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Sample records for survival risk factors

  1. Allergies, obesity, other risk factors and survival from pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Sara H; Chou, Joanne F; Ludwig, Emmy; O'Reilly, Eileen; Allen, Peter J; Jarnagin, William R; Bayuga, Sharon; Simon, Jennifer; Gonen, Mithat; Reisacher, William R; Kurtz, Robert C

    2010-11-15

    Survival from pancreatic adenocarcinoma remains extremely poor, approximately 5% at 5 years. Risk factors include smoking, high body mass index (BMI), family history of pancreatic cancer, and long-standing diabetes; in contrast, allergies are associated with reduced risk. Little is known about associations between these factors and survival. We analyzed overall survival in relation to risk factors for 475 incident cases who took part in a hospital based case-control study. Analyses were conducted separately for those who did (160) and did not (315) undergo tumor resection. Kaplan-Meier methods were used to describe survival according to smoking, BMI, family history, diabetes, and presence of allergies. Cox proportional hazards models were used to adjust for covariates. There was no association with survival based on smoking, family history, or history of diabetes in either group. Among patients with resection, those with allergies showed nonstatistically significant longer survival, a median of 33.1 months (95% CI: 19.0-52.5) vs. 21.8 months (95% CI: 18.0-33.1), p = 0.25. The adjusted hazard ratio (HR) was 0.72 (95% CI: 0.43-1.23), p = 0.23. Among patients without resection, those with self-reported allergies survived significantly longer than those without allergies: 13.3 months (95% CI: 10.6-16.9) compared to 10.4 months (95% CI: 8.8-11.0), p = 0.04, with an adjusted HR of 0.68 (95% CI: 0.49-0.95), p = 0.02. Obesity was nonsignificantly associated with poorer survival, particularly in the resected group (HR = 1.62, 95% CI: 0.76-3.44). The mechanisms underlying the association between history of allergies and improved survival are unknown. These novel results need to be confirmed in other studies.

  2. Survival after stroke. Risk factors and determinants in the Copenhagen Stroke Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammersgaard, Lars Peter

    2010-01-01

    -based surveys is emphasized. For factors such as sex, and most cardiovascular risk factors further studies are necessary to clarify the relation to survival because studies disagree. Conclusions from studies of the relation between survival and alcohol intake are still debatable, mostly because of diverging...... definitions of the intensity of exposure. Smoking is uniformly associated with a poorer survival after stroke. Stroke unit treatment improves both short- and longterm survival regardless of stroke type, severity, age, and cardiovascular risk factor profile....

  3. Risk Factors for Survival in a University Hospital Population of Dogs with Epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredso, N.; Koch, B. C.; Toft, Nils

    2014-01-01

    BackgroundAlthough a common neurological disorder in dogs, long-term outcome of epilepsy is sparsely documented. ObjectivesTo investigate risk factors for survival and duration of survival in a population of dogs with idiopathic epilepsy or epilepsy associated with a known intracranial cause. Ani...

  4. Sarcopenia in patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis: incidence rate, risk factors and its effect on survival risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Hongqi; Gong, Dehua; Jia, Fengyu; Xu, Bin; Liu, Zhihong

    2016-01-01

    Sarcopenia is a degenerative syndrome mainly characterized by the atrophy of skeletal muscle, along with the decrease of muscle strength and function. However, there are currently few studies concerning sarcopenia in patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis dialysis (MHD). This study was aimed to investigate the incidence of sarcopenia in MHD patients and its influencing factors, as well as its impact on survival risk. All 131 MHD patients enrolled in our study were tested with bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) and grip strength. Demographic data was collected and anthropometric measurement and laboratory examination were conducted. The total incidence of sarcopenia within the 131 MHD patients was 13.7% and the incidence of sarcopenia in patients over 60 years was 33.3%. The dialysis duration, with or without diabetes, serum phosphorus and pre-albumin levels of sarcopenic patients were significantly different from those of non-sarcopenicones; the modified quantitative subjective global assessment (MQSGA) scores of sarcopenic patients were higher than those without sarcopenia. Multivariate analysis showed that dialysis duration, diabetes and serum phosphorus level were independent risk factors for sarcopenia in MHD patients. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed a one-year survival of 88.9% in sarcopenic patients, which was significantly lower than non-sarcopenic patients. The incidence of sarcopenia in MHD patients was high and increased gradually with age. Dialysis duration, diabetes, serum phosphorus level and malnutrition predisposed the patients to sarcopenia. One-year follow-up found that the mortality risk of sarcopenic patients was higher than that of non-sarcopenic patients.

  5. Survival rates and risk factors for mortality in systemic lupus erythematosus patients in a Chinese center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ge; Jia, Xiaoyuan; Gao, Dan; Zhao, Zhanzheng

    2014-07-01

    This paper aims to study the survival and risk factors affecting the long-term prognosis of Chinese patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We collected clinical data of 1,072 SLE patients at the time of diagnosis. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate the survival rate, and the Cox proportional hazard regression model for the risk factors affecting prognosis. Of the original 1,072 recruited SLE patients, 665 (570 females and 95 males) were successfully followed up. Mean follow-up was 5.47 ± 4.62 years. Mean age of onset was 29.4 ± 13.4 years. Eighty-one patients did not survive during follow-up; infection, followed by cardiovascular disease, renal failure and SLE disease activity were the leading causes of death. The 5- and 10-year survival rates were 91.2 and 79.6 %, respectively. Moreover, the 5-year survival rates of female and male patients were 92.6 and 81.6 % respectively, and the 10-year survival rates were 80.8 and 62.3 %, respectively. Univariate analyses indicated that male gender, older age of onset, hypertension, increased blood creatinine levels, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol at the time of diagnosis of SLE were risk factors for all-cause mortality. After adjusting for potential confounders by multivariate analysis, male gender, older age of onset, and high SLEDAI scores at the time of diagnosis were independent risk factors for all-cause mortality in SLE patients. The long-term survival of Chinese SLE patients is comparable to that of other countries. Older age of onset, high disease activity, and decline in renal function are independent risk factors for mortality in patients with SLE.

  6. Venous thromboembolism in ovarian cancer: incidence, risk factors and impact on survival.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Abu Saadeh, Feras

    2013-09-01

    Ovarian cancer has a higher incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) than other cancers. Clear cell cancers carry the highest risk at 11-27%. The aim of this study was to identify the predisposing factors for VTE in a population of ovarian cancer patients and to determine the influence of VTE on overall survival.

  7. Impact of Interstitial Pneumonia on the Survival and Risk Factors Analysis of Patients with Hematological Malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Liang Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The emergence of interstitial pneumonia (IP in patients with hematological malignancy (HM is becoming a challenging scenario in current practice. However, detailed characterization and investigation of outcomes and risk factors on survival have not been addressed. Methods. We conducted a retrospective study of 42,584 cancer patients covering the period between 1996 and 2008 using the institutional cancer registry system. Among 816 HM patients, 61 patients with IP were recognized. The clinical features, laboratory results, and histological types were studied to determine the impact of IP on survival and identify the profile of prognostic factors. Results. HM patients with IP showed a significant worse survival than those without IP in the 5-year overall survival (P=0.027. The overall survival showed no significant difference between infectious pneumonia and noninfectious interstitial pneumonia (IIP versus nIIP (P=0.323. In a multivariate Cox regression model, leukocyte and platelet count were associated with increased risk of death. Conclusions. The occurrence of IP in HM patients is associated with increased mortality. Of interest, nIIP is a prognostic indicator in patients with lymphoma but not in patients with leukemia. However, aggressive management of IP in patients with HM is strongly advised, and further prospective survey is warranted.

  8. Blast transformation in chronic myelomonocytic leukemia: Risk factors, genetic features, survival, and treatment outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patnaik, Mrinal M; Wassie, Emnet A; Lasho, Terra L; Hanson, Curtis A; Ketterling, Rhett; Tefferi, Ayalew

    2015-05-01

    Among 274 patients with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) and followed for a median of 17.1 months, blast transformation (BT) occurred in 36 (13%). On multivariable analysis, risk factors for BT were presence of circulating blasts (HR 5.7; 95% CI 2.8-11.9) and female gender (HR 2.6; 95% CI 1.3-5.1); the results remained unchanged when analysis was restricted to CMML-1. ASXL1/SRSF2/SF3B1/U2AF1/SETBP1 mutational frequencies were not significantly different between time of CMML diagnosis and BT. Median survival post-BT was 4.7 months (5-year survival 6%) and better with allogeneic stem cell transplant (SCT) (14.3 months vs. 4.3 months for chemotherapy vs. 0.9 months for supportive care; P = 0.03). Neither karyotype nor mutational status was independently associated with risk of BT or post-BT survival. We conclude that female patients with CMML and those with circulating blasts are at a higher risk of BT. Post-BT survival is dismal and our observations suggest consideration of allogeneic SCT prior to BT. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Risk factors for dental caries in childhood: a five-year survival analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyo-Jin; Kim, Jin-Bom; Jin, Bo-Hyoung; Paik, Dai-Il; Bae, Kwang-Hak

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the risk factors of dental caries at the level of an individual person with survival analysis of the prospective data for 5 years. A total of 249 first-grade students participated in a follow-up study for 5 years. All participants responded to a questionnaire inquiring about socio-demographic variables and oral health behaviors. They also received an oral examination and were tested for Dentocult SM and LB. Over 5 years, the participants received yearly oral follow-up examinations to determine the incidence of dental caries. The incidence of one or more dental caries (DC1) and four or more dental caries (DC4) were defined as one or more and four or more decayed, missing, and filled permanent teeth increments, respectively. Socio-demographic variables, oral health behaviors, and status and caries activity tests were assessed as risk factors for DC1 and DC4. The adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) of risk factors for DC1 and DC4 were calculated using Cox proportional hazard regression models. During the 5-year follow-up period, DC1 and DC4 occurred in 87 and 25 participants, respectively. In multivariate hazard models, five or more decayed, missing, and filled primary molar teeth [HR 1.93, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.19-3.13], and Dentocult LB of two or three (HR 2.21, 95% CI 1.37-3.56) were independent risk factors of DC1. For DC4, only Dentocult LB of two or three was an independent risk factor (HR 2.95, 95% CI 1.11-7.79). Our results suggest that dental caries incidence at an individual level can be associated with the experience of dental caries in primary teeth and Dentocult LB based on the survival models for the 5-year prospective data. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Cognitive ability, lifestyle risk factors, and two-year survival in first myocardial infarction men: A Swedish National Registry study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wallert, John; Madison, Guy; Held, Claes; Olsson, Erik

    2017-01-01

    .... We investigated whether CA estimated approximately 30 years earlier in young adulthood predicted lifestyle-related risk factors and two-year survival in first myocardial infarction (MI) male patients.Methods...

  11. The Relationship Between Risk Factors and Survival in Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allahyari, Abolghasem; Hashemi, Seyed-Mehdi; Nazemian, Fahimeh; Karimi, Mohammad; Kazemi, Mohammad-Reza; Sadeghi, Masoud

    2016-08-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is aggressive cancer, especially in adults as only 20-40% is cured with current treatment regimens. The aim of this study is to evaluate prognostic factors and their effects on survival in ALL patients in the Northeast of Iran. In a descriptive and retrospective study from 2009 to 2015, 48 ALL patients referred to hematology-oncology clinic. Age, sex, fever, blood group, type of ALL and consumption of amphotericin B, forms of cytogenetic, survival in the patients, WBC, hemoglobin, and platelet were checked in the first referral for every patient. The mean follow-up was 27.3 months in which 28 patients (59.3%) died. overall survival (OS) was plotted by GraphPad Prism 5 and the Log-rank test was used for analysis of survival with risk factors. The mean age for all the ALL patients at diagnosis was 32.3 years (range, 15-71 years), and 81.3% were male. Of all patients, 62.5% had fever and 25% consumed amphotericin B. 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-, 5-year OS rates were 62.2%, 52.7%, 40.6%, 39.1%, 22.2%, respectively. 75%, 29.2% and 39.6% of patients had WBC 35 years is the most prognostic factor in ALL patients. Also, patients who received amphotericin B had lower life expectancy because these patients were suffering from fungal infection or due to lack of response to antibacterial drugs, they have been treated with amphotericin B.

  12. Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura in Black People: Impact of Ethnicity on Survival and Genetic Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Suella; Jamme, Mathieu; Deligny, Christophe; Busson, Marc; Loiseau, Pascale; Azoulay, Elie; Galicier, Lionel; Pène, Frédéric; Provôt, François; Dossier, Antoine; Saheb, Samir; Veyradier, Agnès; Coppo, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Black people are at increased risk of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). Whether clinical presentation of TTP in Black patients has specific features is unknown. We assessed here differences in TTP presentation and outcome between Black and White patients. Clinical presentation was comparable between both ethnic groups. However, prognosis differed with a lower death rate in Black patients than in White patients (2.7% versus 11.6%, respectively, P = .04). Ethnicity, increasing age and neurologic involvement were retained as risk factors for death in a multivariable model (P Black patients had a better survival than White patients (P = .03). Salvage therapies were similarly performed between both groups, suggesting that disease severity was comparable. The comparison of HLA-DRB1*11, -DRB1*04 and -DQB1*03 allele frequencies between Black patients and healthy Black individuals revealed no significant difference. However, the protective allele against TTP, HLA-DRB1*04, was dramatically decreased in Black individuals in comparison with White individuals. Black people with TTP may have a better survival than White patients despite a comparable disease severity. A low natural frequency of HLA-DRB1*04 in Black ethnicity may account for the greater risk of TTP in this population.

  13. Composite risk factors predict survival after transplantation for congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavarana, Minoo N; Savage, Andrew; O'Connell, Robert; Rubinstein, Catherine S; Flynn-Reeves, Jennifer; Joshi, Kishor; Stroud, Martha R; Ikonomidis, John S; Bradley, Scott M

    2013-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that individual risk factors are poor predictors of mortality after heart transplantation in patients with congenital heart disease. We developed composite risk factor groups to better predict mortality after cardiac transplantation. We conducted a cross-sectional retrospective analysis of all heart transplants performed for congenital heart disease at a single congenital heart transplant center between 1996 and 2011. Patient, procedural, and hospital course data were obtained through a review of medical records. Univariate analyses were performed using the Fisher exact test for categorical data and the Mann-Whitney U test for continuous variables. Overall mortality was examined using Kaplan-Meier estimates for univariate analysis and Cox regression analysis for multivariate analysis. A comparison of patients with functional single ventricles (SVs) versus biventricular (BV) hearts was performed. Mean follow-up duration for the whole group was 51 ± 43 months (median, 43 months). Forty-six patients underwent heart transplantation during the study period. Mean age at transplant was 9.0 ± 9.1 years; 45% (n = 21) were in the SV group and 55% (n = 25) were in the BV group. The SV group had significantly more previous sternotomies (P = .006) and longer bypass times (266 ± 78 vs 207 ± 64 minutes; P = .001). High panel-reactive antibody levels (>10%) were also more common in the SV group (38% vs 13%; P = .08). Overall hospital mortality was 4.3% (n = 2, both SVs). There was no significant difference in operative mortality (10% SV vs 0% BV; P = .20) or major morbidity (33% SV vs 44% BV; P = .51) between the 2 groups. High-risk groups identified by univariate analysis were patients with an SV diagnosis + dialysis (P survival at 2 years was lower in the SV cohort (73% vs 96%; P = .16), this benefit was not apparent (63% vs 69%) at late follow-up. Preoperative renal insufficiency and SV + dialysis are strong predictors of

  14. Nutritional status of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation recipients: influencing risk factors and impact on survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Ghammaz, Amro Mohamed Sedky; Ben Matoug, Rima; Elzimaity, Maha; Mostafa, Nevine

    2017-04-24

    Patients subjected to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) are at increased nutritional risk which in turn may alter their outcome. For providing good nutritional care for patients, it is important to analyze risk factors influencing nutritional status during and after HSCT. Fifty patients undergoing allogeneic HSCT were subjected to nutritional status assessment by using the patient-generated subjective global assessment (PG-SGA) at initial admission, day 30 and day 180. Two patients (4%) had malnutrition at admission, 36 (72%) at day 30, and 24 (48%) at day 180. At day 30, comorbidity index higher than 0 and fever lasting for more than 1 week had a significant impact on nutritional status (P = .004 and P = .006, respectively). Regarding day 180, comorbidity index higher than 0 and presence of ≥grade II acute gastrointestinal graft versus host disease (GI GVHD) significantly influenced nutritional status (P = .017 and P = .026, respectively). Well-nourished patients at admission and day 180 had a significantly higher overall survival (OS) in comparison to malnourished patients (P Nutritional status at admission and day 180 had a significant influence on OS in multivariate analysis (P = .039 and P = .032, respectively). Allogeneic HSCT patients having high comorbidity index, developing prolonged fever, and experiencing ≥grade II acute GI GVHD suffer from worsening in their nutritional status during hospitalization and after discharge. Also, nutritional status at admission and day 180 significantly influences their survival.

  15. Risk factors for survival in a university hospital population of dogs with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredsø, N; Koch, B C; Toft, N; Berendt, M

    2014-01-01

    Although a common neurological disorder in dogs, long-term outcome of epilepsy is sparsely documented. To investigate risk factors for survival and duration of survival in a population of dogs with idiopathic epilepsy or epilepsy associated with a known intracranial cause. One hundred and two client owned dogs; 78 dogs with idiopathic epilepsy and 24 dogs with epilepsy associated with a known intracranial cause. A retrospective hospital based study with follow-up. Dogs diagnosed with epilepsy between 2002 and 2008 were enrolled in the study. Owners were interviewed by telephone using a structured questionnaire addressing epilepsy status, treatment, death/alive, and cause of death. Median life span was 7.6 years, 9.2 years, and 5.8 years for all dogs, and dogs with idiopathic epilepsy or dogs with epilepsy associated with a known intracranial cause (P dogs with idiopathic epilepsy was significantly (P = .0030) decreased for dogs euthanized because of epilepsy (median: 35 months) compared to dogs euthanized for other reasons (median: 67.5 months). Neutered male dogs with idiopathic epilepsy had a significant (P = .031) shorter survival (median: 38.5 months) after index seizure compared to intact male dogs (median: 71 months). Treatment with two antiepileptic drugs (AED's) did not negatively influence survival (P = .056). Dogs with idiopathic epilepsy can in many cases expect a life span close to what is reported for dogs in general. In dogs where mono-therapy is not sufficient, the need for treatment with two AED's is not linked to a poor prognosis. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  16. Risk factors for unstructured treatment interruptions and association with survival in low to middle income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, James H; Spelman, Tim; Ford, Nathan; Greig, Jane; Mesic, Anita; Ssonko, Charles; Casas, Esther C; O'Brien, Daniel P

    2016-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) treatment interruptions lead to poor clinical outcomes with unplanned or unstructured TIs (uTIs) likely to be underreported. This study describes; uTIs, their risk factors and association with survival. Analysis of ART programmatic data from 11 countries across Asia and Africa between 2003 and 2013 where an uTI was defined as a ≥90-day patient initiated break from ART calculated from the last day the previous ART prescription would have run out until the date of the next ART prescription. Factors predicting uTI were assessed with a conditional risk-set multiple failure time-to-event model to account for repeated events per subject. Association between uTI and mortality was assessed using Cox proportional hazards, with a competing risks extension to test for the influence of lost to follow-up (LTFU). 40,632 patients were included from 11 countries across 33 sites (17 Africa, 16 Asia). Median duration of follow-up was 1.61 years (IQR 0.54-3.31 years), 3386 (8.3 %) patients died, and 3453 (8.5 %) were LTFU. There were 14,817 uTIs, with 10,162 (25 %) patients having more than one uTI. In the adjusted model males were at lower risk of uTI (aHR 0.94, p 350 cells/μL aHR 0.87, p < 0.01), whereas advanced clinical disease was associated with increased uTI rate (WHO stage 3 aHR 1.10, p < 0.01; WHO stage 4 aHR 1.21, p < 0.01). There was no relationship between uTI and mortality after adjusting for disease status and considering LTFU as a competing risk. uTIs were frequent in people in ART programs in low-middle income countries and associated with younger age, female gender and advanced HIV. uTI did not predict survival when loss to follow-up was considered a competing risk. Further evaluation of uTI predictors and interventions to reduce their occurrence is warranted.

  17. Frequency, risk factors and survival associated with an intrasubsegmental recurrence after radiofrequency ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryosuke Tateishi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, hepatic resection has the advantage over radiofrequency ablation (RFA in terms of systematic removal of a hepatic segment. METHODS: We enrolled 303 consecutive patients of a single naïve HCC that had been treated by RFA at The University of Tokyo Hospital from 1999 to 2004. Recurrence was categorized as either intra- or extra-subsegmental as according to the Couinaud's segment of the original nodule. To assess the relationship between the subsegments of the original and recurrent nodules, we calculated the kappa coefficient. We assessed the risk factors for intra- and extra-subsegmental recurrence independently using univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression. We also assessed the impact of the mode of recurrence on the survival outcome. RESULTS: During the follow-up period, 201 patients in our cohort showed tumor recurrence distributed in a total of 340 subsegments. Recurrence was categorized as exclusively intra-subsegmental, exclusively extra-subsegmental, and simultaneously intra- and extra-subsegmental in 40 (20%, 110 (55%, and 51 (25% patients, respectively. The kappa coefficient was measured at 0.135 (95% CI, 0.079-0.190; P<0.001. Multivariate analysis revealed that of the tumor size, AFP value and platelet count were all risk factors for both intra- and extra-subsegmental recurrence. Of the patients in whom recurrent HCC was found to be exclusively intra-subsegmental, extra-subsegmental, and simultaneously intra- and extra-subsegmental, 37 (92.5%, 99 (90.8% and 42 (82.3%, respectively, were treated using RFA. The survival outcomes after recurrence were similar between patients with an exclusively intra- or extra-subsegmental recurrence. CONCLUSIONS: The effectiveness of systematic subsegmentectomy may be limited in the patients with both HCC and chronic liver disease who frequently undergo multi-focal tumor recurrence.

  18. Hemorrhagic cystitis after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation: risk factors, graft source and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunde, L E; Dasaraju, S; Cao, Q; Cohn, C S; Reding, M; Bejanyan, N; Trottier, B; Rogosheske, J; Brunstein, C; Warlick, E; Young, J A H; Weisdorf, D J; Ustun, C

    2015-11-01

    Although hemorrhagic cystitis (HC) is a common complication of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT), its risk factors and effects on survival are not well known. We evaluated HC in a large cohort (n=1321, 2003-2012) receiving alloHCT from all graft sources, including umbilical cord blood (UCB). We compared HC patients with non-HC (control) patients and examined clinical variables at HC onset and resolution. Of these 1321 patients, 219 (16.6%) developed HC at a median of 22 days after alloHCT. BK viruria was detected in 90% of 109 tested HC patients. Median duration of HC was 27 days. At the time of HC diagnosis, acute GVHD, fever, severe thrombocytopenia and steroid use were more frequent than at the time of HC resolution. In univariate analysis, male sex, age <20 years, myeloablative conditioning with cyclophosphamide and acute GVHD were associated with HC. In multivariate analysis, HC was significantly more common in males and HLA-mismatched UCB graft recipients. Severe grade HC (grade III-IV) was associated with increased treatment-related mortality but not with overall survival at 1 year. HC remains hazardous and therefore better prophylaxis, and early interventions to limit its severity are still needed.

  19. Adjuvant chemotherapy is not associated with improved survival for all high-risk factors in stage II colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoeff, S R; van Erning, F N; Lemmens, V E P P; de Wilt, J H W; Pruijt, J F M

    2016-07-01

    Adjuvant chemotherapy can be considered in high-risk stage II colon cancer comprising pT4, poor/undifferentiated grade, vascular invasion, emergency surgery and/or chemotherapy administration and its effect on survival was evaluated for each known risk factor. All patients with high-risk stage II colon cancer who underwent resection and were diagnosed in the Netherlands between 2008 and 2012 were included. After stratification by risk factor(s) (vascular invasion could not be included), Cox regression was used to discriminate the independent association of adjuvant chemotherapy with the probability of death. Relative survival was used to estimate disease-specific survival. A total of 4,940 of 10,935 patients with stage II colon cancer were identified as high risk, of whom 790 (16%) patients received adjuvant chemotherapy. Patients with a pT4 received adjuvant chemotherapy more often (37%). Probability of death in pT4 patients receiving chemotherapy was lower compared to non-recipients (3-year overall survival 91% vs. 73%, HR 0.43, 95% CI 0.28-0.66). The relative excess risk (RER) of dying was also lower for pT4 patients receiving chemotherapy compared to non-recipients (3-year relative survival 94% vs. 85%, RER 0.36, 95% CI 0.17-0.74). For patients with only poor/undifferentiated grade, emergency surgery or chemotherapy and survival was observed. In high-risk stage II colon cancer, adjuvant chemotherapy was associated with higher survival in pT4 only. To prevent unnecessary chemotherapy-induced toxicity, further refinement of patient subgroups within stage II colon cancer who could benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy seems indicated. © 2016 UICC.

  20. Dietary patterns, biological risk factors and survival in elderly European men and women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoops, K.T.B.

    2007-01-01

    Background: The percentage of the population aged 65 and over, which started to rise sharply in the last decades of the past century, is continuing to rise. However, up until now, little is known about dietary factors and diet-related biological factors in elderly in relation to survival in

  1. [Essential thrombocythemia: baseline characteristics and risk factors for survival and thrombosis in a series of 214 patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angona, Anna; Alvarez-Larrán, Alberto; Bellosillo, Beatriz; Martínez-Avilés, Luz; Garcia-Pallarols, Francesc; Longarón, Raquel; Ancochea, Àgueda; Besses, Carles

    2015-03-15

    Two prognostic models to predict overall survival and thrombosis-free survival have been proposed: International Prognostic Score for Essential Thrombocythemia (IPSET) and IPSET-Thrombosis, respectively, based on age, leukocytes count, history of previous thrombosis, the presence of cardiovascular risk factors and the JAK2 mutational status. The aim of the present study was to assess the clinical and biological characteristics at diagnosis and during evolution in essential thrombocythemia (ET) patients as well as the factors associated with survival and thrombosis and the usefulness of these new prognostic models. We have evaluated the clinical data and the mutation status of JAK2, MPL and calreticulin of 214 ET patients diagnosed in a single center between 1985 and 2012, classified according to classical risk stratification, IPSET and IPSET-Thrombosis. With a median follow-up of 6.9 years, overall survival was not associated with any variable by multivariate analysis. Thrombotic history and leukocytes>10×10(9)/l were associated with thrombosis-free survival (TFS). In our series, IPSET prognostic systems of survival and thrombosis did not provide more clinically relevant information regarding the classic risk of thrombosis stratification. Thrombotic history and leukocytosis>10×10(9)/l were significantly associated with lower TFS, while the prognostic IPSET-Thrombosis system did not provide more information than classical thrombotic risk assessment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Incidence of cardiovascular events and associated risk factors in kidney transplant patients: a competing risks survival analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seoane-Pillado, María Teresa; Pita-Fernández, Salvador; Valdés-Cañedo, Francisco; Seijo-Bestilleiro, Rocio; Pértega-Díaz, Sonia; Fernández-Rivera, Constantino; Alonso-Hernández, Ángel; González-Martín, Cristina; Balboa-Barreiro, Vanesa

    2017-03-07

    The high prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors among the renal transplant population accounts for increased mortality. The aim of this study is to determine the incidence of cardiovascular events and factors associated with cardiovascular events in these patients. An observational ambispective follow-up study of renal transplant recipients (n = 2029) in the health district of A Coruña (Spain) during the period 1981-2011 was completed. Competing risk survival analysis methods were applied to estimate the cumulative incidence of developing cardiovascular events over time and to identify which characteristics were associated with the risk of these events. Post-transplant cardiovascular events are defined as the presence of myocardial infarction, invasive coronary artery therapy, cerebral vascular events, new-onset angina, congestive heart failure, rhythm disturbances, peripheral vascular disease and cardiovascular disease and death. The cause of death was identified through the medical history and death certificate using ICD9 (390-459, except: 427.5, 435, 446, 459.0). The mean age of patients at the time of transplantation was 47.0 ± 14.2 years; 62% were male. 16.5% had suffered some cardiovascular disease prior to transplantation and 9.7% had suffered a cardiovascular event. The mean follow-up period for the patients with cardiovascular event was 3.5 ± 4.3 years. Applying competing risk methodology, it was observed that the accumulated incidence of the event was 5.0% one year after transplantation, 8.1% after five years, and 11.9% after ten years. After applying multivariate models, the variables with an independent effect for predicting cardiovascular events are: male sex, age of recipient, previous cardiovascular disorders, pre-transplant smoking and post-transplant diabetes. This study makes it possible to determine in kidney transplant patients, taking into account competitive events, the incidence of post-transplant cardiovascular events and

  3. Influence of obesity and other risk factors on survival outcomes in patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandona, Monica; Linehan, David; Hawkins, William; Strasberg, Steven; Gao, Feng; Wang-Gillam, Andrea

    2011-08-01

    Established risk factors for the development of pancreatic cancer include tobacco use, family history of pancreatic cancer, personal history of diabetes, and obesity. The impact of risk factors on prognosis in patients with pancreatic cancer, particularly obesity, has recently become controversial. We conducted a retrospective analysis of patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma who underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy between 1995 and 2009. Patients were categorized by body mass index (BMI) as normal (18.5-24.9 kg/m), overweight (25-29.9 kg/m), or obese (≥30 kg/m). Univariate analysis was performed to evaluate the association of obesity and other risk factors on overall survival. Of the 355 patients evaluated, 149 (42.0%) had normal BMI, 131 (36.9%) were overweight, and 75 (21.1%) were obese. Overall survival for normal, overweight, and obese groups was 17.3 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 14.2-20.8 months), 20.0 months (95% CI, 16.6-23.6 months), and 22.1 months (95% CI, 16.5-36.4 months), respectively (P = 0.58). Hazard ratios for tobacco use, family history of pancreatic cancer, and history of diabetes were 1.07, 1.38, and 0.87, respectively. Obesity and other risk factors have no impact on overall survival in patients with adenocarcinoma after pancreaticoduodenectomy. Further studies investigating the relationship between risk factors and their prognostic significance in patients with pancreatic cancer are warranted.

  4. Jaundice: an important, poorly recognized risk factor for diminished survival in patients with adenocarcinoma of the head of the pancreas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasberg, Steven M; Gao, Feng; Sanford, Dominic; Linehan, David C; Hawkins, William G; Fields, Ryan; Carpenter, Danielle H; Brunt, Elizabeth M; Phillips, Carolyn

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Jaundice impairs cellular immunity, an important defence against the dissemination of cancer. Jaundice is a common mode of presentation in pancreatic head adenocarcinoma. The purpose of this study was to determine whether there is an association between preoperative jaundice and survival in patients who have undergone resection of such tumours. Methods: Thirty possible survival risk factors were evaluated in a database of over 400 resected patients. Univariate analysis was used to determine odds ratio for death. All factors for which a P-value of jaundice, age, positive node status, poor differentiation and lymphatic invasion were significant indicators of poor outcome in multivariate analysis. Absence of jaundice was a highly favourable prognostic factor. Interaction emerged between jaundice and nodal status. The benefit conferred by the absence of jaundice was restricted to patients in whom negative node status was present. Five-year overall survival in this group was 66%. Jaundiced patients who underwent preoperative stenting had a survival advantage. Conclusions: Preoperative jaundice is a negative risk factor in adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. Additional studies are required to determine the exact mechanism for this effect. PMID:23600768

  5. Preoperative risk factors predict survival following cardiac retransplantation: analysis of the United Network for Organ Sharing database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belli, Erol; Leoni Moreno, Juan Carlos; Hosenpud, Jeffrey; Rawal, Bhupendra; Landolfo, Kevin

    2014-06-01

    The aim of our study was to identify preoperative risk factors affecting overall survival after cardiac retransplantation (ReTX) in a contemporary era. The United Network for Organ Sharing database was used to identify patients undergoing ReTX between 1995 and 2012. Of the total 28,464 primary transplants performed, 987 (3.5%) were retransplants. The primary outcome investigated was overall survival. The influence of preoperative donor and recipient characteristics on survival were then tested with univariate logistic regression and multivariate Cox regression models. Of 987 patients who underwent ReTX, median survival was 9 years. Estimated survival at 1, 3, 5, 10, and 15 years following retransplant was 80% (95% confidence interval [CI], 78%-83%), 70% (95% CI, 67%-73%), 64% (95% CI, 61%-67%), 47% (95% CI, 43%-51%), and 30% (95% CI, 25%-37%), respectively. Clinical predictors of survival using multivariable analysis included donor age (relative risk [RR], 1.14; P = .004), ischemic time > 4 hours (RR, 1.48; P = .004); preoperative support with extracorporeal membrane oxygenator (RR, 3.91; P risk of death compared with patients undergoing primary transplant only (RR, 1.27; 95% CI, 1.13-1.42; P < .001). Patients who undergo cardiac ReTX can expect to have a 1-year survival less than a patient undergoing primary transplant with an acceptable median overall survival. Both donor and recipient preoperative factors contribute to overall survival following cardiac ReTx. Donor characteristics include age of the donor and ischemic time. Recipient factors include the need for extracorporeal membrane oxygenator and the number of days between the first and second transplant. Optimal survival following cardiac ReTX can best be predicted by choosing patients who are farther out from their initial transplant, not dependent upon preoperative extracorporeal support, and by choosing donor hearts younger in age and those likely to have shorter ischemic times. Copyright © 2014 The

  6. Sources and risk factors for contamination, survival, persistence, and heat resistance of Salmonella in low-moisture foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podolak, Richard; Enache, Elena; Stone, Warren; Black, Darryl G; Elliott, Philip H

    2010-10-01

    Sources and risk factors for contamination, survival, persistence, and heat resistance of Salmonella in low-moisture foods are reviewed. Processed products such as peanut butter, infant formula, chocolate, cereal products, and dried milk are characteristically low-water-activity foods and do not support growth of vegetative pathogens such as Salmonella. Significant food safety risk might occur when contamination takes place after a lethal processing step. Salmonella cross-contamination in low-moisture foods has been traced to factors such as poor sanitation practices, poor equipment design, and poor ingredient control. It is well recognized that Salmonella can survive for long periods in low-moisture food products. Although some die-off occurs in low-moisture foods during storage, the degree of reduction depends on factors such as storage temperature and product formulation. The heat resistance of Salmonella is affected by many factors, mostly by strain and serotypes tested, previous growth and storage conditions, the physical and chemical food composition, test media, and the media used to recover heat-damaged cells. Salmonella heat resistance generally increases with reducing moisture. Care must be taken when applying published D- and z-values to a specific food process. The product composition and heating medium and conditions should not be significantly different from the product and process parameters used by the processors.

  7. Long-term survival and risk factors for failure of the native hip joint after operatively treated displaced acetabular fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke-Jenssen, J; Røise, O; Storeggen, S A Ø; Madsen, J E

    2017-06-01

    Our aim in this study was to describe the long-term survival of the native hip joint after open reduction and internal fixation of a displaced fracture of the acetabulum. We also present long-term clinical outcomes and risk factors associated with a poor outcome. A total of 285 patients underwent surgery for a displaced acetabular fracture between 1993 and 2005. For the survival analysis 253 were included, there were 197 men and 56 women with a mean age of 42 years (12 to 78). The mean follow-up of 11 years (1 to 20) was identified from our pelvic fracture registry. There were 99 elementary and 154 associated fracture types. For the long-term clinical follow-up, 192 patients with complete data were included. Their mean age was 40 years (13 to 78) with a mean follow-up of 12 years (5 to 20). Injury to the femoral head and acetabular impaction were assessed with CT scans and patients with an ipsilateral fracture of the femoral head were excluded. A total of 36 patients underwent total hip arthroplasty (THA). The overall ten-year survival of the hip joint was 86% (95% confidence interval (CI) 81% to 90%) and the 20-year survival was 82% (95% CI 76% to 87%). Injury to the femoral head and acetabular impaction were the strongest predictors of failure, with the long-term survival rate falling towards 50% in these patients. The survival fell to 0% at three years when both these risk factors were present in patients aged > 60 years. The long-term survival of the native hip joint after acetabular fractures was good, but the presence of injury to the femoral head and acetabular impaction proved to be strong predictors of failure, especially in patients aged > 60 years. These patients may be better treated with a combination of open reduction and internal fixation and primary arthroplasty. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2017;99-B:834-40. ©2017 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  8. Cognitive ability, lifestyle risk factors, and two-year survival in first myocardial infarction men: A Swedish National Registry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallert, John; Madison, Guy; Held, Claes; Olsson, Erik

    2017-03-15

    General cognitive ability (CA) is positively associated with later physical and mental health, health literacy, and longevity. We investigated whether CA estimated approximately 30years earlier in young adulthood predicted lifestyle-related risk factors and two-year survival in first myocardial infarction (MI) male patients. Young adulthood CA estimated through psychometric testing at age 18-20years was obtained from the mandatory military conscript registry (INSARK) and linked to national quality registry SWEDEHEART/RIKS-HIA data on smoking, diabetes, hypertension, obesity (BMI>30kg/m2) in 60years or younger Swedish males with first MI. Patients were followed up in the Cause of Death registry. The 5659 complete cases (deceased=106, still alive=5553) were descriptively compared. Crude and adjusted associations were modelled with logistic regression. After multivariable adjustment, one SD increase in CA was associated with a decreased odds ratio of being a current smoker (0.63 [0.59, 0.67], Plifestyle risk factors smoking, diabetes, and obesity, and two-year survival in first MI male patients. CA assessment might benefit risk stratification and possibly aid further tailoring of secondary preventive strategy. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Outcome of heart transplants 15 to 20 years ago: graft survival, post-transplant morbidity, and risk factors for mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussel, Jean C; Baron, Olivier; Périgaud, Christian; Bizouarn, Philippe; Pattier, Sabine; Habash, Oussama; Mugniot, Antoine; Petit, Thierry; Michaud, Jean L; Heymann, Marie Françoise; Treilhaud, Michèle; Trochu, Jean N; Gueffet, Jean P; Lamirault, Guillaume; Duveau, Daniel; Despins, Philippe

    2008-05-01

    The study was conducted to determine the long-term outcome of patients who underwent heart transplantation 15 to 20 years ago, in the cyclosporine era, and identify risk factors for death. A retrospective analysis was done of 148 patients who had undergone heart transplantation between 1985 and 1991 at a single center. Operative technique and immunosuppressive treatment were comparable in all patients. Actuarial survival rates were 75% (n = 111), 58% (n = 86), and 42% (n = 62) at 5, 10, and 15 years, respectively. The mean follow-up period was 12.1 +/- 5.6 years for patients who survived more than 3 months after transplantation (n = 131). The major causes of death were malignancy (35.8%) and cardiac allograft vasculopathy (24.7%). No death related to acute rejection was reported after the first month of transplantation. Graft coronary artery disease was detected on angiography in 66 (50.3%), and 7 (5.3%) had retransplantation. Malignancies developed in 131 patients (48.1%), including skin cancers in 31 (23.6%), solid tumors in 26 (19.8%), and hematologic malignancies in 14 (10.6%). Severe renal function requiring dialysis or renal transplantation developed in 27 patients (20.6%). By multivariable analysis, the only pre-transplant risk factor found to affect long-term survival was a history of cigarette use (p cardiac transplantation remains excellent in the cyclosporine era. Controlling acute allograft rejection can be achieved but seems to carry a high rate of cancers and renal dysfunction. History of cigarette use affects significantly long-term survival in our study.

  10. Survival Estimates and Mortality Risk Factors in a Cohort of HIV Vertically Infected Individuals in Salvador, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, Cynthia R S; Netto, Eduardo M; Patrício, Fátima R L; Brites, Carlos

    2017-03-01

    There are few data on long-term survival of Brazilian children with vertically acquired HIV infection. We assessed survival, mortality risk factors and response to antiretroviral therapy (ART). We compared children with early and late access to care. We used Kaplan-Meier survival curves with Log-rank tests to compare survival time and mortality rates of 245 HIV vertically infected children admitted for care during 2002-2014. Total follow-up sum was 1584.4 person-years. Overall survival was 83.9%. Median age at start of ART was 51.6 (18.0-94.2) months, and median age at death was 8.2 (1.7-10.1) years (mortality rate: 1.7/100 person-years). Pneumonia and sepsis were the main causes of death. Male gender, viral load (VL) ≥100,000 copies, severe immunosuppression, moderate/severe symptoms and history of opportunistic infection were associated with higher mortality in bivariate analysis. Only severe symptoms remained associated in multivariate analysis (P = 0.03). There was no difference in mortality in early compared to late access group. Overall, 217 patients received ART; 192 had a recent VL, of which 116 (59.8%) had ≤400 copies. Variables associated with therapeutic failure were as follows: VL ≥100,000 copies, less immune suppression, age <12 months at admission and age <3 years at ART start. We have a high mortality rate in comparison with developed countries. Although early access did not impact mortality, we detected a trend in favor of early treatment as a protecting factor against mortality. We need to increase adherence to care and treatment, and better drugs to optimize outcomes.

  11. Minimal Proteinuria One Year after Transplant is a Risk Factor for Graft Survival in Kidney Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Na Ree; Lee, Jung Eun; Huh, Wooseong; Kim, Sung Joo; Kim, Yoon-Goo; Kim, Dae Joong; Oh, Ha Young

    2009-01-01

    It is generally accepted that one-year post-transplant proteinuria over 0.5 gm per day has a negative impact on renal graft survival. In this study, the effects of minimal proteinuria less than 0.5 g/day were analyzed in 272 renal recipients who had survived for one year with a functioning graft. Recipients were classified by one-year post-transplant proteinuria: no proteinuria group (

  12. Introduction of the resection severity index as independent risk factor limiting survival after resection of colorectal liver metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwiasda, Jill; Schrem, Harald; Kaltenborn, Alexander; Mahlmann, Jan; Mix, Heiko; Lehner, Frank; Kayser, Nicolas; Klempnauer, Jürgen; Kulik, Ulf

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the influence of the recently introduced resection severity index (RSI) in patients with liver resection for hepatocellular carcinoma on survival after resection of colorectal liver metastases. The RSI quantifies pre-operatively the liver cellular damage, liver synthetic function and loss of organ parenchyma. All consecutive patients who underwent liver resection for metastases of colorectal cancer (CLM) between 2000 and 2015 were included in this study. Risk factors limiting survival were analyzed using univariable and multivariable Cox regression analyses. The median survival after liver resection for CLM was 3.0 years. Significant independent risk factors for mortality were the RSI (p = 0.029; hazard ratio (HR): 1.088, 95%-confidence interval (95%-CI): 1.009-1.174), age at resection in years (p = 0.001; HR: 1.017, 95%-CI: 1.007-1.027), pre-operative hemoglobin level (p = 0.041; HR: 0.932, 95%-CI: 0.891-0.997), the cecum as location of primary CRC (p < 0.001; HR: 2.023, 95%-CI: 1.403-2.833), adjuvant chemotherapy (p < 0.001; HR: 1.506, 95%-CI: 1.212-1.878), local relapse of the primary tumor (p = 0.027; HR: 1.591, 95%-CI: 1.057-2.297), the units of intra-operatively transfused packed red blood cells (p < 0.001; HR: 1.068, 95%-CI: 1.033-1.104), the size of the largest metastasis (p = 0.002; HR: 1.005, 95%-CI: 1.002-1.008) and the metastasis' distance to the resection margin (p = 0.014; HR: 0.984, 95%-CI: 0.972-0.997). The RSI is an independent prognostic factor for survival after liver resection for CLM. Besides the extent of liver resection certain primary tumor characteristics have to be taken into account to ensure long-term survival. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Survival, Risk Factors, and Effect of Treatment in 101 Patients With Calciphylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, James T; El-Azhary, Rokea A; Patzelt, Michelle T; Weaver, Amy L; Albright, Robert C; Bridges, Alina D; Claus, Paul L; Davis, Mark D P; Dillon, John J; El-Zoghby, Ziad M; Hickson, LaTonya J; Kumar, Rajiv; McBane, Robert D; McCarthy-Fruin, Kathleen A M; McEvoy, Marian T; Pittelkow, Mark R; Wetter, David A; Williams, Amy W

    2016-10-01

    To report on the survival and the associations of treatments upon survival of patients with calciphylaxis seen at a single center. Using the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision diagnosis code of 275.49 and the keyword "calciphylaxis" in the dismissal narrative, we retrospectively identified 101 patients with calciphylaxis seen at our institution between January 1, 1999, through September 20, 2014, using a predefined, consensus-developed classification scheme. The average age of patients was 60 years: 81 (80.2%) were women; 68 (68.0%) were obese; 19 (18.8%) had stage 0 to 2 chronic kidney disease (CKD), 19 (18.9%) had stage 3 or 4 CKD; 63 (62.4%) had stage 5 or 5D (dialysis) CKD. Seventy-five patients died during follow-up. Six-month survival was 57%. Lack of surgical debridement was associated with insignificantly lower 6-month survival (hazard ratio [HR]=1.99; 95% CI, 0.96-4.15; P=.07) and significantly poorer survival for the entire duration of follow-up (HR=1.98; 95% CI, 1.15-3.41; P=.01), which was most pronounced in stage 5 or 5D CKD (HR=1.91; 95% CI, 1.03-3.56; P=.04). Among patients with stage 5/5D CKD, subtotal parathyroidectomy (performed only in patients with hyperparathyroidism) was associated with better 6-month (HR=0.12; 95% CI, 0.02-0.90; P=.04) and overall survival (HR= 0.37; 95% CI, 0.15-0.87; P=.02). Calciphylaxis is associated with a high mortality rate. Significantly effective treatments included surgical debridement and subtotal parathyroidectomy in patients with stage 5/5D CKD with hyperparathyroidism. Treatments with tissue-plasminogen activator, sodium thiosulfate, and hyperbaric oxygen therapy were not associated with higher mortality. Copyright © 2016 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Factors predicting long-term survival in low-risk diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Michael B; Pedersen, Niels T; Christensen, Bjarne E

    2003-01-01

    -based combination chemotherapy (92%) or loco-regional radiotherapy/surgery (8%) with curative intent were included. The median age was 50 years and 170 achieved complete remission. The median follow-up time was 11 years. Twenty-six patients relapsed, with a median time to relapse of 12.1 months. Overall survival...

  15. [Society of Nephrology, Computer Technology Commission. Dialysis computer program. VI. - Survival and risk factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degoulet, P; Reach, I; Rozenbaum, W; Aime, F; Devries, C; Berger, C; Rojas, P; Jacobs, C; Legrain, M

    1979-12-01

    greater than or equal to 95 mmHg. 9) Viral hepatitis remain the most prominent infectious problem with 30 per cent of patients being chronic Hbs antigen carriers. 10) Annual death rate calculated in the 2,518 patients dialyzed between 1972 and 1978 (78/1000) is 12 times superior to the death rate of the French population, adjusted for sex and age to the dialysis population. 43,1 per cent of deaths are of cardiovascular origin. Risk factors for overall mortality are age, sex (male), existence of a vascular or diabetic nephropathy, twice weekly dialysis strategy, elevation of systolic or diastolic blood pressure during the course of dialysis treatment, hypocholesterolemia and to a lesser extent hypotriglyceridemia. On the contrary, hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia and hyperuricemia do not appear as risk factors for overall mortality or cardiovascular mortality. These results plead for a perfect control of hypertension and to the extension of thrice weekly dialysis for the whole population of patients treated by maintenance hemodialysis.

  16. Validation of Nomograms for Survival and Metastases after Hysterectomy and Adjuvant Therapy in Uterine Cervical Cancer with Risk Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won Sup Yoon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Three nomogram models for early stage uterine cervical cancer have been developed (KROG 13-03 for overall survival [OS], SNUH/AMC for disease-free survival [DFS], and KROG 12-08 for distant metastases-free survival [DMFS] after radical hysterectomy (RH and pelvic lymph node dissection (PLND. This study aimed to validate these models using our cohort with adjuvant radiotherapy. Methods. According to the eligibility criteria of nomogram studies, patients were enrolled in Group A (N=109 for the two KROG models (RH with PLND and whole pelvic irradiation and Group B (N=101 for the SNUH/AMC model (RH with PLND and squamous histology. Using Cox-regression hazard models, the prognostic factors of our cohorts were evaluated. The risk probabilities induced from published nomogram scores were calculated and the concordance indices were evaluated. Results. Group A had 88.1% 5-year OS and 86.0% 5-year DMFS. Group B had 83.0% 5-year DFS. In multivariate analyses, large tumor size for OS (HR 8.62, P<0.001 and DMFS (HR 5.13, P=0.003, young age (≤40 versus 41–64 years for OS (HR 4.63, P=0.097 and DFS (HR 3.44, P=0.051, and multiple lymph node metastases (0 versus ≥3 for DMFS (HR 4.03, P=0.031 and DFS (HR 3.90, P=0.038 were significantly correlated. The concordance indices for OS, DMFS, and DFS were 0.612 (P=0.002, 0.597 (P=0.014, and 0.587 (P=0.020, respectively. Conclusion. The developed nomogram models after RH and PLND are clinically useful in predicting various types of survival with significance.

  17. Survival and Associated Risk Factors of Selective Caries Removal Treatments in Primary Teeth: A Retrospective Study in a High Caries Risk Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melgar, Ximena C; Opdam, Niek J M; Britto Correa, Marcos; Franzon, Renata; Demarco, Flávio Fernando; Araujo, Fernando B; Casagrande, Luciano

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to analyze the survival probability of selective caries removal (SCR) treatments in the primary teeth of children with high caries experience and factors potentially associated with treatment failure. The sample included SCR treatments conducted in anterior and posterior teeth without sedation or general anesthesia among children attending a university dental service. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was used to estimate the longevity of restorations and multivariate Cox regression with shared frailty was used to assess risk factors. A total of 284 SCR treatments in 88 children (aged 5.2 ± 1.91 years) with high caries experience (mean dmft/DMFT = 11.1 ± 5.04) were analyzed. The 3-year survival reached 48.8%, with an annual failure rate of 21.2%. Restorative failures (n = 60) were found more frequently compared to pulp complications (n = 12). SCR performed in anterior primary teeth were more prone to failure (hazard ratio = 3.6, 95% CI: 1.94; 6.71). Patients with a higher amount of visible plaque experienced more failures in SCR treatments (hazard ratio 3.0, 95% CI:1.27; 7.07). In this retrospective study, SCR showed restricted survival when compared to other prospective clinical trials. Patient-related factors, especially the young age and high caries experience of the children, may represent a challenge for restoration survival. Regardless of the caries removal technique or restorative material, cariogenic biofilm has a negative effect on the survival of restorations, probably by acting directly on material deterioration and, particularly, on the development of new caries lesions of rapid progression. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Serum Derived Transfer Factor Stimulates the Innate Immune System to Improve Survival Traits in High Risk Pathogen Scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willeford, Bridget V; Shapiro-Dunlap, Trudy; Willeford, Kenneth O

    2017-08-01

    Preclinical Research Transfer Factors (TFs) are low molecular weight (<5,000 daltons) biological response mediators. In the present study, a serum derived TF improved the ability of the recipient animal to survive high-risk infectious challenges (salmonellosis and canine parvoviral enteritis (CPV)) by altering the host's cytokine response profile. Mice mortally challenged with 5,000 colony-forming units of Salmonella experienced a group mortality of 73% while mice treated with a single 5 mg dose of the TF demonstrated a significant decrease in morbidity (7%, p ≤ 0.01). The splenic bacterial load in untreated mice was over 10,000 times higher than that in the TF treated mice. Twenty-four hours post-administration, the treated murine population expressed a rapid temporal increase in serum IL-6 (26-fold) and INF-γ (77-fold) concentrations. IL-6 can act as a critical signal regulating action against bacterial pathogens. A comparative double-blind study performed using dogs confirmed to be undergoing a canine parvovirus challenge showed that when conventional supportive therapy was supplemented with a single 5 mg TF dose there was a reduction (p ≤ 0.01) in group mortality (68% of the TF treated group survived versus 32% of the placebo group), an observation consistent with the observed increase in INF-γ, a cytokine associated with promoting antiviral activity. Drug Dev Res 78 : 189-195, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Adjuvant chemotherapy is not associated with improved survival for all high-risk factors in stage II colon cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeff, S.R.; Erning, F.N. van; Lemmens, V.E.; Wilt, J.H.W. de; Pruijt, J.F.

    2016-01-01

    Adjuvant chemotherapy can be considered in high-risk stage II colon cancer comprising pT4, poor/undifferentiated grade, vascular invasion, emergency surgery and/or <10 evaluated lymph nodes (LNs). Adjuvant chemotherapy administration and its effect on survival was evaluated for each known risk

  20. Description and validation of a Markov model of survival for individuals free of cardiovascular disease that uses Framingham risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Chris

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Estimation of cardiovascular disease risk is increasingly used to inform decisions on interventions, such as the use of antihypertensives and statins, or to communicate the risks of smoking. Crude 10-year cardiovascular disease risk risks may not give a realistic view of the likely impact of an intervention over a lifetime and will underestimate of the risks of smoking. A validated model of survival to act as a decision aid in the consultation may help to address these problems. This study aims to describe the development of such a model for use with people free of cardiovascular disease and evaluates its accuracy against data from a United Kingdom cohort. Methods A Markov cycle tree evaluated using cohort simulation was developed utilizing Framingham estimates of cardiovascular risk, 1998 United Kingdom mortality data, the relative risk for smoking related non-cardiovascular disease risk and changes in systolic blood pressure and serum total cholesterol total cholesterol with age. The model's estimates of survival at 20 years for 1391 members of the Whickham survey cohort between the ages of 35 and 65 were compared with the observed survival at 20-year follow-up. Results The model estimate for survival was 75% and the observed survival was 75.4%. The correlation between estimated and observed survival was 0.933 over 39 subgroups of the cohort stratified by estimated survival, 0.992 for the seven 5-year age bands from 35 to 64, 0.936 for the ten 10 mmHg systolic blood pressure bands between 100 mmHg and 200 mmHg, and 0.693 for the fifteen 0.5 mmol/l total cholesterol bands between 3.0 and 10.0 mmol/l. The model significantly underestimated mortality in those people with a systolic blood pressure greater than or equal to 180 mmHg (p = 0.006. The average gain in life expectancy from the elimination of cardiovascular disease risk as a cause of death was 4.0 years for all the 35 year-old men in the sample (n = 24, and 1.8 years

  1. Description and validation of a Markov model of survival for individuals free of cardiovascular disease that uses Framingham risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Chris; Vanderpump, Mark; French, Joyce

    2004-05-24

    Estimation of cardiovascular disease risk is increasingly used to inform decisions on interventions, such as the use of antihypertensives and statins, or to communicate the risks of smoking. Crude 10-year cardiovascular disease risk risks may not give a realistic view of the likely impact of an intervention over a lifetime and will underestimate of the risks of smoking. A validated model of survival to act as a decision aid in the consultation may help to address these problems. This study aims to describe the development of such a model for use with people free of cardiovascular disease and evaluates its accuracy against data from a United Kingdom cohort. A Markov cycle tree evaluated using cohort simulation was developed utilizing Framingham estimates of cardiovascular risk, 1998 United Kingdom mortality data, the relative risk for smoking related non-cardiovascular disease risk and changes in systolic blood pressure and serum total cholesterol total cholesterol with age. The model's estimates of survival at 20 years for 1391 members of the Whickham survey cohort between the ages of 35 and 65 were compared with the observed survival at 20-year follow-up. The model estimate for survival was 75% and the observed survival was 75.4%. The correlation between estimated and observed survival was 0.933 over 39 subgroups of the cohort stratified by estimated survival, 0.992 for the seven 5-year age bands from 35 to 64, 0.936 for the ten 10 mmHg systolic blood pressure bands between 100 mmHg and 200 mmHg, and 0.693 for the fifteen 0.5 mmol/l total cholesterol bands between 3.0 and 10.0 mmol/l. The model significantly underestimated mortality in those people with a systolic blood pressure greater than or equal to 180 mmHg (p = 0.006). The average gain in life expectancy from the elimination of cardiovascular disease risk as a cause of death was 4.0 years for all the 35 year-old men in the sample (n = 24), and 1.8 years for all the 35 year-old women in the sample (n = 32

  2. A novel risk stratification model, involving preoperative lymphocyte-monocyte ratio and standard pathological factors, for overall survival in patients with bladder cancer undergoing radical cystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Takashi; Kinoshita, Hidefumi; Yoshida, Kenji; Yanishi, Masaaki; Inui, Hidekazu; Komai, Yoshihiro; Sugi, Motohiko; Inoue, Takaaki; Murota, Takashi; Matsuda, Tadashi

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the ability of preoperative lymphocyte-monocyte ratio to predict prognosis and determine post-operative risk stratification in patients with bladder cancer undergoing radical cystectomy. A retrospective review of the 210 patients who had undergone radical cystectomy for bladder cancer from 2006 to 2013 identified 181 patients with sufficient data to evaluate the prognostic significance of the lymphocyte-monocyte ratio. Overall survival was assessed by the Kaplan-Meier method. The association of clinicopathological findings with overall survival was evaluated by a multivariate Cox proportional model, and a novel risk stratification model to predict prognosis was established. Median follow-up after radical cystectomy was 6.0 years. The 5-year overall survival rate was significantly lower for patients with low than high lymphocyte-monocyte ratio (27.6 vs 80.7%, P model using these factors showed significant differences among the three subgroups (low, intermediate and high risk) with a concordance index of 0.84. The 5-year overall survival rates in patients at low, intermediate and high risk were 85.4, 45.5 and 0%, respectively (P < 0.001). Preoperative lymphocyte-monocyte ratio, pathological tumor and lymph node stage and positive margins are significantly associated with overall survival in patients who have undergone radical cystectomy for bladder cancer. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Implant survival and success rates in patients with risk factors: results from a long-term retrospective study with a 10 to 18 years follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angelis, F; Papi, P; Mencio, F; Rosella, D; Di Carlo, S; Pompa, G

    2017-02-01

    Risk factors for implant therapy are represented by all general and local conditions that through various mechanisms can increase either short-term and long-term failure risk. The aim of this study is to assess the implant survival and implant success rates with single and multiple risk factors. To address the research purpose, a retrospective cohort study was designed and implemented, including a sample of 225 patients with a total of 871 implants placed. The following risk factors were considered: smoking, bruxism, bone augmentation procedures and the presence of load risk (implants with crown/implant relation > 0.8; angulation > 25°; presence of cantilever). Follow-up ranged from 10 years to 18 years (average follow-up 13.6 years). Failures were subdivided into short-term failures, before the prosthetic phase, and long-term failures, after definitive prosthesis. The success criteria published by Albrektsson and Zarb were adopted. A Cox proportional hazard regression model was used to calculate hazard ratio, with a statistically significant p-value implants placed, 138 did not meet the success criteria, (success rate 84.16%), sixty (43.47%) were classified as "early failure" and seventy-eight as "late failure" (56.53%). A total of 70 dental implants were removed, with a survival rate of 91.96%. The presence of a single risk factor does not imply a marked increase of failure risk. Among the analyzed factors, the one that proved to be the most dangerous was bruxism, even when presented as the only risk factor. Bruxism with load risk proved to be the most dangerous association (success rate 69.23%) and could be included among the absolute contraindications for implant treatment.

  4. Survival analysis of factors affecting incidence risk of Salmonella Dublin in Danish dairy herds during a 7-year surveillance period

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Liza Rosenbaum; Dohoo, Ian

    2012-01-01

    A national surveillance programme for Salmonella Dublin, based on regular bulk-tank milk antibody screening and movements of cattle, was initiated in Denmark in 2002. From 2002 to end of 2009 the prevalence of test-positive dairy herds was reduced from 26% to 10%. However, new infections and spread......-quarters (YQs), either at the start of the study period or after recovery from infection. Survival analysis was performed on a dataset including 6931 dairy herds with 118969 YQs at risk, in which 1523 failures (new infection events) occurred. Predictors obtained from register data were tested in a multivariable...

  5. [Treatment outcome, survival and their risk factors among new tuberculosis patients co-infected with HIV during the Ebola outbreak in Conakry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camara, A; Sow, M S; Touré, A; Diallo, O H; Kaba, I; Bah, B; Diallo, T H; Diallo, M S; Guilavogui, T; Sow, O Y

    2017-11-01

    Mortality among TB/HIV co-infected patients remains high in Africa. The study aimed to estimate survival and associated factors in a cohort of TB/HIV co-infected patients who started tuberculosis treatment during the Ebola outbreak in Conakry, Guinea. A prospective cohort study was conducted from April 2014 to December 2015. TB patients with HIV co-infection were enrolled at the University Hospital of Conakry. Survival and risk factors were analyzed according to Kaplan-Meier's method, log-rank test and Cox's regression. Data from 573 patients were analyzed. From these, 86 (15.0%) died before the end of treatment, 52% occurring within eight weeks of treatment onset. Survival at 4, 12 and 24 weeks after the beginning of the TB treatment was 92%, 86% and 83%, respectively. Independent risk factors associated with death were in the cell CD4 treatment of tuberculosis. Prevention of opportunistic infections, anemia and proper management of tuberculosis treatment in early comorbidities may improve survival for TB/HIV co-infected patients in restoring immune function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Campylobacter virulence and survival factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, Declan J

    2015-06-01

    Despite over 30 years of research, campylobacteriosis is the most prevalent foodborne bacterial infection in many countries including in the European Union and the United States of America. However, relatively little is known about the virulence factors in Campylobacter or how an apparently fragile organism can survive in the food chain, often with enhanced pathogenicity. This review collates information on the virulence and survival determinants including motility, chemotaxis, adhesion, invasion, multidrug resistance, bile resistance and stress response factors. It discusses their function in transition through the food processing environment and human infection. In doing so it provides a fundamental understanding of Campylobacter, critical for improved diagnosis, surveillance and control. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Mortality-related risk factors and long-term survival after 4460 liver resections in Sweden-a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilg, Stefan; Sparrelid, Ernesto; Isaksson, Bengt; Lundell, Lars; Nowak, Greg; Strömberg, Cecilia

    2017-02-01

    The objectives of this study were to analyze the outcome after hepatectomy and to identify contributing factors to mortality and long-term survival in a population-based setting. A retrospective, nationwide register study was performed. All patients who underwent hepatectomy in Sweden between 2002 and 2011 were identified in the Swedish Hospital Discharge Registry using their unique personal identification numbers. This cohort was linked to the National Cancer Registry (cancer diagnosis), the National Registry of Causes of Death, and the Migration Registry. Survival analysis by Kaplan-Meier method was performed to assess long-term outcome. A Cox regression model was used to analyze risk factors affecting long-term survival. Overall, 4460 hepatectomies were performed. The 30- and 90-day mortalities were 1.8 and 3.1 %, respectively. The overall 5- and 10-year survival rates for all diagnoses were 45 and 38 %, respectively. Independent risk factors for 5-year mortality were as follows: patient age, comorbidity, male gender, intrahepatic/extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma, gallbladder cancer, extent of hepatectomy, and hepatectomies performed at non-university hospitals. Re-resection (78.1 % with diagnosis "metastasis") was performed on 374 patients. In these patients, mortality risk decreased by >50 % (HR 0.42; 95 %, CI 0.33-0.53). In a population-based analysis, liver resections are done with a low mortality risk and good long-term outcome. Patients who underwent resection at a University Hospital showed a significant better outcome compared to patients resected at non-University Hospitals. These results support further centralization of liver surgery. Re-resection should be performed if feasible.

  8. Impact of non-HIV and HIV risk factors on survival in HIV-infected patients on HAART: a population-based nationwide cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obel, Niels; Omland, Lars Haukali; Kronborg, Gitte; Larsen, Carsten S; Pedersen, Court; Pedersen, Gitte; Sørensen, Henrik Toft; Gerstoft, Jan

    2011-01-01

    We determined the impact of three factors on mortality in HIV-infected patients who had been on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for at least one year: (1) insufficient response to (HAART) and presence of AIDS-defining diseases, (2) comorbidity, and (3) drug and alcohol abuse and compared the mortality to that of the general population. In a Danish nationwide, population-based cohort study, we used population based registries to identify (1) all Danish HIV-infected patients who started HAART in the period 1 January 1998-1 July 2009, and (2) a comparison cohort of individuals matched on date of birth and gender (N = 2,267 and 9,068, respectively). Study inclusion began 1 year after start of HAART. Patients were categorised hierarchically in four groups according to the three risk factors, which were identified before study inclusion. The main outcome measure was probability of survival from age 25 to 65 years. The probability of survival from age 25 to age 65 was substantially lower in HIV patients [0.48 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.42-0.55)] compared to the comparison cohort [0.88 (0.86 to 0.90)]. However, in HIV patients with no risk factors (N = 871) the probability of survival was equivalent to that of the general population [0.86 (95% CI 0.77-0.92)]. In contrast, the probability of survival was 0.58 in patients with HIV risk factors (N = 704), 0.30 in patients with comorbidities (N = 479), and 0.03 in patients with drug or alcohol abuse (N = 313). The increased risk of death in HIV-infected individuals is mainly attributable to risk factors that can be identified prior to or in the initial period of antiretroviral treatment. Mortality in patients without risk factors on a successful HAART is almost identical to that of the non-HIV-infected population.

