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Sample records for survival training scuba

  1. TEMPOROMANDIBULAR DISORDERS IN SCUBA DIVERS DURING DIVING CERTIFICATION TRAINING PROGRAMME

    OpenAIRE

    ÖZTÜRK, Özmen; Tek, Mustafa; Seven, Hüseyin

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The design of a diving regulator's mouth-piece is known to increase the risk of a temporomandibular disorder (TMD) in SCUBA divers. The total weight of a diving regulator is reflected directly on the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) causing articular and periarticular problems. In this study, the prevalence of TMD in SCUBA divers having a training for diving certification is investigated. We also aimed to determine the factors that lead to TMD, and clarify the observation that there i...

  2. Constructing safety through “contrast” during training in scuba diving ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Safety is a very important aspect in scuba diving, as not complying with safety regulations can lead to serious injury or even death. In this article the researchers focused on the discursive construction of safety during training in scuba diving. The research position fell within the field of discursive psychology. The researcher ...

  3. Temporomandibular disorders in scuba divers-an increased risk during diving certification training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oztürk, Ozmen; Tek, Mustafa; Seven, Hüseyin

    2012-11-01

    The design of a diving regulator's mouthpiece increases the risk of a temporomandibular disorder (TMD) in scuba divers. The total weight of a diving regulator is reflected directly on the temporomandibular joint, causing articular and periarticular disorders. In the current study, the prevalence of TMD in scuba divers triggered during diving certification training is investigated. We also aimed to determine the factors that lead to TMD during diving training and clarify the observation that there is an increased incidence of TMD in inexperienced divers. The study was held between 2006 and 2011. Ninety-seven divers were referred with the complaint of pain around temporomandibular area. The divers were classified according to their diving experience. Symptoms and signs of TMD were graded. Fourteen divers were diagnosed with TMD. Temporomandibular disorder was seen more frequently in inexperienced divers than in experienced divers (P = 0.0434). The most prevalent symptom was an increased effort for mouthpiece gripping. Temporomandibular joint tenderness and trigger point activation were the mostly seen physical signs. Thirteen divers had an improvement with therapy. The increased effort for stabilizing the mouthpiece is a recognized factor in TMD development. Attention must be paid to an association of scuba diving with TMDs, especially in inexperienced divers having a scuba certification training.

  4. Scuba Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Club subaquatique

    2011-01-01

    Free Trial Dive Ever thought of exploring the surrealistic world of scuba diving? Well, now you can start by joining the CERN Scuba Diving Club. A big activity of the club is to provide training, within the French Federation system, for beginners right through to monitor level. The level 1 course starts this Autumn in the Varembé swimming pool in Geneva. Curious? Then why not come along for a free trial dive in Varembé swimming pool on the 12th or 19th of October 2011. Just bring your swim wear and we will provide the rest. Offer open to adults, minimum age limit 14 years. To sign up, send an email to subaqua@cern.ch

  5. Scuba Diving Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Scuba Schools International (SSI). Basic courses involve classroom instruction, as well as training in pools and ... Read Article >>Knee Bracing: What Works? Visit our interactive symptom checker Visit our interactive symptom checker Get ...

  6. Scuba Club

    CERN Document Server

    Club subaquatique

    2011-01-01

    Ever thought of exploring the surrealistic world of scuba diving? Well, now you can start by joining the CERN Scuba Diving Club. Since 1963, the CSC has been organising diving trips, lessons and much more to thousands of divers. The main activity of the club is providing training, within the French Federation system, for beginners right through to monitor level. The level 1 course starts this autumn in the Varembé swimming pool in Geneva. Twice a year, the CSC organizes an outing to the Mediterranean. Open to all, the first is usually held in May to finalise the level 1 training while the second, more of a family event, is in the autumn. An excellent atmosphere is guaranteed! Other activities include an underwater photography and video section as well as an underwater biology section. The two are complementary and are animated by qualified and experienced teachers. Curious? Then why not come along for a free trial dive in Varembé swimming pool on the 12th and 19th of October 2011....

  7. Scuba Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glickstein, Neil

    2000-01-01

    Introduces an integrated unit on scuba science. Studies oxygen in kinetic theory, Boyle's law, Charles's law, Dalton's law, human circulatory and respiratory systems, and diving dangers such as decompression sickness. (YDS)

  8. Scuba club

    CERN Multimedia

    Scuba club

    2015-01-01

    The CERN Scuba club will be offering a free trail scuba dive sessions for anyone interested in trying this passionate activity. You don't have to be a daredevil or a great swimmer. Anyone curious to try can have a go. So don't miss the golden opportunity to discover a whole new fascinating world, taking your first breaths underwater! Two separate sessions will be help on Wednesday 7th October and Wednesday 14th October, both starting at 19:00 at the Varembe Swimming pool, 46 Avenue Giuseppe-Motta, 1202 Geneva. To sign up send an email to: subaqua@cern.ch (please indicate which date you wish to attend. You may only attend one). This event is open to adults and young people 14+. Minors must be accompanied by a parent. More information will soon be made available at the club website https://subaqua.web.cern.ch/subaqua/

  9. Scuba club

    CERN Multimedia

    Scuba club

    2014-01-01

    The CERN Scuba club will be offering a free trail scuba dive sessions for anyone interested in trying this passionate activity. You don't have to be a daredevil or a great swimmer. Anyone curious to try can have a go. So don't miss the golden opportunity to discover a whole new fascinating world, taking your first breaths underwater! Two separate sessions will be help on Wednesday 24th September and Wednesday 1st October, both starting at 19:00 at the Varembe Swimming pool, 46 Avenue Giuseppe-Motta, 1202 Geneva. To sign up send an email to: subaqua@cern.ch (please indicate which date you wish to attend. You may only attend one). This event is open to adults and young people 14+. Minors must be accompanied by a parent. More information will soon be made available at the club website https://subaqua.web.cern.ch/subaqua/.

  10. CERN Scuba Diving Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Club Subaquatique du CERN

    2017-01-01

    Interested in scuba diving? Fancy a fun trial dive? Like every year, the CERN Scuba Diving Club is organizing two free trial dive sessions. Where? Varembé Swimming Pool, Avenue Giuseppe Motta 46, 1202 Genève When? 25th October and 1st November at 19:15 (one session per participant) Price? Trial dives are FREE! Swimming pool entrance 5,40 CHF. What to bring? Swimwear, towel, shower necessities and a padlock – diving equipment will be provided by the CSC. For more information and to subscribe, follow the link below: http://cern.ch/csc-baptemes-2017 Looking forward to meeting you!

  11. Evaluation of the Draeger LAR V Pure Oxygen Scuba

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-10-08

    consisting of the basic equipment required by- the swimmer to survive in his opera- tional environ~ment along with his self-contained comunications ...produced a new oxygen scuba nor is a new unit now in the immediate planning. This factor is due in part to management priority and funding considerations

  12. Recreational scuba divers' knowledge regarding the audiological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The sport of scuba diving may be associated with possible injuries, especially those concerning the auditory system. Research available focuses on the implications of recreational scuba diving on the auditory system. However, there is a lack of information regarding the knowledge of recreational scuba divers ...

  13. 46 CFR 197.430 - SCUBA diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false SCUBA diving. 197.430 Section 197.430 Shipping COAST... GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Specific Diving Mode Procedures § 197.430 SCUBA diving. The diving supervisor shall insure that— (a) SCUBA diving is not conducted— (1) Outside the no...

  14. 29 CFR 1910.424 - SCUBA diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false SCUBA diving. 1910.424 Section 1910.424 Labor Regulations... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Commercial Diving Operations Specific Operations Procedures § 1910.424 SCUBA diving. (a) General. Employers engaged in SCUBA diving shall comply with the following...

  15. A Systematic Case Study of the Course, Offshore Survival Systems Training, To Improve the Practice of Marine Survival Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambon, Franco

    A major applied research project evaluated the effectiveness of a novel course, Offshore Survival Systems Training. The major course outcome that was evaluated was the increase in frequency with which offshore personnel correctly launched the covered powered survival craft on offshore drilling rigs. The evaluation methodology included the 628…

  16. Trained interpretive bias survives mood change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salemink, E.; van den Hout, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    Evidence is accumulating that interpretations can be trained using Cognitive Bias Modification procedures (CBM). The effects are replicable, stable over time and there is some evidence of generalizability. As a next step in determining the boundaries of the CBM model, the present experiment was

  17. An upgraded SCUBA-2 for JCMT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bintley, Dan; Dempsey, Jessica T.; Friberg, Per; Holland, Wayne S.; MacIntosh, Michael J.

    2016-07-01

    SCUBA-2 is a state of the art wide field camera on the JCMT. SCUBA-2 has been fully operational since November 2011, producing a wide range of science results, including a unique series of survey programs. A new large survey programme commenced in 2015, which included for the first time, polarisation sensitive measurements using POL-2, the polarimeter ancillary instrument. We discuss proposals and the science case for upgrading SCUBA-2 with new detector arrays that will keep SCUBA-2 and the JCMT at the forefront of continuum submillimetre science.

  18. Survival Training, AFSC 121X0

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-11-01

    products used in this report are available for use by operations and training officials. Major Ken TeBrink developed the survey instrument, Ms Olga Velez ...I I -%I < ) 4- II I 13- Ita 1iI 0 1 1 1 IE I 0. I I I II I I I I IA It It I-.- CD I I I IA I I I = cn I I II I -1 1-4 a ~ S, iI 0 IL I ia Io I1 0O In

  19. Training the brain to survive stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeff F Dunn

    Full Text Available Presently, little can be done to repair brain tissue after stroke damage. We hypothesized that the mammalian brain has an intrinsic capacity to adapt to low oxygen which would improve outcome from a reversible hypoxic/ischemic episode. Acclimation to chronic hypoxia causes increased capillarity and tissue oxygen levels which may improve the capacity to survive ischemia. Identification of these adaptations will lead to protocols which high risk groups could use to improve recovery and reduce costs.Rats were exposed to hypoxia (3 weeks living at ½ an atmosphere. After acclimation, capillary density was measured morphometrically and was increased by 30% in the cortex. Novel implantable oxygen sensors showed that partial pressure of oxygen in the brain was increased by 40% in the normal cortex. Infarcts were induced in brain with 1 h reversible middle cerebral artery occlusions. After ischemia (48 h behavioural scores were improved and T2 weighted MRI lesion volumes were reduced by 52% in acclimated groups. There was a reduction in inflammation indicated by reduced lymphocytes (by 27-33%, and ED1 positive cells (by 35-45%.It is possible to stimulate a natural adaptive mechanism in the brain which will reduce damage and improve outcome for a given ischemic event. Since these adaptations occur after factors such as HIF-1α have returned to baseline, protection is likely related more to morphological changes such as angiogenesis. Such pre-conditioning, perhaps with exercise or pharmaceuticals, would not necessarily reduce the incidence of stroke, but the severity of damage could be reduced by 50%.

  20. 29 CFR 1926.1084 - SCUBA diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false SCUBA diving. 1926.1084 Section 1926.1084 Labor Regulations...) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Diving Specific Operations Procedures § 1926.1084 SCUBA diving. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under this section are identical to those...

  1. Teaching Persons with Disabilities to SCUBA Diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowski, Louis W.

    This booklet is designed to sensitize and inform the scuba diving instructor on appropriate attitudes and successful methods for teaching scuba diving to persons with physical disability. It addresses misconceptions about people with disabilities and the importance of effective two-way communication and mutual respect between instructors and…

  2. Introduction to Scuba Diving. Diver Education Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somers, Lee H.

    Scuba diving is often referred to as a "recreational sport." However, the term "sport" sometimes implies erroneous connotations and limits understanding. Scuba diving can be an avocation or a vocation. It is a pastime, a pursuit, or even a lifestyle, that can be as limited or extensive as one makes it. A persons level of commitment, degree of…

  3. Ear Disorders in Scuba Divers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MH Azizi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available History of underwater diving dates back to antiquity. Breath-hold technique in diving was known to the ancient nations. However, deep diving progressed only in the early decades of the 19th century as the result of advancements in efficient underwater technologies which subsequently led to invention of sophisticated sets of scuba diving in the 20th century. Currently, diving is performed for various purposes including commercial, recreational, military, underwater construction, oil industry, underwater archeology and scientific assessment of marine life. By increasing popularity of underwater diving, dive-related medical conditions gradually became more evident and created a new challenge for the health care professionals, so that eventually, a specialty the so-called “diving medicine” was established. Most of the diving-associated disorders appear in the head and neck. The most common of all occupational disorders associated with diving are otologic diseases. External otitis has been reported as the most common otolaryngologic problem in underwater divers. Exostosis of the external ear canal may be formed in divers as the result of prolonged diving in cold waters. Other disorders of the ear and paranasal sinuses in underwater divers are caused by barometric pressure change (i.e., barotraumas, and to a lesser extent by decompression sickness. Barotrauma of the middle ear is the most prevalent barotrauma in divers. The inner ear barotraumas, though important, is less common. The present paper is a brief overview of diving-related ear disorders particularly in scuba divers.

  4. SCUBA-2 arrays to system interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncan, W. E-mail: william.duncan@roe.ac.uk; Audley, D.; Holland, W.; Atkinson, D.; Baillie, T.; Cliffe, M.; Ellis, M.; Gao, X.; Gostick, D.; Hodson, T.; Kelly, D.; MacIntosh, M.; McGregor, H.; Peacocke, T.; Smith, I.; Robson, I.; Walton, A.; Parkes, W.; Dunare, C.; Smith, S.; Terry, J.; Stevenson, T.; Gundlach, A.; Ruthven, A.; Ade, P.; Tucker, C.; Gannaway, F.; Walker, I.; Sudiwala, R.; Woodcraft, A.; Griffin, M.; Bintley, D.; Schulte, E.; Fich, M.; Kycia, J.; Halpern, M.; Molnar, J.; Burger, B.; Naylor, D.; Bastien, P.; Mitchell, G.; Irwin, K.; Hilton, G.; Ullom, J.; Reintsema, C.; Vale, L.; Ferreira, L.; Doriese, W

    2004-03-11

    Submillimeter common user bolometer array (SCUBA)-2 is a wide field sub-mm bolometer camera designed to replace the existing SCUBA instrument on the JCMT in Hawaii. It will be many hundreds of times faster in large area mapping than SCUBA and will also go deeper in a single frame. It will enable the many discoveries of SCUBA to be followed up with deep systematic surveys and help act as a pathfinder for the ALMA interferometer. The key technologies for making the arrays have been demonstrated and will be put together to fabricate the first prototype later this year (2003). The wide field nature of the SCUBA-2 bolometer camera, combined with the diffraction limit at sub-mm wavelengths, leads to physically large focal planes where the issues of stray light control, magnetic shielding, and electrical, thermal and mechanical connection must be carefully addressed in order to realise a successful instrument. We describe the solutions we have adopted for these problem areas.

  5. Finding Environmental Knowledge in SCUBA-Based Textual Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gündogdu, Cemal; Aygün, Yalin; Ilkim, Mehmet

    2018-01-01

    As marine environments within the adventure domain are future key-settings for recreational SCUBA diving experience, SCUBA-based textual materials should provide insight into environmental knowledge that is well connected to the novice divers' behaviour and attitude. This research is concerned with a major recreational SCUBA diver manual for…

  6. Facial Baroparesis Caused by Scuba Diving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamide, Daisuke; Matsunobu, Takeshi; Shiotani, Akihiro

    2012-01-01

    Middle ear barotrauma is one of the common complications of SCUBA diving representing acute otalgia, hearing loss, and bleeding. But occurrence of facial palsy is rare. Here we report a case of a 30-year-old navy diver suffered middle ear barotrauma with transient facial palsy after SCUBA diving. He felt difficulty in equalizing the pressure in middle ear with Valsalva maneuver during diving, and suffered right facial palsy and aural fullness after diving. Clinical examination showed remarkable bulging of the right tympanic membrane and right facial palsy without other neurological findings. But facial palsy was disappeared immediately after myringotomy. We considered that the etiology of this case was neuropraxia of facial nerve in middle ear caused by over pressure of middle ear. PMID:22953110

  7. Alveolar Hemorrhage After Scuba Diving: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Ju Tsai

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (scuba diving is increasingly popular in Taiwan. There are few references in the literature regarding pulmonary hemorrhage as the sole manifestation of pulmonary barotrauma in scuba divers, and no study from Taiwan was found in the literature. We present the case of a 25-year-old man who suffered alveolar hemorrhage related to pulmonary barotrauma as a complication of scuba diving. To our knowledge, this is the first case report describing a Taiwanese subject suffering from non-fatal pulmonary hemorrhage after scuba diving.

  8. Psychomotor performance of Polish Air Force cadets after 36 hours of survival training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Tomczak

    2017-09-01

    Survival training combined with sleep deprivation mostly affected peripheral factors depending on strong action from both muscles and nervous system, whereas complex tasks involving short-term central alertness and moderate exertion were maintained. In order to improve performance, more endurance strength training, if possible combined with sleep deprivation, should be introduced in military training.

  9. Shipboard Training and Maintenance for Merchant Vessel Survival Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-10-01

    ventilating sytems, ard the operation of all safety equipment. (2) The preparation and launching of lifeboats and liferafts. (3) The extinction of fire. 5-8 (4...water; (2) cold conditions; (3) shark -infested waters; (ii) how 1,o riqht a capsized survival craft; (i) actions to be taken when aboard a survival

  10. Scuba Diving and Kinesiology: Development of an Academic Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Christopher R.; Walter, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The use of scuba diving as a recreational activity within traditional university instructional programs has been well established. Departments focusing on kinesiology, physical education, or exercise science have often provided scuba diving lessons as part of their activity-based course offerings. However, few departments have developed an…

  11. Predictors for the development of temporomandibular disorders in scuba divers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lobbezoo, F.; van Wijk, A.J.; Klinger, M.C.; Ruiz Vicente, E.; van Dijk, C.J.; Eijkman, M.A.J.

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to determine predictors for the development of complaints of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in a large sample of Dutch scuba divers who were free of any TMD complaints before they started diving actively. Five-hundred and thirty-six scuba divers (mean ± SD age = 40·4 ± 11·9 years;

  12. [Scuba diving in children: Physiology, risks and recommendations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilveti, R; Osona, B; Peña, J A; Moreno, L; Asensio, O

    2015-12-01

    The increase in recreational scuba diving in recent years, including children, involves risks and the possibility of accidents. While legislation, conditions and risks of scuba diving are well documented in adults, scientific evidence in scuba diving by children and adolescents is sparse and isolated. Furthermore, existing guidelines and recommendations for adults cannot be transferred directly to children. These circumstances have led to the Group on Techniques of the Spanish Society of Pediatric Pulmonology (SENP) to perform a literature search to review and update the knowledge about scuba diving in children. Physiological adaptations of the body are examined during the dive, as well as the anatomical and physiological characteristics of children that should be taken into account in scuba diving. The most common types of accidents and its causes, as well as the risks of scuba diving practice in children with previous diseases are discussed, along with details of the medical and psychological requirements for scuba diving to be considered in the assessment of child and adolescent. A list of recommendations for scuba diving with compressed air in children is presented by a group of experts. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Downhill exercise training in monocrotaline-injected rats: Effects on echocardiographic and haemodynamic variables and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enache, Irina; Favret, Fabrice; Doutreleau, Stéphane; Goette Di Marco, Paola; Charles, Anne-Laure; Geny, Bernard; Charloux, Anne

    2017-02-01

    Eccentric exercise training has been shown to improve muscle force strength without excessive cardiovascular stress. Such an exercise modality deserves to be tested in pulmonary arterial hypertension. We aimed to assess the effects of an eccentric training modality on cardiac function and survival in an experimental monocrotaline-induced model of pulmonary arterial hypertension with right ventricular dysfunction. Forty rats were randomly assigned to one of four groups: 40mg/kg monocrotaline-injected sedentary rats; 40mg/kg monocrotaline-injected eccentric-trained rats; sedentary control rats; or eccentric-trained control rats. Eccentric exercise training consisted of downhill running on a treadmill with a -15° slope for 30minutes, 5 days a week for 4 weeks. Training tolerance was assessed by echocardiography, right ventricle catheterization and the rats' maximal eccentric speed. Survival in monocrotaline-injected eccentric-trained rats was not different from that in monocrotaline-injected sedentary rats. Monocrotaline-injected eccentric-trained rats tolerated this training modality well, and haemodynamic status did not deteriorate further compared with monocrotaline-injected sedentary rats. The eccentric maximal speed decline was less pronounced in trained compared with sedentary pulmonary arterial hypertension rats. Eccentric exercise training had no detrimental effects on right heart pressure, cardiac function and survival in rats with stable monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Colleges Wade into Survival Training for Campus Shootings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Eric

    2008-01-01

    This month a company in Spokane, Washington, plans to release "Shots Fired on Campus," an instructional DVD with strategies for preventing and surviving a gun rampage. About 50 colleges have ordered the video, and its creators expect to sell several hundred more this fall. Since the massacre at Virginia Tech last year, colleges everywhere have…

  15. Psychomotor performance of Polish Air Force cadets after 36 hours of survival training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomczak, Andrzej; Dąbrowski, Jan; Mikulski, Tomasz

    2017-09-21

    The preparation of Polish Air Force cadets for survival in isolation is a necessary element of their training, to demonstrate just how difficult can be the conditions they could encounter in a combat situation. Objective. The aim of the research was to assess the effect of long-term survival training on selected coordination motor skills in Air Force cadets. Fifteen air force cadets aged 19.6±0.3 years exercised for 36 hours during survival training without the possibility to sleep. They were examined 4 times: Day 1 - before effort (training), Day 2 - after 24 hours training, Day 3 - directly after 36 hours training, Day 4 - next day, after an all night rest. They were examined for shooting and reaction time, the ability to maintain body balance, running motor adjustment, handgrip force differentiation, and on Days 1 and 3, exercise capacity was evaluated with a 1 mile walking test. The survival training resulted in significant decreases in maximum handgrip strength, corrected 50% max handgrip, maintenance of body balance and heart rate. No changes occurred in reaction time, running motor adjustment and shooting performance. Overnight rest did not result in recovery of any of the examined factors to the values observed on Day 1. Survival training combined with sleep deprivation mostly affected peripheral factors depending on strong action from both muscles and nervous system, whereas complex tasks involving short-term central alertness and moderate exertion were maintained. In order to improve performance, more endurance strength training, if possible combined with sleep deprivation, should be introduced in military training.

  16. Surviving Troubled Times: Five Best Practices for Training Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villachica, Steven W.; Stepich, Donald A.; Rist, Shannon

    2011-01-01

    The business of training and performance improvement has always been cyclical, with the fortunes of human resource development (HRD) and performance improvement professionals rising and falling with the economic fortunes of the workplace. The current economic downturn and nascent recovery represent an opportunity for HRD and performance…

  17. B-type natriuretic peptide secretion following scuba diving

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Passino, Claudio; Franzino, Enrico; Giannoni, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    To examine the neurohormonal effects of a scuba dive, focusing on the acute changes in the plasma concentrations of the different peptide fragments from the B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) precursor.......To examine the neurohormonal effects of a scuba dive, focusing on the acute changes in the plasma concentrations of the different peptide fragments from the B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) precursor....

  18. Physical training is beneficial to functional status and survival in patients with prolonged mechanical ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiauyee Chen

    2011-09-01

    Conclusion: Six weeks physical therapy training plus 6 weeks unsupervised maintenance exercise enhanced functional levels and increased survival for the PMV patients compared with those with no such intervention. Early physical therapy interventions are needed for the PMV patients in respiratory care centers. [J Formos Med Assoc 2011; 110(X:XX–XX

  19. Physical skill training increases the number of surviving new cells in the adult hippocampus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel M Curlik

    Full Text Available The dentate gyrus is a major site of plasticity in the adult brain, giving rise to thousands of new neurons every day, through the process of adult neurogenesis. Although the majority of these cells die within two weeks of their birth, they can be rescued from death by various forms of learning. Successful acquisition of select types of associative and spatial memories increases the number of these cells that survive. Here, we investigated the possibility that an entirely different form of learning, physical skill learning, could rescue new hippocampal cells from death. To test this possibility, rats were trained with a physically-demanding and technically-difficult version of a rotarod procedure. Acquisition of the physical skill greatly increased the number of new hippocampal cells that survived. The number of surviving cells positively correlated with performance on the task. Only animals that successfully mastered the task retained the cells that would have otherwise died. Animals that failed to learn, and those that did not learn well did not retain any more cells than those that were untrained. Importantly, acute voluntary exercise in activity wheels did not increase the number of surviving cells. These data suggest that acquisition of a physical skill can increase the number of surviving hippocampal cells. Moreover, learning an easier version of the task did not increase cell survival. These results are consistent with previous reports revealing that learning only rescues new neurons from death when acquisition is sufficiently difficult to achieve. Finally, complete hippocampal lesions did not disrupt acquisition of this physical skill. Therefore, physical skill training that does not depend on the hippocampus can effectively increase the number of surviving cells in the adult hippocampus, the vast majority of which become mature neurons.

  20. Survival

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data provide information on the survival of California red-legged frogs in a unique ecosystem to better conserve this threatened species while restoring...

  1. Fluid Regulation and Time Course of Erythropoietin during Multifactorial Strain of Austrian Special Forces Survival Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-03-01

    It seems that EPO production and release is diminished by nutritional factors, i.e. mainly caloric intake, during prolonged physical strain. In the...sign for a haemolytic anaemia with impaired erythropoiesis (20) which would be in line with decreased EPO values found during the survival training...total body iron stores. The classical biochemical constellation of an haemolytic anaemia might be misleading under the described conditions. The body

  2. Selected Coordination Motor Abilities of Students of the University of Physical Education During Survival Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomczak Andrzej

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Taking up emergency actions when fighting various types of natural disasters requires appropriate psychophysical preparation. Thanks to the development of technique, coordination motor abilities have gained greater importance than physical strength and endurance in such activities. The purpose of the present work was to assess the impact of 36 hours of survival activities and sleep deprivation on selected coordination motor abilities in students of the University of Physical Education. Material and methods. The study involved 12 male students of the University of Physical Education in Warsaw, specialising in “Physical Education in Uniformed Services”. The age of the participants was 21.0 ± 0.74 years, their body height was 179.5 ± 5.6 cm, and their body mass was 74.6 ± 8.0 kg. The assessment was performed based on the following coordination motor ability tests: a test measuring the differentiation of the use of forearm muscle strength, a running motor adjustment test, and a measurement of divided attention. A test involving shooting from a pneumatic gun and a measurement of the maximal force of the forearm were also carried out. Tests and trials were conducted before training (P1, after 24 hours of training (P2, after completing the training - that is after 36 hours of training (P3, and after 12 hours of rest (P4. During the training, the participants completed 12 km on foot, paddled for approximately 6 hours, rowed kayaks for about 4 hours, and performed survival tasks. Results. The analysis of the results of the study of maximal force and the ability to differentiate forearm muscle strength showed that the forearm muscle strength remained at the same level during the entire training. The ability to differentiate forearm muscle strength deteriorated after night training. There were no statistically significant differences in the results of the running motor adjustment tests and in shooting performance between individual

  3. Academic Training: Surviving in space: the challenges of a manned mission to Mars

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    2005-2006 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 26, 27, 28 October from 11:00 to 12:00 - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 Surviving in space: the challenges of a manned mission to Mars by L. S. Pinsky / Univ. Houston, USA Program : Lecture I: Understanding the Space Radiation Environment Lecture II: Dosimetry and the Effects of the Exposure of Human Tissue to Heavily Ionizing Radiation Lecture III: Modelling the Interaction of the Space Radiation in Spacecraft & Humans, and Assessing the Risks on a Mission to Mars... ENSEIGNEMENT ACADEMIQUE ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 academic.training@cern.ch If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please tell to your supervisor and apply electronically from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Departmental Secretariat or from your DTO (Departmental Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order ...

  4. SCUBA: The Self-Contained Unified Bass Augmenter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cceres, Juan Pablo; Mysore, Gautham J.; Trevio, Jeffrey

    2005-04-01

    The Self-Contained Unified Bass Augmenter (SCUBA) is a new augmentative OSC (Open Sound Control) controller for the tuba. SCUBA allows new expressive possibilities by adding onboard continuous and discrete sensors to provide user-controlled parametric data for the processing of the instruments natural sound in Pd. SCUBA endows acoustic instruments with parametric control of virtual instruments and provides a means of integrating the output of a virtual instrument with the natural sound of the tuba. The user sends controller data from the augmented tuba interface to the virtual instrument via FSRs (Force-Sensitive Resistors) and buttons mounted on the existing instrument interface. An AVRMini microcontroller converts raw sensor data to OSC (Open Sound Control) messages, which are mapped in Pd to control virtual instrument parameters. Virtual instrument output is integrated into the solo instrument interface via satellite speakers mounted in the bell; this allows for mixing of the instruments natural sound with that of the virtual instrument to create the impression of a single instrument. This integration is the goal of the SCUBA project: by providing a flexible but unified control interface and acoustic output, traditional acoustic instrument interfaces can be augmented and paired with virtual musical instruments. [We would like to thank Michael Gurevich, Max Matthews, Bill Verplank, Pascal Stang, and classmates from Music 250 (Fall 04) for assistance in the realization of this project.

  5. Differences in SCUBA diver motivations based on level of development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon L. Todd; Alan R. Graefe; Walter Mann

    2002-01-01

    This study examined SCUBA divers' level of development in relationship to their motivations to dive. During the fall of 1999,869 divers ranging from beginners to post-experts were surveyed (37% response rate). Respondents ranked 24 motives on a 5-point importance scale. When the data were reduced using factor analysis to tease out major themes, six factors (...

  6. THE SCUBA-2 COSMOLOGY LEGACY SURVEY: MULTIWAVELENGTH COUNTERPARTS TO 10{sup 3} SUBMILLIMETER GALAXIES IN THE UKIDSS-UDS FIELD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chian-Chou; Smail, Ian; Ma, Cheng-Jiun; Simpson, James M.; Swinbank, A. Mark [Centre for Extragalactic Astronomy, Department of Physics, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Ivison, Rob J.; Arumugam, Vinodiran; Mortlock, Alice; Dunlop, James S.; Michałowski, Michał J. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Almaini, Omar; Conselice, Christopher J.; Hartley, Will G. [University of Nottingham, School of Physics and Astronomy, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Geach, James E. [Center for Astrophysics Research, Science and Technology Research Institute, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Simpson, Chris [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool Science Park, 146 Brownlow Hill, Liverpool L3 5RF (United Kingdom); Aretxaga, Itziar [Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Óptica y Electrónica (INAOE), Luis Enrique Erro 1, Sta. Ma. Tonantzintla, Puebla (Mexico); Blain, Andrew [Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester, LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Chapman, Scott C. [Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University, 6310 Coburg Road, Halifax, NS B3H 4R2 (Canada); Farrah, Duncan [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Halpern, Mark [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); and others

    2016-04-01

    We present multiwavelength identifications for the counterparts of 1088 submillimeter sources detected at 850 μm in the SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey study of the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey-Ultra-Deep Survey (UDS) field. By utilizing an Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) pilot study on a subset of our bright SCUBA-2 sample as a training set, along with the deep optical–near-infrared (OIR) data available in this field, we develop a novel technique, Optical–IR Triple Color (OIRTC), using z − K, K − [3.6], [3.6] − [4.5] colors to select the candidate submillimeter galaxy (SMG) counterparts. By combining radio identification and the OIRTC technique, we find counterpart candidates for 80% of the Class = 1 ≥ 4σ SCUBA-2 sample, defined as those that are covered by both radio and OIR imaging and the base sample for our scientific analyses. Based on the ALMA training set, we expect the accuracy of these identifications to be 82% ± 20%, with a completeness of 69% ± 16%, essentially as accurate as the traditional p-value technique but with higher completeness. We find that the fraction of SCUBA-2 sources having candidate counterparts is lower for fainter 850 μm sources, and we argue that for follow-up observations sensitive to SMGs with S{sub 850} ≳ 1 mJy across the whole ALMA beam, the fraction with multiple counterparts is likely to be >40% for SCUBA-2 sources at S{sub 850} ≳ 4 mJy. We find that the photometric redshift distribution for the SMGs is well fit by a lognormal distribution, with a median redshift of z = 2.3 ± 0.1. After accounting for the sources without any radio and/or OIRTC counterpart, we estimate the median redshift to be z = 2.6 ± 0.1 for SMGs with S{sub 850} > 1 mJy. We also use this new large sample to study the clustering of SMGs and the far-infrared properties of the unidentified submillimeter sources by stacking their Herschel SPIRE far-infrared emission.

  7. Provisional Crown Dislodgement during Scuba Diving: A Case of Barotrauma

    OpenAIRE

    Meenal Nitin Gulve; Nitin Dilip Gulve

    2013-01-01

    Changes in ambient pressure, for example, during flying, diving, or hyperbaric oxygen therapy, can lead to barotrauma. Although it may seem that this issue was neglected in dental education and research in recent decades, familiarity with and understanding of these facts may be of importance for dental practitioners. We report the case of a patient who experienced barotrauma involving dislodgement of a provisional crown during scuba diving. Patients who are exposed to pressure changes as a pa...

  8. Scuba diving post-bleomycin therapy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Richard N

    2010-01-01

    Though there are theoretical risks to scuba diving after undergoing chemotherapy with bleomycin, this case report demonstrates that it may be done without obvious injury if one takes adequate precautions. In this case, one year was allowed to elapse prior to a return to diving. Subsequently 52 dives have been accomplished with no observable adverse effects. Studies are recommended to determine what precautions should be instituted.

  9. Moderate exercise training improves survival and ventricular remodeling in an animal model of left ventricular volume overload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachance, Dominic; Plante, Eric; Bouchard-Thomassin, Andrée-Anne; Champetier, Serge; Roussel, Elise; Drolet, Marie-Claude; Arsenault, Marie; Couet, Jacques

    2009-09-01

    Exercise training has beneficial effects in patients with heart failure, although there is still no clear evidence that it may impact on their survival. There are no data regarding the effects of exercise in subjects with chronic left ventricular (LV) volume overload. Using a rat model of severe aortic valve regurgitation (AR), we studied the effects of long-term exercise training on survival, development of heart failure, and LV myocardial remodeling. One hundred sixty male adult rats were divided in 3 groups: sham sedentary (n=40), AR sedentary (n=80), and AR trained (n=40). Training consisted in treadmill running for up to 30 minutes, 5 times per week for 9 months, at a maximal speed of 20 m/minute. All sham-operated animals survived the entire course of the protocol. After 9 months, 65% of trained animals were alive compared with 46% of sedentary ones (P=0.05). Ejection fractions remained in the normal range (all above 60%) and LV masses between AR groups were similar. There was significantly less LV fibrosis in the trained group and lower LV filling pressures and improved echocardiographic diastolic parameters. Heart rate variability was also improved by exercise. Our data show that moderate endurance training is safe, does not increase the rate of developing heart failure, and most importantly, improves survival in this animal model of chronic LV volume overload. Exercise improved LV diastolic function, heart rate variability, and reduced myocardial fibrosis.

  10. Asthma and recreational SCUBA diving: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehle, Michael; Lloyd-Smith, Rob; McKenzie, Don; Taunton, Jack

    2003-01-01

    Asthma has traditionally been a contraindication to recreational self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (SCUBA) diving, although large numbers of patients with asthma partake in diving. The purpose of this paper is to review all the research relevant to the issue of the safety of asthma in divers. MEDLINE and MDConsult were searched for papers between 1980-2002. Keywords used for the search were 'asthma', 'SCUBA' and 'diving'. Additional references were reviewed from the bibliographies of received articles.A total of fifteen studies were identified as relevant to the area. These included three surveys of divers with asthma, four case series and eight mechanistic investigations of the effect of diving on pulmonary function. The survey data showed a high prevalence of asthma among recreational SCUBA divers, similar to the prevalence of asthma among the general population. There was some weak evidence for an increase in rates of decompression illness among divers with asthma. In healthy participants, wet hyperbaric chamber and open-water diving led to a decrease in forced vital capacity, forced expired volume over 1.0 second and mid-expiratory flow rates. In participants with asymptomatic respiratory atopy, diving caused a decrease in airway conductivity.There is some indication that asthmatics may be at increased risk of pulmonary barotrauma, but more research is necessary. Decisions regarding diving participation among asthmatics must be made on an individual basis involving the patient through informed, shared decision making.

  11. Cognitive function, stress hormones, heart rate and nutritional status during simulated captivity in military survival training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Harris R; Farina, Emily K; Caldwell, John; Williams, Kelly W; Thompson, Lauren A; Niro, Philip J; Grohmann, Kyle A; McClung, James P

    2016-10-15

    Stress influences numerous psychological and physiological processes, and its effects have practical implications in a variety of professions and real-world activities. However, few studies have concurrently assessed multiple behavioral, hormonal, nutritional and heart-rate responses of humans to acute, severe stress. This investigation simultaneously assessed cognitive, affective, hormonal, and heart-rate responses induced by an intensely stressful real-world environment designed to simulate wartime captivity. Sixty males were evaluated during and immediately following participation in U.S. Army Survival, Evasion, Resistance, and Escape (SERE) school, three weeks of intense but standardized training for Soldiers at risk of capture. Simulated captivity and intense mock interrogations degraded grammatical reasoning (pworking memory (pnutritional status and heart rate are simultaneously altered, and each of these subsequently recovers at different rates. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. The Influence of Different Types of Physical Activity on The Redox Status of Scuba Divers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radojevic-Popovic Radmila

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of scuba diving on ROS production and oxidative stress compared to that of other recreational activities is still poorly understood. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of different types of physical activity on the redox status of scuba divers by testing the pro- and anti-oxidative parameters immediately before and after different types of physical load. The prevalence study included 10 professional police divers. All examinees were male, 32 ± 5.1 years of age, well-trained, and with a minimum of five to a maximum of 20 years of diving experience. The study was divided into three experimental protocols: 1 an exercise test (at atmospheric pressure, 2 an at sea dive (30 meters for 30 minutes, and 3 a dive into river current (10 meters for 30 minutes. Immediately before and after the load test of the divers at atmospheric pressure and immediately before and after the dive, blood samples were taken to determine the values of the following pro-oxidant markers: O2−, H2O2, NO2− and TBARS, as well as antioxidant enzymes (SOD and CAT. A comparison of the results before and after physical activity for all three protocols revealed a significant increase in values for NO2−, O2−, H2O2 and CAT after physical activity. It can be concluded that the values of all oxidative stress markers depend on the season of the year in which the research is conducted or on the frequency of dives and degree of physical exertion during this period of the year.

  13. The SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey: demographics of the 450-μm population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roseboom, I. G.; Dunlop, J. S.; Cirasuolo, M.; Geach, J. E.; Smail, I.; Halpern, M.; van der Werf, P.; Almaini, O.; Arumugam, V.; Asboth, V.; Auld, R.; Blain, A.; Bremer, M. N.; Bock, J.; Bowler, R. A. A.; Buitrago, F.; Chapin, E.; Chapman, S.; Chrysostomou, A.; Clarke, C.; Conley, A.; Coppin, K. E. K.; Danielson, A. L. R.; Farrah, D.; Glenn, J.; Hatziminaoglou, E.; Ibar, E.; Ivison, R. J.; Jenness, T.; van Kampen, E.; Karim, A.; Mackenzie, T.; Marsden, G.; Meijerink, R.; Michałowski, M. J.; Oliver, S. J.; Page, M. J.; Pearson, E.; Scott, Douglas; Simpson, J. M.; Smith, D. J. B.; Spaans, M.; Swinbank, A. M.; Symeonidis, M.; Targett, T.; Valiante, E.; Viero, M.; Wang, L.; Willott, C. J.; Zemcov, M.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the multiwavelength properties of a sample of 450-μm-selected sources from the SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey. A total of 69 sources were identified above 4σ in deep SCUBA-2 450-μm observations overlapping the UDS and COSMOS fields and covering 210 arcmin2 to a typical depth of σ450

  14. Helping mothers survive bleeding after birth: an evaluation of simulation-based training in a low-resource setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelissen, Ellen; Ersdal, Hege; Ostergaard, Doris; Mduma, Estomih; Broerse, Jacqueline; Evjen-Olsen, Bjørg; van Roosmalen, Jos; Stekelenburg, Jelle

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate "Helping Mothers Survive Bleeding After Birth" (HMS BAB) simulation-based training in a low-resource setting. Educational intervention study. Rural referral hospital in Northern Tanzania. Clinicians, nurse-midwives, medical attendants, and ambulance drivers involved in maternity care. In March 2012, health care workers were trained in HMS BAB, a half-day simulation-based training, using a train-the-trainer model. The training focused on basic delivery care, active management of third stage of labor, and treatment of postpartum hemorrhage, including bimanual uterine compression. Evaluation questionnaires provided information on course perception. Knowledge, skills, and confidence of facilitators and learners were tested before and after training. Four master trainers trained eight local facilitators, who subsequently trained 89 learners. After training, all facilitators passed the knowledge test, but pass rates for the skills test were low (29% pass rate for basic delivery and 0% pass rate for management of postpartum hemorrhage). Evaluation revealed that HMS BAB training was considered acceptable and feasible, although more time should be allocated for training, and teaching materials should be translated into the local language. Knowledge, skills, and confidence of learners increased significantly immediately after training. However, overall pass rates for skills tests of learners after training were low (3% pass rate for basic delivery and management of postpartum hemorrhage). The HMS BAB simulation-based training has potential to contribute to education of health care providers. We recommend a full day of training and validation of the facilitators to improve the training. © 2013 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  15. Chain of events analysis for a scuba diving fatality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippmann, John; Stevenson, Christopher; McD Taylor, David; Williams, Jo; Mohebbi, Mohammadreza

    2017-09-01

    A scuba diving fatality usually involves a series of related events culminating in death. Several studies have utilised a chain of events-type analysis (CEA) to isolate and better understand the accident sequence in order to facilitate the creation of relevant countermeasures. The aim of this research was to further develop and better define a process for performing a CEA to reduce potential subjectivity and increase consistency between analysts. To develop more comprehensive and better-defined criteria, existing criteria were modified and a template was created and tested using a CEA. Modifications comprised addition of a category for pre-disposing factors, expansion of criteria for the triggers and disabling agents present during the incident, and more specific inclusion criteria to better encompass a dataset of 56 fatalities. Four investigators (raters) used both the previous criteria and this template, in randomly assigned order, to examine a sample of 13 scuba diver deaths. Individual results were scored against the group consensus for the CEA. Raters' agreement consistency was compared using the Index of Concordance and intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC). The template is presented. The index of concordance between the raters increased from 62% (194⁄312) using the previous criteria to 82% (257⁄312) with use of this template indicating a substantially higher inter-rater agreement when allocating criteria. The agreement in scoring with and without template use was also quantified by ICC which were generally graded as low, illustrating a substantial change in consistency of scoring before and after template use. The template for a CEA for a scuba diving fatality improves consistency of interpretation between users and may improve comparability of diving fatality reports.

  16. Evaluation of Commercially Available Open Circuit Scuba Regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-03-01

    more valid approach for setting performance standards. E. First Stage Performance The performance of the scuba regulator’s first stage is critical to... approach 40 to 50 psig, less than static, the regulator ceases to function in a manner which can effectively support a diver. Con- versely, when a...1 2 65 18 80 -DPT I-N _ - F i gur 21)-,) Dacor acer 60 Breith n,, wor v.;. ept at 000 psi ,mp l-v presur so- A - OO pmg 70- 60- CL z 50- 0 33 66 99

  17. Ciné club et Scuba club

    CERN Multimedia

    Ciné club et Scuba club

    2010-01-01

    jeudi 29 avril 2009 à 20 h 30 à l’Amphithéâtre principal du CERN (bâtiment 500) The Cove - La baie de la honte de/by: Louie Psyhoyos (USA, 2009) 92 min. avec/with : Richard O’Barry, Louie Psyhoyos, Simon Hutchins Oscar 2010 “Best Documentary Film at the 82nd Academy Awards” “U.S. Audience Award at the 25th annual Sundance Film Festival in January 2009”   In a sleepy lagoon off the coast of Japan lies a shocking secret that a few desperate men will stop at nothing to keep hidden from the world. In Taiji, Japan, former dolphin trainer Ric O’Barry has come to set things right after a long search for redemption. In the 1960s, it was O’Barry who captured and trained the 5 dolphins who played the title character in the international television sensation “Flipper.” One fateful day, a heartbroken Barry came to realize that these deeply sensitive, highly...

  18. Helping mothers survive bleeding after birth: an educational of simulation-based training in a low resource setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nelissen, E.J.T.; Ersdal, H.; Ostergaard, D.; Mduma, E.; Broerse, J.E.W.; Evjen-Olsen, B.; van Roosmalen, J.; Stekelenburg, J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate "Helping Mothers Survive Bleeding After Birth" (HMS BAB) simulation-based training in a low-resource setting. Design Educational intervention study. Setting Rural referral hospital in Northern Tanzania. Population Clinicians, nurse-midwives, medical attendants, and ambulance

  19. Superior canal dehiscence syndrome associated with scuba diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitajima, Naoharu; Sugita-Kitajima, Akemi; Kitajima, Seiji

    2017-06-01

    A 28-year-old female diver presented with dizziness and difficulty clearing her left ear whilst scuba diving. Her pure-tone audiometry and tympanometry were normal. Testing of Eustachian tube function revealed tubal stenosis. Video-oculography revealed a predominantly torsional nystagmus while the patient was in the lordotic position. Fistula signs were positive. High-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) of the temporal bone revealed a diagnosis of bilateral superior semicircular canal dehiscence (SCDS). Cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (cVEMP) testing showed that the amplitude of the cVEMP measured from her left ear was larger than that from the right. In electronystagmography (ENG), nose-pinched Valsalva manoeuvres caused eye movements to be mainly directed counterclockwise with a vertical component. Tullio phenomenon was also positive for both ears. SCDS patients tend to be misdiagnosed and misunderstood; common misdiagnoses in these cases are alternobaric vertigo (AV), inner ear barotrauma, and inner-ear decompression sickness. It is difficult to diagnose vertigo attacks after scuba diving as SCDS; however, when the patient develops sound- and/or pressure-induced vertical-torsional nystagmus, HRCT should be conducted to confirm a diagnosis of SCDS.

  20. Are recreational SCUBA divers with asthma at increased risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustrup, Amalie S; Ulrik, Charlotte S

    2017-10-01

    Asthma has traditionally been regarded as a contraindication to self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (SCUBA) diving, although large numbers of patients with asthma dive. The aim of the review is to provide an update on current knowledge on potential disease-related hazards in SCUBA divers with asthma. Systematic literature review based on the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Seven studies met the criteria for inclusion in the review (comprising a total of 560 subjects). Five studies reported an increased risk for developing diving-related injuries in divers with asthma, based on case reports (n = 1), case history combined with objective assessment (n = 1), and dives and/or simulated dives (n = 3). The remaining studies (n = 2) were based on self-reported diving habits in divers suffering from asthma, obtained from anonymous questionnaires in diving magazines, reported no diving-related injuries among respondents. Due to limited evidence it is difficult to draw valid conclusions, but there are indications that recreational divers with asthma may be at increased risk for diving-related injuries compared to non-asthmatic divers. However, it is of at most importance to obtain further evidence from large-scale, well-designed studies.

  1. Effect of Nursing Home Staff Training on Quality of Patient Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linn, Margaret W.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Assessed effects of nursing home staff training in care for the dying on quality of life of 306 terminally ill patients in 5 pairs of matched nursing homes assigned randomly to trained and not trained staff groups. Patients in trained homes had less depression and greater satisfaction with care than patients in control homes at 1 and 3 months.…

  2. Provisional Crown Dislodgement during Scuba Diving: A Case of Barotrauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenal Nitin Gulve

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Changes in ambient pressure, for example, during flying, diving, or hyperbaric oxygen therapy, can lead to barotrauma. Although it may seem that this issue was neglected in dental education and research in recent decades, familiarity with and understanding of these facts may be of importance for dental practitioners. We report the case of a patient who experienced barotrauma involving dislodgement of a provisional crown during scuba diving. Patients who are exposed to pressure changes as a part of their jobs or hobbies and their dentists should know the causes of barotrauma. In addition, the clinician must be aware of the possible influence of pressure changes on the retention of dental components.

  3. Estimating the risk of a scuba diving fatality in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippmann, John; Stevenson, Christopher; McD Taylor, David; Williams, Jo

    2016-12-01

    There are few data available on which to estimate the risk of death for Australian divers. This report estimates the risk of a scuba diving fatality for Australian residents, international tourists diving in Queensland, and clients of a large Victorian dive operator. Numerators for the estimates were obtained from the Divers Alert Network Asia-Pacific dive fatality database. Denominators were derived from three sources: Participation in Exercise, Recreation and Sport Surveys, 2001-2010 (Australian resident diving activity data); Tourism Research Australia surveys of international visitors to Queensland 2006-2014 and a dive operator in Victoria 2007-2014. Annual fatality rates (AFR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated using an exact binomial test. Estimated AFRs were: 0.48 (0.37-0.59) deaths per 100,000 dives, or 8.73 (6.85-10.96) deaths per 100,000 divers for Australian residents; 0.12 (0.05-0.25) deaths per 100,000 dives, or 0.46 (0.20-0.91) deaths per 100,000 divers for international visitors to Queensland; and 1.64 (0.20-5.93) deaths per 100,000 dives for the dive operator in Victoria. On a per diver basis, Australian residents are estimated to be almost twenty times more likely to die whilst scuba diving than are international visitors to Queensland, or to lower than fourfold on a per dive basis. On a per dive basis, divers in Victoria are fourteen times more likely to die than are Queensland international tourists. Although some of the estimates are based on potentially unreliable denominator data extrapolated from surveys, the diving fatality rates in Australia appear to vary by State, being considerably lower in Queensland than in Victoria. These estimates are similar to or lower than comparable overseas estimates, although reliability of all such measurements varies with study size and accuracy of the data available.

  4. Regulation for Survival: Training and Skills in the Construction Labour Market in Jersey, Channel Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkani, Sepideh; Clarke, Linda; Michielsens, Elisabeth

    2003-01-01

    There is a crisis in the vocational training provision of the Channel Island of Jersey's construction industry that has similarities with the British situation. Unavailability and inappropriateness of skills, nonviability of current training and recruitment policies on the island, fragmentation of the training infrastructure, the demand-driven and…

  5. Recreational scuba diving: negative or positive effects of oxidative and cardiovascular stress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perovic, Antonija; Unic, Adriana; Dumic, Jerka

    2014-01-01

    Environmental conditions and increased physical activity during scuba diving are followed by increased production of free radicals and disturbed redox balance. Redox balance disorder is associated with damage of cellular components, changes of cellular signaling pathways and alterations of gene expression. Oxidative stress leads to increased expression of sirtuins (SIRTs), molecules which play an important role in the antioxidant defense, due to their sensitivity to the changes in the redox status and their ability to regulate redox homeostasis. These facts make SIRTs interesting to be considered as molecules affected by scuba diving and in that sense, as potential biomarkers of oxidative status or possible drug targets in reduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation. In addition, SIRTs effects through currently known targets make them intriguing molecules which can act positively on health in general and whose expression can be induced by scuba diving.A demanding physical activity, as well as other circumstances present in scuba diving, has the greatest load on the cardiovascular function (CV). The mechanisms of CV response during scuba diving are still unclear, but diving-induced oxidative stress and the increase in SIRTs expression could be an important factor in CV adaptation. This review summarizes current knowledge on scuba diving-induced oxidative and CV stress and describes the important roles of SIRTs in the (patho)physiological processes caused by the redox balance disorder.

  6. The prevalence of oro-facial barotrauma among scuba divers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousef, Mohammed K; Ibrahim, Maria; Assiri, Abeer; Hakeem, Abdulaziz

    2015-09-01

    Barotrauma is a physical injury that results from ambient pressure changes during flying, diving or hyperbaric oxygen therapy. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of oro-facial barotrauma among a sample of scuba divers in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Data for the study were collected through a self-reported questionnaire that was distributed to 166 divers. The questionnaire was divided into two parts, in which the first part contained demographic data and the second part consists of multiple choice questions and a few open-ended questions discussing the different signs and symptoms of orofacial barotraumas. One-hundred-and-sixty-three divers responded. The most frequent symptoms during diving were dry mouth (51.9%), followed by clenching (32.5%) and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain (19.5%), while the most frequent symptoms after diving were dry mouth (22.7%) followed by clenching and facial pain (16.9%). Clenching and dry mouth were common findings but are temporary in nature and do not warrant any dental intervention. TMJ and facial pain were also reported but were temporary. The use of commercial mouthpieces during diving may be related to more symptoms when compared with customized types.

