehabilitation, especially in endangered species. Physiological characteristics, hematological and plasma biochemistry profiles, are useful references for clinical management in animals, especially when animals are during the convalescence period. In this study, these factors associated with sea turtle surviving were analyzed. The blood samples were collected when sea turtles remained alive, and then animals were followed up for surviving status. The results indicated that significantly negative correlation was found between buoyancy disorders (BD) and sea turtle surviving (p turtles had significantly higher levels of aspartate aminotranspherase (AST), creatinine kinase (CK), creatinine and uric acid (UA) than surviving sea turtles (all p turtles and to improve veterinary care at rehabilitation facilities. PMID:25803431

  19. Development of a Summarized Health Index (SHI) for use in predicting survival in sea turtles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tsung-Hsien; Chang, Chao-Chin; Cheng, I-Jiunn; Lin, Suen-Chuain

    2015-01-01

    Veterinary care plays an influential role in sea turtle rehabilitation, especially in endangered species. Physiological characteristics, hematological and plasma biochemistry profiles, are useful references for clinical management in animals, especially when animals are during the convalescence period. In this study, these factors associated with sea turtle surviving were analyzed. The blood samples were collected when sea turtles remained alive, and then animals were followed up for surviving status. The results indicated that significantly negative correlation was found between buoyancy disorders (BD) and sea turtle surviving (p sea turtles had significantly higher levels of aspartate aminotranspherase (AST), creatinine kinase (CK), creatinine and uric acid (UA) than surviving sea turtles (all p sea turtles and to improve veterinary care at rehabilitation facilities.

  20. Pulmonary Artery Sealing With an Ultrasonic Energy Device in Video-Assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery Lobectomy: An Animal Survival Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudie, Eric; Khereba, Mohamed; Tahiri, Mehdi; Hegde, Pravachan; Thiffault, Vicky; Hadjeres, Rachid; Berdugo, Jérémie; Ferraro, Pasquale; Liberman, Moishe

    2016-10-01

    Pulmonary artery (PA) sealing in video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) lobectomy is typically accomplished using vascular endostaplers. Endostaplers may be associated with iatrogenic PA branch injury, especially in short, small PA branches. We evaluated PA branch sealing with the HARMONIC ACE +7 (ACE) shears (Ethicon, Cincinnati, OH) in VATS lobectomy in a canine survival model. Ten adult dogs underwent VATS lobectomy. Standard VATS lobectomy operative technique was used for the entire operation, except for PA branch sealing. The ACE was used for all PA branch sealing. Dogs were kept alive for 30 days. The 10 dogs underwent VATS right upper (n = 5) and right lower (n = 5) lobectomy. The ACE was used to seal 21 PA branches. No PA branch was divided with an endostapler. There were no intraoperative complications or conversions to thoracotomy. Mean in vivo PA diameter was 5.6 mm (range, 2 to 12 mm). One 10-mm PA branch had a partial seal failure immediately at the time of sealing. The device was reapplied on the stump, and the PA branch was successfully sealed. All dogs survived 30 days without hemothorax. Necropsy at 30 days did not reveal any signs of postoperative bleeding. Pathology of the sealed PA branches at 30 days revealed fibrosis, giant cell reaction, neovascularization, and thermal changes of the vessel wall. The use of the ACE for PA branch sealing in VATS lobectomy is safe and effective in an animal survival model. Human studies are needed to determine the clinical safety of ultrasonic PA branch sealing before widespread clinical use. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The search for animal models for Lassa fever vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukashevich, Igor S

    2013-01-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) is the most prevalent arenavirus in West Africa and is responsible for several hundred thousand infections and thousands of deaths annually. The sizeable disease burden, numerous imported cases of Lassa fever (LF) and the possibility that LASV can be used as an agent of biological warfare make a strong case for vaccine development. Currently there is no licensed LF vaccine and research and devlopment is hampered by the high cost of nonhuman primate animal models and by biocontainment requirements (BSL-4). In addition, a successful LF vaccine has to induce a strong cell-mediated cross-protective immunity against different LASV lineages. All of these challenges will be addressed in this review in the context of available and novel animal models recently described for evaluation of LF vaccine candidates.

  2. C. elegans AMPKs promote survival and arrest germline development during nutrient stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masamitsu Fukuyama

    2012-08-01

    Mechanisms controlling development, growth, and metabolism are coordinated in response to changes in environmental conditions, enhancing the likelihood of survival to reproductive maturity. Much remains to be learned about the molecular basis underlying environmental influences on these processes. C. elegans larvae enter a developmentally dormant state called L1 diapause when hatched into nutrient-poor conditions. The nematode pten homologue daf-18 is essential for maintenance of survival and germline stem cell quiescence during this period (Fukuyama et al., 2006; Sigmond et al., 2008, but the details of the signaling network(s in which it functions remain to be elucidated. Here, we report that animals lacking both aak-1 and aak-2, which encode the two catalytic α subunits of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK, show reduced viability and failure to maintain mitotic quiescence in germline stem cells during L1 diapause. Furthermore, failure to arrest germline proliferation has a long term consequence; aak double mutants that have experienced L1 diapause develop into sterile adults when returned to food, whereas their continuously fed siblings are fertile. Both aak and daf-18 appear to maintain germline quiescence by inhibiting activity of the common downstream target, TORC1 (TOR Complex 1. In contrast, rescue of the lethality phenotype indicates that aak-2 acts not only in the intestine, as does daf-18, but also in neurons, likely promoting survival by preventing energy deprivation during L1 diapause. These results not only provide evidence that AMPK contributes to survival during L1 diapause in a manner distinct from that by which it controls dauer diapause, but they also suggest that AMPK suppresses TORC1 activity to maintain stem cell quiescence.

  3. Filial cannibalism improves survival and development of beaugregory damselfish embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Adam G; Smith, Carl; Campbell, Andrew C

    2002-01-01

    Cannibalism of small numbers of offspring by a parent has been proposed as an adaptive parental strategy, by providing energy to support parental care. However, there are few empirical studies to support this hypothesis. We conducted field and laboratory experiments to investigate partial filial cannibalism in Stegastes leucostictus, a coral reef fish with paternal care. Partial cannibalism was shown to be common, and males were found to remove developing embryos from throughout a clutch in a random pattern, rather than in the more aggregated pattern seen during embryo predation. Males that received a diet supplement grew faster than control males, but did not engage in less cannibalism. Also, males did not concentrate cannibalism on early embryonic stages with the highest energetic value. Experimental reduction of embryo densities was found to significantly increase embryo development rate and survival from egg deposition to hatching, and experimental reduction of oxygen levels significantly increased rates of partial filial cannibalism by males. Artificial spawning sites with low oxygen levels were avoided by spawning females, and cannibalism rates by males were higher. We propose that partial filial cannibalism serves as an adaptive parental strategy to low oxygen levels in S. leucostictus by increasing the hatching success of embryos. PMID:12396483

  4. Developing the Immunology Book for Animal and Human Physiology Subject

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuni Mitasari

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available he objective of the study was to develop an immunology book for Animal and Human Physiology subject. This book was developed based on the Thiagarajan development model which was modified of: Define, Design, Develop, dan Disseminate (4D. The data expert validation instrument was questionnaire using Likert scales, comments, and recommendation sheets. Expert appraisal was done by material expert and media and design learning expert. The developmental testing was conducted using questionnaire to test the readibility. The expert validation was conducted by material expert as well as design and media learning expert validator; meanwhile, the field test was done to measure the readability. The validity test results were: the material expert state that the material is valid (97.14%, as well as the design and learning media expert (84.88% and field test by students (88.17%.

  5. Motoneuron development influences dorsal root ganglia survival and Schwann cell development in a vertebrate model of spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Le Thi; Duy, Phan Q; Jontes, James D; Beattie, Christine E

    2015-01-15

    Low levels of the survival motor neuron protein (SMN) cause the disease spinal muscular atrophy. A primary characteristic of this disease is motoneuron dysfunction and paralysis. Understanding why motoneurons are affected by low levels of SMN will lend insight into this disease and to motoneuron biology in general. Motoneurons in zebrafish smn mutants develop abnormally; however, it is unclear where Smn is needed for motoneuron development since it is a ubiquitously expressed protein. We have addressed this issue by expressing human SMN in motoneurons in zebrafish maternal-zygotic (mz) smn mutants. First, we demonstrate that SMN is present in axons, but only during the period of robust motor axon outgrowth. We also conclusively demonstrate that SMN acts cell autonomously in motoneurons for proper motoneuron development. This includes the formation of both axonal and dendritic branches. Analysis of the peripheral nervous system revealed that Schwann cells and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons developed abnormally in mz-smn mutants. Schwann cells did not wrap axons tightly and had expanded nodes of Ranvier. The majority of DRG neurons had abnormally short peripheral axons and later many of them failed to divide and died. Expressing SMN just in motoneurons rescued both of these cell types showing that their failure to develop was secondary to the developmental defects in motoneurons. Driving SMN just in motoneurons did not increase survival of the animal, suggesting that SMN is needed for motoneuron development and motor circuitry, but that SMN in other cells types factors into survival. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Human-animal chimeras for vaccine development: an endangered species or opportunity for the developing world?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daar Abdallah S

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years, the field of vaccines for diseases such as Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV which take a heavy toll in developing countries has faced major failures. This has led to a call for more basic science research, and development as well as evaluation of new vaccine candidates. Human-animal chimeras, developed with a 'humanized' immune system could be useful to study infectious diseases, including many neglected diseases. These would also serve as an important tool for the efficient testing of new vaccine candidates to streamline promising candidates for further trials in humans. However, developing human-animal chimeras has proved to be controversial. Discussion Development of human-animal chimeras for vaccine development has been slowed down because of opposition by some philosophers, ethicists and policy makers in the west-they question the moral status of such animals, and also express discomfort about transgression of species barriers. Such opposition often uses a contemporary western world view as a reference point. Human-animal chimeras are often being created for diseases which cause significantly higher morbidity and mortality in the developing world as compared to the developed world. We argue in our commentary that given this high disease burden, we should look at socio-cultural perspectives on human-animal chimera like beings in the developing world. On examination, it's clear that such beings have been part of mythology and cultural descriptions in many countries in the developing world. Summary To ensure that important research on diseases afflicting millions like malaria, HIV, Hepatitis-C and dengue continues to progress, we recommend supporting human-animal chimera research for vaccine development in developing countries (especially China and India which have growing technical expertise in the area. The negative perceptions in some parts of the west about human-animal chimeras can be used as an

  7. Human-animal chimeras for vaccine development: an endangered species or opportunity for the developing world?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhan, Anant; Singer, Peter A; Daar, Abdallah S

    2010-05-19

    In recent years, the field of vaccines for diseases such as Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) which take a heavy toll in developing countries has faced major failures. This has led to a call for more basic science research, and development as well as evaluation of new vaccine candidates. Human-animal chimeras, developed with a 'humanized' immune system could be useful to study infectious diseases, including many neglected diseases. These would also serve as an important tool for the efficient testing of new vaccine candidates to streamline promising candidates for further trials in humans. However, developing human-animal chimeras has proved to be controversial. Development of human-animal chimeras for vaccine development has been slowed down because of opposition by some philosophers, ethicists and policy makers in the west-they question the moral status of such animals, and also express discomfort about transgression of species barriers. Such opposition often uses a contemporary western world view as a reference point. Human-animal chimeras are often being created for diseases which cause significantly higher morbidity and mortality in the developing world as compared to the developed world. We argue in our commentary that given this high disease burden, we should look at socio-cultural perspectives on human-animal chimera like beings in the developing world. On examination, it's clear that such beings have been part of mythology and cultural descriptions in many countries in the developing world. To ensure that important research on diseases afflicting millions like malaria, HIV, Hepatitis-C and dengue continues to progress, we recommend supporting human-animal chimera research for vaccine development in developing countries (especially China and India which have growing technical expertise in the area). The negative perceptions in some parts of the west about human-animal chimeras can be used as an opportunity for nurturing important vaccine development

  8. Calcineurin inhibition at the clinical phase of prion disease reduces neurodegeneration, improves behavioral alterations and increases animal survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhisek Mukherjee

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders characterized by a long pre-symptomatic phase followed by rapid and progressive clinical phase. Although rare in humans, the unconventional infectious nature of the disease raises the potential for an epidemic. Unfortunately, no treatment is currently available. The hallmark event in prion diseases is the accumulation of a misfolded and infectious form of the prion protein (PrP(Sc. Previous reports have shown that PrP(Sc induces endoplasmic reticulum stress and changes in calcium homeostasis in the brain of affected individuals. In this study we show that the calcium-dependent phosphatase Calcineurin (CaN is hyperactivated both in vitro and in vivo as a result of PrP(Sc formation. CaN activation mediates prion-induced neurodegeneration, suggesting that inhibition of this phosphatase could be a target for therapy. To test this hypothesis, prion infected wild type mice were treated intra-peritoneally with the CaN inhibitor FK506 at the clinical phase of the disease. Treated animals exhibited reduced severity of the clinical abnormalities and increased survival time compared to vehicle treated controls. Treatment also led to a significant increase in the brain levels of the CaN downstream targets pCREB and pBAD, which paralleled the decrease of CaN activity. Importantly, we observed a lower degree of neurodegeneration in animals treated with the drug as revealed by a higher number of neurons and a lower quantity of degenerating nerve cells. These changes were not dependent on PrP(Sc formation, since the protein accumulated in the brain to the same levels as in the untreated mice. Our findings contribute to an understanding of the mechanism of neurodegeneration in prion diseases and more importantly may provide a novel strategy for therapy that is beneficial at the clinical phase of the disease.

  9. Non-apoptotic cell death in animal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutscher, Lena M; Shaham, Shai

    2017-08-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is an important process in the development of multicellular organisms. Apoptosis, a form of PCD characterized morphologically by chromatin condensation, membrane blebbing, and cytoplasm compaction, and molecularly by the activation of caspase proteases, has been extensively investigated. Studies in Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila, mice, and the developing chick have revealed, however, that developmental PCD also occurs through other mechanisms, morphologically and molecularly distinct from apoptosis. Some non-apoptotic PCD pathways, including those regulating germ cell death in Drosophila, still appear to employ caspases. However, another prominent cell death program, linker cell-type death (LCD), is morphologically conserved, and independent of the key genes that drive apoptosis, functioning, at least in part, through the ubiquitin proteasome system. These non-apoptotic processes may serve as backup programs when caspases are inactivated or unavailable, or, more likely, as freestanding cell culling programs. Non-apoptotic PCD has been documented extensively in the developing nervous system, and during the formation of germline and somatic gonadal structures, suggesting that preservation of these mechanisms is likely under strong selective pressure. Here, we discuss our current understanding of non-apoptotic PCD in animal development, and explore possible roles for LCD and other non-apoptotic developmental pathways in vertebrates. We raise the possibility that during vertebrate development, apoptosis may not be the major PCD mechanism.

  10. Animal models for human behavioral deficiencies during development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsner, J

    1992-01-01

    Often considered to be a subdiscipline of neurotoxicology, experimental behavioral teratology has difficulties to be acknowledged by its own right. Results obtained in the laboratory concerning purely behavioral effects induced by low level prenatal exposure to substances are often doubted to contain any relevance with respect to humans. This doubt is based on many debates going on in the numerous extrapolation steps between observed effects on animal behavior and human psychopathology. Taking the inverse path, extrapolation from a typical human behavioral syndrome (minimal brain dysfunction) to observations which can be made on laboratory animals, the following main debates are discussed: the psychology debate (behaviorism--perceptionism--cognitivism); the psychopathology debate (hyperactivity--attention deficit--tactile-kinesthetic perception deficiency--sensory integration deficits); the relevance debate (behavior is reprogrammable software--behavioral deficits may reflect undetectable hardware defects); the interpretation debate (behavioral teratogenicity is chemical imprinting--behavioral disturbances due to chemicals reflect neurotoxicity); the intelligence debate (IQ decrements--attention deficits); the developmental delay debate (the relevance of a delay in the behavioral development); the sensitivity debate (behavior is the most sensitive measure in toxicology--the brain redundancy and plasticity compensates subtle deficiencies); the statistics debate (gather as many behavioral variables as possible--stay simple and measure only one aspect of behavior); the regulation debate (behavioral teratology should be regulated in detail--tests should not be prescribed). It is attempted to find rational solutions for these debates which menace to jeopardize the very existence of behavioral teratology.

  11. Survival and development of Bactrocera oleae Gmelin (Diptera ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-07-18

    Jul 18, 2008 ... All developmental and survivorship tests were replicated five times. Multiple factorial design and analyses of variance (ANOVA) were used to test the effects of treatment on developmental time or survival rate. When a significant F value was obtained in the. ANOVA, means were then separated by Duncan's ...

  12. Developing animals flout prominent assumptions of ecological physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burggren, Warren W

    2005-08-01

    Every field of biology has its assumptions, but when they grow to be dogma, they can become constraining. This essay presents data-based challenges to several prominent assumptions of developmental physiologists. The ubiquity of allometry is such an assumption, yet animal development is characterized by rate changes that are counter to allometric predictions. Physiological complexity is assumed to increase with development, but examples are provided showing that complexity can be greatest at intermediate developmental stages. It is assumed that organs have functional equivalency in embryos and adults, yet embryonic structures can have quite different functions than inferred from adults. Another assumption challenged is the duality of neural control (typically sympathetic and parasympathetic), since one of these two regulatory mechanisms typically considerably precedes in development the appearance of the other. A final assumption challenged is the notion that divergent phylogeny creates divergent physiologies in embryos just as in adults, when in fact early in development disparate vertebrate taxa show great quantitative as well as qualitative similarity. Collectively, the inappropriateness of these prominent assumptions based on adult studies suggests that investigation of embryos, larvae and fetuses be conducted with appreciation for their potentially unique physiologies.

  13. The Development of Animal Behavior: From Lorenz to Neural Nets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolhuis, Johan J.

    In the study of behavioral development both causal and functional approaches have been used, and they often overlap. The concept of ontogenetic adaptations suggests that each developmental phase involves unique adaptations to the environment of the developing animal. The functional concept of optimal outbreeding has led to further experimental evidence and theoretical models concerning the role of sexual imprinting in the evolutionary process of sexual selection. From a causal perspective it has been proposed that behavioral ontogeny involves the development of various kinds of perceptual, motor, and central mechanisms and the formation of connections among them. This framework has been tested for a number of complex behavior systems such as hunger and dustbathing. Imprinting is often seen as a model system for behavioral development in general. Recent advances in imprinting research have been the result of an interdisciplinary effort involving ethology, neuroscience, and experimental psychology, with a continual interplay between these approaches. The imprinting results are consistent with Lorenz' early intuitive suggestions and are also reflected in the architecture of recent neural net models.

  14. Antibiotics in animal feed and their role in resistance development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wegener, Henrik Caspar

    2003-01-01

    Animals and humans constitute overlapping reservoirs of resistance, and consequently use of antimicrobials in animals can impact on public health. For example, the occurrence of vancomycin-resistant enterococci in food-animals is associated with the use of avoparcin, a glycopeptide antibiotic used...... as a feed additive for the growth promotion of animals. Vancomycin-resistant enterococci and vancomycin resistance determinants can therefore spread from animals to humans. The bans on avoparcin and other antibiotics as growth promoters in the EU have provided scientists with a unique opportunity...

  15. Humans, Other Animals and Disease: a comparative approach towards the development of a standardised recording protocol for animal palaeopathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Vann

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available In recent years the impact of animal disease on human societies has had an extremely high profile, with the spread of diseases such as Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE and foot and mouth among animal populations, as well as the transmission of diseases such as Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV, Ebola and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS from animal to human populations. The social and economic impact of such illnesses has been profound. However, studies on the effect of animal disease in past human populations have been widely neglected. This is partly due to the inconsistent manner in which instances of animal disease (palaeopathology are recorded, diagnosed and interpreted which, together with the typically low incidence of specimens per site, has precluded detailed studies of regional or temporal trends. This article outlines the archaeological rationale behind developing a generic methodology to enable the consistent recognition, recording and description of animal palaeopathological data. Furthermore, the experience of palaeopathologists concerned with human populations has been drawn upon to develop a downloadable, stand-alone recording system to facilitate the recording of animal palaeopathological data and enable questions concerning past animal health and disease to be better explored in future.

  16. Effect of vaccination against pneumonia on the survival of bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) commingled with carrier animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Bindu; Bavananthasivam, Jegarubee; Kugadas, Abirami; Haldorson, Gary J; Srikumaran, Subramaniam

    2017-05-01

    Leukotoxin producing (lkt+) members of Pasteurellaceae, particularly Mannheimia haemolytica and Bibersteinia trehalosi are important pathogens of pneumonia in bighorn sheep (BHS; Ovis canadensis), causing fatal disease. Predisposing or concurrent infection with Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae enhances the severity of the disease, resulting in increased morbidity and mortality. Several studies have investigated the effectiveness of vaccines against lkt+ members of Pasteurellaceae in preventing fatal pneumonia in BHS. In all of these studies, however, vaccinated animals were challenged experimentally, by direct inoculation of the pathogens, rather than by natural challenge. Moreover, none has investigated the efficacy of the vaccines under conditions of concurrent infection with M. ovipneumoniae. We immunized three bighorn rams and one pregnant ewe with an experimental multivalent vaccine along with a commercial vaccine. The immunized animals were then commingled with two bighorn ewes known to be carriers of lkt+ members of Pasteurellaceae, to simulate natural infection or disease transmission. All vaccinated animals remained healthy. We then inoculated the two carrier ewes with nasal washings from domestic sheep containing M. ovipneumoniae. Within a week, all animals developed mild to moderate signs of pneumonia. While the rams died within two-three months post-inoculation (p.i.), the vaccinated ewe and her lamb died five and eight months p.i., respectively. Taken together, these results suggest that vaccination of BHS against lkt+ members of Pasteurellaceae alone can protect them from natural challenge by these pathogens. However, it may not be adequate to protect them against pneumonia compounded by concurrent infection with M. ovipneumoniae. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Developing and Validating a Survival Prediction Model for NSCLC Patients Through Distributed Learning Across 3 Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jochems, Arthur; Deist, Timo M; El Naqa, Issam; Kessler, Marc; Mayo, Chuck; Reeves, Jackson; Jolly, Shruti; Matuszak, Martha; Ten Haken, Randall; van Soest, Johan; Oberije, Cary; Faivre-Finn, Corinne; Price, Gareth; de Ruysscher, Dirk; Lambin, Philippe; Dekker, Andre

    2017-10-01

    Tools for survival prediction for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with chemoradiation or radiation therapy are of limited quality. In this work, we developed a predictive model of survival at 2 years. The model is based on a large volume of historical patient data and serves as a proof of concept to demonstrate the distributed learning approach. Clinical data from 698 lung cancer patients, treated with curative intent with chemoradiation or radiation therapy alone, were collected and stored at 2 different cancer institutes (559 patients at Maastro clinic (Netherlands) and 139 at Michigan university [United States]). The model was further validated on 196 patients originating from The Christie (United Kingdon). A Bayesian network model was adapted for distributed learning (the animation can be viewed at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZDJFOxpwqEA). Two-year posttreatment survival was chosen as the endpoint. The Maastro clinic cohort data are publicly available at https://www.cancerdata.org/publication/developing-and-validating-survival-prediction-model-nsclc-patients-through-distributed, and the developed models can be found at www.predictcancer.org. Variables included in the final model were T and N category, age, performance status, and total tumor dose. The model has an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.66 on the external validation set and an AUC of 0.62 on a 5-fold cross validation. A model based on the T and N category performed with an AUC of 0.47 on the validation set, significantly worse than our model (P<.001). Learning the model in a centralized or distributed fashion yields a minor difference on the probabilities of the conditional probability tables (0.6%); the discriminative performance of the models on the validation set is similar (P=.26). Distributed learning from federated databases allows learning of predictive models on data originating from multiple institutions while avoiding many of the data-sharing barriers. We believe

  18. microRNA-100 targets SMRT/NCOR2, reduces proliferation, and improves survival in glioblastoma animal models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahauddeen M Alrfaei

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma (GBM is the most frequently diagnosed malignant human glioma, and current median patient survival is less than two years despite maximal surgery followed by temozolomide chemoradiation therapies. Novel microRNA-related therapies are now being developed for cancers such as GBM. Differential microRNA expression profiling revealed that miR-100 expression is down-regulated in GBM compared to normal controls. We report that miR-100 expression reduces GBM tumorigenicity. In vitro, four GBM lines (U87, U251, 22T, and 33T demonstrated reduced proliferation 24 hours after transient miR100 overexpression via transfection. miR-100 triggered cell death an average 70% more than scrambled miR controls 24 hours after transient transfection (p < 0.01. miR-100 targeted inhibition of the "silencing mediator of retinoid or thyroid hormone receptor-2" (SMRT/NCOR2 gene was confirmed via reporter assays. Ki67 proliferation index was decreased 40% in tumor xenografts generated from stable miR-100 transfected GBM lines versus controls (p < 0.01. Furthermore, treatment of tumor xenografts with a single pre-mir-100 injection (60 pmol significantly extended survival of mice bearing intracranial GBM xenografts 25% more than scrambled controls (p < 0.01; n=8. These studies establish miR-100's effect on tumor GBM growth, and suggest clinical potential for microRNA-related GBM therapy.

  19. microRNA-100 Targets SMRT/NCOR2, Reduces Proliferation, and Improves Survival in Glioblastoma Animal Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrfaei, Bahauddeen M.; Vemuganti, Raghu; Kuo, John S.

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most frequently diagnosed malignant human glioma, and current median patient survival is less than two years despite maximal surgery followed by temozolomide chemoradiation therapies. Novel microRNA-related therapies are now being developed for cancers such as GBM. Differential microRNA expression profiling revealed that miR-100 expression is down-regulated in GBM compared to normal controls. We report that miR-100 expression reduces GBM tumorigenicity. In vitro, four GBM lines (U87, U251, 22T, and 33T) demonstrated reduced proliferation 24 hours after transient miR100 overexpression via transfection. miR-100 triggered cell death an average 70% more than scrambled miR controls 24 hours after transient transfection (p SMRT/NCOR2) gene was confirmed via reporter assays. Ki67 proliferation index was decreased 40% in tumor xenografts generated from stable miR-100 transfected GBM lines versus controls (p < 0.01). Furthermore, treatment of tumor xenografts with a single pre-mir-100 injection (60 pmol) significantly extended survival of mice bearing intracranial GBM xenografts 25% more than scrambled controls (p < 0.01; n=8). These studies establish miR-100’s effect on tumor GBM growth, and suggest clinical potential for microRNA-related GBM therapy. PMID:24244722

  20. [Study on recent status of development of genetically modified animals developed not for food purposes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Osamu; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Teshima, Reiko

    2012-01-01

    Genetically modified (GM) animals can be classified into two groups, those developed for food purposes and those developed not for food purposes. We investigated the recent status of development of GM animals developed not for food purposes. Among the GM animals developed not for food purposes, GM fish, chickens, and pigs were selected because many articles have been published on these organisms. Relevant articles published between 2008 and 2011 were surveyed using PubMed and transgenic fish, chicken, or pig as keywords. Then, studies on organisms that could potentially contaminate the food chain with products from these GM animals were selected and analyzed. Fifteen articles on GM fish were found. These articles were classified into four categories: bioreactor (n = 4), resistance to microorganisms (n = 6), resistance to environmental stresses (n = 1), and detection of chemicals (n = 4). Zebrafish were used in 8 of the articles. Six, three, and three articles were reported from Taiwan, Canada and China. Seven articles on GM chickens were found. These articles were classified into two categories: bioreactor (n = 5), and resistance to pathogens (n = 2). Two articles were reported from Japan and Korea, each. As for GM pigs, 43 articles were found. These articles were classified into three categories: xenotransplantation (n = 36), bioreactor (n = 6), and environmental cleanup (n = 1). Nineteen, seven, six, and five articles were reported from USA, Germany, Korea and Taiwan, respectively. Understanding the recent development of GM animals produced not for food purpose is important for assuring the safety of food.

  1. Development of Gender Differences in Children's Responses to Animated Entertainment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Mary Beth; Green, Stephen

    2001-01-01

    Examined gender differences in children's responses to animated scenes from action adventure and sad films and to animated previews of a prototypical male versus female movie. Girls were more likely than boys to report and express sadness regarding sad segments. Intensities of sadness increased with age. Emotional responses to action adventure…

  2. Growth and development symposium: Fetal programming in animal agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetal programming is the ability to improve animal production and well-being by altering the maternal environment and holds enormous challenges and great opportunities for researchers and the animal industry. A symposium was held to provide an overview of current knowledge of fetal programming in re...

  3. Developing Educational Computer Animation Based on Human Personality Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musa, Sajid; Ziatdinov, Rushan; Sozcu, Omer Faruk; Griffiths, Carol

    2015-01-01

    Computer animation in the past decade has become one of the most noticeable features of technology-based learning environments. By its definition, it refers to simulated motion pictures showing movement of drawn objects, and is often defined as the art in movement. Its educational application known as educational computer animation is considered…

  4. Research and Development on Animal Feed in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Wan Zahari

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The growth of the non-ruminant sector to self–sufficiency in meat and eggs has been matched by massive importation of feed. Thus, a major thrust to reduce the burden of feed imports is to increase the use of indigenous feed resources and intensify research to look for alternatives and substitutes. Over the past 3 decades, local researchers have reported on the availability nutritive content, optimal inclusion levels and treatment methods to enhance nutrient value of many locally available feed ingredients in practical poultry rations. The list includes evaluation and utilization of feed rice, palm kernel cake (PKC, broken rice, bran, sorghum, cassava, sago, fishmeal and commercial grain corn production; but the goal of import substitution and self- sufficiency is still unfulfilled. Although PKC, feed rice, local maize and specialty fats has potential to be viable energy feed sources and local fish meal is a promising protein feed source, more large scale Research and Development (R & D is needed. In the ruminant sub-sector, emphasis is towards maximizing use of locally available agro-industrial byproducts and crop residues for the production of cost-effective feeds. The utilization of local feed resources is highly dependent on the supply of agro- industrial byproducts or crop residues from the oil palm and rice industries. In order to encourage a sustainable ruminant industry in Malaysia, local feed production has to be maximized and strengthened. Current emphasis is towards the development of practical and low-cost feeds for various classes of livestock species, particularly by utilizing local forages, tree fodders, crop residues and agro-industrial byproducts. This paper highlights the research and development on animal feed in Malaysia over the last three decades and discusses various aspects of livestock feeding.

  5. Development of temporomandibular joint arthritis: The use of animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghassemi Nejad, Sheida; Kobezda, Tamás; Tar, Ildikó; Szekanecz, Zoltán

    2017-03-01

    Osteoarthritis is the most common joint disease affecting roughly one sixth of the human population. It is also the most common arthritis affecting the temporomandibular joint, often leading to severe pain and the inability to masticate. Animal models are essential to investigate the disease in part because they lend themselves to genetic manipulation and various treatments and also because of the lack of availability of human specimens from various stages of the disease. The wide range of osteoarthritis models alone are a proof of its multifactorial origin. Manipulation of collagen, cytokine, matrix metalloproteinase and small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycan genes can all have an effect on the development and persistence of arthritis. Surgical models also exist, highlighting the importance of normal anatomy and trauma. Here we review the English literature of murine models of temporomandibular joint arthritis with special attention to the genetic and molecular background of osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2016 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Feed Conversion, Survival and Development, and Composition of Four Insect Species on Diets Composed of Food By-Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oonincx, Dennis G A B; van Broekhoven, Sarah; van Huis, Arnold; van Loon, Joop J A

    2015-01-01

    A large part of the environmental impact of animal production systems is due to the production of feed. Insects are suggested to efficiently convert feed to body mass and might therefore form a more sustainable food and/or feed source. Four diets were composed from by-products of food manufacturing and formulated such as to vary in protein and fat content. These were offered to newly hatched Argentinean cockroaches, black soldier flies, yellow mealworms, and house crickets. The first two species are potentially interesting as a feed ingredient, while the latter two are considered edible for humans. Feed conversion efficiency, survival, development time, as well as chemical composition (nitrogen, phosphorus, and fatty acids), were determined. The Argentinean cockroaches and the black soldier flies converted feed more efficiently than yellow mealworms, and house crickets. The first two were also more efficient than conventional production animals. On three of the four diets yellow mealworms and house crickets had a feed conversion efficiency similar to pigs. Furthermore, on the most suitable diet, they converted their feed as efficiently as poultry, when corrected for edible portion. All four species had a higher nitrogen-efficiency than conventional production animals, when corrected for edible portion. Offering carrots to yellow mealworms increased dry matter- and nitrogen-efficiency and decreased development time. Diet affected survival in all species but black soldier flies, and development time was strongly influenced in all four species. The chemical composition of Argentinean cockroaches was highly variable between diets, for black soldier flies it remained similar. The investigated species can be considered efficient production animals when suitable diets are provided. Hence, they could form a sustainable alternative to conventional production animals as a source of feed or food.

  7. Feed Conversion, Survival and Development, and Composition of Four Insect Species on Diets Composed of Food By-Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oonincx, Dennis G. A. B.; van Broekhoven, Sarah; van Huis, Arnold; van Loon, Joop J. A.

    2015-01-01

    A large part of the environmental impact of animal production systems is due to the production of feed. Insects are suggested to efficiently convert feed to body mass and might therefore form a more sustainable food and/or feed source. Four diets were composed from by-products of food manufacturing and formulated such as to vary in protein and fat content. These were offered to newly hatched Argentinean cockroaches, black soldier flies, yellow mealworms, and house crickets. The first two species are potentially interesting as a feed ingredient, while the latter two are considered edible for humans. Feed conversion efficiency, survival, development time, as well as chemical composition (nitrogen, phosphorus, and fatty acids), were determined. The Argentinean cockroaches and the black soldier flies converted feed more efficiently than yellow mealworms, and house crickets. The first two were also more efficient than conventional production animals. On three of the four diets yellow mealworms and house crickets had a feed conversion efficiency similar to pigs. Furthermore, on the most suitable diet, they converted their feed as efficiently as poultry, when corrected for edible portion. All four species had a higher nitrogen-efficiency than conventional production animals, when corrected for edible portion. Offering carrots to yellow mealworms increased dry matter- and nitrogen-efficiency and decreased development time. Diet affected survival in all species but black soldier flies, and development time was strongly influenced in all four species. The chemical composition of Argentinean cockroaches was highly variable between diets, for black soldier flies it remained similar. The investigated species can be considered efficient production animals when suitable diets are provided. Hence, they could form a sustainable alternative to conventional production animals as a source of feed or food. PMID:26699129

  8. Feed Conversion, Survival and Development, and Composition of Four Insect Species on Diets Composed of Food By-Products.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis G A B Oonincx

    Full Text Available A large part of the environmental impact of animal production systems is due to the production of feed. Insects are suggested to efficiently convert feed to body mass and might therefore form a more sustainable food and/or feed source. Four diets were composed from by-products of food manufacturing and formulated such as to vary in protein and fat content. These were offered to newly hatched Argentinean cockroaches, black soldier flies, yellow mealworms, and house crickets. The first two species are potentially interesting as a feed ingredient, while the latter two are considered edible for humans. Feed conversion efficiency, survival, development time, as well as chemical composition (nitrogen, phosphorus, and fatty acids, were determined. The Argentinean cockroaches and the black soldier flies converted feed more efficiently than yellow mealworms, and house crickets. The first two were also more efficient than conventional production animals. On three of the four diets yellow mealworms and house crickets had a feed conversion efficiency similar to pigs. Furthermore, on the most suitable diet, they converted their feed as efficiently as poultry, when corrected for edible portion. All four species had a higher nitrogen-efficiency than conventional production animals, when corrected for edible portion. Offering carrots to yellow mealworms increased dry matter- and nitrogen-efficiency and decreased development time. Diet affected survival in all species but black soldier flies, and development time was strongly influenced in all four species. The chemical composition of Argentinean cockroaches was highly variable between diets, for black soldier flies it remained similar. The investigated species can be considered efficient production animals when suitable diets are provided. Hence, they could form a sustainable alternative to conventional production animals as a source of feed or food.

  9. Survivin as a potential mediator to support autoreactive cell survival in myasthenia gravis: a human and animal model study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda L Kusner

    Full Text Available The mechanisms that underlie the development and maintenance of autoimmunity in myasthenia gravis are poorly understood. In this investigation, we evaluate the role of survivin, a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein family, in humans and in two animal models. We identified survivin expression in cells with B lymphocyte and plasma cells markers, and in the thymuses of patients with myasthenia gravis. A portion of survivin-expressing cells specifically bound a peptide derived from the alpha subunit of acetylcholine receptor indicating that they recognize the peptide. Thymuses of patients with myasthenia gravis had large numbers of survivin-positive cells with fewer cells in the thymuses of corticosteroid-treated patients. Application of a survivin vaccination strategy in mouse and rat models of myasthenia gravis demonstrated improved motor assessment, a reduction in acetylcholine receptor specific autoantibodies, and a retention of acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction, associated with marked reduction of survivin-expressing circulating CD20+ cells. These data strongly suggest that survivin expression in cells with lymphocyte and plasma cell markers occurs in patients with myasthenia gravis and in two animal models of myasthenia gravis. Survivin expression may be part of a mechanism that inhibits the apoptosis of autoreactive B cells in myasthenia gravis and other autoimmune disorders.

  10. Development of aquatic animal experiment facility, Aquatic Habitat (AQH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, S.; Kono, Y.; Sakimura, T.; Nishikawa, W.; Fujimoto, N.; Murakami, K.; Nakamura, T.

    We have been performing technical studies to develop aquatic animal experiment facility, Aquatic Habitat (AQH), for both of short-term experiments in the Space Shuttle middeck and long-term experiments in the Space Station including the Centrifuge Accommodation Module (CAM). The AQH will have the capabilities to accommodate three-generations of small freshwater fish (medaka and zebrafish) and egg through metamorphosis of amphibian (African clawed frog). For these purposes, the AQH will have the following brand-new capabilities that the previous facilities have never had; 90days experiment duration, automatic feeding according to specimen types and their developmental stages, separation of generations for fish, specimen sample collection in various developmental stages, air/water interface control for amphibian, continuous monitoring of specimen behavior even in dark condition, and so on. We have already performed preliminary breeding tests for medaka and zebrafish with a breeding system prototype. Their mating behavior was performed successfully in the small closed chamber and the hatched larvae grew and started spawning on the 45-47th day after hatching. These results demonstrated that three generational breeding of medaka and zebrafish within 90days would be possible based on this breeding system prototype. Also, we have developed almost of the above new mechanisms, that is, an automatic feeding system, an egg separation mechanism for fish, an air stabilizer to control air/water interface, and a continuous specimen monitoring system through light/dark cycle. Based on these results, we have manufactured a BBM of AQH water circulation system and performed biological compatibility tests as a next step. For African clawed frog breeding, some problems have been revealed through the preliminary tests with the breeding system prototype. Currently, we are performing the investigations to resolve the problems and preparing to proceed to the next step.

  11. Fasudil improves survival and promotes skeletal muscle development in a mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bowerman Melissa

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is the leading genetic cause of infant death. It is caused by mutations/deletions of the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1 gene and is typified by the loss of spinal cord motor neurons, muscular atrophy, and in severe cases, death. The SMN protein is ubiquitously expressed and various cellular- and tissue-specific functions have been investigated to explain the specific motor neuron loss in SMA. We have previously shown that the RhoA/Rho kinase (ROCK pathway is misregulated in cellular and animal SMA models, and that inhibition of ROCK with the chemical Y-27632 significantly increased the lifespan of a mouse model of SMA. In the present study, we evaluated the therapeutic potential of the clinically approved ROCK inhibitor fasudil. Methods Fasudil was administered by oral gavage from post-natal day 3 to 21 at a concentration of 30 mg/kg twice daily. The effects of fasudil on lifespan and SMA pathological hallmarks of the SMA mice were assessed and compared to vehicle-treated mice. For the Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, the log-rank test was used and survival curves were considered significantly different at P t test for paired variables and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA were used to test for differences between samples and data were considered significantly different at P Results Fasudil significantly improves survival of SMA mice. This dramatic phenotypic improvement is not mediated by an up-regulation of Smn protein or via preservation of motor neurons. However, fasudil administration results in a significant increase in muscle fiber and postsynaptic endplate size, and restores normal expression of markers of skeletal muscle development, suggesting that the beneficial effects of fasudil could be muscle-specific. Conclusions Our work underscores the importance of muscle as a therapeutic target in SMA and highlights the beneficial potential of ROCK inhibitors as a therapeutic strategy for SMA

  12. Experiential learning in the animal sciences: development of a multispecies large-animal management and production practicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiling, B A; Marshall, T T; Brendemuhl, J H; McQuagge, J A; Umphrey, J E

    2003-12-01

    Students enrolled in an introductory animal science course (ASG 3003) at the University of Florida were surveyed (n = 788) over a 3-yr period to ascertain their current experience and career goals in animal agriculture. Sixty-one percent of the students indicated that they were from an urban background. Only 4% were raised on a farm or ranch where the majority of family income was attributed to production agriculture. Eighty-six percent of the students had minimal or no experience working with large domestic farm animals, but nearly 64% of the students wanted to pursue a career in veterinary medicine. Disciplinary and species interests of the students were highly associated with previous background experiences. Students from nonagricultural backgrounds, who were most likely to indicate a career interest involving veterinary medicine, were most interested (P animal behavior, whereas the students of rural background were more interested (P animal management. Thirty-three percent of students were primarily interested in small companion animals; 22% in horses; 20% in domestic farm animals, including beef, dairy, swine, or sheep; and 24% in undomesticated zoo animals or wildlife. The career goals indicated by most students necessitate practical application of animal husbandry skills that are often assumed as general knowledge. Thus, a multispecies large animal management and production practicum (ANS 3206) was developed to provide students with hands-on experience. It was an elective course, and students were encouraged to enroll for two consecutive semesters. Teams of students rotated responsibilities among four livestock species (beef, dairy, equine, and swine). Daily responsibilities at each of the units included feeding and monitoring growth of feedlot cattle and finishing swine, farrowing assistance and baby pig processing, and equine training and foaling assistance. Students were also involved with all facets of a working dairy. Additionally, students completed

  13. The immunoregulatory mechanisms of carcinoma for its survival and development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Du Caigan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The immune system in patients detects and eliminates tumor cells, but tumors still progress persistently. The mechanisms by which tumor cells survive under the pressure of immune surveillance are not fully understood. This review is to present the evidence from clinical studies, showing a significant correlation of clinicopathological features of carcinoma with: (1 the loss of classical human leukocyte antigen class I, (2 the up-regulation of non-classical human leukocyte antigen class I, pro-apoptotic Fas ligand and receptor-binding cancer antigen expressed on SiSo cells I, and (3 the formation of immunosuppressive microenvironment by up-regulation of transforming growth factor-beta, Galectin-1, inhibitory ligand B7s, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase and arginase, as well as by recruitment of tumor-induced myeloid-derived suppressor cells and regulatory T cells. All of these factors may together protect carcinoma cells from the immune-cytotoxicity.

  14. Consumer attitudes towards the development of animal-friendly husbandry systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frewer, L.J.; Kole, A.P.W.; Kroon, van der S.M.A.; Lauwere, de C.

    2005-01-01

    ABSTRACT. Recent policy developments in the area of livestock husbandry have suggested that, from the perspective of optimizing animal welfare, new animal husbandry systems should be developed that provide opportunities for livestock animals to be raised in environments where they are permitted to

  15. Development of computational small animal models and their applications in preclinical imaging and therapy research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xie, Tianwu; Zaidi, Habib

    The development of multimodality preclinical imaging techniques and the rapid growth of realistic computer simulation tools have promoted the construction and application of computational laboratory animal models in preclinical research. Since the early 1990s, over 120 realistic computational animal

  16. Professional Veterinary Programs' Perceptions and Experiences Pertaining to Emotional Support Animals and Service Animals, and Recommendations for Policy Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld-Tacher, Regina M; Kogan, Lori R

    Given the unique nature of programs in professional veterinary medicine (PVM), the increasing numbers of students requesting accommodations for emotional support animals (ESAs) in higher education settings is of growing interest to student affairs and administrative staff in PVM settings. Since the legislation pertaining to this type of support animal differs from the laws governing disability service animals, colleges and universities now need to develop new policies and guidelines. Representatives from a sample of 28 PVM programs completed a survey about the prevalence of student requests for ESAs and service animals. PVM associate deans for academic affairs also reported their perceptions of this issue and the challenges these requests might pose within veterinary teaching laboratories and patient treatment areas. Responses indicated that approximately one third of PVM programs have received requests for ESAs (32.1%) in the last 2 years, 17.9% have had requests for psychiatric service animals, and 17.9% for other types of service animals. Despite this, most associate deans reported not having or not being aware of university or college policies pertaining to these issues. Most associate deans are interested in learning more about this topic. This paper provides general recommendations for establishing university or PVM program policies.

  17. Effects of temperature on survival and development of early life stage Pacific and western brook lampreys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeuwig, M.H.; Bayer, J.M.; Seelye, J.G.

    2005-01-01

    We examined the effects of temperature (10, 14, 18, and 22??C) on survival and development of Pacific lampreys Lampetra tridentata and western brook lampreys L. richardsoni during embryological and early larval stages. The temperature for zero development was estimated for each species, and the response to temperature was measured as the proportion of individuals surviving to hatch, surviving to the larval stage, and exhibiting abnormalities at the larval stage (i.e., malformations of the body). The estimated temperature for zero development was 4.850C for Pacific lampreys and 4.97??C for western brook lampreys. Survival was greatest at 18??C, followed by 14, 10, and 22??C, significant differences being observed between 22??C and the other temperatures. Overall survival was significantly greater for western brook lampreys than for Pacific lampreys; however, the overall difference in proportion of individuals surviving was only 0.02. Overall survival significantly decreased from the time of hatch (proportion surviving = 0.85) to the larval stage (0.82; i.e., during the free-embryo stage). The proportion of individuals exhibiting abnormalities at the larval stage was greatest at 22??C, followed by 18, 10, and 14??C, significant differences being observed between 22??C and the other temperatures. These data provide baseline information on the thermal requirements of early life stage Pacific and western brook lampreys and will aid in assessment and prediction of suitable spawning and rearing habitats for these species.

  18. Principles for developing animal models of military PTSD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos P. Daskalakis

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The extent to which animal studies can be relevant to military posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD continues to be a matter of discussion. Some features of the clinical syndrome are more easily modeled than others. In the animal literature, a great deal of attention is focused on modeling the characteristics of military exposures and their impact on measurable behaviors and biological parameters. There are many issues to consider regarding the ecological validity of predator, social defeat or immobilization stress to combat-related experience. In contrast, less attention has been paid to individual variation following these exposures. Such variation is critical to understand how individual differences in the response to military trauma exposure may result to PTSD or resilience. It is important to consider potential differences in biological findings when comparing extremely exposed to non-exposed animals, versus those that result from examining individual differences. Animal models of military PTSD are also critical in advancing efforts in clinical treatment. In an ideal translational approach to study deployment related outcomes, information from humans and animals, blood and brain, should be carefully considered in tandem, possibly even computed simultaneously, to identify molecules, pathways and networks that are likely to be the key drivers of military PTSD symptoms. With the use novel biological methodologies (e.g., optogenetics in the animal models, critical genes and pathways can be tuned up or down (rather than over-expressed or ablated completely in discrete brain regions. Such techniques together with pre-and post-deployment human imaging will accelerate the identification of novel pharmacological and non-pharmacological intervention strategies.

  19. Improved Early Postresuscitation EEG Activity for Animals Treated with Hypothermia Predicted 96 hr Neurological Outcome and Survival in a Rat Model of Cardiac Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bihua Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate the effect of hypothermia on 96 hr neurological outcome and survival by quantitatively characterizing early postresuscitation EEG in a rat model of cardiac arrest. Materials and Methods. In twenty male Sprague-Dawley rats, cardiac arrest was induced through high frequency transesophageal cardiac pacing. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was initiated after 5 mins untreated arrest. Immediately after resuscitation, animals were randomized to either 2 hrs of hypothermia (N=10 or normothermia (N=10. EEG, ECG, aortic pressure, and core temperature were continuously recorded for 6 hrs. Neurological outcome was evaluated daily during the 96 hrs postresuscitation period. Results. No differences in the baseline measurements and resuscitation outcome were observed between groups. However, 96 hr neurological deficit score (204 ± 255 versus 500 ± 0, P=0.005 and survival (6/10 versus 0/10, P=0.011 were significantly better in the hypothermic group. Quantitative analysis of early postresuscitation EEG revealed that burst frequency and spectrum entropy were greatly improved in the hypothermic group and correlated with 96 hr neurological outcome and survival. Conclusion. The improved burst frequency during burst suppression period and preserved spectrum entropy after restoration of continuous background EEG activity for animals treated with hypothermia predicted favorable neurological outcome and survival in this rat model of cardiac arrest.

  20. Improved early postresuscitation EEG activity for animals treated with hypothermia predicted 96 hr neurological outcome and survival in a rat model of cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bihua; Song, Feng-Qing; Sun, Lei-Lei; Lei, Ling-Yan; Gan, Wei-Ni; Chen, Meng-Hua; Li, Yongqin

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the effect of hypothermia on 96 hr neurological outcome and survival by quantitatively characterizing early postresuscitation EEG in a rat model of cardiac arrest. In twenty male Sprague-Dawley rats, cardiac arrest was induced through high frequency transesophageal cardiac pacing. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was initiated after 5 mins untreated arrest. Immediately after resuscitation, animals were randomized to either 2 hrs of hypothermia (N = 10) or normothermia (N = 10). EEG, ECG, aortic pressure, and core temperature were continuously recorded for 6 hrs. Neurological outcome was evaluated daily during the 96 hrs postresuscitation period. No differences in the baseline measurements and resuscitation outcome were observed between groups. However, 96 hr neurological deficit score (204 ± 255 versus 500 ± 0, P = 0.005) and survival (6/10 versus 0/10, P = 0.011) were significantly better in the hypothermic group. Quantitative analysis of early postresuscitation EEG revealed that burst frequency and spectrum entropy were greatly improved in the hypothermic group and correlated with 96 hr neurological outcome and survival. The improved burst frequency during burst suppression period and preserved spectrum entropy after restoration of continuous background EEG activity for animals treated with hypothermia predicted favorable neurological outcome and survival in this rat model of cardiac arrest.

  1. Transforming growth factor-B3 protects murine small intestinal crypt stem cells and animal survival after irradiation, possibly by reducing stem-cell cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, D; Haley, J D; Bruskin, A M; Potten, C S

    2000-04-01

    Damage to the normal replacing tissues of the body, specifically the gastro-intestinal tract, limits the treatment and hence, cure rate of cancer patients. Here, we investigate the possibility that the sensitivity of the gastro-intestinal tract can be manipulated by transforming growth factor beta3 (TGF-beta3), making it more resistant to radiation in a murine model. The effects of TGF-beta3 were assessed using the crypt microcolony assay, a test of crypt stem-cell functional competence, in animal survival studies examining diarrhoea severity, labelling index and crypt size. Prior treatment with TGF-beta3 can result in a 3- to 4-fold increase (protection factor, PF) in surviving crypts, whilst longer exposure can raise the PF to almost 12. Protection of intestinal clonogenic stem cells results in marked protection of survival with a corresponding reduction in the duration and level of diarrhoea and ultimate restoration of normal histology in surviving mice. Inhibition of proliferation can be demonstrated when sufficient TGF-beta3 exposure is studied. Crypt size is also reduced. In conclusion, TGF-beta3 protects small intestinal clonogenic stem cells from radiation damage, reducing diarrhoea and animal mortality. The mode of action is believed to be specific inhibition of stem-cell proliferation.

  2. Determination of the Toxicity to Aquatic Organisms of HMX and Related Wastewater Constituents. Part 1. The Effects of Food Concentration, Animal Interactions and Water Volume on Survival Growth and Reproduction of Daphnia magna under Flow-through Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    Effects of polychlorinated biphenyl’s (PCB’s) on survival and reproduction of Daphnia, Gammarus , and Tanytarsus. Trans. Amer. Fish. Soc. 103(4) : 722-728...WASTEWATER CONSTITUENTS Ruff 1: * THE EFFECTS OF FOOD CONCENTRATION, ANIMAL INTERACTIONS AND WATER VOLUME ON SURVIVAL, GROWTH AND REPRODUCTION OF Daphnia...OF FOOD CONCENTRATION, ANIMAL INTERACTIONS AND WATER VOLUME ON SURVIVAL, GROWTH AND REPRODUCTION OF Daphnia magna UNDER FLOW-THROUGH CONDITIONS

  3. Myo-Inositol Safety in Pregnancy: From Preimplantation Development to Newborn Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilay Kuşcu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Myo-inositol (myo-Ins has a physiological role in mammalian gametogenesis and embryonic development and a positive clinical impact on human medically assisted reproduction. We have previously shown that mouse embryo exposure to myo-Ins through preimplantation development in vitro increases proliferation activity and blastocyst production, representing an improvement in culture conditions. We have herein investigated biochemical mechanisms elicited by myo-Ins in preimplantation embryos and evaluated myo-Ins effects on postimplantation/postnatal development. To this end naturally fertilized embryos were cultured in vitro to blastocyst in the presence or absence of myo-Ins and analyzed for activation of the PKB/Akt pathway, known to modulate proliferation/survival cellular processes. In parallel, blastocyst-stage embryos were transferred into pseudopregnant females and allowed to develop to term and until weaning. Results obtained provide evidence that myo-Ins induces cellular pathways involving Akt and show that (a exposure of preimplantation embryos to myo-Ins increases the number of blastocysts available for uterine transfer and of delivered animals and (b the developmental patterns of mice obtained from embryos cultured in the presence or absence of myo-Ins, up to three weeks of age, overlap. These data further identify myo-Ins as a possibly important supplement for human preimplantation embryo culture in assisted reproduction technology.

  4. Incorporating Usability Criteria into the Development of Animated Hierarchical Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Yu-Cheng; Huang, Pei-Ren; Chen, Sherry Y.

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, Web-based learning systems have become popular because they can provide multiple tools, among which hierarchical maps are widely used to support teaching and learning. However, traditional hierarchical maps may let learners easily get lost within large information space. This study proposes an animated hierarchical map to address this…

  5. Dialects in Animals: Evidence, Development and Potential Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence Henry

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Dialects are one of the parallels that have long been established between human language and animal communication. We discuss the potential functional parallels between human and animal dialects, arguing that in both cases different mechanisms and functions may be at stake where large geographical versus very localized (e.g. social variations are concerned. Birdsong studies in particular, but also recent studies of mammal vocalizations, show that the use of the term “dialect” to refer to within-species vocal variations in animal species is more than a metaphor and that animal dialects offer a possibility to explore the causes and functions of linguistic variation and change, one of the challenges in exploring the origin of diversity of language families. We present here an original view, as our approach was not “primate-centered,” and take into consideration “homoplasy” (analogy as a potential mechanism to explain that different taxa have evolved the same functional response to social constraints.

  6. Análise de sobrevivência relacionada ao sexo, após esplenectomia, em modelo animal Post-splenectomy survival analysis related to gender in animal model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz R. Alberti

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available É sabido que a esplenectomia causa propensão a infecções, principalmente aquelas causadas por microorganismos capsulados. Essas complicações acompanham-se de maior mortalidade e conseqüente menor sobrevida dos indivíduos asplênicos. O objetivo do presente trabalho foi avaliar a sobrevida em relação ao sexo de ratos submetidos a esplenectomia total. Foram estudados 34 ratos, distribuídos em dois grupos, sendo o Grupo 1 (n=14 controle, animais submetidos apenas a laparotomia e o Grupo 2 (n=20 submetidos a esplenectomia total. Os animais de cada grupo foram distribuídos em dois subgrupos iguais, sendo o Subgrupo A composto por machos e o Subgrupo B por fêmeas. Os ratos foram acompanhados por um período máximo de noventa dias com vista à sua sobrevivência. Observou-se que a mortalidade após esplenectomia total foi de 80% no Subgrupo dos animais machos e de 30% no das fêmeas. Não houve óbitos no Grupo 1. Os ratos esplenectomizados apresentaram sobrevida inferior à das ratas esplenectomizadas (p = 0,034. De acordo com os resultados obtidos, a esplenectomia diminui a sobrevida de ratos, e as fêmeas murinas apresentam maior resistência à asplenia e conseqüentemente menor mortalidade do que os machos.It is well known that splenectomy increases the risk of infections, mainly those caused by capsulated bacteria. These complications are associated with greater mortality and lower survival rates in asplenic individuals. The objective of the present work was to assess the survival of rats submitted to total splenectomy. Thirty-four rats were divided into 2 groups: Group 1 (n = 14: control animals, submitted only to laparotomy; Group 2 (n = 20: animals submitted to splenectomy. Both groups were subdivided into 2 subgroups, namely, subgroup A, male rats, and subgroup B, female rats. The animals were followed during a 90-day period to assess their survival. The mortality of animals in Group 2 was 80% for males and 30% for females. No

  7. Survival and development of immature stages of the Mediterranean fruit fly (Diptera: Tephritidae) in citrus fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papachristos, Dimitrios P; Papadopoulos, Nikos T; Nanos, George D

    2008-06-01

    We studied, under laboratory conditions, the performance of the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Tephritidae), immature stages in intact whole fruit of three sweet orange varieties, lemon, and bitter oranges. Both citrus variety and fruit part (flavedo, albedo, and pulp) had strong effects on larval performance, smaller effects on pupae, and no effects on eggs. Fruit peel was the most critical parameter for larval development and survival, drastically affecting larval survival (inducing very high mortality rates). Among fruit regions, survival of larvae placed in flavedo was zero for all varieties tested except for bitter orange (22.5% survival), whereas survival in albedo was very low (9.8-17.4%) for all varieties except for bitter orange (76%). Survival of pupae obtained from larvae placed in the above-mentioned fruit regions was high for all varieties tested (81.1-90.7%). Fruit pulp of all citrus fruit tested was favorable for larval development. The highest survival was observed on bitter oranges, but the shortest developmental times and heaviest pupae were obtained from orange cultivars. Pulp chemical properties, such as soluble solid contents, acidity, and pH had rather small effects on larval and pupal survival and developmental time (except for juice pH on larvae developmental duration), but they had significant effects on pupal weight.