  9. Retrospective epidemiological study of canine epilepsy in Japan using the International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force classification 2015 (2003-2013): etiological distribution, risk factors, survival time, and lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamamoto, Yuji; Hasegawa, Daisuke; Mizoguchi, Shunta; Yu, Yoshihiko; Wada, Masae; Kuwabara, Takayuki; Fujiwara-Igarashi, Aki; Fujita, Michio

    2016-11-09

    Epilepsy is the most common neurological disease in veterinary practice. However, contrary to human medicine, epilepsy classification in veterinary medicine had not been clearly defined until recently. A number of reports on canine epilepsy have been published, reflecting in part updated proposals from the human epilepsy organization, the International League Against Epilepsy. In 2015, the International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force (IVETF) published a consensus report on the classification and definition of canine epilepsy. The purpose of this retrospective study was to investigate the etiological distribution, survival time of dogs with idiopathic epilepsy (IdE) and structural epilepsy (StE), and risk factors for survival time, according to the recently published IVETF classification. We investigated canine cases with epilepsy that were referred to our teaching hospital in Japan during the past 10 years, and which encompassed a different breed population from Western countries. A total of 358 dogs with epilepsy satisfied our etiological study criteria. Of these, 172 dogs (48 %) were classified as IdE and 76 dogs (21 %) as StE. Of these dogs, 100 dogs (consisting of 65 with IdE and 35 with StE) were included in our survival study. Median survival time from the initial epileptic seizure in dogs with IdE and StE was 10.4 and 4.5 years, respectively. Median lifespan of dogs with IdE and StE was 13.5 and 10.9 years, respectively. Multivariable analysis demonstrated that risk factors for survival time in IdE were high seizure frequency (≥0.3 seizures/month) and focal epileptic seizures. Focal epileptic seizures were identified as a risk factor for survival time in IdE. Clinicians should carefully differentiate seizure type as it is difficult to identify focal epileptic seizures. With good seizure control, dogs with IdE can survive for nearly the same lifespan as the general dog population. Our results using the IVETF classification are similar to previous

  10. Survived infancy but still vulnerable: spatial-temporal trends and risk factors for child mortality in the Agincourt rural sub-district, South Africa, 1992-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartorius, Benn; Kahn, Kathleen; Collinson, Mark A; Vounatsou, Penelope; Tollman, Stephen M

    2011-05-01

    Targeting of health interventions to poor children at highest risk of mortality are promising approaches for enhancing equity. Methods have emerged to accurately quantify excess risk and identify space-time disparities. This provides useful and detailed information for guiding policy. A spatio-temporal analysis was performed to identify risk factors associated with child (1-4 years) mortality in the Agincourt sub-district, South Africa, to assess temporal changes in child mortality patterns within the study site between 1992 and 2007, and to produce all-cause and cause-specific mortality maps to identify high risk areas. Demographic, maternal, paternal and fertility-related factors, household mortality experience, distance to health care facility and socio-economic status were among the examined risk factors. The analysis was carried out by fitting a Bayesian discrete time Bernoulli survival geostatistical model using Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation. Bayesian kriging was used to produce mortality risk maps. Significant temporal increase in child mortality was observed due to the HIV epidemic. A distinct spatial risk pattern was observed with higher risk areas being concentrated in poorer settlements on the eastern part of the study area, largely inhabited by former Mozambican refugees. The major risk factors for childhood mortality, following multivariate adjustment, were mother's death (especially when due to HIV and tuberculosis), greater number of children under 5 years living in the same household and winter season. This study demonstrates the use of Bayesian geostatistical models for accurately quantifying risk factors and producing maps of child mortality risk in a health and demographic surveillance system. According to the space-time analysis, the southeast and upper central regions of the site appear to have the highest mortality risk. The results inform policies to address health inequalities in the Agincourt sub-district and to improve access to

  11. Survived infancy but still vulnerable: spatial-temporal trends and risk factors for child mortality in the Agincourt rural sub-district, South Africa, 1992-2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benn Sartorius

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Targeting of health interventions to poor children at highest risk of mortality are promising approaches for enhancing equity. Methods have emerged to accurately quantify excess risk and identify space-time disparities. This provides useful and detailed information for guiding policy. A spatio-temporal analysis was performed to identify risk factors associated with child (1-4 years mortality in the Agincourt sub-district, South Africa, to assess temporal changes in child mortality patterns within the study site between 1992 and 2007, and to produce all-cause and cause-specific mortality maps to identify high risk areas. Demographic, maternal, paternal and fertility-related factors, household mortality experience, distance to health care facility and socio-economic status were among the examined risk factors. The analysis was carried out by fitting a Bayesian discrete time Bernoulli survival geostatistical model using Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation. Bayesian kriging was used to produce mortality risk maps. Significant temporal increase in child mortality was observed due to the HIV epidemic. A distinct spatial risk pattern was observed with higher risk areas being concentrated in poorer settlements on the eastern part of the study area, largely inhabited by former Mozambican refugees. The major risk factors for childhood mortality, following multivariate adjustment, were mother’s death (especially when due to HIV and tuberculosis, greater number of children under 5 years living in the same household and winter season. This study demonstrates the use of Bayesian geostatistical models for accurately quantifying risk factors and producing maps of child mortality risk in a health and demographic surveillance system. According to the space-time analysis, the southeast and upper central regions of the site appear to have the highest mortality risk. The results inform policies to address health inequalities in the Agincourt sub-district and to

  12. Community-Based Management of Child Malnutrition in Zambia: HIV/AIDS Infection and Other Risk Factors on Child Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Moramarco

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available (1 Background: Supplementary feeding programs (SFPs are effective in the community-based treatment of moderate acute malnutrition (MAM and prevention of severe acute malnutrition (SAM; (2 Methods: A retrospective study was conducted on a sample of 1266 Zambian malnourished children assisted from 2012 to 2014 in the Rainbow Project SFPs. Nutritional status was evaluated according to WHO/Unicef methodology. We performed univariate and multivariate Cox proportional risk regression to identify the main predictors of mortality. In addition, a time-to event analysis was performed to identify predictors of failure and time to cure events; (3 Results: The analysis included 858 malnourished children (19 months ± 9.4; 49.9% males. Program outcomes met international standards with a better performance for MAM compared to SAM. Cox regression identified SAM (3.8; 2.1–6.8, HIV infection (3.1; 1.7–5.5, and WAZ <−3 (3.1; 1.6–5.7 as predictors of death. Time to event showed 80% of children recovered by SAM/MAM at 24 weeks. (4 Conclusions: Preventing deterioration of malnutrition, coupled to early detection of HIV/AIDS with adequate antiretroviral treatment, and extending the duration of feeding supplementation, could be crucial elements for ensuring full recovery and improve child survival in malnourished Zambian children.

  13. Community-Based Management of Child Malnutrition in Zambia: HIV/AIDS Infection and Other Risk Factors on Child Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moramarco, Stefania; Amerio, Giulia; Ciarlantini, Clarice; Chipoma, Jean Kasengele; Simpungwe, Matilda Kakungu; Nielsen-Saines, Karin; Palombi, Leonardo; Buonomo, Ersilia

    2016-07-01

    (1) BACKGROUND: Supplementary feeding programs (SFPs) are effective in the community-based treatment of moderate acute malnutrition (MAM) and prevention of severe acute malnutrition (SAM); (2) METHODS: A retrospective study was conducted on a sample of 1266 Zambian malnourished children assisted from 2012 to 2014 in the Rainbow Project SFPs. Nutritional status was evaluated according to WHO/Unicef methodology. We performed univariate and multivariate Cox proportional risk regression to identify the main predictors of mortality. In addition, a time-to event analysis was performed to identify predictors of failure and time to cure events; (3) RESULTS: The analysis included 858 malnourished children (19 months ± 9.4; 49.9% males). Program outcomes met international standards with a better performance for MAM compared to SAM. Cox regression identified SAM (3.8; 2.1-6.8), HIV infection (3.1; 1.7-5.5), and WAZ malnutrition, coupled to early detection of HIV/AIDS with adequate antiretroviral treatment, and extending the duration of feeding supplementation, could be crucial elements for ensuring full recovery and improve child survival in malnourished Zambian children.

  14. Identifying Some Risk Factors for the Time to Death of the Elderly Using the Semi-Parametric Blended Model of Survival Analysis With Competing Risks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samane Hajiabbasi

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion In single-variable fitting, age, history of myocardial infarction, history of stroke, and kidney problems were identified to have significant effects on the time to death of the elderly. Based on one-variable semi-parametric competing risk mixture fitted models, more significant risk factors for the time to death of elderly was identified when compared with a fitted multivariate mode to the data. This implies that the role of some independent variables can be explained by other independent variables.

  15. Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Many things in our genes , our lifestyle, and the environment around us may increase or decrease our risk ... Being exposed to chemicals and other substances in the environment has been linked to some cancers: Links between ...

  16. Survival and associated mortality risk factors among post-treatment pulmonary tuberculosis patients in the northwest of China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, X.H.; Ma, A.G.; Han, X.X.; Liang, H.; Wang, D.; Schouten, E.; Kok, F.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The tuberculosis (TB) program was carried out in the Changji zone in northwest of China. Directly Observed Treatment, Short-Course (DOTS) is a modern control strategy against tuberculosis recommended by World Health Organization. The purpose of this work is to describe the survival of

  17. Risk Factors for Mortality among Adult HIV/AIDS Patients Following Antiretroviral Therapy in Southwestern Ethiopia: An Assessment through Survival Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyoum, Dinberu; Degryse, Jean-Marie; Kifle, Yehenew Getachew; Taye, Ayele; Tadesse, Mulualem; Birlie, Belay; Banbeta, Akalu; Rosas-Aguirre, Angel; Duchateau, Luc; Speybroeck, Niko

    2017-03-12

    Introduction: Efforts have been made to reduce HIV/AIDS-related mortality by delivering antiretroviral therapy (ART) treatment. However, HIV patients in resource-poor settings are still dying, even if they are on ART treatment. This study aimed to explore the factors associated with HIV/AIDS-related mortality in Southwestern Ethiopia. Method: A non-concurrent retrospective cohort study which collected data from the clinical records of adult HIV/AIDS patients, who initiated ART treatment and were followed between January 2006 and December 2010, was conducted, to explore the factors associated with HIV/AIDS-related mortality at Jimma University Specialized Hospital (JUSH). Survival times (i.e., the time from the onset of ART treatment to the death or censoring) and different characteristics of patients were retrospectively examined. A best-fit model was chosen for the survival data, after the comparison between native semi-parametric Cox regression and parametric survival models (i.e., exponential, Weibull, and log-logistic). Result: A total of 456 HIV patients were included in the study, mostly females (312, 68.4%), with a median age of 30 years (inter-quartile range (IQR): 23-37 years). Estimated follow-up until December 2010 accounted for 1245 person-years at risk (PYAR) and resulted in 66 (14.5%) deaths and 390 censored individuals, representing a median survival time of 34.0 months ( IQR: 22.8-42.0 months). The overall mortality rate was 5.3/100 PYAR: 6.5/100 PYAR for males and 4.8/100 PYAR for females. The Weibull survival model was the best model for fitting the data (lowest AIC). The main factors associated with mortality were: baseline age (>35 years old, AHR = 3.8, 95% CI: 1.6-9.1), baseline weight (AHR = 0.93, 95% CI: 0.90-0.97), baseline WHO stage IV (AHR = 6.2, 95% CI: 2.2-14.2), and low adherence to ART treatment (AHR = 4.2, 95% CI: 2.5-7.1). Conclusion: An effective reduction in HIV/AIDS mortality could be achieved through timely ART treatment onset

  18. Risk Factors for Mortality among Adult HIV/AIDS Patients Following Antiretroviral Therapy in Southwestern Ethiopia: An Assessment through Survival Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinberu Seyoum

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Efforts have been made to reduce HIV/AIDS-related mortality by delivering antiretroviral therapy (ART treatment. However, HIV patients in resource-poor settings are still dying, even if they are on ART treatment. This study aimed to explore the factors associated with HIV/AIDS-related mortality in Southwestern Ethiopia. Method: A non-concurrent retrospective cohort study which collected data from the clinical records of adult HIV/AIDS patients, who initiated ART treatment and were followed between January 2006 and December 2010, was conducted, to explore the factors associated with HIV/AIDS-related mortality at Jimma University Specialized Hospital (JUSH. Survival times (i.e., the time from the onset of ART treatment to the death or censoring and different characteristics of patients were retrospectively examined. A best-fit model was chosen for the survival data, after the comparison between native semi-parametric Cox regression and parametric survival models (i.e., exponential, Weibull, and log-logistic. Result: A total of 456 HIV patients were included in the study, mostly females (312, 68.4%, with a median age of 30 years (inter-quartile range (IQR: 23–37 years. Estimated follow-up until December 2010 accounted for 1245 person-years at risk (PYAR and resulted in 66 (14.5% deaths and 390 censored individuals, representing a median survival time of 34.0 months ( IQR: 22.8–42.0 months. The overall mortality rate was 5.3/100 PYAR: 6.5/100 PYAR for males and 4.8/100 PYAR for females. The Weibull survival model was the best model for fitting the data (lowest AIC. The main factors associated with mortality were: baseline age (>35 years old, AHR = 3.8, 95% CI: 1.6–9.1, baseline weight (AHR = 0.93, 95% CI: 0.90–0.97, baseline WHO stage IV (AHR = 6.2, 95% CI: 2.2–14.2, and low adherence to ART treatment (AHR = 4.2, 95% CI: 2.5–7.1. Conclusion: An effective reduction in HIV/AIDS mortality could be achieved through timely ART

  19. Should we use standard survival models or the illness-death model for interval-censored data to investigate risk factors of chronic kidney disease progression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucquemont, Julie; Metzger, Marie; Combe, Christian; Stengel, Bénédicte; Leffondre, Karen

    2014-01-01

    In studies investigating risk factors of chronic kidney disease (CKD) progression, one may be interested in estimating factors effects on both a fall of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) below a specific level (i.e., a CKD stage) and death. Such studies have to account for the fact that GFR is measured at intermittent visit only, which implies that progression to the stage of interest is unknown for patients who die before being observed at that stage. Our objective was to compare the results of an illness-death model that handles this uncertainty, with frequently used survival models. This study included 1,519 patients from the NephroTest cohort with CKD stages 1-4 at baseline (69% males, 59±15 years, median protein/creatinine ratio [PCR] 27.4 mg/mmol) and subsequent annual measures of GFR (follow-up time 4.3±2.7 years). Each model was used to estimate the effects of sex, age, PCR, and GFR at baseline on the hazards of progression to CKD stage 5 (GFRmodels. The differences between results were higher for the hazard of death before or after progression. Our results also suggest that previous findings on the effect of age on end-stage renal disease are more likely due to a strong impact of age on death than to an effect on progression. The probabilities of progression were systematically under-estimated with the survival model as compared with the illness-death model. This study illustrates the advantages of the illness-death model for accurately estimating the effects of risk factors on the hazard of progression and death, and probabilities of progression. It avoids the need to choose arbitrary time-to-event and time-to-censoring, while accounting for both interval censoring and competition by death, using a single analytical model.

  20. Hepatitis B and C Co-Infection in HIV Patients from the TREAT Asia HIV Observational Database: Analysis of Risk Factors and Survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Chen

    Full Text Available We assessed the effects of hepatitis B (HBV or hepatitis C (HCV co-infection on outcomes of antiretroviral therapy (ART in HIV-infected patients enrolled in the TREAT Asia HIV Observational Database (TAHOD, a multi-center cohort of HIV-infected patients in the Asia-Pacific region.Patients testing HBs antigen (Ag or HCV antibody (Ab positive within enrollment into TAHOD were considered HBV or HCV co-infected. Factors associated with HBV and/or HCV co-infection were assessed by logistic regression models. Factors associated with post-ART HIV immunological response (CD4 change after six months and virological response (HIV RNA <400 copies/ml after 12 months were also determined. Survival was assessed by the Kaplan-Meier method and log rank test.A total of 7,455 subjects were recruited by December 2012. Of patients tested, 591/5656 (10.4% were HBsAg positive, 794/5215 (15.2% were HCVAb positive, and 88/4966 (1.8% were positive for both markers. In multivariate analysis, HCV co-infection, age, route of HIV infection, baseline CD4 count, baseline HIV RNA, and HIV-1 subtype were associated with immunological recovery. Age, route of HIV infection, baseline CD4 count, baseline HIV RNA, ART regimen, prior ART and HIV-1 subtype, but not HBV or HCV co-infection, affected HIV RNA suppression. Risk factors affecting mortality included HCV co-infection, age, CDC stage, baseline CD4 count, baseline HIV RNA and prior mono/dual ART. Shortest survival was seen in subjects who were both HBV- and HCV-positive.In this Asian cohort of HIV-infected patients, HCV co-infection, but not HBV co-infection, was associated with lower CD4 cell recovery after ART and increased mortality.

  1. Hepatitis B and C Co-Infection in HIV Patients from the TREAT Asia HIV Observational Database: Analysis of Risk Factors and Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Marcelo; Wong, Wing-Wai; Law, Matthew G; Kiertiburanakul, Sasisopin; Yunihastuti, Evy; Merati, Tuti Parwati; Lim, Poh Lian; Chaiwarith, Romanee; Phanuphak, Praphan; Lee, Man Po; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Saphonn, Vonthanak; Ditangco, Rossana; Sim, Benedict L H; Nguyen, Kinh Van; Pujari, Sanjay; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Zhang, Fujie; Pham, Thuy Thanh; Choi, Jun Yong; Oka, Shinichi; Kantipong, Pacharee; Mustafa, Mahiran; Ratanasuwan, Winai; Durier, Nicolas; Chen, Yi-Ming Arthur

    2016-01-01

    We assessed the effects of hepatitis B (HBV) or hepatitis C (HCV) co-infection on outcomes of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in HIV-infected patients enrolled in the TREAT Asia HIV Observational Database (TAHOD), a multi-center cohort of HIV-infected patients in the Asia-Pacific region. Patients testing HBs antigen (Ag) or HCV antibody (Ab) positive within enrollment into TAHOD were considered HBV or HCV co-infected. Factors associated with HBV and/or HCV co-infection were assessed by logistic regression models. Factors associated with post-ART HIV immunological response (CD4 change after six months) and virological response (HIV RNA infection, age, route of HIV infection, baseline CD4 count, baseline HIV RNA, and HIV-1 subtype were associated with immunological recovery. Age, route of HIV infection, baseline CD4 count, baseline HIV RNA, ART regimen, prior ART and HIV-1 subtype, but not HBV or HCV co-infection, affected HIV RNA suppression. Risk factors affecting mortality included HCV co-infection, age, CDC stage, baseline CD4 count, baseline HIV RNA and prior mono/dual ART. Shortest survival was seen in subjects who were both HBV- and HCV-positive. In this Asian cohort of HIV-infected patients, HCV co-infection, but not HBV co-infection, was associated with lower CD4 cell recovery after ART and increased mortality.

  2. Risk Factors for Scleroderma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You are here: Home For Patients Risk Factors Risk Factors for Scleroderma The cause of scleroderma is ... what biological factors contribute to scleroderma pathogenesis. Genetic Risk Scleroderma does not tend to run in families ...

  3. Risk Factors and Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Risk Factors & Prevention Back to Patient Resources Risk Factors & Prevention Even people who look healthy and ... Blood Pressure , high cholesterol, diabetes, and thyroid disease. Risk Factors For Arrhythmias and Heart Disease The following ...

  4. Infeccion urinaria temprana en trasplante renal: Factores de riesgo y efecto en la sobrevida del injerto Early urinary tract infection in kidney transplantation: Risk factors and impact on graft sur-vival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo A. Cepeda

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available La infección urinariatemprana del injerto (IUTI, definida como infección urinaria sintomática en los primeros 3 meses del trasplante, su efecto sobre la sobrevida del injerto y los factores de riesgo han sido poco estudiados. Los objetivos del presente análisis fueron conocer factores de riesgo para IUTI, analizar agentes causantes e impacto en la sobrevida del injerto. En forma retrospectiva se analizaron pacientes que recibieron trasplante renal durante 1997-2000 en el Hospital Privado - Centro Médico de Córdoba. Se dividió en dos grupos de pacientes, según presencia (grupo IUTI o ausencia (grupo control de IUTI. Los factores de riesgo se analizaron con el modelo de riesgos proporcionales de Cox y la sobrevida del injerto con el método de Kaplan-Meier. Recibieron trasplante renal 226 pacientes consecutivos. La IUTI se presentó en 55 (24.3%. Factores de riesgo asociados con IUTI: antecedentes de maniobras urológicas invasivas (RR=4.34, IC 95% 1.42-13.21, diabetes mellitus (RR=3.79, IC 95% 1.42-10.14, infección por citomegalovirus (RR=2.9, IC 95% 1.02-8.24 y antecedente de trasplante previo (RR=2.83, IC 95% 1.08-7.45. El retardo en la función del injerto (RR=0.38, IC 95% 0.15-0.94 se asoció con menor incidencia de IUTI. Agentes más frecuentes: Klebsiella pneumoniae (36%, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (24% y Escherichia coli (9%. La sobrevida del injerto a los 2 años en el grupo IUTI (87.2% no fue diferente del control (81.2%, P = 0.32. En esta serie las maniobras urológicas invasivas fueron el principal factor de riesgo asociado a IUTI. No hubo disminución de la sobrevida del injerto asociada a IUTI. La alta prevalencia de uropatógenos no coli requiere mayor evaluación.The early urinary tract infection (EUTI in kidney transplant recipients is an infection develop during the first 3 months post transplant surgery. The effect of EUTI on graft survival and risk factors have been scarcely studied. Our objetives were the evaluation of

  5. HMSRP Hawaiian Monk Seal Survival Factors

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains records of survival factors recorded by PSD personnel and cooperating scientists as part of the ongoing monk seal population assessment...

  6. Risk factors and survival routes

    OpenAIRE

    Jahnukainen, Markku; Järvinen, Tero

    2005-01-01

    "Social exclusion is a popular and widely used concept in the social sciences as well as in current European policy rhetoric. However, there is no general agreement on the content and use of the term; it has been used differently and for different purposes in different historical and social contexts. In this article, the social exclusion is understood as life-historical phenomenon. Two cases have been selected as representing the most extreme trajectories based on a larger follow-up study con...

  7. Risk Factors and Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Factors & Prevention Back to Patient Resources Risk Factors & Prevention Even people who look healthy and free of ... as possible. Share: The Normal Heart Risk Factors & Prevention Heart Diseases & Disorders Substances & Heart Rhythm Disorders Symptoms & ...

  8. Survivability of systems under multiple factor impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korczak, Edward [Telecommunications Research Institute, Warsaw (Poland); Levitin, Gregory [Israel Electric Corporation Ltd., Haifa (Israel)]. E-mail: levitin@iec.co.il

    2007-02-15

    The paper considers vulnerable multi-state series-parallel systems operating under influence of external impacts. Both the external impacts and internal failures affect system survivability, which is determined as the probability of meeting a given demand. The external impacts are characterized by several destructive factors affecting the system or its parts simultaneously. In order to increase the system's survivability a multilevel protection against the destructive factors can be applied to its subsystems. In such systems, the protected subsystems can be destroyed only if all of the levels of their protection are destroyed. The paper presents an algorithm for evaluating the survivability of series-parallel systems with arbitrary configuration of multilevel protection against multiple destructive factor impacts. The algorithm is based on a composition of Boolean and the Universal Generating Function techniques. Illustrative examples are presented.

  9. High risk bladder cancer : current management and survival

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leliveld-Kors, Anna; Bastiaannet, Esther; Doornweerd, Benjamin H J; Schaapveld, Michael; de Jong, Igle J

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the pattern of care in patients with high risk non muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) in the Comprehensive Cancer Center North-Netherlands (CCCN) and to assess factors associated with the choice of treatment, recurrence and progression free survival rates. Materials and

  10. Survived infancy but still vulnerable: spatial-temporal trends and risk factors for child mortality in rural South Africa (Agincourt), 1992-2007

    OpenAIRE

    Sartorius, Benn; Kahn, Kathleen; COLLINSON, MARK A.; Vounatsou, Penelope; Tollman, Stephen M.

    2011-01-01

    Targeting of health interventions to poor children at highest risk of mortality are promising approaches for promoting equity. Methods have emerged to accurately quantify excess risk and identify space-time disparities. This provides useful and detailed information for guiding policy. A spatial-temporal analysis was performed to identify risk factors associated with child (1-4 years) mortality in rural South Africa (the Agincourt sub-district), to assess temporal changes in child mortality pa...

  11. Survived infancy but still vulnerable: spatial-temporal trends and risk factors for child mortality in the Agincourt rural sub-district, South Africa, 1992-2007

    OpenAIRE

    Benn Sartorius; Kathleen Kahn; COLLINSON, MARK A.; Penelope Vounatsou; Tollman, Stephen M.

    2011-01-01

    Targeting of health interventions to poor children at highest risk of mortality are promising approaches for enhancing equity. Methods have emerged to accurately quantify excess risk and identify space-time disparities. This provides useful and detailed information for guiding policy. A spatio-temporal analysis was performed to identify risk factors associated with child (1-4 years) mortality in the Agincourt sub-district, South Africa, to assess temporal changes in child mortality patterns w...

  12. Survival in common cancers defined by risk and survival of family members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianguang Ji

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Studies on survival between familial and sporadic cancers have been inconclusive and only recent data on a limited number of cancers are available on the concordance of survival between family members. In this review, we address these questions by evaluating the published and unpublished data from the nation-wide Swedish Family-Cancer Database and a total of 13 cancer sites were assessed. Using sporadic cancer as reference, HRs were close to 1.0 for most of the familial cancers in both the offspring and parental generations, which suggested that survival in patients with familial and sporadic cancers was equal, with an exception for ovarian cancer with a worse prognosis. Compared to offspring whose parents had a poor survival, those with a good parental survival had a decreased risk of death for most cancers and HR was significantly decreased for cancers in the breast, prostate, bladder, and kidney. For colorectal and nervous system cancers, favorable survival between the generations showed a borderline significance. These data are consistent in showing that both good and poor survival in certain cancers aggregate in families. Genetic factors are likely to contribute to the results. These observations call for intensified efforts to consider heritability in survival as one mechanism regulating prognosis in cancer patients.

  13. Nutritional factors in ovarian cancer survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandera, Elisa V; Kushi, Lawrence H; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Lorna

    2009-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death from gynecologic malignancies in the United States. Because symptoms tend be nonspecific, early detection is difficult, and most ovarian cancers are diagnosed at an advanced stage when the prognosis is poor. Nonetheless, there is clinical evidence that even given the same tumor characteristics (histologic type, stage, and grade), some cases experience much better survival than others. This has led to extensive research on molecular prognostic factors to enable more efficient and targeted therapeutic regimens. However, little is known about the impact that lifestyle factors, such as diet or physical activity, may have in the prognosis of ovarian cancer, whether on disease-free survival or on the response to and complications from treatment. The role of obesity on ovarian cancer survival is unclear. Obesity may delay diagnosis, hinder optimal surgical and cytotoxic treatment, and cause postoperative complications. As overweight and obesity rates reach epidemic proportions, the impact of body mass index in the clinical management of ovarian cancer is increasingly significant, whereas current evidence of its impact is limited and inconclusive.

  14. Associations with growth factor genes (FGF1, FGF2, PDGFB, FGFR2, NRG2, EGF, ERBB2) with breast cancer risk and survival: the Breast Cancer Health Disparities Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slattery, Martha L; John, Esther M; Stern, Mariana C; Herrick, Jennifer; Lundgreen, Abbie; Giuliano, Anna R; Hines, Lisa; Baumgartner, Kathy B; Torres-Mejia, Gabriela; Wolff, Roger K

    2013-08-01

    Growth factors (GF) stimulate cell proliferation through binding to cell membrane receptors and are thought to be involved in cancer risk and survival. We examined how genetic variation in epidermal growth factor (EGF), neuregulin 2 (NRG2), ERBB2 (HER2/neu), fibroblast growth factors 1 and 2 (FGF1 and FGF2) and its receptor 2 (FGFR2), and platelet-derived growth factor B (PDGFB) independently and collectively influence breast cancer risk and survival. We analyzed data from the Breast Cancer Health Disparities Study which includes Hispanic (2,111 cases, 2,597 controls) and non-Hispanic white (1,481 cases, 1,586 controls) women. Adaptive rank-truncated product (ARTP) analysis was conducted to determine gene significance. Odds ratios (OR) and 95 % confidence intervals were obtained from conditional logistic regression models to estimate breast cancer risk and Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) of dying from breast cancer. We assessed Native American (NA) ancestry using 104 ancestry informative markers. We observed few significant associations with breast cancer risk overall or by menopausal status other than for FGFR2 rs2981582. This SNP was significantly associated with ER+/PR+ (OR 1.66, 95 % CI 1.37-2.00) and ER+/PR- (OR 1.54, 95 % CI 1.03-2.31) tumors. Multiple SNPs in FGF1, FGF2, and NRG2 significantly interacted with multiple SNPs in EGFR, ERBB2, FGFR2, and PDGFB, suggesting that breast cancer risk is dependent on the collective effects of genetic variants in other GFs. Both FGF1 and ERBB2 significantly influenced overall survival, especially among women with low levels of NA ancestry (P ARTP = 0.007 and 0.003, respectively). Our findings suggest that genetic variants in growth factors signaling appear to influence breast cancer risk through their combined effects. Genetic variation in ERBB2 and FGF1 appear to be associated with survival after diagnosis with breast cancer.

  15. Brain Tumor Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professional Meetings Order Materials Clinical Trials Support Group Leader Training Adolescent and Young Adult Guidelines For brain ... nitrites), cigarette smoking, cell phone use, and residential power line exposure, for example—are true risk factors ...

  16. Cancer risk and subsequent survival after hospitalization for intermittent claudication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onega, Tracy; Baron, John A; Johnsen, Søren P; Pedersen, Lars; Farkas, Dóra K; Sørensen, Henrik T

    2015-04-01

    Intermittent claudication, muscle ischemia due to reduced arterial circulation, may be associated with an increased risk of cancer risk and death due to neoplasm-induced hypercoagulability and angiogenesis, or to shared risk factors, but the relation is not well understood. We conducted a population-based cohort study using the Danish National Registry of Patients to identify patients with intermittent claudication from 1980 to 2011 and no history of cancer. We followed these patients for incident cancers using the Danish Cancer Registry and compared cancer incidence among patients with intermittent claudication to that expected in the general population. We also compared the survival of patients with cancer with and without claudication, matched for sex, cancer site, stage, age at diagnosis, and diagnosis year. A total of 53,762 patients with intermittent claudication were identified. We observed 6,270 incident cancers over a total 269,430 years of follow-up (mean, 5.0), compared with 4,306 cancer cases expected [standardized incidence ratio = 1.46; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.42-1.49]. Cancer risk also increased after the exclusion of patients with a prior diagnosis of cerebrovascular disease, myocardial infarction, or diabetes, particularly for tobacco-related cancers. The elevated cancer risk persisted over 10 years of follow-up. For patients with cancer, diagnosis of intermittent claudication within 3 months preceding the cancer diagnosis did not influence survival, but before 3 months, was associated with modestly worse survival (mortality rate ratio = 1.19; 95% CI, 1.14-1.25). Intermittent claudication is associated with an increased risk of cancer and poorer subsequent survival. Clinical attention following intermittent claudication diagnosis may reveal incident cancers. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  17. Acute pancreatitis: analysis of factors influencing survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, M L; Daggett, W M; Civette, J M; Vasu, M A; Lawson, D W; Warshaw, A L; Nardi, G L; Bartlett, M K

    1977-01-01

    Of patients with acute pancreatitis (AP), there remains a group who suffer life-threatening complications despite current modes of therapy. To identify factors which distinguish this group from the entire patient population, a retrospectiva analysis of 519 cases of AP occurring over a 5-year period was undertaken. Thirty-one per cent of these patients had a history of alcoholism and 47% had a history of biliary disease. The overall mortality was 12.9%. Of symptoms and signs recorded at the time of admission, hypotension, tachycardia, fever, abdominal mass, and abnormal examination of the lung fields correlated positively with increased mortality. Seven features of the initial laboratory examination correlated with increased mortality. Shock, massive colloid requirement, hypocalcemia, renal failure, and respiratory failure requiring endotracheal intubation were complications associated with the poorest prognosis. Among patients in this series with three or more of these clinical characteristics, maximal nonoperative treatment yielded a survival rate of 29%, compared to the 64% survival rate for a group of patients treated operatively with cholecystostomy, gastrostomy, feeding jejunostomy, and sump drainage of the lesser sac and retroperitoneum.

  18. Risk Factors for Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padmanesan Narasimhan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The risk of progression from exposure to the tuberculosis bacilli to the development of active disease is a two-stage process governed by both exogenous and endogenous risk factors. Exogenous factors play a key role in accentuating the progression from exposure to infection among which the bacillary load in the sputum and the proximity of an individual to an infectious TB case are key factors. Similarly endogenous factors lead in progression from infection to active TB disease. Along with well-established risk factors (such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, malnutrition, and young age, emerging variables such as diabetes, indoor air pollution, alcohol, use of immunosuppressive drugs, and tobacco smoke play a significant role at both the individual and population level. Socioeconomic and behavioral factors are also shown to increase the susceptibility to infection. Specific groups such as health care workers and indigenous population are also at an increased risk of TB infection and disease. This paper summarizes these factors along with health system issues such as the effects of delay in diagnosis of TB in the transmission of the bacilli.

  19. High risk bladder cancer: current management and survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna M. Leliveld

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the pattern of care in patients with high risk non muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC in the Comprehensive Cancer Center North-Netherlands (CCCN and to assess factors associated with the choice of treatment, recurrence and progression free survival rates. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Retrospective analysis of 412 patients with newly diagnosed high risk NMIBC. Clinical, demographic and follow-up data were obtained from the CCCN Cancer Registry and a detailed medical record review. Uni and multivariate analysis was performed to identify factors related to choice of treatment and 5 year recurrence and progression free survival. RESULTS: 74/412 (18% patients with high risk NMIBC underwent a transurethral resection (TUR as single treatment. Adjuvant treatment after TUR was performed in 90.7% of the patients treated in teaching hospitals versus 71.8 % in non-teaching hospitals (p 80 years OR 0.1 p = 0.001 and treatment in non-teaching hospitals (OR 0.25; p < 0.001 were associated with less adjuvant treatment after TUR. Tumor recurrence occurred in 191/392 (49% and progression in 84 /392 (21.4% patients. The mean 5-years progression free survival was 71.6% (95% CI 65.5-76.8. CONCLUSION: In this pattern of care study in high risk NMIBC, 18% of the patients were treated with TUR as single treatment. Age and treatment in non-teaching hospitals were associated with less adjuvant treatment after TUR. None of the variables sex, age, comorbidity, hospital type, stage and year of treatment was associated with 5 year recurrence or progression rates.

  20. Pathogen survival in chorizos: ecological factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hew, Carrie M; Hajmeer, Maha N; Farver, Thomas B; Riemann, Hans P; Glover, James M; Cliver, Dean O

    2006-05-01

    This study addressed health risks from ethnic sausages produced on a small scale, without inspection, in California and elsewhere. Mexican-style chorizo, a raw pork sausage that is not cured, fermented, or smoked, was contaminated experimentally in the batter with Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, or Salmonella serotypes and stuffed into natural casings. Formulations were based on a market survey in California. Physical parameters that were controlled were pH, water activity (a(w)), and storage temperature. The pH was adjusted with vinegar, stabilizing at 5.0 within 24 h. Initial a(w) levels adjusted with salt were 0.97, 0.95, 0.93, 0.90, and 0.85; levels declined with time because of evaporation. Pathogen numbers declined with storage up to 7 days, with few brief exceptions. Main effects and interactions of constant temperature and pH with declining a(w) on survival of the pathogens were determined. Maximum death rates occurred at higher a(w) for E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella than for L. monocytogenes. Salt used to adjust a(w) affected palatability. Spices (black pepper, chili pepper, chili powder, cumin, garlic, guajillo pepper, oregano, and paprika) comprised another, potentially significant aspect of the sausage formulation. Some (notably black pepper and cumin) carried an indigenous microflora that contributed significantly to the microbial load of the sausage batter. Only undiluted fresh and powdered garlic exhibited a significant antimicrobial effect on the pathogens. Although each of the tested formulations caused death of the inoculated pathogens, none of the death rates was sufficiently rapid to ensure safety within the probable shelf life of the product.

  1. [Laryngeal cancer risk factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurkiewicz, Dariusz; Dzaman, Karolina; Rapiejko, Piotr

    2006-07-01

    Laryngeal cancer is the most common of head and neck cancers. Neoplasm used to develop basing on DNA mutation which leads to uncontrolled growth and cells' division. It is due to spontaneous mutations or influence of chemical, biological and physical factors. Laryngeal cancer generation is conditioned by many synergic factors. Some of them certainly participate in cancer genesis and this thesis is accepted by medical environment and other of them have been discussed giving different information. Definition of the risk factors role in laryngeal cancer etiology is very difficult especially regarding their contemporary occurrence in one person. Most common risk factors are environmental factors, gastroesophageal reflux, viral infections, diet, radiation, individual predisposition. Some of them, such as cigarette smoking and abuse alcohol are significantly oftener confirmed in patients with neoplasm diagnosis and others' role in developing of illness has been still researched. Thus the purpose of the study was to present so far achievements in laryngeal cancer etiology and to emphasize controversies relating to some factors' role in cancer genesis.

  2. [Pathological gambling: risk factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouju, G; Grall-Bronnec, M; Landreat-Guillou, M; Venisse, J-L

    2011-09-01

    In France, consumption of gambling games increased by 148% between 1960 and 2005. In 2004, gamblers lost approximately 0.9% of household income, compared to 0.4% in 1960. This represents approximately 134 Euros per year and per head. In spite of this important increase, the level remains lower than the European average (1%). However, gambling practices may continue to escalate in France in the next few years, particularly with the recent announce of the legalisation of online games and sports betting. With the spread of legalised gambling, pathological gambling rates may increase in France in the next years, in response to more widely available and more attractive gambling opportunities. In this context, there is a need for better understanding of the risk factors that are implicated in the development and maintenance of pathological gambling. This paper briefly describes the major risk factors for pathological gambling by examining the recent published literature available during the first quarter of 2008. This documentary basis was collected by Inserm for the collective expert report procedure on Gambling (contexts and addictions). Seventy-two articles focusing on risk factors for pathological gambling were considered in this review. Only 47 of them were taken into account for analysis. The selection of these 47 publications was based on the guide on literature analysis established by the French National Agency for Accreditation and Assessment in Health (ANAES, 2000). Some publications from more recent literature have also been added, mostly about Internet gambling. We identify three major types of risk factors implicated in gambling problems: some of them are related to the subject (individual factors), others are related to the object of the addiction, here the gambling activity by itself (structural factors), and the last are related to environment (contextual or situational factors). Thus, the development and maintenance of pathological gambling seems to be

  3. Risk Factors for Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen-Hau Chen

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Dementia is a complex human disease. The incidence of dementia among the elderly population is rising rapidly worldwide. In the United States, Alzheimer's disease (AD is the leading type of dementia and was the fifth and eighth leading cause of death in women and men aged ≥ 65 years, respectively, in 2003. In Taiwan and many other counties, dementia is a hidden health issue because of its underestimation in the elderly population. In Western countries, the prevalence of AD increases from 1–3% among people aged 60–64 years to 35% among those aged > 85 years. In Taiwan, the prevalence of dementia for people aged ≥ 65 years was 2–4% by 2000. Therefore, it is important to identify protective and risk factors for dementia to prevent this disease at an early stage. Several factors are related to dementia, e.g. age, ethnicity, sex, genetic factors, physical activity, smoking, drug use, education level, alcohol consumption, body mass index, comorbidity, and environmental factors. In this review, we focus on studies that have evaluated the association between these factors and the risk of dementia, especially AD and vascular dementia. We also suggest future research directions for researchers in dementia-related fields.

  4. Breast cancer risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzena Kamińska

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed neoplastic disease in women around menopause often leading to a significant reduction of these women’s ability to function normally in everyday life. The increased breast cancer incidence observed in epidemiological studies in a group of women actively participating in social and professional life implicates the necessity of conducting multidirectional studies in order to identify risk factors associated with the occurrence of this type of neoplasm. Taking the possibility of influencing the neoplastic transformation process in individuals as a criterion, all the risk factors initiating the process can be divided into two groups. The first group would include inherent factors such as age, sex, race, genetic makeup promoting familial occurrence of the neoplastic disease or the occurrence of benign proliferative lesions of the mammary gland. They all constitute independent parameters and do not undergo simple modification in the course of an individual’s life. The second group would include extrinsic factors conditioned by lifestyle, diet or long-term medical intervention such as using oral hormonal contraceptives or hormonal replacement therapy and their influence on the neoplastic process may be modified to a certain degree. Identification of modifiable factors may contribute to development of prevention strategies decreasing breast cancer incidence.

  5. Role functioning before start of adjuvant treatment was an independent prognostic factor for survival and time to failure. A report from the Nordic adjuvant interferon trial for patients with high-risk melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandberg, Yvonne; Johansson, Hemming; Aamdal, Steinar

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the role of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) at randomization as independent prognostic factors for survival and time to failure, and to explore associations between HRQoL and treatment effects....

  6. SEMI-COMPETING RISKS ON A TRIVARIATE WEIBULL SURVIVAL MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenq-Daw Lee

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available A setting of a trivairate survival function using semi-competing risks concept is proposed, in which a terminal event can only occur after other events. The Stanford Heart Transplant data is reanalyzed using a trivariate Weibull distribution model with the proposed survival function.

  7. Factors affecting survival of Clavibacter michiganesis subsp. sepedonicus in water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, van der J.M.; Beckhoven, van J.R.C.M.

    2004-01-01

    The survival of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus (Cms), the causal organism of bacterial ring rot in potato, was studied in water, to assess the risks for dissemination of Cms via surface water and infection of potato crops by irrigation. Cms was able to survive for a maximum period of 7

  8. In-hospital resuscitation: opioids and other factors influencing survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karamarie Fecho

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Karamarie Fecho1, Freeman Jackson1, Frances Smith1, Frank J Overdyk21Department of Anesthesiology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA; 2Department of Anesthesia and Perioperative Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina, USAPurpose: “Code Blue” is a standard term used to alertt hospital staff that a patient requires resuscitation. This study determined rates of survival from Code Blue events and the role of opioids and other factors on survival.Methods: Data derived from medical records and the Code Blue and Pharmacy databases were analyzed for factors affecting survival.Results: During 2006, rates of survival from the code only and to discharge were 25.9% and 26.4%, respectively, for Code Blue events involving cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR; N = 216. Survival rates for events not ultimately requiring CPR (N = 77 were higher, with 32.5% surviving the code only and 62.3% surviving to discharge. For CPR events, rates of survival to discharge correlated inversely with time to chest compressions and defibrillation, precipitating event, need for airway management, location and age. Time of week, witnessing, postoperative status, gender and opioid use did not influence survival rates. For non-CPR events, opioid use was associated with decreased survival. Survival rates were lowest for patients receiving continuous infusions (P < 0.01 or iv boluses of opioids (P < 0.05.Conclusions: One-quarter of patients survive to discharge after a CPR Code Blue event and two-thirds survive to discharge after a non-CPR event. Opioids may influence survival from non-CPR events.Keywords: code blue, survival, opioids, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, cardiac arrest, patient safety

  9. Survival sex work and increased HIV risk among sexual minority street-involved youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Brandon D L; Shannon, Kate; Kerr, Thomas; Zhang, Ruth; Wood, Evan

    2010-04-01

    Exchanging sex for money, drugs, or other commodities for survival is associated with an array of HIV risks. We sought to determine if street-involved drug-using sexual minority youth are at greater risk for survival sex work and are more likely to engage in risk behaviors with clients. We examined factors associated with survival sex work among participants enrolled in the At Risk Youth Study using logistic regression. Self-reported risk behaviors with clients were also examined. Of 558 participants eligible for this analysis, 75 (13.4%) identified as a sexual minority and 63 (11.3%) reported survival sex work in the past 6 months. Sexual minority males (adjusted odds ratio = 16.1, P exchange sex are urgently required.

  10. Salivary Gland Cancer: Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer > Salivary Gland Cancer: Risk Factors Request Permissions Salivary Gland Cancer: Risk Factors Approved by the Cancer.Net ... f t k e P Types of Cancer Salivary Gland Cancer Guide Cancer.Net Guide Salivary Gland Cancer ...

  11. Overall survival in lower IPSS risk MDS by receipt of iron chelation therapy, adjusting for patient-related factors and measuring from time of first red blood cell transfusion dependence: an MDS-CAN analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitch, Heather A; Parmar, Ambica; Wells, Richard A; Chodirker, Lisa; Zhu, Nancy; Nevill, Thomas J; Yee, Karen W L; Leber, Brian; Keating, Mary-Margaret; Sabloff, Mitchell; St Hilaire, Eve; Kumar, Rajat; Delage, Robert; Geddes, Michelle; Storring, John M; Kew, Andrea; Shamy, April; Elemary, Mohamed; Lenis, Martha; Mamedov, Alexandre; Ivo, Jessica; Francis, Janika; Zhang, Liying; Buckstein, Rena

    2017-10-01

    Analyses suggest iron overload in red blood cell (RBC) transfusion-dependent (TD) patients with myleodysplastic syndrome (MDS) portends inferior overall survival (OS) that is attenuated by iron chelation therapy (ICT) but may be biassed by unbalanced patient-related factors. The Canadian MDS Registry prospectively measures frailty, comorbidity and disability. We analysed OS by receipt of ICT, adjusting for these patient-related factors. TD International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) low and intermediate-1 risk MDS, at RBC TD, were included. Predictive factors for OS were determined. A matched pair analysis considering age, revised IPSS, TD severity, time from MDS diagnosis to TD, and receipt of disease-modifying agents was conducted. Of 239 patients, 83 received ICT; frailty, comorbidity and disability did not differ from non-ICT patients. Median OS from TD was superior in ICT patients (5·2 vs. 2·1 years; P MDS, adjusting for age, frailty, comorbidity, disability, revised IPSS, TD severity, time to TD and receiving disease-modifying agents. This provides additional evidence that ICT may confer clinical benefit. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. [Cardiovascular risk factors in women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cengel, Atiye

    2010-03-01

    It is estimated that at least 80% of patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD) have conventional risk factors and optimization of these risk factors can reduce morbidity and mortality due to this disease considerably. Contemporary women have increased burden of some of these risk factors such as obesity, metabolic syndrome and smoking. Turkish women have a worse CV risk profile than Turkish men in some aspects. Risk stratification systems such as Framingham have a tendency of underestimating the risk in women. Coronary artery disease remains in vessel wall for a longer period of time in women; therefore obstructive disease appear later in their lifespan necessitating risk stratification systems for estimating their lifetime risk.

  13. Risk Factor Assessment Branch (RFAB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Risk Factor Assessment Branch (RFAB) focuses on the development, evaluation, and dissemination of high-quality risk factor metrics, methods, tools, technologies, and resources for use across the cancer research continuum, and the assessment of cancer-related risk factors in the population.

  14. Random survival forests for competing risks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ishwaran, Hemant; Gerds, Thomas A; Kogalur, Udaya B

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a new approach to competing risks using random forests. Our method is fully non-parametric and can be used for selecting event-specific variables and for estimating the cumulative incidence function. We show that the method is highly effective for both prediction and variable selection...... in high-dimensional problems and in settings such as HIV/AIDS that involve many competing risks....

  15. Perinatal risk factors for strabismus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torp-Pedersen, Tobias; Boyd, Heather A; Poulsen, Gry

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about the aetiological factors underlying strabismus. We undertook a large cohort study to investigate perinatal risk factors for strabismus, overall and by subtype.......Little is known about the aetiological factors underlying strabismus. We undertook a large cohort study to investigate perinatal risk factors for strabismus, overall and by subtype....

  16. Risks factoring business: accounting measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z.V. Gutsaylyuk

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper carried out the identification of risk factors for the development of possible accounting software management. Studied theoretical and methodological aspects of the risk classification of factoring operations in the part of the risk assessment factors. It is proposed to consider the risks factors as the risk that is acceptable controlled by accounting instruments and the risks that can not be taken into account in the accounting records. To minimize the risk factor, accounting-driven tools, a method of self-insurance, which is a factor in the creation of provision for factoring transactions designed to cover unexpected expenses and losses. Provision for factoring factor will establish more stable conditions of financial activity and avoid the fluctuations of profit factor in relation to the writing off of losses on factoring operatsіyam.Developed proposals allow for further research to improve the organizational and methodological basis of accounting and analysis of information as a basis for providing risk management factor, particularly in terms of improving the evaluation questions such risks and their qualitative and quantitative analysis.

  17. Factors Affecting Survival of Longleaf Pine Seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    John S. Kush; Ralph S. Meldahl; William D. Boyer

    2004-01-01

    Longleaf pine may be managed most efficiently in large even-aged stands. Past research has shown that the effect of trees surrounding the openings (gaps) or the use of fire is a complicating factor, especially with small openings. Longleaf seedlings are considered more susceptible to fire under and nearer to standing trees, and seedling size, kind of fire, soil type,...

  18. Colorectal cancer survival by stage of cases diagnosed in Mallorca, Spain, between 2006 and 2011 and factors associated with survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, M; Montaño, J; Esteva, M; Barceló, A; Franch, P

    2016-04-01

    To establish cause-specific survival by stage of colorectal cancer up to 8 years from diagnosis, and to identify factors which explain and predict the likelihood of survival. Retrospective follow-up study of people diagnosed with invasive colorectal cancer during 2006-2011, identified through the Mallorca Cancer Registry. DCO and lymphomas were excluded. Sex, age, diagnostic method, site, histology, T, N, M, and stage, date of diagnosis, date of follow-up or death, and cause of death were collected. End point of follow-up was 31st December 2013. Multiple imputation (MI) method was performed to obtain stage when unknown. Actuarial and Kaplan-Meier methods were used for survival analysis. Extended Cox models were built to identify factors that explain and predict survival. 2889 cases were identified, 41.7% in women and 58.3% in men, with a mean age of 70.5 years. Unknown stage represented 15.3% of cases. After MI, 15% were in stage I, 26.7% were in II, 32.7% in III, and 25.6% in IV. Survival was 56% at the end of the 5th year. Survival by stage changed significantly after MI and was estimated to 83% at stage I, 73% at II, 62% at III, and 16% at IV. Extended Cox model showed that survival worsened with age, mucinous histology, and stage. Risk of dying was 17.0 times higher in stage IV compared to stage I, 3.7 times in stage III, and 1.6 times in stage II. More than half of colorectal cancer patients will survive 5 years after diagnosis, but only if diagnosed in stages I-III. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Social and ecological factors influencing offspring survival in wild macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerhoas, Daphne; Perwitasari-Farajallah, Dyah; Agil, Muhammad; Widdig, Anja; Engelhardt, Antje

    2014-09-01

    Premature loss of offspring decreases direct fitness of parents. In gregarious mammals, both ecological and social variables impact offspring survival and may interact with each other in this regard. Although a number of studies have investigated factors influencing offspring loss in mammals, we still know very little on how different factors interact with one another. We therefore investigated fetal and infant mortality in 3 large groups of wild crested macaques (Macaca nigra) over a period of up to 5 years by including potential social causes such as maternal dominance rank, male immigration, between group encounters, and ecological conditions such as rainfall in a multivariate survival analysis using Cox proportional hazards model. Infant but not fetal survival was most impaired after a recent takeover of the alpha-male position by an immigrant male. Furthermore, infant survival probability increased when there was an increase in number of group adult females and rainfall. Fetal survival probability also increased with an increase of these 2 factors, but more in high-ranking than low-ranking females. Fetal survival, unlike that of infants, was also improved by an increase of intergroup encounter rates. Our study thus stresses the importance of survival analyses using a multivariate approach and encompassing more than a single offspring stage to investigate the determinants of female direct fitness. We further provide evidence for fitness costs and benefits of group living, possibly deriving from high pressures of both within- and between-group competition, in a wild primate population.

  20. Risk factors of cardiac allograft vasculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szyguła-Jurkiewicz, Bożena; Szczurek, Wioletta; Gąsior, Mariusz; Zembala, Marian

    2015-12-01

    Despite advances in prevention and treatment of heart transplant rejection, development of cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) remains the leading factor limiting long-term survival of the graft. Cardiac allograft vasculopathy etiopathogenesis is not fully understood, but a significant role is attributed to endothelial cell damage, caused by immunological and non-immunological mechanisms. Immunological factors include the differences between the recipient's and the donor's HLA systems, the presence of alloreactive antibodies and episodes of acute rejection. Among the non-immunological factors the most important are the age of the donor, ischemia-reperfusion injury and cytomegalovirus infection. The classical cardiovascular risk factors (diabetes, hypertension, obesity and hyperlipidemia) are also important. This study presents an up-to-date overview of current knowledge on the vasculopathy etiopathogenesis and the role played by endothelium and inflammatory processes in CAV, and it also investigates the factors which may serve as risk markers of cardiac allograft vasculopathy.

  1. Multiple Weather Factors Affect Apparent Survival of European Passerine Birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salewski, Volker; Hochachka, Wesley M.; Fiedler, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Weather affects the demography of animals and thus climate change will cause local changes in demographic rates. In birds numerous studies have correlated demographic factors with weather but few of those examined variation in the impacts of weather in different seasons and, in the case of migrants, in different regions. Using capture-recapture models we correlated weather with apparent survival of seven passerine bird species with different migration strategies to assess the importance of selected facets of weather throughout the year on apparent survival. Contrary to our expectations weather experienced during the breeding season did not affect apparent survival of the target species. However, measures for winter severity were associated with apparent survival of a resident species, two short-distance/partial migrants and a long-distance migrant. Apparent survival of two short distance migrants as well as two long-distance migrants was further correlated with conditions experienced during the non-breeding season in Spain. Conditions in Africa had statistically significant but relatively minor effects on the apparent survival of the two long-distance migrants but also of a presumably short-distance migrant and a short-distance/partial migrant. In general several weather effects independently explained similar amounts of variation in apparent survival for the majority of species and single factors explained only relatively low amounts of temporal variation of apparent survival. Although the directions of the effects on apparent survival mostly met our expectations and there are clear predictions for effects of future climate we caution against simple extrapolations of present conditions to predict future population dynamics. Not only did weather explains limited amounts of variation in apparent survival, but future demographics will likely be affected by changing interspecific interactions, opposing effects of weather in different seasons, and the potential for

  2. Multiple weather factors affect apparent survival of European passerine birds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volker Salewski

    Full Text Available Weather affects the demography of animals and thus climate change will cause local changes in demographic rates. In birds numerous studies have correlated demographic factors with weather but few of those examined variation in the impacts of weather in different seasons and, in the case of migrants, in different regions. Using capture-recapture models we correlated weather with apparent survival of seven passerine bird species with different migration strategies to assess the importance of selected facets of weather throughout the year on apparent survival. Contrary to our expectations weather experienced during the breeding season did not affect apparent survival of the target species. However, measures for winter severity were associated with apparent survival of a resident species, two short-distance/partial migrants and a long-distance migrant. Apparent survival of two short distance migrants as well as two long-distance migrants was further correlated with conditions experienced during the non-breeding season in Spain. Conditions in Africa had statistically significant but relatively minor effects on the apparent survival of the two long-distance migrants but also of a presumably short-distance migrant and a short-distance/partial migrant. In general several weather effects independently explained similar amounts of variation in apparent survival for the majority of species and single factors explained only relatively low amounts of temporal variation of apparent survival. Although the directions of the effects on apparent survival mostly met our expectations and there are clear predictions for effects of future climate we caution against simple extrapolations of present conditions to predict future population dynamics. Not only did weather explains limited amounts of variation in apparent survival, but future demographics will likely be affected by changing interspecific interactions, opposing effects of weather in different seasons, and

  3. Factors predicting resource utilization and survival after major amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Antonia J; Hevelone, Nathanael D; Hawkins, Alexander T; Watkins, Michael T; Belkin, Michael; Nguyen, Louis L

    2013-03-01

    , 2.60) were risk factors for decreased survival. Factors associated with SES were not significantly related to the outcomes. This study found that RU is high for amputees, and increased RU persists beyond the perioperative period. Results were similar across SES indices, suggesting higher SES may not be protective against poor outcomes when limb salvage is no longer attainable. These findings support the hypothesis that SES disparities may be more modifiable during earlier stages of care for critical limb ischemia. Copyright © 2013. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  4. Colorectal Cancer in Jordan: Survival Rate and Its Related Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharkas, Ghazi Faisal; Arqoub, Kamal H; Khader, Yousef S; Tarawneh, Mohammad R; Nimri, Omar F; Al-Zaghal, Marwan J; Subih, Hadil S

    2017-01-01

    Objectives. To estimate the survival rate of colorectal cancer (CRC) and determine its predictors among Jordanian patients who were diagnosed in the period of 2005-2010. Methods. This study was based on Jordan cancer registry. All CRC cases that were registered in cancer registry during 2005-2010 were analyzed using the survival analysis. The last date for follow-up was 1st Oct 2016. Results. A total of 3005 patients with CRC were registered during 2005-2010. The overall 5-year and 10-year survival rates for patients with CRC were 58.2% and 51.8%, respectively. The 5-year survival rate decreased significantly from 60.4% for the age <50 years to 49.3% for the age ≥70 years (p < 0.005). The 5-year survival rate was 72.1% for the localized stage, 53.8% for the regional stage, and 22.6% for the distant metastasis. In the multivariate analysis, the only factors that were significantly associated with survival were age, grade, stage, and location of tumor. Conclusions. The overall 5-year and ten-year survival rates for CRC were 58.2% and 51.8%, respectively. Increased age, poor differentiation, advanced cancer stage, and right-sided cancers were associated with lower survival rates. Screening strategies are needed for early detection of colon adenomas and colorectal cancer in Jordan.

  5. Colorectal Cancer in Jordan: Survival Rate and Its Related Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghazi Faisal Sharkas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To estimate the survival rate of colorectal cancer (CRC and determine its predictors among Jordanian patients who were diagnosed in the period of 2005–2010. Methods. This study was based on Jordan cancer registry. All CRC cases that were registered in cancer registry during 2005–2010 were analyzed using the survival analysis. The last date for follow-up was 1st Oct 2016. Results. A total of 3005 patients with CRC were registered during 2005–2010. The overall 5-year and 10-year survival rates for patients with CRC were 58.2% and 51.8%, respectively. The 5-year survival rate decreased significantly from 60.4% for the age <50 years to 49.3% for the age ≥70 years (p<0.005. The 5-year survival rate was 72.1% for the localized stage, 53.8% for the regional stage, and 22.6% for the distant metastasis. In the multivariate analysis, the only factors that were significantly associated with survival were age, grade, stage, and location of tumor. Conclusions. The overall 5-year and ten-year survival rates for CRC were 58.2% and 51.8%, respectively. Increased age, poor differentiation, advanced cancer stage, and right-sided cancers were associated with lower survival rates. Screening strategies are needed for early detection of colon adenomas and colorectal cancer in Jordan.

  6. Factors affecting survival in young alpacas (Lama pacos).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustinza, A V; Burfening, P J; Blackwell, R L

    1988-05-01

    Factors affecting survival of young from birth to weaning (7 mo) in alpacas (Lama pacos) were evaluated in data collected at the Estacion Experimental de Camelidos Sudamericanos La Raya in the Altiplano region of Peru. Age of dam effects on survival rate were curvilinear; survival rate increased from approximately 78% for offspring of 3-yr-old dams to about 91% for those from 9- to 11-yr-old dams, then declined to about 85% for 15-yr-old dams. Weight of dam measured 2 mo prior to parturition was associated negatively with survival of the young (b = -.7%/kg). Alpaca born early in the season of birth had a higher survival rate than those born late; the regression of survival on birth date was -.2%/d. Survival rates were curvilinearly related with birth weight and were highest at weights of 9 to 11 kg (90%) and lowest at weights of 4 to 5 kg (20% to 40%). The estimated heritabilities of survival and birth weight were .10 +/- .17 and .34 +/- .23, weight was -.18 +/- .82; the corresponding environmental and phenotypic correlations were positive (.37 and .26, respectively).

  7. Medulloblastoma in adulthood: prognostic factors influencing survival and recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragonés, M P; Magallón, R; Piqueras, C; Ley, L; Vaquero, J; Bravo, G

    1994-01-01

    Thirty adult patients presenting with medulloblastoma between 1974 and 1991 were studied and treated at Puerta de Hierro Clinic. After diagnosis, all patients were treated by surgery followed by radiotherapy and eight of them received adjuvant chemotherapy. We have studied the influence of some factors such as age, sex, location of tumour in the cerebellum, amount of surgical resection and histological variants on survival and recurrence of the disease. Only the histological type has a statistically significant influence on survival and recurrence: we have found that patients presenting classic medulloblastoma have a long survival and a long relapse-free interval.

  8. The Geriatric Nutritional Risk Index Predicts Survival in Elderly Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Patients with Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, Yacong; Wang, Kunlun; Liu, Yang; You, Jie; Cui, Han; Zhu, Yiwei; Lu, Quanjun; Yuan, Ling

    2016-01-01

    The impact of nutritional status on survival among elderly esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) patients undergoing radiotherapy is unclear. In this study, we aimed at validating the performance of the geriatric nutritional risk index (GNRI) in predicting overall survival time in elderly ESCC patients with radiotherapy. A retrospective cohort study was conducted on 239 ESCC patients aged 60 and over admitted consecutively from January 2008 to November 2014 in the Department of Radiotherapy, Henan Tumor Hospital (Affiliated Tumor Hospital of Zhengzhou University), Zhengzhou, Henan, China. All patients were subjected to nutritional screening using GNRI, and were followed for the occurrence of lymphatic node metastasis, radiation complication and mortality. The Kaplan-Meier method with Log-rank test was used to estimate survival curves. Univariable Cox regression analysis was used to identify variables associated with overall survival time. Among the 239 patients, 184 patients (76.9%) took no nutritional risk, 32 patients (13.4%) took moderate risk of malnutrition, and 23 patients (9.7%) took a high risk of malnutrition. Univariable Cox regression showed that both high nutritional risk group and moderate nutritional risk group were significantly less likely to survive than no nutritional risk patients (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.688, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.019-2.798 for moderate risk group, and HR = 2.699, 95% CI = 1.512-4.819 for high risk group, respectively). The GNRI is an independent prognostic factor for overall survival time in elderly ESCC patients with radiotherapy. A GNRI ≤98 can be suggested as an indicator of surviving less.

  9. Managing Multiple Risk Factors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lollis, Charlie

    1998-01-01

    ...) contribute to the racial differences in cardiovascular risk and events among women. High levels of socioeconomic stress, higher dietary fat intake and sedentary lifestyle are more prevalent among black than white women...

  10. Stroke Risk Factors and Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Version » [ pdf, 433 kb ] Order Materials » Stroke Risk Factors and Symptoms Risk Factors for a Stroke Stroke prevention is ... and can be treated with drugs or surgery. Symptoms of a Stroke If you see or have one or more ...

  11. Proton pump inhibitors on pancreatic cancer risk and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearns, Malcolm D; Boursi, Ben; Yang, Yu-Xiao

    2017-02-01

    Hypergastrinemia may promote the development and progression of pancreatic cancer. Proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy is known to cause hypergastrinemia. We sought to determine the association between PPI therapy and the risk of developing pancreatic cancer as well as survival following pancreatic cancer diagnosis. We conducted a nested case-control study and a retrospective cohort study in The Health Improvement Network (THIN), a medical records database representative of the UK population. In the case-control study, each patient with incident pancreatic cancer was matched with up to four controls based on age, sex, practice site and both duration and calendar time of follow-up using incidence density sampling. The odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for pancreatic cancer risk associated with PPI use were estimated using multivariable conditional logistic regression. The retrospective cohort study compared the survival of pancreatic cancer patients according to their PPI exposure at the time of diagnosis. The effect of PPI use on pancreatic cancer survival was assessed using a multivariable Cox regression analysis. The case-control study included 4113 cases and 16,072 matched controls. PPI use was more prevalent in cases than controls (53% vs. 26% active users). Adjusting for diabetes, smoking, alcohol use and BMI, PPI users including both former users and active users with longer cumulative PPI use had a higher risk of pancreatic cancer compared to non-users. When assessing survival following pancreatic cancer diagnosis, only short-term, active users had a modest decrease in survival. Long-term PPI therapy may be associated with pancreatic cancer risk. While PPI users recently started on treatment had a slightly worse survival, this result likely is from reverse causation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate and Risk of Survival in Acute ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To assess the risk of survival in acute stroke using the MDRD equation derived estimated glomerular filtration rate. Design: A prospective observational cross-sectional study. Setting: Medical wards of a tertiary care hospital. Subjects: Eighty three acute stroke patients had GFR calculated within 48 hours of ...

  13. Individual survival curves comparing subjective and observed mortality risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissonnette, Luc; Hurd, Michael D; Michaud, Pierre-Carl

    2017-12-01

    We compare individual survival curves constructed from objective (actual mortality) and elicited subjective information (probability of survival to a given target age). We develop a methodology to estimate jointly subjective and objective individual survival curves accounting for rounding on subjective reports of perceived survival. We make use of the long follow-up period in the Health and Retirement Study and the high quality of mortality data to estimate individual survival curves that feature both observed and unobserved heterogeneity. This allows us to compare objective and subjective estimates of remaining life expectancy for various groups and compare welfare effects of objective and subjective mortality risk using the life cycle model of consumption. We find that subjective and objective hazards are not the same. The median welfare loss from misperceptions of mortality risk when annuities are not available is 7% of current wealth at age 65 whereas more than 25% of respondents have losses larger than 60% of wealth. When annuities are available and exogenously given, the welfare loss is substantially lower. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Important prognostic factors for the long-term survival of lung cancer subjects in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ko Albert

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study used a large-scale cancer database in determination of prognostic factors for the survival of lung cancer subjects in Taiwan. Methods Total of 24,910 subjects diagnosed with lung cancer was analysed. Survival estimates by Kaplan-Meier methods. Cox proportional-hazards model estimated the death risk (hazard ratio (HR for various prognostic factors. Results The prognostic indicators associated with a higher risk of lung cancer deaths are male gender (males versus females; HR = 1.07, 95% confidence intervals (CI: 1.03–1.11, males diagnosed in later periods (shown in 1991–1994 versus 1987–1990; HR = 1.13, older age at diagnosis, large cell carcinoma (LCC/small cell carcinoma (SCC, and supportive care therapy over chemotherapy. The overall 5-year survival rate for lung cancer death was significantly poorer for males (21.3% than females (23.6%. Subjects with squamous cell carcinoma (SQCC and treatment by surgical resection alone had better prognosis. We find surgical resections to markedly increase 5-year survival rate from LCC, decreased risk of death from LCC, and no improved survival from SCC. Conclusion Gender and clinical characteristics (i.e. diagnostic period, diagnostic age, histological type and treatment modality play important roles in determining lung cancer survival.

  15. Risk Prediction of One-Year Mortality in Patients with Cardiac Arrhythmias Using Random Survival Forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Fen; Cai, Yun-Peng; Zhang, Yu-Xiao; Li, Ye; Zhang, Yuan-Ting

    2015-01-01

    Existing models for predicting mortality based on traditional Cox proportional hazard approach (CPH) often have low prediction accuracy. This paper aims to develop a clinical risk model with good accuracy for predicting 1-year mortality in cardiac arrhythmias patients using random survival forest (RSF), a robust approach for survival analysis. 10,488 cardiac arrhythmias patients available in the public MIMIC II clinical database were investigated, with 3,452 deaths occurring within 1-year followups. Forty risk factors including demographics and clinical and laboratory information and antiarrhythmic agents were analyzed as potential predictors of all-cause mortality. RSF was adopted to build a comprehensive survival model and a simplified risk model composed of 14 top risk factors. The built comprehensive model achieved a prediction accuracy of 0.81 measured by c-statistic with 10-fold cross validation. The simplified risk model also achieved a good accuracy of 0.799. Both results outperformed traditional CPH (which achieved a c-statistic of 0.733 for the comprehensive model and 0.718 for the simplified model). Moreover, various factors are observed to have nonlinear impact on cardiac arrhythmias prognosis. As a result, RSF based model which took nonlinearity into account significantly outperformed traditional Cox proportional hazard model and has great potential to be a more effective approach for survival analysis.

