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Sample records for survival red blood

  1. Evaluation of red blood cell labelling methods based on a statistical model for red blood cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korell, Julia; Coulter, Carolyn V; Duffull, Stephen B

    2011-12-21

    The aim of this work is to compare different labelling methods that are commonly used to estimate the lifespan of red blood cells (RBCs), e.g. in anaemia of renal failure, where the effect of treatment with erythropoietin depends on the lifespan of RBCs. A previously developed model for the survival time of RBCs that accounts for plausible physiological processes of RBC destruction was used to simulate ideal random and cohort labelling methods for RBCs, as well as the flaws associated with these methods (e.g. reuse of label and loss of the label from the surviving RBCs). Random labelling with radioactive chromium and cohort labelling using heavy nitrogen were considered. Blood sampling times were determined for RBC survival studies using both labelling methods by applying the theory of optimal design. It was assessed whether the underlying parameter values of the model are estimable from these studies, and the precision of the parameter estimates were calculated. In theory, parameter estimation would be possible for both types of ideal labelling methods without flaws. However, flaws associated with random labelling are significant and not all parameters controlling RBC survival in the model can be estimated with good precision. In contrast, cohort labelling shows good precision in the parameter estimates even in the presence of reuse and prolonged incorporation of the label. A model based analysis of RBC survival studies is recommended in future to account for limitations in methodology as well as likely causes of RBC destruction. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Survival of the fittest?--survival of stored red blood cells after transfusion.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luten, M.; Roerdinkholder-Stoelwinder, B.; Bost, H.J.; Bosman, G.J.C.G.M.

    2004-01-01

    During the last 90 years many developments have taken place in the world of blood transfusion. Several anticoagulants and storage solutions have been developed. Also the blood processing has undergone many changes. At the moment, in The Netherlands, red blood cell (RBC) concentrates (prepared from a

  3. Evaluation of the effects of red blood cell distribution width on survival in lung cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Kos

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study : Data are available indicating that red blood cell distribution width (RDW is higher in cancer patients compared to healthy individuals or benign events. In our study, we aimed to investigate the influence of different RDW levels on survival in lung cancer patients. Material and methods: Clinical and laboratory data from 146 patients with lung cancer and 40 healthy subjects were retrospectively studied. RDW was recorded before the application of any treatment. Patients were categorised according to four different RDW cut-off values (median RDW, RDW determined by ROC curve analysis, the upper limit at the automatic blood count device, and RDW cut of value which used in previous studies. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was used to examine the effect of RDW on survival for each cut-off level. Results : The median age of patients was 56.5 years (range: 26–83 years. The difference in median RDW between patients and the control group was statistically significant (14.0 and 13.8, respectively, p = 0.04. There was no difference with regard to overall survival when patients with RDW ≥ 14.0 were compared to those with RDW < 14.0 (p = 0.70; however, overall survival was 3.0 months shorter in low values of its own group in each of the following cut-off values: ≥ 14.2 (p = 0.34, ≥ 14.5 (p = 0.25, ≥ 15 (p = 0.59, although no results were statistically significant. Discussion : We consider that the difference between low and high RDW values according to certain cut-off values may reflect the statistics of larger studies although there is a statistically negative correlation between RDW level and survival.

  4. Duration of red blood cell storage and survival of transfused patients (CME)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edgren, Gustaf; Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads; Eloranta, Sandra

    2010-01-01

    Disquieting reports of increased complication and death rates after transfusions of red blood cells (RBCs) stored for more than 14 days prompted us to perform an observational retrospective cohort study of mortality in relation to storage time.......Disquieting reports of increased complication and death rates after transfusions of red blood cells (RBCs) stored for more than 14 days prompted us to perform an observational retrospective cohort study of mortality in relation to storage time....

  5. Improved red blood cell survival after cardiac operations with administration of urea during cardiopulmonary bypass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, D.; Bake, B.; William-Olsson, G.

    1985-01-01

    The plasma hemoglobin and red blood cell survival (half-life of /sup 51/Cr) was studied in 48 patients undergoing single valve replacement or coronary artery bypass graft. Urea or placebo was administered during cardiopulmonary bypass in a prospective, randomized, double-blind manner to test the potential effect on mechanical hemolysis. The mean plasma hemoglobin level at the end of extracorporeal circulation was significantly lower in the urea-treated groups (coronary artery bypass 342 mg/L; valve replacement 364 mg/L) than in the control groups (coronary artery bypass 635 mg/L, valve replacement 518 mg/L. The half-life of /sup 51/Cr was significantly longer in the urea-treated patients (coronary artery bypass 18 days; valve replacement 16 days) than in the control groups (coronary artery bypass 12.4 days; valve replacement 12.7 days) but still below the normal reference value (29 +/- 4 days). The plasma hemoglobin returned to near normal values (50 mg/L) the day after operation (day 1) and remained low with no differences between control and urea-treated groups. The total blood hemoglobin was followed for 2 weeks after operation and showed significantly less anemia in the urea-treated group. The lowest mean blood hemoglobin level was noted between days 5 and 9-114 (coronary artery bypass) and 107 (valve replacement) gm/L in the urea-treated patients compared to 92.3 gm/L in the control subjects. The reduction in the severity of the anemia led to less transfusion in the urea-treated patients (approximately 0.5 unit/patient) than in the control subjects (approximately 1 unit/patient) between days 3 and 14.

  6. Survival of red blood cells after transfusion: a comparison between red cells concentrates of different storage periods.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luten, M.; Roerdinkholder-Stoelwinder, B.; Schaap, N.P.M.; Grip, W.J. de; Bos, H.J.; Bosman, G.J.C.G.M.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The use of fresh red blood cells (RBCs) is recommended for critically ill patients and patients undergoing surgery, although there is no conclusive evidence that this is beneficial. In this follow-up study, the short-term and the long-term recovery of irradiated, leukoreduced RBCs

  7. Association of Age and Packed Red Blood Cell Transfusion to One-Year Survival- an Observational Study of ICU Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudumbai, Seshadri C.; Cronkite, Ruth; Unger-Hu, Kirsten; Heidenreich, Paul; Gonzalez, Chris; Bertaccini, Edward; Stafford, Randall; Cason, Brian; Mariano, Edward R.; Wagner, Todd

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To compare the 1-year survival for different age strata of intensive care unit (ICU) patients after receipt of packed red blood cell (PRBC) transfusions. Background Despite guidelines documenting risks of PRBC transfusion and data showing that increasing age is associated with ICU mortality, little data exist on whether age alters the transfusion-related risk of decreased survival. Methods We retrospectively examined data on 2393 consecutive male ICU patients admitted to a tertiary-care hospital from 2003 to 2009 in age strata: 21–50, 51–60, 61–70, 71–80, and >80 years. We calculated Cox regression models to determine the modifying effect of age on the impact of PRBC transfusion on 1-year survival by using interaction terms between receipt of transfusion and age strata, controlling for type of admission and Charlson co-morbidity indices. We also examined the distribution of admission haematocrit and whether transfusion rates differed by age strata. Results All age strata experienced statistically similar risks of decreased 1-year survival after receipt of PRBC transfusions. However, patients age >80 were more likely than younger cohorts to have hematocrits of 25– 30% at admission and were transfused at approximately twice the rate of each of the younger age strata. Discussion We found no significant interaction between receipt of red cell transfusion and age, as variables, and survival at 1 year as an outcome. PMID:23480030