  8. Survival and psychomotor development with early betaine treatment in patients with severe methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diekman, E.F.; Koning, T.J. de; Verhoeven-Duif, N.M.; Rovers, M.M.; Hasselt, P.M. van

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The impact of betaine treatment on outcome in patients with severe methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) deficiency is presently unclear. OBJECTIVE To investigate the effect of betaine treatment on development and survival in patients with severe MTHFR deficiency. DATA SOURCES

  9. Survival and Psychomotor Development With Early Betaine Treatment in Patients With Severe Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase Deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diekman, Eugene F.; de Koning, Tom J.; Verhoeven-Duif, Nanda M.; Rovers, Maroeska M.; van Hasselt, Peter M.

    IMPORTANCE The impact of betaine treatment on outcome in patients with severe methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) deficiency is presently unclear. OBJECTIVE To investigate the effect of betaine treatment on development and survival in patients with severe MTHFR deficiency. DATA SOURCES

  10. The effect of environment on development and survival of pupae of the necrophagous fly Ophyra albuquerquei Lopes (Diptera, Muscidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Ferreira Krüger

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of environment on development and survival of pupae of the necrophagous fly Ophyra albuquerquei Lopes (Diptera, Muscidae. Species of Ophyra Robineau-Desvoidy, 1830 are found in decomposing bodies, usually in fresh, bloated and decay stages. Ophyra albuquerquei Lopes, for example, can be found in animal carcasses. The influence of environmental factors has not been evaluated in puparia of O. albuquerquei. Thus, the focus of this work was motivated by the need for models to predict the development of a necrophagous insect as a function of abiotic factors. Colonies of O. albuquerquei were maintained in the laboratory to obtain pupae. On the tenth day of each month 200 pupae, divided equally into 10 glass jars, were exposed to the environment and checked daily for adult emergence of each sample. We concluded that the high survival rate observed suggested that the diets used for rearing the larvae and maintaining the adults were appropriate. Also, the data adjusted to robust generalized linear models and there were no interruptions of O. albuquerquei pupae development within the limits of temperatures studied in southern Rio Grande do Sul, given the high survival presented.

  11. Developing Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) in Animal Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusparini, F.; Riandi, R.; Sriyati, S.

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe pre-service teacher’s learning during lecturing Animal Physiology and investigate it’s impact on pre-service teacher’s technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK). How was the lecturing process can improve TPACK of preservice teacher on Biology education espescially in Animal Physiology. There are four experiment classes using Solomon four group design, there are pedagogic treatment, content treatment and technological treatment, the last class without any treatment. Both quantitative and qualitative data were collected. Quantitative data were collected through a questionaire of TPACK. Qualitative data were collected through a lesson plan and teaching simulation. Findings has revealed that participants experienced significant gains in all TPACK constructs. Both of pedagogic and technology treatment is better than others, but pedagogical treatment didn’t also increase PCK most of participants. Findings has implications for teacher education programs to be a professional teachers and for researchers interested.

  12. Polish pronunciation animations developed on the basis of electromagnetic articulography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenc Anita

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the subject of pronunciation visualization, based on methodologies in experimental phonetics. It presents a brief survey of major Polish instrumental research into articulation, focusing primarily on contemporary dynamic visualizations using electromagnetic articulography. The author’s own investigations were conducted using an AG 500 articulograph, a device which records and visualizes the working and movement of the articulatory organs. Two speakers were recorded: one with standard pronunciation and the other with articulation defects. A multi-specialist team prepared vocal tract models, taking into account the speaker’s anatomical conditions as recorded with the articulograph, video recordings, and photographs. Articulographic data enabled the preparation of pronunciation animations of 45 words, which show the standard realization of all vowels and consonants of Polish, and eight animations of non-standard articulation.

  13. Developing Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) in Animal Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusparini, F.; Riandi, R.; Sriyati, S.

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe preservice teacher’s learning during lecturing Animal Physiology and investigate it’s impact on preservice teacher’s technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK). How was the lecturing process can improve TPACK of preservice teacher on Biology education espescially in Animal Physiology. There are four experiment classes using Solomon four group design, there are pedagogic treatment, content treatment and technological treatment, the last class without any treatment. Both quantitative and qualitative data were collected. Quantitative data were collected through a questionaire of TPACK. Qualitative data were collected through a lesson plan and teaching simulation. Findings has revealed that participants experienced significant gains in all TPACK constructs. Both of pedagogic and technology treatment is better than others, but pedagogical treatment didn’t also increase PCK most of participants. Findings has implications for teacher education programs to be a professional teachers and for researchers interested.

  14. Why animal studies are still being used in drug development. An innovation system perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooijman, M.

    2013-01-01

    In Europe alone, 3.6 million animals per year are used for drug development. Animal studies are worldwide the gold standard to evaluate the safety, efficacy and quality of drugs before these drugs are tested in humans. Nevertheless the value of animal studies to predict risks for humans has never

  15. Seeds of survival | IDRC - International Development Research Centre

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2011-07-12

    Jul 12, 2011 ... These are the words of Chinna Narsamma, a farmer who works the thin red soils of India's Deccan Plateau. Narsamma, like other farmers in her community, copes with the drought-prone climate of southern India by using strategies that have been developed over generations. Traditional farming practices ...

  16. A localizing circumferential compression device increases survival after coral snake envenomation to the torso of an animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hack, Jason B; Deguzman, Jocelyn M; Brewer, Kori L; Meggs, William J; O'Rourke, Dorcas

    2011-07-01

    Pressure immobilization bandages have been shown to delay onset of systemic toxicity after Eastern coral snake (Micrurus fulvius) envenomation to the distal extremity. To assess the efficacy of a novel compression device in delaying onset of systemic toxicity after truncal envenomations with Eastern coral snake (Micrurus fulvius) venom in a porcine model. With University approval, nine juvenile pigs (11 kg to 22 kg) were sedated, anesthetized, and intubated but not paralyzed to ensure continuous spontaneous respirations in a university animal laboratory. Each animal was injected subcutaneously with 10 mg of M. fulvius venom in a pre-selected area of the trunk. After 1 min, six animals had the application of a novel, localizing circumferential compression (LoCC) device applied to the bite site (treatment group) and three animals had no treatment (control group). The device was composed of a rigid polymer clay form molded into a hollow fusiform shape with an internal dimension of 8 × 5 × 3 cm and an elastic belt wrapped around the animal securing the device in place. Vital signs were recorded at 30-min intervals. End points included a respiratory rate below 3 breaths/min, oxygen saturation coral snake venom. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. BEHAVIOR QUALITY DECIDES OUR CONDITIONS OF SURVIVAL AND DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tu Runsheng

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background of the topic: The unusual significance of quality has been found, attribute quality concept (quality is the general nature of its supporter has been found, the quality exchange law and the standard to one's liking with quality have been advanced in the process that present wit research the connotation of quality and the value of quality. (2 Current issue: The theory of knowledge economy, the theory of quality first, the theory of distribution according to work and the subjective quality concept all have theirs aggravated limitation. (3 the purpose of this research: Propel the theory of quality forward strengthen the confidence of quality people, spur them to apply quality knowledge and improve their behavior quality in their work, quicken the tempo human to raise the living quality finally. (4 Research method and conclusion: The conclusion of "behavior quality decides resources created, owned and disposed and can further decide the living state and the developing state of personality, organization, nationality and county" has been epitomized out by analyzing the connotation of quality concept, the value of quality and society law; the theory of quality world have obtained. The main reasons that behavior quality decides resources appropriated and disposed are the action of natural law, society law, the system of society value. The specific important reasons still are: the consciousness of protecting good and punishing inferior, popular feeling is partial to the things of high quality; Behavior is controlled by the ideology (thinking of fair deal; Behavior quality decides the efficiency of work; Quality has value; the latent rule about mankind to continue and excellent.

  18. Bovine oocyte vitrification using the Cryotop method: effect of cumulus cells and vitrification protocol on survival and subsequent development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, X L; Al Naib, A; Sun, Da-Wen; Sun, D W; Lonergan, P

    2010-08-01

    The ability to successfully cryopreserve mammalian oocytes has numerous practical, economical and ethical benefits, which may positively impact animal breeding programs and assisted conception in humans. However, oocyte survival and development following vitrification remains poor. The aim of the present study was (1) to evaluate the effect of the presence of cumulus cells on the outcome of vitrification of immature (GV) or mature (MII) bovine oocytes, (2) to compare empirical and theoretical vitrification protocols, and (3) to assess the effect of adding ice blockers to vitrification media on survival and development competence of bovine oocytes following vitrification using the Cryotop method. In Experiment 1, cumulus-enclosed and partially-denuded GV and MII oocytes were vitrified in 15% EG+15% Me(2)SO+0.5M sucrose in two steps. In Experiment 2, GV oocytes were vitrified either as above or using theoretical modeling based on permeability and osmotic tolerance characteristics in 30% EG+11.4% trehalose in three steps or 40% EG+11.4% trehalose in four steps. In Experiment 3, GV oocytes were vitrified in media supplemented or not with 1 of 2 ice blockers (21st Century Medicine, Fontana, CA) 1% X-1000, 1% Z-1000 or both in three steps. In Experiment 1, the survival, cleavage and blastocyst rate of cumulus-enclosed oocytes was significantly higher than those of partially-denuded oocytes when vitrified at the GV stage (93.8% vs. 81.3%, 65.8% vs. 47.3%, 11.3% vs. 4.0%, respectively, P0.05). In conclusion, cumulus-enclosed GV bovine oocytes survived vitrification and subsequently developed at higher rates than MII oocytes using Cryotop method and conventional IVF procedure. Theoretical analysis of permeability characteristics and tolerance limits could not explain the low developmental competence of vitrified oocytes. (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Hematological Changes as Prognostic Indicators of Survival: Similarities Between Gottingen Minipigs, Humans, and Other Large Animal Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-28

    using the PASW Statistic 18 software, SPSS Inc, IL, USA. Survival curves were plotted using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results and Discussion ...of the Gottingen minipig raises questions concerning the possibility of genetic mutations, defects in DNA repair, the effects of inbreeding , etc. In...NHPs (C. Redon, personal communica- tion). Inbreeding for this strain is controlled and kept under 10% [10–11]. Mapping of the minipig genome is ongoing

  20. Effects of ammonia on fertilization, development, and larval survival in the Northern Pacific asteroid, Asterias amurensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang-Hoon; Sung, Chan-Gyoung; Moon, Seong-Dae; Lee, Jong-Hyeon

    2013-07-01

    For developing a complementary test organism to sea urchin during winter in Korea, sensitivities of sperm, embryo, and larvae of Asterias amurensis to un-ionized ammonia were evaluated. The EC₅₀s (Mean ± SD, n = 3) for fertilization and development were 169 ± 62 and 70 ± 19 μg/L, respectively. The 48, 72, and 96-h LC₅₀s for larval survival were 1,674 ± 583, 498 ± 221, and 336 ± 107 μg/L, respectively. The sensitivities of fertilization, development, and larval survival tests with A. amurensis are higher than or comparable to those of sea urchin and other taxonomic groups. Therefore, fertilization, development, and larval survival tests using A. amurensis are suitable for assessing pore water toxicity of marine sediments in Korea.

  1. Sensory neurons in culture: Changing requirements for survival factors during embryonic development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barde, Y.-A.; Edgar, D.; Thoenen, H.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of nerve growth factor (NGF) and medium conditioned by glioma cells (GCM) on the survival of chicken sensory neurons in culture was investigated. Neurons were isolated from embryos 8 days (E8) to 16 days (E16) old and the proportion of surviving neurons was determined after 2 days in culture. In the absence of NGF or GCM, essentially no neurons survived at any age. In the presence of NGF, survival increased from 25% of the neurons at E8 to 40% between E10 and E12 and then decreased to background level (5%) at E16. In contrast, in the presence of GCM, survival increased continuously from 10% of the neurons at E8 to 75% at E16. At early developmental stages, the effect of NGF and GCM together was greater than the sum of their individual effects: at E8, about 80% of the neurons survived, double the number expected for a simple additive effect. Thus, a significant proportion of chicken neurons from dorsal root ganglia require both NGF and GCM for survival, and this may well include neurons from the ventro-lateral population, which do not respond to NGF alone. As neurons matured, the double requirement progressively decreased and, by E16, NGF no longer increased the number of neurons over that surviving in response to GCM alone. The facts that rat brain extracts mimicked the effect of GCM and that the potency of the brain extracts of rat in the postnatal period increased in parallel with the development of the glial cells suggest that glial cells produce a factor(s) both immunologically and functionally different from NGF which supports the survival of sensory neurons. Images PMID:6928668

  2. Peptidomic Approach to Developing ELISAs for the Determination of Bovine and Porcine Processed Animal Proteins in Feed for Farmed Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huet, Anne-Catherine; Charlier, Caroline; Deckers, Elise; Marbaix, Hélène; Raes, Martine; Mauro, Sergio; Delahaut, Philippe; Gillard, Nathalie

    2016-11-30

    The European Commission (EC) wants to reintroduce nonruminant processed animal proteins (PAPs) safely into the feed chain. This would involve replacing the current ban in feed with a species-to-species ban which, in the case of nonruminants, would only prohibit feeding them with proteins from the same species. To enforce such a provision, there is an urgent need for species-specific methods for detecting PAPs from several species in animal feed and in PAPs from other species. Currently, optical microscopy and the polymerase chain reaction are the officially accepted methods, but they have limitations, and alternative methods are needed. We have developed immunoassays using antibodies raised against targets which are not influenced by high temperature and pressure. These targets were identified in a previous study based on an experimental approach. One optimized competitive ELISA detects bovine PAPs at 2% in plant-derived feed. The detection capability demonstrated on blind samples shows a good correlation with mass spectrometry results.

  3. Development of Animation Teaching Media on the Topic of The Property of The Father

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preedawon Kadmateekarun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to develop animation teaching media on the topic of The Property of the Father to teach for students to understand the concept of sufficiency. The animation was developed to evaluate the performance of a sample of 50 grade 4-5 students at Wat Don Sali School. The results were as the achievement of the students who were taught with the animation was .05 significantly and students had a high level of satisfaction with the animation.

  4. Ecological developmental biology: environmental signals for normal animal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Scott F

    2012-01-01

    The environment plays instructive roles in development and selective roles in evolution. This essay reviews several of the instructive roles whereby the organism has evolved to receive cues from the environment in order to modulate its developmental trajectory. The environmental cues can be abiotic (such as temperature or photoperiod) or biotic (such as those emanating from predators, conspecifics, or food), and the "alteration" produces a normal, not a pathological, phenotype, that is appropriate for the environment. In addition, symbiotic organisms can produce important signals during normal development. Environmental cues can be obligatory, such that the organism cannot develop without the environmental cue. These cues often permit and instruct the organism to proceed from one developmental stage to another, as when larvae receive cues to settle and undergo metamorphosis from substrates. Such obligatory cues can also be given by symbionts, as when Wolbachia bacteria prevent apoptosis in developing ovaries of some wasps. Other environmental cues can be used facultatively, allowing organisms to follow different developmental trajectories depending on whether the cue is present or not. This can be seen in the temperature-dependent determination of sex in many reptiles and in the determination of thermotolerance in aphids by their symbiotic bacteria. Signaling from the environment is essential in development, and co-development appears to be normative between symbionts and their hosts. Here, one sees the reciprocal induction of gene expression, just as within the embryonic organism. The ability of organisms to respond to environmental cues by producing different phenotypes may be critically important in evolution, and it may be an essential feature that can facilitate or limit evolution. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Animating Grassroots Development: Women's Popular Education in Bolivia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Kevin

    1991-01-01

    Describes Capacitacion Integral de la Mujer Campesina (CIMCA) development efforts within Bolivian farm communities. Describes CIMCA's focus on social change, ethnic empowerment, and women's rights. Describes organization's initial clashes with rural culture. Describes use of rotafolio drawings to spark workshop discussions, to improve women's…

  6. Development of induced glioblastoma by implantation of a human xenograft in Yucatan minipig as a large animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshnevis, Mehrdad; Carozzo, Claude; Bonnefont-Rebeix, Catherine; Belluco, Sara; Leveneur, Olivia; Chuzel, Thomas; Pillet-Michelland, Elodie; Dreyfus, Matthieu; Roger, Thierry; Berger, François; Ponce, Frédérique

    2017-04-15

    Glioblastoma is the most common and deadliest primary brain tumor for humans. Despite many efforts toward the improvement of therapeutic methods, prognosis is poor and the disease remains incurable with a median survival of 12-14.5 months after an optimal treatment. To develop novel treatment modalities for this fatal disease, new devices must be tested on an ideal animal model before performing clinical trials in humans. A new model of induced glioblastoma in Yucatan minipigs was developed. Nine immunosuppressed minipigs were implanted with the U87 human glioblastoma cell line in both the left and right hemispheres. Computed tomography (CT) acquisitions were performed once a week to monitor tumor growth. Among the 9 implanted animals, 8 minipigs showed significant macroscopic tumors on CT acquisitions. Histological examination of the brain after euthanasia confirmed the CT imaging findings with the presence of an undifferentiated glioma. Yucatan minipig, given its brain size and anatomy (gyrencephalic structure) which are comparable to humans, provides a reliable brain tumor model for preclinical studies of different therapeutic METHODS: in realistic conditions. Moreover, the short development time, the lower cyclosporine and caring cost and the compatibility with the size of commercialized stereotactic frames make it an affordable and practical animal model, especially in comparison with large breed pigs. This reproducible glioma model could simulate human anatomical conditions in preclinical studies and facilitate the improvement of novel therapeutic devices, designed at the human scale from the outset. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of temperature on development, survival and reproduction of insects: experimental design, data analysis and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Régnière, Jacques; Powell, James; Bentz, Barbara; Nealis, Vincent

    2012-05-01

    The developmental response of insects to temperature is important in understanding the ecology of insect life histories. Temperature-dependent phenology models permit examination of the impacts of temperature on the geographical distributions, population dynamics and management of insects. The measurement of insect developmental, survival and reproductive responses to temperature poses practical challenges because of their modality, variability among individuals and high mortality near the lower and upper threshold temperatures. We address this challenge with an integrated approach to the design of experiments and analysis of data based on maximum likelihood. This approach expands, simplifies and unifies the analysis of laboratory data parameterizing the thermal responses of insects in particular and poikilotherms in general. This approach allows the use of censored observations (records of surviving individuals that have not completed development after a certain time) and accommodates observations from temperature transfer treatments in which individuals pass only a portion of their development at an extreme (near-threshold) temperature and are then placed in optimal conditions to complete their development with a higher rate of survival. Results obtained from this approach are directly applicable to individual-based modeling of insect development, survival and reproduction with respect to temperature. This approach makes possible the development of process-based phenology models that are based on optimal use of available information, and will aid in the development of powerful tools for analyzing eruptive insect population behavior and response to changing climatic conditions. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Challenges to the Development and Implementation of Public Policies to Achieve Animal Welfare Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Margaret

    2010-12-31

    Although there is a long-established tradition of concern for the welfare of animals, it was not until the mid 1800's that governments sought to enact legislation to protect animals from cruelty. In the 1950's, questions concerning animal welfare re-emerged and in the ensuing years have been an on-going focus of government activities. These developments occurred against a backdrop of significant social change but there are important differences in what now underpins and informs these considerations. In the formulation and implementation of public policies, governments look for a course of action that represents and protects the interests of the community; the process may be challenging with competing interests but the final determination seeks a middle ground that best meets the needs and interests of the community as a whole. When policy development concerns our relationship with other animals, the complexity of this relationship presents particular challenges not only to the formulation of policies but also to the evaluation of outcomes. Notably, the depth of feelings and diversity of views in our community reflect the complex social, cultural and personal dimensions of this relationship. The use of animals for scientific purposes remains one of the most contentious animal welfare issues primarily because when animals are used for these purposes, accepted animal welfare benchmarks cannot always be met. Based on the Australian experience, this paper will discuss the influences in and on-going challenges to the development and implementation of public policy when animals are used for these purposes.

  9. Cholesterol Modification of Hedgehog Signaling Proteins in Animal Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Jeffrey A.; Young, Keith E.; Beachy, Philip A.

    1996-10-01

    To determine the function of the pS2 trefoil protein, which is normally expressed in the gastric mucosa, the mouse pS2 (mpS2) gene was inactivated. The antral and pyloric gastric mucosa of mpS2-null mice was dysfunctional and exhibited severe hyperplasia and dysplasia. All homozygous mutant mice developed antropyloric adenoma, and 30 percent developed multifocal intraepithelial or intramucosal carcinomas. The small intestine was characterized by enlarged villi and an abnormal infiltrate of lymphoid cells. These results indicate that mpS2 is essential for normal differentiation of the antral and pyloric gastric mucosa and may function as a gastric-specific tumor suppressor gene.

  10. Interrelationships between recent developments in molecular genetics and cytogenetics and animal breeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fechheimer, N S

    1986-06-01

    Animal breeding traditionally has entailed devising means to apply quantitative and population genetic theory to increase productive capacity of livestock. A highly developed and successful industry has been built on foundations established by academic animal breeders. Recent developments in related sciences such as reproductive biology, molecular biology, cellular biology, and cytogenetics offer prospects for the emergence of a number of methodologies that might usefully be applied to animal breeding. Scientists engaged in development of the newer technologies are not wholly familiar with the livestock industry, its breeding structure, its objectives, its institutions or its peculiarities. Animal breeders, however, are not fully cognizant of the scientific advances being made in related fields, their potential for development and application or their limitations, and therefore, animal breeders have not seriously thought about how they might be integrated most usefully and efficaciously into the animal breeding enterprise. A collaboration is needed in which the laboratory scientists produce new ideas, products, and methods and the animal breeders--using system analysis, simulation procedures, and laboratory animal and livestock breeding tests--help make rational choices, partially direct work of the laboratory scientists, help the industry integrate new methods, and monitor the extent of success of adapted innovations.

  11. Animation: The C.C.C.'s Socio-Cultural Development Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Clarence

    1977-01-01

    Integration into a society made for and by men, in which all his activities are meaningful, is animation's ultimate goal. "Animation", the title of the Council for Cultural Cooperation's socio-cultural development project, is described along with the policy necessary to implement it. This includes the role of the animateur, who would…

  12. Using Animation to Support the Teaching of Computer Game Development Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Mark John; Pountney, David C.; Baskett, M.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the potential use of animation for supporting the teaching of some of the mathematical concepts that underlie computer games development activities, such as vector and matrix algebra. An experiment was conducted with a group of UK undergraduate computing students to compare the perceived usefulness of animated and static…

  13. Recent developments in animal models of drug relapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchant, Nathan J; Li, Xuan; Shaham, Yavin

    2013-08-01

    Drug craving and relapse to drug use during abstinence are defining features of addiction. Evidence indicates that drug craving and relapse in humans are often provoked by acute exposure to the self-administered drug, drug-associated cues, or stress. During the last two decades, this clinical scenario has been primarily studied at the preclinical level using the classical reinstatement model. However, a single preclinical model cannot capture the complicated nature of human drug relapse. Therefore, more recently, we and others have developed several other models to study different facets of human drug relapse. In this review, we introduce and discuss recent findings from these other relapse models, including incubation of drug craving, reacquisition and resurgence models, and punishment-based and conflict-based relapse models. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Plant quantity affects development and survival of a gregarious insect herbivore and its endoparasitoid wasp.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fei, M.; Gols, R.; Zhu, F.; Harvey, J.A.

    2016-01-01

    Virtually all studies of plant-herbivore-natural enemy interactions focus on plant quality as the major constraint on development and survival. However, for many gregarious feeding insect herbivores that feed on small or ephemeral plants, the quantity of resources is much more limiting, yet this

  15. The effect of unilateral ovariectomy on early embryonic survival and embryo development in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Peiró

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Unilateral ovariectomy can be used to study uterine capacity in rabbits because an overcrowding of the functional uterine horn is produced. Due to the uterus duplex, the rabbit is the ideal model for such studies. However, this technique may affect embryo survival. The aim of this work is to study the effect of unilateral ovariectomy on early embryo survival and development in rabbit. A total of 101 unilateral ovariectomised females and 52 intact females were compared after slaughter at 30 h post-mating. Early embryo survival was estimated as the ratio between number of embryo recovered and ovulation rate. No differences were found between intact and unilaterally ovariectomised females in this trait. Unilateral ovariectomy did not change embryo development, measured as the number of embryo cells. Variability of embryo development was not affected either. At 30 h post-mating, the majority of embryos (86.2% were 4-cell stage. Embryo quality was evaluated according to morphological criteria. No difference in embryo quality between intact and unilaterally ovariectomised females was found. Therefore, unilateral ovariectomy performed before puberty in rabbit does not modify early embryo survival and development.

  16. Effects of Rearing Density on Survival, Growth, and Development of the Ladybird Coleomegilla maculata in Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric W. Riddick

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Our research focuses on developing techniques to rear ladybird beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae. We evaluated the effects of rearing density on survival, growth, and development of Coleomegilla maculata. The hypothesis that a low to moderate rearing density has limited or no effects on survival and development was tested. C. maculata first instars were reared to pupae at a density of 1, 5, 10, 15, or 20 individuals per arena (2.5 cm high, 9.0 cm diameter, and 159 cm3 volume and fed powdered brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana eggs. More larvae survived at the 1 and 5 densities, but no differences were detected between the 10, 15, or 20 densities. Median survival rate was at least 90% for larvae and 100% for pupae at the 10, 15, and 20 densities. Development time, body weight, and sex ratio were unaffected by rearing density. Overall, this study suggests that C. maculata larvae can be reared successfully at a density of 20 larvae/159 cm3 (≈ 0.126 larvae/cm3 in containers provisioned with powdered A. franciscana eggs. Scaling-up the size of containers, and C. maculata density in these containers, should be possible.

  17. Survival after resection of perihilar cholangiocarcinoma-Development and external validation of a prognostic nomogram

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Groot Koerkamp (Bas); J.K. Wiggers (Jimme K.); M. Gonen (Mithat); A. Doussot (Alexandre); P.J. Allen (Peter); M.G. Besselink (Marc); L.H. Blumgart; O.R. Busch (O.); M.I. D'Angelica (Michael I.); R.P. DeMatteo (Ronald P.); D.J. Gouma (Dirk); T.P. Kingham (T. Peter); T.M. van Gulik (Thomas); W.R. Jarnagin (William R.)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The objective of this study was to derive and validate a prognostic nomogram to predict disease-specific survival (DSS) after a curative intent resection of perihilar cholangiocarcinoma (PHC). Patients and methods: A nomogram was developed from 173 patients treated at

  18. Effects of Rearing Density on Survival, Growth, and Development of the Ladybird Coleomegilla maculata in Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddick, Eric W.; Wu, Zhixin

    2015-01-01

    Our research focuses on developing techniques to rear ladybird beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae). We evaluated the effects of rearing density on survival, growth, and development of Coleomegilla maculata. The hypothesis that a low to moderate rearing density has limited or no effects on survival and development was tested. C. maculata first instars were reared to pupae at a density of 1, 5, 10, 15, or 20 individuals per arena (2.5 cm high, 9.0 cm diameter, and 159 cm3 volume) and fed powdered brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana) eggs. More larvae survived at the 1 and 5 densities, but no differences were detected between the 10, 15, or 20 densities. Median survival rate was at least 90% for larvae and 100% for pupae at the 10, 15, and 20 densities. Development time, body weight, and sex ratio were unaffected by rearing density. Overall, this study suggests that C. maculata larvae can be reared successfully at a density of 20 larvae/159 cm3 (≈ 0.126 larvae/cm3) in containers provisioned with powdered A. franciscana eggs. Scaling-up the size of containers, and C. maculata density in these containers, should be possible. PMID:26466904

  19. Temperature-mediated survival, development and hatching variation of Pacific cod Gadus macrocephalus eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, X; Zhang, X; Sakrai, Y; Jin, X; Gao, T; Wan, R; Yamamoto, J

    2014-01-01

    Laboratory-validated data on the survival, development and hatching responses of fertilized Pacific cod Gadus macrocephalus eggs from the northern Japan stock were determined through an incubation experiment. The optimum temperature for survival until hatching ranged from 4 to 8°C. No significant difference in development rates was found between the populations from Mutsu Bay, Japan, and western Canadian coastal waters even though the samples may belong to different G. macrocephalus stocks. Gadus macrocephalus larvae hatched asynchronously from egg batches despite incubation under the same environment during their development. Both incubation temperature and temperature-mediated hatch rank affect size and yolk reserve. These data suggest that variations in water temperatures within an ecological range markedly influence the development rates, survival and hatching of the eggs, as well as the stage at hatch larvae of G. macrocephalus. Asynchronous hatching and the production of offspring with variable sizes and yolk reserves are considered evolutionary bet-hedging strategies that enable the species to maximize their likelihood of survival in an environment with variable temperatures. © 2013 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  20. Influence of human development and predators on nest survival of tundra birds, Arctic Coastal Plain, Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebezeit, J R; Kendall, S J; Brown, S; Johnson, C B; Martin, P; McDonald, T L; Payer, D C; Rea, C L; Streever, B; Wildman, A M; Zack, S

    2009-09-01

    Nest predation may influence population dynamics of birds on the Arctic Coastal Plain (ACP) of Alaska, USA. Anthropogenic development on the ACP is increasing, which may attract nest predators by providing artificial sources of food, perches, den sites, and nest sites. Enhanced populations or concentrations of human-subsidized predators may reduce nest survival for tundra-nesting birds. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that nest survival decreases in proximity to human infrastructure. We monitored 1257 nests of 13 shorebird species and 619 nests of four passerine species at seven sites on the ACP from 2002 to 2005. Study sites were chosen to represent a range of distances to infrastructure from 100 m to 80 km. We used Cox proportional hazards regression models to evaluate the effects of background (i.e., natural) factors and infrastructure on nest survival. We documented high spatial and temporal variability in nest survival, and site and year were both included in the best background model. We did not detect an effect of human infrastructure on nest survival for shorebirds as a group. In contrast, we found evidence that risk of predation for passerine nests increased within 5 km of infrastructure. This finding provides quantitative evidence of a relationship between infrastructure and nest survival for breeding passerines on the ACP. A posteriori finer-scale analyses (within oil field sites and individual species) suggested that Red and Red-necked Phalaropes combined (Phalaropus fulicarius, P. lobatus) had lower productivity closer to infrastructure and in areas with higher abundance of subsidized predators. However, we did not detect such a relationship between infrastructure and nest survival for Semipalmated and Pectoral Sandpipers (Calidris pusilla, C. melanotos), the two most abundant shorebirds. High variability in environmental conditions, nest survival, and predator numbers between sites and years may have contributed to these inconsistent results

  1. Intratumoral decorin gene delivery by AAV vector inhibits brain glioblastomas and prolongs survival of animals by inducing cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hsin-I; Hueng, Dueng-Yuan; Shui, Hao-Ai; Han, Jun-Ming; Wang, Chi-Hsien; Lai, Ying-Hsiu; Cheng, Shi-Yuan; Xiao, Xiao; Chen, Ming-Teh; Yang, Yi-Ping

    2014-03-12

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most malignant cancer in the central nervous system with poor clinical prognosis. In this study, we investigated the therapeutic effect of an anti-cancer protein, decorin, by delivering it into a xenograft U87MG glioma tumor in the brain of nude mice through an adeno-associated viral (AAV2) gene delivery system. Decorin expression from the AAV vector in vitro inhibited cultured U87MG cell growth by induction of cell differentiation. Intracranial injection of AAV-decorin vector to the glioma-bearing nude mice in vivo significantly suppressed brain tumor growth and prolonged survival when compared to control non-treated mice bearing the same U87MG tumors. Proteomics analysis on protein expression profiles in the U87MG glioma cells after AAV-mediated decorin gene transfer revealed up- and down-regulation of important proteins. Differentially expressed proteins between control and AAV-decorin-transduced cells were identified through MALDI-TOF MS and database mining. We found that a number of important proteins that are involved in apoptosis, transcription, chemotherapy resistance, mitosis, and fatty acid metabolism have been altered as a result of decorin overexpression. These findings offer valuable insight into the mechanisms of the anti-glioblastoma effects of decorin. In addition, AAV-mediated decorin gene delivery warrants further investigation as a potential therapeutic approach for brain tumors.

  2. Intratumoral Decorin Gene Delivery by AAV Vector Inhibits Brain Glioblastomas and Prolongs Survival of Animals by Inducing Cell Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-I Ma

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most malignant cancer in the central nervous system with poor clinical prognosis. In this study, we investigated the therapeutic effect of an anti-cancer protein, decorin, by delivering it into a xenograft U87MG glioma tumor in the brain of nude mice through an adeno-associated viral (AAV2 gene delivery system. Decorin expression from the AAV vector in vitro inhibited cultured U87MG cell growth by induction of cell differentiation. Intracranial injection of AAV-decorin vector to the glioma-bearing nude mice in vivo significantly suppressed brain tumor growth and prolonged survival when compared to control non-treated mice bearing the same U87MG tumors. Proteomics analysis on protein expression profiles in the U87MG glioma cells after AAV-mediated decorin gene transfer revealed up- and down-regulation of important proteins. Differentially expressed proteins between control and AAV-decorin-transduced cells were identified through MALDI-TOF MS and database mining. We found that a number of important proteins that are involved in apoptosis, transcription, chemotherapy resistance, mitosis, and fatty acid metabolism have been altered as a result of decorin overexpression. These findings offer valuable insight into the mechanisms of the anti-glioblastoma effects of decorin. In addition, AAV-mediated decorin gene delivery warrants further investigation as a potential therapeutic approach for brain tumors.

  3. Survival assays using Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hae-Eun H; Jung, Yoonji; Lee, Seung-Jae V

    2017-02-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans is an important model organism with many useful features, including rapid development and aging, easy cultivation, and genetic tractability. Survival assays using C. elegans are powerful methods for studying physiological processes. In this review, we describe diverse types of C. elegans survival assays and discuss the aims, uses, and advantages of specific assays. C. elegans survival assays have played key roles in identifying novel genetic factors that regulate many aspects of animal physiology, such as aging and lifespan, stress response, and immunity against pathogens. Because many genetic factors discovered using C. elegans are evolutionarily conserved, survival assays can provide insights into mechanisms underlying physiological processes in mammals, including humans.

  4. Primary aquatic animal health care in rural, small-scale, aquaculture development

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Arthur, J.R; Subasinghe, R.P; Phillips, M.J

    2002-01-01

    This document is the technical proceedings of the Asia Regional Workshop on Primary Aquatic Animal Health Care in Rural, Small-scale, Aquaculture Development, held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from 27 to 30 September 1999...

  5. Molecular and Cellular Biology Animations: Development and Impact on Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Educators often struggle when teaching cellular and molecular processes because typically they have only two-dimensional tools to teach something that plays out in four dimensions. Learning research has demonstrated that visualizing processes in three dimensions aids learning, and animations are effective visualization tools for novice learners and aid with long-term memory retention. The World Wide Web Instructional Committee at North Dakota State University has used these research results as an inspiration to develop a suite of high-quality animations of molecular and cellular processes. Currently, these animations represent transcription, translation, bacterial gene expression, messenger RNA (mRNA) processing, mRNA splicing, protein transport into an organelle, the electron transport chain, and the use of a biological gradient to drive adenosine triphosphate synthesis. These animations are integrated with an educational module that consists of First Look and Advanced Look components that feature captioned stills from the animation representing the key steps in the processes at varying levels of complexity. These animation-based educational modules are available via the World Wide Web at http://vcell.ndsu.edu/animations. An in-class research experiment demonstrated that student retention of content material was significantly better when students received a lecture coupled with the animations and then used the animation as an individual study activity. PMID:15917875

  6. A New Animal Model for Developing a Somatosensory Neural Interface for Prosthetic Limbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-02-12

    interface for neuroprosthetic limbs. PI: Douglas J. Weber, Ph.D. University of Pittsburgh 1 10/15/2007 Scientific progress and accomplishments. We...information to the brain. A new animal model for developing a somatosensory neural interface for neuroprosthetic limbs. PI: Douglas J. Weber, Ph.D...A new animal model for developing a somatosensory neural interface for neuroprosthetic limbs. PI: Douglas J. Weber, Ph.D. University of Pittsburgh

  7. Building Transnational Bodies: Norway and the International Development of Laboratory Animal Science, ca. 1956–1980

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druglitrø, Tone; Kirk, Robert G. W.

    2015-01-01

    Argument This article adopts a historical perspective to examine the development of Laboratory Animal Science and Medicine, an auxiliary field which formed to facilitate the work of the biomedical sciences by systematically improving laboratory animal production, provision, and maintenance in the post Second World War period. We investigate how Laboratory Animal Science and Medicine co-developed at the local level (responding to national needs and concerns) yet was simultaneously transnational in orientation (responding to the scientific need that knowledge, practices, objects and animals circulate freely). Adapting the work of Tsing (2004), we argue that national differences provided the creative “friction” that helped drive the formation of Laboratory Animal Science and Medicine as a transnational endeavor. Our analysis engages with the themes of this special issue by focusing on the development of Laboratory Animal Science and Medicine in Norway, which both informed wider transnational developments and was formed by them. We show that Laboratory Animal Science and Medicine can only be properly understood from a spatial perspective; whilst it developed and was structured through national “centers,” its orientation was transnational necessitating international networks through which knowledge, practice, technologies, and animals circulated. More and better laboratory animals are today required than ever before, and this demand will continue to rise if it is to keep pace with the quickening tempo of biological and veterinary research. The provision of this living experimental material is no longer a local problem; local, that is, to the research institute. It has become a national concern, and, in some of its aspects . . . even international. (William Lane-Petter 1957, 240) PMID:24941794

  8. Ensuring due process in the IACUC and animal welfare setting: considerations in developing noncompliance policies and procedures for institutional animal care and use committees and institutional officials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Barbara C; Gografe, Sylvia; Pritt, Stacy; Jen, Kai-Lin Catherine; McWhirter, Camille A; Barman, Susan M; Comuzzie, Anthony; Greene, Molly; McNulty, Justin A; Michele, Daniel Eugene; Moaddab, Naz; Nelson, Randall J; Norris, Karen; Uray, Karen D; Banks, Ron; Westlund, Karin N; Yates, Bill J; Silverman, Jerald; Hansen, Kenneth D; Redman, Barbara

    2017-10-01

    Every institution that is involved in research with animals is expected to have in place policies and procedures for the management of allegations of noncompliance with the Animal Welfare Act and the U.S. Public Health Service Policy on the Humane Care and Use of Laboratory Animals. We present here a model set of recommendations for institutional animal care and use committees and institutional officials to ensure appropriate consideration of allegations of noncompliance with federal Animal Welfare Act regulations that carry a significant risk or specific threat to animal welfare. This guidance has 3 overarching aims: 1 ) protecting the welfare of research animals; 2 ) according fair treatment and due process to an individual accused of noncompliance; and 3 ) ensuring compliance with federal regulations. Through this guidance, the present work seeks to advance the cause of scientific integrity, animal welfare, and the public trust while recognizing and supporting the critical importance of animal research for the betterment of the health of both humans and animals.-Hansen, B. C., Gografe, S., Pritt, S., Jen, K.-L. C., McWhirter, C. A., Barman, S. M., Comuzzie, A., Greene, M., McNulty, J. A., Michele, D. E., Moaddab, N., Nelson, R. J., Norris, K., Uray, K. D., Banks, R., Westlund, K. N., Yates, B. J., Silverman, J., Hansen, K. D., Redman, B. Ensuring due process in the IACUC and animal welfare setting: considerations in developing noncompliance policies and procedures for institutional animal care and use committees and institutional officials. © FASEB.

  9. [Effect of heating on the survival of swine fever virus in pasteurised canned ham from experimentally infected animals (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terpstra, C; Krol, B

    1976-11-15

    Experimentally infected pigs were slaughtered during viraemia. The hams were prepared according to the industrial process and packed in tins with an average content of 5.6 kg. The tins were then heated in the course of which temperatures in the centre of the hams reached maximum values varying between 62.5 and 68.5 degrees C. Within 24 hours of heating the centre of the ham was homogenised and one of two piglets were inoculated with 40 to 80 ml of a 25 per cent suspension. Virus was recovered from one out of two hams prepared at 62.5 degrees C. Virus could not be isolated from four hams processed at a maximum of 65.5 degrees C and from two hams which were heated to a maximum of 66.0 degrees and 68.5 degrees C respectively. A heart temperature of 65 degrees C for 30 minutes proved to be sufficient to eliminate all virus in the ham. The preparation of the ham and the proportionally long preheating period are considered favourable circumstances for inactivating the virus. As the hams were taken from seriously diseases animals with high viraemic titres at the time of slaughter and were injected into susceptible pigs without storage, it may be taken for granted that manufacture at the normal temperature of about 67 degrees C or above offers a sufficient margin to exclude the possible entrance of swine fever virus with contaminated ham. Virus from the virulent strains Ald, Kansas and Brescia in heparinised blood was not completely inactivated during 30 minutes at 67.2 degrees C.

  10. Development of prognostic indicators using Classification And Regression Trees (CART) for survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunn, Martha E.; Fan, Juanjuan; Su, Xiaogang; McGuire, Michael K.

    2014-01-01

    The development of an accurate prognosis is an integral component of treatment planning in the practice of periodontics. Prior work has evaluated the validity of using various clinical measured parameters for assigning periodontal prognosis as well as for predicting tooth survival and change in clinical conditions over time. We critically review the application of multivariate Classification And Regression Trees (CART) for survival in developing evidence-based periodontal prognostic indicators. We focus attention on two distinct methods of multivariate CART for survival: the marginal goodness-of-fit approach, and the multivariate exponential approach. A number of common clinical measures have been found to be significantly associated with tooth loss from periodontal disease, including furcation involvement, probing depth, mobility, crown-to-root ratio, and oral hygiene. However, the inter-relationships among these measures, as well as the relevance of other clinical measures to tooth loss from periodontal disease (such as bruxism, family history of periodontal disease, and overall bone loss), remain less clear. While inferences drawn from any single current study are necessarily limited, the application of new approaches in epidemiologic analyses to periodontal prognosis, such as CART for survival, should yield important insights into our understanding, and treatment, of periodontal diseases. PMID:22133372

  11. Insight into post-transcriptional gene regulation: stress-responsive microRNAs and their role in the environmental stress survival of tolerant animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggar, Kyle K; Storey, Kenneth B

    2015-05-01

    Living animals are constantly faced with various environmental stresses that challenge normal life, including: oxygen limitation, very low or high temperature, as well as restriction of water and food. It has been well established that in response to these stresses, tolerant organisms regularly respond with a distinct suite of cellular modifications that involve transcriptional, translational and post-translational modification. In recent years, a new mechanism of rapid and reversible transcriptome regulation, via the action of non-coding RNA molecules, has emerged into post-transcriptional regulation and has since been shown to be part of the survival response. However, these RNA-based mechanisms by which tolerant organisms respond to stressed conditions are not well understood. Recent studies have begun to show that non-coding RNAs control gene expression and translation of mRNA to protein, and can also have regulatory influence over major cellular processes. For example, select microRNAs have been shown to have regulatory influence over the cell cycle, apoptosis, signal transduction, muscle atrophy and fatty acid metabolism during periods of environmental stress. As we are on the verge of dissecting the roles of non-coding RNA in environmental stress adaptation, this Commentary summarizes the hallmark alterations in microRNA expression that facilitate stress survival. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  12. Grass Pollen Affects Survival and Development of Larval Anopheles arabiensis (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmare, Yelfwagash; Hopkins, Richard J; Tekie, Habte; Hill, Sharon R; Ignell, Rickard

    2017-09-01

    Nutrients in breeding sites are critical for the survival and development of malaria mosquitoes, having a direct impact on vectorial capacity. Yet, there is a limited understanding about the natural larval diet and its impact on the individual fitness of mosquitoes. Recent studies have shown that gravid Anopheles arabiensis Patton (Diptera: Culicidae) are attracted by and oviposit in grass-associated habitats. The pollen provided by these grasses is a potential source of nutrients for the larvae. Here, we assess the effect of Typha latifolia L. (Poales: Typhaceae), Echinochloa pyramidalis Lamarck, Pennisetum setaceum Forsskål, and Zea mays L. pollen on larval survival and rate of development in An. arabiensis under laboratory conditions. In addition, we characterize the carbon to nitrogen ratio and the size of pollen grains as a measure of diet quality. Carbon-rich pollen with a small grain size (T. latifolia and P. setaceum; 9.7 ± 0.3 × 103 and 5.5 ± 0.2 × 104 µm3, respectively) resulted in enhanced rates of development of An. arabiensis. In contrast, the larva fed on the nitrogen-rich control diet (TetraMin) was slower to develop, but demonstrated the highest larval survival. Larvae fed on carbon-rich and large-grained Z. mays pollen (4.1 ± 0.2 × 105 µm3) survived at similar levels as those fed on the control diet and also took a longer time to develop compared with larvae fed on the other pollens. While males and females did not appear to develop differently on the different pollen diets, males consistently emerged faster than their female counterparts. These results are discussed in relation to integrated vector management. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America.

  13. Pointer Animation Implementation at Development of Multimedia Learning of Java Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusli, Muhammad; Atmojo, Yohanes Priyo

    2015-01-01

    This research represents the development research using the references of previous research results related to the development of interactive multimedia learning (learner controlled), specially about the effectiveness and efficiency of multimedia learning of a content that developed by pointer animation implementation showing the content in…

  14. The translatability of animal models for clinical development: biomarkers and disease models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendler, Alexandra; Wehling, Martin

    2010-10-01

    Translational science in medicine describes the transfer of basic in vitro and in vivo research into human applications. Animal models are important tools in translational science, and several different approaches such as genetically engineered animals, xenograft models, inbred strains and disease induction models are available for many diseases. Biomarkers are defined as any measurable parameters of biological processes. This includes disease pathophysiology and the impact of interventions thereon. Biomarkers represent the most important tool of translational science in medicine. Therefore, the development of biomarkers, which are useful and accessible both in animals and in humans, represents an important focus of translational activities. Imaging, for example, is translationally ideal as the readouts in disease models and patients are the same or at least very similar. Despite several approved animal models, the majority of compounds tested successfully in animals still fail to be successfully applied to human diseases. To reduce this rate of failure, animal models better resembling the human situation are needed. A new scoring system for the assessment of translatability is discussed; it facilitates the judgement on the predictivity of results from a given animal model regarding human translation by the weighed answers to important data features. These include robust animal data in more than one species, related human data and accessibility. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Enhancing the Lasso Approach for Developing a Survival Prediction Model Based on Gene Expression Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhei Kaneko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past decade, researchers in oncology have sought to develop survival prediction models using gene expression data. The least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (lasso has been widely used to select genes that truly correlated with a patient’s survival. The lasso selects genes for prediction by shrinking a large number of coefficients of the candidate genes towards zero based on a tuning parameter that is often determined by a cross-validation (CV. However, this method can pass over (or fail to identify true positive genes (i.e., it identifies false negatives in certain instances, because the lasso tends to favor the development of a simple prediction model. Here, we attempt to monitor the identification of false negatives by developing a method for estimating the number of true positive (TP genes for a series of values of a tuning parameter that assumes a mixture distribution for the lasso estimates. Using our developed method, we performed a simulation study to examine its precision in estimating the number of TP genes. Additionally, we applied our method to a real gene expression dataset and found that it was able to identify genes correlated with survival that a CV method was unable to detect.

  16. Challenges to the Development and Implementation of Public Policies to Achieve Animal Welfare Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret Rose

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Although there is a long-established tradition of concern for the welfare of animals, it was not until the mid 1800’s that governments sought to enact legislation to protect animals from cruelty. In the 1950’s, questions concerning animal welfare re-emerged and in the ensuing years have been an on-going focus of government activities. These developments occurred against a backdrop of significant social change but there are important differences in what now underpins and informs these considerations. In the formulation and implementation of public policies, governments look for a course of action that represents and protects the interests of the community; the process may be challenging with competing interests but the final determination seeks a middle ground that best meets the needs and interests of the community as a whole. When policy development concerns our relationship with other animals, the complexity of this relationship presents particular challenges not only to the formulation of policies but also to the evaluation of outcomes. Notably, the depth of feelings and diversity of views in our community reflect the complex social, cultural and personal dimensions of this relationship. The use of animals for scientific purposes remains one of the most contentious animal welfare issues primarily because when animals are used for these purposes, accepted animal welfare benchmarks cannot always be met. Based on the Australian experience, this paper will discuss the influences in and on-going challenges to the development and implementation of public policy when animals are used for these purposes.

  17. Development of a RVFV ELISA that can distinguish infected from vaccinated animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albariño César G

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rift Valley Fever Virus is a pathogen of humans and livestock that causes significant morbidity and mortality throughout Africa and the Middle East. A vaccine that would protect animals from disease would be very beneficial to the human population because prevention of the amplification cycle in livestock would greatly reduce the risk of human infection by preventing livestock epizootics. A mutant virus, constructed through the use of reverse genetics, is protective in laboratory animal models and thus shows promise as a potential vaccine. However, the ability to distinguish infected from vaccinated animals is important for vaccine acceptance by national and international authorities, given regulations restricting movement and export of infected animals. Results In this study, we describe the development of a simple assay that can be used to distinguish naturally infected animals from ones that have been vaccinated with a mutant virus. We describe the cloning, expression and purification of two viral proteins, and the development of side by side ELISAs using the two viral proteins. Conclusion A side by side ELISA can be used to differentiate infected from vaccinated animals. This assay can be done without the use of biocontainment facilities and has potential for use in both human and animal populations.

  18. [Recent developments on the European ban on animal experiments for cosmetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhdel, I W

    2001-01-01

    For the second time the European Commission has postponed the sales ban on cosmetics products that have been developed and tested in animal experiments now until 2002. In the meantime the Commission wants to adopt the Seventh Amendment of the EU Cosmetics Directive. In its draft the Commission proposes to scrap the sales ban and replace it with an animal testing ban. This change would avoid possible conflicts with the WTO, however, from the animal welfare point of view would result in animal testing moving into third countries instead of avoiding them. This is because cosmetics products tested on animals outside the EU could be sold in the EU without any restrictions. As a consequence this measure would take the pressure from authorities and industry to further develop and adopt alternative methods. Other proposed measures are not acceptable from the animal welfare point of view, e.g. because they contradict Directive 86/609 and would result in a delay of the application of validated alternative methods. The Deutscher Tierschutzbund therefore still demands an immediate and complete sales ban in connection with an animal testing ban within the EU.

  19. Rearing honey bees, Apis mellifera, in vitro 1: effects of sugar concentrations on survival and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaftanoglu, Osman; Linksvayer, Timothy A; Page, Robert E

    2011-01-01

    A new method for rearing honey bees, Apis mellifera L. (Hymenoptera: Apidae), in vitro was developed and the effects of sugar concentrations on survival and development were studied. Seven different glucose (G) and fructose (F) compositions (0%G+0%F, 3%G+3%F, 6%G+6%F, 12%G+12%F, 0%G+12%F, 12%G+0%F, and 4%G+8%F) were tested. Larvae were able to grow to the post defecation stage without addition of sugars (Diet 1), but they were not able to metamorphose and pupate. Adults were reared from diets 2-7. The average larval survival, prepupal larval weights, adult weights, and ovariole numbers were affected significantly due to the sugar compositions in the diets. High sugar concentrations (12%G+12%F) increased the number of queens and intercastes.

  20. The Groucho/Transducin-like enhancer of split protein family in animal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Megha; Kumar, Pankaj; Mathew, Sam J

    2015-07-01

    Corepressors are proteins that cannot bind DNA directly but repress transcription by interacting with partner proteins. The Groucho/Transducin-Like Enhancer of Split (TLE) are a conserved family of corepressor proteins present in animals ranging from invertebrates such as Drosophila to vertebrates such as mice and humans. Groucho/TLE proteins perform important functions throughout the life span of animals, interacting with several pathways and regulating fundamental processes such as metabolism. However, these proteins have especially crucial functions in animal development, where they are required in multiple tissues in a temporally regulated manner. In this review, we summarize the functions of the Groucho/TLE proteins during animal development, emphasizing on specific tissues where they play essential roles. © 2015 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  1. Animal evolution and atmospheric pO2: is there a link between gradual animal adaptation to terrain elevation due to Ural orogeny and survival of subsequent hypoxic periods?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurbel, Sven

    2014-10-22

    Considering evolution of terrestrial animals as something happening only on flat continental plains seems wrong. Many mountains have arisen and disappeared over the geologic time scale, so in all periods some areas of high altitude existed, with reduced oxygen pressure (pO2) and increased aridity. During orogeny, animal species of the raising terrain can slowly adapt to reduced oxygen levels.This review proposes that animal evolution was often driven by atmospheric oxygen availability. Transitions of insect ancestors and amphibians out of water are here interpreted as events forced by the lack of oxygen in shallow and warm water during Devonian. Hyperoxia during early Carboniferous allowed giant insects to be predators of lowlands, forcing small amphibians to move to higher terrains, unsuitable to large insects due to reduced pO2. In arid mountainous habitats, ascended animals evolved in early reptiles with more efficient lungs and improved circulation. Animals with alveolar lungs became the mammalian ancestors, while those with respiratory duct lungs developed in archosaurs. In this interpretation, limb precursors of wings and pneumatised bones might have been adaptations for moving on steep slopes.Ural mountains have risen to an estimated height of 3000 m between 318 and 251 Mya. The earliest archosaurs have been found on the European Ural side, estimated 275 Myr old. It is proposed that Ural orogeny slowly elevated several highland habitats within the modern Ural region to heights above 2500 m. Since this process took near 60 Myr, animals in these habitats fully to adapted to hypoxia.The protracted P-Tr hypoxic extinction event killed many aquatic and terrestrial animals. Devastated lowland areas were repopulated by mammaliaformes that came down from mountainous areas. Archosaurs were better adapted to very low pO2, so they were forced to descend to the sea level later when the lack of oxygen became severe. During the Triassic period, when the relative content

  2. Late development of homoeothermy in mink (Mustela vison) kits - a strategy for maximum survival rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tauson, A-H; Chwalibog, André; Tygesen, M P

    2006-01-01

    . Evaporative water losses was higher among single than among groups of kits and slightly lower but more variable for animals at L than at H temperature. It was concluded that mink kits develop functional homoeothermy at an age of close to 6 weeks and that the failure of very young kits to thermoregulate...

  3. Effect of stocking density and source of animal protein on growth and survival of rainbow trout fingerlings in flow-through system at Nuwakot, Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prem Timalsina

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was conducted in outdoor nursing raceways with flow-through system (2.7 m2 at the Fisheries Research Station, Trishuli, Nuwakot Nepal for 249 days to evaluate the effect of stocking density and sources of animal protein on growth and survival of rainbow trout fingerlings production. The experiment was conducted in 2 × 2 factorial completely randomized design having two stocking densities, (density-1: 10 kg/m2 and density-2: 12.5 kg/m2 and two diets (diet-1: shrimp meal based diet and diet-2: 5% bovine blood meal mixed diet. All treatments were replicated thrice. Water from the Trishuli river was used and 50 cm water depth was maintained in all treatments. Initial feeding rate of 10% of the body weight was gradually reduced to 8, 7, 6, 5, 4 and 3% was maintained for the subsequent months. Feeding was done 5 times a day throughout the study period. Results showed that the mean total harvest weight in diet-1 (30.17 ± 1.34 kg was significantly higher than in diet-2 (22.77 ± 1.34 kg; however, no significance difference was observed at stocking density levels. Mean survival of fish in diet-1 (60.30 ± 2.08% was significantly higher than diet-2 (47.78 ± 2.08%. Similarly, survivability of fish in density-1 (63.45 ± 2.08% was significantly higher than in density-2 (44.63 ± 2.08%. The mean dissolve oxygen at density-2 (8.89 ± 0.02 mg/L was significantly lower to that of density-1 (8.94 ± 0.02 mg/L and B:C ratio was high with shrimp meal based diet and high stocking density (T3. In the present study, the treatment with shrimp meal based diet and high stocking density (T3 was superior with high mean total harvest weight, gross fish yield, low FCR and high B: C ratio than other treatment combinations. The present study demonstrated that growth, production and survival performances of rainbow trout in the present experimental condition were not satisfactory by substituting a part of shrimp meal by blood meal.

  4. The role of animation in spiritual and moral development of preschool children

    OpenAIRE

    Yulia Baranova

    2014-01-01

    Animated film has a high potential of artistic and aesthetic, moral and emotional impact on children of preschool age, as well as extensive educational and training opportunities. The author describes the experience of using animation on lessons in the system of supplementary education. In the process of artistic activity cartoons do not create only background information, but allow children to develop such values as goodness, love, family, friendship, humane attitude toward nature.

  5. Effect of Water on Survival and Development of Diapausing Eggs of Apolygus lucorum (Hemiptera: Miridae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinli Jin

    Full Text Available The green mirid bug Apolygus lucorum is a regional pest of multiple crops in northern China, and the survival and development of diapausing eggs during winter plays an important role in the population dynamics of this species. The effect of water on the survival and development of A. lucorum eggs was investigated using laboratory-induced diapause. Diapausing eggs were exposed to various humidity regimes under three conditions: (1 termination of diapause with exposure to warm long-day (WLD conditions (i.e., 26 ± 1°C and 75 ± 5% relative humidity (RH under a photoperiod of 16 hours light and 8 hours dark, (2 termination of diapause by chilling at 4°C, or (3 during the post-diapause stage, i.e., from transfer to WLD conditions after chilling, until the hatching of nymphs. The results indicate that water availability is crucial for the post-diapause resumption of development of A. lucorum. However, exposure to excessive moisture was detrimental, as indicated by a decrease in diapause termination rate and a prolonged pre-hatching period of diapausing eggs, compared to limited moisture conditions. This implies that both too dry and too humid environmental conditions would suppress survival and postpone hatching of overwintered A. lucorum eggs, and might explain why this pest has not caused severe damage in either southern or western China where the respective climates are very humid or dry.