  16. Environmental risk factors for autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietert, Rodney R.; Dietert, Janice M.; Dewitt, Jamie C.

    2010-01-01

    Autism is a devastating childhood condition that has emerged as an increasing social concern just as it has increased in prevalence in recent decades. Autism and the broader category of autism spectrum disorders are among the increasingly seen examples in which there is a fetal basis for later disease or disorder. Environmental, genetic, and epigenetic factors all play a role in determining the risk of autism and some of these effects appear to be transgenerational. Identification of the most critical windows of developmental vulnerability is paramount to understanding when and under what circumstances a child is at elevated risk for autism. No single environmental factor explains the increased prevalence of autism. While a handful of environmental risk factors have been suggested based on data from human studies and animal research, it is clear that many more, and perhaps the most significant risk factors, remain to be identified. The most promising risk factors identified to date fall within the categories of drugs, environmental chemicals, infectious agents, dietary factors, and other physical/psychological stressors. However, the rate at which environmental risk factors for autism have been identified via research and safety testing has not kept pace with the emerging health threat posed by this condition. For the way forward, it seems clear that additional focused research is needed. But more importantly, successful risk reduction strategies for autism will require more extensive and relevant developmental safety testing of drugs and chemicals. PMID:24149029

  17. Cardiovascular risk factors in men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gyllenborg, J; Rasmussen, S L; Borch-Johnsen, Knut

    2001-01-01

    Males have higher risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) than premenopausal females. Gonadal steroids are probably involved in the gender difference in CVD, but previous results have been conflicting. We investigated the associations between CVD risk factors and sex hormones in a cross-sectional de......Males have higher risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) than premenopausal females. Gonadal steroids are probably involved in the gender difference in CVD, but previous results have been conflicting. We investigated the associations between CVD risk factors and sex hormones in a cross...

  18. Time Course of Risk Factors in Cancer Etiology and Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Esther K.; Wolin, Kathleen Y.; Colditz, Graham A.

    2010-01-01

    Patients with cancer increasingly ask what they can do to change their lifestyles and improve outcomes. Risk factors for onset of cancer may differ substantially from those that modify survival with implications for counseling. This review focuses on recent data derived from population-based studies of causes of cancer and of patients with cancer to contrast risk factors for etiology with those that impact survival. For different cancer sites, the level of information to inform the timing of lifestyle exposures and risk of disease onset or progression after diagnosis is often limited. For breast cancer, timing of some exposures, such as radiation, is particularly important. For other exposures, such as physical activity, higher levels may prevent onset and also improve survival. For colon cancer, study of precursor polyps has provided additional insight to timing. Extensive data indicate that physical activity reduces risk of colon cancer, and more limited data suggest that exposure after diagnosis improves survival. Dietary factors including folate and calcium may also reduce risk of onset. More limited data on prostate cancer point to obesity increasing risk of aggressive or advanced disease. Timing of change in lifestyle for change in risk of onset and for survival is important but understudied among patients with cancer. Counseling patients with cancer to increase physical activity and avoid weight gain may improve outcomes. Advice to family members on lifestyle may become increasingly important for breast and other cancers where family history is a strong risk factor. PMID:20644083

  19. Surviving a cluster collapse: risk aversion as a core value

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schiele, Holger; Hospers, Gerrit J.; van der Zee, D.J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose – This paper analyses firms, which survived in a collapsed regional cluster. The target is to analyze whether the principles for enduring success identified researching success factors of very old firms also apply in such an environment. Design/methodology/approach – The authors conduct a

  20. [Survival pronostic factors in Mexican patients with multiforme glioblastoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Reyna, Ricardo; Medellín-Sánchez, Roberto; Cerda-Flores, Ricardo M; Calderón-Garcidueñas, Ana Laura

    2010-01-01

    To study the pre- and transoperative factors that influence patients' survival with GM. Clinical and pathological records of all confirmed cases of GM diagnosed between 2000 and 2006 were included. Postoperative survival was divided in less or more than 8 months. χ2 test was used. One hundred and twenty patients (45 women and 75 men) were studied. Age range was from 7 to 85 years, 3.3% were 16 years old or younger and 12.5% were 70 years old or older. Headache was the most frequent complain, 40 patients developed hemiparesia and 6 had parestesias. Predominance of white matter hemispheric lesions was observed: right hemispheric tumors 65 (54%), left lesions 30 (25%) and bilateral tumors 7%. Histologically, 1.6% of GM had a sarcomatous component; 35% of patients survived less than 8 months. A difference between patients survival was the preoperative Karnofsky Performance Scale Score and the degree of cerebral edema during the surgical procedure. Pre-operative Karnofsky evaluation and edema during the surgical procedure were significant prognostic factors for survival.

  1. Hidden Risk Factors for Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A.S.T. Quiz Hidden Stroke Risk Factors for Women Updated:Nov 22,2016 Excerpted from "What Women ... Cerebral Aneurysms 7 Types of Aphasia 8 Brain Stem Stroke 9 Cognitive Challenges After Stroke 10 Personality ...

  2. Risk factors of placental abruption

    OpenAIRE

    Ghaheh, Hooria Seyedhosseini; Feizi, Awat; Mousavi, Maryam; Sohrabi, Davood; Mesghari, Leila; Hosseini, Zahra

    2013-01-01

    Background: Placental abruption is one of the most common causes of bleeding during pregnancy. Multiple factors are known to be associated with increase of risk of placental abruption such as alcohol, cocaine use and cigarette smoking. The objective of this study was to identify risk factors for placental abruption in an Iranian women population. Materials and Methods: In a retrospective case ? control study birth records included 78 cases with placental abruption and 780 randomly selected co...

  3. Early survival factor deprivation in the olfactory epithelium enhances activity-dependent survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrien eFrançois

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The neuronal olfactory epithelium undergoes permanent renewal because of environmental aggression. This renewal is partly regulated by factors modulating the level of neuronal apoptosis. Among them, we had previously characterized endothelin as neuroprotective. In this study, we explored the effect of cell survival factor deprivation in the olfactory epithelium by intranasal delivery of endothelin receptors antagonists to rat pups. This treatment induced an overall increase of apoptosis in the olfactory epithelium. The responses to odorants recorded by electroolfactogram were decreased in treated animal, a result consistent with a loss of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs. However, the treated animal performed better in an olfactory orientation test based on maternal odor compared to non-treated littermates. This improved performance could be due to activity-dependent neuronal survival of OSNs in the context of increased apoptosis level. In order to demonstrate it, we odorized pups with octanal, a known ligand for the rI7 olfactory receptor (Olr226. We quantified the number of OSN expressing rI7 by RT-qPCR and whole mount in situ hybridization. While this number was reduced by the survival factor removal treatment, this reduction was abolished by the presence of its ligand. This improved survival was optimal for low concentration of odorant and was specific for rI7-expressing OSNs. Meanwhile, the number of rI7-expressing OSNs was not affected by the odorization in non-treated littermates; showing that the activity-dependant survival of OSNs did not affect the OSN population during the 10 days of odorization in control conditions. Overall, our study shows that when apoptosis is promoted in the olfactory mucosa, the activity-dependent neuronal plasticity allows faster tuning of the olfactory sensory neuron population towards detection of environmental odorants.

  4. Early survival factor deprivation in the olfactory epithelium enhances activity-driven survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    François, Adrien; Laziz, Iman; Rimbaud, Stéphanie; Grebert, Denise; Durieux, Didier; Pajot-Augy, Edith; Meunier, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    The neuronal olfactory epithelium undergoes permanent renewal because of environmental aggression. This renewal is partly regulated by factors modulating the level of neuronal apoptosis. Among them, we had previously characterized endothelin as neuroprotective. In this study, we explored the effect of cell survival factor deprivation in the olfactory epithelium by intranasal delivery of endothelin receptors antagonists to rat pups. This treatment induced an overall increase of apoptosis in the olfactory epithelium. The responses to odorants recorded by electroolfactogram were decreased in treated animal, a result consistent with a loss of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). However, the treated animal performed better in an olfactory orientation test based on maternal odor compared to non-treated littermates. This improved performance could be due to activity-dependent neuronal survival of OSNs in the context of increased apoptosis level. In order to demonstrate it, we odorized pups with octanal, a known ligand for the rI7 olfactory receptor (Olr226). We quantified the number of OSN expressing rI7 by RT-qPCR and whole mount in situ hybridization. While this number was reduced by the survival factor removal treatment, this reduction was abolished by the presence of its ligand. This improved survival was optimal for low concentration of odorant and was specific for rI7-expressing OSNs. Meanwhile, the number of rI7-expressing OSNs was not affected by the odorization in non-treated littermates; showing that the activity-dependant survival of OSNs did not affect the OSN population during the 10 days of odorization in control conditions. Overall, our study shows that when apoptosis is promoted in the olfactory mucosa, the activity-dependent neuronal plasticity allows faster tuning of the olfactory sensory neuron population toward detection of environmental odorants. PMID:24399931

  5. Cardiovascular risk factors in men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gyllenborg, J; Rasmussen, S L; Borch-Johnsen, Knut

    2001-01-01

    Males have higher risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) than premenopausal females. Gonadal steroids are probably involved in the gender difference in CVD, but previous results have been conflicting. We investigated the associations between CVD risk factors and sex hormones in a cross...

  6. Estimating haplotype relative risks on human survival in population-based association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Qihua; Christiansen, Lene; Bathum, Lise; Zhao, Jing Hua; Yashin, Anatoli I; Vaupel, James W; Christensen, Kaare; Kruse, Torben A

    2005-01-01

    Association-based linkage disequilibrium (LD) mapping is an increasingly important tool for localizing genes that show potential influence on human aging and longevity. As haplotypes contain more LD information than single markers, a haplotype-based LD approach can have increased power in detecting associations as well as increased robustness in statistical testing. In this paper, we develop a new statistical model to estimate haplotype relative risks (HRRs) on human survival using unphased multilocus genotype data from unrelated individuals in cross-sectional studies. Based on the proportional hazard assumption, the model can estimate haplotype risk and frequency parameters, incorporate observed covariates, assess interactions between haplotypes and the covariates, and investigate the modes of gene function. By introducing population survival information available from population statistics, we are able to develop a procedure that carries out the parameter estimation using a nonparametric baseline hazard function and estimates sex-specific HRRs to infer gene-sex interaction. We also evaluate the haplotype effects on human survival while taking into account individual heterogeneity in the unobserved genetic and nongenetic factors or frailty by introducing the gamma-distributed frailty into the survival function. After model validation by computer simulation, we apply our method to an empirical data set to measure haplotype effects on human survival and to estimate haplotype frequencies at birth and over the observed ages. Results from both simulation and model application indicate that our survival analysis model is an efficient method for inferring haplotype effects on human survival in population-based association studies.

  7. [Prognostic factors in renal cancer with venous thrombus survival analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual-Fernández, Angela; Calleja-Escudero, Jesús; Gómez de Segura, Cristina; Pesquera-Ortega, Laura; Taylor, James; Fajardo, José Antonio; González de Zárate, Javier; Monllor-Gisbert, Jesús; Cortiñas-González, José Ramón

    2017-07-01

    To analyze surgery for renal cancer with venous thrombus at different levels, perioperative complications and prognostic factors associated to overall, cancer-specific and disease-free survival. Retrospective analysis of 42 cases of renal cancer with venous thrombus performed between 2005 and 2015. The level reached by the thrombus was established according to the Mayo Clinic classification. Postoperative complications were staged according to Clavien-Dindo classification. Most frequent in males. Mean age 65.7 years. 16.6% were tumors with level II thrombus. Subcostal approach was performed in 58.9%. Extracorporeal circulation with cardiac arrest and hypothermia was established in 2 patients. Resection of metastatic disease was performed in 3 patients during radical nephrectomy. Reoperation was 2.3% while, perioperative mortality was 4.7%. 30% presented with metastases at diagnosis. Twenty patients progressed at 15.5 months (3-55). Overall survival was 60 months. The cancer-specific mortality was 75%. Disease-free survival was 30% at 55 months. Surgical treatment of renal cancer with venous thrombus requires a multidisciplinary management. The surgical technique varies according to the level reached by the venous thrombus. Tumor stage is the most important prognostic factor. Thrombus level influences prognosis, with longer survival for patients with tumor thrombus confined to the renal vein (pT3a) in comparison to tumors with thrombus in the atrium (pT3c).

  8. Methodological considerations for disentangling a risk factor's influence on disease incidence versus postdiagnosis survival: The example of obesity and breast and colorectal cancer mortality in the Women's Health Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cespedes Feliciano, Elizabeth M; Prentice, Ross L; Aragaki, Aaron K; Neuhouser, Marian L; Banack, Hailey R; Kroenke, Candyce H; Ho, Gloria Y F; Zaslavsky, Oleg; Strickler, Howard D; Cheng, Ting-Yuan David; Chlebowski, Rowan T; Saquib, Nazmus; Nassir, Rami; Anderson, Garnet; Caan, Bette J

    2017-12-01

    Often, studies modeling an exposure's influence on time to disease-specific death from study enrollment are incorrectly interpreted as if based on time to death from disease diagnosis. We studied 151,996 postmenopausal women without breast or colorectal cancer in the Women's Health Initiative with weight and height measured at enrollment (1993-1998). Using Cox regression models, we contrast hazard ratios (HR) from two time-scales and corresponding study subpopulations: time to cancer death after enrollment among all women and time to cancer death after diagnosis among only cancer survivors. Median follow-up from enrollment to diagnosis/censoring was 13 years for both breast (7,633 cases) and colorectal cancer (2,290 cases). Median follow-up from diagnosis to death/censoring was 7 years for breast and 5 years for colorectal cancer. In analyses of time from enrollment to death, body mass index (BMI) ≥ 35 kg/m2 versus 18.5-cancer mortality: HR = 1.99; 95% CI: 1.54, 2.56 for breast cancer (p trend colorectal cancer (p trend = 0.05). However, in analyses of time from diagnosis to cancer death, trends indicated no significant association (for BMI ≥ 35 kg/m2 , HR = 1.25; 95% CI: 0.94, 1.67 for breast [p trend = 0.33] and HR = 1.18; 95% CI: 0.84, 1.86 for colorectal cancer [p trend = 0.39]). We conclude that a risk factor that increases disease incidence will increase disease-specific mortality. Yet, its influence on postdiagnosis survival can vary, and requires consideration of additional design and analysis issues such as selection bias. Quantitative tools allow joint modeling to compare an exposure's influence on time from enrollment to disease incidence and time from diagnosis to death. © 2017 UICC.

  9. Does stage of cancer, comorbidity or lifestyle factors explain educational differences in survival after endometrial cancer?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seidelin, Ulla Holten; Ibfelt, Else; Andersen, Ingelise

    2016-01-01

    .11–1.67). Conclusion: Early detection in all educational groups might reduce social inequalities in survival, however, the unexplained increased risk for death after adjustment for prognostic factors, warrants increased attention to patients with short education in all age groups throughout treatment......Background: Several studies have documented an association between socioeconomic position and survival from gynaecological cancer, but the mechanisms are unclear. Objective: The aim of this study was to examine the association between level of education and survival after endometrial cancer among...... Danish women; and whether differences in stage at diagnosis and comorbidity contribute to the educational differences in survival. Methods: Women with endometrial cancer diagnosed between 2005 and 2009 were identified in the Danish Gynaecological Cancer Database, with information on clinical...

  10. Obesity and head and neck cancer risk and survival by human papillomavirus serology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xinmiao; Nelson, Heather H; Langevin, Scott M; McClean, Michael; Marsit, Carmen J; Waterboer, Tim; Pawlita, Michael; Kelsey, Karl T; Michaud, Dominique S

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies examining the association of body mass index (BMI) with risk of and survival from head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) have been inconsistent, although an inverse association has been noted for obesity and risk of HNSCC in several studies. Previous studies have not examined whether these associations differ by human papillomavirus (HPV) status. We utilized the resources of a population-based case-control study of HNSCC from the greater Boston area (959 cases and 1,208 controls were eligible for this analysis). Anthropometric history was collected through personal interviews, and HPV status was assessed using serology. We analyzed the association between BMI (assessed 5 years prior to disease incidence) and disease risk and survival using logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards regression, respectively. After adjusting for known risk factors, the association between obesity and overall risk of HNSCC was not significant (OR 0.79, 95 % CI 0.60-1.04). However, obesity (BMI ≥30 kg/m(2)) was inversely associated with HNSCC risk among HPV-seronegative cases (OR 0.48, 95 % CI 0.32-0.70), but not among HPV-seropositive cases (OR 0.91, 95 % CI 0.68-1.21). BMI was not associated with survival overall or by HPV status. However, being overweight (BMI 25-29.9 kg/m(2)) was associated with longer survival among HPV-seropositive smokers (HR 0.48, 95 % CI 0.31-0.74). Our findings are consistent with previous observations that obesity is inversely associated with the risk of HNSCC; however, this association appears to be confined to HPV-seronegative cases. Overall, obesity was not associated with HNSCC survival overall or by HPV status. Obesity is associated with risk of non-HPV HNSCC, but not HPV HNSCC.

  11. Risk factors for congenital hydrocephalus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch, Tina Noergaard; Rasmussen, Marie-Louise Hee; Wohlfahrt, Jan

    2014-01-01

    . Furthermore, to identify the risk factors unique for isolated CHC as compared to syndromic CHC. METHODS: We established a cohort of all children born in Denmark between 1978 and 2008. Information on CHC and maternal medical diseases were obtained from the National Patient Discharge Register, maternal intake...... of medicine during pregnancy from the National Prescription Drug Register, and birth characteristics of the child from the Danish National Birth Register. Rate ratios (RR) of isolated and syndromic CHC with 95% CI were estimated using log-linear Poisson regression. RESULTS: In a cohort of 1928666 live...... increased risk of isolated CHC compared to unexposed children (RR 2.52, 95% CI 1.47 to 4.29) (1.5/1000 born children). Risk factors also found for syndromic CHC were: Male gender, multiples and maternal diabetes. CONCLUSIONS: The higher risk for isolated CHC in first-born children as well as behavioural...

  12. Factors Predicting Survival after Transarterial Chemoembolization of Unresectable Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farina M. Hanif

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Transarterial chemoembolization is the preferred treatment for unresectable, intermediate-stage hepatocellular carcinoma. Survival after transarterial chemoembolization can be highly variable. The purpose of this study is to identify the factors that predict overall survival of patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma who undergo transarterial chemoembolization as the initial therapy. Methods:We included patients who underwent transarterial chemoembolization from 2007 to 2012 in this study. Patient’s age, gender, cause of cirrhosis, Child-Turcotte-Pugh score, model of end-stage liver disease score, Cancer of the Liver Italian Program score, Okuda stage, alpha- fetoprotein level, site, size and number of tumors were recorded. Radiological response to transarterial chemoembolization was assessed by computerized tomography scan at 1 and 3 months after the procedure. Repeat sessions of transarterial chemoembolization were performed according to the response. We performed survival assessment and all patients were assessed for survival at the last follow-up. Results: Included in this study were 71 patients of whom there were 57 (80.3 % males, with a mean age of 51.9±12.1 years (range: 18-76 years. The mean follow-up period was 12.5±10.7 months. A total of 31 (43.7% patients had only one session of transarterial chemoembolization, 17 (23.9% underwent 2 and 11 (15.5% had 3 or more sessions. On univariate analysis, significant factors that predicted survival included serum bilirubin (P=0.02, esophageal varices (P=0.002, Cancer of the Liver Italian Program score (P=0.003, tumor size (P=0.005, >3 sessions of transarterial chemoembolization (P=0.006 and patient's age (P=0.001. Cox regression analysis showed that tumor size of 1 transarterial chemoembolization session (P=0.004 were associated with better survival. Conclusion: Our study demonstrates that survival after transarterial chemoem- bolization is predicted by tumor size

  13. Prognostic Factors and Survival in Pediatric and Adolescent Liposarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric J. Stanelle

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Liposarcoma is extremely rare in the pediatric population. To identify prognostic factors and determine treatment outcomes, we reviewed our institutional experience with pediatric liposarcoma. Methods. We retrospectively reviewed all pediatric patients (age <22 years with confirmed liposarcoma treated at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Histologic subtype, tumor location, margin status, recurrence, and adjuvant therapy were analyzed and correlated with overall survival. Results. Thirty-four patients (56% male with a median age of 18.1 years were identified. Twenty-two (65% had peripheral tumors and 12 (35% had centrally located tumors. Histologically, 29 (85% tumors were low grade, and 5 (15% were high grade pleomorphic. Eleven (32% had recurrent disease, 9 patients with central tumors and 2 patients with peripheral lesions. Eight deaths occurred, all in patients with central disease. Five-year overall survival was 78%, with a median follow-up time of 5.4 years (range, 0.3–30.3 years. Tumor grade (=.003, histologic subtype (=.01, and primary location (<.001 all correlated with survival, as did stage (<.001 and margin status (=.001. Conclusions. Central location of the primary tumor, high tumor grade, and positive surgical margins are strongly correlated with poor survival in pediatric patients with liposarcoma.

  14. Fatores de risco para óbito em unidade de terapia intensiva neonatal, utilizando a técnica de análise de sobrevida Risk factors for neonatal death in neonatal intensive care unit according to survival analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana de Paula Risso

    2010-03-01

    ; hospitalar variables: report of mechanical ventilation, positive pressure ventilation, reports of prolonged parenteral nutrition, sepsis, intubation, cardiac massage, phototherapy, hyaline membrane disease, oxygen and fraction of inspired oxygen. It was built a model in three hierarchical levels for the survival analysis by the Cox model; it was used the software Stata v9 and the final model contained variables with p <0.05. The risks were estimated by measure effect known as hazard ratio (HR with confidence intervals of 95%. The newborns transferred during hospitalization to another service were excluded from the study. RESULTS: There were admitted during the study period 495 newborns, with 129 deaths (26.1%. In the final model, only the variables of steroid use (HR 1.64, 95% CI 1.02-2.70, malformation (HR 1.93, CI 95% 1,05-2,88, very low birth weight (HR 4.28, 95% CI 2,79-6,57 and Apgar scores lower than seven of no1 min (HR 1.87, 95% CI 1,19-2,93 and 5 min (HR 1.74, 95% CI 1,05-2,88 and the variables phototherapy (HR 0.34; 95% CI 0,22-0,53 and endotracheal intubation (HR 2.28, 95% CI 1 .41-3, 70. CONCLUSION: Factors related primarily to the newborn and the hospitalar internment (except therapy with corticosteroids were identified as associated to mortality highlighting a possible protective factor of phototherapy and the risk of infants with very low birth weight.

  15. Factors predicting survival in ALS: a multicenter Italian study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, Andrea; Moglia, Cristina; Lunetta, Christian; Marinou, Kalliopi; Ticozzi, Nicola; Ferrante, Gianluca Drago; Scialo, Carlo; Sorarù, Gianni; Trojsi, Francesca; Conte, Amelia; Falzone, Yuri M; Tortelli, Rosanna; Russo, Massimo; Chiò, Adriano; Sansone, Valeria Ada; Mora, Gabriele; Silani, Vincenzo; Volanti, Paolo; Caponnetto, Claudia; Querin, Giorgia; Monsurrò, Maria Rosaria; Sabatelli, Mario; Riva, Nilo; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Messina, Sonia; Fini, Nicola; Mandrioli, Jessica

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this multicenter, retrospective study is to investigate the role of clinical characteristics and therapeutic intervention on ALS prognosis. The study included patients diagnosed from January 1, 2009 to December 31, 2013 in 13 Italian referral centers for ALS located in 10 Italian regions. Caring neurologists collected a detailed phenotypic profile and follow-up data until death into an electronic database. One center collected also data from a population-based registry for ALS. 2648 incident cases were collected. The median survival time from onset to death/tracheostomy was 44 months (SE 1.18, CI 42-46). According to univariate analysis, factors related to survival from onset to death/tracheostomy were: age at onset, diagnostic delay, site of onset, phenotype, degree of certainty at diagnosis according to revised El Escorial criteria (R-EEC), presence/absence of dementia, BMI at diagnosis, patients' provenance. In the multivariate analysis, age at onset, diagnostic delay, phenotypes but not site of onset, presence/absence of dementia, BMI, riluzole use, R-EEC criteria were independent prognostic factors of survival in ALS. We compared patients from an ALS Registry with patients from tertiary centers; the latter ones were younger, less frequently bulbar, but more frequently familial and definite at diagnosis. Our large, multicenter study demonstrated the role of some clinical and demographic factors on ALS survival, and showed some interesting differences between referral centers' patients and the general ALS population. These results can be helpful for clinical practice, in clinical trial design and to validate new tools to predict disease progression.

  16. Biochemical failure after radical prostatectomy in intermediate-risk group men increases with the number of risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuki Furubayashi

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: The number of intermediate risk factors is significantly associated with the PSA failure-free survival rate after radical prostatectomy in the intermediate-risk group. Patients classified into the intermediate-risk group based on all three intermediate risk factors are less likely to achieve a complete cure through surgery alone.

  17. Prognostic factors for locoregional recurrence and survival in stage IIIC breast carcinoma: impact of adjuvant radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuru, B

    2011-04-01

    The aims of the present study were to define the prognostic factors for locoregional recurrence (LRR) and survival in stage IIIC breast carcinoma as well as to examine the impact of adjuvant radiotherapy on the outcome of the disease. The records of 586 consecutive patients with stage IIIC breast carcinoma who underwent modified radical mastectomy were evaluated, and the prognostic factors for LRR and survival were analysed. Survival curves were generated using the Kaplan-Meier method, and multivariate analysis was performed using the Cox proportional hazard model. Five-year LRR and survival of stage IIIC breast carcinoma were 15 percent and 41.3 percent, respectively. Five-year LRR was significantly lower and five-year survival was significantly higher for all patients as well as for T1-2 patients with one to three apical node involvements who were treated with adjuvant radiotherapy. In multivariate analysis, apical node involvement, age below 35 years, T4 tumour, grade 3, extracapsular extension and lymphovascular invasion decreased survival, whereas adjuvant tamoxifen and adjuvant radiotherapy (risk ratio [RR] 0.51, 95 percent confidence interval [CI] 0.39-0.67) increased survival. Adjuvant radiotherapy was the sole independent factor that was found to be significantly associated with decreased LRR (RR 0.25, 95 percent CI 0.16-0.38). Radiotherapy decreased LRR and increased survival significantly in all stage IIIC patients and in the subgroup of T1-2 patients with one to three apical node involvements. Thus, it should be considered in the treatment of stage IIIC breast carcinoma.

  18. Seasonality of cardiovascular risk factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marti-Soler, Helena; Gubelmann, Cédric; Aeschbacher, Stefanie

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the seasonality of cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF) in a large set of population-based studies. METHODS: Cross-sectional data from 24 population-based studies from 15 countries, with a total sample size of 237 979 subjects. CVRFs included Body Mass Index (BMI) and waist...

  19. Risk factors for undescended testis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwers, M.M.; Bruijne, L.M. de; Gier, R.P.E. de; Zielhuis, G.A.; Feitz, W.F.J.; Roeleveld, N.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To contribute to the understanding of the etiology of undescended testis (UDT), by exploring a wide range of potential risk factors in a case-referent study. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Cases and referents were recruited at five hospitals and included 200 boys with surgically corrected UDT and

  20. [Psoriasis and cardiovascular risk factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tal, Roy; Pavlovsky, Lev; David, Michael

    2012-10-01

    Psoriasis is a common inflammatory skin disease which may dramatically affect patients' lives. This chronic disease is characterized by a protracted course of alternating remissions and relapses. In recent years, the attention of researchers has focused on the association between psoriasis and cardiovascular disease risk factors. This review summarizes the literature on this topic with an emphasis on research conducted in Israel.

  1. Risk factors of placental abruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hooria Seyedhosseini Ghaheh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Placental abruption is one of the most common causes of bleeding during pregnancy. Multiple factors are known to be associated with increase of risk of placental abruption such as alcohol, cocaine use and cigarette smoking. The objective of this study was to identify risk factors for placental abruption in an Iranian women population. Materials and Methods: In a retrospective case - control study birth records included 78 cases with placental abruption and 780 randomly selected controls were investigated. Statistical analysis for comparing the studied risk factors between groups was performed using Pearson ′ s Chi-square test along with presenting relevant odds ratio (OR. Results: From 7301 deliveries included in the study, 78 (1% was complicated placental abruption. Women aged 35 or more likely for experiencing (OR = 3.650, 95% confidence interval [CL] = 1.57-6.83 and those who had a previous cesarean section (OR = 2.65, 95% CL = 3.91- 33.41 were in higher risk for placental abruption ([50 cases] 64% vs. [28 cases] 36% P < 0.01. Conclusion: The results indicate that among the placental abruption is one of the most common causes of bleeding during the pregnancy and one of the major obstetrical emergency.

  2. [Risk factors associated to preclampsia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Carbajal, Mario Joaquín; Manríquez-Moreno, María Esther; Gálvez-Camargo, Daniela; Ramírez-Jiménez, Evelia

    2012-01-01

    preeclampsia constitutes one of the main causes of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. The aim was to identify the risk factors associated to the developmental of preeclampsia mild-moderate and severe, as well as the force of association of these factors in a hospital of second-level medical care. study of cases and controls, a relation 1:1, in women withdrawn of the Service of Gynecology and Obstetrics during 2004 to 2007. Pregnant women with more than 20 weeks gestation were included. In the cases group we included patients with diagnosis of preeclampsia mild-moderate or severe (corroborated clinical and laboratory). In the controls group that had a normal childbirth without pathology during the pregnancy. 42 cases and 42 controls. The average age was of 27 years. The associated risk factors were overweight, obesity, irregular prenatal control, short or long intergenesic period, history of caesarean or preeclampsia in previous pregnancies. the knowledge of the risk factors will allow the accomplishment of preventive measures and decrease the fetal and maternal morbidity and mortality due to preeclampsia.

  3. Survival in Patients Receiving Prolonged Ventilation: Factors that Influence Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. James Mamary

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Prolonged mechanical ventilation is increasingly common. It is expensive and associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Our objective is to comprehensively characterize patients admitted to a Ventilator Rehabilitation Unit (VRU for weaning and identify characteristics associated with survival. Methods 182 consecutive patients over 3.5 years admitted to Temple University Hospital (TUH VRU were characterized. Data were derived from comprehensive chart review and a prospectively collected computerized database. Survival was determined by hospital records and social security death index and mailed questionnaires. Results Upon admission to the VRU, patients were hypoalbuminemic (albumin 2.3 ± 0.6 g/dL, anemic (hemoglobin 9.6 ± 1.4 g/dL, with moderate severity of illness (APACHE II score 10.7 + 4.1, and multiple comorbidities (Charlson index 4.3 + 2.3. In-hospital mortality (19% was related to a higher Charlson Index score ( P = 0.006; OR 1.08-1.6, and APACHE II score ( P = 0.016; OR 1.03-1.29. In-hospital mortality was inversely related to admission albumin levels ( P = 0.023; OR 0.17-0.9. The presence of COPD as a comorbid illness or primary determinant of respiratory failure and higher VRU admission APACHE II score predicted higher long-term mortality. Conversely, higher VRU admission hemoglobin was associated with better long term survival (OR 0.57-0.90; P = 0.0006. Conclusion Patients receiving prolonged ventilation are hypoalbuminemic, anemic, have moderate severity of illness, and multiple comorbidities. Survival relates to these factors and the underlying illness precipitating respiratory failure, especially COPD.

  4. Disability as a risk factor?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøttcher, Louise; Dammeyer, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    Empirical research has established that children with disabilities are more likely to develop psychopathology than children without disabilities. But too little is known about the association between disability and psychopathology. The aim of this article is to discuss developmental...... psychopathological models that conceptualize the connection between childhood disability and psychopathology. Empirical studies of psychopathology among children with a congenital hearing impairment and children with cerebral palsy will be reviewed, representing in-depth examples of association between disability...... and psychopathology. Both a congenital hearing impairment and cerebral palsy were found to be dominating risk factors for all types of psychopathology, but no relationship was identified between degree of disability and risk of psychopathology. The higher risk cannot be explained by biological impairments alone...

  5. CEREBRAL PALSY : ANTENATAL RISK FACTORS

    OpenAIRE

    Srinivasa Rao; Vidyullatha; Subbalakshmi

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Cerebral palsy (CP) is a group of permanent movement disorders that appear in early childhood. Cerebral palsy is caused by abnormal development or damage to the parts of the brain that control movement, balance, and posture. Most often the problems occur during pregnancy; however, they may also occur during childbirth, or shortly after birth. Often the cause is unknown. AIM: To study the different antenatal maternal risk factors associated with cere...

  6. Risk factors for cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvanand, S; Kapoor, S K; Reddaiah, V P; Singh, U; Sundaram, K R

    1997-01-01

    Cerebral palsy is a major cause of crippling in children, but it's etiology is poorly understood. This case control study was done to assess some of the identified risk factors for cerebral palsy, 125 cerebral palsy cases selected from hospital clinic and 125 age and sex matched neighbourhood controls, all aged less than 5 years and residing in Delhi (India) were studied. Information regarding antenatal, natal and postnatal period was collected by mother's interview, and wherever available, from hospital records with the study subjects. Most common type of cerebral palsy was spastic (88%). Quadriplegia was the commonest topographical subtype (86.4%). Birth asphyxia was found to be present in only 25.6% of cases. The commonest risk factor amongst cases was low birth weight (28.8%). The multivariate odds ratios (confidence limits) for the risk factors found to be significantly associated with cerebral palsy were 36.1 (7.76-160) for birth asphyxia, 13.8 (4.95-38.3) for low birth weight, 37.4 (4.47-313) for neonatal convulsion, 23 (4.7-112) for neonatal jaundice, 14.4 (3.69-56.4) for neonatal infection, 24.9 (2.78-223) for instrument assisted delivery and 15.4 (1.57-152) for antepartum hemorrhage. Precipitate labour, caesarean section, twins, toxemia, breech delivery and head injury were not found to be significantly associated with cerebral palsy. Thus birth asphyxia, low birth weight, neonatal convulsions, neonatal jaundice, neonatal infection, instrument assisted delivery and antepartum hemorrhage are significant risk factors for cerebral palsy.

  7. Impact of individual and neighborhood factors on disparities in prostate cancer survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeRouen, Mindy C; Schupp, Clayton W; Koo, Jocelyn; Yang, Juan; Hertz, Andrew; Shariff-Marco, Salma; Cockburn, Myles; Nelson, David O; Ingles, Sue A; John, Esther M; Gomez, Scarlett L

    2018-01-09

    We addressed the hypothesis that individual-level factors act jointly with social and built environment factors to influence overall survival for men with prostate cancer and contribute to racial/ethnic and socioeconomic (SES) survival disparities. We analyzed multi-level data, combining (1) individual-level data from the California Collaborative Prostate Cancer Study, a population-based study of non-Hispanic White (NHW), Hispanic, and African American prostate cancer cases (N = 1800) diagnosed from 1997 to 2003, with (2) data on neighborhood SES (nSES) and social and built environment factors from the California Neighborhoods Data System, and (3) data on tumor characteristics, treatment and follow-up through 2009 from the California Cancer Registry. Multivariable, stage-stratified Cox proportional hazards regression models with cluster adjustments were used to assess education and nSES main and joint effects on overall survival, before and after adjustment for social and built environment factors. African American men had worse survival than NHW men, which was attenuated by nSES. Increased risk of death was associated with residence in lower SES neighborhoods (quintile 1 (lowest nSES) vs. 5: HR = 1.56, 95% CI: 1.11-2.19) and lower education (survival. Both individual- and contextual-level SES influence overall survival of men with prostate cancer. Additional research is needed to identify the mechanisms underlying these robust associations. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Tumor subtype-specific associations of hormone-related reproductive factors on breast cancer survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Song

    Full Text Available It is inconclusive whether reproductive factors, which are known as risk factors of breast cancer, also influence survival. We investigated overall and subtype-specific associations between reproductive factors and breast cancer survival.Among 3,430 incident breast cancer patients who enrolled in the Seoul Breast Cancer Study, 269 patients (7.8% died and 528 patients (15.4% recurred. The overall and subtype-specific associations of reproductive factors including age at menarche and menopause, duration of estrogen exposure, menstrual cycle, parity, age at first full-term pregnancy, number of children, age at last birth, time since the last birth, and duration of breastfeeding, on overall and disease-free survival (OS and DFS were estimated by hazard ratios (HRs and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs using a multivariate Cox proportional hazard model.An older age at menarche (HR for OS=1.10, 95% CI=1.03-1.19, a greater number of children (≥ 4 vs. 2, HR for DFS=1.58, 95% CI=1.11-2.26, and a shorter time since last birth (<5 vs. ≥ 20 years, HR for DFS=1.67, 95% CI=1.07-2.62 were associated with worse survival while longer duration of estrogen exposure with better survival (HR for DFS=0.97, 95% CI=0.96-0.99. In the stratified analyses by subtypes, those associations were more pronounced among women with hormone receptor and human epidermal growth factor 2 positive (HR+ HER2+ tumors.It is suggested that reproductive factors, specifically age at menarche, number of children, time since last birth, and duration of estrogen exposure, could influence breast tumor progression, especially in the HR+ HER2+ subtype.

  9. Factors Influencing the Cure Rate in the Corneal Graft Rejection with Survival Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feizi S.

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground and Objectives: Immunologic rejection of the transplanted cornea is the major cause of human allograft failure with several risk factors contributing to it. Since in the corneal graft, most individuals do not reject the graft, we used the survival analysis with cure rate for the assessment of the factors influencing the cure rate at the time of data analysis. The main aim of this study was to evaluate the cure rate and assess the risk factors for corneal graft rejection in the keratoconus disease in Labafinejad Hospital, Tehran, Iran. Methods: This was a routine data base study in which the data were gathered from keratoconus patients’ files that had undergone penetrating keratoplasty operation. In the survival analysis, individuals who didn’t reject corneal were considered cured. To study the factors influencing the cure rate, we used the Weibull distribution for survival function and the logistic link function for the cure rate because of their tractability and accuracy.Results: Out of 119 patients 31 patients (26% rejected grafts. Among the factors influencing cure rate, only in vascularization and in persons older than 25 years of age was ameaningful effect on decreasing cure rate. With this cure model, the expected cure rate in the non-vascularization and less than 25 year- old patients was 81, in non-vascularization and more than 25 year- olds it is 64, in the vascularization and less than 25 year- olds, the cure rate is 19 and in the vascularization and more than 25 years of age, the cure rate is 9 percent and the observed cure rate for Kaplan-Meier product limit estimator was 79, 61, 27 and 0 percent, respectively. The results showed that the estimate of cure rate in the survival analysis was near the Kaplan-Meier product-limits estimator.Conclusion: One of the benefits of modeling is its ability to generalize the results; using them in the prediction. According to the results obtained from the fitting cure model

  10. Factors driving inequality in prostate cancer survival: a population based study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richéal M Burns

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: As cancer control strategies have become more successful, issues around survival have become increasingly important to researchers and policy makers. The aim of this study was to examine the role of a range of clinical and socio-demographic variables in explaining variations in survival after a prostate cancer diagnosis, paying particular attention to the role of healthcare provider(s i.e. private versus public status. METHODS: Data were extracted from the National Cancer Registry Ireland, for patients diagnosed with prostate cancer from 1998-2009 (N = 26,183. A series of multivariate Cox and logistic regression models were used to examine the role of healthcare provider and socio-economic status (area-based deprivation on survival, controlling for age, stage, Gleason grade, marital status and region of residence. Survival was based on all-cause mortality. RESULTS: Older individuals who were treated in a private care setting were more likely to have survived than those who had not, when other factors were controlled for. Differences were evident with respect to marital status, region of residence, clinical stage and Gleason grade. The effect of socio-economic status was modified by healthcare provider, such that risk of death was higher in those men of lower socio-economic status treated by public, but not private providers in the Cox models. The logistic models revealed a socio-economic gradient in risk of death overall; the gradient was larger for those treated by public providers compared to those treated by private providers when controlling for a range of other confounding factors. CONCLUSION: The role of healthcare provider and socio-economic status in survival of men with prostate cancer may give rise to concerns that warrant further investigation.

  11. Immigration factors and prostate cancer survival among Hispanic men in California: does neighborhood matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schupp, Clayton W; Press, David J; Gomez, Scarlett Lin

    2014-05-01

    Hispanics are more likely than other racial/ethnic groups in the United States to be diagnosed with later stage of prostate cancer, yet they have lower prostate cancer mortality rates. The authors evaluated the impact of nativity and neighborhood-level Hispanic ethnic enclave on prostate cancer survival among Hispanics. A total of 35,427 Hispanic men diagnosed with invasive prostate cancer from 1995 through 2008 in the California Cancer Registry were studied; vital status data were available through 2010. Block group-level neighborhood measures were developed from US Census data. Stage-stratified Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess the effect of nativity and ethnic enclave on prostate cancer survival. In models adjusted for neighborhood socioeconomic status and other individual factors, foreign-born Hispanics were found to have a significantly lower risk of prostate cancer survival (hazards ratio [HR], 0.81; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.75-0.87). Living in an ethnic enclave appeared to modify this effect, with the survival advantage slightly more pronounced in the high ethnic enclave neighborhoods (HR, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.71-0.86) compared with low ethnic enclave neighborhoods (HR, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.76-0.98). Despite lower socioeconomic status, Hispanic immigrants have better survival after prostate cancer than US-born Hispanics and this pattern was more striking among those living in ethnic enclaves. Identifying the modifiable individual and neighborhood-level factors that facilitate this survival advantage in Hispanic immigrants may help to inform specific interventions to improve survival among all patients. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  12. Smoking and Histological Factors Influencing Long-term Survival of Gastric Carcinoma in Consecutive Patient Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Delpisheh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is little information about the possible influence of lifestyle and etiologic risk factors on survival amongst patients with gastric cancer. Methods: We recruited a consecutive series of 249 patients with definite diagnosis of gastric cancer who had been hospitalized in Towhid Hospital, Sanandaj, Kurdistan Province in Western Iran during a five-year period from 2006 until 2011. Survival rate was calculated according to the Kaplan-Meier and log rank statistical methods. Cox hazard regression was used to investigate the effect of the variables and adjust for the effect of age. Results: According to univariate analysis, related variables that included age, gender, Residence, histology grade, histology type, familial history of gastrointestinal cancer and mental illness during the disease had no significant effects on survival rate variation. Significant independent factors on survival included past medical history of gastrointestinal diseases (P-value = 0.010, tobacco smoking (P-value = 0.012, and early diagnosis (P-value = 0.008. Cox-regression analysis of demographic, lifestyle and histological factors with >45 years of age as the reference revealed that patients 46-65 years of age at diagnosis (HR=0.602; 95% CI=0.250-1.44; P=0.256 and those >66 years of age (HR=1.07, 95% CI=0.46-2.50, P≤0.001 had an increased risk for disease progression and death. Conclusions: Past medical history of gastrointestinal diseases, tobacco smoking and early stage diagnosis might influence the long-term survival of patients with gastric cancer.

  13. Association of breast cancer risk loci with breast cancer survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrdahl, Myrto; Canzian, Federico; Lindström, Sara; Shui, Irene; Black, Amanda; Hoover, Robert N; Ziegler, Regina G; Buring, Julie E; Chanock, Stephen J; Diver, W Ryan; Gapstur, Susan M; Gaudet, Mia M; Giles, Graham G; Haiman, Christopher; Henderson, Brian E; Hankinson, Susan; Hunter, David J; Joshi, Amit D; Kraft, Peter; Lee, I-Min; Le Marchand, Loic; Milne, Roger L; Southey, Melissa C; Willett, Walter; Gunter, Marc; Panico, Salvatore; Sund, Malin; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Sánchez, María-José; Overvad, Kim; Dossus, Laure; Peeters, Petra H; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Kaaks, Rudolf; Campa, Daniele

    2015-12-15

    The survival of breast cancer patients is largely influenced by tumor characteristics, such as TNM stage, tumor grade and hormone receptor status. However, there is growing evidence that inherited genetic variation might affect the disease prognosis and response to treatment. Several lines of evidence suggest that alleles influencing breast cancer risk might also be associated with breast cancer survival. We examined the associations between 35 breast cancer susceptibility loci and the disease over-all survival (OS) in 10,255 breast cancer patients from the National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3) of which 1,379 died, including 754 of breast cancer. We also conducted a meta-analysis of almost 35,000 patients and 5,000 deaths, combining results from BPC3 and the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) and performed in silico analyses of SNPs with significant associations. In BPC3, the C allele of LSP1-rs3817198 was significantly associated with improved OS (HRper-allele =0.70; 95% CI: 0.58-0.85; ptrend  = 2.84 × 10(-4) ; HRheterozygotes  = 0.71; 95% CI: 0.55-0.92; HRhomozygotes  = 0.48; 95% CI: 0.31-0.76; p2DF  = 1.45 × 10(-3) ). In silico, the C allele of LSP1-rs3817198 was predicted to increase expression of the tumor suppressor cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1C (CDKN1C). In the meta-analysis, TNRC9-rs3803662 was significantly associated with increased death hazard (HRMETA =1.09; 95% CI: 1.04-1.15; ptrend  = 6.6 × 10(-4) ; HRheterozygotes  = 0.96 95% CI: 0.90-1.03; HRhomozygotes  = 1.21; 95% CI: 1.09-1.35; p2DF =1.25 × 10(-4) ). In conclusion, we show that there is little overlap between the breast cancer risk single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified so far and the SNPs associated with breast cancer prognosis, with the possible exceptions of LSP1-rs3817198 and TNRC9-rs3803662. © 2015 UICC.

  14. Pattern of breast cancer risk factors among pre and post ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Context: The incidence of breast cancer is increasing worldwide. In black women, breast cancer is associated with aggressive features and poor survival. Objective: Identification of risk factors such as early age of menarche, obesity and family history of breast cancer may permit preventive strategies. Study Design: A ...

  15. Cardiovascular risk factors in men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gyllenborg, J; Rasmussen, S L; Borch-Johnsen, Knut

    2001-01-01

    Males have higher risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) than premenopausal females. Gonadal steroids are probably involved in the gender difference in CVD, but previous results have been conflicting. We investigated the associations between CVD risk factors and sex hormones in a cross...... lipids. We suggest that conflicting results of cross-sectional and intervention studies of sex hormones and lipids, in part, may be explained by interindividual differences or changes in SHBG. Thus, further studies on the potential role of SHBG in the development of ischemic heart disease (IHD) should......-sectional designed study of 508 healthy males, aged 41 to 72 years. We determined total testosterone (T), sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), free androgen index (FAI), and estradiol (E2) and studied their relationship to body fat mass (BF), blood pressure (BP), aortic compliance, left ventricular mass (LVM...

  16. Risk Factors in Derivatives Markets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raimonda Martinkutė-Kaulienė

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the article is to analyse and present the classification of risks actual to derivative securities. The analysis is based on classical and modern literature findings and analysis of newest statistical data. The analysis led to the conclusion, that the main risks typical for derivatives contracts and their traders are market risk, liquidity risk, credit and counterparty risk, legal risk and transactions risk. Pricing risk and systemic risk is also quite important. The analysis showed that market risk is the most important kind of risk that in many situations influences the level of remaining risks.

  17. Factors related to survival from oral cancer in an Andalusian population sample (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallecillo Capilla, Manuel; Romero Olid, Maria Nuria; Olmedo Gaya, Maria Victoria; Reyes Botella, Candela; Bustos Ruiz, Vicente

    2007-11-01

    Approximately 3% of malignant tumors originate in the oral cavity. The majority are squamous cell carcinomas, and a small percentage, malignant tumors of the salivary glands, lymphoreticular diseases, bone tumors, melanomas, sarcomas, malignant odontogenic tumors and metastases of tumors from other locations. The prognosis of these pathologies depends on the size, infiltration, and site of the lesion, the presence or absence of metastatic spread, and to a certain degree the differentiation of the tumor. The prognosis of an oral cancer remains generally negative, with 5-year survival figures below 50%, producing high rates of mortality and morbidity. To evaluate the influence of different variables on survival in an oral cancer population. Two-hundred and sixteen patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma were studied over a period of five years, evaluating 42 variables grouped into five data sections: personal, lesion, site, stage, and risk factors. Average survival was 2088 days, with a standard deviation of 98 days. The factors most associated with mortality were: location in the gingiva (p=0.0590), in the trigone (p=0.0104), size (T3-T4) (p=0.0004) and lymph node involvement (N2a-N2b) (p=0.0035). Tobacco and alcohol, nowadays considered to be highly significant in carcinogenesis, had no considerable influence on survival.

  18. Injury risk factors for runners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Rodal Abal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine those risk factors that may cause running injuries in general, and particularly damage to the muscle mass, and the tendon. Twenty six male and female Galician runners were evaluated about their lower limb flexibility and length, knee Q angle, explosive power and training features such as kilometers and sessions per week, level of competition, shoes, surface, injuries last year, use of insoles, athletic specially, age, weight and height. During next 12 weeks runners continued training as they had been doing regularly and we recorded all injuries that appeared in this period. After that and from the liner regression we obtained different models that explained the variability of general injuries, tendon injuries and damages to the muscle mass. We also find positive correlations between previous injuries and training volume, and these with the dependent variable «injuries in 12 weeks». In regard to tendinopathy and muscle mass injuries, we observed that the synthetic material present in the track is a risk factor for these muscle injuries. Meanwhile, the increasing age and the Q angle, increments the occurrence of tendon injuries.

  19. Risk factors for mortality in children with Wilms tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuni Purwanti

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Wilms tumor is the most common renal malignancy in children (95% and one of the leading causes of death in children, with high mortality rates in developing countries. Identifying risk factors for mortality is important in order to provide early intervention to improve cure rates. Objective To identify risk factors for mortality in children with Wilms tumor. Methods We performed a case-control study of children (0-18 years of age with Wilms tumor admitted to Dr. Sardjito Hospital between 2005 and 2012. The case group consisted of children who died of Wilms tumor, whereas the control group were children who survived. Data were collected from medical records. Statistical analyses using Chi-square and logistic regression tests were done to determine odds ratios and 95% CI of the potential risk factors for mortality from Wilms tumor. Results Thirty-five children with Wilms tumor were admitted to Dr. Sardjito Hospital during the study period. Nine (26% children died and 26 survived. Stage ≥III was a significant risk factor for mortality in chidren with Wilms tumor (OR 62.8; 95%CI 5.6 to 70.5. Age ≥2 years (OR 1.4; 95%CI 0.1 to 14.3 and male sex (OR 1.2; 95%CI 0.1 to 10.8 were not significant risk factors for mortality. Conclusion Stage ≥III is a risk factor for mortality in children with Wilms tumor.

  20. Study of Hip Fracture Risk using Tree Structured Survival Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Y

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In dieser Studie wird das Hüftfraktur-Risiko bei postmenopausalen Frauen untersucht, indem die Frauen in verschiedene Subgruppen hinsichtlich dieses Risikos klassifiziert werden. Frauen in einer gemeinsamen Subgruppe haben ein ähnliches Risiko, hingegen in verschiedenen Subgruppen ein unterschiedliches Hüftfraktur-Risiko. Die Subgruppen wurden mittels der Tree Structured Survival Analysis (TSSA aus den Daten von 7.665 Frauen der SOF (Study of Osteoporosis Fracture ermittelt. Bei allen Studienteilnehmerinnen wurde die Knochenmineraldichte (BMD von Unterarm, Oberschenkelhals, Hüfte und Wirbelsäule gemessen. Die Zeit von der BMD-Messung bis zur Hüftfraktur wurde als Endpunkt notiert. Eine Stichprobe von 75% der Teilnehmerinnen wurde verwendet, um die prognostischen Subgruppen zu bilden (Trainings-Datensatz, während die anderen 25% als Bestätigung der Ergebnisse diente (Validierungs-Datensatz. Aufgrund des Trainings-Datensatzes konnten mittels TSSA 4 Subgruppen identifiziert werden, deren Hüftfraktur-Risiko bei einem Follow-up von im Mittel 6,5 Jahren bei 19%, 9%, 4% und 1% lag. Die Einteilung in die Subgruppen erfolgte aufgrund der Bewertung der BMD des Ward'schen Dreiecks sowie des Oberschenkelhalses und nach dem Alter. Diese Ergebnisse konnten mittels des Validierungs-Datensatzes reproduziert werden, was die Sinnhaftigkeit der Klassifizierungregeln in einem klinischen Setting bestätigte. Mittels TSSA war eine sinnvolle, aussagekräftige und reproduzierbare Identifikation von prognostischen Subgruppen, die auf dem Alter und den BMD-Werten beruhen, möglich. In this paper we studied the risk of hip fracture for post-menopausal women by classifying women into different subgroups based on their risk of hip fracture. The subgroups were generated such that all the women in a particular subgroup had relatively similar risk while women belonging to two different subgroups had rather different risks of hip fracture. We used the Tree Structured

  1. Perioperative and postoperative risk factors for corneal graft failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu AL

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Alice L Yu,1 Michaela Kaiser,1 Markus Schaumberger,1 Elisabeth Messmer,1 Daniel Kook,1 Ulrich Welge-Lussen2 1Department of Ophthalmology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich, 2Department of Ophthalmology, Friedrich-Alexander-University, Erlangen, Germany Purpose: In this study, we assessed the outcome of penetrating keratoplasties using organ-cultured corneal tissues at the University Eye Hospital, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich, Germany. The goal was to identify perioperative and postoperative risk factors that may affect graft survival.Patients and methods: The medical records of 377 patients who underwent a penetrating keratoplasty between 2001 and 2011 were reviewed. Organ-cultured corneal tissue was obtained from the eye bank of Ludwig-Maximilians-University. Perioperative and postoperative risk factors for graft failure were evaluated by univariate and multivariate analyses.Results: The 5-year overall survival rate of penetrating keratoplasties was 68%. Graft failure occurred in 26% of patients. High-risk keratoplasties, such as repeat penetrating keratoplasties and emergency penetrating keratoplasties, as well as postoperative conditions, such as glaucoma, retinal surgery, suture problems, persistent epithelial defect, infectious keratitis, and graft rejection, were significantly associated with graft failure in the multivariate analyses.Conclusion: This study showed a similar graft-survival rate as demonstrated in previous studies. In addition, a number of perioperative and postoperative risk factors were identified in this specific patient population. Keywords: penetrating keratoplasty, graft failure, risk factor, cornea bank

  2. Skin Cancer: Biology, Risk Factors & Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... turn Javascript on. Feature: Skin Cancer Skin Cancer: Biology, Risk Factors & Treatment Past Issues / Summer 2013 Table ... Articles Skin Cancer Can Strike Anyone / Skin Cancer: Biology, Risk Factors & Treatment / Timely Healthcare Checkup Catches Melanoma ...

  3. Risk factors identified for certain lymphoma subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    In a large international collaborative analysis of risk factors for non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), scientists were able to quantify risk associated with medical history, lifestyle factors, family history of blood or lymph-borne cancers, and occupation for 11

  4. Nocturnal Sleep Disturbances: Risk Factors for Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... insomnia. Sleep Problems as a Risk Factor for Suicide As noted above, sleep problems are associated with ... disorders, both of which are risk factors for suicide (Wong & Brower, 2012). Overarousal, marked by agitation and ...

  5. PROGNOSTIC FACTORS AND SURVIVAL ANALYSIS IN ESOPHAGEAL CARCINOMA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tustumi, Francisco; Kimura, Cintia Mayumi Sakurai; Takeda, Flavio Roberto; Uema, Rodrigo Hideki; Salum, Rubens Antônio Aissar; Ribeiro-Junior, Ulysses; Cecconello, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent advances in diagnosis and treatment, esophageal cancer still has high mortality. Prognostic factors associated with patient and with disease itself are multiple and poorly explored. Assess prognostic variables in esophageal cancer patients. Retrospective review of all patients with esophageal cancer in an oncology referral center. They were divided according to histological diagnosis (444 squamous cell carcinoma patients and 105 adenocarcinoma), and their demographic, pathological and clinical characteristics were analyzed and compared to clinical stage and overall survival. No difference was noted between squamous cell carcinoma and esophageal adenocarcinoma overall survival curves. Squamous cell carcinoma presented 22.8% survival after five years against 20.2% for adenocarcinoma. When considering only patients treated with curative intent resection, after five years squamous cell carcinoma survival rate was 56.6 and adenocarcinoma, 58%. In patients with squamous cell carcinoma, poor differentiation histology and tumor size were associated with worse oncology stage, but this was not evidenced in adenocarcinoma. Weight loss (kg), BMI variation (kg/m²) and percentage of weight loss are factors that predict worse stage at diagnosis in the squamous cell carcinoma. In adenocarcinoma, these findings were not statistically significant. Apesar dos avanços recentes nos métodos diagnósticos e tratamento, o câncer de esôfago mantém alta mortalidade. Fatores prognósticos associados ao paciente e ao câncer propriamente dito são pouco conhecidos. Investigar variáveis prognósticas no câncer esofágico. Pacientes diagnosticados entre 2009 e 2012 foram analisados e subdivididos de acordo com tipo histológico (444 carcinomas espinocelulares e 105 adenocarcinomas), e então características demográficas, anatomopatológicas e clínicas foram analisadas. Não houve diferença entre os dois tipos histológicos na sobrevida global. Carcinoma espinocelular

  6. Predictive factors for prolonged survival in recurrent endometrial carcinoma: Implications for follow-up protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Isao; Uno, Masaya; Wakabayashi, Akira; Kameda, Shogo; Udagawa, Hideo; Kubota, Toshiro

    2010-12-01

    To evaluate the role of follow-up after curative treatment in endometrial carcinoma, we determined predictive factors for prolonged survival after recurrence. We retrospectively studied patients with endometrioid endometrial carcinoma who had a follow-up appointment consisting of pelvic examination, vaginal cytology, imaging and CA-125 measurements and who developed recurrence. Possible prognostic factors were evaluated by univariate and multivariate analyses. Fifty-one patients developed recurrence. The median time from initial treatment to recurrence was 12 months (range, 3-119 months). A total of 25 (49%) and 45 (88%) recurrences were detected within 1 and 3 years of initial treatment, respectively. Twenty (39%) patients were symptomatic, while 31 (61%) were asymptomatic. The median survival time of symptomatic patients was longer than that of asymptomatic patients (27 vs. 12 months); however, the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.42). No recurrences were detected by vaginal cytology. Of asymptomatic patients with low/intermediate risk (stage I/II), patients with recurrence detected by imaging or CA-125 measurements tended to have shorter survival than patients with recurrence detected by physical examination (7 vs. 31+ months, P = 0.057). Multivariate analysis revealed that site of recurrence (vaginal vs. extravaginal, P 1 year vs. ≤ 1 year, P = 0.01) were significant independent predictors of prolonged survival after recurrence. In endometrial carcinoma, site of and time to recurrence are significant predictive factors of prolonged survival after recurrence, suggesting that early detection of recurrence by imaging studies and CA-125 measurements cannot improve prognosis. Although intensive follow-up using these methods may provide psychological reassurance to some patients, the use of these methods must be balanced against the wise use of limited health care resources. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Epidemiologic factors that predict long-term survival following a diagnosis of epithelial ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Shana J; Rosen, Barry; Fan, Isabel; Ivanova, Anna; McLaughlin, John R; Risch, Harvey; Narod, Steven A; Kotsopoulos, Joanne

    2017-03-28

    Various epidemiologic factors have been shown to influence the risk of ovarian cancer development. Given the high fatality associated with this disease, it is of interest to evaluate the association of prediagnostic hormonal, reproductive, and lifestyle exposures with ovarian cancer-specific survival. We included 1421 patients with invasive epithelial ovarian cancer diagnosed in Ontario, Canada. Clinical information was obtained from medical records and prediagnostic exposure information was collected by telephone interview. Survival status was determined by linkage to the Ontario Cancer Registry. Proportional hazards regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for ovarian cancer-specific mortality associated with each exposure. Analyses were stratified by histologic subtype to further investigate the associations of risk factors on ovarian cancer-specific mortality. After a mean follow-up of 9.48 years (range 0.59-20.32 years), 655 (46%) women had died of ovarian cancer. Parity (ever) was associated with a significant 29% decreased mortality risk compared with nulliparity (HR=0.71; 95% CI 0.54-0.93; P=0.01). There was a borderline significant association between ever use of oestrogen-containing hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and mortality (HR=0.79; 95% CI 0.62-1.01; P=0.06). A history of cigarette smoking was associated with a significant 25% increased risk of death compared with never smoking (HR=1.25; 95% CI 1.01-1.54; P=0.04). Women with a greater cumulative number of ovulatory cycles had a significantly decreased risk of ovarian cancer-specific death (HR=0.63; 95% CI 0.43-0.94; P=0.02). Increasing BMI (kg m-2) 5 years before diagnosis was associated with an increased risk of death (HR=1.17; 95% CI 1.07-1.28; P=0.0007). Other hormonal or lifestyle factors were not significantly associated with ovarian cancer-specific mortality. Parity, ovulatory cycles, smoking, and BMI may affect survival following the diagnosis

  8. Configurations of Common Childhood Psychosocial Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, William; Shanahan, Lilly; Costello, E. Jane; Angold, Adrian

    2009-01-01

    Background: Co-occurrence of psychosocial risk factors is commonplace, but little is known about psychiatrically-predictive configurations of psychosocial risk factors. Methods: Latent class analysis (LCA) was applied to 17 putative psychosocial risk factors in a representative population sample of 920 children ages 9 to 17. The resultant class…

  9. Prognostic factors and scoring system for survival in colonic perforation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Shuhei; Shimomatsuya, Takumi; Nakajima, Masayuki; Amaya, Hirokazu; Kobuchi, Taketsune; Shiraishi, Susumu; Konishi, Sayuri; Ono, Susumu; Maruhashi, Kazuhiro

    2005-01-01

    No ideal and generally accepted prognostic factors and scoring systems exist to determine the prognosis of peritonitis associated with colonic perforation. This study was designed to investigate prognostic factors and evaluate the various scoring systems to allow identification of high-risk patients. Between 1996 and 2003, excluding iatrogenic and trauma cases, 26 consecutive patients underwent emergency operations for colorectal perforation and were selected for this retrospective study. Several clinical factors were analyzed as possible predictive factors, and APACHE II, SOFA, MPI, and MOF scores were calculated. The overall mortality was 26.9%. Compared with the survivors, non-survivors were found more frequently in Hinchey's stage III-IV, a low preoperative marker of pH, base excess (BE), and a low postoperative marker of white blood cell count, PaO2/FiO2 ratio, and renal output (24h). According to the logistic regression model, BE was a significant independent variable. Concerning the prognostic scoring systems, an APACHE II score of 19, a SOFA score of 8, an MPI score of 30, and an MOF score of 7 or more were significantly related to poor prognosis. Preoperative BE and postoperative white blood cell count were reliable prognostic factors and early classification using prognostic scoring systems at specific points in the disease process are useful to improve our understanding of the problems involved.

  10. Aspirin use and endometrial cancer risk and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takiuchi, Tsuyoshi; Blake, Erin A; Matsuo, Koji; Sood, Anil K; Brasky, Theodore M

    2018-01-01

    The role of acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) as a chemo-preventive and adjuvant therapeutic agent for cancers is generating attention. Mounting evidence indicates that aspirin reduces the incidence and mortality of certain obesity-related cancers, particularly colorectal cancer. In endometrial cancer, previous studies examining the effect of aspirin remain inconsistent as to the reduction in the risk of endometrial cancer. While some evidence indicates protective effects in obese women, other studies have showed a potential deleterious effect of these medications on endometrial cancer outcomes. However, exposure measurement across studies has been inconsistent in recording dose, duration, and frequency of use; thus making comparisons difficult. In this article, we review the evidence for the association between endometrial cancer and obesity, the pharmacological differences between regular- and low-dose aspirin, as well as the potential anti-tumor mechanism of aspirin, supporting a possible therapeutic effect on endometrial cancer. A proposed mechanism behind decreased cancer mortality in endometrial cancer may be a result of inhibition of metastasis via platelet inactivation and possible prostaglandin E 2 suppression by aspirin. Additionally, aspirin use in particular may have a secondary benefit for obesity-related comorbidities including cardiovascular disease in women with endometrial cancer. Although aspirin-related bleeding needs to be considered as a possible adverse effect, the benefits of aspirin therapy may exceed the potential risk in women with endometrial cancer. The current evidence reviewed herein has resulted in conflicting findings regarding the potential effect on endometrial cancer outcomes, thus indicating that future studies in this area are needed to resolve the effects of aspirin on endometrial cancer survival, particularly to identify specific populations that might benefit from aspirin use. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Factors relating to poor survival rates of aged cervical cancer patients: a population-based study with the relative survival model in Osaka, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioka, Akiko; Ito, Yuri; Tsukuma, Hideaki

    2009-01-01

    Poor survival of older cervical cancer patients has been reported; however, related factors, such as the extent of disease and the competitive risk by aging have not been well evaluated. We applied the relative survival model developed by Dickman et al to resolve this issue. Study subjects were cervical cancer patients retrieved from the Osaka Cancer Registry. They were limited to the 10,048 reported cases diagnosed from 1975 to 1999, based on the quality of data collection on vital status. Age at diagnosis was categorized into or = 65 years. The impact of prognostic factors on 5-year survival was evaluated with the relative survival model, incorporating patients' expected survival in multivariate analysis. The age-specific relative excess risk (RER) of death was significantly higher for older groups as compared with women aged 30-54 years (RER, 1.58 at 55-64 and 2.51 at > or = 65 years). The RER was decreased by 64.8% among the 55-64 year olds as an effect of cancer stage at diagnosis, and by 43.4% among those 65 years old and over. After adding adjustment for treatment modalities, the RER was no longer significantly higher among 55-64 year olds; however, it was still higher among 65 year olds and over. Advanced stage at diagnosis was the main determinant of poor survival among the aged cervical cancer patients, although other factors such as limitations on the combination of treatment were also suggested to have an influence in those aged 65 years and over.