  8. Survival after blood transfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads; Ahlgren, Martin; Rostgaard, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    of transfusion recipients in Denmark and Sweden followed for up to 20 years after their first blood transfusion. Main outcome measure was all-cause mortality. RESULTS: A total of 1,118,261 transfusion recipients were identified, of whom 62.0 percent were aged 65 years or older at the time of their first...... the SMR remained significantly 1.3-fold increased. CONCLUSION: The survival and relative mortality patterns among blood transfusion recipients were characterized with unprecedented detail and precision. Our results are relevant to assessments of the consequences of possible transfusion-transmitted disease...... as well as for cost-benefit estimation of new blood safety interventions....

  9. Red blood cell alloimmunization after blood transfusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schonewille, Henk

    2008-01-01

    Current pretransfusion policy requires the patients’ serum to be tested for the presence of irregular red blood cell antibodies. In case of an antibody, red blood cells lacking the corresponding antigen are transfused after an antiglobulin crossmatch. The aim of the studies in this thesis is

  10. Rare red blood cell abnormalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zwieten, R.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to give insight in the process of diagnosing rare red blood cell defects, to clarify the relation of a defect with cell function and to extend, in this respect, our knowledge about normal red cell function and biochemistry. It is possible to categorize different red cell

  11. Effect of Plasma and Red Blood Cell Transfusions on Survival in Patients with Combat Related Traumatic Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-10-01

    fibrinogen and prothrombin complex concentrate used to reverse dilutional coagulopathy—a porcine model. Br J Anaesth. 2006;97:460–467. 44. Fries D...with acute myocardial infarction . N Engl J Med. 2001;345:1230–1236. 65. Fergusson D, Khanna MP, Tinmouth A, Hébert PC. Transfusion of leukoreduced red

  12. Red Blood Cell Transfusion Dependency and Hyperferritinemia Are Associated with Impaired Survival in Patients Diagnosed with Myelodysplastic Syndromes: Results from the First Polish MDS-PALG Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waszczuk-Gajda, Anna; Mądry, Krzysztof; Machowicz, Rafał; Drozd-Sokołowska, Joanna; Stella-Hołowiecka, Beata; Mital, Andrzej; Obara, Agata; Szmigielska-Kapłon, Anna; Sikorska, Anna; Subocz, Edyta; Jędrzejczak, Wiesław W; Dwilewicz-Trojaczek, Jadwiga

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogeneous group of clonal stem cell disorders characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis, cytopenias and a risk of progression to acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Anemia is the most frequent cytopenia diagnosed in patients with MDS. Regular RBC transfusions are the only treatment option for about 40% of patients. Transfusion-dependent patients develop secondary iron overload. The influence of serum ferritin (SF) concentration on survival and acute myeloid leukemia transformation in MDS patients remains controversial. The data for the Central European population is scarce and so far there is no description for Poland. The aim of this study was to perform a retrospective analysis of the relationship of SF concentration with red blood cell transfusion dependency, survival and transformation to acute myeloid leukemia. We retrospectively evaluated the data of the 819 MDS patients (58% male; median age 70 years) included in the MDS Registry of the MDS Section of the Polish Adult Leukemia Group (PALG). Analyses were performed on 190 patients diagnosed with MDS, maximal 6 months before inclusion to the registry in order to avoid selection bias (a shorter survival of higher risk MDS patients). Patients with hyperferritinemia higher than 1000 ng/L vs. patients with SF concentration lower than 1000 ng/L had a median survival of 320 days vs. 568 days, respectively (p log-rank = 0.014). The following factors were found to significantly worsen survival: RBC-transfusion dependence (p = 0.0033; HR 2.67L), platelet transfusion dependence (p = 0.0071; HR 3.321), hemoglobin concentration lower than 10 g/dL (p = 0.0036; HR 2.97), SF concentration higher than 1000 ng/L (p = 0.0023; HR = 2.94), platelet count lower than 10 G/L (p = 0.0081 HR = 5.04), acute leukemia transformation (p = 0.0081; HR 1.968). Taking into account the relatively low number of patients in previous studies exploring hyperferritinemia in MDS, the results of the first Polish

  13. Red blood cells, sickle cell (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is an inherited blood disease in which the red blood cells produce abnormal pigment (hemoglobin). The abnormal hemoglobin causes deformity of the red blood cells into crescent or sickle-shapes, as ...

  14. Red cell survival time in chronic renal failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rath, R.N.; Das, R.K.; Panda, R.K.; Mahakur, A.C.; Patnaik, S.R. (M.K.C.G. Medical College, Berhampur (India))

    1979-10-01

    The red cell survival time was estimated in 50 cases of chronic renal failure and 20 healthy subjects, using radioactive chromium /sup 51/Cr. The mean value of red cell survival half time (T1/2/sup 51/Cr) was determined to be 25.9 +- 1.1 days in control subjects. The red cell survival half time (17.9 +- 4.67 days) was found to be significantly decreased in cases of chronic renal failure, when compared to the control group. An inverse relationship was observed between T1/2/sup 51/Cr value and blood urea, serum creatinine, the magnitude of hypertension, and duration of illness, whereas, creatinine clearance showed a direct relationship. There was no increased splenic uptake of radioactive chromium, indicating that haemolysis occurred elsewhere in the circulation other than spleen. The possible mechanism for the reduction of red cell survival time and the effect of uraemic environment on it has been discussed.

  15. Red blood cells in thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrnes, James R; Wolberg, Alisa S

    2017-10-19

    Red blood cells (RBCs) have historically been considered passive bystanders in thrombosis. However, clinical and epidemiological studies have associated quantitative and qualitative abnormalities in RBCs, including altered hematocrit, sickle cell disease, thalassemia, hemolytic anemias, and malaria, with both arterial and venous thrombosis. A growing body of mechanistic studies suggests that RBCs can promote thrombus formation and enhance thrombus stability. These findings suggest that RBCs may contribute to thrombosis pathophysiology and reveal potential strategies for therapeutically targeting RBCs to reduce thrombosis. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  16. 21 CFR 640.10 - Red Blood Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Red Blood Cells. 640.10 Section 640.10 Food and... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Red Blood Cells § 640.10 Red Blood Cells. The proper name of this product shall be Red Blood Cells. The product is defined as red blood cells remaining...