  7. Nitric oxide-related endothelial changes in breath-hold and scuba divers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theunissen, S; Guerrero, F; Sponsiello, N; Cialoni, D; Pieri, M; Germonpré, P; Obeid, G; Tillmans, F; Papadopoulou, V; Hemelryck, W; Marroni, A; De Bels, D; Balestra, C

    2013-01-01

    Scuba and breath-hold divers are compared to investigate whether endothelial response changes are similar despite different exposure(s) to hyperoxia. 14 divers (nine scuba and five breath-holding) performed either one scuba dive (25m/25 minutes) or successive breath-hold dives at a depth of 20 meters, adding up to 25 minutes of immersion time in a diving pool. Flow-mediated dilation (FMD) was measured using echography. Peripheral post-occlusion reactive hyperemia (PORH) was assessed by digital plethysmography and plasmatic nitric oxide (NO) concentration using a nitrate/nitrite colorimetric assay kit. The FMD decreased in both groups. PORH was reduced in scuba divers but increased in breath-hold divers. No difference in circulating NO was observed for the scuba group. Opposingly, an increase in circulating NO was observed for the breath-hold group. Some cardiovascular effects can be explained by interaction between NO and superoxide anion during both types of diving ending to less NO availability and reducing FMD. The increased circulating NO in the breath-hold group can be caused by physical exercise. The opposite effects found between FMD and PORH in the breath-hold group can be assimilated to a greater responsiveness to circulating NO in small arteries than in large arteries.

  8. Growing Evidence about the Relationship between Vessel Dissection and Scuba Diving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Brajkovic

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Carotid and vertebral artery dissection are relatively frequent and risky conditions. In the last decade, different patients with extracranial (and in 1 case also intracranial dissections associated with the practice of scuba diving were reported. The connection between the two conditions has not been fully explained so far. In the present article, we report the case of a patient presenting with Claude Bernard-Horner syndrome and homolateral XII cranial nerve palsy, manifesting a few days after diving in the cold water of a lake. The patient ended up having internal carotid artery dissection associated with the formation of a pseudoaneurysm. Here, we offer a summary of all cases reported in the literature about scuba diving and arterial dissection, and provide a critical discussion about which scuba diving-related factors can trigger the dissection of cervical vessels.

  9. Suitability Analysis For Scuba Diving To Develop Marine Tourism At Saebus Island, East Java, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijaya, Putranto; Putra, Tri; Hidayat, Fatra; Levraeni, Chandra; Rizmaadi, Mada; Ambariyanto, Ambariyanto

    2018-02-01

    Indonesian government currently has policies to improve the performance of the tourism sector, including marine tourism. One of the attractions of marine tourism is the coral ecosystem especially through scuba diving activities. The purpose of this study was to determine the suitability of the coral ecosystem on Saebus Island, East Java, to find appropriate locations for scuba diving activities. Purposive samplings were done around the island to determine four stations which will be assessed through suitability analysis. Tourism Suitability Index was used to assess all stations for scuba diving activities. The result showed that all four stations were categorized as very suitable with the score: 85%, 85%, 85% and 83%, respectively. Several aspects that need to be improved and anticipated for diving at all stations are coral coverage and water current. These results suggest that there are several spots around Saebus Island that are suitable for diving site, and can be promoted as marine tourism destination.

  10. Exercise intensity inferred from air consumption during recreational scuba diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzzacott, Peter; Pollock, Neal W; Rosenberg, Michael

    2014-06-01

    Episodic exercise is a risk factor for acute cardiac events and cardiac complications are increasingly recognized in fatalities during recreational scuba diving. What is not known is the exercise intensity involved in typical recreational diving. This study used pre- to post-dive gas cylinder pressure drop to estimate air consumption and, from that, exercise intensity during recreational dives. Dive profiles were captured electronically and divers self-reported cylinder pressure changes, perceived workload, thermal status and any problems during dives. Mean surface air consumption (SAC) rate per kg body weight and mean exercise intensity (reported in metabolic equivalents, MET multiples of assumed resting metabolic rate of 3.5 mL·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹) were then estimated. Data are reported as mean ± standard deviation. A total of 959 recreational air dives (20 ± 9 metres' sea water maximum depth; 50 ± 12 min underwater time) by 139 divers (42 ± 10 y age; 11 ± 10 y of diving; 12% smokers; 73% male) were monitored. Problems were reported with 129/959 dives: buoyancy (45%), equalization (38%), rapid ascent (10%), vertigo (5%) and other (2%). Assuming a 10% overestimate due to cylinder cooling and uncontrolled gas loss, the estimated exercise intensity associated with monitored dives was 5 ± 1 MET. Mean ± 2SD, or 7 MET, captures the effort associated with the vast majority of dives monitored. Our estimates suggest that uncomplicated recreational dives require moderate-intensity energy expenditure to complete, with a 7-MET capacity generally adequate. Higher levels of aerobic fitness are still strongly recommended to ensure ample reserves. Further research is needed to quantify energetic demands of recreational diving during both typical and emergent events in both experienced and less experienced divers.

  11. Managing the cryogenic systems of SCUBA-2 for long term operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cookson, Jamie L.; Bintley, Dan

    2016-07-01

    SCUBA-2 has been operational on JCMT producing excellent science for almost 5 years. We describe the strategy and methods that we have evolved to keep one of the world's first "dry dilution refrigerators" and the other cryogenic systems working effectively at the summit of Mauna Kea, keeping the instrument functioning at peak efficiency for extended periods (over 12 months at a time), with minimum downtime. We discuss new plans to reduce day-to-day operational costs and to add remote management of the gas handling systems, as we look to the future and envisage another ten years of SCUBA-2 science.

  12. Construction of Tests in the Cognitive and Psychomotor Domains for Skin and Scuba Diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Jean

    The fundamental purposes of this study were to develop mastery tests in the cognitive and psychomotor domains for skin and scuba diving and to establish validity and reliability for the tests. A table of specifications was developed for each domain, and a pilot study refined the initial test batteries into their final form. In the main study,…

  13. Contrast sensitivity of air-breathing nonprofessional scuba divers at a depth of 40 meters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellart, N. A.

    1992-01-01

    Photopic contrast sensitivity of air-breathing scuba divers was measured with a translucent test pattern at depths up to 40 m. The pattern was composed of sine wave gratings with spatial frequency and contrast changing logarithmically. The spatial transfer characteristics were measured at various

  14. Katayama fever in scuba divers - A report of 3 cases | Evans | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Katayama fever or acute schistosomiasis probably occurs more commonly than is recorded. Interviews with a 3-man scuba diving team who had had contact with a large dam in an ·endemic area of the eastern Transvaal Lowveld at the same time and contact area on the same day during late summer of 1986 are discussed.

  15. Correction for adiabatic effects in lethe calculated instantaneous gas consumption of scuba dives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellart, Nico A. M.; Le Péchon, Jean-Claude

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In scuba-diving practice, instantaneous gas consumption is generally calculated from the fall in cylinder pressure without considering the effects of water temperature (heat transfer) and adiabatic processes. We aimed to develop a simple but precise method for calculating the

  16. Who is the Scuba Diver that visits Sodwana Bay and why ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Understanding the travel motives of scuba divers will benefit dive operations and destinations in developing the most appropriate product, improving the services offered and creating more effective promotional activities that will ultimately lead to a competitive advantage. The purpose of this research was to understand the ...

  17. The influence of anti-predator training, personality and sex in the behavior, dispersion and survival rates of translocated captive-raised parrots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice R.S. Lopes

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Predation is one of the main factors responsible for the failure of reintroduction/translocation programs. Animal's personality and sex can also influence key behaviors for survival and reproduction. This study aimed to evaluate the influence of anti-predator training, personality and sex on the survival and behaviors of translocated blue-fronted Amazon parrots. Thirty-one captive-raised parrots were translocated to a Cerrado area in Brazil. Parrots were separated into two groups: anti-predator trained group (ATG and control group (CG. Personality tests were performed with individuals of the ATG group. Data were collected using focal sampling with instantaneous recording of behavior every minute. Anti-predator training, personality and sex did not influenced parrots' survival after release. However, anti-predator training proved to be efficient in eliciting more natural behaviors in parrots after release. Shy individuals and males showed to be more sociable than bold individuals and females. Personality and sex did not influence behavior exhibition. Parrots interacted more, positively or negatively, with individuals of its own group. Training session closer to the release date should be tried. Behavioral data and not just survival rates should be used to evaluate the efficiency of the techniques, because behavior can give clues about the adaptation of the individuals to the new habitat, increasing the success of the conservation program.

  18. Exercise training attenuates cerebral ischemic hyperglycemia by improving hepatic insulin signaling and β-cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sunmin; Kim, Da Sol; Kang, Sunna

    2013-08-06

    Preventing hyperglycemia after acute stroke attenuates complications of cerebral ischemia and reduces the risk of mortality. We investigated whether regular exercise prevents neuronal cell death and post-stroke hyperglycemia in gerbils after cerebral ischemia. Cerebral ischemia was induced by carotid artery occlusion for 8min. The gerbils that underwent ischemic or sham operations were randomly subdivided into exercise (ran on inclined treadmill at 20m/min for 30min 5days per week for 1week prior to surgery) or non-exercise groups. Gerbils were fed a 40% fat diet and after 28days, glucose metabolism, serum cytokine levels and cognitive function was measured. Artery occlusion resulted in a 64% reduction in hippocampal CA1 neurons in comparison to the sham gerbils, and caused decreased neuronal mass and impaired cognitive function. Exercise partially prevented neuronal death and improved ischemia-induced glucose intolerance. Ischemia decreased hepatic insulin signaling and exacerbated insulin resistance whereas exercise prevented the disturbance. Insulin secretion was lower in ischemic gerbils than sham gerbils, due to lowered pancreatic β-cell mass caused by increased β-cell apoptosis and decreased β-cell proliferation, which were also prevented by exercise. Increase of apoptosis was associated with elevated caspase-3 activity, consistent with increased serum tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-1β levels. Hippocampal neuronal cell death induces hyperglycemia due to attenuated hepatic insulin signaling and decreased β-cell mass by increased β-cell apoptosis through increased TNF-α and IL-1β levels. Exercise partially prevents this phenomenon suggesting that exercise training may provide neuroprotective benefits from cerebral ischemic hyperglycemia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A Review of SCUBA Diving Impacts and Implication for Coral Reefs Conservation and Tourism Management

    OpenAIRE

    Zainal Abidin Siti Zulaiha; Mohamed Badaruddin

    2014-01-01

    Dive tourism has become important in term of magnitude and significantly contributes to regional economies. Nevertheless, in the absence of proper controls and enforcement, unplanned tourism growth has caused environmental degradation which undermines the long-term sustainability of the tourism industry. The purpose of this paper is to explore factors that contribute to the SCUBA diving impacts on coral and fish communities. This paper explains the causes of a certain event, validating the pr...

  20. The perceived value of scuba diving tourists at a marina destination / Kiéra Seymour.

    OpenAIRE

    Seymour, Kiéra Danielle

    2012-01-01

    Tourism activities set in coastal and marine environments have evolved far beyond the traditional passive leisure experiences of the classic resort holiday. While the traditional beach holiday remains a contemporary mass tourism phenomenon. Marine tourism now extends far beyond beach activities to a wide spread spectrum of activities including scuba diving with over 20 million certified divers worldwide. The tourism product carries both the characteristics of the service product and the chara...

  1. Effects of recreational scuba diving on Mediterranean fishes: evidence of involuntary feeding?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. DI FRANCO

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite a large body of literature assessing the impacts of recreational scuba diving on marine habitats, little attention has been paid to the potentially harmful effects this has on fishes. The aim of this study was the assessment of the immediate response of different fish species to divers’ activities. A decrease of fishes’ natural diffidence towards divers is shown, probably due to an enhanced availability of their prey as a result of divers’ contacts with the substrate.

  2. Description of an eye barotrauma in scuba diving with clinical discussion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Barreiros

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we report and discuss a scuba diving accident caused by compression of the mask at a depth of 9.1 m resulting in conjunctiva haemorrhage of both eyes in a 21-year-old male. After five weeks and benefiting from immediate post-accident medical attention and medication followed by ophthalmologic examinations the patient recovered with no chronic effects neither in vision nor in the eyes.

  3. Cerebellar infarction presenting as inner ear decompression sickness following scuba diving: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gempp, E; Louge, P; Soulier, B; Alla, P

    2014-11-01

    Inner ear decompression sickness following scuba diving is not uncommon and the characteristic features of this disorder are acute peripheral vestibular syndrome, sometimes associated with cochlear signs, requiring urgent hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Cerebellar infarction can also mimic isolated peripheral vestibulopathy. The authors report the case of a 47-year-old man in good general health admitted with acute left vestibular dysfunction suggestive of inner ear decompression sickness 6 hours after scuba diving. Normal videonystagmography and delayed onset of occipital headache finally led to brain MRI that confirmed the presence of recent ischaemic infarction in the territory of the medial branch of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery. Complementary investigations revealed the presence of a patent foramen ovale with atrial septal aneurysm. No underlying atherosclerotic disease or clotting abnormalities were observed. Cerebellar infarction can present clinically with features of inner ear decompression sickness following scuba diving. An underlying air embolism mechanism cannot be excluded, particularly in patients with a large right-to-left circulatory shunt and no other cardiovascular risk factors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. SCUBA-2 follow-up of Herschel-SPIRE observed Planck overdensities

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKenzie, Todd P.; Scott, Douglas; Bianconi, Matteo; Clements, David L.; Dole, Herve A.; Flores-Cacho, Inés; Guery, David; Kneissl, Ruediger; Lagache, Guilaine; Marleau, Francine R.; Montier, Ludovic; Nesvadba, Nicole P. H.; Pointecouteau, Etienne; Soucail, Genevieve

    2017-07-01

    We present SCUBA-2 follow-up of 61 candidate high-redshift Planck sources. Of these, 10 are confirmed strong gravitational lenses and comprise some of the brightest such submm sources on the observed sky, while 51 are candidate proto-cluster fields undergoing massive starburst events. With the accompanying Herschel-Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver observations and assuming an empirical dust temperature prior of 34^{+13}_{-9} K, we provide photometric redshift and far-IR luminosity estimates for 172 SCUBA-2-selected sources within these Planck overdensity fields. The redshift distribution of the sources peak between a redshift of 2 and 4, with one-third of the sources having S500/S350 > 1. For the majority of the sources, we find far-IR luminosities of approximately 1013 L⊙, corresponding to star formation rates of around 1000 M⊙ yr-1. For S850 > 8 mJy sources, we show that there is up to an order of magnitude increase in star formation rate density and an increase in uncorrected number counts of 6 for S850 > 8 mJy when compared to typical cosmological survey fields. The sources detected with SCUBA-2 account for only approximately 5 per cent of the Planck flux at 353 GHz, and thus many more fainter sources are expected in these fields.

  5. A rare case of a scuba diver's death due to propeller injuries of a desalination pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perilli, G; Di Battista, B; Montana, A; Pavia, J; Cauchi, S; Zerafa, N M; Pomara, C

    2015-05-01

    Water skiing, boat racing, skin and scuba diving, as well as pleasure boat cruising are becoming increasingly popular hobbies. As a result, the incidence of injuries secondary to motor propellers is becoming more frequent. Injuries by propellers, amputation, death by drowning, and bleeding are rare reported events in forensic literature. The most common circumstances surrounding boat-propeller-related injuries are concerned with getting into or out of the boat, personal watercraft use or water skiing, and falling or being thrown from the boat. A case of a scuba diver's death that occurred during an illegal scuba fishing trip around a desalination plant is presented. A complete autopsy and histological study of all organs and surfaces of dismembered cadaveric sections, performed in order to determine the phases of death, are reported. An underwater scene investigation was conducted by an engineering team studying the mouth of the pump and the dynamic characteristic of rotating propeller blades. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SCUBA-2 high-redshift galaxies sample (Barger+, 2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barger, A. J.; Cowie, L. L.; Chen, C.-C.; Owen, F. N.; Wang, W.-H.; Casey, C. M.; Lee, N.; Sanders, D. B.; Williams, J. P.

    2017-05-01

    We obtained 25.4 hr of observations on the CDF-N with SCUBA-2 on the JCMT during observing runs in 2012 and 2013. The data were obtained using a mixture of scanning modes and under a variety of weather conditions. Using the CV Daisy scanning mode (detailed information about the SCUBA-2 scan patterns can be found in Holland et al. 2013MNRAS.430.2513H), we obtained a 2.2 hr observation in band 1 weather (225 GHz opacity<0.05) and a 16.5 hr observation in band 2 weather (225 GHz opacity ~0.05-0.08). We also obtained a 6.7 hr observation in band 2 weather using the pong-900 scanning mode. While SCUBA-2 observes at both 450 um and 850 um simultaneously, there are too few sources directly detected at 450 um in our data to be interesting. Thus, we only use the 850 um data in our subsequent analysis. (1 data file).

  7. Recreational scuba diving in patients with congenital heart disease: Time for new guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleich, Jean-Marc; Schnell, Frédéric; Brouant, Benoît; Phan, Gerald; Lafay, Vincent; Bonnemains, Laurent; Bédossa, Marc

    2016-01-01

    The number of recreational scuba divers is steadily increasing. In its latest recommendations, the French Federation of Undersea Studies and Sports listed congenital heart disease as a formal and final contraindication to scuba diving. On the other hand, with the progress made in their management, the prognosis and quality of life of patients with congenital heart diseases have improved considerably, enabling them to engage in physical and sports endeavours, which are known to confer general health and psychological benefits. As a consequence, the ability of these patients to dive has become a regular and recurrent issue. We review the various types of scuba diving, the physical performance required for its practice, its effects on cardiovascular function and the elements that need to be considered before recommending whether it can be practiced safely at various levels of difficulty. Because of the diversity and broad heterogeneity of congenital heart diseases, a detailed evaluation of each patient's performance based on clinical criteria common to all congenital heart diseases is recommended. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. The JCMT and Herschel Gould Belt Surveys: a comparison of SCUBA-2 and Herschel data of dense cores in the Taurus dark cloud L1495

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward-Thompson, D.; Pattle, K.; Kirk, J. M.; Marsh, K.; Buckle, J.; Hatchell, J.; Nutter, D. J.; Griffin, M. J.; Di Francesco, J.; André, P.; Beaulieu, S.; Berry, D.; Broekhoven-Fiene, H.; Currie, M.; Fich, M.; Jenness, T.; Johnstone, D.; Kirk, H.; Mottram, J.; Pineda, J.; Quinn, C.; Sadavoy, S.; Salji, C.; Tisi, S.; Walker-Smith, S.; White, G.; Hill, T.; Könyves, V.; Palmeirim, P.; Pezzuto, S.

    2016-11-01

    We present a comparison of Submillimetre Common User Bolometer Array-2 (SCUBA-2) 850-μm and Herschel 70-500-μm observations of the L1495 filament in the Taurus Molecular Cloud with the goal of characterizing the SCUBA-2 Gould Belt Survey (GBS) data set. We identify and characterize starless cores in three data sets: SCUBA-2 850-μm, Herschel 250-μm, and Herschel 250-μm spatially filtered to mimic the SCUBA-2 data. SCUBA-2 detects only the highest-surface-brightness sources, principally detecting protostellar sources and starless cores embedded in filaments, while Herschel is sensitive to most of the cloud structure, including extended low-surface-brightness emission. Herschel detects considerably more sources than SCUBA-2 even after spatial filtering. We investigate which properties of a starless core detected by Herschel determine its detectability by SCUBA-2, and find that they are the core's temperature and column density (for given dust properties). For similar-temperature cores, such as those seen in L1495, the surface brightnesses of the cores are determined by their column densities, with the highest-column-density cores being detected by SCUBA-2. For roughly spherical geometries, column density corresponds to volume density, and so SCUBA-2 selects the densest cores from a population at a given temperature. This selection effect, which we quantify as a function of distance, makes SCUBA-2 ideal for identifying those cores in Herschel catalogues that are closest to forming stars. Our results can now be used by anyone wishing to use the SCUBA-2 GBS data set.

  9. The effect of pre-dive ingestion of dark chocolate on endothelial function after a scuba dive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theunissen, Sigrid; Balestra, Costantino; Boutros, Antoine; De Bels, David; Guerrero, François; Germonpré, Peter

    2015-03-01

    The aim of the study was to observe the effects of dark chocolate on endothelial function after scuba diving. Forty-two male scuba divers were divided into two groups: a control (n=21) and a chocolate group (n=21). They performed a 33-metres deep scuba-air dive for 20 minutes in a diving pool (Nemo 33, Brussels). Water temperature was 33⁰C. The chocolate group ingested 30 g of dark chocolate (86% cocoa) 90 minutes before the dive. Flow-mediated dilatation (FMD), digital photoplethysmography and nitric oxide (NO) and peroxynitrites (ONOO-) levels were measured before and after the scuba dive in both groups. A significant decrease in FMD was observed in the control group after the dive (91±7% (mean±95% confidence interval) of pre-dive values; Pchocolate group (105±5% of pre-dive values; Pchocolate group (154±73% of pre-dive values; P=0.04). A significant reduction in ONOO- was observed in the control group (84±12% of pre-dive values; P=0.003) whereas no variation was shown after the dive with chocolate intake (100±28% of pre-dive values; ns). Ingestion of 30 g of dark chocolate 90 minutes before scuba diving prevented post-dive endothelial dysfunction, as the antioxidants contained in dark chocolate probably scavenge free radicals.

  10. Decapod assemblages in subtidal and intertidal zones—Importance of scuba diving as a survey technique in tropical reefs, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Welter Giraldes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Decapods play a crucial role within the reef ecosystem and the development of scuba diving as a survey tool has allowed researchers the opportunity to study the decapod–reef relationship more comprehensively. The present study describes the differences in decapod assemblages in intertidal and subtidal zones at a tropical coastal reef system in the southwestern Atlantic Ocean and reports the importance of scuba diving as a survey technique. A total of 71 decapods were recorded during the research; 42 in the intertidal zone mainly formed by small endobenthic species and 39 in the subtidal zone primarily large species only 10 were found to frequent both sample zones. The study extends the range of Brachycarpusholthuisi Fausto Filho 1966 in Brazil; and also demonstrates how scuba diving can be used to complement traditional methodologies and vice versa. The research shows the advantages of using scuba diving when studying trade endangered decapods, as the methodology allows access to cryptic habitats such as reef caves and underwater cavities which were inaccessible when using traditional techniques. In conclusion scuba diving represents a revolutionary non-destructive survey tool allowing the researcher to directly access a specific decapod assemblage in fragile reef environments and in protected marine areas.

  11. [Lung function testing in children before and after an age-adapted SCUBA dive in a swimming pool].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollin, P; Christmann, M; Kroker, A; Zielen, S

    2011-05-01

    The number of children that SCUBA dive is increasing. Airway narrowing while SCUBA diving can cause dangerous complications like pulmonary barotrauma and arterial gas embolism. Statistics show that children are at an increased risk. Since data are scarce, the goal of this study was to gain new knowledge about acute lung function changes in children while SCUBA diving. 41 children aged 8 - 14 years underwent lung function testing (spirometry and residual volume measurement) before and after a single age-adapted SCUBA dive in a swimming pool. A significant reduction of the dynamic expiratory lung function parameters FEV (1) (p  10 % (12 % - 21 %) was found in 5 children (12.2 %). The majority of the children (87.8 %) did not show any relevant lung function changes. Five children had a considerable reduction of FEV (1). Signs indicate the importance of bronchial hyperreactivity (BHR) as a key factor. Children with asthma or BHR should not SCUBA dive. A detailed medical examination is recommended (including an unspecific bronchial provocation test) before starting to dive. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Exercise training enhanced SIRT1 longevity signaling replaces the IGF1 survival pathway to attenuate aging-induced rat heart apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chao-Hung; Ho, Tsung-Jung; Kuo, Wei-Wen; Day, Cecilia-Hsuan; Pai, Pei-Ying; Chung, Li-Chin; Liao, Po-Hsiang; Lin, Feng-Huei; Wu, En-Ting; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the second leading cause of death (9.1 %) in Taiwan. Heart function deteriorates with age at a rate of 1 % per year. As society ages, we must study the serious problem of cardiovascular disease. SIRT1 regulates important cellular processes, including anti-apoptosis, neuronal protection, cellular senescence, aging, and longevity. In our previous studies, rats with obesity, high blood pressure, and diabetes exhibiting slowed myocardial performance and induced cell apoptosis were reversed via sports training through IGF1 survival signaling compensation. This study designed a set of experiments with rats, in aging and exercise groups, to identify changes in myocardial cell signaling transduction pathways. Three groups of three different aged rats, 3, 12, and 18 months old, were randomly divided into aging groups (C3, A12, and A18) and exercise groups (E3, AE12, and AE18). The exercise training consisted of swimming five times a week with gradual increases from the first week from 20 to 60 min for 12 weeks. After the sports training process was completed, tissue sections were taken to observe cell organization (hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stain) and apoptosis (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assays) and to observe any changes in the myocardial tissues and proteins (Western blotting). The experimental results show that cardiomyocyte apoptotic pathway protein expression increased with age in the aging groups (C3, A12, and A18), with improvement in the exercise group (E3, AE12, and AE18). However, the expression of the pro-survival p-Akt protein decreased significantly with age and reduced performance. The IGF1R/PI3K/Akt survival pathway in the heart of young rats can indeed be increased through exercise training. As rats age, this pathway loses its original function, even with increasing upstream IGF1. However, levels of SIRT1 and its downstream target PGC-1α were found to increase with age and

  13. The Use of Restoring Resources of the Survival Roles and Reflex Patterns in MNRI® (Reflex Integration Interactive Training of Personality Growth and Interpersonal Relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masgutova S.K.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Personality growth as a socio-psychological problem is a multi-complex phenomenon that targets Self-identity, Self-actualization, and other areas. During the last decade scientists started studying other factors limiting the personality growth, such as stress and post-trauma. However, the Survival Roles, the socio-individual patterns based on neurophysiological and psychological defense mechanisms blocking the personality Self-actualization, social interaction and professional business qualities, are rarely discussed. Thus this study based on Survival Roles may extend the personality growth oriented concepts and therapy modality tools. This study showed a correlation between Survival Role patterns, stress resilience, and survival reflexes (integrative units of the nervous system functions. Comparative data on 464 business professionals from high management jobs (Study Group — n=340, and Control Group — n=124 participated in this research which found 70.9 % (n=329 of the total group was in stress. This stress activated socio-individual Survival Roles and protective reflex patterns which responded with reactivity, over-protection, non-constructive interactions with others and limited business strategies. The MNRI® reflex integrative training used in this study demonstrated improvement of functions of the protective reflex patterns effected positively the survival mechanisms including increased stress resilience, and decreased negative effect of Survival Roles. MNRI® proposes a new paradigm in the realm of personality growth and socio-interpersonal activity, and supports the neurophysiological aspects to optimize the overall quality of life of business professionals from a variety of high management business areas.

  14. Effects of scuba diving on vascular repair mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culic, Vedrana Cikes; Van Craenenbroeck, Emeline; Muzinic, Nikolina Rezic; Ljubkovic, Marko; Marinovic, Jasna; Conraads, Viviane; Dujic, Zeljko

    2014-01-01

    A single air dive causes transient endothelial dysfunction. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and circulating angiogenic cells (CAC) contribute synergistically to endothelial repair. In this study (1) the acute effects of diving on EPC numbers and CAC migration and (2) the influence of the gas mixture (air/nitrox-36) was investigated. Ten divers performed two dives to 18 meters on Day (D) 1 and D3, using air. After 15 days, dives were repeated with nitrox-36. Blood sampling took place before and immediately after diving. Circulating EPCs were quantified by flow cytometry, CAC migration of culture was assessed on D7. When diving on air, a trend for reduced EPC numbers is observed post-dive, which is persistent on D1 and D3. CAC migration tends to improve acutely following diving. These effects are more pronounced with nitrox-36 dives. Diving acutely affects EPC numbers and CAC function, and to a larger extent when diving with nitrox-36. The diving-induced oxidative stress may influence recruitment or survival of EPC. The functional improvement of CAC could be a compensatory mechanism to maintain endothelial homeostasis.

  15. Does recreational scuba diving have clinically significant effect on routine haematological parameters?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perovic, Antonija; Nikolac, Nora; Braticevic, Marina Njire; Milcic, Ana; Sobocanec, Sandra; Balog, Tihomir; Dabelic, Sanja; Dumic, Jerka

    2017-06-15

    Scuba diving represents a combination of exercise and changes in environmental conditions. This study aimed to evaluate changes in haematological parameters after recreational scuba diving in order to identify clinically significant changes. The study included males, 17 recreational divers, median age (range) 41 (30-52) years. Blood samples were taken before diving, immediately after diving to 30 meters for 30 minutes, 3 hours and 6 hours after diving. Complete blood counts were analyzed on the Cell Dyn Ruby haematology analyzer. Statistical significance between successive measurements was tested using Friedman test. The difference between the two measurements was judged against desirable bias (DSB) derived from biological variation and calculated reference change values (RCV). The difference higher than RCV was considered clinically significant. A statistically significant increase and difference judging against DSB was observed: for neutrophils immediately, 3 and 6 hours after diving (18%, 34% and 36%, respectively), for white blood cells (WBCs) 3 and 6 hours after diving (20% and 25%, respectively), for lymphocytes (20%) and monocytes (23%) 6 hours after diving. A statistically significant decrease and difference judging against DSB was found: immediately after diving for monocytes (- 15%), 3 and 6 hours after diving for red blood cells (RBCs) (- 2.6% and -2.9%, respectively), haemoglobin (- 2.1% and - 2.8%, respectively) and haematocrit (- 2.4% and - 3.2%, respectively). A clinically significant change was not found for any of the test parameters when compared to RCV. Observed statistically significant changes after recreational scuba diving; WBCs, neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes increase and RBCs, haemoglobin, haematocrit decrease, probably will not affect clinical decision.

  16. Mobility, expansion and management of a multi-species scuba diving fishery in East Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hampus Eriksson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Scuba diving fishing, predominantly targeting sea cucumbers, has been documented to occur in an uncontrolled manner in the Western Indian Ocean and in other tropical regions. Although this type of fishing generally indicates a destructive activity, little attention has been directed towards this category of fishery, a major knowledge gap and barrier to management. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: With the aim to capture geographic scales, fishing processes and social aspects the scuba diving fishery that operate out of Zanzibar was studied using interviews, discussions, participant observations and catch monitoring. The diving fishery was resilient to resource declines and had expanded to new species, new depths and new fishing grounds, sometimes operating approximately 250 km away from Zanzibar at depths down to 50 meters, as a result of depleted easy-access stock. The diving operations were embedded in a regional and global trade network, and its actors operated in a roving manner on multiple spatial levels, taking advantage of unfair patron-client relationships and of the insufficient management in Zanzibar. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: This study illustrates that roving dynamics in fisheries, which have been predominantly addressed on a global scale, also take place at a considerably smaller spatial scale. Importantly, while proposed management of the sea cucumber fishery is often generic to a simplified fishery situation, this study illustrates a multifaceted fishery with diverse management requirements. The documented spatial scales and processes in the scuba diving fishery emphasize the need for increased regional governance partnerships to implement management that fit the spatial scales and processes of the operation.

  17. Understanding scuba diving fatalities: carbon dioxide concentrations in intra-cardiac gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varlet, Vincent; Dominguez, Alejandro; Augsburger, Marc; Lossois, Maisy; Egger, Coraline; Palmiere, Cristian; Vilarino, Raquel; Grabherr, Silke

    2017-06-01

    Important developments in the diagnosis of scuba diving fatalities have been made thanks to forensic imaging tool improvements. Multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) permits reliable interpretation of the overall gaseous distribution in the cadaver. However, due to post-mortem delay, the radiological interpretation is often doubtful because the distinction between gas related to the dive and post-mortem decomposition artifactual gases becomes less obvious. We present six cases of fatal scuba diving showing gas in the heart and other vasculature. Carbon dioxide (CO₂) in cardiac gas measured by gas chromatography coupled to thermal conductivity detection were employed to distinguish decomposition from embolism based on the detection of decomposition gases (hydrogen, hydrogen sulfide and methane) and to confirm arterial gas embolism (AGE) or post-mortem offgasing diagnoses. A Radiological Alteration Index (RAI) was calculated from the scan. Based on the dive history, the intra-cadaveric gas was diagnosed as deriving from decomposition (one case, minimal RAI of 61), post-mortem decompression artifacts (two cases, intermediate RAI between 60 and 85) and barotrauma/AGE (three cases, maximal RAI between 85 and 100), illustrating a large distribution inside the bodies. MDCT scans should be interpreted simultaneously with compositional analysis of intra-cadaveric gases. Intra-cadaveric gas sampling and analysis may become useful tools for understanding and diagnosing scuba diving fatalities. In cases with short post-mortem delays, the CO₂ concentration of the cardiac gas provides relevant information about the circumstances and cause of death when this parameter is interpreted in combination with the diving profile.

  18. Assessment of extravascular lung water and cardiac function in trimix SCUBA diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinovic, Jasna; Ljubkovic, Marko; Obad, Ante; Breskovic, Toni; Salamunic, Ilza; Denoble, Petar J; Dujic, Zeljko

    2010-06-01

    An increasing number of recreational self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (SCUBA) divers use trimix of oxygen, helium, and nitrogen for dives deeper than 60 m of sea water. Although it was seldom linked to the development of pulmonary edema, whether SCUBA diving affects the extravascular lung water (EVLW) accumulation is largely unexplored. Seven divers performed six dives on consecutive days using compressed gas mixture of oxygen, helium, and nitrogen (trimix), with diving depths ranging from 55 to 80 m. The echocardiographic parameters (bubble grade, lung comets, mean pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP), and left ventricular function) and the blood levels of the N-terminal part of pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) were assessed before and after each dive. Venous gas bubbling was detected after each dive with mean probability of decompression sickness ranging from 1.77% to 3.12%. After each dive, several ultrasonographically detected lung comets rose significantly, which was paralleled by increased pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) and decreased left ventricular contractility (reduced ejection fraction at higher end-systolic and end-diastolic volumes) as well as the elevated NT-proBNP. The number of ultrasound lung comets and mean PAP did not return to baseline values after each dive. This is the first report that asymptomatic SCUBA dives are associated with accumulation of EVLW with concomitant increase in PAP, diminished left ventricular contractility, and increased release of NT-proBNP, suggesting a significant cardiopulmonary strain. EVLW and PAP did not return to baseline during repetitive dives, indicating possible cumulative effect with increasing the risk for pulmonary edema.

  19. The Herschel Bright Sources (HerBS): sample definition and SCUBA-2 observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakx, Tom J. L. C.; Eales, S. A.; Negrello, M.; Smith, M. W. L.; Valiante, E.; Holland, W. S.; Baes, M.; Bourne, N.; Clements, D. L.; Dannerbauer, H.; De Zotti, G.; Dunne, L.; Dye, S.; Furlanetto, C.; Ivison, R. J.; Maddox, S.; Marchetti, L.; Michałowski, M. J.; Omont, A.; Oteo, I.; Wardlow, J. L.; van der Werf, P.; Yang, C.

    2018-01-01

    We present the Herschel Bright Sources (HerBS) sample, a sample of bright, high-redshift Herschel sources detected in the 616.4 deg2 Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey. The HerBS sample contains 209 galaxies, selected with a 500 μm flux density greater than 80 mJy and an estimated redshift greater than 2. The sample consists of a combination of hyperluminous infrared galaxies and lensed ultraluminous infrared galaxies during the epoch of peak cosmic star formation. In this paper, we present Submillimetre Common-User Bolometer Array 2 (SCUBA-2) observations at 850 μm of 189 galaxies of the HerBS sample, 152 of these sources were detected. We fit a spectral template to the Herschel-Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE) and 850 μm SCUBA-2 flux densities of 22 sources with spectroscopically determined redshifts, using a two-component modified blackbody spectrum as a template. We find a cold- and hot-dust temperature of 21.29_{-1.66}^{+1.35} and 45.80_{-3.48}^{+2.88} K, a cold-to-hot dust mass ratio of 26.62_{-6.74}^{+5.61} and a β of 1.83_{-0.28}^{+0.14}. The poor quality of the fit suggests that the sample of galaxies is too diverse to be explained by our simple model. Comparison of our sample to a galaxy evolution model indicates that the fraction of lenses are high. Out of the 152 SCUBA-2 detected galaxies, the model predicts 128.4 ± 2.1 of those galaxies to be lensed (84.5 per cent). The SPIRE 500 μm flux suggests that out of all 209 HerBS sources, we expect 158.1 ± 1.7 lensed sources, giving a total lensing fraction of 76 per cent.

  20. A SCUBA imaging survey of ultracompact HII regions: The environments of massive star formation

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, M. A.; Hatchell, J.; Walsh, A. J.; Macdonald, G. H.; Millar, T. J.

    2006-01-01

    We present a SCUBA submillimetre (450 & 850 micron) survey of the environment of 105 IRAS point sources, selected from the Wood & Churchwell (1989a) and Kurtz, Churchwell & Wood (1994) radio ultracompact (UC) HII region surveys. We detected a total of 155 sub-mm clumps associated with the IRAS point sources and identified three distinct types of object: ultracompact cm-wave sources that are not associated with any sub-mm emission (sub-mm quiet objects), sub-mm clumps that are associated with ...

  1. The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: SCUBA-2 observations of radiative feedback in NGC1333

    OpenAIRE

    Hatchell, J.; Wilson, T; Drabek, E.; Curtis, E; Richer, J; Nutter, D.; Di Francesco, J.; consortium, D. Ward-Thompson on behalf of the JCMT GBS

    2012-01-01

    We present observations of NGC1333 from SCUBA-2 on JCMT, observed as a JCMT Gould Belt Survey pilot project during the shared risk campaign when the first of four arrays was installed at each of 450 and 850 microns. Temperature maps are derived from 450 micron and 850 micron ratios under the assumption of constant dust opacity spectral index beta=1.8. Temperatures indicate that the dust in the northern (IRAS 6/8) region of NGC1333 is hot, 20-40 K, due to heating by the B star SVS3, other youn...

  2. [A CASE OF NATTOU (FERMENTED-SOYBEAN)-INDUCED LATE-ONSET ANAPHYLAXIS FOLLOWING SCUBA DIVING].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagakura, Toshikazu; Tanaka, Katsuichirou; Horikawa, Satoshi

    2015-06-01

    We here report a 34-years old male who had nattou-(fermented-soybean) induced late-onset anaphylaxis following SCUBA diving to about 20 m in the ocean off a small remote Japanese island (Kuroshima, Okinawa). He had eaten nattou for breakfast at 7:30 am. He traveled by boat to the dive site, dove twice and then ate lunch at 12:30 on the diving boat (no nattou at lunch). After lunch at 14:30 he dove again (third dive of the day) during which time itchiness started. Back on the diving boat, urticarial was noticed. At 15:30, while washing his diving gear at the diving shop near the harbor, he fainted. A physician arrived on the scene at 15:45. Chest sound was clear and SpO2 was 98%, and blood pressure was 60/- mmHg. Intra-venous hydrocortisone was given, however, his recovery was not satisfactory. Then he was transferred to the Yaeyama Hospital by helicopter at 17:45. The examination of diving computer analysis reveals no sign of increased residual nitrogen, denying the possibility of decompression syndrome. Prick to prick test shows a strongly positive response to nattou. Nattou-induced late-onset anaphylaxis following SCUBA diving was suspected.

  3. Funding conservation through use and potentials for price discrimination among scuba divers at Sipadan, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emang, Diana; Lundhede, Thomas Hedemark; Thorsen, Bo Jellesmark

    2016-11-01

    The protected coral reefs off the coast of Malaysia receive numerous tourists, while also being as fishing grounds. These joint environmental pressures raise the need for additional costly conservation measures. It is natural to consider the potential for expanding the 'user pays' principle, already implemented in the form of various user fees. This study explores the potential for price discrimination among scuba divers at Sipadan in Malaysia. The study applies a choice experiment to estimate scuba divers willingness to pay higher user fees for avoiding decreases of or getting improvements in environmental and recreational aspects of the diving experience. We investigate how sensitivity to fee size and hence willingness to pay vary with suitable selected characteristics of divers. We find potentials for a third degree price discrimination strategy exploiting higher willingness to pay among foreign divers (45%), male divers (16%) and people who has visited Sipadan several times (25%). Thus, revised pricing structures could significantly increase funds for the preservation of Sipadan. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Diving dentistry: a review of the dental implications of scuba diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadik, Y; Drucker, S

    2011-09-01

    In light of the overwhelming popularity of self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (SCUBA) diving, general dental practitioners should be prepared to address complications arising as a result of diving and to provide patients with accurate information. The aim of this article was to introduce the concepts of diving medicine and dentistry to the dentist, and to supply the dental practitioner with some diagnostic tools as well as treatment guidelines. The literature was reviewed to address diving barotrauma (pressure-induced injury related to an air space) to the head, face and oral regions, as well as scuba mouthpiece-related oral conditions. The relevant conditions for dentists who treat divers include diving-associated headache (migraine, tension-type headache), barosinusitis and barotitis-media (sinus and middle ear barotrauma, respectively), neuropathy, trigeminal (CN V) or facial (CN VII) nerve baroparesis (pressure-induced palsy), dental barotrauma (barometric-related tooth injury), barodontalgia (barometric-related dental pain), mouthpiece-associated herpes infection, pharyngeal gag reflex and temporomandibular joint disorder (dysfunction). For each condition, a theoretical description is followed by practical recommendations for the dental practitioner for the prevention and management of the condition. © 2011 Australian Dental Association.

  5. The SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey: demographics of the 450-μm population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roseboom, I. G.; Dunlop, J. S.; Cirasuolo, M.; Geach, J. E.; Smail, I.; Halpern, M.; van der Werf, P.; Almaini, O.; Arumugam, V.; Asboth, V.; Auld, R.; Blain, A.; Bremer, M. N.; Bock, J.; Bowler, R. A. A.; Buitrago, F.; Chapin, E.; Chapman, S.; Chrysostomou, A.; Clarke, C.; Conley, A.; Coppin, K. E. K.; Danielson, A. L. R.; Farrah, D.; Glenn, J.; Hatziminaoglou, E.; Ibar, E.; Ivison, R. J.; Jenness, T.; van Kampen, E.; Karim, A.; Mackenzie, T.; Marsden, G.; Meijerink, R.; Michałowski, M. J.; Oliver, S. J.; Page, M. J.; Pearson, E.; Scott, Douglas; Simpson, J. M.; Smith, D. J. B.; Spaans, M.; Swinbank, A. M.; Symeonidis, M.; Targett, T.; Valiante, E.; Viero, M.; Wang, L.; Willott, C. J.; Zemcov, M.

    2013-11-01

    We investigate the multiwavelength properties of a sample of 450-μm-selected sources from the SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey. A total of 69 sources were identified above 4σ in deep SCUBA-2 450-μm observations overlapping the UDS and COSMOS fields and covering 210 arcmin2 to a typical depth of σ450 = 1.5 mJy. Reliable cross-identifications are found for 58 sources (84 per cent) in Spitzer and Hubble Space Telescope WFC3/IR data. The photometric redshift distribution (dN/dz) of 450-μm-selected sources is presented, showing a broad peak in the redshift range 1 = 1012 ± 0.8 L⊙, = 42 ± 11 K and = 1.6 ± 0.5, respectively. The relationship between these SED parameters and the physical properties of galaxies is investigated, revealing correlations between TD and LIR and between βD and both stellar mass and effective radius. The connection between the star formation rate (SFR) and stellar mass is explored, with 24 per cent of 450-μm sources found to be `starbursts', i.e. displaying anomalously high specific SFRs. However, both the number density and observed properties of these `starburst' galaxies are found to be consistent with the population of normal star-forming galaxies.

  6. JCMT Telescope structure modifications and facility upgrades for SCUBA-2 instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chylek, Tomas; Craig, Simon C.; Chuter, Timothy C.; Lewsley, Harry J.; Hileman, Edward A.

    2006-06-01

    The James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) on the summit of Mauna Kea is currently undergoing significant structural upgrade in order to accommodate the new generation instrument SCUBA-2 (Submillimeter Common-User Bolometric Array) which is being developed by the United Kingdom Astronomy Technology Centre (UK ATC). This four tonne instrument will be located at the Nasmyth focus of the telescope and will require five large auxiliary external warm mirrors to be installed on the telescope structure and in the receiver cabin along with dedicated automatically deployable tertiary mirror. The carousel of the observatory building as well as the original telescope structure was not designed for an instrument of this mass and complexity. The whole left Nasmyth platform of the telescope has to be removed and rebuilt in order to accommodate the instrument, its support structure and the warm optics. The floor of the observatory has to be reinforced and fitted with rail system and a scissor lift in order to handle the installation of the instrument on the telescope and removal from the telescope for maintenance. Details are given of particular challenges associated with handling, mechanical interfacing, optical alignment, design of the external warm mirrors mounts and the tertiary mirror deployment mechanism for SCUBA-2.

  7. The SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey: ALMA Resolves the Bright-end of the Sub-millimeter Number Counts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simpson, J. M.; Smail, Ian; Swinbank, A. M.; Chapman, S. C.; Geach, J. E.; Ivison, R. J.; Thomson, A. P.; Aretxaga, I.; Blain, A. W.; Cowley, W. I.; Chen, Chian-Chou; Coppin, K. E. K.; Dunlop, J. S.; Edge, A. C.; Farrah, D.; Ibar, E.; Karim, A.; Knudsen, K. K.; Meijerink, R.; Michałowski, M. J.; Scott, D.; Spaans, M.; van der Werf, P. P.

    We present high-resolution 870 μm Atacama Large Millimeter/sub-millimeter Array (ALMA) continuum maps of 30 bright sub-millimeter sources in the UKIDSS UDS field. These sources are selected from deep, 1 degree2 850 μm maps from the SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey, and are representative of the

  8. The SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey: Multi-wavelength Properties of ALMA-identified Submillimeter Galaxies in UKIDSS UDS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simpson, J. M.; Smail, Ian; Swinbank, A. M.; Ivison, R. J.; Dunlop, J. S.; Geach, J. E.; Almaini, O.; Arumugam, V.; Bremer, M. N.; Chen, Chian-Chou; Conselice, C.; Coppin, K. E. K.; Farrah, D.; Ibar, E.; Hartley, W. G.; Ma, C. J.; Michałowski, M. J.; Scott, D.; Spaans, M.; Thomson, A. P.; van der Werf, P. P.

    2017-01-01

    We present a multi-wavelength analysis of 52 submillimeter galaxies (SMGs), identified using ALMA 870 μm continuum imaging in a pilot program to precisely locate bright SCUBA-2-selected submillimeter sources in the UKIDSS Ultra Deep Survey (UDS) field. Using the available deep (especially

  9. Scuba diving & underwater cultural resources: differences in environmental beliefs, ascriptions of responsibility, and management preferences based on level of development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon L. Todd; Tiffany Cooper; Alan R. Graefe

    2001-01-01

    This study examined SCUBA divers' level of development in relationship to environmental beliefs, ascriptions of responsibility, and management preferences concerning the use and management of New York's Great Lakes' underwater cultural resources. More than 850 New York State divers were surveyed during the fall of 1999, ranging from novices to experts...

  10. Sensation Seeking: A Potential Factor Influencing Perceived Risk and Perceived Competence in an Introductory Scuba Diving Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Cass

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between the sensation-seeking personality trait to changes in perceived risk and perceived competence during an adventure experience. Participants (n = 57) were enrolled in a 14-week introductory scuba diving course offered at a university in eastern North Carolina in 2006. The data was analyzed using a…

  11. The Hawaii SCUBA-2 Lensing Cluster Survey: Are Low-luminosity Submillimeter Galaxies Detected in the Rest-frame UV?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Li-Yen; Cowie, Lennox L.; Barger, Amy J.; Wang, Wei-Hao

    2017-12-01

    In this third paper of the Hawaii SCUBA-2 Lensing Cluster Survey series, we present Submillimeter Array (SMA) detections of six intrinsically faint 850 μm sources detected in SCUBA-2 images of the lensing cluster fields, A1689, A2390, A370, MACS J0717.5+3745, and MACS J1423.8+2404. Two of the SCUBA-2 sources split into doublets, yielding a total of eight SMA detections. The intrinsic 870 μm flux densities of these submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) are ∼1 mJy. Five of the eight SMGs are not detected in optical or near-infrared (NIR) images. The NIR-to-submillimeter flux ratios of these faint SMGs suggest that most of them are extremely dusty and/or are at very high redshifts. By combining these SMGs and several other samples from the literature, we find a bimodal distribution for the faint sources in the space of submillimeter flux versus NIR-to-submillimeter flux ratio. While most of the SMA-detected lensed sources are very obscured, the other SMGs with similar flux densities are mostly bright in the NIR. Future Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array observations of a large sample of SCUBA-2 sources in cluster fields will allow us to decide whether or not the bimodality we observe here really exists.

  12. EOWD-Eco Open Water Diver- New Divers License needed? Effect of Intensive SCUBA Diving on Fringing Reefs of the Northern Red Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasler-Sheetal, Harald

    2006-01-01

    Intensive recreational SCUBA diving threatens coral reef diversity and health [1]. Two anthropogenic factors contributing to coral reef decline are sedimentation [4] and damage from snorklers and SCUBA divers [1]. Physical contact of divers (fins, hands, equipment) and increased sedimentation...... are two major effects diredtly caused by SCUBA diving. Diver damage varies depending on the growth form of corals present. Branching corals appear to sustain most of the breaks although they are most affected [5]. As coral reef tourism continues to grow, the need to quantify, manage and mitigate...

  13. Helping Mothers Survive Bleeding After Birth: retention of knowledge, skills, and confidence nine months after obstetric simulation-based training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nelissen, E.J.T.; Ersdal, H.; Mduma, E.; Evjen-Olsen, B.; Broerse, J.E.W.; van Roosmalen, J.; Stekelenburg, J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: It is important to know the decay of knowledge, skills, and confidence over time to provide evidence-based guidance on timing of follow-up training. Studies addressing retention of simulation-based education reveal mixed results. The aim of this study was to measure the level of

  14. Helping Mothers Survive Bleeding After Birth : retention of knowledge, skills, and confidence nine months after obstetric simulation-based training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nelissen, Ellen; Ersdal, Hege; Mduma, Estomih; Evjen-Olsen, Bjorg; Broerse, Jacqueline; van Roosmalen, Jos; Stekelenburg, Jelle

    2015-01-01

    Background: It is important to know the decay of knowledge, skills, and confidence over time to provide evidence-based guidance on timing of follow-up training. Studies addressing retention of simulation-based education reveal mixed results. The aim of this study was to measure the level of

  15. Design and Validation of a Breathing Detection System for Scuba Divers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corentin Altepe

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Drowning is the major cause of death in self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (SCUBA diving. This study proposes an embedded system with a live and light-weight algorithm which detects the breathing of divers through the analysis of the intermediate pressure (IP signal of the SCUBA regulator. A system composed mainly of two pressure sensors and a low-power microcontroller was designed and programmed to record the pressure sensors signals and provide alarms in absence of breathing. An algorithm was developed to analyze the signals and identify inhalation events of the diver. A waterproof case was built to accommodate the system and was tested up to a depth of 25 m in a pressure chamber. To validate the system in the real environment, a series of dives with two different types of workload requiring different ranges of breathing frequencies were planned. Eight professional SCUBA divers volunteered to dive with the system to collect their IP data in order to participate to validation trials. The subjects underwent two dives, each of 52 min on average and a maximum depth of 7 m. The algorithm was optimized for the collected dataset and proved a sensitivity of inhalation detection of 97.5% and a total number of 275 false positives (FP over a total recording time of 13.9 h. The detection algorithm presents a maximum delay of 5.2 s and requires only 800 bytes of random-access memory (RAM. The results were compared against the analysis of video records of the dives by two blinded observers and proved a sensitivity of 97.6% on the data set. The design includes a buzzer to provide audible alarms to accompanying dive buddies which will be triggered in case of degraded health conditions such as near drowning (absence of breathing, hyperventilation (breathing frequency too high and skip-breathing (breathing frequency too low measured by the improper breathing frequency. The system also measures the IP at rest before the dive and indicates with

  16. Design and Validation of a Breathing Detection System for Scuba Divers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altepe, Corentin; Egi, S Murat; Ozyigit, Tamer; Sinoplu, D Ruzgar; Marroni, Alessandro; Pierleoni, Paola

    2017-06-09

    Drowning is the major cause of death in self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (SCUBA) diving. This study proposes an embedded system with a live and light-weight algorithm which detects the breathing of divers through the analysis of the intermediate pressure (IP) signal of the SCUBA regulator. A system composed mainly of two pressure sensors and a low-power microcontroller was designed and programmed to record the pressure sensors signals and provide alarms in absence of breathing. An algorithm was developed to analyze the signals and identify inhalation events of the diver. A waterproof case was built to accommodate the system and was tested up to a depth of 25 m in a pressure chamber. To validate the system in the real environment, a series of dives with two different types of workload requiring different ranges of breathing frequencies were planned. Eight professional SCUBA divers volunteered to dive with the system to collect their IP data in order to participate to validation trials. The subjects underwent two dives, each of 52 min on average and a maximum depth of 7 m. The algorithm was optimized for the collected dataset and proved a sensitivity of inhalation detection of 97.5% and a total number of 275 false positives (FP) over a total recording time of 13.9 h. The detection algorithm presents a maximum delay of 5.2 s and requires only 800 bytes of random-access memory (RAM). The results were compared against the analysis of video records of the dives by two blinded observers and proved a sensitivity of 97.6% on the data set. The design includes a buzzer to provide audible alarms to accompanying dive buddies which will be triggered in case of degraded health conditions such as near drowning (absence of breathing), hyperventilation (breathing frequency too high) and skip-breathing (breathing frequency too low) measured by the improper breathing frequency. The system also measures the IP at rest before the dive and indicates with flashing light

  17. Enhancing Human Resources and Use of Appropriate Training for Maternal and Perinatal Survival in SubSaharan Africa (ETATMBA)

    OpenAIRE

    Ellard, DR; DAVIES, D; F. Griffiths; Kandala, NB; Mazuguni, F.; Shemdoe, A.; Chimwaza, W; Chiwandira, C; Mbaruku, G.; Bergström, S; Kamwendo, F; Mhango, C.; Peile, E; Quenby, S.; Simkiss, D

    2014-01-01

    There is a chronic shortage of medical doctors in many Sub-Saharan African countries and indeed many of these countries have very little to spend on healthcare. As a consequence levels of maternal and neonatal mortality still very high and many are struggling to meet the WHO Millennium development goals. Many African countries like Malawi have a cadre of health workers called Non Physician Clinicians (NPCs) who are trained by the Ministry of Health and are often the most experienced health wo...