  6. An integrated scientific framework for child survival and early childhood development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shonkoff, Jack P; Richter, Linda; van der Gaag, Jacques; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2012-02-01

    Building a strong foundation for healthy development in the early years of life is a prerequisite for individual well-being, economic productivity, and harmonious societies around the world. Growing scientific evidence also demonstrates that social and physical environments that threaten human development (because of scarcity, stress, or instability) can lead to short-term physiologic and psychological adjustments that are necessary for immediate survival and adaptation, but which may come at a significant cost to long-term outcomes in learning, behavior, health, and longevity. Generally speaking, ministries of health prioritize child survival and physical well-being, ministries of education focus on schooling, ministries of finance promote economic development, and ministries of welfare address breakdowns across multiple domains of function. Advances in the biological and social sciences offer a unifying framework for generating significant societal benefits by catalyzing greater synergy across these policy sectors. This synergy could inform more effective and efficient investments both to increase the survival of children born under adverse circumstances and to improve life outcomes for those who live beyond the early childhood period yet face high risks for diminished life prospects.

  7. Development of computational small animal models and their applications in preclinical imaging and therapy research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Tianwu [Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva 4 CH-1211 (Switzerland); Zaidi, Habib, E-mail: habib.zaidi@hcuge.ch [Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva 4 CH-1211 (Switzerland); Geneva Neuroscience Center, Geneva University, Geneva CH-1205 (Switzerland); Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen 9700 RB (Netherlands)

    2016-01-15

    The development of multimodality preclinical imaging techniques and the rapid growth of realistic computer simulation tools have promoted the construction and application of computational laboratory animal models in preclinical research. Since the early 1990s, over 120 realistic computational animal models have been reported in the literature and used as surrogates to characterize the anatomy of actual animals for the simulation of preclinical studies involving the use of bioluminescence tomography, fluorescence molecular tomography, positron emission tomography, single-photon emission computed tomography, microcomputed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and optical imaging. Other applications include electromagnetic field simulation, ionizing and nonionizing radiation dosimetry, and the development and evaluation of new methodologies for multimodality image coregistration, segmentation, and reconstruction of small animal images. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the history and fundamental technologies used for the development of computational small animal models with a particular focus on their application in preclinical imaging as well as nonionizing and ionizing radiation dosimetry calculations. An overview of the overall process involved in the design of these models, including the fundamental elements used for the construction of different types of computational models, the identification of original anatomical data, the simulation tools used for solving various computational problems, and the applications of computational animal models in preclinical research. The authors also analyze the characteristics of categories of computational models (stylized, voxel-based, and boundary representation) and discuss the technical challenges faced at the present time as well as research needs in the future.

  8. The Food Production Environment and the Development of Antimicrobial Resistance in Human Pathogens of Animal Origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekshmi, Manjusha; Ammini, Parvathi; Kumar, Sanath; Varela, Manuel F

    2017-03-14

    Food-borne pathogens are a serious human health concern worldwide, and the emergence of antibiotic-resistant food pathogens has further confounded this problem. Once-highly-efficacious antibiotics are gradually becoming ineffective against many important pathogens, resulting in severe treatment crises. Among several reasons for the development and spread of antimicrobial resistance, their overuse in animal food production systems for purposes other than treatment of infections is prominent. Many pathogens of animals are zoonotic, and therefore any development of resistance in pathogens associated with food animals can spread to humans through the food chain. Human infections by antibiotic-resistant pathogens such as Campylobacter spp., Salmonella spp., Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus are increasing. Considering the human health risk due to emerging antibiotic resistance in food animal-associated bacteria, many countries have banned the use of antibiotic growth promoters and the application in animals of antibiotics critically important in human medicine. Concerted global efforts are necessary to minimize the use of antimicrobials in food animals in order to control the development of antibiotic resistance in these systems and their spread to humans via food and water.

  9. 77 FR 18251 - Development of Animal Models of Pregnancy To Address Medical Countermeasures for Influenza in the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Development of Animal Models of Pregnancy To Address Medical... Research are announcing a 2-day public workshop entitled ``Development of Animal Models of Pregnancy To... challenges in the development of animal models of pregnancy that can be used to address the safety and...

  10. Resistance to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis development in Lewis rats from a conventional animal facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Fernanda Gonçalves Zorzella

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE is an inflammatory disease of the brain and spinal cord that is mediated by CD4+ T lymphocytes specific to myelin components. In this study we compared development of EAE in Lewis rats from two colonies, one kept in pathogen-free conditions (CEMIB colony and the other (Botucatu colony kept in a conventional animal facility. Female Lewis rats were immunized with 100 µl of an emulsion containing 50 µg of myelin, associated with incomplete Freund's adjuvant plus Mycobacterium butyricum. Animals were daily evaluated for clinical score and weight. CEMIB colony presented high EAE incidence with clinical scores that varied from three to four along with significant weight losses. A variable disease incidence was observed in the Botucatu colony with clinical scores not higher than one and no weight loss. Immunological and histopathological characteristics were also compared after 20 days of immunization. Significant amounts of IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha and IL-10 were induced by myelin in cultures from CEMIB animals but not from the Botucatu colony. Significantly higher levels of anti-myelin IgG1 were detected in the CEMIB colony. Clear histopathological differences were also found. Cervical spinal cord sections from CEMIB animals showed typical perivascular inflammatory foci whereas samples from the Botucatu colony showed a scanty inflammatory infiltration. Helminths were found in animals from Botucatu colony but not, as expected, in the CEMIB pathogen-free animals. As the animals maintained in a conventional animal facility developed a very discrete clinical, and histopathological EAE in comparison to the rats kept in pathogen-free conditions, we believe that environmental factors such as intestinal parasites could underlie this resistance to EAE development, supporting the applicability of the hygiene hypothesis to EAE.

  11. Development and Validation of a Scale to Assess Students' Attitude towards Animal Welfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazas, Beatriz; Rosario Fernández Manzanal, Mª; Zarza, Francisco Javier; Adolfo María, Gustavo

    2013-07-01

    This work presents the development of a scale of attitudes of secondary-school and university students towards animal welfare. A questionnaire was drawn up following a Likert-type scale attitude assessment model. Four components or factors, which globally measure animal welfare, are proposed to define the object of the attitude. The components are animal abuse for pleasure or due to ignorance (C1), leisure with animals (C2), farm animals (C3) and animal abandonment (C4). The final version of the questionnaire contains 29 items that are evenly distributed among the four components indicated, guaranteeing that each component is one-dimensional. A sample of 329 students was used to validate the scale. These students were aged between 11 and 25, and were from secondary schools in Aragon and the University in Zaragoza (Aragon's main and largest city, located in NE Spain). The scale shows good internal reliability, with a Cronbach's alpha value of 0.74. The questionnaire was later given to 1,007 students of similar levels and ages to the sample used in the validation, the results of which are presented in this study. The most relevant results show significant differences in gender and level of education in some of the components of the scale, observing that women and university students rate animal welfare more highly.

  12. Animal Research Practices and Doctoral Student Identity Development in a Scientific Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holley, Karri

    2009-01-01

    This article examines doctoral student identity development in regard to engagement with research practices. Using animal research as a contextual lens, it considers how students develop an identity congruent to their perception of the community which facilitates their social and cognitive activities. The shared, interpretive understanding among…

  13. Intact fetal ovarian cord formation promotes mouse oocyte survival and development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pera Renee

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Female reproductive potential, or the ability to propagate life, is limited in mammals with the majority of oocytes lost before birth. In mice, surviving perinatal oocytes are enclosed in ovarian follicles for subsequent oocyte development and function in the adult. Before birth, fetal germ cells of both sexes develop in clusters, or germline cysts, in the undifferentiated gonad. Upon sex determination of the fetal gonad, germ cell cysts become organized into testicular or ovarian cord-like structures and begin to interact with gonadal somatic cells. Although germline cysts and testicular cords are required for spermatogenesis, the role of cyst and ovarian cord formation in mammalian oocyte development and female fertility has not been determined. Results Here, we examine whether intact fetal ovarian germ and somatic cell cord structures are required for oocyte development using mouse gonad re-aggregation and transplantation to disrupt gonadal organization. We observed that germ cells from disrupted female gonad prior to embryonic day e13.5 completed prophase I of meiosis but did not survive following transplantation. Furthermore, re-aggregated ovaries from e13.5 to e15.5 developed with a reduced number of oocytes. Oocyte loss occurred before follicle formation and was associated with an absence of ovarian cord structure and ovary disorganization. However, disrupted ovaries from e16.5 or later were resistant to the re-aggregation impairment and supported robust oocyte survival and development in follicles. Conclusions Thus, we demonstrate a critical window of oocyte development from e13.5 to e16.5 in the intact fetal mouse ovary, corresponding to the establishment of ovarian cord structure, which promotes oocyte interaction with neighboring ovarian somatic granulosa cells before birth and imparts oocytes with competence to survive and develop in follicles. Because germline cyst and ovarian cord structures are conserved in the

  14. Cholesterol Effect on Survival and Development of Larval Mud Crab Scylla serrata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUHAMMAD AGUS SUPRAYUDI

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of cholesterol on the survival and development of larval mud crab Scylla serrata were examined by feeding larvae with Artemia enriched with different level of cholesterol. Artemia enriched with four stated levels of cholesterol i.e., 0, 5, 10, and 20 ul/l (Chol 0, 5, 10, and 20. All treatments were mixed with DHA70G at 25 ul/l. All the oil was adjusted to 100 ul/l by adding the oleic acid. Survival rate, intermolt period, and carapace width at the fisrt crab stage of mud crab larvae fed Chol 0, 5, and 10 were higher compared to that of Chol 20 (P < 0.05. We suggest that free sterol contained in Artemia at 1.37% was harmful to the growth performance of mud crab larvae. This study suggests that mud crab larvae required at least 0.61% cholesterol for maintaining good survival and development and therefore no need to enrich Artemia by cholesterol for the practical purpose.

  15. Post-transplant development of C1q-positive HLA antibodies and kidney graft survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Antonina; Poggi, Elvira; Ozzella, Giuseppina; Adorno, Domenico

    2013-01-01

    The development of de novo human leukocyte antigen (HLA) donor specific antibodies (DSA), detected by both cytotoxic or solid phase assays, was considered the major risk factor for allograft failure in kidney transplantation. However, it was shown that not all patients with persistent production of DSA suffered loss of their grafts. Modified Luminex-Single Antigen assays, able to identify C1q-fixing antibodies, represent a new strategy in assessing the clinical relevance of detected DSA. This study demonstrated that C1q-fixing capability of de novo DSA is a clinically relevant marker of worse outcome and inferior graft survival in kidney transplantation. In fact, our findings evidenced a very low graft survival only in the patients who developed DSA able to fix C1q during post-transplant course, while patients producing C1q-negative DSA had good graft survival, which was comparable to that found in our previous study for DSA-negative patients. Moreover, anti-HLA class II antibodies had a higher incidence than anti-HLA class I, and the ability to fix C1q was significantly more frequent among anti-DQ DSA than anti-DR DSA. Monitoring of de novo C1q-DSA production represents a useful, non-invasive tool for risk stratification and prediction of graft outcome in kidney transplantation.

  16. OIE involvement in aquatic animal welfare: the need for development of guidelines based on welfare for farming, transport and slaughter purposes in aquatic animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Håstein, Tore

    2007-01-01

    Globally there has been increasing agreement that aquatic animals are entitled to certain welfare considerations and standards. This trend will most likely grow stronger in the years to come. The World Animal Health Organisation (OIE) has realised that animal welfare issues are receiving increased public attention by governments as well as non-governmental and consumer organisations. Animal welfare was identified as a priority in the 2001-2005 OIE Strategic Plan. OIE Member Countries decided that the OIE must provide international leadership on animal welfare. Animal protection includes important scientific, ethical, economic and political dimensions and thus a need to establish guidelines in the field of welfare. The OIE established a permanent Working Group on Animal Welfare (2002) to coordinate and manage animal welfare activities. It was indicated that the welfare of animals used in agriculture and aquaculture should be prioritized and that the development of policies and guiding principles on transportation, humane slaughter and killing for disease control purposes was a primary task. Thus, the OIE established two ad hoc Groups to draft the guiding principles on the humane slaughter of fish for human consumption, killing fish for disease control purposes, and land and sea transport based on the generic OIE guiding principles and policies for animal welfare. Below, the scope and development of these Guidelines, the OIE guiding principles for the welfare of aquatic animals as well as the OIE in house procedures for the approval of a set of guidelines to be incorporated into the OIE Aquatic Animal Health Code will be described in more detail.

  17. Survival and development of lake herring (Coregonus artedii) eggs at various incubation temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colby, Peter J.; Brooke, L.T.; Lindsey, C.C.; Woods, C.S.

    1970-01-01

    Lake herring eggs stripped and fertilized from a local stock were incubated in a constant-flow incubator at constant temperatures ranging from 0 to 12.1° C. Rate of development, percentage survival, percentage of abnormal and normal hatching, and length of fry at hatching were determined. The average incubation time from fertilization to 50% hatch varied from 37 days at 9.9-10.3° C to 236 days at 0.5° C. The optimum temperature range for normal development was approximately 2 to 8° C. Eggs incubated at 0 and 12.1° C developed but did not hatch. Mortality was high among eggs incubated at 0.5 and 10.0° C. Most of the mortalities came during the early stages of development. The incidence of abnormalities was highest among fry hatched at 10° C, and was high in the one incubation series in which the eggs were rolled because of a high flow rate. Total length of fry at hatching decreased with increased incubation temperature. A comparison of survival and development between lake herring and whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) at various constant incubation temperatures suggests that lake herring have a higher optimum temperature (5.6 °C) than whitefish (0.5 °C) for successful development.

  18. Metastatic Spinal Cord Compression: A Survival Score Particularly Developed for Elderly Prostate Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rades, Dirk; Conde-Moreno, Antonio J; Cacicedo, Jon; Segedin, Barbara; Veninga, Theo; Schild, Steven E

    2015-11-01

    Metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) is an oncological emergency. Many elderly patients cannot tolerate intensive treatment and need individual approaches accounting for a patient's remaining lifetime. The goal of the present study was to develop a survival score for elderly prostate cancer patients with MSCC. Nine characteristics were analyzed in 243 patients: age, performance status, interval from prostate cancer diagnosis until MSCC, affected vertebrae, ambulatory status, further bone lesions, visceral metastases, time developing motor deficits, fractionation schedule. Pre-radiotherapy ambulatory status (ppriorities ranging from symptom control to prolongation of life. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  19. Intrinsic competition and its effects on the survival and development of three species of endoparasitoid wasps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Jeffrey A; Gols, Rieta; Strand, Michael R

    2009-02-09

    In natural systems, pre-adult stages of some insect herbivores are known to be attacked by several species of parasitoids. Under certain conditions, hosts may be simultaneously parasitised by more than one parasitoid species (= multiparasitism), even though only one parasitoid species can successfully develop in an individual host. Here, we compared development, survival, and intrinsic competitive interactions amongst three species of solitary larval endoparasitoids, Campoletis sonorensis (Cameron) (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae), Microplitis demolitor Wilkinson, and Microplitis croceipes (Cresson) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), in singly parasitised and multiparasitised hosts. The three species differed in certain traits, such as in host usage strategies and adult body size. Campoletis sonorensis and M. demolitor survived equally well to eclosion in two host species that differed profoundly in size, Pseudoplusia includens (Walker) and the larger Heliothis virescens (Fabricius) (both Lepidoptera: Noctuidae). Egg-to-adult development time in C. sonorensis and M. demolitor also differed in the two hosts. Moreover, adult body mass in C. sonorensis (and not M. demolitor) was greater when developing in H. virescens larvae. We then monitored the outcome of competitive interactions in host larvae that were parasitised by one parasitoid species and subsequently multiparasitised by another species at various time intervals (0, 6, 24, and 48 h) after the initial parasitism. These experiments revealed that M. croceipes was generally a superior competitor to the other two species, whereas M. demolitor was the poorest competitor, with C. sonorensis being intermediate in this capacity. However, competition sometimes incurred fitness costs in M. croceipes and C. sonorensis, with longer development time and/or smaller adult mass observed in surviving wasps emerging from multiparasitised hosts. Our results suggest that rapid growth and large size relative to competitors of a similar age

  20. The Food Production Environment and the Development of Antimicrobial Resistance in Human Pathogens of Animal Origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjusha Lekshmi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Food-borne pathogens are a serious human health concern worldwide, and the emergence of antibiotic-resistant food pathogens has further confounded this problem. Once-highly-efficacious antibiotics are gradually becoming ineffective against many important pathogens, resulting in severe treatment crises. Among several reasons for the development and spread of antimicrobial resistance, their overuse in animal food production systems for purposes other than treatment of infections is prominent. Many pathogens of animals are zoonotic, and therefore any development of resistance in pathogens associated with food animals can spread to humans through the food chain. Human infections by antibiotic-resistant pathogens such as Campylobacter spp., Salmonella spp., Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus are increasing. Considering the human health risk due to emerging antibiotic resistance in food animal–associated bacteria, many countries have banned the use of antibiotic growth promoters and the application in animals of antibiotics critically important in human medicine. Concerted global efforts are necessary to minimize the use of antimicrobials in food animals in order to control the development of antibiotic resistance in these systems and their spread to humans via food and water.

  1. The potential of tissue engineering for developing alternatives to animal experiments: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Rob B M; Leenaars, Marlies; Tra, Joppe; Huijbregtse, Robbertjan; Bongers, Erik; Jansen, John A; Gordijn, Bert; Ritskes-Hoitinga, Merel

    2015-07-01

    An underexposed ethical issue raised by tissue engineering is the use of laboratory animals in tissue engineering research. Even though this research results in suffering and loss of life in animals, tissue engineering also has great potential for the development of alternatives to animal experiments. With the objective of promoting a joint effort of tissue engineers and alternative experts to fully realise this potential, this study provides the first comprehensive overview of the possibilities of using tissue-engineered constructs as a replacement of laboratory animals. Through searches in two large biomedical databases (PubMed, Embase) and several specialised 3R databases, 244 relevant primary scientific articles, published between 1991 and 2011, were identified. By far most articles reviewed related to the use of tissue-engineered skin/epidermis for toxicological applications such as testing for skin irritation. This review article demonstrates, however, that the potential for the development of alternatives also extends to other tissues such as other epithelia and the liver, as well as to other fields of application such as drug screening and basic physiology. This review discusses which impediments need to be overcome to maximise the contributions that the field of tissue engineering can make, through the development of alternative methods, to the reduction of the use and suffering of laboratory animals. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. The effect of environment on development and survival of pupae of the necrophagous fly Ophyra albuquerquei Lopes (Diptera, Muscidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Ferreira Krüger

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of environment on development and survival of pupae of the necrophagous fly Ophyra albuquerquei Lopes (Diptera, Muscidae. Species of Ophyra Robineau-Desvoidy, 1830 are found in decomposing bodies, usually in fresh, bloated and decay stages. Ophyra albuquerquei Lopes, for example, can be found in animal carcasses. The influence of environmental factors has not been evaluated in puparia of O. albuquerquei. Thus, the focus of this work was motivated by the need for models to predict the development of a necrophagous insect as a function of abiotic factors. Colonies of O. albuquerquei were maintained in the laboratory to obtain pupae. On the tenth day of each month 200 pupae, divided equally into 10 glass jars, were exposed to the environment and checked daily for adult emergence of each sample. We concluded that the high survival rate observed suggested that the diets used for rearing the larvae and maintaining the adults were appropriate. Also, the data adjusted to robust generalized linear models and there were no interruptions of O. albuquerquei pupae development within the limits of temperatures studied in southern Rio Grande do Sul, given the high survival presented.Efeito de fatores ambientais sobre o desenvolvimento e sobrevivência de pupas de Ophyra albuquerquei Lopes (Diptera, Muscidae. Espécies de Ophyra Robineau-Desvoidy, 1830 são encontradas em corpos em decomposição, usualmente nas fases fresca, inchamento e murcha. Entre estas espécies, Ophyra albuquerquei Lopes, 1985 pode ser encontrada em carcaças de ratos e coelhos. A influência de fatores ambientais sobre pupas de O. albuquerquei não tinha sido avaliada até o momento. Desta maneira, o foco deste trabalho foi motivado pela necessidade por modelos de previsão do desenvolvimento de insetos necrófagos em função de fatores abióticos. Colônias de O. albuquerquei foram mantidas em laboratório para a obtenção de pupas. Até o décimo dia de cada mês, 200

  3. Development of Rations for the Enhanced Survival of Salmon, 1983-1984 Progress (Annual) Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, David L.

    1985-04-01

    Hydroelectric development coupled with numerous other encroachments on the supply and quality of water has reduced the natural habitat for the spawning and rearing of salmon in the Columbia river system. Artificial production in hatcheries has become a critical link in the restoration of natural stocks of salmon. Released hatchery salmon must survive predation, be able to acquire sustainable nutrients under natural conditions, possess the vitality to surmount man-made impediments to seaward migration and adapt to a sea water environment. Survival of hatchery salmonids is dependent upon a number of factors. Time of release, natural food abundance, fish size and the health and/or quality of smolts all play synergistic roles. The nutritional and physical characteristics of ration regimes for hatchery fish plays a major role in determining the effectiveness of hatchery production and the health and/or quality of smolts.Ration regimes containing high quality components in uniform and fine-free pellet forms produce efficient growth response and minimize loss of nutrients maintaining the quality of hatchery water supply. Under such feed regimes, fish are less susceptible to disease and more uniform and desirable fish sizes can be achieved at release time. High quality smolts would help to optimize out-migration survival and successful adaptation to salt water.

  4. Glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor-dependent fusimotor neuron survival during development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Jennifer; Keller-Peck, Cynthia; Kucera, Jan; Tourtellotte, Warren G

    2005-01-01

    Glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is a potent survival factor for motor neurons. Previous studies have shown that some motor neurons depend upon GDNF during development but this GDNF-dependent motor neuron subpopulation has not been characterized. We examined GDNF expression patterns in muscle and the impact of altered GDNF expression on the development of subtypes of motor neurons. In GDNF hemizygous mice, motor neuron innervation to muscle spindle stretch receptors (fusimotor neuron innervation) was decreased, whereas in transgenic mice that overexpress GDNF in muscle, fusimotor innervation to muscle spindles was increased. Facial motor neurons, which do not contain fusimotor neurons, were not changed in number when GDNF was over expressed by facial muscles during their development. Taken together, these data indicate that fusimotor neurons depend upon GDNF for survival during development. Since the fraction of cervical and lumbar motor neurons lost in GDNF-deficient mice at birth closely approximates the size of the fusimotor neuron pool, these data suggest that motor neuron loss in GDNF-deficient mice may be primarily of fusimotor neuron origin.

  5. Nematode parasites of animals are more prone to develop xenobiotic resistance than nematode parasites of plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvestre A.

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we concentrate on a comparison of plant and animal-parasitic nematodes, to gain insight into the factors that influence the acquisition of the drug resistance by nematodes. Comparing nematode parasite of domestic animals and cultivated plants, it appears that drug resistance threatens only domestic animal production. Does the paucity of report on nematicide field resistance reflect reality or, is nematicide resistance bypassed by other management practices, specific to cultivated plants (i.e. agricultural control ? First, it seems that selection pressure by treatments in plants is not as efficient as selection pressure in ruminants. Agronomic practices (i.e. sanitation, early planting, usage of nematodes resistant cultivar and crop rotation are frequently used to control parasitic-plant nematodes. Although the efficiency of such measures is generally moderate to high, integrated approaches are developing successfully in parasitic-plant nematode models. Secondly, the majority of anthelmintic resistance cases recorded in animal-parasitic nematodes concern drug families that are not used in plant-parasitic nematodes control (i.e. benzimidazoles, avermectines and levamisole. Thirdly, particular life traits of parasitic-plant nematodes (low to moderate fecundity and reproductive strategy are expected to reduce probability of appearance and transmission of drug resistance genes. It has been demonstrated that, for a large number of nematodes such as Meloidogyne spp., the mode of reproduction by mitotic parthenogenesis reduced genetic diversity of populations which may prevent a rapid drug resistance development. In conclusion, anthelmintic resistance develops in nematode parasite of animals as a consequence of an efficient selection pressure. Early detection of anthelmintic resistance is then crucial : it is not possible to avoid it, but only to delay its development in farm animal industry.

  6. The development of animal infection models and antifungal efficacy assays against clinical isolates of Trichosporon asahii, T. asteroides and T. inkin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariné, Marçal; Bom, Vinicius Leite Pedro; de Castro, Patricia Alves; Winkelstroter, Lizziane Kretli; Ramalho, Leandra Naira; Brown, Neil Andrew; Goldman, Gustavo Henrique

    2015-01-01

    The present study developed Galleria mellonella and murine infection models for the study of Trichosporon infections. The utility of the developed animal models was demonstrated through the assessment of virulence and antifungal efficacy for 7 clinical isolates of Trichosporon asahii, T. asteroides and T. inkin. The susceptibility of the Trichosporon isolates to several common antifungal drugs was tested in vitro using the broth microdilution and the E-test methods. The E-test method depicted a lower minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) for amphotericin and a slightly higher MIC for caspofungin, while MICs observed for the azoles were different but comparable between both methods. All three Trichosporon species established infection in both the G. mellonella and immunosuppressed murine models. Species and strain dependent differences were observed in both the G. mellonella and murine models. T. asahii was demonstrated to be more virulent than the other 2 species in both animal hosts. Significant differences in virulence were observed between strains for T. asteroides in the murine model. In both animal models, fluconazole and voriconazole were able to improve the survival of the animals compared to the untreated control groups infected with any of the 3 Trichosporon species. In G. mellonella, amphotericin was not able to reduce mortality in any of the 3 species. In contrast, amphotericin was able to reduce murine mortality in the T. asahii or T. inkin models, respectively. Hence, the developed animal infection models can be directly applicable to the future deeper investigation of the molecular determinants of Trichosporon virulence and antifungal resistance.

  7. Development of electronic learning courses for surgical training of animal research personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, Szczepan W; Johnson, Elizabeth J; Stephens, Matthew A; Kehler, James

    2009-09-01

    The animal research community comprises members from a wide variety of backgrounds, some of whom must learn basic surgical skills. Though demand for animal research personnel who have surgical skills is increasing, surgical training opportunities are becoming more scarce. Electronic learning or e-learning platforms can be used as an adjunct to hands-on surgical training. Course developers can adapt these e-learning courses to fit the needs of participants who have varying levels of expertise. The authors outline the steps involved in developing an effective e-learning surgical course. They also describe how to use various equipment and software products to help implement e-learning courses. Though the authors focus on developing surgical courses, course developers could apply the general steps outlined by the authors when developing any e-learning course.

  8. The evolving threat of influenza viruses of animal origin and the challenges in developing appropriate diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Polly W Y; Jayawardena, Shanthi; Poon, Leo L M

    2012-11-01

    An H1N1 subtype of swine origin caused the first influenza pandemic in this century. This pandemic strain was a reassortant of avian, swine, and human influenza viruses. Many diagnostic laboratories were overwhelmed by the testing demands related to this pandemic. Nevertheless, there remains the threat of other animal influenza viruses, such as highly pathogenic H5N1. As a part of pandemic preparedness, it is essential to identify the diagnostic challenges that will accompany the next pandemic. We discuss the natural reservoir of influenza viruses and the possible role of livestock in the emergence of pandemic strains. The current commonly used molecular tests for influenza diagnosis or surveillance are also briefly reviewed. Some of these approaches are also used to detect animal viruses. Unfortunately, owing to a lack of systematic surveillance of animal influenza viruses, established tests may not be able to detect pandemic strains that have yet to emerge from the animal reservoir. Thus, multiple strategies need to be developed for better identification of influenza viruses. In addition, molecular assays for detection of mutations associated with antiviral resistance and for viral segment reassortments should also be encouraged. Influenza viruses are highly dynamic viruses. Regular and systematic influenza surveillance in both humans and animals is essential to provide a more comprehensive picture of the prevalent influenza viruses. To better prepare for the next pandemic, we should develop some simple and easy-to-use tests for characterizing newly emerging influenza viruses. © 2012 American Association for Clinical Chemistry

  9. Low cardiac output predicts development of hepatorenal syndrome and survival in patients with cirrhosis and ascites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, A; Bendtsen, F; Møller, S

    2010-01-01

    compared to those with a higher CI (N = 16), padvanced cirrhosis and ascites seem to be related to a cardiac......OBJECTIVES: Recent studies suggest that cardiac dysfunction precedes development of the hepatorenal syndrome. In this follow-up study, we aimed to investigate the relation between cardiac and renal function in patients with cirrhosis and ascites and the impact of cardiac systolic function...... on survival. Patients and DESIGN: Twenty-four patients with cirrhosis and ascites were included. Cardiac function was investigated by gated myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) for assessment of cardiac index (CI) and cardiac volumes. The renal function was assessed by determination of glomerular filtration...

  10. No effects of GSM-modulated 900 MHz electromagnetic fields on survival rate and spontaneous development of lymphoma in female AKR/J mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansen Volkert W

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several reports indicated that non-thermal electromagnetic radiation such as from mobile phones and base stations may promote cancer. Therefore, it was investigated experimentally, whether 900 MHz electromagnetic field exposure influences lymphoma development in a mouse strain that is genetically predisposed to this disease. The AKR/J mice genome carries the AK-virus, which leads within one year to spontaneous development of thymic lymphoblastic lymphoma. Methods 320 unrestrained female mice were sham-exposed or exposed (each n = 160 animals to GSM like 900 MHz electromagnetic fields for 24 hours per day, 7 days per week, at an average whole body specific absorption rate (SAR value of 0.4 W/kg. Animals were visually checked daily and were weighed and palpated weekly. Starting with an age of 6 months, blood samples were taken monthly from the tail. Animals with signs of disease or with an age of about 46 weeks were sacrificed and a gross necropsy was performed. Results Electromagnetic field exposure had a significant effect on body weight gain, with higher values in exposed than in sham-exposed animals. However, survival rate and lymphoma incidence did not differ between exposed and sham-exposed mice. Conclusion These data do not support the hypothesis that exposure to 900 MHz electromagnetic fields is a significant risk factor for developing lymphoma in a genetically predisposed species, even at a relatively high exposure level.

  11. No effects of GSM-modulated 900 MHz electromagnetic fields on survival rate and spontaneous development of lymphoma in female AKR/J mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Angela M; Streckert, Joachim; Bitz, Andreas K; Hansen, Volkert W; Lerchl, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    Background Several reports indicated that non-thermal electromagnetic radiation such as from mobile phones and base stations may promote cancer. Therefore, it was investigated experimentally, whether 900 MHz electromagnetic field exposure influences lymphoma development in a mouse strain that is genetically predisposed to this disease. The AKR/J mice genome carries the AK-virus, which leads within one year to spontaneous development of thymic lymphoblastic lymphoma. Methods 320 unrestrained female mice were sham-exposed or exposed (each n = 160 animals) to GSM like 900 MHz electromagnetic fields for 24 hours per day, 7 days per week, at an average whole body specific absorption rate (SAR) value of 0.4 W/kg. Animals were visually checked daily and were weighed and palpated weekly. Starting with an age of 6 months, blood samples were taken monthly from the tail. Animals with signs of disease or with an age of about 46 weeks were sacrificed and a gross necropsy was performed. Results Electromagnetic field exposure had a significant effect on body weight gain, with higher values in exposed than in sham-exposed animals. However, survival rate and lymphoma incidence did not differ between exposed and sham-exposed mice. Conclusion These data do not support the hypothesis that exposure to 900 MHz electromagnetic fields is a significant risk factor for developing lymphoma in a genetically predisposed species, even at a relatively high exposure level. PMID:15538947

  12. Youth Motivation to Participate in Animal Science-Related Career Development Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, Kendra; Knobloch, Neil; Jones, Amy; Brady, Colleen

    2013-01-01

    The explorative study reported here describes youth participants in three animal science-related career development events from 2010. Variables included students' self-efficacy, task value motivation, career interests, and to what extent they utilized resources in preparation. It was concluded that all three groups were self-efficacious,…

  13. Afghanistan and the development of alternative systems of animal health in the absence of effective government

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, B.E.C.; Ward, D.E.

    2004-01-01

    This case study describes the efforts by both non-governmental organisations and United Nations agencies to develop an alternative system for delivering animal health services in Afghanistan, during a period in which there was effectively no government. The authors examine the period from the

  14. Specialty Animal Production Curriculum Guide for Vocational Agriculture/Agribusiness. Curriculum Development. Bulletin No. 1806.

    Science.gov (United States)

    University of Southwestern Louisiana, Lafayette.

    This curriculum guide was developed to aid vocational agriculture/agribusiness teachers in Louisiana in improving their instruction and to provide students with the opportunity to obtain skills and knowledge in the production of nontraditional specialty animals. The guide covers the techniques of production, management, care, and marketing of…

  15. Social, economic, and political factors in progress towards improving child survival in developing nations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lykens, Kristine; Singh, Karan P; Ndukwe, Elewichi; Bae, Sejong

    2009-01-01

    Child mortality is a persistent health problem faced by developing nations. In 2000 the United Nations (UN) established a set of high priority goals to address global problems of poverty and health, the Millennium Development Goals, which address extreme poverty, hunger, primary education, child mortality, maternal health, infectious diseases, environmental sustainability, and partnerships for development. Goal 4 aims to reduce by two thirds, between 2000 and 2015, the under-five mortality rate in developing countries. In sub-Saharan Africa from 2000 to 2006 these rates have only been reduced from 167 per 1,000 live births to 157, and 27 nations in this region have made no progress towards the goal. A country-specific database was developed from the UN Millennium Development Goal tracking project and other international sources which include age distribution, under-nutrition, per capita income, government expenditures on health, external resources for health, civil liberties, and political rights. A multiple regression analysis examined the extent to which these factors explain the variance in child mortality rates in developing countries. Nutrition, external resources, and per capita income were shown to be significant factors in child survivability. Policy options include developed countries' renewed commitment of resources, and developing nations' commitments towards governance, development, equity, and transparency.

  16. Development of a model to predict breast cancer survival using data from the National Cancer Data Base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asare, Elliot A; Liu, Lei; Hess, Kenneth R; Gordon, Elisa J; Paruch, Jennifer L; Palis, Bryan; Dahlke, Allison R; McCabe, Ryan; Cohen, Mark E; Winchester, David P; Bilimoria, Karl Y

    2016-02-01

    With the large amounts of data on patient, tumor, and treatment factors available to clinicians, it has become critically important to harness this information to guide clinicians in discussing a patient's prognosis. However, no widely accepted survival calculator is available that uses national data and includes multiple prognostic factors. Our objective was to develop a model for predicting survival among patients diagnosed with breast cancer using the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) to serve as a prototype for the Commission on Cancer's "Cancer Survival Prognostic Calculator." A retrospective cohort of patients diagnosed with breast cancer (2003-2006) in the NCDB was included. A multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression model to predict overall survival was developed. Model discrimination by 10-fold internal cross-validation and calibration was assessed. There were 296,284 patients for model development and internal validation. The c-index for the 10-fold cross-validation ranged from 0.779 to 0.788 after inclusion of all available pertinent prognostic factors. A plot of the observed versus predicted 5 year overall survival showed minimal deviation from the reference line. This breast cancer survival prognostic model to be used as a prototype for building the Commission on Cancer's "Cancer Survival Prognostic Calculator" will offer patients and clinicians an objective opportunity to estimate personalized long-term survival based on patient demographic characteristics, tumor factors, and treatment delivered. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Development of a rabbit's urethral sphincter deficiency animal model for anatomical-functional evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Skaff

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to develop a new durable animal model (using rabbits for anatomical-functional evaluation of urethral sphincter deficiency. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 40 New Zealand male rabbits, weighting 2.500 kg to 3.100 kg, were evaluated to develop an incontinent animal model. Thirty-two animals underwent urethrolysis and 8 animals received sham operation. Before and at 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks after urethrolysis or sham operation, it was performed cystometry and leak point pressure (LPP evaluation with different bladder distension volumes (10, 20, 30 mL. In each time point, 10 animals (8 from the study group and 2 from the sham group were sacrificed to harvest the bladder and urethra. The samples were evaluated by H&E and Masson's Trichrome to determine urethral morphology and collagen/smooth muscle density. RESULTS: Twelve weeks after urethrolysis, it was observed a significant decrease in LPP regardless the bladder volume (from 33.7 ± 6.6 to 12.8 ± 2.2 cmH2O. The histological analysis evidenced a decrease of 22% in smooth muscle density with a proportional increase in the collagen, vessels and elastin density (p < 0.01. CONCLUSIONS: Transabdominal urethrolysis develops urethral sphincter insufficiency in rabbits, with significant decrease in LPP associated with decrease of smooth muscle fibers and increase of collagen density. This animal model can be used to test autologous cell therapy for stress urinary incontinence treatment.

  18. Towards a sustainable livestock production in developing countries and the importance of animal health strategy therein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaasschieter, G A; de Jong, R; Schiere, J B; Zwart, D

    1992-04-01

    Livestock and animal health development projects have not always led to substantial increases in animal productivity or in farmers' welfare. Some have even resulted in unsustainable systems, when they were not based on an understanding of (livestock) production systems. The multipurpose functions of livestock and complex relationships between the biological, technical and social components require a systems approach, whereby nutrition, animal health, breeding, biotechnology knowhow, inputs and technologies are used to optimise resource use. The challenge for developed and developing countries is to reverse the current degradation of the environment, and arrive at sustainable increases in crop and livestock production to secure present and future food supplies. For rural development, governments should show long term commitment and political will to support the rural population in development programmes, because smallholders (including women and landless livestock keepers) represent a large labour force in developing countries. Different systems need different approaches. Pastoral systems must focus on effective management of grazing pressure of the rangelands. Communal rangelands management involves not only the development and application of technologies (e.g. feedlots, vaccination campaigns), but also land tenure policies, institutional development, economic return and a reduction in the number of people depending upon livestock. Smallholder mixed farms must aim at intensification of the total production system, in which external inputs are indispensable, but with the emphasis on optimum input-output relationships by reducing resource losses due to poor management. Resource-poor farming systems must aim at the improved management of the various livestock species in backyards and very small farms, and proper packages for cattle, buffaloes, sheep, goats, rabbits and poultry should be developed. Specialised commercial livestock farming systems (poultry, pigs, dairy

  19. The mych gene is required for neural crest survival during zebrafish development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Kook Hong

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Among Myc family genes, c-Myc is known to have a role in neural crest specification in Xenopus and in craniofacial development in the mouse. There is no information on the function of other Myc genes in neural crest development, or about any developmental role of zebrafish Myc genes.We isolated the zebrafish mych (myc homologue gene. Knockdown of mych leads to severe defects in craniofacial development and in certain other tissues including the eye. These phenotypes appear to be caused by cell death in the neural crest and in the eye field in the anterior brain.Mych is a novel factor required for neural crest cell survival in zebrafish.

  20. Development of a combined microSPECT/CT system for small animal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mingshan

    Modern advances in the biomedical sciences have placed increased attention on small animals such as mice and rats as models of human biology and disease in biological research and pharmaceutical development. Their small size and fast breeding rate, their physiologic similarity to human, and, more importantly, the availability of sophisticated genetic manipulations, all have made mice and rats the laboratory mammals of choice in these experimental studies. However, the increased use of small animals in biomedical research also calls for new instruments that can measure the anatomic and metabolic information noninvasively with adequate spatial resolution and measurement sensitivity to facilitate these studies. This dissertation describes the engineering development of a combined single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and X-ray computed tomography (CT) system dedicated for small animals imaging. The system aims to obtain both the anatomic and metabolic images with submillimeter spatial resolution in a way that the data can be correlated to provide improved image quality and to offer more complete biological evaluation for biomedical studies involving small animals. The project requires development of complete microSPECT and microCT subsystems. Both subsystems are configured with a shared gantry and animal bed with integrated instrumentation for data acquisition and system control. The microCT employs a microfocus X-ray tube and a CCD-based detector for low noise, high resolution imaging. The microSPECT utilizes three semiconductor detectors coupled with pinhole collimators. A significant contribution of this dissertation project is the development of iterative algorithms with geometrical compensation that allows radionuclide images to be reconstructed at submillimeter spatial resolution, but with significantly higher detection efficiency than conventional methods. Both subsystems are capable of helical scans, offering lengthened field of view and improved

  1. Chronic stress in adulthood followed by intermittent stress impairs spatial memory and the survival of newborn hippocampal cells in aging animals: prevention by FGL, a peptide mimetic of neural cell adhesion molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borcel, Erika; Pérez-Alvarez, Laura; Herrero, Ana Isabel

    2008-01-01

    each week to a stress stimulus. When evaluated in the water maze at the early stages of aging (18 months old), chronic unpredictable stress accelerated spatial-cognitive decline, an effect that was accompanied by a reduction in the survival of newborn cells and in the number of adult granular cells......In this study, we examined whether chronic stress in adulthood can exert long-term effects on spatial-cognitive abilities and on the survival of newborn hippocampal cells in aging animals. Male Wistar rats were subjected to chronic unpredictable stress at midlife (12 months old) and then reexposed......, a peptide mimetic of neural cell adhesion molecule, during the 4 weeks of continuous stress not only prevented the deleterious effects of chronic stress on spatial memory, but also reduced the survival of the newly generated hippocampal cells in aging animals. FGL treatment did not, however, prevent...

  2. Small RNAs in the animal gonad: Guarding genomes and guiding development

    OpenAIRE

    Lau, Nelson C.

    2010-01-01

    Germ cells must safeguard, apportion, package, and deliver their genomes with exquisite precision to ensure proper reproduction and embryonic development. Classical genetic approaches have identified many genes controlling animal germ cell development, but only recently have some of these genes been linked to the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway, a gene silencing mechanism centered on small regulatory RNAs. Germ cells contain microRNAs (miRNAs), endogenous siRNAs (endo-siRNAs), and Piwi-intera...

  3. Animal models of maternal nutrition and altered offspring bone structure – Bone development across the lifecourse

    OpenAIRE

    SA Lanham; C Bertram; C Cooper; ROC Oreffo

    2011-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the likelihood of offspring developing heart disease, stroke, or diabetes in later life, is influenced by the their in utero environment and maternal nutrition. There is increasing epidemiological evidence that osteoporosis in the offspring may also be influenced by the mother’s nutrition during pregnancy. This review provides evidence from a range of animal models that supports the epidemiological data; suggesting that lifelong bone development and growth in offspr...

  4. Development of a likelihood of survival scoring system for hospitalized equine neonates using generalized boosted regression modeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna A Dembek

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Medical management of critically ill equine neonates (foals can be expensive and labor intensive. Predicting the odds of foal survival using clinical information could facilitate the decision-making process for owners and clinicians. Numerous prognostic indicators and mathematical models to predict outcome in foals have been published; however, a validated scoring method to predict survival in sick foals has not been reported. The goal of this study was to develop and validate a scoring system that can be used by clinicians to predict likelihood of survival of equine neonates based on clinical data obtained on admission. METHODS AND RESULTS: Data from 339 hospitalized foals of less than four days of age admitted to three equine hospitals were included to develop the model. Thirty seven variables including historical information, physical examination and laboratory findings were analyzed by generalized boosted regression modeling (GBM to determine which ones would be included in the survival score. Of these, six variables were retained in the final model. The weight for each variable was calculated using a generalized linear model and the probability of survival for each total score was determined. The highest (7 and the lowest (0 scores represented 97% and 3% probability of survival, respectively. Accuracy of this survival score was validated in a prospective study on data from 283 hospitalized foals from the same three hospitals. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values for the survival score in the prospective population were 96%, 71%, 91%, and 85%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The survival score developed in our study was validated in a large number of foals with a wide range of diseases and can be easily implemented using data available in most equine hospitals. GBM was a useful tool to develop the survival score. Further evaluations of this scoring system in field conditions are needed.

  5. Challenges in the development of chronic pulmonary hypertension models in large animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, Abraham; Wiencek, Robert G; Davidson, Stephanie; Evans, William N; Restrepo, Humberto; Sarukhanov, Valeri; Mann, David

    2017-03-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) results in significant morbidity and mortality. Chronic PH animal models may advance the study of PH's mechanisms, evolution, and therapy. In this report, we describe the challenges and successes in developing three models of chronic PH in large animals: two models (one canine and one swine) utilized repeated infusions of ceramic microspheres into the pulmonary vascular bed, and the third model employed a surgical aorto-pulmonary shunt. In the canine model, seven dogs underwent microsphere infusions that resulted in progressive elevation of pulmonary arterial pressure over a few months. In this model, pulmonary endoarterial tissue was obtained for histology. In the aorto-pulmonary shunt swine model, 17 pigs developed systemic level pulmonary pressures after 2-3 months. In this model, pulmonary endoarterial tissue was sequentially obtained to assess for changes in gene and microRNA expression. In the swine microsphere infusion model, three pigs developed only a modest chronic increase in pulmonary arterial pressure, despite repeated infusions of microspheres (up to 40 in one animal). The main purpose of this model was for vasodilator testing, which was performed successfully immediately after acute microsphere infusions. Chronic PH in large animal models can be successfully created; however, a model's characteristics need to match the investigational goals.

  6. Assessing development assistance for child survival between 2000 and 2014: A multi-sectoral perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chunling; Chu, Annie; Li, Zhihui; Shen, Jian; Subramanian, Subu; Hill, Kenneth

    2017-01-01

    The majority of Countdown countries did not reach the fourth Millennium Development Goal (MDG 4) on reducing child mortality, despite the fact that donor funding to the health sector has drastically increased. When tracking aid invested in child survival, previous studies have exclusively focused on aid targeting reproductive, maternal, newborn, and child health (RMNCH). We take a multi-sectoral approach and extend the estimation to the four sectors that determine child survival: health (RMNCH and non-RMNCH), education, water and sanitation, and food and humanitarian assistance (Food/HA). Using donor reported data, obtained mainly from the OECD Creditor Reporting System and Development Assistance Committee, we tracked the level and trends of aid (in grants or loans) disbursed to each of the four sectors at the global, regional, and country levels. We performed detailed analyses on missing data and conducted imputation with various methods. To identify aid projects for RMNCH, we developed an identification strategy that combined keyword searches and manual coding. To quantify aid for RMNCH in projects with multiple purposes, we adopted an integrated approach and produced the lower and upper bounds of estimates for RMNCH, so as to avoid making assumptions or using weak evidence for allocation. We checked the sensitivity of trends to the estimation methods and compared our estimates to that produced by other studies. Our study yielded time-series and recipient-specific annual estimates of aid disbursed to each sector, as well as their lower- and upper-bounds in 134 countries between 2000 and 2014, with a specific focus on Countdown countries. We found that the upper-bound estimates of total aid disbursed to the four sectors in 134 countries rose from US$ 22.62 billion in 2000 to US$ 59.29 billion in 2014, with the increase occurring in all income groups and regions with sub-Saharan Africa receiving the largest sum. Aid to RMNCH has experienced the fastest growth (12

  7. Assessing development assistance for child survival between 2000 and 2014: A multi-sectoral perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunling Lu

    Full Text Available The majority of Countdown countries did not reach the fourth Millennium Development Goal (MDG 4 on reducing child mortality, despite the fact that donor funding to the health sector has drastically increased. When tracking aid invested in child survival, previous studies have exclusively focused on aid targeting reproductive, maternal, newborn, and child health (RMNCH. We take a multi-sectoral approach and extend the estimation to the four sectors that determine child survival: health (RMNCH and non-RMNCH, education, water and sanitation, and food and humanitarian assistance (Food/HA.Using donor reported data, obtained mainly from the OECD Creditor Reporting System and Development Assistance Committee, we tracked the level and trends of aid (in grants or loans disbursed to each of the four sectors at the global, regional, and country levels. We performed detailed analyses on missing data and conducted imputation with various methods. To identify aid projects for RMNCH, we developed an identification strategy that combined keyword searches and manual coding. To quantify aid for RMNCH in projects with multiple purposes, we adopted an integrated approach and produced the lower and upper bounds of estimates for RMNCH, so as to avoid making assumptions or using weak evidence for allocation. We checked the sensitivity of trends to the estimation methods and compared our estimates to that produced by other studies. Our study yielded time-series and recipient-specific annual estimates of aid disbursed to each sector, as well as their lower- and upper-bounds in 134 countries between 2000 and 2014, with a specific focus on Countdown countries. We found that the upper-bound estimates of total aid disbursed to the four sectors in 134 countries rose from US$ 22.62 billion in 2000 to US$ 59.29 billion in 2014, with the increase occurring in all income groups and regions with sub-Saharan Africa receiving the largest sum. Aid to RMNCH has experienced the

  8. Science learning at the zoo: Evaluating children's developing understanding of animals and their habitats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagoner, Brady; Jensen, Eric

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the development of new ideas about animals, habitats and the zoo amongst a sample of pupils attending ZSL London Zoo. Results indicate the potential of educational presentations based around zoo visits, for enabling conceptual transformations relating to environmental...... science. At the same time, the research highlights the vital role of existing cultural representations of different animals and habitats which are confronted by the new ideas introduced during educational visits to the zoo. Zoos
 attract
 hundreds
 of
 millions 
of
 visitors
 every 
year 
worldwide
–
many...... 
of 
them
 children.
 In
 the
 UK,
 hundreds
 of
 thousands
 of
 school
 children
 visit
 zoos
 every
 year.
 Thus,
 the
 zoo
 is
 a
 key
 institution 
for
publics 
engaging
 with 
live
 animals 
and
 environmental
 education. 
However,
 zoos
 have
 recently
 come 
under
 ethical
 criticism 
linked...

  9. The development of a screening questionnaire for childhood cruelty to animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guymer, E C; Mellor, D; Luk, E S; Pearse, V

    2001-11-01

    Childhood cruelty to animals may be a marker of poor prognosis amongst conduct disordered children. However, other than semistructured interviews with parents or children, there are no screening instruments for this behavior. The aim of this study was to develop such an instrument. In the first phase of the study, a parent-report questionnaire, Children's Attitudes and Behaviors Towards Animals (CABTA) was designed and piloted on 360 elementary school children, enabling community norms and a factor structure for the instrument to be derived. In the second phase, the questionnaire was completed by the parents of a small sample of children (N = 17) to establish its test-retest reliability. In the third phase of the study, the CABTA was completed by the parents of 19 children who had been diagnosed with either a Disruptive Behavioral Disorder or Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, and the results were compared with the outcome of a semistructured interview with parents regarding their child's behavior toward animals. The results of the various phases of the study indicated that the CABTA consists of two factors. Typical and Malicious Cruelty to animals, and is a reliable and valid tool for detecting childhood cruelty to animals. Possible use and adaptations of the CABTA as a screening instrument in clinical and community samples are discussed.

  10. The potential for improving the growth and development of cultured farm animal oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansel, W

    2003-12-15

    Previous predictions that the technologies for producing genetically engineered large animal embryos containing genes for faster growth rates, leaner carcasses, greater disease resistance and improved lactational performance would be available early in the twenty-first century have been, for the most part, realized. The animal industries have been slow to adopt these technological advances and it cannot be said that any of them are currently having great impact on animal agriculture worldwide. A major reason for this is the inefficiencies of the techniques for superovulation, ovum recovery, in vitro fertilization, nuclear transfer, cloning and embryo transfer. Although improvements in these techniques can be expected, the best hope for increasing the impact of embryo transfer technologies on the animal industries lies in developing ways to mature, harvest, store and fertilize in vitro the large numbers of primordial oocytes present in the ovaries of all farm animals. Although limited progress has been made in the culture of bovine primordial oocytes, it is clear that much more research is needed to achieve success in this important area.

  11. Domestication and cereal feeding developed domestic pig-type intestinal microbiota in animals of suidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushida, Kazunari; Tsuchida, Sayaka; Ogura, Yoshitoshi; Toyoda, Atsushi; Maruyama, Fumito

    2016-06-01

    Intestinal microbiota are characterized by host-specific microorganisms, which have been selected through host-microbe interactions under phylogenetic evolution and transition of feeding behavior by the host. Although many studies have focused on disease-related intestinal microbiota, the origin and evolution of host-specific intestinal microbiota have not been well elucidated. Pig is the ideal mammal model to reveal the origin and evolution of host-specific intestinal microbiota because their direct wild ancestor and close phylogenetic neighbors are available for comparison. The pig has been recognized as a Lactobacillus-type animal. We analyzed the intestinal microbiota of various animals in Suidae: domestic pigs, wild boars and Red river hogs to survey the origin and evolution of Lactobacillus-dominated intestinal microbiota by metagenomic approach and following quantitative PCR confirmation. The metagenomic datasets were separated in two clusters; the wild animal cluster being characterized by a high abundance of Bifidobacterium, whereas the domesticated (or captured) animal cluster by Lactobacillus. In addition, Enterobacteriaceae were harbored as the major family only in domestic Sus scrofa. We conclude that domestication may have induced a larger Enterobacteriaceae population in pigs, and the introduction of modern feeding system further caused the development of Lactobacillus-dominated intestinal microbiota, with genetic and geographical factors possibly having a minor impact. © 2015 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  12. Effects of salinity and temperature on the development and survival of fish parasites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller, H.

    1978-04-01

    In brackish water the variety of marine and freshwater parasite species is considerably reduced. The distribution in brackish water of most marine endoparasites is restricted by the salinty tolerance of their hosts, most of the parasite species are more tolerant than their hosts. The influence of salinity and temperature of nine species has been examined; first stage larvae of Contracaecum aduncum develop in 0 to 32/sup 0///sub 00/ salinity; Cryptocotyle lingua proved to be infective at salinities down to 4/sup 0///sub 00/. The greatest resistance was found in Anisakis larvae from herring Clupea harengus, which survived for more than half a year. Parasites in the fish intestines appear to be unaffected by changing water salinities, as the osmolarity in the intestines stays nearly constant. Marine ectoparasites (Acanthochondria depressa, Lepeophtheirus pectoralis) survive about three times longer than freshwater species (Piscicola geometra, Argulus foliaceus) when salinity is 16/sup 0///sub 00/. High temperature increases the effects of adverse salinities on parasites. There is evidence that none of these ectoparasitic species can develop within the range of 7 to 20/sup 0///sub 00/ salinity.

  13. Control of canine rabies in developing countries: key features and animal welfare implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aréchiga Ceballos, N; Karunaratna, D; Aguilar Setién, A

    2014-04-01

    Over 90% of human deaths from rabies worldwide are caused by dog bites. Mass vaccination, along with the effective control of dog populations, has been used successfully in industrialised countries to control this disease. A lower success rate in developing countries is due to a number of factors, including vaccination campaigns that do not cover a sufficient number of animals or reach all communities, and a wide biodiversity that increases the number of reservoirs of the rabies virus. Educational programmes are needed, which focus on the commitment involved when acquiring a domestic animal, stating clearly what is required to provide it with a good quality of life. New technologies developed in the industrialised world will not always be successful in less developed countries. Approaches must be adapted to the particular conditions in each country, taking cultural and socio-economic issues into account. Authorities must promote research on dog population dynamics, the development of non-invasive methods to control dog populations and the most efficient, stable and low-cost options for vaccination. Under the One Health model, it is hoped that dog-transmitted human rabies will be accorded high priority as a zoonosis by human health authorities, international authorities and donor agencies to support ambitious eradication goals, particularly those being set in South-East Asia. Well-designed and adequately resourced vaccination programmes, based on the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) guidelines, will have significant animal welfare benefits, due to the availability of improved vaccines (in terms of efficacy, duration of immunity, ease of administration and lower cost), advances in dog population management and the more widespread implementation of the OIE Guidelines on Stray Dog Control. Animal welfare benefits include not only the elimination of pain and suffering caused by the clinical disease itself, but also the avoidance of the indirect impact of

  14. [Assessment of efficiency of use of the developed supplement containing selenium on laboratory animals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazhenova, B A; Aslaliev, A D; Danilov, M B; Badmaeva, T M; Vtorushina, I A

    2015-01-01

    blood of control animals and was seven fold higher than that in blood of animals kept on selenium deficient diet (35.57 ± 3.36 µmol/g per 1 min) A similar dependence was established when studying the activity of glutathione reductase. It has been revealed thatthe oxidative-antioxidative status of animals from experimental groups 1 and 3 was lower than from control group and group 2. Thus, blood antioxidant activity in animals receiving diet with selenium deficiency and high dose of this trace element, was less than in the control group by 43.1 and 25.4%, respectively. Liver MDA level in animals kept on a diet with selenium deficiency exceeded the value of this indicator in the group 2 more than 1.5 fold (110.5 ± 10.70 vs. 72.5 ± 4.30 nmol/mg). When using selenium-containing supplement, this parameter decreased to the control level. In blood plasma of the animals of group 2 total antioxidant activity increased by about five times as compared with the indicators of animals kept on selenium-deficient diet, and was 25% higher than in control. Thus, the introduction of a selenium supplements in the deficient diet contributes to the development of endogenous antioxidants that suppress lipid oxidation. High biological effectiveness of supplements containing organic form of selenium has been proved.

  15. EG-VEGF Maintenance Over Early Gestation to Develop a Pregnancy-Induced Hypertensive Animal Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynaud, Déborah; Sergent, Frédéric; Nahed, Roland Abi; Brouillet, Sophie; Benharouga, Mohamed; Alfaidy, Nadia

    2018-01-01

    During the last decade, multiple animal models have been developed to mimic hallmarks of pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) diseases, which include gestational hypertension, preeclampsia (PE), or eclampsia. Converging in vitro, ex vivo, and clinical studies from our group strongly suggested the potential involvement of the new angiogenic factor EG-VEGF (endocrine gland-derived-VEGF) in the development of PIH. Here, we described the protocol that served to demonstrate that maintenance of EG-VEGF production over 11.5 days post coitus (dpc) in the gravid mice caused the development of PIH. The developed model exhibited most hallmarks of preeclampsia.