  17. Red blood cell sedimentation of Apheresis Granulocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodermeier, Michelle A; Byrne, Karen M; Flegel, Willy A

    2017-10-01

    Sedimentation of Apheresis Granulocyte components removes red blood cells. It is used to increase the blood donor pool when blood group-compatible donors cannot be recruited for a patient because of a major ABO incompatibility or incompatible red blood cell antibodies in the recipient. Because granulocytes have little ABO and few other red blood cell antigens on their membrane, such incompatibility lies mostly with the contaminating red blood cells. Video Clip S1 shows the process of red blood cell sedimentation of an Apheresis Granulocyte component. This video was filmed with a single smart phone attached to a commercial tripod and was edited on a tablet computer with free software by an amateur videographer without prior video experience. © 2017 AABB.

  18. Uptake of carnitine by red blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campa, M.; Borum, P.

    1986-05-01

    A significant amount of blood carnitine (70% of cord blood and 40% of blood from healthy adults) is partitioned into the red blood cell compartment of whole blood. Data indicate that the plasma compartment and the red blood cell compartment of whole blood represent different metabolic pools of carnitine. There are no data to indicate that red blood cells synthesize carnitine, but our understanding of the uptake of carnitine by red blood cells is negligible. Red blood cells were obtained from healthy adults, washed twice with normal saline, and used for uptake experiments. When the cells were incubated at 37/sup 0/C in the presence of /sup 14/C-carnitine, radioactivity was found both in the soluble cytosolic and membrane fractions of the cells following lysis. The uptake was dependent upon the time of incubation, temperature of incubation, and carnitine concentration in the incubation medium. Washed red blood cell membranes incubated with /sup 14/C-carnitine showed specific binding of radioactivity. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that red blood cells have an uptake mechanism for L-carnitine.

  19. Red blood cell vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amr eAlaarg

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary hemolytic anemia encompasses a heterogeneous group of anemias characterised by decreased red blood cell survival because of inherited membrane, enzyme, or hemoglobin disorders. Affected red blood cells are more fragile, less deformable, and more susceptible to shear stress and oxidative damage, and show increased vesiculation. Red blood cells, as essentially all cells, constitutively release phospholipid extracellular vesicles in vivo and in vitro in a process known as vesiculation. These extracellular vesicles comprise a heterogeneous group of vesicles of different sizes and intracellular origins. They are described in literature as exosomes if they originate from multi-vesicular bodies, or as microvesicles when formed by a one-step budding process directly from the plasma membrane. Extracellular vesicles contain a multitude of bioactive molecules that are implicated in intercellular communication and in different biological and pathophysiological processes. Mature red blood cells release in principle only microvesicles. In hereditary hemolytic anemias, the underlying molecular defect affects and determines red blood cell vesiculation, resulting in shedding microvesicles of different compositions and concentrations. Despite extensive research into red blood cell biochemistry and physiology, little is known about red cell deformability and vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemias, and the associated pathophysiological role is incompletely asessed. In this review, we discuss recent progress in understanding extracellular vesicles biology, with focus on red blood cell vesiculation. Also, we review recent scientific findings on the molecular defects of hereditary hemolytic anemias, and their correlation with red blood cell deformability and vesiculation. Integrating bio-analytical findings on abnormalities of red blood cells and their microvesicles will be critical for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of hereditary

  20. Red blood cell vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaarg, Amr; Schiffelers, Raymond M.; van Solinge, Wouter W.; van Wijk, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary hemolytic anemia encompasses a heterogeneous group of anemias characterized by decreased red blood cell survival because of inherited membrane, enzyme, or hemoglobin disorders. Affected red blood cells are more fragile, less deformable, and more susceptible to shear stress and oxidative damage, and show increased vesiculation. Red blood cells, as essentially all cells, constitutively release phospholipid extracellular vesicles in vivo and in vitro in a process known as vesiculation. These extracellular vesicles comprise a heterogeneous group of vesicles of different sizes and intracellular origins. They are described in literature as exosomes if they originate from multi-vesicular bodies, or as microvesicles when formed by a one-step budding process directly from the plasma membrane. Extracellular vesicles contain a multitude of bioactive molecules that are implicated in intercellular communication and in different biological and pathophysiological processes. Mature red blood cells release in principle only microvesicles. In hereditary hemolytic anemias, the underlying molecular defect affects and determines red blood cell vesiculation, resulting in shedding microvesicles of different compositions and concentrations. Despite extensive research into red blood cell biochemistry and physiology, little is known about red cell deformability and vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemias, and the associated pathophysiological role is incompletely assessed. In this review, we discuss recent progress in understanding extracellular vesicles biology, with focus on red blood cell vesiculation. Also, we review recent scientific findings on the molecular defects of hereditary hemolytic anemias, and their correlation with red blood cell deformability and vesiculation. Integrating bio-analytical findings on abnormalities of red blood cells and their microvesicles will be critical for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of hereditary hemolytic anemias. PMID

  1. Red Blood Cell.pm6

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    Inexpensive, but safe, effective and user friendly methods are therefore sought to warm blood. The changes in red blood cell integrity were measured in the following way:- METHOD AND STATISTICS. One unit ... Plasma Fhb was measured spectrophotometrically. After 34 days of storage at 4˚C the blood of each volunteer.

  2. Phosphatidylserine exposure on stored red blood cells as a parameter for donor-dependent variation in product quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinkla, Sip; Peppelman, Malou; Van Der Raadt, Jori; Atsma, Femke; Novotný, Vera M J; Van Kraaij, Marian G J; Joosten, Irma; Bosman, Giel J C G M

    2014-04-01

    Exposure of phosphatidylserine on the outside of red blood cells contributes to recognition and removal of old and damaged cells. The fraction of phosphatidylserine-exposing red blood cells varies between donors, and increases in red blood cell concentrates during storage. The susceptibility of red blood cells to stress-induced phosphatidylserine exposure increases with storage. Phosphatidylserine exposure may, therefore, constitute a link between donor variation and the quality of red blood cell concentrates. In order to examine the relationship between storage parameters and donor characteristics, the percentage of phosphatidylserine-exposing red blood cells was measured in red blood cell concentrates during storage and in fresh red blood cells from blood bank donors. The percentage of phosphatidylserine-exposing red blood cells was compared with red blood cell susceptibility to osmotic stress-induced phosphatidylserine exposure in vitro, with the regular red blood cell concentrate quality parameters, and with the donor characteristics age, body mass index, haemoglobin level, gender and blood group. Phosphatidylserine exposure varies between donors, both on red blood cells freshly isolated from the blood, and on red blood cells in red blood cell concentrates. Phosphatidylserine exposure increases with storage time, and is correlated with stress-induced phosphatidylserine exposure. Increased phosphatidylserine exposure during storage was found to be associated with haemolysis and vesicle concentration in red blood cell concentrates. The percentage of phosphatidylserine-exposing red blood cells showed a positive correlation with the plasma haemoglobin concentration of the donor. The fraction of phosphatidylserine-exposing red blood cells is a parameter of red blood cell integrity in red blood cell concentrates and may be an indicator of red blood cell survival after transfusion. Measurement of phosphatidylserine exposure may be useful in the selection of donors and