  18. Scuba diving, acute left anterior descending artery occlusion and normal ECG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doll, Sébastien Xavier; Rigamonti, Fabio; Roffi, Marco; Noble, Stéphane

    2013-01-01

    We report the case of an acute proximal occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary (LAD) artery following a scuba diving decompression accident and associated with normal ECG. Following uneventful thromboaspiration and coronary stenting, the patient was discharged on day  4 with secondary preventative therapies. A transthoracic echocardiography performed at this point showed a complete recovery compared with an initial localised akinesia involving the anterior and apical portion of the left ventricle upon admission. This case highlights that significant acute coronary lesions involving the LAD can occur without any ECG anomaly. The presence of acute and persistent angina associated with troponin elevation should prompt physicians to consider coronary angiography without delay, independently of the ECG results. PMID:23376677

  19. A Review of SCUBA Diving Impacts and Implication for Coral Reefs Conservation and Tourism Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainal Abidin Siti Zulaiha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dive tourism has become important in term of magnitude and significantly contributes to regional economies. Nevertheless, in the absence of proper controls and enforcement, unplanned tourism growth has caused environmental degradation which undermines the long-term sustainability of the tourism industry. The purpose of this paper is to explore factors that contribute to the SCUBA diving impacts on coral and fish communities. This paper explains the causes of a certain event, validating the problem of impacts, defining the core issues and identifies possible causes leading to an effect. The phenomenon of diving impacts on coral reefs is a result of intensive use of dive site over the long-term. The divers can reduce their impacts towards coral reefs through responsible diving behaviors. The causes of cumulative diver’s contacts are more complicated than it seems. In response, this paper proposes the best mitigation strategies that need to be considered for future dive tourism management.

  20. SCUBA divers as oceanographic samplers: The potential of dive computers to augment aquatic temperature monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Serena; Hull, Tom; Sivyer, David B.; Pearce, David; Pinnegar, John K.; Sayer, Martin D. J.; Mogg, Andrew O. M.; Azzopardi, Elaine; Gontarek, Steve; Hyder, Kieran

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring temperature of aquatic waters is of great importance, with modelled, satellite and in-situ data providing invaluable insights into long-term environmental change. However, there is often a lack of depth-resolved temperature measurements. Recreational dive computers routinely record temperature and depth, so could provide an alternate and highly novel source of oceanographic information to fill this data gap. In this study, a citizen science approach was used to obtain over 7,000 scuba diver temperature profiles. The accuracy, offset and lag of temperature records was assessed by comparing dive computers with scientific conductivity-temperature-depth instruments and existing surface temperature data. Our results show that, with processing, dive computers can provide a useful and novel tool with which to augment existing monitoring systems all over the globe, but especially in under-sampled or highly changeable coastal environments. PMID:27445104

  1. Creativity in the Research Process. Accompanying Aristotle on a scuba diving excursion in the Red Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Åke Nilsén

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigates creativity as an attitude on demand from the researcher in a special situation in the research process. The situation occurs when the collected data does not coinside with the antecipated result. Hans Joas understanding of creative action is abolished for the adaptation of the Aristotelian concept of practical wisdom (phronesis as the foundation for the attitude. The data has to be analysed with the unique and particular in focus in order for new connections and relations to be revealed. An attitude concentrated on revealing the particular in the data is necessary. From there a new attitude takes over that focuses the general on behalf of the particular. The research process is exposed in a parallell text on Scuba diving.

  2. Recreational SCUBA divers' willingness to pay for marine biodiversity in Barbados.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuhmann, Peter W; Casey, James F; Horrocks, Julia A; Oxenford, Hazel A

    2013-05-30

    The use of natural resources and the services they provide often do not have an explicit price and are therefore undervalued in decision-making, leading to environmental degradation. To 'monetize' the benefits from these services requires the use of non-market valuation techniques. Using a stated preference survey of recreational divers in Barbados conducted between 2007 and 2009, the economic value of marine biodiversity to recreational SCUBA divers in Barbados was estimated. In addition to a variety of demographic variables, divers were asked about their level of experience, expenditures related to travel and diving, and encounters with fish and sea turtles. Divers then completed a choice experiment, selecting between alternative dives with varying characteristics including price, crowding, fish diversity, encounters with sea turtles, and coral cover. Results indicate that divers in Barbados have a clear appreciation of reef quality variables. Willingness to pay for good coral cover, fish diversity and presence of sea turtles is significantly higher than prices paid for dives. In general, divers valued reef attributes similarly, although their appreciation of low density of divers at a site and high coral cover varied with prior diving experience. The results of this study demonstrate the economic value generated in Barbados by the recreational SCUBA diving industry and highlight the potential for substantial additional economic contributions with improvements to the quality of a variety of reef attributes. These results could inform management decisions regarding reef use and sea turtle conservation, and could aid in the development of informed 'win-win' policies aimed at maximizing returns from diving while reducing negative impacts often associated with tourism activities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Scuba diving injuries among Divers Alert Network members 2010-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranapurwala, Shabbar I; Bird, Nicholas; Vaithiyanathan, Pachabi; Denoble, Petar J

    2014-06-01

    Scuba diving injuries vary greatly in severity and prognosis. While decompression sickness (DCS) and arterial gas embolism can be tracked easily, other forms of diving injury remain unaccounted for. The purpose of this paper is to assess rates of overall self-reported scuba-diving-related injuries, self-reported DCS-like symptoms, and treated DCS and their association with diver certification level, diving experience and demographic factors. We analyzed self-reported data from a Divers Alert Network membership health survey conducted during the summer of 2011. Poisson regression models with scaled deviance were used to model the relative rates of reported injuries. Models were adjusted for sex, age, body mass index (BMI) and average annual dives, based on the bias-variance tradeoff. The overall rate of diving-related injury was 3.02 per 100 dives, self-reported DCS symptoms was 1.55 per 1,000 dives and treated DCS was 5.72 per 100,000 dives. Diving-related injury and self-reported DCS symptom rates decreased for higher diver certification levels, increasing age, increasing number of average annual dives and for men; they increased for increasing BMI. Diving injury rates may be higher than previously thought, indicating a greater burden on the diving community. Self-reported DCS-like symptoms are a small fraction of all dive-related injuries and those receiving treatment for DCS are an even smaller fraction. The small number of divers seeking treatment may suggest the mild nature and a tendency towards natural resolution for most injuries.

  4. SCUBA and HIRES Results for Protostellar Cores in the MON OB1 Dark Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf-Chase, G.; Moriarty-Schieven, G.; Fich, M.; Barsony, M.

    1999-05-01

    We have used HIRES-processing of IRAS data and point-source modelling techniques (Hurt & Barsony 1996; O'Linger 1997; Barsony et al. 1998), together with submillimeter continuum imaging using the Submillimeter Common-User Bolometer Array (SCUBA) on the 15-meter James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT), to search CS cores in the Mon OB1 dark cloud (Wolf-Chase, Walker, & Lada 1995; Wolf-Chase & Walker 1995) for deeply embedded sources. These observations, as well as follow-up millimeter photometry at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) 12-meter telescope on Kitt Peak, have lead to the identification of two Class 0 protostellar candidates, which were previously unresolved from two brighter IRAS point sources (IRAS 06382+0939 & IRAS 06381+1039) in this cloud. Until now, only one Class 0 object had been confirmed in Mon OB1; the driving source of the highly-collimated outflow NGC 2264 G (Ward-Thompson, Eiroa, & Casali 1995; Margulis et al. 1990; Lada & Fich 1996), which lies well outside the extended CS cores. One of the new Class 0 candidates may be an intermediate-mass source associated with an H_2O maser, and the other object is a low-mass source which may be associated with a near-infrared jet, and possibly with a molecular outflow. We report accurate positions for the new Class 0 candidates, based on the SCUBA images, and present new SEDs for these sources, as well as for the brighter IRAS point sources. A portion of this work was performed while GWC held a President's Fellowship from the University of California. MB and GWC gratefully acknowledge financial support from MB's NSF CAREER Grant, AST97-9753229.

  5. A SCUBA imaging survey of ultracompact HII regions. The environments of massive star formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, M. A.; Hatchell, J.; Walsh, A. J.; MacDonald, G. H.; Millar, T. J.

    2006-07-01

    We present a SCUBA submillimetre (450 and 850 μm) survey of the environment of 105 IRAS point sources, selected from the Wood & Churchwell (1989a) and Kurtz et al. (1994) radio ultracompact (UC) Hii region surveys. We detected a total of 155 sub-mm clumps associated with the IRAS point sources and identified three distinct types of object: ultracompact cm-wave sources that are not associated with any sub-mm emission (sub-mm quiet objects), sub-mm clumps that are associated with ultracompact cm-wave sources (radio-loud clumps); and sub-mm clumps that are not associated with any known ultracompact cm-wave sources (radio-quiet clumps). 90% of the sample of IRAS point sources were found to be associated with strong sub-mm emission. We consider the sub-mm colours, morphologies and distance-scaled fluxes of the sample of sub-mm clumps and show that the sub-mm quiet objects are unlikely to represent embedded UC Hii regions unless they are located at large heliocentric distances. Many of the 2.5 arcmin SCUBA fields contain more than one sub-mm clump, with an average number of companions (the companion clump fraction) of 0.90. The clumps are more strongly clustered than other candidate HMPOs and the mean clump surface density exhibits a broken power-law distribution with a break at 3 pc. We demonstrate that the sub-mm and cm-wave fluxes of the majority of radio-loud clumps are in excellent agreement with the standard model of ultracompact Hii regions. We speculate on the nature of the radio-quiet sub-mm clumps and, whilst we do not yet have sufficient data to conclude that they are in a pre-UC Hii region phase, we argue that their characteristics are suggestive of such a stage.

  6. The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: first results from SCUBA-2 observations of the Cepheus Flare region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattle, K.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Kirk, J. M.; Di Francesco, J.; Kirk, H.; Mottram, J. C.; Keown, J.; Buckle, J.; Beaulieu, S. F.; Berry, D. S.; Broekhoven-Fiene, H.; Currie, M. J.; Fich, M.; Hatchell, J.; Jenness, T.; Johnstone, D.; Nutter, D.; Pineda, J. E.; Quinn, C.; Salji, C.; Tisi, S.; Walker-Smith, S.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Bastien, P.; Bresnahan, D.; Butner, H.; Chen, M.; Chrysostomou, A.; Coudé, S.; Davis, C. J.; Drabek-Maunder, E.; Duarte-Cabral, A.; Fiege, J.; Friberg, P.; Friesen, R.; Fuller, G. A.; Graves, S.; Greaves, J.; Gregson, J.; Holland, W.; Joncas, G.; Knee, L. B. G.; Mairs, S.; Marsh, K.; Matthews, B. C.; Moriarty-Schieven, G.; Mowat, C.; Rawlings, J.; Richer, J.; Robertson, D.; Rosolowsky, E.; Rumble, D.; Sadavoy, S.; Thomas, H.; Tothill, N.; Viti, S.; White, G. J.; Wouterloot, J.; Yates, J.; Zhu, M.

    2017-02-01

    We present observations of the Cepheus Flare obtained as part of the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) Gould Belt Legacy Survey (GBLS) with the SCUBA-2 instrument. We produce a catalogue of sources found by SCUBA-2, and separate these into starless cores and protostars. We determine masses and densities for each of our sources, using source temperatures determined by the Herschel Gould Belt Survey. We compare the properties of starless cores in four different molecular clouds: L1147/58, L1172/74, L1251 and L1228. We find that the core mass functions for each region typically show shallower-than-Salpeter behaviour. We find that L1147/58 and L1228 have a high ratio of starless cores to Class II protostars, while L1251 and L1174 have a low ratio, consistent with the latter regions being more active sites of current star formation, while the former are forming stars less actively. We determine that if modelled as thermally supported Bonnor-Ebert spheres, most of our cores have stable configurations accessible to them. We estimate the external pressures on our cores using archival 13CO velocity dispersion measurements and find that our cores are typically pressure confined, rather than gravitationally bound. We perform a virial analysis on our cores, and find that they typically cannot be supported against collapse by internal thermal energy alone, due primarily to the measured external pressures. This suggests that the dominant mode of internal support in starless cores in the Cepheus Flare is either non-thermal motions or internal magnetic fields.

  7. The SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey: 850 μm maps, catalogues and number counts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geach, J. E.; Dunlop, J. S.; Halpern, M.; Smail, Ian; van der Werf, P.; Alexander, D. M.; Almaini, O.; Aretxaga, I.; Arumugam, V.; Asboth, V.; Banerji, M.; Beanlands, J.; Best, P. N.; Blain, A. W.; Birkinshaw, M.; Chapin, E. L.; Chapman, S. C.; Chen, C.-C.; Chrysostomou, A.; Clarke, C.; Clements, D. L.; Conselice, C.; Coppin, K. E. K.; Cowley, W. I.; Danielson, A. L. R.; Eales, S.; Edge, A. C.; Farrah, D.; Gibb, A.; Harrison, C. M.; Hine, N. K.; Hughes, D.; Ivison, R. J.; Jarvis, M.; Jenness, T.; Jones, S. F.; Karim, A.; Koprowski, M.; Knudsen, K. K.; Lacey, C. G.; Mackenzie, T.; Marsden, G.; McAlpine, K.; McMahon, R.; Meijerink, R.; Michałowski, M. J.; Oliver, S. J.; Page, M. J.; Peacock, J. A.; Rigopoulou, D.; Robson, E. I.; Roseboom, I.; Rotermund, K.; Scott, Douglas; Serjeant, S.; Simpson, C.; Simpson, J. M.; Smith, D. J. B.; Spaans, M.; Stanley, F.; Stevens, J. A.; Swinbank, A. M.; Targett, T.; Thomson, A. P.; Valiante, E.; Wake, D. A.; Webb, T. M. A.; Willott, C.; Zavala, J. A.; Zemcov, M.

    2017-02-01

    We present a catalogue of ˜3000 submillimetre sources detected (≥3.5σ) at 850 μm over ˜5 deg2 surveyed as part of the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey (S2CLS). This is the largest survey of its kind at 850 μm, increasing the sample size of 850 μm selected submillimetre galaxies by an order of magnitude. The wide 850 μm survey component of S2CLS covers the extragalactic fields: UKIDSS-UDS, COSMOS, Akari-NEP, Extended Groth Strip, Lockman Hole North, SSA22 and GOODS-North. The average 1σ depth of S2CLS is 1.2 mJy beam-1, approaching the SCUBA-2 850 μm confusion limit, which we determine to be σc ≈ 0.8 mJy beam-1. We measure the 850 μm number counts, reducing the Poisson errors on the differential counts to approximately 4 per cent at S850 ≈ 3 mJy. With several independent fields, we investigate field-to-field variance, finding that the number counts on 0.5°-1° scales are generally within 50 per cent of the S2CLS mean for S850 > 3 mJy, with scatter consistent with the Poisson and estimated cosmic variance uncertainties, although there is a marginal (2σ) density enhancement in GOODS-North. The observed counts are in reasonable agreement with recent phenomenological and semi-analytic models, although determining the shape of the faint-end slope (S850 10 mJy there are approximately 10 sources per square degree, and we detect the distinctive up-turn in the number counts indicative of the detection of local sources of 850 μm emission, and strongly lensed high-redshift galaxies. All calibrated maps and the catalogue are made publicly available.

  8. Imaging the environment of a z = 6.3 submillimeter galaxy with SCUBA-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robson, E. I.; Holland, W. S. [United Kingdom Astronomy Technology Centre, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Ivison, R. J. [European Space Observatory, Karl Schwarzschild Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Smail, Ian [Institute for Computational Cosmology, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Geach, J. E. [Centre for Astrophysics Research, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Gibb, A. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Riechers, D. [Astronomy Department, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Ade, P. A. R. [Astronomy and Instrumentation Group, Cardiff University, Cardiff, Wales CF10 3XQ (United Kingdom); Bintley, D. [Joint Astronomy Centre, 660 North Ahoku Place, University Park, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Bock, J. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Chapin, E. L. [XMM-Newton Science Operations Centre, European Space Astronomy Centre, Apartado 79, E-28691 Villaneueva de la Canada, Madrid (Spain); Chapman, S. C. [Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University, Coburg Road, Halifax B3H 1A6 (Canada); Clements, D. L. [Astrophysics Group, Imperial College London, Blackett Laboratory, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Conley, A. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, 389 UCB, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Cooray, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Dunlop, J. S. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Farrah, D., E-mail: rob.ivison@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); and others

    2014-09-20

    We describe a search for submillimeter emission in the vicinity of one of the most distant, luminous galaxies known, HerMES FLS3, at z = 6.34, exploiting it as a signpost to a potentially biased region of the early universe, as might be expected in hierarchical structure formation models. Imaging to the confusion limit with the innovative, wide-field submillimeter bolometer camera, SCUBA-2, we are sensitive to colder and/or less luminous galaxies in the surroundings of HFLS3. We use the Millennium Simulation to illustrate that HFLS3 may be expected to have companions if it is as massive as claimed, but find no significant evidence from the surface density of SCUBA-2 galaxies in its vicinity, or their colors, that HFLS3 marks an overdensity of dusty, star-forming galaxies. We cannot rule out the presence of dusty neighbors with confidence, but deeper 450 μm imaging has the potential to more tightly constrain the redshifts of nearby galaxies, at least one of which likely lies at z ≳ 5. If associations with HFLS3 can be ruled out, this could be taken as evidence that HFLS3 is less biased than a simple extrapolation of the Millennium Simulation may imply. This could suggest either that it represents a rare short-lived, but highly luminous, phase in the evolution of an otherwise typical galaxy, or that this system has suffered amplification due to a foreground gravitational lens and so is not as intrinsically luminous as claimed.

  9. The Synergy between Scuba Diving and Household Behaviour: Testing Plastic and Food Waste "The use of natural habitats for tourism education"

    OpenAIRE

    Soares Mota, Luís Cândido

    2014-01-01

    The activity of scuba diving is used for studying behaviours of U.S. visitors to a popular tourist destination in Mexico. The impact created by human activity can produce marine debris and therefore affect the marine environment. The subpopulation of 181 divers was tested for their current household practices regarding discarding plastic and food waste, providing quantitative statistics for divers’ referential behaviour. Prior to partaking in scuba diving, certified, trainee, and “one-day-exp...

  10. Comparative analysis of free and scuba diving for benthopelagic and cryptic fish species associated with rocky reefs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Gutterres Giordano

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed to assess, through experimental comparisons between free and scuba diving performed in Arraial do Cabo city, RJ, Brazil, the abundances of Scartella cristata e Chaetodon striatus -two reef fish species of contrasting behaviors- in different depth layers of sheltered and exposed rocky reefs. C. striatus was homogeneously distributed through all the depth strata (0-10 m and scuba diving should be preferred over free diving to assess the abundance of this species at exposed rocky shores, undergoing continuous effects of waves and winds. Both free and scuba diving can be used indistinctly and with no data biases to appraise the abundances of C. striatus in non-turbulent reefs or in shallow zones (i.e., ≤ 5 m of exposed reefs, and, for S. cristata, in all depth layers (i.e., up to 10 m of both sheltered and exposed reefs. Although the abundances of S. cristata did not significantly differ between free and scuba diving, contrasting with most previous studies that stressed the risk of the first method to underestimate the abundance of small and cryptic species, it should be considered that the previous experience of the diver and the nature of our study (i.e., focused specifically on a cryptic species may have contributed to our findings. Further studies are, however, necessary to test our findings in different conditions (i.e., depths, hydrodynamic characteristics, and habitat complexity and for other tropical reef fish species, in order to increase the truthfulness of underwater visual census and reduce the risk of failure of fish conservation and management programs potentially based on biased data.

  11. The Hawaii SCUBA-2 Lensing Cluster Survey: Radio-detected Submillimeter Galaxies in the HST Frontier Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Li-Yen; Desai, Vandana; Murphy, Eric J.; Cowie, Lennox L.; Heywood, Ian; Momjian, Emmanuel; Barger, Amy J.; Smail, Ian

    2017-05-01

    In this second paper of the Hawaii SCUBA-2 Lensing Cluster Survey series, we cross-match SCUBA-2 maps with 3 and 6 GHz images from the Janksy-VLA Frontier Fields Legacy Survey for three cluster fields, MACS J0416.1-2403, MACS J0717.5+3745, and MACS J1149.5+2223. Within the HST coverage, 14 out of 44 850 μm sources have 3 GHz counterparts, five of which are also detected at 6 GHz. The 850 μm flux densities of these detected sources span from 0.7 to 4.4 mJy after correcting for lensing amplification. The median redshift of the sample is z={1.28}-0.09+0.07, much lower than the typical redshifts (z = 2-3) of brighter submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) in the literature. In addition, we find that our sources have lower dust temperatures than those of the brighter SMGs. This is also confirmed by an analysis of the ratio between infrared star-formation rate and 850 μm flux density. However, these 14 sources may not represent the general submillimeter population at the same flux range, given that the SCUBA-2 sources without radio counterparts are likely at higher redshifts. Detection of these sources would require deeper radio images or submillimeter interferometry.

  12. Epilepsy, scuba diving and risk assessment. Near misses and the need for ongoing vigilance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, David; Lippmann, John

    2013-03-01

    There is ongoing debate about the safety of scuba diving for individuals with a history of epilepsy. An in-water seizure is highly likely to be fatal. Recommendations for fitness to dive vary with some regarding epilepsy as an absolute contraindication to diving (South Pacific Underwater Medicine Society) and others permitting diving under strict criteria (United Kingdom Sport Diving Medical Committee) with diving to be postponed for a period of three to five years without seizures. Long-term follow up of people with epilepsy shows that at least one-third will have a recurrence and that the risk remains elevated for many years. We present three cases where individuals with a history of epilepsy (or likely epilepsy) almost fell through the cracks of health risk assessment, two with near-fatal consequences. These cases inform the on-going debate about fitness to dive for those with current or past epilepsy, and highlight the importance of education for doctors, dive professionals and divers about the risks associated with epilepsy and diving.

  13. Flying after diving: in-flight echocardiography after a scuba diving week.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cialoni, Danilo; Pieri, Massimo; Balestra, Costantino; Marroni, Alessandro

    2014-10-01

    Flying after diving may increase decompression sickness risk (DCS), but strong evidence indicating minimum preflight surface intervals (PFSI) is missing. On return flights after a diving week on a live-aboard, 32 divers were examined by in-flight echocardiography with the following protocol: 1) outgoing flight, no previous dive; 2) during the diving week; 3) before the return flight after a 24-h PFSI; and 4) during the return flight. All divers completed similar multiple repetitive dives during the diving week. All dives were equivalent as to inert gas load and gradient factor upon surfacing. No bubbles in the right heart were found in any diver during the outgoing flight or at the preflight control after a 24-h PFSI following the diving week. A significant increase in the number and grade of bubbles was observed during the return flight. However, bubbles were only observed in 6 of the 32 divers. These six divers were the same ones who developed bubbles after every dive. Having observed a 24-h preflight interval, the majority of divers did not develop bubbles during altitude exposure; however, it is intriguing to note that the same subjects who developed significant amounts of bubbles after every dive showed equally significant bubble grades during in-flight echocardiography notwithstanding a correct PFSI. This indicates a possible higher susceptibility to bubble formation in certain individuals, who may need longer PFSI before altitude exposure after scuba diving.

  14. User fees across ecosystem boundaries: Are SCUBA divers willing to pay for terrestrial biodiversity conservation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Michaela; Hanley, Nick; Cresswell, Will

    2017-09-15

    While ecological links between ecosystems have been long recognised, management rarely crosses ecosystem boundaries. Coral reefs are susceptible to damage through terrestrial run-off, and failing to account for this within management threatens reef protection. In order to quantify the extent to that coral reef users are willing to support management actions to improve ecosystem quality, we conducted a choice experiment with SCUBA divers on the island of Bonaire, Caribbean Netherlands. Specifically, we estimated their willingness to pay to reduce terrestrial overgrazing as a means to improve reef health. Willingness to pay was estimated using the multinomial, random parameter and latent class logit models. Willingness to pay for improvements to reef quality was positive for the majority of respondents. Estimates from the latent class model determined willingness to pay for reef improvements of between $31.17 - $413.18/year, dependent on class membership. This represents a significant source of funding for terrestrial conservation, and illustrates the potential for user fees to be applied across ecosystem boundaries. We argue that such across-ecosystem-boundary funding mechanisms are an important avenue for future investigation in many connected systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SCUBA-2 galaxies in 850um survey (Koprowski+, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koprowski, M. P.; Dunlop, J. S.; Michalowski, M. J.; Roseboom, I.; Geach, J. E.; Cirasuolo, M.; Aretxaga, I.; Bowler, R. A. A.; Banerji, M.; Bourne, N.; Coppin, K. E. K.; Chapman, S.; Hughes, D. H.; Jenness, T.; McLure, R. J.; Symeonidis, M.; van der Werf, P.

    2017-02-01

    We used the deep 850um and 450um S2CLS imaging of the central ~=150arcmin2 of the COSMOS/UltraVISTA field, coincident with the Spitzer SEDS (Ashby et al., 2013, Cat. J/ApJ/769/80) and HST CANDELS (Grogin et al., 2011ApJS..197...35G) imaging. The observations were taken with SCUBA-2 mounted on the JCMT between October 2011 and March 2013, reaching depths of σ850~=0.25mJy and σ450~=1.5mJy (Geach et al., 2013MNRAS.432...53G, Roseboom et al., 2013, Cat. J/MNRAS/436/430, Geach et al. 2016 in preparation). In order to enable effective 450um observations, only the very best/dryest conditions were used (i.e. {tau}225GHz<0.05), and to maximise depth the imaging was undertaken with a "daisy" mapping pattern (Bintley et al., 2014, SPIE, 9153, 3). (5 data files).

  16. The development of glossopharyngeal breathing and palatal myoclonus in a 29 year old after scuba diving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas AR

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Palatal myoclonus is a rare movement disorder characterized by brief, rhythmic involuntary movements of the soft palate. Palatal myoclonus is further subdivided into “essential palatal tremor” (EPT and “symptomatic palatal tremor” (SPT. EPT is characterized by involvement of the tensor veli palatini, myoclonus that might persist during sleep, as well as ear clicks, usually the patient’s presenting complaint. The MRI and neurological exam are normal in EPT. SPT is characterized by involvement of the levator veli palatini and myoclonus which consistently perseveres during sleep. The MRI shows olivary hypertrophy and clinical features may include ataxia, dysarthria and nystagmus, depending on the size of the lesion1. Glossopharyngeal breathing is a technique used by deep-sea divers to increase lung vital capacity, which is also useful in patients with ventilator dependence from poliomyelitis and Duchenne muscular dystrophy. To date there have been no reported cases of palatal myoclonus and glossopharyngeal breathing occurring simultaneously. We present the case of a 29 year-old female with palatal myoclonus and glossopharyngeal breathing after scuba-diving.

  17. Scuba diving induces nitric oxide synthesis and the expression of inflammatory and regulatory genes of the immune response in neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sureda, Antoni; Batle, Juan M; Capó, Xavier; Martorell, Miquel; Córdova, Alfredo; Tur, Josep A; Pons, Antoni

    2014-09-01

    Scuba diving, characterized by hyperoxia and hyperbaria, could increase reactive oxygen species production which acts as signaling molecules to induce adaptation against oxidative stress. The aim was to study the effects of scuba diving immersion on neutrophil inflammatory response, the induction of oxidative damage, and the NO synthesis. Nine male divers performed a dive at 50 m depth for a total time of 35 min. Blood samples were obtained at rest before the dive, after the dive, and 3 h after the diving session. Markers of oxidative and nitrosative damage, nitrite, and the gene expression of genes related with the synthesis of nitric oxide and lipid mediators, cytokine synthesis, and inflammation were determined in neutrophils. The mRNA levels of genes related with the inflammatory and immune response of neutrophils, except TNF-α, myeloperoxidase, and toll-like receptor (TLR) 2, significantly increased after the recovery period respect to predive and postdive levels. NF-κB, IL-6, and TLR4 gene expression reported significant differences immediately after diving respect to the predive values. Protein nitrotyrosine levels significantly rose after diving and remained high during recovery, whereas no significant differences were reported in malondialdehyde. Neutrophil nitrite levels as indicative of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) activity progressively increased after diving and recovery. The iNOS protein levels maintained the basal values in all situations. Scuba diving which combines hyperoxia, hyperbaria, and acute exercise induces nitrosative damage with increased nitrotyrosine levels and an inflammatory response in neutrophils. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Negative neurofunctional effects of frequency, depth and environment in recreational scuba diving: the Geneva "memory dive" study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slosman, D O; De Ribaupierre, S; Chicherio, C; Ludwig, C; Montandon, M-L; Allaoua, M; Genton, L; Pichard, C; Grousset, A; Mayer, E; Annoni, J-M; De Ribaupierre, A

    2004-04-01

    To explore relationships between scuba diving activity, brain, and behaviour, and more specifically between global cerebral blood flow (CBF) or cognitive performance and total, annual, or last 6 months' frequencies, for standard dives or dives performed below 40 m, in cold water or warm sea geographical environments. A prospective cohort study was used to examine divers from diving clubs around Lac Léman and Geneva University Hospital. The subjects were 215 healthy recreational divers (diving with self-contained underwater breathing apparatus). Main outcome measures were: measurement of global CBF by (133)Xe SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography); psychometric and neuropsychological tests to assess perceptual-motor abilities, spatial discrimination, attentional resources, executive functioning, and memory; evaluation of scuba diving activity by questionnaire focusing on number and maximum depth of dives and geographical site of the diving activity (cold water v warm water); and body composition analyses (BMI). (1) A negative influence of depth of dives on CBF and its combined effect with BMI and age was found. (2) A specific diving environment (more than 80% of dives in lakes) had a negative effect on CBF. (3) Depth and number of dives had a negative influence on cognitive performance (speed, flexibility and inhibition processing in attentional tasks). (4) A negative effect of a specific diving environment on cognitive performance (flexibility and inhibition components) was found. Scuba diving may have long-term negative neurofunctional effects when performed in extreme conditions, namely cold water, with more than 100 dives per year, and maximal depth below 40 m.

  19. The differentiation of common species in a coral-reef fish assemblage for recreational scuba diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tsen-Chien; Ho, Cheng-Tze; Jan, Rong-Quen

    2016-01-01

    Recreational scuba diving is a popular activity of the coral reef tourism industry. In practice, local diving centers recommend interesting sites to help visiting divers make their plans. Fish are among the major attractions, but they need to be listed with care because the temporal occurrence of a fish species is difficult to predict. To address this issue, we propose methods to categorize each fish species based on its long-term occurrence and likelihood of being seen. We assume that there are K categories of occurrence of a fish assemblage and propose two methods [an arithmetic-mean method (AM) and a geometric-mean method (GM)] to define the range of species in each category. Experiments based on long term datasets collected at three underwater stations (each having 51-53 surveys and totals of 262-284 fish species) on coral reefs in southern Taiwan showed that when K = 4 (rare, occasional, frequent and common categories), 11-14 species were concurrently assigned to the common category by AM for data sets based on surveys 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, or 51-53 in contrast to the 18-26 species assigned as common by GM. If a similarity index of 0.7 (compared to the total pool of fish species) was the minimum threshold for diver satisfaction, then 20-25 surveys provide sufficient data for listing the common species at a given dive spot. Common fish species, are the most temporally stable, and thus are more appropriate for attracting divers. These can be effectively differentiated by either AM or GM with at least 25 surveys. We suggest regular updating of each fish's category through periodic surveys to assure the accuracy of information at a particular dive spot.

  20. The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: a first look at Southern Orion A with SCUBA-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mairs, S.; Johnstone, D.; Kirk, H.; Buckle, J.; Berry, D. S.; Broekhoven-Fiene, H.; Currie, M. J.; Fich, M.; Graves, S.; Hatchell, J.; Jenness, T.; Mottram, J. C.; Nutter, D.; Pattle, K.; Pineda, J. E.; Salji, C.; Di Francesco, J.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Bastien, P.; Bresnahan, D.; Butner, H.; Chen, M.; Chrysostomou, A.; Coudé, S.; Davis, C. J.; Drabek-Maunder, E.; Duarte-Cabral, A.; Fiege, J.; Friberg, P.; Friesen, R.; Fuller, G. A.; Greaves, J.; Gregson, J.; Holland, W.; Joncas, G.; Kirk, J. M.; Knee, L. B. G.; Marsh, K.; Matthews, B. C.; Moriarty-Schieven, G.; Mowat, C.; Rawlings, J.; Richer, J.; Robertson, D.; Rosolowsky, E.; Rumble, D.; Sadavoy, S.; Thomas, H.; Tothill, N.; Viti, S.; White, G. J.; Wouterloot, J.; Yates, J.; Zhu, M.

    2016-10-01

    We present the JCMT Gould Belt Survey's first look results of the southern extent of the Orion A Molecular Cloud (δ ≤ -5:31:27.5). Employing a two-step structure identification process, we construct individual catalogues for large-scale regions of significant emission labelled as islands and smaller-scale subregions called fragments using the 850 μm continuum maps obtained using SCUBA-2. We calculate object masses, sizes, column densities, and concentrations. We discuss fragmentation in terms of a Jeans instability analysis and highlight interesting structures as candidates for follow-up studies. Furthermore, we associate the detected emission with young stellar objects (YSOs) identified by Spitzer and Herschel. We find that although the population of active star-forming regions contains a wide variety of sizes and morphologies, there is a strong positive correlation between the concentration of an emission region and its calculated Jeans instability. There are, however, a number of highly unstable subregions in dense areas of the map that show no evidence of star formation. We find that only ˜72 per cent of the YSOs defined as Class 0+I and flat-spectrum protostars coincide with dense 850 μm emission structures (column densities >3.7 × 1021 cm-2). The remaining 28 per cent of these objects, which are expected to be embedded in dust and gas, may be misclassified. Finally, we suggest that there is an evolution in the velocity dispersion of YSOs such that sources which are more evolved are associated with higher velocities.

  1. Properties of the Scuba-2 850 μm Sources in the XMM-LSS Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Hyunjong; Jeong, Woong-Seob; Kim, Seong Jin; Pyo, Jeonghyun; Kim, Min Gyu; Ko, Jongwan; Kim, Minjin; Kim, Sam

    2017-02-01

    We carry out the study of 850 μm sources in a part of the XMM-LSS field. The 850 μm imaging data were obtained by the SCUBA-2 on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope(JCMT) for three days in July 2015 with an integration time of 6.1 hours, covering a circular area with a radius of 15'. We choose the central area up to a radius of 9.15 arcmin for the study, where the noise distribution is relatively uniform. The root mean square (rms) noise at the center is 2.7 mJy. We identify 17 sources with S/N > 3.5. Differential number count is estimated in flux range between 3.5 and 9.0 mJy after applying various corrections derived by imaging simulations, which is consistent with previous studies. For detailed study on the individual sources, we select three sources with more reliable measurements (S/N > 4.5), and construct their spectral energy distributions (SEDs) from optical to far-infrared band. Redshift distribution of the sources ranges from 0.36 to 3.28, and their physical parameters are extracted using MAGPHYS model, which yield infrared luminosity L_{IR}= 10^{11.3}-10^{13.4} L_{⊙}, star formation rate SFR = 10^{1.3}-10^{3.2} M_{⊙}yr^{-1} and dust temperature T_{D} = 30-53 K. We investigate the correlation between L_{IR} and T_{D}, which appears to be consistent with previous studies.}

  2. Epilepsy and recreational scuba diving: an absolute contraindication or can there be exceptions? A call for discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Maria do Rosario G; Bell, Gail S; Sander, Josemir W

    2007-05-01

    Recreational scuba diving is a popular sport, and people with epilepsy often ask physicians whether they may engage in diving. Scuba diving is not, however, without risk for anyone; apart from the risk of drowning, the main physiological problems, caused by exposure to gases at depth, are decompression illness, oxygen toxicity, and nitrogen narcosis. In the United Kingdom, the Sport Diving Medical Committee advises that, to dive, someone with epilepsy must be seizure free and off medication for at least 5 years. The reasons for this are largely theoretical. We review the available evidence in the medical literature and diving websites. The risk of seizures recurring decreases with increasing time in remission, but the risk is never completely abolished. We suggest that people with epilepsy who wish to engage in diving, and the physicians who certify fitness to dive, should be provided with all the available evidence. Those who have been entirely seizure-free on stable antiepileptic drug therapy for at least 4 years, who are not taking sedative antiepileptic drugs and who are able to understand the risks, should then be able to consider diving to shallow depths, provided both they and their diving buddy have fully understood the risks.

  3. Message Collision Avoidance Protocols for Detecting Stray Nodes in a Scuba Diving Group Using Ultrasonic Multi-Hop Message Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinya Kaido

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent years have seen a growing interest in underwater communication and some progress has been made in this area. However, underwater communication is still immature compared with terrestrial communication. A prime reason for this is that the underwater environment is intrinsically not suitable for propagation of electric waves. Instead, ultrasonic waves are mainly used for underwater communication. Since ultrasonic waves cannot provide sufficient communication speed or capacity, they cannot use existing network technologies, which assume use of radio waves. In particular, communication in shallow water is still an uncharted territory. Few communication technologies are employed in environments where people enjoy scuba diving. This paper addresses problems faced by recreational scuba divers. It proposes constructing an ad hoc mesh-shaped network between divers within a group and use ultrasonic waves as transmission media in order to enable the detection of a stray diver. It also proposes a communication protocol in which messages are relayed in multiple hops, and a message collision avoidance method, which is intended to reduce the rate of packet loss caused by message propagation delay. We have implemented the proposed methods in a network simulator, and compared them with an existing communication method that has no message collision avoidance function, in terms of the packet loss rate, the stray driver detection rate, and the rate of the ability to communicate in multiple hops.

  4. Effect of a single, open-sea, air scuba dive on human micro- and macrovascular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrechts, Kate; Pontier, Jean-Michel; Balestra, Costantino; Mazur, Aleksandra; Wang, Qiong; Buzzacott, Peter; Theron, Michael; Mansourati, Jacques; Guerrero, François

    2013-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that bubble formation induced endothelial damage on conduit arteries. We aim to evaluate the effect of diving on microvascular and macrovascular function. Nine divers took part in a SCUBA dive at 30 msw (400 kPa), for 30 min of bottom time. Pre- and post-dive, they underwent an assessment of endothelial-dependent (acetylcholine) and endothelial-independent (sodium nitroprusside) microvascular function (laser Doppler flowmetry), as well as endothelial-dependent (flow-mediated dilation) and endothelial-independent (nitroglycerin-mediated dilation) function. Bubble grades were monitored with Doppler according to the Spencer grade. The mean KISS bubble score ranged from 21.10 ± 4.7 at rest to 55.03 ± 8.8 after knee flexion. The increase in cutaneous vascular conductance elicited by either acetylcholine (25.34 ± 6.71 to 7.63 ± 1.25 %, p = 0.021) or sodium nitroprusside (35.24 ± 8.75 to 7.61 ± 1.86 %, p = 0.017) was significantly reduced after diving. Similarly, both flow-mediated dilation (10.8 ± 0.9 to 5.4 ± 1.5 %, p = 0.002) and nitroglycerin-mediated dilation (15 ± 1.1 to 6.5 ± 1.6 %, p = 0.002) were also significantly decreased. There were no correlations between vascular parameters and bubble formation. There appears to be a reduction in endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent, macro- and microvascular function associated with diving. Our results suggest that in the process of vascular dysfunction during diving, functional changes in the vessel wall may not be limited to the endothelium and may be mediated by alterations in vascular smooth muscle.

  5. The SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey : The nature of bright submm galaxies from 2 deg2 of 850-μm imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michałowski, Michał J.; Dunlop, J. S.; Koprowski, M. P.; Cirasuolo, M.; Geach, J. E.; Bowler, R. A. A.; Mortlock, A.; Caputi, K. I.; Aretxaga, I.; Arumugam, V.; Chen, Chian-Chou; McLure, R. J.; Birkinshaw, M.; Bourne, N.; Farrah, D.; Ibar, E.; van der Werf, P.; Zemcov, M.

    2017-01-01

    We present physical properties [redshifts (z), star-formation rates (SFRs) and stellar masses (Mstar)] of nearly 2000 bright (S850 > 4 mJy) submm galaxies in the ~2 deg2 COSMOS and UDS fields selected with SCUBA-2 on the JCMT, representing the largest homogeneous sample of 850-um-selected sources to

  6. THE HERSCHEL AND JCMT GOULD BELT SURVEYS: CONSTRAINING DUST PROPERTIES IN THE PERSEUS B1 CLUMP WITH PACS, SPIRE, AND SCUBA-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadavoy, S. I.; Di Francesco, J.; Johnstone, D.; Fallscheer, C.; Matthews, B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 355, STN CSC, Victoria, BC V8W 3P6 (Canada); Currie, M. J.; Jenness, T. [Joint Astronomy Centre, 660 N. A' ohoku Place, University Park, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Drabek, E.; Hatchell, J. [School of Physics, University of Exeter, Stocker Road, Exeter EX4 4QL (United Kingdom); Nutter, D. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, Queen' s Buildings, The Parade, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Andre, Ph.; Hennemann, M.; Hill, T.; Koenyves, V. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Universite Paris Diderot, IRFU/Service d' Astrophysique, Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Arzoumanian, D. [IAS, CNRS (UMR 8617), Universite Paris-Sud 11, Batiment 121, F-91400 Orsay (France); Benedettini, M. [Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Bernard, J.-P. [CNRS, IRAP, 9 Av. colonel Roche, BP 44346, F-31028 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Duarte-Cabral, A. [Universite de Bordeaux, LAB, UMR 5804, F-33270 Floirac (France); Friesen, R. [Dunlap Institute, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada); Greaves, J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St. Andrews, North Haugh, St. Andrews, Fife KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Collaboration: JCMT and Herschel Gould Belt Survey teams; and others

    2013-04-20

    We present Herschel observations from the Herschel Gould Belt Survey and SCUBA-2 science verification observations from the JCMT Gould Belt Survey of the B1 clump in the Perseus molecular cloud. We determined the dust emissivity index using four different techniques to combine the Herschel PACS+SPIRE data at 160-500 {mu}m with the SCUBA-2 data at 450 {mu}m and 850 {mu}m. Of our four techniques, we found that the most robust method was filtering out the large-scale emission in the Herschel bands to match the spatial scales recovered by the SCUBA-2 reduction pipeline. Using this method, we find {beta} Almost-Equal-To 2 toward the filament region and moderately dense material and lower {beta} values ({beta} {approx}> 1.6) toward the dense protostellar cores, possibly due to dust grain growth. We find that {beta} and temperature are more robust with the inclusion of the SCUBA-2 data, improving estimates from Herschel data alone by factors of {approx}2 for {beta} and by {approx}40% for temperature. Furthermore, we find core mass differences of {approx}< 30% compared to Herschel-only estimates with an adopted {beta} = 2, highlighting the necessity of long-wavelength submillimeter data for deriving accurate masses of prestellar and protostellar cores.

  7. Training safely, Training safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianjun Wu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available It is the basic requirement of maritime safety education to guarantee the safety of teaching operation while training the crew's occupation safety capability. Marine Training Center of Shanghai Maritime University has undertaken the practical teaching of "marine survival" for many years and come up with the whole safety procedures of training. Based on the requirements of SOLAS convention and regulations of STCW over crew training, this paper introduces the safety allocation, utilization and maintenance of teaching equipments. Through the investigation of the safety situation of students' practical operation, the safety teaching method named "four in one" has been put forward, which includes the pre-teaching safety precaution, the whole monitor during the teaching process, the post-teaching summary evaluation, and the reset and standby of teaching facilities. Finally, during the learning and training of "marine survival", crews and students are called on to place priority on personal safety rather than acquisition of knowledge and skills. Only in this way can they be capable of self-protection and protection of others in the career of seafaring.

  8. SCUBA-2 Ultra Deep Imaging EAO Survey (STUDIES): Faint-end Counts at 450 μm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Hao; Lin, Wei-Ching; Lim, Chen-Fatt; Smail, Ian; Chapman, Scott C.; Zheng, Xian Zhong; Shim, Hyunjin; Kodama, Tadayuki; Almaini, Omar; Ao, Yiping; Blain, Andrew W.; Bourne, Nathan; Bunker, Andrew J.; Chang, Yu-Yen; Chao, Dani C.-Y.; Chen, Chian-Chou; Clements, David L.; Conselice, Christopher J.; Cowley, William I.; Dannerbauer, Helmut; Dunlop, James S.; Geach, James E.; Goto, Tomotsugu; Jiang, Linhua; Ivison, Rob J.; Jeong, Woong-Seob; Kohno, Kotaro; Kong, Xu; Lee, Chien-Hsu; Lee, Hyung Mok; Lee, Minju; Michałowski, Michał J.; Oteo, Iván; Sawicki, Marcin; Scott, Douglas; Shu, Xin Wen; Simpson, James M.; Tee, Wei-Leong; Toba, Yoshiki; Valiante, Elisabetta; Wang, Jun-Xian; Wang, Ran; Wardlow, Julie L.

    2017-11-01

    The SCUBA-2 Ultra Deep Imaging EAO Survey (STUDIES) is a three-year JCMT Large Program aiming to reach the 450 μm confusion limit in the COSMOS-CANDELS region to study a representative sample of the high-redshift far-infrared galaxy population that gives rise to the bulk of the far-infrared background. We present the first-year data from STUDIES. We reached a 450 μm noise level of 0.91 mJy for point sources at the map center, covered an area of 151 arcmin2, and detected 98 and 141 sources at 4.0σ and 3.5σ, respectively. Our derived counts are best constrained in the 3.5-25 mJy regime using directly detected sources. Below the detection limits, our fluctuation analysis further constrains the slope of the counts down to 1 mJy. The resulting counts at 1-25 mJy are consistent with a power law having a slope of -2.59 (±0.10 for 3.5-25 mJy, and {}-0.7+0.4 for 1-3.5 mJy). There is no evidence of a faint-end termination or turnover of the counts in this flux density range. Our counts are also consistent with previous SCUBA-2 blank-field and lensing-cluster surveys. The integrated surface brightness from our counts down to 1 mJy is 90.0 ± 17.2 Jy deg-2, which can account for up to {83}-16+15 % of the COBE 450 μm background. We show that Herschel counts at 350 and 500 μm are significantly higher than our 450 μm counts, likely caused by its large beam and source clustering. High angular resolution instruments like SCUBA-2 at 450 μm are therefore highly beneficial for measuring the luminosity and spatial density of high-redshift dusty galaxies.

  9. The SCUBA-2 cosmology legacy survey: Ultraluminous star-forming galaxies in a z = 1.6 cluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smail, Ian; Swinbank, A. M.; Danielson, A. L. R.; Edge, A. C.; Simpson, J. M. [Institute for Computational Cosmology, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Geach, J. E. [Centre for Astrophysics Research, Science and Technology Research Institute, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Tadaki, K. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan); Arumugam, V.; Dunlop, J. S.; Ivison, R. J. [Institute for Astronomy, Royal Observatory, University of Edinburgh, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Hartley, W. [Institute for Astronomy, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Almaini, O.; Conselice, C. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG9 2RD (United Kingdom); Bremer, M. N. [H. H. Wills Physics Laboratory, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Chapin, E. [XMM SOC, ESAC, Apartado 78, E-28691 Villanueva de la Canada, Madrid (Spain); Chapman, S. C. [Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University, 6310 Coburg Road, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 4R2 (Canada); Scott, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Simpson, C. J. [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool Science Park, 146 Brownlow Hill, Liverpool L3 5RF (United Kingdom); Karim, A. [Argelander-Institute of Astronomy, Bonn University, Auf dem Hügel 71, D-53121, Bonn (Germany); Kodama, T. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); and others

    2014-02-10

    We analyze new SCUBA-2 submillimeter and archival SPIRE far-infrared imaging of a z = 1.62 cluster, Cl 0218.3–0510, which lies in the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey/Ultra-Deep Survey field of the SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey. Combining these tracers of obscured star-formation activity with the extensive photometric and spectroscopic information available for this field, we identify 31 far-infrared/submillimeter-detected probable cluster members with bolometric luminosities ≳10{sup 12} L {sub ☉} and show that by virtue of their dust content and activity, these represent some of the reddest and brightest galaxies in this structure. We exploit ALMA submillimeter continuum observations, which cover one of these sources, to confirm the identification of a SCUBA-2-detected ultraluminous star-forming galaxy in this structure. Integrating the total star-formation activity in the central region of the structure, we estimate that it is an order of magnitude higher (in a mass-normalized sense) than clusters at z ∼ 0.5-1. However, we also find that the most active cluster members do not reside in the densest regions of the structure, which instead host a population of passive and massive, red galaxies. We suggest that while the passive and active populations have comparable near-infrared luminosities at z = 1.6, M{sub H} ∼ –23, the subsequent stronger fading of the more active galaxies means that they will evolve into passive systems at the present day that are less luminous than the descendants of those galaxies that were already passive at z ∼ 1.6 (M{sub H} ∼ –20.5 and M{sub H} ∼ –21.5, respectively, at z ∼ 0). We conclude that the massive galaxy population in the dense cores of present-day clusters were already in place at z = 1.6 and that in Cl 0218.3–0510 we are seeing continuing infall of less extreme, but still ultraluminous, star-forming galaxies onto a pre-existing structure.

  10. Virtopsy-postmortem multislice computed tomography (MSCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a fatal scuba diving incident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plattner, Thomas; Thali, Michael J; Yen, Kathrin; Sonnenschein, Martin; Stoupis, Christoforos; Vock, Peter; Zwygart-Brügger, Karin; Kilchör, Thomas; Dirnhofer, Richard

    2003-11-01

    The body of a 44-year-old scuba diver was examined using postmortem multislice computed tomography (MSCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and findings were verified by subsequent autopsy. The goal was to find out whether the important pathomorphological findings for the reconstruction of events and the identification of cause and manner of death could be identified using modem digital cross-sectioning techniques. The findings of a massive vital decompression with pulmonary barotrauma and lethal gas embolism were identified in the radiological images. MSCT and MRI were superior to autopsy in the demonstration of the extent and distribution of gas accumulation in intraparenchymal blood vessels of internal organs as well as in areas of the body inaccessible by standard autopsy.