  16. Caregiver Behavior Change for Child Survival and Development in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: An Examination of the Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, John P.; Pequegnat, Willo; Ahmed, Saifuddin; Bachman, Gretchen; Bullock, Merry; Carlo, Waldemar A.; Chandra-Mouli, Venkatraman; Fox, Nathan A.; Harkness, Sara; Huebner, Gillian; Lombardi, Joan; Murry, Velma McBride; Moran, Allisyn; Norton, Maureen; Mulik, Jennifer; Parks, Will; Raikes, Helen H.; Smyser, Joseph; Sugg, Caroline; Sweat, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In June of 2012, representatives from more than 80 countries promulgated a Child Survival Call to Action, which called for reducing child mortality to 20 or fewer child deaths per 1,000 live births in every country by 2035. To address the problem of ending preventable child deaths, the U.S. Agency for International Development and the United Nations Children's Fund convened, on June 3–4, 2013, an Evidence Summit on Enhancing Child Survival and Development in Lower- and Middle-Income Countries by Achieving Population-Level Behavior Change. Six evidence review teams were established on different topics related to child survival and healthy development to identify the relevant evidence-based interventions and to prepare reports. This article was developed by the evidence review team responsible for identifying the research literature on caregiver change for child survival and development. This article is organized into childhood developmental periods and cross-cutting issues that affect child survival and healthy early development across all these periods. On the basis of this review, the authors present evidence-based recommendations for programs focused on caregivers to increase child survival and promote healthy development. Last, promising directions for future research to change caregivers' behaviors are given. PMID:25315597

  17. Multivariable model development and internal validation for prostate cancer specific survival and overall survival after whole-gland salvage Iodine-125 prostate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Max; van der Voort van Zyp, Jochem R N; Moerland, Marinus A; Hoekstra, Carel J; van de Pol, Sandrine; Westendorp, Hendrik; Maenhout, Metha; Kattevilder, Rob; Verkooijen, Helena M; van Rossum, Peter S N; Ahmed, Hashim U; Shah, Taimur T; Emberton, Mark; van Vulpen, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Whole-gland salvage Iodine-125-brachytherapy is a potentially curative treatment strategy for localised prostate cancer (PCa) recurrences after radiotherapy. Prognostic factors influencing PCa-specific and overall survival (PCaSS & OS) are not known. The objective of this study was to develop a multivariable, internally validated prognostic model for survival after whole-gland salvage I-125-brachytherapy. Whole-gland salvage I-125-brachytherapy patients treated in the Netherlands from 1993-2010 were included. Eligible patients had a transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy-confirmed localised recurrence after biochemical failure (clinical judgement, ASTRO or Phoenix-definition). Recurrences were assessed clinically and with CT and/or MRI. Metastases were excluded using CT/MRI and technetium-99m scintigraphy. Multivariable Cox-regression was used to assess the predictive value of clinical characteristics in relation to PCa-specific and overall mortality. PCa-specific mortality was defined as patients dying with distant metastases present. Missing data were handled using multiple imputation (20 imputed sets). Internal validation was performed and the C-statistic calculated. Calibration plots were created to visually assess the goodness-of-fit of the final model. Optimism-corrected survival proportions were calculated. All analyses were performed according to the TRIPOD statement. Median total follow-up was 78months (range 5-139). A total of 62 patients were treated, of which 28 (45%) died from PCa after mean (±SD) 82 (±36) months. Overall, 36 patients (58%) patients died after mean 84 (±40) months. PSA doubling time (PSADT) remained a predictive factor for both types of mortality (PCa-specific and overall): corrected hazard ratio's (HR's) 0.92 (95% CI: 0.86-0.98, p=0.02) and 0.94 (95% CI: 0.90-0.99, p=0.01), respectively (C-statistics 0.71 and 0.69, respectively). Calibration was accurate up to 96month follow-up. Over 80% of patients can survive 8years if PSADT>24

  18. Effects of Temperatures on Immature Development and Survival of the Invasive Stink Bug (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Darcy A; Ganjisaffar, Fatemeh; Palumbo, John C; Perring, Thomas M

    2017-12-05

    Bagrada hilaris (Burmeister) (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) is a non-native stink bug that feeds primarily on cole crops and wild mustards. Its invasion into desert agriculture in California and Arizona presents a conundrum between rapid pest development at warm temperatures and severe damage to cool season crops. In this study, the development and survival of B. hilaris were determined at nine constant temperatures (ranging from 20-42°C) when reared on organically grown broccoli florets. Egg hatching was greatly delayed at 20°C, and first instar nymphs did not survive at this temperature. No eggs hatched at 42°C. The highest survival rates (70.0-86.7%) of B. hilaris were observed at temperatures ranging from 24 to 35°C. The total developmental rate of B. hilaris from egg to adult increased from 0.027 to 0.066/d from 24 to 35°C, and then slightly dropped to 0.064/d at 39°C. Based on the linear model, B. hilaris requires 285.4 degree-days to complete its development. The Briere 1 model predicted the lower and upper temperature thresholds as 16.7 and 42.7°C, respectively. The optimal temperature for development (TOpt) was estimated as 36°C. According to the results, B. hilaris is well adapted to warm conditions, and temperatures of 33-39°C are well suited for B. hilaris development. Information from this study helps explain the rapid range expansion of B. hilaris across the southern United States and will be instrumental in predicting future expansion across the rest of the country and in other parts of the world. The relationship between thermal thresholds and invasion dynamics of this pest are discussed. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Invited review: Pre- and postnatal adipose tissue development in farm animals: from stem cells to adipocyte physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louveau, I; Perruchot, M-H; Bonnet, M; Gondret, F

    2016-11-01

    Both white and brown adipose tissues are recognized to be differently involved in energy metabolism and are also able to secrete a variety of factors called adipokines that are involved in a wide range of physiological and metabolic functions. Brown adipose tissue is predominant around birth, except in pigs. Irrespective of species, white adipose tissue has a large capacity to expand postnatally and is able to adapt to a variety of factors. The aim of this review is to update the cellular and molecular mechanisms associated with pre- and postnatal adipose tissue development with a special focus on pigs and ruminants. In contrast to other tissues, the embryonic origin of adipose cells remains the subject of debate. Adipose cells arise from the recruitment of specific multipotent stem cells/progenitors named adipose tissue-derived stromal cells. Recent studies have highlighted the existence of a variety of those cells being able to differentiate into white, brown or brown-like/beige adipocytes. After commitment to the adipocyte lineage, progenitors undergo large changes in the expression of many genes involved in cell cycle arrest, lipid accumulation and secretory functions. Early nutrition can affect these processes during fetal and perinatal periods and can also influence or pre-determinate later growth of adipose tissue. How these changes may be related to adipose tissue functional maturity around birth and can influence newborn survival is discussed. Altogether, a better knowledge of fetal and postnatal adipose tissue development is important for various aspects of animal production, including neonatal survival, postnatal growth efficiency and health.

  20. Reflections of testicular damage on psychosexual development in adolescent males who survived childhood malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ropponen, P; Aalberg, V; Rautonen, J; Siimes, M A

    1994-01-01

    We studied testicular growth and psychosexual development in 41 young males who had survived malignancies in childhood. The focus of the study was evaluation of the connection between the possible pathologies of these two phenomena. The size of the testicles was measured in millilitres and compared with reference values. The psychosexual development was evaluated using three approaches: the interviewer's evaluation, the patient's subjective assessment and information gained by specific questions. On the basis of the developmental theory of adolescence described by Blos, the appropriate development in each criterion was defined. Our results indicated that both psychosexual and somatic development were impaired. A significant relationship existed between testicular size and three criteria assessed by the patients: the patients who felt that their pubertal development was different from that of their peers, those who felt that their developmental failures were related to their personal medical histories, and those who did not feel that they had the ability to have sexual intercourse and/or children. The last group had significantly smaller testicles than the others. We speculate that the perception of the small size of testicles may trigger the psychological experiences of failed development, leading to narcissistic problems in adolescent development. In order to prevent these harmful consequences it will be necessary for different specialists to work together with the families and patients.

  1. Focus on the Positive: The Campaign for Child Survival. Education about Development in School and Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiPeri, Loretta

    1987-01-01

    Health measures promoted by the Campaign for Child Survival include growth monitoring, oral rehydration therapy breastfeeding, and immunization, which together form the cornerstones of the Child Survival Strategy. (CB)

  2. Development of animal models against emerging coronaviruses: From SARS to MERS coronavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Troy C; Subbarao, Kanta

    2015-05-01

    Two novel coronaviruses have emerged to cause severe disease in humans. While bats may be the primary reservoir for both viruses, SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) likely crossed into humans from civets in China, and MERS coronavirus (MERS-CoV) has been transmitted from camels in the Middle East. Unlike SARS-CoV that resolved within a year, continued introductions of MERS-CoV present an on-going public health threat. Animal models are needed to evaluate countermeasures against emerging viruses. With SARS-CoV, several animal species were permissive to infection. In contrast, most laboratory animals are refractory or only semi-permissive to infection with MERS-CoV. This host-range restriction is largely determined by sequence heterogeneity in the MERS-CoV receptor. We describe animal models developed to study coronaviruses, with a focus on host-range restriction at the level of the viral receptor and discuss approaches to consider in developing a model to evaluate countermeasures against MERS-CoV. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Development and validation of a universal primer pair for the simultaneous detection of eight animal species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Chaobo; Wang, Pingya; Zhao, Jin; Xu, Aichun; Guan, Feng

    2017-04-15

    In the present study, we developed a novel simplex PCR assay for the simultaneous detection of eight animal species, including goat, sheep, deer, buffalo, cattle, yak, pig and camel. A unique pair of universal primers was designed to target mitochondrial DNA variable regions in the eight animal species, generating, 787, 763, 563, 512, 507, 491, 455 and 385bp long fragments for goat, sheep, deer, buffalo, cattle, yak, pig and camel, respectively. The assay showed no cross-reactivity with other common domestic animals, and was validated by sequencing and enzyme digestion. Detection limit for DNA samples from the eight animal species varied between 6 and 20pg in a 20μl PCR mixture. Interestingly, the newly developed method successfully identified 170 commercial meat products, and is simple, fast, sensitive, specific, and cost-effective. Therefore, it could be used for the detection of goat, sheep, deer, buffalo, cattle, yak, pig, and camel species in foodstuffs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Survival and health benefits of breastfeeding versus artificial feeding in infants of HIV-infected women: developing versus developed world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Louise; Aldrovandi, Grace

    2010-12-01

    Infant feeding policies for HIV-infected women in developing countries differ from policies in developed countries. This article summarizes the epidemiologic data on the risks and benefits of various infant feeding practices for HIV-infected women living in different contexts. Artificial feeding can prevent a large proportion of mother-to-child HIV transmission but also is associated with increases in morbidity and mortality among exposed-uninfected and HIV-infected children. Antiretroviral drugs can be used during lactation and reduce risks of transmission. For most of the developing world, the health and survival benefits of breastfeeding exceed the risks of HIV transmission, especially when antiretroviral interventions are provided. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Minipig and beagle animal model genomes aid species selection in pharmaceutical discovery and development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vamathevan, Jessica J., E-mail: jessica.j.vamathevan@gsk.com [Computational Biology, Quantitative Sciences, GlaxoSmithKline, Stevenage (United Kingdom); Hall, Matthew D.; Hasan, Samiul; Woollard, Peter M. [Computational Biology, Quantitative Sciences, GlaxoSmithKline, Stevenage (United Kingdom); Xu, Meng; Yang, Yulan; Li, Xin; Wang, Xiaoli [BGI-Shenzen, Shenzhen (China); Kenny, Steve [Safety Assessment, PTS, GlaxoSmithKline, Ware (United Kingdom); Brown, James R. [Computational Biology, Quantitative Sciences, GlaxoSmithKline, Collegeville, PA (United States); Huxley-Jones, Julie [UK Platform Technology Sciences (PTS) Operations and Planning, PTS, GlaxoSmithKline, Stevenage (United Kingdom); Lyon, Jon; Haselden, John [Safety Assessment, PTS, GlaxoSmithKline, Ware (United Kingdom); Min, Jiumeng [BGI-Shenzen, Shenzhen (China); Sanseau, Philippe [Computational Biology, Quantitative Sciences, GlaxoSmithKline, Stevenage (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-15

    Improving drug attrition remains a challenge in pharmaceutical discovery and development. A major cause of early attrition is the demonstration of safety signals which can negate any therapeutic index previously established. Safety attrition needs to be put in context of clinical translation (i.e. human relevance) and is negatively impacted by differences between animal models and human. In order to minimize such an impact, an earlier assessment of pharmacological target homology across animal model species will enhance understanding of the context of animal safety signals and aid species selection during later regulatory toxicology studies. Here we sequenced the genomes of the Sus scrofa Göttingen minipig and the Canis familiaris beagle, two widely used animal species in regulatory safety studies. Comparative analyses of these new genomes with other key model organisms, namely mouse, rat, cynomolgus macaque, rhesus macaque, two related breeds (S. scrofa Duroc and C. familiaris boxer) and human reveal considerable variation in gene content. Key genes in toxicology and metabolism studies, such as the UGT2 family, CYP2D6, and SLCO1A2, displayed unique duplication patterns. Comparisons of 317 known human drug targets revealed surprising variation such as species-specific positive selection, duplication and higher occurrences of pseudogenized targets in beagle (41 genes) relative to minipig (19 genes). These data will facilitate the more effective use of animals in biomedical research. - Highlights: • Genomes of the minipig and beagle dog, two species used in pharmaceutical studies. • First systematic comparative genome analysis of human and six experimental animals. • Key drug toxicology genes display unique duplication patterns across species. • Comparison of 317 drug targets show species-specific evolutionary patterns.

  6. Establishment, survival, site selection and development of Leptorhynchoides thecatus in largemouth bass, Micropterus salmoides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leadabrand, C C; Nickol, B B

    1993-06-01

    Establishment, survival and distribution of Leptorhynchoides thecatus (Acanthocephala) were investigated in largemouth bass, Micropterus salmoides, fed 10, 25, or 40 cystacanths and examined at 1, 3 or 5 weeks post-infection. Worms established widely in the alimentary tracts of bass but by 5 weeks post-infection had localized in the pyloric caeca and intercaecal region. Other individuals moved to parenteral sites where they remained immature, though viable. In the 10- and 25-level exposures, establishment and survivorship in the alimentary tract were roughly proportional to the dose of cystacanths. After 1 week post-infection in the 40-level exposure class, numbers of worms in the alimentary tract decreased significantly and parenteral occurrence increased significantly. Total survival of L. thecatus appeared to be density-independent. Maturation of worms was retarded temporarily as intensity of infection increased, but by 5 weeks post-infection worms from all doses were at roughly the same stage of development within sex. The caeca and intercaecal area apparently did not differ in their suitability for maturation.

  7. Traditional products: Base for the sustainable development of Serbian animal origin products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevanović Jasna Lj.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Research results on the diversity of traditional products of animal origin from certain areas of the Republic of Serbia, provides an opportunity to become part of the sustainable quality development, which would be based on their promotion and protection of local resources. Traditional products of animal origin are different and inseparable from the local identity, typical for nation and its food culture. Through confidence-building, and protection from oblivion, the value of domestic products, had preserved trough centuries-old tradition. Nowadays, each domestic product has its own recognisable taste, representing climate of the Republic of Serbia, from which it comes. Universally accepted model of rural institutional structure does not exist. Instead it accommodates and develops in accordance to needs, possibilities and area specific characteristics. By the efficient protection rural models becomes an investment incentives and contribute to general economic and industrial prosperity of the society.

  8. The Food Production Environment and the Development of Antimicrobial Resistance in Human Pathogens of Animal Origin

    OpenAIRE

    Lekshmi, Manjusha; Ammini, Parvathi; Kumar, Sanath; Varela, Manuel F.

    2017-01-01

    Food-borne pathogens are a serious human health concern worldwide, and the emergence of antibiotic-resistant food pathogens has further confounded this problem. Once-highly-efficacious antibiotics are gradually becoming ineffective against many important pathogens, resulting in severe treatment crises. Among several reasons for the development and spread of antimicrobial resistance, their overuse in animal food production systems for purposes other than treatment of infections is prominent. M...

  9. Fear conditioning and extinction across development: Evidence from human studies and animal models☆

    OpenAIRE

    Shechner, Tomer; Hong, Melanie; Britton, Jennifer C.; Pine, Daniel S.; Fox, Nathan A.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to differentiate danger and safety through associative processes emerges early in life. Understanding the mechanisms underlying associative learning of threat and safety can clarify the processes that shape development of normative fears and pathological anxiety. Considerable research has used fear conditioning and extinction paradigms to delineate underlying mechanisms in animals and human adults; however, little is known about these mechanisms in children and adolescents. The cu...

  10. Gastric Endocrine Cell Carcinoma with Long-Term Survival Developing Metachronous Remnant Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoyuki Abe

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available A rare case of primary gastric endocrine cell carcinoma in a 79-year-old man is reported. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy showed a large Bormann’s type 2 tumour located in the middle of the stomach. On computed tomography, the gastric wall was thickened by the large tumour, and there were no distant metastases. Distal gastrectomy, lymph node dissection, and partial resection of the transverse colon were performed because the tumour involved the transverse mesocolon. The final pathological diagnosis was endocrine cell carcinoma, with tumour infiltration up to the subserous layer. Adjuvant chemotherapy was given, but metachronous remnant gastric cancer developed 2 years after surgery. Endoscopic submucosal dissection was performed for the early 0-IIc type gastric cancer, and the surgical margin was preserved. The patient has survived for 5 years after the primary surgery, remaining disease-free so far.

  11. Reproductive development and survival of Lucilia cuprina Wiedemann when fed sheep dung containing ivermectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahon, R J; Wardhaugh, K G; van Gerwen, A C; Whitby, W A

    1993-06-01

    When fed dung from sheep treated with ivermectin 24 h previously, Lucilia cuprina adults exhibited reduced survival, delayed ovarian development and reduced egg production. These effects were absent in dung produced 2 or more days after ivermectin treatment. Such transient toxicity is ideal to restrict the evolution of resistance to this drug. This situation may change if the current practice of oral treatment is replaced by a slow-release system of administering avermectins. The avoidance of coincidental evolution of resistance is critical to the long-term welfare of the Australian sheep industry as the avermectins represent an important, and as yet unexploited, insecticide for the treatment of flystrike caused by Lucilia cuprina.

  12. Gene expression signature of cigarette smoking and its role in lung adenocarcinoma development and survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Teresa Landi

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Tobacco smoking is responsible for over 90% of lung cancer cases, and yet the precise molecular alterations induced by smoking in lung that develop into cancer and impact survival have remained obscure.We performed gene expression analysis using HG-U133A Affymetrix chips on 135 fresh frozen tissue samples of adenocarcinoma and paired noninvolved lung tissue from current, former and never smokers, with biochemically validated smoking information. ANOVA analysis adjusted for potential confounders, multiple testing procedure, Gene Set Enrichment Analysis, and GO-functional classification were conducted for gene selection. Results were confirmed in independent adenocarcinoma and non-tumor tissues from two studies. We identified a gene expression signature characteristic of smoking that includes cell cycle genes, particularly those involved in the mitotic spindle formation (e.g., NEK2, TTK, PRC1. Expression of these genes strongly differentiated both smokers from non-smokers in lung tumors and early stage tumor tissue from non-tumor tissue (p1.5, for each comparison, consistent with an important role for this pathway in lung carcinogenesis induced by smoking. These changes persisted many years after smoking cessation. NEK2 (p<0.001 and TTK (p = 0.002 expression in the noninvolved lung tissue was also associated with a 3-fold increased risk of mortality from lung adenocarcinoma in smokers.Our work provides insight into the smoking-related mechanisms of lung neoplasia, and shows that the very mitotic genes known to be involved in cancer development are induced by smoking and affect survival. These genes are candidate targets for chemoprevention and treatment of lung cancer in smokers.

  13. Schinus terebinthifolius Leaf Extract Causes Midgut Damage, Interfering with Survival and Development of Aedes aegypti Larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procópio, Thamara Figueiredo; Fernandes, Kenner Morais; Pontual, Emmanuel Viana; Ximenes, Rafael Matos; de Oliveira, Aline Rafaella Cardoso; Souza, Carolina de Santana; Melo, Ana Maria Mendonça de Albuquerque; Navarro, Daniela Maria do Amaral Ferraz; Paiva, Patrícia Maria Guedes; Martins, Gustavo Ferreira; Napoleão, Thiago Henrique

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a leaf extract from Schinus terebinthifolius was evaluated for effects on survival, development, and midgut of A. aegypti fourth instar larvae (L4), as well as for toxic effect on Artemia salina. Leaf extract was obtained using 0.15 M NaCl and evaluated for phytochemical composition and lectin activity. Early L4 larvae were incubated with the extract (0.3–1.35%, w/v) for 8 days, in presence or absence of food. Polymeric proanthocyanidins, hydrolysable tannins, heterosid and aglycone flavonoids, cinnamic acid derivatives, traces of steroids, and lectin activity were detected in the extract, which killed the larvae at an LC50 of 0.62% (unfed larvae) and 1.03% (fed larvae). Further, the larvae incubated with the extract reacted by eliminating the gut content. No larvae reached the pupal stage in treatments at concentrations between 0.5% and 1.35%, while in the control (fed larvae), 61.7% of individuals emerged as adults. The extract (1.0%) promoted intense disorganization of larval midgut epithelium, including deformation and hypertrophy of cells, disruption of microvilli, and vacuolization of cytoplasms, affecting digestive, enteroendocrine, regenerative, and proliferating cells. In addition, cells with fragmented DNA were observed. Separation of extract components by solid phase extraction revealed that cinnamic acid derivatives and flavonoids are involved in larvicidal effect of the extract, being the first most efficient in a short time after larvae treatment. The lectin present in the extract was isolated, but did not show deleterious effects on larvae. The extract and cinnamic acid derivatives were toxic to A. salina nauplii, while the flavonoids showed low toxicity. S. terebinthifolius leaf extract caused damage to the midgut of A. aegypti larvae, interfering with survival and development. The larvicidal effect of the extract can be attributed to cinnamic acid derivatives and flavonoids. The data obtained using A. salina indicates that caution

  14. Development of a Salmonella cross-protective vaccine for food animal production systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heithoff, Douglas M; House, John K; Thomson, Peter C; Mahan, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Intensive livestock production is associated with increased Salmonella exposure, transmission, animal disease, and contamination of food and water supplies. Modified live Salmonella enterica vaccines that lack a functional DNA adenine methylase (Dam) confer cross-protection to a diversity of salmonellae in experimental models of murine, avian, ovine, and bovine models of salmonellosis. However, the commercial success of any vaccine is dependent upon the therapeutic index, the ratio of safety/efficacy. Herein, secondary virulence-attenuating mutations targeted to genes involved in intracellular and/or systemic survival were introduced into Salmonella dam vaccines to screen for vaccine candidates that were safe in the animal and the environment, while maintaining the capacity to confer cross-protective immunity to pathogenic salmonellae serotypes. Salmonella dam mgtC, dam sifA, and dam spvB vaccine strains exhibited significantly improved vaccine safety as evidenced by the failure to give rise to virulent revertants during the infective process, contrary to the parental Salmonella dam vaccine. Further, these vaccines exhibited a low grade persistence in host tissues that was associated with reduced vaccine shedding, reduced environmental persistence, and induction of cross-protective immunity to pathogenic serotypes derived from infected livestock. These data indicate that Salmonella dam double mutant vaccines are suitable for commercial applications against salmonellosis in livestock production systems. Reducing pre-harvest salmonellae load through vaccination will promote the health and productivity of livestock and reduce contamination of livestock-derived food products, while enhancing overall food safety. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Communities, households and animals. Convergent developments in Central Anatolian and Central European Neolithic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkadiusz Marciniak

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper intends to scrutinize striking similarities in cultural developments and social transformations in Neolithic communities in the North European Plain of Central Europe and Central Anatolia in the early phase of their development and in the following post-Eearly Neolithic period. They will be explored through evidence pertaining to architecture and the organization of space, alongside changes in settlement pattern, as well as animal bone assemblages and zoomorphic representations. Social changes, in particular a transition from communal arrangements of local groups in the Early Neolithic to autonomous household organization in the following period, will be debated.

  16. Fear conditioning and extinction across development: evidence from human studies and animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shechner, Tomer; Hong, Melanie; Britton, Jennifer C; Pine, Daniel S; Fox, Nathan A

    2014-07-01

    The ability to differentiate danger and safety through associative processes emerges early in life. Understanding the mechanisms underlying associative learning of threat and safety can clarify the processes that shape development of normative fears and pathological anxiety. Considerable research has used fear conditioning and extinction paradigms to delineate underlying mechanisms in animals and human adults; however, little is known about these mechanisms in children and adolescents. The current paper summarizes the empirical data on the development of fear conditioning and extinction. It reviews methodological considerations and future directions for research on fear conditioning and extinction in pediatric populations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Fear conditioning and extinction across development: Evidence from human studies and animal models☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shechner, Tomer; Hong, Melanie; Britton, Jennifer C.; Pine, Daniel S.; Fox, Nathan A.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to differentiate danger and safety through associative processes emerges early in life. Understanding the mechanisms underlying associative learning of threat and safety can clarify the processes that shape development of normative fears and pathological anxiety. Considerable research has used fear conditioning and extinction paradigms to delineate underlying mechanisms in animals and human adults; however, little is known about these mechanisms in children and adolescents. The current paper summarizes the empirical data on the development of fear conditioning and extinction. It reviews methodological considerations and future directions for research on fear conditioning and extinction in pediatric populations. PMID:24746848

  18. The development of simple survival prediction models for blunt trauma victims treated at Asian emergency centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Akio; Nakahara, Shinji; Chadbunchachai, Witaya

    2012-02-02

    For real-time assessment of the probability of survival (Ps) of blunt trauma victims at emergency centers, this study aimed to establish regression models for estimating Ps using simplified coefficients. The data of 10,210 blunt trauma patients not missing both the binary outcome data about survival and the data necessary for Ps calculation by The Trauma and Injury Severity Score (TRISS) method were extracted from the Japan Trauma Data Bank (2004-2007) and analyzed. Half (5,113) of the data was allocated to a derivation data set, with the other half (5,097) allocated to a validation data set. The data of 6,407 blunt trauma victims from the trauma registry of Khon Kaen Regional Hospital in Thailand were analyzed for validation. The logistic regression models included age, the Injury Severity Score (ISS), the Glasgow Coma Scale score (GCS), systolic blood pressure (SBP), respiratory rate (RR), and their coded values (cAGE, 0-1; cISS, 0-4; cSBP, 0-4; cGCS, 0-4; cRR, 0-4) as predictor variables. The coefficients were simplified by rounding off after the decimal point or choosing 0.5 if the coefficients varied across 0.5. The area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUROCC) was calculated for each model to measure discriminant ability. A group of formulas (log (Ps/1-Ps) = logit (Ps) = -9 + cISS - cAGE + cSBP + cGCS + cRR/2, where -9 becomes -7 if the predictor variable of cRR or cISS is missing) was developed. Using these formulas, the AUROCCs were between 0.950 and 0.964. When these models were applied to the Khon Kean data, their AUROCCs were greater than 0.91. These equations allow physicians to perform real-time assessments of survival by easy mental calculations at Asian emergency centers, which are overcrowded with blunt injury victims of traffic accidents. © 2012 Kimura et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  19. The development of simple survival prediction models for blunt trauma victims treated at Asian emergency centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimura Akio

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For real-time assessment of the probability of survival (Ps of blunt trauma victims at emergency centers, this study aimed to establish regression models for estimating Ps using simplified coefficients. Methods The data of 10,210 blunt trauma patients not missing both the binary outcome data about survival and the data necessary for Ps calculation by The Trauma and Injury Severity Score (TRISS method were extracted from the Japan Trauma Data Bank (2004-2007 and analyzed. Half (5,113 of the data was allocated to a derivation data set, with the other half (5,097 allocated to a validation data set. The data of 6,407 blunt trauma victims from the trauma registry of Khon Kaen Regional Hospital in Thailand were analyzed for validation. The logistic regression models included age, the Injury Severity Score (ISS, the Glasgow Coma Scale score (GCS, systolic blood pressure (SBP, respiratory rate (RR, and their coded values (cAGE, 0-1; cISS, 0-4; cSBP, 0-4; cGCS, 0-4; cRR, 0-4 as predictor variables. The coefficients were simplified by rounding off after the decimal point or choosing 0.5 if the coefficients varied across 0.5. The area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUROCC was calculated for each model to measure discriminant ability. Results A group of formulas (log (Ps/1-Ps = logit (Ps = -9 + cISS - cAGE + cSBP + cGCS + cRR/2, where -9 becomes -7 if the predictor variable of cRR or cISS is missing was developed. Using these formulas, the AUROCCs were between 0.950 and 0.964. When these models were applied to the Khon Kean data, their AUROCCs were greater than 0.91. Conclusion: These equations allow physicians to perform real-time assessments of survival by easy mental calculations at Asian emergency centers, which are overcrowded with blunt injury victims of traffic accidents.

  20. Splenectomy increases the survival time of heart allograft via developing immune tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The spleen is an active lymphoid organ. The effect of splenectomy on the immune response remains unclear. This study investigated whether splenectomy can induce immune tolerance and has a beneficial role in cardiac allograft. Methods Wistar rats were used for heart donors. The Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats designated as the recipients of heart transplantation (HT) were randomly assigned into four groups: sham, splenectomy, HT, splenectomy + HT. The survival of transplanted hearts was assessed by daily checking of abdominal palpation. At various time points after transplantation, the transplanted hearts were collected and histologically examined; the level of CD4+CD25+ T regulatory lymphocytes (Tregs) and rate of lymphocyte apoptosis (annexin-v+ PI+ cells) in the blood were analyzed by using flow cytometric method. Results 1) Splenectomy significantly prolonged the mean survival time of heart allografts (7 ± 1.1 days and 27 ± 1.5 days for HT and splenectomy + HT, respectively; n = 12-14/group, HT vs. splenectomy + HT, p Splenectomy delayed pathological changes (inflammatory cell infiltration, myocardial damage) of the transplanted hearts in splenectomy + HT rats; 3) The level of CD4+CD25+ Tregs in the blood of splenectomized rats was significantly increased within 7 days (2.4 ± 0.5%, 4.9 ± 1.3% and 5.3 ± 1.0% for sham, splenectomy and splenectomy + HT, respectively; n = 15/group, sham vs. splenectomy or splenectomy + HT, p splenectomy surgery and gradually decreased to baseline level; 4) Splenectomy increased the rate of lymphocyte apoptosis (day 7: 0.3 ± 0.05%, 3.9 ± 0.9% and 4.1 ± 0.9% for sham, splenectomy and splenectomy + HT, respectively; n = 15/group, sham vs. splenectomy or splenectomy + HT, p Splenectomy inhibits the development of pathology and prolongs the survival time of cardiac allograft. The responsible mechanism is associated with induction of immune

  1. Development of an angiogenesis animal model featuring brain arteriovenous malformation histological characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papagiannaki, Chrysanthi; Clarençon, Frédéric; Ponsonnard, Sébastien; Couquet, Claude; Maizeroi-Eugène, Franck; Bresson, Damien; Yardin, Catherine; Mounayer, Charbel

    2017-02-01

    Angiogenesis has a key role in the formation and evolution of brain arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Numerous models have been developed aiming to recreate configuration of brain AVMs. To develop an animal model sharing the same pathological characteristics as human brain AVMs. Ten pigs were divided into two groups. Five animals underwent endovascular left common carotid artery (CCA) and external carotid artery (ECA) occlusion and five animals served as controls. DSA, associated with 3D-rotational angiography, was performed at day 0 and at 3 months in both groups. The volume of the retia was calculated. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A serum levels were measured in both groups at the same time intervals. Finally, the animals were sacrificed at 3 months and the retia were harvested for pathological and immunohistochemistry examinations. At 3 months, a significantly higher rete volume was seen in group A than in group B (2.92±0.33 mL vs 1.87±0.69 mL, respectively; p=0.016). There was a trend for increased VEGF-A levels in group A at 3 months. In the occlusion group, histological findings showed significant reduction of media thickness and disrupted internal elastic lamina; immunohistochemistry findings showed strong reactivity for VEGF receptors and interleukin 6. Unilateral endovascular occlusion of the CCA-ECA results in angiogenesis triggering of the rete mirabile with both significant augmentation of the rete volume and histological evidence of pro-angiogenic stimulation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  2. Animal models to guide clinical drug development in ADHD: lost in translation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickens, Jeffery R; Hyland, Brian I; Tripp, Gail

    2011-01-01

    We review strategies for developing animal models for examining and selecting compounds with potential therapeutic benefit in attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). ADHD is a behavioural disorder of unknown aetiology and pathophysiology. Current understanding suggests that genetic factors play an important role in the aetiology of ADHD. The involvement of dopaminergic and noradrenergic systems in the pathophysiology of ADHD is probable. We review the clinical features of ADHD including inattention, hyperactivity and impulsivity and how these are operationalized for laboratory study. Measures of temporal discounting (but not premature responding) appear to predict known drug effects well (treatment validity). Open-field measures of overactivity commonly used do not have treatment validity in human populations. A number of animal models have been proposed that simulate the symptoms of ADHD. The most commonly used are the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) and the 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned (6-OHDA) animals. To date, however, the SHR lacks treatment validity, and the effects of drugs on symptoms of impulsivity and inattention have not been studied extensively in 6-OHDA-lesioned animals. At the present stage of development, there are no in vivo models of proven effectiveness for examining and selecting compounds with potential therapeutic benefit in ADHD. However, temporal discounting is an emerging theme in theories of ADHD, and there is good evidence of increased value of delayed reward following treatment with stimulant drugs. Therefore, operant behaviour paradigms that measure the effects of drugs in situations of delayed reinforcement, whether in normal rats or selected models, show promise for the future. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed issue on Translational Neuropharmacology. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2011.164.issue-4 PMID:21480864

  3. Survival after resection of perihilar cholangiocarcinoma-development and external validation of a prognostic nomogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groot Koerkamp, B; Wiggers, J K; Gonen, M; Doussot, A; Allen, P J; Besselink, M G H; Blumgart, L H; Busch, O R C; D'Angelica, M I; DeMatteo, R P; Gouma, D J; Kingham, T P; van Gulik, T M; Jarnagin, W R

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to derive and validate a prognostic nomogram to predict disease-specific survival (DSS) after a curative intent resection of perihilar cholangiocarcinoma (PHC). A nomogram was developed from 173 patients treated at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC), New York, USA. The nomogram was externally validated in 133 patients treated at the Academic Medical Center (AMC), Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Prognostic accuracy was assessed with concordance estimates and calibration, and compared with the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) staging system. The nomogram will be available as web-based calculator at mskcc.org/nomograms. For all 306 patients, the median overall survival (OS) was 40 months and the median DSS 41 months. Median follow-up for patients alive at last follow-up was 48 months. Lymph node involvement, resection margin status, and tumor differentiation were independent prognostic factors in the derivation cohort (MSKCC). A nomogram with these prognostic factors had a concordance index of 0.73 compared with 0.66 for the AJCC staging system. In the validation cohort (AMC), the concordance index was 0.72, compared with 0.60 for the AJCC staging system. Calibration was good in the derivation cohort; in the validation cohort patients had a better median DSS than predicted by the model. The proposed nomogram to predict DSS after curative intent resection of PHC had a better prognostic accuracy than the AJCC staging system. Calibration was suboptimal because DSS differed between the two institutions. The nomogram can inform patients and physicians, guide shared decision making for adjuvant therapy, and stratify patients in future randomized, controlled trials. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Modeling the development of drug addiction in male and female animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Wendy J

    2017-06-15

    An increasing emphasis has been placed on the development and use of animal models of addiction that capture defining features of human drug addiction, including escalation/binge drug use, enhanced motivation for the drug, preference for the drug over other reward options, use despite negative consequences, and enhanced drug-seeking/relapse vulnerability. The need to examine behavior in both males and females has also become apparent given evidence demonstrating that the addiction process occurs differently in males and females. This review discusses the procedures that are used to model features of addiction in animals, as well as factors that influence their development. Individual differences are also discussed, with a particular focus on sex differences. While no one procedure consistently produces all characteristics, different models have been developed to focus on certain characteristics. A history of escalating/binge patterns of use appears to be critical for producing other features characteristic of addiction, including an enhanced motivation for the drug, enhanced drug seeking, and use despite negative consequences. These characteristics tend to emerge over abstinence, and appear to increase rather than decrease in magnitude over time. In females, these characteristics develop sooner during abstinence and/or following less drug exposure as compared to males, and for psychostimulant addiction, may require estradiol. Although preference for the drug over other reward options has been demonstrated in non-human primates, it has been more difficult to establish in rats. Future research is needed to define the parameters that optimally induce each of these features of addiction in the majority of animals. Such models are essential for advancing our understanding of human drug addiction and its treatment in men and women. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Development of a participatory tool for the evaluation of Village Animal Health Workers in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calba, Clementine; Ponsich, Aurelia; Nam, Sophorn; Collineau, Lucie; Min, Sophoan; Thonnat, Jerome; Goutard, Flavie Luce

    2014-06-01

    In countries with a lack of primary care systems, health workers are of crucial importance to improving the delivery of health and animal health services at community level. But somehow they are rarely evaluated and usually with a top-down approach. This is the case in Cambodia, where thousands of Village Animal Health Workers (VAHWs) have been trained by the government, and where no standardized evaluation tool is available to accurately assess the situation. Based on methodology developed by the French NGO Agronomes et Vétérinaires Sans Frontières (AVSF) in Madagascar for farmers' association evaluation, we developed our own participatory methods to collect information about the VAHW context and build a criteria grid for their evaluation. In this framework, several participatory approaches were used such as problem trees, semi-structured interviews, pair-wise ranking and focus groups. The grid was built with the help of relevant stakeholders involved in the animal health system in Cambodia in order to (i) identify VAHW functions; (ii) set up criteria and associated questionnaires, and (iii) score the grid with all the stakeholders. The tool was divided into five categories of evaluation criteria: sustainability, treatment, production, vaccination and disease reporting. Our approach looked at local indicators of success developed and used by VAHWs themselves, which should lead to better acceptability of evaluation. This method gave priority to dialog aiming to engage decision makers and other stakeholders in a mutual learning process and could be applied in other countries to develop trust between health workers and official service representatives as well as to foster corrective action after evaluation. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Mammalian target of rapamycin is essential for cardiomyocyte survival and heart development in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Pengpeng [Key Laboratory of Swine Genetics and Breeding, Ministry of Agriculture, College of Animal Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Key Laboratory of Agricultural Animal Genetics, Breeding and Reproduction, Ministry of Education, College of Animal Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Department of Animal Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Shan, Tizhong; Liang, Xinrong [Department of Animal Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Deng, Changyan [Key Laboratory of Swine Genetics and Breeding, Ministry of Agriculture, College of Animal Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Key Laboratory of Agricultural Animal Genetics, Breeding and Reproduction, Ministry of Education, College of Animal Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Kuang, Shihuan, E-mail: skuang@purdue.edu [Department of Animal Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2014-09-12

    Highlights: • mTOR is a critical regulator of many biological processes yet its function in heart is not well understood. • MCK-Cre/Mtor{sup flox/flox} mice were established to delete Mtor in cardiomyocytes. • The mTOR-mKO mice developed normally but die prematurely within 5 weeks after birth due to heart disease. • The mTOR-mKO mice had dilated myocardium and increased cell death. • mTOR-mKO hearts had reduced expression of metabolic genes and activation of mTOR target proteins. - Abstract: Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a critical regulator of protein synthesis, cell proliferation and energy metabolism. As constitutive knockout of Mtor leads to embryonic lethality, the in vivo function of mTOR in perinatal development and postnatal growth of heart is not well defined. In this study, we established a muscle-specific mTOR conditional knockout mouse model (mTOR-mKO) by crossing MCK-Cre and Mtor{sup flox/flox} mice. Although the mTOR-mKO mice survived embryonic and perinatal development, they exhibited severe postnatal growth retardation, cardiac muscle pathology and premature death. At the cellular level, the cardiac muscle of mTOR-mKO mice had fewer cardiomyocytes due to apoptosis and necrosis, leading to dilated cardiomyopathy. At the molecular level, the cardiac muscle of mTOR-mKO mice expressed lower levels of fatty acid oxidation and glycolysis related genes compared to the WT littermates. In addition, the mTOR-mKO cardiac muscle had reduced Myh6 but elevated Myh7 expression, indicating cardiac muscle degeneration. Furthermore, deletion of Mtor dramatically decreased the phosphorylation of S6 and AKT, two key targets downstream of mTORC1 and mTORC2 mediating the normal function of mTOR. These results demonstrate that mTOR is essential for cardiomyocyte survival and cardiac muscle function.

  7. Effects of 17α-trenbolone and melengestrol acetate on Xenopus laevis growth, development, and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, Bryson E; Blackwell, Brett R; Faust, Derek R; Wooten, Kimberly J; Maul, Jonathan D; Cox, Stephen B; Smith, Philip N

    2013-02-01

    The synthetic growth-promoting hormones trenbolone and melengestrol acetate have been detected in the environment near beef cattle feedlots and are reportedly transported via wind-borne particulate matter. Therefore, movement of synthetic hormones from beef cattle feedlots to water bodies via particulate matter is possible. Our objective was to evaluate potential effects of 17α-trenbolone (17α-TB), melengestrol acetate (MGA), and combinations of both on growth, development, and survival of Xenopus laevis larvae. On post-hatch day 2 (stage 33/34), X. laevis larvae were exposed to three nominal concentrations of 17α-TB (10, 100, and 500 ng/L), MGA (1, 10, and 100 ng/L), a combination of both (1/10, 10/100, and 100/500 ng/L MGA/17α-TB), frog embryo teratogenesis assay-Xenopus medium, or a solvent control. Significant increases in all X. laevis growth metrics were observed among larvae in the 1 ng/L MGA + 10 ng/L 17α-TB and 10 ng/L MGA + 100 ng/L 17α-TB treatments. Stage of development was increased among larvae in the 1 ng/L MGA + 10 ng/L 17α-TB treatment group and significantly decreased among those in the 500 ng/L 17α-TB treatment. Total body mass and snout-vent length of X. laevis larvae were significantly reduced in the 100 ng/L MGA and 100 ng/L MGA + 500 ng/L 17α-TB treatment groups. Larvae exposed to 500 ng/L 17α-TB had decreased total body mass, snout-vent length, and total length. In general, growth measurements decreased with increasing concentration of MGA, 17α-TB, or a combination of both. Survival among all treatments was not significantly different from controls. Amphibians exposed to MGA and 17α-TB in the environment may experience alterations in growth and development.

  8. The utility of fecal corticosterone metabolites and animal welfare assessment protocols as predictive parameters of tumor development and animal welfare in a murine xenograft model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Kirsten Rosenmaj; Jørgensen, Pernille Schønning; Pipper, Christian Bressen

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the utility of various non-invasive parameters for the prediction of tumor development and animal welfare in a murine xenograft model in male C.B-17 SCID (C.B-Igh-1(b)/IcrTac-Prkdc(scid)) mice. The study showed that body weight, food and water consumpt......The aim of the present study was to evaluate the utility of various non-invasive parameters for the prediction of tumor development and animal welfare in a murine xenograft model in male C.B-17 SCID (C.B-Igh-1(b)/IcrTac-Prkdc(scid)) mice. The study showed that body weight, food and water...... consumption, and an animal welfare assessment (AWA) protocol revealed marked differences between control and cancer lines as the size of the tumor increased. However, only the AWA protocol was effective in predicting the tumor size and the level of fecal corticosterone metabolites (FCM). FCM levels were......, however, negatively-correlated to the AWA score, and the tumor size, both when evaluated on a given day and when accumulated over the entire period. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that body weight and food and water consumption were negatively-affected as tumor developed but only the animal...

  9. Growth and Development Symposium: promoting healthier humans through healthier livestock: animal agriculture enters the metagenomics era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, D N

    2011-03-01

    The priorities of public health and agricultural sciences intersect through a shared objective to foster better human health. Enhancements in food quality and reductions in the environmental effects of modern agriculture represent 2 distinct paths through which animal sciences can contribute to the cause of public health. Recent developments in the study of human-associated microbial communities (microbiotas), notably in association with disease, indicate that better understanding of the microbial ecology of livestock can contribute to achieving the goals of better foods and a cleaner environment. Culture-independent microbiological technologies now permit comprehensive study of complex microbial communities in their natural environments. Microbiotas associated with both humans and animals provide myriad beneficial services to their hosts that, if lost or diminished, could compromise host health. Dysfunctional microbial communities have been noted in several human conditions, including inflammatory bowel disease, obesity, and antibiotic-associated diarrhea. Examination of the mechanisms by which the human microbiota influences health and disease susceptibility can inform similar studies of host-microbe function in the animal sciences. Insights gained from human studies indicate strategies to raise not only healthier livestock, through selective manipulation of microbial communities, but also healthier humans.

  10. Animal systems in the development of treatments for Alzheimer's disease: challenges, methods, and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbagh, Jonathan J; Kinney, Jefferson W; Cummings, Jeffrey L

    2013-01-01

    Substantial resources and effort have been invested into the development of therapeutic agents for Alzheimer's disease (AD) with mixed and limited success. Research into the etiology of AD with animal models mimicking aspects of the disorder has substantially contributed to the advancement of potential therapies. Although these models have shown utility in testing novel therapeutic candidates, large variability still exists in terms of methodology and how the models are utilized. No model has yet predicted a successful disease-modifying therapy for AD. This report reviews several of the widely accepted transgenic and nontransgenic animal models of AD, highlighting the pathological and behavioral characteristics of each. Methodological considerations for conducting preclinical animal research are discussed, such as which behavioral tasks and histological markers may be associated with the greatest insight into therapeutic benefit. An overview of previous and current therapeutic interventions being investigated in AD models is presented, with an emphasis on factors that may have contributed to failure in past clinical trials. Finally, we propose a multitiered approach for investigating candidate therapies for AD that may reduce the likelihood of inappropriate conclusions from models and failed trials in humans. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Associations between several aspects of heifer development and dairy cow survivability to second lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, A

    2011-02-01

    A data set from 7,768 Holstein heifers born between 2004 and 2006, including growth rates from birth until first calving; age and body weight at insemination; and incidence of diarrhea, navel infections, and bovine respiratory disease (BRD) was used to evaluate potential associations between these factors and the odds of completing the first lactation. All heifers were raised in a contract heifer operation (Rancho Las Nieves, Mallen, Spain) and returned to their herds of origin (133 herds in total) before calving. Dates of death were provided by the Subdirección General de Explotaciones y Sistemas de Trazabilidad de los Recursos Agrícolas y Ganaderos from the Ministry of Environment, and Rural and Marine Areas of the Spanish government. At the time of analysis, 2,571 (33.1%) animals out of the 7,768 considered had died. In total, 655 (8.4%) heifers did not finish first lactation, and 31.5% of these left the herd within the first 50 DIM. Also, 4.8% of heifers aborted and were rebred. Data were analyzed using a mixed-effects logistic regression and survival analysis for dichotomous variables and a mixed-effects model for continuous ones. Incidence of diarrhea or navel infection was not associated with the chances of finishing the first lactation. Heifers that completed first lactation had a lesser average age at first calving (724 ± 2 d) than those that did not (737 ± 3 d). Heifers that reached second lactation grew (0.8 ± 0.04 kg/d) more between 12 and 65 d of age than those that did not (0.7 ± 0.04 kg/d). As conception rate decreased, chances of leaving the herd before completing the first lactation increased. The number of AI services needed per conception as a nulliparous heifer was negatively associated with survivorship to second lactation. Heifers that experienced an abortion were 2.73 ± 0.52 times more likely to leave the herd before completing the first lactation (but also calved with a much older age at first calving). Heifers that experienced 4 or

  12. Cardio-respiratory development in bird embryos: new insights from a venerable animal model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warren W. Burggren

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The avian embryo is a time-honored animal model for understanding vertebrate development. A key area of extensive study using bird embryos centers on developmental phenotypic plasticity of the cardio-respiratory system and how its normal development can be affected by abiotic factors such as temperature and oxygen availability. Through the investigation of the plasticity of development, we gain a better understanding of both the regulation of the developmental process and the embryo's capacity for self-repair. Additionally, experiments with abiotic and biotic stressors during development have helped delineate not just critical windows for avian cardio-respiratory development, but the general characteristics (e.g., timing and dose-dependence of critical windows in all developing vertebrates. Avian embryos are useful in exploring fetal programming, in which early developmental experiences have implications (usually negative later in life. The ability to experimentally manipulate the avian embryo without the interference of maternal behavior or physiology makes it particularly useful in future studies of fetal programming. The bird embryo is also a key participant in studies of transgenerational epigenetics, whether by egg provisioning or effects on the germline that are transmitted to the F1 generation (or beyond. Finally, the avian embryo is heavily exploited in toxicology, in which both toxicological testing of potential consumer products as well as the consequences of exposure to anthropogenic pollutants are routinely carried out in the avian embryo. The avian embryo thus proves useful on numerous experimental fronts as an animal model that is concurrently both of adequate complexity and sufficient simplicity for probing vertebrate cardio-respiratory development.

  13. Software Development: 3D Animations and Creating User Interfaces for Realistic Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordillo, Orlando Enrique

    2015-01-01

    My fall 2015 semester was spent at the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center working in the Integrated Graphics, Operations, and Analysis Laboratory (IGOAL). My first project was to create a video animation that could tell the story of OMICS. OMICS is a term being used in the field of biomedical science to describe the collective technologies that study biological systems, such as what makes up a cell and how it functions with other systems. In the IGOAL I used a large 23 inch Wacom monitor to draw storyboards, graphics, and line art animations. I used Blender as the 3D environment to sculpt, shape, cut or modify the several scenes and models for the video. A challenge creating this video was to take a term used in biomedical science and describe it in such a way that an 8th grade student can understand. I used a line art style because it would visually set the tone for what we thought was an educational style. In order to get a handle on the perspective and overall feel for the animation without overloading my workspace, I split up the 2 minute animation into several scenes. I used Blender's python scripting capabilities which allowed for the addition of plugins to add or modify tools. The scripts can also directly interact with the objects to create naturalistic patterns or movements. After collecting the rendered scenes, I used Blender's built-in video editing workspace to output the animation. My second project was to write software that emulates a physical system's interface. The interface was to simulate a boat, ROV, and winch system. Simulations are a time and cost effective way to test complicated data and provide training for operators without having to use expensive hardware. We created the virtual controls with 3-D Blender models and 2-D graphics, and then add functionality in C# using the Unity game engine. The Unity engine provides several essential behaviors of a simulator, such as the start and update functions. A framework for Unity, which was developed in

  14. Aequorin-based genetic approaches to visualize Ca2+ signaling in developing animal systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Sarah E; Miller, Andrew L

    2012-08-01

    In recent years, as our understanding of the various roles played by Ca2+ signaling in development and differentiation has expanded, the challenge of imaging Ca2+ dynamics within living cells, tissues, and whole animal systems has been extended to include specific signaling activity in organelles and non-membrane bound sub-cellular domains. In this review we outline how recent advances in genetics and molecular biology have contributed to improving and developing current bioluminescence-based Ca2+ imaging techniques. Reporters can now be targeted to specific cell types, or indeed organelles or domains within a particular cell. These advances have contributed to our current understanding of the specificity and heterogeneity of developmental Ca2+ signaling. The improvement in the spatial resolution that results from specifically targeting a Ca2+ reporter has helped to reveal how a ubiquitous signaling messenger like Ca2+ can regulate coincidental but different signaling events within an individual cell; a Ca2+ signaling paradox that until now has been hard to explain. Techniques used to target specific reporters via genetic means will have applications beyond those of the Ca2+ signaling field, and these will, therefore, make a significant contribution in extending our understanding of the signaling networks that regulate animal development. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biochemical, biophysical and genetic approaches to intracellular calcium signalling. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Development and characterization of a nonprimate animal model of methanol-induced neurotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eells, J.T.; Salzman, M.M.; Lewandowski, M.F. [Medical Coll. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Murray, T.G. [Univ. of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States). Bascom Palmer Eye Inst.

    1996-12-31

    Humans and nonhuman primates are uniquely sensitive to the toxic effects of methanol. The toxic syndrome in these species is characterized by formic acidemia, metabolic acidosis and blindness or serious visual impairment. Nonprimate species are normally resistant to the accumulation of formate and associated metabolic and visual toxicity. The authors have developed a nonprimate model of methanol toxicity using rates in which formate oxidation has been selectively inhibited. Methanol-intoxicated rats developed formic acidemia, metabolic acidosis and visual toxicity analogous to the human methanol poisoning syndrome. Visual dysfunction was manifested as reductions in the flash evoked cortical potential and electroretinogram which occurred coincident with blood formate accumulation. Histopathologic studies revealed mitochondrial disruption and vacuolation in the retinal pigment epithelium, photoreceptor inner segments and optic nerve. The establishment of this nonprimate animal model of methanol intoxication will facilitate research into the mechanistic aspects of methanol toxicity as well as the development and testing of treatments for human methanol poisoning.

  16. Development of locomotion after spinal cord injury in small animals – Literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréia Coutinho Facin

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injuries are common in cats and dogs and result in severe neurological deficit, which can lead to permanent loss of sensory and motor capacity. In patients with fair to poor prognoses, complementary treatments have been used to develop an involuntary and uncoordinated ambulation that resembles normal gait, commonly known as spinal locomotion or reflexive stepping. Under experimental conditions, the recovery of a rhythmic gait has been reported following complete spinal cord transection. In veterinary medicine, the development of reflex stepping is of extreme importance to the quality of life and independence of the patients, as well as the satisfaction and tranquility of the owners. The present study is a literature review about the development of locomotion after spinal cord injury in small animals.

  17. Differences in the timing of cardio-respiratory development determine whether marine gastropod embryos survive or die in hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudin-Bitterli, Tabitha S; Spicer, John I; Rundle, Simon D

    2016-04-01

    Physiological plasticity of early developmental stages is a key way by which organisms can survive and adapt to environmental change. We investigated developmental plasticity of aspects of the cardio-respiratory physiology of encapsulated embryos of a marine gastropod, Littorina obtusata, surviving exposure to moderate hypoxia (PO2 =8 kPa) and compared the development of these survivors with that of individuals that died before hatching. Individuals surviving hypoxia exhibited a slower rate of development and altered ontogeny of cardio-respiratory structure and function compared with normoxic controls (PO2 >20 kPa). The onset and development of the larval and adult hearts were delayed in chronological time in hypoxia, but both organs appeared earlier in developmental time and cardiac activity rates were greater. The velum, a transient, 'larval' organ thought to play a role in gas exchange, was larger in hypoxia but developed more slowly (in chronological time), and velar cilia-driven, rotational activity was lower. Despite these effects of hypoxia, 38% of individuals survived to hatching. Compared with those embryos that died during development, these surviving embryos had advanced expression of adult structures, i.e. a significantly earlier occurrence and greater activity of their adult heart and larger shells. In contrast, embryos that died retained larval cardio-respiratory features (the velum and larval heart) for longer in chronological time. Surviving embryos came from eggs with significantly higher albumen provisioning than those that died, suggesting an energetic component for advanced development of adult traits. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  18. Development of a Model to Predict Transplant-free Survival of Patients With Acute Liver Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, David G; Tillman, Holly; Durkalski, Valerie; Lee, William M; Reuben, Adrian

    2016-08-01

    Patients with acute liver failure (ALF) have a high risk of death that can be substantially reduced with liver transplantation. It is a challenge to predict which patients with ALF will survive without liver transplant because available prognostic scoring systems are inadequate. We devised a mathematical model, using a large dataset collected by the Acute Liver Failure Study Group, which can predict transplant-free survival in patients with ALF. We performed a retrospective analysis of data from 1974 subjects who met criteria for ALF (coagulopathy and hepatic encephalopathy within 26 weeks of the first symptoms, without pre-existing liver disease) enrolled in the Acute Liver Failure Study Group database from January 1, 1998 through June 11, 2013. We randomly assigned the subjects to development and validation cohorts. Data from the development cohort were analyzed to identify factors associated with transplant-free survival (alive without transplantation by 21 days after admission to the study). Statistically significant variables were used to create a multivariable logistic regression model. Most subjects were women (70%) and white (78%); acetaminophen overdose was the most common cause (48% of subjects). The rate of transplant-free survival was 50%. Admission values of hepatic encephalopathy grade, ALF etiology, vasopressor use, and log transformations of bilirubin and international normalized ratio were significantly associated with transplant-free survival, based on logistic regression analysis. In the validation cohort, the resulting model predicted transplant-free survival with a C statistic value of 0.84, 66.3% accuracy (95% confidence interval, 63.1%-69.4%), 37.1% sensitivity (95% confidence interval, 32.5%-41.8%), and 95.3% specificity (95% confidence interval, 92.9%-97.1%). Using data from the Acute Liver Failure Study Group, we developed a model that predicts transplant-free survival of patients with ALF based on easily identifiable hospital admission

  19. Storage condition of mulberry branches (Morus sp. in the survival, development and production of Bombyx mori L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio José Porto

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The study was carried with the objective of evaluate the survival, development and cocoons production of silkworm fed with mulberry leaves (Cultivar IZ 56/4 from branches stored in warehouse(24 hours or stored in the system of covering with wet cloth and immersion of bases in water, for a period of 72 hours. It was used a completely randomized design, with two treatments and six replications. Caterpillars fed with mulberry leaves from branches stored in the system of covering and immersion for 72 hours had conditions suitable for survival, development and production of cocoon, not differing from those who received leaves from branches stored in the warehouse.