  3. Phosphatidylserine exposure on stored red blood cells as a parameter for donor-dependent variation in product quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinkla, Sip; Peppelman, Malou; van der Raadt, Jori; Atsma, Femke; Novotný, Vĕra M.J.; van Kraaij, Marian G.J.; Joosten, Irma; Bosman, Giel J.C.G.M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Exposure of phosphatidylserine on the outside of red blood cells contributes to recognition and removal of old and damaged cells. The fraction of phosphatidylserine-exposing red blood cells varies between donors, and increases in red blood cell concentrates during storage. The susceptibility of red blood cells to stress-induced phosphatidylserine exposure increases with storage. Phosphatidylserine exposure may, therefore, constitute a link between donor variation and the quality of red blood cell concentrates. Materials and methods In order to examine the relationship between storage parameters and donor characteristics, the percentage of phosphatidylserine-exposing red blood cells was measured in red blood cell concentrates during storage and in fresh red blood cells from blood bank donors. The percentage of phosphatidylserine-exposing red blood cells was compared with red blood cell susceptibility to osmotic stress-induced phosphatidylserine exposure in vitro, with the regular red blood cell concentrate quality parameters, and with the donor characteristics age, body mass index, haemoglobin level, gender and blood group. Results Phosphatidylserine exposure varies between donors, both on red blood cells freshly isolated from the blood, and on red blood cells in red blood cell concentrates. Phosphatidylserine exposure increases with storage time, and is correlated with stress-induced phosphatidylserine exposure. Increased phosphatidylserine exposure during storage was found to be associated with haemolysis and vesicle concentration in red blood cell concentrates. The percentage of phosphatidylserine-exposing red blood cells showed a positive correlation with the plasma haemoglobin concentration of the donor. Discussion The fraction of phosphatidylserine-exposing red blood cells is a parameter of red blood cell integrity in red blood cell concentrates and may be an indicator of red blood cell survival after transfusion. Measurement of phosphatidylserine

  4. Effects of red blood cells on hemostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roeloffzen, WilfriedW. H.; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C.; Bosman, Lotte; de Wolf, Joost Th. M.

    BACKGROUND: Currently there is no sensitive laboratory test to establish the influence of red blood cells (RBCs) on hemostasis. As thromboelastography (TEG) measures hemostasis in whole blood, taking into account the interactions of all cellular elements, we used this instrument to investigate the

  5. High Red Blood Cell Count

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Marx JA, et al., eds. Anemia, polycythemia, and white blood cells disorders. In: Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice. 8th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2014. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Dec. ...

  6. Freeze-Dried Human Red Blood Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-04-15

    after reinfusion. Blood 1982; 56: 1141-1147. 11. Danon D, Marikovsky Y. Determination of density distribution of red cell population. J Lab Clin Med...back to the study site. The lyophilized red cells will be stored refrigerated until use. Fourteen days after phlebotomy, the subject will return to the...The subject will remain in confinement at the study site for 24 hours following the transfusion and return on the following four days (Study Days 2

  7. Screening for hemosiderosis in patients receiving multiple red blood cell transfusions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jongh, Adriaan D; van Beers, E J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314670793; de Vooght, K M K|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304817961; Schutgens, R E G|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/258752084

    2017-01-01

    Background: The dramatic impact of hemosiderosis on survival in chronically transfused patients with hereditary anemia is well known. We evaluated whether patients receiving multiple red blood cell (RBC) transfusions are adequately screened for hemosiderosis. Methods: We retrospectively assessed

  8. Nucleated red blood cells and artifactual hypoglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaron, C I; Kadri, A; Macaron, Z

    1981-01-01

    A patient with chronic hemolytic anemia presented with an acute hemolytic crisis, a high count of nucleated red blood cells (NRBC), and artifactual hypoglycemia. Temporal events showed a parallel relationship between an increased number of nucleated RBCs and an excess in vitro consumption of glucose.

  9. Overall survival in lower IPSS risk MDS by receipt of iron chelation therapy, adjusting for patient-related factors and measuring from time of first red blood cell transfusion dependence: an MDS-CAN analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitch, Heather A; Parmar, Ambica; Wells, Richard A; Chodirker, Lisa; Zhu, Nancy; Nevill, Thomas J; Yee, Karen W L; Leber, Brian; Keating, Mary-Margaret; Sabloff, Mitchell; St Hilaire, Eve; Kumar, Rajat; Delage, Robert; Geddes, Michelle; Storring, John M; Kew, Andrea; Shamy, April; Elemary, Mohamed; Lenis, Martha; Mamedov, Alexandre; Ivo, Jessica; Francis, Janika; Zhang, Liying; Buckstein, Rena

    2017-10-01

    Analyses suggest iron overload in red blood cell (RBC) transfusion-dependent (TD) patients with myleodysplastic syndrome (MDS) portends inferior overall survival (OS) that is attenuated by iron chelation therapy (ICT) but may be biassed by unbalanced patient-related factors. The Canadian MDS Registry prospectively measures frailty, comorbidity and disability. We analysed OS by receipt of ICT, adjusting for these patient-related factors. TD International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) low and intermediate-1 risk MDS, at RBC TD, were included. Predictive factors for OS were determined. A matched pair analysis considering age, revised IPSS, TD severity, time from MDS diagnosis to TD, and receipt of disease-modifying agents was conducted. Of 239 patients, 83 received ICT; frailty, comorbidity and disability did not differ from non-ICT patients. Median OS from TD was superior in ICT patients (5·2 vs. 2·1 years; P MDS, adjusting for age, frailty, comorbidity, disability, revised IPSS, TD severity, time to TD and receiving disease-modifying agents. This provides additional evidence that ICT may confer clinical benefit. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. 21 CFR 660.30 - Reagent Red Blood Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reagent Red Blood Cells. 660.30 Section 660.30...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.30 Reagent Red Blood Cells. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall be...

  11. Molecular mechanisms of disease in hereditary red blood cell enzymopathies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijk, Henricus Anthonius van

    2004-01-01

    Metabolically defective red blood cells are old before their time, and suffer from metabolic progeria. The focus of this thesis was to identify the molecular mechanisms by which inherited enzymopathies of the red blood cell lead to impaired enzyme function and, consequently, shorten red blood cell

  12. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864... enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity in... kinase or 2,3-diphosphoglycerate. A red blood cell enzyme assay is used to determine the enzyme defects...

  13. Survival, mortality, and predators of red tree voles (Arborimus longicaudus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    James K. Swingle; Eric D. Forsman; Robert G. Anthony

    2010-01-01

    Although estimations of vital rates are important to understand population dynamics of small mammals, there is little information on survival rates and causes of mortality for many species. In 2002-2003, we estimated monthly and annual survival of 50 radiocollared red tree voles (Arborimus longicaudus) during a study of movements and diel activity...