  12. Can MRI-derived factors predict the survival in glioblastoma patients treated with postoperative chemoradiation therapy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hideo Nakamura, Hideo [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto Univ., Kumamoto, (Japan); Murakami, Ryuji [Dept. of Medical Imaging, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto Univ., Kumamoto (Japan)], e-mail: murakami@kumamoto-u.ac.jp; Hirai, Toshinori; Kitajima, Mika; Yamashita, Yasuyuki [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto Univ., Kumamoto (Japan)

    2013-03-15

    Background: Advanced diagnostic and therapeutic developments may yield novel prognostic factors in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Purpose: To validate the predictive values of pretreatment quantitative diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MRI performed within 72 h after surgery in patients with GBM. Material and Methods: Between January 2000 and September 2009, 138 patients with GBM underwent postoperative chemoradiation therapy (chemo-RT) and longitudinal MRI before surgery, in the early postoperative period, and at 1-month intervals thereafter. The role of the patient age, Karnofsky performance scale (KPS) score, minimum apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) on pretreatment DW-MRI, and gross residual tumor on early postoperative MRI were assessed by factor analysis of overall survival (OS). Survival curves were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method; the multivariate Cox's proportional hazards model was used to adjust for the influence of prognostic factors. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group-recursive partitioning analysis (RTOG-RPA) criteria were used to validate the predictive value of the MRI-derived factors. Results: Substantial independent prognostic factors were the KPS score (hazard ratio [HR], 1.812), minimum ADC (HR, 2.365), and gross residual tumor (HR, 1.777). Based on MRI-derived factors, we assigned the patients to different prognostic groups in the RTOG-RPA classification and grouped them according to the level of risk, i.e. a high-risk group with low minimum ADCs (<0.93 X 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s) with gross residual tumor and a low-risk group with high minimum ADCs ({>=}0.93 X 10{sup -}3 mm{sup 2}/s) without gross residual tumor; the other patients were assigned to the intermediate-risk group. Median OS for the low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups were 28.2, 14.7, and 10.8 months, respectively (P < 0.001). Conclusion: The minimum ADC on pretreatment DW-MRI and gross residual tumor on early

  13. Survival

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data provide information on the survival of California red-legged frogs in a unique ecosystem to better conserve this threatened species while restoring...

  14. Risk factors associated with rosacea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abram, K; Silm, H; Maaroos, H-I; Oona, M

    2010-05-01

    Although rosacea is a common disease, the cause of disease is still a mystery -Helicobacter pylori infection, genetic predisposition, climatic factors, and detrimental habits are implicated as triggers of rosacea. The aim of current study is to evaluate several suspected risk factors coincidently. Patients with rosacea from a dermatology clinic and skin-healthy controls from an randomly selected employees' population enrolled the study. Skin status were evaluated by one and same dermatologist. Participants were queried for age, gender, sun-reactive skin type, and detrimental habits using a questionnaire; blood samples for detecting Helicobacter pylori serostatus were collected. Totally 145 skin-healthy controls and 172 subjects either with flushing episodes or established rosacea included the study. In multivariate analysis, rosacea patients had significantly higher chance to have photosensitive skin types (OR 1.75; 95% CI 1.01-3.04; P < 0.05), positive family history to rosacea (OR 4.31; 95% CI 2.34-7.92; P < 0.0001) or previous smoking status (OR 2.01; 95% CI 1.07-3.80; P < 0.05) comparing with skin-healthy controls. There were no statistically significant differences either in gender, Helicobacter pylori serostatus, caffeine intake, alcohol consumption, occupational environment, or education level between rosacea patients and controls. Rosacea is foremost associated with familial predisposition. There is no association between Helicobacter pylori infection and rosacea in current study.

  15. Survival patterns in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck: pain as an independent prognostic factor for survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Gibby, Cielito C; Anderson, Karen O; Merriman, Kelly W; Todd, Knox H; Shete, Sanjay S; Hanna, Ehab Y

    2014-10-01

    Survival outcomes in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC) vary by extent of disease, behavioral factors, and socioeconomic factors. We assessed the extent to which pretreatment pain influences survival in 2,340 newly diagnosed patients with HNSCC, adjusting for disease stage, symptoms, pain medications, comorbidities, smoking, alcohol consumption, age, sex, and race/ethnicity. Patients rated their pain at presentation to the cancer center (0 = "no pain" and 10 = "pain as bad as you can imagine"). Survival time was calculated from the date of diagnosis to the date of death of any cause or last follow-up. Five-year overall survival was calculated for all the variables assessed in the study. Severe pain (≥7) was most prevalent among those with oral cancer (20.4%; pharynx = 18.8%; larynx = 16.1%) and significantly varied by tumor stage, fatigue severity, smoking status, comorbid lung disease, and race (all P pain for oral (severe pain = 31% vs nonsevere pain = 52%; P pain = 33% vs nonsevere pain = 53%; P pain persisted as an independent prognostic factor for survival. Pain reported prior to treatment should be considered in understanding survival outcomes in HNSCC patients. Pretreatment pain was an independent predictor of survival in a large sample of HNSCC patients even after accounting for tumor node metastasis stage, fatigue, age, race/ethnicity, smoking, and alcohol intake. Therefore, symptoms at presentation and before cancer treatment are important factors to be considered in understanding survival outcomes in HNSCC patients. Copyright © 2014 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Prognostic factors affecting the survival of patients with multiple ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, age, sex, Durie and Salmon staging, lytic lesions, serum immunoglobulin concentration, urine Bence Jones protein, percentage of plasma cells in the bone marrow, proteinuria, and type of chemotherapy given were not significantly associated with survival. A strong prediction of survival was found by grouping the ...

  17. Activation of nuclear factor-kappa B via endogenous tumor necrosis factor alpha regulates survival of axotomized adult sensory neurons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernyhough, P; Smith, DR; Schapansky, J; Van Der Ploeg, R; Gardiner, NJ; Tweed, CW; Kontos, A; Freeman, L; Purves-Tyson, TD; Glazner, GW

    2005-01-01

    Embryonic dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons die after axonal damage in vivo, and cultured embryonic DRG neurons require exogenous neurotrophic factors that activate the neuroprotective transcription factor nuclear factor-kappaB(NF-kappaB) for survival. In contrast, adult DRG neurons survive

  18. Anaphylaxis: risk factors for recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, R J

    2003-08-01

    There are few studies on the incidence or recurrence of anaphylaxis. To examine the incidence of anaphylaxis and risk factors for recurrence. A prospective study of 432 patients referred to a community-based specialist practice in the Australian Capital Territory with anaphylaxis, followed by a survey to obtain information on recurrence. Of 432 patients (48% male, 73% atopic, mean 27.4 years, SD 19.5, median 26) with anaphylaxis, 260 patients were seen after their first episode; 172 experienced 584 previous reactions. fifty-four percent of index episodes were treated in hospital. Aetiology was identified in 91.6% patients: food (61%), stinging insects (20.4%) or medication (8.3%). The minimum occurrence and incidence of new cases of anaphylaxis was estimated at 12.6 and 9.9 episodes/100,000 patient-years, respectively. Follow-up data were obtained from 304 patients (674 patient-years). One hundred and thirty experienced further symptoms (45 serious), 35 required hospitalization and 19 administered adrenaline. Accidental ingestion of peanut/tree nut caused the largest number of relapses, but the highest risk of recurrence was associated with sensitivity to wheat and/or exercise. Rates of overall and serious recurrence were 57 and 10 episodes/100 patient-years, respectively. Of those prescribed adrenaline, 3/4 carried it, 2/3 were in date, and only 1/2 patients faced with serious symptoms administered adrenaline. Five patients each developed new triggers for anaphylaxis, or re-presented with significant psychiatric symptoms. In any 1 year, 1/12 patients who have suffered anaphylaxis will experience recurrence, and 1/50 will require hospital treatment or use adrenaline. Compliance with carrying and using adrenaline is poor. Occasional patients develop new triggers or suffer psychiatric morbidity.

  19. [Disease-free survival related factors in breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dávila-Arias, Cristina; Ocón, Olga; Fernández, Mariana F; Arrebola, Juan Pedro; Sánchez, María José; Aneiros, José; Torné, Pablo; Olea, Nicolás

    2014-10-07

    To evaluate the relationship between the clinical and pathological parameters of the primary tumor and disease-free survival (DFS) in a sample of hospital cases of invasive breast cancer. We performed a retrospective cohort study in 635 patients recruited at San Cecilio University Hospital in Granada (Spain) between 1994 and 2006. Information on the primary tumor and the outcomes of patients was collected by reviewing the medical records. Predictors of recurrence and/or metastasis and DFS (follow up of 3, 5 and 10 years) were analyzed by using Cox regression analysis. Multivariate models adjusted for age, tumor size, lymph nodal status, histological grade and estrogen and progesterone receptor expression showed a higher risk of recurrence and/or metastasis and lower DFS (adjusted relative risk, 95% confidence intervals) with tumor size (3 yrs: 3.00, 1.79-5.03; 5 yrs: 2.56, 1.65-3.98; 10 yrs: 2.16, 1.44-3.24), lymph nodal status (3 yrs: 4.58, 2.42-8.65; 5 yrs: 3.84, 2.35-6.30; 10 yrs: 3.08, 2.05-4.61), lymphovascular invasion (5 yrs: 1.88, 1.16-3.04; 10 yrs: 2.19, 1.43-3.35), multifocal and/or multicenter tumors (3 yrs: 2.69, 1.46-4.96; 5 yrs: 1.90, 1.08-3.35) and p53 protein expression (3 yrs: 2.03, 1.00-4.09). DFS was positively associated with an increased expression of progesterone receptor (3 yr: 0.48, 0.26-0.89; 5 yrs: 0.58, 0.35-0.97; 10 yrs: 0.59, 0.38-0.90). The biological characteristics of the primary tumor can be used to identify patients with distinctive prognoses and DFS, and could be helpful in making individual follow up strategies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Polyhydramnios. Risk factors and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Mariam; Saquib, Shabnam; Rizvi, Syed G

    2008-02-01

    To determine the risk factors associated with polyhydramnios, and assess the maternal and perinatal outcome in these patients. A prospective study of all deliveries complicated with polyhydramnios in Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Sultanate of Oman between January 2005 and April 2006. Polyhydramnios was divided into mild and moderate to severe based on the amniotic fluid index values. The demographic data, antenatal complications, gestational age at delivery, mode of delivery, postpartum complications, and perinatal outcome were studied. A total of 2648 singleton deliveries occurred during the study period. Two hundred and eight (7.8%) women with polyhydramnios formed the study group, and 2440 women with normal amniotic fluid formed the control. Polyhydramnios was mild in 179 (86.1%) and moderate to severe in 29 (13.9%) cases. Sixty-eight (32.7%) of these pregnancies were complicated with diabetes as compared with 12.4% of the controls. Preterm delivery occurred in 16 (7.7%) cases. Cesarean delivery rate was 27.9% in the study group compared with 17.3% in the control. Major congenital anomalies were found in 2.8% of newborns compared with 1% among the controls. Eighteen babies were admitted to the special care baby unit. These data demonstrates a significant positive relation with maternal age, diabetes in pregnancy, and fetal macrosomia with polyhydramnios. Anemia during pregnancy, cesarean delivery rate, and congenital anomalies were significantly higher in the study group.

  1. Predictive factors of biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy for high-risk prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Yukiko; Tatsugami, Katsunori; Yoshikawa, Masahiro; Hamaguchi, Masumitsu; Yamada, Shigetomo; Hayakawa, Yusuke; Ueda, Kouhei; Momosaki, Seiya; Sakamoto, Naotaka

    2018-01-08

    To identify risk factors of biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy in high-risk patients. A total of 191 high-risk prostate cancer patients according to the D'Amico classification treated with radical prostatectomy at a single institution between April 2000 and December 2013 were enrolled. The pathological evaluation including intraductal carcinoma of prostate was reassessed, and the clinical and pathological risk factors of biochemical recurrence were analyzed. The median follow up after radical prostatectomy was 49 months. The 5-year biochemical recurrence-free survival rate after radical prostatectomy in high-risk prostate cancer patients was 41.6%. Initial prostate-specific antigen, pathological Gleason score, seminal vesicle invasion, extraprostatic extension and intraductal carcinoma of the prostate were significantly associated with biochemical recurrence-free survival. The 5-year biochemical recurrence-free survival rates in patients with zero, one, two and three of these risk factors were 92.9%, 70.7%, 38.3% and 28.8%, respectively. In patients with four or more factors, the biochemical recurrence-free survival rate was 6.1% after 18 months. In D'Amico high-risk patients treated with radical prostatectomy, risk factors for biochemical recurrence can be identified. Patients with fewer risk factors have longer biochemical recurrence-free survival, even among these high-risk cases. © 2018 The Japanese Urological Association.

  2. Prognostic factors for survival after salvage total laryngectomy following radiotherapy or chemoradiation failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wulff, N B; Andersen, E; Kristensen, C A

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The primary aims were to determine the rates of and prognostic factors for overall survival, disease-specific survival and disease-free survival following salvage total laryngectomy. DESIGN: Retrospective longitudinal study. SETTING: Tertiary medical centres. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 1...

  3. Factors affecting the postoperative morbidity and survival of patients with liver cirrhosis following colorectal cancer surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun Ho; Yu, Chang Sik; Lee, Jong Lyul; Kim, Chan Wook; Yoon, Yong Sik; Park, In Ja; Lim, Seok-Byung; Kim, Jin Cheon

    2017-04-01

    Data are lacking on the appropriate risk stratification of patients undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer (CRC). This study aimed to evaluate the predictive factors for perioperative morbidity and oncological outcomes in CRC patients with liver cirrhosis (LC). A retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data was conducted. A total of 161 LC patients who underwent surgery for CRC were identified between January 2001 and December 2010. The mean patient age was 60 ± 10 years, and the median follow-up period was 54.0 months (range 0.5-170.0). The proportions of patients with Child-Pugh classifications for LC were as follows: A (n = 118; 73.3%), B (n = 39; 24.2%), and C (n = 4; 2.5%). The median model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score was 8 (range 6-21). The postoperative morbidity rate was 37.3% (60/161). Hyperbilirubinemia (p = 0.002), prothrombin time (PT) prolongation (p = 0.020), and intraoperative transfusion (p = 0.003) were the significant factors for postoperative morbidity in multivariate analysis. The postoperative mortality rate was 3.1% (5/161), and the 5-year cancer-specific and 5-year overall survival rates were 86.1 and 59.9%, respectively. The significant clinical risk factors by multivariate analysis that influenced overall survival were the TNM stage of CRC (p = 0.035), MELD score (>8 points) (p morbidity in LC patients who undergo surgery for CRC. Additionally, not only advanced TNM stage but also a high MELD score and the coexistence of HCC are associated with poor overall survival in CRC patients with LC.

  4. Prognostic factors for survival in adult patients with recurrent glioblastoma: a decision-tree-based model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audureau, Etienne; Chivet, Anaïs; Ursu, Renata; Corns, Robert; Metellus, Philippe; Noel, Georges; Zouaoui, Sonia; Guyotat, Jacques; Le Reste, Pierre-Jean; Faillot, Thierry; Litre, Fabien; Desse, Nicolas; Petit, Antoine; Emery, Evelyne; Lechapt-Zalcman, Emmanuelle; Peltier, Johann; Duntze, Julien; Dezamis, Edouard; Voirin, Jimmy; Menei, Philippe; Caire, François; Dam Hieu, Phong; Barat, Jean-Luc; Langlois, Olivier; Vignes, Jean-Rodolphe; Fabbro-Peray, Pascale; Riondel, Adeline; Sorbets, Elodie; Zanello, Marc; Roux, Alexandre; Carpentier, Antoine; Bauchet, Luc; Pallud, Johan

    2017-11-20

    We assessed prognostic factors in relation to OS from progression in recurrent glioblastomas. Retrospective multicentric study enrolling 407 (training set) and 370 (external validation set) adult patients with a recurrent supratentorial glioblastoma treated by surgical resection and standard combined chemoradiotherapy as first-line treatment. Four complementary multivariate prognostic models were evaluated: Cox proportional hazards regression modeling, single-tree recursive partitioning, random survival forest, conditional random forest. Median overall survival from progression was 7.6 months (mean, 10.1; range, 0-86) and 8.0 months (mean, 8.5; range, 0-56) in the training and validation sets, respectively (p = 0.900). Using the Cox model in the training set, independent predictors of poorer overall survival from progression included increasing age at histopathological diagnosis (aHR, 1.47; 95% CI [1.03-2.08]; p = 0.032), RTOG-RPA V-VI classes (aHR, 1.38; 95% CI [1.11-1.73]; p = 0.004), decreasing KPS at progression (aHR, 3.46; 95% CI [2.10-5.72]; p < 0.001), while independent predictors of longer overall survival from progression included surgical resection (aHR, 0.57; 95% CI [0.44-0.73]; p < 0.001) and chemotherapy (aHR, 0.41; 95% CI [0.31-0.55]; p < 0.001). Single-tree recursive partitioning identified KPS at progression, surgical resection at progression, chemotherapy at progression, and RTOG-RPA class at histopathological diagnosis, as main survival predictors in the training set, yielding four risk categories highly predictive of overall survival from progression both in training (p < 0.0001) and validation (p < 0.0001) sets. Both random forest approaches identified KPS at progression as the most important survival predictor. Age, KPS at progression, RTOG-RPA classes, surgical resection at progression and chemotherapy at progression are prognostic for survival in recurrent glioblastomas and should inform the treatment decisions.

  5. Identification of Behavioral Risk Factors During Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruţa Florina

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to smoking during pregnancy is known to be one of the main modifiable risk factors, which threatens maternal and child health. Along with this factor, are not to be neglected also other risk factors belonging to lifestyle sphere, such as alcohol, sedentary, irregular daily meal serving plan, lack of knowledge.

  6. Adjuvant Sunitinib for High-risk Renal Cell Carcinoma After Nephrectomy: Subgroup Analyses and Updated Overall Survival Results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Motzer, Robert J; Ravaud, Alain; Patard, Jean-Jacques

    2018-01-01

    the relationship between baseline factors and DFS, pattern of recurrence, and updated overall survival (OS). DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Data for 615 patients randomized to sunitinib (n=309) or placebo (n=306) in the S-TRAC trial. OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS AND STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Subgroup DFS analyses...... by baseline risk factors were conducted using a Cox proportional hazards model. Baseline risk factors included: modified University of California Los Angeles integrated staging system criteria, age, gender, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (ECOG PS), weight, neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio...

  7. Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) after extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO): Incidence, risks and survivals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangappan, Karthik; Cavarocchi, Nicholas C; Baram, Michael; Thoma, Brandi; Hirose, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is frequently observed after extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) decannulation; however, these issues have not been investigated well in the past. Retrospective chart review was performed to identify post-ECMO SIRS phenomenon, defined by exhibiting 2/3 of the following criteria: fever, leukocytosis, and escalation of vasopressors. The patients were divided into 2 groups: patients with documented infections (Group I) and patients with true SIRS (Group TS) without any evidence of infection. Survival and pre-, intra- and post-ECMO risk factors were analyzed. Among 62 ECMO survivors, 37 (60%) patients developed the post-ECMO SIRS phenomenon, including Group I (n = 22) and Group TS (n = 15). The 30-day survival rate of Group I and TS was 77% and 100%, respectively (p = 0.047), although risk factors were identical. SIRS phenomenon after ECMO decannulation commonly occurs. Differentiating between the similar clinical presentations of SIRS and infection is important and will impact clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. CDC Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) is a state-based system of health surveys that collects information on health risk behaviors, preventive...

  9. Cardiovascular risk factors in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraporti, Marisete Inês; Scherer Adami, Fernanda; Dutra Rosolen, Michele

    2017-10-01

    Systemic hypertension is one of the main risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Early diagnosis and treatment of hypertension in childhood can potentially have a significant impact on future adverse outcomes. To investigate the relationship of diastolic (DBP) and systolic blood pressure (SBP) with anthropometric data and area of residence of children in municipalities of Rio Grande do Sul state, Brazil. This is a cross-sectional study of 709 children between six and nine years of age. Blood pressure, weight, height and waist circumference (WC) were measured. Statistical tests had a maximum significance level of 5% (p≤0.05) and the software used was SPSS version 13.0. Obesity was significantly associated with pre-hypertension, and stage 1 and 2 hypertension as assessed by DBP and SBP (≤0.05); high WC was significantly associated with a classification of pre-hypertension and stage 1 hypertension based on DBP and a classification of stage 1 and 2 hypertension based on SBP (≤0.01). Children living in urban areas had significantly higher mean SBP than those living in rural areas. Those with high WC presented higher SBP and DBP compared to children with normal WC. Obese children showed higher mean SBP and DBP compared to those who were overweight or normal weight and mean SBP and DBP also increased with older age and higher mean body mass index and WC. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Suicide and violence in parents : risk factors and consequences

    OpenAIRE

    Lysell, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Suicide and deadly violence directed towards other people are two different expressions of aggression. In family life, lethal violent behaviour may have devastating consequences, obviously for the victims but also for the surviving and bereaved children. In this thesis, focus is on violent behaviour related to parenthood; violence in the form of suicide as well as violent behaviour directed towards others. The aim has been to identify risk factors of violent expression, for...

  11. Survival and Its Influencing Factors of the Lung Cancer Patients 
with Hospice Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao LIU

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Survival and the quality of life more comprehensively evaluates the survival conditions of cancer patients. This paper aims to analyze the survival time and quality of life (QOL of hospice lung cancer patients and discusses the influencing factors to provide a basis for ameliorating their survival conditions. Methods Advanced lung cancer patients who are receiving hospice care in the Shengjing Hospital were retrospectively analyzed and followed-up. The data were analyzed using SPSS 13.0. The median survival of patients was determined using the Kaplan-Meier method, and their QOL were evaluated using the tumor patient's QOL scale. Finally, the relationship between the survival index and the various factors were determined. Results For 269 patients, the average QOL score was 28.76 and the median survival was 10 months. Awareness of their illness, pain relief, Karnofsky performance status (KPS score, and nutritional status are the independent factors of QOL. Surgery, time of the occurrence of pain, pain relief, and KPS score are the independent factors of survival time. Conclusion The survival of patients with advanced cancer is poor; hence, we should strengthen and improve hospice care in terms of the influencing factors to enhance the QOL of patients and prolong their survival.

  12. prevalence and obstetric risk factors

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    risk of developing pelvic floor disorders 5 - 10 years after their first delivery. Our finding of a non-significant association between AI and instrumental delivery at 6 weeks after delivery differs from that of. Donnelly et al.,[6] who showed that instrumentation, mainly forceps delivery, carried the greatest risk for sphincter disruption ...

  13. Postpartum depression risk factors: A narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaedrahmati, Maryam; Kazemi, Ashraf; Kheirabadi, Gholamreza; Ebrahimi, Amrollah; Bahrami, Masood

    2017-01-01

    Postpartum depression is a debilitating mental disorder with a high prevalence. The aim of this study was review of the related studies. In this narrative review, we report studies that investigated risk factors of postpartum depression by searching the database, Scopus, PubMed, ScienceDirect, Uptodate, Proquest in the period 2000-2015 published articles about the factors associated with postpartum depression were assessed in Farsi and English. The search strategy included a combination of keywords include postpartum depression and risk factors or obstetrical history, social factors, or biological factors. Literature review showed that risk factors for postpartum depression in the area of economic and social factors, obstetrical history, and biological factors, lifestyle and history of mental illness detected. Data from this study can use for designing a screening tools for high-risk pregnant women and for designing a prevention programs.

  14. Hypertension, Obesity, Diabetes, and Heart Failure-Free Survival: The Cardiovascular Disease Lifetime Risk Pooling Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Faraz S; Ning, Hongyan; Rich, Jonathan D; Yancy, Clyde W; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M; Wilkins, John T

    2016-12-01

    This study was designed to quantify the relationship between the absence of heart failure risk factors in middle age and incident heart failure, heart failure-free survival, and overall survival. Quantification of years lived free from heart failure in the context of risk factor burden in mid-life may improve risk communication and prevention efforts. We conducted a pooled, individual-level analysis sampling from communities across the United States as part of 4 cohort studies: the Framingham Heart, Framingham Offspring, Chicago Heart Association Detection Project in Industry, and ARIC (Atherosclerosis Risk In Communities) studies. Participants with and without hypertension (blood pressure ≥140/90 mm Hg or treatment), obesity (body mass index ≥30 kg/m 2 ), or diabetes (fasting glucose ≥126 mg/dl or treatment), and combinations of these factors, at index ages of 45 years and 55 years through 95 years. Competing risk-adjusted Cox models, a modified Kaplan-Meier estimator, and Irwin's restricted mean were used to estimate the association between the absence of risk factors at mid-life and incident heart failure, heart failure-free survival, and overall survival. For participants at age 45 years, over 516,537 person-years of follow-up, 1,677 incident heart failure events occurred. Men and women with no risk factors, compared to those with all 3, had 73% to 85% lower risks of incident heart failure. Men and women without hypertension, obesity, or diabetes at age 45 years lived on average 34.7 years and 38.0 years without incident heart failure, and they lived on average an additional 3 years to 15 years longer free of heart failure than those with 1, 2, or 3 risk factors. Similar trends were seen when stratified by race and at index age 55 years. Prevention of hypertension, obesity, and diabetes by ages 45 years and 55 years may substantially prolong heart failure-free survival, decrease heart failure-related morbidity, and reduce the public health impact of

  15. Risk factors and risk reduction of breast and ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.T. Brekelmans (Cecile)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractPurpose of review: Breast and ovarian cancer remain a significant burden for women living in the Western world. This paper reviews the risk factors and current strategies to prevent these diseases. Recent findings: Established factors associated with the risk of breast cancer include

  16. Prognostic factors for local control and survival after radiotherapy of metastatic spinal cord compression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rades, Dirk; Fehlauer, Fabian; Schulte, Rainer; Veninga, Theo; Stalpers, Lukas J. A.; Basic, Hiba; Bajrovic, Amira; Hoskin, Peter J.; Tribius, Silke; Wildfang, Ingeborg; Rudat, Volker; Engenhart-Cabilic, Rita; Karstens, Johann H.; Alberti, Winfried; Dunst, Juergen; Schild, Steven E.

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate potential prognostic factors for local control and survival after radiotherapy of metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC). The following potential prognostic factors were investigated retrospectively in 1,852 patients irradiated for MSCC: age, sex, performance status, primary tumor,

  17. Modeling post-fledging survival of lark buntings in response to ecological and biological factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yackel Adams, A.A.; Skagen, S.K.; Savidge, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the influences of several ecological, biological, and methodological factors on post-fledging survival of a shortgrass prairie bird, the Lark Bunting (Calamospiza melanocorys). We estimated daily post-fledging survival (n = 206, 82 broods) using radiotelemetry and color bands to track fledglings. Daily survival probabilities were best explained by drought intensity, time in season (quadratic trend), ages ≤3 d post-fledging, and rank given drought intensity. Drought intensity had a strong negative effect on survival. Rank was an important predictor of fledgling survival only during the severe drought of 2002 when the smallest fledglings had lower survival. Recently fledged young (ages ≤3 d post-fledging) undergoing the transition from nest to surrounding habitat experienced markedly lower survival, demonstrating the vulnerable nature of this time period. Survival was greater in mid and late season than early season, corresponding to our assumptions of food availability. Neither mark type nor sex of attending parent influenced survival. The model-averaged product of the 22-d survival calculated using mean rank and median value of time in season was 0.360 ± 0.08 in 2001 and 0.276 ± 0.08 in 2002. Survival estimates that account for age, condition of young, ecological conditions, and other factors are important for parameterization of realistic population models. Biologists using population growth models to elucidate mechanisms of population declines should attempt to estimate species-specific of post-fledging survival rather than use generalized estimates.

  18. Effects of Maternal Nutrition, Resource Use and Multi-Predator Risk on Neonatal White-Tailed Deer Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duquette, Jared F.; Belant, Jerrold L.; Svoboda, Nathan J.; Beyer, Dean E.; Lederle, Patrick E.

    2014-01-01

    Growth of ungulate populations is typically most sensitive to survival of neonates, which in turn is influenced by maternal nutritional condition and trade-offs in resource selection and avoidance of predators. We assessed whether resource use, multi-predator risk, maternal nutritional effects, hiding cover, or interactions among these variables best explained variation in daily survival of free-ranging neonatal white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) during their post-partum period (14 May–31 Aug) in Michigan, USA. We used Cox proportional hazards mixed-effects models to assess survival related to covariates of resource use, composite predation risk of 4 mammalian predators, fawn body mass at birth, winter weather, and vegetation growth phenology. Predation, particularly from coyotes (Canis latrans), was the leading cause of mortality; however, an additive model of non-ideal resource use and maternal nutritional effects explained 71% of the variation in survival. This relationship suggested that dams selected areas where fawns had poor resources, while greater predation in these areas led to additive mortalities beyond those related to resource use alone. Also, maternal nutritional effects suggested that severe winters resulted in dams producing smaller fawns, which decreased their likelihood of survival. Fawn resource use appeared to reflect dam avoidance of lowland forests with poor forage and greater use by wolves (C. lupus), their primary predator. While this strategy led to greater fawn mortality, particularly by coyotes, it likely promoted the life-long reproductive success of dams because many reached late-age (>10 years old) and could have produced multiple generations of fawns. Studies often link resource selection and survival of ungulates, but our results suggested that multiple factors can mediate that relationship, including multi-predator risk. We emphasize the importance of identifying interactions among biological and environmental factors

  19. Effects of maternal nutrition, resource use and multi-predator risk on neonatal white-tailed deer survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared F Duquette

    Full Text Available Growth of ungulate populations is typically most sensitive to survival of neonates, which in turn is influenced by maternal nutritional condition and trade-offs in resource selection and avoidance of predators. We assessed whether resource use, multi-predator risk, maternal nutritional effects, hiding cover, or interactions among these variables best explained variation in daily survival of free-ranging neonatal white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus during their post-partum period (14 May-31 Aug in Michigan, USA. We used Cox proportional hazards mixed-effects models to assess survival related to covariates of resource use, composite predation risk of 4 mammalian predators, fawn body mass at birth, winter weather, and vegetation growth phenology. Predation, particularly from coyotes (Canis latrans, was the leading cause of mortality; however, an additive model of non-ideal resource use and maternal nutritional effects explained 71% of the variation in survival. This relationship suggested that dams selected areas where fawns had poor resources, while greater predation in these areas led to additive mortalities beyond those related to resource use alone. Also, maternal nutritional effects suggested that severe winters resulted in dams producing smaller fawns, which decreased their likelihood of survival. Fawn resource use appeared to reflect dam avoidance of lowland forests with poor forage and greater use by wolves (C. lupus, their primary predator. While this strategy led to greater fawn mortality, particularly by coyotes, it likely promoted the life-long reproductive success of dams because many reached late-age (>10 years old and could have produced multiple generations of fawns. Studies often link resource selection and survival of ungulates, but our results suggested that multiple factors can mediate that relationship, including multi-predator risk. We emphasize the importance of identifying interactions among biological and

  20. Prognostic factors affecting the survival of patients with multiple ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1991-01-19

    Jan 19, 1991 ... cantly associated with poor survival: serum creatinine ~ 150 mmolll, haemoglobin < 11 g/dl and ... urine Bence Jones protein, percentage of plasma cells in the bone marrow, proteinuria, and type of ... chain excretion, and lactic dehydrogenase level, recently recog- nised to be of prognostic value, were not ...

  1. Filial factors of kwashiorkor survival in urban Ghana: Rediscovering ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Suggestions are offered for familyoriented, community health education regarding the irony of this form of malnutrition being endemic in communities that do not lack appropriate food. Implications for increased recognition and support for the elderly and senior family members to enhance child survival are discussed within ...

  2. Sobrevida e fatores de risco para mortalidade neonatal em uma coorte de nascidos vivos de muito baixo peso ao nascer, na Região Sul do Município de São Paulo, Brasil Survival and risk factors for neonatal mortality in a cohort of very low birth weight infants in the southern region of São Paulo city, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Furquim de Almeida

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Estudos populacionais sobre mortalidade neonatal de nascimentos de muito baixo peso ao nascer contribuem para identificar sua complexa rede de fatores de risco. Foi estudada uma coorte de 213 recém-nascidos com peso inferior a 1.500g (112 óbitos neonatais e 101 sobreviventes na Região Sul do Município de São Paulo, Brasil, em 2000/2001. Foram realizadas entrevistas domiciliares e obtidos dados de prontuários hospitalares. Foi realizada análise de sobrevida e empregada regressão múltipla de Cox. A elevada mortalidade na sala de parto, no primeiro dia de vida e ausência de sobreviventes Population studies can help identify the complex set of risk factors for neonatal mortality among very low birth weight infants. A cohort (2000-2001 of 213 live newborns with birth weight < 1,500g in the southern region of São Paulo city, Brazil, was studied (112 neonatal deaths and 101 survivors. Data were obtained from home interviews and hospital records. Survival analysis and multiple Cox regression were performed. The high mortality in the delivery room and in the first day of life among neonates < 1,000g and < 28 weeks gestational age and the absence of survival in neonates < 700g suggest that care was actively oriented towards newborns with better prognosis. Increased risk of neonatal mortality was associated with maternal residence in slum areas, history of previous cesarean(s, history of induced abortion(s, adolescent motherhood, vaginal bleeding, and lack of prenatal care. Cesarean section and referral of the newborn to the hospital nursery showed protective effects. Birth weight less than 1,000g and Apgar index < 7 were associated with increased risk. The high mortality was due to poor living conditions and to maternal and neonatal characteristics. Improvement in prenatal and neonatal care could reduce neonatal mortality in these infants.

  3. Preoperative Nutritional Risk Index to predict postoperative survival time in primary liver cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, Yacong; Yao, Mingjie; Zhang, Ling; Bekalo, Wolde; Lu, Weiquan; Lu, Quanjun

    2015-01-01

    We designed this study to determine the predictive value of Nutritional Risk Index (NRI) for postoperative survival time of patients who had undergone hepatectomy for primary liver cancer. The 620 patients who underwent hepatectomy for primary liver cancer (PLC) in the Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, Cancer Hospital of Henan Province, Zhengzhou, China from December 1, 2008 to December 1, 2012 were followed up. A nutritional risk index (NRI) was used to screen the patients with malnutrition (NRI100) patients had longer postoperative survival time compared with malnourished patients. NRI values>100 was sig-nificantly associated with longer postoperative survival time. Cox proportional hazards model showed that NRI was an independent predictor of postoperative survival time and that NRI varied inversely with the risk of death. The patients with NRI values>100 survived longer than those with NRI values

  4. Developmental Risk Factors for Sexual Offending.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joseph K. P.; Jackson, Henry J.; Pattison, Pip; Ward, Tony

    2002-01-01

    A study involving 64 Australian sex offenders and 33 non-sex offenders found childhood emotional abuse and family dysfunction, childhood behavior problems, and childhood sexual abuse were developmental risk factors for paraphilia. Emotional abuse and family dysfunction was found to be a risk factor for pedophilia, exhibitionism, rape, or multiple…

  5. Early life risk factors for testicular cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piltoft, Johanne Spanggaard; Larsen, Signe Benzon; Dalton, Susanne Oksbjerg

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: One established risk factors for testicular cancer is cryptorchidism. However, it remains unclear whether cryptorchidism is a risk factor in itself or whether the two conditions share common causes in early life (estrogen hypothesis), such as birth weight and birth order. The objective...

  6. Risk Factors and Therapeutic Targets in Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wörmann, Sonja Maria; Algül, Hana

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is one of the most challenging tumor entities worldwide, characterized as a highly aggressive disease with dismal overall prognosis and an incidence rate equalling mortality rate. Over the last decade, substantial progress has been made to define the morphological changes and key genetic events in pancreatic carcinogenesis. And yet, it is still unclear what factors trigger PC. Some risk factors appear to be associated with sex, age, race/ethnicity, or other rare genetic conditions. Additionally, modifying factors such as smoking, obesity, diabetes, occupational risk factors, etc., increase the potential for acquiring genetic mutations that may result in PC. Another hallmark of PC is its poor response to radio- and chemo-therapy. Current chemotherapeutic regimens could not provide substantial survival benefit with a clear increase in overall survival. Recently, several new approaches to significantly improve the clinical outcome of PC have been described involving downstream signaling cascades desmoplasia and stromal response as well as tumor microenvironment, immune response, vasculature, and angiogenesis. This review summarizes major risk factors for PC and tries to illuminate relevant targets considerable for new therapeutic approaches. PMID:24303367

  7. Risk Factors and Therapeutic Targets in Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Maria Wörmann

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer (PC is one of the most challenging tumor entities worldwide, characterized as a highly aggressive disease with dismal overall prognosis and an incidence rate equalling mortality rate. Over the last decade, substantial progress has been made to define the morphological changes and key genetic events in pancreatic carcinogenesis. And yet, it is still unclear what factors trigger PC. Some risk factors appear to be associated with sex, age, race/ethnicity, or other rare genetic conditions. Additionally, modifying factors such as smoking, obesity, diabetes, occupational risk factors, etc. increase the potential for acquiring genetic mutations that may result in PC.Another hallmark of PC is its poor response to radio- and chemotherapy. Current chemotherapeutic regimens could not provide substantial survival benefit with a clear increase in overall survival. Recently, several new approaches to significantly improve the clinical outcome of PC have been described involving downstream signalling cascades desmoplasia and stromal response as well as tumor microenvironment, immune response, vasculature, and angiogenesis. This review summarizes major risk factors for PC and tries to illuminate relevant targets considerable for new therapeutic approaches.

  8. Epidemiology of conventional cardiovascular risk factors among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Impaired fasting or glucose tolerance and/or diabetes can occur with hypertension, which theoretically predicts a worse cardiovascular risk profile, and consequently requires intensive cardiovasular risk management. Objectives. To characterise the frequency of the occurence of conventional cardiovascular risk factors ...

  9. Risk factors for sepsis-related death in children and adolescents with hematologic and malignant diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirozumi Sano

    2017-04-01

    Conclusion: It was found that a history of relapse, a refractory state of underlying disease, and high C-reactive protein concentrations at the beginning of fever were significant risk factors for mortality after developing sepsis. Survival rate of patients with risk factors raised in this study might be improved by early introduction of vancomycin.

  10. Adult Prostitution Recidivism: Risk Factors and Impact of a Diversion Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe-Sepowitz, Dominique E.; Hickle, Kristine E.; Loubert, Martha Perez; Egan, Tom

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the risk factors and the impact of a prostitution diversion program on prostitution recidivism. Risk factors and recidivism were explored using chi-square, t tests, and survival analysis. Participants were 448 individuals who were arrested for prostitution and attended a prostitution-focused diversion…

  11. Lifestyle and other risk factors for diverticulitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, Stephan K; Kruis, Wolfgang

    2017-06-01

    Diverticulosis is a very common condition. Around 20% of the carriers of diverticula are believed to suffer from diverticular disease during their lifetime. This makes diverticular disease one of the clinically and economically most significant diseases in gastroenterology. The etiopathogenesis of diverticulosis and diverticular disease is not well understood. Epidemiological studies allow defining risk factors for the development of diverticulitis and its complications. A comprehensive literature search was performed and the current knowledge about risk factors for diverticulitis and associated conditions reviewed. Besides non-controllable risk factors like age and sex, lifestyle factors like food, drinks and physical activity, drugs are described to increase or decrease the risk to develop diverticulitis or to suffer from complications. The recognition of risk factors for the development of diverticular disease or even complicated disease like lifestyle habits or medication is crucial for patient management.

  12. Intrinsic Risk Factors of Falls in Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasmin Amatullah

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Falls are common geriatric problems. The risk factors of falls are the intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors. Studies on falls are scarcely conducted in Indonesia, especially in Bandung. Therefore, this study was conducted to identify the intrinsic risk factors of falls among elderly. Methods: A descriptive study was carried out from August to October 2013 at the Geriatric Clinic of Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital Bandung. Fifty three participants were selected according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria using consecutive sampling. The determined variables in this study were classification of the risk of falls, demographic profile, history of falls, disease, and medications. After the selection, the participants were tested by Timed up-and-go test (TUGT. Moreover, an interview and analysis of medical records were carried out to discover the risk factors of falls. The collected data were analyzed and presented in the form of percentages shown in tables. Results: From 53 patients, women (35.66% were considered to have higher risk of fall than men (18.34%. The majority of patients (66% with the risk of fall were from the age group 60–74 years. The major diseases suffered by patients were hypertension, osteoarthritis and diabetes mellitus. Drugs that were widely used were antihypertensive drugs; analgesic and antipyretic drugs and antidiabetic drugs. Conclusions: There are various intrinsic risk factors of falls in elderly and each of the elderly has more than one intrinsic risk factor of falls.

  13. Hypoproteinemia as a prognostic risk factor for arteriovenous fistula failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premuzic, Vedran; Hudolin, Tvrtko; Pasini, Josip; Zimak, Zoran; Hauptman, Dinko; Jelakovic, Bojan; Kastelan, Zeljko

    2017-01-29

    Any vascular access is of limited duration with many factors which influence survival in patients on chronic hemodialysis (HD). Hypoproteinemia as a marker of chronic illness is common among chronic HD patients. Our aim was to analyze the survival of the primary arteriovenous fistula (AVFs) and the risk factors which influence their patency and to test the hypothesis that patients with normal values of serum proteins have lower risk of AVF failure compared to patients with hypoproteinemia. Seven hundred thirty-four consecutive patients were included who underwent creation of an AVF. The patients were prospectively followed-up for 2 years. Only patients with AVF function after a month from its creation were analyzed. The patients were divided into two subgroups, with normal and low serum protein levels (functional while 237 (32.3%) AVFs failed due to thrombosis or stenosis. Serum proteins and AVFs created on the forearm were positive predictors while diabetes was a negative predictor of longer AVF survival (P < 0.001; P = 0.003; P = 0.043). When comparing patients with normal and low serum protein levels (<65 g/L), mean survival time was significantly longer in patients with normal serum levels (P < 0.001). In this study, hypoproteinemia was an independent prognostic marker for AVF failure at 2 years. Hypoproteinemia, based on our results, is an independent, more sensitive and prognostic marker of possible vascular access failure than the presence of other common factors which influence shorter AVF survival. © 2017 International Society for Hemodialysis.

  14. Liver recurrence in endometrial cancer: a multi-institutional analysis of factors predictive of postrecurrence survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toptas, Tayfun; Karalok, Alper; Ureyen, Isin; Tasci, Tolga; Erol, Onur; Bozkurt, Selen; Tulunay, Gokhan; Simsek, Tayup; Turan, Taner

    2016-10-01

    Predictive factors for survival following liver metastasis in endometrial cancer (EC) have not been studied to date. It is expected that patients who initially presented with liver metastasis or developed liver metastasis as the subsequent metastatic site of progressive disease are likely to have poor outcomes. However, patients developing liver metastasis as the first site of recurrence may have a chance of benefiting from the salvage therapies. Therefore, we aimed to determine factors influencing postrecurrence survival in EC patients who developed liver metastasis as the first site of recurrence. Patients with EC who underwent primary surgery at three centers between 1993 and 2013 were reviewed. Liver recurrence was defined as documentation of parenchymal liver metastasis either by radiologically or biopsy, after a disease-free interval of ≥3 months. Patients with liver metastasis at presentation, or liver metastasis as the subsequent metastatic site of progressive disease were excluded. Forty-six patients were identified. Median time to liver recurrence was 12 months, with 91.3 % of recurrences detected within 3 years. Most patients (73.9 %) had liver recurrence concomitant with extra-hepatic disease. Median survival after the diagnosis of liver recurrence was 9 months. While in univariate analysis, time to liver recurrence (p liver recurrence (p < 0.001) was the only independent predictor. This criterion may be used as a marker for stratifying patients into different prognostic risk groups and for selection of patients for salvage therapies.

  15. Predictive risk factors for persistent postherniotomy pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aasvang, Eske K; Gmaehle, Eliza; Hansen, Jeanette B

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Persistent postherniotomy pain (PPP) affects everyday activities in 5-10% of patients. Identification of predisposing factors may help to identify the risk groups and guide anesthetic or surgical procedures in reducing risk for PPP. METHODS: A prospective study was conducted in 464 pa...... to a standardized heat stimulus may preferably be treated using an operative technique with lowest risk for nerve damage.......BACKGROUND: Persistent postherniotomy pain (PPP) affects everyday activities in 5-10% of patients. Identification of predisposing factors may help to identify the risk groups and guide anesthetic or surgical procedures in reducing risk for PPP. METHODS: A prospective study was conducted in 464...... patients undergoing open or laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal elective groin hernia repair. Primary outcome was identification of risk factors for substantial pain-related functional impairment at 6 months postoperatively assessed by the validated Activity Assessment Scale (AAS). Data on potential...

  16. Glaucoma history and risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles W. McMonnies

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Apart from the risk of developing glaucoma there is also the risk that it is not detected and irreversible loss of vision ensues. Some studies of methods of glaucoma diagnosis have examined the results of instrument-based examinations with great if not complete reliance on objective findings in arriving at a diagnosis. The very valuable advances in glaucoma detection instrument technologies, and apparent increasing dependence on them, may have led to reduced consideration of information available from a patient history in those studies. Dependence on objective evidence of glaucomatous pathology may reduce the possibility of detecting glaucoma suspects or patients at risk for becoming glaucoma suspects. A valid positive family history of glaucoma is very valuable information. However, negative family histories can often be unreliable due to large numbers of glaucoma cases being undiagnosed. No evidence of family history is appropriate rather than no family history. In addition the unreliability of a negative family history is increased when patients with glaucoma fail to inform their family members. A finding of no family history can only be stated as no known family history. In examining the potential diagnostic contribution from a patient history, this review considers, age, frailty, race, type and degree of refractive error, systemic hyper- and hypotension, vasospasm, migraine, pigmentary dispersion syndrome, pseudoexfoliation syndrome, obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, diabetes, medication interactions and side effects, the degree of exposure to intraocular and intracranial pressure elevations and fluctuations, smoking, and symptoms in addition to genetics and family history of the disease.

  17. Relationship Satisfaction and Risk Factors for Suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Till, Benedikt; Tran, Ulrich S; Niederkrotenthaler, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that troubled romantic relationships are associated with higher risk factors for mental health. However, studies examining the role of relationship satisfaction in suicide risk factors are scarce. We investigated differences in risk factors for suicide between individuals with high relationship satisfaction, individuals with low relationship satisfaction, and singles. Furthermore, we explored patterns of experiencing, and dealing with, conflicts in the relationship and examined associations with suicide risk factors. In this cross-sectional study, we assessed relationship status, relationship satisfaction, specific types of relationship conflicts, and suicide risk factors (i.e., suicidal ideation, hopelessness, depression) with questionnaires among 382 individuals in Austria. Risk factors for suicide were higher among singles than among individuals in happy relationships, but lower among those with low relationship satisfaction. Participants reporting a high number of unsolved conflicts in their relationship had higher levels of suicidal ideation, hopelessness, and depression than individuals who tend to solve issues with their partner amicably or report no conflicts. Relationship satisfaction and relationship conflicts reflect risk factors for suicide, with higher levels of suicidal ideation, hopelessness, and depression reported by individuals who mentioned unsolved conflicts with their partner and experienced low satisfaction with their relationship.

  18. Seismic Risk Perception compared with seismic Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crescimbene, Massimo; La Longa, Federica; Pessina, Vera; Pino, Nicola Alessandro; Peruzza, Laura

    2016-04-01

    The communication of natural hazards and their consequences is one of the more relevant ethical issues faced by scientists. In the last years, social studies have provided evidence that risk communication is strongly influenced by the risk perception of people. In order to develop effective information and risk communication strategies, the perception of risks and the influencing factors should be known. A theory that offers an integrative approach to understanding and explaining risk perception is still missing. To explain risk perception, it is necessary to consider several perspectives: social, psychological and cultural perspectives and their interactions. This paper presents the results of the CATI survey on seismic risk perception in Italy, conducted by INGV researchers on funding by the DPC. We built a questionnaire to assess seismic risk perception, with a particular attention to compare hazard, vulnerability and exposure perception with the real data of the same factors. The Seismic Risk Perception Questionnaire (SRP-Q) is designed by semantic differential method, using opposite terms on a Likert scale to seven points. The questionnaire allows to obtain the scores of five risk indicators: Hazard, Exposure, Vulnerability, People and Community, Earthquake Phenomenon. The questionnaire was administered by telephone interview (C.A.T.I.) on a statistical sample at national level of over 4,000 people, in the period January -February 2015. Results show that risk perception seems be underestimated for all indicators considered. In particular scores of seismic Vulnerability factor are extremely low compared with house information data of the respondents. Other data collected by the questionnaire regard Earthquake information level, Sources of information, Earthquake occurrence with respect to other natural hazards, participation at risk reduction activities and level of involvement. Research on risk perception aims to aid risk analysis and policy-making by

  19. HUMAN PROSTATE CANCER RISK FACTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prostate cancer has the highest prevalence of any non-skin cancer in the human body, with similar likelihood of neoplastic foci found within the prostates of men around the world regardless of diet, occupation, lifestyle, or other factors. Essentially all men with circulating an...

  20. BREAST CANCER: IS OBESITY A RISK FACTOR?

    OpenAIRE

    Anjali; Deepak; Dinesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Most epidemiological studies established obesity as an important risk factor for breast cancer. It is one of the few risk factors that women can modify. Now-a-days breast cancer is considered to be a life-style disease. The relation of obesity to breast cancer is complex one. Obesity is found to be associated with increased risk of cancer in post-menopausal women, but relation is reverse in pre-menopausal women. In these patients, obesity increases risk due to enhanced oestrogenic...

  1. Risk Factors for Complications of Traumatic Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Aguiar Júnior, Wagner; Saleh, Carmen Mohamad Rida; Whitaker, Iveth Yamaguchi

    2016-01-01

    Complications in hospitalized trauma patients are major causes of morbidity and mortality. The aims of this study were to identify the in-hospital trauma patients' complications and identify the risk factors for complications in this population. A retrospective analysis was conducted in a sample from a Brazilian hospital. The sample consisted of 407 patients, 194 (47.66%) of whom had records of complications. The most common complications were infections (41.80%). The risk factors related to the complications were age, length of hospital stay, external causes, and injury severity. The complications were frequent in this sample, and the risk for complications was characterized by multiple factors.

  2. Glaucoma history and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMonnies, Charles W

    Apart from the risk of developing glaucoma there is also the risk that it is not detected and irreversible loss of vision ensues. Some studies of methods of glaucoma diagnosis have examined the results of instrument-based examinations with great if not complete reliance on objective findings in arriving at a diagnosis. The very valuable advances in glaucoma detection instrument technologies, and apparent increasing dependence on them, may have led to reduced consideration of information available from a patient history in those studies. Dependence on objective evidence of glaucomatous pathology may reduce the possibility of detecting glaucoma suspects or patients at risk for becoming glaucoma suspects. A valid positive family history of glaucoma is very valuable information. However, negative family histories can often be unreliable due to large numbers of glaucoma cases being undiagnosed. No evidence of family history is appropriate rather than no family history. In addition the unreliability of a negative family history is increased when patients with glaucoma fail to inform their family members. A finding of no family history can only be stated as no known family history. In examining the potential diagnostic contribution from a patient history, this review considers, age, frailty, race, type and degree of refractive error, systemic hyper- and hypotension, vasospasm, migraine, pigmentary dispersion syndrome, pseudoexfoliation syndrome, obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, diabetes, medication interactions and side effects, the degree of exposure to intraocular and intracranial pressure elevations and fluctuations, smoking, and symptoms in addition to genetics and family history of the disease. Copyright © 2016 Spanish General Council of Optometry. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. The Marriage Protective Factors in Married People With Risk Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    شیدا خالدی

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to investigate the marriage protective factors in married people with risk factors. The method of this study is qualityative. In this study the researcher-made risk factor check list and Enrich Marital Satisfaction Questionnaire (115-item test were used. to select the sample group, Risk Factor Check List and Enrich marital satisfaction questionnaire were distributed among 100 men and 100 women who had been married for at least 3 years. Among these 200 individuals, 22 people with high risk factors and marital satisfaction were screened. Data reached saturation through Interviewing 18 people. Protective factors based on their frequencies include: relationship, personality traits, skills, adjustment, out-side factors, religion, and beliefs. Each of these protective factors includes several primary components. Some of the components such as respect, desirable sexual relation and commitment have important role in protecting marriage. In addition, some other factors, such as contentment, not being jealous of otherpeople’s lives, accepting the current life situation, were mentioned that seem to be specific to Iranian culture. There was no significant difference between men and women choosing protective factors. There was however a significant difference between men and women in some of the mentioned components.

  4. The transcription factor Myt3 acts as a pro-survival factor in β-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan R Tennant

    Full Text Available We previously identified the transcription factor Myt3 as specifically expressed in pancreatic islets. Here, we sought to determine the expression and regulation of Myt3 in islets and to determine its significance in regulating islet function and survival.Myt3 expression was determined in embryonic pancreas and adult islets by qPCR and immunohistochemistry. ChIP-seq, ChIP-qPCR and luciferase assays were used to evaluate regulation of Myt3 expression. Suppression of Myt3 was used to evaluate gene expression, insulin secretion and apoptosis in islets.We show that Myt3 is the most abundant MYT family member in adult islets and that it is expressed in all the major endocrine cell types in the pancreas after E18.5. We demonstrate that Myt3 expression is directly regulated by Foxa2, Pdx1, and Neurod1, which are critical to normal β-cell development and function, and that Ngn3 induces Myt3 expression through alterations in the Myt3 promoter chromatin state. Further, we show that Myt3 expression is sensitive to both glucose and cytokine exposure. Of specific interest, suppressing Myt3 expression reduces insulin content and increases β-cell apoptosis, at least in part, due to reduced Pdx1, Mafa, Il-6, Bcl-xl, c-Iap2 and Igfr1 levels, while over-expression of Myt3 protects islets from cytokine induced apoptosis.We have identified Myt3 as a novel transcriptional regulator with a critical role in β-cell survival. These data are an important step in clarifying the regulatory networks responsible for β-cell survival, and point to Myt3 as a potential therapeutic target for improving functional β-cell mass.

  5. Epidemiology and risk factors of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janoutová, Jana; Janácková, Petra; Serý, Omar; Zeman, Tomás; Ambroz, Petr; Kovalová, Martina; Varechová, Katerina; Hosák, Ladislav; Jirík, Vitezslav; Janout, Vladimír

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a severe mental disorder that affects approximately one percent of the general population. The pathogenesis of schizophrenia is influenced by many risk factors, both environmental and genetic. The environmental factors include the date of birth, place of birth and seasonal effects, infectious diseases, complications during pregnancy and delivery, substance abuse and stress. At the present time, in addition to environmental factors, genetic factors are assumed to play a role in the development of the schizophrenia. The heritability of schizo- phrenia is up to 80%. If one parent suffers from the condition, the probability that it will be passed down to the offspring is 13%. If it is present in both parents, the risk is more than 20%. The opinions are varied as to the risk factors affecting the development of schizophrenia. Knowing these factors may greatly contribute to prevention of the condition.

  6. Exercise for breast cancer survival: the effect on cancer risk and cancer-related fatigue (CRF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Jennifer A; Mokbel, Kefah; van Someren, Ken A; Jewell, Andrew P; Garrod, Rachel

    2005-01-01

    To date, all epidemiological research in this area has focused on the relationship between physical activity level and the risk of breast cancer in healthy women, or more recently, those who have recovered from the disease. Most of this research highlights the fact that those women who are physically active are at a reduced risk of the disease. Although physical activity is similar to exercise, it lacks the specificity of a prescribed exercise training program. Consequently, such research can only be viewed as a promising indicator of the beneficial effect that regular exercise may have for breast cancer survivors. Furthermore, due to the nature of such research, there has been a failure to provide specific evidence concerning the most suitable modality, duration, intensity, and frequency of training for risk reduction in breast cancer survivors. Thus, evidence aiding the correct prescription of exercise for this population has been lacking. More promising evidence is provided by randomized controlled trials, which examine the effect of exercise on specific risk factors and provide convincing scientific rationale for the use of exercise among breast cancer survivors. These studies not only provide understanding of the physiological mechanisms by which exercise can be effective at aiding a reduction in breast cancer risk, but also allow conclusions on the correct prescription to be drawn. Additionally, exercise has proven to be effective in combating cancer-related fatigue (CRF), significantly improving both quality of life outcomes (QOL) and physiological capacity in women who have survived breast cancer. In order to promote a wider understanding of the beneficial effect that exercise holds for this population regarding reduction of breast cancer risk and CRF, this review discusses this research, making conclusions regarding the necessary training prescription to elicit such benefits.

  7. Ectasia risk factors in refractive surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santhiago MR

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Marcony R Santhiago,1 Natalia T Giacomin,1 David Smadja,2 Samir J Bechara1 1Department of Ophthalmology, Federal University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil, 2Ophthalmology Department, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv, Israel Abstract: This review outlines risk factors of post-laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK ectasia that can be detected preoperatively and presents a new metric to be considered in the detection of ectasia risk. Relevant factors in refractive surgery screening include the analysis of intrinsic biomechanical properties (information obtained from corneal topography/tomography and patient’s age, as well as the analysis of alterable biomechanical properties (information obtained from the amount of tissue altered by surgery and the remaining load-bearing tissue. Corneal topo­graphy patterns of placido disk seem to play a pivotal role as a surrogate of corneal strength, and abnormal corneal topography remains to be the most important identifiable risk factor for ectasia. Information derived from tomography, such as pachymetric and epithelial maps as well as computational strategies, to help in the detection of keratoconus is additional and relevant. High percentage of tissue altered (PTA is the most robust risk factor for ectasia after LASIK in patients with normal preoperative corneal topography. Compared to specific residual stromal bed (RSB or central corneal thickness values, percentage of tissue altered likely provides a more individualized measure of biomechanical alteration because it considers the relationship between thickness, tissue altered through ablation and flap creation, and ultimate RSB thickness. Other recognized risk factors include low RSB, thin cornea, and high myopia. Age is also a very important risk factor and still remains as one of the most overlooked ones. A comprehensive screening approach with the Ectasia Risk Score System, which evaluates multiple risk factors simultaneously, is also a

  8. Survival risk assessment for primary blast exposures to the head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafaels, Karin; Bass, Cameron R Dale; Salzar, Robert S; Panzer, Matthew B; Woods, William; Feldman, Sanford; Cummings, Thomas; Capehart, Bruce

    2011-11-01

    Many soldiers returning from the current conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan have had at least one exposure to an explosive event and a significant number have symptoms consistent with traumatic brain injury. Although blast injury risk functions have been determined and validated for pulmonary injury, there is little information on the blast levels necessary to cause blast brain injury. Anesthetized male New Zealand White rabbits were exposed to varying levels of shock tube blast exposure focused on the head, while their thoraces were protected. The specimens were euthanized and evaluated when the blast resulted in respiratory arrest that was non-responsive to resuscitation or at 4?h post-exposure. Injury was evaluated by gross examination and histological evaluation. The fatality data from brain injury were then analyzed using Fisher's exact test to determine a brain fatality risk function. Greater blast intensity was associated with post-blast apnea and the need for mechanical ventilation. Gross examination revealed multifocal subdural hemorrhages, most often near the brainstem, at more intense levels of exposure. Histological evaluation revealed subdural and subarachnoid hemorrhages in the non-responsive respiratory-arrested specimens. A fatality risk function from blast exposure to the head was determined for the rabbit specimens with an LD(50) at a peak overpressure of 750?kPa. Scaling techniques were used to predict injury risk at other blast overpressure/duration combinations. The fatality risk function showed that the blast level needed to cause fatality from an overpressure wave exposure to the head was greater than the peak overpressure needed to cause fatality from pulmonary injury. This risk function can be used to guide future research for blast brain injury by providing a realistic fatality risk to guide the design of protection or to evaluate injury.

  9. Survival and prognostic factors for survival, cancer specific survival and disease free interval in 239 patients with Hurthle cell carcinoma: a single center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oluic, Branisav; Paunovic, Ivan; Loncar, Zlatibor; Djukic, Vladimir; Diklic, Aleksandar; Jovanovic, Milan; Garabinovic, Zeljko; Slijepcevic, Nikola; Rovcanin, Branislav; Micic, Dusan; Filipovic, Aleksandar; Zivaljevic, Vladan

    2017-05-25

    Hurthle cell carcinoma makes up 3 to 5% of all thyroid cancers and is considered to be a true rarity. The aim of our study was to analyze clinical characteristics and survival rates of patients with Hurthle cell carcinoma. Clinical data regarding basic demographic characteristics, tumor grade, type of surgical treatment and vital status were collected. Methods of descriptive statistics and Kaplan-Meier survival curves were used for statistical analysis. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to identify independent predictors. During the period from 1995 to 2014, 239 patients with Hurthle cell carcinoma were treated at our Institution. The average age of the patients was 54.3, with female to male ratio of 3.6:1 and average tumor size was 41.8 mm. The overall recurrence rate was 12.1%, with average time for relapse of 90.74 months and average time without any signs of the disease of 222.4 months. Overall 5-year, 10-year and 20-year survival rates were 89.4%, 77.2%, 61.9% respectively. The 5-year, 10-year and 20-year cancer specific survival rates were 94.6%, 92.5%, 87.4%, respectively. When disease free interval was observed, 5-year, 10-year and 20-year rates were 91.1%, 86.2%, 68.5%, respectively. The affection of both thyroid lobes and the need for reoperation due to local relapse were unfavorable independent prognostic factors, while total thyroidectomy as primary procedure was favorable predictive factor for cancer specific survival. Hurthle cell carcinoma is a rare tumor with an encouraging prognosis and after adequate surgical treatment recurrences are rare.

  10. Resting heart rate and cardiovascular events: risk factor or risk ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Review: Resting heart rate and cardiovascular events: risk factor or risk marker? 128. Vol 52 No 2. SA Fam Pract 2010. SA Fam Pract 2010;52(2): 128-129. Heart rate in epidemiological studies. Over the last 25 years numerous reports demonstrated a significant association between resting heart rate and all- cause mortality ...

  11. Obesity and Cardiovascular Disease: a Risk Factor or a Risk Marker?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandviwala, Taher; Khalid, Umair; Deswal, Anita

    2016-05-01

    In the USA, 69 % of adults are either overweight or obese and 35 % are obese. Obesity is associated with an increased incidence of various cardiovascular disorders. Obesity is a risk marker for cardiovascular disease, in that it is associated with a much higher prevalence of comorbidities such as diabetes, hypertension, and metabolic syndrome, which then increase the risk for cardiovascular disease. However, in addition, obesity may also be an independent risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease. Furthermore, although obesity has been shown to be an independent risk factor for several cardiovascular diseases, it is often associated with improved survival once the diagnosis of the cardiovascular disease has been made, leading to the term "obesity paradox." Several pathways linking obesity and cardiovascular disease have been described. In this review, we attempt to summarize the complex relationship between obesity and cardiovascular disorders, in particular coronary atherosclerosis, heart failure, and atrial fibrillation.

  12. RISK FACTORS FOR STROKE AND USE OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kateee

    2003-04-04

    Apr 4, 2003 ... Objective: To review risk factors for stroke and the use of echocardiography in ... echocardiography may enhance the diagnosis but not necessarily change management. ..... Task Force on Practice Guidelines (Committee on.

  13. Atherogenic risk factors and hearing thresholds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Thomas Winther; Ramlau-Hansen, Cecilia Høst; Stokholm, Zara Ann

    2014-01-01

    children's day care units, financial services and 10 manufacturing trades. Associations between atherogenic risk factors (blood lipids, glycosylated hemoglobin, smoking habits, body mass index (BMI), and ambulatory blood pressure) and hearing thresholds were analyzed using multiple linear regression models...

  14. Epilepsy Risk Factors Following Neonatal Seizures

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-01-01

    Clinical and polysomnographic risk factors as early predictors for the development of postnatal epilepsy were determined in 158 infants presenting with two or more seizures, in a study at Hospital Sao Lucas, Porto Alegre, Brazil.

  15. Awareness of risk factors for cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lagerlund, Magdalena; Hvidberg, Line; Hajdarevic, Senada

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sweden and Denmark are neighbouring countries with similarities in culture, healthcare, and economics, yet notable differences in cancer statistics. A crucial component of primary prevention is high awareness of risk factors in the general public. We aimed to determine and compare...... awareness of risk factors for cancer between a Danish and a Swedish population sample, and to examine whether there are differences in awareness across age groups. Methods: Data derive from Module 2 of the International Cancer Benchmarking Partnership. Telephone interviews were conducted with 3000 adults...... in Denmark and 3070 in Sweden using the Awareness and Beliefs about Cancer measure. Data reported here relate to awareness of 13 prompted risk factors for cancer. Prevalence ratios with 95 % confidence intervals were calculated to examine associations between country, age, and awareness of risk factors...

  16. Women's Heart Disease: Heart Disease Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... changing, depending on your age and other factors unique to you. High Blood Pressure —Blood pressure is ... cholesterol raise your LDL cholesterol level. A high-sodium (salt) diet can raise your risk for high ...

  17. Smoldering multiple myeloma risk factors for progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørrig, Rasmus; Klausen, Tobias W; Salomo, Morten

    2016-01-01

    Several risk scores for disease progression in patients with smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) have been proposed; however, all have been developed using single-center registries. To examine risk factors for time to progression (TTP) to multiple myeloma (MM) for SMM, we analyzed a nationwide...... population-based cohort of 321 patients with newly diagnosed SMM registered within the Danish Multiple Myeloma Registry between 2005 and 2014. Significant univariable risk factors for TTP were selected for multivariable Cox regression analyses. We found that both an M-protein ≥30 g/L and immunoparesis...... as having ultra high-risk of transformation to MM. Using only immunoparesis and M-protein ≥30 g/L, we created a scoring system to identify low-, intermediate-, and high-risk SMM. This first population-based study of patients with SMM confirms that an M-protein ≥30 g/L and immunoparesis remain important risk...

  18. Time-Varying Effects of Prognostic Factors Associated With Disease-Free Survival in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Loki; Pu, Minya; Parker, Barbara A.; Thomson, Cynthia A.; Caan, Bette J.; Flatt, Shirley W.; Madlensky, Lisa; Hajek, Richard A.; Al-Delaimy, Wael K.; Saquib, Nazmus; Gold, Ellen B.