  20. PDK1 regulates VDJ recombination, cell-cycle exit and survival during B-cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venigalla, Ram K C; McGuire, Victoria A; Clarke, Rosemary; Patterson-Kane, Janet C; Najafov, Ayaz; Toth, Rachel; McCarthy, Pierre C; Simeons, Frederick; Stojanovski, Laste; Arthur, J Simon C

    2013-04-03

    Phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 (PDK1) controls the activation of a subset of AGC kinases. Using a conditional knockout of PDK1 in haematopoietic cells, we demonstrate that PDK1 is essential for B cell development. B-cell progenitors lacking PDK1 arrested at the transition of pro-B to pre-B cells, due to a cell autonomous defect. Loss of PDK1 decreased the expression of the IgH chain in pro-B cells due to impaired recombination of the IgH distal variable segments, a process coordinated by the transcription factor Pax5. The expression of Pax5 in pre-B cells was decreased in PDK1 knockouts, which correlated with reduced expression of the Pax5 target genes IRF4, IRF8 and Aiolos. As a result, Ccnd3 is upregulated in PDK1 knockout pre-B cells and they have an impaired ability to undergo cell-cycle arrest, a necessary event for Ig light chain rearrangement. Instead, these cells underwent apoptosis that correlated with diminished expression of the pro-survival gene Bcl2A1. Reintroduction of both Pax5 and Bcl2A1 together into PDK1 knockout pro-B cells restored their ability to differentiate in vitro into mature B cells.

  1. Development of a Survivable Cloud Multi-Robot Framework for Heterogeneous Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac Osunmakinde

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cloud robotics is a paradigm that allows for robots to offload computationally intensive and data storage requirements into the cloud by providing a secure and customizable environment. The challenge for cloud robotics is the inherent problem of cloud disconnection. A major assumption made in the development of the current cloud robotics frameworks is that the connection between the cloud and the robot is always available. However, for multi-robots working in heterogeneous environments, the connection between the cloud and the robots cannot always be guaranteed. This work serves to assist with the challenge of disconnection in cloud robotics by proposing a survivable cloud multi-robotics (SCMR framework for heterogeneous environments. The SCMR framework leverages the combination of a virtual ad hoc network formed by robot-to-robot communication and a physical cloud infrastructure formed by robot-to-cloud communications. The quality of service (QoS on the SCMR framework was tested and validated by determining the optimal energy utilization and time of response (ToR on drivability analysis with and without cloud connection. The design trade-off, including the result, is between the computation energy for the robot execution and the offloading energy for the cloud execution.

  2. Maternal N-Carbamylglutamate Supplementation during Early Pregnancy Enhances Embryonic Survival and Development through Modulation of the Endometrial Proteome in Gilts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jinlong; Zeng, Xiangfang; Peng, Qian; Zeng, Shenming; Zhao, Haiyi; Shen, Hexiao; Qiao, Shiyan

    2015-10-01

    Early pregnancy loss is a major concern in humans and animals. N-carbamylglutamate (NCG) has been found to enhance embryonic survival during early pregnancy in rats. However, little is known about the key factors in the endometrium involved in the improvement of embryonic implantation and development induced by maternal NCG supplementation. Our objectives were to investigate whether NCG supplementation during early gestation enhanced embryonic survival and development in gilts and to uncover the related factors using the approach of endometrium proteome analysis with isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ). Uteruses and embryos/fetuses were obtained on days 14 and 28 of gestation from gilts fed a basal diet that was or was not supplemented with 0.05% NCG. The iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics approach was performed to explore the endometrium proteome altered by NCG supplementation. Maternal NCG supplementation significantly increased the number of total fetuses and live fetuses on day 28 of gestation by 1.32 and 1.29, respectively (P gilts. The differentially expressed proteins primarily are involved in cell adhesion, energy metabolism, lipid metabolism, protein metabolism, antioxidative stress, and immune response. On day 14 of gestation, several proteins closely related to embryonic implantation and development, such as integrin-αv, integrin-β3, talin, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase, were upregulated (3.7-, 4.1-, 2.4-, and 5.4-fold increases, respectively) by NCG supplementation. To our knowledge, our results provide the first evidence that altered abundance of the endometrial proteome induced by NCG supplementation is highly associated with the improvement of embryonic survival and development in gilts. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  3. Animal Models of Diabetic Macrovascular Complications: Key Players in the Development of New Therapeutic Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suvi E. Heinonen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a lifelong, incapacitating metabolic disease associated with chronic macrovascular complications (coronary heart disease, stroke, and peripheral vascular disease and microvascular disorders leading to damage of the kidneys (nephropathy and eyes (retinopathy. Based on the current trends, the rising prevalence of diabetes worldwide will lead to increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Therefore, novel means to prevent and treat these complications are needed. Under the auspices of the IMI (Innovative Medicines Initiative, the SUMMIT (SUrrogate markers for Micro- and Macrovascular hard end points for Innovative diabetes Tools consortium is working on the development of novel animal models that better replicate vascular complications of diabetes and on the characterization of the available models. In the past years, with the high level of genomic information available and more advanced molecular tools, a very large number of models has been created. Selecting the right model for a specific study is not a trivial task and will have an impact on the study results and their interpretation. This review gathers information on the available experimental animal models of diabetic macrovascular complications and evaluates their pros and cons for research purposes as well as for drug development.

  4. The influence of social structure on brood survival and development in a socially polymorphic ant: insights from a cross-fostering experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Jessica; Chapuisat, M

    2012-11-01

    Animal societies vary in the number of breeders per group, which affects many socially and ecologically relevant traits. In several social insect species, including our study species Formica selysi, the presence of either one or multiple reproducing females per colony is generally associated with differences in a suite of traits such as the body size of individuals. However, the proximate mechanisms and ontogenetic processes generating such differences between social structures are poorly known. Here, we cross-fostered eggs originating from single-queen (= monogynous) or multiple-queen (= polygynous) colonies into experimental groups of workers from each social structure to investigate whether differences in offspring survival, development time and body size are shaped by the genotype and/or prefoster maternal effects present in the eggs, or by the social origin of the rearing workers. Eggs produced by polygynous queens were more likely to survive to adulthood than eggs from monogynous queens, regardless of the social origin of the rearing workers. However, brood from monogynous queens grew faster than brood from polygynous queens. The social origin of the rearing workers influenced the probability of brood survival, with workers from monogynous colonies rearing more brood to adulthood than workers from polygynous colonies. The social origin of eggs or rearing workers had no significant effect on the head size of the resulting workers in our standardized laboratory conditions. Overall, the social backgrounds of the parents and of the rearing workers appear to shape distinct survival and developmental traits of ant brood. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2012 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  5. Field assessment of Bt cry1Ah corn pollen on the survival, development and behavior of Apis mellifera ligustica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Ping-Li; Zhou, Wei; Zhang, Jie; Cui, Hong-Juan; Wang, Qiang; Jiang, Wei-Yu; Sun, Ji-Hu; Wu, Yan-Yan; Zhou, Ting

    2012-05-01

    Honeybees may be exposed to insecticidal proteins from transgenic plants via pollen. An assessment of the impact of such exposures on the honeybee is an essential part of the risk assessment process for transgenic Bacillus thuringiensis corn. A field trial was conducted to evaluate the effect of transgenic Bt cry1Ah corn on the honeybee Apis mellifera ligustica. Colonies of honeybees were moved to Bt or non-Bt corn fields during anthesis and then sampled to record their survival, development and behavior. No differences in immature stages, worker survival, bee body weight, hypopharyngeal gland weight, colony performance, foraging activity or olfactory learning abilities were detected between colonies that were placed in non-Bt corn fields and those placed in Bt corn fields. We conclude that cry1Ah corn carries no risk for the survival, development, colony performance or behavior of the honeybee A. mellifera ligustica. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The development of an in vitro model for studying mechanisms of nephrotoxicity as an alternative for animal experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mertens, J.J.W.M.

    1991-01-01

    SUMMARY

    Presently in our society animal tests still form the main starting point for the assessment of the possible risks of chemicals with regard to human and animal health. For scientific. economic, and ethical reasons. attempts are undertaken continuously to develop cell models as

  7. The Future of Animals, Cells, Models, and Systems in Research, Development, Education, and Testing: Proceedings of a Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Inst. of Lab. Animal Resources.

    This volume contains the prepared papers and discussions of a National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council Symposium on the Future of Animals, Cells, Models, and Systems in Research, Development, Education, and Testing. The purpose of the symposium was to examine the past, present, and future contributions of animals to human health…

  8. Pancreatic cancer patient survival correlates with DNA methylation of pancreas development genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Michael J; Rubbi, Liudmilla; Dawson, David W; Donahue, Timothy R; Pellegrini, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic mark associated with regulation of transcription and genome structure. These markers have been investigated in a variety of cancer settings for their utility in differentiating normal tissue from tumor tissue. Here, we examine the direct correlation between DNA methylation and patient survival. We find that changes in the DNA methylation of key pancreatic developmental genes are strongly associated with patient survival.

  9. Propofol-Induced Neurotoxicity in the Fetal Animal Brain and Developments in Modifying These Effects—An Updated Review of Propofol Fetal Exposure in Laboratory Animal Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Xiong

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the past twenty years, evidence of neurotoxicity in the developing brain in animal studies from exposure to several general anesthetics has been accumulating. Propofol, a commonly used general anesthetic medication, administered during synaptogenesis, may trigger widespread apoptotic neurodegeneration in the developing brain and long-term neurobehavioral disturbances in both rodents and non-human primates. Despite the growing evidence of the potential neurotoxicity of different anesthetic agents in animal studies, there is no concrete evidence that humans may be similarly affected. However, given the growing evidence of the neurotoxic effects of anesthetics in laboratory studies, it is prudent to further investigate the mechanisms causing these effects and potential ways to mitigate them. Here, we review multiple studies that investigate the effects of in utero propofol exposure and the developmental agents that may modify these deleterious effects.

  10. Malaria in pregnancy: the relevance of animal models for vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doritchamou, Justin; Teo, Andrew; Fried, Michal; Duffy, Patrick E

    2017-10-06

    Malaria during pregnancy due to Plasmodium falciparum or P. vivax is a major public health problem in endemic areas, with P. falciparum causing the greatest burden of disease. Increasing resistance of parasites and mosquitoes to existing tools, such as preventive antimalarial treatments and insecticide-treated bed nets respectively, is eroding the partial protection that they offer to pregnant women. Thus, development of effective vaccines against malaria during pregnancy is an urgent priority. Relevant animal models that recapitulate key features of the pathophysiology and immunology of malaria in pregnant women could be used to accelerate vaccine development. This review summarizes available rodent and nonhuman primate models of malaria in pregnancy, and discusses their suitability for studies of biologics intended to prevent or treat malaria in this vulnerable population.

  11. Effect of a long-term high-protein diet on survival, obesity development, and gut microbiota in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiilerich, Pia; Myrmel, Lene Secher; Fjære, Even; Hao, Qin; Hugenholtz, Floor; Sonne, Si Brask; Derrien, Muriel; Pedersen, Lone Møller; Petersen, Rasmus Koefoed; Mortensen, Alicja; Licht, Tine Rask; Rømer, Maria Unni; Vogel, Ulla Birgitte; Waagbø, Linn Jeanette; Giallourou, Natasa; Feng, Qiang; Xiao, Liang; Liu, Chuan; Liaset, Bjørn; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Wang, Jun; Madsen, Lise; Kristiansen, Karsten

    2016-06-01

    Female C57BL/6J mice were fed a regular low-fat diet or high-fat diets combined with either high or low protein-to-sucrose ratios during their entire lifespan to examine the long-term effects on obesity development, gut microbiota, and survival. Intake of a high-fat diet with a low protein/sucrose ratio precipitated obesity and reduced survival relative to mice fed a low-fat diet. By contrast, intake of a high-fat diet with a high protein/sucrose ratio attenuated lifelong weight gain and adipose tissue expansion, and survival was not significantly altered relative to low-fat-fed mice. Our findings support the notion that reduced survival in response to high-fat/high-sucrose feeding is linked to obesity development. Digital gene expression analyses, further validated by qPCR, demonstrated that the protein/sucrose ratio modulated global gene expression over time in liver and adipose tissue, affecting pathways related to metabolism and inflammation. Analysis of fecal bacterial DNA using the Mouse Intestinal Tract Chip revealed significant changes in the composition of the gut microbiota in relation to host age and dietary fat content, but not the protein/sucrose ratio. Accordingly, dietary fat rather than the protein/sucrose ratio or adiposity is a major driver shaping the gut microbiota, whereas the effect of a high-fat diet on survival is dependent on the protein/sucrose ratio. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  12. From experimental zoology to big data: Observation and integration in the study of animal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolker, Jessica; Brauckmann, Sabine

    2015-06-01

    The founding of the Journal of Experimental Zoology in 1904 was inspired by a widespread turn toward experimental biology in the 19th century. The founding editors sought to promote experimental, laboratory-based approaches, particularly in developmental biology. This agenda raised key practical and epistemological questions about how and where to study development: Does the environment matter? How do we know that a cell or embryo isolated to facilitate observation reveals normal developmental processes? How can we integrate descriptive and experimental data? R.G. Harrison, the journal's first editor, grappled with these questions in justifying his use of cell culture to study neural patterning. Others confronted them in different contexts: for example, F.B. Sumner insisted on the primacy of fieldwork in his studies on adaptation, but also performed breeding experiments using wild-collected animals. The work of Harrison, Sumner, and other early contributors exemplified both the power of new techniques, and the meticulous explanation of practice and epistemology that was marshaled to promote experimental approaches. A century later, experimentation is widely viewed as the standard way to study development; yet at the same time, cutting-edge "big data" projects are essentially descriptive, closer to natural history than to the approaches championed by Harrison et al. Thus, the original questions about how and where we can best learn about development are still with us. Examining their history can inform current efforts to incorporate data from experiment and description, lab and field, and a broad range of organisms and disciplines, into an integrated understanding of animal development. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Zinc and copper in animal feed – development of resistance and co-resistance to antimicrobial agents in bacteria of animal origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siamak Yazdankhah

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Farmed animals such as pig and poultry receive additional Zn and Cu in their diets due to supplementing elements in compound feed as well as medical remedies. Enteral bacteria in farmed animals are shown to develop resistance to trace elements such as Zn and Cu. Resistance to Zn is often linked with resistance to methicillin in staphylococci, and Zn supplementation to animal feed may increase the proportion of multiresistant E. coli in the gut. Resistance to Cu in bacteria, in particular enterococci, is often associated with resistance to antimicrobial drugs like macrolides and glycopeptides (e.g. vancomycin. Such resistant bacteria may be transferred from the food-producing animals to humans (farmers, veterinarians, and consumers. Data on dose-response relation for Zn/Cu exposure and resistance are lacking; however, it seems more likely that a resistance-driven effect occurs at high trace element exposure than at more basal exposure levels. There is also lack of data which could demonstrate whether Zn/Cu-resistant bacteria may acquire antibiotic resistance genes/become antibiotics resistant, or if antibiotics-resistant bacteria are more capable to become Zn/Cu resistant than antibiotics-susceptible bacteria. Further research is needed to elucidate the link between Zn/Cu and antibiotic resistance in bacteria.

  14. Temperature- and age-dependent survival, development, and oviposition rates of the pupal parasitoid Spalangia cameroni (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgård, Henrik; Nachman, Gösta

    2016-01-01

    The combined effect of temperature and age on development, survival, attack rate, and oviposition of the parasitoid Spalangia cameroni (Perkins) (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) exploiting house fly pupae was investigated by conducting life-table experiments at 15, 20, 25, 30 and 35°C. Temperature had...

  15. Effect of a long-term high-protein diet on survival, obesity development, and gut microbiota in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiilerich, Pia; Myrmel, Lene Secher; Fjære, Even; Hao, Qin; Hugenholtz, Floor; Sonne, Si Brask; Derrien, Muriel; Pedersen, Lone Møller; Petersen, Rasmus Koefoed; Mortensen, Alicja; Licht, Tine Rask; Rømer, Maria Unni; Vogel, Ulla Birgitte; Waagbø, Linn Jeanette; Giallourou, Natasa; Feng, Qiang; Xiao, Liang; Liu, Chuan; Liaset, Bjørn; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Wang, Jun; Madsen, Lise; Kristiansen, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    Female C57BL/6J mice were fed a regular low-fat diet or high-fat diets combined with either high or low protein-to-sucrose ratios during their entire lifespan to examine the long-term effects on obesity development, gut microbiota, and survival. Intake of a high-fat diet with a low

  16. [Well-being--intrinsic value--integrity. Developments in the reevaluation of the domesticated animal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grommers, F J; Rutgers, L J; Wijsmuller, J M

    1995-09-01

    Owing to selective breeding and conditioning to husbandry methods, domestication has resulted in modification of the anatomy, physiology, and behaviour of animals. Nevertheless, domestic animals cannot be regarded and treated as artificial products. Public interest and concern about the welfare of domestic animals has led to the recognition of the intrinsic value of animals and, in extension of this, to the ethical principle of respect for the integrity of animals. The sensibility and acceptance of these principles by those involved in ethical decision-making depends on their fundamental views about humans and the living world. In order to make judgements about the use of, and interference with, animals, it is desirable to clarify these personal views. The principle of respect for the integrity of animals leads to considerations and arguments beyond animal health and welfare. This is shown by three examples: declawing of cats, caesarean section in cattle, and laying hens in battery cages.

  17. Mechanical forces as information: an integrated approach to plant and animal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Hernández, Valeria; Rueda, Denisse; Caballero, Lorena; Alvarez-Buylla, Elena R; Benítez, Mariana

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical forces such as tension and compression act throughout growth and development of multicellular organisms. These forces not only affect the size and shape of the cells and tissues but are capable of modifying the expression of genes and the localization of molecular components within the cell, in the plasma membrane, and in the plant cell wall. The magnitude and direction of these physical forces change with cellular and tissue properties such as elasticity. Thus, mechanical forces and the mesoscopic fields that emerge from their local action constitute important sources of positional information. Moreover, physical and biochemical processes interact in non-linear ways during tissue and organ growth in plants and animals. In this review we discuss how such mechanical forces are generated, transmitted, and sensed in these two lineages of multicellular organisms to yield long-range positional information. In order to do so we first outline a potentially common basis for studying patterning and mechanosensing that relies on the structural principle of tensegrity, and discuss how tensegral structures might arise in plants and animals. We then provide some examples of morphogenesis in which mechanical forces appear to act as positional information during development, offering a possible explanation for ubiquitous processes, such as the formation of periodic structures. Such examples, we argue, can be interpreted in terms of tensegral phenomena. Finally, we discuss the hypothesis of mechanically isotropic points as a potentially generic mechanism for the localization and maintenance of stem-cell niches in multicellular organisms. This comparative approach aims to help uncovering generic mechanisms of morphogenesis and thus reach a better understanding of the evolution and development of multicellular phenotypes, focusing on the role of physical forces in these processes.

  18. Mechanical forces as information: an integrated approach to plant and animal development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria eHernández-Hernández

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical forces such as tension and compression act throughout growth and development of multicellular organisms. These forces not only affect the size and shape of the cells and tissues but are capable of modifying the expression of genes and the localization of molecular components within the cell, in the plasma membrane, and in the plant cell wall. The magnitude and direction of these physical forces change with cellular and tissue properties such as elasticity. Thus, mechanical forces and the mesoscopic fields that emerge from their local action constitute important sources of positional information. Moreover, physical and biochemical processes interact in non-linear ways during tissue and organ growth in plants and animals. In this review we discuss how such mechanical forces are generated, transmitted, and sensed in these two lineages of multicellular organisms to yield long-range positional information. In order to do so we first outline a potentially common basis for studying patterning and mechanosensing that relies on the structural principle of tensegrity, and discuss how tensegral structures might arise in plants and animals. We then provide some examples of morphogenesis in which mechanical forces appear to act as positional information during development, offering a possible explanation for ubiquitous processes, such as the formation of periodic structures. Such examples, we argue, can be interpreted in terms of tensegral phenomena. Finally, we discuss the hypothesis of mechanically isotropic points as a potentially generic mechanism for the localization and maintenance of stem-cell niches in multicellular organisms. This comparative approach aims to help uncovering generic mechanisms of morphogenesis and thus reach a better understanding of the evolution and development of multicellular phenotypes, focusing on the role of physical forces in these processes.

  19. Development of a new PCR protocol to detect and subtype Blastocystis spp. from humans and animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santín, Mónica; Gómez-Muñoz, María Teresa; Solano-Aguilar, Gloria; Fayer, Ronald

    2011-07-01

    Blastocystis spp. is commonly found in the feces of humans worldwide. Infection has been reported as asymptomatic, acute symptomatic, and chronic symptomatic. This wide range of responses to infection could be related to the genetic diversity of morphologically indistinguishable specimens obtained from infected hosts. The former name Blastocystis hominis is now reported as Blastocystis spp. because of its genetic diversity. Blastocystis is recognized as a complex of subtypes that have not been fully characterized as independent species. The finding of Blastocystis spp. in feces from several animal species suggests a zoonotic potential. Based on conserved regions of published nucleotide SSU rDNA sequences from all Blastocystis subtypes found in GenBank, a PCR and sequencing protocol was developed. The ~500 bp SSU rDNA gene fragment amplified by this PCR is highly sensitive compared with published primers and contains highly variable regions that allow phylogenetic analysis of Blastocystis. These primers were used to detect and subtype Blastocystis spp. specimens from naturally infected humans, primates, cattle, pigs, and chickens. Based on these findings, application of this method can elucidate the complexity of this heterogeneous genus and its role in human and animal disease, as well as its zoonotic potential.

  20. Efficacy of a Meiosis Learning Module Developed for the Virtual Cell Animation Collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goff, Eric E.; Reindl, Katie M.; Johnson, Christina; McClean, Phillip; Offerdahl, Erika G.; Schroeder, Noah L.; White, Alan R.

    2017-01-01

    Recent reports calling for change in undergraduate biology education have resulted in the redesign of many introductory biology courses. Reports on one common change to course structure, the active-learning environment, have placed an emphasis on student preparation, noting that the positive outcomes of active learning in the classroom depend greatly on how well the student prepares before class. As a possible preparatory resource, we test the efficacy of a learning module developed for the Virtual Cell Animation Collection. This module presents the concepts of meiosis in an interactive, dynamic environment that has previously been shown to facilitate learning in introductory biology students. Participants (n = 534) were enrolled in an introductory biology course and were presented the concepts of meiosis in one of two treatments: the interactive-learning module or a traditional lecture session. Analysis of student achievement shows that students who viewed the learning module as their only means of conceptual presentation scored significantly higher (d = 0.40, p students who only attended a traditional lecture on the topic. Our results show the animation-based learning module effectively conveyed meiosis conceptual understanding, which suggests that it may facilitate student learning outside the classroom. Moreover, these results have implications for instructors seeking to expand their arsenal of tools for “flipping” undergraduate biology courses. PMID:28188282

  1. Sampling of prenatal and postnatal offspring from individual rat dams enhances animal use without compromising development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberts, J. R.; Burden, H. W.; Hawes, N.; Ronca, A. E.

    1996-01-01

    To assess prenatal and postnatal developmental status in the offspring of a group of animals, it is typical to examine fetuses from some of the dams as well as infants born to the remaining dams. Statistical limitations often arise, particularly when the animals are rare or especially precious, because all offspring of the dam represent only a single statistical observation; littermates are not independent observations (biologically or statistically). We describe a study in which pregnant laboratory rats were laparotomized on day 7 of gestation (GD7) to ascertain the number and distribution of uterine implantation sites and were subjected to a simulated experience on a 10-day space shuttle flight. After the simulated landing on GD18, rats were unilaterally hysterectomized, thus providing a sample of fetuses from 10 independent uteruses, followed by successful vaginal delivery on GD22, yielding postnatal samples from 10 uteruses. A broad profile of maternal and offspring morphologic and physiologic measures indicated that these novel sampling procedures did not compromise maternal well-being and maintained normal offspring development and function. Measures included maternal organ weights and hormone concentrations, offspring body size, growth, organ weights, sexual differentiation, and catecholamine concentrations.

  2. Child survival and development with special reference to the girl child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, M P

    1990-01-01

    This article is based on plenary address given before the International Symposium on the Girl Child in Asia, a Neglected Majority. The author answers the question of how do the efforts in child survival relate to the real welfare of children. The statistics are grim. 40,000 children 5 years died today. 1 child dies every 2 seconds. Every other second a child is severely disabled with a permanent mental or physical handicap, mostly in developing countries. More female than male children die even though, biologically, it ought to be the reverse. Most of the 14 million dying in a year and comparable figures for those who are disabled are preventable. Safe drinking water, appropriate sanitation, immunization, basic nutritional measures, and the guarantee of basic human rights would contribute greatly to changing the trend. 500 million children have insufficient food and clothing. The status of girls, particularly those in Nepal, is also grim. In 1981, 14.6% of Nepali children 10-14 years were either married, widowed, or divorced. Female illiteracy is high. Approximately 102 million of those 6-11 years old are not in school. In 50% of developing countries, universal primary education is decreasing. 57% of 10-14 year olds in Nepal are economically active. Daily, hundreds of girls are subjected to bonded labor, marriages without consent, sexual abuse and prostitution. 150 million street children are begging, picking rags, or engaged in underpaid, unhealthy and unsafe labor. The goal of ratifying the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child is not enough. Implementation is required. The rights of the child begin in utero. Women and girls are economically, politically, and socially powerless. Their complaints are frequently misunderstood, misinterpreted, or ignored. The development and education of the child must be appropriate to the historical, physical, sociocultural and demographic conditions of the country. Empowerment of women and participation in the social and

  3. Impact of Elimination or Reduction of Dietary Animal Proteins on Cancer Progression and Survival: Protocol of an Online Pilot Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catany Ritter, Anna; Egger, Annarita Sabrina; Machacek, Jennifer; Aspalter, Rosa

    2016-07-29

    Current evidence suggests that the incidence of cancer is low in vegan populations, and experimental studies have revealed a significant role of dietary proteins in cancer development and progression. However, little data currently exists regarding the effect of a plant-based diet on the progression of diagnosed cancer. The main objective of this study is to determine if a reduction or total elimination of animal protein from the diet can positively influence the outcome of an existing cancer and, in addition to standard oncological therapies, increase remission rates. The primary aim of this online study is to test the effect on remission rates in cancer patients (primary outcome) with distinct self-selected dietary patterns (omnivore, lacto-ovo-vegetarian, vegan), and allow for an estimation of the effect size. Secondary outcomes are tumor behavior, relapse-free interval, therapies, therapy tolerability and side-effects, comorbidities, medication, quality of life, acceptance, and feasibility of the selected diet. Safety concerns exist for vegan diets (especially in cancer patients) and the study will carefully monitor for deterioration of health, tumor progression, or malnutrition. Furthermore, the study will evaluate the online portal as a study platform (technical and safety aspects, and sequence of displayed questionnaires) as well as the validity of self-reported and online-generated data. The study was performed between April, 2015 and June, 2016, and a preliminary evaluation of safety aspects was undertaken after June, 2016. Primary and secondary outcomes will be evaluated when the final patients complete the study in December, 2016. This study will reveal information about the effects of dietary patterns on cancer disease and progression. The methodology of the study addresses several aspects and limitations of nutrition studies in cancer patients, such as precision of nutrition data, acceptance criteria, online methodology, and safety aspects

  4. Hepatocyte growth factor modulates in vitro survival and proliferation of germ cells during postnatal testis development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catizone, A; Ricci, G; Del Bravo, J; Galdieri, M

    2006-04-01

    The hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a pleiotropic cytokine that influences mitogenesis, motility and differentiation of many different cell types by its tyrosine kinase receptor c-Met. We previously demonstrated that the c-Met/HGF system is present and functionally active during postnatal testis development. We found also that spermatozoa express c-Met and that HGF has a positive effect on the maintenance of sperm motility. In the present paper, we extend our study on the germ cells at different stages of differentiation during the postnatal development of the testis. We demonstrate that c-met is present in rat spermatogonia, pachytene spermatocytes and round spermatids and that HGF significantly increases spermatogonial proliferation in 8- to 10-day-old pre-pubertal rats. At this age HGF does not affect Sertoli cells and peritubular myoid cells proliferation. In addition, we studied the effect of the factor on germ cell apoptosis and we show that HGF prevents the germ cell apoptotic process. We also studied the effect of HGF on 18- to 20-day-old and 28- to 30-day-old rat testes. At these ages also the factor significantly increases germ cell duplication and decreases the number of apoptotic cells. However, the effect on programmed cell death is higher in the 8- to 10-day-old rats and declines in the older animals. In conclusion, we report that rat germ cells (spermatogonia, pachytene spermatocytes and round spermatids) express c-met and that HGF modulates germ cell proliferating activity and apoptosis in vitro. These data indicate that the c-Met/HGF system is involved in male germ cell homeostasis and, consequently, has a role in male fertility.

  5. Companion Animals and Child/Adolescent Development: A Systematic Review of the Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purewal, Rebecca; Christley, Robert; Kordas, Katarzyna; Joinson, Carol; Meints, Kerstin; Gee, Nancy; Westgarth, Carri

    2017-02-27

    Childhood and adolescence are important developmental phases which influence health and well-being across the life span. Social relationships are fundamental to child and adolescent development; yet studies have been limited to children's relationships with other humans. This paper provides an evidence review for the potential associations between pet ownership and emotional; behavioural; cognitive; educational and social developmental outcomes. As the field is in the early stages; a broad set of inclusion criteria was applied. A systematic search of databases and grey literature sources found twenty-two studies meeting selection criteria. The review found evidence for an association between pet ownership and a wide range of emotional health benefits from childhood pet ownership; particularly for self-esteem and loneliness. The findings regarding childhood anxiety and depression were inconclusive. Studies also showed evidence of an association between pet ownership and educational and cognitive benefits; for example, in perspective-taking abilities and intellectual development. Evidence on behavioural development was unclear due to a lack of high quality research. Studies on pet ownership and social development provided evidence for an association with increased social competence; social networks; social interaction and social play behaviour. Overall, pet ownership and the significance of children's bonds with companion animals have been underexplored; there is a shortage of high quality and longitudinal studies in all outcomes. Prospective studies that control for a wide range of confounders are required.

  6. Companion Animals and Child/Adolescent Development: A Systematic Review of the Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purewal, Rebecca; Christley, Robert; Kordas, Katarzyna; Joinson, Carol; Meints, Kerstin; Gee, Nancy; Westgarth, Carri

    2017-01-01

    Childhood and adolescence are important developmental phases which influence health and well-being across the life span. Social relationships are fundamental to child and adolescent development; yet studies have been limited to children’s relationships with other humans. This paper provides an evidence review for the potential associations between pet ownership and emotional; behavioural; cognitive; educational and social developmental outcomes. As the field is in the early stages; a broad set of inclusion criteria was applied. A systematic search of databases and grey literature sources found twenty-two studies meeting selection criteria. The review found evidence for an association between pet ownership and a wide range of emotional health benefits from childhood pet ownership; particularly for self-esteem and loneliness. The findings regarding childhood anxiety and depression were inconclusive. Studies also showed evidence of an association between pet ownership and educational and cognitive benefits; for example, in perspective-taking abilities and intellectual development. Evidence on behavioural development was unclear due to a lack of high quality research. Studies on pet ownership and social development provided evidence for an association with increased social competence; social networks; social interaction and social play behaviour. Overall, pet ownership and the significance of children’s bonds with companion animals have been underexplored; there is a shortage of high quality and longitudinal studies in all outcomes. Prospective studies that control for a wide range of confounders are required. PMID:28264460

  7. Companion Animals and Child/Adolescent Development: A Systematic Review of the Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Purewal

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Childhood and adolescence are important developmental phases which influence health and well-being across the life span. Social relationships are fundamental to child and adolescent development; yet studies have been limited to children’s relationships with other humans. This paper provides an evidence review for the potential associations between pet ownership and emotional; behavioural; cognitive; educational and social developmental outcomes. As the field is in the early stages; a broad set of inclusion criteria was applied. A systematic search of databases and grey literature sources found twenty-two studies meeting selection criteria. The review found evidence for an association between pet ownership and a wide range of emotional health benefits from childhood pet ownership; particularly for self-esteem and loneliness. The findings regarding childhood anxiety and depression were inconclusive. Studies also showed evidence of an association between pet ownership and educational and cognitive benefits; for example, in perspective-taking abilities and intellectual development. Evidence on behavioural development was unclear due to a lack of high quality research. Studies on pet ownership and social development provided evidence for an association with increased social competence; social networks; social interaction and social play behaviour. Overall, pet ownership and the significance of children’s bonds with companion animals have been underexplored; there is a shortage of high quality and longitudinal studies in all outcomes. Prospective studies that control for a wide range of confounders are required.

  8. Development of Rations for the Enhanced Survival of Salmon, 1981-1990 Progress (Annual) Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewing, Richard D.

    1990-12-01

    The nutritional quality of feed plays an important role in determining the health and ``fitness`` of smolts. Commercial fish meal, the major source of protein in salmon rations, may be reduced in quality from poor drying techniques during manufacture. Dietary stress in the hatchery may result. This investigation tests the hypothesis that protein quality of fish rations can influence the survival of smolts and the ultimate return of adults. The test involves a comparison between performances of coho (Oncorhynchus kisutch) and chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) reared on rations containing very high quality protein derived from vacuum dried meals and those of fish reared on commercial rations, with commercial fish meal as a source of protein. Survival and return of several brood years of test and control fish are used to measure the influence of ration on survival. This report includes recovery data from these marked fish collected 1982 through September 1990.

  9. Survival and development of bovine blastocysts produced in vitro after assisted hatching, vitrification and in-straw direct rehydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vajta, G; Holm, P; Greve, T; Callesen, H

    1997-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish an efficient combination of assisted hatching and cryopreservation procedures for producing bovine embryos in vitro. A total of 1312 day 7 blastocysts were subjected randomly to 14 different combinations of three factors: osmotic stress, assisted hatching and vitrification. Re-expansion, initiation and completion of the hatching process, as well as attachment to the culture dish, were analysed by SAS Genmod procedure. Incubation with sucrose was found to decrease survival rates; among the assisted hatching procedures used, zona fenestration resulted in higher survival rates compared with partial zona dissection and controls; and vitrification decreased survival and further development. The combined effect of sucrose incubation and vitrification decreased further development markedly, as did partial zona dissection followed by vitrification. Partial zona dissection performed in medium containing sucrose severely lowered embryo survival. Zona fenestration without sucrose incubation followed by vitrification did not compromise further embryo development: 86%, 84% and 79% of the blastocysts initiated, completed hatching and attached to the bottom, respectively. These data were not different from the controls (80%, 76% and 63%, respectively; P > 0.05). Cell count analysis revealed a decrease in the total number of cells as a result of the assisted hatching and vitrification compared with controls (135 versus 202, respectively; P embryo transfer results (36% pregnancy rate and 30% calving rate) require further improvement, this combination of methods may prove useful in the commercial production of bovine embryos in vitro.

  10. Experimental dermatological surgery: an animal model for developing skills with dermal fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boza, Juliana Catucci; Cunha, Vanessa Santos; de Andrade, Claudia Dickel; Palma Kuhl, Isabel Cristina

    2011-05-01

    The importance of laboratory experiments in the formation of physicians is well recognized since they facilitate scientific development and enhance technical skills. Dermal filling procedures are performed for the correction of wrinkles, rhytids, scars, and lipodystrophy. Till date, experimental models for the training of dermal filling techniques have not been studied. To demonstrate an experimental laboratory model for the training of dermal filling techniques in an animal model. The heads of pigs were used for this purpose, together with Carbopol gel at different densities, which was used to simulate the fillers available in the market. Needles and specific cannulas were used to apply the fillers into the creases and other areas of the pig skin. The pig head appears to be a suitable model for this training. Carbopol gel is a good choice for simulating fillers. This model of laboratory experiment requires a minimum of infrastructure; it is a low-cost alternative and facilitates practical training in the application of dermal fillers.

  11. Development of an individualized scoring system to predict mid-term survival after carotid endarterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Gisbert, Sara M; Zaragozá García, José M; Plaza Martínez, Ángel; Gómez Palonés, Francisco J; Ortiz-Monzón, Eduardo

    2017-08-01

    Carotid endarterectomy (CEA) is a prophylactic surgery focused in preventing stroke in the mid-long term. The purpose of this study was to analyze mid-term mortality in patients undergoing CEA, identify predictors of 3-year mortality and design a score to estimate individual risk of mortality in this population. A retrospective single-center study including consecutive patients undergoing CEA between 1997-2010. Demographic data and comorbidities, postoperative results and patient follow-up data were registered and evaluated. Kaplan Meier analysis was used to analyze survival. After multivariable COX regression analysis, a score based on the calculated Hazards Ratios (HR) was designed. The sum of all points performed the individual score for each patient for estimating 3-years mortality. Population was stratified into four groups according to percentiles of score obtained: Group A (-7 to 4 points), Group B (5-8 points), Group C (9-10 points), Group D (score greater than 11 points). A total of 453 patients with a mean follow-up of 53.4 months were included in the study. Overall 3-year survival was 88.4%. On the univariate analysis the variables associated with significant increasing in 3-year mortality were: female gender (OR 2.32), diabetes mellitus (OR 2.28), COPD (OR 2.98), ischemic heart disease (OR 2.29), critical carotid stenosis >90% (OR 2.16) and antiplatelet therapy as a protective factor (OR 0,23). Factors associated with mortality in multivariate analysis were age (HR 1.14 P=0.001), diabetes mellitus (HR 1.62, P=0.031), COPD (HR 1.88 P=0.022), ischemic heart disease (HR 1.59 P=0.05), critical stenosis >90% (HR 1.70 P=0.015) and antiplatelet therapy as a protective factor (HR 0.23 P=0.027). The scoring system includes the following items: female gender (+2 points), age (50-69 years +7 points, 70-79 years +12 points, >80 years +15 points), diabetes (+4 points), COPD (+5 points), ischemic heart disease (+4 points), carotid stenosis> 90% (+4 points

  12. Mechanisms of animal diapause: recent developments from nematodes, crustaceans, insects, and fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hand, Steven C; Denlinger, David L; Podrabsky, Jason E; Roy, Richard

    2016-06-01

    Life cycle delays are beneficial for opportunistic species encountering suboptimal environments. Many animals display a programmed arrest of development (diapause) at some stage(s) of their development, and the diapause state may or may not be associated with some degree of metabolic depression. In this review, we will evaluate current advancements in our understanding of the mechanisms responsible for the remarkable phenotype, as well as environmental cues that signal entry and termination of the state. The developmental stage at which diapause occurs dictates and constrains the mechanisms governing diapause. Considerable progress has been made in clarifying proximal mechanisms of metabolic arrest and the signaling pathways like insulin/Foxo that control gene expression patterns. Overlapping themes are also seen in mechanisms that control cell cycle arrest. Evidence is emerging for epigenetic contributions to diapause regulation via small RNAs in nematodes, crustaceans, insects, and fish. Knockdown of circadian clock genes in selected insect species supports the importance of clock genes in the photoperiodic response that cues diapause. A large suite of chaperone-like proteins, expressed during diapause, protects biological structures during long periods of energy-limited stasis. More information is needed to paint a complete picture of how environmental cues are coupled to the signal transduction that initiates the complex diapause phenotype, as well as molecular explanations for how the state is terminated. Excellent examples of molecular memory in post-dauer animals have been documented in Caenorhabditis elegans It is clear that a single suite of mechanisms does not regulate diapause across all species and developmental stages. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  13. [Transgenic animals and animal welfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt, Christoph

    1998-01-01

    Under the pressure of a public vote in Switzerland (7 June 1998) on an initiative to ban the production, use and patenting of transgenic animals, their value for biomedical research and development is intensely debated. In addition, the Swiss legislation has adopted (1992) a constitutional obligation to "take into account the dignity of creatures". The term "dignity of creatures", however, can be interpreted in anthropocentric or biocentric ways. The government has now formulated the legal implications of this term for transgenic animals and plants in various laws including the animal and environmental protection laws. This paper gives arguments for a fair evaluation of trangenic animals from an animal welfare point of view where not only the costs of animal suffering must be considered but also the probability of potential benefit for man. A self-confident research community should allow such an evaluation procedure even in view of an outcome which could ban many uses of transgenic animals

  14. Testing the effect of dietary carotenoids on larval survival, growth and development in the critically endangered southern corroboree frog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Phillip G; Silla, Aimee J

    2017-03-01

    The success of captive breeding programs (CBPs) for threatened species is often limited due to a lack of knowledge of the nutritional conditions required for optimal growth and survival. Carotenoids are powerful antioxidants known to accelerate vertebrate growth and reduce mortality. However, the effect of carotenoids on amphibian life-history traits remains poorly understood. The aim of our study was to use a manipulative laboratory experiment to test the effect of dietary-carotenoid supplementation during the larval life stage on the survival, growth and development of the critically endangered southern corroboree frog (Pseudophryne corroboree). Larvae were fed either a carotenoid supplemented diet or an unsupplemented diet and the survival, growth and development of individuals was monitored and compared. There was no significant effect of dietary treatment on larval survival, growth rate, time taken to reach metamorphosis, or body size at metamorphosis. Our findings provide no evidence that carotenoid supplementation during the larval life stage improves the growth and development of southern corroboree frogs. However, because the carotenoid dose used in our study did not have any detrimental effects on P. corroboree larvae, but has previously been shown to improve adult coloration, immunity, and exercise performance, carotenoid supplementation should be considered when evaluating the nutritional requirements of P. corroboree in captivity. Carotenoid supplementation studies are now required for a diversity of anuran species to determine the effects of carotenoids on amphibian survival, growth and development. Understanding the effects of dietary carotenoids on different life-history traits may assist with amphibian captive breeding and conservation. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. The effect of minimal concentration of ethylene glycol (EG) combined with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) on mouse oocyte survival and subsequent embryonic development following vitrification

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Yao; Okitsu, Osamu; Zhao, Xiao-Ming; Sun, Yun; Di, Wen; Chian, Ri-Cheng

    ... actions.The minimal concentration of ethylene glycol (EG) on mouse oocyte survival and subsequent embryonic development was evaluated following vitrification-warming and parthenogenetic activation...

  16. Survival Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Rupert G

    2011-01-01

    A concise summary of the statistical methods used in the analysis of survival data with censoring. Emphasizes recently developed nonparametric techniques. Outlines methods in detail and illustrates them with actual data. Discusses the theory behind each method. Includes numerous worked problems and numerical exercises.

  17. Development of Rations for the Enhanced Survival of Salmon, 1986-1987 Progress (Annual) Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradford, C. Samuel

    1987-12-01

    The nutritional quality of feed plays an important role in determining the health and fitness of smolts. Commercial fish meal, the major source of protein in salmon rations, is subject to heat damage during drying and chemical interaction of fat oxidation products with proteins. Protein bioavailability is reduced and dietary stress may be introduced into hatchery feeds. This investigation tests the hypothesis that ration protein quality can influence the survival of smolts and the ultimate return of adults. Improved survival production would be better able to reestablish natural runs of salmon in the Columbia River system and maintain and improve the genetic integrity of specific stocks. The general approach being used involves a comparison of coho and chinook salmon reared on rations containing very high quality protein derived from vacuum dried meals and commercial rations relying on commercial fish meal as a source of protein. Survival and return of replicate brood-years of coded wire tagged test and control fish are being used to determine the influence of ration on survival. Project rearing and release of tagged fish to date include 1982, 1983, 1984 and 1985-broods of coho salmon; the 1983 and 1984-broods of fall chinook (tule stock) salmon; and the 1985 and 1986-broods of fall chinook (up-river-bright stock) salmon. This report covers the rearing and release of the 1985-brood coho and the 1986-brood fall chinook (up-river-bright stock) salmon.

  18. Effects of temperature on development, survival and reproduction of insects: Experimental design, data analysis and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques Regniere; James Powell; Barbara Bentz; Vincent Nealis

    2012-01-01

    The developmental response of insects to temperature is important in understanding the ecology of insect life histories. Temperature-dependent phenology models permit examination of the impacts of temperature on the geographical distributions, population dynamics and management of insects. The measurement of insect developmental, survival and reproductive responses to...

  19. Western bean cutworm survival and the development of economic injury levels and economic thresholds in field corn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paula-Moraes, S; Hunt, T E; Wright, R J; Hein, G L; Blankenship, E E

    2013-06-01

    Western bean cutworm, Striacosta albicosta (Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), is a native pest of dry beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and corn (Zea mays L.). Historically, the western bean cutworm was distributed in the western United States, but since 1999 eastward expansion has been observed. In corn, economic impact is caused by larval ear feeding. Information on western bean cutworm biology, ecology, and economic impact is relatively limited, and the development of economic injury levels (EILs) and economic thresholds (ETs) is required for more effective management. Studies during 2008-2011, across three ecoregions of Nebraska, sought to characterize western bean cutworm survival and development of EILs and ETs. Calculations of EILs and ETs incorporated the dynamics of corn price, management cost, and pest survival. The results from the current study demonstrated low larval survival of this species (1.51-12.82%). The mean yield loss from one western bean cutworm larva per plant was 945.52 kg/ha (15.08 bu/acre), based on 74,100 plants per ha. Economic thresholds are expressed as a percentage of plants with at least one egg mass. This study is the first study that explicitly incorporates variable management costs and crop values into western bean cutworm EIL calculations, and larval survival into ET calculations.

  20. Ingestion of Bt rice pollen does not reduce the survival or hypopharyngeal gland development of Apis mellifera adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Dai, Pingli; Chen, Xiuping; Romeis, Jörg; Shi, Jianrong; Peng, Yufa; Li, Yunhe

    2017-05-01

    Because of its ecological and economic importance, the honey bee Apis mellifera is commonly used to assess the environmental risk of insect-resistant, genetically modified plants. In the present study, feeding-exposure experiments were used to determine whether pollen from transgenic rice harms A. mellifera worker bees. In 1 experiment, the survival and mean acinus diameter of hypopharyngeal glands of adult bees were similar when bees were fed on pollen from Bt rice lines or from a non-Bt rice line, but bee survival was significantly reduced when they received pollen that was mixed with potassium arsenate as a positive control. In a second experiment, bee survival and hypopharyngeal gland development were not reduced when adult bees were fed on non-Bt pollen and a sucrose solution supplemented with Cry2A at 400 µg/g, Cry1C at 50 µg/g, or bovine serum albumin (BSA) at 400 µg/g, but bee survival and hypopharyngeal gland development were reduced when the diet was supplemented with soybean trypsin inhibitor as a positive control. In both experiments, the uptake of Cry proteins by adult bees was confirmed. Overall, the results indicate that the planting of Bt rice lines expressing Cry2A or Cry1C protein poses a negligible risk to A. mellifera worker bees. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:1243-1248. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  1. Effect of a long-term high-protein diet on survival, obesity development, and gut microbiota in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiilerich, Pia; Myrmel, Lene Secher; Fjære, Even

    2016-01-01

    Female C57BL/6J mice were fed a regular low-fat diet or high-fat diets combined with either high or low protein-to-sucrose ratios during their entire lifespan to examine the long-term effects on obesity development, gut microbiota, and survival. Intake of a high-fat diet with a low protein....../sucrose ratio precipitated obesity and reduced survival relative to mice fed a low-fat diet. By contrast, intake of a high-fat diet with a high protein/sucrose ratio attenuated lifelong weight gain and adipose tissue expansion, and survival was not significantly altered relative to low-fat-fed mice. Our...... findings support the notion that reduced survival in response to high-fat/high-sucrose feeding is linked to obesity development. Digital gene expression analyses, further validated by qPCR, demonstrated that the protein/sucrose ratio modulated global gene expression over time in liver and adipose tissue...

  2. Effects of compaction and wetting of laterite cover soil on development and survival of Musca domestica (Diptera: Muscidae) immatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Tahir, Nurita; Ahmad, Abu Hassan

    2013-09-01

    Effects of laterite cover soil with different characteristics on survival of buried eggs, third instar larvae, and pupae of Musca domestica (L.) were studied experimentally. Soil treatments were loose dry soil, loose wet soil, compacted dry soil, and compacted wet soil (CWS). Eggs, third instar larvae, and pupae were buried under 30 cm of the different soil treatments and placed under field conditions until adults emerged. Rearing medium was provided for eggs and larvae, and control treatments of all stages were unburied immatures placed on soil surface. Egg and pupal survival to adult were significantly affected by the cover soil treatments, but third instars were more resilient. Wet soil treatments (loose wet soil and CWS) resulted in significantly reduced pupal survival, but increased survival of eggs. However, CWS significantly reduced adult emergence from buried eggs. Though emergence of house flies buried as eggs was significantly reduced, some were able to hatch and emerging first instar larvae developed to pupation. Although cover soil does not completely prevent fly emergence, it did limit development and emergence of buried house flies.

  3. 3-hydroxykynurenine suppresses CD4+ T-cell proliferation, induces T-regulatory-cell development, and prolongs corneal allograft survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaher, Sarah S; Germain, Conrad; Fu, Hongmei; Larkin, Daniel F P; George, Andrew J T

    2011-04-01

    IDO (indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase) modulates the immune response by depletion of the essential amino acid tryptophan, and IDO overexpression has been shown to prolong corneal allograft survival. This study was conducted to examine the effect of kynurenines, the products of tryptophan breakdown and known to act directly on T lymphocytes, on corneal graft survival. The effects of kynurenines on T-cell proliferation and death, T-regulatory-cell development, and dendritic cell function, phenotype, and viability were analyzed in vitro. The effect of topical and systemic administration of 3-hydroxykynurenine (3HK) on orthotopic murine corneal allograft survival was examined. T-lymphocyte proliferation was inhibited by two of the four different kynurenines: 3HK and 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid (3HAA). This effect was accompanied by significant T-cell death. Neither 3HK nor 3HAA altered dendritic cell function, nor did they induce apoptosis or pathogenicity to corneal endothelial cells. Administration of systemic and topical 3HK to mice receiving a fully mismatched corneal graft resulted in significant prolongation of graft survival (median survival of control grafts, 12 days; of treated, 19 and 15 days, respectively; P < 0.0003). While systemic administration of 3HK was associated with a significant depletion of CD4(+) T, CD8(+) T, and B lymphocytes in peripheral blood, no depletion was found after topical administration. The production of kynurenines, in particular 3HK and 3HAA, may be one mechanism (in addition to tryptophan depletion) by which IDO prolongs graft survival. These molecules have potential as specific agents for preventing allograft rejection in patients at high rejection risk.

  4. The postnatal development of the mucosal immune system and mucosal tolerance in domestic animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Mick; Haverson, Karin

    2006-01-01

    The mucosal immune system is exposed to a range of antigens associated with pathogens, to which it must mount active immune responses. However, it is also exposed to a large number of harmless antigens associated with food and with commensal microbial flora, to which expression of active, inflammatory immune responses to these antigens is undesirable. The mucosal immune system must contain machinery capable of evaluating the antigens to which it is exposed and mounting appropriate effector or regulatory responses. Since the immune system is likely to have evolved initially in mucosal tissues, the requirement to prevent damaging allergic responses must be at least as old as the adaptive immune system, and studies of the mechanisms should include a range of non-mammalian species. Despite the importance for rational design of vaccines and for control of allergic reactions, the mechanisms involved are still largely unclear. It is not clear that the classical experimental protocol of "oral tolerance" is, in fact, measuring a biologically important phenomenon, nor is it clear whether tolerance is regulated in the evolutionarily recent organised lymphoid tissue (the lymph nodes) or the more ancient, diffuse architecture in the intestine. The capacity of the immune system to discriminate between "dangerous" and "harmless" antigens appears to develop with age and exposure to microbial flora. Thus, the ability of an individual or a group of animals to correctly regulate mucosal immune responses will depend on age, genetics and on their microbial environment and history. Attempts to manipulate the mucosal immune system towards active immune responses by oral vaccines, or towards oral tolerance, are likely to be confounded by environmentally-induced variability between individuals and between groups of animals.

  5. [Development of colloidal gold immunochromatography assay strip for schistosomiasis diagnosis in domestic animals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Rui; Zhao, Deng-yun; Lu, Ke; Hong, Yang; Li, Hao; Lin, Jiao-jiao; Liu, Jin-ming; Xu, Yu-mei; Zhu Chuan-gang

    2015-10-01

    To develop a quick and easy colloidal gold immunochromatography assay (GICA) strip for schistosomiasis diagnosis in domestic animals. The reconstruction of Streptococcal Protein G (SPG) was designed and its gene was subcloned into plasmid pET-28a(+) to express in Escherichia coli. The recombinant SPG was purified and labeled with colloidal gold. The Schistosoma japonicum soluble egg antigen (SEA) and rSPG were blotted on the nitrocellulose membrane for the test line and control line respectively. The specificity, sensitivity and cross-reaction of the strip method were detected. The rSPG was successfully expressed and purified to label with colloidal gold. The colloidal gold immunochromatography assay strips were assembled and they could detect the sera of S. japonicum infected BALB/c mice, New Zealand white rabbits, buffalo and sheep successfully. Besides, the sensitivity of GICA strip was 100% in the sera of mice and the serum of rabbits with S. japonicum infection. The specificity was 100% in the serum of mice and the sera of rabbits with free of infection. The sensitivity was 100% in the sera of sheep with miracidia of S. japonicum hatching from the stool and the specificity was 88.46% in the sera of sheep without that. The sensitivity was 94.44% in the sera of buffalo with miracidia hatching from the stool and the specificity was 100% in the sera of buffalo without that. The cross-reaction rate was 5.88% in Paramphistomum. The GICA strip can successfully detect a variety of S. japonicum infected domestic animals and may be a useful tool for screening on a large scale in the endemic areas.

  6. Developing a collaborative agenda for humanities and social scientific research on laboratory animal science and welfare.

    OpenAIRE

    Davies, Gail F.; Greenhough, Beth J.; Hobson-West, Pru; Kirk, Robert G.W.; Applebee, Ken; Bellinghan, Laura C.; Berdoy, Manuel; Buller, Henry; Cassaday, Helen J.; Davies, Keith; Diefenbacher, Daniela; Druglitrø, Tone; Escobar, Maria Paula; Friese, Carrie

    2016-01-01

    Improving laboratory animal science and welfare requires both new scientific research and insights from research in the humanities and social sciences. Whilst scientific research provides evidence to replace, reduce and refine procedures involving laboratory animals (the‘3Rs’), work in the humanities and social sciences can help understand the social, economic and cultural processes that enhance or impede humane ways of knowing and working with laboratory animals. However, communication acros...

  7. A new incision for unilateral cleft lip repair developed using animated simulation of repair on computer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahay A

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Unilateral cleft lip repair continues to leave behind some amount of dissatisfaction, as a scope for further improvement is always felt. Most surgeons do not like to deviate from the standard Millard′s/ triangular techniques, or their minor modifications, as no one likes to experiment on the face for fear of unfavourable outcomes. The computer can be utilized as a useful tool in the analysis and planning of surgery and new methods can be developed and attempted subsequently with greater confidence. Aim: We decided to see if an improved lip repair could be developed with the use of computers. Materials and Methods: Analysis of previous lip repairs was done to determine where an improvement was required. Movement of tissues, by simulating an ideal repair, using image warping software, on digital images of cleft lip was studied in animation sequences. A repair which could reproduce these movements was planned. A new incision emerged, which had combined the principles of Millard′s and Randall / Tennyson repairs, with additional features. The new method was performed on 30 cases. Conclusions: The results were encouraging as the shortcomings of these methods were minimized, and the advantages maximized.

  8. Development of a monoclonal sandwich ELISA for direct detection of bluetongue virus 8 in infected animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Haaf, Andre; Kohl, Johannes; Pscherer, Sibylle; Hamann, Hans-Peter; Eskens, Hans Ulrich; Bastian, Max; Gattenlöhner, Stefan; Tur, Mehmet Kemal

    2017-05-01

    Bluetongue is an infectious viral disease which can cause mortality in affected ruminants, and tremendous economic damage via impacts upon fertility, milk production and the quality of wool. The disease is caused by bluetongue virus (BTV) which is transmitted by species of Culicoides biting midge. Rapid detection of BTV is required to contain disease outbreaks and reduce economic losses. The purpose of this study was to develop a monoclonal sandwich ELISA for direct detection of BTV in infected animals. Phage display technology was used to isolate BTV specific antibody fragments by applying the human scFv Tomlinson antibody libraries directly on purified BTV-8 particles. Three unique BTV-8 specific human antibody fragments were isolated which were able to detect purified BTV particles and also BTV in serum of an infected sheep. A combination of a human/mouse scFv-Fc chimeric fusion protein and a human Fab fragment in a sandwich ELISA format was able to detect BTV specifically with a limit of detection (LOD) of 10(4) infectious virus particles, as determined by tissue culture titration. This approach provided pilot data towards the development of a novel diagnostic test that might be used for direct detection of BTV-8 particles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. [Effects of the designer drug methylenedioxypyrovalerone on the developing brain in experimental animal model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerecsei, László István; Ádám, Ágota

    2015-07-26

    The designer drug methylenedioxypyrovalerone is a frequently used psychoactive drug of abuse. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of methylenedioxypyrovalerone, administrated from the 8th to the 14th day of the gestation, on the development of central nervous system and on the behaviour of offspring mice. Pregnant mice were treated during this period either with subcutaneous injection of 1×10 mg/kg body weight methylenedioxypyrovalerone or vehicle (saline). Maternal behaviour (pup retrieval test), locomotor activity (open field test) and motor coordination (grip strength test) of dams were evaluated. Locomotor activity at the 7th and 21st postnatal day (open field test) and motor coordination at the 21st postnatal day (grip strength test) were examined. Reduced maternal behaviour among treated animals was observed. There was no difference in the results of the open field test between treated and control groups. Decrease of locomotor activity was observed in the pups of the methylenedioxypyrovalerone treated dams. The results suggest that cathinones (in particular methylenedioxypyrovalerone) may adversely affect neural integrity of the developing central nervous system.

  10. The routine use of antibiotics to promote animal growth does little to benefit protein undernutrition in the developing world

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Collignon, P.; Wegener, Henrik Caspar; Braam, P.