  14. Distribution and survival of Borrelia miyamotoi in human blood components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorp, Aaron M; Tonnetti, Laura

    2016-03-01

    Borrelia miyamotoi, the agent of relapsing fever, is a tick-borne spirochete first isolated in Japan in 1994. Since then, the spirochete has been detected in ticks globally, generally in the same vectors as the Lyme disease agent. Human infection has been reported in Russia, Europe, Japan, and the United States, as influenza-like febrile illness. In addition, two cases of meningoencephalitis caused by B. miyamotoi have also been reported in immunocompromised patients. Here we evaluate the ability of the spirochete to survive in human blood components stored under standard blood bank conditions. Freshly collected human whole blood was spiked with in vitro cultured B. miyamotoi or B. miyamotoi-infected mouse plasma and separated into red blood cells (RBCs), plasma, and platelets. Components were either injected into immunocompromised (SCID) or wild-type immunocompetent mice or cultured in vitro, right after separation and after storage at the appropriate conditions. Infection was monitored by microscopic observation, blood smears, and polymerase chain reaction. In vivo, all the SCID mice challenged with the components before storage and the RBCs stored for up to 42 days developed the infection. Wild-type mice also developed the infection when injected with prestorage samples from all components, while a lower number of mice were infected by RBCs stored for 42 days. In vitro, spirochetes grew in all samples but frozen plasma. This study demonstrated that B. miyamotoi can survive standard storage conditions of most human blood components, suggesting the possibility of transmission by blood transfusion. © 2015 AABB.

  15. Optical analysis of red blood cell suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szołna, Alicja A.; Grzegorzewski, Bronisław

    2008-12-01

    The optical properties of suspensions of red blood cells (RBCs) were studied. Fresh human venues blood was obtained from adult healthy donors. RBCs were suspended in isotonic salt solution, and in autologous plasma. Suspensions with haematocrit 0.25 - 3% were investigated. Novel technique was proposed to determine the scattering coefficient μs for the suspensions. The intensity of He-Ne laser light transmitted through a wedge-shape container filled with a suspension was recorded. To find the dependence of the intensity on the thickness of the sample the container was moved horizontally. The dependence of μs on the haematocrit was determined for RBCs suspended in the isotonic salt solution. RBCs suspended in plasma tend to form rouleaux. For the RBCs suspended in plasma, the scattering coefficient as a function of time was obtained. It is shown that this technique can be useful in the study of rouleaux formation.

  16. Deep coverage mouse red blood cell proteome: a first comparison with the human red blood cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pasini, Erica M; Kirkegaard, Morten; Salerno, Doris

    2008-01-01

    Mice have close genetic/physiological relationships to humans, breed rapidly, and can be genetically modified, making them the most used mammal in biomedical research. Because the red blood cell (RBC) is the sole gas transporter in vertebrates, diseases of the RBC are frequently severe; much...

  17. Red blood cell in simple shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Wei; Hew, Yayu; Chen, Yeng-Long

    2013-03-01

    The dynamics of red blood cells (RBC) in blood flow is critical for oxygen transport, and it also influences inflammation (white blood cells), thrombosis (platelets), and circulatory tumor migration. The physical properties of a RBC can be captured by modeling RBC as lipid membrane linked to a cytoskeletal spectrin network that encapsulates cytoplasm rich in hemoglobin, with bi-concave equilibrium shape. Depending on the shear force, RBC elasticity, membrane viscosity, and cytoplasm viscosity, RBC can undergo tumbling, tank-treading, or oscillatory motion. We investigate the dynamic state diagram of RBC in shear and pressure-driven flow using a combined immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method with a multi-scale RBC model that accurately captures the experimentally established RBC force-deformation relation. It is found that the tumbling (TU) to tank-treading (TT) transition occurs as shear rate increases for cytoplasm/outer fluid viscosity ratio smaller than 0.67. The TU frequency is found to be half of the TT frequency, in agreement with experiment observations. Larger viscosity ratios lead to the disappearance of stable TT phase and unstable complex dynamics, including the oscillation of the symmetry axis of the bi-concave shape perpendicular to the flow direction. The dependence on RBC bending rigidity, shear modulus, the order of membrane spectrin network and fluid field in the unstable region will also be discussed.

  18. Red blood cell transfusion in septic shock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosland, Ragnhild G; Hagen, Marte U; Haase, Nicolai

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treating anaemia with red blood cell (RBC) transfusion is frequent, but controversial, in patients with septic shock. Therefore we assessed characteristics and outcome associated with RBC transfusion in this group of high risk patients. METHODS: We did a prospective cohort study at 7...... general intensive care units (ICUs) including all adult patients with septic shock in a 5-month period. RESULTS: Ninety-five of the 213 included patients (45%) received median 3 (interquartile range 2-5) RBC units during shock. The median pre-transfusion haemoglobin level was 8.1 (7.4-8.9) g...... and SAPS II and SOFA-score on day 1. CONCLUSIONS: The decision to transfuse patients with septic shock was likely affected by disease severity and bleeding, but haemoglobin level was the only measure that consistently differed between transfused and non-transfused patients....

  19. RISK OF RED BLOOD CELL ALLOIMMUNISATION IN RWANDA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-04-04

    Apr 4, 2013 ... blood sample collection and the questionnaire was updated with the time period between transfusion .... of clinician and blood bank staff awareness about the indications of blood product use, blood ordering .... and Brand A. Red blood cell alloantibodies after transfusion: factor influencing incidence and.

  20. Survival of northern red oak acorns after fall burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    L.R. Auchmoody; H. Clay Smith; H. Clay Smith

    1993-01-01

    Survival of recently fallen northern red oak acorns after exposure to a cool fall burn was evaluated in northwestern Pennsylvania. Although no acorns were consumed by the fire, some were charred. Between 40 and 49 percent of the acorns in the litter were destroyed. The fire was not hot enough to kill Curculio larvae within the acorns. Burned acorns infested with...

  1. Red blood cells in sports: effects of exercise and training on oxygen supply by red blood cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mairbäurl, Heimo

    2013-01-01

    .... These functions require adequate amounts of red blood cells in circulation. Trained athletes, particularly in endurance sports, have a decreased hematocrit, which is sometimes called "sports anemia...

  2. agglutination of red blood cells by canine distemper.virus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Haemagglutination of red blood cells by morbilliviruses such as measles virus and peste des petits ruminants ... with chicken red blood cells (RBC), pig RBC, .... With Pseudo- rinderpest in Nigerian dwarf goats. Bull. Epizool. Dis. Afri., 16:411 417. JOHNSON, RH. (1971); Seroliogical. 61 procedures for the study of feline.