    2009-01-01

    Early detection and effective treatments have dramatically improved breast cancer survivorship, yet the risk of relapse persists even 15 years after the initial diagnosis. It is important to identify prognostic factors for late breast cancer events. The authors investigated time-varying effects of tumor characteristics on breast-cancer-free survival using data on 3,088 breast cancer survivors from 4 US states who participated in a randomized dietary intervention trial in 1995–2006, with maximum follow-up through 15 years (median, 9 years). A piecewise constant penalized spline approach incorporating time-varying coefficients was adopted, allowing for deviations from the proportional hazards assumption. This method is more flexible than standard approaches, provides direct estimates of hazard ratios across time intervals, and is computationally tractable. Having a stage II or III tumor was associated with a 3-fold higher hazard of breast cancer than having a stage I tumor during the first 2.5 years after diagnosis; this hazard ratio decreased to 2.1 after 7.7 years, but higher tumor stage remained a significant risk factor. Similar diminishing effects were found for poorly differentiated tumors. Interestingly, having a positive estrogen receptor status was protective up to 4 years after diagnosis but detrimental after 7.7 years (hazard ratio = 1.5). These results emphasize the importance of careful statistical modeling allowing for possibly time-dependent effects in long-term survivorship studies. PMID:19403844

  19. Is old age a risk factor for dental implants?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazunori Ikebe

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Patient's condition is distinctly different among individuals especially in the elderly. Dental implant failure seems to be a multi-factorial problem; therefore, it is unclear that aging itself is a risk factor for the placement of implants. This review reorders and discusses age-related risk factors for the success of dental implants. In dental implant treatment, chronological age by itself is suggested as one of the risk factors for success, but it would not be a contraindication. In general, reserved capacity of bone and soft tissue make it possible to establish osseointegration in the long run. Rather than aging itself, the specific nature of the disease process, such as osteoporosis or diabetes, and local bone quality and quantity at the implant site, mostly related to aging, are more important for successful dental implant treatment. This review revealed a shortage of published data for the survival and success of dental implants in older patients. More studies useful for evidence-based decision making are needed to assess the survival and success of dental implants for aged patients with a compromised condition.

  20. Ectasia risk factors in refractive surgery

    OpenAIRE

    de Santhiago, MR; Giacomin NT; Smadja D; Bechara SJ

    2016-01-01

    Marcony R Santhiago,1 Natalia T Giacomin,1 David Smadja,2 Samir J Bechara1 1Department of Ophthalmology, Federal University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil, 2Ophthalmology Department, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv, Israel Abstract: This review outlines risk factors of post-laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) ectasia that can be detected preoperatively and presents a new metric to be considered in the detection of ectasia risk. Relevant factors in refracti...

  1. Risk factors for osteoporosis and associated fractures.

    OpenAIRE

    Kelsey, J L

    1989-01-01

    Established risk factors for osteoporosis and associated fractures are increasing age, female sex, white race, removal of the ovaries at an early age, prolonged immobility, and prolonged use of corticosteroids. Obesity and use of estrogen replacement therapy are protective. Factors that probably or possibly increase risk in postmenopausal white women include a low calcium intake, cigarette smoking, and, at least for hip fractures, use of long half-life psychotrophic drugs and heavy alcohol co...

  2. Self-management of vascular risk factors

    OpenAIRE

    Sol-de Rijk, B.G.M.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The aim of this thesis was to provide insight into the potential of a self-management approach in treatment of vascular risk factors and to develop a self-management intervention. Furthermore to examine if this intervention, based on self-efficacy promoting theory, is effective in reducing vascular risk factors in patients with established vascular diseases. Patients with different manifestations of vascular diseases appeared to have high levels of self-efficacy concerning the self-ma...

  3. Modifiable risk factors for surgical site infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moucha, Calin S; Clyburn, Terry A; Evans, Richard P; Prokuski, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Multiple risk factors for orthopaedic surgical site infection have been identified. Some of these factors directly affect the wound-healing process, whereas others can lead to blood-borne sepsis or relative immunosuppression. Modifying a patient's medications; screening for comorbidities, such as HIV or diabetes mellitus; and advising the patient on options to diminish or eliminate adverse behaviors, such as smoking, should lower the risk for surgical site infections.

  4. Primary localization and tumor thickness as prognostic factors of survival in patients with mucosal melanoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarun Mehra

    Full Text Available Data on survival with mucosal melanoma and on prognostic factors of are scarce. It is still unclear if the disease course allows for mucosal melanoma to be treated as primary cutaneous melanoma or if differences in overall survival patterns require adapted therapeutic approaches. Furthermore, this investigation is the first to present 10-year survival rates for mucosal melanomas of different anatomical localizations.116 cases from Sep 10 1984 until Feb 15 2011 retrieved from the Comprehensive Cancer Center and of the Central Register of the German Dermatologic Society databases in Tübingen were included in our analysis. We recorded anatomical location and tumor thickness, and estimated overall survival at 2, 5 and 10 years and the mean overall survival time. Survival times were analyzed with the Kaplan-Meier method. The log-rank test was used to compare survival times by localizations and by T-stages.We found a median overall survival time of 80.9 months, with an overall 2-year survival of 71.7%, 5-year survival of 55.8% and 10-year survival of 38.3%. The 10-year survival rates for patients with T1, T2, T3 or T4 stage tumors were 100.0%, 77.9%, 66.3% and 10.6% respectively. 10-year survival of patients with melanomas of the vulva was 64.5% in comparison to 22.3% of patients with non-vulva mucosal melanomas.Survival times differed significantly between patients with melanomas of the vulva compared to the rest (p = 0.0006. It also depends on T-stage at the time of diagnosis (p < 0.0001.

  5. Aviation occupant survival factors: an empirical study of the SQ006 accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yu-Hern; Yang, Hui-Hua

    2010-03-01

    We present an empirical study of Singapore Airline (SIA) flight SQ006 to illustrate the critical factors that influence airplane occupant survivability. The Fuzzy Delphi Method was used to identify and rank the survival factors that may reduce injury and fatality in potentially survivable accidents. This is the first attempt by a group from both the public and private sectors in Taiwan to focus on cabin-safety issues related to survival factors. We designed a comprehensive survey based on our discussions with aviation safety experts. We next designed an array of important cabin-safety dimensions and then investigated and selected the critical survival factors for each dimension. Our findings reveal important cabin safety and survivability information that should provide a valuable reference for developing and evaluating aviation safety programs. We also believe that the results will be practical for designing cabin-safety education material for air travelers. Finally, the major contribution of this research is that it has identified 47 critical factors that influence accident survivability; therefore, it may encourage improvements that will promote more successful cabin-safety management. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Preventing Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors through Aerobic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper focused on the reduction of cardiovascular disease risk factors, through aerobic exercises. The central argument here is that through exercise there is the tendency for increased strength of the heart muscles. When this is the case, what follows is a reduction in body weight and ultimately less risk on the ...

  7. Cardiovascular risk factors over the life course

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulsegge, G.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) usually manifests itself at middle age or beyond, but it is the result of an ongoing disease process. This stresses the need for insight into changes in lifestyle and metabolic risk factors that occur throughout the life course, and their effect on CVD. We studied risk

  8. Risk factors in prevention of drug dependences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orosova, Ol'ga; Gajdosova, Beata; Madarasova-Geckova, Andrea; Van Dijk, Jitse P.

    2007-01-01

    The study presents the state-of-art of knowledge of risk factors of drug use as a form of risk behaviour in adolescents in individual, interpersonal, and environmental domain (family, school, society). The attention is paid to general deviation syndrome and to the construct of general tendency to

  9. What Are Coronary Heart Disease Risk Factors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is high mainly because the body doesn't use its insulin properly. Over time, a high blood sugar level can lead to ... plaque buildup in their heart arteries by the time they’re in their 70s. ... of CHD. Gender Some risk factors may affect CHD risk differently ...

  10. [Aflatoxins--health risk factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miliţă, Nicoleta Manuela; Mihăescu, Gr; Chifiriuc, Carmen

    2010-01-01

    Aflatoxins are secondary metabolites produced by a group of strains, mainly Aspergillus and Penicillium species. These mycotoxins are bifurano-coumarin derivatives group with four major products B1, B2, G1 and G2 according to blue or green fluorescence emitted in ultraviolet light and according to chromatographic separation. After metabolism of aflatoxin B1 and B2 in the mammalian body, result two metabolites M1 and M2 as hydroxylated derivatives of the parent compound. Aflatoxins have high carcinogenic potential, the most powerful carcinogens in different species of animals and humans. International Agency for Research on Cancer has classified aflatoxin B1 in Group I carcinogens. The target organ for aflatoxins is the liver. In chronic poisoning, aflatoxin is a risk to health, for a long term causing cancer (hepatocellular carcinoma), and in acute intoxications aflatoxin is lethal. This work purpose to discuss aflatoxins issue: the synthesis, absorption and elimination of aflatoxins, the toxicity mechanisms, and measures to limit the content of aflatoxins in food

  11. Risk Factors for Homelessness Among US Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jack; Rosenheck, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Homelessness among US veterans has been a focus of research for over 3 decades. Following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, this is the first systematic review to summarize research on risk factors for homelessness among US veterans and to evaluate the evidence for these risk factors. Thirty-one studies published from 1987 to 2014 were divided into 3 categories: more rigorous studies, less rigorous studies, and studies comparing homeless veterans with homeless nonveterans. The strongest and most consistent risk factors were substance use disorders and mental illness, followed by low income and other income-related factors. There was some evidence that social isolation, adverse childhood experiences, and past incarceration were also important risk factors. Veterans, especially those who served since the advent of the all-volunteer force, were at greater risk for homelessness than other adults. Homeless veterans were generally older, better educated, and more likely to be male, married/have been married, and to have health insurance coverage than other homeless adults. More studies simultaneously addressing premilitary, military, and postmilitary risk factors for veteran homelessness are needed. This review identifies substance use disorders, mental illness, and low income as targets for policies and programs in efforts to end homelessness among veterans. PMID:25595171

  12. Risk factors for homelessness among US veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jack; Rosenheck, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Homelessness among US veterans has been a focus of research for over 3 decades. Following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, this is the first systematic review to summarize research on risk factors for homelessness among US veterans and to evaluate the evidence for these risk factors. Thirty-one studies published from 1987 to 2014 were divided into 3 categories: more rigorous studies, less rigorous studies, and studies comparing homeless veterans with homeless nonveterans. The strongest and most consistent risk factors were substance use disorders and mental illness, followed by low income and other income-related factors. There was some evidence that social isolation, adverse childhood experiences, and past incarceration were also important risk factors. Veterans, especially those who served since the advent of the all-volunteer force, were at greater risk for homelessness than other adults. Homeless veterans were generally older, better educated, and more likely to be male, married/have been married, and to have health insurance coverage than other homeless adults. More studies simultaneously addressing premilitary, military, and postmilitary risk factors for veteran homelessness are needed. This review identifies substance use disorders, mental illness, and low income as targets for policies and programs in efforts to end homelessness among veterans. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health 2015. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  13. [Renal markers and predictors, and renal and cardiovascular risk factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Andrade, C

    2002-01-01

    An important task of the nephrologists during the last century, it has been the search of elements and means that allow us, with the adequate precision, to correlate the functional deterioration of the kidney, and the patient's clinical reality. And the continuous searching of factors and markers that injure them, the prognosis, and early diagnosis, to be able to predict the degree of the organs and patient's survival. Almost parallel survival presage in the natural history of the illness, almost one century ago. In the second half of the XX century, in the developed countries, appear modifications of the social, cultural, and sanitary conditions, that make appear some very different partner-sanitary and epidemic circumstances, and take place like they are, among others: 1. An increase of per cápita private rents, what takes place to increase of the level of social life and the population's health. With increment of the longevity, and smaller incidence and prevalence of classic process, as malnutrition, infections, infantile mortality, so increasing the weight of the cardiovascular diseases and death. This is potentiated for the increment and the incidence of environmental cardiovascular risk's factors (like high caloric and fatty-rich diets, smoke, alcohol, disappearance of the physical work, inactivity, etc). And that situations are also product of the change of the outline of human and social values and guides. 2. Access of the whole population to a sanitary attention of more quality and effectiveness. It allows the biggest survival of patients that suffer vascular crisis, (as angina, miocardial infarction or cerebrovascular accident), that few years ago they have had a higher morbimortality and an inferior survival (2). 3. The execution of big epidemic studies has been able to, not only characterize and test with scientific evidence to numerous factors and markers, that induce renal and cardiovascular prejudicial changes, but risk and death probability

  14. Risk factors for homelessness among women veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, Donna L; Yano, Elizabeth M; McGuire, James; Hines, Vivian; Lee, Martin; Gelberg, Lillian

    2010-02-01

    Women veterans are three to four times more likely than non-veteran women to become homeless. However, their risk factors for homelessness have not been defined. Case-control study of non-institutionalized homeless women veterans (n533) and age-matched housed women veterans (n=165). Health, health care, and factors associated with homelessness were assessed using multiple logistic regression with a Monte Carlo algorithm to estimate exact standard errors of the model coefficients and p-values. Characteristics associated with homelessness were sexual assault during military service, being unemployed, being disabled, having worse overall health, and screening positive for an anxiety disorder or post-traumatic stress disorder. Protective factors were being a college graduate or married. Efforts to assess housed women veterans' risk factors for homelessness should be integrated into clinical care programs within and outside the Veterans Administration. Programs that work to ameliorate risk factors may prevent these women's living situations from deteriorating over time.

  15. Agonists of fibroblast growth factor receptor induce neurite outgrowth and survival of cerebellar granule neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Shizhong; Christensen, Claus; Køhler, Lene B

    2009-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) signaling is pivotal in the regulation of neurogenesis, neuronal differentiation and survival, and synaptic plasticity both during development and in adulthood. In order to develop low molecular weight agonists of FGFR, seven peptides, termed hexafins...

  16. Survival of Patients on Hemodialysis and Predictors of Mortality: a Single-Centre Analysis of Time-Dependent Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossareh, Shahrzad; Farrokhi, Farhat; Zebarjadi, Marjan

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the outcome and predictors of survival in hemodialysis patients of Hasheminejad Kidney Center where a comprehensive dialysis care program has been placed since 2004. Data of 560 hemodialysis patients were used to evaluate 9-year survival rates and predictors of mortality. Cox regression models included comorbidities as well as averaged and 6-month-averaged time-dependent values of laboratory findings as independent factors. Survival rates were 91.9%, 66.0%, 46.3%, and 28.5%,  at 1, 3, 5, and 9 years, respectively, in all patients and 90.8%, 61.6%, 42.1%, and 28.0% in 395 incident patients starting hemodialysis after 2004. Adjusted survival models demonstrated age, male sex, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, and high-risk vascular access as baseline predictors of mortality, as well as averaged low hemoglobin level (hazard ratio [HR], 1.98; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.36 to 2.90) and a single-pool KT/V patients have relatively comparable survival rates with high-profile dialysis centers. Aiming to better achieve the recommended targets, especially hemoglobin and nutritional and bone metabolism factors, should be considered for optimal dialysis outcomes.

  17. When do we need competing risks methods for survival analysis in nephrology?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordzij, Marlies; Leffondré, Karen; van Stralen, Karlijn J.; Zoccali, Carmine; Dekker, Friedo W.; Jager, Kitty J.

    2013-01-01

    Survival analyses are commonly applied to study death or other events of interest. In such analyses, so-called competing risks may form an important problem. A competing risk is an event that either hinders the observation of the event of interest or modifies the chance that this event occurs. For

  18. Risk Factors Incident Preterm Labor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liva Maita

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Preterm labor or parturition Prematurus is labor that occurs at age less than 37 weeks of pregnancy is calculated from the first day of last period. Data in hospitals Arifin Achmad Pekanbaru data obtained in 2010 obtained data on the number of labor as much as 2400 cases, with 190 cases of preterm labor (7.91%, in 2011 the number of births as 2287 cases with 279 cases of preterm labor (12% and in the period January-April 2012 Number 780 cases of preterm labor (11.5%. The purpose of research is knowing the relationship of the complications of pregnancy, a history of preterm labor, anemia, age and parity with preterm labor. Type of research is a case-control study. The population in this study were all mothers giving birth at hospitals Arifin achmad Pekanbaru. Size of the sample consisted of 245 cases and 245 controls. Data analysis was performed by univariate, bivariate and multivariate Logistic Regression method Ganda. The results is a complication of pregnancy (95% CI: 4.09 to 9.21, age (95% CI: 1.58 to 3.69, and parity (95% CI: 1.05 to 2.36 associated with preterm labor. The conclusion that the dominant variables associated with the incidence of preterm birth is a complication of pregnancy and no variable counfounding. Advice to pregnant women who experience pregnancy complications during their pregnancy on a regular basis at least four times during pregnancy and high parity mothers are advised to use contraception; To health professionals to classify the status of patients at risk to facilitate the provision of IEC.

  19. Modifiable risk factors for schizophrenia and autism--shared risk factors impacting on brain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlyn, Jess; Duhig, Michael; McGrath, John; Scott, James

    2013-05-01

    Schizophrenia and autism are two poorly understood clinical syndromes that differ in age of onset and clinical profile. However, recent genetic and epidemiological research suggests that these two neurodevelopmental disorders share certain risk factors. The aims of this review are to describe modifiable risk factors that have been identified in both disorders, and, where available, collate salient systematic reviews and meta-analyses that have examined shared risk factors. Based on searches of Medline, Embase and PsycINFO, inspection of review articles and expert opinion, we first compiled a set of candidate modifiable risk factors associated with autism. Where available, we next collated systematic-reviews (with or without meta-analyses) related to modifiable risk factors associated with both autism and schizophrenia. We identified three modifiable risk factors that have been examined in systematic reviews for both autism and schizophrenia. Advanced paternal age was reported as a risk factor for schizophrenia in a single meta-analysis and as a risk factor in two meta-analyses for autism. With respect to pregnancy and birth complications, for autism one meta-analysis identified maternal diabetes and bleeding during pregnancy as risks factors for autism whilst a meta-analysis of eight studies identified obstetric complications as a risk factor for schizophrenia. Migrant status was identified as a risk factor for both autism and schizophrenia. Two separate meta-analyses were identified for each disorder. Despite distinct clinical phenotypes, the evidence suggests that at least some non-genetic risk factors are shared between these two syndromes. In particular, exposure to drugs, nutritional excesses or deficiencies and infectious agents lend themselves to public health interventions. Studies are now needed to quantify any increase in risk of either autism or schizophrenia that is associated with these modifiable environmental factors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc

  20. Ectasia risk factors in refractive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhiago, Marcony R; Giacomin, Natalia T; Smadja, David; Bechara, Samir J

    2016-01-01

    This review outlines risk factors of post-laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) ectasia that can be detected preoperatively and presents a new metric to be considered in the detection of ectasia risk. Relevant factors in refractive surgery screening include the analysis of intrinsic biomechanical properties (information obtained from corneal topography/tomography and patient's age), as well as the analysis of alterable biomechanical properties (information obtained from the amount of tissue altered by surgery and the remaining load-bearing tissue). Corneal topography patterns of placido disk seem to play a pivotal role as a surrogate of corneal strength, and abnormal corneal topography remains to be the most important identifiable risk factor for ectasia. Information derived from tomography, such as pachymetric and epithelial maps as well as computational strategies, to help in the detection of keratoconus is additional and relevant. High percentage of tissue altered (PTA) is the most robust risk factor for ectasia after LASIK in patients with normal preoperative corneal topography. Compared to specific residual stromal bed (RSB) or central corneal thickness values, percentage of tissue altered likely provides a more individualized measure of biomechanical alteration because it considers the relationship between thickness, tissue altered through ablation and flap creation, and ultimate RSB thickness. Other recognized risk factors include low RSB, thin cornea, and high myopia. Age is also a very important risk factor and still remains as one of the most overlooked ones. A comprehensive screening approach with the Ectasia Risk Score System, which evaluates multiple risk factors simultaneously, is also a helpful tool in the screening strategy.

  1. Risk factors for esophageal candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chocarro Martínez, A; Galindo Tobal, F; Ruiz-Irastorza, G; González López, A; Alvarez Navia, F; Ochoa Sangrador, C; Martín Arribas, M I

    2000-02-01

    The role of gastric acid inhibitors as predisposing factors for Candida esophagitis is unknown. A retrospective case-control study of esophageal candidiasis was conducted in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-negative patients diagnosed from January 1991 to December 1997. The diagnosis of esophageal candidiasis was always made on the basis of endoscopic and histological criteria. Fifty-one patients were diagnosed with esophageal candidiasis, 15 of whom had esophageal complaints and 48 of whom suffered from another previous chronic disease (17 had cancer). In addition, 20 patients had previously been treated with antibiotics, 13 with steroids and 14 with omeprazole. In the multivariate analysis, neoplasm (odds ratio, 5.50; 95% confidence interval, 1.94-15.56) and therapy with antibiotics (odds ratio, 11.97; 95% confidence interval, 3.82-37.45), steroids (odds ratio, 35.52; 95% confidence interval, 3.90-324.01) or omeprazole (odds ratio, 18.23; 95% confidence interval, 4.67-71.03) were all associated with esophageal candidiasis. These data suggest that Candida esophagitis tends to occur in patients with chronic diseases, most of whom have been previously treated with antibiotics, steroids or omeprazole. The findings support the hypothesis that treatment with omeprazole favors the development of esophageal candidiasis.

  2. Neuroglobin, a Factor Playing for Nerve Cell Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Guidolin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Cell death represents the final outcome of several pathological conditions of the central nervous system and available evidence suggests that in both acute injuries and neurodegenerative diseases it is often associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. Thus, the possibility to prevent mitochondrial events involved in cell death might represent efficient tools to limit neuronal damage. In recent years, increased attention has been paid to the endogenous protein neuroglobin, since accumulating evidence showed that its high expression was associated with preserved mitochondrial function and to an increased survival of nerve cells in vitro and in vivo in a variety of experimental models of cell insult. The biological and structural features of neuroglobin and the mitochondria-related mechanisms of neuroglobin-induced neuroprotection will be here briefly discussed. In this respect, the inhibition of the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis emerges as a key neuroprotective effect induced by the protein. These findings could open the possibility to develop efficient neuroglobin-mediated therapeutic strategies aimed at minimizing the neuronal cell death occurring in impacting neurological pathologies like stroke and neurodegenerative diseases.

  3. Java project on periodontal diseases. The natural development of periodontitis: risk factors, risk predictors and risk determinants : risk factors, risk predictors and risk determinants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Velden, U.; Abbas, F.; Armand, S.; Loos, B. G.; Timmerman, M. F.; Van der Weijden, G. A.; Van Winkelhoff, A. J.; Winkel, E. G.

    Objective: To identify risk factors, risk predictors and risk determinants for onset and progression of periodontitis. Material and Methods: For this longitudinal, prospective study all subjects in the age range 15-25 years living in a village of approximately 2000 inhabitants at a tea estate on

  4. Tuberculosis: distribution, risk factors, mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochi, A

    1994-10-01

    About a century after Koch's discovery of the TB bacilli the tuberculosis epidemic which had appeared to be under control was again recognized as a major global health threat. The decline in the epidemic in this century had been largely through the improved living standards and, eventually, the availability and use of effective antibiotics. While tuberculosis gradually disappeared from the health agenda in the western world it remained a big killer throughout the century and in 1992 an estimated 2.7 million TB deaths occurred; 30 million will die from TB during the 1990s if current trends are not reversed. The annual number of new cases will increase from 7.5 million estimated in 1990 to more than 10 million in the year 2000. The main factors for this increase are demographic forces, population movements, the HIV epidemic and increasing drug resistance. The impact of the HIV epidemic is already felt in many sub-Saharan African countries and now threatens Asia where almost two-thirds of the world's TB infected population live and where HIV is spreading. Tuberculosis has also reemerged as a major public health problem in industrialized countries due to international migration, the breakdown of health services, including TB services etc. The control of the epidemic can only be through a concerted action to reinstate TB as priority among health concerns, reflected in national and international resources. A coalition of public and private supporters must be mobilized to support the effort to fight the disease. Governments, non-governmental organizations, the business community, refugee organizations, medical institutions, and other UN agencies are invited to join with WHO in this effort.

  5. Occupational risk factors for Parkinson disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Mark, M.

    2014-01-01

    Environmental factors probably play an important role in the etiology of Parkinson disease (PD). However, not many environmental factors have been identified for which unequivocal evidence is available for a relation with PD risk. The main focus of the research described in this thesis was on

  6. Prognostic factors in the survival of patients with blood disorders recovering from septic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waszczuk-Gajda, Anna; Wiktor Jedrzejczak, Wieslaw

    2017-06-01

    Septic shock is one of the major direct causes of death in patients in hematology departments. The knowledge about clinical outcomes and factors associated with negative outcome in these patients can be important and useful for physicians to identify the patients who are most likely to benefit from ICU therapy. We retrospectively analyzed records of 214 episodes of septic shock in patients with different blood diseases hospitalized between 1998 and 2011 in the Department of Hematology, Oncology and Internal Medicine, the Medical University of Warsaw, Poland. Direct survival with resolution of septic shock was 46%. Among these survivors, 75% continued to live at 30 days, 49% at 6 months, and 12% at 5 years after shock resolution. It was found that the most important prognostic factors for direct (short-term) mortality were multiorgan failure, lack of concordance of empiric antibiotic treatment with results of in vitro sensitivity testing, the Karnofsky score below 60%, presence of more than two comorbidities. Long-term prognosis (3-year follow-up) was affected by multiple factors with the most significant being Karnofsky score, higher organ failure score, hematologic disease relapse or resistance to treatment. Septic shock in patients with blood disorders treated in the hematology ward was associated with very high risk of mortality in all periods after its completion. However, although the results of treatment of septic shock in patients with blood diseases are poor, they were comparable to the results of treatment of septic shock in mixed populations treated in intensive care units.

  7. When perception reflects reality: Non-native grass invasion alters small mammal risk landscapes and survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceradnini, Joseph P.; Chalfoun, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Modification of habitat structure due to invasive plants can alter the risk landscape for wildlife by, for example, changing the quality or availability of refuge habitat. Whether perceived risk corresponds with actual fitness outcomes, however, remains an important open question. We simultaneously measured how habitat changes due to a common invasive grass (cheatgrass, Bromus tectorum) affected the perceived risk, habitat selection, and apparent survival of a small mammal, enabling us to assess how well perceived risk influenced important behaviors and reflected actual risk. We measured perceived risk by nocturnal rodents using a giving-up density foraging experiment with paired shrub (safe) and open (risky) foraging trays in cheatgrass and native habitats. We also evaluated microhabitat selection across a cheatgrass gradient as an additional assay of perceived risk and behavioral responses for deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) at two spatial scales of habitat availability. Finally, we used mark-recapture analysis to quantify deer mouse apparent survival across a cheatgrass gradient while accounting for detection probability and other habitat features. In the foraging experiment, shrubs were more important as protective cover in cheatgrass-dominated habitats, suggesting that cheatgrass increased perceived predation risk. Additionally, deer mice avoided cheatgrass and selected shrubs, and marginally avoided native grass, at two spatial scales. Deer mouse apparent survival varied with a cheatgrass–shrub interaction, corresponding with our foraging experiment results, and providing a rare example of a native plant mediating the effects of an invasive plant on wildlife. By synthesizing the results of three individual lines of evidence (foraging behavior, habitat selection, and apparent survival), we provide a rare example of linkage between behavioral responses of animals indicative of perceived predation risk and actual fitness outcomes. Moreover, our results

  8. Transient risk factors of acute occupational injuries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østerlund, Anna H; Lander, Flemming; Nielsen, Kent

    2017-01-01

    occupational injuries seen in 2013 at two emergency departments in Denmark. Effect estimates were calculated using the matched-pair interval approach. Results Increased risk for an occupational injury was found for time pressure [odds ratio (OR) 1.6, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.3-2.0], feeling sick (OR......Objectives The objectives of this study were to (i) identify transient risk factors of occupational injuries and (ii) determine if the risk varies with age, injury severity, job task, and industry risk level. Method A case-crossover design was used to examine the effect of seven specific transient...... risk factors (time pressure, disagreement with someone, feeling sick, being distracted by someone, non-routine task, altered surroundings, and broken machinery and materials) for occupational injuries. In the study, 1693 patients with occupational injuries were recruited from a total of 4002...

  9. External risk factors affecting construction costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubarak, Husin, Saiful; Oktaviati, Mutia

    2017-11-01

    Some risk factors can have impacts on the cost, time, and performance. Results of previous studies indicated that the external conditions are among the factors which give effect to the contractor in the completion of the project. The analysis in the study carried out by considering the conditions of the project in the last 15 years in Aceh province, divided into military conflict phase (2000-2004), post tsunami disaster rehabilitation and reconstruction phase (2005-2009), and post-rehabilitation and reconstruction phase (2010-present). This study intended to analyze the impact of external risk factors, primarily related to the impact on project costs and to investigate the influence of the risk factors and construction phases impacted the project cost. Data was collected by using a questionnaire distributed in 15 large companies qualification contractors in Aceh province. Factors analyzed consisted of socio-political, government policies, natural disasters, and monetary conditions. Data were analyzed using statistical application of severity index to measure the level of risk impact. The analysis results presented the tendency of impact on cost can generally be classified as low. There is only one variable classified as high-impact, variable `fuel price increases', which appear on the military conflict and post tsunami disaster rehabilitation and reconstruction periods. The risk impact on costs from the factors and variables classified with high intensity needs a serious attention, especially when the high level impact is followed by the high frequency of occurrences.

  10. Risk factors for post-tonsillectomy hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikoma, Ryo; Sakane, Sayaka; Niwa, Kazutomo; Kanetaka, Sayaka; Kawano, Toshiro; Oridate, Nobuhiko

    2014-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the rate of post-tonsillectomy hemorrhage (PTH) in a single institution and to evaluate the clinical risk factors for PTH. We reviewed the records of 692 patients who underwent tonsillectomy (TE) at Yokohama Minami Kyosai Hospital in Japan. PTH grades were grouped into three categories according to the severity of the hemorrhagic episode: (I) minimal hemorrhage that stopped after noninvasive treatment, (II) hemorrhage requiring treatment with local anesthesia, and (III) hemorrhage requiring reoperation under general anesthesia in the operating room. Clinical risk factors such as sex, age (adults vs. children), TE indication, surgeon's skill level, operative time, ligature type, and duration of antibiotic administration for PTH were investigated. Among the 692 patients, 80 (11.6%) showed PTH, with primary and secondary hemorrhage accounting for 1.6% and 10.0%, respectively. A category III PTH was observed in 18 patients; thus, the overall risk of reoperation was 2.6%. The PTH episode most frequently occurred on postoperative days 5 and 6. The frequency of PTH was significantly higher in male patients and in adults (Pskill was also associated with PTH rate. A stepwise multivariate logistic regression revealed that adult age (odds ratio [OR]=18.9) and male gender (OR=3.78) were the clinical risk factors for PTH. It also revealed that male gender (OR=82065335), adult age (OR=10.6), and surgeon's skill level (OR=7.50) were the clinical risk factors for the category III PTH. The risk of PTH was higher in this report compared with previous reports, which may be associated with the definition of PTH. Clinical risk factors for PTH were adult age and male gender. The surgeon's skill level was an additional risk factor for category III PTH. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Biological risk factors for deep vein trombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vayá, Amparo; Mira, Yolanda; Martínez, Marcial; Villa, Piedad; Ferrando, Fernando; Estellés, Amparo; Corella, Dolores; Aznar, Justo

    2002-01-01

    Hypercoagulable states due either to inherited or acquired thrombotic risk factors are only present in approximately half of cases of DVT, but the causes in the other half, remain unknown. The importance of biological risk factors such as hyperlipidemia, hypofibrinolysis and hemorheological alterations in the pathogenesis of DVT has not been well established. In order to ascertain whether the above mentioned biological factors are associated with DVT and could constitute independent risk factors, we carried out a case-control study in 109 first DVT patients in whom inherited or acquired thrombophilic risk factors had been ruled out and 121 healthy controls age (42+/-15 years) and sex matched. From all the biological variables analyzed (cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose, fibrinogen, erythrocyte aggregation, hematocrit, plasma viscosity and PAI-1) only fibrinogen concentration reached a statistically significant difference on the comparison of means (290+/-73 mg/dl in cases vs 268+/-58 mg/dl in controls, p220 mg/dl, hematocrit >45% and fibrinogen >300 mg/dl was higher in cases than in controls: 38% vs 22%; p30 ng/ml, 37% vs 25% was borderline significant; p=0.055. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that cholesterolemia >220 mg/dl and fibrinogen >300 mg/dl constitute independent predictors of venous thrombotic risk. The adjusted OR's were 2.03 (95% CI; 1.12-3.70) for cholesterolemia and 1.94 (95% CI; 1.07-3.55) for fibrinogen. When these two variables combined DVT risk rose about fourfold (3.96; p<0.05). Our results suggest that hypercholesterolemia and hyperfibrinogenemia should be added to the list of known DVT risk factors and we recommend adopting measures to decrease these variables in the population with a high risk of DVT.

  12. Factors affecting post-capture survivability of lobster Homarus americanus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basti, David; Bricknell, Ian; Hoyt, Ken; Chang, Ernest S; Halteman, William; Bouchard, Deborah

    2010-06-11

    Technological advances in gear and fishing practices have driven the global expansion of the American lobster live seafood market. These changes have had a positive effect on the lobster industry by increasing capture efficiency. However, it is unknown what effect these improved methods will have on the post-capture fitness and survival of lobsters. This project utilized a repeated measures design to compare the physiological changes that occur in lobsters over time as the result of differences in depth, hauling rate, and storage methodology. The results indicate that lobsters destined for long distance transport or temporary storage in pounds undergo physiological disturbance as part of the capture process. These changes are significant over time for total hemocyte counts, crustacean hyperglycemic hormone, L-lactate, ammonia, and glucose. Repeated measures multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) for glucose indicates a significant interaction between depth and storage methodology over time for non-survivors. A Gram-negative bacterium, Photobacterium indicum, was identified in pure culture from hemolymph samples of 100% of weak lobsters. Histopathology revealed the presence of Gram-negative bacteria throughout the tissues with evidence of antemortem edema and necrosis suggestive of septicemia. On the basis of these findings, we recommend to the lobster industry that if a reduction in depth and hauling rate is not economically feasible, fishermen should take particular care in handling lobsters and provide them with a recovery period in recirculating seawater prior to land transport. The ecological role of P. indicum is not fully defined at this time. However, it may be an emerging opportunistic pathogen of stressed lobsters. Judicious preemptive antibiotic therapy may be necessary to reduce mortality in susceptible lobsters destined for high-density holding facilities.

  13. Risk factors for and assessment of constipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Sherree; Hungerford, Catherine

    2015-04-01

    Constipation commonly occurs in older people, particularly in hospital or residential care settings, and leads to decreased quality of life and increased healthcare costs. Despite its frequency, however, nurses often overlook the condition. One possible reason for this may be the lack of appropriate tools or scales for nurses to assess risk factors for developing constipation. This article identifies, from the academic literature, 14 risk factors for developing constipation in older people. These factors are then considered in light of four common constipation assessment charts. The article concludes by arguing the need for more comprehensive assessment tools to, firstly, identify risk factors; and, secondly, support the implementation of appropriate preventative strategies that will enable better health outcomes for older people.

  14. Incidence and risk factors for exacerbations of asthma during pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Z

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Zarqa Ali, Charlotte Suppli UlrikDepartment of Pulmonary Medicine, Hvidovre Hospital and University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, DenmarkBackground: Asthma is one of the most common chronic diseases among pregnant women. Acute exacerbations of asthma during pregnancy have an unfavorable impact on pregnancy outcome. This review provides an overview of current knowledge of incidence, mechanisms, and risk factors for acute exacerbations of asthma during pregnancy.Methods: A narrative literature review was carried out using the PubMed database.Results: During pregnancy, up to 6% of women with asthma are hospitalized for an acute exacerbation. The maternal immune system is characterized by a very high T-helper-2:T-helper-1 cytokine ratio during pregnancy and thereby provides an environment essential for fetal survival but one that may aggravate asthma. Cells of the innate immune system such as monocytes and neutrophils are also increased during pregnancy, and this too can exacerbate maternal asthma. Severe or difficult-to-control asthma appears to be the major risk factor for exacerbations during pregnancy, but studies also suggest that nonadherence with controller medication and viral infections are important triggers of exacerbations during pregnancy. So far, inconsistent findings have been reported regarding the effect of fetal sex on exacerbations during pregnancy. Other risk factors for exacerbation during pregnancy include obesity, ethnicity, and reflux, whereas atopy does not appear to be a risk factor.Discussion: The incidence of asthma exacerbations during pregnancy is disturbingly high. Severe asthma – better described as difficult-to-control asthma – nonadherence with controller therapy, viral infections, obesity, and ethnicity are likely to be important risk factors for exacerbations of asthma during pregnancy, whereas inconsistent findings have been reported with regard to the importance of sex of the fetus.Keywords: acute exacerbations

  15. Predictive factors of long-term colorectal cancer survival after ultrasound-controlled ablation of hepatic metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Socorro, Carmen Rosa; Saavedra, Pedro; Ramírez Felipe, José; Bohn Sarmiento, Uriel; Ruiz-Santana, Sergio

    2017-04-21

    The risk factors associated to long-term survival were assessed in patients with liver metastases of colorectal carcinoma undergoing ablative therapies. Single-centre cohort study, retrospectively analysed and prospectively collected consecutive patients with unresectable metastatic liver disease of colorectal carcinoma treated with ablative therapies between 1996 and 2013. Factors associated with survival time were identified using Cox's proportional hazard model with time-dependent covariates. A forward variable selection based on Akaike information criterion was performed. Relative risk and 95% confidence intervals for each factor were calculated. Statistical significance was set as P<.05. Seventy-five patients with liver metastases of colorectal cancer, with a mean age of 65.6 (10.3) underwent 106 treatments. Variables selected were good quality of life (RR 0.308, 95% CI 0.150-0.632) and tumour extension (RR 3.070, 95% CI 1.776-5.308). The median overall survival was 18.5 months (95% CI 17.4-24.4). The survival prognosis in median was 13.5 vs. 23.4 months for patients with and without tumour extension, and 23.0 vs. 12.8 months for patients with good and fair or poor quality of life, respectively. Good quality of life and tumour extension were the only statistically significant predictors of long-term survival in patients of colorectal carcinoma with liver metastatic disease undergoing ablative treatment with ultrasound. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Biochemical Control With Radiotherapy Improves Overall Survival in Intermediate and High-Risk Prostate Cancer Patients Who Have an Estimated 10-Year Overall Survival of >90%

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbert, Christopher, E-mail: cherbert@bccancer.bc.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Liu, Mitchell; Tyldesley, Scott; Morris, W. James [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Joffres, Michel [Department of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Surrey, BC (Canada); Khaira, Mandip; Kwan, Winkle [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Fraser Valley Centre, Surrey, BC (Canada); Moiseenko, Vitali [Department of Medical Physics, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Pickles, Thomas [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To identify subgroups of patients with carcinoma of the prostate treated with radical radiotherapy that have improved overall survival when disease is biochemically controlled. Methods and Materials: A cohort of 1,060 prostate cancer patients treated with radical radiotherapy was divided into nine subgroups based on National Comprehensive Cancer Network risk category and estimated 10-year overall survival (eOS 10y) derived from the age adjusted Charlson Comorbidity Index. Patients with and without biochemical control were compared with respect to overall survival. Actuarial estimates of overall survival were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were used for analysis of overall survival. Results: Median follow-up was 125 months (range, 51-176 months). Only the subgroups with high or intermediate risk disease and an eOS 10y of >90% had a statistically significantly improved overall survival when prostate cancer was biochemically controlled. In all other groups, biochemical control made no significant difference to overall survival. In the subgroup with high-risk disease and eOS 10y >90%, actuarial overall survival was 86.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] 78.5%-94.1%) and 62.1% (95% CI 52.9%-71.3%) for patients with biochemical control and biochemical relapse respectively (p = 0.002). In the intermediate risk group with eOS >90%, actuarial overall survival was 95.3% (95% CI 89.0%-100%) and 79.8% (95% CI 68.0%-91.6%) for biochemically controlled and biochemically relapsed patients (p = 0.033). On multivariate analysis, National Comprehensive Cancer Network risk group (p = 0.005), biochemical control (p = 0.033) and eOS 10y (p < 0.001) were statistically significant. Conclusion: Biochemical control translates into improved overall survival in patients with high or intermediate risk disease and an estimated 10-year overall survival of >90%.

  17. Effect of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) on motoneuron survival

    OpenAIRE

    Sendtner, Michael; Arakawa, Yoshihiro; Stöckli, Kurt A.; Kreutzberg, Georg W.; Thoenen, Hans

    2010-01-01

    We have demonstrated that the extensive degeneration of motoneurons in the rat facial nucleus after transection of the facial nerve in newborn rats can be prevented by local ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) administration. CNTF differs distinctly from known neurotrophic molecules such as NGF, BDNF and NT-3 in both its molecular characteristics (CNTF is a cytosolic rather than a secretory molecule) and its broad spectrum of biological activities. CNTF is expressed selectively by Schwann cell...

  18. Factors Affecting the Survival of SMEs: A Study of Biotechnology Firms in South Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwangsoo Shin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Past studies examining survival factors of biotechnology firms have focused on pioneer countries, such as the USA, the UK and Germany. However, as the biotechnology industry in Asia is reaching the take-off stage and showing a high growth rate, the research on survival factors in the context of Asian latecomers is needed. The present research investigates internal and external factors affecting the survival of SMEs (Small and Medium-sized Enterprises in the biotechnology industry in South Korea. The Cox hazard model was employed to perform a robust estimation in survival analysis. The analysis of internal factors showed that the origin of a firm (i.e., having prior experience or spin-offs and the business sub-sector (i.e., platform-based affect the hazard rates of biotechnology firms. In terms of external factors, unlike strategic alliances, government R&D funding lowered hazard rates for the firm’s survival. Additionally, considering that the reasons of firm exit can be divided into bankruptcy and M&A (Mergers and Acquisitions, the different effects of origins from other firms and strategic alliance for firm survival are confirmed. The results suggest that prior experience, platform-based and constant government R&D funding contribute to the sustainable development of SMEs in the biotechnology industry.

  19. Análise de sobrevida global e fatores de risco para óbito em 509 pacientes com Lúpus Eritematoso Sistêmico (LES Analysis of global survival and risk factors for death in 509 Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Appenzeller

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Estudos epidemiológicos com análise multivariada de fatores prognósticos em pacientes com lúpus eritematoso sistêmico (LES são fundamentais para avaliar a sobrevida e demonstrar estratégias de diagnóstico e tratamento. OBJETIVO: analisar os fatores de risco para a mortalidade em uma coorte de 509 pacientes com LES. MÉTODOS: os pacientes foram acompanhados em um hospital terciário, por um período de 27 anos (1974-2001, de acordo com um protocolo previamente padronizado. Inicialmente, foi realizada a análise de sobrevida global até o óbito dos 509 pacientes e, posteriormente, foi verificada a diferença entre as probabilidades de sobrevida global para pacientes com início da doença antes dos 16 anos e após os 16 anos. RESULTADOS: a taxa de sobrevida para os 509 pacientes com LES após 1, 5, 10 e 20 anos foram respectivamente de 96%, 88%, 80% e 75%. Os fatores prognósticos para o óbito dos pacientes com LES foram a ausência de artrite ao diagnóstico (p=0,007; OR=0,45; 95%IC= 0,25-0,8, a ausência do uso de antimaláricos (p=0,0001; OR=0,3; 95%IC=0,2-0,5, a presença de hipertensão arterial (p=0,002; OR=2,2; 95%IC=1,1-4,5, a presença de infecções (p=0,003; OR=2,3; 95%IC=1,3-4,1 e a idade ao diagnóstico menor que 16 anos (p=0,004; OR=2,6; 95%IC=1,4-5,0. CONCLUSÕES: este trabalho mostra uma excelente taxa de sobrevida nesta casuística de 509 pacientes com LES, observando-se proporção de pacientes que sobreviveram após 1, 5, 10 e 20 anos de seguimento, respectivamente, de 96%, 88%, 80% e 75%, comparável às maiores séries que tratam de sobrevida.Epidemiological studies using multivariate analysis of risk factors in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE patients are essential to determinate survival and to demonstrate diagnosis and treatment strategies. OBJECTIVE: To analyse the risk factors of mortality in 509 SLE patients who were followed over a 27-year period (from 1974 to 2001 according to a standard protocol in a

  20. Risk Factors and Risk-Based Protective Factors for Violent Offending: A Study of Young Victorians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemphill, Sheryl A; Heerde, Jessica A; Scholes-Balog, Kirsty E

    2016-06-01

    The present study aims to examine risk factors and risk-based and interactive protective factors for violent offending in a group of 437 young Australians. Participants were recruited into the study when they were in Grade 5 (10-11 years) and followed up almost annually until young adulthood (18-19 years). Measures of violent offending, risk and protective factors, and demographics were obtained through a modification of the Communities That Care youth survey. The data collected enabled identification of groups of students at-risk of violent offending according to drug use, low family socioeconomic status, and antisocial behavior. Results showed that there were very few associations between the risk factors and risk-based protective factors measured in this study (e.g., belief in the moral order, religiosity, peer recognition for prosocial involvement, attachment to parents, low commitment to school, and poor academic performance) and later self-reported violent offending. There were no statistically significant interactive protective factors. Further longitudinal analyses with large sample sizes are needed to examine risk factors and risk-based protective factors and interactive protective factors in at-risk groups. The findings support the need for multi-faceted prevention and early intervention approaches that target multiple aspects of youth's lives.

  1. Oral cancer: Etiology and risk factors: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malay Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral cancer is the sixth most common malignancy in the world. Oral cancer is of major concern in Southeast Asia primarily because of the prevalent oral habits of betel quid chewing, smoking, and alcohol consumption. Despite recent advances in cancer diagnoses and therapies, the 5.year survival rate of oral cancer patients has remained at a dismal 50% in the last few decades. This paper is an overview of the various etiological agents and risk factors implicated in the development of oral cancer.

  2. Endocrine Risk Factors for Cognitive Impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Hoon Moon

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive impairment, including Alzheimer's disease and other kinds of dementia, is a major health problem in older adults worldwide. Although numerous investigators have attempted to develop effective treatment modalities or drugs, there is no reasonably efficacious strategy for preventing or recovering from cognitive impairment. Therefore, modifiable risk factors for cognitive impairment have received attention, and the growing literature of metabolic risk factors for cognitive impairment has expanded from epidemiology to molecular pathogenesis and therapeutic management. This review focuses on the epidemiological evidence for the association between cognitive impairment and several endocrine risk factors, including insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, thyroid dysfunction, vitamin D deficiency, and subclinical atherosclerosis. Researches suggesting possible mechanisms for this association are reviewed. The research investigating modifiable endocrine risk factors for cognitive impairment provides clues for understanding the pathogenesis of cognitive impairment and developing novel treatment modalities. However, so far, interventional studies investigating the beneficial effect of the "modification" of these "modifiable risk factors" on cognitive impairment have reported variable results. Therefore, well-designed, randomized prospective interventional studies are needed.

  3. Extinction risk assessment for the species survival plan (SSP) population of the Bali mynah (Leucopsar rothschildi).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earnhardt, Joanne M; Thompson, Steven D; Faust, Lisa J

    2009-05-01

    The Bali mynah Species Survival Plan (SSP), an Association of Zoos and Aquariums program, strives to maintain the genetic and demographic health of its population, avoid unplanned changes in size, and minimize the risk of population extinction. The SSP population meets current demographic and genetic objectives with a population size of 209 birds at 61 institutions and 96% genetic diversity (GD) retained from the source population. However, participating institutions have expressed concerns regarding space allocation, target population size (TPS), breeding restrictions, inbreeding depression, and harvest in relation to future population availability and viability. Based on these factors, we assess five questions with a quantitative risk assessment, specifically a population viability analysis (PVA) using ZooRisk software. Using an individual-based stochastic model, we project potential population changes under different conditions (e.g. changes in TPS and genetic management) to identify the most effective management actions. Our projections indicate that under current management conditions, population decline and extinction are unlikely and that although GD will decline over 100 years the projected loss does not exceed levels acceptable to population managers (less than 90% GD retained). Model simulations indicate that the combination of two genetic management strategies (i.e. priority breeding based on mean kinship and inbreeding avoidance) benefits the retention of GD and reduces the accumulation of inbreeding. The current TPS (250) is greater than necessary to minimize the risk of extinction for the SSP population but any reduction in TPS must be accompanied by continued application of genetic management. If carefully planned, birds can be harvested for transfer to Bali for a reintroduction program without jeopardizing the SSP population.

  4. Environmental Risk Factors for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molodecky, Natalie A.

    2010-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract and is associated with significant morbidity. The etiology of IBD has been extensively studied during the last several decades; however, causative factors in disease pathology are not yet fully understood. IBD is thought to result from the interaction between genetic and environmental factors that influence the normal intestinal commensal flora to trigger an inappropriate mucosal immune response. Although many IBD susceptibility genes have been discovered, similar advances in defining environmental risk factors have lagged. A number of environmental risk factors have been explored, including smoking, appendectomy, oral contraceptives, diet, breastfeeding, infections/ vaccinations, antibiotics, and childhood hygiene. However, most of these factors have demonstrated inconsistent findings, thus making additional studies necessary to better understand the etiology of IBD. PMID:20567592

  5. [Risk factors for development of cerebrovascular stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrović, G

    2000-01-01

    Nowadays stroke has a dominant place in the structure of neurological morbidity. According to data of the World Health Organization, stroke is the third highest cause of morbidity and mortality in the developed countries of the world, immediately following ischemic heart disease and malignant diseases. The appearance of the disease is influenced by many etiological factors, that is risk factors. Natural risk factors are: heredity, sex, age, geographical and climatic factors. Other diseases being risk factors include: hypertension, heart disease and diabetes. Bad habits as risk factors are: eating habits, obesity, smoking, alcoholism and physical and mental inactivity. The paper presents a review of risk factors, their categorization and the influence of each individual risk factor on the development of stroke. Hereditary factors have a significant role in development of stroke and they may serve as a basis for determining the person's susceptibility to stroke in a certain period of life. SEX: It has been proved that persons of female sex in the period prior to menopause are less susceptible to atherosclerosis risk and its side effects--ischemic heart disease and stroke. It is due to the fact that in this period of life women have a higher concentration of high-density lipoproteins, which are known to protect blood vessels against atherosclerosis. AGE: The incidence of stroke is higher at an older age, although nowadays there is evidence that younger people may develop the disease as well. It has been noticed that the frequency and intensity of insult are connected with abrupt changes of the front (weather conditions with certain values of atmospheric factors). A high correlation between the frequency of cerebrovascular insult and abrupt change of the front is evident during spells of warm front in cold months and during spells of cold front in warm months. Moreover, changes during the circadian cycle are of utmost importance. Hypertension is one of the factors

  6. Cancer Risk Factor Knowledge Among Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merten, Julie Williams; Parker, Alexander; Williams, Adrienne; King, Jessica L; Largo-Wight, Erin; Osmani, Morsal

    2017-12-01

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the USA. Incidence and mortality rates for cancer have risen steadily and cost the healthcare system over $264 billion annually. Cancer risk can be reduced by restricting alcohol consumption, avoiding tobacco, eating a balanced diet, limiting sun exposure, exercising, and seeking routine cancer screenings. The purpose of this study is to examine cancer risk factor knowledge among college students. Researchers surveyed undergraduate and graduate students (n = 758) at a mid-sized public university in the Southeast about their knowledge regarding cancer risk factors including smoking, alcohol consumption, diet, obesity, hypertension, and human papillomavirus (HPV). Participants were mostly able to identify the association between cancers and health risk behaviors that have received widespread media coverage, are somewhat intuitive, or are salient to their life stage such as drinking, tanning, and smoking. Nearly all participants correctly reported exposure to ultraviolet (UV) rays, and smoking increased risk of developing skin and lung cancer, respectively. Most students correctly identified an increased risk of liver cancer associated with alcohol use but missed head/neck and breast cancer. However, knowledge of less publicized relationships was insufficient. The findings offer encouragement to public health professionals that campaigns have increased awareness of cancer risk. However, there were many relationships that revealed a lack of knowledge, and future campaigns can target lesser-known cancer risk relationships to reduce the personal tragedy and societal burden of cancer.

  7. Risk Factors for Melanoma in Renal Transplant Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascha, Mona; Ascha, Mustafa S; Tanenbaum, Joseph; Bordeaux, Jeremy S

    2017-11-01

    Melanoma risk factors and incidence in renal transplant recipients can inform decision making for both patients and clinicians. To determine risk factors and characteristics of renal transplant recipients who develop melanoma. This cohort study of a large national data registry used a cohort of renal transplant recipients from the United States Renal Data System (USRDS) database from the years 2004 through 2012. Differences in baseline characteristics between those who did and did not develop melanoma were examined, and a survival analysis was performed. Patients with renal transplants who received a diagnosis of melanoma according to any inpatient or outpatient claim associated with a billing code for melanoma were included. A history of pretransplant melanoma, previous kidney transplantation, or transplantation after 2012 or before 2004 were exclusion criteria. The data analysis was conducted from 2015 to 2016. Receipt of a renal transplant. Incidence and risk factors for melanoma. Of 105 174 patients (64 151 [60.7%] male; mean [SD] age, 49.6 [15.3] years) who received kidney transplants between 2004 and 2012, 488 (0.4%) had a record of melanoma after transplantation. Significant risk factors for developing melanoma vs not developing melanoma included older age among recipients (mean [SD] age, 60.5 [10.2] vs 49.7 [15.3] years; P melanoma in USRDS patients compared with Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results patients across all years was 4.9. A Kaplan-Meier estimate of the median time to melanoma among those patients who did develop melanoma was 1.45 years (95% CI, 1.31-1.70 years). Renal transplant recipients had greater risk of developing melanoma than the general population. We believe that the risk factors we identified can guide clinicians in providing adequate care for patients in this vulnerable group.

  8. Risk Factors for Developing Atopic Dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    G. Carson, Charlotte

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to investigate possible risk factors affecting the development of AD. AD is a frequent disease among children and has a substantial impact on the lives of both the child and its family. A better understanding of the disease would enable better treatment, prevention...... exposure to dog was the only environmental exposure that significantly reduced the disease manifestation, suggesting other, yet unknown environmental factors affecting the increasing prevalence of AD in children. Length at birth was shown to be inversely associated with the risk of later developing AD.......016). In addition, there was a significant effect of duration of exclusive breastfeeding (p=0.043), as the relative risk of AD was increased in proportion to increased duration of breastfeeding. The risk associated with exclusive breastfeeding was not explained by the fatty acid composition of mother's milk, though...

  9. Metabolite Signatures of Metabolic Risk Factors and their Longitudinal Changes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yin, X.; Subramanian, S.; Willinger, C.M.; Chen, G.; Juhasz, P.; Courchesne, P.; Chen, B.H.; Li, X.; Hwang, S.J.; Fox, C.S.; O'Donnell, C.J.; Muntendam, P.; Fuster, V.; Bobeldijk-Pastorova, I.; Sookoian, S.C.; Pirola, C.J.; Gordon, N.; Adourian, A.; Larson, M.G.; Levy, D.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Metabolic dysregulation underlies key metabolic risk factors—obesity, dyslipidemia, and dysglycemia. Objective: To uncover mechanistic links between metabolomic dysregulation and metabolic risk by testing metabolite associations with risk factors cross-sectionally and with risk factor

  10. Time trends in osteoporosis risk factor profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jakob Præst; Hyldstrup, Lars; Jensen, Jens-Erik Beck

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this article was to identify prevalent osteoporosis risk factors, medications and comorbidities associated with bone mineral density (BMD). Furthermore to evaluate changes in risk factor profiles over 12 years. 6285 women consecutively referred to an osteoporosis specialist clinic were...... included. Information of potential risk factors was obtained by questionnaire and clinical examination. Additional information on medication use, comorbidities and fractures were obtained from national registries. An association (bone health.......7), hyperthyroidism (OR = 1.5), previous major osteoporotic fracture (OR = 1.7), former osteoporosis treatment (OR = 3.5), higher BMI (OR = 0.87), use of calcium supplementation (OR = 1.2), high exercise level (OR = 0.7), and use of thiazide diuretics (OR = 0.7) were identified as predictors of osteoporosis by DXA...

  11. Vitamin D, Cardiovascular Disease and Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaaby, Tea; Thuesen, Betina H; Linneberg, Allan

    2017-01-01

    Observational studies have suggested a possible protective role of vitamin D on the cardiovascular system. The available evidence does not support either cardiovascular benefits or harms of vitamin D supplementation. This chapter provides an overview and discussion of the current knowledge of vitamin D effects from a cardiovascular health perspective. It focuses on vitamin D in relation to cardiovascular disease, i.e. ischemic heart disease, and stroke; the traditional cardiovascular risk factors hypertension, abnormal blood lipids, obesity; and the emerging risk factors hyperparathyroidism, microalbuminuria, chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Meta-analyses of observational studies have largely found vitamin D levels to be inversely associated with cardiovascular risk and disease. However, Mendelian randomization studies and randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) have not been able to consistently replicate the observational findings. Several RCTs are ongoing, and the results from these are needed to clarify whether vitamin D deficiency is a causal and reversible factor to prevent cardiovascular disease.

  12. Vitamin D, cardiovascular disease and risk factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaaby, Tea; Thuesen, Betina H.; Linneberg, Allan

    2017-01-01

    of vitamin D effects from a cardiovascular health perspective. It focuses on vitamin D in relation to cardiovascular disease, i.e. ischemic heart disease, and stroke; the traditional cardiovascular risk factors hypertension, abnormal blood lipids, obesity; and the emerging risk factors hyperparathyroidism......, microalbuminuria, chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Meta-analyses of observational studies have largely found vitamin D levels to be inversely associated with cardiovascular risk and disease. However, Mendelian randomization studies and randomized, controlled trials...... (RCTs) have not been able to consistently replicate the observational findings. Several RCTs are ongoing, and the results from these are needed to clarify whether vitamin D deficiency is a causal and reversible factor to prevent cardiovascular disease....

  13. Vitamin D, Cardiovascular Disease and Risk Factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaaby, Tea; Thuesen, Betina H; Linneberg, Allan

    2017-01-01

    of vitamin D effects from a cardiovascular health perspective. It focuses on vitamin D in relation to cardiovascular disease, i.e. ischemic heart disease, and stroke; the traditional cardiovascular risk factors hypertension, abnormal blood lipids, obesity; and the emerging risk factors hyperparathyroidism......, microalbuminuria, chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Meta-analyses of observational studies have largely found vitamin D levels to be inversely associated with cardiovascular risk and disease. However, Mendelian randomization studies and randomized, controlled trials...... (RCTs) have not been able to consistently replicate the observational findings. Several RCTs are ongoing, and the results from these are needed to clarify whether vitamin D deficiency is a causal and reversible factor to prevent cardiovascular disease....

  14. Cardiovascular risk factors in subjects with psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter; Thyssen, Jacob P; Zachariae, Claus

    2013-01-01

    Background Epidemiological data have established an association between cardiovascular disease and psoriasis. Only one general population study has so far compared prevalences of cardiovascular risk factors among subjects with psoriasis and control subjects. We aimed to determine the prevalence...... of cardiovascular risk factors in subjects with and without psoriasis in the general population. Methods During 2006-2008, a cross-sectional study was performed in the general population in Copenhagen, Denmark. A total of 3471 subjects participated in a general health examination that included assessment of current...... between subjects with and without psoriasis with regard to traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Conclusions Our results contrast with the hitherto-reported increased prevalence of metabolic syndrome in subjects with psoriasis in the general US population. However, our results agree with those of other...

  15. EVALUATION OF RISK FACTORS IN ACUTE STROKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Putta

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cerebrovascular disease is the third most common cause of death in the developed world after cancer and ischemic heart disease. In India, community surveys have shown a crude prevalence rate of 200 per 100000 population for hemiplegia. Aims and objectives: Identification of risk factors for c erebrovascular disease. Materials and Methods: Inclusion Criteria: Cases of acute stroke admitted in S.V.R.R.G.G.H, Tirupati were taken for the study. Exclusion Criteria: Head injury cases, neoplasm cases producing cerebrovascular disease were excluded. Re sults: Stroke was more common in male, 54% patients were male 46% were female. It was more common in 6 th and 7 th decade. More common risk factors were hypertension followed by smoking, diabetes mellitus. More common pathology was infarction. Conclusion: Com mon risk factors for acute stroke are hypertension, smoking, diabetes mellitus, alcoholism, obesity, cardiac disease. Stroke was confirmed by CT scan of brain.

  16. Getting ready for invasions: can background level of risk predict the ability of na?ve prey to survive novel predators?

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrari, Maud C. O.; Crane, Adam L; Grant E Brown; Chivers, Douglas P.

    2015-01-01

    Factors predicting the outcome of predator invasions on native prey communities are critical to our understanding of invasion ecology. Here, we tested whether background level of risk affected the survival of prey to novel predators, both native and invasive, predicting that high-risk environments would better prepare prey for invasions. We used na?ve woodfrog as our prey and exposed them to a high or low risk regime either as embryos (prenatal exposure) or as larvae (recent exposure). Tadpol...

  17. Psychological Factors Linked to Risk Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armaş, I.; Creãu, R. Z.; Stǎnciugelu, I.

    2012-04-01

    Risks are mental models, which allow people to cope with dangerous phenomena (Renn, 2008; Jasanoff, 1998). The term "risk" refers to the likelihood of an adverse effect resulting from an event. The aim of the present study is to identify the psychological factors that are most predictive of risk perception in relation with age, gender, educational level and socio-economical status. Earthquake hazard was considered, because it is an emerging danger for Bucharest. 80% of the laypeople sample are waiting for this event to happen in the next three years. By integrating all the research data, it was attempted to build a risk profile of the investigated population, which could be used by institutions responsible for earthquake risk mitigation situations in Bucharest. This research appealed to the social learning Rotter (1966), auto-effectiveness Bandura (1977; 1983), and anxiety and stress theories. We used psychological variables that measured stress, personal effectiveness and the belief in personal control. The multi-modal risk perception questionnaire was structured on a 49 items sequence. The sample was composed of 1.376 participants recruited on a voluntary basis. The characteristics of risk (like probability and magnitude, time scales) are perceived differently according to psychological factors that play a role also in biases in people's ability to draw inferences from probabilistic information (like cognitive dissonance). Since the 1970's, it has been argued that those who perceive life's events as being beyond their locus of control (external locus of control) are significantly more anxious and less adapted. In this research, strongest associations and significant differences were obtained between sex, age and income categories with Stress vulnerability factor and the External Locus of Control factor. The profile of the low risk perceiver is that of a young, more educated, male individual with a higher self- efficacy level and an internal locus of control.

  18. Risk Factors for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Helen C.; Vacek, Pamela; Johnson, Robert J.; Slauterbeck, James R.; Hashemi, Javad; Shultz, Sandra; Beynnon, Bruce D.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) of the knee are immediately debilitating and can cause long-term consequences, including the early onset of osteoarthritis. It is important to have a comprehensive understanding of all possible risk factors for ACL injury to identify individuals who are at risk for future injuries and to provide an appropriate level of counseling and programs for prevention. Objective: This review, part 1 of a 2-part series, highlights what is known an...

  19. Risk Factors for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Helen C.; Vacek, Pamela; Johnson, Robert J.; Slauterbeck, James R.; Hashemi, Javad; Shultz, Sandra; Beynnon, Bruce D.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are immediately disabling and are associated with long-term consequences, such as posttraumatic osteoarthritis. It is important to have a comprehensive understanding of all possible risk factors for ACL injury to identify individuals who are at risk for future injuries and to provide an appropriate level of counseling and programs for prevention. Objective: This review, part 2 of a 2-part series, highlights what is known and still unkn...

  20. Predicting long-term risk for relationship dissolution using nonparametric conditional survival trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliem, Sören; Weusthoff, Sarah; Hahlweg, Kurt; Baucom, Katherine J W; Baucom, Brian R

    2015-12-01

    Identifying risk factors for divorce or separation is an important step in the prevention of negative individual outcomes and societal costs associated with relationship dissolution. Programs that aim to prevent relationship distress and dissolution typically focus on changing processes that occur during couple conflict, although the predictive ability of conflict-specific variables has not been examined in the context of other factors related to relationship dissolution. The authors examine whether emotional responding and communication during couple conflict predict relationship dissolution after controlling for overall relationship quality and individual well-being. Using nonparametric conditional survival trees, the study at hand simultaneously examined the predictive abilities of physiological (systolic and diastolic blood pressure, heart rate, cortisol) and behavioral (fundamental frequency; f0) indices of emotional responding, as well as observationally coded positive and negative communication behavior, on long-term relationship stability after controlling for relationship satisfaction and symptoms of depression. One hundred thirty-six spouses were assessed after participating in a randomized clinical trial of a relationship distress prevention program as well as 11 years thereafter; 32.5% of the couples' relationships had dissolved by follow up. For men, the only significant predictor of relationship dissolution was cortisol change score (p = .012). For women, only f0 range was a significant predictor of relationship dissolution (p = .034). These findings highlight the importance of emotional responding during couple conflict for long-term relationship stability. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Survey of risk factors urinary tract infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Dehghani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Women are very susceptible to urinary tract infections and pregnancy raises the risk of urinary tract infection. In general, little information on the risk factors of urinary tract infection in pregnancy is underway. Urinary tract infection in pregnancy is an important risk factor for pregnancy dire consequences. The purpose of this study is to find risk factors associated with urinary tract infection in pregnant women. Methods: The study was observational and retrospective analysis was carried on in the winter of which 310 pregnant women participated in 11 health centers in Shahrekord. Of these 155 cases (patients and 155 controls (healthy that were matched for age Information required from the health records of pregnant women and complete Czech list of researcher whose validity was confirmed by experts were gathered. Information needed by pregnant women health records and complete list researcher was collected. Czech list contains a number of possible risk factors for illness and demographic characteristics of the study participants was Statistical analysis software spss version 16 by using chi square tests and logistic regression and t analysis was performed. Results: Among the variables vomiting (p = 0/00 a history of urinary tract infection in a previous pregnancy (P =.001, CI = 1.508-4.408, OR = 2.578 abortion own history (P =.014, CI = 1.165 -3.847, OR = 2.117, respectively, the most important risk factors for urinary tract infection in pregnant women were determined. Conclusion: Prevention and treatment of vomiting in pregnancy prevention of urinary tract infections during pregnancy. Prevention of abortion can play an important role in the prevention of urinary tract infection and its complications in pregnancy. The study also revealed a number of factors can have an impact on urinary tract infection in pregnancy that has not been enough attention and it is necessary that more attention be placed on health programs and

  2. Cardiovascular Risk Factors in the Antiphospholipid Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Freire da Silva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A major cause of morbidity and mortality in the context of the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS is the occurrence of thrombotic events. Besides the pathogenic roles of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL, other risk factors and medical conditions, which are conditions for traditional risk of an individual without the APS, can coexist in this patient, raising their risk of developing thrombosis. Therefore, the clinical and laboratory investigation of comorbidities known to increase cardiovascular risk in patients with antiphospholipid antibody syndrome is crucial for the adoption of a more complete and effective treatment. Experimental models and clinical studies show evidence of association between APS and premature formation of atherosclerotic plaques. Atherosclerosis has major traditional risk factors: hypertension, diabetes mellitus, obesity, dyslipidemia, smoking, and sedentary lifestyle that may be implicated in vascular involvement in patients with APS. The influence of nontraditional risk factors as hyperhomocysteinemia, increased lipoprotein a, and anti-oxLDL in the development of thromboembolic events in APS patients has been studied in scientific literature. Metabolic syndrome with all its components also has been recently studied in antiphospholipid syndrome and is associated with arterial events.