    2005-01-01

    Some persons argue that the routine addition of antibiotics to animal feed will help alleviate protein undernutrition in developing countries by increasing meat production. In contrast, we estimate that, if all routine antibiotic use in animal feed were ceased, there would be negligible effects...... in these countries. Poultry and pork production are unlikely to decrease by more than 2%. Average daily protein supply would decrease by no more than 0.1 g per person (or 0.2% of total protein intake). Eliminating the routine use of in-feed antibiotics will improve human and animal health, by reducing...

  11. Protecting and rescuing the effectors: roles of differentiation and survival in the control of memory T cell development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sema eKurtulus

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Vaccines, arguably the single most important intervention in improving human health, have exploited the phenomenon of immunological memory. The elicitation of memory T cells is often an essential part of successful long-lived protective immunity. Our understanding of T cell memory has been greatly aided by the development of TCR Tg mice and MHC tetrameric staining reagents that have allowed the precise tracking of antigen-specific T cell responses. Indeed, following acute infection or immunization, naïve T cells undergo a massive expansion culminating in the generation of a robust effector T cell population. This peak effector response is relatively short-lived and, while most effector T cells die by apoptosis, some remain and develop into memory cells. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying this cell fate decision remain incompletely defined, substantial progress has been made, particularly with regards to CD8+ T cells. For example, the effector CD8+ T cells generated during a response are heterogeneous, consisting of cells with more or less potential to develop into full-fledged memory cells. Development of CD8+ T cell memory is regulated by the transcriptional programs that control the differentiation and survival of effector T cells. While the type of antigenic stimulation and level of inflammation control effector CD8+ T cell differentiation, availability of cytokines and their ability to control expression and function of Bcl-2 family members governs their survival. These distinct differentiation and survival programs may allow for finer therapeutic intervention to control both the quality and quantity of CD8+ T cell memory. Effector to memory transition of CD4+ T cells is less well characterized than CD8+ T cells, emerging details will be discussed. This review will focus on the recent progress made in our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the development of T cell memory with an emphasis on factors controlling survival of

  12. Development of Rations for the Enhanced Survival of Salmon, 1985-1986 Progress (Annual) Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradford, C. Samuel

    1987-04-01

    This investigation tests the hypothesis that ration protein quality can influence the survival of smolts and the ultimate return of adults. The general approach being used involves a comparison of coho and chinook salmon reared on rations containing very high quality protein derived from vacuum dried meals and commercial rations relying on commercial fish meal as a source of protein. Survival and return of replicate brood-years of coded wire tagged test and control fish are being used to determine the influence of ration on survival. Project rearing and release of tagged fish to date include 1982, 1983, and 1984-brood replicates of coho salmon; the 1983 and 1984-brood replicates of fall chinook (tule stock salmon; and the 1985-brood of fall chinook (up-river-bright stock) salmon. The 1985-brood year replicate of coho salmon is presently being reared and has been tagged for release in April 1987. The rearing of the 1986-brood replicate of fall chinook (up-river-bright stock) salmon has been initiated. This report covers the rearing and release of the 1984-brood coho and the 1985-brood fall chinook (up-river-bright stock) salmon. Plasma cortisol and thyroxine (T/sub 4/) level, gill Na/sup +//K/sup +/-ATPase, osmoregulatory performance, immunocompetency and total hepatic/gill microsomal lipid content were monitored from early June to mid-October 1986 to assess the physiological condition of fall chinook salmon. Results indicated that on several sampling dates early in the 1986 rearing period fish supplied the control ration were physiologically different than fish receiving the salmon meal ration. Incomplete recovery of coded wire tags from 1982 and 1983-broods of coho salmon (Sandy stock) revealed an improved (P greater than or equal to .05) survival for fish supplied test rations.

  13. Development of Rations for the Enhanced Survival of Salmon, 1987-1988 Progress (Annual) Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewing, Richard D.

    1988-12-01

    The nutritional quality of feed plays an important role in determining the health and fitness of smolts. Commercial fish meal, the major source of protein in salmon rations, may be reduced in quality from poor drying techniques during manufacture. Dietary stress in the hatchery may result. This investigation tests the hypothesis that protein quality of fish rations can influence the survival of smolts and the ultimate return of adults. The test involves a comparison between performances of coho and chinook salmon reared on rations containing very high quality protein derived from vacuum dried meals and those of fish reared on commercial rations, with commercial fish meal as a source of protein. Survival and return of several brood years of test and control fish are used to measure the influence of ration on survival. Rearing and release of tagged fish to date include 1982, 1983, 1984 and 1985 broods of coho salmon; the 1983 and 1984 broods of fall chinook (tule stock) salmon; and the 1985 and 1986 broods of fall chinook (upriver bright stock) salmon. This report includes recovery data from these marked fish collected through September 1988.

  14. Development of Rations for the Enhanced Survival of Salmon, 1988-1989 Progress (Annual) Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewing, Richard D.

    1990-03-01

    The nutritional quality of feed plays an important role in determining the health and fitness'' of smolts. Commercial fish meal, the major source of protein in salmon rations, may be reduced in quality from poor drying techniques during manufacture. Dietary stress in the hatchery may result. This investigation test the hypothesis that protein quality of fish rations can influence the survival of smolts and the ultimate return of adults. The test involves a comparison between performances of coho (Oncorhynchus kisutch) and chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) reared on rations containing very high quality protein derived from vacuum dried meals and those of fish reared on commercial rations, with commercial fish meal as a source of protein. Survival and return of several brood years of test and control fish are used to measure the influence of ration on survival. Rearing and release of tagged fish to date include 1982, 1983, 1984 and 1985 broods of coho salmon (Sandy stock); the 1983 and 1984 broods of fall chinook (tule stock) salmon; and the 1985 and 1986 broods of fall chinook (upriver bright stock) salmon. This report includes recovery data from these marked fish collected through September 1989. 2 tabs.

  15. The development of mixer machine for organic animal feed production: Proposed study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leman, A. M.; Wahab, R. Abdul; Zakaria, Supaat; Feriyanto, Dafit; Nor, M. I. F. Che Mohd; Muzarpar, Syafiq

    2017-09-01

    Mixer machine plays a major role in producing homogenous composition of animal feed. Long time production, inhomogeneous and minor agglomeration has been observed by existing mixer. Therefore, this paper proposed continuous mixer to enhance mixing efficiency with shorter time of mixing process in order to abbreviate the whole process in animal feed production. Through calculation of torque, torsion, bending, power and energy consumption will perform in mixer machine process. Proposed mixer machine is designed by two layer buckets with purpose for continuity of mixing process. Mixing process was performed by 4 blades which consists of various arm length such as 50, 100,150 and 225 mm in 60 rpm velocity clockwise rotation. Therefore by using this machine will produce the homogenous composition of animal feed through nutrition analysis and short operation time of mixing process approximately of 5 minutes. Therefore, the production of animal feed will suitable for various animals including poultry and aquatic fish. This mixer will available for various organic material in animal feed production. Therefore, this paper will highlights some areas such as continues animal feed supply chain and bio-based animal feed.

  16. Development of an Animal Model of Thoracolumbar Burst Fracture-Induced Acute Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    At the advice of our veterinary colleagues we also made some minor changes to the post-surgical animal care. The primary analgesia was changed...from fentanyl patch to IM buprenorphine because the patches did not stick to the animal hide. We also performed routine skin care, bladder expression

  17. Development of the teaching simulator based on animated film to strengthening pedagogical competencies of prospective teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatimah, Siti; Setiawan, Wawan; Kusnendar, Jajang; Rasim, Junaeti, Enjun; Anggraeni, Ria

    2017-05-01

    Debriefing of pedagogical competence through both theory and practice which became a requirement for prospective teachers were through micro teaching and teaching practice program. But, some reports from the partner schools stated that the participants of teaching practice program have not well prepared on implementing the learning in the classroom because of lacking the debriefing. In line with the development of information technology, it is very possible to develop a media briefing of pedagogical competencies for prospective teachers through an application so that they can use it anytime and anywhere. This study was one answer to the problem of unpreparedness participants of the teaching practice program. This study developed a teaching simulator, which was an application for learning simulation with the animated film to enhance the professional pedagogical competence prospective teachers. By the application of this teaching simulator, students as prospective teacher could test their own pedagogic competence through learning models with different varied characteristics of students. Teaching Simulator has been equipped with features that allow users to be able to explore the quality of teaching techniques that they employ for the teaching and learning activities in the classroom. These features included the election approaches, the student's character, learning materials, questioning techniques, discussion, and evaluation. Teaching simulator application provided the ease of prospective teachers or teachers in implementing the development of lessons for practice in the classroom. Applications that have been developed to apply simulation models allow users to freely manage a lesson. Development of teaching simulator application was passed through the stages which include needs assessment, design, coding, testing, revision, improvement, grading, and packaging. The application of teaching simulator was also enriched with some real instructional video as a comparison

  18. Effects of the chitin synthesis inhibitor buprofezin on survival and development of immatures of Chrysoperla rufilabris (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, T X; Chen, T Y

    2000-04-01

    Effects of buprofezin (Applaud), a chitin synthesis inhibitor, on survival and development of eggs, three instars, and pupae of Chrysoperla rufilabris (Burmeister) were determined in the laboratory. Buprofezin at three tested concentrations (100, 500, and 1,000 mg [AI]/liter) did not affect the viability and development of eggs when the eggs were treated, or third instars and pupae when those stages were treated. Although the degree of effects by buprofezin on larvae varied with instar, buprofezin at the higher concentrations (500 and 1,000 mg [AI]/liter) reduced survival rates 17-47% and prolonged the overall development from first instars to adult emergence by 2 or 3 d when first instars were treated, indicating that the first instar is the most vulnerable stage. When second instars were treated, the survival of C. rufilabris from second instars to pupae was not significantly affected. However, the developmental time from second instar to adult emergence was longer in the treatments with the highest concentration (1,000 mg [AI]/liter) than that with the lowest concentration (100 mg [AI]/liter). The compatibility of buprofezin with natural enemies in integrated pest management programs is discussed.

  19. Survivability on the Island of Spice: The Development of the UH-60 Blackhawk and Its Baptism of Fire in Operation Urgent Fury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-12

    SURVIVABILITY ON THE ISLAND OF SPICE : THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE UH-60 BLACKHAWK AND ITS BAPTISM OF FIRE IN OPERATION URGENT FURY......THESIS APPROVAL PAGE Name of Candidate: Major Matthew G. Easley Thesis Title: Survivability on the Island of Spice : The Development of the UH

  20. THE DEVELOPMENT OF THREE DIMENSIONAL ANIMATION FILM FOR CHARACTER EDUCATION MEDIA IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cepi Riyana

    2015-06-01

    Abstrak. Pembentukan karakter merupakan salah satu tujuan pendidikan nasional. Pasal 1 UU Sisdiknas tahun 2003 menyatakan bahwa di antara tujuan pendidikan nasional adalah mengembangkan potensi peserta didik untuk memiliki kecerdasan, kepribadian dan akhlak mulia. Saat ini penguatan terhadap karakter bangsa menjadi prioritas program strategis pendidikan nasional, mengingat kondisi bangsa harus dikembalikan pada karakterisasi jati diri bangsa. Berbagai upaya perlu dilakukan untuk membangun pendidikan karakter, diantaranya melalui pemodelan (modeling karakter melalui tayangan Fim Animasi 3D. Kekuatan media ini adalah daya tariknya yang mampu menghipnosis anak sehingga muatan-muatan pendidikan karakter dapat diinternalisasi pada diri anak. Tujuan Penelitian ini adalah “mengembangkan Film Animasi 3D untuk Pendidikan Karater di Sekolah Dasar”, Penelitian ini menggunakan metode Research & Development (R&D melalui tahapan : (1 Analisis kebutuhan Media, (2 Pengembangan Media , (3 Validasi dan Diseminasi Produk. Subyek penelitian adalah siswa SD, dengan lokasi di tiga wilayah Jawa Barat (Cimahi, Kabupaten Bandung Barat dan Cianjur. Hasil penelitian ini menunjukkan bahwa model animasi yang didesain dengan ABC (animation character building berdampak pada pembiasaan positif sebagai langkah awal untuk pembentukan karakter pada siswa SD. Kata Kunci : Pendidikan Karakter, Film 3D Animasi

  1. Development of a PET Scanner for Simultaneously Imaging Small Animals with MRI and PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Thompson

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Recently, positron emission tomography (PET is playing an increasingly important role in the diagnosis and staging of cancer. Combined PET and X-ray computed tomography (PET-CT scanners are now the modality of choice in cancer treatment planning. More recently, the combination of PET and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is being explored in many sites. Combining PET and MRI has presented many challenges since the photo-multiplier tubes (PMT in PET do not function in high magnetic fields, and conventional PET detectors distort MRI images. Solid state light sensors like avalanche photo-diodes (APDs and more recently silicon photo-multipliers (SiPMs are much less sensitive to magnetic fields thus easing the compatibility issues. This paper presents the results of a group of Canadian scientists who are developing a PET detector ring which fits inside a high field small animal MRI scanner with the goal of providing simultaneous PET and MRI images of small rodents used in pre-clinical medical research. We discuss the evolution of both the crystal blocks (which detect annihilation photons from positron decay and the SiPM array performance in the last four years which together combine to deliver significant system performance in terms of speed, energy and timing resolution.

  2. Nanoradiopharmaceuticals for breast cancer imaging: development, characterization, and imaging in inducted animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarcinelli, Michelle Alvares; Albernaz, Marta de Souza; Szwed, Marzena; Iscaife, Alexandre; Leite, Kátia Ramos Moreira; Junqueira, Mara de Souza; Bernardes, Emerson Soares; da Silva, Emerson Oliveira; Tavares, Maria Ines Bruno; Santos-Oliveira, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies as polymeric nanoparticles are quite interesting and endow this new drug category with many advantages, especially by reducing the number of adverse reactions and, in the case of radiopharmaceuticals, also reducing the amount of radiation (dose) administered to the patient. In this study, a nanoradiopharmaceutical was developed using polylactic acid (PLA)/polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)/montmorillonite (MMT)/trastuzumab nanoparticles labeled with technetium-99m (99mTc) for breast cancer imaging. In order to confirm the nanoparticle formation, atomic force microscopy and dynamic light scattering were performed. Cytotoxicity of the nanoparticle and biodistribution with 99mTc in healthy and inducted animals were also measured. The results from atomic force microscopy showed that the nanoparticles were spherical, with a size range of ~200–500 nm. The dynamic light scattering analysis demonstrated that over 90% of the nanoparticles produced had a size of 287 nm with a zeta potential of −14,6 mV. The cytotoxicity results demonstrated that the nanoparticles were capable of reaching breast cancer cells. The biodistribution data demonstrated that the PLA/PVA/MMT/trastuzumab nanoparticles labeled with 99mTc have great renal clearance and also a high uptake by the lesion, as ~45% of the PLA/PVA/MMT/trastuzumab nanoparticles injected were taken up by the lesion. The data support PLA/PVA/MMT/trastuzumab labeled with 99mTc nanoparticles as nanoradiopharmaceuticals for breast cancer imaging. PMID:27713638

  3. Development of an animal model to evaluate the allergenicity of food allergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, Birgit; Quarcoo, David; Buhner, Sabine; Reese, Gerald; Vieths, Stefan; Hamelmann, Eckard

    2014-01-01

    Considering the increasing numbers of patients suffering from food allergy (FA) as well as the great variety of novel foods and food compositions, an unmet need exists for the development of preclinical approaches to characterize the allergenic potential of proteins. The aim of our study was to evaluate the allergenicity of different food allergens in a rat model. Brown Norway rats were sensitized to protein extracts (RuBisCO, apple, soy, peanut, garden pea) or ovalbumin (OVA) combined with Bordetella pertussis and aluminium hydroxide, followed by oral allergen challenges. Allergen-specific serum immunoglobulin production and the proliferation of mononuclear cells from spleen confirmed sensitization. To assess functional alterations in the gut, intestinal permeability was measured, which increased in sensitized and challenged animals compared to non-sensitized controls. Allergens with high allergenic potential (peanut, OVA, soy) caused a stronger immunological response than allergens with low allergenic potential, such as RuBisCO and apple. Moreover, the immunological responses were reduced when using boiled instead of raw soy and pea proteins. This model mimics key features of FA and facilitates investigating the allergenicity of allergens in novel food or food compositions in vivo. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Experimental dermatological surgery: An animal model for developing skills with dermal fillers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Catucci Boza

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The importance of laboratory experiments in the formation of physicians is well recognized since they facilitate scientific development and enhance technical skills. Dermal filling procedures are performed for the correction of wrinkles, rhytids, scars, and lipodystrophy. Till date, experimental models for the training of dermal filling techniques have not been studied. To demonstrate an experimental laboratory model for the training of dermal filling techniques in an animal model. The heads of pigs were used for this purpose, together with Carbopol gel at different densities, which was used to simulate the fillers available in the market. Needles and specific cannulas were used to apply the fillers into the creases and other areas of the pig skin. The pig head appears to be a suitable model for this training. Carbopol gel is a good choice for simulating fillers. This model of laboratory experiment requires a minimum of infrastructure; it is a low-cost alternative and facilitates practical training in the application of dermal fillers.

  5. Animal Research, the 3Rs, and the "Internet of Things": Opportunities and Oversight in International Pharmaceutical Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemi, Steven M; Davies, Gail F

    2016-12-01

    Stages of drug (and vaccine) discovery and evaluation that involve laboratory animals increasingly occur via scientific collaborations across national borders and continents. Many of these research collaborations are between asset-rich institutions and others in less wealthy parts of the world. The care and use of laboratory animals in geographically disparate locations introduces new complexities, such as different oversight requirements and available resources, as well as diverse organizational and cultural milieus. These complexities can hamper the effectiveness of local animal welfare committees and regulatory compliance, as well as compromise good science and animal welfare. At the same time, new technologies are becoming available that offer greater transparency in how these collaborations and their animal subjects are faring in real time that, in turn, can enable progress towards the 3 Rs. The focus of this essay is to identify potential rewards and risks stemming from new techniques for producing and connecting data in preclinical pharmaceutical development and consider how further social scientific investigations have the potential to enhance the benefits of international research collaborations for both human health and animal welfare. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute for Laboratory Animal Research. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Breast cancer and leptomeningeal disease (LMD): hormone receptor status influences time to development of LMD and survival from LMD diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yust-Katz, S; Garciarena, P; Liu, D; Yuan, Y; Ibrahim, N; Yerushalmi, R; Penas-Prado, M; Groves, M D

    2013-09-01

    Leptomeningeal disease (LMD) occurs in 5 % of breast cancer patients. The aim of this study was to identify risk factors related to survival and time to development of LMD in breast cancer patients. A retrospective analysis of breast cancer patients with LMD, evaluated in MDACC between 1995 and 2011. 103 patients with diagnosis of breast cancer and LMD were identified (one male). The median age at LMD diagnosis was 49.2 years. 78.2 % had invasive ductal carcinoma. Hormone receptors (HRs) were positive in 55.3 % of patients, 47.4 % were human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive and 22.8 % were triple negative. 52 % of the patients were treated with WBRT, 19 % with spinal radiation, 36 % with systemic chemotherapy and 55 % with intrathecal chemotherapy. Estimated median overall survival from time of breast cancer diagnosis was 3.66 years. Median survival from time of LMD diagnosis was 4.2 months. Time from breast cancer diagnosis to LMD was 2.48 years. In multivariate analysis, HR status and stage at diagnosis were significantly associated with time to LMD diagnosis (p < 0.05). In triple negative patients, time to LMD was shorter. In patients who were HR positive, time to LMD was longer. Survival from LMD diagnosis was significantly associated with both treatment, as well as positive HR status (multivariate analysis p < 0.05). In conclusion LMD has dismal prognosis in breast cancer patients. HR status contributes to time to LMD diagnosis and survival from LMD diagnosis. The impact of treatment aimed at LMD cannot be ascertained in our retrospective study due to the inherent bias associated with the decision to treat.

  7. The development of response surface pathway design to reduce animal numbers in toxicity studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewi, Sagita; Aune, Tore; Bunæs, John A Aasen; Smith, Adrian J; Larsen, Stig

    2014-03-25

    This study describes the development of Response Surface Pathway (RSP) design, assesses its performance and effectiveness in estimating LD50, and compares RSP with Up and Down Procedures (UDPs) and Random Walk (RW) design. A basic 4-level RSP design was used on 36 male ICR mice given intraperitoneal doses of Yessotoxin. Simulations were performed to optimise the design. A k-adjustment factor was introduced to ensure coverage of the dose window and calculate the dose steps. Instead of using equal numbers of mice on all levels, the number of mice was increased at each design level. Additionally, the binomial outcome variable was changed to multinomial. The performance of the RSP designs and a comparison of UDPs and RW were assessed by simulations. The optimised 4-level RSP design was used on 24 female NMRI mice given Azaspiracid-1 intraperitoneally. The in vivo experiment with basic 4-level RSP design estimated the LD50 of Yessotoxin to be 463 μg/kgBW (95% CI: 383-535). By inclusion of the k-adjustment factor with equal or increasing numbers of mice on increasing dose levels, the estimate changed to 481 μg/kgBW (95% CI: 362-566) and 447 μg/kgBW (95% CI: 378-504 μg/kgBW), respectively. The optimised 4-level RSP estimated the LD50 to be 473 μg/kgBW (95% CI: 442-517). A similar increase in power was demonstrated using the optimised RSP design on real Azaspiracid-1 data. The simulations showed that the inclusion of the k-adjustment factor, reduction in sample size by increasing the number of mice on higher design levels and incorporation of a multinomial outcome gave estimates of the LD50 that were as good as those with the basic RSP design. Furthermore, optimised RSP design performed on just three levels reduced the number of animals from 36 to 15 without loss of information, when compared with the 4-level designs. Simulated comparison of the RSP design with UDPs and RW design demonstrated the superiority of RSP. Optimised RSP design reduces the number of animals

  8. Development of a PET Insert for simultaneously small animal PET/MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yingjie; Zhang, Zhiming; Li, Daowu; Liu, Shuangquan; Wang, Peilin; Feng, Baotong; Chai, Pei; Wei, Long [Division of Nuclear Technology and Applications, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100049 (China); Beijing Engineering Research Center of Radiographic Techniques and Equipment, Beijing, 100049 (China)

    2015-05-18

    PET/MR is a new multi-modality imaging system which provide both structural and functional information with good soft tissue imaging ability and no ionizing radiation. In recent years, PET/MR is under major progress because of the development of silicon photomultipliers (SiPM). The goal of this study is to develop a MRI compatible PET insert based on SiPM and LYSO scintillator. The PET system was constituted by the detector ring, electronics and software. The detector ring consists of 16 detector module. The inner diameter of the ring was 151 mm, the external diameter was 216 mm, which was big enough for small animal research, e.g. rat, rabbit and tupaia. The sensor of each module was 2*2 SensL SPMArraySL, coupled with an array of 14 x 14 LYSO crystals, each crystal measuring 2 mm x 2 mm 10 mm. The detector was encapsulated in a copper box for light and magnetic shielding. Resister charge multiplexing circuit was used in the front end electronics. Each detector output 8X and 8Y position signals. One summed timing signal was extracted from the common cathode of all 64 channels. All these signals were transmitted to digital electronic board by a 3 m long coaxial cable from inside of the MR to the outside. Each digital electronic board handled 8 detector modules based on FPGA to obtain the timing, position and energy information of a single event. And then these single events were sent to the coincidence processing board to produce coincidence packets which are prepared for further processing. A 0.2mCi 68Ge line source was used to do the preliminary imaging test. The image was reconstructed by 3D-OSEM algorithm. The initial result proved the system to be feasible as a PET. FDG phantom imaging and simultaneous PET/MR imaging are in progress.

  9. Biothreat Reduction and Economic Development: The Case of Animal Husbandry in Central Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert eWalker

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Improving human welfare is a global concern, but not always easy to achieve. In this regard, challenges have been faced by the states of the Former Soviet Union (FSU, where socialist institutions have disappeared, and the transition to a market economy has been slow. Economic adjustments have been difficult in the new nations of central Asia, including Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan. Here, a severe climate limits agriculture, and industrialization has been inhibited by a lack of infrastructure, human capital, and financial resources. These conditions are aggravated by the fact that the central Asia is mostly landlocked, far from market centers. Despite these barriers, development potential exists, and the goal of the paper is to consider central Asia’s pastoral economy, with a focus on Kazakhstan, which stands poised to become a regional growth pole. The article pursues its goal as follows. It first addresses the biothreat situation to central Asian livestock herds, a significant impediment to realizing the market potential of the region’s animal products. It next provides an outline of interventions that can reduce risk levels for key biothreats impacting central Asia, namely foot and mouth disease (FMD and Brucellosis. Included is a success story involving FMD eradication in Brazil, which enabled an export boom in beef. After this comes a description of the epidemiological situation in Kazakhstan; here, the article considers how wildlife might act as a disease reservoir, which presents a conservation issue for the Kazakhstani case. This is followed by a discussion of the role of science in threat reduction, particularly with respect to the potential offered by geospatial technologies. The article concludes with an assessment of the research that would be necessary to identify pathways to developing the economic potential of central Asia, as changes in policy are implemented and livestock health improves.

  10. Syndromic surveillance in companion animals utilizing electronic medical records data: development and proof of concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip H. Kass

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In an effort to recognize and address communicable and point-source epidemics in dog and cat populations, this project created a near real-time syndromic surveillance system devoted to companion animal health in the United States. With over 150 million owned pets in the US, the development of such a system is timely in light of previous epidemics due to various causes that were only recognized in retrospect. The goal of this study was to develop epidemiologic and statistical methods for veterinary hospital-based surveillance, and to demonstrate its efficacy by detection of simulated foodborne outbreaks using a database of over 700 hospitals. Data transfer protocols were established via a secure file transfer protocol site, and a data repository was constructed predominantly utilizing open-source software. The daily proportion of patients with a given clinical or laboratory finding was contrasted with an equivalent average proportion from a historical comparison period, allowing construction of the proportionate diagnostic outcome ratio and its confidence interval for recognizing aberrant heath events. A five-tiered alert system was used to facilitate daily assessment of almost 2,000 statistical analyses. Two simulated outbreak scenarios were created by independent experts, blinded to study investigators, and embedded in the 2010 medical records. Both outbreaks were detected almost immediately by the alert system, accurately detecting species affected using relevant clinical and laboratory findings, and ages involved. Besides demonstrating proof-in-concept of using veterinary hospital databases to detect aberrant events in space and time, this research can be extended to conducting post-detection etiologic investigations utilizing exposure information in the medical record.

  11. Development of an animal model to investigate optimal laparoscopic trocar site fascial closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Sickle, Kent R; Nanda Kumar, Hanuma Reddy; Parikh, Amit; Ayon, Arturo A; Cohn, Stephen M

    2013-09-01

    The rate of hernia formation after closure of 10-12 mm laparoscopic trocar sites is grossly under-reported. Using an animal model, we have developed a method to assess trocar site fascial dehiscence and the strength of different methods of fascial closure. Pigs (n = 9; 17 ± 2.5 lbs) underwent placement of 12 mm Hasson trocars with pneumoperitoneum maintained for 1 h. Three closure techniques (Figure-of-eight; simple interrupted; pulley) were compared with no fascial closure and to native fascia at five randomly allocated abdominal wall midline locations. Necropsy was performed on the fourth postoperative d. Statistical comparisons of tensile strength and breaking strength based on closure type and trocar location were made using ANOVA with Tukey's tests. The mean (SD) force (Newtons) required for fascial disruption varied significantly with closure type [Native Fascia 170 (39), Figure-of-eight 169 (31), Pulley 167 (59), Simple Interrupted 151 (27), No Closure 108 (28)]; P = 0.007. The mean force required for fascial disruption was significantly increased for Native Fascia, Figure-of-eight, and Pulley relative to No Closure (P = 0.013, P = 0.015, P = 0.023, respectively). The mean (SD) force (in Newtons) required for fascial disruption also varied significantly with location of trocar [subxiphoid 181 (43), supraumbilical 151 (23), Umbilical 146 (23), infraumbilical 168 (62), suprapubic 120 (38)]; P = 0.03. The mean force for subxiphoid location was significantly increased relative to the suprapubic location (P = 0.021). We have developed a novel assessment model that reliably detects differences in fascial integrity after laparoscopic trocar placement and closure. This model will allow for further testing of various trocars and closure techniques, and facilitate hernia prevention strategies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. COLLECTIVE LEARNING IN A LEARNING ORGANIZATION: GROWING TEAM LEARNING CULTURE TO SURVIVE AND DEVELOP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adi Suryani

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A learning organization has a deep culture of learning. It is constantly encourage its member to learn. This learning activity is not only for adapting to the rapid changing of its internal and external environment, but also for growing. The effort of a learning organization to create a conducive learning climate can be indicated by training its members. Working towards a learning organization has both its strengths and drawbacks. The strengths are it can improve the organization performance and organization survival. However, learning too rapid can lead to learning stress. Moreover it can lead to harsh internal competition.

  13. Developing the Frith-Happé animations: a quick and objective test of Theory of Mind for adults with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Sarah J; Coniston, Devorah; Rogers, Rosannagh; Frith, Uta

    2011-04-01

    It is now widely accepted that individuals with autism have a Theory of Mind (ToM) or mentalizing deficit. This has traditionally been assessed with false-belief tasks and, more recently, with silent geometric animations, an on-line ToM task. In adults with milder forms of autism standard false-belief tests, originally devised for children, often prove insensitive, while the Frith-Happé animations have had rather better success at capturing the on-line ToM deficit in this population. However, analysis of participants' verbal descriptions of these animations, which span scenarios from "Random" to "Goal-Directed" and "ToM," is time consuming and subjective. In this study, we developed and established the feasibility of an objective method of response through a series of multiple-choice questions. Sixteen adults with autism and 15 typically developing adults took part, matched for age and intelligence. The adults with autism were less accurate as a group at categorizing the Frith-Happé animations by the presence or absence of mental and physical interactions. Furthermore, they were less able to select the correct emotions that are typically attributed to the triangles in the mental state animations. This new objective method for assessing the understanding of the animations succeeded in being as sensitive as the original subjective method in detecting the mentalizing difficulties in autism, as well as being quicker and easier to administer and analyze. Copyright © 2011, International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Education at the service of man in promoting child survival and development: the special role of primary schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyamwaya, D

    1987-03-01

    The importance of health education in primary schools is a major concern in Southern and Eastern Africa. Although health education may not always cause changes in behavior that are needed for survival, it is the first crucial step. Parents, especially mothers with just 1 additional year of schooling results in a reduction of 9/1000 in infant mortality. Since 20% of the total population are in primary schools, if their education reaches 2 other people then 1/2 the country's population would be affected. These schools have the infrastructure that can be used to distribute health services. Since teachers are respected, their influence on the community would be taken seriously, and students are likely to participate in many activities outside the school to promote child survival and development. The basic causes for high infant mortality in Africa are malnutrition and communicable diseases; activities necessary for child survival are, growth monitoring, oral rehydration, breast feeding, and immunization. Female education, nutrition and food production, and family planning are also important elements. In addition, components such as water and personal hygiene, environmental sanitation, psychosocial stimulation and development, and maternal health must be monitored. The educational process must be applicable to real life situations and be taught in an environment where students enjoy learning. In addition to the knowledge, behavioral change must be emphasized. Since teachers see themselves as more in academic roles changes will be needed to make them more effective.

  15. Qualitative stakeholder analysis for the development of sustainable monitoringssystem for farm animal welfare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bracke, M.B.M.; Greef, de K.H.; Hopster, H.

    2005-01-01

    Continued concern for animal welfare may be alleviated when welfare would be monitored on farms. Monitoring can be characterized as an information system where various stakeholders periodically exchange relevant information. Stakeholders include producers, consumers, retailers, the government,

  16. Growth and Development Symposium: promoting healthier humans through healthier livestock: animal agriculture enters the metagenomics era

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Frank, D N

    2011-01-01

    .... Enhancements in food quality and reductions in the environmental effects of modern agriculture represent 2 distinct paths through which animal sciences can contribute to the cause of public health...

  17. Effect of semolina-jaggery diet on survival and development of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Debarati; James, Joel; Roy, Debasish; Sen, Soumadeep; Chatterjee, Rishita; Thirumurugan, Kavitha

    2015-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster is an ideal model organism for developmental studies. This study tests the potential of semolina-jaggery (SJ) diet as a new formulation for bulk rearing of flies. Semolina and jaggery are organic products obtained from wheat endosperm and cane sugar, respectively. Semolina is a rich source of carbohydrates and protein. Jaggery has a high content of dietary sugars. Moreover, preparation of semolina jaggery diet is cost-effective and easy. Thus, the current study aimed to compare survival and developmental parameters of flies fed the SJ diet to flies fed the standard cornmeal-sugar-yeast (CSY) diet. SJ diet enhanced survival of flies without affecting fecundity; male flies showed increased resistance to starvation. A higher number of flies emerged at F2 and F3 generation when fed the SJ diet than when fed the control CSY diet. SJ diet did not increase fly body weight and lipid percentage. Therefore, SJ diet can be used for bulk rearing of healthy flies at par with the standard cornmeal-sugar-yeast diet.

  18. Effect of a long-term high-protein diet on survival, obesity development, and gut microbiota in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiilerich, Pia; Myrmel, Lene Secher; Fjære, Even

    2016-01-01

    , affecting pathways related to metabolism and inflammation. Analysis of fecal bacterial DNA using the Mouse Intestinal Tract Chip revealed significant changes in the composition of the gut microbiota in relation to host age and dietary fat content, but not the protein/sucrose ratio. Accordingly, dietary fat......Female C57BL/6J mice were fed a regular low-fat diet or high-fat diets combined with either high or low protein-to-sucrose ratios during their entire lifespan to examine the long-term effects on obesity development, gut microbiota, and survival. Intake of a high-fat diet with a low protein...... rather than the protein/sucrose ratio or adiposity is a major driver shaping the gut microbiota, whereas the effect of a high-fat diet on survival is dependent on the protein/sucrose ratio....

  19. Effects of interspecific competition, predation, and their interaction on survival and development time of immature Anopheles quadrimaculatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Tiffany M; Chase, Jonathan M; Goss, Charles W; Knight, Jennifer J

    2004-12-01

    We examined the effect of predation by the backswimmer (Notonecta undulata; Hemiptera: Notonectidae), competition by zooplankton and snails, and both predation and competition on the survival and development time of larval Anopheles quadrimaculatus mosquitoes in experimental mesocosms. We found that both predation and interspecific competition greatly reduced the survivorship of larvae and the number of larvae emerging into adulthood. Treatments with both predators and competitors had fewer larvae transitioning among instars and into adulthood but not in an additive way. In addition, mosquito larvae in the presence of predators and competitors took two days longer to emerge than where predators and competitions were absent. Our work provides evidence that biotic interactions, such as predation and competition, can strongly regulate the number of mosquito larvae by reducing the number of larvae that survive through instars and to emergence and by increasing the generation time.

  20. A roadmap for the development of alternative (non-animal) methods for systemic toxicity testing

    OpenAIRE

    Ruhdel, Irmela; Vanparys, Philippe; Knudsen, Thomas B.; ROGGEN Erwin; Oué draogo, Gladys; Basketter, David A; Daneshian, Mardas; Eskes, Chantra; Rossi, Annamaria; Skinner, Nigel; Blaauboer, Bas; Pelkonen, Olavi; Maxwell, Gavin; Yager, James

    2012-01-01

    Systemic toxicity testing forms the cornerstone for the safety evaluation of substances. Pressures to move from traditional animal models to novel technologies arise from various concerns, including: the need to evaluate large numbers of previously untested chemicals and new products (such as nanoparticles or cell therapies), the limited predictivity of traditional tests for human health effects, duration and costs of current approaches, and animal welfare considerations. The latter holds esp...

  1. Incubation media affect the survival, pathway and time of embryo development in Neotropical annual fish Austrolebias nigrofasciatus (Rivulidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Fonseca, A P; Volcan, M V; Robaldo, R B

    2018-01-01

    To analyse the survival, pathway and time of embryo development in the annual fish Austrolebias nigrofasciatus eggs were monitored in four liquid media and two damp media under experimental conditions for 130 days until their development was complete. Eggs kept in the same breeding water from oviposition remained in diapause I (DI) during all experiments. In constrast, up to the stage prior to entering diapause II (DII), the other media had no influence on development. Embryos at this stage (DII), however, show longer development time when treated in medium with water and powdered coconut shell so that about 80% of embryos remained in DII at 100 days. In contrast, all other treatments had a significantly lower proportion of embryos remaining in DII. When treated with Yamamoto's solution in humid media, embryos showed the fastest development. The first fully developed embryos (DIII) were seen at 27 days after oviposition. It took an average of 46-58 days for 50% of eggs in each treatment to reach DIII. Compared with other studies, survival in all incubation media was high at between 70 and 98%. Taken together, it can be concluded that all incubation media were found to be viable for maintaining embryos. Altering developmental trajectories through the manipulation of diapauses in different media makes this species a potential model organism for laboratory studies. © 2017 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  2. Biothreat Reduction and Economic Development: The Case of Animal Husbandry in Central Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Robert; Blackburn, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Improving human welfare is a critical global concern, but not always easy to achieve. Complications in this regard have been faced by the states of the Former Soviet Union, where socialist-style economic institutions have disappeared, and the transition to a market economy has been slow in coming. Lack of capital, ethnic conflict, and political instability have at times undermined the institutional reform that would be necessary to enable economic efficiency and development. Nowhere are such challenges more pronounced than in the new nation states of central Asia, including Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan. Here, a severe climate limits agriculture, and industrialization has been inhibited by lack of infrastructure, low levels of human capital, and a scarcity of financial resources. These conditions are aggravated by the fact that the central Asian states are landlocked, far from centers of market demand and capital availability. Despite these daunting barriers, development potential does exist, and the goal of the paper is to consider central Asia's pastoral economy, with a focus on Kazakhstan, which stands poised to become a regional growth pole. The article pursues its goal as follows. It first addresses the biothreat situation to central Asian livestock herds, the most significant existing impediment to realizing the full market potential of the region's animal products. Next, it provides an outline of interventions that can reduce risk levels for key biothreats impacting central Asia, namely foot and mouth disease (FMD), which greatly impacts livestock and prohibits export, and Brucellosis, a bacterial zoonosis with high incidence in both humans and livestock in the region. Included is an important success story involving the FMD eradication programs in Brazil, which enabled an export boom in beef. After this comes a description of the epidemiological situation in Kazakhstan; here, the article considers the role of wildlife in

  3. Effect of different diets and rearing tanks on the development and larval survival of Lysmata amboinensis (De Mann, 1888

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Marques

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The optimization of rearing tanks and identification of rich nutritional diets for the larval development of ornamental decapods are two key factors in defining suitable protocols for larval rearing. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of two rearing tanks (spheroconical and planktonkreisel and three different diets (diet 1: newly hatched Artemia nauplii on a density of 5 nauplii/ml, diet 2: newly hatched Artemia nauplii and harpacticoid copepods on a proportion of 3 artemia nauplii and 2 copepods/ml, Diet 3: Tetraselmis chuii for the first 24h, followed by Artemia nauplii at a density of 5 nauplii/ml on the survival rate and larval development time of Lysmata amboinensis. The results here obtained indicated that the survival rate at 10 days after hatching on kreisel tanks (48.9 ± 3.60% was significantly higher than spheroconical tanks (16.2 ± 2.80% (PTetraselmis chuii was used as a first food (76.7 ± 6.67%. The development time from Zoea I to Zoea IV of L. amboinensis was faster when subject to diet 1 (7.5 ± 0.01 days. In contrast, diet 3 was revealed a longer development period (8.2 ± 0.01 days. The use of copepods diet on the larval rearing of L. amboinensis larvae although not displaying the highest survival, revealed to be extremely promising, needing to adjust the size of the prey throughout the larval development of L. amboinensis.

  4. HuD and the Survival Motor Neuron Protein Interact in Motoneurons and Are Essential for Motoneuron Development, Function, and mRNA Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao le, Thi; Duy, Phan Q; An, Min; Talbot, Jared; Iyer, Chitra C; Wolman, Marc; Beattie, Christine E

    2017-11-29

    Motoneurons establish a critical link between the CNS and muscles. If motoneurons do not develop correctly, they cannot form the required connections, resulting in movement defects or paralysis. Compromised development can also lead to degeneration because the motoneuron is not set up to function properly. Little is known, however, regarding the mechanisms that control vertebrate motoneuron development, particularly the later stages of axon branch and dendrite formation. The motoneuron disease spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is caused by low levels of the survival motor neuron (SMN) protein leading to defects in vertebrate motoneuron development and synapse formation. Here we show using zebrafish as a model system that SMN interacts with the RNA binding protein (RBP) HuD in motoneurons in vivo during formation of axonal branches and dendrites. To determine the function of HuD in motoneurons, we generated zebrafish HuD mutants and found that they exhibited decreased motor axon branches, dramatically fewer dendrites, and movement defects. These same phenotypes are present in animals expressing low levels of SMN, indicating that both proteins function in motoneuron development. HuD binds and transports mRNAs and one of its target mRNAs, Gap43, is involved in axonal outgrowth. We found that Gap43 was decreased in both HuD and SMN mutants. Importantly, transgenic expression of HuD in motoneurons of SMN mutants rescued the motoneuron defects, the movement defects, and Gap43 mRNA levels. These data support that the interaction between SMN and HuD is critical for motoneuron development and point to a role for RBPs in SMA.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In zebrafish models of the motoneuron disease spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), motor axons fail to form the normal extent of axonal branches and dendrites leading to decreased motor function. SMA is caused by low levels of the survival motor neuron (SMN) protein. We show in motoneurons in vivo that SMN interacts with the RNA binding

  5. Design and development of a high resolution animal SPECT scanner dedicated for rat and mouse imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sajedi, Salar; Zeraatkar, Navid [Research Center for Molecular and Cellular Imaging, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Moji, Vahideh; Farahani, Mohammad Hossein [Research Center for Molecular and Cellular Imaging, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Parto Negar Persia Co, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sarkar, Saeed [Research Center for Molecular and Cellular Imaging, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Arabi, Hossein [Research Center for Molecular and Cellular Imaging, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Teymoorian, Behnoosh [Research Center for Molecular and Cellular Imaging, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Parto Negar Persia Co, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghafarian, Pardis [Chronic Respiratory Disease Research Center, NRITLD, Masih Daneshvari Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); PET/CT and Cyclotron Center, Masih Daneshvari Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rahmim, Arman [Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Reza Ay, Mohammad, E-mail: mohammadreza_ay@sina.tums.ac.ir [Research Center for Molecular and Cellular Imaging, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-03-21

    A dedicated small-animal SPECT system, HiReSPECT, was designed and developed to provide a high resolution molecular imaging modality in response to growing research demands. HiReSPECT is a dual-head system mounted on a rotating gantry. The detection system is based on pixelated CsI(Na) scintillator crystals coupled to two Hamamatsu H8500 Position Sensitive Photomultiplier Tubes in each head. Also, a high resolution parallel-hole collimator is applied to every head. The dimensions of each head are 50 mm×100 mm, enabling sufficient transaxial and axial fields-of-view (TFOV and AFOV), respectively, for coverage of the entire mouse in single-bed position imaging. However, a 50 mm TFOV is not sufficient for transaxial coverage of rats. To address this, each head can be rotated by 90 degrees in order to align the larger dimension of the heads with the short body axis, allowing tomographic data acquisition for rats. An innovative non-linear recursive filter was used for signal processing/detection. Resolution recovery was also embedded in the modified Maximum-Likelihood Expectation Maximization (MLEM) image reconstruction code to compensate for Collimator-Detector Response (CDR). Moreover, an innovative interpolation algorithm was developed to speed up the reconstruction code. The planar spatial resolution at the head surface and the image spatial resolutions were 1.7 mm and 1.2–1.6 mm, respectively. The measurements followed by post-processing showed that the observed count rate at 20% count loss is about 42 kcps. The system sensitivity at the collimator surface for heads 1 and 2 were 1.32 cps/µCi and 1.25 cps/µCi, respectively. The corresponding values were 1.18 cps/µCi and 1.02 cps/µCi at 8 cm distance from the collimator surfaces. In addition, whole-body scans of mice demonstrated appropriate imaging capability of the HiReSPECT.

  6. Development of a Prognostic Score Using the Complete Blood Cell Count for Survival Prediction in Unselected Critically Ill Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Chongliang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The purpose of this study was to develop a new prognostic scoring system for critically ill patients using the simple complete blood cell count (CBC. Methods. CBC measurements in samples from 306 patients in an intensive care unit were conducted with automated analyzers, including levels of neutrophils, lymphocytes, erythrocytes, hemoglobin, and platelets. The time of sampling and the time of death were recorded. Z values were calculated according to the measured values, reference mean values, and standard deviations. The prognostic score was equivalent to the median of the Z value of each of the measured parameters. Results. There was a significant correlation between survival time and neutrophil, lymphocyte, and platelet levels (P<0.05. Prognostic scores were calculated from the Z value of these three parameters. Survival times decreased as the prognostic score increased. Conclusions. This study suggests that a model that uses levels of neutrophils, lymphocytes, and platelets is potentially useful in the objective evaluation of survival time or disease severity in unselected critically ill patients.

  7. Evaluation of Octhylphenol Effect on Development and Survival on Zebra Fish (Danio Rerio During Different Ontogenic Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabi Dumitrescu

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper is part of a complex study of our research collective that studies the toxic effect of the ethinylestradiolum, and some of the polyethoxylated alkylphenols on the growth and reproduction of the Zebra fish (Danio rerio and of the common Carp (Cyprinus carpio. Our study aim was to evaluate the effect of octylphenol on growth and survival of zebra fish, from 21-115 days, and within 21-75 days of life. For this purpose, for each period under study, fishes were divided into three groups of 30 individuals, named: Lot 1 - Control, respectively lots 2 and 3, at which the administrated octylphenol concentrations were of 60 μg L-1, respectively 100 μg L-1. Fishes of the six groups were raised in 30-liters aquariums (30 fish / aquarium. The growth was measured by weighing and biometric measurements (total length, standard length, the length of the head, maximal height, minimal height and the mass of the body, while the surviving rate was established at the end of every period and at the end of the experiment, when we were able to calculate the total number of dead fish. Biometric study of the analysis performed in 75 days, 115 days respectively shows that octylphenol has negative influence on body development, and survival both, the highest percentage of mortality (46,66% was registered at 100 μgL-1 concentration, between 21 -75 days.

  8. Multivariable model development and internal validation for prostate cancer specific survival and overall survival after whole-gland salvage Iodine-125 prostate brachytherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, Max; van der Voort van Zyp, Jochem R N; Moerland, Marinus A; Hoekstra, Carel J; van de Pol, Sandrine; Westendorp, Hendrik; Maenhout, Metha; Kattevilder, Rob; Verkooijen, Helena M; van Rossum, Peter S N; Ahmed, Hashim U; Shah, Taimur T; Emberton, Mark; van Vulpen, Marco

    BACKGROUND: Whole-gland salvage Iodine-125-brachytherapy is a potentially curative treatment strategy for localised prostate cancer (PCa) recurrences after radiotherapy. Prognostic factors influencing PCa-specific and overall survival (PCaSS & OS) are not known. The objective of this study was to

  9. Impact of animal health programmes on poverty reduction and sustainable livestock development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradere, J P

    2017-04-01

    Based on data from publications and field observations, this study analyses the interactions between animal health, rural poverty and the performance and environmental impact of livestock farming in low-income countries and middle-income countries. There are strong statistical correlations between the quality of Veterinary Services, livestock productivity and poverty rates. In countries with effective Veterinary Services, livestock growth stems mainly from productivity gains and poverty rates are the lowest. Conversely, these analyses identify no statistical link between the quality of Veterinary Services and increased livestock production volumes. However, where animal diseases are poorly controlled, productivity is low and livestock growth is extensive, based mainly on a steady increase in animal numbers. Extensive growth is less effective than intensive growth in reducing poverty and aggravates the pressure of livestock production on natural resources and the climate.

  10. Developments of Thermal Environment Techniques of Animal Housing in Hot Climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Guoqiang; Bjerg, Bjarne Schmidt

    It is a challenge to create the satisfied indoor climate of farm animal housing in hot climate conditions by ventilation design and control. Facing to the global warming tendency, the challenge become event great. To overcome this challenge, an optimal indoor climate control system should be able...... cooling and ventilation techniques have been investigated and reported. In practices, however, different climate regions and farm animal species may request for different engineering solutions. To provide the fundamentals for an optimal design and control of ventilation system with feasible cooling...... approaches for hot climate farm animal housing, an overview of the available methods and techniques is given and potentials for integrations and optimizations of the methods are discussed....

  11. Development and internal validation of a prognostic model to predict recurrence free survival in patients with adult granulosa cell tumors of the ovary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Meurs, Hannah S.; Schuit, Ewoud; Horlings, Hugo M.; van der Velden, Jacobus; van Driel, Willemien J.; Mol, Ben Willem J.; Kenter, Gemma G.; Buist, Marrije R.

    2014-01-01

    Models to predict the probability of recurrence free survival exist for various types of malignancies, but a model for recurrence free survival in individuals with an adult granulosa cell tumor (GCT) of the ovary is lacking. We aimed to develop and internally validate such a prognostic model. We

  12. Development of Methods for Genetic Assessment of Antibiotic Resistance In Animal Herds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Gunilla Veslemøy

    -time PCR (qPCR) assays that supply an easy and rapid method for quantifying antibiotic resistance levels in animal herds. The pig production is accountable for a large portion of the antibiotics used for food producing animals in Denmark. Therefore, the antibiotic resistance genes included in this study...... from the Danish pig production. Fecal samples from wildlife and Massai cattle in Tanzania were screened for the presence of the 14 antibiotic resistance genes using the qPCR assays. The wildlife and cattle samples were collected in the Ngorongoro Conservational Area (NCA) (wildlife and cattle...

  13. Development of an immunochromatographic strip test for rapid detection of melamine in raw milk, milk products, and animal feed

    Science.gov (United States)

    A simple, rapid and sensitive immunogold chromatographic strip test based on a monoclonal antibody was developed for the detection of melamine (MEL) residues in raw milk, milk products and animal feed. The limit of detection was estimated to be 0.05 µg/mL in raw milk, since the detection test line ...

  14. Effect of Roughage Source and Roughage to Concentrate Ratio on Animal Performance and Rumen Development in Veal Calves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suárez, B.J.; Reenen, van C.G.; Stockhofe, N.; Dijkstra, J.; Gerrits, W.J.J.

    2007-01-01

    Sixty-four male Holstein-Friesian x Dutch Friesian veal calves (46 ± 3.0 kg) were used to evaluate the effect of the inclusion of different levels and sources of dietary roughage on animal performance and rumen development. Treatments consisted of 1) C100 = concentrate only; 2) C70-S30 = concentrate

  15. Development and Application of In Vitro Models for Screening Drugs and Environmental Chemicals that Predict Toxicity in Animals and Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Development and Application of In Vitro Models for Screening Drugs and Environmental Chemicals that Predict Toxicity in Animals and Humans (Presented by James McKim, Ph.D., DABT, Founder and Chief Science Officer, CeeTox) (5/25/2012)

  16. The Impact of Animated Books on the Vocabulary and Language Development of Preschool-Aged Children in Two School Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broemmel, Amy D.; Moran, Mary Jane; Wooten, Deborah A.

    2015-01-01

    With the emergence of electronic media over the past two decades, young children have been found to have increased exposure to video games, computer-based activities, and electronic books (e-books). This study explores how exposure to animated ebooks impacts young children's literacy development. A stratified convenience sample (n = 24) was…

  17. Born to move : Development of form and function of the locomotor system in the early juvenile phase of precocial animals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorissen, B.M.C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/372825788

    2017-01-01

    Precocial animals are extraordinary creatures, as they are able to walk within an hour after birth. However, hardly any information regarding the early development of gait in the horse was available. Also the ways the precocial skeleton copes with the sudden changes in loading after birth were

  18. Combat-Related Heterotopic Ossification: Development of Animal Models for Identifying Mechanisms and Testing Therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    examination, cohorts of rats at specified time points post were euthanized (Fatal Plus 50 mg/kg IP; Patterson Veterinary , Devens, MA) and...pronounced systemic inflammatory response with 70% to 90% survivability.26-28 The rats were anaesthetised with isoflurane and received buprenorphine ...sutures (Ethicon Inc., Somerville, New Jersey). Post-operatively, all rats received sustained release buprenorphine (1.2 mg/kg subcutaneously

  19. ["In the Third Reich there must be no cruelty to animals anymore"--the development of the Reich's Animal Welfare Law from 1933].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimanski, Michael

    2009-04-01

    In the German Reich cruelty to animals was punishable over decades only under anthropozentrical points of view, animal experiments and slaughter without stunning were also settled insufficient. Then at the end of the republic of Weimar initiated by the national socialists slaughter without stunning was forbidden. After the takeover by the national socialists the ban was immediately extended to the hole country, the criminal punishment of cruelty to animals was increased and finally the Reichstierschutzgesetz was enacted--influenced by an ethical way of protection of animals. The societies for the prevention of cruelty to animals were aligned and offences against the law were punished with hard sentences. Protection of animals was particularly promoted by the national socialists on propagandistic purposes and served for the compensation of an increasing degeneration of social values.

  20. Effect of Triiodothyronine and Cortisol on Development, Growth and Survival Rate of Sand Goby (Oxyeleotris marmorata, Blkr. Larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.R Sri Pudji

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTThis experiment was conducted to investigate the effect of triiodothyronine and cortisol on the development, growth, and survival rate of sand goby larvae.  The experiment was carried out at Kolan Percobaan Babakan, Faculty of Fisheries and Marine Sciences, IPB Bogor.  The larvae were immersed in solution of A (T3 2 mg/1 + C 1 mg/1, B (T3 2 mg/1 + C 0, 1 mgll, C (T3 2 mg/1 + C 0,0 1 mg/1 dan D (without hormone for one hour.  After treatment, larvae were reared in aquarium (50x50x50 cm.  Larvae were fed by rotifer and phytoplankton, three times a day.  Larval development, growth and survival rate were observed.  Result showed that T3 2 mg/1 +C 1 nig/1 and T3 2 mg/1 + C 0, 1 mg/1 could accelerated development of swim bladder and eyespot of larvae.  Treatment did not effect body pigmentation and growth; but effect survival rate of sand goby larvae.Key words :  Triidothyronine, cortisol, larvae, sand goby fish, development, growth, survival rate ABSTRAKPenelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui pengaruh pemberian hormon triidotironin dan kortisol terhadap perkembangan, pertumbuhan dan kelangsungan hidup larva ikan betutu.  Penelitian ini dilakukan di Kolam Percobaan Babakan, Fakultas Perikanan dan Ilmu Kelautan, Institut Pertanian Bogor.  Larva direndam selama satu jam dalam larutan A (T3 2 mg/1 + C 1 mg/1, B (T3 2 mg/1 + C 0, 1 mg/1, C (T3 2 mg/1 + C 0,0 1 mg/1 dan D (tanpa hormon.  Setelah perlakuan, larva dipelihara dalam akuariun berukuran 50x50x50 cm.  Selama pemeliharaan larva diberi pakan berupa rotifer dan fitoplankton dengan frekuensi tiga kali sehari.  Perkembangan, petumbuhan, dan kelangsungan hidup larva diamati.  Perendaman larva ikan betutu dalam larutan A dan B dapat mempercepat pembentukan gelembung renang dan bintik mata.  Perlakuan yang diberikan tidak mempengaruhi kecepatan terjadinya pigmentasi tubuh dan pertumbuhan, tetapi mempengaruhi derriat kelangsungan hidup larva.Kata kunci :  Triidotironin, kortisol

  1. Nanoradiopharmaceuticals for breast cancer imaging: development, characterization, and imaging in inducted animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarcinelli MA

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Michelle Alvares Sarcinelli,1,2 Marta de Souza Albernaz,3 Marzena Szwed,4 Alexandre Iscaife,2 Kátia Ramos Moreira Leite,2 Mara de Souza Junqueira,5 Emerson Soares Bernardes,6 Emerson Oliveira da Silva,1 Maria Ines Bruno Tavares,1 Ralph Santos-Oliveira7 1Instituto de Macromoléculas Professora Eloisa Mano Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; 2Laboratory of Medical Investigation, Faculty of Medicine, São Paulo University, São Paulo, Brazil; 3Radiopharmacy Sector, University Hospital Clementino Fraga Filho, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; 4Department of Thermobiology, Faculty of Biology and Environmental Protection, University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland; 5Laboratory of Experimental Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, São Paulo University, São Paulo, Brazil; 6Radiopharmacy Center, Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN, São Paulo, Brazil; 7Laboratory of Nanoradiopharmaceuticals, Zona Oeste State University, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Abstract: Monoclonal antibodies as polymeric nanoparticles are quite interesting and endow this new drug category with many advantages, especially by reducing the number of adverse reactions and, in the case of radiopharmaceuticals, also reducing the amount of radiation (dose administered to the patient. In this study, a nanoradiopharmaceutical was developed using polylactic acid (PLA/polyvinyl alcohol (PVA/montmorillonite (MMT/trastuzumab nanoparticles labeled with technetium-99m (99mTc for breast cancer imaging. In order to confirm the nanoparticle formation, atomic force microscopy and dynamic light scattering were performed. Cytotoxicity of the nanoparticle and biodistribution with 99mTc in healthy and inducted animals were also measured. The results from atomic force microscopy showed that the nanoparticles were spherical, with a size range of ~200–500 nm. The dynamic light scattering analysis demonstrated that over 90% of the nanoparticles produced had a size of 287 nm with a zeta

  2. Beyond Survival: Educational Development and the Maturing of the POD Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortquist-Ahrens, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    Scholarship about the growth of educational development has charted major shifts in developers' focuses and roles through time and, especially in recent years, has explored the professionalization of the field around the globe. This essay uses a lifecycle analogy to consider the development of one organization, the POD Network (The Professional…

  3. Developing Animal Models for Optimizing the Musculoskeletal Repair Potential of Emerging Human Progenitor Cell Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Within 4 weeks, a swelling at the site of the implantation was visible in the intact animal that remained at a stationary size for an additional 8...of crosslining to affect its in vivo degradation and release of adsorbed BMP2. Another advantage of the chitosan hydrogel is its ability to deliver

  4. Developing an Animal Model of Human Amnesia: The Role of the Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesner, Raymond P.; Goodrich-Hunsaker, Naomi J.