  3. Red blood cells in sports: effects of exercise and training on oxygen supply by red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mairbäurl, Heimo

    2013-01-01

    During exercise the cardiovascular system has to warrant substrate supply to working muscle. The main function of red blood cells in exercise is the transport of O2 from the lungs to the tissues and the delivery of metabolically produced CO2 to the lungs for expiration. Hemoglobin also contributes to the blood's buffering capacity, and ATP and NO release from red blood cells contributes to vasodilation and improved blood flow to working muscle. These functions require adequate amounts of red blood cells in circulation. Trained athletes, particularly in endurance sports, have a decreased hematocrit, which is sometimes called "sports anemia." This is not anemia in a clinical sense, because athletes have in fact an increased total mass of red blood cells and hemoglobin in circulation relative to sedentary individuals. The slight decrease in hematocrit by training is brought about by an increased plasma volume (PV). The mechanisms that increase total red blood cell mass by training are not understood fully. Despite stimulated erythropoiesis, exercise can decrease the red blood cell mass by intravascular hemolysis mainly of senescent red blood cells, which is caused by mechanical rupture when red blood cells pass through capillaries in contracting muscles, and by compression of red cells e.g., in foot soles during running or in hand palms in weightlifters. Together, these adjustments cause a decrease in the average age of the population of circulating red blood cells in trained athletes. These younger red cells are characterized by improved oxygen release and deformability, both of which also improve tissue oxygen supply during exercise.

  4. Duration of red blood cell storage and inflammatory marker generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sut, Caroline; Tariket, Sofiane; Chou, Ming Li; Garraud, Olivier; Laradi, Sandrine; Hamzeh-Cognasse, Hind; Seghatchian, Jerard; Burnouf, Thierry; Cognasse, Fabrice

    2017-01-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) transfusion is a life-saving treatment for several pathologies. RBCs for transfusion are stored refrigerated in a preservative solution, which extends their shelf-life for up to 42 days. During storage, the RBCs endure abundant physicochemical changes, named RBC storage lesions, which affect the overall quality standard, the functional integrity and in vivo survival of the transfused RBCs. Some of the changes occurring in the early stages of the storage period (for approximately two weeks) are reversible but become irreversible later on as the storage is extended. In this review, we aim to decipher the duration of RBC storage and inflammatory marker generation. This phenomenon is included as one of the causes of transfusion-related immunomodulation (TRIM), an emerging concept developed to potentially elucidate numerous clinical observations that suggest that RBC transfusion is associated with increased inflammatory events or effects with clinical consequence. PMID:28263172

  5. Influence of dendrimers on red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemba, Barbara; Matuszko, Gabriela; Bryszewska, Maria; Klajnert, Barbara

    2012-03-01

    Dendrimers, highly branched macromolecules with a specific size and shape, provide many exciting opportunities for biomedical applications. However, most dendrimers demonstrate toxic and haemolytic activity because of their positively charged surface. Masking the peripheral cationic groups by coating them with biocompatible molecules is a method to reduce it. It was proven that modified dendrimers can even diminish haemolytic activity of encapsulated drugs. Experiments confirmed that anionic dendrimers are less haemotoxic than cationic ones. Due to the high affinity of dendrimers for serum proteins, presence of these components in an incubation buffer might also influence red blood cell (RBC)-dendrimer interactions and decrease the haemolysis level. Generally, haemotoxicity of dendrimers is concentration-, generation-, and time-dependent. Various changes in the RBCs' shape in response to interactions with dendrimers have been observed, from echinocytic transformations through cell aggregation to cluster formation, depending on the dendrimer's type and concentration. Understanding the physical and chemical origins of dendrimers' influences on RBCs might advance scientists' ability to construct dendrimers more suitable for medical applications.

  6. Light scattering by aggregated red blood cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsinopoulos, Stephanos V.; Sellountos, Euripides J.; Polyzos, Demosthenes

    2002-03-01

    In low flow rates, red blood cells (RBCs) fasten together along their axis of symmetry and form a so-called rouleaux. The scattering of He-Ne laser light by a rouleau consisting of n (2 less-than-or-equal n less-than-or-equal 8) average-sized RBCs is investigated. The interaction problem is treated numerically by means of an advanced axisymmetric boundary element--fast Fourier transform methodology. The scattering problem of one RBC was solved first, and the results showed that the influence of the RBC's membrane on the scattering patterns is negligible. Thus the rouleau is modeled as an axisymmetric, homogeneous, low-contrast dielectric cylinder, on the surface of which appears, owing to aggregated RBCs, a periodic roughness along the direction of symmetry. The direction of the incident laser light is considered to be perpendicular to the scatterer's axis of symmetry. The differential scattering cross sections in both perpendicular and parallel scattering planes and for all the scattering angles are calculated and presented in detail.

  7. Nucleated red blood cells, critical illness survivors and postdischarge outcomes: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purtle, Steven W; Horkan, Clare M; Moromizato, Takuhiro; Gibbons, Fiona K; Christopher, Kenneth B

    2017-06-21

    Little is known about risk factors associated with out-of-hospital outcomes in survivors of critical illness. We hypothesized that the presence of nucleated red blood cells in patients who survived critical care would be associated with adverse outcomes following hospital discharge. We performed a two-center observational cohort study of patients treated in medical and surgical intensive care units in Boston, Massachusetts. All data were obtained from the Research Patient Data Registry at Partners HealthCare. We studied 2878 patients, age ≥ 18 years, who received critical care between 2011 and 2015 and survived hospitalization. The exposure of interest was nucleated red blood cells occurring from 2 days prior to 7 days after critical care initiation. The primary outcome was mortality in the 90 days following hospital discharge. Secondary outcome was unplanned 30-day hospital readmission. Adjusted odds ratios were estimated by multivariable logistic regression models with inclusion of covariate terms thought to plausibly interact with both nucleated red blood cells and outcome. Adjustment included age, race (white versus nonwhite), gender, Deyo-Charlson Index, patient type (medical versus surgical), sepsis and acute organ failure. In patients who received critical care and survived hospitalization, the absolute risk of 90-day postdischarge mortality was 5.9%, 11.7%, 15.8% and 21.9% in patients with 0/μl, 1-100/μl, 101-200/μl and more than 200/μl nucleated red blood cells respectively. Nucleated red blood cells were a robust predictor of postdischarge mortality and remained so following multivariable adjustment. The fully adjusted odds of 90-day postdischarge mortality in patients with 1-100/μl, 101-200/μl and more than 200/μl nucleated red blood cells were 1.77 (95% CI, 1.23-2.54), 2.51 (95% CI, 1.36-4.62) and 3.72 (95% CI, 2.16-6.39) respectively, relative to patients without nucleated red blood cells. Further, the presence of nucleated red blood

  8. Red Blood Cell Homeostasis: Pharmacological Interventions to Explore Biochemical, Morphological and Mechanical Properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cluitmans, J.C.A.; Gevi, F.; Siciliano, A.; Matte, A.; Leal, J.K.; Franceschi, L. De; Zolla, L.; Brock, R.E.; Adjobo-Hermans, M.J.W.; Bosman, G.J.C.G.M.