  3. Sensory neurons in culture: Changing requirements for survival factors during embryonic development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barde, Y.-A.; Edgar, D.; Thoenen, H.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of nerve growth factor (NGF) and medium conditioned by glioma cells (GCM) on the survival of chicken sensory neurons in culture was investigated. Neurons were isolated from embryos 8 days (E8) to 16 days (E16) old and the proportion of surviving neurons was determined after 2 days in culture. In the absence of NGF or GCM, essentially no neurons survived at any age. In the presence of NGF, survival increased from 25% of the neurons at E8 to 40% between E10 and E12 and then decreased to background level (5%) at E16. In contrast, in the presence of GCM, survival increased continuously from 10% of the neurons at E8 to 75% at E16. At early developmental stages, the effect of NGF and GCM together was greater than the sum of their individual effects: at E8, about 80% of the neurons survived, double the number expected for a simple additive effect. Thus, a significant proportion of chicken neurons from dorsal root ganglia require both NGF and GCM for survival, and this may well include neurons from the ventro-lateral population, which do not respond to NGF alone. As neurons matured, the double requirement progressively decreased and, by E16, NGF no longer increased the number of neurons over that surviving in response to GCM alone. The facts that rat brain extracts mimicked the effect of GCM and that the potency of the brain extracts of rat in the postnatal period increased in parallel with the development of the glial cells suggest that glial cells produce a factor(s) both immunologically and functionally different from NGF which supports the survival of sensory neurons. Images PMID:6928668

  4. Ribosome hibernation factor promotes Staphylococcal survival and differentially represses translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Arnab; Yap, Mee-Ngan F

    2016-06-02

    In opportunistic Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus, a small protein called hibernation-promoting factor (HPFSa) is sufficient to dimerize 2.5-MDa 70S ribosomes into a translationally inactive 100S complex. Although the 100S dimer is observed in only the stationary phase in Gram-negative gammaproteobacteria, it is ubiquitous throughout all growth phases in S. aureus The biological significance of the 100S ribosome is poorly understood. Here, we reveal an important role of HPFSa in preserving ribosome integrity and poising cells for translational restart, a process that has significant clinical implications for relapsed staphylococcal infections. We found that the hpf null strain is severely impaired in long-term viability concomitant with a dramatic loss of intact ribosomes. Genome-wide ribosome profiling shows that eliminating HPFSa drastically increased ribosome occupancy at the 5' end of specific mRNAs under nutrient-limited conditions, suggesting that HPFSa may suppress translation initiation. The protective function of HPFSa on ribosomes resides at the N-terminal conserved basic residues and the extended C-terminal segment, which are critical for dimerization and ribosome binding, respectively. These data provide significant insight into the functional consequences of 100S ribosome loss for protein synthesis and stress adaptation. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  5. Preoperative modifiable risk factors in colorectal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Rooijen, Stefanus; Carli, Francesco; Dalton, Susanne O

    2017-01-01

    complications (CCI ≥20). Multivariate logistic regression analysis was done to explore the combined effect of individual risk factors. RESULTS: In this 139 patient cohort, smoking, malnutrition, alcohol consumption, neoadjuvant therapy, higher age, and male sex, were seen more frequently in the severe...... in higher mortality rates and greater hospital costs. The number and severity of complications is closely related to patients' preoperative performance status. The aim of this study was to identify the most important preoperative modifiable risk factors that could be part of a multimodal prehabilitation...

  6. Environmental risk factors in the incidence of Johne's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Geoffrey N; Hough, Rupert L; Avery, Lisa M; Maltin, Charlotte A; Campbell, Colin D

    2015-01-01

    This review addresses the survival and persistence of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), the causative pathogen of Johne's disease (JD), once it has left its ruminant host. JD has significant economic impact on dairy, beef and sheep industries and is difficult to control due to the long-term sub-clinical nature of the infection, intermittent or persistent MAP shedding during and after this period, inadequate test effectiveness, and the potential for MAP to exist for extended periods outside the host. The role that environmental factors play in the persistence and spread of MAP and consequent disease is assessed. Published risk factor analysis, organism survival across various environmental media and conditions, presence and spread in ruminant and non-ruminant wildlife, and the general potential for survival and multiplication of MAP ex-host both on and off-farm are discussed and knowledge gaps highlighted. An inclusive approach to disease management that takes into account the persistence and transport of the causative organism in on-farm soils and waters, land use and management, dispersal by domestic and non-domestic host species, as well as general animal husbandry is required on those farms where more traditional approaches to disease management have failed to reduce disease prevalence.

  7. A Study on the Factors Influencing the Growth and Survival of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence environmental factors such as salinity and temperature and biological factors such as stocking density and feed type on the growth and survival of juvenile sea cucumbers Holothuria atra. The study was conducted from mid-October 2006 to end of January 2007 ...

  8. A prospective study of phobic anxiety, risk of ovarian cancer, and survival among patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Elizabeth M; Kubzansky, Laura D; Sood, Anil K; Okereke, Olivia I; Tworoger, Shelley S

    2016-05-01

    In ovarian cancer patients and mouse models, psychosocial stress is associated with higher circulating markers of angiogenesis and cell migration, impaired immune response, and increasing tumor burden and aggressiveness. In the Nurses' Health Studies (NHS/NHSII), we assessed whether phobic anxiety, a marker of chronic distress, was associated with risk of incident ovarian cancer as well as survival among ovarian cancer patients. We used Cox proportional hazards regression to model the relative risks (RRs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI) of ovarian cancer incidence and survival by categories of the Crown-Crisp phobic anxiety index (CCI). We identified 779 cases of ovarian cancer during 2,497,892 person-years of follow-up. For baseline CCI (NHS: 1988; NHSII: 1993), we observed a statistically nonsignificant increased risk of epithelial ovarian cancer (RR for CCI ≥ 4 vs. 0 or 1: 1.14; 95 % CI 0.96-1.36). However, when we updated CCI (NHS: 2004; NHSII: 2005), the associations were attenuated. Pre-diagnosis CCI was not associated with ovarian cancer survival (RR for ≥4 vs. 0 or 1: 1.00; 95 % CI 0.77-1.31); results were similar for post-diagnosis CCI. Distress, as measured by phobic anxiety symptoms, was not associated with ovarian cancer risk, although we cannot rule out a modest association. Future research should explore the role of phobic anxiety and other forms of psychological distress and ovarian cancer risk and survival.

  9. Risk factors for benign breast disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinton, L A; Vessey, M P; Flavel, R; Yeates, D

    1981-03-01

    The importance of various risk factors for benign breast disorders has been assessed an analysis of data obtained from a multicenter cohort study of contraceptive use among women in the United Kingdom (the Oxford Family Planning Association Contraceptive Study). Cases comprised all women diagnosed as having any type of benign breast lesion; 74 had fibroadenoma, 211 had histologically confirmed chronic cystic disease, 331 had breast lumps not subjected to biopsy and 70 had other disease. Each case was individually matched with another study participant who was free from recognized breast disease. Matching factors were center of recruitment, date of recruitment, age at entry, and continuation in the study. An inverse association was found between use of oral contraceptives and the risk of the first three conditions. Current users of the pill had the lowest risk, particularly when the use was for an extended period. In contrast, past users demonstrated no reduction in risk. The reduction in risk for chronic cystic disease appeared to relate to the amount of progestogen contained in the pill. No significant association was observed between the risk of any of the conditions and either parity or age at first livebirth. Women of low social class and obese women were at low risk, perhaps reflecting diagnostic biases.

  10. REVEAL risk scores applied to riociguat-treated patients in PATENT-2: Impact of changes in risk score on survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benza, Raymond L; Farber, Harrison W; Frost, Adaani; Ghofrani, Hossein-Ardeschir; Gómez-Sánchez, Miguel A; Langleben, David; Rosenkranz, Stephan; Busse, Dennis; Meier, Christian; Nikkho, Sylvia; Hoeper, Marius M

    2017-11-11

    The Registry to Evaluate Early and Long-term PAH Disease Management (REVEAL) risk score (RRS) calculator was developed using data derived from the REVEAL registry, and predicts survival in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) based on multiple patient characteristics. Herein we applied the RRS to a pivotal PAH trial database, the 12-week PATENT-1 and open-label PATENT-2 extension studies of riociguat. We examined the effect of riociguat vs placebo on RRS in PATENT-1, and investigated the prognostic implications of change in RRS during PATENT-1 on long-term outcomes in PATENT-2. RRS was calculated post hoc for baseline and Week 12 of PATENT-1, and Week 12 of PATENT-2. Patients were grouped into risk strata by RRS. Kaplan-Meier estimates were made for survival and clinical worsening-free survival in PATENT-2 to evaluate the relationship between RRS in PATENT-1 and long-term outcomes in PATENT-2. A total of 396 patients completed PATENT-1 and participated in PATENT-2. In PATENT-1, riociguat significantly improved RRS (p = 0.031) and risk stratum (p = 0.018) between baseline and Week 12 compared with placebo. RRS at baseline, and at PATENT-1 Week 12, and change in RRS during PATENT-1 were significantly associated with survival (hazard ratios for a 1-point reduction in RRS: 0.675, 0.705 and 0.804, respectively) and clinical worsening-free survival (hazard ratios of 0.736, 0.716 and 0.753, respectively) over 2 years in PATENT-2. RRS at baseline and Week 12, and change in RRS, were significant predictors of both survival and clinical worsening-free survival. These data support the long-term predictive value of the RRS in a controlled study population. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Factors predicting survival in patients with early stage laryngeal cancer: A cohort study between 2000 to 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fararouei, Mohammad; Daneshi, Nima; Mohammadianpanah, Μohammad; Reza Tabatabaei, Hamid; Zare-Bandamiri, Mohammad; Dianatinasab, Mostafa

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, trends of treatment and survival of laryngeal cancer have received heightened attention. Despite the fact that most laryngeal cancers are diagnosed at early stage, a concern of worsening survival in patients with localized cancer has been raised but not consistently observed. This study aimed to determine factors affecting laryngeal cancer survival. This was a cohort study from 2000 to 2015 in which clinical and demographic characteristics of patients at early stage of laryngeal cancer were collected. Medical records and telephone interviews were used to define patient's demographic and clinical status during the study period. Multivariate Cox model was used as the main method for analyzing data. Age at diagnosis, type of treatment, stage, and tumor grade were statistically associated with patient survival. Older patients were more prone to worse prognosis (HR=1.69, 95% CI: 1.03-2.75, p=0.03). The results also suggested that people who had surgery compared with those who received only radiation therapy (RT) survived longer (HR=0.44, 95% CI: 0.20-0.94, p=0.03). Furthermore, for those whose tumor was grade 3 at diagnosis, the risk of death was 2.45-fold higher than those with grade 1 (HR =2.45, 95% CI: 1.19-5.40, p=0.01). Stage II patients experienced worse prognosis than stage I patients (HR=1.77, 95% CI: 1.06-2.93, p=0.02). This study revealed several factors that can influence patient survival rate, among them different therapeutic approaches.

  12. Sociomedical risk factors for male infecundity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Epanchintseva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Subjects and methods. A total of 917 men from infertile couples with abnormal ejaculate indicators were examined. Their age was 34.1 ± 6.3 years; the infertility period was 4.6 ± 3.9 years. A retrospective analysis of their case histories, clinical examination, questioning to identify risk factors for infertility, and anthropometric measurements of weight and height were made. Weight was rated normal at a body mass index (BMI of ≤ 24.9 kg/m2 ; overweight at 25.0–29.9 kg/m2 , and obesity at ≥ 30 kg/m2 . When identifying infertility risk factors, the investigators kept in mind 24 risk factors at the moment of examination or in the patient histories, which were grouped into 3 clusters: 1 – environmental factors and occupational hazards; 2 – evidence of congenital and acquired abnormalities; 3 – social and quality-of-life factors; this cluster also includes history and examination evidence of tuberculosis, sexually transmitted diseases, and other social diseases, such as hepatitis B and C, or human immunodeficiency infection. Then the men who did not show an exacerbation of somatic diseases, genetic anomalies associated with reproductive disorders, or an exacerbation of social diseases at the moment of examination were selected from the total sample. These were divided into 2 groups: normal weight and obese patients. The frequency of the above mentioned infertility risk factors and additionally the proportion of persons engaged in intellectual or manual labor were calculated in each group.Results and discussion. In the total sample, the frequency of infertility risk factors including occupational hazards and environmental factors was < 20 %; the incidence of congenital and acquired abnormalities was 1–39 %. The highest frequency of risk factors was noted in cluster 3. Among them, alcohol consumption (75 % occupied the first place; next were the rate of sexually transmitted infections (59 %, emotional stress (44 %, and smoking (42

  13. Prevalence and Risk Factors of High Risk Human Papillomavirus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cervical cancer is the most common female cancer in northern Nigeria, yet the pattern of infection with human papillomavirus, the principal aetiologic agent is unknown. This was a preliminary study conducted in two referral hospitals in order to establish base-line data on the prevalence and risk factors for the infection in ...

  14. Evaluation of the Risk of Relapse in Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma at Event-Free Survival Time Points and Survival Comparison With the General Population in British Columbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hapgood, Greg; Zheng, Yvonne; Sehn, Laurie H; Villa, Diego; Klasa, Richard; Gerrie, Alina S; Shenkier, Tamara; Scott, David W; Gascoyne, Randy D; Slack, Graham W; Parsons, Christina; Morris, James; Pickles, Tom; Connors, Joseph M; Savage, Kerry J

    2016-07-20

    Studies in classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) typically measure the time to events from diagnosis. We evaluated the risk of relapse at event-free survival time points in cHL and compared the risk of death to expected mortality rates in British Columbia (BC). The BC Cancer Agency Lymphoid Cancer Database was screened to identify all patients age 16 to 69 years diagnosed with cHL between 1989 and 2012 treated with the chemotherapy regimen of doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine (or equivalent). We compared the observed mortality to the general population using age-, sex-, and calendar period-generated expected mortality rates from BC life-tables. Relative survival was calculated using a conditional approach and expressed as a standardized mortality ratio of observed-to-expected deaths. One thousand four hundred two patients were identified; 749 patients were male (53%), the median age was 32 years, and 68% had advanced-stage disease. The median follow-up time was 8.4 years. Seventy-two percent of relapses occurred within the first 2 years of diagnosis. For all patients, the 5-year risk of relapse from diagnosis was 18.1% but diminished to 5.6% for patients remaining event free at 2 years. For advanced-stage patients who were event free at 2 years, the 5-year risk of relapse was only 7.6%, and for those who were event free at 3 years, it was comparable to that of limited-stage patients (4.1% v 2.5%, respectively; P = .07). Furthermore, international prognostic score ≥ 4 and bulky disease were no longer prognostic in patients who were event free at 1 year. Although the relative survival improved as patients remained in remission, it did not normalize compared with the general population. Patients with cHL who are event free at 2 years have an excellent outcome regardless of baseline prognostic factors. All patients with cHL had an enduring increased risk of death compared with the general population. © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  15. Early risk factors for pubertal asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovland, V; Riiser, A; Mowinckel, P; Carlsen, K-H; Lødrup Carlsen, K C

    2015-01-01

    Early life risk factors are previously described for childhood asthma, but less is known related to asthma in adolescence. We aimed to investigate early risk factors (before 2 years) for pubertal asthma and secondarily for pubertal asthma phenotypes based upon allergic comorbidities. Based on data from 550 adolescents in the prospective birth cohort 'Environment and Childhood Asthma' study, subjects were categorized by recurrent bronchial obstruction (rBO) 0-2 years, asthma 2-10 years, and pubertal asthma from 10 to 16 years including incident asthma in puberty and asthma in remission from 10 to 16 years or as never rBO/asthma 0-16 years. Asthma in puberty was further classified based on the comorbidities atopic dermatitis and allergic rhinitis (AR) from 10 to 16 years. Twenty-three common asthma risk factors identified by 2 years of age, including frequency and persistence of bronchial obstruction (severity score), were analysed by weighted logistic regression for each phenotype. In adjusted models, the risk of pubertal asthma increased significantly with higher severity score, parental rhinitis, being the firstborn child, and familial stress around birth. Pubertal asthma in remission was significantly associated with severity score and number of lower respiratory tract infections and inversely associated with breastfeeding beyond 4 months. Pubertal incident asthma was more common among firstborn children. All asthma phenotypes with allergic diseases were significantly associated with severity score, whereas familial perinatal stress increased the risk of asthma only. Asthma combined with AR was associated with parental asthma and being firstborn, whereas the risk of asthma with both atopic dermatitis and AR increased with higher paternal education, atopic dermatitis, being firstborn, and familial perinatal stress. Important early risk factors for pubertal asthma were early airways obstruction, parental rhinitis, being the firstborn child, and perinatal familial

  16. Dementia risk factors for Australian baby boomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panegyres, Peter K; Gray, Victoria

    2010-06-21

    Baby boomers are individuals born in the years 1946 to 1965. The objective of this paper was to define the risk factors for dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD) and their relevance to Australian baby boomers, with the aim of providing evidence-based guidelines for dementia prevention. A series of PubMed searches (1994-2010) were conducted with relevant key words. Data was included from the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) in relation to baby boomers in Australia. Article titles and abstracts were assessed by two reviewers for inclusion. Searches through ABS revealed no specific study on baby boomers at a national level; information was only available for Western Australia, South Australia and Queensland. A number of genetic and non-genetic risk factors for dementia were identified most of which remain controversial and require further study. We did not identify significant differences in the prevalence and incidence of dementia in those under 65 years in Queensland, South Australia and Western Australia. There were no correlations of risk factors and dementia between the Australian states. Modification of risk factors has not been proven to reduce the incidence and prevalence of dementia and AD in baby boomers. Nevertheless, on available evidence, we recommend: i) active management of cardiovascular risk factors such as hypertension; ii) the encouragement of a healthy lifestyle (eg, weight reduction, exercise) as offering the best pathways to reduce the emerging dementia risk for baby boomers. The implications are that activities promoting a healthy heart might lead to a healthy brain and help to prevent dementia.

  17. Dementia risk factors for Australian baby boomers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter K. Panegyres

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Baby boomers are individuals born in the years 1946 to 1965. The objective of this paper was to define the risk factors for dementia and Alzheimer’s disease (AD and their relevance to Australian baby boomers, with the aim of providing evidence-based guidelines for dementia prevention. A series of PubMed searches (1994-2010 were conducted with relevant key words. Data was included from the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS in relation to baby boomers in Australia. Article titles and abstracts were assessed by two reviewers for inclusion. Searches through ABS revealed no specific study on baby boomers at a national level; information was only available for Western Australia, South Australia and Queensland. A number of genetic and non-genetic risk factors for dementia were identified most of which remain controversial and require further study. We did not identify significant differences in the prevalence and incidence of dementia in those under 65 years in Queensland, South Australia and Western Australia. There were no correlations of risk factors and dementia between the Australian states. Modification of risk factors has not been proven to reduce the incidence and prevalence of dementia and AD in baby boomers. Nevertheless, on available evidence, we recommend: i active management of cardiovascular risk factors such as hypertension; ii the encouragement of a healthy lifestyle (eg, weight reduction, exercise as offering the best pathways to reduce the emerging dementia risk for baby boomers. The implications are that activities promoting a healthy heart might lead to a healthy brain and help to prevent dementia.

  18. Adolescent sexual aggression: risk and protective factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowsky, I W; Hogan, M; Ireland, M

    1997-12-01

    Little research addresses the correlates of sexual aggression in nonclinical populations of adolescents. The purpose of this study was to identify risk and protective factors associated with sexual violence among male and female adolescents. We analyzed data on 71,594 students in the 9th and 12th grades responding to the 1992 Minnesota Student Survey, an anonymous, self-report survey examining an array of risk environments, health-compromising behaviors, and protective factors. The responses of students reporting a history of forcing someone into a sexual act were compared with those who reported that they had never forced someone into a sexual act. Separate analyses were conducted for males and females. A history of sexual violence perpetration was reported by 4.8% of male and 1.3% of female adolescents. Using a logistic regression model, sexual aggression was associated with experiencing intrafamilial or extrafamilial sexual abuse, witnessing family violence, frequent use of illegal drugs, anabolic steroid use, daily alcohol use, gang membership, high levels of suicide risk behavior, and excessive time spent "hanging out." Emotional health and connectedness with friends and adults in the community were protective factors for male adolescents against sexually aggressive behavior, and academic achievement was a protective factor for female adolescents. A history of forcing someone into a sexual act was associated with several risk and protective factors. Efforts to prevent adolescent sexual violence should target individuals at increased risk. Through their psychosocial assessment of young people, health care professionals can play a role in identifying, counseling, and making appropriate referrals for adolescents at risk for sexually aggressive behavior.

  19. Risk factors for mortality in Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppal, H; Chandran, S; Potluri, R

    2015-09-01

    Down syndrome is a genetic condition that contributes to a significantly shorter life expectancy compared with the general population. We investigated the most common comorbidities in a population of acute hospital patients with Down syndrome and further explored what the most common risk factors for mortality are within this population. From our database of one million patients admitted to National Health Service (NHS) Trusts in northern England, we identified 558 people who had Down syndrome. We compared this group with an age- and gender-matched control group of 5580 people. The most prevalent comorbid diseases within the Down's population were hypothyroidism (22.9%) and epilepsy (20.3%). However, the conditions that had the highest relative risks (RRs) in the Down's population were septal defects and dementia. Respiratory failure, dementia and pneumonia were the most significantly related comorbidities to mortality in the Down syndrome population. In the control population, respiratory failure, dementia and renal failure were the most significant disease contributors. When these contributors were analysed using multivariate analysis, heart failure, respiratory failure, pneumonia and epilepsy were the identified risk factors for in-hospital mortality in the Down syndrome population. Respiratory failure was the sole risk factor for mortality in the Down syndrome population [RR = 9.791 (1.6-59.9) P ≤ 0.05], when compared with the risk factors for mortality in the control population. There is significant medical morbidity in Down syndrome. This morbidity contributes to the lower life expectancy. Respiratory failure is a risk factor for mortality in Down syndrome. We need to thoroughly investigate people with Down syndrome to ensure any treatable illnesses are well managed. © 2015 MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. The Expression of p-STAT3 in Stage IV Melanoma: Risk of CNS Metastasis and Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, Roland; Kong, Ling-Yuan; Schacherer, Christopher W.; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E.; Grimm, Elizabeth A.; Fuller, Gregory N.; Heimberger, Amy B.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is a key molecular hub of tumorigenesis and immune suppression. The expression of phosphorylated STAT3 (p-STAT3) has been shown to be higher in melanoma metastasis to the central nervous system (CNS) relative to distant metastasis in the rest of the body (systemic). We sought to determine whether the increased expression of p-STAT3 in non-CNS systemic melanoma metastasis is associated with an increased risk of developing CNS metastasis and is a negative prognostic factor for overall survival time. Methods We retrospectively identified 299 patients with stage IV melanoma. In a tissue microarray of systemic non-CNS metastasis specimens from these patients, we used immunohistochemical analysis to measure the percentage of cells with p-STAT3 expression and Kaplan–Meier survival estimates to analyze the association of p-STAT3 expression with median survival time, time to first CNS metastasis, and development of CNS metastasis. Results Lung metastases exhibited the highest level of p-STAT3 expression while spleen lesions had the lowest. The p-STAT3 expression was not associated with an increased risk of developing CNS metastasis or time to CNS metastasis. However, p-STAT3 expression was a negative prognostic factor for overall survival time in patients that did not develop CNS metastasis. Conclusions Stage IV melanoma patients without CNS metastasis treated with p-STAT3 inhibitors in efficacy studies should be stratified based on tumor expression of p-STAT3; however since p-STAT3 expression is not associated with the risk of CNS disease, increased MRI surveillance of the brain is not likely necessary. PMID:22488042

  1. Risk factors associated with provoked pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjonbrataj, Endri; Kim, Ji Na; Gjonbrataj, Juarda; Jung, Hye In; Kim, Hyun Jung; Choi, Won-Il

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the risk factors associated with provoked pulmonary embolism (PE). This retrospective cohort study included 237 patients with PE. Patients that had transient risk factors at diagnosis were classified as having provoked PE, with the remaining patients being classified as having unprovoked PE. The baseline clinical characteristics and factors associated with coagulation were compared. We evaluated the risk factors associated with provoked PE. Of the 237 PE patients, 73 (30.8%) had provoked PE. The rate of respiratory failure and infection, as well as the disseminated intravascular coagulation score and ratio of right ventricular diameter to left ventricular diameter were significantly higher in patients with provoked PE than in those with unprovoked PE. The protein and activity levels associated with coagulation, including protein C antigen, protein S antigen, protein S activity, anti-thrombin III antigen, and factor VIII, were significantly lower in patients with provoked PE than in those with unprovoked PE. Multivariate analysis showed that infection (odds ratio [OR], 3.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.4 to 7.4) and protein S activity (OR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.95 to 0.99) were significantly associated with provoked PE. Protein S activity and presence of infection were important factors associated with provoked PE. We should pay attention to the presence of infection in patients with provoked PE.

  2. Is Free Testosterone Concentration a Prognostic Factor of Survival in Chronic Renal Failure (CRF)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemczyk, Stanislaw; Niemczyk, Longin; Szamotulska, Katarzyna; Bartoszewicz, Zbigniew; Romejko-Ciepielewska, Katarzyna; Gomółka, Malgorzata; Saracyn, Marek; Matuszkiewicz-Rowińska, Joanna

    2015-11-07

    Lowered testosterone level in CRF patients is associated with elevated risk of death due to cardiovascular reasons, and is influenced by many factors, including acid-base balance disorders. evaluation of testoste-rone concentration (TT) and free testosterone concentration (fT) in pre-dialysis and dialysis patients; assessment of TT and fT relationships with biochemical parameters; evaluation of prognostic importance of TT and fT in predicting patient survival. 4 groups of men: 14 - on hemodialysis (HD), 13 - on peritoneal dialysis (PD), 9 - with chronic renal failure (CRF) and 8 - healthy (CG), aged 56±17, 53±15, 68±12, 43±10 years, respectively. TT and biochemical para-meters were measured; fT was calculated. The lowest TT and fT were observed in HD and CRF, the highest - in CG (p=0.035 for TT; p=0.007 for fT). fT in CRF and CG were different (p=0.031). TT and age was associated in HD (p=0.026). Age and fT was strongly associated in PD (pfree testosterone in decompensated acidosis was observed (ptrend=0.027). Such a trend was not seen for testosterone concentrations (ptrend=0.107). Total and free testosterone levels were lower in HD and pre-dialysis than in healthy patients. Free testost-erone level may predict long-term survival better than age. Total and free testosterone levels are lower in metabolic acidosis and total and free testosterone levels were positively associated with HCO3 level.

  3. Early liver allograft dysfunction: risk factors, clinical course and outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya. G. Moysyuk

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Early liver allograft dysfunction (EAD is associated with a high incidence of graft loss and patient mortality in the first 6 weeks after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT.The aim of this retrospective single-center study is to identify the risk factors of EAD and to compare the short- and long-term results in EAD and non-EAD groups.Materials and methods. The results of 213 consecutive deceased donor liver transplantations performed between December 2004 and February 2015 were included in the analysis. Indications for OLT were non-viral liver cirrhosis in 52% of cases, viral hepatitis C or B in 34 %, hepatocellular carcinoma in 8 %; retransplantations were performed in 6% of cases due to previous liver graft dysfunction. EAD was defined by Olthoff criteria (Olthoff et al., 2010.Results. Overall incidence of EAD was 41.3%, including 5.6% of primary non-function grafts (PNF, i.e. irreversible EAD. No significant differences between EAD and non-EAD groups were seen either among donors in their age, gender, cause of death, bilirubin, plasma sodium level, aminotransferases aktivity, or among the recipients in their age, gender, body mass index, MELD. Retransplantation, donor time on mechanical ventilation in the intensive care unit for more than 2 days, highrisk donor category, transplant surgery duration more than 9.5 hours, and cold ischemia time (CIT > 8 hours were independent significant risk factors of EAD in a multivariate model. A 42-day mortality rates were 18.2% in EAD group (mostly due to PNF without urgent retransplantanion in 9.1%, and 0% in non-EAD group. Long-term results in EAD group were also significantly poorer: 1-, 5-, and 10-year graft survival rates were 74%, 68%, and 64%, respectively, versus 96%, 90%, and 83% in non-EAD group, Log-rank p = 0.0001.Conclusion. EAD significantly (≈ 20% decreases the short-term graft and patient survival rates. Meanwhile, a reversible EAD has no impact on long-term results

  4. Seizure After Cranioplasty: Incidence and Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haifeng; Zhang, Kewei; Cao, Hongshi; Zhang, Xiaohong; Li, Ye; Wei, Qiang; Zhang, Dezhi; Jia, Qian; Bie, Li

    2017-09-01

    To investigate clinical characteristics of postcranioplasty seizures (PCS) first observed after cranioplasty after decompressive craniectomy (DC) to treat traumatic brain injury and to define factors that increase PCS risk. This retrospective study, covering the period between January 2008 and July 2015, compared PCS in postcranioplasty patients. Postcranioplasty seizures risk factors included diabetes mellitus, hypertension, time between DC and cranioplasty, duraplasty material, cranioplasty contusion location, electrocautery method, PCS type, and infection. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed and confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated (95% CI). Of 270 patients, 32 exhibited initial PCS onset postcranioplasty with 11.9% incidence (32/270). Patients fell into immediate (within 24 hours), early (from 1 to 7 days), and late (after 7 days) PCS groups with frequencies of 12, 5, and 15 patients, respectively. Generalized, partial, and mixed seizure types were observed in 13, 13, and 6 patients, respectively. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed increased risk with increasing age (>50 years). Cranioplasty contusion location, precranioplasty deficits, duraplasty material, and monopolar electrocautery were predictive of PCS onset (P < 0.05). Increased DC to cranioplasty interval increased risk but was not statistically significant (P = 0.062). Understanding risk factors for PCS will benefit the management of cranioplasty patients.

  5. Exploring Risk Factors for Follicular Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander J. Ambinder

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Follicular lymphoma (FL is an indolent malignancy of germinal center B cells with varied incidence across racial groups and geographic regions. Improvements in the classification of non-Hodgkin lymphoma subtypes provide an opportunity to explore associations between environmental exposures and FL incidence. Our paper found that aspects of Western lifestyle including sedentary lifestyle, obesity, and diets high in meat and milk are associated with an increased risk of FL. Diets rich in fruits and vegetables, polyunsaturated fatty acids, vitamin D, and certain antioxidants are inversely associated with FL risk. A medical history of Sjogren's syndrome, influenza vaccination, and heart disease may be associated with FL incidence. Associations between FL and exposure to pesticides, industrial solvents, hair dyes, and alcohol/tobacco were inconsistent. Genetic risk factors include variants at the 6p21.32 region of the MHC II locus, polymorphisms of the DNA repair gene XRCC3, and UV exposure in individuals with certain polymorphisms of the vitamin D receptor. Increasing our understanding of risk factors for FL must involve integrating epidemiological studies of genetics and exposures to allow for the examination of risk factors and interactions between genes and environment.

  6. Risk factors and effective management of preeclampsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    English FA

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Fred A English,1 Louise C Kenny,1 Fergus P McCarthy1,2 1Irish Centre for Fetal and Neonatal Translational Research (INFANT, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland; 2Women’s Health Academic Centre, King's Health Partners, St Thomas' Hospital, London, UK Abstract: Preeclampsia, a hypertensive disorder of pregnancy is estimated to complicate 2%–8% of pregnancies and remains a principal cause of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Preeclampsia may present at any gestation but is more commonly encountered in the third trimester. Multiple risk factors have been documented, including: family history, nulliparity, egg donation, diabetes, and obesity. Significant progress has been made in developing tests to predict risk of preeclampsia in pregnancy, but these remain confined to clinical trial settings and center around measuring angiogenic profiles, including placental growth factor or newer tests involving metabolomics. Less progress has been made in developing new treatments and therapeutic targets, and aspirin remains one of the few agents shown to consistently reduce the risk of developing preeclampsia. This review serves to discuss recent advances in risk factor identification, prediction techniques, and management of preeclampsia in antenatal, intrapartum, and postnatal patients. Keywords: pregnancy, treatment, risk reduction, prediction

  7. Risk factors of recurrent anal sphincter ruptures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jangö, Hanna; Langhoff-Roos, J; Rosthøj, Steen

    2012-01-01

    augmentation, epidural, episiotomy, vacuum extraction, forceps, shoulder dystocia, delivery interval and year of second delivery. Results  Out of 159 446 women, 7336 (4.6%) experienced an ASR at first delivery, and 521 (7.1%) had a recurrent ASR (OR 5.91). The risk factors of recurrent ASR in the multivariate...

  8. Risk factors for permanent hypernasality after adenoidectomy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Risk factors for permanent hypernasality after adenoidectomy. ... Design. Retrospective and descriptive design. ... speech; and (iv) the hypernasality was rated as severe by a speech therapist, could not be remedied by speech therapy alone and required further management by a plastic surgeon through pharyngosplasty.

  9. Self-management of vascular risk factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sol-de Rijk, B.G.M.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The aim of this thesis was to provide insight into the potential of a self-management approach in treatment of vascular risk factors and to develop a self-management intervention. Furthermore to examine if this intervention, based on self-efficacy promoting theory, is effective in reducing

  10. Major Risk Factors for Heart Disease: Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medicines as prescribed. Ask your doctor about taking aspirin. Ask others to help you manage your diabetes. "I wasn't aware of my risk factors, such as being diabetic and having a family history of heart problems." — Ann Preventing Diabetes If you ...

  11. Hypospadias: risk factor patterns and different phenotypes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwers, M.M.; Zanden, L.F.M. van der; Gier, R.P.E. de; Barten, E.J.; Zielhuis, G.A.; Feitz, W.F.J.; Roeleveld, N.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To obtain more insight into the origin of hypospadias by exploring a wide range of potential risk factors in a case-referent study in which a distinction was made between different phenotypes. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Cases and referents were 305 boys with hypospadias and 629 boys with

  12. Risk factors for primary sclerosing cholangitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, Kirsten; de Vries, Elisabeth M G; van Geloven, Nan; van Erpecum, Karel J.; Spanier, Marcel; Poen, Alexander C; van Nieuwkerk, Carin M; Witteman, Ben J; Tuynman, Hans A; Naber, Anton H; Kingma, Paul J; Beuers, Ulrich; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a progressive cholestatic liver disease of unknown cause, but strongly associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Potential risk factors triggering PSC have never been studied on a population level. The aim of this study was to

  13. Chronic Renal Allograft Dysfunction: Risk Factors, Immunology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    associated with an increased risk of graft loss, but less is known regarding the severity of rejection [18]. Factors contributing to ongoing alloimmune responses include breakdown in immunosuppression as a result of patient non compliance, therapeutic decisions to minimize exposure to complications of immunosuppressive ...

  14. Macrosomia - maternal and fetal risk factors

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of the high perinatal mortality and morbidity rates, as well as maternal morbidity, are discussed. S Afr Med J 1995; 85: 43-46. Little attention has been paid to fetal macrosomia in black. African populations, despite the fact that as a high-risk factor in pregnancy and delivery macrosomia probably deserves as much attention as ...

  15. Depression: risk factor for cardiovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuehl, L.K.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; Otte, C.

    2012-01-01

    Major depression is an independent risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease. In patients with existing cardiovascular disease, major depression has a large impact on the quality of life and is associated with a poor course and prognosis. Potential mechanisms responsible for this

  16. Nutritional risk factors for postmenopausal osteoporosis | Berriche ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Osteoporosis is a bone disease that combines both a decrease in bone density and its internal architecture changes. Nutrition is one of the major determinants of osteoporosis. Aim: The purpose of our study was to identify nutritional risk factors of osteoporosis of two groups of osteoporotic women and ...

  17. Environmental Factors and Breast Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breast Cancer Risk and Environmental Factors For millions of women whose lives have been affected by breast cancer, the 1994 discovery of the first breast ... gene by researchers from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) and their collaborators, was a ...

  18. Atherogenic risk factors and hearing thresholds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederiksen, Thomas Winther; Ramlau-Hansen, Cecilia Høst; Stokholm, Zara Ann; Brødsgaard Grynderup, Matias; Hansen, Åse Marie; Lund, Søren Peter; Medom Vestergaard, Jesper; Kristiansen, Jesper; Bonde, Jens Peter; Kolstad, Henrik Albert

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of atherogenic risk factors on hearing thresholds. In a cross-sectional study we analyzed data from a Danish survey in 2009-2010 on physical and psychological working conditions. The study included 576 white- and blue-collar workers from children's day care units, financial services and 10 manufacturing trades. Associations between atherogenic risk factors (blood lipids, glycosylated hemoglobin, smoking habits, body mass index (BMI), and ambulatory blood pressure) and hearing thresholds were analyzed using multiple linear regression models. Adjusted results suggested associations between smoking, high BMI and triglyceride level and low high-density lipoprotein level and increased low-frequency hearing thresholds (average of pure-tone hearing thresholds at 0.25, 0.5 and 1 kHz). Furthermore, an increasing load of atherogenic risk factors seemed associated with increased low-frequency hearing thresholds, but only at a borderline level of statistical significance. Associations were generally strongest with hearing levels of the worst hearing ear. We found no statistically significant associations between atherogenic risk factors and high-frequency hearing thresholds (average of pure-tone hearing thresholds at 4, 6 and 8 kHz). © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Risk Factors for Depression in Early Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacPhee, Angela R.; Andrews, Jac J. W.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify salient risk factors for depression in early adolescence from a group of common predictors. The following nine predictors were examined: (1) perceived quality of peer relationships, (2) perceived parental nurturance, (3) perceived parental rejection, (4) self-esteem, (5) body image, (6) pubertal status,…

  20. Adolescent Suicide Risk: Four Psychosocial Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutter, Philip A.; Behrendt, Andrew E.

    2004-01-01

    Suicide is a leading cause of death among adolescents. This study examined the suicidal ideation, behavior, and attempt history of 100 adolescents ages seventeen to nineteen. Four psychosocial factors were found to be important for overall suicide risk: hopelessness, hostility, negative self-concept, and isolation. It is suggested that focusing on…

  1. Exogenous risk factors for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, M.H.B.

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this thesis were to determine the epidemiology of ALS in the Netherlands, to determine the familial aggregation of ALS with Parkinson disease (PD), dementia, and vascular diseases, and to determine the association between several environmental and lifestyle factors and risk for sporadic

  2. Lifestyle factors and risk of cardiovascular diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoevenaar-Blom, M.P.

    2013-01-01

     Background Evidence is accumulating that lifestyle factors influence the incidence of fatal and non-fatal cardiovascular diseases (CVD). A healthy diet, being physically active, moderate alcohol consumption and not smoking are associated with a lower CVD risk. In addition to

  3. Risk factors for domestic violence in Curacao

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wijk, N.Ph.L.; de Bruijn, J.G.M.

    2012-01-01

    One out of three people (25% of men, 38% of women) in Curacao have experienced some form of domestic violence at some point in their adult lives. The most significant risk factors for domestic violence in Curacao are the female gender, a young age, low education, and experiencing domestic violence

  4. Risk Factors for Domestic Violence in Curacao

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wijk, N. Ph. L.; de Bruijn, J. G. M.

    2012-01-01

    One out of three people (25% of men, 38% of women) in Curacao have experienced some form of domestic violence at some point in their adult lives. The most significant risk factors for domestic violence in Curacao are the female gender, a young age, low education, and experiencing domestic violence victimization in childhood. Divorce, single…

  5. 459 Preventing Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors through ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FIRST LADY

    2011-01-18

    Jan 18, 2011 ... exercise there is the tendency for increased strength of the heart muscles. When this is the case, what follows is a ... Key words: Cardiovascular disease, Risk factor, Aerobic Exercise. Introduction. There has always ... Oftentimes, problems appear to be more prevalent among the elderly. This may not be far.

  6. Risk Factors of γ-Hydroxybutyrate Overdosing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korf, D.J.; Nabben, T.; Benschop, A.; Ribbink, K.; van Amsterdam, J.G.C.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify in recreational drug users the factors which increase the risk of overdosing (OD) with γ-hydroxybutyrate (GHB). A purposive sample of 45 experienced GHB users was interviewed, equally divided into three groups (never OD, occasional OD, and repeat OD). The repeat

  7. Risk Factors for Smoking Behaviors among Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Sung Suk; Joung, Kyoung Hwa

    2014-01-01

    Many students in Korea begin to use tobacco and develop a regular smoking habit before they reach adulthood. Yet, little is known about various signs contributing to the transition of the student smoking behaviors. This study used a national sample to explore and compare risk factors for smoking behaviors. Three types of smoking behaviors were…

  8. Is malnutrition a risk factor of stroke?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, M A; Dey, S K; Alam, M R; Bhuiyan, M; Bhuiyan, S I; Khatun, M H; Rizvi, A N; Haque, A

    2015-04-01

    Obesity is an established risk factor of stroke. Malnutrition in post-stroke period is common and can influence outcome. But malnutrition, though predicted, has not yet been established as a risk factor of stroke. This descriptive study was carried out in the Department of Neurology, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU), Dhaka and Department of Neurology, Dhaka Medical College (DMC), from January 2009 to December 2010 to explore whether malnutrition is an independent risk factor of stroke. Nutritional status of 100 stroke patients and 100 healthy controls were assessed in this study. Anthropometric measurements including Body Mass Index (BMI), Triceps skin fold (TSF), Mid-arm circumference (MAC) and Arm-muscle circumference (AMC) were measured within 7 days of stroke. Haemoglobin and haematocrit percentage, serum iron and serum albumin were measured at the same time. No significant difference was observed regarding TSF thickness, MAC, AMC, mean Hb and mean albumin level between the stroke patients and the control group, although iron level was significantly lower in stroke group. Multiple logistic regressions analysis showed that increase in age, smoking and decreased serum iron level has a positive association with stroke. Malnutrition is, according to this study, not a significant risk factor of stroke and triceps skin fold (TSF) thickness, mid-arm circumference (MAC), arm-muscle circumference (AMC), hemoglobin and serum albumin are not appropriate predictor of stroke.

  9. Risk Factors and Prodromal Eating Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stice, Eric; Ng, Janet; Shaw, Heather

    2010-01-01

    Prospective studies have identified factors that increase risk for eating pathology onset, including perceived pressure for thinness, thin-ideal internalization, body dissatisfaction, dietary restraint, and negative affect. Research also suggests that body dissatisfaction and dietary restraint may constitute prodromal stages of the development of…

  10. Retinopathy of prematurity in Indonesia: Incidence and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edy Siswanto, J; Sauer, Pieter Jj

    2017-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is a vaso-proliferative disease of the eye, which mainly affects preterm newborn infants with an incompletely vascularized retina. The incidence of ROP has increased in industrialized countries due to the increased survival of extremely low birth weight (ELBW) infants. ROP is also increasing in developing countries like Indonesia, where it is most likely due to the improved survival of ELBW infants. To ascertain the incidence of ROP and possible risk factors associated with the development of ROP in preterm infants in Indonesia. We reviewed the literature on the incidence and potential risk factors for the development of ROP in Indonesia, obtained data from three referral eye clinics and added data from our institution. The reported incidence of all stages of ROP in infants with a gestational age of Indonesia. The overall incidence of ROP in infants born below 32 weeks in Indonesia is higher than in developed countries, and it is seen in infants with older gestational ages. This might be due to a less strict monitoring during the use of oxygen in Indonesia compared to industrialized countries.

  11. Getting ready for invasions: can background level of risk predict the ability of naïve prey to survive novel predators?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Maud C O; Crane, Adam L; Brown, Grant E; Chivers, Douglas P

    2015-02-06

    Factors predicting the outcome of predator invasions on native prey communities are critical to our understanding of invasion ecology. Here, we tested whether background level of risk affected the survival of prey to novel predators, both native and invasive, predicting that high-risk environments would better prepare prey for invasions. We used naïve woodfrog as our prey and exposed them to a high or low risk regime either as embryos (prenatal exposure) or as larvae (recent exposure). Tadpoles were then tested for their survival in the presence of 4 novel predators: two dytiscid beetles, crayfish and trout. Survival was affected by both risk level and predator type. High risk was beneficial to prey exposed to the dytiscids larvae (ambush predators), but detrimental to prey exposed to crayfish or trout (pursuit predators). No effect of ontogeny of risk was found. We further documented that high-risk tadpoles were overall more active than their low-risk counterparts, explaining the patterns found with survival. Our results provide insights into the relationship between risk and resilience to predator invasions.

  12. Intraocular pressure control and corneal graft survival after implantation of Ahmed valve device in high-risk penetrating keratoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almousa, Radwan; Nanavaty, Mayank A; Daya, Sheraz M; Lake, Damian B

    2013-08-01

    To analyze the control of intraocular pressure (IOP) and corneal graft survival after implantation of Ahmed glaucoma device (AGD) in eyes that had high-risk penetrating keratoplasty (PK). This is a retrospective noncomparative case series of 59 eyes that had high-risk PK and underwent AGD insertion. The primary outcome measures are the control of IOP between 6 and 21 mm Hg and corneal graft survival. The secondary outcome measures are risk factors associated with IOP control and corneal graft survival. The mean IOP reduced significantly after the AGD procedure (26.45 ± 6.8 mm Hg preoperatively vs. 16.85 ± 7.4 mm Hg, 16.95 ± 4.6 mm Hg, 17.97 ± 5.7 mm Hg, 15.78 ± 5.2 mm Hg, and 15.59 ± 5.5 mm Hg, at 1 month, 6 months, 1 year, 2 years, and at the last follow-up postoperatively; P IOP control was successful in 44 eyes (75.8%). IOP control was successful in 96% of the eyes at 1 year, 87% at 2 years, 83% at 3 years, and 83% at 5 years. The percentage of clear corneal grafts after 1, 2, 3, and 5 years following the AGD insertion were 87%, 77%, 65%, and 47%, respectively. Further surgery after AGD insertion was associated with 1.79 times greater risk of failure of IOP control. AGD was effective in controlling the IOP associated with high-risk PK over a 5-year period. Postvalve surgery doubles the risk of failure of IOP control.

  13. Risk stratification and prognostic nomogram for post-recurrence overall survival in patients with recurrent extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byoung Hyuck; Kim, Kyubo; Chie, Eui Kyu; Kwon, Jeanny; Jang, Jin-Young; Kim, Sun Whe; Oh, Do-Youn; Bang, Yung-Jue

    2017-05-01

    This study aimed to investigate post-recurrence overall survival (PROS) in patients with recurrent extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (EHC) and to indicate which groups of patients need active salvage treatments. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 251 consecutive patients who underwent curative surgery followed by adjuvant chemoradiotherapy for EHC. Among these, 144 patients experienced a recurrence and were included for further analysis. The median PROS was 7 months (range, 1-130). In multivariate analysis, poorly differentiated histology, short disease-free survival, poor performance status, and elevated CA 19-9 were identified as significant prognosticators for poor PROS. Based on this, we stratified study patients into three categories by the number of risk factors: group 1 (0 or 1 factors), group 2 (2 factors) and group 3 (3-4 factors). Median PROS for groups 1, 2, and 3 were 13, 7, and 5 months, respectively (p < 0.001). Group 1 patients showed a significant benefit from salvage treatment, but groups 2 and 3 did not demonstrate clear benefit. In addition, we developed a nomogram to specifically identify individual patient's prognosis. Our simple risk stratification as well as proposed nomogram can classify patients into subgroups with different prognosis and will help facilitate personalized strategies after recurrence. Copyright © 2017 International Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Risk factors for hypospadias in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ling-Fan; Liang, Chao-Zhao; Lipianskaya, Julia; Chen, Xian-Guo; Fan, Song; Zhang, Li; Zhou, Jun; Tai, Sheng; Jiang, Chang-Qin

    2014-01-01

    This case-controlled study was designed to evaluate the association between various baseline parental factors and the risk of hypospadias in China. Patients were selected from tertiary referral hospitals in Anhui, a province in mid-eastern China. A questionnaire was given to the parents of each patient. The final database included 193 cases and 835 controls. The incidence of additional coexistent anomalies was 13.0%, primarily cryptorchidism (9.8%). Ten patients (5.1%) were from families with genital anomaly, including five families (2.6%) with hypospadias. The risks of hypospadias was higher for children of mothers > 35 (odds ratio [OR] =1.47) and hypospadias was also higher when mothers (OR = 1.68) and fathers (OR = 1.74) were engaged in agriculture. Other factors assessed were not associated with the risk of hypospadias. PMID:24875823

  15. Chronic disease risk factors among hotel workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawde, Nilesh Chandrakant; Kurlikar, Prashika R

    2016-01-01

    Non-communicable diseases have emerged as a global health issue. Role of occupation in pathogenesis of non-communicable diseases has not been explored much especially in the hospitality industry. Objectives of this study include finding risk factor prevalence among hotel workers and studying relationship between occupational group and chronic disease risk factors chiefly high body mass index. A cross-sectional study was conducted among non-managerial employees from classified hotels in India. The study participants self-administered pre-designed pilot-tested questionnaires. The risk factor prevalence rates were expressed as percentages. Chi-square test was used for bi-variate analysis. Overweight was chosen as 'outcome' variable of interest and binary multi-logistic regression analysis was used to identify determinants. The prevalence rates of tobacco use, alcohol use, inadequate physical activity and inadequate intake of fruits and vegetables were 32%, 49%, 24% and 92% respectively among hotel employees. Tobacco use was significantly common among those in food preparation and service, alcohol use among those in food service and security and leisure time physical activity among front office workers. More than two-fifths (42.7%) were overweight. Among the hotel workers, those employed in food preparation and security had higher odds of 1.650 (CI: 1.025 - 2.655) and 3.245 (CI: 1.296 - 8.129) respectively of being overweight. Prevalence of chronic disease risk factors is high among hotel workers. Risk of overweight is significantly high in food preparation and security departments and workplace interventions are necessary to address these risks.

  16. Risk factors associated with lambing traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, N; Berry, D P; Pabiou, T

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to establish the risk factors associated with both lambing difficulty and lamb mortality in the Irish sheep multibreed population. A total of 135 470 lambing events from 42 675 ewes in 839 Irish crossbred and purebred flocks were available. Risk factors associated with producer-scored ewe lambing difficulty score (scale of one (no difficulty) to four (severe difficulty)) were determined using linear mixed models. Risk factors associated with the logit of the probability of lamb mortality at birth (i.e. binary trait) were determined using generalised estimating equations. For each dependent variable, a series of simple regression models were developed as well as a multiple regression model. In the simple regression models, greater lambing difficulty was associated with quadruplet bearing, younger ewes, of terminal breed origin, lambing in February; for example, first parity ewes experienced greater (P7.0 kg) birth weights, quadruplet born lambs and lambs that experienced a more difficult lambing (predicted probability of death for lambs that required severe and veterinary assistance of 0.15 and 0.32, respectively); lambs from dual-purpose breeds and born to younger ewes were also at greater risk of mortality. In the multiple regression model, the association between ewe parity, age at first lambing, year of lambing and lamb mortality no longer persisted. The trend in solutions of the levels of each fixed effect that remained associated with lamb mortality in the multiple regression model, did not differ from the trends observed in the simple regression models although the differential in relative risk between the different lambing difficulty scores was greater in the multiple regression model. Results from this study show that many common flock- and animal-level factors are associated with both lambing difficulty and lamb mortality and management of different risk category groups (e.g. scanned litter sizes, ewe age groups) can be used

  17. Neuronal Survival, Morphology and Outgrowth of Spiral Ganglion Neurons Using a Defined Growth Factor Combination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Schwieger

    Full Text Available The functionality of cochlear implants (CI depends, among others, on the number and excitability of surviving spiral ganglion neurons (SGN. The spatial separation between the SGN, located in the bony axis of the inner ear, and the CI, which is inserted in the scala tympani, results in suboptimal performance of CI patients and may be decreased by attracting the SGN neurites towards the electrode contacts. Neurotrophic factors (NTFs can support neuronal survival and neurite outgrowth.Since brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF is well known for its neuroprotective effect and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF increases neurite outgrowth, we evaluated if the combination of BDNF and CNTF leads to an enhanced neuronal survival with extended neurite outgrowth. Both NTFs were added in effective high concentrations (BDNF 50 ng/ml, CNTF 100 ng/ml, alone and in combination, to cultured dissociated SGN of neonatal rats for 48 hours.The neuronal survival and neurite outgrowth were significantly higher in SGN treated with the combination of the two NTFs compared to treatment with each factor alone. Additionally, with respect to the morphology, the combination of BDNF and CNTF leads to a significantly higher number of bipolar neurons and a decreased number of neurons without neurites in culture.The combination of BDNF and CNTF shows a great potential to increase the neuronal survival and the number of bipolar neurons in vitro and to regenerate retracted nerve fibers.

  18. PROGNOSTIC FACTORS FOR SURVIVAL IN PATIENTS WITH METASTATIC RENAL CELL CARCINOMA TREATED WITH CHEMOTHERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deyan Davidov

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic significance for survival of certain clinical and pathological factors in patients with advanced or metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC treated with chemotherapy. Methods: From 1990 to 2009 sixty seven consecutive patients with mRCC, treated in UMHAT- Dr. G. Stranski, Department of Medical Oncology entered the study. Parameters including some patients characteristics, hematological and pathological parameters, were evaluated for their role as predictors of overall survival. The therapeutic regimens included Interferon- alpha or Medroxyprogesterone acetat. Survival analysis was evaluated by Kaplan- Meier test. The influence of pretreatment characteristics as prognostic factor for survival was analyzed using multivariate stepwise Cox regression analyses. Results: Variables significantly associated with overall survival univariate analysis were performance status >1, thrombocytosis, anemia and number of metastatic sites >1. In multivariate analysis as independent poor prognostic factors were identified poor performance status and multiple sites of metastasis. Conclusion: These results indicated that performance status, presence of elevated platelet counts or anemia as well as well as multiple site of metastasis could be useful prognostic factors in patients with mRCC.

  19. The Identification of Prognostic Factors and Survival Statistics of Conventional Central Chondrosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sjoerd P. F. T. Nota

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Chondrosarcomas are malignant bone tumors that are characterized by the production of chondroid tissue. Since radiation therapy and chemotherapy have limited effect on chondrosarcoma, treatment of most patients depends on surgical resection. We conducted this study to identify independent predictive factors and survival characteristics for conventional central chondrosarcoma and dedifferentiated central chondrosarcoma. Methods. A systematic literature review was performed in September 2014 using the Pubmed, Embase, and Cochrane databases. Subsequent to a beforehand-composed selection procedure we included 13 studies, comprising a total of 1114 patients. Results. The prognosis of central chondrosarcoma is generally good for the histologically low-grade tumors. Prognosis for the high-grade chondrosarcoma and the dedifferentiated chondrosarcoma is poor with lower survival rates. Poor prognostic factors in conventional chondrosarcoma for overall survival are high-grade tumors and axial/pelvic tumor location. In dedifferentiated chondrosarcoma the percentage of dedifferentiated component has significant influence on disease-free survival. Conclusion. Despite the fact that there are multiple prognostic factors identified, as shown in this study, there is a need for prospective and comparative studies. The resulting knowledge about prognostic factors and survival can give direction in the development of better therapies. This could eventually lead to an evidence-based foundation for treating chondrosarcoma patients.

  20. Cardiovascular Risk Factors and 5-year Mortality in the Copenhagen Stroke Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammersgaard, Lars Peter; Olsen, Tom Skyhøj

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The treatment of cardiovascular risk factors has improved over the recent years and may have improved survival. The aim of this study was to investigate the up-to-date prognostic significance of cardiovascular risk factors for 5-year survival in a large unselected ischemic stroke...... and questionnaire for cardiovascular risk factors, age, and sex. Follow-up was performed 5 years after stroke, and data on mortality were obtained for all, except 6, who had left the country. Five-year mortality was calculated by the Kaplan-Meier procedure and the influence of multiple predictors was analyzed...... by Cox proportional hazards analyses adjusted for age, gender, stroke severity, and risk factor profile. RESULTS: In Kaplan-Meier analyses atrial fibrillation (AF), ischemic heart disease, diabetes, and previous stroke were associated with increased mortality, while smoking and alcohol intake were...

  1. Cardiovascular risk factors and 5-year mortality in the Copenhagen Stroke Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammersgaard, Lars Peter; Olsen, Tom Skyhøj

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The treatment of cardiovascular risk factors has improved over the recent years and may have improved survival. The aim of this study was to investigate the up-to-date prognostic significance of cardiovascular risk factors for 5-year survival in a large unselected ischemic stroke...... and questionnaire for cardiovascular risk factors, age, and sex. Follow-up was performed 5 years after stroke, and data on mortality were obtained for all, except 6, who had left the country. Five-year mortality was calculated by the Kaplan-Meier procedure and the influence of multiple predictors was analyzed...... by Cox proportional hazards analyses adjusted for age, gender, stroke severity, and risk factor profile. RESULTS: In Kaplan-Meier analyses atrial fibrillation (AF), ischemic heart disease, diabetes, and previous stroke were associated with increased mortality, while smoking and alcohol intake were...

  2. Postpartum venous thromboembolism: incidence and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepper, Naomi K; Boulet, Sheree L; Whiteman, Maura K; Monsour, Michael; Marchbanks, Polly A; Hooper, W Craig; Curtis, Kathryn M

    2014-05-01

    To calculate incidence of postpartum venous thromboembolism by week after delivery and to examine potential risk factors for venous thromboembolism overall and at different times during the postpartum period. A deidentified health care claims information database from employers, health plans, hospitals, and Medicaid programs across the United States was used to identify delivery hospitalizations among women aged 15-44 years during the years 2005-2011. International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification diagnosis and procedure codes were used to identify instances of venous thromboembolism and associated characteristics and conditions among women with recent delivery. Incidence proportions of venous thromboembolism by week postpartum through week 12 were calculated per 10,000 deliveries. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios for selected risk factors among women with postpartum venous thromboembolism and among women with venous thromboembolism during the early or later postpartum periods. The incidence proportion of postpartum venous thromboembolism was highest during the first 3 weeks after delivery, dropping from nine per 10,000 during the first week to one per 10,000 at 4 weeks after delivery and decreasing steadily through the 12th week. Certain obstetric procedures and complications such as cesarean delivery, preeclampsia, hemorrhage, and postpartum infection conferred an increased risk for venous thromboembolism (odds ratios ranging from 1.3 to 6.4), which persisted over the 12-week period compared with women without these risk factors. Risk for postpartum venous thromboembolism is highest during the first 3 weeks after delivery. Women with obstetric complications are at highest risk for postpartum venous thromboembolism, and this risk remains elevated throughout the first 12 weeks after delivery. II.

  3. Is consanguinity a risk factor for keratoconus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon-Shaag, Ariela; Millodot, Michel; Essa, Maron; Garth, Jeanne; Ghara, Mohammed; Shneor, Einat

    2013-05-01

    To determine whether consanguinity is a risk factor for keratoconus (KC). A questionnaire was distributed to all patients presenting to St. John Eye Hospital, Jerusalem, Israel. Questionnaire included data on demographic characteristics and potential risk factors. Patients were divided into two groups: cases with KC, in at least one eye, who were diagnosed by the attending ophthalmologist on the basis of abnormal corneal topography and at least one of the common signs of the disease; and controls presenting for problems other than KC and free of systemic and ocular conditions associated with KC. Multivariate logistic analyses were performed to identify risk factors for KC. Seventy cases and 140 controls participated in the study. Groups were similar with respect to sex and age. Univariate analyses found a significant association between KC and parental first-cousin consanguinity, eye rubbing, allergy, positive family history, education (>12 years), and sunglass wear, whereas asthma, eczema, smoking, and second-cousin consanguinity were not. Multivariate analyses showed that total consanguinity (first-cousin and second-cousin) (adjusted odds ratio, 3.96; p = 0.001), eye rubbing and absence of sunglass wear were significant risk factors. Education was also associated with KC, but family history was not so in the multivariate analysis. This study supports the hypothesis that consanguinity is a significant risk factor for KC and provides strong support for a genetic contribution to the disease. Wearing sunglasses in this environment is beneficial, and the study confirmed that eye rubbing, allergy, and education are also significantly associated with KC after adjusting for other predictors.

  4. Risk factors of preseptal and orbital cellulitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babar, Tariq Farooq; Zaman, Mir; Khan, Mohammad Naeem; Khan, Mohammad Daud

    2009-01-01

    To estimate the frequency and major risk factors of preseptal and orbital cellulitis. A cross-sectional analytical study. The Khyber Institute of Ophthalmic Medical Sciences, Hayatabad Medical Complex, Peshawar from July 2003 to December 2006. All consecutive patients between ages 6 and 40 years, admitted to the institute with the diagnosis of preseptal and orbital cellulitis were included in the study. The patients were divided into two groups. Group I included patients with ages 6-16 years and group II with ages 17-40 years. The clinical features, diagnosis and risk factors were entered on a specially-designed proforma. The risk factors included were trauma, insect bite, localized or systemic infection and postsurgical. Odd ratio and p-values were calculated for potential risk factors. The frequency of orbital cellulitis was 0.1% of total admission. Out of 26 patients, 42.30% patients were in group I and 57 in group II. In group I, insect bite was the most common risk factor identified in 40% of patients with preseptal cellulitis and trauma as a common cause in 50% with orbital cellulitis. In group II, trauma was the leading cause in 50% of patients with preseptal cellulitis and sinusitis as a common cause in 18.1% with those of orbital cellulitis. In both groups the p-values were found insignificant (p>0.5). Complications included cicatricial ectropion in 44.4% and orbital abscess in 41.1%. For preseptal cellulitis, insect bite was the most common cause in group I and trauma was the leading cause in group II. For orbital cellulitis, trauma was important cause in group I and sinusitis in group II.

  5. Risk factors for voice problems in teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooijman, P G C; de Jong, F I C R S; Thomas, G; Huinck, W; Donders, R; Graamans, K; Schutte, H K

    2006-01-01

    In order to identify factors that are associated with voice problems and voice-related absenteeism in teachers, 1,878 questionnaires were analysed. The questionnaires inquired about personal data, voice complaints, voice-related absenteeism from work and conditions that may lead to voice complaints and absenteeism. Different factors play a role in the development and consolidation of voice problems. Physical and psycho-emotional factors appear to be the most important risk factors. Remarkably, voice load and environment seem to be less important as risk factors in the development and consolidation of voice complaints. Teachers who experienced voice problems during their training reported more voice problems during their career. The results of this study stress the importance of a multifactorial approach in the diagnosis and treatment of voice problems, whereby physical and psycho-emotional aspects should be considered as sensitive to the risk of developing voice problems. Moreover, this study shows the crucial importance of adequate voice training during the teacher training programme.

  6. Survival and Risk Comparison of Campylobacter jejuni on Various Processed Meat Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Soo Hyeon; Kim, Han Sol; Yoon, Ki Sun

    2016-06-09

    The objective of this study was to investigate survival kinetics of Campylobacter jejuni on various processed meat products (dry-cured ham, round ham with/without sodium nitrite, garlic seasoned ham with/without sodium nitrite, and sausage without sodium nitrite). Additionally, a semi-quantitative risk assessment of C. jejuni on various processed meat products was conducted using FDA-iRISK 1.0. Inoculated processed meat products with 6.0 ± 0.5 log CFU/g of C. jejuni were vacuum packed and stored at 4, 10, 17, 24, 30, and 36 °C. Survival curves were fitted to the Weibull model to obtain the delta values of C. jejuni on various processed meat products. The most rapid death of C. jejuni was observed on dry-cured ham, followed by sausage without sodium nitrite. The results of semi-quantitative risk assessment indicate that dry-cured ham represented the lowest risk among all samples. C. jejuni on processed meats presented a greater risk at 4 °C than at 10 °C. The risk of ham was greater than the risk of sausage, regardless of type. Among all samples, the highest risk of C. jejuni was observed in round ham without sodium nitrite. Overall, our data indicates that risk of processed meat products due to C. jejuni is relatively low.

  7. Survival and Risk Comparison of Campylobacter jejuni on Various Processed Meat Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo Hyeon Hong

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate survival kinetics of Campylobacter jejuni on various processed meat products (dry-cured ham, round ham with/without sodium nitrite, garlic seasoned ham with/without sodium nitrite, and sausage without sodium nitrite. Additionally, a semi-quantitative risk assessment of C. jejuni on various processed meat products was conducted using FDA-iRISK 1.0. Inoculated processed meat products with 6.0 ± 0.5 log CFU/g of C. jejuni were vacuum packed and stored at 4, 10, 17, 24, 30, and 36 °C. Survival curves were fitted to the Weibull model to obtain the delta values of C. jejuni on various processed meat products. The most rapid death of C. jejuni was observed on dry-cured ham, followed by sausage without sodium nitrite. The results of semi-quantitative risk assessment indicate that dry-cured ham represented the lowest risk among all samples. C. jejuni on processed meats presented a greater risk at 4 °C than at 10 °C. The risk of ham was greater than the risk of sausage, regardless of type. Among all samples, the highest risk of C. jejuni was observed in round ham without sodium nitrite. Overall, our data indicates that risk of processed meat products due to C. jejuni is relatively low.

  8. Prognostic factors for survival in metastatic renal cell carcinoma: update 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowski, Ronald M

    2009-05-15

    A variety of prognostic factor models to predict survival in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma have been developed. Diverse populations of patients with variable treatments have been used for these analyses. A variety of clinical, pathologic, and molecular factors have been studied, but current models use predominantly easily obtained clinical factors. These approaches are reviewed, and current approaches to further refine and develop these techniques are reviewed. (c) 2009 American Cancer Society.