    2010-01-01

    This review summarizes a series of experiments aimed at answering the question whether the hippocampus in rats can serve as an animal model of amnesia. It is recognized that a comparison of the functions of the rat hippocampus with human hippocampus is difficult, because of differences in methodology, differences in complexity of life experiences,…

  5. [Neuron reactions of brain structures suppressing motion during development of animal hypnosis in guinea pigs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mileĭkovskiĭ, B Iu; Karmanova, I G; Oganesian, G A

    1998-01-01

    Multisensory and motor units are suppressed in hypnosis in the guinea pig giganto-cellular reticular nucleus and in the dorsolateral. pons. In contrast, inhibitory intexneuvons neurons and the ponto-medulla neurons are activated in hypnosis. The data obtained suggests a key role of the brain-stem structures in descending unspecific inhibition during hypnosis in animals.

  6. Courseware Development with Animated Pedagogical Agents in Learning System to Improve Learning Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Kai-Yi; Hong, Zeng-Wei; Huang, Yueh-Min; Shen, Wei-Wei; Lin, Jim-Min

    2016-01-01

    The addition of animated pedagogical agents (APAs) in computer-assisted learning (CAL) systems could successfully enhance students' learning motivation and engagement in learning activities. Conventionally, the APA incorporated multimedia materials are constructed through the cooperation of teachers and software programmers. However, the thinking…

  7. Affective Realism of Animated Films in the Development of Simulation-Based Tutoring Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekanayake, Hiran B.; Fors, Uno; Ramberg, Robert; Ziemke, Tom; Backlund, Per; Hewagamage, Kamalanath P.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a study focused on comparing real actors based scenarios and animated characters based scenarios with respect to their similarity in evoking psychophysiological activity for certain events by measuring galvanic skin response (GSR). In the experiment, one group (n = 11) watched the real actors' film whereas another group (n…

  8. Development and implementation of a behaviour test for dogs kept in animal shelters and investigation of changes in their behaviour

    OpenAIRE

    Frank, Cornelia

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was the development of a behaviour test for dogs suitable for the everyday life in an animal shelter. In addition to the revelation of behavioural problems as a main criterion for the placement options of a dog, possible changes of the behaviour during a prolonged stay in the animal shelter should be recognised. As a baseline, dogs were tested in their kennel using 12 subtests. The content of these subtests are situations close to reality, which have proven...

  9. Developments in undergraduate teaching of small-animal soft-tissue surgical skills at the University of Sydney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, Deepa; McGreevy, Paul D; Zuber, Richard M; Klupiec, Corinna; Baguley, John; Barrs, Vanessa R

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses recent developments in soft-tissue surgery teaching at the University of Sydney, Faculty of Veterinary Science. An integrated teaching program was developed for Bachelor of Veterinary Science (BVSc) students with the aim of providing them with optimal learning opportunities to meet "Day One" small-animal soft-tissue surgical competencies. Didactic lectures and tutorials were introduced earlier into the curriculum to prepare students for live-animal surgery practical. In addition to existing clinics, additional spay/neuter clinics were established in collaboration with animal welfare organizations to increase student exposure to live-animal surgery. A silicon-based, life-like canine ovariohysterectomy model was developed with the assistance of a model-making and special effects company. The model features elastic ovarian pedicles and suspensory ligaments, which can be stretched and broken like those of an actual dog. To monitor the volume and type of student surgical experience, an E-portfolio resource was established. This resource allows for the tracking of numbers of live, student-performed desexing surgeries and incorporates competency-based assessments and reflective tasks to be completed by students. Student feedback on the integrated surgical soft-tissue teaching program was assessed. Respondents were assessed in the fourth year of the degree and will have further opportunities to develop Day One small-animal soft-tissue surgical competencies in the fifth year. Ninety-four percent of respondents agreed or strongly agreed that they were motivated to participate in all aspects of the program, while 78% agreed or strongly agreed that they received an adequate opportunity to develop their skills and confidence in ovariohysterectomy or castration procedures through the fourth-year curriculum.

  10. Animal Health Surveillance in Scotland in 2030: Using Scenario Planning to Develop Strategies in the Context of “Brexit”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boden, Lisa A.; Auty, Harriet; Reeves, Aaron; Rydevik, Gustaf; Bessell, Paul; McKendrick, Iain J.

    2017-01-01

    Animal health surveillance is necessary to protect human and animal health, rural economies, and the environment from the consequences of large-scale disease outbreaks. In Scotland, since the Kinnaird review in 2011, efforts have been made to engage with stakeholders to ensure that the strategic goals of surveillance are better aligned with the needs of the end-users and other beneficiaries. The aims of this study were to engage with Scottish surveillance stakeholders and multidisciplinary experts to inform the future long-term strategy for animal health surveillance in Scotland. In this paper, we describe the use of scenario planning as an effective tool for the creation and exploration of five plausible long-term futures; we describe prioritization of critical drivers of change (i.e., international trade policy, data-sharing philosophies, and public versus private resourcing of surveillance capacity) that will unpredictably influence the future implementation of animal health surveillance activities. We present 10 participant-developed strategies to support 3 long-term visions to improve future resilience of animal health surveillance and contingency planning for animal and zoonotic disease outbreaks in Scotland. In the absence of any certainty about the nature of post-Brexit trade agreements for agriculture, participants considered the best investments for long-term resilience to include data collection strategies to improve animal health benchmarking, user-benefit strategies to improve digital literacy in farming communities, and investment strategies to increase veterinary and scientific research capacity in rural areas. This is the first scenario planning study to explore stakeholder beliefs and perceptions about important environmental, technological, societal, political, and legal drivers (in addition to epidemiological “risk factors”) and effective strategies to manage future uncertainties for both the Scottish livestock industry and animal health

  11. Animal Health Surveillance in Scotland in 2030: Using Scenario Planning to Develop Strategies in the Context of "Brexit".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boden, Lisa A; Auty, Harriet; Reeves, Aaron; Rydevik, Gustaf; Bessell, Paul; McKendrick, Iain J

    2017-01-01

    Animal health surveillance is necessary to protect human and animal health, rural economies, and the environment from the consequences of large-scale disease outbreaks. In Scotland, since the Kinnaird review in 2011, efforts have been made to engage with stakeholders to ensure that the strategic goals of surveillance are better aligned with the needs of the end-users and other beneficiaries. The aims of this study were to engage with Scottish surveillance stakeholders and multidisciplinary experts to inform the future long-term strategy for animal health surveillance in Scotland. In this paper, we describe the use of scenario planning as an effective tool for the creation and exploration of five plausible long-term futures; we describe prioritization of critical drivers of change (i.e., international trade policy, data-sharing philosophies, and public versus private resourcing of surveillance capacity) that will unpredictably influence the future implementation of animal health surveillance activities. We present 10 participant-developed strategies to support 3 long-term visions to improve future resilience of animal health surveillance and contingency planning for animal and zoonotic disease outbreaks in Scotland. In the absence of any certainty about the nature of post-Brexit trade agreements for agriculture, participants considered the best investments for long-term resilience to include data collection strategies to improve animal health benchmarking, user-benefit strategies to improve digital literacy in farming communities, and investment strategies to increase veterinary and scientific research capacity in rural areas. This is the first scenario planning study to explore stakeholder beliefs and perceptions about important environmental, technological, societal, political, and legal drivers (in addition to epidemiological "risk factors") and effective strategies to manage future uncertainties for both the Scottish livestock industry and animal health

  12. Animal Health Surveillance in Scotland in 2030: Using Scenario Planning to Develop Strategies in the Context of “Brexit”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa A. Boden

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Animal health surveillance is necessary to protect human and animal health, rural economies, and the environment from the consequences of large-scale disease outbreaks. In Scotland, since the Kinnaird review in 2011, efforts have been made to engage with stakeholders to ensure that the strategic goals of surveillance are better aligned with the needs of the end-users and other beneficiaries. The aims of this study were to engage with Scottish surveillance stakeholders and multidisciplinary experts to inform the future long-term strategy for animal health surveillance in Scotland. In this paper, we describe the use of scenario planning as an effective tool for the creation and exploration of five plausible long-term futures; we describe prioritization of critical drivers of change (i.e., international trade policy, data-sharing philosophies, and public versus private resourcing of surveillance capacity that will unpredictably influence the future implementation of animal health surveillance activities. We present 10 participant-developed strategies to support 3 long-term visions to improve future resilience of animal health surveillance and contingency planning for animal and zoonotic disease outbreaks in Scotland. In the absence of any certainty about the nature of post-Brexit trade agreements for agriculture, participants considered the best investments for long-term resilience to include data collection strategies to improve animal health benchmarking, user-benefit strategies to improve digital literacy in farming communities, and investment strategies to increase veterinary and scientific research capacity in rural areas. This is the first scenario planning study to explore stakeholder beliefs and perceptions about important environmental, technological, societal, political, and legal drivers (in addition to epidemiological “risk factors” and effective strategies to manage future uncertainties for both the Scottish livestock industry and

  13. Mouse survival motor neuron alleles that mimic SMN2 splicing and are inducible rescue embryonic lethality early in development but not late.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzan M Hammond

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is caused by low survival motor neuron (SMN levels and patients represent a clinical spectrum due primarily to varying copies of the survival motor neuron-2 (SMN2 gene. Patient and animals studies show that disease severity is abrogated as SMN levels increase. Since therapies currently being pursued target the induction of SMN, it will be important to understand the dosage, timing and cellular requirements of SMN for disease etiology and potential therapeutic intervention. This requires new mouse models that can induce SMN temporally and/or spatially. Here we describe the generation of two hypomorphic Smn alleles, Smn(C-T-Neo and Smn(2B-Neo. These alleles mimic SMN2 exon 7 splicing, titre Smn levels and are inducible. They were specifically designed so that up to three independent lines of mice could be generated, herein we describe two. In a homozygous state each allele results in embryonic lethality. Analysis of these mutants indicates that greater than 5% of Smn protein is required for normal development. The severe hypomorphic nature of these alleles is caused by inclusion of a loxP-flanked neomycin gene selection cassette in Smn intron 7, which can be removed with Cre recombinase. In vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrate these as inducible Smn alleles. When combined with an inducible Cre mouse, embryonic lethality caused by low Smn levels can be rescued early in gestation but not late. This provides direct genetic evidence that a therapeutic window for SMN inductive therapies may exist. Importantly, these lines fill a void for inducible Smn alleles. They also provide a base from which to generate a large repertoire of SMA models of varying disease severities when combined with other Smn alleles or SMN2-containing mice.

  14. Developing a Collaborative Agenda for Humanities and Social Scientific Research on Laboratory Animal Science and Welfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Gail F.; Greenhough, Beth J; Hobson-West, Pru; Kirk, Robert G. W.; Applebee, Ken; Bellingan, Laura C.; Berdoy, Manuel; Buller, Henry; Cassaday, Helen J.; Davies, Keith; Diefenbacher, Daniela; Druglitrø, Tone; Escobar, Maria Paula; Friese, Carrie; Herrmann, Kathrin; Hinterberger, Amy; Jarrett, Wendy J.; Jayne, Kimberley; Johnson, Adam M.; Johnson, Elizabeth R.; Konold, Timm; Leach, Matthew C.; Leonelli, Sabina; Lewis, David I.; Lilley, Elliot J.; Longridge, Emma R.; McLeod, Carmen M.; Miele, Mara; Nelson, Nicole C.; Ormandy, Elisabeth H.; Pallett, Helen; Poort, Lonneke; Pound, Pandora; Ramsden, Edmund; Roe, Emma; Scalway, Helen; Schrader, Astrid; Scotton, Chris J.; Scudamore, Cheryl L.; Smith, Jane A.; Whitfield, Lucy; Wolfensohn, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Improving laboratory animal science and welfare requires both new scientific research and insights from research in the humanities and social sciences. Whilst scientific research provides evidence to replace, reduce and refine procedures involving laboratory animals (the ‘3Rs’), work in the humanities and social sciences can help understand the social, economic and cultural processes that enhance or impede humane ways of knowing and working with laboratory animals. However, communication across these disciplinary perspectives is currently limited, and they design research programmes, generate results, engage users, and seek to influence policy in different ways. To facilitate dialogue and future research at this interface, we convened an interdisciplinary group of 45 life scientists, social scientists, humanities scholars, non-governmental organisations and policy-makers to generate a collaborative research agenda. This drew on methods employed by other agenda-setting exercises in science policy, using a collaborative and deliberative approach for the identification of research priorities. Participants were recruited from across the community, invited to submit research questions and vote on their priorities. They then met at an interactive workshop in the UK, discussed all 136 questions submitted, and collectively defined the 30 most important issues for the group. The output is a collaborative future agenda for research in the humanities and social sciences on laboratory animal science and welfare. The questions indicate a demand for new research in the humanities and social sciences to inform emerging discussions and priorities on the governance and practice of laboratory animal research, including on issues around: international harmonisation, openness and public engagement, ‘cultures of care’, harm-benefit analysis and the future of the 3Rs. The process outlined below underlines the value of interdisciplinary exchange for improving communication across

  15. Developing a Collaborative Agenda for Humanities and Social Scientific Research on Laboratory Animal Science and Welfare.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gail F Davies

    Full Text Available Improving laboratory animal science and welfare requires both new scientific research and insights from research in the humanities and social sciences. Whilst scientific research provides evidence to replace, reduce and refine procedures involving laboratory animals (the '3Rs', work in the humanities and social sciences can help understand the social, economic and cultural processes that enhance or impede humane ways of knowing and working with laboratory animals. However, communication across these disciplinary perspectives is currently limited, and they design research programmes, generate results, engage users, and seek to influence policy in different ways. To facilitate dialogue and future research at this interface, we convened an interdisciplinary group of 45 life scientists, social scientists, humanities scholars, non-governmental organisations and policy-makers to generate a collaborative research agenda. This drew on methods employed by other agenda-setting exercises in science policy, using a collaborative and deliberative approach for the identification of research priorities. Participants were recruited from across the community, invited to submit research questions and vote on their priorities. They then met at an interactive workshop in the UK, discussed all 136 questions submitted, and collectively defined the 30 most important issues for the group. The output is a collaborative future agenda for research in the humanities and social sciences on laboratory animal science and welfare. The questions indicate a demand for new research in the humanities and social sciences to inform emerging discussions and priorities on the governance and practice of laboratory animal research, including on issues around: international harmonisation, openness and public engagement, 'cultures of care', harm-benefit analysis and the future of the 3Rs. The process outlined below underlines the value of interdisciplinary exchange for improving

  16. Developing a Collaborative Agenda for Humanities and Social Scientific Research on Laboratory Animal Science and Welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Gail F; Greenhough, Beth J; Hobson-West, Pru; Kirk, Robert G W; Applebee, Ken; Bellingan, Laura C; Berdoy, Manuel; Buller, Henry; Cassaday, Helen J; Davies, Keith; Diefenbacher, Daniela; Druglitrø, Tone; Escobar, Maria Paula; Friese, Carrie; Herrmann, Kathrin; Hinterberger, Amy; Jarrett, Wendy J; Jayne, Kimberley; Johnson, Adam M; Johnson, Elizabeth R; Konold, Timm; Leach, Matthew C; Leonelli, Sabina; Lewis, David I; Lilley, Elliot J; Longridge, Emma R; McLeod, Carmen M; Miele, Mara; Nelson, Nicole C; Ormandy, Elisabeth H; Pallett, Helen; Poort, Lonneke; Pound, Pandora; Ramsden, Edmund; Roe, Emma; Scalway, Helen; Schrader, Astrid; Scotton, Chris J; Scudamore, Cheryl L; Smith, Jane A; Whitfield, Lucy; Wolfensohn, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Improving laboratory animal science and welfare requires both new scientific research and insights from research in the humanities and social sciences. Whilst scientific research provides evidence to replace, reduce and refine procedures involving laboratory animals (the '3Rs'), work in the humanities and social sciences can help understand the social, economic and cultural processes that enhance or impede humane ways of knowing and working with laboratory animals. However, communication across these disciplinary perspectives is currently limited, and they design research programmes, generate results, engage users, and seek to influence policy in different ways. To facilitate dialogue and future research at this interface, we convened an interdisciplinary group of 45 life scientists, social scientists, humanities scholars, non-governmental organisations and policy-makers to generate a collaborative research agenda. This drew on methods employed by other agenda-setting exercises in science policy, using a collaborative and deliberative approach for the identification of research priorities. Participants were recruited from across the community, invited to submit research questions and vote on their priorities. They then met at an interactive workshop in the UK, discussed all 136 questions submitted, and collectively defined the 30 most important issues for the group. The output is a collaborative future agenda for research in the humanities and social sciences on laboratory animal science and welfare. The questions indicate a demand for new research in the humanities and social sciences to inform emerging discussions and priorities on the governance and practice of laboratory animal research, including on issues around: international harmonisation, openness and public engagement, 'cultures of care', harm-benefit analysis and the future of the 3Rs. The process outlined below underlines the value of interdisciplinary exchange for improving communication across

  17. Pleuromutilins: use in food-producing animals in the European Union, development of resistance and impact on human and animal health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Duijkeren, Engeline; Greko, Christina; Pringle, Märit; Baptiste, Keith Edward; Catry, Boudewijn; Jukes, Helen; Moreno, Miguel A; Pomba, M Constança Matias Ferreira; Pyörälä, Satu; Rantala, Merja; Ružauskas, Modestas; Sanders, Pascal; Teale, Christopher; Threlfall, E John; Torren-Edo, Jordi; Törneke, Karolina

    2014-08-01

    Pleuromutilins (tiamulin and valnemulin) are antimicrobial agents that are used mainly in veterinary medicine, especially for swine and to a lesser extent for poultry and rabbits. In pigs, tiamulin and valnemulin are used to treat swine dysentery, spirochaete-associated diarrhoea, porcine proliferative enteropathy, enzootic pneumonia and other infections where Mycoplasma is involved. There are concerns about the reported increases in the MICs of tiamulin and valnemulin for porcine Brachyspira hyodysenteriae isolates from different European countries, as only a limited number of antimicrobials are available for the treatment of swine dysentery where resistance to these antimicrobials is already common and widespread. The loss of pleuromutilins as effective tools to treat swine dysentery because of further increases in resistance or as a consequence of restrictions would present a considerable threat to pig health, welfare and productivity. In humans, only one product containing pleuromutilins (retapamulin) is authorized currently for topical use; however, products for oral and intravenous administration to humans with serious multidrug-resistant skin infections and respiratory infections, including those caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), are being developed. The objective of this review is to summarize the current knowledge on the usage of pleuromutilins, resistance development and the potential impact of this resistance on animal and human health. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Acylcarnitines profile best predicts survival in horses with atypical myopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Boemer

    Full Text Available Equine atypical myopathy (AM is caused by hypoglycin A intoxication and is characterized by a high fatality rate. Predictive estimation of survival in AM horses is necessary to prevent unnecessary suffering of animals that are unlikely to survive and to focus supportive therapy on horses with a possible favourable prognosis of survival. We hypothesized that outcome may be predicted early in the course of disease based on the assumption that the acylcarnitine profile reflects the derangement of muscle energetics. We developed a statistical model to prognosticate the risk of death of diseased animals and found that estimation of outcome may be drawn from three acylcarnitines (C2, C10:2 and C18 -carnitines with a high sensitivity and specificity. The calculation of the prognosis of survival makes it possible to distinguish the horses that will survive from those that will die despite severe signs of acute rhabdomyolysis in both groups.

  19. A new prognostic factor for the survival of patients with renal cell carcinoma developing metastatic spinal cord compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rades, D. [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck, University of Luebeck, Department of Radiation Oncology, Luebeck (Germany); Weber, A. [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck, University of Luebeck, Department of Radiation Oncology, Luebeck (Germany); University of Luebeck, Department of Medical Oncology and Hematology, Luebeck (Germany); Bartscht, T. [University of Luebeck, Department of Medical Oncology and Hematology, Luebeck (Germany); Bajrovic, A. [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Radiation Oncology, Hamburg (Germany); Karstens, J.H. [Hannover Medical University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Hannover (Germany); Schild, S.E. [Mayo Clinic Scottsdale, Department of Radiation Oncology, Scottsdale (United States)

    2014-07-15

    This study aimed to identify a potential association of the number of involved extraspinal organs with the survival of patients with metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) from renal cell carcinoma. Data of 69 patients irradiated for MSCC from renal cell carcinoma were retrospectively evaluated for survival. The prognostic value of the number of involved extraspinal organs and eight additional factors were investigated. These additional factors included age, gender, performance status, number of involved vertebrae, interval from cancer diagnosis to radiotherapy (RT) of MSCC, ambulatory status prior to RT, time developing motor deficits, and the fractionation regimen (30 Gy in 10 fractions vs. higher doses). The 6-month survival rates for involvement of 0, 1, and ≥ 2 extraspinal organs were 93, 57, and 21 %, respectively (p < 0.001). In the multivariate analysis, the number of involved extraspinal organs maintained significance (risk ratio 2.65; 95 % confidence interval 1.64-4.52; p < 0.001). The interval from cancer diagnosis to RT of MSCC (p = 0.013) and ambulatory status prior to RT (p = 0.002) were also independent predictors of survival. The number of involved extraspinal organs is a new prognostic factor of survival in patients with MSCC from renal cell carcinoma and should be considered in future clinical trials. (orig.) [German] Ziel dieser Studie war es, eine moegliche Assoziation zwischen der Zahl metastatisch befallener extraspinaler Organe und dem Ueberleben von Patienten mit einem Nierenzellkarzinom und metastatisch bedingter Rueckenmarkskompression (MSCC) aufzudecken. Die Daten von 69 Patienten mit einem Nierenzellkarzinom, die aufgrund einer MSCC eine Strahlentherapie erhalten hatten, wurden retrospektiv fuer den Endpunkt Ueberleben ausgewertet. Die prognostische Bedeutung der Zahl metastatisch befallener extraspinaler Organe und 8 weiterer Faktoren wurden untersucht. Die weiteren Faktoren waren Alter, Geschlecht, Allgemeinzustand, Zahl

  20. Development and use of an animal model to study post-traumatic stiffness and contracture of the elbow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, Spencer P; Castile, Ryan M; Borinsky, Stephanie; Dunham, Chelsey L; Havlioglu, Necat; Galatz, Leesa M

    2016-02-01

    Post-traumatic joint stiffness (PTJS) of the elbow is a debilitating condition that poses unique treatment challenges. While previous research has implicated capsular tissue in PTJS, much regarding the development and progression of this condition remains unknown. The objective of this study was to develop an animal model of post-traumatic elbow contracture and evaluate its potential for studying the etiology of PTJS. The Long-Evans rat was identified as the most appropriate species/breed for development due to anatomical and functional similarities to the human elbow joint. Two surgical protocols of varying severity were utilized to replicate soft tissue damage seen in elbow subluxation/dislocation injuries, including anterior capsulotomy and lateral collateral ligament transection, followed by 6 weeks of unilateral joint immobilization. Following sacrifice, flexion-extension mechanical joint testing demonstrated decreased range-of-motion and increased stiffness for injured-immobilized limbs compared to control and sham animals, where functional impact correlated with severity of injury. Histological evaluation showed increased cellularity, adhesion, and thickness of capsule tissue in injured limbs, consistent with clinical evidence. To our knowledge, this is the first animal model capable of examining challenges unique to the anatomically and biomechanically complex elbow joint. Future studies will use this animal model to investigate mechanisms responsible for PTJS. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Development and preliminary testing of a computerized Animated Activity Questionnaire (AAQ) in patients with hip and knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peter, Wf; Loos, M; de Vet, Hcw

    2015-01-01

    Objective To develop an Animated Activity Questionnaire (AAQ), based on video animations, for assessing activity limitations in patients with hip/knee osteoarthritis (OA), which combines the advantages of self-reported questionnaires and performance-based tests, without many of their limitations...... correlations with performance-based tests (Stair Climbing Test , Timed Up and Go test, 30 second Chair Stand Test ) were calculated. Results 17 basic daily activities were chosen for the AAQ. Video animations were made showing a person performing each activity with 3 to 5 different levels of difficulty......, and to preliminary assess its reliability and validity. We hypothesize that the AAQ correlates highly with performance-based tests, and moderately with self-reports. Methods Item selection was based on 1) the pilot AAQ; 2) pre-specified conditions; 3) the International Classification of Functioning core set for OA...

  2. Weight development and survival rate of reindeer calves treated against Oedemagena tarandi L and Cephenemyia trompe L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endre Persen

    1982-05-01

    Full Text Available Three trials with treatment of reindeer warbles are carried out. All treated groups were injected intramuscularly with Warbex (35%, American Cyanamid, dosage 10 mg active ingredient/10 kg live weight. In total 911 calves and 403 adult females were included in the experiments. All animals were individually marked with plastic eartags. The trials tried to give answers as to the effect of treatment on: a weight development during winter, b weight development to the normal age of slaughter (18 months and c loss rate during winter. One trial deals with the effect of weight loss during winter by different date of treatment. All studies are undertaken within sex. Generelly the trials show that treated animals lost more weight during winter than untreated. There was found significant higher weight loss for treated female calves (0.7 kg, p=0.005 in the period January 13. — April 28. in trial I and for male calves (0.8 kg, p=0.01 in the period February 14. — April 4. in trial II. There is a trend that treatment increases the slaughter weight. A significant higher increase in the slaughter weight (0.8 kg, p=0.05 of treated male calves was found in trial III. No effect was found by treatment in the loss of animals in winter. The calves lossed during winter had a significant lower live weight at the start of the trial compared to those which survived. In the period February 14. — April 4. there was a higher weight loss in the male calves which were treated on February 14. compared to those treated on November 27. (0.5 kg, p=0.01. Forsøk med behandling av reinkalver mot reinbremslarver (Oedemagena tarandi L og Cephenemyia trompe L.Effekt på kalvens kondisjon målt ved levende vekt og overlevingsevne.Abstract in Norwegian / Sammendrag: Det er utført tre forsøk med behandling av rein mot reinbremselarver (Oedemagena tarandi L. og Cephenemyia trompe L.. I alle forsøk er brukt intramuskulær injeksjon av Warbex (Am. Cyanamid 35% med dosering 30 mg

  3. Cryo-survival and development of bovine blastocysts are enhanced by culture with recombinant albumin and hyaluronan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Michelle; Maybach, Jeffrey M; Hooper, Kathy; Hasler, John F; Gardner, David K

    2003-01-01

    Recombinant albumin can be used to supplement culture medium for the maturation and fertilization of bovine oocytes and subsequent embryo development to the blastocyst stage. Recombinant albumin was able to support blastocyst development at rates equivalent to that of bovine serum albumin (BSA) supplemented media. Supplementation of media containing recombinant albumin and citrate stimulated blastocyst expansion. Culture with recombinant albumin and citrate significantly increased the ability of the resultant blastocysts to re-expand and hatch following cryopreservation. The further addition of the glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan to the culture medium containing either BSA or recombinant albumin also increased the ability of blastocysts to survive cryopreservation. Inclusion of recombinant albumin and hyaluronan in culture media facilitates the development of physiological defined culture conditions. For bovine embryos this has implications for both research and commercial applications where defined reproducible conditions are desirable. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Early development, survival and growth rates of the giant clam Tridacna crocea (Bivalvia: Tridacnidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Mies

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Tridacnid clams are conspicuous inhabitants of Indo-Pacific coral reefs and are traded and cultivated for the aquarium and food industries. In the present study, daily growth rates of larvae of the giant clam Tridacna crocea were determined in the laboratory during the first week of life. Adults were induced to spawn via intra-gonadal serotonin injection through the byssal orifice. After spawning oocytes were collected, fertilized and kept in 3 L glass beakers and raceways treated with antibiotics to avoid culture contamination. Larvae were fed twice with the microalga Isochrysis galbana and zooxanthellae were also offered twice during the veliger stage (days 4 and 6. Larval length was measured using a digitizing tablet coupled to a microcomputer. Larval mortality was exponential during the first 48 hours of life declining significantly afterwards. Mean growth rate was 11.3 μm day-1, increasing after addition of symbionts to 18.0 μm day-1. Survival increased to ca. 75% after the addition of zooxanthellae. The results describe the growth curve for T. crocea larvae and suggest that the acquisition of symbionts by larvae may be useful for larval growth and survival even before larvae have attained metamorphosis.Bivalves tridacnídeos são habitantes conspícuos dos recifes da região do Indo-Pacífico e são cultivados e comercializados para os mercados alimentício e aquarista. No estudo apresentado foram determinadas as taxas de crescimento diário durante a primeira semana de vida da larva do bivalve ornamental Tridacna crocea. As matrizes foram induzidas à desova por meio de uma injeção intragonadal de serotonina realizada através do orifício bissal. Após desova, ovócitos foram coletados, fertilizados e mantidos em béqueres de vidro e tanques de fluxo contínuo tratados com antibióticos para evitar contaminação. Larvas foram alimentadas em duas ocasiões com a microalga Isochrysis galbana e zooxantelas foram oferecidas também por

  5. Type I vs type II spiral ganglion neurons exhibit differential survival and neuritogenesis during cochlear development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Housley Gary D

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mechanisms that consolidate neural circuitry are a major focus of neuroscience. In the mammalian cochlea, the refinement of spiral ganglion neuron (SGN innervation to the inner hair cells (by type I SGNs and the outer hair cells (by type II SGNs is accompanied by a 25% loss of SGNs. Results We investigated the segregation of neuronal loss in the mouse cochlea using β-tubulin and peripherin antisera to immunolabel all SGNs and selectively type II SGNs, respectively, and discovered that it is the type II SGN population that is predominately lost within the first postnatal week. Developmental neuronal loss has been attributed to the decline in neurotrophin expression by the target hair cells during this period, so we next examined survival of SGN sub-populations using tissue culture of the mid apex-mid turn region of neonatal mouse cochleae. In organotypic culture for 48 hours from postnatal day 1, endogenous trophic support from the organ of Corti proved sufficient to maintain all type II SGNs; however, a large proportion of type I SGNs were lost. Culture of the spiral ganglion as an explant, with removal of the organ of Corti, led to loss of the majority of both SGN sub-types. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF added as a supplement to the media rescued a significant proportion of the SGNs, particularly the type II SGNs, which also showed increased neuritogenesis. The known decline in BDNF production by the rodent sensory epithelium after birth is therefore a likely mediator of type II neuron apoptosis. Conclusion Our study thus indicates that BDNF supply from the organ of Corti supports consolidation of type II innervation in the neonatal mouse cochlea. In contrast, type I SGNs likely rely on additional sources for trophic support.

  6. Challenges and opportunities for the future of monoclonal antibody development: Improving safety assessment and reducing animal use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewell, Fiona; Chapman, Kathryn; Couch, Jessica; Dempster, Maggie; Heidel, Shawn; Loberg, Lise; Maier, Curtis; Maclachlan, Timothy K; Todd, Marque; van der Laan, Jan Willem

    2017-07-01

    The market for biotherapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) is large and is growing rapidly. However, attrition poses a significant challenge for the development of mAbs, and for biopharmaceuticals in general, with large associated costs in resource and animal use. Termination of candidate mAbs may occur due to poor translation from preclinical models to human safety. It is critical that the industry addresses this problem to maintain productivity. Though attrition poses a significant challenge for pharmaceuticals in general, there are specific challenges related to the development of antibody-based products. Due to species specificity, non-human primates (NHP) are frequently the only pharmacologically relevant species for nonclinical safety and toxicology testing for the majority of antibody-based products, and therefore, as more mAbs are developed, increased NHP use is anticipated. The integration of new and emerging in vitro and in silico technologies, e.g., cell- and tissue-based approaches, systems pharmacology and modeling, have the potential to improve the human safety prediction and the therapeutic mAb development process, while reducing and refining animal use simultaneously. In 2014, to engage in open discussion about the challenges and opportunities for the future of mAb development, a workshop was held with over 60 regulators and experts in drug development, mechanistic toxicology and emerging technologies to discuss this issue. The workshop used industry case-studies to discuss the value of the in vivo studies and identify opportunities for in vitro technologies in human safety assessment. From these and continuing discussions it is clear that there are opportunities to improve safety assessment in mAb development using non-animal technologies, potentially reducing future attrition, and there is a shared desire to reduce animal use through minimised study design and reduced numbers of studies.

  7. Development of Animal Model for Studying Deep Second-Degree Thermal Burns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle dos Santos Tavares Pereira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal lesions were produced in 12 male Wistar rats, positioning a massive aluminum bar 10 mm in diameter (51 g, preheated to 99°C ± 2°C/10 min. on the back of each animal for 15 sec. After 7, 14, 21, and 28 days, animals were euthanized. The edema intensity was mild, with no bubble and formation of a thick and dry crust from the 3rd day. The percentage of tissue shrinkage at 28 days was 66.67 ± 1.66%. There was no sign of infection, bleeding, or secretion. Within 28 days reepithelialization was incomplete, with fibroblastic proliferation and moderate fibrosis and presence of modeled dense collagen fibers. It is concluded that the model established is applicable in obtaining deep second-degree thermal burns in order to evaluate the healing action of therapeutic agents of topical use.

  8. Overexpression of pairedless Pax6 in the retina disrupts corneal development and affects lens cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jiha; Lauderdale, James D

    2008-01-01

    The Pax6 transcription factor is required for multiple aspects of vertebrate eye development. The Pax6 gene encodes isoforms that either contain (Pax6+PD) or lack (Pax6DeltaPD) the N-terminal paired-box DNA-binding domain, in addition to the homeodomain. Alternative promoters control the expression of Pax6+PD and Pax6DeltaPD in the eye. Using a modified bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) transgene that specifically expresses Pax6DeltaPD, but not paired-containing Pax6, in the normal endogenous pattern, we show that overexpression of Pax6DeltaPD causes a severe microphthalmic phenotype in both wild-type and Pax6-deficient (Sey(/+)) mice in a dosage-dependent manner. The microphthalmic phenotype is due to lens degeneration during embryonic development. Lens development initiates correctly, but cells in the lens undergo apoptotic cell death between E12 and E13. Concomitantly, in these mice, changes in Bmp4, Msx1, and Wnt2b expression were observed in the mesenchymal cells of the developing cornea. To visualize Pax6DeltaPD expression, we developed a dual-reporter Pax6 BAC transgene in which EGFP and DsRed demonstrate paired-containing and pairedless transcripts, respectively. In BAC transgenic mice, DsRed is predominantly expressed in the peripheral neural retina during early eye development, but not in the developing lens or cornea. Later DsRed is strongly expressed in the developing ciliary body, but not in the iris. We suggest that the ratio of Pax6+PD and Pax6DeltaPD isoforms in the distal retina is important for both cornea and lens development, either directly by controlling transcription of necessary growth factors or indirectly by controlling development of the distal neural retina.

  9. Bim gene dosage is critical in modulating nephron progenitor survival in the absence of microRNAs during kidney development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerqueira, Débora M; Bodnar, Andrew J; Phua, Yu Leng; Freer, Rachel; Hemker, Shelby L; Walensky, Loren D; Hukriede, Neil A; Ho, Jacqueline

    2017-08-01

    Low nephron endowment at birth has been associated with an increased risk for developing hypertension and chronic kidney disease. We demonstrated in an earlier study that conditional deletion of the microRNA (miRNA)-processing enzyme Dicer from nephron progenitors results in premature depletion of the progenitors and increased expression of the proapoptotic protein Bim (also known as Bcl-2L11). In this study, we generated a compound mouse model with conditional deletion of both Dicer and Bim, to determine the biologic significance of increased Bim expression in Dicer-deficient nephron progenitors. The loss of Bim partially restored the number of nephron progenitors and improved nephron formation. The number of progenitors undergoing apoptosis was significantly reduced in kidneys with loss of a single allele, or both alleles, of Bim compared to mutant kidneys. Furthermore, 2 miRNAs expressed in nephron progenitors (miR-17 and miR-106b) regulated Bim levels in vitro and in vivo Together, these data suggest that miRNA-mediated regulation of Bim controls nephron progenitor survival during nephrogenesis, as one potential means of regulating nephron endowment.-Cerqueira, D. M., Bodnar, A. J., Phua, Y. L., Freer, R., Hemker, S. L., Walensky, L. D., Hukriede, N. A., Ho, J. Bim gene dosage is critical in modulating nephron progenitor survival in the absence of microRNAs during kidney development. © FASEB.

  10. Green House Gas Control and Agricultural Biomass for Sustainable Animal Agriculture in Developing Countries

    OpenAIRE

    J Takahashi

    2010-01-01

    Important green house gases (GHG) attributed to animal agriculture are methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O), though carbon dioxide (CO2) contributes almost half of total greenhouse effect. Rumen CH4 production in an enteric fermentation can be accounted as the biggest anthropogenic source. Some of prebiotics and probiotics have been innovated to mitigate rumen CH4 emission. The possible use of agricultural biomass consisted of non-edible parts of crop plants such as cellulose and hemi cellul...

  11. Development of an Animal Model of Thoracolumbar Burst Fracture Induced Acute Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Department of Neurosurgery 600 N. Wolfe St., Meyer 5-185 Baltimore, MD 21287 AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER rtment of...Neurosurgery 600 N. Wolfe St., Meyer 5-185 9. SPONSORING / MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) U.S. Army...impactor and mounting platform were fabricated to be placed anteriorly or posteriorly over a large animal (e.g., pig, sheep, dog ). Repeated impacts

  12. Harnessing cognitive neuroscience to develop new treatments for improving cognition in schizophrenia: CNTRICS selected cognitive paradigms for animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Holly; Geyer, Mark A; Carter, Cameron S; Barch, Deanna M

    2013-11-01

    Over the past two decades, the awareness of the disabling and treatment-refractory effects of impaired cognition in schizophrenia has increased dramatically. In response to this still unmet need in the treatment of schizophrenia, the Cognitive Neuroscience Treatment Research to Improve Cognition in Schizophrenia (CNTRICS) initiative was developed. The goal of CNTRICS is to harness cognitive neuroscience to develop a brain-based set of tools for measuring cognition in schizophrenia and to test new treatments. CNTRICS meetings focused on development of tasks with cognitive construct validity for use in both human and animal model studies. This special issue presents papers discussing the cognitive testing paradigms selected by CNTRICS for animal model systems. These paradigms are designed to measure cognitive constructs within the domains of perception, attention, executive function, working memory, object/relational long-term memory, and social/affective processes. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Green House Gas Control and Agricultural Biomass for Sustainable Animal Agriculture in Developing Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Takahashi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Important green house gases (GHG attributed to animal agriculture are methane (CH4 and nitrous oxide (N2O, though carbon dioxide (CO2 contributes almost half of total greenhouse effect. Rumen CH4 production in an enteric fermentation can be accounted as the biggest anthropogenic source. Some of prebiotics and probiotics have been innovated to mitigate rumen CH4 emission. The possible use of agricultural biomass consisted of non-edible parts of crop plants such as cellulose and hemi cellulose and animal wastes was proposed as a renewable energy and nitrogen sources. The ammonia stripping from digested slurry of animal manure in biogas plant applied three options of nitrogen recycling to mitigate nitrous oxide emission. In the first option of the ammonia stripping, the effect of ammonolysis on feed value of cellulose biomass was evaluated on digestibility, energy metabolism and protein utilization. Saccharification of the NH3 treated cellulose biomass was confirmed in strictly anaerobic incubation with rumen cellulolytic bacteria, Ruminoccous flavefaciens, to produce bio-ethanol as the second option of ammonia stripping. In an attempt of NH3 fuel cell, the reformed hydrogen from the NH3 stripped from 20 liter of digested slurry in thermophilic biogas plant could generate 0.12 W electricity with proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEM as the third option.

  14. An Exploratory Study on the Development of an Animal Model of Acute Pancreatitis Following Nicotine Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chowdhury P

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cigarette smoking is known to be a major risk factor for pancreatic cancer and pancreatitis is believed to be a predisposed condition for pancreatic cancer. As of this date, there is no established experimental animal model to conduct detailed studies on these two deadly diseases. Our aim is to establish a rodent model by which we can systematically study the pathogenesis of pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. Methods Adult Male Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to graded doses of nicotine by various routes for periods of three to 16 weeks. Blood samples were measured for hormonal and metabolic parameters. The pancreas was evaluated for histopathological changes and its function was assessed in isolated pancreatic acini upon stimulation with cholecystokinin (CCK or carbachol (Cch. The pancreatic tissue was evaluated further for oncogene expression. Results Body weight, food and fluid intakes, plasma glucose and insulin levels were significantly reduced in animals with nicotine exposure when compared to control. However, CCK and gastrin levels in the blood were significantly elevated. Pancreatic function was decreased significantly with no alteration in CCK receptor binding. Pancreatic histology revealed vacuolation, swelling, cellular pyknosis and karyorrhexis. Mutant oncogene, H-ras, was overexpressed in nicotine-treated pancreatic tissue. Summary and conclusion The results suggest that alterations in metabolic, hormonal and pathologic parameters following nicotine-treatment appear consistent with diagnostic criteria of human pancreatitis. It is proposed that rats could be considered as a potential animal model to study the pathogenesis of pancreatitis.

  15. The role of the International Society for Applied Ethology (ISAE) in the global development of animal welfare science and its relationship with the OIE; strength through partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this presentation is to introduce the ISAE and to highlight members’ roles in the development and implementation of OIE’s animal welfare standards. Animal welfare science is a young discipline. Originally, welfare science was heavily focused on animal behavior (ethology), but it is ...

  16. Surviving the Lunacy Act of 1890: English Psychiatrists and Professional Development during the Early Twentieth Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takabayashi, Akinobu

    2017-04-01

    In recent decades, historians of English psychiatry have shifted their major concerns away from asylums and psychiatrists in the nineteenth century. This is also seen in the studies of twentieth-century psychiatry where historians have debated the rise of psychology, eugenics and community care. This shift in interest, however, does not indicate that English psychiatrists became passive and unimportant actors in the last century. In fact, they promoted Lunacy Law reform for a less asylum-dependent mode of psychiatry, with a strong emphasis on professional development. This paper illustrates the historical dynamics around the professional development of English psychiatry by employing Andrew Abbott's concept of professional development. Abbott redefines professional development as arising from both abstraction of professional knowledge and competition regarding professional jurisdiction. A profession, he suggests, develops through continuous re-formation of its occupational structure, mode of practice and political language in competing with other professional and non-professional forces. In early twentieth-century England, psychiatrists promoted professional development by framing political discourse, conducting a daily trade and promoting new legislation to defend their professional jurisdiction. This professional development story began with the Lunacy Act of 1890, which caused a professional crisis in psychiatry and led to inter-professional competition with non-psychiatric medical service providers. To this end, psychiatrists devised a new political rhetoric, 'early treatment of mental disorder', in their professional interests and succeeded in enacting the Mental Treatment Act of 1930, which re-instated psychiatrists as masters of English psychiatry.

  17. Distribution of hepatic stellate cells and their role in the development of parasitic fibrosis and liver cirrhosis in domestic animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kukolj Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing of the extracellular matrix in rats, as well as in humans, occurs as a consequence of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs activity. The objective of this work was to investigation the role of these cells in the development of fibrosis and liver cirrhosis which occurs as a consequence of infection of sheep and goats with large (Fasciola hepatica and small (Dicrocoelium dendriticum fluke. Liver samples taken from 12 cattle and 10 sheep infected under natural conditions with large and small fluke were fixed in formalin and embedded in paraffin. Paraffin clips were stained with hematoxylin- eosin and masson trichrome method, and immunohistochemical method for α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA. All tested samples were divided into three groups according to histological criteria: livers of infected animals with the first degree of fibrosis, livers of infected animals with the second degree of fibrosis, and livers of infected animals with cirrhosis. Distribution of HSCs depended on the degree of liver fibrosis. Immunohistochemically reactive HSCs were predominantly placed in perisinusoidal space. In liver samples with cirrhosis, HSCs were placed on the periphery of pseudolobulus. Cells of a different shape and size were positive to α-SMA. HSCs play an important role in synthesis of components of extracellular matrix during the development of parasitic fibrosis and liver cirrhosis in domestic animals.

  18. Examination of the impact of animal and dairy science journals based on traditional and newly developed bibliometric indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malesios, C; Abas, Z

    2012-12-01

    Using traditional bibliometric indices such as the well-known journal impact factor (IFAC), as well as other more recently developed measures like the (journal) h-index and modifications, we assessed the impact of most prolific scientific journals in the field of animal and dairy science. To achieve this end, we performed a detailed investigation on the evaluation of journals quality, using a total of 50 journals selected from the category of "Agriculture, Dairy & Animal Science" included in the Thomson Reuters' (formerly Institute of Scientific Information, ISI) Web of Science. Our analysis showed that among the top journals in the field are the Journal of Dairy Research, the Journal of Dairy Science, and the Journal of Animal Science. In particular, the Journal of Animal Science, the most productive and frequently cited journal, has shown rapid development, especially in recent years. The majority of the top-tier, highly cited articles are those associated with the description of statistical methodology and the standard chemical analytical methodologies.

  19. STAT5A Regulates the Survival of Mammary Epithelial Cells and the Development of Mammary Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Humphreys, Robin

    2000-01-01

    The in vivo relationship between epidermal growth factor (EGF) and prolactin/Jak/Stat signaling pathways in mammary gland development and tumorigenesis was explored in transgenic nice overexpressing the TGF alpha gene (TGFalphaTG...

  20. [Mendelism in animal breeding as developed by professor Leopold Frateur, Louvain (1877-1946)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobin, A

    2000-01-01

    Educated as a veterinarian at Cureghem, Leopold Frateur started his scientific career in 1899 as a professor at the Faculty of Sciences of the Catholic University of Louvain, Belgium, in charge of the course in zootechnology. After a study tour to zootechnical institutes and centres of animal breeding in Europe he was invited by the governmental department of Agriculture and the Belgian Society of Zootechnology to investigate the relevance of the Mendelian laws of heredity for the improvement of cattle breeding. In the early years of the century, Frateur conducted field research in order to determine the characteristics of the cattle breeds in Belgium. In 1908 Frateur founded the Institute of Animal Husbandry at his university. Here he worked out his programme of experimental genetics until his retirement in 1936. The last six years of his professorship he teached also agricultural economics in the Faculty of Economical Sciences. In Frateur's experimental research the following main lines can be distinguished: 1) The analysis of simple and complex hereditary factors in cattle, rabbits and poultry; 2) The study of qualitative and quantitative characteristics of importance for the improvement of animal breeds; 3) The synthesis of genetic factors from different stock in order to obtain higher yielding breeds with stable characteristics; 4) Theoretical study of the relationship between genotype and phenotype and the influence of environment factors; 5) Theoretical exploration of the issue of variability and modification of newly formed characteristics; 6) Research leading to an explanation of telegony and atavism; 7) The formulation of a theory on the creation of new breeds in domestic animals and plants, and the relation between breed and species. Also he was responding to topical needs, e.g. he determined the causal factor of pullorum epidemic in chicken farming, or he investigated the hereditary resistance against diphteric infection amongst chickens. Frateur took

  1. Proficiency Testing of Feed Constituents: A Comparative Evaluation of European and Developing Country Laboratories and Its Implications for Animal Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makkar, H P S; Strnad, I; Mittendorfer, J

    2016-10-06

    Proficiency tests, with two feed samples each year, for various constituents (proximate, macro- and microminerals, feed additives, and amino acids) were conducted in 2014 and 2015. A total of 40 and 50 European and 73 and 63 developing country feed analysis laboratories participated in the study in 2014 and 2015, respectively. The data obtained from these two sets of laboratories in each year enabled a comparison of the performance of the European and developing country laboratories. Higher standard deviation and several-fold higher coefficients of variation were obtained for the developing country laboratories. The coefficients of variation for chemical composition parameters, macrominerals, microminerals, and amino acids were higher by up to 9-fold, 14-fold, 10-fold, and 14-fold, respectively, for the developing country laboratories compared with the European laboratories in 2014, while the corresponding values for 2015 were 4.6-fold, 4.4-fold, 9-fold, and 14-fold higher for developing county laboratories. Also, higher numbers of outliers were observed for developing countries (2014, 7.6-8.7% vs 2.9-3.0%; 2015, 7.7-9.5% vs 4.2-7.0%). The results suggest higher need for developing country feed analysis laboratories to improve the quality of data being generated. The likely impact of higher variability of the data generated in developing countries toward safe and quality preparation of animal diets, their impact on animal productivity, and possible ways to improve the quality of data from developing countries are discussed.

  2. Individual and joint actions of selenate and methylmercury on the development and survival of insect detritivore Megaselia scalaris (Diptera: Phoridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, P D; Johnson, L R; Trumble, J T

    2006-05-01

    Despite the important roles played by insects in most ecosystems, surprisingly little is known about how anthropogenic pollutants or their mixtures interact to affect insect populations. The independent and joint actions of selenate and methylmercury on a ubiquitous insect detritivore, Megaselia scalaris (Loew), were determined in this study. Ovipositing females did not distinguish between untreated food sources and those contaminated with toxic concentrations of selenate, methylmercury, or both chemicals in combination. Even at the highest concentrations of pollutants, no negative effects were observed for the egg stage. However, larval survival was significantly decreased and development significantly prolonged by selenate and methylmercury individually at low or intermediate ecologically relevant treatment levels. Potentiation was strongly evident because mixtures containing concentrations as little as only 1% of the respective individual median lethal tolerances (LC(50)s) caused significantly more mortality and delayed larval development than would be expected from the responses selenate and methylmercury elicit individually. However, survival and pupal development was not affected at any rate tested. Female fecundity was significantly decreased by methylmercury but not by selenate or mixture treatments. The relative toxicity to M. scalaris of each of the individual and joint treatments was selenate (LC(50) = 260 microg/g) < methylmercury (LC(50) = 22 microg/g) < the mixture at approximately 5% of the LC(50) concentration of each of the components (12 microg/g selenate plus 1.0 microg/g methylmercury). The increased mortality and delayed larval development within sites contaminated by selenate, methylmercury, or combination of the two have substantial implications for the ecology, population dynamics, and sustainability of M. scalaris populations. If these results can be extrapolated to other arthropod detritivores, ecosystem food-web function may be

  3. Climatic influences on development and survival of free-living stages of equine strongyles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Martin Krarup; Kaplan, Ray M.; Thamsborg, Stig Milan

    2007-01-01

    Development of resistance to anthelmintic drugs by horse strongyles constitutes a growing threat to equine health because it is unknown when the new drug xlasses can be exoected on the market. Consequently, parasite control strategies should attemt to maintain drug efficacy for as long as possible....... The proportion of the parasite pupulation that is not exposed to anthelmintic treatment is descriebed as being "in refugia" and althogt many factors affect the rate at which resistance develops, levels of refugia are considered the most important as these parasites are not selected by treatment and so provide...

  4. Agile software development in an earned value world: a survival guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantor, Jeffrey; Long, Kevin; Becla, Jacek; Economou, Frossie; Gelman, Margaret; Juric, Mario; Lambert, Ron; Krughoff, Simon; Swinbank, John D.; Wu, Xiuqin

    2016-08-01

    Agile methodologies are current best practice in software development. They are favored for, among other reasons, preventing premature optimization by taking a somewhat short-term focus, and allowing frequent replans/reprioritizations of upcoming development work based on recent results and current backlog. At the same time, funding agencies prescribe earned value management accounting for large projects which, these days, inevitably include substantial software components. Earned Value approaches emphasize a more comprehensive and typically longer-range plan, and tend to characterize frequent replans and reprioritizations as indicative of problems. Here we describe the planning, execution and reporting framework used by the LSST Data Management team, that navigates these opposite tensions.

  5. Development and survival of Ascaris suum eggs in deep litter of pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katakam, Kiran Kumar; Thamsborg, Stig Milan; Kyvsgaard, Niels Christian

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Indoor transmission of Ascaris suum partly depends on the physico-chemical conditions in bedding material. Temperature, pH, aqueous ammonia, moisture, occurrence and development of A. suum eggs were therefore compared in different areas (resting, intermediate and latrine) of two deep litter......-1 DM), but overall viability was very low (5%) and few eggs were larvated (0·004%) or even infective (0·002%). Latrines typically had high moisture (79%) and moderate temperature (30 °C) levels. The concentration of eggs was very high (1444 egg g-1 DM) and though 32% were viable, none had developed...

  6. Anesthesia-related neurotoxicity and the developing animal brain is not a significant problem in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tom G

    2015-01-01

    , these findings could have significant public health implications. So far, relatively few human (cohort) studies focusing on this topic have been published with inconsistent results. While some studies have indicated an association between exposure to anesthesia and surgery, other studies have indicated...... verification in humans. Fortunately, the humans studies performed so far have been unable to confirm these animal data. A single brief anesthetic seems safe in infants. Multiple anesthetic and surgical exposures on the other hand are different. But there may be other reasons for this than merely...

  7. Application of cellular mechanisms to growth and development of food producing animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, K Y; Johnson, B J

    2008-04-01

    Postnatal skeletal muscle growth is a result of hypertrophy of existing skeletal muscle fibers in food producing animals. Accumulation of additional nuclei, as a source of DNA, to the multinucleated skeletal muscle fiber aids in fiber hypertrophy during periods of rapid skeletal muscle growth. Muscle satellite cells are recognized as the source of nuclei to support muscle hypertrophy. Exogenous growth-enhancing compounds have been used to modulate growth rate and efficiency in meat animals for over a half century. In cattle, these compounds enhance efficiency of growth by preferentially stimulating skeletal muscle growth compared with adipose tissue. There are 2 main classes of compounds approved for use in cattle in the United States, anabolic steroids and beta-adrenergic agonists (beta-AA). Administration of both trenbolone acetate and estradiol-17beta, as implants, increased carcass protein accumulation 8 to 10% in yearling steers. Muscle satellite cells isolated from steers implanted with trenbolone acetate/ estradiol-17beta had a shorter lag phase in culture compared with satellite cells isolated from control steers. Collectively, these data indicate that activation, increased proliferation, and subsequent fusion of satellite cells in muscles of implanted cattle may be an important mechanism by which anabolic steroids enhance muscle hypertrophy. Oral administration of beta-AA to ruminants does not alter DNA accumulation in skeletal muscle over a typical feeding period (28 to 42 d). Enhanced muscle hypertrophy observed due to beta-AA feeding occurs by direct, receptor-mediated changes in protein synthesis and degradation rates of skeletal muscle tissue. Proper timing of anabolic steroid administration when coupled with beta-AA feeding could result in a synergistic response in skeletal muscle growth due to the effects of anabolic steroids at increasing satellite cell activity, which then can support the rapid hypertrophic changes of the muscle fiber when exposed

  8. #WaysToRelax: developing an online alcohol-related health promotion animation for people aged 55 and older

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyssa Ferguson

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol use among middle-aged and older adults (55 years and older is increasingly becoming a public health concern. Despite this, there is relatively little research on the experiences of alcohol use and related concerns among people aged 55 and older to inform tailored and engaging health promotion activities. To address this gap, we aimed to develop an engaging alcohol-related health promotion resource for people aged 55 and older. We drew on a research-into-action approach, which involved: 1 thematic analysis of alcohol-related concerns in online counselling transcripts of 70 people aged 55 and older, 2 a review of health promotion literature, and 3 consultation with consumers of alcohol and other drug services, and carers. The research phase highlighted that people aged 55 and older were concerned that their reliance on alcohol use to manage stress had become a habit they wanted to shift. Alongside this, the literature showed that people aged 55 and older were often dismissive of conventional health promotion activities, and pointed to the benefits of conveying health promotion messages through animation. In response, we developed an animation to stimulate reflection and thought about other ways to relax and manage stress. We drew on health promotion principles to ensure that the animation had a positive message and was engaging without being ageist or paternalistic. It was further refined with input from consumers and carers, who thought the animation was appropriate, appealing and useful. Future activities will include further dissemination and evaluation of the animation and associated activities.

  9. Effects of temperature, total dissolved solids, and total suspended solids on survival and development rate of larval Arkansas River Shiner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Julia S.; Grabowski, Timothy B.; Brewer, Shannon K.; Worthington, Thomas A.

    2017-01-01

    Decreases in the abundance and diversity of stream fishes in the North American Great Plains have been attributed to habitat fragmentation, altered hydrological and temperature regimes, and elevated levels of total dissolved solids and total suspended solids. Pelagic-broadcast spawning cyprinids, such as the Arkansas River Shiner Notropis girardi, may be particularly vulnerable to these changing conditions because of their reproductive strategy. Our objectives were to assess the effects of temperature, total dissolved solids, and total suspended solids on the developmental and survival rates of Arkansas River Shiner larvae. Results suggest temperature had the greatest influence on the developmental rate of Arkansas River Shiner larvae. However, embryos exposed to the higher levels of total dissolved solids and total suspended solids reached developmental stages earlier than counterparts at equivalent temperatures. Although this rapid development may be beneficial in fragmented waters, our data suggest it may be associated with lower survival rates. Furthermore, those embryos incubating at high temperatures, or in high levels of total dissolved solids and total suspended solids resulted in less viable embryos and larvae than those incubating in all other temperature, total dissolved solid, and total suspended solid treatment groups. As the Great Plains ecoregion continues to change, these results may assist in understanding reasons for past extirpations and future extirpation threats as well as predict stream reaches capable of sustaining Arkansas River Shiners and other species with similar early life-history strategies.

  10. Biphasic influence of Miz1 on neural crest development by regulating cell survival and apical adhesion complex formation in the developing neural tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerosuo, Laura; Bronner, Marianne E.