    2016-01-01

    During their passage through the circulation, red blood cells (RBCs) encounter severe physiological conditions consisting of mechanical stress, oxidative damage and fast changes in ionic and osmotic conditions. In order to survive for 120 days, RBCs adapt to their surroundings by subtle regulation

  9. Certain Red Blood Cell Indices of Maternal and Umbilical Cord ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Umbilical cord blood analysis may give a clue to the state of health of both pregnant mothers and their neonates. However, there is paucity of literature on some of these indices from our area. Objectives: This present study determined the red blood indices of maternal and umbilical cord blood in Owerri, Nigeria ...

  10. Nucleated red blood cells in infants of mothers with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littner, Yoav; Mandel, Dror; Sheffer-Mimouni, Galit; Mimouni, Francis B; Deutsch, Varda; Dollberg, Shaul

    2003-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the absolute nucleated red blood cell and lymphocyte count is elevated in term, appropriate-for-gestational-age infants born to women with asthma. We compared absolute nucleated red blood cell counts taken during the first 12 hours of life in two groups of term, vaginally delivered, appropriate-for-gestational-age infants; one group was born to mothers with active asthma during pregnancy (n = 28 infants), and the other group was born to control mothers (n = 29 infants). Asthma severity was classified according to the National Asthma Education and Prevention Program. We excluded infants of women with diabetes mellitus, hypertension, alcohol, and tobacco or drug abuse and infants with fetal heart rate abnormalities, hemolysis, blood loss, or chromosomal anomalies. There were no differences between groups in birth weight, gestational age, maternal age, gravidity, parity, maternal analgesia during labor, 1- and 5-minute Apgar scores, and infant sex. The hematocrit level, red blood cell count, absolute nucleated red blood cell count, and corrected leukocyte and lymphocyte counts were significantly higher in the asthma group than in the control group. The platelet count was not significantly different between groups. The absolute nucleated red blood cell count correlated significantly with the asthma severity score (r (2) = 28%, P cell count with the presence of asthma and its severity (P mothers with asthma have increased circulating absolute nucleated red blood cell and lymphocyte counts compared with control infants.

  11. Prolonged cold storage of red blood cells by oxygen removal and additive usage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitensky, Mark W. (Boston, MA); Yoshida, Tatsuro (Newton, MA)

    1998-01-01

    Prolonged cold storage of red blood cells by oxygen removal and additive usage. A cost-effective, 4.degree. C. storage procedure that preserves red cell quality and prolongs post-transfusion in vivo survival is described. The improved in vivo survival and the preservation of adenosine triphosphate levels, along with reduction in hemolysis and membrane vesicle production of red blood cells stored at 4.degree. C. for prolonged periods of time, is achieved by reducing the oxygen level therein at the time of storage; in particular, by flushing the cells with an inert gas, and storing them in an aqueous solution which includes adenine, dextrose, mannitol, citrate ion, and dihydrogen phosphate ion, but no sodium chloride, in an oxygen-permeable container which is located in an oxygen-free environment containing oxygen-scavenging materials.

  12. Prolonged cold storage of red blood cells by oxygen removal and additive usage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitensky, M.W.; Yoshida, Tatsuro

    1998-08-04

    Prolonged cold storage of red blood cells by oxygen removal and additive usage. A cost-effective, 4 C storage procedure that preserves red cell quality and prolongs post-transfusion in vivo survival is described. The improved in vivo survival and the preservation of adenosine triphosphate levels, along with reduction in hemolysis and membrane vesicle production of red blood cells stored at 4 C for prolonged periods of time, is achieved by reducing the oxygen level therein at the time of storage; in particular, by flushing the cells with an inert gas, and storing them in an aqueous solution which includes adenine, dextrose, mannitol, citrate ion, and dihydrogen phosphate ion, but no sodium chloride, in an oxygen-permeable container which is located in an oxygen-free environment containing oxygen-scavenging materials. 8 figs.

  13. Red Wine and Beer Elevate Blood Pressure in Normotensive Men

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zilkens, Renate R; Burke, Valerie; Hodgson, Jonathan M; Barden, Anne; Beilin, Lawrence J; Puddey, Ian B

    2005-01-01

    .... This study aimed to determine whether red wine may improve vascular function and have less of an impact on blood pressure because of its high content of antioxidant vasodilator polyphenolic compounds...

  14. Restrictive versus liberal transfusion strategy for red blood cell transfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Lars B; Petersen, Marie W; Haase, Nicolai

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the benefit and harm of restrictive versus liberal transfusion strategies to guide red blood cell transfusions. DESIGN: Systematic review with meta-analyses and trial sequential analyses of randomised clinical trials. DATA SOURCES: Cochrane central register of controlled...... differences with 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS: 31 trials totalling 9813 randomised patients were included. The proportion of patients receiving red blood cells (relative risk 0.54, 95% confidence interval 0.47 to 0.63, 8923 patients, 24 trials) and the number of red blood cell units transfused (mean...... were associated with a reduction in the number of red blood cell units transfused and number of patients being transfused, but mortality, overall morbidity, and myocardial infarction seemed to be unaltered. Restrictive transfusion strategies are safe in most clinical settings. Liberal transfusion...

  15. Perioperative blood transfusion does not decrease survival after surgical treatment of spinal metastases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Caroline; Lönn, Lars; Morgen, Søren Schmidt

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess whether perioperative allogenic blood transfusions in patients undergoing surgical treatment for spinal metastases independently influence patient survival. METHODS: A retrospective study including 170 consecutive patients undergoing surgical treatment for spinal metastases...... in 2009 and 2010 at a tertiary referral center. Variables related to postoperative survival were all included in the same multivariable logistic regression analysis with either 3- or 12-month survival as the dependent variable. The independent variables were: transfusion of allogenic red blood cells, age...... at surgery, gender, preoperative hemoglobin, revised Tokuhashi score and no. of instrumented levels. RESULTS: Perioperative allogenic blood transfusion of 1-2 units was associated with increased 12-month survival [p = 0.049, odds ratio 2.619 (confidence interval 1.004-6.831)], but not with 3-month survival...

  16. Calcium in Red Blood Cells—A Perilous Balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Kaestner

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Ca2+ is a universal signalling molecule involved in regulating cell cycle and fate, metabolism and structural integrity, motility and volume. Like other cells, red blood cells (RBCs rely on Ca2+ dependent signalling during differentiation from precursor cells. Intracellular Ca2+ levels in the circulating human RBCs take part not only in controlling biophysical properties such as membrane composition, volume and rheological properties, but also physiological parameters such as metabolic activity, redox state and cell clearance. Extremely low basal permeability of the human RBC membrane to Ca2+ and a powerful Ca2+ pump maintains intracellular free Ca2+ levels between 30 and 60 nM, whereas blood plasma Ca2+ is approximately 1.8 mM. Thus, activation of Ca2+ uptake has an impressive impact on multiple processes in the cells rendering Ca2+ a master regulator in RBCs. Malfunction of Ca2+ transporters in human RBCs leads to excessive accumulation of Ca2+ within the cells. This is associated with a number of pathological states including sickle cell disease, thalassemia, phosphofructokinase deficiency and other forms of hereditary anaemia. Continuous progress in unravelling the molecular nature of Ca2+ transport pathways allows harnessing Ca2+ uptake, avoiding premature RBC clearance and thrombotic complications. This review summarizes our current knowledge of Ca2+ signalling in RBCs emphasizing the importance of this inorganic cation in RBC function and survival.