  11. 2D speckle tracking echocardiography of the right ventricle free wall in SCUBA divers after single open sea dive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susilovic-Grabovac, Zora; Obad, Ante; Duplančić, Darko; Banić, Ivana; Brusoni, Denise; Agostoni, Piergiuseppe; Vuković, Ivica; Dujic, Zeljko; Bakovic, Darija

    2018-03-01

    The presence of circulating gas bubbles and their influence on pulmonary and right heart hemodynamics was reported after uncomplicated self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (SCUBA) dive(s). Improvements in cardiac imaging have recently focused great attention on the right ventricle (RV). The aim of our study was to evaluate possible effects of a single air SCUBA dive on RV function using 2D speckle tracking echocardiography in healthy divers after single open sea dive to 18 meters of seawater, followed by bottom stay of 47 minutes with a direct ascent to the surface. Twelve experienced male divers (age 39.5 ± 10.5 years) participated in the study. Echocardiographic assessment of the right ventricular function (free wall 2 D strain, tricuspid annular planes systolic excursion [TAPSE], lateral tricuspid annular peak systolic velocity [RV s`] and fractional area change [FAC]) was performed directly prior to and 30, 60, 90 and 120 minutes after surfacing. Two-dimensional strain of all three segments of free right ventricular wall showed a significant increase in longitudinal shortening in post-dive period for maximally 26% (basal), 15.4% (mid) and 16.3% (apical) as well as TAPSE (11.6%), RV FAC (19.2%), RV S` (12.7%) suggesting a rise in systolic function of right heart. Mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mean PAP) increased post-dive from 13.3 mmHg to maximally 23.5 mmHg (P = .002), indicating increased RV afterload. Our results demonstrated that single dive with significant bubble load lead to increase in systolic function and longitudinal strain of the right heart in parallel with increase in mean PAP. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  12. The SCUBA-2 850 μm Follow-up of WISE-selected, Luminous Dust-obscured Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Lulu; Jones, Suzy F.; Han, Yunkun; Knudsen, Kirsten K.

    2017-12-01

    Hot dust-obscured galaxies (Hot DOGs) are a new population recently discovered in the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer All-Sky survey. Multiwavelength follow-up observations suggest that they are luminous, dust-obscured quasars at high redshift. Here we present the JCMT SCUBA-2 850 μm follow-up observations of 10 Hot DOGs. Four out of ten Hot DOGs have been detected at >3σ level. Based on the IR SED decomposition approach, we derive the IR luminosities of AGN torus and cold dust components. Hot DOGs in our sample are extremely luminous with most of them having {L}{IR}{tot}> {10}14 {L}⊙ . The torus emissions dominate the total IR energy output. However, the cold dust contribution is still non-negligible, with the fraction of the cold dust contribution to the total IR luminosity (˜8%-24%) being dependent on the choice of torus model. The derived cold dust temperatures in Hot DOGs are comparable to those in UV bright quasars with similar IR luminosity, but much higher than those in SMGs. Higher dust temperatures in Hot DOGs may be due to the more intense radiation field caused by intense starburst and obscured AGN activities. Fourteen and five submillimeter serendipitous sources in the 10 SCUBA-2 fields around Hot DOGs have been detected at >3σ and >3.5σ levels, respectively. By estimating their cumulative number counts, we confirm the previous argument that Hot DOGs lie in dense environments. Our results support the scenario in which Hot DOGs are luminous, dust-obscured quasars lying in dense environments, and being in the transition phase between extreme starburst and UV-bright quasars.

  13. The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: the effect of molecular contamination in SCUBA-2 observations of Orion A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coudé, S.; Bastien, P.; Kirk, H.; Johnstone, D.; Drabek-Maunder, E.; Graves, S.; Hatchell, J.; Chapin, E. L.; Gibb, A. G.; Matthews, B.; JCMT Gould Belt Survey Team

    2016-04-01

    Thermal emission from cold dust grains in giant molecular clouds can be used to probe the physical properties, such as density, temperature and emissivity in star-forming regions. We present the Submillimetre Common-User Bolometer Array (SCUBA-2) shared-risk observations at 450 and 850 μm of the Orion A molecular cloud complex taken at the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT). Previous studies showed that molecular emission lines can contribute significantly to the measured fluxes in those continuum bands. We use the Heterodyne Array Receiver Programme 12CO J = 3-2 integrated intensity map for Orion A in order to evaluate the molecular line contamination and its effects on the SCUBA-2 maps. With the corrected fluxes, we have obtained a new spectral index α map for the thermal emission of dust in the well-known integral-shaped filament. Furthermore, we compare a sample of 33 sources, selected over the Orion A molecular cloud complex for their high 12CO J = 3-2 line contamination, to 27 previously identified clumps in OMC 4. This allows us to quantify the effect of line contamination on the ratio of 850-450 μm flux densities and how it modifies the deduced spectral index of emissivity β for the dust grains. We also show that at least one Spitzer-identified protostellar core in OMC 5 has a 12CO J = 3-2 contamination level of 16 per cent. Furthermore, we find the strongest contamination level (44 per cent) towards a young star with disc near OMC 2. This work is part of the JCMT Gould Belt Legacy Survey.

  14. The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: A First Look at SCUBA-2 Observations of the Lupus I Molecular Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowat, C.; Hatchell, J.; Rumble, D.; Kirk, H.; Buckle, J.; Berry, D. S.; Broekhoven-Fiene, H.; Currie, M. J.; Jenness, T.; Johnstone, D.; Mottram, J. C.; Pattle, K.; Tisi, S.; Di Francesco, J.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Bastien, P.; Bresnahan, D.; Butner, H.; Chen, M.; Chrysostomou, A.; Coudé, S.; Davis, C. J.; Drabek-Maunder, E.; Duarte-Cabral, A.; Fich, M.; Fiege, J.; Friberg, P.; Friesen, R.; Fuller, G. A.; Graves, S.; Greaves, J.; Holland, W.; Joncas, G.; Kirk, J. M.; Knee, L. B. G.; Mairs, S.; Marsh, K.; Matthews, B. C.; Moriarty-Schieven, G.; Rawlings, J.; Retter, B.; Richer, J.; Robertson, D.; Rosolowsky, E.; Sadavoy, S.; Thomas, H.; Tothill, N.; Viti, S.; White, G. J.; Wouterloot, J.; Yates, J.; Zhu, M.

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents observations of the Lupus I molecular cloud at 450 and 850 μm with Submillimetre Common User Bolometer Array (SCUBA-2) as part of the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope Gould Belt Survey (JCMT GBS). Nine compact sources, assumed to be the discs of young stellar objects (YSOs), 12 extended protostellar, pre-stellar and starless cores, and one isolated, low-luminosity protostar, are detected in the region. Spectral energy distributions, including submillimetre fluxes, are produced for 15 YSOs, and each is fitted with the models of Robitaille et al. The proportion of Class 0/I protostars is higher than that seen in other Gould Belt regions such as Ophiuchus and Serpens. Circumstellar disc masses are calculated for more evolved sources, while protostellar envelope masses are calculated for protostars. Up to four very low luminosity objects are found; a large fraction when compared to other Spitzer c2d regions. One YSO has a disc mass greater than the minimum mass solar nebula. 12 starless/protostellar cores are detected by SCUBA-2 and their masses are calculated. The stability of these cores is examined using both the thermal Jeans mass and a turbulent virial mass when possible. Two cores in Lupus I are super-Jeans and contain no known YSOs. One of these cores has a virial parameter of 1.1 ± 0.4, and could therefore be pre-stellar. The high ratio of Class 0/I to Class III YSOs (1:1), and the presence of a pre-stellar core candidate, provides support for the hypothesis that a shock recently triggered star formation in Lupus I.

  15. Do reef fish habituate to diver presence? Evidence from two reef sites with contrasting historical levels of SCUBA intensity in the Bay Islands, Honduras.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin M Titus

    Full Text Available Contact between humans and the marine environment is increasing, but the capacity of communities to adapt to human presence remains largely unknown. The popularization of SCUBA diving has added a new dimension to human impacts in aquatic systems and, although individual-level impacts have been identified, cumulative effects on ecosystem function and community-wide responses are unclear. In principle, habituation may mitigate the consequences of human presence on the biology of an individual and allow the quick resumption of its ecological roles, but this has not been documented in aquatic systems. Here, we investigate the short-term impact of human presence and the long-term habituation potential of reef-fish communities to recreational SCUBA divers by studying symbiotic cleaning interactions on coral reefs with differing levels of historical contact with divers. We show that incidences of human contact result in a smaller decline in ecosystem function and more rapid resumption of baseline services on a reef in Utila, Honduras that has heavy historical levels of SCUBA diver presence, compared to an un-dived reef site in the Cayos Cochinos Marine Protected Area (CCMPA. Nonetheless, despite the generally smaller change in ecosystem function and decades of regular contact with divers, cleaning behavior is suppressed by >50% at Utila when divers are present. We hypothesize that community-wide habituation of reef fish is not fully achievable and may be biologically restricted to only partial habituation. Differential responses to human presence impacts the interpretation and execution of behavioral research where SCUBA is the predominant means of data collection, and provides an important rationale for future research investigating the interplay between human presence, ecosystem function, and community structure on coral reefs.

  16. Artillery Survivability Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    experiment mode also enables users to set their own design of experiment by manipulating an editable CSV file. The second one is a real-time mode that...renders a 3D virtual environment of a restricted battlefield where the survivability movements of an artillery company are visualized . This mode...provides detailed visualization of the simulation and enables future experimental uses of the simulation as a training tool. 14. SUBJECT TERMS

  17. Scuba diving and otology: a systematic review with recommendations on diagnosis, treatment and post-operative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingstone, Devon M; Smith, Kristine A; Lange, Beth

    2017-06-01

    Scuba diving is a popular recreational and professional activity with inherent risks. Complications related to barotrauma and decompression illness can pose significant morbidity to a diver's hearing and balance systems. The majority of dive-related injuries affect the head and neck, particularly the outer, middle and inner ear. Given the high incidence of otologic complications from diving, an evidence-based approach to the diagnosis and treatment of otic pathology is a necessity. We performed a systematic and comprehensive literature review including the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of otologic pathology related to diving. This included inner, middle, and outer ear anatomic subsites, as well as facial nerve complications, mal de debarquement syndrome, sea sickness and fitness to dive recommendations following otologic surgery. Sixty-two papers on diving and otologic pathology were included in the final analysis. We created a set of succinct evidence-based recommendations on each topic that should inform clinical decisions by otolaryngologists, dive medicine specialists and primary care providers when faced with diving-related patient pathology.

  18. The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: A First Look at the Auriga–California Molecular Cloud with SCUBA-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broekhoven-Fiene, H.; Matthews, B. C.; Harvey, P.; Kirk, H.; Chen, M.; Currie, M. J.; Pattle, K.; Lane, J.; Buckle, J.; Di Francesco, J.; Drabek-Maunder, E.; Johnstone, D.; Berry, D. S.; Fich, M.; Hatchell, J.; Jenness, T.; Mottram, J. C.; Nutter, D.; Pineda, J. E.; Quinn, C.; Salji, C.; Tisi, S.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Bastien, P.; Bresnahan, D.; Butner, H.; Chrysostomou, A.; Coude, S.; Davis, C. J.; Duarte-Cabral, A.; Fiege, J.; Friberg, P.; Friesen, R.; Fuller, G. A.; Graves, S.; Greaves, J.; Gregson, J.; Holland, W.; Joncas, G.; Kirk, J. M.; Knee, L. B. G.; Mairs, S.; Marsh, K.; Moriarty-Schieven, G.; Mowat, C.; Rawlings, J.; Richer, J.; Robertson, D.; Rosolowsky, E.; Rumble, D.; Sadavoy, S.; Thomas, H.; Tothill, N.; Viti, S.; White, G. J.; Wilson, C. D.; Wouterloot, J.; Yates, J.; Zhu, M.

    2018-01-01

    We present 850 and 450 μm observations of the dense regions within the Auriga–California molecular cloud using SCUBA-2 as part of the JCMT Gould Belt Legacy Survey to identify candidate protostellar objects, measure the masses of their circumstellar material (disk and envelope), and compare the star formation to that in the Orion A molecular cloud. We identify 59 candidate protostars based on the presence of compact submillimeter emission, complementing these observations with existing Herschel/SPIRE maps. Of our candidate protostars, 24 are associated with young stellar objects (YSOs) in the Spitzer and Herschel/PACS catalogs of 166 and 60 YSOs, respectively (177 unique), confirming their protostellar nature. The remaining 35 candidate protostars are in regions, particularly around LkHα 101, where the background cloud emission is too bright to verify or rule out the presence of the compact 70 μm emission that is expected for a protostellar source. We keep these candidate protostars in our sample but note that they may indeed be prestellar in nature. Our observations are sensitive to the high end of the mass distribution in Auriga–Cal. We find that the disparity between the richness of infrared star-forming objects in Orion A and the sparsity in Auriga–Cal extends to the submillimeter, suggesting that the relative star formation rates have not varied over the Class II lifetime and that Auriga–Cal will maintain a lower star formation efficiency.

  19. Fatal scuba diving incident with massive gas embolism in cerebral and spinal arteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozdoba, C. [University of Bern, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Bern (Switzerland); Weis, J. [University of Bern, Department of Neuropathology, Institute of Pathology, Bern (Switzerland); RWTH University Hospital, Institute of Neuropathology, Aachen (Germany); Plattner, T.; Dirnhofer, R.; Yen, K. [University of Bern, Institute of Forensic Medicine, Bern (Switzerland)

    2005-06-01

    CT and MRI have the potential to become useful adjuncts to forensic autopsy in the near future. The examination of fatal injuries facilitates a profound experience in the clinical-radiological examination of these cases; the more severe findings in corpses with autopsy verification can help one to understand the tiny signs seen in clinical cases of surviving victims. We present the case of a 44-year-old male diver who died from severe decompression sickness after rapid ascent from approximately 120 m. Post-mortem CT and MRI studies of the brain and spinal cord revealed extensive gas inclusions in cerebral arteries, spinal arteries and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces, while the intracranial venous sinuses remained unaffected. These findings were confirmed at autopsy. Appropriate imaging techniques can help forensic pathologists to aim their autopsies at findings that might otherwise remain undetected. (orig.)

  20. Survival Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Rupert G

    2011-01-01

    A concise summary of the statistical methods used in the analysis of survival data with censoring. Emphasizes recently developed nonparametric techniques. Outlines methods in detail and illustrates them with actual data. Discusses the theory behind each method. Includes numerous worked problems and numerical exercises.

  1. Modelling survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashauer, Roman; Albert, Carlo; Augustine, Starrlight

    2016-01-01

    well GUTS, calibrated with short-term survival data of Gammarus pulex exposed to four pesticides, can forecast effects of longer-term pulsed exposures. Thirdly, we tested the ability of GUTS to estimate 14-day median effect concentrations of malathion for a range of species and use these estimates...

  2. The SCUBA-2 Ambitious Sky Survey: a catalogue of beam-sized sources in the Galactic longitude range 120°-140°

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettke, Will; Scott, Douglas; Gibb, Andy G.; Thompson, Mark; Chrysostomou, Antonio; Evans, A.; Hill, Tracey; Jenness, Tim; Joncas, Gilles; Moore, Toby; Serjeant, Stephen; Urquhart, James; Vaccari, Mattia; Weferling, Bernd; White, Glenn; Zhu, Ming

    2017-06-01

    The SCUBA-2 Ambitious Sky Survey (SASSy) is composed of shallow 850-μm imaging using the Submillimetre Common-User Bolometer Array 2 (SCUBA-2) on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. Here we describe the extraction of a catalogue of beam-sized sources from a roughly 120 deg2 region of the Galactic plane mapped uniformly (to an rms level of about 40 mJy), covering longitude 120° extraction procedure through estimates of the false discovery rate, as well as by adding artificial sources to the real images. The primary catalogue contains a total of 189 sources at 850 μm, down to an S/N threshold of approximately 4.6. Additionally, we list 136 sources detected down to S/N = 4.3, but recognize that as we go lower in S/N, the reliability of the catalogue rapidly diminishes. We perform follow-up observations of some of our lower significance sources through small targeted SCUBA-2 images and list 265 sources detected in these maps down to S/N = 5. This illustrates the real power of SASSy: inspecting the shallow maps for regions of 850-μm emission and then using deeper targeted images to efficiently find fainter sources. We also perform a comparison of the SASSy sources with the Planck Catalogue of Compact Sources and the IRAS Point Source Catalogue, to determine which sources discovered in this field might be new, and hence potentially cold regions at an early stage of star formation.

  3. The SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey: the nature of bright submm galaxies from 2 deg2 of 850-μm imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michałowski, Michał J.; Dunlop, J. S.; Koprowski, M. P.; Cirasuolo, M.; Geach, J. E.; Bowler, R. A. A.; Mortlock, A.; Caputi, K. I.; Aretxaga, I.; Arumugam, V.; Chen, Chian-Chou; McLure, R. J.; Birkinshaw, M.; Bourne, N.; Farrah, D.; Ibar, E.; van der Werf, P.; Zemcov, M.

    2017-07-01

    We present physical properties [redshifts (z), star-formation rates (SFRs) and stellar masses ({M_star})] of bright (S850 ≥ 4 mJy) submm galaxies in the ≃2 deg2 COSMOS and UDS fields selected with SCUBA-2/JCMT. We complete the galaxy identification process for all (≃2000) S/N ≥ 3.5 850-μm sources, but focus our scientific analysis on a high-quality subsample of 651 S/N ≥ 4 sources with complete multiwavelength coverage including 1.1-mm imaging. We check the reliability of our identifications, and the robustness of the SCUBA-2 fluxes by revisiting the recent ALMA follow-up of 29 sources in our sample. Considering >4 mJy ALMA sources, our identification method has a completeness of ≃86 per cent with a reliability of ≃92 per cent, and only ≃15-20 per cent of sources are significantly affected by multiplicity (when a secondary component contributes >1/3 of the primary source flux). The impact of source blending on the 850-μm source counts as determined with SCUBA-2 is modest; scaling the single-dish fluxes by ≃0.9 reproduces the ALMA source counts. For our final SCUBA-2 sample, we find median z = 2.40^{+0.10}_{-0.04}, SFR = 287 ± 6 M⊙ yr- 1 and log ({M_star}/{M_{⊙}}) = 11.12± 0.02 (the latter for 349/651 sources with optical identifications). These properties clearly locate bright submm galaxies on the high-mass end of the 'main sequence' of star-forming galaxies out to z ≃ 6, suggesting that major mergers are not a dominant driver of the high-redshift submm-selected population. Their number densities are also consistent with the evolving galaxy stellar mass function. Hence, the submm galaxy population is as expected, albeit reproducing the evolution of the main sequence of star-forming galaxies remains a challenge for theoretical models/simulations.

  4. Innovations’ Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Tabas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Innovations currently represent a tool of maintaining the going concern of a business entity and its competitiveness. However, effects of innovations are not infinite and if an innovation should constantly preserve a life of business entity, it has to be a continual chain of innovations, i.e. continual process. Effective live of a single innovation is limited while the limitation is derived especially from industry. The paper provides the results of research on innovations effects in the financial performance of small and medium-sized enterprises in the Czech Republic. Objective of this paper is to determine the length and intensity of the effects of technical innovations in company’s financial performance. The economic effect of innovations has been measured at application of company’s gross production power while the Deviation Analysis has been applied for three years’ time series. Subsequently the Survival Analysis has been applied. The analyses are elaborated for three statistical samples of SMEs constructed in accordance to the industry. The results obtained show significant differences in innovations’ survival within these three samples of enterprises then. The results are quite specific for the industries, and are confronted and discussed with the results of authors’ former research on the issue.

  5. A standardized randomized 6-month aerobic exercise-training down-regulated pro-inflammatory genes, but up-regulated anti-inflammatory, neuron survival and axon growth-related genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyalomhe, Osigbemhe; Chen, Yuanxiu; Allard, Joanne; Ntekim, Oyonumo; Johnson, Sheree; Bond, Vernon; Goerlitz, David; Li, James; Obisesan, Thomas O

    2015-09-01

    There is considerable support for the view that aerobic exercise may confer cognitive benefits to mild cognitively impaired elderly persons. However, the biological mechanisms mediating these effects are not entirely clear. As a preliminary step towards informing this gap in knowledge, we enrolled older adults confirmed to have mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in a 6-month exercise program. Male and female subjects were randomized into a 6-month program of either aerobic or stretch (control) exercise. Data collected from the first 10 completers, aerobic exercise (n=5) or stretch (control) exercise (n=5), were used to determine intervention-induced changes in the global gene expression profiles of the aerobic and stretch groups. Using microarray, we identified genes with altered expression (relative to baseline values) in response to the 6-month exercise intervention. Genes whose expression were altered by at least two-fold, and met the p-value cutoff of 0.01 were inputted into the Ingenuity Pathway Knowledge Base Library to generate gene-interaction networks. After a 6-month aerobic exercise-training, genes promoting inflammation became down-regulated, whereas genes having anti-inflammatory properties and those modulating immune function or promoting neuron survival and axon growth, became up-regulated (all fold change≥±2.0, paerobic program as opposed to the stretch group. We conclude that three distinct cellular pathways may collectively influence the training effects of aerobic exercise in MCI subjects. We plan to confirm these effects using rt-PCR and correlate such changes with the cognitive phenotype. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Helping mothers survive bleeding after birth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nelissen, Ellen; Ersdal, Hege; Ostergaard, Doris

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate "Helping Mothers Survive Bleeding After Birth" (HMS BAB) simulation-based training in a low-resource setting. DESIGN: Educational intervention study. SETTING: Rural referral hospital in Northern Tanzania. POPULATION: Clinicians, nurse-midwives, medical attendants, and ambul......OBJECTIVE: To evaluate "Helping Mothers Survive Bleeding After Birth" (HMS BAB) simulation-based training in a low-resource setting. DESIGN: Educational intervention study. SETTING: Rural referral hospital in Northern Tanzania. POPULATION: Clinicians, nurse-midwives, medical attendants...

  7. Medical Aspects of Survival: Training for Aircrew

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    frequently in the less palatable, most often discar- ded portions. Green and yellow vegetables are good sources of vitamins. Citrus fruits have long...the patient on his back with shoulders elevated so that the neck is extended and in a straight line. Locate the "Adam’s apple " and the smaller...the discomforts of colds and upper respiratory deseases , and at best, will just take the edge off severe pain. They should be taken, however, if

  8. How Do Stars Gain Their Mass? A JCMT/SCUBA-2 Transient Survey of Protostars in Nearby Star-forming Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herczeg, Gregory J.; Johnstone, Doug; Mairs, Steve; Hatchell, Jennifer; Lee, Jeong-Eun; Bower, Geoffrey C.; Chen, Huei-Ru Vivien; Aikawa, Yuri; Yoo, Hyunju; Kang, Sung-Ju; Kang, Miju; Chen, Wen-Ping; Williams, Jonathan P.; Bae, Jaehan; Dunham, Michael M.; Vorobyov, Eduard I.; Zhu, Zhaohuan; Rao, Ramprasad; Kirk, Helen; Takahashi, Satoko; Morata, Oscar; Lacaille, Kevin; Lane, James; Pon, Andy; Scholz, Aleks; Samal, Manash R.; Bell, Graham S.; Graves, Sarah; Lee, E.'lisa M.; Parsons, Harriet; He, Yuxin; Zhou, Jianjun; Kim, Mi-Ryang; Chapman, Scott; Drabek-Maunder, Emily; Chung, Eun Jung; Eyres, Stewart P. S.; Forbrich, Jan; Hillenbrand, Lynne A.; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro; Kim, Gwanjeong; Kim, Kyoung Hee; Kuan, Yi-Jehng; Kwon, Woojin; Lai, Shih-Ping; Lalchand, Bhavana; Lee, Chang Won; Lee, Chin-Fei; Long, Feng; Lyo, A.-Ran; Qian, Lei; Scicluna, Peter; Soam, Archana; Stamatellos, Dimitris; Takakuwa, Shigehisa; Tang, Ya-Wen; Wang, Hongchi; Wang, Yiren

    2017-11-01

    Most protostars have luminosities that are fainter than expected from steady accretion over the protostellar lifetime. The solution to this problem may lie in episodic mass accretion—prolonged periods of very low accretion punctuated by short bursts of rapid accretion. However, the timescale and amplitude for variability at the protostellar phase is almost entirely unconstrained. In A James Clerk Maxwell Telescope/SCUBA-2 Transient Survey of Protostars in Nearby Star-forming Regions, we are monitoring monthly with SCUBA-2 the submillimeter emission in eight fields within nearby (< 500 pc) star-forming regions to measure the accretion variability of protostars. The total survey area of ˜1.6 deg2 includes ˜105 peaks with peaks brighter than 0.5 Jy/beam (43 associated with embedded protostars or disks) and 237 peaks of 0.125-0.5 Jy/beam (50 with embedded protostars or disks). Each field has enough bright peaks for flux calibration relative to other peaks in the same field, which improves upon the nominal flux calibration uncertainties of submillimeter observations to reach a precision of ˜2%-3% rms, and also provides quantified confidence in any measured variability. The timescales and amplitudes of any submillimeter variation will then be converted into variations in accretion rate and subsequently used to infer the physical causes of the variability. This survey is the first dedicated survey for submillimeter variability and complements other transient surveys at optical and near-IR wavelengths, which are not sensitive to accretion variability of deeply embedded protostars.

  9. Fish survey, fishing duration and other data from otter trawls and scuba observations from NOAA Ship MILLER FREEMAN and other platforms as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1977-11-04 to 1979-11-26 (NODC Accession 8100532)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish survey, fishing duration, and other data were collected from otter trawls and scuba diver observations from NOAA Ship MILLER FREEMAN and other platforms from 04...

  10. 38 CFR 21.3104 - Special training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., spouse's or surviving spouse's need for a course of specialized vocational training or special... needs a course of specialized vocational training or special restorative training, and where need is... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Special training. 21.3104...

  11. Effect of decompression-induced bubble formation on highly trained divers microvascular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrechts, Kate; Pontier, Jean-Michel; Mazur, Aleksandra; Buzzacott, Peter; Morin, Jean; Wang, Qiong; Theron, Michael; Guerrero, Francois

    2013-11-01

    We previously showed microvascular alteration of both endothelium-dependent and -independent reactivity after a single SCUBA dive. We aimed to study mechanisms involved in this postdive vascular dysfunction. Ten divers each completed three protocols: (1) a SCUBA dive at 400 kPa for 30 min; (2) a 41-min duration of seawater surface head immersed finning exercise to determine the effect of immersion and moderate physical activity; and (3) a simulated 41-min dive breathing 100% oxygen (hyperbaric oxygen [HBO]) at 170 kPa in order to analyze the effect of diving-induced hyperoxia. Bubble grades were monitored with Doppler. Cutaneous microvascular function was assessed by laser Doppler. Endothelium-dependent (acetylcholine, ACh) and -independent (sodium nitroprusside, SNP) reactivity was tested by iontophoresis. Endothelial cell activation was quantified by plasma Von Willebrand factor and nitric oxide (NO). Inactivation of NO by oxidative stress was assessed by plasma nitrotyrosine. Platelet factor 4 (PF4) was assessed in order to determine platelet aggregation. Blood was also analyzed for measurement of platelet count. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) response to ACh delivery was not significantly decreased by the SCUBA protocol (23 ± 9% before vs. 17 ± 7% after; P = 0.122), whereas CVC response to SNP stimulation decreased significantly (23 ± 6% before vs. 10 ± 1% after; P = 0.039). The HBO and immersion protocols did not affect either endothelial-dependent or -independent function. The immersion protocol induced a significant increase in NO (0.07 ± 0.01 vs. 0.12 ± 0.02 μg/mL; P = 0.035). This study highlighted change in microvascular endothelial-independent but not -dependent function in highly trained divers after a single air dive. The results suggest that the effects of decompression on microvascular function may be modified by diving acclimatization.

  12. Attributing death to cancer: cause-specific survival estimation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathew A

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Cancer survival estimation is an important part of assessing the overall strength of cancer care in a region. Generally, the death of a patient is taken as the end point in estimation of overall survival. When calculating the overall survival, the cause of death is not taken into account. With increasing demand for better survival of cancer patients it is important for clinicians and researchers to know about survival statistics due to disease of interest, i.e. net survival. It is also important to choose the best method for estimating net survival. Increase in the use of computer programmes has made it possible to carry out statistical analysis without guidance from a bio-statistician. This is of prime importance in third- world countries as there are a few trained bio-statisticians to guide clinicians and researchers. The present communication describes current methods used to estimate net survival such as cause-specific survival and relative survival. The limitation of estimation of cause-specific survival particularly in India and the usefulness of relative survival are discussed. The various sources for estimating cancer survival are also discussed. As survival-estimates are to be projected on to the population at large, it becomes important to measure the variation of the estimates, and thus confidence intervals are used. Rothman′s confidence interval gives the most satisfactory result for survival estimate.

  13. Relevance Vector Machine for Survival Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiaee, Farkhondeh; Sheikhzadeh, Hamid; Mahabadi, Samaneh Eftekhari

    2016-03-01

    An accelerated failure time (AFT) model has been widely used for the analysis of censored survival or failure time data. However, the AFT imposes the restrictive log-linear relation between the survival time and the explanatory variables. In this paper, we introduce a relevance vector machine survival (RVMS) model based on Weibull AFT model that enables the use of kernel framework to automatically learn the possible nonlinear effects of the input explanatory variables on target survival times. We take advantage of the Bayesian inference technique in order to estimate the model parameters. We also introduce two approaches to accelerate the RVMS training. In the first approach, an efficient smooth prior is employed that improves the degree of sparsity. In the second approach, a fast marginal likelihood maximization procedure is used for obtaining a sparse solution of survival analysis task by sequential addition and deletion of candidate basis functions. These two approaches, denoted by smooth RVMS and fast RVMS, typically use fewer basis functions than RVMS and improve the RVMS training time; however, they cause a slight degradation in the RVMS performance. We compare the RVMS and the two accelerated approaches with the previous sparse kernel survival analysis method on a synthetic data set as well as six real-world data sets. The proposed kernel survival analysis models have been discovered to be more accurate in prediction, although they benefit from extra sparsity. The main advantages of our proposed models are: 1) extra sparsity that leads to a better generalization and avoids overfitting; 2) automatic relevance sample determination based on data that provide more accuracy, in particular for highly censored survival data; and 3) flexibility to utilize arbitrary number and types of kernel functions (e.g., non-Mercer kernels and multikernel learning).

  14. Comparison of Reef Fish Survey Data Gathered by Open and Closed Circuit SCUBA Divers Reveals Differences in Areas With Higher Fishing Pressure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew E Gray

    Full Text Available Visual survey by divers using open-circuit (OC SCUBA is the most widely used approach to survey coral reef fishes. Therefore, it is important to quantify sources of bias in OC surveys, such as the possibility that avoidance of OC divers by fishes can lead to undercounting in areas where targeted species have come to associate divers with a risk of being speared. One potential way to reduce diver avoidance is to utilize closed circuit rebreathers (CCRs, which do not produce the noise and bubbles that are a major source of disturbance associated with OC diving. For this study, we conducted 66 paired OC and CCR fish surveys in the Main Hawaiian Islands at locations with relatively high, moderate, and light fishing pressure. We found no significant differences in biomass estimates between OC and CCR surveys when data were pooled across all sites, however there were differences at the most heavily fished location, Oahu. There, biomass estimates from OC divers were significantly lower for several targeted fish groups, including surgeonfishes, targeted wrasses, and snappers, as well as for all targeted fishes combined, with mean OC biomass between 32 and 68% of mean CCR biomass. There were no clear differences between OC and CCR biomass estimates for these groups at sites with moderate or low fishing pressure, or at any location for other targeted fish groups, including groupers, parrotfishes, and goatfishes. Bias associated with avoidance of OC divers at heavily fished locations could be substantially reduced, or at least calibrated for, by utilization of CCR. In addition to being affected by fishing pressure, the extent to which avoidance of OC divers is problematic for visual surveys varies greatly among taxa, and is likely to be highly influenced by the survey methodology and dimensions used.

  15. Multinationals and plant survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandick, Roger

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper is twofold: first, to investigate how different ownership structures affect plant survival, and second, to analyze how the presence of foreign multinational enterprises (MNEs) affects domestic plants’ survival. Using a unique and detailed data set on the Swedish manufacturing...... sector, I am able to separate plants into those owned by foreign MNEs, domestic MNEs, exporting non-MNEs, and purely domestic firms. In line with previous findings, the result, when conditioned on other factors affecting survival, shows that foreign MNE plants have lower survival rates than non......-MNE plants. However, separating the non-MNEs into exporters and non-exporters, the result shows that foreign MNE plants have higher survival rates than non-exporting non-MNEs, while the survival rates of foreign MNE plants and exporting non-MNE plants do not seem to differ. Moreover, the simple non...

  16. Columbia Crew Survival Investigation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    NASA commissioned the Columbia Accident Investigation Board (CAIB) to conduct a thorough review of both the technical and the organizational causes of the loss of the Space Shuttle Columbia and her crew on February 1, 2003. The accident investigation that followed determined that a large piece of insulating foam from Columbia s external tank (ET) had come off during ascent and struck the leading edge of the left wing, causing critical damage. The damage was undetected during the mission. The CAIB's findings and recommendations were published in 2003 and are available on the web at http://caib.nasa.gov/. NASA responded to the CAIB findings and recommendations with the Space Shuttle Return to Flight Implementation Plan. Significant enhancements were made to NASA's organizational structure, technical rigor, and understanding of the flight environment. The ET was redesigned to reduce foam shedding and eliminate critical debris. In 2005, NASA succeeded in returning the space shuttle to flight. In 2010, the space shuttle will complete its mission of assembling the International Space Station and will be retired to make way for the next generation of human space flight vehicles: the Constellation Program. The Space Shuttle Program recognized the importance of capturing the lessons learned from the loss of Columbia and her crew to benefit future human exploration, particularly future vehicle design. The program commissioned the Spacecraft Crew Survival Integrated Investigation Team (SCSIIT). The SCSIIT was asked to perform a comprehensive analysis of the accident, focusing on factors and events affecting crew survival, and to develop recommendations for improving crew survival for all future human space flight vehicles. To do this, the SCSIIT investigated all elements of crew survival, including the design features, equipment, training, and procedures intended to protect the crew. This report documents the SCSIIT findings, conclusions, and recommendations.

  17. Bubble formation and endothelial function before and after 3 months of dive training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontier, Jean-Michel; Guerrero, François; Castagna, Olivier

    2009-01-01

    It has been suggested that repeated compression-decompression cycles reduce diver susceptibility to decompression sickness (DCS). This study examined whether intensive scuba dive training would reduce bubble formation and modulate endothelial function as shown by skin circulation. There were 22 military divers who were studied before and after a 90-d program of physical training and open-sea air diving (mean 67 dives total). Skin blood flow in the forearm was measured at rest (baseline), during post-occlusive hyperemia (endothelium-dependent vasodilatation), and with local heating to 42 degrees C (maximal vasodilatation). Subjects were also examined by pulsed Doppler for venous bubbles 30, 60, and 90 min after surfacing from a hyperbaric exposure to 400 kPa (30 msw) for 30 min in a dry chamber. None of the divers experienced DCS during the training period. There was no change in weight, body mass index, maximal oxygen uptake, or endothelial function. Bubble grades by the Kisman Integrated Severity Score were significantly decreased immediately after the diving training period (3.6 +/- 9.2 vs. 16.4 +/- 14.3) and increased 3 mo after this period (10.3 +/- 13.9 vs. 3.6 +/- 9.2). The results highlight that repeated scuba dives and regular physical exercise activity reduce bubble formation and probably have a protective effect against DCS risk. Although this phenomenon has been observed for decades, the mechanism remains complex and the results cannot elucidate the effects of physical exercise and NO production. Bubble formation could activate the stress response which could be the basis for diving acclimatization.

  18. Analysis of Transportation Alternatives for Ejection Seat Training

    OpenAIRE

    Gambel, Ray; Lundy, David; Murphy, William; Southmost Consulting

    2011-01-01

    EMBA Project Report EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Student Military Aviators who complete primary flight training at Training Wing FOUR and select jets for their advanced training track will require Naval Aviation Survival Training Program (NASTP) Class 1 training until the T-6B replaces the T-34C as the primary flight training aircraft. This Class 1 training instructs students in ejection seat equipment and procedures for emergency egress of their new aircraft. Of the eight available Aviation Survi...

  19. Language training: French training

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 30 January to 07 April 2006. These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz : Tel. 73127. Writing Professional Documents in French The next session will take place from 30 January to 07 April 2006. This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken French. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF (for 8 students) For further information and registration, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz : Tel. 73127. FORMATION EN LANGUES LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 language.training@cern.ch

  20. Language Training: French Training

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 11 October to 17 December 2004. These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Fontbonne: Tel. 72844. Writing Professional Documents in French This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken French. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF (for 8 students) For further information and registration, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Fontbonne: tel. 72844. FORMATION EN LANGUES LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 language.training@cern.ch

  1. Language Training: French Training

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 18 April to 30 June 2005. These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz : Tel. 73127. Writing Professional Documents in French The next session will take place from 18 April to 30 June 2005. This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken French. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF (for 8 students) For further information and registration, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz : Tel. 73127. FORMATION EN LANGUES LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 language.training@cern.ch

  2. Challenges in the estimation of Net SURvival: The CENSUR working survival group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgi, R

    2016-10-01

    Net survival, the survival probability that would be observed, in a hypothetical world, where the cancer of interest would be the only possible cause of death, is a key indicator in population-based cancer studies. Accounting for mortality due to other causes, it allows cross-country comparisons or trends analysis and provides a useful indicator for public health decision-making. The objective of this study was to show how the creation and formalization of a network comprising established research teams, which already had substantial and complementary experience in both cancer survival analysis and methodological development, make it possible to meet challenges and thus provide more adequate tools, to improve the quality and the comparability of cancer survival data, and to promote methodological transfers in areas of emerging interest. The Challenges in the Estimation of Net SURvival (CENSUR) working survival group is composed of international researchers highly skilled in biostatistics, methodology, and epidemiology, from different research organizations in France, the United Kingdom, Italy, Slovenia, and Canada, and involved in French (FRANCIM) and European (EUROCARE) cancer registry networks. The expected advantages are an interdisciplinary, international, synergistic network capable of addressing problems in public health, for decision-makers at different levels; tools for those in charge of net survival analyses; a common methodology that makes unbiased cross-national comparisons of cancer survival feasible; transfer of methods for net survival estimations to other specific applications (clinical research, occupational epidemiology); and dissemination of results during an international training course. The formalization of the international CENSUR working survival group was motivated by a need felt by scientists conducting population-based cancer research to discuss, develop, and monitor implementation of a common methodology to analyze net survival in order

  3. The SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey: The EGS deep field - II. Morphological transformation and multi-wavelength properties of faint submillimetre galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavala, J. A.; Aretxaga, I.; Dunlop, J. S.; Michałowski, M. J.; Hughes, D. H.; Bourne, N.; Chapin, E.; Cowley, W.; Farrah, D.; Lacey, C.; Targett, T.; van der Werf, P.

    2018-01-01

    We present a multi-wavelength analysis of galaxies selected at 450 and 850 {μ m} from the deepest SCUBA-2 observations in the Extended Groth Strip (EGS) field, which have an average depth of σ450 = 1.9 and σ _850=0.46 mJy beam^{-1} over ˜70 arcmin2. The final sample comprises 95 sources: 56 (59 %) are detected at both wavelengths, 31 (33 %) are detected only at 850 {μ m}, and 8 (8 %) are detected only at 450 {μ m}. We identify counterparts for 75 % of the whole sample. The redshift distributions of the 450 and 850 {μ m} samples peak at different redshifts with median values of \\bar{z}=1.66± 0.18 and \\bar{z}=2.30± 0.20, respectively. However, the two populations have similar IR luminosities, SFRs, and stellar masses, with mean values of 1.5 ± 0.2 × 1012 L⊙, 150 ± 20 M⊙/yr, and 9.0 ± 0.6 × 1010 M⊙, respectively. This places most of our sources (≳ 85 %) on the high-mass end of the `main-sequence' of star-forming galaxies. Exploring the IR excess vs UV-slope (IRX-β) relation we find that the most luminous galaxies are consistent with the Meurer law, while the less luminous galaxies lie below this relation. Using the results of a two-dimensional modelling of the HST H160-band imaging, we derive a median Sérsic index of n=1.4^{+0.3}_{-0.1} and a median half-light radius of r1/2 = 4.8 ± 0.4 kpc. Based on a visual-like classification in the same band, we find that the dominant component for most of the galaxies at all redshifts is a disk-like structure, although there is a transition from irregular disks to disks with a spheroidal component at z ˜ 1.4, which morphologically supports the scenario of SMGs as progenitors of massive elliptical galaxies.

  4. Language Training: English Training

    CERN Document Server

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place from 04 October 2004 to 11 February 2005 (3 weeks break at Christmas). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow, tel. 72957. Oral Expression This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be approximately 8 participants in...

  5. Network ties and survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Acheampong, George; Narteh, Bedman; Rand, John

    2017-01-01

    Poultry farming has been touted as one of the major ways by which poverty can be reduced in low-income economies like Ghana. Yet, anecdotally there is a high failure rate among these poultry farms. This current study seeks to understand the relationship between network ties and survival chances...... of small commercial poultry farms (SCPFs). We utilize data from a 2-year network survey of SCPFs in rural Ghana. The survival of these poultry farms are modelled using a lagged probit model of farms that persisted from 2014 into 2015. We find that network ties are important to the survival chances...... but this probability reduces as the number of industry ties increases but moderation with dynamic capability of the firm reverses this trend. Our findings show that not all network ties aid survival and therefore small commercial poultry farmers need to be circumspect in the network ties they cultivate and develop....

  6. Aircraft Survivability: Rotorcraft Survivability. Summer 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    protect those who serve to protect us?” The answer is a mixed bag. I am fortunate to have joined a group of dedicated men and women who represent this...and Service subject matter experts on rotorcraft safety and survivability to complete the study and report the results to the Joint Chiefs of...Operations and Support CDD TEMP DT DT/OT LUT IOT &E BLRIP TEMP TEMP LRIP Acquisition & LFT Strategies B C LFT&E Review Requirements Approve TEMPs

  7. Language Training - French Training

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2008-01-01

    General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 26 January to 3rd April 2009. These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Nathalie Dumeaux : Tel. 78144. Writing Professional Documents in French The next session will take place from 26 January to 3rd April 2009. This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken French. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF For further information and registration, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Nathalie Dumeaux : Tel. 78144. Nathalie Dumeaux Tel. 78144 mailto:nathalie.dumeaux@cern.ch

  8. Language Training - French Training

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 26 January to 3rd April 2009. These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Nathalie Dumeaux : Tel. 78144. Writing Professional Documents in French The next session will take place from 26 January to 3rd April 2009. This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken French. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF For further information and registration, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Nathalie Dumeaux : Tel. 78144. Nathalie Dumeaux Tel. 78144 mailto:nathalie.dumeaux@cern.ch

  9. Language training: French training

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    General and professional french coursesThe next session will take place from 14 April to 27 June 2008. These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs Nathalie Dumeaux: Tel. 78144. Writing Professional Documents in French The next session will take place from 14 April to 27 June 2008. This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken French. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF For further information and registration, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs Nathalie Dumeaux: Tel. 78144.

  10. Certification of training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Richard S.

    1994-01-01

    Training has been around as an informal process for countless years. Most higher order animals require some level of training in hunting, social skills, or other survival related skills to continue their existence beyond early infancy. Much of the training is accomplished through imitation, trial and error, and good luck. In some ways the essentials of training in aviation have not deviated from this original formula a great deal. One of the major changes in aviation and other technical areas is that more complex response chains based on a broader base of knowledge are now required. 'To certify' means many things according to the American Heritage dictionary of the English Language. These meanings range from 'to guarantee as meeting a standard' to 'to declare legally insane'. For this discussion, we will use the definition 'an action taken by some authoritative body that essentially guarantees that the instruction meets some defined standard'. In order to make this certification, the responsible body subjects the educational process, training, training device, or simulator to some type of examination to determine its adequacy or validity.

  11. Methodology scuba diving on tinge

    OpenAIRE

    Vondrášek, David

    2011-01-01

    Title: Methodology of apnea diving Objectives: The main objective of this work is to develop materials that could serve as a learning support students in basic studies of apnea diving. A part of the history of diving equipment and diving physiology of flavor and also methodologies apnea diving. Methods: Study of available sources. Literature available sources. Development of educational material using the material used and its own experience. Results: The result is a learning support for stud...

  12. Gas Consumption of Scuba Divers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-10-01

    divers R = rectal temperatura T i = regression coefficients -, 1 = 0, 1, 2, ... 23, This regression model includes the above controlled parameters along...electrodes and the ground electrode. These resistors were mounted in the sensor harness. The + 10 vdc power supply for the signal conditioners and the...Initiate post-test 0830 Divers instrumentation and calibrations; remove dressing - start sensor harnesses; clean electrodes and 0830 Tape recorder

  13. Katayama fever ID scuba divers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1991-03-02

    Mar 2, 1991 ... became infected while recovering a boat engine from the shallows of a 1,1 million m3 dam near ... Because the weather was warm, the divers did not dry them- selves thoroughly on leaving the .... tests were conducted to confirm whether or not they had an active infection before treatment. Importantly, both ...

  14. Proof-Carrying Survivability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-15

    pp.289-302 ( Impact factor : 2.09). 2. Julic, J. and Zuo, Y. (2012). “An RFID Survivability Impact Model in the Military Domain”, Proc. of 18 th...Availability, Reliability and Security, 40(4), pp. 406-418 ( Impact factor : 2.016). 10. Zuo, Y. (2010). “A Holistic Approach for Specification of Security... Impact factor : 1.596). 20. Zuo, Y., Pimple, M. and Lande, S. (2009). “A Framework for RFID Survivability Requirement Analysis and Specification”, Proc

  15. Successful implementation of Helping Babies Survive and Helping Mothers Survive programs-An Utstein formula for newborn and maternal survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hege L Ersdal

    Full Text Available Globally, the burden of deaths and illness is still unacceptably high at the day of birth. Annually, approximately 300.000 women die related to childbirth, 2.7 million babies die within their first month of life, and 2.6 million babies are stillborn. Many of these fatalities could be avoided by basic, but prompt care, if birth attendants around the world had the necessary skills and competencies to manage life-threatening complications around the time of birth. Thus, the innovative Helping Babies Survive (HBS and Helping Mothers Survive (HMS programs emerged to meet the need for more practical, low-cost, and low-tech simulation-based training. This paper provides users of HBS and HMS programs a 10-point list of key implementation steps to create sustained impact, leading to increased survival of mothers and babies. The list evolved through an Utstein consensus process, involving a broad spectrum of international experts within the field, and can be used as a means to guide processes in low-resourced countries. Successful implementation of HBS and HMS training programs require country-led commitment, readiness, and follow-up to create local accountability and ownership. Each country has to identify its own gaps and define realistic service delivery standards and patient outcome goals depending on available financial resources for dissemination and sustainment.

  16. Language Training - French Training

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 29 January to 30 March 2007. These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz : Tel. 73127. Writing Professional Documents in French The next session will take place from 29 January to 30 March 2007. This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken French. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF (for 8 students) For further information and registration, please consult our Web pages:   http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz : Tel. 73127. Writing Professional Documents in English The next session will take place from January to June 2007 (break at Easter). This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken English. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF (for 8 students) Timetable will be fixed after discussion with the students. For registratio...

  17. Language Training: English Training

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place from 04 October 2004 to 11 February 2005 (3 weeks break at Christmas). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow, tel. 72957. Oral Expression This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be approximately 8 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. depending on the needs of the students. Duration: 20 hours (2 hours a week) Price: 440 CHF (for 8 students) For further information, please contact Mr. Liptow, tel. 72957. Date and timetable will be fixed when there are sufficient participants enrolled. FORMATION EN LANGUES LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 langua...

  18. Language Training: English Training

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place from 04 October 2004 to 11 February 2005 (3 weeks break at Christmas). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow, tel. 72957. Oral Expression This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be approximately 8 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. depending on the needs of the students. Duration: 20 hours (2 hours a week) Price: 440 CHF (for 8 students) For further information, please contact Mr. Liptow, tel. 72957. Date and timetable will be fixed when there are sufficient participants enrolled. FORMATION EN LANGUES LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 languag...

  19. Language Training: English Training

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    La prochaine session se déroulera du 04 octobre 2004 au 11 février 2005 (interruption de 3 semaines à Noël). Ces cours s'adressent à toute personne travaillant au CERN ainsi qu'à leur conjoint. Pour vous inscrire et voir tout le détail des cours proposés, consultez nos pages Web : http://cern.ch/Training Vous pouvez aussi contacter M. Liptow, tél. 72957. General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place from 04 October 2004 to 11 February 2005 (3 weeks break at Christmas). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow, tel. 72957. Oral Expression This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be approximately 8 participants ...

  20. Survivability via Control Objectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CAMPBELL,PHILIP L.

    2000-08-11

    Control objectives open an additional front in the survivability battle. A given set of control objectives is valuable if it represents good practices, it is complete (it covers all the necessary areas), and it is auditable. CobiT and BS 7799 are two examples of control objective sets.

  1. Artists’ Survival Rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Trine; Jensen, Søren

    2017-01-01

    The literature of cultural economics generally finds that an artistic education has no significant impact on artists’ income and careers in the arts. In our research, we have readdressed this question by looking at the artists’ survival in the arts occupations. The results show that an artistic...... education has a significant impact on artists’ careers in the arts and we find important industry differences....

  2. Education for Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldrich, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This article provides a brief overview of current approaches to education and concludes that none of these is sufficient to meet the challenges that now face the human race. It argues instead for a new concept of education for survival. (Contains 1 note.)

  3. Flexible survival regression modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortese, Giuliana; Scheike, Thomas H; Martinussen, Torben

    2009-01-01

    Regression analysis of survival data, and more generally event history data, is typically based on Cox's regression model. We here review some recent methodology, focusing on the limitations of Cox's regression model. The key limitation is that the model is not well suited to represent time-varyi...

  4. Seeds to survive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, S.P.C.

    2002-01-01

    Seeds are important for man, either as propagation material of crops or directly for the production of foods, fodder and drinks. The natural function of seeds is dispersal of its genes to successive generations. Survival mechanisms seed have evolved sometimes interfere with those preferred by

  5. Survival After Retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Clark; Youngblood, Stuart A.

    1986-01-01

    Examined survival rates after retirement in a large corporation. A regression analysis was performed to control for age, sex, job status, and type of work differences that may influence longevity. Short-term suvivors seemed to undergo a different adjustment process than long-term survivors. (Author/ABL)

  6. Strength Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... big difference between strength training, powerlifting, and competitive bodybuilding! Strength training uses resistance methods like free weights, ... a person can lift at one time. Competitive bodybuilding involves evaluating muscle definition and symmetry, as well ...

  7. Surviving Sepsis Campaign

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rhodes, Andrew; Evans, Laura E; Alhazzani, Waleed

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide an update to "Surviving Sepsis Campaign Guidelines for Management of Sepsis and Septic Shock: 2012". DESIGN: A consensus committee of 55 international experts representing 25 international organizations was convened. Nominal groups were assembled at key international meetings......, and to formulate recommendations as strong or weak, or best practice statement when applicable. RESULTS: The Surviving Sepsis Guideline panel provided 93 statements on early management and resuscitation of patients with sepsis or septic shock. Overall, 32 were strong recommendations, 39 were weak recommendations...... of care have relatively weak support, evidence-based recommendations regarding the acute management of sepsis and septic shock are the foundation of improved outcomes for these critically ill patients with high mortality....

  8. Surviving Sepsis Campaign

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rhodes, Andrew; Evans, Laura E; Alhazzani, Waleed

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide an update to "Surviving Sepsis Campaign Guidelines for Management of Sepsis and Septic Shock: 2012." DESIGN: A consensus committee of 55 international experts representing 25 international organizations was convened. Nominal groups were assembled at key international meetings......, and to formulate recommendations as strong or weak, or best practice statement when applicable. RESULTS: The Surviving Sepsis Guideline panel provided 93 statements on early management and resuscitation of patients with sepsis or septic shock. Overall, 32 were strong recommendations, 39 were weak recommendations...... of care have relatively weak support, evidence-based recommendations regarding the acute management of sepsis and septic shock are the foundation of improved outcomes for these critically ill patients with high mortality....