    2014-01-01

    Myc interacting zinc finger protein-1 (Miz1) is a transcription factor known to regulate cell cycle– and cell adhesion–related genes in cancer. Here we show that Miz1 also plays a critical role in neural crest development. In the chick, Miz1 is expressed throughout the neural plate and closing neural tube. Its morpholino-mediated knockdown affects neural crest precursor survival, leading to reduction of neural plate border and neural crest specifier genes Msx-1, Pax7, FoxD3, and Sox10. Of interest, Miz1 loss also causes marked reduction of adhesion molecules (N-cadherin, cadherin6B, and α1-catenin) with a concomitant increase of E-cadherin in the neural folds, likely leading to delayed and decreased neural crest emigration. Conversely, Miz1 overexpression results in up-regulation of cadherin6B and FoxD3 expression in the neural folds/neural tube, leading to premature neural crest emigration and increased number of migratory crest cells. Although Miz1 loss effects cell survival and proliferation throughout the neural plate, the neural progenitor marker Sox2 was unaffected, suggesting a neural crest–selective effect. The results suggest that Miz1 is important not only for survival of neural crest precursors, but also for maintenance of integrity of the neural folds and tube, via correct formation of the apical adhesion complex therein. PMID:24307680

  11. Animal cloning: problems and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, D N

    2005-04-01

    An efficient animal cloning technology would provide many new opportunities for livestock agriculture, human medicine, and animal conservation. Nuclear cloning involves the production of animals that are genetically identical to the donor cells used in a technique known as nuclear transfer (NT). However, at present it is an inefficient process: in cattle, only around 6% of the embryos transferred to the reproductive tracts of recipient cows result in healthy, longterm surviving clones. Of concern are the high losses throughout gestation, during birth and in the post-natal period through to adulthood. Many of the pregnancy losses relate to failure of the placenta to develop and function correctly. Placental dysfunction may also have an adverse influence on postnatal health. These anomalies are probably due to incorrect epigenetic reprogramming of the donor genome following NT, leading to inappropriate patterns of gene expression during the development of clones. Whilst some physiological tests on surviving clones suggest normality, other reports indicate a variety of post-natal clone-associated abnormalities. This variability in outcome may reflect species-specific and/or cloning methodological differences. Importantly, to date it appears that these clone-associated phenotypes are not transmitted to offspring following sexual reproduction. This indicates that they represent epigenetic errors, rather than genetic errors, which are corrected during gametogenesis. Whilst this needs confirmation at the molecular level, it provides initial confidence in the first application of NT in agriculture, namely, the production of small numbers of cloned sires from genetically elite bulls, for natural mating, to effectively disseminate genetic gain. In addition to the animal welfare concerns with the technology, the underlying health of the animals and the consequential effect on food safety are critical aspects that require investigation to gain regulatory and consumer

  12. Challenges and opportunities for the future of monoclonal antibody development: Improving safety assessment and reducing animal use

    OpenAIRE

    Sewell, Fiona; Chapman, Kathryn; Couch, Jessica; Dempster, Maggie; Heidel, Shawn; Loberg, Lise; Maier, Curtis; Maclachlan, Timothy K.; Todd, Marque; van der Laan, Jan Willem

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The market for biotherapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) is large and is growing rapidly. However, attrition poses a significant challenge for the development of mAbs, and for biopharmaceuticals in general, with large associated costs in resource and animal use. Termination of candidate mAbs may occur due to poor translation from preclinical models to human safety. It is critical that the industry addresses this problem to maintain productivity. Though attrition poses a significant...

  13. Development of a large animal model for investigation of deep brain stimulation for epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stypulkowski, Paul H; Giftakis, Jonathon E; Billstrom, Tina M

    2011-01-01

    To better understand the mechanism of action of deep brain stimulation (DBS) for epilepsy and to investigate implantable device features, it is desirable to have a large animal model to evaluate clinical-grade systems. This study assessed the suitability of an ovine model of epilepsy for this purpose. Animals were anesthetized for surgery and 1.5 T MRIs collected. Unilateral anterior thalamic DBS leads, hippocampal depth electrodes and catheters were implanted using a frameless stereotactic system. Evoked responses and local field potentials were collected and stored for off-line analysis. Despite limited neuroanatomic information for this species, it was possible to reliably implant leads into the target structures using MR-guided techniques. Stimulation of these regions produced robust evoked potentials within this circuit that were dependent on stimulus location and parameters. High-frequency thalamic DBS produced a clear inhibition of both spontaneous and penicillin-induced ictal activity in the hippocampus which far outlasted the duration of the stimulation. These preliminary results suggest that the sheep model may be useful for further investigation of DBS for epilepsy. The demonstration of marked suppression of network excitability with high-frequency stimulation supports a potential therapeutic mechanism for this DBS therapy. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Development of Analytical Method and Monitoring of Veterinary Drug Residues in Korean Animal Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jae-Sang; Park, Su-Jeong; Choi, Jung-Yun; Kim, Jin-Sook; Kang, Myung-Hee; Choi, Bo-Kyung; Hur, Sun Jin

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the residual amount of veterinary drugs such as meloxicam, flunixin, and tulathromycin in animal products (beef, pork, horsemeat, and milk). Veterinary drugs have been widely used in the rearing of livestock to prevent and treat diseases. A total of 152 samples were purchased from markets located in major Korean cities (Seoul, Busan, Incheon, Daegu, Daejeon, Gwangju, Ulsan and Jeju), including Jeju. Veterinary drugs were analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry according to the Korean Food Standards Code. The resulting data, which are located within 70-120% of recovery range and less than 20% of relative standard deviations, are in compliance with the criteria of CODEX. A total of five veterinary drugs were detected in 152 samples, giving a detection rate of approximately 3.3%; and no food source violated the guideline values. Our result indicated that most of the veterinary drug residues in animal products were below the maximum residue limits specified in Korea.

  15. Development of Analytical Method and Monitoring of Veterinary Drug Residues in Korean Animal Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jae-Sang; Park, Su-Jeong; Choi, Jung-Yun; Kim, Jin-Sook; Kang, Myung-Hee; Choi, Bo-Kyung

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the residual amount of veterinary drugs such as meloxicam, flunixin, and tulathromycin in animal products (beef, pork, horsemeat, and milk). Veterinary drugs have been widely used in the rearing of livestock to prevent and treat diseases. A total of 152 samples were purchased from markets located in major Korean cities (Seoul, Busan, Incheon, Daegu, Daejeon, Gwangju, Ulsan and Jeju), including Jeju. Veterinary drugs were analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry according to the Korean Food Standards Code. The resulting data, which are located within 70-120% of recovery range and less than 20% of relative standard deviations, are in compliance with the criteria of CODEX. A total of five veterinary drugs were detected in 152 samples, giving a detection rate of approximately 3.3%; and no food source violated the guideline values. Our result indicated that most of the veterinary drug residues in animal products were below the maximum residue limits specified in Korea. PMID:27433102

  16. Development an Automatic Speech to Facial Animation Conversion for Improve Deaf Lives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Hamidreza Kasaei

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose design and initial implementation of a robust system which can automatically translates voice into text and text to sign language animations. Sign Language
    Translation Systems could significantly improve deaf lives especially in communications, exchange of information and employment of machine for translation conversations from one language to another has. Therefore, considering these points, it seems necessary to study the speech recognition. Usually, the voice recognition algorithms address three major challenges. The first is extracting feature form speech and the second is when limited sound gallery are available for recognition, and the final challenge is to improve speaker dependent to speaker independent voice recognition. Extracting feature form speech is an important stage in our method. Different procedures are available for extracting feature form speech. One of the commonest of which used in speech
    recognition systems is Mel-Frequency Cepstral Coefficients (MFCCs. The algorithm starts with preprocessing and signal conditioning. Next extracting feature form speech using Cepstral coefficients will be done. Then the result of this process sends to segmentation part. Finally recognition part recognizes the words and then converting word recognized to facial animation. The project is still in progress and some new interesting methods are described in the current report.

  17. Development of a large animal model of cirrhosis and portal hypertension using hepatic transarterial embolization: a study in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avritscher, Rony; Wright, Kenneth C; Javadi, Sanaz; Uthamanthil, Rajesh; Gupta, Sanjay; Gagea, Mihai; Bassett, Roland L; Murthy, Ravi; Wallace, Michael J; Madoff, David C

    2011-09-01

    To develop a clinically relevant porcine model of liver cirrhosis with portal hypertension by means of hepatic transarterial embolization. Institutional animal care and use committee approval was obtained for all experiments. Pigs received transcatheter arterial infusion of a 3:1 mixture of iodized oil and ethanol into the hepatic artery in volumes of 16 mL in group 1 (n = 4), 28 mL in group 2 (n = 4), and 40 mL in group 3 (n = 4) with intent of bilobar distribution. Hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG) measurement, liver function tests, and volumetry were performed at baseline, at 2 weeks, and before necropsy. Cirrhosis was successfully induced in three animals that received 16 mL of the embolic mixture and in all four animals that received 28 mL. The animals in the 40-mL group did not recover from the procedure and were euthanized within 48 h. Increases in HVPG after 6-8 weeks versus baseline reached statistical significance (P < .05). Correlation between degree of fibrosis and volume of embolic agent did not reach statistical significance, but there was a trend toward increased fibrosis in the 28-mL group compared with the 16-mL group. Transcatheter hepatic arterial embolization can be used to create a reliable and reproducible porcine model of liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Copyright © 2011 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Establishment study of the in vivo imaging analysis with small animal imaging modalities for bio-durg development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Beomsu; Park, Sanghyeon; Choi, Dae Seong; Park, Jeonghoon; Jung, Uhee; Lee, Yun Jong

    2012-01-15

    In this study, we established the image modalities (micro-PET, SPECT/CT) using the experimental animal (mouse) for the development of imaging assessment method for the bio-durg and extramural collaboration proposal. We examined the micro-SPECT/CT, PET imaging study using the Siemens Inveon micro-multimodality system (SPECT/CT) and imaging study using the Siemens Inveon micro-multimodality system (SPECT/CT) and micro-PET with {sup 99m}Tc tricarbonyl bifunctional chelators and {sup 18}F-clotrimazole derivative. SPECT imaging studies were performed with {sup 99m}Tc tricarbonyl BFCs. PET imaging study was performed with {sup 18}F-clotrimazole derivatives. We performed the PET image study of {sup 18}F-clotrimazole derivatives using U87MG tumor bearing mice. Also we tested the intramural and extramural collaboration using small animal imaging modalities and prepared the draft of extramural R and D operation manual for small animal imaging modalities and the experimental animal imaging facility. These research results can be utilized as a basic image study protocols and data for the image assessment of drugs including biological drug.

  19. Animal-assisted dyadic therapy: A therapy model promoting development of the reflective function in the parent-child bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shani, Liat

    2017-01-01

    Animal-assisted psychotherapy (AAP) inherently incorporates standpoints, interventions, and ways of action promoting the development of the reflective function and mentalization, and thus has special value for parent-child psychotherapy. Two central tools in AAP contribute to this process. The first is the ethical stance of the therapist, who sees the animals as full partners in the therapy situation, respecting them as subjects with needs, desires, and thoughts of their own. The second tool combines nonverbal communication with animals together with the relating, in the here and now, to the understanding and decoding of body language of everyone in the setting. Nonverbal communication in AAP enables access to implicit communication patterns occurring between parent and child. This article provides a survey of theoretical development and research constituting a basis for the development of therapeutic approaches for the improvement of parent-children dynamics, followed by a description of a dyadic therapy model of a mentalization-based treatment originating from a psychoanalytic-relational orientation. Clinical examples are provided to illustrate AAP processes in parent-child psychotherapy (consent was received for examples that were not aggregated).

  20. Development, Reproduction, Survival, and Demographic Patterns of Tuta absoluta (Meyrick) (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae) on Different Commercial Tomato Cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krechemer, F S; Foerster, L A

    2017-12-01

    The increase in the production of tomato, Solanum lycopersicon Mill. (Solanaceae), has favored the proliferation of pests, especially Tuta absoluta (Meyrick) (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae). In this study, the development, reproduction, survival, and demographic parameters of T. absoluta reared on six commercial tomato cultivars (Cherry, Cordilheira, Giuliana, Nemoneta, Paron, and Santa Clara) were evaluated. Tuta absoluta completed its development in all tomato cultivars. Development from newly hatched caterpillar to newly emerged adult varied between 24.8 and 28.2 days. Female fecundity ranged from 126.3 to 166.9 eggs, with fertility from 54.2 to 84.1%. Mortality during egg-adult development varied between 21.4 and 46.4% for insects reared on cultivars Cherry and Giuliana, respectively. The cultivars Cordilheira, Giuliana, and Santa Clara are promising options to tomato producers in order to decrease the attack and proliferation of T. absoluta. However, the development and population growth of T. absoluta is faster on the tomato cultivar Cherry.

  1. Survival and Health Benefits of Breastfeeding Versus Artificial Feeding in Infants of HIV-Infected Women: Developing Versus Developed World

    OpenAIRE

    Kuhn, Louise; Aldrovandi, Grace

    2010-01-01

    Infant feeding policies for HIV-infected women in developing countries differ from policies in developed countries. Here we summarize the epidemiologic data on the risks and benefits of various infant feeding practices for HIV-infected women living in different contexts. Artificial feeding can prevent a large proportion of mother-to-child HIV transmission but also is associated with increases in morbidity and mortality among both exposed-uninfected and HIV-infected children. Antiretroviral dr...

  2. Animated symbols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølunde, Lisbeth

    2008-01-01

    This paper is based on data about animation film production by 18-year-old students in a Danish upper secondary school. The optic is the on-going potential for learning and development of reflection. The purpose is to clarify what might support young people's reflection on media. I propose...... an analytic working model called Animated Symbols concerning critical reflection in a dialogic learning process. The model shows dialogue as interactions that involve two types of transformation: inner ‘learning processes' and outer signs and symbols. The classroom-based research study is part of a Ph...

  3. Advances in biosensor development for the screening of antibiotic residues in food products of animal origin - A comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudin, Valérie

    2017-04-15

    Antibiotic residues may be found in food of animal origin, since veterinary drugs are used for preventive and curative purposes to treat animals. The control of veterinary drug residues in food is necessary to ensure consumer safety. Screening methods are the first step in the control of antibiotic residues in food of animal origin. Conventional screening methods are based on different technologies, microbiological methods, immunological methods or physico-chemical methods (e.g. thin-layer chromatography, HPLC, LC-MS/MS). Screening methods should be simple, quick, inexpensive and specific, with low detection limits and high sample throughput. Biosensors can meet some of these requirements. Therefore, the development of biosensors for the screening of antibiotic residues has been increasing since the 1980s. The present review provides extensive and up-to-date findings on biosensors for the screening of antibiotic residues in food products of animal origin. Biosensors are constituted of a bioreceptor and a transducer. In the detection of antibiotic residues, even though antibodies were the first bioreceptors to be used, new kinds of bioreceptors are being developed more and more (enzymes, aptamers, MIPs); their advantages and drawbacks are discussed in this review. The different categories of transducers (electrochemical, mass-based biosensors, optical and thermal) and their potential applications for the screening of antibiotic residues in food are presented. Moreover, the advantages and drawbacks of the different types of transducers are discussed. Lastly, outlook and the future development of biosensors for the control of antibiotic residues in food are highlighted. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Development of Genome Engineering Tools from Plant-Specific PPR Proteins Using Animal Cultured Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Takehito; Yagi, Yusuke; Nakamura, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    The pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) motif is a sequence-specific RNA/DNA-binding module. Elucidation of the RNA/DNA recognition mechanism has enabled engineering of PPR motifs as new RNA/DNA manipulation tools in living cells, including for genome editing. However, the biochemical characteristics of PPR proteins remain unknown, mostly due to the instability and/or unfolding propensities of PPR proteins in heterologous expression systems such as bacteria and yeast. To overcome this issue, we constructed reporter systems using animal cultured cells. The cell-based system has highly attractive features for PPR engineering: robust eukaryotic gene expression; availability of various vectors, reagents, and antibodies; highly efficient DNA delivery ratio (>80 %); and rapid, high-throughput data production. In this chapter, we introduce an example of such reporter systems: a PPR-based sequence-specific translational activation system. The cell-based reporter system can be applied to characterize plant genes of interested and to PPR engineering.

  5. A framework for the development of STR genotyping in domestic animal species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Asch, Barbara; Pinheiro, Raquel; Pereira, Rui

    2010-01-01

    This study reports the methodology used to search, select and characterize STR loci on the canine X chromosome using publicly available genome resources and following the current guidelines for human and non-human forensic testing. After several rounds of selection, 12 X-STR markers were optimized...... offspring. Its use may complement the information obtained by autosomal STR analysis and contribute to the resolution of complex cases of kinship in dogs. The presented methodology for the de novo construction of an STR multiplex may also provide a helpful framework for analogous work in other animal...... species. As an increasing number of reference genomes become available, convenient tools for individual identification and parentage testing based on STR loci selected from autosomes or sex chromosomes' sequences may be created following this strategy....

  6. Development and evaluation of web-based animated pedagogical agents for facilitating critical thinking in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morey, Diane J

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Web-based animated pedagogical agents on critical thinking among nursing students. A pedagogical agent or virtual character provides a possible innovative tool for critical thinking through active engagement of students by asking questions and providing feedback about a series of nursing case studies. This mixed methods experimental study used a pretest, posttest design with a control group. ANCOVA demonstrated no significant difference between the groups on the Critical Thinking Process Test. Pre- and post-think-alouds were analyzed using a rating tool and rubric for the presence of eight cognitive processes, level of critical thinking, and for accuracy of nursing diagnosis, conclusions, and evaluation. Chi-square analyses for each group revealed a significant difference for improvement of the critical thinking level and correct conclusions from pre-think-aloud to post-think-aloud, but only the pedagogical agent group had a significant result for appropriate evaluations.

  7. Improvement of survival and development of Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei larvae by feeding taurine enriched rotifers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dedi Jusadi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTThe objective of the present experiment was to study the most optimum taurine enrichment concentration of rotifers in improving Pacific white shrimp larva Litopenaeus vannamei survival and development. White shrimp larvae at sixth naupliar stage were reared in 12 units of 500 L fibre glass tanks with a stocking density of 125 ind/L. Starting from zoea two stage (Z-2, the larva was provided with rotifers with different taurine enrichment concentration according to the treatments, i.e. 0 mg/L enrichment medium (A, 25 mg/L (B, 50 mg/L(C, and 100 mg/L (D. The results show that different taurine concentration in the enrichment media increased taurine level in rotifers. Furthermore, the administration of taurine enriched rotifers up to 50 mg/L significantly improved larval survival and may accelerate larval development. The experimental results also concluded that a concentration of 50 mg/L is the most optimum taurine enrichment concentration of rotifers for the improvement of white shrimp larval survival and developmental stage.Keywords: taurine, rotifer, white shrimp, enrichmentABSTRAKPenelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengkaji konsentrasi optimum taurin melalui pengayaan pada rotifera terhadap tingkat kelangsungan hidup dan perkembangan stadia larva udang vaname Litopenaeus vannamei. Larva udang vaname stadia naupli-6 dipelihara dalam 12 tangki fiberglass volume 500 L dengan kepadatan 125 ind/L. Dimulai sejak stadia zoea 2 (Z-2 larva diberi rotifera yang diperkaya dengan taurin dengan konsentrasi yang berbeda sesuai dengan perlakuan, yaitu 0 mg/L media pengkaya (A, 25 mg/L (B, 50mg/L (C, dan 100mg/L (D. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan pengayaan taurin pada konsentrasi yang berbeda menyebabkan peningkatan kandungan taurin rotifera. Sementara pemberian rotifera yang diperkaya taurin hingga 50 mg/L meningkatkan kelangsungan hidup dan mempercepat perkembangan stadia larva udang. Berdasarkan hasil penelitian ini dapat disimpulkan bahwa pemberian

  8. Influence of Water with Modified Isotope Structure on Development of Radiation Damage in Experimental Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakov, D. V.; Fedorenko, B. S.; Sinyak, Yu. E.

    begin table htbp begin center begin tabular p 442pt hline As the duration of space missions increases the problem of durability of space crews and their resistivity to space flight factors becomes more important The purpose of the present work was to study the radioprotective effects of lowered deuterium content water in experimental animals after repeated exposures to low doses of gamma radiation Both male and female adult mice of NAAoN57Al6 F1 and BALB c lines were exposed to 0 25 0 5 and 1 0 Gy of 60 Co gamma rays by multiple fractions The dose rate was 0 32 Gy min Starting from one month prior to the first irradiation fraction till the end of the experiment the animals were only supplied with lowered deuterium content water ad libitum The control group of mice consumed tap water only The mice were sacrificed by means of cervical dislocation within one month after finishing the last irradiation fraction The following parameters were registered the weight of body thymus and spleen number of leucocytes blood formula number of caryocytes in femur bone marrow cytogenetic lesions in nucleated bone marrow cells The water with lowered deuterium content was produced by means of electrolysis with a special device in the Institute for Biomedical Problems par A long-term consumption of water with lowered deuterium content by irradiated mice was found to result in lower levels of depletion of peripheral blood leucocytes and bone marrow cells in a decrease in the yield of cytogenetic aberrations and in a less intensive reduction of the mass

  9. Comparing environmental issues in Cuba before and after the Special Period: balancing sustainable development and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maal-Bared, Rasha

    2006-04-01

    Following the Earth Summit in 1992, Cuba designed and implemented a variety of programs, administrative structures, and public awareness activities to promote sound environmental management and sustainable development. This came shortly after the fall of the Soviet Union and the strengthening of the US blockade in 1990, which resulted in a 35% drop in Cuban GDP. This period, referred to as the Special Period, witnessed a decrease in many environmentally damaging activities both by choice and by necessity, but also resulted in many decisions to resuscitate the Cuban economy. The purpose of this work was to compare and rank the environmental risks Cuba faced before and during the Special Period (1990-2000) using two Comparative environmental risk assessments (CERAs). To do so, an ecosystem integrity risk assessment matrix was constructed with 42 risk end points. The matrix assessed the risk posed by 17 problem areas including air pollution, water contamination, solid waste sites, pesticides and ecosystem degradation. The risks were calculated using five criteria: area affected, vulnerability of affected population, severity of impact, irreversibility of effect and uncertainty. To construct this matrix, both literature reviews and expert interviews in Cuba were conducted in 2000. The results showed a general decrease in risk scores during the Special Period. Before the Special Period, high risks were posed by: terrestrial degradation and industrial wastewater and sludge, followed by freshwater degradation, surface water stressors, and pesticides. After the Special Period, industrial wastewater and sludge and pesticides were no longer high-risk areas, but municipal wastewater and marine coastal degradation ranked higher than previously. Also, the risk endpoints most stressed after 1990 were affected by activities controlled by the government, such as mining and tourism, and lack of infrastructure. Therefore, the claims that public environmental education is the main

  10. Context- and dose-dependent modulatory effects of naringenin on survival and development of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Debarati; Sen, Soumadeep; Chatterjee, Rishita; Roy, Debasish; James, Joel; Thirumurugan, Kavitha

    2016-04-01

    Naringenin, the predominant bioflavonoid found in grapefruit and tomato has diverse bioactive properties that encompass anti-carcinogenic, anti-inflammatory, anti-atherogenic, anti-estrogenic, anti-hyperlipidemic and anti-hyperglycemic characteristics. Naringenin has not been explored for its pro-longevity traits in fruit flies. Therefore, the current study explores its influence on longevity, fecundity, feeding rate, larval development, resistance to starvation stress and body weight in male and female wild-type Drosophila melanogaster Canton-S flies. Flies were fed with normal and high fat diets respectively. The results implied hormetic effects of naringenin on longevity and development in flies. In flies fed with standard and high fat diets, lower concentrations of naringenin (200 and 400 µM) augmented mean lifespan while higher concentrations (600 and 800 µM) were consistently lethal. However, enhanced longevity seen at 400 µM of naringenin was at the expense of reduced fecundity and food intake in flies. Larvae reared on standard diet having 200 µM of naringenin exhibited elevated pupation and emergence as flies. Eclosion time was hastened in larvae reared on standard diet having 200 µM of naringenin. Female flies fed with a standard diet having 200 and 400 µM of naringenin were more resistant to starvation stress. Reduction in body weight was observed in male and female flies fed with a high fat diet supplemented with 200 and 400 µM of naringenin respectively. Collectively, the results elucidated a context- and dose-dependent hormetic efficacy of naringenin that varied with gender, diet and stage of lifecycle in flies.

  11. Development of prognostic model for predicting survival after retrograde placement of ureteral stent in advanced gastrointestinal cancer patients and its evaluation by decision curve analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Shingo; Komai, Yoshinobu; Ishioka, Junichiro; Sakai, Yasuyuki; Fuse, Nozomu; Ito, Masaaki; Kihara, Kazunori; Saito, Norio

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine risk factors for survival after retrograde placement of ureteral stents and develop a prognostic model for advanced gastrointestinal tract (GIT: esophagus, stomach, colon and rectum) cancer patients. We examined the clinical records of 122 patients who underwent retrograde placement of a ureteral stent against malignant extrinsic ureteral obstruction. A prediction model for survival after stenting was developed. We compared its clinical usefulness with our previous model based on the results from nephrostomy cases by decision curve analysis. Median follow-up period was 201 days (8-1490) and 97 deaths occurred. The 1-year survival rate in this cohort was 29%. Based on multivariate analysis, primary site of colon origin, absence of retroperitoneal lymph node metastasis and serum albumin >3g/dL were significantly associated with a prolonged survival time. To develop a prognostic model, we divided the patients into 3 risk groups of favorable: 0-1 factors (N.=53), intermediate: 2 risk factors (N.=54), and poor: 3 risk factors (N.=15). There were significant differences in the survival profiles of these 3 risk groups (P<0.0001). Decision curve analyses revealed that the current model has a superior net benefit than our previous model for most of the examined probabilities. We have developed a novel prognostic model for GIT cancer patients who were treated with retrograde placement of a ureteral stent. The current model should help urologists and medical oncologists to predict survival in cases of malignant extrinsic ureteral obstruction.

  12. Dynamic animations of journal maps: indicators of structural changes and interdisciplinary developments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leydesdorff, L.; Schank, T.

    2008-01-01

    The dynamic analysis of structural change in the organization of the sciences requires, methodologically, the integration of multivariate and time-series analysis. Structural change - for instance, interdisciplinary development - is often an objective of government interventions. Recent developments

  13. Role of cumulus cells during vitrification and fertilization of mature bovine oocytes: Effects on survival, fertilization, and blastocyst development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Escribano, N; Smits, K; Piepers, S; Van den Abbeel, E; Woelders, H; Van Soom, A

    2016-07-15

    This study was designed to determine the role of cumulus cells during vitrification of bovine oocytes. Mature cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) with many layers of cumulus cells, corona radiata oocytes (CRs), with a few layers of cumulus cells, and denuded oocytes (DOs) without cumulus cells were vitrified in 15% ethylene glycol, 15% dimethyl sulfoxide, and 0.5-M sucrose. Oocytes that survived the vitrification process were fertilized. Denuded oocytes were fertilized with or without supplementation of intact COCs (DOsCOCs). First, survival and embryo development rates were studied. Higher survival rates were obtained for DOs and DOsCOCs (94% and 95%, respectively) compared with COCs (82.7%, P vitrification of mature bovine oocytes. Because cumulus cells are required for fertilization, the use of partially DOs (CRs) or the addition of intact COCs (DOsCOCs) during fertilization can result in higher survival and embryo development after vitrification. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Surviving in the presence of sulphur dioxide: strategies developed by wine yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divol, Benoit; du Toit, Maret; Duckitt, Edward

    2012-08-01

    Sulphur dioxide has been used as a common preservative in wine since at least the nineteenth century. Its use has even become essential to the making of quality wines because of its antioxidant, antioxidasic and antiseptic properties. The chemistry of SO₂ in wine is fairly complex due to its dissociation into different species and its binding to other compounds produced by yeasts and bacteria during fermentation. The only antiseptic species is the minute part remaining as molecular SO₂. The latter concentration is both dependent on pH and concentration of free bisulphite. However, certain yeast species have developed cellular and molecular mechanisms as a response to SO₂ exposure. Some of these mechanisms are fairly complex and have only been investigated recently, at least for the molecular mechanisms. They include sulphite reduction, sulphite oxidation, acetaldehyde production, sulphite efflux and the entry into viable but not culturable state, as the ultimate response. In this review, the chemistry of SO₂ in wine is explained together with the impact of SO₂ on yeast cells. The different defence mechanisms are described and discussed, mostly based on current knowledge available for Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  15. Survival of the fetus: fetal B and T cell receptor repertoire development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rechavi, Erez; Somech, Raz

    2017-11-01

    A mature and diverse T and B cell receptor repertoire is a prerequisite for immunocompetence. In light of its increased susceptibility to infection, the human fetus has long been considered deficient in this regard. However, data accumulated since the 1990s and in earnest in the past couple of years paints a more complicated picture. As we describe in this review, mechanisms responsible for generating a diverse receptor repertoire, such as somatic recombination, class switch recombination, and somatic hypermutation, are all operational to surprising extents in the growing fetus. The composition of the fetal repertoire differs from that of adults, with preferential usage of certain variable (V), diversity (D), and joining (J) gene segments and a shorter complementarity determining (CDR3) region, primarily due to decreased terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT) expression. Both T and B cell receptor repertoires are extremely diverse by the end of the second trimester, and in the case of T cells, are capable of responding to an invading pathogen with in utero clonal expansion. Thus, it would appear as though the T and B cell receptor repertoires are not a hindrance towards immunocompetence of the newborn. Our improved understanding of fetal receptor repertoire development is already bearing fruit in the early diagnosis of primary immunodeficiencies (PID) and may help clarify the pathogenesis of congenital infections, recurrent abortions, and autoimmune disorders in the near future.

  16. Survival of motor neurone protein is required for normal postnatal development of the spleen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Alison K; Somers, Eilidh; Powis, Rachael A; Shorrock, Hannah K; Murphy, Kelley; Swoboda, Kathryn J; Gillingwater, Thomas H; Parson, Simon H

    2017-02-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), traditionally described as a predominantly childhood form of motor neurone disease, is the leading genetic cause of infant mortality. Although motor neurones are undoubtedly the primary affected cell type, the severe infantile form of SMA (Type I SMA) is now widely recognised to represent a multisystem disorder where a variety of organs and systems in the body are also affected. Here, we report that the spleen is disproportionately small in the 'Taiwanese' murine model of severe SMA (Smn -/- ;SMN2 tg/0 ), correlated to low levels of cell proliferation and increased cell death. Spleen lacks its distinctive red appearance and presents with a degenerated capsule and a disorganised fibrotic architecture. Histologically distinct white pulp failed to form and this was reflected in an almost complete absence of B lymphocytes necessary for normal immune function. In addition, megakaryoctyes persisted in the red pulp. However, the vascular density remained unchanged in SMA spleen. Assessment of the spleen in SMA patients with the infantile form of the disease indicated a range of pathologies. We conclude that development of the spleen fails to occur normally in SMA mouse models and human patients. Thus, further analysis of immune function is likely to be required to fully understand the full extent of systemic disease pathology in SMA. © 2016 Anatomical Society.

  17. Development of Self Fire Retardant Melamine-Animal Glue Formaldehyde (MGF) Resin for the Manufacture of BWR Ply Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatua, Pijus Kanti; Dubey, Rajib Kumar; Roymahapatra, Gourisankar; Mishra, Anjan; Shahoo, Shadhu Charan; Kalawate, Aparna

    2017-10-01

    Wood is one of the most sustainable, naturally growing materials that consist mainly of combustible organic carbon compounds. Since plywood are widely used nowadays especially in buildings, furniture and cabinets. Too often the fire behavior of ply-board may be viewed as a drawback. Amino-plastic based thermosetting resin adhesives are the important and most widely used in the plywood panel industries. The fire retardant property of wood panel products by adding animal glue as an additive in the form of MGF resin and used as substitute of melamine for manufacture of plywood. Environment concerns and higher cost of petroleum based resins have resulted in the development of technologies to replace melamine partially by biomaterials for the manufacturing of resin adhesive. Natural bio-based materials such as tannin, CNSL (cardanol), lignin, soya etc. are used as partial substitution of melamine. This article presents the development of melamine-animal glue formaldehyde resin as plywood binder. About 30 % melamine was substituted by animal glue and optimized. The different physico-mechanical and fire retardant property properties tested as per IS: 1734-1983 and IS: 5509-2000 respectively are quite satisfactory. The production of adhesive from melamine with compatible natural proteinous material is cost effective, eco-friendly and enhance the fire retardant property.

  18. Myeloid leukemias and virally induced lymphomas in miniature inbred swine; development of a large animal tumor model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RAIMON eDURAN-STRUUCK

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The lack of a large animal transplantable tumor model has limited the study of novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of liquid cancers. Swine as a species provide a natural option based on their similarities with humans and their already extensive use in biomedical research. Specifically, the MGH miniature swine herd retains unique genetic characteristics that facilitate the study of hematopoietic cell and solid organ transplantation. Spontaneously arising liquid cancers in these swine, specifically myeloid leukemias and B cell lymphomas, closely resemble human malignancies. The ability to establish aggressive tumor cell lines in vitro from these naturally occurring malignancies makes a transplantable tumor model a close reality. Here, we discuss our experience with myeloid and lymphoid tumors in MHC characterized miniature swine and future approaches regarding the development of a large animal transplantable tumor model.

  19. Songbird: a unique animal model for studying the molecular basis of disorders of vocal development and communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Chihiro; Wada, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Like humans, songbirds are one of the few animal groups that learn vocalization. Vocal learning requires coordination of auditory input and vocal output using auditory feedback to guide one's own vocalizations during a specific developmental stage known as the critical period. Songbirds are good animal models for understand the neural basis of vocal learning, a complex form of imitation, because they have many parallels to humans with regard to the features of vocal behavior and neural circuits dedicated to vocal learning. In this review, we will summarize the behavioral, neural, and genetic traits of birdsong. We will also discuss how studies of birdsong can help us understand how the development of neural circuits for vocal learning and production is driven by sensory input (auditory information) and motor output (vocalization).

  20. They are afraid of the animal, so therefore I am too: Influence of peer modeling on fear beliefs and approach-avoidance behaviors towards animals in typically developing children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broeren, Suzanne; Lester, Kathryn J; Muris, Peter; Field, Andy P

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of filmed peer modeling on fear beliefs and approach-avoidance behaviors towards animals in 8- to 10-year-old typically developing children. Ninety-seven children randomly received either a positive or negative modeling film in which they saw peers interact with a novel animal. Before and after this film, children's fear beliefs and avoidance tendencies towards the modeled and non-modeled control animal were measured. A behavioral approach task was also administered post-modeling. Following positive peer modeling, children's fear beliefs and avoidance tendencies towards the modeled but also towards the non-modeled animal decreased significantly. After negative modeling, children's fear beliefs towards the modeled animal increased significantly, but did not change for the non-modeled animal. Negative modeling did not change avoidance tendencies for the modeled animal, while it decreased children's avoidance of the non-modeled animal. No significant effects were observed on the behavioral approach task. These results support Rachman's indirect pathway of modeling/vicarious learning as a plausible mechanism by which children can acquire fears of novel stimuli and stresses the important fear-reducing effects of positive peer modeling. Clinical implications and directions for future research are discussed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Development, economic viability and attributes of lamb carcass from confined animals fed on different amounts of crude glycerin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiola Cristine de Almeida Rego

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The current study aims to assess the effect from crude glycerin inclusion (0, 7, 14, and 21% dry matter in the diet of slaughtered lamb on their development, nutrient consumption, biometrical measures, diet economic viability and carcass features. Thirty two (32 non-castrated male Texel lambs were used in the study, they presented mean initial weight 15.9 ± 4.1 kilos and were distributed in casual outlining. They were fed with four treatments, with 8 repetitions. Animals were slaughtered when they reached approximately 35 kilos. The mean total weight gain was 20.72 kilos and mean daily weight gain was 260 grams. No changes resulted from glycerin use. The carcass performance was similar among treatments (P>0.05 and the cold carcass performance (CCP was 44.68%. There were no effects (P>0.05 on the loin eye area (LEA and on fat thickness (FT; they showed averages of 13.66 cm2 and 0.84 mm, respectively. Nutrition cost per animal during the whole confinement period varied between R$82.60 (eighty-two Reais and forty-eight cents to R$92.48. The smallest nutrition amount consisted of 21% crude glycerin. The gross profit ranged from R$30.75 to R$ 34.01 per animal, for feed without glycerin and 21% glycerin, respectively. Animal development was not impacted by glycerin introduction, even with decrease on dry and organic mass consumption. The result showed that crude glycerin inclusion might be used in lambs’ diet. Whenever there are big amounts of feed involved in the process, the 21% crude glycerin addition may be an interesting cost reduction. Seventy eight percent (78% glycerol crude glycerin to replace corn-based feed in confined lambs’ diet appeared to be nutritionally and economically viable. 

  2. Pattern formation in a pentameral animal: induction of early adult rudiment development in sea urchins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minsuk, Sharon B; Raff, Rudolf A

    2002-07-15

    We investigated adult rudiment induction in the direct-developing sea urchin Heliocidaris erythrogramma microsurgically. After removal of the archenteron (which includes presumptive coelomic mesoderm as well as presumptive endoderm) from late gastrulae, larval ectoderm develops properly but obvious rudiments (tube feet, nervous system, and adult skeleton) fail to form, indicating that coelomic mesoderm, endoderm, or both are required for induction of adult development. Recombination of ectoderm and archenteron rescues development. Implanted endoderm alone or left coelom alone each regenerate the full complement of archenteron derivatives; thus, they are uninformative as to the relative inductive potential of the two regions. However, in isolated ectoderm, more limited regeneration gives rise to larvae containing no archenteron derivatives at all, endoderm only, or both endoderm and left coelom. Adult nervous system begins to develop only in the latter, indicating that left coelom is required for the inductive signal. Isolated ectoderm develops a vestibule (the precursor of adult ectoderm) and correctly regulates vestibular expression of the ectodermal territory marker HeET-1, indicating that the early phase of vestibule development occurs autonomously; only later development requires the inductive signal. Another ectodermal marker, HeARS, is regulated properly in the larval ectoderm region, but not in the vestibule. HeARS regulation thus represents an early response to the inducing signal. We compare HeARS expression in H. erythrogramma with that in indirect developers and discuss its implications for modularity in the evolution of developmental mode. 2002 Elsevier Science (USA).

  3. Noise Trauma Induced Neural Plasticity Throughout the Auditory System of Mongolian Gerbils: Differences between Tinnitus Developing and Non-Developing Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tziridis, Konstantin; Ahlf, Sönke; Jeschke, Marcus; Happel, Max F. K.; Ohl, Frank W.; Schulze, Holger

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we describe differences between neural plasticity in auditory cortex (AC) of animals that developed subjective tinnitus (group T) after noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) compared to those that did not [group non-tinnitus (NT)]. To this end, our analysis focuses on the input activity of cortical neurons based on the temporal and spectral analysis of local field potential (LFP) recordings and an in-depth analysis of auditory brainstem responses (ABR) in the same animals. In response to NIHL in NT animals we find a significant general reduction in overall cortical activity and spectral power as well as changes in all ABR wave amplitudes as a function of loudness. In contrast, T-animals show no significant change in overall cortical activity as assessed by root mean square analysis of LFP amplitudes, but a specific increase in LFP spectral power and in the amplitude of ABR wave V reflecting activity in the inferior colliculus (IC). Based on these results, we put forward a refined model of tinnitus prevention after NIHL that acts via a top-down global (i.e., frequency-unspecific) inhibition reducing overall neuronal activity in AC and IC, thereby counteracting NIHL-induced bottom-up frequency-specific neuroplasticity suggested in current models of tinnitus development. PMID:25713557

  4. Cellular and molecular regulation of muscle growth and development in meat animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayton, W R; White, M E

    2008-04-01

    Although in vivo and in vitro studies have established that anabolic steroids, transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), and myostatin affect muscle growth in meat-producing animals, their mechanisms of action are not completely understood. Anabolic steroids have been widely used as growth promoters in feedlot cattle for over 50 yr. A growing body of evidence suggests that increased muscle levels of IGF-I and increased muscle satellite cell numbers play a role in anabolic steroid enhanced muscle growth. In contrast to anabolic steroids, the members of the TGF-beta-myostatin family suppress muscle growth in vivo and suppress both proliferation and differentiation of cultured myogenic cells. Recent evidence suggests that IGFBP-3 and IGFBP-5 play a role in mediating the proliferation-suppressing actions of both TGF-beta and myostatin on cultured myogenic cells. Consequently, this review will focus on the roles of IGF-I and IGFBP in the cellular and molecular mechanisms of action of anabolic steroids and TGF-beta and myostatin, respectively.

  5. [Development and application of poison databank and poisonous animal and plants sample databank].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yu; Jiang, Shao-Feng; Cai, Jun; Luo, Tao; Xie, Li-Jing; Zhou, Jing; Sun, Cheng-Ye

    2008-03-01

    To establish a comprehensive,easily approached, operated, and searched internet poison databank as to providing professional poison data and knowledge of effective treatment for those consented such as medical staff, and emergency response team in the shortest time. We established a computer poison databank, by adopting B/S structure, using SQL Server databank, and explore technology, in which all information may easily be explored and obtained by users. The database integrated the information in relating to the substances identifiers, physical and chemical properties, toxicology data, clinical manifestation while intoxication, emergency response guides, effective treatment, anything related to the special antidotes, preventive measures, poison analysis, and manufacturers of chemicals, pharmaceuticals, herbs, pesticides, animal, plant, bacteria, fungi, productions and toxins. Otherwise some information about poison control organizations and experts, literatures about poison case reports, poison incidents, were also involved in the system, which can also provide a shortcut, convenient, and exact search. The databank might be easily used on several fields, providing important information with acute poison incidents disposal and clinic treatment.

  6. Development and validation of risk prediction equations to estimate survival in patients with colorectal cancer: cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hippisley-Cox, Julia; Coupland, Carol

    2017-06-15

    Objective  To develop and externally validate risk prediction equations to estimate absolute and conditional survival in patients with colorectal cancer. Design  Cohort study. Setting  General practices in England providing data for the QResearch database linked to the national cancer registry. Participants  44 145 patients aged 15-99 with colorectal cancer from 947 practices to derive the equations. The equations were validated in 15 214 patients with colorectal cancer from 305 different QResearch practices and 437 821 patients with colorectal cancer from the national cancer registry. Main outcome measures  The primary outcome was all cause mortality and secondary outcome was colorectal cancer mortality. Methods  Cause specific hazards models were used to predict risks of colorectal cancer mortality and other cause mortality accounting for competing risks, and these risk estimates were combined to obtain risks of all cause mortality. Separate equations were derived for men and women. Several variables were tested: age, ethnicity, deprivation score, cancer stage, cancer grade, surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, smoking status, alcohol consumption, body mass index, family history of bowel cancer, anaemia, liver function test result, comorbidities, use of statins, use of aspirin, clinical values for anaemia, and platelet count. Measures of calibration and discrimination were determined in both validation cohorts at 1, 5, and 10 years. Results  The final models included the following variables in men and women: age, deprivation score, cancer stage, cancer grade, smoking status, colorectal surgery, chemotherapy, family history of bowel cancer, raised platelet count, abnormal liver function, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, chronic renal disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, prescribed aspirin at diagnosis, and prescribed statins at diagnosis. Improved survival in women was associated with younger age, earlier stage of cancer, well or

  7. Melanophore migration and survival during zebrafish adult pigment stripe development require the immunoglobulin superfamily adhesion molecule Igsf11.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae Seok Eom

    Full Text Available The zebrafish adult pigment pattern has emerged as a useful model for understanding the development and evolution of adult form as well as pattern-forming mechanisms more generally. In this species, a series of horizontal melanophore stripes arises during the larval-to-adult transformation, but the genetic and cellular bases for stripe formation remain largely unknown. Here, we show that the seurat mutant phenotype, consisting of an irregular spotted pattern, arises from lesions in the gene encoding Immunoglobulin superfamily member 11 (Igsf11. We find that Igsf11 is expressed by melanophores and their precursors, and we demonstrate by cell transplantation and genetic rescue that igsf11 functions autonomously to this lineage in promoting adult stripe development. Further analyses of cell behaviors in vitro, in vivo, and in explant cultures ex vivo demonstrate that Igsf11 mediates adhesive interactions and that mutants for igsf11 exhibit defects in both the migration and survival of melanophores and their precursors. These findings identify the first in vivo requirements for igsf11 as well as the first instance of an immunoglobulin superfamily member functioning in pigment cell development and patterning. Our results provide new insights into adult pigment pattern morphogenesis and how cellular interactions mediate pattern formation.

  8. Effects of fine sediment, hyporheic flow, and spawning site characteristics on survival and development of bull trout embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowerman, Tracy; Neilson, Bethany; Budy, Phaedra

    2014-01-01

    Successful spawning is imperative for the persistence of salmonid populations, but relatively little research has been conducted to evaluate factors affecting early life-stage survival for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), a threatened char. We conducted a field experiment to assess the relationship between site-specific environmental factors and bull trout embryo survival and fry emergence timing. Survival from egg to hatch was negatively related to percent fine sediment (hydraulic conductivity via redd construction and selection of spawning sites with strong downwelling appear to enhance hyporheic flow rates and bull trout egg survival, but early life-stage success may ultimately be limited by intrusion of fine sediment into the incubation environment.

  9. Animating Critical Action Learning: Process-Based Leadership and Management Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trehan, Kiran; Pedler, Mike

    2009-01-01

    Increasing attention is focusing on the value of critical approaches to enhancing leadership and management development processes. This paper examines how a critical action learning perspectives can be harnessed to produce valuable learning and development through critically reflective practise. Critical action learning approaches not only explore…

  10. Antiviral therapy improves overall survival in hepatitis C virus-infected patients who develop diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosry, Jeff; Mahale, Parag; Turturro, Francesco; Miranda, Roberto N; Economides, Minas P; Granwehr, Bruno P; Torres, Harrys A

    2016-12-01

    Chronic Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is associated with increased incidence of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Several studies have demonstrated regression of indolent lymphoma with antiviral therapy (AVT) alone. However, the role of AVT in HCV-infected patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is unclear. We therefore analyzed AVT's impact on oncologic outcomes of HCV-infected patients (cases) who developed DLBCL. Cases seen at our institution (June 2004-May 2014) were matched with uninfected counterparts (controls) and then divided according to prior AVT consisting of interferon-based regimens. We studied 304 patients (76 cases and 228 controls). More cases than controls had extranodal (79% vs. 72%; p = 0.07) and upper gastrointestinal (GI; 42% vs. 24%; p = 0.004) involvement. Cases never given AVT had DLBCL more refractory to first-line chemotherapy than that in the controls (33% vs. 17%; p = 0.05) and exhibited a trend toward more progressive lymphoma at last examination compared to controls (50% vs. 32%; p = 0.09) or cases given AVT (50% vs. 27%; p = 0.06). Cases never given AVT had worse 5-year overall survival (OS) rates than did the controls (HR, 2.3 [95% CI, 1.01-5.3]; p = 0.04). Furthermore, AVT improved 5-year OS rates among cases in both univariate (median [Interquartile range]: 39 [26-56] vs. 16 [6-41] months, p = 0.02) and multivariate analyses (HR = 0.21 [95% CI, 0.06-0.69]; p = 0.01). This study highlights the negative impact of chronic HCV on survival of DLBCL patients and shows that treatment of HCV infection is associated with a better cancer response to chemotherapy and improves 5-year OS. © 2016 UICC.

  11. Development of a high-throughput method to evaluate serum bactericidal activity using bacterial ATP measurement as survival readout.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Necchi

    Full Text Available Serum Bactericidal Activity (SBA assay is the method of choice to evaluate the complement-mediated functional activity of both infection- and vaccine-induced antibodies. To perform a typical SBA assay, serial dilutions of sera are incubated with target bacterial strains and complement. The conventional SBA assay is based on plating on agar the SBA reaction mix and counting the surviving bacterial colony forming units (CFU at each serum dilution. Even with automated colony counting, it is labor-intensive, time-consuming and not amenable for large-scale studies. Here, we have developed a luminescence-based SBA (L-SBA method able to detect surviving bacteria by measuring their ATP. At the end of the SBA reaction, a single commercially available reagent is added to each well of the SBA plate, and the resulting luminescence signal is measured in a microplate reader. The signal obtained is proportional to the ATP present, which is directly proportional to the number of viable bacteria. Bactericidal activity is subsequently calculated. We demonstrated the applicability of L-SBA with multiple bacterial serovars, from 5 species: Citrobacter freundii, Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis, Shigella flexneri serovars 2a and 3a, Shigella sonnei and Neisseria meningitidis. Serum bactericidal titers obtained by the luminescence readout method strongly correlate with the data obtained by the conventional agar plate-based assay, and the new assay is highly reproducible. L-SBA considerably shortens assay time, facilitates data acquisition and analysis and reduces the operator dependency, avoiding the plating and counting of CFUs. Our results demonstrate that L-SBA is a useful high-throughput bactericidal assay.

  12. Development, survival and reproduction of Podisus nigrispinus (Dallas, 1851 (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae with salt and amino acids solutions supplementary diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Patrícia Carneiro Freitas

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the effect of a supplementary diet with amino acids and sodium chloride solutions in addition to prey on the development, survival and reproduction of the predator Podisus nigrispinus (Heteroptera, Pentatomidae. Both solutions showed deleterious effects on nymph survival, adult weight, female longevity, number of egg masses, eggs per female, eggs per egg mass and nymphs per female besides egg viability of P. nigrispinus when compared with diet with water and prey. When compared with plant supplements in the diet the use of amino acids and salt solutions for mass rearing of P. nigrispinus was inferior.O presente estudo mostra o efeito da suplementação alimentar com soluções de aminoácidos e salina (NaCl no desenvolvimento, sobrevivência e reprodução de Podisus nigrispinus (Dallas (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae. Ambas soluções causaram efeito deletério na sobrevivência ninfal, peso dos adultos, longevidade das fêmeas e nos números de posturas, de ovos/fêmea, de ovos/postura e de ninfas, bem como na viabilidade dos ovos de P. nigrispinus quando comparado com estes insetos que além de presa receberam água. Estes resultados são discutidos em comparação com o efeito positivo que a suplementação alimentar com plantas tem sido relatada para esses predadores e sugerem que o uso de plantas é melhor que a substituição por solução de aminoácidos em sistemas de criação em laboratório desses predadores.

  13. Applied survival analysis using R

    CERN Document Server

    Moore, Dirk F

    2016-01-01

    Applied Survival Analysis Using R covers the main principles of survival analysis, gives examples of how it is applied, and teaches how to put those principles to use to analyze data using R as a vehicle. Survival data, where the primary outcome is time to a specific event, arise in many areas of biomedical research, including clinical trials, epidemiological studies, and studies of animals. Many survival methods are extensions of techniques used in linear regression and categorical data, while other aspects of this field are unique to survival data. This text employs numerous actual examples to illustrate survival curve estimation, comparison of survivals of different groups, proper accounting for censoring and truncation, model variable selection, and residual analysis. Because explaining survival analysis requires more advanced mathematics than many other statistical topics, this book is organized with basic concepts and most frequently used procedures covered in earlier chapters, with more advanced topics...

  14. Cardio-respiratory development in bird embryos: new insights from a venerable animal model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Burggren, Warren W; Santin, Josele Flores; Antich, Maria Rojas

    2016-01-01

    .... A key area of extensive study using bird embryos centers on developmental phenotypic plasticity of the cardio-respiratory system and how its normal development can be affected by abiotic factors...

  15. The Development of Novel Recombinant Human Gelatins as Replacements for Animal-Derived Gelatin in Pharmaceutical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, David; Chang, Robert; Williams, Kim E.; Polarek, James W.

    We have developed a recombinant expression system to produce a series of novel recombinant human gelatins that can substitute for animal sourced gelatin preparations currently used in pharmaceutical and nutraceutical applications. This system allows the production of human sequence gelatins, or, if desired, gelatins from any other species depending on the availability of the cloned gene. The gelatins produced with this recombinant system are of defined molecular weight, unlike the animal-sourced gelatins, which consist of numerous polypeptides of varying size. The fermentation and purification process used to prepare these recombinant gelatins does not use any human- or animal-derived components and thus this recombinant material should be free from viruses and agents that cause transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. The recombinant gelatins exhibit lot-to-lot reproducibility and we have performed extensive analytical testing on them. We have demonstrated the utility of these novel gelatins as biological stabilizers and plasma expanders, and we have shown they possess qualities that are important in applications where gel formation is critical. Finally, we provide examples of how our system allows the engineering of these recombinant gelatins to optimize the production process.

  16. Irrational beliefs, biases and gambling: exploring the role of animal models in elucidating vulnerabilities for the development of pathological gambling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocker, P J; Winstanley, C A

    2015-02-15

    Gambling is a heterogeneous and complex disorder. Multiple factors may lead to problem gambling, yet one of the most important appears to be the increased presence of cognitive biases or distortions. These biases are thought to precipitate gambling as they can lead to dysfunctional decision making under risk or ambiguity. Modelling these cognitive perturbations in animals can improve our understanding of their neurobiological bases, and potentially stimulate novel treatment options. The first aim of this review is to give a broad overview of some of the cognitive biases that are most commonly associated with gambling. Secondly, we will discuss several animal models that we have developed in which rodent decision-making appears hallmarked by the same cognitive inconsistencies as human choice. In particular, we will discuss two tasks that capture elements of risk and loss averse decision making, and another in which rats appear susceptible to the 'near-miss' effect. To date, findings from both human and non-human studies suggest that these different biases are neuropharmacologically and neurostructurally dissociable, and that dopamine plays a key role in their expression. Lastly, we will briefly discuss areas in both human and animal research where limitations within the field may be hampering a more complete understanding of pathological gambling as a disorder. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The economic and poverty impacts of animal diseases in developing countries: new roles, new demands for economics and epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Karl M; Perry, Brian D

    2011-09-01

    Animal disease outbreaks pose significant threats to livestock sectors throughout the world, both from the standpoint of the economic impacts of the disease itself and the measures taken to mitigate the risk of disease introduction. These impacts are multidimensional and not always well understood, complicating effective policy response. In the developing world, livestock diseases have broader, more nuanced effects on markets, poverty, and livelihoods, given the diversity of uses of livestock and complexity of livestock value chains. In both settings, disease control strategies, particularly those informed by ex ante modeling platforms, often fail to recognize the constraints inherent among farmers, veterinary services, and other value chain actors. In short, context matters. Correspondingly, an important gap in the animal health economics literature is the explicit incorporation of behavior and incentives in impact analyses that highlight the interactions of disease with its socio-economic and institutional setting. In this paper, we examine new approaches and frameworks for the analysis of economic and poverty impacts of animal diseases. We propose greater utilization of "bottom-up" analyses, highlighting the strengths and weaknesses of value chain and information economics approaches in impact analyses and stressing the importance of improved integration between the epidemiology of disease and its relationships with economic behavior. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The Schistosoma mansoni Cytochrome P450 (CYP3050A1 Is Essential for Worm Survival and Egg Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter D Ziniel

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis affects millions of people in developing countries and is responsible for more than 200,000 deaths annually. Because of toxicity and limited spectrum of activity of alternatives, there is effectively only one drug, praziquantel, available for its treatment. Recent data suggest that drug resistance could soon be a problem. There is therefore the need to identify new drug targets and develop drugs for the treatment of schistosomiasis. Analysis of the Schistosoma mansoni genome sequence for proteins involved in detoxification processes found that it encodes a single cytochrome P450 (CYP450 gene. Here we report that the 1452 bp open reading frame has a characteristic heme-binding region in its catalytic domain with a conserved heme ligating cysteine, a hydrophobic leader sequence present as the membrane interacting region, and overall structural conservation. The highest sequence identity to human CYP450s is 22%. Double stranded RNA (dsRNA silencing of S. mansoni (SmCYP450 in schistosomula results in worm death. Treating larval or adult worms with antifungal azole CYP450 inhibitors results in worm death at low micromolar concentrations. In addition, combinations of SmCYP450-specific dsRNA and miconazole show additive schistosomicidal effects supporting the hypothesis that SmCYP450 is the target of miconazole. Treatment of developing S. mansoni eggs with miconazole results in a dose dependent arrest in embryonic development. Our results indicate that SmCYP450 is essential for worm survival and egg development and validates it as a novel drug target. Preliminary structure-activity relationship suggests that the 1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl-2-(1H-imidazol-1-ylethan-1-ol moiety of miconazole is necessary for activity and that miconazole activity and selectivity could be improved by rational drug design.

  19. Veterinary Public Health in Italy: From Healthy Animals to Healthy Food, Contribution to Improve Economy in Developing Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacaci, Margherita; Lelli, Rossella Colomba

    2017-06-22

    The role of the veterinarian as a public health officer is intrinsic to the history and the culture of veterinary organization in Italy. The Veterinary service being part of the Health administration since the birth of the Italian State in the XIX Century. In the second half of the last century the birth of the Italian National Health Service confirmed that the function of the Italian veterinary service was to analyze and reduce the risks for the human population connected to the relationship man-animal-environment, animal health, food safety and security. The Italian Veterinary Medicine School curricula, reflected this "model" of veterinarian as well. In the majority of countries in the world, Veterinary Services are organized within the Agriculture Administration with the main function to assure animal health and wellbeing. After the so-called "Mad-cow crisis" the awareness of the direct and essential role of veterinary services in the prevention of human illness has been officially recognized and in the third millennium the old concept of "one health" and "human-animal interface" has gained popularity worldwide.The concept of Veterinary Public Health, has evolved at International level and has incorporated the more than a century old vision of the Italian Veterinary medicine and it is defined as "the sum of the contributions to the physical, mental and social development of people through the knowledge and application of veterinary science" (WHO, Future trends in veterinary public health. Gruppo di lavoro OMS: TE, Italy, 1999, Available from: http://www.who.int/zoonoses/vph/en/ . Last visited 16 Feb 2016, 1999).On the subject of Cooperation, Sustainability and Public Health, the EXPO 2015 event and the activities of international organizations WHO, FAO and World Organization for Animal Health are refo