  9. Risk factors of coercion among psychiatric inpatients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Christoffer; Starkopf, Liis; Hastrup, Lene Halling

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: Reducing the use of coercion among patients with mental disorders has long been a political priority. However, risk factors for coercive measures have primarily been investigated in smaller studies. To reduce the use of coercion, it is crucial to identify people at risk which we aim to do...... measure (21.9%). Clinical characteristics were the foremost predictors of coercion and patients with organic mental disorder had the highest increased risk of being subjected to a coercive measure (OR = 5.56; 95% CI = 5.04, 6.14). The risk of coercion was the highest in the first admission and decreased...... with the number of admissions (all p income countries (all p 

  10. Prognostic factors and a survival score for patients with metastatic spinal cord compression from colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rades, D.; Douglas, S.; Huttenlocher, S. [Luebeck Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Veninga, T. [Dr. Bernard Verbeeten Institute, Tilburg (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Bajrovic, A. [University Medical Center Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Rudat, V. [Saad Specialist Hospital Al-Khobar (Saudi Arabia). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Schild, S.E. [Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2012-12-15

    Background: This study aimed to identify independent prognostic factors and to create a survival score for patients with metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) from colorectal cancer (CRC). Patients and methods: Data from 121 patients irradiated for MSCC from CRC were retrospectively analyzed. Eleven potential prognostic factors were investigated including tumor type, age, gender, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status score (ECOG-PS), number of involved vertebrae, ambulatory status prior to radiotherapy (RT), other bone metastases, visceral metastases, interval from cancer diagnosis to RT of MSCC, time of developing motor deficits prior to RT, and the RT schedule. Results: On multivariate analysis, improved motor function was significantly associated with an ECOG-PS of 1-2 (p = 0.011) and a slower development of motor deficits (p < 0.001). Improved local control was significantly associated with absence of visceral metastases (p = 0.043) and longer-course RT (p = 0.008). Improved survival was significantly associated with an ECOG-PS of 1-2 (p < 0.001), ambulatory status (p < 0.001), absence of visceral metastases (p < 0.001), and a slower development of motor deficits (p = 0.047). These four prognostic factors were included in a survival score. The score for each factor was determined by dividing the 6-month survival rate by 10. The prognostic score represented the sum of the factor scores. Four prognostic groups were designed; the 6-month survival rates were 0% for 8-12 points, 26% for 13-18 points, 62% for 20-23 points, and 100% for 24-27 points (p < 0.001). Conclusion: This study identified several independent prognostic factors for treatment outcomes in patients irradiated for MSCC from CRC. The survival prognosis of these patients can be estimated with a new score. (orig.)

  11. Prognostic Factors and Decision Tree for Long-term Survival in Metastatic Uveal Melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, Daniel; Ochoa, María; Piulats, Josep Maria; Gutiérrez, Cristina; Arias, Luis; Català, Jaum; Grau, María; Peñafiel, Judith; Cobos, Estefanía; Garcia-Bru, Pere; Rubio, Marcos Javier; Padrón-Pérez, Noel; Dias, Bruno; Pera, Joan; Caminal, Josep Maria

    2017-12-04

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the existence of a bimodal survival pattern in metastatic uveal melanoma. Secondary aims were to identify the characteristics and prognostic factors associated with long-term survival and to develop a clinical decision tree. The medical records of 99 metastatic uveal melanoma patients were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were classified as either short (≤ 12 months) or long-term survivors (> 12 months) based on a graphical interpretation of the survival curve after diagnosis of the first metastatic lesion. Ophthalmic and oncological characteristics were assessed in both groups. Of the 99 patients, 62 (62.6%) were classified as short-term survivors, and 37 (37.4%) as long-term survivors. The multivariate analysis identified the following predictors of long-term survival: age ≤ 65 years (p=0.012) and unaltered serum lactate dehydrogenase levels (p=0.018); additionally, the size (smaller vs. larger) of the largest liver metastasis showed a trend towards significance (p=0.063). Based on the variables significantly associated with long-term survival, we developed a decision tree to facilitate clinical decision-making. The findings of this study demonstrate the existence of a bimodal survival pattern in patients with metastatic uveal melanoma. The presence of certain clinical characteristics at diagnosis of distant disease is associated with long-term survival. A decision tree was developed to facilitate clinical decision-making and to counsel patients about the expected course of disease.

  12. Embolotherapy for Neuroendocrine Tumor Liver Metastases: Prognostic Factors for Hepatic Progression-Free Survival and Overall Survival

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, James X. [Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States); Rose, Steven [University of San Diego Medical Center, Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States); White, Sarah B. [Medical College of Wisconsin, Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States); El-Haddad, Ghassan [Moffitt Cancer Center, Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States); Fidelman, Nicholas [University of San Francisco Medical Center, Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States); Yarmohammadi, Hooman [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States); Hwang, Winifred; Sze, Daniel Y.; Kothary, Nishita [Stanford University Medical Center, Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States); Stashek, Kristen [Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Pathology (United States); Wileyto, E. Paul [University of Pennsylvania, Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology (United States); Salem, Riad [Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States); Metz, David C. [Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine (United States); Soulen, Michael C., E-mail: michael.soulen@uphs.upenn.edu [Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2017-01-15

    PurposeThe purpose of the study was to evaluate prognostic factors for survival outcomes following embolotherapy for neuroendocrine tumor (NET) liver metastases.Materials and MethodsThis was a multicenter retrospective study of 155 patients (60 years mean age, 57 % male) with NET liver metastases from pancreas (n = 71), gut (n = 68), lung (n = 8), or other/unknown (n = 8) primary sites treated with conventional transarterial chemoembolization (TACE, n = 50), transarterial radioembolization (TARE, n = 64), or transarterial embolization (TAE, n = 41) between 2004 and 2015. Patient-, tumor-, and treatment-related factors were evaluated for prognostic effect on hepatic progression-free survival (HPFS) and overall survival (OS) using unadjusted and propensity score-weighted univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models.ResultsMedian HPFS and OS were 18.5 and 125.1 months for G1 (n = 75), 12.2 and 33.9 months for G2 (n = 60), and 4.9 and 9.3 months for G3 tumors (n = 20), respectively (p < 0.05). Tumor burden >50 % hepatic volume demonstrated 5.5- and 26.8-month shorter median HPFS and OS, respectively, versus burden ≤50 % (p < 0.05). There were no significant differences in HPFS or OS between gut or pancreas primaries. In multivariate HPFS analysis, there were no significant differences among embolotherapy modalities. In multivariate OS analysis, TARE had a higher hazard ratio than TACE (unadjusted Cox model: HR 2.1, p = 0.02; propensity score adjusted model: HR 1.8, p = 0.11), while TAE did not differ significantly from TACE.ConclusionHigher tumor grade and tumor burden prognosticated shorter HPFS and OS. TARE had a higher hazard ratio for OS than TACE. There were no significant differences in HPFS among embolotherapy modalities.

  13. Risk factors and their identification. First Part: What is a risk factor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkau, B; Eschwege, E

    1995-02-01

    This series of three articles reviews the designs of studies which can be used to identify risk factors of a disease, here: diabetes or complications of diabetes. In the present issue of Diabete & Metabolisme, the first article of the series, we give the definition of a risk factor, along with measures of its force--relative risk and odds ratio, followed by the epidemiological definitions of the diseases: diabetes, coronary heart disease and hypertension. Risk factors are further discussed and we complete the discussion by some observations on the bias which can arise from a study or from its analysis, which can lead the researcher to the wrong conclusion. The three types of epidemiological studies which are used to determine whether factors are associated with a disease: observational or cross-sectional studies, cohort studies and case-cohort studies will be described in the second of the series in the next issue of the journal. Examples will be provided of each of these study types; their advantages and disadvantages will be discussed. In a third issue, the final paper will provide some examples of the study types and the identification of risk factors. The first examples involve diabetes and pancreatic cancer, the second birth weight and non-insulin dependent diabetes. Having found an association between a risk factor and diabetes, then we will discuss whether it can be considered to be a risk factor and if so and whether it is likely to be a cause of the disease.

  14. Risk factors and their identification second part: study designs for identification of risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkau, B; Eschwege, E

    1995-06-01

    This is the second a series of three articles which reviews the identification of risk factors of a disease, here: diabetes or complications of diabetes. In the first of the series [1], we gave the definition of a risk factor, along with measures of its force-relative risk and odds ratio, followed by the epidemiological definitions of the diseases: diabetes, coronary heart disease and hypertension. Risk factors were further discussed and we completed the discussion by some observations on the bias which can arise from a study or from its analysis, which can lead the researcher to the wrong conclusion. In this second article we define the three types of epidemiological studies which are used to determine whether factors are associated with a disease: observational or cross-sectional studies, cohort studies and casecohort studies. Examples are provided of each of these study types; their advantages and disadvantages are discussed. The final paper will provide some examples of the identification of risk factors from the literature. The first example involves diabetes and pancreatic cancer, the second birth weight and non-insulin dependent diabetes. Having found an association between a risk factor and diabetes, we will discuss whether it can be considered to be a risk factor, and if so whether it is likely to be a cause of the disease.

  15. Prevalence of health risk factors among fishermen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frantzeskou, Elpida; Jensen, Olaf; Linos, Athena

    2014-01-01

    Background Studies have shown that fishermen have a higher mortality from cardiovascular diseases, cancer and accidents. The majority of cardiovascular disease is caused by external risk factors such as the diet, tobacco, alcohol and lack of physical activity. The purpose of this paper was to rev......Background Studies have shown that fishermen have a higher mortality from cardiovascular diseases, cancer and accidents. The majority of cardiovascular disease is caused by external risk factors such as the diet, tobacco, alcohol and lack of physical activity. The purpose of this paper...... the Scottish, the Greek and the Turkish fishermen respectively. For the diet, 23% of the Scottish fishermen reported eating fruit and vegetables more than once a day at sea and only 29% at home. The Spanish study reported “excessive calorie consumption while on shore, notably high in animal fats....... Of the Danish fishermen 25%-, 34% and 37% were obese in the 18-24, 25-44 and 45-64 years age groups. Conclusion Health risk factors among fishermen need to be highlighted and further investigated as they represent occupational risks of major impact to chronic diseases prevalence with projections to quality...

  16. Risk factors for age-related maculopathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Connell, Paul P

    2012-02-01

    Age-related maculopathy (ARM) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly. Although beneficial therapeutic strategies have recently begun to emerge, much remains unclear regarding the etiopathogenesis of this disorder. Epidemiologic studies have enhanced our understanding of ARM, but the data, often conflicting, has led to difficulties with drawing firm conclusions with respect to risk for this condition. As a consequence, we saw a need to assimilate the published findings with respect to risk factors for ARM, through a review of the literature appraising results from published cross-sectional studies, prospective cohort studies, case series, and case control studies investigating risk for this condition. Our review shows that, to date, and across a spectrum of epidemiologic study designs, only age, cigarette smoking, and family history of ARM have been consistently demonstrated to represent risk for this condition. In addition, genetic studies have recently implicated many genes in the pathogenesis of age-related maculopathy, including Complement Factor H, PLEKHA 1, and LOC387715\\/HTRA1, demonstrating that environmental and genetic factors are important for the development of ARM suggesting that gene-environment interaction plays an important role in the pathogenesis of this condition.

  17. Risk Factors for Age-Related Maculopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul P. Connell

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related maculopathy (ARM is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly. Although beneficial therapeutic strategies have recently begun to emerge, much remains unclear regarding the etiopathogenesis of this disorder. Epidemiologic studies have enhanced our understanding of ARM, but the data, often conflicting, has led to difficulties with drawing firm conclusions with respect to risk for this condition. As a consequence, we saw a need to assimilate the published findings with respect to risk factors for ARM, through a review of the literature appraising results from published cross-sectional studies, prospective cohort studies, case series, and case control studies investigating risk for this condition. Our review shows that, to date, and across a spectrum of epidemiologic study designs, only age, cigarette smoking, and family history of ARM have been consistently demonstrated to represent risk for this condition. In addition, genetic studies have recently implicated many genes in the pathogenesis of age-related maculopathy, including Complement Factor H, PLEKHA 1, and LOC387715/HTRA1, demonstrating that environmental and genetic factors are important for the development of ARM suggesting that gene-environment interaction plays an important role in the pathogenesis of this condition.

  18. Molecular markers to complement sentinel node status in predicting survival in patients with high-risk locally invasive melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Casey J; Tang, Fiona; Hughes, Maria Celia B; Rodero, Mathieu P; Malt, Maryrose; Lambie, Duncan; Barbour, Andrew; Hayward, Nicholas K; Smithers, B Mark; Green, Adele C; Khosrotehrani, Kiarash

    2016-08-01

    Sentinel lymph node status is a major prognostic marker in locally invasive cutaneous melanoma. However, this procedure is not always feasible, requires advanced logistics and carries rare but significant morbidity. Previous studies have linked markers of tumour biology to patient survival. In this study, we aimed to combine the predictive value of established biomarkers in addition to clinical parameters as indicators of survival in addition to or instead of sentinel node biopsy in a cohort of high-risk melanoma patients. Patients with locally invasive melanomas undergoing sentinel lymph node biopsy were ascertained and prospectively followed. Information on mortality was validated through the National Death Index. Immunohistochemistry was used to analyse proteins previously reported to be associated with melanoma survival, namely Ki67, p16 and CD163. Evaluation and multivariate analyses according to REMARK criteria were used to generate models to predict disease-free and melanoma-specific survival. A total of 189 patients with available archival material of their primary tumour were analysed. Our study sample was representative of the entire cohort (N = 559). Average Breslow thickness was 2.5 mm. Thirty-two (17%) patients in the study sample died from melanoma during the follow-up period. A prognostic score was developed and was strongly predictive of survival, independent of sentinel node status. The score allowed classification of risk of melanoma death in sentinel node-negative patients. Combining clinicopathological factors and established biomarkers allows prediction of outcome in locally invasive melanoma and might be implemented in addition to or in cases when sentinel node biopsy cannot be performed. © 2016 UICC.

  19. Risk factors for suicidal behavior in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkcaldy, B D; Siefen, G R; Urkin, J; Merrick, J

    2006-10-01

    Adolescent suicide is today a public health problem among the leading cause of mortality among adolescents and young adults. There seems to be many reasons for this increase (which has different trends in different populations), but associations have been found with increased substance abuse, television and video violence, socio-economic status and easy access to firearms. Gender differences have also been observed with crime, suicide and substance abuse higher among males, while eating disorder, depression and suicidal behavior more prevalent among females. This paper will review prevalence and incidence of adolescent suicidal behavior, socio-demographic and psychological risk factors, associated cognitive factors and socio-economic factors. Risk factors include previous suicide attempts, a history of others in the family who have been suicidal, mental illness, alcohol and drug use, and other self-destructive behaviors as well as consideration being given to hopelessness, hostility, negative self-concept and isolation. At the individual difference level, factors such as trait depression, anger and hostility, perfectionism and social sensitivity would seem critical variables, as would age, gender and intellectual functioning. Sociological and family-related factors may also be implicated including dysfunctional family organizations, a history of physical or psychological abuse (sexual abuse) and limited extent of social support networks. A frequently reported precipitating event of suicidal behavior is family adversity including rejection, separation and interpersonal conflict. At a socio-economic level it would seem essential to provide comprehensive document about the social and economic conditions from which the adolescent comes.

  20. Obesity as a risk factor for severe acute pancreatitis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katuchova, Jana; Bober, Juraj; Harbulak, Pavol; Hudak, Alexander; Gajdzik, Tomas; Kalanin, Rastislav; Radonak, Jozef

    2014-04-01

    Obesity plays an important role in increasing the risks of cardiovascular diseases, metabolic diseases, and death. Controversy persists concerning the degrees to which obesity influences mortality and morbidity in severe acute pancreatitis. Between 2008 and 2012, the findings of 384 consecutive acute pancreatitis patients were analyzed in a prospective trial. Ranson's scores, Acute Physiology And Chronic Evaluation II scores, and computed tomography severity indexes were calculated. Patients were categorized by body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference for the analysis. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of obesity on local and systemic complications as well as on mortality in severe acute pancreatitis patients. Severe acute pancreatitis was confirmed in 91 (23.7 %) patients. Local and systemic complications were recorded in 64 (16.7 %) and 51 (13.3 %) patients, respectively. Obesity calculated by BMI was identified as a significant risk factor for local and systemic complications (p obesity was also categorized by waist circumference and was confirmed as a risk factor (p obesity can have a statistically significant influence on the mortality of severe acute pancreatitis patients. The presence of obesity has a negative impact on the survival rate of severe acute pancreatitis patients. Obese patients have higher incidence of local and systemic complications. Obesity seems to be a negative prognostic factor in severe acute pancreatitis patients.

  1. Obesity, diabetes, and associated risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlJaroudi, Wael A; Petersen, John L

    2006-02-01

    The prevalence of obesity has increased in the past 10 years. Recent studies have associated obesity with other cardiovascular risk factors, and an increased risk of diabetes and cardiovascular death. Patients with obesity should undergo a global evaluation cardiovascular risk, including measurement of abdominal waist circumference, assessment of standard cardiovascular risk factors, screening for dyslipidemia, abnormal glucose metabolism, and hypertension. Recommendations for dietary modification should be tailored to the patient's associated medical conditions, such as diabetes, dyslipidemia, and hypertension, and all patients should be instructed on the importance of monitoring caloric intake. For patients who can engage in regular physical activity, we recommend a minimum regimen of 150 min/wk of moderate intensity exercise, such as brisk walking. Use of pharmacotherapy for obesity can be considered when efforts at therapeutic lifestyle modification have been ineffective, but patients must be carefully screened because many agents have potential side effects. Surgical approaches for obesity have also been demonstrated to be effective in achieving and sustaining weight loss and improving markers of cardiovascular risk and should be considered in patients who are refractory to therapeutic lifestyle modification. All diabetic patients should be treated comprehensively to reduce other comorbid conditions, including hypertension and dyslipidemia. Hypoglycemic therapy should be initiated when efforts to reduce hyperglycemia to target thresholds fail.

  2. Lifestyle risk factors and chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vupputuri, Suma; Sandler, Dale P

    2003-11-01

    To examine the effects of lifestyle risk factors such as alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking and body mass index (BMI) on the development of chronic kidney disease. We used a case-control study of 554 hospital cases and 516 age, race, and gender-matched community controls. The main outcome measure was newly-diagnosed chronic kidney disease, assessed by chart review. Self-reported history of alcohol consumption, smoking, and BMI as well as other co-variables were obtained during telephone interviews. Logistic regression models assessed the association between lifestyle risk factors and chronic kidney disease and were adjusted for important co-variables. We found no significant associations between alcohol consumption and chronic kidney disease, with the exception of moonshine, which resulted in an increased risk of chronic kidney disease (including all subtypes). The effects of smoking on chronic kidney disease were inconsistent, but pointed to no appreciable excess risk among smokers. Increasing quartiles of BMI were positively and significantly associated with nephrosclerosis (ORs [95% CI]: 2.5 [1.0-6.0], 2.8 [1.2-6.8] and 4.6 [1.8-11.6], for the second, third, and fourth quartiles of BMI, respectively). Our study revealed a significant positive association between BMI and nephrosclerosis. We did not find an increased risk of chronic kidney disease associated with alcohol or cigarette smoking.

  3. Risk factors for statin-associated rhabdomyolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schech, Stephanie; Graham, David; Staffa, Judy; Andrade, Susan E; La Grenade, Lois; Burgess, Margaret; Blough, David; Stergachis, Andy; Chan, K Arnold; Platt, Richard; Shatin, Deborah

    2007-03-01

    To identify and characterize risk factors for rhabdomyolysis in patients prescribed statin monotherapy or statin plus fibrate therapy. A nested case-control study was conducted within a cohort of 252,460 new users of lipid-lowering medications across 11 geographically dispersed U.S. health plans. Twenty-one cases of rhabdomyolysis confirmed by medical record review were compared to 200 individually matched controls without rhabdomyolysis. A conditional logistic regression model was applied to evaluate the effects of age, gender, comorbidities, concurrent medication use, dosage, and duration of statin use on the development of rhabdomyolysis. Statin users 65 years of age and older have four times the risk of hospitalization for rhabdomyolysis than those under age 65 (odds ratio (OR) = 4.36, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.5,14.1). We also observed a joint effect of high statin dosage and renal disease (p = 0.022). When these two variables were added to the model with age, we obtained an OR of 5.73 for dosage (95%CI: 0.63, 52.6) and 6.26 for renal disease (95%CI: 0.46, 63.38). Although not statistically significant, we did observe a greater than twofold increase in risk for rhabdomyolysis among females (OR = 2.53, 95%CI: 0.91, 7.32). Findings of this study indicate that older age is a risk factor for rhabdomyolysis among statin users. Although the evidence is not as strong, high statin dosage, renal disease, and female gender may be additional risk factors. Patients at higher risk of developing rhabdomyolysis should be closely monitored for signs and symptoms of the disease. (c) 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Psychosocial risk factors for coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glozier, Nick; Tofler, Geoffrey H; Colquhoun, David M; Bunker, Stephen J; Clarke, David M; Hare, David L; Hickie, Ian B; Tatoulis, James; Thompson, David R; Wilson, Alison; Branagan, Maree G

    2013-08-05

    In 2003, the National Heart Foundation of Australia published a position statement on psychosocial risk factors and coronary heart disease (CHD). This consensus statement provides an updated review of the literature on psychosocial stressors, including chronic stressors (in particular, work stress), acute individual stressors and acute population stressors, to guide health professionals based on current evidence. It complements a separate updated statement on depression and CHD. Perceived chronic job strain and shift work are associated with a small absolute increased risk of developing CHD, but there is limited evidence regarding their effect on the prognosis of CHD. Evidence regarding a relationship between CHD and job (in)security, job satisfaction, working hours, effort-reward imbalance and job loss is inconclusive. Expert consensus is that workplace programs aimed at weight loss, exercise and other standard cardiovascular risk factors may have positive outcomes for these risk factors, but no evidence is available regarding the effect of such programs on the development of CHD. Social isolation after myocardial infarction (MI) is associated with an adverse prognosis. Expert consensus is that although measures to reduce social isolation are likely to produce positive psychosocial effects, it is unclear whether this would also improve CHD outcomes. Acute emotional stress may trigger MI or takotsubo ("stress") cardiomyopathy, but the absolute increase in transient risk from an individual stressor is low. Psychosocial stressors have an impact on CHD, but clinical significance and prevention require further study. Awareness of the potential for increased cardiovascular risk among populations exposed to natural disasters and other conditions of extreme stress may be useful for emergency services response planning. Wider public access to defibrillators should be available where large populations gather, such as sporting venues and airports, and as part of the response

  5. Clinical, Molecular, and Environmental Risk Factors for Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison Maggioncalda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies suggest unique occurrence patterns of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL worldwide. In most Western countries there is a clear bimodal age distribution with an early peak in young adults followed by a second peak in older adults, particularly among males. In the Middle East and Asia, HL is more common in early childhood. There also are marked racial differences in the presentations of HL and HL subtypes, and particular single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs have been identified as etiological factors suggesting that gene-gene and gene-environment interactions are involved. Personal health choices such as exercise and smoking may modify an individual's chances of developing HL. Numerous studies highlight the impact that exposure to Epstein-Barr virus and other environmental factors have on HL risk. Understanding the relative importance of each of these findings and their links to HL development and survival will help clinical researchers expand curative therapies and create preventative strategies for HL.

  6. Prolonged survival after diagnosis of brain metastasis from breast cancer: contributing factors and treatment implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Yayoi; Aruga, Tomoyuki; Yamashita, Toshinari; Miyamoto, Hiromi; Horiguchi, Kazumi; Kitagawa, Dai; Idera, Nami; Goto, Risa; Kuroi, Katsumasa

    2015-08-01

    The prognosis of breast cancer-derived brain metastasis is poor, but new drugs and recent therapeutic strategies have helped extend survival in patients. Prediction of therapeutic responses and outcomes is not yet possible, however. In a retrospective study, we examined prognostic factors in patients with breast cancer-derived brain metastasis, and we tested the prognostic utility of a breast cancer-specific Graded Prognostic Assessment in these patients. Sixty-three patients diagnosed with brain metastasis from breast cancer treated surgically and adjuvantly were included. We examined clinical variables per primary tumor subtype: ER+/HER2- (luminal), HER2+ (human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2-enriched) or ER-/PR-/HER2- (triple negative). We also categorized patients' breast cancer-specific Graded Prognostic Assessment scores and analyzed post-brain metastasis survival time in relation to these categories. The breast cancers comprised the following subtypes: luminal, n = 18; human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2-enriched, n = 27 and triple-negative, n = 18; median survival per subtype was 11, 37 and 3 months, respectively. Survival of human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2-enriched patients was longer, though not significantly (P = 0.188), than that of luminal patients. Survival of triple-negative patients was significantly short (vs. human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2-enriched patients, P cancer-specific Graded Prognostic Assessment scores reflected disease-free intervals and survival times. Our data indicate that breast cancer-specific Graded Prognostic Assessment-based prediction will be helpful in determining appropriate therapeutic strategies for patients with brain metastasis from breast cancer. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Risk factors for the prognosis of pediatric medulloblastoma: a retrospective analysis of 40 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jianzhong; Zhao, Rui; Shi, Wei; Li, Hao

    2017-05-01

    In this study, we evaluated the association of molecular subtypes, clinical characteristics and pathological types with the prognosis of patients with medulloblastoma. We analyzed forty patients with medulloblastoma who underwent surgical resection at our center between January 2004 and June 2014. Risk factors associated with survival, disease progression and recurrence were analyzed with a univariate Cox regression analysis, and the identified significant risk factors were further analyzed by Kaplan-Meier survival curves. Factors associated with overall survival included M stage (p=0.014), calcification (p=0.012), postoperative treatment, postoperative Karnofsky Performance Scale (KPS) score (p=0.015), and molecular subtype (p=0.005 for WNT and p=0.008 for SHH). Number of symptoms (p=0.029), M stage (p2 and ≥M1 stage without postoperative radiotherapy. The risk of recurrence increased with advanced M stage. Protective factors for recurrence included M0 stage and a combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. We identified the risk factors associated with survival, disease progression and recurrence of medulloblastoma patients. This information is helpful for understanding the prognostic factors related to medulloblastoma.

  8. Risk factors in child sexual abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Eryl A; Jones, Alyson C

    2013-04-01

    To quantify the incidence of child sexual abuse allegations referred to a forensic examination centre; to identify possible risk factors predisposing children to sexual abuse by measuring their prevalence among the complainant population. The records of children involved in sexual abuse allegations presenting over a 12 month period were reviewed retrospectively. Demographic data such as nature of case, sex, ethnicity, number of previous allegations, assailant relationship, month of presentation, and age were compiled. Potential risk factors such as alcohol or drug use, being 'looked after', physical disability, learning disability, previous consensual sexual intercourse, past psychiatric history, and history of psychiatric support were compiled. Descriptive statistics were calculated. 138 cases were recorded, of which the majority were acute. Epidemiological data demonstrated a higher incidence in females and most complainants were of White British origin. Most of the cases were of first allegations and the assailant relationship was most frequently an acquaintance. The incidence was highest in January. The modal age was 15 years and age distribution was positively skewed. Of the potential risk factors studied, alcohol and drug use was the most prevalent. Prevalence increased with age for the majority of factors studied. Alcohol and drug use may be an area in which preventative strategies would be beneficial. Ethnic minorities may hold a large amount of unreported cases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  9. Breast cancer epidemiology and risk factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broeders, M. J. M.; Verbeek, A. L. M. [Nijmegen, Univ. (Netherlands). Dept. of Epidemiology

    1997-09-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among women in the Western society. Over the past decades it has become apparent that breast cancer incidence rates are increasing steadily, whereas the mortality rates for breast cancer have remained relatively constant. Information through the media on this rising number of cases has increased breast health awareness but has also introduced anxiety in the female population. This combination of factors has made the need for prevention of breast cancer an urgent matter. Breast cancer does not seem to be a single disease entity. A specific etiologic factor may therefore have more influence on one form may therefore have more influence on one form of breast cancer than another. So far though, as shown in their summary of current knowledge on established and dubious risk factors, no risk factors have been identified that can explain a major part of the incidence. Efforts to identify other ways for primary prevention have also been discouraging, even though breast cancer is one of the most investigated tumours world-wide. Thus, at this point i time, the most important strategy to reduce breast cancer mortality is early detection through individual counselling and organised breast screening programs. The recent isolation of breast cancer susceptibility genes may introduce new ways to reduce the risk of breast cancer in a small subset of women.

  10. The prognostic factors affecting survival in muscle invasive bladder cancer treated with radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Woong Ki; Oh, Bong Ryoul; Ahn, Sung Ja; Nah, Byung Sik; Kwon, Dong Deuk; Park, Kwang Sung; Ryu, Soo Bang; Park, Yang Il [Chonnam National University Medical School, Chonnam National University Hospital, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-06-15

    This study analyzed the prognostic factors affecting the survival rate and evaluated the role of radiation therapy in muscle-invading bladder cancer. Twenty eight patient with bladder cancer who completed planned definitive radiotherapy in the Departments of Therapeutic Radiology and Urology, Chonnam National University Hospital between Jan. 1986 to Dec. 1998 were retrospectively analyzed. The reviews were performed based on the patients' medical records. There were 21 males and 7 females in this study. The median of age was 72 years old ranging from 49 to 84 years. All patients were confirmed as having transitional cell carcinoma with histological grade 1 in one patient, grade 2 in 15, grade 3 in 9, and uniformed in 3. Radiation therapy was performed using a linear accelerator with 6 or 10 MV X-rays. Radiation was delivered daily with a 1.8 or 2.0 Gy fraction size by 4 ports (anterior-posterior, both lateral, alternatively) or 3 ports (Anterior and both lateral). The median radiation dose delivered to the isocenter of the target volume was 61.24 Gy ranging from 59 to 66.6 Gy. The survival rate was calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Multivariate analysis was performed on the prognostic factors affecting the survival rate. The survival rate was 76%, 46%, 33%, 33% at 1, 2, 3, 5 years, respectively, with 19 months of median survival. The potential factors of age (less than 70 years vs above 70), sex, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, hydronephrosis, T-stage (T3a vs T3b), TUR, chemotherapy, total duration of radiotherapy, radiation dose (less than 60 Gy vs above 60 Gy), and the treatment response were investigated with uni- and multivariate analysis. In univariate analysis, the T-stage ({rho} 0.078) and radiation dose ({rho} = 0.051) were marginally significant, and the treatment response ({rho} = 0.011) was a statistically significant factor on the survival rate. Multivariate analysis showed there were no significant prognostic factors affecting the survival

  11. Factors influencing breeding success, ovarian cyclicity, and cub survival in zoo-managed tigers (Panthera tigris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Sarah P; Harris, Tara; Traylor-Holzer, Kathy; Beck, Karen Goodrowe

    2014-01-10

    Understanding factors that influence reproduction and offspring survival in zoo populations is critical for management of threatened and endangered species. Examination of long-term data (1989-2011) compiled from the Association of Zoos and Aquarium's zoo-managed tiger breeding program provides the basis for a more thorough understanding of reproduction and scientifically based decisions for effective population management in this endangered felid. Biological and management-related factors that could influence tiger breeding success and cub survival were evaluated using logistic mixed models. Breeding success improved with female age until approximately age five, then declined thereafter. Experienced female breeders had greater breeding success than inexperienced females. Litter size was most predictive of cub survival, with average-sized litters (3-4 cubs) experiencing the highest proportional survival. Management-related factors, such as whether the breeding institution had a recent tiger litter and whether both animals were already located at the same institution, also influenced breeding success and cub survival. These results highlight the importance of institutional husbandry experience and the need to retain knowledge through staff turnovers to achieve optimal reproductive success. Using fecal estrogen data, frequency of ovarian cyclicity and mean cycle length did not differ by female age or parity; thus, lack of cyclicity and/or increased cycle duration are not likely explanations for declining breeding success with age. These results provide valuable reproductive information that should improve scientific management of zoo-based tiger populations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The importance of building construction materials relative to other factors affecting structure survival during wildfire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syphard, Alexandra D.; Brennan, Teresa J.; Keeley, Jon E.

    2017-01-01

    Structure loss to wildfire is a serious problem in wildland-urban interface areas across the world. Laboratory experiments suggest that fire-resistant building construction and design could be important for reducing structure destruction, but these need to be evaluated under real wildfire conditions, especially relative to other factors. Using empirical data from destroyed and surviving structures from large wildfires in southern California, we evaluated the relative importance of building construction and structure age compared to other local and landscape-scale variables associated with structure survival. The local-scale analysis showed that window preparation was especially important but, in general, creating defensible space adjacent to the home was as important as building construction. At the landscape scale, structure density and structure age were the two most important factors affecting structure survival, but there was a significant interaction between them. That is, young structure age was most important in higher-density areas where structure survival overall was more likely. On the other hand, newer-construction structures were less likely to survive wildfires at lower density. Here, appropriate defensible space near the structure and accessibility to major roads were important factors. In conclusion, community safety is a multivariate problem that will require a comprehensive solution involving land use planning, fire-safe construction, and property maintenance.

  13. Factors affecting ejection risk in rollover crashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, James R; Cormier, Joseph M; Bain, Charles E; Wirth, Jeffrey L; Bonugli, Enrique B; Watson, Richard A

    2012-01-01

    Ejection greatly increases the risk of injury and fatality in a rollover crash. The purpose of this study was to determine the crash, vehicle, and occupant characteristics that affect the risk of ejection in rollovers. Information from real world rollover crashes occurring from 2000 - 2010 was obtained from the National Automotive Sampling System (NASS) in order to analyze the effect of the following parameters on ejection risk: seatbelt use, rollover severity, vehicle type, seating position, roof crush, side curtain airbag deployment, glazing type, and occupant age, gender, and size. Seatbelt use was found to reduce the risk of partial ejection and virtually eliminate the risk of complete ejection. For belted occupants, the risk of partial ejection risk was significantly increased in rollover crashes involving more roof inversions, light trucks and vans (LTVs), and larger occupants. For unbelted occupants, the risk of complete ejection was significantly increased in rollover crashes involving more roof inversions, LTVs, far side occupants, and higher levels of roof crush. Roof crush was not a significant predictor of ejection after normalizing for rollover severity. Curtain airbag deployment was associated with reduced rates of partial and complete ejection, but the effect was not statistically significant, perhaps due to the small sample size (n = 89 raw cases with curtain deployments). A much greater proportion of occupants who were ejected in spite of curtain airbag deployment passed through the sunroof and other portals as opposed to the adjacent side window compared to occupants who were ejected in rollovers without a curtain airbag deployment. The primary factors that reduce ejection risk in rollover crashes are, in generally decreasing order of importance: seatbelt use, fewer roof inversions, passenger car body type, curtain airbag deployment, near side seating position, and small occupant size.

  14. Risk factors for sporadic ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Vysotsky

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The review of the literature on the problems of sporadic ovarian cancer details the present views of its disputable risk factors, such as dietary habits, body weight, contraception, and labor, and age of commencing a sexual activity. It discusses the dietary and sexual behavior model that has changed since the Neolithic, as well as the number of menses and ovulations throughout the reproductive peri- od. The works by authors dealing with the impact of smoking and alcohol consumption on the risk of ovarian cancer are analyzed.

  15. [A new perspective of survival data on clinical epidemiology: introduction of competitive risk model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Z Q; Ou, Y Q; Qu, Y J; Yuan, H Y; Liu, X Q

    2017-08-10

    Competing risks occur frequently in the analysis of survival data that should be dealt with competing risk models. Competing risk is an event whose occurrence precludes the occurrence of the primary event of interest. Previous commonly used Kaplan-Meier method tends to overestimate the cumulative survival functions, while the traditional Cox proportional hazards model falsely evaluates the effects of covariates on the hazard related to the occurrence of the event. There are few domestic reports mentioning the concept, application and methodology of competing risk model as well as the implementation procedures or resolution of model conditions and parameters. The current work aims to explain the core concept and methodology of the competing risk model and to illustrate the process of analysis on cumulative incidence rate, using both the cause-specific hazard function model and the sub-distribution hazard function model. Software macro code in SAS 9.4 is also provided to assist clinical researchers to further understand the application of the model so to properly analyze the survival data.

  16. Personalized Risk Prediction in Clinical Oncology Research: Applications and Practical Issues Using Survival Trees and Random Forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chen; Steingrimsson, Jon Arni

    2017-10-19

    A crucial component of making individualized treatment decisions is to accurately predict each patient's disease risk. In clinical oncology, disease risks are often measured through time-to-event data, such as overall survival and progression/recurrence-free survival, and are often subject to censoring. Risk prediction models based on recursive partitioning methods are becoming increasingly popular largely due to their ability to handle nonlinear relationships, higher-order interactions, and/or high-dimensional covariates. The most popular recursive partitioning methods are versions of the Classification and Regression Tree (CART) algorithm, which builds a simple interpretable tree structured model. With the aim of increasing prediction accuracy, the random forest algorithm averages multiple CART trees, creating a flexible risk prediction model. Risk prediction models used in clinical oncology commonly use both traditional demographic and tumor pathological factors as well as high-dimensional genetic markers and treatment parameters from multimodality treatments. In this article, we describe the most commonly used extensions of the CART and random forest algorithms to right-censored outcomes. We focus on how they differ from the methods for noncensored outcomes, and how the different splitting rules and methods for cost-complexity pruning impact these algorithms. We demonstrate these algorithms by analyzing a randomized Phase III clinical trial of breast cancer. We also conduct Monte Carlo simulations to compare the prediction accuracy of survival forests with more commonly used regression models under various scenarios. These simulation studies aim to evaluate how sensitive the prediction accuracy is to the underlying model specifications, the choice of tuning parameters, and the degrees of missing covariates.

  17. Socioeconomic factors and the risk for sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampras, Shalaka S; Moysich, Kirsten B; Marimuthu, Sathiya P; Ravi, Vinod; Jayaprakash, Vijayvel

    2014-11-01

    Sarcomas are a heterogeneous group of rare malignancies arising from mesenchymal tissue. Although several occupational exposures have been evaluated in association with sarcoma, little is known about the role of socioeconomic indicators such as education. Socioeconomic status has been found to be associated with risk of development of several types of cancers, primarily lung, gastric, and cervical cancers. We conducted a hospital-based case-control study to evaluate the association of socioeconomic level with the risk for sarcoma. A total of 371 incident cases of sarcoma were matched in terms of age, sex, and year of enrollment in the study with 742 cancer-free controls. Education and income levels were evaluated as the indicators of socioeconomic status. Higher education (college level) was associated with a significantly lower risk for sarcoma [odds ratio (OR)=0.48, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.29-0.80], even after adjusting for important confounders. After stratifying by sex, significantly lower risk for sarcoma was observed among men who had college level education compared with men with a level of education of eighth grade or lower (OR=0.38, 95% CI=0.19-0.74). A significant association between education and the risk for sarcoma remained after stratifying by income (OR=0.49, 95% CI=0.28-0.86, among the low income group). When analyzed as a composite exposure, individuals with high education and high income status had significantly lower risk for sarcoma compared with those with low income and low education status (OR=0.41, 95% CI=0.23-0.71). Thus, socioeconomic factors may play a significant role in determining the risk for sarcoma and should be explored further to elucidate the underlying factors that may explain these sociodemographic inequalities related to sarcoma.

  18. Risk factors and outcome in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis with persistent biliary candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, Christian; Bode, Konrad Alexander; Chahoud, Fadi; Wannhoff, Andreas; Friedrich, Kilian; Weiss, Karl-Heinz; Sauer, Peter; Stremmel, Wolfgang; Gotthardt, Daniel Nils

    2014-10-23

    Candidiasis is commonly observed in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), but the clinical risk factors associated with its presence have not been fully investigated. In this study, we aimed to analyse the incidence, risk factors, and transplantation-free survival in primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) patients with persistent biliary candidiasis. We retrospectively analysed patients diagnosed with PSC who were admitted to our department during 2002 to 2012. One-hundred fifty patients whose bile cultures were tested for fungal species were selected, and their clinical and laboratory parameters were investigated. The results of endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC) and bile cultures were analysed using chart reviews. The cases of biliary candidiasis were sub-classified as transient or persistent. Thirty out of 150 (20.0%) patients had biliary candidiasis. Although all patients demonstrated comparable baseline characteristics, those with biliary candidiasis showed significantly reduced transplantation-free survival (p candidiasis. A subgroup analysis showed reduced survival with a greater necessity for orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) only in patients with persistence of Candida (p = 0.007). The survival in the patients with transient biliary candidiasis was comparable to that in candidiasis-free patients. In a multivariate regression analysis that included Mayo risk score (MRS), sex, age, dominant stenosis, inflammatory bowel disease, autoimmune hepatitis overlap syndrome, and number of times ERC was performed, biliary candidiasis was an independent risk factor for reduced survival (p = 0.008). Risk factors associated with acquisition of biliary candidiasis were age at PSC diagnosis and number of ERCs. The persistence of biliary candidiasis is associated with markedly reduced transplantation-free survival in PSC patients. By contrast, actuarial survival in patients with transient biliary candidiasis approaches that for patients without any

  19. Major Risk Factors for Heart Disease: High Blood Cholesterol

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Major Risk Factors for Heart Disease High Blood Cholesterol High blood cholesterol is another major risk factor for heart disease ... can do something about. The higher your blood cholesterol level, the greater your risk for developing heart ...

  20. [Elevated blood pressure as cardiovascular risk factor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalewski, Wiesław; Hebel, Kazimiera

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases for decades have been and still are the main and current health problem of the Polish society and there are many reasons for these diseases. Hypertension is one of the major risk factors for developing cardiovascular disease. The factors significantly increasing risk the of cardiovascular disease are in addition to high blood pressure, smoking (also passive), high blood fats (cholesterol and its HDL, LDL fractions as well as triglyceride levels, obesity, lack of exercise, diabetes and hereditary features. Other important factors which play an important role are external factors such as e.g. environmental pollution, lifestyle, stress. Prediction of cardiovascular disease should start from the evaluation of the fetal period because low birth weight may be a risk of coronary heart disease, hypertension, obesity or diabetes in adulthood. The authors of the referred tests showed that the level of blood pressure observed during childhood is closely associated with the level of blood pressure in adults and is also dependent on the body weight. Since the issue of the effects of high pressure on the cardiovascular system is inherent in the issue of the metabolic syndrome, it should be mentioned also that another causative factor may be an irregularity in the removal of urine from the body and the amount of insulin. The control of hypertension is a complex problem, at least in view of the wide range of adverse factors affecting the human body: hypertension is often either a constituent of other lesions. Therefore, it is difficult to treat high blood pressure in the strict sense; more often it is a combination therapy based on pharmacology caused for other reasons.

  1. One-year survival rate of renal transplant: factors influencing the outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rezapour S

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Siavash Rezapour,1 Aliasghar Yarmohammadi,1,2 Mahmoud Tavakkoli1,2 1Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, 2Urology Department, Montaserie Organ Transplantation Hospital, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran Background: Renal transplantation remains the treatment of choice for end-stage renal disease, as the procedure not only improves quality of life, but also markedly increases patients’ survival rates. Organ and patient survival rates are important issues of interest post-transplantation. Aim: To determine the 1-year survival rate of renal transplant, we studied graft function, which is a predictor of survival, among those who received a kidney transplant in the time period between February 2012 and February 2013 at Montaserie Organ Transplantation Hospital. Materials and methods: This is a retrospective cohort study planned to determine patient and organ survival rates after kidney transplantation from living and deceased donors during a 1-year period. We also tried to clarify factors resulting in graft loss. Designated variables were collected using checklists and subsequently entered into SPSS software version 17 and analyzed using the Kaplan–Meier method and descriptive statistics.Results: From 173 patients included in the study, 67.1% (n=116 were female. The mean age of the recipients was 33±12.85 years. In the majority of cases, cause of end-stage renal disease was not clear (n=89, 51.44%. Urinary tract infection (23.1% was the commonest post-operative complication, followed by delayed graft function, which was diagnosed in 22 (12.7% recipients. Seventeen cases of graft rejection (9.8% were recorded and 4 (2.3% of these cases underwent nephrectomy that will be regarded as graft loss in this paper. Therefore, 1-year graft survival was 90.2%. Graft survival in cadaveric and live-donor recipients was 90.8% and 88.7%, respectively. As there was no mortality reported among graft recipients, 1-year patient survival rate

  2. Risk factors for nosocomial bloodstream infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolopolou, Eleni; Katsaris, Georgios; Katostaras, Theophanis

    A retrospective study of 205 patients was performed to identify the risk factors associated with nosocomial bloodstream infection (BSI). The study occurred during a 5-month period in four medical-surgical intensive care units (ICUs) in Athens, Greece. Risk factors were determined using single and multivariate analyses. Thirty-five patients developed nosocomial BSI (17.1%). The incidence density (defined as the number of new cases of BSI divided by the total of patient-days in the population studied; Jarvis, 1997) of BSI was 14.3 per 1000 patient-days (total number of days that patients are in the ICU during the selected time period). A multivariate model showed that only three factors were significantly and independently responsible for nosocomial BSI: the length of ICU stay (adjusted odds ratios (AOR) 1.052, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.018-1.087, P = 0.002); the presence of trauma at admission (AOR 2.622, 95% CI 1.074-6.404, P = 0.034); and nosocomial ventilator-associated pneumonia (AOR 6.153, 95% CI 2.305-16.422, P = 0.000). These results show that the factors that had most influence on the development of nosocomial BSI were those factors associated with the treatment received by patients during ICU stay.

  3. Risk factors for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingre, Caroline; Roos, Per M; Piehl, Fredrik; Kamel, Freya; Fang, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is the most common motor neuron disease. It is typically fatal within 2–5 years of symptom onset. The incidence of ALS is largely uniform across most parts of the world, but an increasing ALS incidence during the last decades has been suggested. Although recent genetic studies have substantially improved our understanding of the causes of ALS, especially familial ALS, an important role of non-genetic factors in ALS is recognized and needs further study. In this review, we briefly discuss several major genetic contributors to ALS identified to date, followed by a more focused discussion on the most commonly examined non-genetic risk factors for ALS. We first review factors related to lifestyle choices, including smoking, intake of antioxidants, physical fitness, body mass index, and physical exercise, followed by factors related to occupational and environmental exposures, including electromagnetic fields, metals, pesticides, β-methylamino-L-alanine, and viral infection. Potential links between ALS and other medical conditions, including head trauma, metabolic diseases, cancer, and inflammatory diseases, are also discussed. Finally, we outline several future directions aiming to more efficiently examine the role of non-genetic risk factors in ALS. PMID:25709501

  4. Familial risk factors favoring drug addiction onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimić, Jadranka Ivandić; Jukić, Vlado

    2012-01-01

    This study, primarily aimed at identification of familial risk factors favoring drug addiction onset, was carried out throughout 2008 and 2009. The study comprised a total of 146 addicts and 134 control subjects. Based on the study outcome, it can be concluded that in the families the addicts were born into, familial risk factors capable of influencing their psychosocial development and favoring drug addiction onset had been statistically more frequently encountered during childhood and adolescence as compared to the controls. The results also indicated the need for further research into familial interrelations and the structure of the families addicts were born into, as well as the need for the implementation of family-based approaches to both drug addiction prevention and therapy.

  5. RISK FACTORS FOR INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceren Atakay

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Intimate partner violence has kept being one of the major societal issues in our country over the past year. It is absolutely necessary to intervene in this substantially psychological issue multi-directionally. In order to intervene in the problem from psychological aspect, it is important to estimate and interpret the risk factors for intimate partner violence. Therefore in the current study, ‘I-cube theory’ which is about the risk factors for intimate partner violence has been explained first. Afterwards, the findings of content analysis which was obtained from newspaper reports about femicide in 2013 have been shown and these findings have been discussed within the context of I-cube theory, respectively. Finally, solutions to prevent this violence has been suggested.

  6. Psychosocial risk factors and heart failure hospitalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rod, Naja Hulvej; Andersen, Ingelise; Prescott, Eva

    2011-01-01

    Prospective studies on the role of psychosocial factors in heart failure development are virtually nonexistent. The authors aimed to address the effect of psychosocial factors on the risk of heart failure hospitalization in men and women free of cardiovascular disease. In 1991-1993, the 8......-fourth of the population reported some degree of vital exhaustion. The vital exhaustion score was associated with a higher risk of heart failure in a dose-response manner (P heart failure in both men (hazard ratio = 1.93, 95% confidence...... interval: 1.20, 3.10) and women (hazard ratio = 2.56, 95% confidence interval: 1.80, 3.65). Contrary to expectation, major life events, social network, and sleeping medication did not play an individual role for heart failure hospitalization. Because of the high prevalence of vital exhaustion...

  7. Psychosocial risk factors for the metabolic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jolene Masters; Lund, Rikke; Andersen, Ingelise

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Metabolic deregulations and development of metabolic syndrome may be an important pathway underlying the relationship between stress and cardiovascular disease. We aim to estimate the effect of a comprehensive range of psychosocial factors on the risk of developing metabolic...... syndrome in men and women. Methods: The study population consisted of 3621 men and women from the Copenhagen City Heart Study who were free of metabolic syndrome at baseline and reexamined after 10 years. The data was analyzed by multivariable logistic regression models adjusted for age, education, income.......11) to be risk factors for developing the metabolic syndrome in women, while vital exhaustion (OR 2.09, 95% CI 0.95 to 4.59) and intake of sleep medications (OR 2.54, 95% CI 0.92 to 5.96) may play a more important role in men. Conclusions: Experiencing major life events in work and adult life and...

  8. Risk Factor Analysis In Oral Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharti A.R

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available A case-control study involving 54 cases and 108 matched controls was conducted to find out the association of risk factors like smoking, chewing paan and tobacco and the occurrence of cancers of the oral cavity. More than 80% of the cases were over 40 years of age, with a male: female ratio of 2:1, paan and tobacco chewing were significantly related to the oral cancers (Odds Ratio of 9.3 and 7.8 respectively. Smoking showed a statistically significant relationship with oral cancers among male patients. In addition, the study also established dose-response and time-response relationship these risk factors and oral cancer.

  9. The suitability of corneas stored by organ culture for penetrating keratoplasty and influence of donor and recipient factors on 5-year graft survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armitage, W John; Jones, Mark N A; Zambrano, Isaac; Carley, Fiona; Tole, Derek M

    2014-02-10

    To determine the impact of donor factors on the suitability of corneas stored by organ culture for penetrating keratoplasty (PK) and the influence of donor and recipient factors on 5-year survival of first PK. Logistic regression analyses were carried out to determine the influence of donor factors on, respectively, the risk of microbial contamination during organ culture, the suitability of corneas for PK (endothelial cell density ≥ 2200 cells/mm(2)), and the quality of corneas (endothelial cell density ≥ 2500 cells/mm(2)). Only one cornea, randomly selected, from each donor was included in these analyses. A Cox regression analysis was used to determine the influence of donor and recipient factors on 5-year PK survival. Risk of contamination (n = 8317): Causes of donor death including infection, respiratory disease, and cancer all increased the risk of contamination during organ culture (P culture (P influence. Corneas from organ donors were more likely to be suitable for PK (P = 0.0003). Five-year graft survival (n = 3014): Graft survival was dominated by the indication for PK (P influenced the suitability of corneas for PK. The indication for PK and other recipient factors were the main predictors of graft failure.

  10. Interleukin genes and associations with colon and rectal cancer risk and overall survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondurant, Kristina L.; Lundgreen, Abbie; Herrick, Jennifer S.; Kadlubar, Susan; Wolff, Roger K.; Slattery, Martha L.

    2012-01-01

    Interleukins are a group of cytokines that contribute to growth and differentiation, cell migration, and inflammatory and anti-inflammatory responses by the immune system. In this study we examined genetic variation in genes from various anti-inflammatory and pro-inflammatory interleukins to determine association with colon and rectal cancer risk and overall survival. Data from two population-based incident studies of colon cancer (1555 cases and 1956 controls) and rectal cancer (754 cases and 954 controls) were utilized. After controlling for multiple comparisons, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from four genes, IL3, IL6R, IL8, IL15, were associated with increased colon cancer risk and CXCR1, and CXCR2 were significantly associated with increased rectal cancer risk. Only SNPs from genes within the IL-8 pathway (IL8, CXCR1, and CXCR2) showed a significant association with both colon and rectal cancer risk. Several SNPs interacted significantly with IL8 and IFNG SNPs and with aspirin/NSAID, cigarette smoking, estrogen use and BMI. For both colon and rectal cancer, increasing numbers of risk alleles were associated with increased hazard of death from cancer; the estimated hazard of death for colon cancer for the highest category of risk alleles was 1.74 (95% CI 1.18–2.56) and 1.96 (95% CI 1.28–2.99) for rectal cancer. These data suggest interleukin genes play a role in risk and overall survival for colon and rectal cancer. PMID:22674296

  11. [Secondary cancers: Incidence, risk factors and recommendations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demoor-Goldschmidt, Charlotte; Fayech, Chiraz; Girard, Pauline; Plantaz, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Cure rates for most childhood cancers and adolescents have made remarkable progress over the last thirty to forty years. The development of secondary malignancies has become an important question for these patients. The frequency is low, but the risk is significantly higher (between 3 and 10 times) and it is the leading cause of long-term mortality off relapse. In this literature review, we discuss the epidemiological aspect and the risk factors contributing to this increased risk, and conclude with a summary of current recommendations for screening and surveillance. We also discuss briefly the constitutional predisposing genetic contributions to other cancers. Copyright © 2015 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Epidemiology and risk factors for drug allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thong, Bernard Y-H; Tan, Teck-Choon

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this review was to describe the current evidence-based knowledge of the epidemiology, prevalence, incidence, risk factors and genetic associations of drug allergy. Articles published between 1966 and 2010 were identified in MEDLINE using the key words adult, adverse drug reaction reporting systems, age factors, anaphylactoid, anaphylaxis, anaesthetics, antibiotics, child, drug allergy, drug eruptions, ethnic groups, hypersensitivity, neuromuscular depolarizing agents, neuromuscular nondepolarizing agents, sex factors, Stevens Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis. Additional studies were identified from article reference lists. Relevant, peer-reviewed original research articles, case series and reviews were considered for review. Current epidemiological studies on adverse drug reactions (ADRs) have used different definitions for ADR-related terminology, often do not differentiate immunologically and non-immunologically mediated drug hypersensitivity, study different study populations (different ethnicities, inpatients or outpatients, adults or children), utilize different methodologies (spontaneous vs. non-spontaneous reporting, cohort vs. case-control studies), different methods of assessing drug imputability and different methods of data analyses. Potentially life-threatening severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCAR) are associated with a high risk of morbidity and mortality. HLA associations for SCAR associated with allopurinol, carbamazepine and abacavir have been reported with the potential for clinical use in screening prior to prescription. Identification of risk factors for drug allergy and appropriate genetic screening of at-risk ethnic groups may improve the outcomes of drug-specific SCAR. Research and collaboration are necessary for the generation of clinically-relevant, translational pharmacoepidemiological and pharmacogenomic knowledge, and success of health outcomes research and policies on drug allergies. PMID:21480948

  13. Longitudinal Risk Factors for Cyberbullying in Adolescence

    OpenAIRE

    Sticca, Fabio; Ruggieri, Sabrina; Alsaker, Françoise; Perren, Sonja

    2013-01-01

    Cyberbullying has emerged as a new form of antisocial behaviour in the context of online communication over the last decade. The present study investigates potential longitudinal risk factors for cyberbullying. A total of 835 Swiss seventh graders participated in a short-term longitudinal study (two assessments 6 months apart). Students reported on the frequency of cyberbullying, traditional bullying, rule-breaking behaviour, cybervictimisation, traditional victimisation, and frequency of onl...

  14. Risk Factors of Chronic Atrophic Gastritis

    OpenAIRE

    Siregar, Gontar Alamsyah; Laksmi, Lidya Imelda

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chronic atrophic gastritis is a well-established precursor of gastric cancer. The development of atrophic chronic gastritis is multifactorial, involving the environment as well as host responses to the Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. The aim of this study is to determine prevalence and risk factors of chronic atrophic gastritis.Method: The study was a cross sectional study on gastritis patients admitted to endoscopy units at Adam Malik General Hospital and P...

  15. Studying risk factors associated with Human Leptospirosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandra Kamath

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Leptospirosis is one of the most under diagnosed and underreported disease in both developed and developing countries including India. It is established that environmental conditions and occupational habit of the individuals put them at risk of acquiring disease, which varies from community to community. Various seroprevalence studies across the world have documented emerging situation of this neglected tropical disease, but limited have probed to identify the risk factors, especially in India. Objectives: The objective of this study was to identify the environmental and occupational risk factors associated with the disease in Udupi District. Materials and Methods: This population-based case-control study was carried out in Udupi, a District in Southern India from April 2012 until August 2012. Udupi is considered to be endemic for Leptospirosis and reported 116 confirmed cases in the year 2011. Seventy of 116 laboratory confirmed cases and 140 sex matched neighborhood healthy controls participated in the study. A predesigned, semi-structured and validated questionnaire was used for data collection through house to house visit and observations were noted about environmental conditions. Univariate analysis followed by multivariate analysis (back ward conditional logistic regression was performed by using STATA version 9.2 (StataCorp, College Station, TX, USA to identify potential risk factors. Results: Occupational factors such as outdoor activities (matched odds ratio [OR] of 3.95, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.19-13.0, presence of cut or wound at body parts during work (matched OR: 4.88, CI: 1.83-13.02 and environmental factors such as contact with rodents through using the food materials ate by rat (matched OR: 4.29, CI: 1.45-12.73 and contact with soil or water contaminated with urine of rat (matched OR: 4.58, CI: 1.43-14.67 were the risk factors identified to be associated with disease. Conclusion: Leptospirosis is still

  16. Risk factors for hypospadias in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling-Fan Xu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This case-controlled study was designed to evaluate the association between various baseline parental factors and the risk of hypospadias in China. Patients were selected from tertiary referral hospitals in Anhui, a province in mid-eastern China. A questionnaire was given to the parents of each patient. The final database included 193 cases and 835 controls. The incidence of additional coexistent anomalies was 13.0%, primarily cryptorchidism (9.8%. Ten patients (5.1% were from families with genital anomaly, including five families (2.6% with hypospadias. The risks of hypospadias was higher for children of mothers > 35 (odds ratio [OR] =1.47 and < 18 (OR = 2.95 years of age, and in mothers who had consumed alcohol (OR = 2.67, used drugs (OR = 1.53 and had an infection (OR = 1.87 during pregnancy. The risk of hypospadias was also higher when mothers (OR = 1.68 and fathers (OR = 1.74 were engaged in agriculture. Other factors assessed were not associated with the risk of hypospadias.

  17. Risk factors of intestinal obstruction in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khvorostukhina N.F.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available

    Objective: to study risk factors and options for clinical course of acute intestinal obstruction in pregnancy. Materials and methods. A detailed study of history, clinical course, diagnosis and treatment characteristics of acute intestinal obstruction in 79 pregnant women was undertaken. Results: It was determined that a combination of intestinal obstruction, and pregnancy is more common for II and III trimester of gestation (88,5%, with more likely to develop mechanical obstruction caused by the adhesive process (77,2%. Risk factors for intestinal obstruction in pregnancy are: chronic diseases of gastrointestinal tract, surgery of abdominal cavity and pelvis, burdened obstetric and gynecological history and long-term use of progestogens during pregnancy. Difficulties in diagnosis are associated with absence of classical symptoms of disease that is caused by changes in topographical relations of abdominal cavity, increasing size of uterus, as well as lack of immune response to the emergence of a pathological process. Conclusion. Formation of pregnant women at risk for development of intestinal obstruction and preventive measures to address violations of intestinal motor function can reduce the risk of disease. Algorithm of medical tactics for suspected acute intestinal obstruction in pregnancy, allowing to reduce time of diagnosis and provision of medical care.

  18. Survival data and prognostic factors seen in Pakistani patients with esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alidina, A; Gaffar, A; Hussain, F; Islam, M; Vaziri, I; Burney, I; Valimohd, A; Jafri, W

    2004-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is common in Pakistan. An attempt has been made for the first time to look at the survival data and prognostic factors associated with esophageal cancer in this region. We did a retrospective review of 263 cases seen at the Aga Khan University Hospital in Karachi. Data analysis was done using the Kaplan-Meier method and the Cox proportional hazard model. Squamous cell carcinoma was noted in 81% of the cases, whereas adenocarcinoma was the second most common. At the time of diagnosis, early-stage disease was found in 25%, locally advanced in 41% and metastatic in 34% of all cases. Mean age at diagnosis was 56 years, with 59% males and 41% females. Survival data were available in 89 cases. Median survival was 7 months. On univariate analysis, the following factors were of prognostic significance: obstruction, histology, albumin level at diagnosis, age and platelet count. On multivariate analysis, three factors were found prognostic: presence or absence of obstruction, squamous cell carcinoma versus adenocarcinoma and platelet count. We found that patients with squamous cell carcinoma and absence of thrombocytopenia and obstruction had a better overall survival. However, this is a limited retrospective analysis; we therefore recommend that these prognostic factors be evaluated in larger studies.

  19. Renal survival and prognostic factors in patients with PR3-ANCA associated vasculitis with renal involvement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slot, MC; Tervaert, JWC; Franssen, CFM; Stegeman, CA

    Background. Severe renal disease is a feature of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA)-associated small-vessel vasculitis. We evaluated patient and renal survival and prognostic factors in patients with PR3-ANCA associated vasculitis with renal involvement at diagnosis during long-term

  20. The effects of transforming growth factor-beta 2 on dopaminergic graft survival

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Macauley, SL; Horsch, AD; Oterdoom, M; Zheng, MH; Stewart, GR

    2004-01-01

    Dopaminergic cell transplantation is a promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. the potential of which is limited due to poor survival and low dopamine content within engrafted tissue. In this study. the ability of transforming growth factor-beta2 (TGF-beta2) to

  1. Telomerase in relation to clinicopathologic prognostic factors and survival in cervical cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wisman, GBA; Knol, AJ; Helder, MN; Krans, M; de Vries, EGE; Hollema, H; de Jong, S; van der Zee, AGJ

    2001-01-01

    We investigated, in cervical cancer, the relation between telomerase activity, telomerase RNA (hTR) and mRNA of the catalytic subunit of telomerase, hTERT, with "classic" clinicopathological factors as well as survival. Frozen specimens were obtained from 107 consecutive patients with cervical

  2. Survival and prognostic factors in patients treated with stereotactic radiotherapy for brain metastases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Thomas; Oettingen, Gorm von; Lassen-Ramshad, Yasmin A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background. Stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT) of brain metastases is used with good effect around the world, but no consensus exists regarding which prognostic factors that are related to favourable or unfavourable prognosis after the treatment. A better definition of these factors...... will ensure a more precise application of the treatment. Material and methods. A consecutive cohort of the 198 patients treated for brain metastases with SRT without concurrent whole-brain radiation therapy at our department from 2001 to 2012 was retrospectively analysed. Results. Median survival was seven...... to clinical cerebral progression. Conclusion. We identified four prognostic factors related to survival after SRT for brain metastases. The grouping of patients by these factors is useful to determine the level of treatment. We discourage the delivery of SRT to patients with 3-4 unfavourable prognostic...

  3. Risk factors and management of diabetic nephropathy

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    Mohamed Akheel Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine the risk factors for nephropathy in diabetic patients and to study the management of diabetic nephropathy (DN, we conducted a hospital-based prospective study in the Internal Medicine department of our hospital on 60 patients with DN and 60 diabetic patients without DN. An odds ratio (OR disclosed the following risk factors: Hypertension (OR = 2.06, family history of diabetes (OR = 1.23, family history of DN (OR = 2.86, uncontrolled hyperglycemia (OR = 11.80, obesity (OR = 1.07, duration of diabetes between 11 and 20 years (OR = 4.69, smoking (OR = 2.79, alcohol consumption (OR = 3.75, other complications (OR = 2.03, lack of physical activity (OR = 1.51 and anemia (OR = 2.29. According to these risk factors, we suggest that improving patient′s knowledge on diabetes and its treatment, life style modifications and aggressive management of the disease may delay the progression of disease to advanced stages.

  4. Social risk factors in the elderly.

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    Yanelis Emilia Tabio Henry

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available There are social risk factors that can rebound negatively in the functional capacity of elder people thus they associate to an enchancement of the vulnerability to have them develop a state of fragility and necessity. A descriptive investigation was done with the objective of determinig the social risk factors of elder people in the dispensaries 28 of policlinic ll from Jatibonico municipality from january 1 st to december 31 st, 2009 .The sample was conformed by 103 older people. Different variables were used like: age, sex, marital status, associated desease and basic components of the family functions disminished or null. It prevailed the 60-64 and 70-74 year old group (24.3%, female sex (60.2%, the elder widow women (20,3 %, the hypertension (60,2% and family comprehension about conduct and elderly points of view (50,4%. There was a high incidence of the social risk factors associated to the presence of old women, alone and widows, the lessen of economic resources, the retirement, the incomprehension of elder people by their families and the presence of non transmisible chronic desease.

  5. Risk factors for developing diabetic foot

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    Julia Estela Willrich Boell

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the present study is to identify the risk factors for developing diabetic foot. A cross-sectional study, with a convenience sample, developed with 70 individuals with diabetes mellitus (DM, registered in three basic health units in the municipality of Florianópolis/SC, Brazil, in the period from November 2010 to May 2011. Biometric data was collected regarding their sociodemographic, health and illness conditions. An assessment of the feet was also carried out. The average participant age was 66.17 years and time with diagnosed disease was under ten years (61.42%. The following risk factors were identified: advanced age; time of DM diagnosis; few years of schooling; overweight/obesity; inadequate diet; physical inactivity; inadequate metabolic control; lack of proper and specific foot care; and arterial hypertension. We conclude that the majority of the population presented one or more risk factors that favor the appearance of foot-related complications. doi: 10.5216/ree.v16i2.20460.