  9. Cracking the survival code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Füllgrabe, Jens; Heldring, Nina; Hermanson, Ola; Joseph, Bertrand

    2014-01-01

    Modifications of histones, the chief protein components of the chromatin, have emerged as critical regulators of life and death. While the “apoptotic histone code” came to light a few years ago, accumulating evidence indicates that autophagy, a cell survival pathway, is also heavily regulated by histone-modifying proteins. In this review we describe the emerging “autophagic histone code” and the role of histone modifications in the cellular life vs. death decision. PMID:24429873

  10. Survival analysis models and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Xian

    2012-01-01

    Survival analysis concerns sequential occurrences of events governed by probabilistic laws.  Recent decades have witnessed many applications of survival analysis in various disciplines. This book introduces both classic survival models and theories along with newly developed techniques. Readers will learn how to perform analysis of survival data by following numerous empirical illustrations in SAS. Survival Analysis: Models and Applications: Presents basic techniques before leading onto some of the most advanced topics in survival analysis.Assumes only a minimal knowledge of SAS whilst enablin

  11. Language Training - English Training

    CERN Document Server

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place: from 2nd March to end of June 2009 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Nathalie Dumeaux, tel. 78144. Oral Expression The next session will take place from 2nd March to end of June 2009 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to enhance their speaking skills. There will be an average of 8 participants per class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays, etc., depending on the needs of the students. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF (for a minimum of 8 students) Writing Professional Documents in English The next session will take place from 2nd March to end of June 2009 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). This course is designed for people ...

  12. Language Training - English Training

    CERN Document Server

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place: from 2nd March to end of June 2009 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Nathalie Dumeaux, tel. 78144. Oral Expression The next session will take place from 2nd March to end of June 2009 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to enhance their speaking skills. There will be on average of 8 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. depending on the needs of the students. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF (for a minimum of 8 students) Writing Professional Documents in English The next session will take place from 2nd March to end of June 2009 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). This course is designed for people w...

  13. Applied survival analysis using R

    CERN Document Server

    Moore, Dirk F

    2016-01-01

    Applied Survival Analysis Using R covers the main principles of survival analysis, gives examples of how it is applied, and teaches how to put those principles to use to analyze data using R as a vehicle. Survival data, where the primary outcome is time to a specific event, arise in many areas of biomedical research, including clinical trials, epidemiological studies, and studies of animals. Many survival methods are extensions of techniques used in linear regression and categorical data, while other aspects of this field are unique to survival data. This text employs numerous actual examples to illustrate survival curve estimation, comparison of survivals of different groups, proper accounting for censoring and truncation, model variable selection, and residual analysis. Because explaining survival analysis requires more advanced mathematics than many other statistical topics, this book is organized with basic concepts and most frequently used procedures covered in earlier chapters, with more advanced topics...

  14. Survival after blood transfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads; Ahlgren, Martin; Rostgaard, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    of transfusion recipients in Denmark and Sweden followed for up to 20 years after their first blood transfusion. Main outcome measure was all-cause mortality. RESULTS: A total of 1,118,261 transfusion recipients were identified, of whom 62.0 percent were aged 65 years or older at the time of their first...... the SMR remained significantly 1.3-fold increased. CONCLUSION: The survival and relative mortality patterns among blood transfusion recipients were characterized with unprecedented detail and precision. Our results are relevant to assessments of the consequences of possible transfusion-transmitted disease...... as well as for cost-benefit estimation of new blood safety interventions....

  15. Nuclear War Survival Skills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kearny, C.H.

    2002-06-24

    The purpose of this book is to provide Americans with information and instructions that will significantly increase their chances of surviving a possible nuclear attack. It brings together field-tested instructions that, if followed by a large fraction of Americans during a crisis that preceded an attack, could save millions of lives. The author is convinced that the vulnerability of our country to nuclear threat or attack must be reduced and that the wide dissemination of the information contained in this book would help achieve that objective of our overall defense strategy.

  16. Design of survivable networks

    CERN Document Server

    Stoer, Mechthild

    1992-01-01

    The problem of designing a cost-efficient network that survives the failure of one or more nodes or edges of the network is critical to modern telecommunications engineering. The method developed in this book is designed to solve such problems to optimality. In particular, a cutting plane approach is described, based on polyhedral combinatorics, that is ableto solve real-world problems of this type in short computation time. These results are of interest for practitioners in the area of communication network design. The book is addressed especially to the combinatorial optimization community, but also to those who want to learn polyhedral methods. In addition, interesting new research problemsare formulated.

  17. Endurance training

    OpenAIRE

    Borůvková, Lenka

    2017-01-01

    Title: Endurance training Objectives: The aim of this research is to analyse the complexity of endurance growth for amateur cyclist. We will endeavour to suggest a suitable training plan for a 41 year old female. Method: All data was gained by collecting. The entry and final diagnostics were carried out by biomedical laboratory. A cycling ergometer was used in the maximum perseverance training test (spiroergometry). The maximum heart rate test was completed in the outdoor terrain. We also car...

  18. Gene Expression Profiling Predicts Survival in Conventional Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Conventional renal cell carcinoma (cRCC accounts for most of the deaths due to kidney cancer. Tumor stage, grade, and patient performance status are used currently to predict survival after surgery. Our goal was to identify gene expression features, using comprehensive gene expression profiling, that correlate with survival. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Gene expression profiles were determined in 177 primary cRCCs using DNA microarrays. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis segregated cRCC into five gene expression subgroups. Expression subgroup was correlated with survival in long-term follow-up and was independent of grade, stage, and performance status. The tumors were then divided evenly into training and test sets that were balanced for grade, stage, performance status, and length of follow-up. A semisupervised learning algorithm (supervised principal components analysis was applied to identify transcripts whose expression was associated with survival in the training set, and the performance of this gene expression-based survival predictor was assessed using the test set. With this method, we identified 259 genes that accurately predicted disease-specific survival among patients in the independent validation group (p < 0.001. In multivariate analysis, the gene expression predictor was a strong predictor of survival independent of tumor stage, grade, and performance status (p < 0.001. CONCLUSIONS: cRCC displays molecular heterogeneity and can be separated into gene expression subgroups that correlate with survival after surgery. We have identified a set of 259 genes that predict survival after surgery independent of clinical prognostic factors.

  19. Gene expression profiling predicts survival in conventional renal cell carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongjuan Zhao

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Conventional renal cell carcinoma (cRCC accounts for most of the deaths due to kidney cancer. Tumor stage, grade, and patient performance status are used currently to predict survival after surgery. Our goal was to identify gene expression features, using comprehensive gene expression profiling, that correlate with survival. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Gene expression profiles were determined in 177 primary cRCCs using DNA microarrays. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis segregated cRCC into five gene expression subgroups. Expression subgroup was correlated with survival in long-term follow-up and was independent of grade, stage, and performance status. The tumors were then divided evenly into training and test sets that were balanced for grade, stage, performance status, and length of follow-up. A semisupervised learning algorithm (supervised principal components analysis was applied to identify transcripts whose expression was associated with survival in the training set, and the performance of this gene expression-based survival predictor was assessed using the test set. With this method, we identified 259 genes that accurately predicted disease-specific survival among patients in the independent validation group (p < 0.001. In multivariate analysis, the gene expression predictor was a strong predictor of survival independent of tumor stage, grade, and performance status (p < 0.001. CONCLUSIONS: cRCC displays molecular heterogeneity and can be separated into gene expression subgroups that correlate with survival after surgery. We have identified a set of 259 genes that predict survival after surgery independent of clinical prognostic factors.

  20. Interval Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Weston M, et al. Effects of low-volume high-intensity interval training (HIT) on fitness in adults: A meta-analysis ... 2014;44:1005. Gillen JB, et al. Is high-intensity interval training a time-efficient exercise strategy to improve health ...

  1. ENGLISH TRAINING

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 language.training@cern.ch PLACES AVAILABLE Writing Professional Documents in English This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken English who need to improve their professional writing (administrative, scientific, technical). Duration: 20 hours (2 hours a week) Price: 440 CHF (for 8 students) Date and timetable will be fixed when there are sufficient participants enrolled. Oral Expression This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their sp...

  2. OBESITY IN CANCER SURVIVAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, Niyati; Chandran, Urmila; Bandera, Elisa V.

    2013-01-01

    Although obesity is a well known risk factor for several cancers, its role on cancer survival is poorly understood. We conducted a systematic literature review to assess the current evidence evaluating the impact of body adiposity on the prognosis of the three most common obesity-related cancers: prostate, colorectal, and breast. We included 33 studies of breast cancer, six studies of prostate cancer, and eight studies of colorectal cancer. We note that the evidence over-represents breast cancer survivorship research and is sparse for prostate and colorectal cancers. Overall, most studies support a relationship between body adiposity and site-specific mortality or cancer progression. However, most of the research was not specifically designed to study these outcomes and, therefore, several methodological issues should be considered before integrating their results to draw conclusions. Further research is urgently warranted to assess the long-term impact of obesity among the growing population of cancer survivors. PMID:22540252

  3. Surviving relatives after suicide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørrelykke, Helle; Cohrt, Pernille

    suicide in Denmark. This means that at least 400 people undergo the trauma it is when one of their near relatives commits suicide. We also know that the loss from suicide involves a lot of conflicting feelings - like anger, shame, guilt and loss and that the lack of therapy/treatment of these difficult...... and conflicting feelings may result in pathological expansion of grief characterized by extremely reduced quality of life involving severe psychical and social consequences. Suicide a subject of taboo In the 1980s WHO drafted a health policy document (‘Health for all year 2000’) with 38 targets for attaining......We would like to focus on the surviving relatives after suicides, because it is generally accepted that it is especially difficult to recover after the loss from suicide and because we know as a fact that one suicide affects five persons on average. Every year approximately 700 people commit...

  4. Obesity in cancer survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, Niyati; Chandran, Urmila; Bandera, Elisa V

    2012-08-21

    Although obesity is a well-known risk factor for several cancers, its role on cancer survival is poorly understood. We conducted a systematic literature review to assess the current evidence evaluating the impact of body adiposity on the prognosis of the three most common obesity-related cancers: prostate, colorectal, and breast. We included 33 studies of breast cancer, six studies of prostate cancer, and eight studies of colo-rectal cancer. We note that the evidence overrepresents breast cancer survivorship research and is sparse for prostate and colorectal cancers. Overall, most studies support a relationship between body adiposity and site-specific mortality or cancer progression. However, most of the research was not specifically designed to study these outcomes and, therefore, several methodological issues should be considered before integrating their results to draw conclusions. Further research is urgently warranted to assess the long-term impact of obesity among the growing population of cancer survivors.

  5. Candida survival strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polke, Melanie; Hube, Bernhard; Jacobsen, Ilse D

    2015-01-01

    Only few Candida species, e.g., Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida dubliniensis, and Candida parapsilosis, are successful colonizers of a human host. Under certain circumstances these species can cause infections ranging from superficial to life-threatening disseminated candidiasis. The success of C. albicans, the most prevalent and best studied Candida species, as both commensal and human pathogen depends on its genetic, biochemical, and morphological flexibility which facilitates adaptation to a wide range of host niches. In addition, formation of biofilms provides additional protection from adverse environmental conditions. Furthermore, in many host niches Candida cells coexist with members of the human microbiome. The resulting fungal-bacterial interactions have a major influence on the success of C. albicans as commensal and also influence disease development and outcome. In this chapter, we review the current knowledge of important survival strategies of Candida spp., focusing on fundamental fitness and virulence traits of C. albicans. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Psychology and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, D P; Ruth, T E; Wagner, L M

    1993-11-06

    We examined the deaths of 28,169 adult Chinese-Americans, and 412,632 randomly selected, matched controls coded "white" on the death certificate. Chinese-Americans, but not whites, die significantly earlier than normal (1.3-4.9 yr) if they have a combination of disease and birthyear which Chinese astrology and medicine consider ill-fated. The more strongly a group is attached to Chinese traditions, the more years of life are lost. Our results hold for nearly all major causes of death studied. The reduction in survival cannot be completely explained by a change in the behaviour of the Chinese patient, doctor, or death-registrar, but seems to result at least partly from psychosomatic processes.

  7. Improving Survival and Promoting Respiratory Motor Function After Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    This application proposes to help improve survival, decrease early dependence on mechanical ventilation, and restore breathing after cervical spinal...complications. This application proposes to help improve survival, decrease early dependence on mechanical ventilation, and restore breathing after...training as cervical SCI is a complicated and difficult surgery and much practice is needed in order to produce consistent injury outcomes

  8. Training Attestations

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2004-01-01

    In the past, paper Training Attestations were printed during the first quarter of a New Year for Staff Members having followed courses and seminars the previous year in the context of CERN's official Training Programmes.  The attestations were sent to Divisional Training Officers (DTO's) for distribution to all Staff Members concerned within their Division. In practise many Staff Members did not find this paper useful, however some expressed a wish to be able to have access to a self-service facility in case of need. This change was discussed by the Joint Training Board (JTB) and with the DTO's during 2003 and was supported. As a consequence, following a collaboration between HR-PMD and IT-AIS, from 2004 onwards paper Training Attestations will no longer be printed and distributed as before. Those requiring a list of training followed in the past can now obtain their attestation directly from the Human Resources Toolkit (HRT) application for all training followed since 1997. https://hrt.cern...

  9. LANGUAGE TRAINING

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 language.training@cern.ch FRENCH TRAINING General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 26 January to 02 April 2004. These courses are open to all persons working on the Cern site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz : Tel. 73127. Writing Professional Documents in French The next session will take place from 26 January to 02 April 2004. This course is designed for peop...

  10. LANGUAGE TRAINING

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 language.training@cern.ch FRENCH TRAINING General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 26 January to 02 April 2004. These courses are open to all persons working on the Cern site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz: Tel. 73127. Writing Professional Documents in French The next session will take place from 26 January to 02 April 2004. This course is designed for people wi...

  11. Exercise training in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piepoli, Massimo F

    2005-05-01

    The reduction of exercise capacity with early occurrence of fatigue and dyspnea is a hallmark of heart failure syndrome. There are objective similarities between heart failure and muscular deconditioning. Deficiencies in peripheral blood flow and skeletal muscle function, morphology, metabolism, and function are present. The protective effects of physical activity have been elucidated in many recent studies: training improves ventilatory control, skeletal muscle metabolism, autonomic nervous system, central and peripheral circulation, and heart function. These provide the physiologic basis to explain the benefits in terms of survival and freedom from hospitalization demonstrated by physical training also in heart failure.

  12. Survival assays using Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hae-Eun H; Jung, Yoonji; Lee, Seung-Jae V

    2017-02-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans is an important model organism with many useful features, including rapid development and aging, easy cultivation, and genetic tractability. Survival assays using C. elegans are powerful methods for studying physiological processes. In this review, we describe diverse types of C. elegans survival assays and discuss the aims, uses, and advantages of specific assays. C. elegans survival assays have played key roles in identifying novel genetic factors that regulate many aspects of animal physiology, such as aging and lifespan, stress response, and immunity against pathogens. Because many genetic factors discovered using C. elegans are evolutionarily conserved, survival assays can provide insights into mechanisms underlying physiological processes in mammals, including humans.

  13. Supervisor training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Nygaard

    2015-01-01

    This article fills a gap in knowledge about supervisor training programmes in the field of music therapy in Europe. Sparse research exists which demonstrates evidence of effective professional supervision upon the outcome of music therapy clinical practice. The article has its focus on the experi......This article fills a gap in knowledge about supervisor training programmes in the field of music therapy in Europe. Sparse research exists which demonstrates evidence of effective professional supervision upon the outcome of music therapy clinical practice. The article has its focus...... on the experience of an integrated supervisor training programme offered in Aalborg, Denmark in 2009/2010. In this programme general issues of professional supervision and the application of artistic media as a core element in the supervisory process were Integrated. It is the hope of the author that this article...... will inspire other music therapists to develop supervisor training programmes for professional music therapists and also to undertake further research into professional supervision....

  14. Language Training

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2006-01-01

    General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 8 May to 30 June (or 7 July) 2006. These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz : Tel. 73127. Writing Professional Documents in French The next session will take place from 10 April to 19 June 2006. This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken French. Duration: 24 hours Price: 528 CHF (for 8 students) For further information and registration, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz : Tel. 73127. FORMATION EN LANGUES LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 language.training@cern.ch

  15. [Problems and priorities in child survival].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobadilla, J L

    1988-01-01

    This work synthesizes the conclusions and recommendations of the 1985 International Workshop on Child Survival held in Teotihuacan, Mexico. Data are presented which document the extent of the problem of child survival in Latin America and the deficiencies of available data. Malnutrition, diseases preventable through vaccination, diarrheal diseases, acute respiratory infections, perinatal disorders, and shortcomings in quality of care are separately discussed following an assessment of their socioeconomic and cultural determining factors. Recent advances in the preventive component of primary health care programs are discussed. In Latin America, 900 of each 1000 live born babies survive to the 5th year of life compared to 980 in developed countries. Although the mortality rate of children under 5 in Latin America declined from 128 in 1950-55 to 63 in 1980-85, there are wide disparities between countries. Most countries of Latin America were classified as having high or very high infant and child mortality. There are serious differences in child survival between geographic regions and social groups of each country. The mortality decline in Costa Rica, Cuba, and Chile demonstrates that other countries could avoid a large proportion of deaths by ensuring that benefits of current programs have broader coverage. The severe economic crisis in Mexico and other countries threatens the progress already achieved in child survival. The recommendations of the conference are based on the premise that recent efforts to improve survival have been insufficient and a more rational use of the available resources and knowledge is required. In the area of health policy, priority should continue to be given to providing care for mothers and small children. Investments should be reoriented toward extending coverage of primary health care. The proportion of mothers attended during delivery by trained paramedical personnel or physicians should be increased, and family planning programs in

  16. Surviving a Suicide Attempt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Al-Harrasi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Suicide is a global phenomenon in all regions of the world affecting people of all age groups. It has detrimental consequences on patients, their families, and the community as a whole. There have been numerous risk factors described for suicide including mental illness, stressful life situations, loss of social support, and general despair. The association of suicide with Islam has not been extensively studied. The common impression from clinical practice is that being a practicing Muslim reduces the risk of suicide. Another factor associated with suicide is starting a patient on antidepressants. However, this has been questioned recently. This report describes a middle-aged man with depression and multiple social stressors who survived a serious suicide attempt. The discussion will focus on the factors that lead him to want to end his life and the impact of the assumed protective factors such as religious belief and family support on this act of self-harm. Such patients can be on the edge when there is an imbalance between risk factors (such as depression, insomnia, and psychosocial stressors and protective factors (like religious affiliation and family support. All physicians are advised to assess the suicide risk thoroughly in patients with depression regardless of any presumed protective factor.

  17. Surviving a Suicide Attempt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Harrasi, Ahmed; Al Maqbali, Mandhar; Al-Sinawi, Hamed

    2016-09-01

    Suicide is a global phenomenon in all regions of the world affecting people of all age groups. It has detrimental consequences on patients, their families, and the community as a whole. There have been numerous risk factors described for suicide including mental illness, stressful life situations, loss of social support, and general despair. The association of suicide with Islam has not been extensively studied. The common impression from clinical practice is that being a practicing Muslim reduces the risk of suicide. Another factor associated with suicide is starting a patient on antidepressants. However, this has been questioned recently. This report describes a middle-aged man with depression and multiple social stressors who survived a serious suicide attempt. The discussion will focus on the factors that lead him to want to end his life and the impact of the assumed protective factors such as religious belief and family support on this act of self-harm. Such patients can be on the edge when there is an imbalance between risk factors (such as depression, insomnia, and psychosocial stressors) and protective factors (like religious affiliation and family support). All physicians are advised to assess the suicide risk thoroughly in patients with depression regardless of any presumed protective factor.

  18. Will the olympics survive?.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosla, T.

    1977-01-01

    The United States of America dominated 58 events in athletics, field and swimming, which between them accounted for 35 per cent of all events in the Munich Olympiad. 1972; these events favour taller individuals. But, in 25 per cent of other events (1) cycling, (2) fencing, (3) gymnastics, (4) judo, (5) weightlifting and (6) Graeco Roman wrestling the U.S.A. did not win a single medal. The failure of the U.S.A. to maintain her lead in Munich was largely due to weaknesses in these other events in many of which the potential medallists can be derived from the lower half of the height distribution (events 3 to 6). These weaknesses are Russia's strength and they continued to remain unstrengthened at Montreal. Also, the domination held by the U.S.A. in swimming was seriously challenged by East Germany. The present trends indicate that the U.S.A.'s ranking is likely to slip further to the third position in Moscow 1980. Factors inhibiting the survival of the Olympics are pointed. PMID:861436

  19. Teaching Community Survival Skills to Mentally Retarded Adults: A Review and Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, James E.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    The article reviews research on training mentally retarded adults in the following community survival skills: travel training, money management, meal preparation, clothing and personal care, telephone skill, housekeeping, self-medication, leisure skills, social skills, and conversation. Results are said to indicate the value of behavioral…

  20. Disparities in Survival with Bystander CPR following Cardiopulmonary Arrest Based on Neighborhood Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Thakkar Rivera

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The American Heart Association reports the annual incidence of out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary arrests (OHCA is greater than 300,000 with a survival rate of 9.5%. Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR saves one life for every 30, with a 10% decrease in survival associated with every minute of delay in CPR initiation. Bystander CPR and training vary widely by region. We conducted a retrospective study of 320 persons who suffered OHCA in South Florida over 25 months. Increased survival, overall and with bystander CPR, was seen with increasing income (p=0.05, with a stronger disparity between low- and high-income neighborhoods (p=0.01 and p=0.03, resp.. Survival with bystander CPR was statistically greater in white- versus black-predominant neighborhoods (p=0.04. Increased survival, overall and with bystander CPR, was seen with high- versus low-education neighborhoods (p=0.03. Neighborhoods with more high school age persons displayed the lowest survival. We discovered a significant disparity in OHCA survival within neighborhoods of low-income, black-predominance, and low-education. Reduced survival was seen in neighborhoods with larger populations of high school students. This group is a potential target for training, and instruction can conceivably change survival outcomes in these neighborhoods, closing the gap, thus improving survival for all.

  1. Survival After Relapse of Medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koschmann, Carl; Bloom, Karina; Upadhyaya, Santhosh; Geyer, J Russell; Leary, Sarah E S

    2016-05-01

    Survival after recurrence of medulloblastoma has not been reported in an unselected cohort of patients in the contemporary era. We reviewed 55 patients diagnosed with medulloblastoma between 2000 and 2010, and treated at Seattle Children's Hospital to evaluate patterns of relapse treatment and survival. Fourteen of 47 patients (30%) over the age of 3 experienced recurrent or progressive medulloblastoma after standard therapy. The median time from diagnosis to recurrence was 18.0 months (range, 3.6 to 62.6 mo), and site of recurrence was metastatic in 86%. The median survival after relapse was 10.3 months (range, 1.3 to 80.5 mo); 3-year survival after relapse was 18%. There were trend associations between longer survival and having received additional chemotherapy (median survival 12.8 vs. 1.3 mo, P=0.16) and radiation therapy (15.4 vs. 5.9 mo, P=0.20). Isolated local relapse was significantly associated with shorter survival (1.3 vs. 12.8 mo, P=0.009). Recurrence of medulloblastoma is more likely to be metastatic than reported in previous eras. Within the limits of our small sample, our data suggest a potential survival benefit from retreatment with cytotoxic chemotherapy and radiation even in heavily pretreated patients. This report serves as a baseline against which to evaluate novel therapy combinations.

  2. Marketing child survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, J P

    1984-01-01

    Growth monitoring charts, packets of oral rehydration salts (ORS), and vaccines, are inexpensive, life-saving, growth-protecting technologies which can enable parents to protect their children against the worst effects of poverty. Similarly, a matrix of current and easily understandable information about pregnancy, breast feeding, weaning, feeding during and immediately after illness, child spacing, and preparing and using home-made oral rehydration solutions, also could empower parents to protect the lives and the health of their children. The question arises as to how can these technologies and this information be put at the disposal of millions of families in the low-income world. The initial task of the Child Survival and Development Revolution is the communication of what is now possible, yet little is known about how to communicate information whose principal value is to the poor. There are 2 large-scale precedents: the Green Revolution, which in many instances succeeded in putting into the hands of thousands of small and large farmers the techniques and the knowledge which enabled them to double and treble the yields from their lands; and the campaign to put the knowledge and the means of family planning at the disposal of many millions of people. There are 2 lessons to be learned from these precedents: they have shown that the way to promote a people's technology and to put information at the disposal of the majority is by mobilizing all possible resources and working through all possible channels both to create the demand and to meet it; and neither the Green Revolution nor the family planning movement rally took off until they were viewed as political and economic priorities and given the full support of the nation's political leadership. Nowhere are these 2 lessons more clearly illustrated than in present-day Indonesia. Because the campaign for family planning was given high personal and political priority by the President, and because 85% of all family

  3. French Training

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2003-01-01

    General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place: from 13 October to 19 December 2003. These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages or contact Mrs. Fontbonne: Tel. 72844. Writing Professional Documents in French This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken French. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF (for 8 students) For further information and registration, please consult our Web pages or contact Mrs. Fontbonne: Tel. 72844. Language Training Françoise Benz Tel.73127 language.training@cern.ch

  4. Succession and survival in psychotherapy organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaleelee, Olya

    2008-11-01

    This paper examines the world of psychotherapy by applying a systemic and psychodynamic understanding of the family business as a way of understanding the dilemmas and challenges of leadership succession. Oedipal factors are explored as an important theme within the succession process. This exploration is set within the context of what function psychotherapy has performed in society over the last thirty years. The hypothesis is that the first generation of leaders aimed to provide containment for the individual citizen at a time of failed dependency in society. The suggestion is that this gave way to the primary task for the second generation, which has been to focus on the therapist in training. The challenge for the third generation is to develop a meaningful role for psychotherapy today and to ensure survival at a time when other shorter therapies such as CBT are gaining ascendancy over longer term psychoanalytic psychotherapy.

  5. Global Activities and Plant Survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandick, Roger

    2014-01-01

    This chapter provides an extensive review of the empirical evidence found for Sweden concerning plant survival. The result reveals that foreign MNE plants and exporting non-MNE plants have the lowest exit rates, followed by purely domestic-oriented plants, and that domestic MNE plants have...... the highest exit rates. Moreover, the exit rates of globally engaged plants seem to be unaffected by increased foreign presence, whereas there appears to be a negative impact on the survival rates of non-exporting non-MNE plants. Finally, the result reveals that the survival ratio of plants of acquired...... exporters, but not other types of plants, improves post acquisition....

  6. Cardiovascular disease incidence and survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byberg, Stine; Agyemang, Charles; Zwisler, Ann Dorthe

    2016-01-01

    Studies on cardiovascular disease (CVD) incidence and survival show varying results between different ethnic groups. Our aim was to add a new dimension by exploring the role of migrant status in combination with ethnic background on incidence of-and survival from-CVD and more specifically acute...... of some types of cardiovascular disease compared to Danish-born. Family-reunified migrants on the other hand had lower rates of CVD. All migrants had better survival than Danish-born indicating that migrants may not always be disadvantaged in health....

  7. ACADEMIC TRAINING

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    12, 13, 14, March LECTURE SERIES from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg. 500 POSTPONED! - Modern Project Management Methods - POSTPONED! By G. Vallet / Ed. Highware, Paris, F. Academic Training Françoise Benz Secretariat Tel. 73127 francoise.benz@cern.ch

  8. Language training

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2006-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please tell to your supervisor and apply electronically from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training'form available from your Departmental Secretariat or from your DTO (Departmental Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order in which they are received. General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place from beginning of October 2006 to beginning of February 2007 (3 weeks break at Christmas).These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Tessa Osborne, tel.16 23 40. Oral Expression The next session will take place from beginning of October 2006 to beginning of February 2007 (3 weeks break at Christmas).This course is intended for people with a goo...

  9. Language Training

    CERN Document Server

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please tell to your supervisor and apply electronically from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Departmental Secretariat or from your DTO (Departmental Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order in which they are received. General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place: from end of September 2005 to middle of February 2006 (2/ 3 weeks break at Christmas). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow: tel. 72957. Oral Expression The next session will take place from end of September to December 2005. This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain the...

  10. Language training

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please tell to your supervisor and apply electronically from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Departmental Secretariat or from your DTO (Departmental Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order in which they are received. General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place from beginning of October 2006 to beginning of February 2007 (3 weeks break at Christmas).These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Tessa Osborne, tel.16 23 40. Oral Expression The next session will take place from beginning of October 2006 to beginning of February 2007 (3 weeks break at Christmas).This course is intended for people with a good knowl...

  11. Bullet Train.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galagan, Patricia A.

    1999-01-01

    Knowledge Universe is a conglomerate that includes an assortment of training companies, a chain of child-care centers, a knowledge-management consulting business, and an educational toy maker. KU's mission includes building human capital from birth to post-retirement, providing lifelong learning opportunities, and helping businesses use the power…

  12. Technical Training: Technical Training Seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch Monday 9 February 2004 From 10:00 to 12:00 - IT Auditorium - bldg. 31, 3rd floor ANSOFT High-Frequency Seminar David Prestaux, Application Engineer, ANSOFT F-78535 BUC, France This Technical Training seminar will present two Ansoft application products: Ansoft HFSS and Ansoft Designer. Ansoft HFSS makes use of the Finite Element Method (FEM) to calculate field solutions from first principles. It can accurately predict all high-frequency behaviours such as dispersion, mode conversion, and losses due to materials and radiation. Ansoft Designer is a suite of design tools to fully integrate high-frequency, physics-based electromagnetic simulations into a seamless system-level simulation environment. Ansoft Designer uses a simple interface to give complete control over every design task, by a method allowing multiple solvers, Solver on Demand. • Introduction • Overview of the Ansoft Total solution • Ansoft HFSS 9...

  13. [Physical activity and cancer survival].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romieu, Isabelle; Touillaud, Marina; Ferrari, Pietro; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Antoun, Sami; Berthouze-Aranda, Sophie; Bachmann, Patrick; Duclos, Martine; Ninot, Grégory; Romieu, Gilles; Sénesse, Pierre; Behrendt, Jan; Balosso, Jacques; Pavic, Michel; Kerbrat, Pierre; Serin, Daniel; Trédan, Olivier; Fervers, Béatrice

    2012-10-01

    Physical activity has been shown in large cohort studies to positively impact survival in cancer survivors. Existing randomized controlled trials showed a beneficial effect of physical activity on physical fitness, quality of life, anxiety and self-esteem; however, the small sample size, the short follow-up and the lack of standardization of physical activity intervention across studies impaired definite conclusion in terms of survival. Physical activity reduces adiposity and circulating estrogen levels and increases insulin sensitivity among other effects. A workshop was conducted at the International Agency for Research on Cancer in April 2011 to discuss the role of physical activity on cancer survival and the methodology to develop multicentre randomized intervention trials, including the type of physical activity to implement and its association with nutritional recommendations. The authors discuss the beneficial effect of physical activity on cancer survival with a main focus on breast cancer and report the conclusions from this workshop.

  14. Operational slack and venture survival

    OpenAIRE

    Azadegan, Arash; Patel, Pankaj; Parida, Vinit

    2013-01-01

    Slack can act as a double-edged sword. While it can buffer against environmental threats to help ensure business continuity, slack canalso be costly and reduce profitability. In this study, we focus on operational slack, the form related to the firm’s production processes. We investigate the role of operational slack on firm survival during its venture stage, when its survival is significantly challenged by environmental threats. Specifically, we explore how change in three types of environme...

  15. Family Business Training: A Canadian Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, A. B.; Soufani, K.; Lam, Jose

    2003-01-01

    Family firms play an important role in the working of the Canadian economy; despite their importance to the economic activities and job creation it is observed that family businesses have lower survival rates than non-family firms, some argue that this can possibly be attributed (amongst other factors) to the lack of training. Most of the training…

  16. Training Special Educators: Sustaining Professional Development in Special School Placements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Melanie

    2013-01-01

    With the rapidly changing demographic due to survival rates from medical advances, the need to strengthen training on SEND is now recognised, and special school placements valued, having been previously marginalised within initial teacher training. Practices developed since 2008 at one university to support progression of trainees to gain advanced…

  17. Language training

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 14 April to 27 June 2008. These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs Nathalie Dumeaux: Tel. 78144. Writing Professional Documents in French The next session will take place from 14 April to 27 June 2008. This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken French. Duration: 30 hours. Price: 660 CHF. For further information and registration, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs Nathalie Dumeaux: Tel. 78144.

  18. Sports Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    Practitioners of martial arts have long seen a need for a precise method of measuring the power of a karate kick or a boxer's punch in training and competition. Impax sensor is a piezoelectric film less than one thousandth of an inch thick, yet extremely durable. They give out a voltage impulse when struck, the greater the force of impact, the higher the voltage. The impulse is transmitted to a compact electronics package where voltage is translated into a force-pounds reading shown on a digital display. Impax, manufactured by Impulse Technology, Inc. is used by martial arts instructors, practitioners, U.S. Olympic Committee Training Center, football blocking sleds, and boxers as well as police defensive tactics, providing a means of evaluating the performance of recruits.

  19. Earthquake Safety Training through Virtual Drills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Changyang; Liang, Wei; Quigley, Chris; Zhao, Yibiao; Yu, Lap-Fai

    2017-04-01

    Recent popularity of consumer-grade virtual reality devices, such as the Oculus Rift and the HTC Vive, has enabled household users to experience highly immersive virtual environments. We take advantage of the commercial availability of these devices to provide an immersive and novel virtual reality training approach, designed to teach individuals how to survive earthquakes, in common indoor environments. Our approach makes use of virtual environments realistically populated with furniture objects for training. During a training, a virtual earthquake is simulated. The user navigates in, and manipulates with, the virtual environments to avoid getting hurt, while learning the observation and self-protection skills to survive an earthquake. We demonstrated our approach for common scene types such as offices, living rooms and dining rooms. To test the effectiveness of our approach, we conducted an evaluation by asking users to train in several rooms of a given scene type and then test in a new room of the same type. Evaluation results show that our virtual reality training approach is effective, with the participants who are trained by our approach performing better, on average, than those trained by alternative approaches in terms of the capabilities to avoid physical damage and to detect potentially dangerous objects.

  20. Language Training

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    Permanence A "permanence" for language Training has been set up. If anyone has a question or requires information on any aspect of English or French training please come to our office 5 4-016 at the following times. Lucette Fournier - French courses Monday 13.30 - 15.30 Tuesday\t10.30 - 12.30 Tessa Osborne - English courses Wednesday\t12.00 - 14.00 Thursday\t11.00 - 13.00   New courses Specific English and French courses - Exam preparation/ We are now offering specific courses in English and French leading to a recognised external examination (e.g. Cambridge, DELF, DALF). If you are interested in following one of these courses and have at least an upper intermediate level of English or French, please enrol through the following link:  English courses French courses Or contact: Tessa Osborne 72957 (English courses) Lucette Fournier 73483 (French courses) Language Training Nathalie Dumeaux Tel. 78144 nathalie.dumeaux@cern.ch

  1. Language Training

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    PermanenceA "permanence" for language Training has been set up. If anyone has a question or requires information on any aspect of English or French training please come to our office 5 4-016 at the following times. Lucette Fournier French courses Monday 13.30 - 15.30 Tuesday\t10.30 - 12.30 Tessa Osborne English courses Wednesday\t12.00 - 14.00 Thursday\t11.00 - 13.00 New courses Specific English and French courses - Exam preparation/ We are now offering specific courses in English and French leading to a recognised external examination (e.g. Cambridge, DELF and BULATS). If you are interested in following one of these courses and have at least an upper intermediate level of English or French, please enrol through the following link: http://English courses http://French courses Or contact: Tessa Osborne 72957 (English courses) Lucette Fournier 73483 (French courses) Language Training Nathalie Dumeaux Tel. 78144 mailto:nathalie.dumeaux@cern.ch

  2. Technical Training: Technical Training Seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch Tuesday 3 February 2004 From 09:00 to 13:30 - Training Centre Auditorium - bldg. 593, room 11 USB (Universal Serial Bus) CYPRESS Seminar Claudia Colombini, Field Application Engineer CYPRESS ActiveComp Electronic GmbH D-85077 MANCHING, Germany As a pioneer in USB, CYPRESS sets the standard for cost-effective solutions without sacrificing functionality, performance or reliability. Having shipped over 200 million USB devices, Cypress is the undisputed market leader and demonstrates unmatched USB expertise. With the industry's broadest selection of USB solutions, Cypress has the right silicon, software and support for every USB application, from Low-speed to High-Speed and USB On-The-Go (OTG). 9:00 - 10:30 Overview of USB systems. USB CYPRESS product overview. Peripherals: Low Speed, Full Speed, High Speed (1.1 and 2.0). Hub Solutions, Embedded Host Solutions, On-The-Go (OTG) and wireless USB. USB Development Tools (first part) 10:30 -...

  3. Survival Processing Eliminates Collaborative Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reysen, Matthew B; Bliss, Heather; Baker, Melissa A

    2017-04-11

    The present experiments examined the effect of processing words for their survival value, relevance to moving, and pleasantness on participants' free recall scores in both nominal groups (non-redundant pooled individual scores) and collaborative dyads. Overall, participants recalled more words in the survival processing conditions than in the moving and pleasantness processing conditions. Furthermore, nominal groups in both the pleasantness condition (Experiment 1) and the moving and pleasantness conditions (Experiment 2) recalled more words than collaborative groups, thereby replicating the oft-observed effect of collaborative inhibition. However, processing words for their survival value appeared to eliminate the deleterious effects of collaborative remembering in both Experiments 1 and 2. These results are discussed in the context of the retrieval strategy disruption hypothesis and the effects of both expertise and collaborative skill on group remembering.

  4. Recruitment and Apprenticeship Training

    OpenAIRE

    Mohrenweiser, Jens

    2016-01-01

    The paper assesses non-training firm’s potential for free-riding on the training efforts of firms that train apprentices. In order to assess potential free-riding, the paper analyses whether training or non-training firms are more likely to recruit apprenticeship graduates that have been trained elsewhere. Firms without apprenticeships are less likely to hire apprenticeship graduates trained elsewhere than training firms. If these firms do hire apprenticeship graduates, they hire a smaller pr...

  5. Survival in Women with NSCLC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katcoff, Hannah; Wenzlaff, Angela S.; Schwartz, Ann G.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Although lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in women, few studies have investigated the hormonal influence on survival after a lung cancer diagnosis and results have been inconsistent. We evaluated the role of reproductive and hormonal factors in predicting overall survival in women with non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods Population-based lung cancer cases diagnosed between November 1, 2001 and October 31, 2005 were identified through the Metropolitan Detroit Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Registry. Interview and follow-up data were collected for 485 women. Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to determine hazard ratios (HRs) for death after an NSCLC diagnosis associated with reproductive and hormonal variables. Results Use of hormone therapy (HT) was associated with improved survival (HR, 0.69; 95% confidence interval, 0.54–0.89), adjusting for stage, surgery, radiation, education level, pack-years of smoking, age at diagnosis, race, and a multiplicative interaction between stage and radiation. No other reproductive or hormonal factor was associated with survival after an NSCLC diagnosis. Increased duration of HT use before the lung cancer diagnosis (132 months or longer) was associated with improved survival (HR, 0.54; 95% confidence interval, 0.37–0.78), and this finding remained significant in women taking either estrogen alone or progesterone plus estrogen, never smokers, and smokers. Conclusion These findings suggest that HT use, in particular use of estrogen plus progesterone, and long-term HT use are associated with improved survival of NSCLC. PMID:24496005

  6. Survival of Sami cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leena Soininen

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The incidence of cancer among the indigenous Sami people of Northern Finland is lower than among the Finnish general population. The survival of Sami cancer patients is not known, and therefore it is the object of this study. Study design. The cohort consisted of 2,091 Sami and 4,161 non-Sami who lived on 31 December 1978 in the two Sami municipalities of Inari and Utsjoki, which are located in Northern Finland and are 300–500 km away from the nearest central hospital. The survival experience of Sami and non-Sami cancer patients diagnosed in this cohort during 1979–2009 was compared with that of the Finnish patients outside the cohort. Methods. The Sami and non-Sami cancer patients were matched to other Finnish cancer patients for gender, age and year of diagnosis and for the site of cancer. An additional matching was done for the stage at diagnosis. Cancer-specific survival analyses were made using the Kaplan–Meier method and Cox regression modelling. Results. There were 204 Sami and 391 non-Sami cancer cases in the cohort, 20,181 matched controls without matching with stage, and 7,874 stage-matched controls. In the cancer-specific analysis without stage variable, the hazard ratio for Sami was 1.05 (95% confidence interval 0.85–1.30 and for non-Sami 1.02 (0.86–1.20, indicating no difference between the survival of those groups and other patients in Finland. Likewise, when the same was done by also matching the stage, there was no difference in cancer survival. Conclusion. Long distances to medical care or Sami ethnicity have no influence on the cancer patient survival in Northern Finland.

  7. Survival following spinal cord infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New, P W; McFarlane, C L

    2013-06-01

    Retrospective open cohort. To calculate the survival of patients with spinal cord infarction and to compare the cause of death in patients with different mechanisms of ischaemic injury. Spinal Rehabilitation Unit, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. Consecutive admissions between 1 January 1995 and 31 December 2008 with recent onset of spinal cord infarction. Linkage to the Registry of Births, Deaths and Marriages (Victoria) was used to determine survival following discharge from in-patient rehabilitation and cause of death. A total of 44 patients were admitted (males=26, 59%), with a median age of 72 years (interquartile range (IQR) 62-79). One patient died during their in-patient rehabilitation programme. In all, 14 patients (n=14/44; 33%) died during the follow-up period. The median survival after diagnosis was 56 months (IQR 28-85) and after discharge from in-patient rehabilitation was 46 months (IQR 25-74). The 1- and 5-year mortality rates were 7.0% (n=3/43; 95% confidence interval (CI)=2.4-18.6%) and 20.9% (n=9/43; 95% CI=11.4-35.2%). There was no statistically significant difference in survival between patients with the different aetiologies of spinal cord infarction (other vs idiopathic: χ(2)=0.6, P=0.7; other vs vascular: χ(2)=1.9, P=0.3). There was no relationship between survival and gender (χ(2)=0.2, P=0.6), age (χ(2)=3.0, P=0.08), level of injury (χ(2)=0.0, P=1) or American Spinal Cord Society Impairment Scale grade of spinal cord injury (χ(2)=0.02, P=0.9). Patients with spinal cord infarction appear to have a fair survival after discharge from in-patient rehabilitation, not withstanding the occurrence of risk factors of vascular disease in many patients.

  8. ACADEMIC TRAINING

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    6, 7 May LECTURE SERIES from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg. 500 Decoding the Human Genome, Scientific basis and ethic and social aspects by S.E. Antonarakis and A. Mauron / Univ. of Geneva Decoding the Human genome is a very up-to-date topic, raising several questions besides purely scientific, in view of the two competing teams (public and private), the ethics of using the results, and the fact that the project went apparently faster and easier than expected. The lecture series will address the following chapters: Scientific basis and challenges, Ethical and social aspects of genomics. Academic Training Françoise Benz Tel. 73127

  9. Media Training

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2009-01-01

    With the LHC starting up soon, the world's media are again turning their attention to CERN. We're all likely to be called upon to explain what is happening at CERN to media, friends and neighbours. The seminar will be given by BBC television news journalists Liz Pike and Nadia Marchant, and will deal with the kind of questions we're likely to be confronted with through the restart period. The training is open for everybody. Make sure you arrive early enough to get a seat - there are only 200 seats in the Globe. The session will also be webcast: http://webcast.cern.ch/

  10. Genetic aspects of piglet survival

    OpenAIRE

    Knol, E.F.

    2001-01-01

    Piglet mortality is high. In the USA nearly 20% of the piglets do not survive between late gestation and weaning; 7% of the piglets die during farrowing and some 13% are lost during lactation. These statistics from the USA are no exception to the norm. Selection for increased piglet survival, if possible, could have an important economic impact.

    Litters and sows

    Data on some 33.000 litters and some 400.000 piglets from a commercial breeding progr...

  11. Frailty Models in Survival Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Wienke, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    The concept of frailty offers a convenient way to introduce unobserved heterogeneity and associations into models for survival data. In its simplest form, frailty is an unobserved random proportionality factor that modifies the hazard function of an individual or a group of related individuals. "Frailty Models in Survival Analysis" presents a comprehensive overview of the fundamental approaches in the area of frailty models. The book extensively explores how univariate frailty models can represent unobserved heterogeneity. It also emphasizes correlated frailty models as extensions of

  12. English Training

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place: from 03 March to 28 June 2003 (2 weeks break at Easter). These courses are open to all persons working on the Cern site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz: tel.73127 or Mr. Liptow: tel.72957. Writing Professional Documents in English This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken English. Duration: 20 hours (2 hours a week) Price: 440 CHF (for 8 students) For registration and further information, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Tessa Osborne: Tessa.Osborne@cern. Oral Expression This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be approximately 8 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-p...

  13. English Training

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place: from 03 March to 28 June 2003 (2 weeks break at Easter). These courses are open to all persons working on the Cern site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz: tel.73127 or Mr. Liptow: tel.72957. Writing Professional Documents in English This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken English. Duration: 20 hours (2 hours a week) Price: 440 CHF (for 8 students) For registration and further information, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Tessa Osborne: Tessa.Osborne@cern. Oral Expression This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be approximately 8 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, rol...

  14. Language Training

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Formation en anglais Cours d'anglais général et professionnel La prochaine session se déroulera: du 06 octobre 2003 au 13 février 2004 (interruption de 3/4 semaines à Noël). Ces cours s'adressent à toute personne travaillant au CERN ainsi qu'à leur conjoint. Pour vous inscrire et voir tout le détail des cours proposés, consultez nos pages Web: http://cern.ch/Training Vous pouvez aussi contacter Mme Benz, tél. 73127 ou Mr Liptow, tél. 72957. General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place: from 06 October 2003 to 13 February 2004 (3/4 weeks break at Christmas). These courses are open to all persons working on the Cern site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz: tel. 73127 or Mr. Liptow: tel. 72957. Writing Professional Documents in Engl...

  15. Language Training

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Formation en anglais Cours d'anglais général et professionnel La prochaine session se déroulera: du 06 octobre 2003 au 13 février 2004 (interruption de 3/4 semaines à Noël). Ces cours s'adressent à toute personne travaillant au CERN ainsi qu'à leur conjoint. Pour vous inscrire et voir tout le détail des cours proposés, consultez nos pages Web: http://cern.ch/Training Vous pouvez aussi contacter M. Liptow, tél. 72957. General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place: from 06 October 2003 to 13 February 2004 (3/4 weeks break at Christmas). These courses are open to all persons working on the Cern site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow: tel. 72957. Writing Professional Documents in English This course is designed for people with a good level of...

  16. Language Training

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Formation en anglais Cours d'anglais général et professionnel La prochaine session se déroulera: du 06 octobre 2003 au 13 février 2004 (interruption de 3/4 semaines à Noël). Ces cours s'adressent à toute personne travaillant au CERN ainsi qu'à leur conjoint. Pour vous inscrire et voir tout le détail des cours proposés, consultez nos pages Web: http://cern.ch/Training Vous pouvez aussi contacter Mme Benz, tél. 73127 ou Mr Liptow, tél. 72957. General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place: from 06 October 2003 to 13 February 2004 (3/4 weeks break at Christmas). These courses are open to all persons working on the Cern site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz: tel. 73127 or Mr. Liptow: tel. 72957. Writing Professional Documents in English This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken English. Duration: 20 hours (2 hours a week) Price: ...

  17. Plant and animal communities along the Swedish Baltic Sea coast - the building of a database of quantitative data collected by SCUBA divers, its use and some GIS applications in the Graesoe area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandman, Antonia; Kautsky, Hans [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Systems Ecology

    2004-06-01

    The aim of the project was to compile a single database with quantitative data collected by SCUBA divers from the whole Swedish Baltic Sea coast. Data of plant and animal biomass, together with position, depth and type of substrate from 19 areas along the Swedish coast from the county of Blekinge to Kalix in the Bothnian Bay were compiled in a single database. In all, the database contains 2,170 records (samples) from 179 different stations where in total 161 plant and 145 animal species have been found. The data were then illustrated by the geographical distribution of plant and animal biomass and by constructing a model to estimate future changes of the plant and animal communities in the Graesoe area in the Aaland Sea applying GIS-techniques. To illustrate the opportunities of the database the change of the composition of benthic plant and animal biomass with salinity was calculated. The proportion of marine species increased with increasing salinity and the benthic biomass was at its highest in the southern Baltic proper. Quantitative data from Grepen and the Graesoe-Singoe area were used to calculate present biomass in the Graesoe area. A scenario of the change in biomass distribution and total biomass caused by shore displacement was created using data from Raaneaa and Kalix in the Bothnian Bay. To map the biomass distribution the material was divided into different depth intervals. The change of biomass with time was calculated as a function of salinity change and reduction of the available area, caused by shore displacement. The total biomass for all plants and animals in the investigated area was 50,500 tonnes at present. In 2,000 years the total biomass will be 25,000 tonnes and in 4,000 years 3,600 tonnes due to shore displacement causing a decrease in both salinity and available substrate.To make an estimate of the species distribution and a rough estimate of their biomass in an unknown geographic area, the type of substrate, the depth and the wave

  18. Plant and animal communities along the Swedish Baltic Sea coast - the building of a database of quantitative data collected by SCUBA divers, its use and some GIS applications in the Graesoe area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandman, Antonia; Kautsky, Hans [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Systems Ecology

    2005-03-01

    The aim of the project was to compile a single database with quantitative data collected by SCUBA divers from the whole Swedish Baltic Sea coast. Data of plant and animal biomass, together with position, depth and type of substrate from 19 areas along the Swedish coast from the county of Blekinge to Kalix in the Bothnian Bay were compiled in a single database. In all, the database contains 2,170 records (samples) from 179 different stations where in total 161 plant and 145 animal species have been found. The data were then illustrated by the geographical distribution of plant and animal biomass and by constructing a model to estimate future changes of the plant and animal communities in the Graesoe area in the Aaland Sea applying GIS-techniques. To illustrate the opportunities of the database the change of the composition of benthic plant and animal biomass with salinity was calculated. The proportion of marine species increased with increasing salinity and the benthic biomass was at its highest in the southern Baltic proper. Quantitative data from Grepen and the Graesoe-Singoe area were used to calculate present biomass in the Graesoe area. A scenario of the change in biomass distribution and total biomass caused by shore displacement was created using data from Raaneaa and Kalix in the Bothnian Bay. To map the biomass distribution the material was divided into different depth intervals. The change of biomass with time was calculated as a function of salinity change and reduction of the available area, caused by shore displacement. The total biomass for all plants and animals in the investigated area was 50,500 tonnes at present. In 2,000 years the total biomass will be 25,000 tonnes and in 4,000 years 3,600 tonnes due to shore displacement causing a decrease in both salinity and available substrate.To make an estimate of the species distribution and a rough estimate of their biomass in an unknown geographic area, the type of substrate, the depth and the wave

  19. School Leadership: Handbook for Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Stuart C., Ed.; And Others

    Based on the assumption that the survival of the nation's schools and their leaders depends on these leaders having real influence over the quality of schooling, this volume draws from the work of many authorities to look at leadership from three perspectives: the person, the structure, and the skills. Chapters focusing on the person who holds the…

  20. Long-term haemodialysis survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heaf, James; Nielsen, Arne Høj; Hansen, Henrik Post

    2012-01-01

    Haemodialysis (HD) treatment for end-stage renal disease bears a poor prognosis. We present a case of a patient who, apart from two transplant periods lasting 8 months in all, was treated with conventional in-centre HD three times a week and who survived for 41 years. Patients should be aware tha...

  1. Characteristics of Patients Who Survived

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verlaan, Jorrit-Jan; Choi, David; Versteeg, Anne; Albert, Todd; Arts, Mark; Balabaud, Laurent; Bunger, Cody; Buchowski, Jacob Maciej; Chung, Chung Kee; Coppes, Maarten Hubert; Crockard, Hugh Alan; Depreitere, Bart; Fehlings, Michael George; Harrop, James; Kawahara, Norio; Kim, Eun Sang; Lee, Chong-Suh; Leung, Yee; Liu, Zhongjun; Martin-Benlloch, Antonio; Massicotte, Eric Maurice; Mazel, Christian; Meyer, Bernhard; Peul, Wilco; Quraishi, Nasir A.; Tokuhashi, Yasuaki; Tomita, Katsuro; Ulbricht, Christian; Wang, Michael; Oner, F. Cumhur

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Survival after metastatic cancer has improved at the cost of increased presentation with metastatic spinal disease. For patients with pathologic spinal fractures and/or spinal cord compression, surgical intervention may relieve pain and improve quality of life. Surgery is generally

  2. Genetic aspects of piglet survival

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knol, E.F.

    2001-01-01

    Piglet mortality is high. In the USA nearly 20% of the piglets do not survive between late gestation and weaning; 7% of the piglets die during farrowing and some 13% are lost during lactation. These statistics from the USA are no exception to the norm. Selection for increased piglet

  3. Cool echidnas survive the fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowack, Julia; Cooper, Christine Elizabeth; Geiser, Fritz

    2016-01-01

    Fires have occurred throughout history, including those associated with the meteoroid impact at the Cretaceous–Palaeogene (K–Pg) boundary that eliminated many vertebrate species. To evaluate the recent hypothesis that the survival of the K–Pg fires by ancestral mammals was dependent on their ability to use energy-conserving torpor, we studied body temperature fluctuations and activity of an egg-laying mammal, the echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus), often considered to be a ‘living fossil’, before, during and after a prescribed burn. All but one study animal survived the fire in the prescribed burn area and echidnas remained inactive during the day(s) following the fire and substantially reduced body temperature during bouts of torpor. For weeks after the fire, all individuals remained in their original territories and compensated for changes in their habitat with a decrease in mean body temperature and activity. Our data suggest that heterothermy enables mammals to outlast the conditions during and after a fire by reducing energy expenditure, permitting periods of extended inactivity. Therefore, torpor facilitates survival in a fire-scorched landscape and consequently may have been of functional significance for mammalian survival at the K–Pg boundary. PMID:27075255

  4. Modelling survival and connectivity of

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Molen, J.; van Beek, J.; Augustine, S.; Vansteenbrugge, L.; van Walraven, L.; van Langenberg, V.; van der Veer, H.W.; Hostens, K.; Pitois, S.; Robbens, J.

    2015-01-01

    Three different models were applied to study the reproduction, survival and dispersal of Mnemiopsis leidyi in the Scheldt estuaries and the southern North Sea: a high-resolution particle tracking model with passive particles, a low-resolution particle tracking model with a reproduction model

  5. Survivability of SCADA Control Loop

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Camacho, José; de Boer, Pieter-Tjerk; Remke, Anne Katharina Ingrid

    2009-01-01

    The endorsement of information technologies for critical infrastructures control introduces new threats in their security and surveillance. Along with certain level of protection against attacks, it is desirable for critical processes to survive even if they succeed. A stochastic Petri Nets-based

  6. Conventional Training Versus Game-Based Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    Shooter) ( Bug Killer ) (Spy Plane) Conventional Training Versus Game-Based Training Anacapa Sciences, Inc. – Final Report, March 2006 Page...test- bed (which is described in more detail in Chapter 3.) Articles that referenced improved efficiency of training (e.g., reduced training time or...test- bed training programs. In designing the taxonomy, we also conferred with our expert consultant in the field of instructional design, Dr

  7. ACADEMIC TRAINING

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    25, 26, 27, 28 February and 1st March from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg. 500 LECTURE SERIES Neutrino masses and oscillations by A. de Rujula / CERN-TH This course will not cover its subject in the customary way. The emphasis will be on the simple theoretical concepts (helicity, handedness, chirality, Majorana masses) which are obscure in most of the literature, and on the quantum mechanics of oscillations, that ALL books get wrong. Which, hopefully, will not deter me from discussing some of the most interesting results from the labs and from the cosmos. Academic Training Françoise Benz Secretariat Tel. 73127 francoise.benz@cern.ch

  8. English training

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    You have a good level of English BUT... You still need to improve your speaking or You have problems writing professional documents Would you like to work in a small group on either of these areas? Then, the following courses are for you! Writing Professional Documents in English The aim of the course is for students to improve their professional writing. Participants will work on technical, scientific or administrative documents depending on the needs of the group. Duration: 20 hours (2 hours a week) Price: 440 CHF (for 8 students) Oral Expression The emphasis will be on oral expression with necessary feed-back. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. Duration: 20 hours (2 hours a week) Price: 440 CHF (for 8 students) For registration and further information, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow: tel. 72957 / Mrs. Tessa Osborne: Tessa.Osborne@cern.ch.

  9. English Training

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    You have a good level of English BUT... You still need to improve your speaking or You have problems writing professional documents Would you like to work in a small group on either of these areas? Then, the following courses are for you! Writing Professional Documents in English The aim of the course is for students to improve their professional writing. Participants will work on technical, scientific or administrative documents depending on the needs of the group. Duration: 20 hours (2 hours a week) Price: 440 CHF (for 8 students) Oral Expression The emphasis will be on oral expression with necessary feed-back. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. Duration: 20 hours (2 hours a week) Price: 440 CHF (for 8 students) For registration and further information, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow: tel. 72957 / Mrs. Tessa Osborne: Tessa.Osborne@cern.ch.

  10. Complete hazard ranking to analyze right-censored data: An ALS survival study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhengnan; Zhang, Hongjiu; Boss, Jonathan; Goutman, Stephen A; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Dinov, Ivo D; Guan, Yuanfang

    2017-12-01

    Survival analysis represents an important outcome measure in clinical research and clinical trials; further, survival ranking may offer additional advantages in clinical trials. In this study, we developed GuanRank, a non-parametric ranking-based technique to transform patients' survival data into a linear space of hazard ranks. The transformation enables the utilization of machine learning base-learners including Gaussian process regression, Lasso, and random forest on survival data. The method was submitted to the DREAM Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) Stratification Challenge. Ranked first place, the model gave more accurate ranking predictions on the PRO-ACT ALS dataset in comparison to Cox proportional hazard model. By utilizing right-censored data in its training process, the method demonstrated its state-of-the-art predictive power in ALS survival ranking. Its feature selection identified multiple important factors, some of which conflicts with previous studies.

  11. Complete hazard ranking to analyze right-censored data: An ALS survival study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengnan Huang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Survival analysis represents an important outcome measure in clinical research and clinical trials; further, survival ranking may offer additional advantages in clinical trials. In this study, we developed GuanRank, a non-parametric ranking-based technique to transform patients' survival data into a linear space of hazard ranks. The transformation enables the utilization of machine learning base-learners including Gaussian process regression, Lasso, and random forest on survival data. The method was submitted to the DREAM Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS Stratification Challenge. Ranked first place, the model gave more accurate ranking predictions on the PRO-ACT ALS dataset in comparison to Cox proportional hazard model. By utilizing right-censored data in its training process, the method demonstrated its state-of-the-art predictive power in ALS survival ranking. Its feature selection identified multiple important factors, some of which conflicts with previous studies.

  12. Survival of captive-reared Puerto Rican Parrots released in the Caribbean National Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, T.H.; Collazo, J.A.; Vilella, F.J.

    2005-01-01

    We report first-year survival for 34 captive-reared Puerto Rican Parrots (Amazona vittata) released in the Caribbean National Forest, Puerto Rico between 2000 and 2002. The purpose of the releases were to increase population size and the potential number of breeding individuals of the sole extant wild population, and to refine release protocols for eventual reintroduction of a second wild population elsewhere on the island. After extensive prerelease training, we released 10 parrots in 2000, 16 parrots in 2001, and eight parrots in 2002 ranging in age from 1-4 years old. All birds were equipped with radio-transmitters to monitor survival. The overall first-year survival estimate for the 34 parrots was 41% (CI = 22%-61%). Only one parrot died within the first week postrelease, with most (94%) surviving for at least eight weeks after release. Most (54%) documented mortalities were due to raptor predation, which claimed 21% of all released parrots. A captive-reared bird (male, age one), released in 2001, paired with a wild female and fledged two young in 2004. We also calculated survival based on 0% and 50% of observed predation losses and found hypothetical survival rates of 72% and 54%, respectively. Rigorous prerelease training and acclimation was believed to have improved initial postrelease parrot survival, and releasing mixed age-class groups suggests the potential for shortening the time to recruitment. ?? The Cooper Ornithological Society 2005.

  13. A standardized Code Blue Team eliminates variable survival from in-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Sultana A; Ahern, Terence; O'Shea, Ryan; Hatch, Lorien; Henderson, Sean O

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that time of day affects survival from in-hospital cardiac arrest. Lower survival rates are observed during nights and on weekends, except in areas with consistent physician care, such as the Emergency Department. Since 1997, our hospital has utilized a standard, hospital-wide "Code Blue Team" (CBT) to respond to cardiac arrests at any time. This team is always led by an emergency physician, and includes specially trained nurses. To assess if time of day or week affects survival from in-hospital cardiac arrest when a trained, consistent, emergency physician-led CBT is implemented. This is an analysis of prospectively collected data on initial survival rates (return of spontaneous circulation >20 min) of all cardiac arrests that were managed by the CBT from 2000 to 2008. Cardiac arrests were also subcategorized based on initial cardiac rhythm. Survival rates were compared according to time of day or week. A total of 1692 cardiac arrests were included. There was no significant difference in the overall rate of initial survival between day/evening vs. night hours (odds ratio [OR] 1.04, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.83-1.29), or between weekday vs. weekend hours (OR 1.10, 95% CI 0.85-1.38). This held true for all cardiac rhythms. At our institution, there is no significant difference in survival from cardiac arrest when a standardized "Code Blue Team" is utilized, regardless of the time of day or week. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Nuclear manpower training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, In Suk; Lee, H. Y.; Joe, B. J.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, E. J.; Yoo, B. H.; Seo, K. W.; Lee, W. K.; Jun, H. I.; Yang, K. N.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, I. H.; Kim, M. Y.; Ju, Y. C.; Hyun, H. Y.; Choi, I. G.; Hong, C. S.; Won, J. Y.; Nam, J. Y.; Lee, H. J.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the annual results of training courses. the scope and contents are as follows: 1. Regional and interregional training courses 2. Training courses assisted by foreign experts 3. Training courses for nuclear industry personnel 4. Training courses for internal staff-members 5. Training courses under the law. This Nuclear Training Center executed the open-door training courses for 2,400 engineers/scientists from the regulatory body, nuclear industries, research institutes and other related organizations by means of offering 51 training courses during the fiscal year 1996. (author). 23 refs.

  15. Individual social capital and survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejlskov, Linda; Mortensen, Rikke N; Overgaard, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The concept of social capital has received increasing attention as a determinant of population survival, but its significance is uncertain. We examined the importance of social capital on survival in a population study while focusing on gender differences. METHODS: We used data from...... a Danish regional health survey with a five-year follow-up period, 2007-2012 (n = 9288, 53.5% men, 46.5% women). We investigated the association between social capital and all-cause mortality, performing separate analyses on a composite measure as well as four specific dimensions of social capital while...... controlling for covariates. Analyses were performed with Cox proportional hazard models by which hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated. RESULTS: For women, higher levels of social capital were associated with lower all-cause mortality regardless of age, socioeconomic status, health...

  16. Campylobacter virulence and survival factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, Declan J

    2015-06-01

    Despite over 30 years of research, campylobacteriosis is the most prevalent foodborne bacterial infection in many countries including in the European Union and the United States of America. However, relatively little is known about the virulence factors in Campylobacter or how an apparently fragile organism can survive in the food chain, often with enhanced pathogenicity. This review collates information on the virulence and survival determinants including motility, chemotaxis, adhesion, invasion, multidrug resistance, bile resistance and stress response factors. It discusses their function in transition through the food processing environment and human infection. In doing so it provides a fundamental understanding of Campylobacter, critical for improved diagnosis, surveillance and control. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Does Intelligence Provide Survival Value?

    OpenAIRE

    Cairns, John

    2009-01-01

    Intelligence is defined as a general mental capacity to reason, plan, solve problems, think abstractly, comprehend ideas, and learn. Intelligence can also be defined as the ability to acquire and apply information gathered from the environment to modify its behavior. It is this intelligence that has allowed the genus Homo to survive for 2 million years. However, recently the global financial meltdown and the deleterious effects of climate change raise the question of whether intelligence has ...

  18. Survival on Land and Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    1943-01-01

    flower, leaf steams, and young leaves may be eaten cooked as greens provided you cook them in several changes of water to remove the bitter taste and...and become a weed almost throughout the tropics. Its bladdery pods contain a single retl tomato-like fruit that is edible. Raspberries, blackberries ...plant that 108 SURVIVAL OK LAND AND SEA is about one foot In height and has blue flowers and inflated leaf stems. The young leaves, leafy stalks

  19. Statistical analysis of survival data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, J; Breslow, N

    1984-01-01

    A general review of the statistical techniques that the authors feel are most important in the analysis of survival data is presented. The emphasis is on the study of the duration of time between any two events as applied to people and on the nonparametric and semiparametric models most often used in these settings. The unifying concept is the hazard function, variously known as the risk, the force of mortality, or the force of transition.

  20. LATERAL SURVIVAL: AN OT ACCOUNT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moira Yip

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available When laterals are the targets of phonological processes, laterality may or may not survive. In a fixed feature geometry, [lateral] should be lost if its superordinate node is eliminated by either the spreading of a neighbouring node, or by coda neutralization. So if [lateral] is under Coronal (Blevins 1994, it should be lost under Place assimilation, and if [lateral] is under Sonorant Voicing (Rice & Avery 1991 it should be lost by rules that spread voicing. Yet in some languages lateral survives such spreading intact. Facts like these argue against a universal attachment of [lateral] under either Coronal or Sonorant Voicing, and in favour of an account in terms of markedness constraints on feature-co-occurrence (Padgett 2000. The core of an OT account is that IFIDENTLAT is ranked above whatever causes neutralization, such as SHARE-F or *CODAF. laterality will survive. If these rankings are reversed, we derive languages in which laterality is lost. The other significant factor is markedness. High-ranked feature co-occurrence constraints like *LATDORSAL can block spreading from affecting laterals at all.

  1. Spaced cognitive training promotes training transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuowei eWang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive training studies yield wildly inconsistent results. One dimension on which studies vary is the scheduling of training sessions (Morrison & Chein, 2011. In this study, we systematically address whether or not spacing of practice influences training and transfer. We randomly assigned 115 fifth grade children to an active control group or one of four training groups who received working memory training based on a running span task (Zhao et al., 2011. All groups received the same total amount of training: 20 sessions of training with 60 trials for an average of 20 minutes per session. The training was spread across 2 days, 5 days, 10 days, or 20 days. The active control group received 20-minute sessions of math instruction for 20 sessions. Before and after training participants in all five groups performed a single transfer test that assessed fluid intelligence, the Raven's Progressive Matrices Test. Overall, participants in all four training groups improved significantly on the training task (at least partially, as reflected by increased speed. More importantly, the only training group to show significant improvement on the Raven's was the group who had the greatest amount of spacing (20 days group during training and improvement in this group was significantly higher than that of the control group.

  2. Language training

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place from beginning of October 2006 to beginning of February 2007 (3 weeks break at Christmas).These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Tessa Osborne, tel.16 23 40. Oral Expression The next session will take place from beginning of October 2006 to beginning of February 2007 (3 weeks break at Christmas).This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be a maximum of 10 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc., depending on the needs of the students. Duration: 30 hours (2 hours a week) Price: 660 CHF (for a minimum of 8 students). Writing Professional Documents in English The next ses...

  3. Language training

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place from 26 February or 5 March to end of June 2007 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Françoise Benz, tel. 73127. Oral Expression The next session will take place from 26 February or 5 March to end of June 2007 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be a maximum of 10 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. depending on the needs of the students. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF (for a minimum of 8 students). Writing Professional Documents in English The next session will take place from 26 February or...

  4. Language training

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place: from 26 February or 5 March to end of June 2007 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Françoise Benz, tel. 73127. Oral Expression The next session will take place from 26 February or 5 March to end of June 2007 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be a maximum of 10 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. depending on the needs of the students. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF (for a minimum of 8 students). Writing Professional Documents in English The next session will take place from 26 February or 5 M...

  5. Language training

    CERN Document Server

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place: from end of September 2005 to middle of February 2006 (2/ 3 weeks break at Christmas). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow: tel. 72957. Oral Expression in English The next session will take place from end of September to December 2005. This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be a maximum of 10 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. depending on the needs of the students. Duration: 20 hours Price: 440 CHF (for a minimum of 8 students) Writing Professional Documents in English The next session will take place from end of September 2005 to middle of Feb...

  6. Language Training

    CERN Document Server

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place: from end of September 2005 to middle of February 2006 (2/ 3 weeks break at Christmas). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow: tel. 72957. Oral Expression in English The next session will take place from end of September to December 2005. This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be a maximum of 10 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. depending on the needs of the students. Duration: 20 hours Price: 440 CHF (for a minimum of 8 students) Writing Professional Documents in English The next session will take place from end of September 2005 to middle of Febr...

  7. Measuring survival rates from sudden cardiac arrest: the elusive definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayre, Michael R; Travers, Andrew H; Daya, Mohamud; Greene, H Leon; Salive, Marcel E; Vijayaraghavan, Krishnaswami; Craven, Richard A; Groh, William J; Hallstrom, Alfred P

    2004-07-01

    Measuring survival from sudden out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OOH-CA) is often used as a benchmark of the quality of a community's emergency medical service (EMS) system. The definition of OOH-CA survival rates depends both upon the numerator (surviving cases) and the denominator (all cases). The purpose of the public access defibrillation (PAD) trial was to measure the impact on survival of adding an automated external defibrillator (AED) to a volunteer response system trained in CPR. This paper reports the definition of OOH-CA developed by the PAD trial investigators, and it evaluates alternative statistical methods used to assess differences in reported "survival." Case surveillance was limited to the prospectively determined geographic boundaries of the participating trial units. The numerator in calculating a survival rate should include only those patients who survived an event but who otherwise would have died except for the application of some facet of emergency medical care-in this trial a defibrillatory shock. Among denominators considered were: total population of the study unit, all deaths within the study unit, and documented ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrests. The PAD classification focused upon cases that might have benefited from the early use of an AED, in addition to the likely benefit from early recognition of OOH-CA, early access of EMS, and early cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Results of this classification system were used to evaluate the impact of the PAD definition on the distribution of cardiac arrest case types between CPR only and CPR + AED units. Potential OOH-CA episodes were classified into one of four groups: definite, probable, uncertain, or not an OOH-CA. About half of cardiac arrests in the PAD units were judged to be definite OOH-CA events and therefore potentially treatable with an AED. However, events that occurred in CPR-only units were less likely to be classified as definite or probable OOH-CA events than those

  8. Ergonomics and Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Geoff

    1974-01-01

    The relationship of ergonomics (the study of man in relation to his working environment) and training is examined in the context of physical stress, training time required, man-machine systems, skill and job performance analysis, and training effectiveness. (AG)

  9. Dynamic training devices in CRM training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawver, J.

    1984-01-01

    Pilot training effectiveness and flying safety of a seasonal tour flight company are described. The change from single pilot to two pilot operated twin otters is examined. The use of the ATC 810 training device, its possibilities and training capacity is outlined. Problem areas which may arise, emergency system and pilot/passenger interaction are analyzed.

  10. Technical Training: Technical Training Seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Tuesday 30 March TECHNICAL TRAINING SEMINAR From 9:00 to 12:00 and from 13:00 to 16:00 hrs - Council Chamber, Salle B, Salle des Pas Perdus National Instruments (NI) on Tour 2004 Claudia Jüngel, Evrem Yarkin, Joel Clerc, Hervé Baour / NATIONAL INSTRUMENTS The special event NI on Tour 2004, run in Germany, Austria and Switzerland, will be at CERN on March 30. Technical seminars and free introductory courses will be offered all day long in the Council Chamber, Salle B, and Salle des Pas Perdus (buildings 61 and 503). Technical conferences: 09:00 - 12:00 Data acquisition systems on PCs. Industrial measurement and control techniques. 13:00 - 16:00 Advanced LabVIEW software and PXI instrumentation. Measuring instruments and system components for teststand automation. Introductory courses: 09:00 - 12:00 DIAdem: Data analysis and presentation 13:00 - 16:00 Data acquisition with LabVIEW Language: English and French Free special seminar. Registration is recommended with National Instruments Switzerland (please sp...

  11. Technical Training: Technical Training Seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Tuesday 30 March TECHNICAL TRAINING SEMINAR From 9:00 to 12:00 and from 13:00 to 16:00 hrs - Council Chamber, Salle B, Salle des Pas Perdus National Instruments (NI) on Tour 2004 Claudia Jüngel, Evrem Yarkin, Joel Clerc, Hervé Baour / NATIONAL INSTRUMENTS The special event NI on Tour 2004, run in Germany, Austria and Switzerland, will be at CERN on March 30. Technical seminars and free introductory courses will be offered all day long in the Council Chamber, Salle B, and Salle des Pas Perdus (buildings 61 and 503). Technical conferences: 09:00 - 12:00 Data acquisition systems on PCs. Industrial measurement and control techniques. 13:00 - 16:00 Advanced LabVIEW software and PXI instrumentation. Measuring instruments and system components for teststand automation. Introductory courses: 09:00 - 12:00 DIAdem: Data analysis and presentation 13:00 - 16:00 Data acquisition with LabVIEW Language: English and French Free special seminar. Registration is recommended with National Instruments Swi...

  12. Stage at diagnosis and ovarian cancer survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maringe, Camille; Walters, Sarah; Butler, John

    2012-01-01

    We investigate what role stage at diagnosis bears in international differences in ovarian cancer survival.......We investigate what role stage at diagnosis bears in international differences in ovarian cancer survival....

  13. Facial Baroparesis Caused by Scuba Diving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Kamide

    2012-01-01

    tympanic membrane and right facial palsy without other neurological findings. But facial palsy was disappeared immediately after myringotomy. We considered that the etiology of this case was neuropraxia of facial nerve in middle ear caused by over pressure of middle ear.

  14. Privacy Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recognizing that training and awareness are critical to protecting agency Personally Identifiable Information (PII), the EPA is developing online training for privacy contacts in its programs and regions.

  15. Artificial neural network: predicted vs observed survival in patients with colonic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolgobrodov, S G; Moore, P; Marshall, R; Bittern, R; Steele, R J C; Cuschieri, A

    2007-02-01

    An Internet-web-based artificial neural network has been developed for practicing clinical oncologists and medical researchers as part of an ongoing program designed for the implementation of advanced neural networks for prognostic estimates and eventually for management/treatment decisions in individual patients with colonic cancer. An interdisciplinary team of academic oncologists and physicists has configured and implemented a Partial Logistic Artificial Neural Network and trained it to predict cancer-related survival in patients with confirmed colorectal cancer by using a database (1,558 patients) made available for the study by the Information & Statistics Division of National Health Service Scotland. The reliability of the trained network was evaluated against Kaplan-Meier observed survival plots of a random sample of 300 patients not used in the training but forming part of the same data set. The predicted survival curves obtained as the output from the artificial neural network showed close agreement with observed actual survival rates of a cohort of 300 patients with four grades of risk of dying from the cancer within five years of diagnosis. The web-based Partial Logistic Artificial Neural Network system accurately predicts survival after staging and treatment of colonic cancer. It can be made web-accessible where it is powerful enough to serve hundreds of users simultaneously.

  16. Starvation-Survival in Haloarchaea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, Yaicha D.; Lowenstein, Tim K.; Timofeeff, Michael N.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies claiming to revive ancient microorganisms trapped in fluid inclusions in halite have warranted an investigation of long-term microbial persistence. While starvation-survival is widely reported for bacteria, it is less well known for halophilic archaea—microorganisms likely to be trapped in ancient salt crystals. To better understand microbial survival in fluid inclusions in ancient evaporites, laboratory experiments were designed to simulate growth of halophilic archaea under media-rich conditions, complete nutrient deprivation, and a controlled substrate condition (glycerol-rich) and record their responses. Haloarchaea used for this work included Hbt. salinarum and isolate DV582A-1 (genus Haloterrigena) sub-cultured from 34 kyear Death Valley salt. Hbt. salinarum and DV582A-1 reacted to nutrient limitation with morphological and population changes. Starved populations increased and most cells converted from rods to small cocci within 56 days of nutrient deprivation. The exact timing of starvation adaptations and the physical transformations differed between species, populations of the same species, and cells of the same population. This is the first study to report the timing of starvation strategies for Hbt. salinarum and DV582A-1. The morphological states in these experiments may allow differentiation between cells trapped with adequate nutrients (represented here by early stages in nutrient-rich media) from cells trapped without nutrients (represented here by experimental starvation) in ancient salt. The hypothesis that glycerol, leaked from Dunaliella, provides nutrients for the survival of haloarchaea trapped in fluid inclusions in ancient halite, is also tested. Hbt. salinarum and DV582A-1 were exposed to a mixture of lysed and intact Dunaliella for 56 days. The ability of these organisms to utilize glycerol from Dunaliella cells was assessed by documenting population growth, cell length, and cell morphology. Hbt. salinarum and DV582A-1

  17. Starvation-Survival in Haloarchaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaicha D. Winters

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies claiming to revive ancient microorganisms trapped in fluid inclusions in halite have warranted an investigation of long-term microbial persistence. While starvation-survival is widely reported for bacteria, it is less well known for halophilic archaea—microorganisms likely to be trapped in ancient salt crystals. To better understand microbial survival in fluid inclusions in ancient evaporites, laboratory experiments were designed to simulate growth of halophilic archaea under media-rich conditions, complete nutrient deprivation, and a controlled substrate condition (glycerol-rich and record their responses. Haloarchaea used for this work included Hbt. salinarum and isolate DV582A-1 (genus Haloterrigena sub-cultured from 34 kyear Death Valley salt. Hbt. salinarum and DV582A-1 reacted to nutrient limitation with morphological and population changes. Starved populations increased and most cells converted from rods to small cocci within 56 days of nutrient deprivation. The exact timing of starvation adaptations and the physical transformations differed between species, populations of the same species, and cells of the same population. This is the first study to report the timing of starvation strategies for Hbt. salinarum and DV582A-1. The morphological states in these experiments may allow differentiation between cells trapped with adequate nutrients (represented here by early stages in nutrient-rich media from cells trapped without nutrients (represented here by experimental starvation in ancient salt. The hypothesis that glycerol, leaked from Dunaliella, provides nutrients for the survival of haloarchaea trapped in fluid inclusions in ancient halite, is also tested. Hbt. salinarum and DV582A-1 were exposed to a mixture of lysed and intact Dunaliella for 56 days. The ability of these organisms to utilize glycerol from Dunaliella cells was assessed by documenting population growth, cell length, and cell morphology. Hbt. salinarum

  18. Survival of adult martens in Northern Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas P. McCann; Patrick A. Zollner; Jonathan H. Gilbert

    2010-01-01

    Low adult marten (Martes americana) survival may be one factor limiting their population growth >30 yr after their reintroduction in Wisconsin, USA. We estimated annual adult marten survival at 0.81 in northern Wisconsin, with lower survival during winter (0.87) than summer-fall (1.00). Fisher (Martes pennanti) and raptor kills...

  19. Long-term survival after perforated diverticulitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Vermeulen (Jan); M.P. Gosselink (Martijn Pieter); W.C.J. Hop (Wim); E. van der Harst (Erwin); B.E. Hansen (Bettina); G.H.H. Mannaerts (Guido); P-P. Coene (Peter Paul); W.F. Weidema (Wibo); J.F. Lange (Johan)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAim: Short-term survival after emergency surgery for perforated diverticulitis is poor. Less is known about long-term survival. The aims of this study were to evaluate long-term survival after discharge from hospital and to identify factors associated with prognosis. Method: All patients

  20. Clustered survival data with left-truncation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Frank; Martinussen, Torben; Scheike, Thomas H.

    2015-01-01

    Left-truncation occurs frequently in survival studies, and it is well known how to deal with this for univariate survival times. However, there are few results on how to estimate dependence parameters and regression effects in semiparametric models for clustered survival data with delayed entry...

  1. 46 CFR 133.105 - Survival craft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Survival craft. 133.105 Section 133.105 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS LIFESAVING SYSTEMS Requirements for All OSVs § 133.105 Survival craft. (a) Each survival craft must be approved and equipped as...

  2. 46 CFR 199.201 - Survival craft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Survival craft. 199.201 Section 199.201 Shipping COAST... SYSTEMS FOR CERTAIN INSPECTED VESSELS Additional Requirements for Passenger Vessels § 199.201 Survival craft. (a) Each survival craft must be approved and equipped as follows: (1) Each lifeboat must be...

  3. 46 CFR 199.261 - Survival craft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Survival craft. 199.261 Section 199.261 Shipping COAST... SYSTEMS FOR CERTAIN INSPECTED VESSELS Additional Requirements for Cargo Vessels § 199.261 Survival craft. (a) Each survival craft must be approved and equipped as follows: (1) Each lifeboat must be a totally...

  4. 46 CFR 28.120 - Survival craft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Survival craft. 28.120 Section 28.120 Shipping COAST... VESSELS Requirements for All Vessels § 28.120 Survival craft. (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (b) through (h) of this section and 28.305, each vessel must carry the survival craft specified in Table 28...

  5. 46 CFR 174.320 - Damage survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Damage survival. 174.320 Section 174.320 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO... survival. A hopper dredge survives assumed damage if it meets the following conditions: (a) The maximum...

  6. Surviving the crash: T-cell homeostasis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TOSHIBA

    Spatial and temporal elements. – Cellular sites for the integration of cell death and survival cues. – Spatial regulation of Notch activity for cell survival. Page 4. Cell survival is determined by the availability and uptake of nutrients live dead. Activated T-cells. T-cells. Page 5. dead wildtype. Bax active -6A7. Nucleus – H33342.

  7. Breastfeeding. COTALMA: training health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanovas, M C

    1994-01-01

    The Comite Tecnico de Apoyo a la Lactancia Materna (COTALMA), the Technical Breastfeeding Support Committee, was founded in Bolivia in 1989. It is financed by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF). It is administered in coordination with the Ministry of Health (MOH). MOH and UNICEF choose the hospitals, who send teams that include a pediatrician, a gynecologist, a nurse, and a nutritionist. The first phase of the course (5.5 days) covers the scientific background of breastfeeding. A baseline study is then planned and conducted at each hospital. 2 to 3 months later, the second phase takes place during which data is presented and breast feeding programs are developed for each hospital. Communication, training, counseling, and planning and evaluation are covered. Practicums are conducted at hospitals. Trainers are usually members of COTALMA. The person in charge of maternal and child health services at MOH lectures on national health policies concerning mothers and children. Training includes use of the national health card, breastfeeding and child survival, and breastfeeding as a family planning method. Culturally appropriate course materials, which are in Spanish, are adapted from those developed by Wellstart International. Articles by COTALMA members and others are added. Participants are encouraged to train all staff at their institutions.

  8. Survival strategies in arctic ungulates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. J. C. Tyler

    1990-09-01

    Full Text Available Arctic ungulates usually neither freeze nor starve to death despite the rigours of winter. Physiological adaptations enable them to survive and reproduce despite long periods of intense cold and potential undernutrition. Heat conservation is achieved by excellent insulation combined with nasal heat exchange. Seasonal variation in fasting metabolic rate has been reported in several temperate and sub-arctic species of ungulates and seems to occur in muskoxen. Surprisingly, there is no evidence for this in reindeer. Both reindeer and caribou normally maintain low levels of locomotor activity in winter. Light foot loads are important for reducing energy expenditure while walking over snow. The significance and control of selective cooling of the brain during hard exercise (e.g. escape from predators is discussed. Like other cervids, reindeer and caribou display a pronounced seasonal cycle of appetite and growth which seems to have an intrinsic basis. This has two consequences. First, the animals evidently survive perfectly well despite enduring negative energy balance for long periods. Second, loss of weight in winter is not necessarily evidence of undernutrition. The main role of fat reserves, especially in males, may be to enhance reproductive success. The principal role of fat reserves in winter appears to be to provide a supplement to, rather than a substitute for, poor quality winter forage. Fat also provides an insurance against death during periods of acute starvation.

  9. Predicting clinical outcomes from large scale cancer genomic profiles with deep survival models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi, Safoora; Amrollahi, Fatemeh; Amgad, Mohamed; Dong, Chengliang; Lewis, Joshua E; Song, Congzheng; Gutman, David A; Halani, Sameer H; Velazquez Vega, Jose Enrique; Brat, Daniel J; Cooper, Lee A D

    2017-09-15

    Translating the vast data generated by genomic platforms into accurate predictions of clinical outcomes is a fundamental challenge in genomic medicine. Many prediction methods face limitations in learning from the high-dimensional profiles generated by these platforms, and rely on experts to hand-select a small number of features for training prediction models. In this paper, we demonstrate how deep learning and Bayesian optimization methods that have been remarkably successful in general high-dimensional prediction tasks can be adapted to the problem of predicting cancer outcomes. We perform an extensive comparison of Bayesian optimized deep survival models and other state of the art machine learning methods for survival analysis, and describe a framework for interpreting deep survival models using a risk backpropagation technique. Finally, we illustrate that deep survival models can successfully transfer information across diseases to improve prognostic accuracy. We provide an open-source software implementation of this framework called SurvivalNet that enables automatic training, evaluation and interpretation of deep survival models.

  10. A prognostic model for lung adenocarcinoma patient survival with a focus on four miRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianqiu; An, Zhaoling; Li, Peihui; Liu, Haihua

    2017-09-01

    There is currently no effective biomarker for determining the survival of patients with lung adenocarcinoma. The purpose of the present study was to construct a prognostic survival model using microRNA (miRNA) expression data from patients with lung adenocarcinoma. miRNA data were obtained from The Cancer Genome Atlas, and patients with lung adenocarcinoma were divided into either the training or validation set based on the random allocation principle. The prognostic model focusing on miRNA was constructed, and patients were divided into high-risk or low-risk groups as per the scores, to assess their survival time. The 5-year survival rate from the subgroups within the high- and low-risk groups was assessed. P-values of the prognostic model in the total population, the training set and validation set were 0.0017, 0.01986 and 0.02773, respectively, indicating that the survival time of the lung adenocarcinoma high-risk group was less than that of the low-risk group. Thus, the model had a good assessment effectiveness for the untreated group (P=0.00088) and the Caucasian patient group (P=0.00043). In addition, the model had the best prediction effect for the 5-year survival rate of the Caucasian patient group (AUC=0.629). In conclusion, the prognostic model developed in the present study can be used as an independent prognostic model for patients with lung adenocarcinoma.

  11. Foreign Ownership and Long-term Survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronborg, Dorte; Thomsen, Steen

    2006-01-01

    Does foreign ownership enhance or decrease a firm's chances of survival? Over the 100 year period 1895-2001 this paper compares the survival of foreign subsidiaries in Denmark to a control sample matched by industry and firm size. We find that foreign-owned companies have higher survival...... probability. On average exit risk for domestic companies is 2.3 times higher than for foreign companies. First movers like Siemens, Philips, Kodak, Ford, GM or Goodyear have been active in the country for almost a century. Relative foreign survival increases with company age. However, the foreign survival...

  12. Nuclear manpower training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, In Suk; Lee, H. Y.; Lee, E. J.; Yang, K. N.; Jun, H. R.; Seo, K. W.; Lee, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, I. H.; Joe, B. J.; Koh, Y. S.; Yoo, B. H.; Kim, M. Y.; Ju, Y. C.; Hyun, H. U.; Choi, I. K.; Hong, C. S.; Won, J. Y.; Nam, J. Y.; Lee, H. J

    1997-12-01

    This report describes the annual results of training courses. The scope and contents are as follows: 1. Education program development of nuclear field 2. International training courses for foreigners 3. Training courses for industry personnel 4. Training courses for R and D staff-members 5. Training courses under the law. The nuclear training center executed 65 training courses for 2,700 engineers/ scientists from the regulatory body, nuclear industries, research institutes and other related organizations during the fiscal year 1997. (author). 18 refs., 3 tabs.

  13. Preserving arteriovenous fistula outcomes during surgical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrogan, Damian G; Maxwell, Alexander P; Inston, Nicholas G; Krishnan, Hari; Field, Mel

    2014-01-01

    Arteriovenous fistulae (AVFs) are the preferred option for vascular access, as they are associated with lower mortality in hemodialysis patients than in those patients with arteriovenous grafts (AVGs) or central venous catheters (CVCs). We sought to assess whether vascular access outcomes for surgical trainees are comparable to fully trained surgeons. A prospectively collected database of patients was created and information recorded regarding patient demographics, past medical history, preoperative investigations, grade of operating surgeon, type of AVF formed, primary AVF function, cumulative AVF survival and functional patency. One hundred and sixty-two patients were identified as having had vascular access procedures during the 6 month study period and 143 were included in the final analysis. Secondary AVF patency was established in 123 (86%) of these AVFs and 89 (62.2%) were used for dialysis. There was no significant difference in survival of AVFs according to training status of surgeon (log rank x2 0.506 p=0.477) or type of AVF (log rank x2 0.341 p=0.559). Patency rates of successful AVFs at 1 and 2 years were 60.9% and 47.9%, respectively. We have demonstrated in this prospective study that there are no significant differences in outcomes of primary AVFs formed by fully trained surgeons versus surgical trainees. Creation of a primary AVF represents an excellent training platform for intermediate stage surgeons across general and vascular surgical specialties.

  14. Survival paths through the forest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Ulla Brasch

    when the information is high-dimensional e.g. when there are many thousands of genes or markers. In these situations machine learning methods such as the random forest can still be applied and provide reasonable prediction accuracy. The main focus in this talk is the performance of random forest...... in particular when the response is three-dimensional. In a diagnostic study of inflammatory bowel disease three classes of patients have to be diagnosed based on microarray gene-expression data. The performance of random forest is compared on a probability scale and on a classification scale to elastic net....... In survival analysis with competing risks I present an extension of random forest using time-dependent pseudo-values to build event risk prediction models. This approach is evaluated with data from Copenhagen stroke study. Further, I will explain how to use the R-package "pec" to evaluate random forests using...

  15. MRI survival guide; MRT Basiskurs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardoza, J. [Alta Imaging Medical Group and Magnetic Imaging Affiliates, Berkeley, CA (United States); Herfkens, R.J. [eds.] [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Medical Center

    1999-07-01

    The book is a German translation of an American textbook with the original title ''MRI Survival Guide'' and is intended to serve as an introductory guide for beginners or a reference book for quick information. Readers will find information on the fundamentals of the technology and methodology of MRI as well as all details of relevance to practice in a precise and easy-to-grasp arrangement, covering all anatomic areas of interest, illustrations and descriptions of characteristic signs of pathologic processes, high-quality and unusually large-sized diagnostic pictures, a modern didactic concept for quick orientiation, including surveys, tables, and reproductions for visualisation of contents. (orig./CB) [German] Praktisch jeder Mediziner wird im Laufe seiner Berufstaetigkeit mit der MRT konfrontiert - unabhaengig davon ob in der Radiologie, Orthopaedie, Gynaekologie, Chirurgie, Neurologie oder sonstigen Fachrichtung. Das Buch ist eine Uebersetzung eines amerikanischen Lehrbuches mit dem Originaltitel ''MRI Survival Guide'' und will eine wesentliche Erleichterung als 'Ueberlebenshandbuch fuer die MRT' bieten: - Darstellung aller relevanten Grundlagen zu Technik, verschiedenen Sequenzen und Methodik der MRT - knapp und mit maximalem Praxisbezug - Beruecksichtigung aller moeglichen Untersuchungsregionen und strukturierte Orientierung daran (Gehirn, Wirbelsaeule, Kopf/Nacken, Brustkorb, Bauch, Becken, Muskel-Skelett-Bereich) - Illustration und Beschreibung der charakteristischen Erscheinungsmerkmale aller haeufigen pathologischen Prozesse im MRT, inklusive direkt umsetzbarer differentialdiagnostischer Abgrenzungskriterien - hochwertiges und aussergewoehnlich gross dimensioniertes Bildmaterial - modernes, didaktisches Konzept fuer die rasche Orientierung mit vielen Uebersichten, Tabellen und Abbildungen zur Visualisierung der Inhalte, Praxistips und Aufzeigen von Fehlermoeglichkeiten - zum Einstieg, zur Rekapitulation

  16. Prognostic factors for survival in adult patients with recurrent glioblastoma: a decision-tree-based model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audureau, Etienne; Chivet, Anaïs; Ursu, Renata; Corns, Robert; Metellus, Philippe; Noel, Georges; Zouaoui, Sonia; Guyotat, Jacques; Le Reste, Pierre-Jean; Faillot, Thierry; Litre, Fabien; Desse, Nicolas; Petit, Antoine; Emery, Evelyne; Lechapt-Zalcman, Emmanuelle; Peltier, Johann; Duntze, Julien; Dezamis, Edouard; Voirin, Jimmy; Menei, Philippe; Caire, François; Dam Hieu, Phong; Barat, Jean-Luc; Langlois, Olivier; Vignes, Jean-Rodolphe; Fabbro-Peray, Pascale; Riondel, Adeline; Sorbets, Elodie; Zanello, Marc; Roux, Alexandre; Carpentier, Antoine; Bauchet, Luc; Pallud, Johan

    2017-11-20

    We assessed prognostic factors in relation to OS from progression in recurrent glioblastomas. Retrospective multicentric study enrolling 407 (training set) and 370 (external validation set) adult patients with a recurrent supratentorial glioblastoma treated by surgical resection and standard combined chemoradiotherapy as first-line treatment. Four complementary multivariate prognostic models were evaluated: Cox proportional hazards regression modeling, single-tree recursive partitioning, random survival forest, conditional random forest. Median overall survival from progression was 7.6 months (mean, 10.1; range, 0-86) and 8.0 months (mean, 8.5; range, 0-56) in the training and validation sets, respectively (p = 0.900). Using the Cox model in the training set, independent predictors of poorer overall survival from progression included increasing age at histopathological diagnosis (aHR, 1.47; 95% CI [1.03-2.08]; p = 0.032), RTOG-RPA V-VI classes (aHR, 1.38; 95% CI [1.11-1.73]; p = 0.004), decreasing KPS at progression (aHR, 3.46; 95% CI [2.10-5.72]; p < 0.001), while independent predictors of longer overall survival from progression included surgical resection (aHR, 0.57; 95% CI [0.44-0.73]; p < 0.001) and chemotherapy (aHR, 0.41; 95% CI [0.31-0.55]; p < 0.001). Single-tree recursive partitioning identified KPS at progression, surgical resection at progression, chemotherapy at progression, and RTOG-RPA class at histopathological diagnosis, as main survival predictors in the training set, yielding four risk categories highly predictive of overall survival from progression both in training (p < 0.0001) and validation (p < 0.0001) sets. Both random forest approaches identified KPS at progression as the most important survival predictor. Age, KPS at progression, RTOG-RPA classes, surgical resection at progression and chemotherapy at progression are prognostic for survival in recurrent glioblastomas and should inform the treatment decisions.

  17. Could Staying Human in Medical Training Help Make Medicine Humane? Review of Allan D. Peterkin, Staying Human During Residency Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ballesteros, Fabián

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Staying Human During Residency Training. How to survive and Thrive after Medical School, Dr. Allan D. Peterkin provides guidance and tools to medical residents, with a common thread the wellbeing of the person in each resident, essential to staying humane during the demanding training called residency. This review focuses on ethics, as presented in the author’s discourse, in a chapter specifically dealing with clinical ethics.

  18. Exercise training in adverse cardiac remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncker, Dirk J; van Deel, Elza D; de Waard, Monique C; de Boer, Martine; Merkus, Daphne; van der Velden, Jolanda

    2014-06-01

    Cardiac remodeling in response to a myocardial infarction or chronic pressure-overload is an independent risk factor for the development of heart failure. In contrast, cardiac remodeling produced by regular physical exercise is associated with a decreased risk for heart failure. There is evidence that exercise training has a beneficial effect on disease progression and survival in patients with cardiac remodeling and dysfunction, but concern has also been expressed that exercise training may aggravate pathological remodeling and dysfunction. Here we present studies from our laboratory into the effects of exercise training on pathological cardiac remodeling and dysfunction in mice. The results indicate that even in the presence of a large infarct, exercise training exerts beneficial effects on the heart. These effects were mimicked in part by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) overexpression and abrogated by eNOS deficiency, demonstrating the importance of nitric oxide signaling in mediating the cardiac effects of exercise. Exercise prior to a myocardial infarction was also cardioprotective. In contrast, exercise tended to aggravate pathological cardiac remodeling and dysfunction in the setting of pressure-overload produced by an aortic stenosis. These observations emphasize the critical importance of the underlying pathological stimulus for cardiac hypertrophy and remodeling, in determining the effects of exercise training. Future studies are needed to define the influence of exercise type, intensity and duration in different models and severities of pathological cardiac remodeling. Together such studies will aid in optimizing the therapy of exercise training in the setting of cardiovascular disease.

  19. Shared Frailty Model for Left-Truncated Multivariate Survival Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henrik; Brookmeyer, Ron; Aaby, Peter

    multivariate survival data, left truncation, multiplicative hazard model, shared gamma frailty, conditional model, piecewise exponential model, childhood survival......multivariate survival data, left truncation, multiplicative hazard model, shared gamma frailty, conditional model, piecewise exponential model, childhood survival...

  20. The Survival and Birth of Firms

    OpenAIRE

    Leon Shilton; Craig Stanley

    1999-01-01

    Using a modified form of the location quotient, a "growth quotient," this study traces the survival and growth for the headquarters of publicly listed firms in the United States. At the county level, the spatial concentrations of headquarters listed in 1997 are correlated with the spatial concentrations of corporate headquarters that survived from 1986 though 1996. Counties that house the headquarters of many different survival firms continue to spawn new headquarters. Counties with headquart...

  1. Predicting post-treatment survivability of patients with breast cancer using Artificial Neural Network methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tan-Nai; Cheng, Chung-Hao; Chiu, Hung-Wen

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, the use of data mining techniques has become widely accepted in medical applications, especially in predicting cancer patients' survival. In this study, we attempted to train an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) to predict the patients' five-year survivability. Breast cancer patients who were diagnosed and received standard treatment in one hospital during 2000 to 2003 in Taiwan were collected for train and test the ANN. There were 604 patients in this dataset excluding died not in breast cancer. Among them 140 patients died within five years after their first radiotherapy treatment. The artificial neural networks were created by STATISTICA(®) software. Five variables (age, surgery and radiotherapy type, tumor size, regional lymph nodes, distant metastasis) were selected as the input features for ANN to predict the five-year survivability of breast cancer patients. We trained 100 artificial neural networks and chose the best one to analyze. The accuracy rate is 85% and area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve is 0.79. It shows that artificial neural network is a good tool to predict the five-year survivability of breast cancer patients.

  2. Reflexive Aero Structures for Enhanced Survivability Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cornerstone Research Group Inc. (CRG) proposes to develop an advanced reflexive structure system to increase the survivability of aerostructures. This reflexive...

  3. Surviving severe traumatic brain injury in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Lene; Poulsen, Ingrid; Kammersgaard, Lars Peter

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To identify all hospitalized patients surviving severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) in Denmark and to compare these patients to TBI patients admitted to highly specialized rehabilitation (HS-rehabilitation). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients surviving severe TBI were identified from...... severe TBI were admitted to HS-rehabilitation. Female sex, older age, and non-working status pre-injury were independent predictors of no HS-rehabilitation among patients surviving severe TBI. CONCLUSION: The incidence rate of hospitalized patients surviving severe TBI was stable in Denmark...

  4. Reflexive Aero Structures for Enhanced Survivability Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cornerstone Research Group Inc. (CRG) will develop an advanced reflexive structure technology system to increase the survivability of future systems constructed of...

  5. Combining gene signatures improves prediction of breast cancer survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Zhao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several gene sets for prediction of breast cancer survival have been derived from whole-genome mRNA expression profiles. Here, we develop a statistical framework to explore whether combination of the information from such sets may improve prediction of recurrence and breast cancer specific death in early-stage breast cancers. Microarray data from two clinically similar cohorts of breast cancer patients are used as training (n = 123 and test set (n = 81, respectively. Gene sets from eleven previously published gene signatures are included in the study. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To investigate the relationship between breast cancer survival and gene expression on a particular gene set, a Cox proportional hazards model is applied using partial likelihood regression with an L2 penalty to avoid overfitting and using cross-validation to determine the penalty weight. The fitted models are applied to an independent test set to obtain a predicted risk for each individual and each gene set. Hierarchical clustering of the test individuals on the basis of the vector of predicted risks results in two clusters with distinct clinical characteristics in terms of the distribution of molecular subtypes, ER, PR status, TP53 mutation status and histological grade category, and associated with significantly different survival probabilities (recurrence: p = 0.005; breast cancer death: p = 0.014. Finally, principal components analysis of the gene signatures is used to derive combined predictors used to fit a new Cox model. This model classifies test individuals into two risk groups with distinct survival characteristics (recurrence: p = 0.003; breast cancer death: p = 0.001. The latter classifier outperforms all the individual gene signatures, as well as Cox models based on traditional clinical parameters and the Adjuvant! Online for survival prediction. CONCLUSION: Combining the predictive strength of multiple gene signatures improves

  6. Application of Survival Analysis and Multistate Modeling to Understand Animal Behavior: Examples from Guide Dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, Lucy; Harvey, Naomi D.; Green, Martin; England, Gary C. W.

    2017-01-01

    Epidemiology is the study of patterns of health-related states or events in populations. Statistical models developed for epidemiology could be usefully applied to behavioral states or events. The aim of this study is to present the application of epidemiological statistics to understand animal behavior where discrete outcomes are of interest, using data from guide dogs to illustrate. Specifically, survival analysis and multistate modeling are applied to data on guide dogs comparing dogs that completed training and qualified as a guide dog, to those that were withdrawn from the training program. Survival analysis allows the time to (or between) a binary event(s) and the probability of the event occurring at or beyond a specified time point. Survival analysis, using a Cox proportional hazards model, was used to examine the time taken to withdraw a dog from training. Sex, breed, and other factors affected time to withdrawal. Bitches were withdrawn faster than dogs, Labradors were withdrawn faster, and Labrador × Golden Retrievers slower, than Golden Retriever × Labradors; and dogs not bred by Guide Dogs were withdrawn faster than those bred by Guide Dogs. Multistate modeling (MSM) can be used as an extension of survival analysis to incorporate more than two discrete events or states. Multistate models were used to investigate transitions between states of training to qualification as a guide dog or behavioral withdrawal, and from qualification as a guide dog to behavioral withdrawal. Sex, breed (with purebred Labradors and Golden retrievers differing from F1 crosses), and bred by Guide Dogs or not, effected movements between states. We postulate that survival analysis and MSM could be applied to a wide range of behavioral data and key examples are provided. PMID:28804710

  7. Application of Survival Analysis and Multistate Modeling to Understand Animal Behavior: Examples from Guide Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, Lucy; Harvey, Naomi D; Green, Martin; England, Gary C W

    2017-01-01

    Epidemiology is the study of patterns of health-related states or events in populations. Statistical models developed for epidemiology could be usefully applied to behavioral states or events. The aim of this study is to present the application of epidemiological statistics to understand animal behavior where discrete outcomes are of interest, using data from guide dogs to illustrate. Specifically, survival analysis and multistate modeling are applied to data on guide dogs comparing dogs that completed training and qualified as a guide dog, to those that were withdrawn from the training program. Survival analysis allows the time to (or between) a binary event(s) and the probability of the event occurring at or beyond a specified time point. Survival analysis, using a Cox proportional hazards model, was used to examine the time taken to withdraw a dog from training. Sex, breed, and other factors affected time to withdrawal. Bitches were withdrawn faster than dogs, Labradors were withdrawn faster, and Labrador × Golden Retrievers slower, than Golden Retriever × Labradors; and dogs not bred by Guide Dogs were withdrawn faster than those bred by Guide Dogs. Multistate modeling (MSM) can be used as an extension of survival analysis to incorporate more than two discrete events or states. Multistate models were used to investigate transitions between states of training to qualification as a guide dog or behavioral withdrawal, and from qualification as a guide dog to behavioral withdrawal. Sex, breed (with purebred Labradors and Golden retrievers differing from F1 crosses), and bred by Guide Dogs or not, effected movements between states. We postulate that survival analysis and MSM could be applied to a wide range of behavioral data and key examples are provided.