  6. Corneal Graft Rejection: Incidence and Risk Factors

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    Alireza Baradaran-Rafii

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available

    PURPOSE: To determine the incidence and risk factors of late corneal graft rejection after penetrating keratoplasty (PKP. METHODS: Records of all patients who had undergone PKP from 2002 to 2004 without immunosuppressive therapy other than systemic steroids and with at least one year of follow up were reviewed. The role of possible risk factors such as demographic factors, other host factors, donor factors, indications for PKP as well as type of rejection were evaluated. RESULTS: During the study period, 295 PKPs were performed on 286 patients (176 male, 110 female. Mean age at the time of keratoplasty was 38±20 (range, 40 days to 90 years and mean follow up period was 20±10 (range 12-43 months. Graft rejection occurred in 94 eyes (31.8% at an average of 7.3±6 months (range, 20 days to 39 months after PKP. The most common type of rejection was endothelial (20.7%. Corneal vascularization, regrafting, anterior synechiae, irritating sutures, active inflammation, additional anterior segment procedures, history of trauma, uncontrolled glaucoma, prior graft rejection, recurrence of herpetic infection and eccentric grafting increased the rate of rejection. Patient age, donor size and bilateral transplantation had no significant influence on graft rejection. CONCLUSION: Significant risk factors for corneal graft rejection include

  7. Clinical and clinicopathological factors associated with survival in 44 horses with equine neorickettsiosis (Potomac horse Fever).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertin, F R; Reising, A; Slovis, N M; Constable, P D; Taylor, S D

    2013-01-01

    The epidemiology of equine neorickettsiosis (EN) has been extensively studied but limited clinical and clinicopathological data are available concerning naturally infected horses. Factors predictive of survival will be identified in horses diagnosed with EN. Convenience sample of 44 horses with EN admitted to 2 referral institutions. A retrospective study was performed. A diagnosis of EN was based on the presence of positive blood or fecal PCR. The most common clinical signs included diarrhea (66%), fever (50%), anorexia (45%), depression (39%), colic (39%), and lameness (18%). The median duration of hospitalization was 6 days and 73% of horses survived to discharge. Laminitis was present in 36% of horses, 88% of which were affected in all 4 feet. Serum creatinine and urea nitrogen concentrations, as well as RBC count, blood hemoglobin concentration, hematocrit, band neutrophils, serum AST activity, serum CK activity, and anion gap, were significantly (P < .05) higher in nonsurvivors. Serum chloride and sodium, concentrations as well as duration of hospitalization were significantly lower in nonsurvivors. The results of forward stepwise logistic regression indicated that blood hemoglobin concentration on admission and antimicrobial treatment with oxytetracycline were independent factors associated with survival. Severity of colitis as reflected by electrolyte loss, hemoconcentration, and prerenal azotemia were predictors of survival in horses diagnosed with EN. Treatment with oxytetracycline was associated with increased survival. Copyright © 2013 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  8. Trophic factors as modulators of motor neuron physiology and survival: implications for ALS therapy

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    Luis B Tovar-y-Romo

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Motor neuron physiology and development depend on a continuous and tightly regulated trophic support from a variety of cellular sources. Trophic factors guide the generation and positioning of motor neurons during every stage of the developmental process. As well, they are involved in axon guidance and synapse formation. Even in the adult spinal cord an uninterrupted trophic input is required to maintain neuronal functioning and protection from noxious stimuli. Among the trophic factors that have been demonstrated to participate in motor neuron physiology are vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF, ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1. Upon binding to membrane receptors expressed in motor neurons or neighboring glia, these trophic factors activate intracellular signaling pathways that promote cell survival and have protective action on motor neurons, in both in vivo and in vitro models of neuronal degeneration. For these reasons these factors have been considered a promising therapeutic method for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and other neurodegenerative diseases, although their efficacy in human clinical trials have not yet shown the expected protection. In this review we summarize experimental data on the role of these trophic factors in motor neuron function and survival, as well as their mechanisms of action. We also briefly discuss the potential therapeutic use of the trophic factors and why these therapies may have not been yet successful in the clinical use.

  9. Prognostic factors associated with hospital survival in comatose survivors of cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathianathan, Kushaharan; Tiruvoipati, Ravindranath; Vij, Sanjiv

    2016-02-04

    To identify patient, cardiac arrest and management factors associated with hospital survival in comatose survivors of cardiac arrest. A retrospective, single centre study of comatose patients admitted to our intensive care unit (ICU) following cardiac arrest during the twenty year period between 1993 and 2012. This study was deemed by the Human Research Ethics Committee (HREC) of Monash Health to be a quality assurance exercise, and thus did not require submission to the Monash Health HREC (Research Project Application, No. 13290Q). The study population included all patients admitted to our ICU between 1993 and 2012, with a discharge diagnosis including "cardiac arrest". Patients were excluded if they did not have a cardiac arrest prior to ICU admission (i.e., if their primary arrest was during their admission to ICU), or were not comatose on arrival to ICU. Our primary outcome measure was survival to hospital discharge. Secondary outcome measures were ICU and hospital length of stay (LOS), and factors associated with survival to hospital discharge. Five hundred and eighty-two comatose patients were admitted to our ICU following cardiac arrest, with 35% surviving to hospital discharge. The median ICU and hospital LOS was 3 and 5 d respectively. There was no survival difference between in-hospital and out-of-hospital cardiac arrests. Males made up 62% of our cardiac arrest population, were more likely to have a shockable rhythm (56% vs 37%, P initiated (e.g., pre-hospital, emergency department, intensive care) was associated with increased survival. There was however no difference in survival associated with target temperature, time at target temperature, location of initial cooling, method of initiating cooling, method of maintaining cooling or method of rewarming. Patients that survived were more likely to have a shockable rhythm (P initial rhythm (OR = 6.4, 95%CI: 3.95-10.4; P < 0.01) and a shorter time to return of spontaneous circulation (OR = 0.95, 95%CI: 0

  10. Associations and Risk Factors of Diabetic Maculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, M M; Ali, M; Naher, Z U; Akhanda, A H; Motaleb, M A; Uddin, M S; Islam, M R

    2016-04-01

    Diabetic maculopathy is characterised by increased capillary leakage in the main retinal vessels and by alterations in the microcirculation of the macula. Maculopathy occurs frequently in type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients. Prevalence is higher in type 2 than in type 1 diabetic patients. Factors associated with the development of maculopathy are mostly unknown. As maculopathy is the main cause of vision deprivation in diabetic patients it is essential to know the associations and risk factors of diabetic maculopathy so that appropriate measures can be taken to prevent as well as treat diabetic maculopathy. We started the research work to find out the relation between diabetic maculopathy and various associated factors and risk factors for patients with diabetic retinopathy with maculopathy. This cross-sectional observational study done at the Department of Ophthalmology, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU), Dhaka & National Institute of Ophthalmology & Hospital (NIO & H), Sher-e-Bangla Nagar, Dhaka, Bangladesh from January 2006 to June 2006. In this study out of 50 patients, diabetes was controlled in 20(40%) patients and uncontrolled in 30(60%). A significant percentage of patients (40%) had elevated blood pressure. Diabetic autonomic neuropathy was observed in 24% cases and polyneuropathy was observed in 36% cases. It is evident that diabetic maculopathy has association with dyslipidaemia, abnormal renal function due to nephropathy. This study lighted on the association of diabetic maculopathy with diabetic nephropathy, cardiac abnormalities and diabetic neuropathy.

  11. Maternal and Gestational Risk Factors for Hypospadias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akre, Olof; Boyd, Heather A.; Ahlgren, Martin; Wilbrand, Kerstin; Westergaard, Tine; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Nordenskjöld, Agneta; Ekbom, Anders; Melbye, Mads

    2008-01-01

    Background An increase in the prevalence of hypospadias has been reported, but the environmental causes remain virtually unknown. Objectives Our goal was to assess the association between risk of hypospadias and indicators of placental function and endogenous hormone levels, exposure to exogenous hormones, maternal diet during pregnancy, and other environmental factors. Methods We conducted a case–control study in Sweden and Denmark from 2000 through 2005 using self-administered questionnaires completed by mothers of hypospadias cases and matched controls. The response rate was 88% and 81% among mothers of cases and controls, respectively. The analyses included 292 cases and 427 controls. Results A diet during pregnancy lacking both fish and meat was associated with a more than 4-fold increased risk of hypospadias [odds ratio (OR) = 4.6; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.6–13.3]. Boys born to obese [body mass index (BMI) ≥ 30] women had a more than 2-fold increased risk of hypospadias (OR = 2.6; 95% CI, 1.2–5.7) compared with boys born to mothers with a normal weight (BMI = 20–24). Maternal hypertension during pregnancy and absence of maternal nausea increased a boy’s risk of hypospadias 2.0-fold (95% CI, 1.1–3.7) and 1.8-fold (95% CI, 1.2–2.8), respectively. Nausea in late pregnancy also appeared to be positively associated with hypospadias risk (OR = 7.6; 95% CI, 1.1–53). Conclusions A pregnancy diet lacking meat and fish appears to increase the risk of hypospadias in the offspring. Other risk associations were compatible with a role for placental insufficiency in the etiology of hypospadias. PMID:18709149

  12. Risk factors and consequences of delayed graft function

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    Mondher Ounissi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The impact of delayed graft function (DGF on the outcome of renal transplantation remains controversial. We analyzed the risk factors for DGF and its impact on graft and patient survival. A total of 354 renal transplants performed between June 1986 and April 2000 were analyzed. Variables analyzed included donor and recipient age, method and duration of renal replacement therapy, HLA mismatch, cold and warm ischemia times, biopsy-confirmed acute rejection, length of stay in the hospital, serum creatinine at the end of first hospitalization as well as graft and patient survival at one, three, five and ten years. The study patients were divided into two groups: patients with DGF (G1 and those without DGF (G2. DGF occurred in 50 patients (14.1%, and it was seen more frequently in patients transplanted from deceased donors (60% vs. 40%, P <0.0001. The cause of DGF was acute tubular necrosis, seen in 98% of the cases. Univariate analysis showed a statistically significant difference between the two groups G1 and G2 in the following parameters: average duration on dialysis (52.3 vs. 36.4 months, P = 0.006, HLA mismatch (44.9% vs. 32.11% P = 0.015, donor age (35.9 vs. 40.2 years, P = 0.026, cold ischemia time (23 vs. 18.2 h, P = 0.0016, warm ischemia time (41.9 vs. 38.6 mn, P = 0.046, length of stay in the hospital during first hospitalization (54.7 vs. 33.2 days, P <0.0001, serum creatinine at the end of first hospitalization (140 vs. 112 μmol/L, P <0.0001 and at three months following transplantation (159 vs. 119 μmol/L, P = 0.0002. Multivariate analysis revealed the following independent risk factors for DGF: deceased donor (RR = 13.2, P <0.0001 and cold ischemia time (RR = 1.17, P = 0.008. The graft survival at one, three, five and ten years was 100%, 93%, 88.3% and 78.3% in G1 versus 100%, 95.9% 92.8% and 82.3% in G2; there was no statistically significant difference. The patient survival at one, three, five and ten years was 100%, 91.3%, 83

  13. Examining mortality risk and rate of ageing among Polish Olympic athletes: a survival follow-up from 1924 to 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuhui; Gajewski, Antoni; Poznańska, Anna

    2016-04-18

    Population-based studies have shown that an active lifestyle reduces mortality risk. Therefore, it has been a longstanding belief that individuals who engage in frequent exercise will experience a slower rate of ageing. It is uncertain whether this widely-accepted assumption holds for intense wear-and-tear. Here, using the 88 years survival follow-up data of Polish Olympic athletes, we report for the first time on whether frequent exercise alters the rate of ageing. Longitudinal survival data of male elite Polish athletes who participated in the Olympic Games from year 1924 to 2010 were used. Deaths occurring before the end of World War II were excluded for reliable estimates. Recruited male elite athletes N=1273 were preassigned to two categorical birth cohorts--Cohort I 1890-1919; Cohort II 1920-1959--and a parametric frailty survival analysis was conducted. An event-history analysis was also conducted to adjust for medical improvements from year 1920 onwards: Cohort II. Our findings suggest (1) in Cohort I, for every threefold reduction in mortality risk, the rate of ageing decelerates by 1%; (2) socioeconomic transitions and interventions contribute to a reduction in mortality risk of 29% for the general population and 50% for Olympic athletes; (3) an optimum benefit gained for reducing the rate of ageing from competitive sports (Cohort I 0.086 (95% CI 0.047 to 0.157) and Cohort II 0.085 (95% CI 0.050 to 0.144)). This study further suggests that intensive physical training during youth should be considered as a factor to improve ageing and mortality risk parameters. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  14. Identification of caries risk factors in toddlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, M; Jackson, R; Eckert, G; Swigonski, N; Chin, J; Zandona, A Ferreira; Ando, M; Stookey, G K; Downs, S; Zero, D T

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify risk factors to predict caries progression in toddlers in primary-healthcare settings for the cost-effective targeting of preventive and referral strategies. We examined 329 children (26 ± 6 mos old) twice, one year apart, in Indiana, USA. A 107-item structured interview was used to collect information from the primary caregiver and child on factors/beliefs/perceptions/behaviors that could affect caries development, transmission of bacteria, medical-dental health, and access to care. Bacterial levels, gingivitis, dental plaque, and caries experience were assessed. Multiple-variable logistic regression models of caries progression toward cavitation included family caries experience, transmission-related behaviors, dietary factors, health beliefs, and lower income, but differed in selected predictors/predictive power by race/ethnicity. Addition of clinical variables did not significantly improve the prediction.

  15. Dental Implants Placed in Patients with Mechanical Risk Factors: A Long-term Follow-up Retrospective Study

    OpenAIRE

    Papi, Piero; Di Carlo, Stefano; Mencio, Francesca; Rosella, Daniele; De Angelis, Francesca; Pompa, Giorgio

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Risk factors in oral implantology are defined as local or systemic conditions that increase failure rates. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the long-term survival rate of dental implants placed in patients presenting mechanical risk factors. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study was conducted only with patients presenting at least one of the following risk factors were included: Bruxism; crown-to-implant (C/I) ratio 0.05). Conclusions: Within the limitations of ...

  16. Risk Factors for Hepatic Steatosis in Children

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    Yu.M. Stepanov

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease has become the most common cause of liver disease in children worldwide. Purpose: to identify risk factors (RF for hepatic steatosis in children. Methods. Thirty two children with gastrointestinal disorders were examined by us. The presence and severity of hepatic steatosis was determined using FibroScan® 502 touch with controlled attenuation parameter (CAP. According to the results of CAP the children were divided into 2 groups: group 1 (basic — 13 children with steatosis (40.6 %, group 2 (control — 19 children without steatosis (59.4 %. To determine the risk factors we analyzed a history of life and disease, objective clinical and laboratory examination of patients. Results. Analysis of the age distribution showed that children older than 10 years old dominated in the basic group (RR 3.3; OR 4.0; p = 0.1. Obesity was found in 12 (92.3 % children in the group with steatosis and in 9 (47 % children without steatosis. Increased waist circumference values above 95 percentile according to age and sex of a child was observed in 12 (92.3 % children in the basic group and in 8 (42.1 % children in the control group (RR 7.2; OR 16.5; p < 0.05. It was found that the presence of pubertal hypothalamic syndrome is associated with risk of hepatic steatosis in children (RR 30.6; OR 4.8; p < 0.05. Discussion. Abdominal type of obesity in combination with diseases of the endocrine system, namely, hypothalamic syndrome should be considered as the leading risk factors for hepatic steatosis in children.

  17. Retinopathy of prematurity and risk factors: a prospective cohort study

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    Angell Linda

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increased survival of extremely low birth infants due to advances in antenatal and neonatal care has resulted in a population of infants at high risk of developing retinopathy of prematurity (ROP. Therapeutic interventions include the use of antenatal and postnatal steroids however, their effects on the severity of ROP is in dispute. In addition, it has not been investigated whether severe ROP is due to therapeutic interventions or due to the severity of illness. The aim of the present study was to assess the association between the incidence of severe retinopathy of prematurity (greater than stage 2 – International classification of ROP and mechanical ventilation, oxygen therapy, gestational age, antenatal and postnatal steroids in extremely low birth weight infants. Methods Neonates admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit in Lansing, Michigan, during 1993–2000 were followed to determine factors influencing the development of severe retinopathy of prematurity. Ophthalmologic examinations were started at 6 weeks and followed until resolution. We used logistic regression to estimate the relative risk (odds ratio associated with risk factors of ROP. Results Of the neonates with ≤ 1500 g birth weight, admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit, 85% (616/725 survived. Severe retinopathy of prematurity was detected in 7.8% of 576 neonates who had eye examinations. Neonates of lower gestational age (≤ 25 weeks and 26–28 weeks had an increased odds ratio of 8.49 and 3.19 for the development of severe retinopathy of prematurity, respectively, compared to those 29 weeks and older. Late postnatal steroid treatment starting after 3 weeks of life showed 2.9-fold increased odds ratio, in particular administration for two weeks and more (OR: 4.09, 95% CI: 1.52–11.03. With increasing antenatal steroids courses the risk of severe retinopathy of prematurity decreased, however, it was not significant. Lower gestational age

  18. Risk factors for idiopathic optic neuritis recurrence.

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    Yi Du

    Full Text Available Approximately 30-50% of idiopathic optic neuritis (ION patients experience one or multiple episodes of recurrence. The aim of this study was to search for risk factors for ION recurrence.Clinical data on hospitalized patients diagnosed with ION between January 2003 and January 2011 at the First Affiliated Hospital of Guangxi Medical University were retrospectively collected. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed on factors that might cause ION recurrence. In total, 115 ION cases (32 recurrent and 83 non-recurrent cases with complete data were analyzed. The length of the follow-up period ranged from 12 to 108 months (median: 42 months.The univariate analysis showed that the recurrence rate for unilateral ION was higher than that for bilateral ION (40% vs. 12%, p=0.001. Underlying diseases had a significant impact on recurrence (p<0.001: the recurrence rates due to neuromyelitis optica (NMO, multiple sclerosis (MS, demyelinating lesions alone of the central nervous system, and unknown causes were 89%, 70%, 41%, and 8.7%, respectively. The multivariate analysis showed that the factors causing relatively high recurrence rates included NMO (odds ratio [OR], 73.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 7.3 to 740.9, MS (OR, 33.9; 95% CI, 5.2 to 222.2, and demyelinating lesions alone (OR, 8.9; 95% CI, 2.3 to 34.4, unilateral involvement (OR, 5.7; 95% CI, 1.5 to 21.3, relatively low initial glucocorticoid dosage (equivalent to ≤ 100 mg prednisone/day (OR, 4.3; 95% CI, 1.0 to 17.9.Underlying diseases, laterality (unilateral or bilateral, and initial glucocorticoid dosage are important risk factors of ION recurrence. Clinical physicians are advised to treat ION patients with a sufficient dose of glucocorticoid in the initial treatment stage to reduce the recurrence risk.

  19. Racial disparities in breast carcinoma survival rates: seperating factors that affect diagnosis from factors that affect treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Kenneth C; Lamar, Charisee A; Freeman, Harold P

    2003-06-01

    Black females have lower breast carcinoma survival rates compared with white females. One possible reason is that black females have more advanced-stage breast disease. Another factor may be racial differences in the utilization of cancer treatments. The authors determined racial differences in 6-year stage specific survival rates, adjusting for age and treatments (using estrogen receptor [ER] status), to determine whether there were racial differences in treatment. Racial differences in the stage distributions of breast disease were used to examine the impact of racial factors on breast carcinoma diagnosis. For all breast carcinoma cases, the stage specific 6-year survival rates, in general, were significantly lower for black females for all stages combined and for Stages I-III in every age group. However, examination by different treatments, as measured by ER status, revealed some different results. Only black women younger than age 50 years with ER-positive tumors and women younger than age 65 years with ER-negative tumors had significantly lower stage-specific survival rates. In addition, the stage distribution analyses showed that black females of every age group had less Stage I breast disease. For younger black women (younger than age 50 years), there was evidence of racial differences in treatment for both women with ER-positive tumors and women with ER-negative tumors, as indicated by their lower stage-specific survival rates. In contrast, for black females age 65 years or older with ER-positive or ER-negative tumors, the lack of a significant difference in the stage-specific survival rate suggests that Medicare may help to alleviate racial disparities in cancer treatment. Furthermore, racial differences in the stage distributions indicated the need for earlier diagnosis for black females of every age. Published 2003 American Cancer Society.

  20. Improved Survival Endpoints With Adjuvant Radiation Treatment in Patients With High-Risk Early-Stage Endometrial Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elshaikh, Mohamed A., E-mail: melshai1@hfhs.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Vance, Sean; Suri, Jaipreet S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Mahan, Meredith [Public Health Science, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Munkarah, Adnan [Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Women' s Health Services, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): To determine the impact of adjuvant radiation treatment (RT) on recurrence-free survival (RFS), disease-specific survival (DSS), and overall survival (OS) in patients with high-risk 2009 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage I-II endometrial carcinoma. Methods and Materials: We identified 382 patients with high-risk EC who underwent hysterectomy. RFS, DSS, and OS were calculated from the date of hysterectomy by use of the Kaplan-Meier method. Cox regression modeling was used to explore the risks associated with various factors on survival endpoints. Results: The median follow-up time for the study cohort was 5.4 years. The median age was 71 years. All patients underwent hysterectomy and salpingo-oophorectomy, 93% had peritoneal cytology, and 85% underwent lymphadenectomy. Patients with endometrioid histology constituted 72% of the study cohort, serous in 16%, clear cell in 7%, and mixed histology in 4%. Twenty-three percent of patients had stage II disease. Adjuvant management included RT alone in 220 patients (57%), chemotherapy alone in 25 patients (7%), and chemoradiation therapy in 27 patients (7%); 110 patients (29%) were treated with close surveillance. The 5-year RFS, DSS, and OS were 76%, 88%, and 73%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, adjuvant RT was a significant predictor of RFS (P<.001) DSS (P<.001), and OS (P=.017). Lymphovascular space involvement was a significant predictor of RFS and DSS (P<.001). High tumor grade was a significant predictor for RFS (P=.038) and DSS (P=.025). Involvement of the lower uterine segment was also a predictor of RFS (P=.049). Age at diagnosis and lymphovascular space involvement were significant predictors of OS: P<.001 and P=.002, respectively. Conclusion: In the treatment of patients with high-risk features, our study suggests that adjuvant RT significantly improves recurrence-free, disease-specific, and overall survival in patients with early-stage endometrial carcinoma

  1. Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Glioblastoma Multiforme-Assessing Risk and Survival: Results of a Large Retrospective Study and Systematic Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barami, Kaveh; Lyon, Liisa; Conell, Carol

    2017-10-01

    Despite studies showing a positive correlation between type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2), a modifiable risk factor, and various cancer types, the link remains controversial in the setting of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). In this study, we assessed whether DM2 and DM2-associated factors were associated with a higher risk of developing GBM and also determined if DM2 affected the survival of patients with GBM. A cross-sectional case-control study of 1144 GBM cases diagnosed between 2000 and 2013 of which 969 patients matched for age and sex was performed to assess the association between DM2, hyperlipidemia, and obesity with the incidence of GBM. A longitudinal study of the patients with GBM was also performed to assess the association between the effect of DM2 and GBM survival. No association was seen between DM2, hyperlipidemia, obesity, and GBM. DM2 was associated with poorer survival in univariate testing yet not in multivariate testing. Diabetic patients with GBM had good glycemic control. Older patients had poorer survival and overall survival improved over years of study. DM2, hyperlipidemia, and obesity were not associated with increased risk of developing GBM, and DM2 itself does not seem to influence survival among these patients. This finding might be related to good glycemic control in this cohort. Survey of the literature consistently shows that hyperglycemia is associated with poorer survival. Our findings suggest that rather than the presence or absence of DM2, glycemic control seems to be more important in the survival of patients with GBM, which warrants future investigation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A new prognostic factor for the survival of patients with renal cell carcinoma developing metastatic spinal cord compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rades, D. [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck, University of Luebeck, Department of Radiation Oncology, Luebeck (Germany); Weber, A. [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck, University of Luebeck, Department of Radiation Oncology, Luebeck (Germany); University of Luebeck, Department of Medical Oncology and Hematology, Luebeck (Germany); Bartscht, T. [University of Luebeck, Department of Medical Oncology and Hematology, Luebeck (Germany); Bajrovic, A. [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Radiation Oncology, Hamburg (Germany); Karstens, J.H. [Hannover Medical University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Hannover (Germany); Schild, S.E. [Mayo Clinic Scottsdale, Department of Radiation Oncology, Scottsdale (United States)

    2014-07-15

    This study aimed to identify a potential association of the number of involved extraspinal organs with the survival of patients with metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) from renal cell carcinoma. Data of 69 patients irradiated for MSCC from renal cell carcinoma were retrospectively evaluated for survival. The prognostic value of the number of involved extraspinal organs and eight additional factors were investigated. These additional factors included age, gender, performance status, number of involved vertebrae, interval from cancer diagnosis to radiotherapy (RT) of MSCC, ambulatory status prior to RT, time developing motor deficits, and the fractionation regimen (30 Gy in 10 fractions vs. higher doses). The 6-month survival rates for involvement of 0, 1, and ≥ 2 extraspinal organs were 93, 57, and 21 %, respectively (p < 0.001). In the multivariate analysis, the number of involved extraspinal organs maintained significance (risk ratio 2.65; 95 % confidence interval 1.64-4.52; p < 0.001). The interval from cancer diagnosis to RT of MSCC (p = 0.013) and ambulatory status prior to RT (p = 0.002) were also independent predictors of survival. The number of involved extraspinal organs is a new prognostic factor of survival in patients with MSCC from renal cell carcinoma and should be considered in future clinical trials. (orig.) [German] Ziel dieser Studie war es, eine moegliche Assoziation zwischen der Zahl metastatisch befallener extraspinaler Organe und dem Ueberleben von Patienten mit einem Nierenzellkarzinom und metastatisch bedingter Rueckenmarkskompression (MSCC) aufzudecken. Die Daten von 69 Patienten mit einem Nierenzellkarzinom, die aufgrund einer MSCC eine Strahlentherapie erhalten hatten, wurden retrospektiv fuer den Endpunkt Ueberleben ausgewertet. Die prognostische Bedeutung der Zahl metastatisch befallener extraspinaler Organe und 8 weiterer Faktoren wurden untersucht. Die weiteren Faktoren waren Alter, Geschlecht, Allgemeinzustand, Zahl

  3. Risk factors for fatigue among airline pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Drongelen, Alwin; Boot, Cécile R L; Hlobil, Hynek; Smid, Tjabe; van der Beek, Allard J

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine risk factors for fatigue among airline pilots, taking into account person-, work-, health-, sleep-, and lifestyle-related characteristics. The study population consisted of 502 pilots who participated in the MORE Energy study. Included risk factors were either measured through an online questionnaire or provided by the company. The outcome of this study, fatigue, was assessed using the Checklist Individual Strength (CIS), and was defined as scoring more than 76 points on this questionnaire. The association of the risk factors with fatigue was determined using univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Of the participating pilots, 29.5 % scored more than 76 points on the CIS and were classified as being fatigued. The fully adjusted regression model showed that person-, work-, health-, and lifestyle-related characteristics were associated with fatigue. Pilots who were aged 31 to 40 (OR 3.36, 95 % CI 1.32-8.53) or 41 to 50 (OR 4.19, 95 % CI 1.40-12.47), an evening type (OR 2.40, 95 % CI 1.38-4.16), scored higher on work-life balance disturbance (OR 1.22, 95 % CI 1.10-1.36), scored higher on need for recovery (OR 1.02, 95 % CI 1.01-1.04), scored lower on general health perception (OR 0.31, 95 % CI 0.20-0.47), were less physically active (OR 0.77, 95 % CI 0.66-0.89), and had a moderate alcohol consumption (OR 3.88, 95 % CI 1.21-12.43), were at higher risk for fatigue. Higher age, being an evening type, disturbance of the work-life balance, more need for recovery, a lower perceived health, less physical activity, and moderate alcohol consumption were shown to be risk factors for fatigue. Further longitudinal research is needed to elucidate the direction of the associations found and to evaluate the effects of possible countermeasures in airline pilots.

  4. Risk factors for metabolic syndrome after liver transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoefner, Line Buch; Rostved, Andreas Arendtsen; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian

    2018-01-01

    that survival was not affected by metabolic syndrome. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalences of metabolic syndrome and new-onset metabolic syndrome were high after liver transplantation. Metabolic syndrome was associated with cardiovascular events, but not poorer survival. Patients with pre-transplant diabetes...... and -obesity are at high risk of metabolic syndrome and should be under careful surveillance in order to prevent, earlier diagnose, and treat metabolic syndrome and thereby limit the risk of cardiovascular events....

  5. Risk factors for depression after kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunoda, T; Yamashita, R; Kojima, Y; Takahara, S

    2010-06-01

    Kidney transplantation is recognized as the only potentially curative treatment for end-stage renal failure. But many psychiatric problems are associated with the procedure. The purpose of this study was to identify predictors of a risk for depression after kidney transplantation. This retrospective cohort study recruited 116 first kidney-only Japanese recipients whose mean age was 50.2 +/- 11.87 years include a male/female ratio of 63/53. They underwent transplantation between 1990 and 2008. At enrollment, we used the Zung Self-rating Depression Scale score as well as characterized demographic and clinical features of recipients and donors. Comparisons between depressed and non-depressed patients concerning sociodemographic and clinical characteristics were used chi(2) tests for categorical variables and Student's t-tests for continuous variables. Risk factors with significant correlation coefficients (P depression after kidney transplantation. The prevalence of depression in this study was 41.4%. Depressed patients were significantly more likely to not have regular incomes, nor to have desired kidney transplantation, to have experienced a rejection episode, and to live alone (P depression was living alone; subjects living alone were 2.51 times more likely to be depressed as those living with others (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 2.51; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.31-5.22; P depression after kidney transplantation is driven by multiple, complex, and often overlapping risk factors, we observed characteristic features of recipients including their social environment and follow-up treatment.

  6. Risk factors for asthma exacerbation in patients presenting to an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Asthma exacerbations are caused by a variety of risk factors. Reducing exposure to these risk factors improves the control of asthma and reduces medication needs. Knowledge of the particular risk factors is essential in formulating controlling and treatment protocols. This study set out to determine the risk ...

  7. Risk Factors for Placenta Praevia in Jos, North Central Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    About half (44.8%) of the cases had no known risk factor. Conclusion: Uterine scaring following abortion management is an important risk factor for placenta praevia. However, majority of patients with placenta praevia in this work have no identifiable risk factor. Key Words: placenta praevia, antepartum haemorrhage, risk ...

  8. Self-organzatonal interacton as a factor of fan groups survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Baranova

    2016-06-01

    Also in this study the matter of survival of social groups is examined though the synergetic approach. Survival of the football fan groups is presented as a result of the overcoming the internal entropy of the system. In addition, in the end of the article the implementation of value basis and their functions in the self-organized football fan groups are discussed. The author demonstrates the social importance of the informal internal «code» for football fans. This s how the author defines the role of the self-organization as a factor of the football fan groups survival. Thus, the inner football fans corporate culture is seen not only as a system that is capable of self-regulation, but also as a basic condition for self-organization.

  9. Postmastectomy radiotherapy improves disease-free survival of high risk of locoregional recurrence breast cancer patients with T1-2 and 1 to 3 positive nodes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen-Yu He

    Full Text Available The indications for post-mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT with T1-2 breast cancer and 1-3 positive axillary lymph nodes is still controversial. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of PMRT in T1-2 breast cancer with 1-3 positive axillary lymph node.We retrospectively reviewed the file records of 79 patients receiving PMRT and not receiving PMRT (618 patients.The median follow-up was 65 months. Multivariate analysis showed that PMRT was an independent prognostic factor of locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRFS (P = 0.010. Subgroup analysis of patients who did not undergo PMRT showed that pT stage, number of positive axillary lymph nodes, and molecular subtype were independent prognostic factors of LRFS. PMRT improved LRFS in the entire group (P = 0.005, but did not affect distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS (P = 0.494, disease-free survival (DFS (P = 0.215, and overall survival (OS (P = 0.645. For patients without PMRT, the 5-year LRFS of low-risk patients (0-1 risk factor for locoregional recurrence of 94.5% was significantly higher than that of high-risk patients (2-3 risk factors for locoregional recurrence (80.9%, P < 0.001. PMRT improved LRFS (P = 0.001 and DFS (P = 0.027 in high-risk patients, but did not improve LRFS, DMFS, DFS, and OS in low-risk patients.PMRT is beneficial in patients with high risk of locoregional recurrence breast cancer patients with T1-2 and 1 to 3 positive nodes.

  10. Modeling the survival kinetics of Salmonella in tree nuts for use in risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santillana Farakos, Sofia M; Pouillot, Régis; Anderson, Nathan; Johnson, Rhoma; Son, Insook; Van Doren, Jane

    2016-06-16

    Salmonella has been shown to survive in tree nuts over long periods of time. This survival capacity and its variability are key elements for risk assessment of Salmonella in tree nuts. The aim of this study was to develop a mathematical model to predict survival of Salmonella in tree nuts at ambient storage temperatures that considers variability and uncertainty separately and can easily be incorporated into a risk assessment model. Data on Salmonella survival on raw almonds, pecans, pistachios and walnuts were collected from the peer reviewed literature. The Weibull model was chosen as the baseline model and various fixed effect and mixed effect models were fit to the data. The best model identified through statistical analysis testing was then used to develop a hierarchical Bayesian model. Salmonella in tree nuts showed slow declines at temperatures ranging from 21°C to 24°C. A high degree of variability in survival was observed across tree nut studies reported in the literature. Statistical analysis results indicated that the best applicable model was a mixed effect model that included a fixed and random variation of δ per tree nut (which is the time it takes for the first log10 reduction) and a fixed variation of ρ per tree nut (parameter which defines the shape of the curve). Higher estimated survival rates (δ) were obtained for Salmonella on pistachios, followed in decreasing order by pecans, almonds and walnuts. The posterior distributions obtained from Bayesian inference were used to estimate the variability in the log10 decrease levels in survival for each tree nut, and the uncertainty of these estimates. These modeled uncertainty and variability distributions of the estimates can be used to obtain a complete exposure assessment of Salmonella in tree nuts when including time-temperature parameters for storage and consumption data. The statistical approach presented in this study may be applied to any studies that aim to develop predictive models to be

  11. Internet Abuse Risk Factors among Spanish Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carballo, José L; Marín-Vila, María; Espada, José P; Orgilés, Mireia; Piqueras, José A

    2015-11-27

    Empirical evidence has revealed various factors that contribute to the development and maintenance of Internet abuse. The aim of this paper was to analyze, on a sample of Spanish adolescents, the relationship between Internet abuse and: (1) Personal and interpersonal risk factors, including social skills in both virtual and real-life contexts; (2) Drug use. A total of 814 high school students aged between 13 and 17 participated in this study, and were divided into two groups: Internet Abusers (IA = 173) and Non-Internet Abusers (NIA = 641). Questionnaires were used to analyze Internet and drug use/abuse, as well as social skills, in virtual and real contexts. Various interpersonal risk factors (family and group of friends) were also assessed. IA showed a more severe pattern of Internet and drug use, as well as poorer social skills in both contexts. Moreover, their groups of friends appeared more likely to become involved in risky situations related to Internet and drug abuse. Both IA and NIA showed more adaptive social skills in the virtual context than in the real one. There is a need for further research to build on these findings, with a view to designing specific preventive programs that promote responsible Internet use.

  12. Assessing risk factors for periodontitis using regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo Pereira, J. A.; Ferreira, Maria Cristina; Oliveira, Teresa

    2013-10-01

    Multivariate statistical analysis is indispensable to assess the associations and interactions between different factors and the risk of periodontitis. Among others, regression analysis is a statistical technique widely used in healthcare to investigate and model the relationship between variables. In our work we study the impact of socio-demographic, medical and behavioral factors on periodontal health. Using regression, linear and logistic models, we can assess the relevance, as risk factors for periodontitis disease, of the following independent variables (IVs): Age, Gender, Diabetic Status, Education, Smoking status and Plaque Index. The multiple linear regression analysis model was built to evaluate the influence of IVs on mean Attachment Loss (AL). Thus, the regression coefficients along with respective p-values will be obtained as well as the respective p-values from the significance tests. The classification of a case (individual) adopted in the logistic model was the extent of the destruction of periodontal tissues defined by an Attachment Loss greater than or equal to 4 mm in 25% (AL≥4mm/≥25%) of sites surveyed. The association measures include the Odds Ratios together with the correspondent 95% confidence intervals.

  13. Adherence to immunosuppression in adult lung transplant recipients : Prevalence and risk factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosma, Otto H.; Vermeulen, Karin M.; Verschuuren, Erik A.; Erasmus, Michiel E.; van der Bij, Wim

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Adherence to medication is a favourable with regard to survival after kidney, heart and liver transplantation. Little is known about adherence to medication in lung transplant recipients. To determine the prevalence of adherence and identify risk factors of non-adherence (NA) we

  14. INSURE method (INtubation-SURfactant-Extubation) in early and late premature neonates with respiratory distress: factors affecting the outcome and survival rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseh, Ali; Yekta, Batool Ghorbani

    2014-01-01

    We studied the effects of administering exogenous surfactant for the treatment of respiratory distress in premature neonates (born before 37 weeks of gestational age [GA]) and compared the role of different risk factors on the outcome as well as survival rate. All the neonates (242) suffered from moderate to severe respiratory distress, identified by clinical signs, chest X-ray, respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) score >6, and blood gas measurements. All the neonates included were treated by administering surfactant (Beractant or Poractant alfa, dosage 100 mg/kg). The INSURE method was "successful" in 74% of patients, meaning there was no need for a second dose of surfactant or mechanical ventilation repetition. The factors that determined the "success" (Table II) were as follows: type of delivery, weight, GA, and number of fetuses. The factors affecting survival were: number of fetuses, mechanical ventilation dependency, pregnancy complications, and type of surfactant. The INSURE method reduced mortality (91.3% survived).

  15. Rural AIDS Diagnoses in Florida: Changing Demographics and Factors Associated With Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trepka, Mary Jo; Niyonsenga, Theophile; Maddox, Lorene M.; Lieb, Spencer

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To compare demographic characteristics and predictors of survival of rural residents diagnosed with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) with those of urban residents. Methods Florida surveillance data for people diagnosed with AIDS during 1993–2007 were merged with 2000 Census data using ZIP code tabulation areas (ZCTA). Rural status was classified based on the ZCTA’s rural-urban commuting area classification. Survival rates were compared between rural and urban areas using survival curves and Cox proportional hazards models controlling for demographic, clinical, and area-level socioeconomic and health care access factors. Findings Of the 73,590 people diagnosed with AIDS, 1,991 (2.7%) resided in rural areas. People in the most recent rural cohorts were more likely than those in earlier cohorts to be female, non-Hispanic black, older, and have a reported transmission mode of heterosexual sex. There were no statistically significant differences in the 3-, 5-, or 10-year survival rates between rural and urban residents. Older age at the time of diagnosis, diagnosis during the 1993–1995 period, other/unknown transmission mode, and lower CD4 count/percent categories were associated with lower survival in both rural and urban areas. In urban areas only, being non-Hispanic black or Hispanic, being US born, more poverty, less community social support, and lower physician density were also associated with lower survival. Conclusions In rural Florida, the demographic characteristics of people diagnosed with AIDS have been changing, which may necessitate modifications in the delivery of AIDS-related services. Rural residents diagnosed with AIDS did not have a significant survival disadvantage relative to urban residents. PMID:23802929

  16. Persistent postsurgical pain: risk factors and prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehlet, Henrik; Jensen, Troels Staehelin; Woolf, Clifford J.

    2006-01-01

    Acute postoperative pain is followed by persistent pain in 10-50% of individuals after common operations, such as groin hernia repair, breast and thoracic surgery, leg amputation, and coronary artery bypass surgery. Since chronic pain can be severe in about 2-10% of these patients, persistent...... therapy for postoperative pain should be investigated, since the intensity of acute postoperative pain correlates with the risk of developing a persistent pain state. Finally, the role of genetic factors should be studied, since only a proportion of patients with intraoperative nerve damage develop...... chronic pain. Based on information about the molecular mechanisms that affect changes to the peripheral and central nervous system in neuropathic pain, several opportunities exist for multimodal pharmacological intervention. Here, we outline strategies for identification of patients at risk...

  17. OCCUPATIONAL RISK FACTORS IN KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muralidhara

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Osteoarthritis (OA, also often called “osteoarthrosis” or “degenerative joint disease” is the most common form of arthritis. MATERIALS AND METHODS Present retrospective statistical study was conducted at the Department of orthopaedics in a tertiary care hospital (Catering to a largely agricultural population over a period of 2 years from January 2012 to December 2014. RESULTS Prevalence of osteoarthritis common in farmers accounting to 70%. Other occupations at risk of OA of knee were, Teachers 12%, Housewives 08%, Athletes 04%, Policemen 04% and Drivers 02%. It is in conformity with most previous studies reviewed. CONCLUSION Osteoarthritis of Knee is a major health issue and important cause of disability in elderly population. Occupational risk factors are important in development of osteoarthritis.

  18. Factors affecting healing and survival after finger amputations in patients with digital artery occlusive disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Gregory J; McClary, Ashley; Liem, Timothy K; Mitchell, Erica L; Azarbal, Amir F; Moneta, Gregory L

    2013-05-01

    Finger amputations are typically performed as distal as possible to preserve maximum finger length. Failure of primary amputation leads to additional procedures, which could potentially be avoided if a more proximal amputation was initially performed. The effect of single versus multiple procedures on morbidity and mortality is not known. We evaluated factors that predicted primary healing and the effects of secondary procedures on survival. Patients undergoing finger amputations from 1995 to 2011 were evaluated for survival with uni- and multivariate analysis of demographic data and preoperative vascular laboratory studies to assess factors influencing primary healing. Seventy-six patients underwent 175 finger amputations (range 1 to 6 fingers per patient). Forty-one percent had diabetes, 33% had nonatherosclerotic digital artery disease, and 29% were on dialysis. Sex distribution was equal. Primary healing occurred in 78.9%, with the remainder requiring revisions. By logistic regression analysis, nonatherosclerotic digital artery disease was associated with failure of primary healing (odds ratio = 7.5; 95% confidence interval, 1.03 to 54; P = .047). Digital photoplethysmography did not predict primary healing. The overall healing of primary and secondary finger amputations was 96.0%. The mean survival after the initial finger amputation was 34.3 months and did not differ between patients undergoing single (35.6 months) versus multiple procedures (33.6 months). Dialysis dependence was associated with decreased survival (hazard ratio = 2.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.13 to 7.25; P = .026). Failure of primary healing is associated with the presence of nonatherosclerotic digital artery disease and is not predicted by digital photoplethysmographic studies. Dialysis dependence is associated with decreased survival in patients with finger amputations, but failure of primary healing does not adversely affect survival. A strategy of aggressive preservation of finger

  19. Inhibition of Decay-Accelerating Factor (CD55 Attenuates Prostate Cancer Growth and Survival In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert D. Loberg

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Decay-accelerating factor (CD55 is a member of membrane-bound complement-regulatory proteins. CD55 expression correlates with poor survival in patients with colorectal cancer and has been implicated in the survival and tumorigenesis of blood-borne malignancies. Histologic analysis of clinical specimens from patients with advanced prostate cancer revealed an increase in CD55 expression in prostate tumor epithelial cells. CD55 was shown to be functionally active and to inhibit complement-mediated lysis in PC-3 and DU145 cells. The percentage of lysis was correlative with the CD55 expression profile observed in these prostate cancer cell lines. These data suggest that CD55 is an important regulator of prostate cancer cell survival. As a result, we have hypothesized that CD55 expression on prostate cancer cells promotes cell survival and contributes to the metastatic potential of prostate cancer cells. To determine the role of CD55 in prostate cancer tumorigenesis and metastasis, we generated PC-3Luc prostate cancer cells with CD55 siRNA-targeted disruption. We found that PC-3Luc/CD55 siRNA constructs in SCID mice resulted in a significant attenuation of overall tumor burden. Further investigation into the mechanisms of CD55-mediated tumor cell/microenvironment interaction is necessary to understand the role of CD55 in tumor cell survival and metastatic lesion formation.

  20. Factors Affecting the Survival of Auxotrophs and Prototrophs of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in Mixed Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moat, A G; Barnes, I J; McCurley, E H

    1966-08-01

    Moat, Albert G. (Hahnemann Medical College, Philadelphia, Pa.), Isabel J. Barnes, and Eleanor H. McCurley. Factors affecting the survival of auxotrophs and prototrophs of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in mixed populations. J. Bacteriol. 92:297-301. 1966.-The conditions under which the number of yeast prototrophs, as well as respiration-deficient mutants, could be materially decreased, while allowing the survival of auxotrophic mutants in recoverable numbers, have been investigated in detail. Neither the use of carbohydrates other than glucose to prevent development of respiration-deficient mutants, nor treatment with acriflavine to render all surviving wild types respiration-deficient, provided a selective advantage for the auxotrophs. Increased concentrations of the antifungal agents amphotericin B or endomycin, while reducing the number of respiration-deficient mutants, did not significantly increase the final mutant-wild type ratio. A more soluble form of amphotericin B (Fungizone), when used under carefully defined physiological conditions, produced a significant reduction in the number of surviving prototrophs relative to the surviving auxotrophs, without development of respiration-deficient mutants.

  1. Adolescent self-harm and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jixiang; Song, Jianwei; Wang, Jing

    2016-12-01

    This study aims to define the characteristics of adolescents who have engaged in self-harm behavior and ascertain the risk factors. From January 2013 to January 2014, 4,176 adolescents from senior middle schools in Linyi, China, were administered four questionnaire surveys to ascertain the following: incidence of self-harm behavior regarding the frequency of different self-harm behaviors by group (never/one to five times/greater than five times in the last 6 months) and then comparing the self-harm behavior of the different subgroups; symptom self-check, comparing the differences between the adolescents with self-harm behavior and without in nine subscales (somatization, obsessive-compulsive symptoms, interpersonal sensitivity, depression, anxiety, hostility, fear, paranoid, and psychosis); Adolescent Self-Rating Life Events Check List scores; and Egna Minnenav Barndoms Uppfostran (EMBU) scores. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to determine the risk factors of self-harm in adolescents. The incidence of adolescent self-harm was 27.60%; the occurrence of adolescent self-harm was closely related to their mental health status, stressful life events, and EMBU. Being female, an urban student, or an only child; having poor school performance or experiences of stressful life events, harsh parenting styles, or excessive interference; and poor mental health were the risk factors for adolescent self-harm. The incidence of adolescent self-harm was high, and their mental health status, stressful life events, and EMBU affected the occurrence of adolescent self-harm, which is an issue that needs greater attention. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  2. Are low wages risk factors for hypertension?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, J Paul; Du, Juan

    2012-12-01

    Socio-economic status (SES) is strongly correlated with hypertension. But SES has several components, including income and correlations in cross-sectional data need not imply SES is a risk factor. This study investigates whether wages-the largest category within income-are risk factors. We analysed longitudinal, nationally representative US data from four waves (1999, 2001, 2003 and 2005) of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics. The overall sample was restricted to employed persons age 25-65 years, n = 17 295. Separate subsamples were constructed of persons within two age groups (25-44 and 45-65 years) and genders. Hypertension incidence was self-reported based on physician diagnosis. Our study was prospective since data from three base years (1999, 2001, 2003) were used to predict newly diagnosed hypertension for three subsequent years (2001, 2003, 2005). In separate analyses, data from the first base year were used to predict time-to-reporting hypertension. Logistic regressions with random effects and Cox proportional hazards regressions were run. Negative and strongly statistically significant correlations between wages and hypertension were found both in logistic and Cox regressions, especially for subsamples containing the younger age group (25-44 years) and women. Correlations were stronger when three health variables-obesity, subjective measures of health and number of co-morbidities-were excluded from regressions. Doubling the wage was associated with 25-30% lower chances of hypertension for persons aged 25-44 years. The strongest evidence for low wages being risk factors for hypertension among working people were for women and persons aged 25-44 years.

  3. Are low wages risk factors for hypertension?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Juan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Socio-economic status (SES) is strongly correlated with hypertension. But SES has several components, including income and correlations in cross-sectional data need not imply SES is a risk factor. This study investigates whether wages—the largest category within income—are risk factors. Methods: We analysed longitudinal, nationally representative US data from four waves (1999, 2001, 2003 and 2005) of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics. The overall sample was restricted to employed persons age 25–65 years, n = 17 295. Separate subsamples were constructed of persons within two age groups (25–44 and 45–65 years) and genders. Hypertension incidence was self-reported based on physician diagnosis. Our study was prospective since data from three base years (1999, 2001, 2003) were used to predict newly diagnosed hypertension for three subsequent years (2001, 2003, 2005). In separate analyses, data from the first base year were used to predict time-to-reporting hypertension. Logistic regressions with random effects and Cox proportional hazards regressions were run. Results: Negative and strongly statistically significant correlations between wages and hypertension were found both in logistic and Cox regressions, especially for subsamples containing the younger age group (25–44 years) and women. Correlations were stronger when three health variables—obesity, subjective measures of health and number of co-morbidities—were excluded from regressions. Doubling the wage was associated with 25–30% lower chances of hypertension for persons aged 25–44 years. Conclusions: The strongest evidence for low wages being risk factors for hypertension among working people were for women and persons aged 25–44 years. PMID:22262559

  4. Gastric Cancer: Descriptive Epidemiology, Risk Factors, Screening, and Prevention

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    Karimi, Parisa; Islami, Farhad; Anandasabapathy, Sharmila; Freedman, Neal D.; Kamangar, Farin

    2014-01-01

    Less than a century ago, gastric cancer (GC) was the most common cancer in the United States and perhaps throughout the world. Despite its worldwide decline in incidence over the past century, GC remains a major killer across the globe. This article reviews the epidemiology, screening, and prevention of gastric cancer. We first discuss the descriptive epidemiology of GC, including its incidence, survival, and mortality, including trends over time. Next, we characterize the risk factors for gastric cancer, both environmental and genetic. Serological markers and histological precursor lesions of GC and early detection of GC of using these markers is reviewed. Finally, we discuss prevention strategies and provide suggestions for further research. PMID:24618998

  5. Prognostic factors associated with survival in patients with symptomatic spinal bone metastases: a retrospective cohort study of 1 043 patients

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    Bollen, Laurens; van der Linden, Yvette M.; Pondaag, Willem; Fiocco, Marta; Pattynama, Bas P.M.; Marijnen, Corrie A.M.; Nelissen, Rob G.H.H.; Peul, Wilco C.; Dijkstra, P.D. Sander

    2014-01-01

    Background Expected survival is a major factor influencing extent of treatment for symptomatic spinal bone metastases (SBM). Predictive models have been developed, but their use can lead to over- or undertreatment.. The study objective was to identify prognostic factors associated with survival in patients with symptomatic SBM and to create a validated risk stratification model. Methods All patients who were treated for symptomatic SBM between 2001 and 2010 were included in this single center retrospective study. Medical records were reviewed for type of primary cancer, performance status, presence of visceral, brain and bone metastases, number and location of spinal metastases, and neurological functioning. Performance status was assessed with the Karnofsky performance score and neurological functioning with the Frankel scale. Analysis was performed using Kaplan-Meier curves, univariate log-rank tests, Cox regression models, and Harrell's C statistic. Results A total of 1 043 patients were studied. The most prevalent tumors were those of breast (n = 299), lung (n = 250), and prostate (n = 215). Median follow-up duration was 6.6 years, and 6 patients were lost to follow-up. Based on the results of the uni- and multivariate analyses, 4 categories were created. Median survival in category A was 31.2 months (95% CI, 25.2–37.3 months), 15.4 months (95% CI, 11.9–18.2 months) for category B, 4.8 months (95% CI, 4.1–5.4 months) for category C, and 1.6 months (95% CI, 1.4–1.9 months) for category D. Harrell's C statistic was calculated after the model was applied to an external dataset, yielding a result of 0.69. Conclusion Assessing patients according to the presented model results in 4 categories with significantly different survival times. PMID:24470544

  6. Risk of pneumonia and urinary tract infection within the first week after total hip arthroplasty and the impact on survival

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    Glassou EN

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Eva N Glassou,1,2 Torben B Hansen,1,3 Alma B Pedersen2 1University Clinic of Hand, Hip and Knee Surgery, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Regional Hospital West Jutland, Aarhus University, 2Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, 3The Lundbeck Foundation Centre for Fast-track Hip and Knee Replacement, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark Background: Pneumonia and urinary tract infections (UTIs increase morbidity and mortality. There is little epidemiological evidence from large population-based studies on risk factors for these infections and subsequent mortality in total hip arthroplasty (THA patients.Aim: To examine the risk factors of postoperative pneumonia and UTI after THA and their impact on survival.Patients and methods: We used the Danish Hip Arthroplasty Register to identify THAs due to osteoarthritis registered from 2000 to 2013. We collected data about comorbidities, mortality and infections in relation to primary hospitalization and potential predictive variables from administrative databases. Regression models were used to estimate associations between potential risk factors and infection, and subsequently, between infection and mortality.Results: In total 84,812 THAs were included. The cumulative incidence of pneumonia and UTI within 7 days of the primary procedure were 0.21 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.18–0.25 and 0.29 (95% CI: 0.26–0.33, respectively. Patient-related risk factors for infection were being 80 years or older, gender and a comorbidity burden at time of surgery. The hazard ratio (HR of dying within 90 days of the primary THA was 10.67 (95% CI: 5.79–19.57 compared to patients without pneumonia. For patients with UTIs, the HR was 1.64 (95% CI: 0.41–6.59 compared to those without a UTI.Conclusion: Pneumonia was associated with an increased short-term risk of dying, despite adjustment for coexisting comorbidity and other potential confounders. Age, gender and comorbidity were the most

  7. Subconjunctival hemorrhage: risk factors and potential indicators

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    Tarlan B

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Bercin Tarlan,1 Hayyam Kiratli21Department of Ophthalmology, Kozluk State Hospital, Batman, Turkey; 2Ocular Oncology Service, Hacettepe University Schoolof Medicine, Ankara, TurkeyAbstract: Subconjunctival hemorrhage is a benign disorder that is a common cause of acute ocular redness. The major risk factors include trauma and contact lens usage in younger patients, whereas among the elderly, systemic vascular diseases such as hypertension, diabetes, and arteriosclerosis are more common. In patients in whom subconjunctival hemorrhage is recurrent or persistent, further evaluation, including workup for systemic hypertension, bleeding disorders, systemic and ocular malignancies, and drug side effects, is warranted.Keywords: subconjunctival hemorrhage, contact lens, hypertension, red eye

  8. Resistant hypertension: epidemiology and risk factors

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    I. E. Deneka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the possibilities of contemporary pharmacotherapy, more than 80% of hypertensive patients do not achieve target blood pressure levels. Besides the obvious reasons – poor adherence of patients to treatment and non-rational therapy, there are other objective risk factors of resistance. Three main modifiable causes of resistant hypertension, that are often underestimated, are considered: obesity, obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and primary hyperaldosteronism. Understanding these mechanisms of resistance and their diagnostic criteria can improve the results of resistant hypertension treatment.

  9. Lung cancer associated hypercalcemia: An analysis of factors influencing survival and prognosis in 34 cases

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    Su-jie ZHANG

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives  To explore the factors influencing survival time in lung cancer associated hypercalcemia patients. Methods  Thirty-four patients with pathologically confirmed lung cancer complicated with hypercalcemia, who were treated at the Department of Oncology in General Hospital of PLA from Jan. 2001 to Dec. 2010, were enrolled in this study. The clinical data analyzed included sex, age, pathological type of the malignancies, organ metastasis (bone, lung, liver, kidney, brain, number of distal metastatic site, mental status, interval between final diagnosis of lung cancer and of hypercalcemia, peak value of blood calcium during the disease course, treatment methods and so on. Survival analysis was performed with the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox analysis with statistic software SPSS 18.0 to identify the potential prognostic factors. Results  The highest blood calcium level ranged from 2.77 to 4.87mmol/L, and the median value was 2.94mmol/L. The patients' survival time after diagnosis of hypercalcemia varied from 1 day to 1067 days, and the median survival time was 92 days. With the log-rank test, age above 50 years old, hypercalcemia occurring over 90 days after diagnosis of cancer, central nervous system symptoms and renal metastasis were predictors for poor survival (P=0.048, P=0.001, P=0.000, P=0.003. In the COX proportional hazard model analysis, age above 50 years old, hypercalcemia occurring over 90 days after cancer diagnosis, central nervous system symptoms and renal metastasis were significant prognostic factors for poor survival (HR=11.483, P=0.006; HR=4.371, P=0.002; HR=6.064, P=0.026; HR=8.502, P=0.011. Conclusions  Patients with lung cancer associated hypercalcemia have a shorter survival time and poor prognosis. Age above 50 years old, hypercalcemia occurring over 90 days after cancer diagnosis, central nervous system symptoms and renal metastasis are significant factors of poor prognosis.

  10. [Environmental risk factors and epidemiologic study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signorelli, C; Limina, R M

    2002-01-01

    The problems regarding communication of risks in the environmental sector and the analysis of certain causes of pollution, together with their effects on human health are the subjects of this article. In an illustrative and concise manner results of the most important epidemiological studies concerning the effects of non-ionizing radiations, of radon and of air pollution have been analyzed. Throughout this analysis emphasis has been placed on the difficulty of obtaining clear and scientifically based results. Such results are needed in order to provide the population with satisfying information and thus meet the increasing demand for unambiguous answers. Among the risk factors for human health are the high frequency electromagnetic fields used for mobile phones (radiofrequency--RF) nd extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMFs) of power-lines. Even though these risk factors may be minimal the high number of persons exposed could make them an important impact on public health. Regarding the topic of air pollution, effects on particular segments of the population (children, elderly people and subjects with chronic diseases) have been found in various studies; for example, for an increase of PM(10) of 10 microg/m(3) an increase in daily mortality of 0.69% (CI 0.40-0.98) due to cardiovascular and respiratory causes has been estimated as well as an increase in general daily mortality of 0.54% (CI 0.33-0.76). Due to the populations' low risk perception (caused by unawareness of the problem) radon is undoubtedly the environmental pollutant which has the most impact on public health. This is true even in Italy where 4,000 cases of lung cancer attributable to radon (about 11% of total lung cancer) have been estimated per year; this risk is heightened by the combined effect with smoking. When dealing with health risks the tools of communication must be simple and correct; the mass-media are the most important mediators between the scientific community and the

  11. Netrin-1 expression is an independent prognostic factor for poor patient survival in brain metastases.

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    Patrick N Harter

    Full Text Available The multifunctional molecule netrin-1 is upregulated in various malignancies and has recently been presented as a major general player in tumorigenesis leading to tumor progression and maintenance in various animal models. However, there is still a lack of clinico-epidemiological data related to netrin-1 expression. Therefore, the aim of our study was to elucidate the association of netrin-1 expression and patient survival in brain metastases since those constitute one of the most limiting factors for patient prognosis. We investigated 104 brain metastases cases for netrin-1 expression using in-situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry with regard to clinical parameters such as patient survival and MRI data. Our data show that netrin-1 is strongly upregulated in most cancer subtypes. Univariate analyses revealed netrin-1 expression as a significant factor associated with poor patient survival in the total cohort of brain metastasis patients and in sub-entities such as non-small cell lung carcinomas. Interestingly, many cancer samples showed a strong nuclear netrin-1 signal which was recently linked to a truncated netrin-1 variant that enhances tumor growth. Nuclear netrin-1 expression was associated with poor patient survival in univariate as well as in multivariate analyses. Our data indicate both total and nuclear netrin-1 expression as prognostic factors in brain metastases patients in contrast to other prognostic markers in oncology such as patient age, number of brain metastases or Ki67 proliferation index. Therefore, nuclear netrin-1 expression constitutes one of the first reported molecular biomarkers for patient survival in brain metastases. Furthermore, netrin-1 may constitute a promising target for future anti-cancer treatment approaches in brain metastases.

  12. Survival and Factors Associated with Failure of Pulpectomies Performed in Primary Teeth by Dental Students.

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    Brustolin, Juliane Priscila; Mariath, Adriela Azevedo Souza; Ardenghi, Thiago Machado; Casagrande, Luciano

    2017-01-01

    Although endodontic treatment is widely recommended for compromised dental pulp, there is no information regarding the factors associated with failures in primary teeth. The aim of this study was to evaluate the survival and factors associated with failure of pulpectomies performed in primary teeth by dental students. The sample comprised patients treated at a University Dental Service and required endodontic treatment in primary teeth. The study investigated treatment-related variables and patient factors potentially associated with treatment failure. Pulpectomy survival was analyzed by Kaplan-Meier estimator followed by log-rank test (ppulpectomies performed in 62 children (5.6±1.5 years). The survival reached 62.9% up to 12 months follow-up. Most failures occurred in the first 3 months (pTeeth with carious lesions at the start of treatment presented more failures than those with restorations or history of trauma (p=0.002). The survival of endodontically treated teeth restored with composite was higher than the ones filled with GIC (p=0.006). Pulpectomy performed in two or more sessions resulted in more failures (p=0.028). Patients presenting gingivitis had more failures in the endodontic treatment (p=0.022). The failures of root canal treatment in primary teeth were more prone to occur in a short time and when the treatment was performed in teeth presenting carious lesions. The use of composite instead of GIC increased the survival of pulpectomies. Repeated sessions for endodontic treatment and lack of oral hygiene habits had a negative effect on the results.

  13. Clinicopathological factors associated with survival in patients with breast cancer brain metastasis.

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    Li, Rong; Zhang, Kui; Siegal, Gene P; Wei, Shi

    2017-06-01

    Brain metastasis from breast cancer generally represents a catastrophic event yet demonstrates substantial biological heterogeneity. There have been limited studies solely focusing on the prognosis of patients with such metastasis. In this study, we carried out a comprehensive analysis in 108 consecutive patients with breast cancer brain metastases between 1997 and 2012 to further define clinicopathological factors associated with early onset of brain metastasis and survival outcomes after development of them. We found that lobular carcinoma, higher clinical stages at diagnosis, and lack of coexisting bone metastasis were significantly associated with a worse brain relapse-free survival when compared with brain-only metastasis. High histologic grade, triple-negative breast cancer, and absence of visceral involvement were unfavorable prognostic factors after brain metastasis. Furthermore, high histologic grade, advanced tumor stages, and lack of coexisting bone involvement indicated a worse overall survival. Thus, the previously established prognostic factors in early stage or advanced breast cancers may not entirely apply to patients with brain metastases. Furthermore, the prognostic significance of the clinicopathological factors differed before and after a patient develops brain metastasis. This knowledge might help in establishing an algorithm to further stratify patients with breast cancer into prognostically significant categories for optimal prevention, screening, and treatment of their brain metastasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A retrospective study on related factors affecting the survival rate of dental implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jeong-Kyung; Lee, Ki; Lee, Yong-Sang; Park, Pil-Kyoo

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this retrospective study is to analyze the relationship between local factors and survival rate of dental implant which had been installed and restored in Seoul Veterans Hospital dental center for past 10 years. And when the relationship is found out, it could be helpful to predict the prognosis of dental implants. MATERIALS AND METHODS A retrospective study of patients receiving root-shaped screw-type dental implants placed from January 2000 to December 2009 was conducted. 6385 implants were placed in 3755 patients. The following data were collected from the dental records and radiographs: patient's age, gender, implant type and surface, length, diameter, location of implant placement, bone quality, prosthesis type. The correlations between these data and survival rate were analyzed. Statistical analysis was performed with the use of Kaplan-Meier analysis, Chi-square test and odds ratio. RESULTS In all, 6385 implants were placed in 3755 patients (3120 male, 635 female; mean age 65 ± 10.58 years). 108 implants failed and the cumulative survival rate was 96.33%. There were significant differences in age, implant type and surface, length, location and prosthesis type (P.05). CONCLUSION Related factors such as age, implant type, length, location and prosthesis type had a significant effect on the implant survival. PMID:22259704

  15. [Risk factors of children overweight and obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelkafi Koubaa, Afifa; Younes, Kawthar; Gabsi, Zvinemira; Bouslah, Amel; Maalel, Issam; Maatouk El May, Wahiba; Dahmen, Hayet; Bel Abed, Najet; Bchir, Nedra; Gabsi, Abdallah; Tekaya, Mohamed Salah; Jebara, Hassen

    2012-05-01

    The increase of the prevalence of children obesity in some countries as Tunisia, necessitate to welling known risk factors for obesity, to prevent and early management. To determine the prevalence of overweight and of obesity in a group of 4-6 year-old school children in Monastir and to investigate the association with possible risk factors. A descriptive transversal study including 121 children aged 4-6 years old (637 males, 698 females), was conducted in 10 Kindergartens in Monastir, in 2011. Personal data such as age, sex, birth weight, breastfeeding history and parental data including parental weights and heights, parental education level and occupation were collected by questionnaires completed by parents. Height and weight were measured with a weighing-scale and body mass index (BMI; kg/m²) was calculated. The prevalence of overweight and obesity was defined based according to the curves of the french reference of Rolland Cachera. Prevalence of overweight and obesity was 9.1% and 11.6% respectively. Parental factors associated with overweight were: parental obesity: 44% vs 17% (p=0.005) (OR = 3.65: 1.27-10.57), artificial feeding: 68% vs 33% (p=0.0016) (OR= 4.25: 1.51-12.27), and the early diversification of food before the age of 6 months: 88% vs 65% (p=0.029) (OR= 3.84: 0.98 - 17.66). Exclusive breast feeding duration ≥ 6mois is probably protector factor against obesity: 0% vs 21% (p=0. 01) (OR=0: 0.00 overweight and non-overweight schoolchildren in frequency of high degree educated mother and father, birth weight, breakfast intake, eating habits and exercise. However overweight children intake high-caloric food, low in fiber, with troubles of nutritional comportment, and a sedentary lifestyle. Risk factors for obesity, well known in most industrialized countries, necessitate to be more understood in Tunisia, to place a preventive strategy included supervision of children weight, nutritional education and promote physical activity and reducing the time

  16. Musculoskeletal Injuries and Their Associated Risk Factors

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    M Jahangiri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims :Prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs is high among office workers. Long time seated posture, working with computer, repetitive movements and inappropriate environmental conditions may have causal effects in these disorders. High prevalence rate of MSDs makes ergonomics assessment and working conditions improvement necessary. Designing an assessment checklist and calculating ergonomics indices can be useful in this evaluation. This study was conducted with the objectives of determination of prevalence rate, ergonomics assessment of working conditions and determination of factors associated with MSDs among office workers. Methods:In this study 400 randomly selected office workers participated. Nordic musculoskeletal disorders questionnaire was applied to determine prevalence rate of MSDs. Working conditions were assessed by the designed ergonomics checklist and ergonomic risk factors were identified. Data were analyzed using statistical tests including t-test, Chi-square and test of proportion by SPSS software (Version 12.0. Results:The highest prevalence rates of MSDs were reported in lower back and neck regions (49% and 47%, respectively. Statistical analysis revealed that there were significant association between occurrence of MSDs and calculated ergonomics indices (P<0.05. The mean of ergonomics index among those suffered from MSDs were less than other healthy workers indicating inappropriate ergonomics conditions. Calculation of OR also revealed that ergonomics conditions was associated with MSDs occurrence among workers (P<0.05. Totally