  8. Application of Survival Analysis and Multistate Modeling to Understand Animal Behavior: Examples from Guide Dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy Asher

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiology is the study of patterns of health-related states or events in populations. Statistical models developed for epidemiology could be usefully applied to behavioral states or events. The aim of this study is to present the application of epidemiological statistics to understand animal behavior where discrete outcomes are of interest, using data from guide dogs to illustrate. Specifically, survival analysis and multistate modeling are applied to data on guide dogs comparing dogs that completed training and qualified as a guide dog, to those that were withdrawn from the training program. Survival analysis allows the time to (or between a binary event(s and the probability of the event occurring at or beyond a specified time point. Survival analysis, using a Cox proportional hazards model, was used to examine the time taken to withdraw a dog from training. Sex, breed, and other factors affected time to withdrawal. Bitches were withdrawn faster than dogs, Labradors were withdrawn faster, and Labrador × Golden Retrievers slower, than Golden Retriever × Labradors; and dogs not bred by Guide Dogs were withdrawn faster than those bred by Guide Dogs. Multistate modeling (MSM can be used as an extension of survival analysis to incorporate more than two discrete events or states. Multistate models were used to investigate transitions between states of training to qualification as a guide dog or behavioral withdrawal, and from qualification as a guide dog to behavioral withdrawal. Sex, breed (with purebred Labradors and Golden retrievers differing from F1 crosses, and bred by Guide Dogs or not, effected movements between states. We postulate that survival analysis and MSM could be applied to a wide range of behavioral data and key examples are provided.

  9. Improving Survival in Decompensated Cirrhosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amar Nath Mukerji

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mortality in cirrhosis is consequent of decompensation, only treatment being timely liver transplantation. Organ allocation is prioritized for the sickest patients based on Model for End Stage Liver Disease (MELD score. In order to improve survival in patients with high MELD score it is imperative to preserve them in suitable condition till transplantation. Here we examine means to prolong life in high MELD score patients till a suitable liver is available. We specially emphasize protection of airways by avoidance of sedatives, avoidance of Bilevel Positive Airway Pressure, elective intubation in grade III or higher encephalopathy, maintaining a low threshold for intubation with lesser grades of encephalopathy when undergoing upper endoscopy or colonoscopy as pre transplant evaluation or transferring patient to a transplant center. Consider post-pyloric tube feeding in encephalopathy to maintain muscle mass and minimize risk of aspiration. In non intubated and well controlled encephalopathy, frequent physical mobility by active and passive exercises are recommended. When renal replacement therapy is needed, night-time Continuous Veno-Venous Hemodialysis may be useful in keeping the daytime free for mobility. Sparing and judicious use of steroids needs to be borne in mind in treatment of ARDS and acute hepatitis from alcohol or autoimmune process.

  10. Microfinance Institutions’ Social Intermediation and Micro and Small Enterprises Survival in Thika Town, Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZabronChege Wairimu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The continuous rapid growth of microfinance institutions in Kenya seems not to offer enough solution to the micro and small enterprises survival challenges with more than a one-third of MSEs start-ups collapsing within the first three years. It is the high rate of collapse and low rate of survival of MSEs that motivated this research to fill the existing gap on the missing linkage between MFIs and MSEs survival. This study looked at the role of the social intermediation services offered by MFIs on survival of MSEs in Thika Town which is both an industrial town and a business hub. A descriptive study design was adopted. Stratified and purposive sampling methods were used to select a sample 272 MSEs. Findings indicated that; regular microfinance participation help reduce loan application and payment bureaucracy while keeping entrepreneur updated on available opportunities. Training equips MSEs owners with necessary managerial skills on financial management, book keeping, and business operations. Group liability eliminates the need for collateral security when accessing loan while it increases the amount of loan accessed. Networking increases business link widening goods and services markets and allows for formation of business clubs. Finally, it was found that training was the most sought service followed by group liability, microfinance participation, and networking. From the study findings, the researcher recommends that MSEs continue seeking for social intermediation services and especially networking to improve their competitiveness and create a competitive advantage over their competitors boosting their survival.

  11. Teaching and Training Relevant Community Skills to Mentally Retarded Persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, Johnny L.

    1988-01-01

    Reviews some of the major developments in teaching and training relevant community skills to mentally retarded persons. The following adaptive skills are discussed: (1) toilet use and bed wetting; (2) eating, dressing, and personal hygiene; (3) community survival; and (4) vocational and social skills. (BJV)

  12. Moldova - Value Chain Training

    Data.gov (United States)

    Millennium Challenge Corporation — The evaluation of the GHS value chain training subactivity wwas designed to measure the extent, if any, to which the training activities improved the productivity...

  13. Technical training: places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    If you would like more information on a course, or for any other inquiry/suggestions, please contact Technical.Training@cern.ch. Eva Stern and Elise Romero, Technical Training Administration (Tel: 74924)

  14. Technical training: places available

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    If you would like more information on a course, or have any other inquiry/suggestions, please contact Technical.Training@cern.ch. Eva Stern and Elise Romero, Technical Training Administration (Tel: 74924)

  15. Technical training - places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    If you would like more information on a course, or have any other inquiry/suggestions, please contact Technical.Training@cern.ch. Eva Stern and Elise Romero, Technical Training Administration (Tel: 74924)

  16. Technical training: places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    If you would like more information on a course, or have any other inquiry/suggestions, please contact Technical.Training@cern.ch. Eva Stern and Marie Lahchimi, Technical Training Administration (Tel: 74924)

  17. Technical training: places available

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    If you would like more information on a course, or for any other inquiry/suggestions, please contact Technical.Training@cern.ch. Eva Stern and Elise Romero, Technical Training Administration (Tél : 74924)  

  18. HANDBALL IDEOMOTOR TRAINING

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Beatrice Aurelia Abălaşei

    2017-01-01

    .... injury, is particularly satisfactory results. Mental training or ideomotor training is the process of maintaining and consolidating, movement and actions, resulting bands neuromuscular activation and thus increase efficiency athletes...

  19. Brain Training for Seniors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for SeniorsGallstonesRead Article >>GallstonesBladder Training for Urinary IncontinenceRead Article >>Bladder Training for Urinary Incontinence Visit our interactive symptom checker Visit our interactive ...

  20. Criticality safety training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodruff, S.K. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1997-06-01

    Criticality safety training is an important element of the Plutonium Facility safety program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Training consists of student self-study handbooks and hands-on performance-based training in a mock-up laboratory containing gloveboxes, trolley conveyor system, and self-monitoring instruments. A 10-minute video tape and lecture was presented to describe how training in this area is conducted.

  1. Functional Training Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siff, Mel C.

    2002-01-01

    Asserts that though functional training is vital in all sporting preparation, it is only one aspect of the overall process. The paper defines functional training; discusses facets of functionality, functionality and balancing drills, and functional training and periodization; and concludes that functionality is best defined in terms of the outcome…

  2. Human Factors in Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barshi, Immanuel; Byrne, Vicky; Arsintescu, Lucia; Connell, Erin

    2010-01-01

    Future space missions will be significantly longer than current shuttle missions and new systems will be more complex than current systems. Increasing communication delays between crews and Earth-based support means that astronauts need to be prepared to handle the unexpected on their own. As crews become more autonomous, their potential span of control and required expertise must grow to match their autonomy. It is not possible to train for every eventuality ahead of time on the ground, or to maintain trained skills across long intervals of disuse. To adequately prepare NASA personnel for these challenges, new training approaches, methodologies, and tools are required. This research project aims at developing these training capabilities. By researching established training principles, examining future needs, and by using current practices in space flight training as test beds, both in Flight Controller and Crew Medical domains, this research project is mitigating program risks and generating templates and requirements to meet future training needs. Training efforts in Fiscal Year 09 (FY09) strongly focused on crew medical training, but also began exploring how Space Flight Resource Management training for Mission Operations Directorate (MOD) Flight Controllers could be integrated with systems training for optimal Mission Control Center (MCC) operations. The Training Task addresses Program risks that lie at the intersection of the following three risks identified by the Project: 1) Risk associated with poor task design; 2) Risk of error due to inadequate information; and 3) Risk associated with reduced safety and efficiency due to poor human factors design.

  3. (ARV) treatment training programme

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Winnie

    Recommendations are made for improved training effectiveness and for specific national policy on training, to meet the demand for scaling up ..... This was a proxy measurement of any benefit from training, since we could not implement a ...... Finally we appreciate all the volunteers who participated in this study. References.

  4. Training a Bicultural Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Bernice

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the unique training problems of Witan Associates Limited, a company with Japanese and American employees. Their three-part training program is described: (1) contact with the training company, (2) two-day classroom seminar for all staff, and (3) corporate and departmental meetings. Results of the program are discussed. (CT)

  5. Training the trainers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, M

    2007-12-01

    Our understanding of how adults learn has undergone many advances in the last few years. This information needs to be used to build more effective training in anaesthesia throughout the world, especially in those countries where the need to train large numbers is critical to the development of effective medical services. Training a new generation of teachers is a key part of this.

  6. Training Top 125

    Science.gov (United States)

    Training, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Top companies realize how vital training is to their success and continue to invest in it, even in trying times. This article presents "Training" magazine's 11th annual ranking of the top companies with employee-sponsored workforce training and development. First-time No. 1 winner Farmers Insurance puts such a premium on learning that its new…

  7. Training Black Entrepreneurs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Earl F.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    The training phases of a pre-business program to prepare a limited number of blacks to enter business is described in four stages: preparation, formal instruction, on the job training, and follow-up training. The program was not successful as a variety of problems arose from participants, budgets, and/or program planning. (AG)

  8. Cilia Train Spotting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhns, Stefanie; Blacque, Oliver E

    2016-06-06

    Cilium formation depends on intraflagellar transport trains that move bidirectionally along ciliary microtubules. Reporting in Science, Stepanek and Pigino (2016) employ correlative light and electron microscopy in algae to determine the ultrastructure of anterograde and retrograde trains and discover that these trains avoid collision by running on B- and A-tubules, respectively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Contract Training for Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averill, Donald F.

    1983-01-01

    Describes contract training whereby industries arrange with community colleges, technical institutes, and vocational schools to prepare employees for specific job assignments. Indicates that industrial training performed under contract with public institutions should be encouraged in favor of expansion of training that industry performs for…

  10. Computer Based Training Authors' and Designers' training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric GODET

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This communication, through couple of studies driven since 10 years, tries to show how important is the training of authors in Computer Based Training (CBT. We submit here an approach to prepare designers mastering Interactive Multimedia modules in this domain. Which institutions are really dedicating their efforts in training authors and designers in this area of CBTs? Television devices and broadcast organisations offered since year 60s' a first support for Distance Learning. New media, New Information and Communication Technologies (NICT allowed several public and private organisations to start Distance Learning projects. As usual some of them met their training objectives, other of them failed. Did their really failed? Currently, nobody has the right answer. Today, we do not have enough efficient tools allowing us to evaluate trainees' acquisition in a short term view. Training evaluation needs more than 10 to 20 years of elapsed time to bring reliable measures. Nevertheless, given the high investments already done in this area, we cannot wait until the final results of the pedagogical evaluation. A lot of analyses showed relevant issues which can be used as directions for CBTs authors and designers training. Warning - Our studies and the derived conclusions are mainly based on projects driven in the field. We additionally bring our several years experience in the training of movie film authors in the design of interactive multimedia products. Some of our examples are extracting from vocational training projects where we were involved in all development phases from the analysis of needs to the evaluation of the acquisition within the trainee's / employee job's. Obviously, we cannot bring and exhaustive approach in this domain where a lot of parameters are involved as frame for the CBT interactive multimedia modules authors' and designers' training.

  11. Survival From Childhood Hematological Malignancies in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erdmann, Friederike; Winther, Jeanette Falck; Dalton, Susanne Oksbjerg

    2016-01-01

    .76 (CI 2.01; 16.51) were observed for the fourth or later born children with ALL (N = 41) and AML (N = 9), respectively. Children with older parents showed a tendency toward inferior ALL survival, while for AML young maternal age was related to poorer survival. Based on small numbers, a trend toward...

  12. Zimbabwe's Exodus: Crisis, Migration, Survival | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Zimbabwe's Exodus: Crisis, Migration, Survival. Book cover Zimbabwe's Exodus: Crisis, Migration, Survival. Editor(s):. Jonathan Crush and Daniel Tevera. Publisher(s):. Southern African Migration Programme, IDRC. July 1, 2010. ISBN: 9781920409227. 420 pages. e-ISBN: 9781552504994. Download PDF · Read the e- ...

  13. Domesticating Ugandan local earthworms: Survival of African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    3.5; E, 90±2.8 and E. eugeniae There was significant effect (P<0.05) of feeding rate on the survival of both species and the Fisher's LSD multiple comparison test also showed significant different (P<0.05) in the survival among the two species.

  14. Cancer rehabilitation: a barometer for survival?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saotome, Takako; Klein, Linda; Faux, Steven

    2015-10-01

    This pilot study was conducted to describe the clinical features and functional outcomes of patients attending inpatient rehabilitation for cancer-related deconditioning and neurological deficits and to explore factors associated with improved survival. Using a retrospective audit, demographic characteristics, discharge outcomes, survival time, and functional status as measured by Functional Independence Measure (FIM) were recorded for 73 patients. Clinical status was estimated by Karnofsky Performance Status Scale (KPS). Cox regression was used to assess factors associated with improved survival following discharge from rehabilitation. Significant functional gains following rehabilitation were observed in total FIM (p = 0.02), motor FIM (p = 0.001), and KPS (p = 0.003). Length of survival ranged from 9.0 to 25.0 months, with 26 cases surviving to the end of study (censored). Patients scoring a total FIM of ≥80 survived significantly longer than patients scoring <80 (p = 0.002). At discharge, motor FIM scores (p = 0.004), FIM Efficiency (p = 0.001), KPS scores (p = 0.022), ambulation ability (p = 0.026), return to home (p = 0.009), and receipt of in-home services (p = 0.045) were significantly associated with improved survival. Functional improvement achieved through inpatient rehabilitation was associated with prolonged survival among cancer patients. Rehabilitation leading to improved independence among cancer patients may act as a marker of those with greater likelihood of better prognosis.

  15. Nematode survival in relation to soil moisture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simons, W.R.

    1973-01-01

    Established nematode populations are very persistent in the soil. It is known that they need sufficient soil moisture for movement, feeding and reproduction (fig. 5), and that there are adverse soil moisture conditions which they cannot survive. The influence of soil moisture on survival

  16. Socioeconomic position and survival after cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibfelt, E H; Kjær, S K; Høgdall, C

    2013-01-01

    In an attempt to decrease social disparities in cancer survival, it is important to consider the mechanisms by which socioeconomic position influences cancer prognosis. We aimed to investigate whether any associations between socioeconomic factors and survival after cervical cancer could...... be explained by socioeconomic differences in cancer stage, comorbidity, lifestyle factors or treatment....

  17. MECHANICAL TRANSMISSION AND SURVIVAL OF BACTERIAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    jen

    The transmission of enset bacterial wilt with contaminated knives and the survival of the causal agent in soil and enset plant debris was studied ... Xanthomonas campestris pv. musacearum (Xcm) isolates were observed to survive in the soil up to. 9 days. Thereafter the .... and needle, while pathogenicity tests were carried ...

  18. Long-term survival in Patau syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunca, Y; Kadandale, J S; Pivnick, E K

    2001-04-01

    A female patient with an extra chromosome 13 (Patau syndrome) is described. There are only five previous reports of patients with trisomy 13 who have survived past the first decade. It is concluded that non-lethal congenital anomalies and aggressive medical care play an important role in the survival of patients with trisomy 13.

  19. EFFECT OF SALINITY ON SURVIVAL AND LARVAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Laboratory investigations was conducted to gain a better insight into the effect of changing salinity regime on the development and survival of Macrobrachium vollenhoveli larvae. At water temperature of 28 ± 2oC, larvae reared in the salinity range of 0 to 10 ppt showed low survival (<48%), whereas those reared at 12 ...

  20. Escherichia coli survival in waters: Temperature dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowing the survival rates of water-borne Escherichia coli is important in evaluating microbial contamination and making appropriate management decisions. E. coli survival rates are dependent on temperature, a dependency that is routinely expressed using an analogue of the Q10 mo...

  1. Relief for surviving relatives following a suicide.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oud, MJT; de Groot, MH

    2006-01-01

    Relief for surviving relatives following a suicide. - After the suicide of a 43-year-old woman with known depression, a 41-year-old paraplegic man who recently developed diarrhoea and a 41-year-old woman with probable depression with symptoms of psychosis, the general practitioners of the surviving

  2. Survival after in-hospital Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Adib Hajbaghery

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: During recent years, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR in hospital has received much attention. However, the survival rate of CPR in Iran’s hospitals is unknown. This study was designed to evaluate outcome of in-hospital CPR in Kashan. Methods: A longitudinal case registry study was conducted on all cases of in-hospital CPR during 6 months at 2002. Necessary data including; age, sex, underlying disease, working shift, time from cardiac arrest until initiating of CPR and until defibrillation, duration and result of CPR, frequency of tracheal intubations and time served for it were collected in a checklist. Results: In six months study, 206 cases of cardiopulmonary resuscitation attempted. The survival rate was similar for both sexes. Short-term survival observed in19.9% of cases and only 5.3% survived to discharge. Conclusions: Duration of CPR, time of the first defibrillation, response time and the location of cardiac arrest are the key predictors of survival to hospital discharge and in-hospital CPR strategies require improvement. This study promotes a national study on post CPR survival for accurate data on our performance in attention to chain of survival. KeyWords: Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR, Survival rate, Iran

  3. Racial differences in survival from gynecologic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, M A; Behbakht, K; Benjamin, I; Berlin, M; King, S A; Rubin, S C

    1996-12-01

    To determine whether survival from gynecologic cancer is different between African-American and white patients at an inner-city hospital with both a large clinic and a private service. We studied 538 patients (89 African American, 449 white) diagnosed with cervical, uterine, or ovarian cancer at a single institution from January 1, 1989 through December 31, 1993. Information was obtained on age, stage, site of disease, histology, and type of health insurance (public or commercial). Insurance coverage was used as a proxy for socioeconomic status. Overall survival was estimated by the method of Kaplan and Meier and compared by the log-rank test. Cox proportional hazard modeling was used to evaluate the effects of multiple factors on survival. African-American patients were significantly older and were more likely to have cervical cancer and public insurance than white patients. Overall survival was worse for African-American patients than for white patients (P whites, and African-American patients older than 65 years had a worse survival than whites of similar age. On multivariate analysis, only stage and insurance coverage were significant predictors of survival. African-American patients with gynecologic cancer at our institution have worse overall survival than white patients. The survival difference seems to be due predominantly to differences in socioeconomic status and stage at diagnosis.

  4. Teaching home safety and survival skills to latch-key children: a comparison of two manuals and methods.

    OpenAIRE

    Peterson, L

    1984-01-01

    I evaluated the influence of two training manuals on latch-key children's acquisition of home safety and survival skills. The widely used, discussion-oriented "Prepared for Today" manual was compared with a behaviorally oriented "Safe at Home" manual. Data were scored by response criteria developed by experts and by parents' and experts' ratings of children's spontaneous answers. With both methods of scoring, three behaviorally trained children demonstrated clear and abrupt increases in skill...

  5. Training as a factor of business excellence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Luz Marín-Díaz

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Adopting a specific strategy is sometimes the key to the survival of companies. Given the increasing interest on the part of the companies to have the best strategy that allows them to differentiate themselves from their competitors, the aim of this empirical work is to study the relationship that exists between training and business results.Design/methodology/approach: The empirical set of this paper is comprised by a survey applied to 381 large organizations in Catalonia region during the time frame of 2066-2007. At one hand, the survey allowed identifying the independent (training variables, and at other, the dependent variables (economical were obtained from Sabi Data Base and from the “Fomento de la Producción” Magazine.Findings: According to data obtained, it is possible to consider training as an additional strategic tool that should be used by companies to improve their performance outcomes.Originality/value: Taking into account that the literature review only demonstrates studies linking training and results such as total shareholder return, productivity, higher quality of customer services, reduced staff turnover, organizational performance, growth on the staff wages, etc., therefore, the key value of the paper rely at one hand on providing an analysis of the impact of training on billing and at other, on the use of the Model of Industrial Economy as part of the theoretical framework for the causal model development.

  6. Microbial survival and odor in laundry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Signe Munk; Johansen, Charlotte; Stahnke, Louise Heller

    2001-01-01

    , hydrophobic odorants [(Z)-4- heptenal, (E)-2-nonenal, and guaiacol] adhered more strongly to polyester than the acids. The odor formed by surviving skin microflora attached to textiles soiled with human sebum and sweat after laundering at 30 degreesC was studied by sensory evaluation and aroma extract......-were evaluated on cotton textile. A significant survival and transfer between textiles were found for all four test strains washed in E.U. and U.S. color detergents (without bleach), whereas no survival was observed in bleach-containing detergents. Gram-negative strains generally survived in greater numbers than...... Gram-positive strains. A greater survival was observed in U.S. detergents at U.S. conditions (30 degreesC, 12 min) than in E.U. detergents at E.U. conditions (40 degreesC, 30 min). The adhesion of odorants to cotton and polyester textiles during washing and drying was studied using six previously...

  7. Training in peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) for esophageal achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleftheriadis, Nicholas; Inoue, Haruhiro; Ikeda, Haruo; Onimaru, Manabu; Yoshida, Akira; Hosoya, Toshihisa; Maselli, Roberta; Kudo, Shin-Ei

    2012-01-01

    Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) has been developed in the context of natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) as a minimally invasive endoscopic treatment for symptomatic esophageal achalasia, which is a chronic progressive benign disease with severe morbidity and difficult management. Since September 2008, POEM has been successfully performed in more than 200 consecutive patients with symptomatic achalasia at the Digestive Disease Center of Showa University, Northern Yokohama Hospital, Yokohama, Japan, with excellent short- and long-term results and absence of serious complications. International experience of POEM within clinical studies is also promising. According to these results, POEM is considered as a safe procedure that can be applied to all achalasia patients. However, the low incidence of achalasia (0.3%-1% per 100,000 population), in combination with the potential serious complications related to the technically demanding POEM procedure, has made training difficult. There is therefore an urgent need for an animal model for training to decrease the learning curve. Further, there are other ethical and training issues to address. The pig is the most appropriate animal model for training in POEM due to its anatomy being similar to that of humans. The porcine esophagus has the advantage of easy mobilization due to absence of tight junctions to surrounding organs. A non-survival porcine model would be a simple, inexpensive, and reproducible animal model for training in POEM, without the need for concern about complications. A possible training process might first involve observation of POEM performed by specialists, then training on non-survival and survival porcine models, followed by training in humans under specialist guidance and finally, performance of POEM in humans.

  8. Radiological worker training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-10-01

    This Handbook describes an implementation process for core training as recommended in Implementation Guide G441.12, Radiation Safety Training, and as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control Standard (RCS). The Handbook is meant to assist those individuals within the Department of Energy, Managing and Operating contractors, and Managing and Integrating contractors identified as having responsibility for implementing core training recommended by the RCS. This training is intended for radiological workers to assist in meeting their job-specific training requirements of 10 CFR 835. While this Handbook addresses many requirements of 10 CFR 835 Subpart J, it must be supplemented with facility-specific information to achieve full compliance.

  9. Workmanship Training Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Ashley; Sikes, Larry; Corbin, Cheryl; Rucka, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Special processes require special skills, knowledge and experienced application. For over 15 years, the NASA Johnson Space Center's Receiving, Inspection and Test Facility (RITF) has provided Workmanship Standards compliance training, issuing more than 500 to 800 training completion certificates annually. It is critical that technicians and inspectors are trained and that they maintain their proficiency to implement the applicable standards and specifications. Training services include 'hands-on' training to engineers, technicians, and inspectors in the areas of electrostatic discharge (ESD), soldering, fiber optics, lithium battery handling, torque and wire safety, and wire wrapping.

  10. Seasonal survival of adult female mottled ducks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Jena A.; Haukos, David A.; Conway, Warren C.

    2017-01-01

    The mottled duck (Anas fulgivula) is a non-migratory duck dependent on coastal habitats to meet all of its life cycle requirements in the Western Gulf Coast (WGC) of Texas and Louisiana, USA. This population of mottled ducks has experienced a moderate decline during the past 2 decades. Adult survival has been identified as an important factor influencing population demography. Previous work based on band-recovery data has provided only annual estimates of survival. We assessed seasonal patterns of female mottled duck survival from 2009 to 2012 using individuals marked with satellite platform transmitter terminals (PTTs). We used temperature and movement sensors within each PTT to indicate potential mortality events. We estimated cumulative weekly survival and ranked factors influential in patterns of mortality using known-fate modeling in Program MARK. Models included 4 predictors: week; hunting and non-hunting periods; biological periods defined as breeding, brooding, molt, and pairing; and mass at time of capture. Models containing hunt periods, during and outside the mottled duck season, comprised essentially 100% of model weights where both legal and illegal harvest had a negative influence on mottled duck survival. Survival rates were low during 2009–2011 (12–38% annual rate of survival), when compared with the long-term banding average of 53% annual survival. During 2011, survival of female mottled ducks was the lowest annual rate (12%) ever documented and coincided with extreme drought. Management actions maximizing the availability of wetlands and associated upland habitats during hunting seasons and drought conditions may increase adult female mottled duck survival.

  11. Academic Training: Academic Training Lectures-Questionnaire

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 academic.training@cern.ch SUGGEST AND WIN! Its time to plan the 2004-2005 lecture series. From today until March 19 you have the chance to give your contribution to planning for next year's Academic Training Lecture Series. At the web site: http://cern.ch/Academic.Training/questionnaire you will find questionnaires proposing topics in high energy physics, applied physics and science and society. Answering the questionnaire will help ensure that the selected topics are as close as possible to your interests. In particular requests and comments from students will be much appreciated. To encourage your contribution, the AT Committee will reward one lucky winner with a small prize, a 50 CHF coupon for a book purchase at the CERN bookshop.

  12. Survival associated pathway identification with group Lp penalized global AUC maximization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Zhenqiu

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract It has been demonstrated that genes in a cell do not act independently. They interact with one another to complete certain biological processes or to implement certain molecular functions. How to incorporate biological pathways or functional groups into the model and identify survival associated gene pathways is still a challenging problem. In this paper, we propose a novel iterative gradient based method for survival analysis with group Lp penalized global AUC summary maximization. Unlike LASSO, Lp (p 1. We first extend Lp for individual gene identification to group Lp penalty for pathway selection, and then develop a novel iterative gradient algorithm for penalized global AUC summary maximization (IGGAUCS. This method incorporates the genetic pathways into global AUC summary maximization and identifies survival associated pathways instead of individual genes. The tuning parameters are determined using 10-fold cross validation with training data only. The prediction performance is evaluated using test data. We apply the proposed method to survival outcome analysis with gene expression profile and identify multiple pathways simultaneously. Experimental results with simulation and gene expression data demonstrate that the proposed procedures can be used for identifying important biological pathways that are related to survival phenotype and for building a parsimonious model for predicting the survival times.

  13. Predicting the survival of diabetes using neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamuda, Mamman; Sathasivam, Saratha

    2017-08-01

    Data mining techniques at the present time are used in predicting diseases of health care industries. Neural Network is one among the prevailing method in data mining techniques of an intelligent field for predicting diseases in health care industries. This paper presents a study on the prediction of the survival of diabetes diseases using different learning algorithms from the supervised learning algorithms of neural network. Three learning algorithms are considered in this study: (i) The levenberg-marquardt learning algorithm (ii) The Bayesian regulation learning algorithm and (iii) The scaled conjugate gradient learning algorithm. The network is trained using the Pima Indian Diabetes Dataset with the help of MATLAB R2014(a) software. The performance of each algorithm is further discussed through regression analysis. The prediction accuracy of the best algorithm is further computed to validate the accurate prediction

  14. Cancer survival in Cuba, 1994-1995.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrote, L F; Alvarez, Y G; Babie, P T; Yi, M G; Alvarez, M G; Cicili, M L

    2011-01-01

    The population-based cancer registry in Cuba is a national cancer registry established in 1964; cancer registration is entirely done by passive methods. Data on survival from 13 cancer sites or types registered during 1994-1995 are reported. Follow-up has been carried out predominantly by passive methods, with median follow-up ranging from 13-54 months. The proportion with histologically verified diagnosis for various cancers ranged between 34-100%; death certificates only (DCOs) comprised 8-50%; 50-89% of total registered cases were included for the survival analysis. The 5-year age-standardized relative survival for selected cancers were breast (69%), colon (41%), cervix (56%), urinary bladder (64%), rectum (48%) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (49%). The 5-year relative survival by age group showed no distinct pattern or trend, and was fluctuating. A decreasing survival with increasing clinical extent of disease was noted for all cancers studied. The data on survival trend revealed that the 5-year relative survival of most cancers diagnosed in 1994-1995 was greater than that in 1988-1989.

  15. Linking age, survival, and transit time distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Salvatore; Porporato, Amilcare

    2015-10-01

    Although the concepts of age, survival, and transit time have been widely used in many fields, including population dynamics, chemical engineering, and hydrology, a comprehensive mathematical framework is still missing. Here we discuss several relationships among these quantities by starting from the evolution equation for the joint distribution of age and survival, from which the equations for age and survival time readily follow. It also becomes apparent how the statistical dependence between age and survival is directly related to either the age dependence of the loss function or the survival-time dependence of the input function. The solution of the joint distribution equation also allows us to obtain the relationships between the age at exit (or death) and the survival time at input (or birth), as well as to stress the symmetries of the various distributions under time reversal. The transit time is then obtained as a sum of the age and survival time, and its properties are discussed along with the general relationships between their mean values. The special case of steady state case is analyzed in detail. Some examples, inspired by hydrologic applications, are presented to illustrate the theory with the specific results. This article was corrected on 11 Nov 2015. See the end of the full text for details.

  16. Survival analysis of orthodontic mini-implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shin-Jae; Ahn, Sug-Joon; Lee, Jae Won; Kim, Seong-Hun; Kim, Tae-Woo

    2010-02-01

    Survival analysis is useful in clinical research because it focuses on comparing the survival distributions and the identification of risk factors. Our aim in this study was to investigate the survival characteristics and risk factors of orthodontic mini-implants with survival analyses. One hundred forty-one orthodontic patients (treated from October 1, 2000, to November 29, 2007) were included in this survival study. A total of 260 orthodontic mini-implants that had sandblasted (large grit) and acid-etched screw parts were placed between the maxillary second premolar and the first molar. Failures of the implants were recorded as event data, whereas implants that were removed because treatment ended and those that were not removed during the study period were recorded as censored data. A nonparametric life table method was used to visualize the hazard function, and Kaplan-Meier survival curves were generated to identify the variables associated with implant failure. Prognostic variables associated with implant failure were identified with the Cox proportional hazard model. Of the 260 implants, 22 failed. The hazard function for implant failure showed that the risk is highest immediately after placement. The survival function showed that the median survival time of orthodontic mini-implants is sufficient for relatively long orthodontic treatments. The Cox proportional hazard model identified that increasing age is a decisive factor for implant survival. The decreasing pattern of the hazard function suggested gradual osseointegration of orthodontic mini-implants. When implants are placed in a young patient, special caution is needed to lessen the increased probability of failure, especially immediately after placement.

  17. Portable Virtual Training Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Reagan; Johnston, Alan

    2015-01-01

    The Mission Operations Lab initiated a project to design, develop, deliver, test, and validate a unique training system for astronaut and ground support personnel. In an effort to keep training costs low, virtual training units (VTUs) have been designed based on images of actual hardware and manipulated by a touch screen style interface for ground support personnel training. This project helped modernized the training system and materials by integrating them with mobile devices for training when operators or crew are unavailable to physically train in the facility. This project also tested the concept of a handheld remote device to control integrated trainers using International Space Station (ISS) training simulators as a platform. The portable VTU can interface with the full-sized VTU, allowing a trainer co-located with a trainee to remotely manipulate a VTU and evaluate a trainee's response. This project helped determine if it is useful, cost effective, and beneficial for the instructor to have a portable handheld device to control the behavior of the models during training. This project has advanced NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) VTU capabilities with modern and relevant technology to support space flight training needs of today and tomorrow.

  18. Foreign Ownership and long-term Survival

    OpenAIRE

    Kronborg, Dorte; Thomsen, Steen

    2006-01-01

    Does foreign ownership enhance or decrease a firm’s chances of survival? Over the 100 year period 1895-2001 this paper compares the survival of foreign subsidiaries in Denmark to a control sample matched by industry and firm size. We find that foreign-owned companies have higher survival probability. On average exit risk for domestic companies is 2.3 times higher than for foreign companies. First movers like Siemens, Philips, Kodak, Ford, GM or Goodyear have been active in the country for alm...

  19. Controlling chaotic transients: Yorke's game of survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aguirre, Jacobo; D'ovidio, Francesco; Sanjuán, Miguel A. F.

    2004-01-01

    . This problem is focused as a two-person, mathematical game between two players called "the protagonist" and "the adversary." The protagonist's goal is to survive. He can lose but cannot win; the best he can do is survive to play another round, struggling ad infinitum. In the absence of actions by either player...... knows the action of the adversary in choosing his response and is permitted to choose the initial point x(0) of the game. We use the "slope 3" tent map in an example of this problem. We show that it is possible for the protagonist to survive....

  20. Empirical likelihood method in survival analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Mai

    2015-01-01

    Add the Empirical Likelihood to Your Nonparametric ToolboxEmpirical Likelihood Method in Survival Analysis explains how to use the empirical likelihood method for right censored survival data. The author uses R for calculating empirical likelihood and includes many worked out examples with the associated R code. The datasets and code are available for download on his website and CRAN.The book focuses on all the standard survival analysis topics treated with empirical likelihood, including hazard functions, cumulative distribution functions, analysis of the Cox model, and computation of empiric

  1. Major Differences in Advanced Life Support Training Strategies Among Danish Hospitals - A Nationwide Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glerup Lauridsen, Kasper; Mygind-Klausen, Troels; Stærk, Mathilde

    2017-01-01

    %), but only 56% evaluated non-technical skills during or after team training. Overall, 2% reported to practice specific team leadership skills.Conclusion: There are major differences in duration, retraining interval, and methods for ALS training in Danish hospitals. These differences call for research......Introduction: Advanced life support (ALS) training may increase survival from in-hospital cardiac arrest. Efficient ALS training includes practice of both technical and non-technical skills in a realistic setting with frequent retraining to avoid decay in ALS skills. ALS training strategies among...... inquired information on: A) Course duration and retraining interval, B) Training methods and setting, C) Scenario training and practicing non-technical skills.Results: In total, 44 hospitals replied (response rate: 96%). ALS training was conducted in 43 hospitals (98%). Median (range) ALS course duration...

  2. Opportunities and barriers to cardiopulmonary resuscitation training in English secondary schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockey, Andrew S; Barton, Katherine; Yoxall, Heather

    2016-10-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation rates and survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest are poor in the UK compared with areas abroad that deliver mandatory training to all school children. We sought to identify barriers to training and develop a strategy to enable delivery of this training. Qualitative analysis, comprising semistructured interviews and group discussions, covering 14 schools in the metropolitan borough of Calderdale in West Yorkshire. Only three schools out of 14 were delivering training to entire year groups. Barriers include lack of resources, lack of training for teachers and difficulty in initiating a programme. Strategies were developed to overcome these barriers with the result that four additional schools are now teaching a whole year group. There is no single solution and bespoke plans may be needed for each school. The establishment of cardiopulmonary resuscitation training in secondary schools in the UK is achievable. The commonly perceived barriers to establishment of training are all surmountable, but solving them does not necessarily ensure universal coverage. Support from healthcare professionals, in particular public health, is essential to ensure that the training is as widespread as possible. Mandatory inclusion of this training on the school curriculum, as seen in other countries, would result in significantly improved survival rates from out-of-hospital cardiorespiratory arrest. Solutions to improve training have been proposed, which could be used in other parts of Europe where such training is not a mandatory requirement.

  3. To favor survival under food shortage, the brain disables costly memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaçais, Pierre-Yves; Preat, Thomas

    2013-01-25

    The brain regulates energy homeostasis in the organism. Under resource shortage, the brain takes priority over peripheral organs for energy supply. But can the brain also down-regulate its own consumption to favor survival? We show that the brain of Drosophila specifically disables the costly formation of aversive long-term memory (LTM) upon starvation, a physiological state required for appetitive LTM formation. At the neural circuit level, the slow oscillations normally triggered in two pairs of dopaminergic neurons to enable aversive LTM formation were abolished in starved flies. Transient artificial activation of these neurons during training restored LTM formation in starved flies but at the price of a reduced survival. LTM formation is thus subject to adaptive plasticity that helps survival under food shortage.

  4. Academic Training: String Theory

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    2004-2005 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10 June from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg. 500 on 6, 7, 8 & 10 June, TH Auditorium, bldg. 4, 3rd floor on 9 June String Theory by C. Johnson / Univ. of Southern California, USA ENSEIGNEMENT ACADEMIQUE ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 academic.training@cern.ch If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt.

  5. Safety training news

    CERN Multimedia

    Safety Training, HSE Unit

    2014-01-01

      SELF-RESCUE MASK The "Self-Rescue Mask" face-to-face training course has been replaced by a revised version. This measure concerns both the initial and the refresher course. For personnel who have successfully attended the initial or refresher Self-Rescue Mask training within the last three years, their Self-Rescue Mask training will still be valid.  The course description and registration form can be found in the training catalogue on the Safety Training Service’s website or catalogue. The Self-Rescue Mask training course is a mandatory prerequisite for following the new "Portable ODH Detector" e-learning course.   PORTABLE ODH DETECTOR A new e-learning awareness course, "Portable ODH Detector", is available via the SIR application on CERN’s intranet. Personnel requiring a portable ODH detector of the DRÄGER x-am 5000 type to allowed access th...

  6. Ministerial Importance and Survival in Government

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bright, Jonathan; Döring, Holger; Little, Conor

    2015-01-01

    Are holders of important ministerial positions more likely to survive in cabinet than their colleagues who hold less important positions? This study examines the relationship between the importance of a ministerial position and the length of time ministers are able to survive in government....... It is based on an original dataset of cabinet ministers in seven West European countries from 1945 to 2011. Employing a little-used measure of ministerial survival based on overall time in government, it is found that holders of important ministerial positions are more durable than their colleagues who hold...... less important ministerial positions. Age, prior government experience and the size of the party to which the minister belongs are also associated with consistently significant effects. Further, the study explores the determinants of survival for two types of risk – exiting government with one’s party...

  7. SURVIVAL OF SALMONELLA SPECIES IN RIVER WATER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The survival of four Salmonella strains in river water microcosms was monitored using culturing techniques, direct counts, whole cell hybridization, scanning electron microscopy, and resuscitation techniques via the direct viable count method and flow cytrometry. Plate counts of...

  8. Surviving Sepsis: Taming a Deadly Immune Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues Subscribe August 2014 Print this issue Surviving Sepsis Taming a Deadly Immune Response En español Send ... Mouth? Looking at Lupus Wise Choices Signs of Sepsis Sepsis can be hard to spot, because its ...

  9. Cognitive function in families with exceptional survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barral, Sandra; Cosentino, Stephanie; Costa, Rosann

    2012-01-01

    members in the offspring generation demonstrate significantly better performance on multiple tasks requiring attention, working memory, and semantic processing when compared with individuals without a family history of exceptional survival, suggesting that cognitive performance may serve as an important...

  10. Bay Scallop Spawning, Survival, Growth Records

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bay Scallops are selected and cultured according to criteria of growth and survival. Morphological attributes have also been selected to assess heretibility....

  11. Zooplankton Data - Ocean Survival of Salmonids

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A study to evaluate the role of changing ocean conditions on growth and survival of juvenile salmon from the Columbia River basin as they enter the Columbia River...

  12. Juvenile Salmonid Metrics - Ocean Survival of Salmonids

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A study to evaluate the role of changing ocean conditions on growth and survival of juvenile salmon from the Columbia River basin as they enter the Columbia River...

  13. Oceanographic Trawl Data - Ocean Survival of Salmonids

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A study to evaluate the role of changing ocean conditions on growth and survival of juvenile salmon from the Columbia River basin as they enter the Columbia River...

  14. CTD Oceanographic Data - Ocean Survival of Salmonids

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A study to evaluate the role of changing ocean conditions on growth and survival of juvenile salmon from the Columbia River basin as they enter the Columbia River...

  15. Abiraterone Improves Survival in Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    A multinational phase III trial found that the drug abiraterone acetate prolonged the median survival of patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer by 4 months compared with patients who received a placebo.

  16. New Firm Survival: Industry versus Firm Effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.B. Audretsch (David); P. Houweling (Patrick); A.R. Thurik (Roy)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractRecent studies show that the likelihood of survival differs significantly across firms. Both firm and industry characteristics are hypothesized to account for this heterogenity. Using a longitudinal database of manufacturing firms we investigate whether firm or industry characteristics

  17. FCS Vehicle Transportability, Survivability, and Reliability Analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dion-Schwarz, Cynthia; Hirsch, Leon; Koehn, Phillip; Macheret, Jenya; Sparrow, Dave

    2005-01-01

    .... The investigation into metrics for transportability revealed that the C130 Transportability requirement for FCS vehicles is a constraint that leads to a less survivable platform but without improving Unit of Action (UA) transportability...

  18. HMSRP Hawaiian Monk Seal Survival Factors

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains records of survival factors recorded by PSD personnel and cooperating scientists as part of the ongoing monk seal population assessment...

  19. Delaying a shock after takeover from the automated external defibrillator by paramedics is associated with decreased survival

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berdowski, Jocelyn; Schulten, Ron J.; Tijssen, Jan G. P.; van Alem, Anouk P.; Koster, Rudolph W.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the takeover by Advanced Life Support [ALS] trained ambulance paramedics from rescuers using an automated external defibrillator [AED] delays shocks and if this delay is associated with decreased survival after out-of-hospital

  20. Extended family medicine training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, Steve; Ross, Shelley; Lawrence, Kathrine; Archibald, Douglas; Mackay, Maria Palacios; Oandasan, Ivy F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To examine trends in family medicine training at a time when substantial pedagogic change is under way, focusing on factors that relate to extended family medicine training. Design Aggregate-level secondary data analysis based on the Canadian Post-MD Education Registry. Setting Canada. Participants All Canadian citizens and permanent residents who were registered in postgraduate family medicine training programs within Canadian faculties of medicine from 1995 to 2013. Main outcome measures Number and proportion of family medicine residents exiting 2-year and extended (third-year and above) family medicine training programs, as well as the types and numbers of extended training programs offered in 2015. Results The proportion of family medicine trainees pursuing extended training almost doubled during the study period, going from 10.9% in 1995 to 21.1% in 2013. Men and Canadian medical graduates were more likely to take extended family medicine training. Among the 5 most recent family medicine exit cohorts (from 2009 to 2013), 25.9% of men completed extended training programs compared with 18.3% of women, and 23.1% of Canadian medical graduates completed extended training compared with 13.6% of international medical graduates. Family medicine programs vary substantially with respect to the proportion of their trainees who undertake extended training, ranging from a low of 12.3% to a high of 35.1% among trainees exiting from 2011 to 2013. Conclusion New initiatives, such as the Triple C Competency-based Curriculum, CanMEDS–Family Medicine, and Certificates of Added Competence, have emerged as part of family medicine education and credentialing. In acknowledgment of the potential effect of these initiatives, it is important that future research examine how pedagogic change and, in particular, extended training shapes the care family physicians offer their patients. As part of that research it will be important to measure the breadth and uptake of

  1. Modelling population-based cancer survival trends using join point models for grouped survival data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Binbing; Huang, Lan; Tiwari, Ram C; Feuer, Eric J; Johnson, Karen A

    2009-04-01

    In the United States cancer as a whole is the second leading cause of death and a major burden to health care, thus the medical progress against cancer is a major public health goal. There are many individual studies to suggest that cancer treatment breakthroughs and early diagnosis have significantly improved the prognosis of cancer patients. To better understand the relationship between medical improvements and the survival experience for the patient population at large, it is useful to evaluate cancer survival trends on the population level, e.g., to find out when and how much the cancer survival rates changed. In this paper, we analyze the population-based grouped cancer survival data by incorporating joinpoints into the survival models. A joinpoint survival model facilitates the identification of trends with significant change points in cancer survival, when related to cancer treatments or interventions. The Bayesian Information Criterion is used to select the number of joinpoints. The performance of the joinpoint survival models is evaluated with respect to cancer prognosis, joinpoint locations, annual percent changes in death rates by year of diagnosis, and sample sizes through intensive simulation studies. The model is then applied to the grouped relative survival data for several major cancer sites from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) Program of the National Cancer Institute. The change points in the survival trends for several major cancer sites are identified and the potential driving forces behind such change points are discussed.

  2. Minding the body: psychotherapy and cancer survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegel, David

    2014-09-01

    This article reviews evidence regarding effects of psychotherapy on overall cancer survival time. Special emphasis is given to research on adverse effects of depression on cancer survival, breast cancer, and mediating psychophysiological pathways linking psychosocial support to longer survival. It reviews all published clinical trials addressing effects of psychotherapy on cancer survival, emphasizing depression, breast cancer, and psychophysiological evidence linking stress, depression, and support to cancer survival. Systematic literature review and synthesis. Eight of 15 published trials indicate that psychotherapy enhances cancer survival time. No studies show an adverse effect of psychotherapy on cancer survival. Potential psychophysiological mechanisms linking stress to shorter survival include dysregulation of diurnal cortisol, increased pro-inflammatory cytokines, reduced natural killer cell activity, shorter telomeres and lower telomerase activity, glucocorticoid-mediated suppression of p53 and BrCA1 gene expression, and sympathetic nervous system activation of vascular endothelial growth factor. Stress and support affect the course of cancer progression. What is known? Stress and support have been thought to be related to cancer risk and progression, but evidence has been mixed. Depression is a natural co-morbid condition with cancer. It has not been clear how stress and support could physiologically affect the rate of cancer progression. Immune function was not thought to have much relevance to cancer progression. Few other physiological mechanisms linking stress to cancer progression were known. What does this paper add? There is evidence from 15 RCTs indicating that effective psychosocial support improves quantity as well as quality of life with cancer. There is evidence that chronic depression predicts poorer prognosis with cancer. Dysregulated circadian cortisol patterns predict more rapid cancer progression. Inflammatory processes affect cancer

  3. Survival of Burkholderia pseudomallei in Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woods Donald E

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability of Burkholderia pseudomallei to survive in water likely contributes to its environmental persistence in endemic regions. To determine the physiological adaptations which allow B. pseudomallei to survive in aqueous environments, we performed microarray analyses of B. pseudomallei cultures transferred from Luria broth (LB to distilled water. Findings Increased expression of a gene encoding for a putative membrane protein (BPSL0721 was confirmed using a lux-based transcriptional reporter system, and maximal expression was noted at approximately 6 hrs after shifting cells from LB to water. A BPSL0721 deficient mutant of B. pseudomallei was able to survive in water for at least 90 days indicating that although involved, BPSL0721 was not essential for survival. BPSL2961, a gene encoding a putative phosphatidylglycerol phosphatase (PGP, was also induced when cells were shifted to water. This gene is likely involved in cell membrane biosynthesis. We were unable to construct a PGP mutant suggesting that the gene is not only involved in survival in water but is essential for cell viability. We also examined mutants of polyhydroxybutyrate synthase (phbC, lipopolysaccharide (LPS oligosaccharide and capsule synthesis, and these mutations did not affect survival in water. LPS mutants lacking outer core were found to lose viability in water by 200 days indicating that an intact LPS core provides an outer membrane architecture which allows prolonged survival in water. Conclusion The results from these studies suggest that B. pseudomallei survival in water is a complex process that requires an LPS molecule which contains an intact core region.

  4. Evolution and Survival of Quantum Entanglement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-06

    independently for tasks of  quantum  information. These include  quantum  computing,  quantum   cryptography ,  quantum  teleportation and other forms of entanglement...Evolution and Survival of Quantum Entanglement Theoretical foundations for methods to preserve quantum entanglement are explored and explained...Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 quantum entanglement, decoherence, qubit, revival, survival, Jaynes-Cummings, Rabi, rotating wave approximation

  5. Survival function of hypo-exponential distributions

    OpenAIRE

    Lotfy, Mamdouh M.; Abdelsamad, Ali S.

    1985-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited The reliability of a system is the probability that the system will survive or complete an intended mission of certain duration. Describing all possible ways that a system can survive a mission in reliability shorthand gives a simple approach to reliability computations. Reliability computation for a system defined by shorthand notation is greatly dependent upon the convolution problem. Assuming constant component failure rates, this p...

  6. Retrofiting survivability of military vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canavan, Gregory H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    of 0.5. Over the range from 0.5 to 4.5 cm the shock KE is attenuated by a factor of {approx}70, while its momentum is changed little. The shock and particle velocity falls by a factor of 200 while the mass increases by a factor of 730. In the limit of very porous media u {approx} 1/M, so KE {approx} 1/M, which falls by a factor of {approx}600, while momentum Mu does not change at all. Figure 2 shows the KE, Mu, u, and M for a material with a porosity of 1.05, for which the KE changes little. In the limit of media of very low porosity, u {approx} 1/{radical}M, so KE is constant while Mu {approx} {radical}M, which increases by a factor of 15. Thus, if the goal is to reduce the peak pressure from strong explosions below, very porous materials, which strongly reduce pressure but do not increase momentum, are preferred to non-porous materials, which amplify momentum but do not decrease pressure. These predictions are in qualitative accord with the results of experiments at Los Alamos in which projectiles from high velocity, large caliber cannons were stopped by one to two sandbags. The studies were performed primarily to determine the effectiveness of sand in stopping fragments of various sizes, but could be extended to study sand's effectiveness in attenuating blast pressure. It would also be useful to test the above predictions on the effectiveness of media with higher porosity. Water barriers have been discussed but not deployed in previous retrofit survivability studies for overseas embassies. They would detect the flash from the mine detonation below, trigger a thin layer of explosive above a layer of water, and drive water droplets into the approaching blast wave. The blast loses energy in evaporating the droplets and loses momentum in slowing them. Under favorable conditions that could attenuate the pressure in the blast enough to prevent the penetration or disruption of the vehicle. However, such barriers would depend on prompt and reliable detonation

  7. Virtual Environments for Training

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stiles, R

    1998-01-01

    .... Progress on productization of the VET Training Studio software includes increased robustness for Vista virtual environment display and interaction services, a new capability to use the STEVE visual...

  8. Components of Effective Training

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lussier, James W; Shadrick, Scott B

    2006-01-01

    .... The two types of activity are markedly different in structure, pace, amount and type of coaching required, composition of the training audience, focus of conscious attention, appropriate performance...

  9. Universal Drive Train Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This vehicle drive train research facility is capable of evaluating helicopter and ground vehicle power transmission technologies in a system level environment. The...

  10. Virtual Training Devices Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Virtual Training Devices (VTD) Laboratory at the Life Cycle Software Engineering Center, Picatinny Arsenal, provides a software testing and support environment...

  11. World's simplest electric train

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criado, C.; Alamo, N.

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the physics of the "world's simplest electric train." The "train" consists of a AA battery with a strong magnet on each end that moves through a helical coil of copper wire. The motion of the train results from the interaction between the magnetic field created by the current in the wire and the magnetic field of the magnets. We calculate the force of this interaction and the terminal velocity of the train due to eddy currents and friction. Our calculations provide a good illustration of Faraday's and Lenz's laws, as well as of the concepts of the Lorentz force and eddy currents.

  12. Improving child survival: Malnutrition Task Force and the paediatrician's responsibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, A A; Ashworth, A; Khanum, S

    2006-01-01

    Malnutrition (underweight) contributes to approximately 60% of all child deaths, yet health professionals, policy makers, and donor agencies often fail to recognise its relevance to child survival. There is a need for the paediatric community to champion the importance of adequate nutrition for normal growth and development, and of placing sufficient emphasis on the prevention and treatment of malnutrition. Many severely malnourished children die from inappropriate treatment. Case fatality rates of 25–30% are commonly found and in some hospitals as many as 50–70% will die. Many of these deaths are avoidable. Weaknesses in health systems, inappropriate training of doctors and nurses, inadequate supervision, and lack of support for staff all contribute to compromised quality of care. The International Union of Nutritional Sciences, with support from the International Pediatric Association, Launched a global Malnutrition Task Force in 2005. The main objective is to ensure that an integrated system of prevention and treatment of malnutrition is actively supported as a fundamental aspect of care, and becomes an integral part of all training programmes. PMID:16861489

  13. The survival of Coxiella burnetii in soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evstigneeva, A. S.; Ul'Yanova, T. Yu.; Tarasevich, I. V.

    2007-05-01

    Coxiella burnetii is a pathogen of Q-fever—a widespread zoonosis. The effective adaptation of C. burnetii to intracellular existence is in contrast with its ability to survive in the environment outside the host cells and its resistance to chemical and physical agents. Its mechanism of survival remains unknown. However, its survival appears to be related to the developmental cycle of the microorganism itself, i.e., to the formation of its dormant forms. The survival of Coxiella burnetii was studied for the first time. The pathogenic microorganism was inoculated into different types of soil and cultivated under different temperatures. The survival of the pathogen was verified using a model with laboratory animals (mice). Viable C. burnetii were found in the soil even 20 days after their inoculation. The relationship between the organic carbon content in the soils and the survival of C. burnetii was revealed. Thus, the results obtained were the first to demonstrate that the soil may serve as a reservoir for the preservation and further spreading of the Q-fever pathogen in the environment, on the one hand, and reduce the risk of epidemics, on the other.

  14. It isn't like this on TV: Revisiting CPR survival rates depicted on popular TV shows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portanova, Jaclyn; Irvine, Krystle; Yi, Jae Yoon; Enguidanos, Susan

    2015-11-01

    Public perceptions of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) can be influenced by the media. Nearly two decades ago, a study found that the rates of survival following CPR were far higher in popular TV shows than actual rates. In recent years, major strides toward enhanced education and communication around life sustaining interventions have been made. This study aimed to reassess the accuracy of CPR portrayed by popular medical TV shows. Additionally, we sought to determine whether these shows depicted discussions of care preferences and referenced advance directives. Three trained research assistants independently coded two leading medical dramas airing between 2010 and 2011, Grey's Anatomy and House. Patient characteristics, CPR survival rates, and goals of care discussions were recorded. CPR was depicted 46 times in the 91 episodes, with a survival rate of 69.6%. Among those immediately surviving following CPR, the majority (71.9%) survived to hospital discharge and 15.6% died before discharge. Advance directive discussions only occurred for two patients, and preferences regarding code status (8.7%), intubation (6.5%) and feeding (4.3%) rarely occurred. Both popular TV shows portrayed CPR as more effective than actual rates. Overall, the shows portrayed an immediate survival rate nearly twice that of actual survival rates. Inaccurate TV portrayal of CPR survival rates may misinform viewers and influence care decisions made during serious illness and at end of life. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Outsourcing of Training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GAMIN, J.E.

    1999-06-17

    Several lessons are covered that has been learned at Fluor Daniel Hanford during their outsourcing effort. We have overcome problems because of our joint commitment to success. We continue to work our way through issues as they arise. On the positive side, several good things have happened as a result of outsourcing. Our training provider (EXITECH) has proven to be very responsive to our many different customers. We have been able to establish and support a 6-month training schedule for the first time. This has allowed the different facilities who send workers to training with more flexibility in planning their workers' time away from their jobs. In addition to the master training schedule, each facility on the Hanford Site has its own special or emergent training needs, and EXITECH has been very responsive in meeting these individual facilities' needs. Student and supervisor feedback on the quality and effectiveness of environmental, safety and health training provided by EXITECH has been very positive. Worker and supervisor feedback indicates the ''hands-on'' training serves their needs, and focuses on what they need to know to be able to perform work safely and efficiently. EXITECH strives very hard at presenting training so students can become successful in their training efforts. The workforce has noticed EXITECH's training philosophy is based on shared success with the trainee, not failure. Along the way, FDH has saved money as a result of this outsourcing. During our first year of the contract, we estimated a $400,000 savings. The decision as to outsource training is likely the most important you will make for your organization. In our situation, it fit the business goals we had established in our bid for the Hanford contract. However, if we were to begin again, we would factor some of the valuable lessons learned experienced during the first 16 months of our current outsourcing.

  16. Tooth survival after root canal treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balto, Khaled

    2011-01-01

    Medline, the Cochrane Library, hand searches of the International Endodontic Journal, Journal of Endodontics, Oral Surgery Oral Medicine Oral Pathology Oral Radiology and Endodontics, Dental Traumatology (& Endodontics) and bibliographies of all relevant articles and review articles. Unpublished studies were identified by searching abstracts and conference proceedings. Personal contacts were used to identify ongoing or unpublished studies. Two reviewers independently assessed and selected the studies with disagreements being resolved by discussion. Clinical studies of RCTx on more than 30 teeth and of at least six-month duration, where the success was based on survival of tooth and the proportion of teeth surviving was given, or could be calculated from the raw data, were included. Data were extracted by two reviewers independently using custom-designed forms. The weighted pooled proportion of teeth surviving after treatment and the combined effects (expressed as odds ratio) of clinical factors on tooth survival were estimated using fixed and random effects meta-analyses using DerSimonean and Laird's methods. The survival data were pooled into three groups based on the duration after treatment: 2 or 3 years; 4 or 5 years; and 8, 9 or 10 years. Statistical heterogeneity amongst the studies was assessed by Cochran's (Q) test. Of the 31 articles identified, 14 studies were included. The majority (10) were retrospective. The reported survival is shown in Table 1. Substantial differences in study characteristics were found to hinder effective direct comparison of findings. Evidence for the effect of prognostic factors on tooth survival was weak. Based on the data available for meta-analysis, four conditions were found to significantly improve tooth survival. In descending order of influence, the conditions increasing observed proportion of survival were as follows: (i) a crown restoration after RCTx; (ii) tooth having both mesial and distal proximal contacts; (iii

  17. Criterion-based laparoscopic training reduces total training time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkman, W.M.; Buzink, S.N.; Alevizos, L.; De Hingh, I.H.J.T.; Jakimowicz, J.J.

    The benefits of criterion-based laparoscopic training over time-oriented training are unclear. The purpose of this study is to compare these types of training based on training outcome and time efficiency. Methods During four training sessions within 1 week (one session per day) 34 medical interns

  18. Five-year survival and median survival time of nasopharyngeal carcinoma in Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siti-Azrin, Ab Hamid; Norsa'adah, Bachok; Naing, Nyi Nyi

    2014-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is the fourth most common cancer in Malaysia. The objective of this study was to determine the five-year survival rate and median survival time of NPC patients in Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM). One hundred and thirty four NPC cases confirmed by histopathology in Hospital USM between 1st January 1998 and 31st December 2007 that fulfilled the inclusion and exclusion criteria were retrospectively reviewed. Survival time of NPC patients were estimated by Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Log-rank tests were performed to compare survival of cases among presenting symptoms, WHO type, TNM classification and treatment modalities. The overall five-year survival rate of NPC patients was 38.0% (95% confidence interval (CI): 29.1, 46.9). The overall median survival time of NPC patients was 31.30 months (95%CI: 23.76, 38.84). The significant factors that altered the survival rate and time were age (p=0.041), cranial nerve involvement (p=0.012), stage (p=0.002), metastases (p=0.008) and treatment (p<0.001). The median survival of NPC patients is significantly longer for age≤50 years, no cranial nerve involvement, and early stage and is dependent on treatment modalities.

  19. Intercultural Training: Six Measures Assessing Training Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Andrea; Mertesacker, Marion

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to develop recommendations for measures assessing intercultural training needs for international human resource management. Based on scientific as well as application-oriented criteria the aim is to select six measures assessing general intercultural competencies and with the help of behaviour ratings in…

  20. All aboard the Safety Train(ing)!

    CERN Multimedia

    Rosaria Marraffino

    2015-01-01

    Would you like to influence CERN’s safety courses? Do you want to help build better training courses? If your answer is yes to one or both of these questions: now is the time! The Safety Training section is looking for volunteers from the whole CERN community to test new courses before they go online for all members of the personnel.    The Safety Training section is redesigning the CERN e-learning package in order to adopt a more educational approach and to make the courses a more enjoyable experience. The section is now calling for volunteers. “We know we can do much more with testers’ help and feedback,” explains Christoph Balle, Safety Training section leader. “By having the end users actively involved in the process, we’ll achieve our goal of communicating safety in the best possible way. As the volunteers will play an active role in the development of the courses, they will be providing a service to the whole community.&am...

  1. Academic Training: 2004 - 2005 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    1st Term - 01 October to 17 December 2004 REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME New Trends in Fusion Research by A. Fasoli, EPFL, Lausanne, CH 11, 12, 13 October Physics at e+e- linear collider by K. Desch, DESY, Hamburg, D 15, 16, 17, 18, 19 November LECTURE SERIES FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS Standard Model by R. Barbieri, CERN-PH-TH 6, 7, 8, 9 10 December The lectures are open to all those interested, without application. The abstract of the lectures, as well as any change to the above information (title, dates, time, place etc) will be published in the CERN Bulletin, the WWW, and by notices before each term and for each series of lectures. ENSEIGNEMENT ACADEMIQUE ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 academic.training@cern.ch If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form a...

  2. Sensing train integrity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, Johan; Westenberg, Roel; Schoemaker, Manfred

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a new approach to check integrity of cargo trains based on a distributed wireless sensor network (WSN). The WSN is autonomous and gathers information about the composition of the train without outside help or intervention. If the WSN infers from its data that an unexpected change

  3. Army Physical Readiness Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    advanced calisthenics , military movement, kettlebell and climbing drills are performed with increasing resistance. Endurance and mobility activities such as...strength required to perform functional movements against resistance. Calisthenics are the foundation of Army strength training and body management. They...Strength is further developed through the performance of advanced calisthenics , resistance training, climbing drills and the guerrilla drill. ENDURANCE 2

  4. Training for Productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglen, Leo; Hopkins, Sonnie; Burke, Gerald

    An exploratory study was conducted to evaluate the utility of a method to demonstrate that Australian enterprises that invest in the training of their employees gain a return from that investment through an increase in employee productivity. The method, which compares enterprise expenditure on training of personnel with labor productivity across a…

  5. Parent Training Packages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowitschek, Joseph J.; Hofmeister, Alan

    1975-01-01

    Discusses the current development of training packages for educating parents to help their children develop self-help, math, reading, and spelling skills. Two packages are described: (1) a multimedia package monitored by a professional in training workshops for parents of mentally retarded children; and (2) pencil and paper packages in which…

  6. Education, Training and Identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fevre, Ralph; Rees, Gareth; Gorard, Stephen; Furlong, John

    Although public policy debate centers on education and training (ET) as a primary determinant of economic success, this study suggests that instead the economy determines patterns of participation in education and training. Research over time shows that planned government ET policies have little ability to affect the economy because the effects of…

  7. Dropouts and Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Terry

    1984-01-01

    Exploring the uses of human capital theory to an analysis of effective adult education, the author tests several hypotheses. Focusing on teacher characteristics, he examines whether trained teachers are better than untrained and whether dropout rates are affected by adult education teacher training. (SK)

  8. Training Recurrent Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Morten With

    1997-01-01

    Training recurrent networks is generally believed to be a difficult task. Excessive training times and lack of convergence to an acceptable solution are frequently reported. In this paper we seek to explain the reason for this from a numerical point of view and show how to avoid problems when...

  9. Training in laparoscopic urology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laguna, Ma Pilar; de Reijke, Theodorus M.; Wijkstra, Hessel; de la Rosette, Jean

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Training in laparoscopy has become an important issue in the current surgical scenario. In this overview we aim to update the current knowledge in the field of laparoscopic urological training and to highlight the potential dangers of using simulation for accreditation and

  10. Community Education Training Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whetten, Clifford L.; Berridge, Robert I.

    This manual is intended for use primarily as a guide to assist in the planning, organization, and implementation of preservice and inservice training of community educators. The material presented here describes the goal, objectives, basic training and rationale, planning, activities, resources and equipment, and evaluation of each of five…

  11. Hospital radiopharmacy training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawada, T; Wolf, W; Mochizuki, D

    1975-06-01

    Training of radiopharmacists, including self-study and a hospital short-term course, is discussed. A systematic approach for self-study is suggested. The 30-day hospital training program described includes both didactic material and on-the-job experience.

  12. Training a cataract surgeon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Babar Qureshi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Training in cataract surgery is one of the key factors needed to ensure high quality cataract surgery with good visual outcomes and patient satisfaction. The training has to impart the right skills to the right person by the right trainer and in the right environment.

  13. Training Evaluation: Clients' Roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Junaidah

    2001-01-01

    A study was conducted of 262 training providers in Malaysia, where providers must be government approved. Government regulation, client demands for high quality, and an economic downturn that focused attention on training costs have all influenced evaluation in a positive direction. (SK)

  14. Survivability is more fundamental than evolvability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E Palmer

    Full Text Available For a lineage to survive over long time periods, it must sometimes change. This has given rise to the term evolvability, meaning the tendency to produce adaptive variation. One lineage may be superior to another in terms of its current standing variation, or it may tend to produce more adaptive variation. However, evolutionary outcomes depend on more than standing variation and produced adaptive variation: deleterious variation also matters. Evolvability, as most commonly interpreted, is not predictive of evolutionary outcomes. Here, we define a predictive measure of the evolutionary success of a lineage that we call the k-survivability, defined as the probability that the lineage avoids extinction for k generations. We estimate the k-survivability using multiple experimental replicates. Because we measure evolutionary outcomes, the initial standing variation, the full spectrum of generated variation, and the heritability of that variation are all incorporated. Survivability also accounts for the decreased joint likelihood of extinction of sub-lineages when they 1 disperse in space, or 2 diversify in lifestyle. We illustrate measurement of survivability with in silico models, and suggest that it may also be measured in vivo using multiple longitudinal replicates. The k-survivability is a metric that enables the quantitative study of, for example, the evolution of 1 mutation rates, 2 dispersal mechanisms, 3 the genotype-phenotype map, and 4 sexual reproduction, in temporally and spatially fluctuating environments. Although these disparate phenomena evolve by well-understood microevolutionary rules, they are also subject to the macroevolutionary constraint of long-term survivability.

  15. SURVIVAL ANALYSIS AND LENGTH-BIASED SAMPLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Asgharian

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available When survival data are colleted as part of a prevalent cohort study, the recruited cases have already experienced their initiating event. These prevalent cases are then followed for a fixed period of time at the end of which the subjects will either have failed or have been censored. When interests lies in estimating the survival distribution, from onset, of subjects with the disease, one must take into account that the survival times of the cases in a prevalent cohort study are left truncated. When it is possible to assume that there has not been any epidemic of the disease over the past period of time that covers the onset times of the subjects, one may assume that the underlying incidence process that generates the initiating event times is a stationary Poisson process. Under such assumption, the survival times of the recruited subjects are called “lengthbiased”. I discuss the challenges one is faced with in analyzing these type of data. To address the theoretical aspects of the work, I present asymptotic results for the NPMLE of the length-biased as well as the unbiased survival distribution. I also discuss estimating the unbiased survival function using only the follow-up time. This addresses the case that the onset times are either unknown or known with uncertainty. Some of our most recent work and open questions will be presented. These include some aspects of analysis of covariates, strong approximation, functional LIL and density estimation under length-biased sampling with right censoring. The results will be illustrated with survival data from patients with dementia, collected as part of the Canadian Study of Health and Aging (CSHA.

  16. Training Public Health Advisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Pamela A; Brusuelas, Kristin M; Baden, Daniel J; Duncan, Heather L

    2015-01-01

    Federal public health advisors provide guidance and assistance to health departments to improve public health program work. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) prepares them with specialized training in administering public health programs. This article describes the evolving training and is based on internal CDC documents and interviews. The first federal public health advisors worked in health departments to assist with controlling syphilis after World War II. Over time, more CDC prevention programs hired them. To meet emerging needs, 3 major changes occurred: the Public Health Prevention Service, a fellowship program, in 1999; the Public Health Associate Program in 2007; and integration of those programs. Key components of the updated training are competency-based training, field experience, supervision, recruitment and retention, and stakeholder support. The enduring strength of the training has been the experience in a public health agency developing practical skills for program implementation and management.

  17. Army Training: Efforts to Adjust Training Requirements Should Consider the Use of Virtual Training Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    ARMY TRAINING Efforts to Adjust Training Requirements Should Consider the Use of Virtual Training Devices Report...Requirements Should Consider the Use of Virtual Training Devices What GAO Found In 2010, the Army began modifying its training priorities and goals to...until fiscal year 2017. The Army has taken some steps to improve the integration of virtual training devices into operational training , but gaps in

  18. COMPLEX TRAINING: A BRIEF REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William P. Ebben

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of plyometric training is well supported by research. Complex training has gained popularity as a training strategy combining weight training and plyometric training. Anecdotal reports recommend training in this fashion in order to improve muscular power and athletic performance. Recently, several studies have examined complex training. Despite the fact that questions remain about the potential effectiveness and implementation of this type of training, results of recent studies are useful in guiding practitioners in the development and implementation of complex training programs. In some cases, research suggests that complex training has an acute ergogenic effect on upper body power and the results of acute and chronic complex training include improved jumping performance. Improved performance may require three to four minutes rest between the weight training and plyometrics sets and the use of heavy weight training loads

  19. Training Feedforward Neural Networks Using Symbiotic Organisms Search Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haizhou; Zhou, Yongquan; Luo, Qifang; Basset, Mohamed Abdel

    2016-01-01

    Symbiotic organisms search (SOS) is a new robust and powerful metaheuristic algorithm, which stimulates the symbiotic interaction strategies adopted by organisms to survive and propagate in the ecosystem. In the supervised learning area, it is a challenging task to present a satisfactory and efficient training algorithm for feedforward neural networks (FNNs). In this paper, SOS is employed as a new method for training FNNs. To investigate the performance of the aforementioned method, eight different datasets selected from the UCI machine learning repository are employed for experiment and the results are compared among seven metaheuristic algorithms. The results show that SOS performs better than other algorithms for training FNNs in terms of converging speed. It is also proven that an FNN trained by the method of SOS has better accuracy than most algorithms compared.

  20. Attenuation caused by infrequently updated covariates in survival analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Per Kragh; Liestøl, Knut

    2003-01-01

    Attenuation; Cox regression model; Measurement errors; Survival analysis; Time-dependent covariates......Attenuation; Cox regression model; Measurement errors; Survival analysis; Time-dependent covariates...

  1. A gradient boosting algorithm for survival analysis via direct optimization of concordance index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yifei; Jia, Zhenyu; Mercola, Dan; Xie, Xiaohui

    2013-01-01

    Survival analysis focuses on modeling and predicting the time to an event of interest. Many statistical models have been proposed for survival analysis. They often impose strong assumptions on hazard functions, which describe how the risk of an event changes over time depending on covariates associated with each individual. In particular, the prevalent proportional hazards model assumes that covariates are multiplicatively related to the hazard. Here we propose a nonparametric model for survival analysis that does not explicitly assume particular forms of hazard functions. Our nonparametric model utilizes an ensemble of regression trees to determine how the hazard function varies according to the associated covariates. The ensemble model is trained using a gradient boosting method to optimize a smoothed approximation of the concordance index, which is one of the most widely used metrics in survival model performance evaluation. We implemented our model in a software package called GBMCI (gradient boosting machine for concordance index) and benchmarked the performance of our model against other popular survival models with a large-scale breast cancer prognosis dataset. Our experiment shows that GBMCI consistently outperforms other methods based on a number of covariate settings. GBMCI is implemented in R and is freely available online.

  2. Multidimensional Poverty and Child Survival in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Sanjay K.

    2011-01-01

    Background Though the concept of multidimensional poverty has been acknowledged cutting across the disciplines (among economists, public health professionals, development thinkers, social scientists, policy makers and international organizations) and included in the development agenda, its measurement and application are still limited. Objectives and Methodology Using unit data from the National Family and Health Survey 3, India, this paper measures poverty in multidimensional space and examine the linkages of multidimensional poverty with child survival. The multidimensional poverty is measured in the dimension of knowledge, health and wealth and the child survival is measured with respect to infant mortality and under-five mortality. Descriptive statistics, principal component analyses and the life table methods are used in the analyses. Results The estimates of multidimensional poverty are robust and the inter-state differentials are large. While infant mortality rate and under-five mortality rate are disproportionately higher among the abject poor compared to the non-poor, there are no significant differences in child survival among educationally, economically and health poor at the national level. State pattern in child survival among the education, economical and health poor are mixed. Conclusion Use of multidimensional poverty measures help to identify abject poor who are unlikely to come out of poverty trap. The child survival is significantly lower among abject poor compared to moderate poor and non-poor. We urge to popularize the concept of multiple deprivations in research and program so as to reduce poverty and inequality in the population. PMID:22046384

  3. Survival of pneumococcus on hands and fomites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beissbarth Jemima

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pneumococcal hand contamination in Indigenous children in remote communities is common (37%. It is not clear whether this requires frequent inoculation, or if pneumococci will survive on hands for long periods of time. Thus the aim of this study was to determine the survival time of pneumococci on hands and fomites. Findings The hands of 3 adult volunteers, a glass plate and plastic ball were inoculated with pneumococci suspended in two different media. Survival at specified time intervals was determined by swabbing and re-culture onto horse blood agar. Pneumococci inoculated onto hands of volunteers were recovered after 3 minutes at 4% to 79% of the initial inoculum. Recovery from one individual was consistently higher. By one hour, only a small number of pneumococci were recovered and this was dependent on the suspension medium used. At subsequent intervals and up to 3 hours after inoculation, Conclusion The poor survival of pneumococci on hands suggests that the high prevalence of pneumococcal hand contamination in some populations is related to frequent inoculation rather than long survival. It is plausible that hand contamination plays a (brief role in transmission directly, and indirectly through contamination via fomites. Regular hand washing and timely cleansing or removal of contaminated fomites may aid control of pneumococcal transmission via these routes.

  4. Incidence and overall survival of malignant ameloblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Rizzitelli

    Full Text Available Malignant ameloblastoma, comprising metastasizing ameloblastoma and ameloblastic carcinoma, represents 1.6-2.2% of all odontogenic tumors. Due to its rare nature, malignant ameloblastoma has only been reported in the literature in small case series or case reports. Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End-Results (SEER database, we have performed a population-based study to determine the incidence rate and the absolute survival of malignant ameloblastoma.Using the International Classification of Diseases for Oncology (ICD-O codes 9310/3 and 9270/3, data from the SEER database were used to calculate the incidence rate and absolute survival rate of population with malignant ameloblastoma.The overall incidence rate of malignant ameloblastoma was 1.79 per 10 million person/year. The incidence rate was higher in males than females and also higher in black versus white population. The median overall survival was 17.6 years from the time of diagnosis and increasing age was associated with a statistically significant poorer survival.To our best knowledge, we report the largest population-based series of malignant ameloblastoma. The incidence rate was 1.79 per 10 million person/year and the overall survival was 17.6 years.

  5. Survivability of a metapopulation under local extinctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Srilena; Majhi, Soumen; Sasmal, Sourav Kumar; Ghosh, Dibakar; Rakshit, Biswambhar

    2017-12-01

    A metapopulation structure in landscape ecology comprises a group of interacting spatially separated subpopulations or patches of the same species that may experience several local extinctions. This makes the investigation of survivability (in the form of global oscillation) of a metapopulation on top of diverse dispersal topologies extremely crucial. However, among various dispersal topologies in ecological networks, which one can provide higher metapopulation survivability under local extinction is still not well explored. In this article, we scrutinize the robustness of an ecological network consisting of prey-predator patches having Holling type I functional response, against progressively extinct population patches. We present a comprehensive study on this while considering global, small-world, and scale-free dispersal of the subpopulations. Furthermore, we extend our work in enhancing survivability in the form of sustained global oscillation by introducing asymmetries in the dispersal rates of the considered species. Our findings affirm that the asynchrony among the patches plays an important role in the survivability of a metapopulation. In order to demonstrate the model independence of the observed phenomenon, we perform a similar analysis for patches exhibiting Holling type II functional response. On the grounds of the obtained results, our work is expected to provide a better perception of the influence of dispersal arrangements on the global survivability of ecological networks.

  6. Multidimensional poverty and child survival in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Sanjay K

    2011-01-01

    Though the concept of multidimensional poverty has been acknowledged cutting across the disciplines (among economists, public health professionals, development thinkers, social scientists, policy makers and international organizations) and included in the development agenda, its measurement and application are still limited. OBJECTIVES AND METHODOLOGY: Using unit data from the National Family and Health Survey 3, India, this paper measures poverty in multidimensional space and examine the linkages of multidimensional poverty with child survival. The multidimensional poverty is measured in the dimension of knowledge, health and wealth and the child survival is measured with respect to infant mortality and under-five mortality. Descriptive statistics, principal component analyses and the life table methods are used in the analyses. The estimates of multidimensional poverty are robust and the inter-state differentials are large. While infant mortality rate and under-five mortality rate are disproportionately higher among the abject poor compared to the non-poor, there are no significant differences in child survival among educationally, economically and health poor at the national level. State pattern in child survival among the education, economical and health poor are mixed. Use of multidimensional poverty measures help to identify abject poor who are unlikely to come out of poverty trap. The child survival is significantly lower among abject poor compared to moderate poor and non-poor. We urge to popularize the concept of multiple deprivations in research and program so as to reduce poverty and inequality in the population.

  7. Regression analysis of restricted mean survival time based on pseudo-observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Per Kragh; Hansen, Mette Gerster; Klein, John P.

    censoring; hazard function; health economics; regression model; survival analysis; mean survival time; restricted mean survival time; pseudo-observations......censoring; hazard function; health economics; regression model; survival analysis; mean survival time; restricted mean survival time; pseudo-observations...

  8. Regression Analysis of Restricted Mean Survival Time Based on Pseudo-Observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Per Kragh; Hansen, Mette Gerster; Klein, John P.

    2004-01-01

    censoring; hazard function; health economics; mean survival time; pseudo-observations; regression model; restricted mean survival time; survival analysis......censoring; hazard function; health economics; mean survival time; pseudo-observations; regression model; restricted mean survival time; survival analysis...

  9. Physical activity and survival in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ammitzbøll, Gunn; Søgaard, Karen; Karlsen, Randi V

    2016-01-01

    the Diet, Cancer, and Health cohort, all enrolled before diagnosis. Self-reported PA was measured as time per activity, and estimated metabolic equivalent task (MET)-hours per week were summed for each activity. We constructed measures for household, exercise, and total PA. The association between......PURPOSE: Knowledge about lifestyle factors possibly influencing survival after breast cancer (BC) is paramount. We examined associations between two types of postdiagnosis physical activity (PA) and overall survival after BC. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We used prospective data on 959 BC survivors from...... from all causes during the study period. In adjusted analyses, exercise PA above eight MET h/week compared to lower levels of activity was significantly associated with improved overall survival (HR, 0.68; confidence interval [CI]: 0.47-0.99). When comparing participation in exercise to non...

  10. Survivability of systems under multiple factor impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korczak, Edward [Telecommunications Research Institute, Warsaw (Poland); Levitin, Gregory [Israel Electric Corporation Ltd., Haifa (Israel)]. E-mail: levitin@iec.co.il

    2007-02-15

    The paper considers vulnerable multi-state series-parallel systems operating under influence of external impacts. Both the external impacts and internal failures affect system survivability, which is determined as the probability of meeting a given demand. The external impacts are characterized by several destructive factors affecting the system or its parts simultaneously. In order to increase the system's survivability a multilevel protection against the destructive factors can be applied to its subsystems. In such systems, the protected subsystems can be destroyed only if all of the levels of their protection are destroyed. The paper presents an algorithm for evaluating the survivability of series-parallel systems with arbitrary configuration of multilevel protection against multiple destructive factor impacts. The algorithm is based on a composition of Boolean and the Universal Generating Function techniques. Illustrative examples are presented.

  11. Survival of ovarian cancer patients in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, Hellen McKinnon; Noer, Mette Calundann; Sperling, Cecilie Dyg

    2016-01-01

    linked via the patients' personal identification number and the analyses included data on cancer stage, age, survival, surgery status and comorbidity. The computed outcome measures were age-adjusted mortality rates and age-adjusted overall and relative survival rates for one and five years. RESULTS: We......BACKGROUND: Ovarian cancer has a high mortality rate, especially in Denmark where mortality rates have been reported higher than in adjacent countries with similar demographics. This study therefore examined recent survival and mortality among Danish ovarian cancer patients over an 18-year study...... period. METHODS: This nationwide registry-based observational study used data from the Danish Gynecology Cancer Database, Danish Pathology Registry, and Danish National Patient Registry. All patients with ovarian cancer diagnosed between 1995 and 2012 were included in the study. The data sources were...

  12. Analysis of survival data from telemetry projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunck, C.M.; Winterstein, S.R.; Pollock, K.H.

    1985-01-01

    Telemetry techniques can be used to study the survival rates of animal populations and are particularly suitable for species or settings for which band recovery models are not. Statistical methods for estimating survival rates and parameters of survival distributions from observations of radio-tagged animals will be described. These methods have been applied to medical and engineering studies and to the study of nest success. Estimates and tests based on discrete models, originally introduced by Mayfield, and on continuous models, both parametric and nonparametric, will be described. Generalizations, including staggered entry of subjects into the study and identification of mortality factors will be considered. Additional discussion topics will include sample size considerations, relocation frequency for subjects, and use of covariates.

  13. Training by simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angelini, E.

    1984-12-01

    Effective training by simulation is a matter of 1. accurate definition of the training need, 2. selecting the right hardware/software package to do the job cost effectively, 3. careful, methodical building of the training program and 4. an appropriate setting, such as a well-equipped training center. Several points seem clear: 1. ''Computer shock'' or computer phobia -- that is, fear of the simulator, can be a factor with some of the older operators. But it quickly disappears once they're into the program, and learn the versatility and the exciting dynamics of simulators. 2. Operator training is becoming more sophisticated throughout the HPI. Among other things, operators should get out into the plant to learn more about how their actions in the control room impact the plant. Operators are becoming more ''big picture'' oriented. 3. When inexperienced training instructors are used, they should attend a good ''train the trainer'' course emphasizing platform skills and instructional technology. 4. Operators need as much ''hands on'' experience with the plant's actual operating equipment as possible. The cognitive ''linkage'' between that equipment and what they see on the CRT is vitally important.

  14. Primary Spinal Tumor Mortality Score (PSTMS): a novel scoring system for predicting poor survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szövérfi, Zsolt; Lazary, Aron; Bozsódi, Árpád; Klemencsics, István; Éltes, Péter E; Varga, Péter Pál

    2014-11-01

    Although the surgical and oncological therapies of primary spinal tumors (PSTs) have changed significantly over the last few decades, the prognosis of this rare disease is still poor. The decision-making process in the multidisciplinary management is handicapped by the lack of large-scale population-based prognostic studies. The objective of the present study was to investigate preoperative factors associated with PST mortality and to develop a predictive scoring system of poor survival. This is a large-scale ambispective cohort study. The study included 323 consecutive patients with PSTs, treated surgically over an 18-year period at a tertiary care spine referral center for a population of 10 million. Survival was the outcome measure. Patients were randomly divided into a training cohort (n=273) and a validation cohort (n=50). In the training cohort, 12 preoperative factors were investigated using Cox proportional hazard models. Based on the mortality-related variables, a simple scoring system of mortality was created, and three groups of patients were identified. Kaplan-Meier and log-rank analyses were used to compare the survival in the three groups. The model performance was assessed by measuring the discriminative ability (c-index) of the model and by applying a pseudo-R(2) goodness-of-fit test (Nagelkerke R(2), RN(2)). Internal validation was performed using bootstrapping in the training cohort and assessing the discrimination and explained variation of the model in the validation cohort. Patient age, spinal region, tumor grade, spinal pain, motor deficit, and myelopathy/cauda equina syndrome were significantly associated with poor survival in the multivariate analysis (psurvival (psurvival in all types of PST patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. 38 CFR 21.4265 - Practical training approved as institutional training or on-job training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... approved as institutional training or on-job training. 21.4265 Section 21.4265 Pensions, Bonuses, and... training or on-job training. (a) Medical-dental internships and residencies. (1) Medical residencies (other...) of this section. If the course is not so accredited such practical or on-the-job training or...

  16. Panspermia Survival Scenarios for Organisms that Survive Typical Hypervelocity Solar System Impact Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasini, D.

    2014-04-01

    Previous experimental studies have demonstrated the survivability of living cells during hypervelocity impact events, testing the panspermia and litho-panspermia hypotheses [1]. It has been demonstrated by the authors that Nannochloropsis Oculata Phytoplankton, a eukaryotic photosynthesizing autotroph found in the 'euphotic zone' (sunlit surface layers of oceans [2]), survive impacts up to 6.93 km s-1 (approx. shock pressure 40 GPa) [3, 4]. Also shown to survive impacts up to 5.49 km s-1 is the tardigrade species Hypsibius dujardini (a complex micro-animal consisting of 40,000 cells) [5, 6]. It has also been shown that they can survive sustained pressures up to 600 MPa using a water filled pressure capsule [7]. Additionally bacteria can survive impacts up to 5.4 km s-1 (~30 GPa) - albeit with a low probability of survival [1], and the survivability of yeast spores in impacts up to 7.4 km s-1 (~30 GPa) has also recently been demonstrated [8]. Other groups have also reported that the lichen Xanthoria elegans is able to survive shocks in similar pressure ranges (~40 GPa) [9]. Here we present various simulated impact regimes to show which scenarios are condusive to the panspermia hypothesis of the natural transfer of life (via an icy body) through space to an extraterrestrial environment.

  17. Survival in common cancers defined by risk and survival of family members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianguang Ji

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Studies on survival between familial and sporadic cancers have been inconclusive and only recent data on a limited number of cancers are available on the concordance of survival between family members. In this review, we address these questions by evaluating the published and unpublished data from the nation-wide Swedish Family-Cancer Database and a total of 13 cancer sites were assessed. Using sporadic cancer as reference, HRs were close to 1.0 for most of the familial cancers in both the offspring and parental generations, which suggested that survival in patients with familial and sporadic cancers was equal, with an exception for ovarian cancer with a worse prognosis. Compared to offspring whose parents had a poor survival, those with a good parental survival had a decreased risk of death for most cancers and HR was significantly decreased for cancers in the breast, prostate, bladder, and kidney. For colorectal and nervous system cancers, favorable survival between the generations showed a borderline significance. These data are consistent in showing that both good and poor survival in certain cancers aggregate in families. Genetic factors are likely to contribute to the results. These observations call for intensified efforts to consider heritability in survival as one mechanism regulating prognosis in cancer patients.

  18. Acute traumatic coagulopathy decreased actual survival rate when compared with predicted survival rate in severe trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Su Jin; Lee, Sung Woo; Han, Gap Su; Moon, Sung Woo; Choi, Sung Hyuck; Hong, Yun Sik

    2012-11-01

    To determine whether acute traumatic coagulopathy (ATC) should be combined with the trauma and injury severity score (TRISS) to predict outcome in severe trauma patients and investigate effects of the change in coagulation state during early resuscitation on the actual survival rate. This was a retrospective study. Significant variables that affected 28-day mortality were analysed using multivariate logistic regression. Study patients were classified into three groups: no coagulopathy, mild coagulopathy or severe coagulopathy. Concordance between actual and predicted survival rates were compared for each group. The predicted survival rate was calculated using the TRISS method. The study also determined whether changes in the coagulation state during inhospital resuscitation affected the relationship between actual and predicted survival in patients who had rechecked coagulation profile within 12 h after presentation. Data from a total of 336 patients were analysed. At presentation, 20.8% of the study patients had mild coagulopathy, whereas 7.7% had severe coagulopathy. Age, injury severity score, revised trauma score and presence of ATC at presentation were independently associated with 28-day mortality. Actual survival was significantly lower than predicted survival in the mild and severe coagulopathy groups. Aggravation of coagulation state from normal or mild to severe coagulopathy or persistent severe coagulopathy during inhospital resuscitation mainly contributed to the discrepancy between actual and predicted survival. ATC decreased actual survival more than expected. ATC should be combined with TRISS to predict trauma outcome in severely injured patients. Improvement in coagulopathy during resuscitation may reduce the incidence of preventable death after trauma.

  19. Finding Risk Groups by Optimizing Artificial Neural Networks on the Area under the Survival Curve Using Genetic Algorithms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Kalderstam

    Full Text Available We investigate a new method to place patients into risk groups in censored survival data. Properties such as median survival time, and end survival rate, are implicitly improved by optimizing the area under the survival curve. Artificial neural networks (ANN are trained to either maximize or minimize this area using a genetic algorithm, and combined into an ensemble to predict one of low, intermediate, or high risk groups. Estimated patient risk can influence treatment choices, and is important for study stratification. A common approach is to sort the patients according to a prognostic index and then group them along the quartile limits. The Cox proportional hazards model (Cox is one example of this approach. Another method of doing risk grouping is recursive partitioning (Rpart, which constructs a decision tree where each branch point maximizes the statistical separation between the groups. ANN, Cox, and Rpart are compared on five publicly available data sets with varying properties. Cross-validation, as well as separate test sets, are used to validate the models. Results on the test sets show comparable performance, except for the smallest data set where Rpart's predicted risk groups turn out to be inverted, an example of crossing survival curves. Cross-validation shows that all three models exhibit crossing of some survival curves on this small data set but that the ANN model manages the best separation of groups in terms of median survival time before such crossings. The conclusion is that optimizing the area under the survival curve is a viable approach to identify risk groups. Training ANNs to optimize this area combines two key strengths from both prognostic indices and Rpart. First, a desired minimum group size can be specified, as for a prognostic index. Second, the ability to utilize non-linear effects among the covariates, which Rpart is also able to do.

  20. Finding Risk Groups by Optimizing Artificial Neural Networks on the Area under the Survival Curve Using Genetic Algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalderstam, Jonas; Edén, Patrik; Ohlsson, Mattias

    2015-01-01

    We investigate a new method to place patients into risk groups in censored survival data. Properties such as median survival time, and end survival rate, are implicitly improved by optimizing the area under the survival curve. Artificial neural networks (ANN) are trained to either maximize or minimize this area using a genetic algorithm, and combined into an ensemble to predict one of low, intermediate, or high risk groups. Estimated patient risk can influence treatment choices, and is important for study stratification. A common approach is to sort the patients according to a prognostic index and then group them along the quartile limits. The Cox proportional hazards model (Cox) is one example of this approach. Another method of doing risk grouping is recursive partitioning (Rpart), which constructs a decision tree where each branch point maximizes the statistical separation between the groups. ANN, Cox, and Rpart are compared on five publicly available data sets with varying properties. Cross-validation, as well as separate test sets, are used to validate the models. Results on the test sets show comparable performance, except for the smallest data set where Rpart's predicted risk groups turn out to be inverted, an example of crossing survival curves. Cross-validation shows that all three models exhibit crossing of some survival curves on this small data set but that the ANN model manages the best separation of groups in terms of median survival time before such crossings. The conclusion is that optimizing the area under the survival curve is a viable approach to identify risk groups. Training ANNs to optimize this area combines two key strengths from both prognostic indices and Rpart. First, a desired minimum group size can be specified, as for a prognostic index. Second, the ability to utilize non-linear effects among the covariates, which Rpart is also able to do.

  1. Changing Pattern in Malignant Mesothelioma Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Faig

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Survival for mesothelioma has been shown to be poor, with marginal improvement over time. Recent advances in the understanding of pathophysiology and treatment of mesothelioma may impact therapy to improve survival that may not be evident from available clinical trials that are often small and not randomized. Therapies may affect survival differently based on mesothelioma location (pleural vs peritoneal. Data are conflicting regarding the effect of asbestos exposure on mesothelioma location. OBJECTIVES: We examined survival in a large cohort of mesothelioma subjects analyzed by tumor location and presence and mode of asbestos exposure. METHODS: Data were analyzed from cases (n = 380 diagnosed with mesothelioma from 1992 to 2012. Cases were either drawn from treatment referrals, independent medical evaluation for medical legal purposes, or volunteers who were diagnosed with mesothelioma. Subjects completed an occupational medical questionnaire, personal interview with the examining physician, and physician review of the medical record. RESULTS: This study reports better survival for mesothelioma than historical reports. Survival for peritoneal mesothelioma was longer than that for pleural mesothelioma (hazard ratio = 0.36, 95% confidence interval = 0.24-0.54, P < .001 after adjusting for gender and age at diagnosis. Non-occupational cases were more likely to be 1 diagnosed with peritoneal mesothelioma, 2 female, 3 exposed, and 4 diagnosed at a younger age and to have a 5 shorter latency compared to occupational cases (P < .001. CONCLUSION: Peritoneal mesothelioma was more likely associated with non-occupational exposure, thus emphasizing the importance of exposure history in enhancing early diagnosis and treatment impact.

  2. Making relative survival analysis relatively easy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohar, Maja; Stare, Janez

    2007-12-01

    In survival analysis we are interested in time from the beginning of an observation until certain event (death, relapse, etc.). We assume that the final event is well defined, so that we are never in doubt whether the final event has occurred or not. In practice this is not always true. If we are interested in cause-specific deaths, then it may sometimes be difficult or even impossible to establish the cause of death, or there may be different causes of death, making it impossible to assign death to just one cause. Suicides of terminal cancer patients are a typical example. In such cases, standard survival techniques cannot be used for estimation of mortality due to a certain cause. The cure to the problem are relative survival techniques which compare the survival experience in a study cohort to the one expected should they follow the background population mortality rates. This enables the estimation of the proportion of deaths due to a certain cause. In this paper, we briefly review some of the techniques to model relative survival, and outline a new fitting method for the additive model, which solves the problem of dependency of the parameter estimation on the assumption about the baseline excess hazard. We then direct the reader's attention to our R package relsurv that provides functions for easy and flexible fitting of all the commonly used relative survival regression models. The basic features of the package have been described in detail elsewhere, but here we additionally explain the usage of the new fitting method and the interface for using population mortality data freely available on the Internet. The combination of the package and the data sets provides a powerful informational tool in the hands of a skilled statistician/informatician.

  3. Academic Training: 2004 - 2005 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    1st Term - 01 October to 17 December 2004 REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME New Trends in Fusion Research by A. Fasoli, EPFL, Lausanne, CH 11, 12, 13 October Physics at e+e- linear collider by K. Desch, DESY, Hamburg, D 15, 16, 17, 18, 19 November LECTURE SERIES FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS Standard Model by R. Barbieri, CERN-PH-TH 6, 7, 8, 9 10 December The lectures are open to all those interested, without application. The abstract of the lectures, as well as any change to the above information (title, dates, time, place etc) will be published in the CERN Bulletin, the WWW, and by notices before each term and for each series of lectures. ENSEIGNEMENT ACADEMIQUE ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 academic.training@cern.ch

  4. Otologic Skills Training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiet, Gregory J; Sørensen, Mads Sølvsten; Andersen, Steven Arild Wuyts

    2017-01-01

    This article presents a summary of the current simulation training for otologic skills. There is a wide variety of educational approaches, assessment tools, and simulators in use, including simple low-cost task trainers to complex computer-based virtual reality systems. A systematic approach...... to otologic skills training using adult learning theory concepts, such as repeated and distributed practice, self-directed learning, and mastery learning, is necessary for these educational interventions to be effective. Future directions include development of measures of performance to assess efficacy...... of simulation training interventions and, for complex procedures, improvement in fidelity based on educational goals....

  5. [Dichoptic training for amblyopia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, M

    2016-04-01

    Dichoptic training is a promising new therapeutic approach to amblyopia, which employs simultaneous and separate stimulation of both eyes (thus dichoptic). The contrast for the good eye is reduced thus aiming at a balance with the amblyopic eye. In contrast to monocular patching, binocular vision is trained by video game tasks that can only be solved binocularly. To date the average gain in visual acuity achieved in currently available studies is only 0.20 ± 0.07 logMAR and is not significantly better than competing treatment options. This article explains the basic approach of dichoptic training, summarizes pertinent studies, names unsolved problems and closes with a personal critical assessment.

  6. Auditory Integration Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Jafari

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Auditory integration training (AIT is a hearing enhancement training process for sensory input anomalies found in individuals with autism, attention deficit hyperactive disorder, dyslexia, hyperactivity, learning disability, language impairments, pervasive developmental disorder, central auditory processing disorder, attention deficit disorder, depressin, and hyperacute hearing. AIT, recently introduced in the United States, and has received much notice of late following the release of The Sound of a Moracle, by Annabel Stehli. In her book, Mrs. Stehli describes before and after auditory integration training experiences with her daughter, who was diagnosed at age four as having autism.

  7. Review: Auditory Integration Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Ja'fari

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Auditory integration training (AIT is a hearing enhancement training process for sensory input anomalies found in individuals with autism, attention deficit hyperactive disorder, dyslexia, hyperactivity, learning disability, language impairments, pervasive developmental disorder, central auditory processing disorder, attention deficit disorder, depression, and hyper acute hearing. AIT, recently introduced in the United States, and has received much notice of late following the release of the sound of a miracle, by Annabel Stehli. In her book, Mrs. Stehli describes before and after auditory integration training experiences with her daughter, who was diagnosed at age four as having autism.

  8. Physical training for asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Mônica Corso

    2014-01-01

    People with asthma may show less tolerance to exercise due to worsening asthma symptoms during exercise or other reasons such as deconditioning as a consequence of inactivity. Some may restrict activities as per medical advice or family influence and this might result in reduced physical fitness. Physical training programs aim to improve physical fitness, neuromuscular coordination and self confidence. Subjectively, many people with asthma report that they are symptomatically better when fit, but results from trials have varied and have been difficult to compare because of different designs and training protocols. Also, as exercise can induce asthma, the safety of exercise programmes needs to be considered. To gain a better understanding of the effect of physical training on the respiratory and general health of people with asthma, from randomised trials. We searched the Cochrane Airways Group Specialised Register of trials up to January 2013. We included randomised trials of people over eight years of age with asthma who were randomised to undertake physical training or not. Physical training had to be undertaken for at least 20 minutes, two times a week, over a minimum period of four weeks. Two review authors independently assessed eligibility for inclusion and undertook risk of bias assessment for the included studies. Twenty-one studies (772 participants) were included in this review with two additional 2012 studies identified as 'awaiting classification'. Physical training was well tolerated with no adverse effects reported. None of the studies mentioned worsening of asthma symptoms following physical training. Physical training showed marked improvement in cardiopulmonary fitness as measured by a statistically and clinically significant increase in maximum oxygen uptake (mean difference (MD) 4.92 mL/kg/min; 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.98 to 5.87; P physical training may have positive effects on health-related quality of life, with four of five studies

  9. CERN Technical Training : Vista !

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2008-01-01

    You are running Vista on your new PC – or are planning to install it? The Technical Training service is organizing a half-day training course on the new features of the VISTA operating system. This course introduces the new interfaces and presents the new functionalities for people who are experienced in the use of Windows XP. The next bilingual sessions of this course will take place on 12 December 2008 and 30 January 2009. Register using our catalogue: http://cta.cern.ch/cta2/f?p=110:9 or contact us with your questions/comments at mailto:Technical.Training@cern.ch

  10. CERN Technical Training : Vista !

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Are you running Vista on your new PC – or are you planning to install it? The Technical Training service is organizing a half-day training course on the new features of the VISTA operating system. This course introduces the new interfaces and presents the new functionalities for people who are experienced in the use of Windows XP. The next bilingual session of this course will take place on 30 January 2009. Register using our catalogue: http://cta.cern.ch/cta2/f?p=110:9 or contact us with your questions/comments at mailto:Technical.Training@cern.ch

  11. CERN Technical Training : Vista !

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2008-01-01

    Are you running Vista on your new PC – or are you planning to install it? The Technical Training service is organizing a half-day training course on the new features of the VISTA operating system. This course introduces the new interfaces and presents the new functionalities for people who are experienced in the use of Windows XP. The next bilingual sessions of this course will take place on 12 December 2008 and 30 January 2009. Register using our catalogue: http://cta.cern.ch/cta2/f?p=110:9 or contact us with your questions/comments at mailto:Technical.Training@cern.ch

  12. CERN Technical Training : Vista !

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2008-01-01

    You are running Vista on your new PC – or are planning to install it? The Technical Training service is organizing a half-day training on the new features of the VISTA operating system. This course introduces the new interfaces and presents the new functionalities for people who are experienced using Windows XP. The next bilingual sessions of this course will take place on December 12, 2008 and January 30, 2009. Register using our catalogue : http://cta.cern.ch/cta2/f?p=110:9 or contact us with your questions/comments at Technical.Training@cern.ch

  13. CERN Technical Training : Vista !

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2008-01-01

    Are you running Vista on your new PC – or are planning to install it? The Technical Training service is organizing a half-day training course on the new features of the VISTA operating system. This course introduces the new interfaces and presents the new functionalities for people who are experienced in the use of Windows XP. The next bilingual sessions of this course will take place on 12 December 2008 and 30 January 2009. Register using our catalogue: http://cta.cern.ch/cta2/f?p=110:9 or contact us with your questions/comments at Technical.Training@cern.ch

  14. PLATO administers operator training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buehner, R.E.

    1979-02-15

    Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. is committed to an in-depth training program for substation operators. For the past two years, one important part of the training program has been a computer-based educational system with a CRT touch-response graphic display that is interactive with the trainee. This system, known as PLATO, reproduces a training situation so realistic that the operator becomes completely involved with the lesson. When used for pretraining prior to substation operating experience, it provides a hands-on insight into operating practices without jeopardizing personnel or equipment, or degrading customer service.

  15. Space Age Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Teledyne Brown developed a computer-based interactive multimedia training system for use with the Crystal Growth Furnace in the U.S. Microgravity Laboratory-2 mission on the Space Shuttle. Teledyne Brown commercialized the system and customized it for PPG Industries Aircraft Products. The system challenges learners with role-playing scenarios and software-driven simulations engaging all the senses using text, video, animation, voice, sounds and music. The transfer of this technology to commercial industrial process training has resulted in significant improvements in effectiveness, standardization, and quality control, as well as cost reductions over the usual classroom and on-the- job training approaches.

  16. Conducting Elite Performance Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Elliott; Tucker, Scott A; Imsdahl, Solveig; Charles, Justin A; Stellato, Mallory A; Wagner, Mercy D; Brown, Kimberly M

    2015-08-01

    Training to excellence in the conduct of surgical procedures has many similarities to the acquisition and mastery of technical skills in elite-level music and sports. By using coaching techniques and strategies gleaned from analysis of professional music ensembles and athletic training, surgical educators can set conditions that increase the success rate of training to elite performance. This article describes techniques and strategies used in both music and athletic coaching, and it discusses how they can be applied and integrated into surgical simulation and education. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Model selection criterion in survival analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabey, Uǧur; Tutkun, Nihal Ata

    2017-07-01

    Survival analysis deals with time until occurrence of an event of interest such as death, recurrence of an illness, the failure of an equipment or divorce. There are various survival models with semi-parametric or parametric approaches used in medical, natural or social sciences. The decision on the most appropriate model for the data is an important point of the analysis. In literature Akaike information criteria or Bayesian information criteria are used to select among nested models. In this study,the behavior of these information criterion is discussed for a real data set.

  18. Evaluating survival model performance: a graphical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, M; Galai, N; Simchen, E

    2005-06-30

    In the last decade, many statistics have been suggested to evaluate the performance of survival models. These statistics evaluate the overall performance of a model ignoring possible variability in performance over time. Using an extension of measures used in binary regression, we propose a graphical method to depict the performance of a survival model over time. The method provides estimates of performance at specific time points and can be used as an informal test for detecting time varying effects of covariates in the Cox model framework. The method is illustrated on real and simulated data using Cox proportional hazard model and rank statistics. Copyright 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. A stochastic evolutionary model for survival dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenner, Trevor; Levene, Mark; Loizou, George

    2014-09-01

    The recent interest in human dynamics has led researchers to investigate the stochastic processes that explain human behaviour in different contexts. Here we propose a generative model to capture the essential dynamics of survival analysis, traditionally employed in clinical trials and reliability analysis in engineering. In our model, the only implicit assumption made is that the longer an actor has been in the system, the more likely it is to have failed. We derive a power-law distribution for the process and provide preliminary empirical evidence for the validity of the model from two well-known survival analysis data sets.

  20. Body mass index and breast cancer survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Qi; Burgess, Stephen; Turman, Constance

    2017-01-01

    Background: There is increasing evidence that elevated body mass index (BMI) is associated with reduced survival for women with breast cancer. However, the underlying reasons remain unclear. We conducted a Mendelian randomization analysis to investigate a possible causal role of BMI in survival...... from breast cancer. Methods: We used individual-level data from six large breast cancer case-cohorts including a total of 36 210 individuals (2475 events) of European ancestry. We created a BMI genetic risk score (GRS) based on genotypes at 94 known BMI-associated genetic variants. Association between...