  17. The Microrheology of Red Blood Cell Suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Harry L.

    1968-01-01

    The general problem of microrheology is to predict the macroscopic flow properties of a material from a detailed description of the behavior of its constituent elements. This approach has been used to study suspensions of human red cells in plasma or Ringer's solution flowing steadily in rigid tubes 8–25 times the red cell diameter by observing individual cell motions under the microscope. The results have been compared with those previously obtained with model particles under similar conditions. In very dilute suspensions single red cells rotated in orbits similar to those of rigid discs at low flow rates, but, in common with model deformable particles, were observed to migrate away from the tube wall. Linear rouleaux of red cells rotated as rodlike particles and were flexible, bending during their rotational orbits in a manner similar to that of filaments of nylon or Dacron. Transparent concentrated suspensions were produced by preparing ghost cells reconstituted in biconcave form in plasma. In these, the motions of some unhemolyzed red cells were followed. The erythrocyte velocity profiles were blunted at concentrations above 20%; the cell paths were erratic because of frequent radial displacements, especially at the tube periphery, with the particles being markedly deformed and oriented parallel to the flow. Finally, the difference in flow pattern in large and small vessels is discussed and some relevant model experiments are described. PMID:19873628

  18. The Rh complex exports ammonium from human red blood cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemker, Mirte B.; Cheroutre, Goedele; van Zwieten, Rob; Maaskant-van Wijk, Petra A.; Roos, Dirk; Loos, Johannes A.; van der Schoot, C. Ellen; von dem Borne, Albert E. G. Kr

    2003-01-01

    The Rh blood group system represents a major immunodominant protein complex on red blood cells (RBC). Recently, the Rh homologues RhAG and RhCG were shown to promote ammonium ion transport in yeast. In this study, we showed that also in RBC the human Rh complex functions as an exporter of ammonium

  19. Bacterial glycosidases for the production of universal red blood cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Qiyong P; Sulzenbacher, Gerlind; Yuan, Huaiping

    2007-01-01

    Enzymatic removal of blood group ABO antigens to develop universal red blood cells (RBCs) was a pioneering vision originally proposed more than 25 years ago. Although the feasibility of this approach was demonstrated in clinical trials for group B RBCs, a major obstacle in translating this techno...

  20. Assessment of Red Blood Cell Parameters and Peripheral Smear at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cold agglutinins were first described by Landsteiner in. 1903.[1] Their pathological action against red blood cells (RBCs). (hemolytic anemia) and blood vessels (Raynaud's syndrome) was described some years later by Clough and Iwai.[2,3]. The association of cold hemagglutination with hemolysis was described in 1937 ...

  1. Risk of red blood cell alloimmunisation in Rwanda: Assessment of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Screening of alloantibodies in patients is not yet done in district hospitals of Rwanda. The practice is to transfuse ABO/D compatible blood following an immediate spin crossmatch (IS-XM) or indirect antiglobulin test crossmatch (IAT-XM). Objectives: To assess the risk of red blood cell (RBC) alloimmunisation ...

  2. Red blood cell alloimmunization in sickle cell disease patients in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Alloimmunization is a recognized complication of red blood cell (RBC) transfusion and causes delayed hemolytic transfusion reactions and provides problems sourcing compatible blood for future transfusions. The objective of this study was to determine the frequency of RBC alloimmunization in SCD patients in ...

  3. Frequency and specificity of red blood cell alloantibodies among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Blood transfusion usually results in production of alloantibody against one or more foreign red blood cell antigens which may complicate subsequent transfusions. The probability of alloimmunization depends on number and frequency of transfusion, antigen immunogenicity, recipient immune response and ...

  4. Single-cell measurement of red blood cell oxygen affinity

    CERN Document Server

    Caprio, Di; Higgins, John M; Schonbrun, Ethan

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen is transported throughout the body by hemoglobin in red blood cells. While the oxygen affinity of blood is well understood and is routinely assessed in patients by pulse oximetry, variability at the single-cell level has not been previously measured. In contrast, single-cell measurements of red blood cell volume and hemoglobin concentration are taken millions of times per day by clinical hematology analyzers and are important factors in determining the health of the hematologic system. To better understand the variability and determinants of oxygen affinity on a cellular level, we have developed a system that quantifies the oxygen saturation, cell volume and hemoglobin concentration for individual red blood cells in high-throughput. We find that the variability in single-cell saturation peaks at an oxygen partial pressure of 2.5%, which corresponds to the maximum slope of the oxygen-hemoglobin dissociation curve. In addition, single-cell oxygen affinity is positively correlated with hemoglobin concentr...

  5. Quantification of Depletion-Induced Adhesion of Red Blood Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, P.; Verdier, C.; Wagner, C.

    2013-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) are known to form aggregates in the form of rouleaux due to the presence of plasma proteins under physiological conditions. The formation of rouleaux can also be induced in vitro by the addition of macromolecules to the RBC suspension. Current data on the adhesion strength between red blood cells in their natural discocyte shapes mostly originate from indirect measurements such as flow chamber experiments, but data is lacking at the single cell level. Here, we present measurements on the dextran-induced aggregation of red blood cells using atomic force microscopy-based single cell force spectroscopy. The effects of dextran concentration and molecular weight on the interaction energy of adhering RBCs were determined. The results on adhesion energy are in excellent agreement with a model based on the depletion effect and previous experimental studies. Furthermore, our method allowed to determine the adhesion force, a quantity that is needed in theoretical investigations on blood flow.

  6. The homeostasis of Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob M A Mauritz

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The asexual reproduction cycle of Plasmodium falciparum, the parasite responsible for severe malaria, occurs within red blood cells. A merozoite invades a red cell in the circulation, develops and multiplies, and after about 48 hours ruptures the host cell, releasing 15-32 merozoites ready to invade new red blood cells. During this cycle, the parasite increases the host cell permeability so much that when similar permeabilization was simulated on uninfected red cells, lysis occurred before approximately 48 h. So how could infected cells, with a growing parasite inside, prevent lysis before the parasite has completed its developmental cycle? A mathematical model of the homeostasis of infected red cells suggested that it is the wasteful consumption of host cell hemoglobin that prevents early lysis by the progressive reduction in the colloid-osmotic pressure within the host (the colloid-osmotic hypothesis. However, two critical model predictions, that infected cells would swell to near prelytic sphericity and that the hemoglobin concentration would become progressively reduced, remained controversial. In this paper, we are able for the first time to correlate model predictions with recent experimental data in the literature and explore the fine details of the homeostasis of infected red blood cells during five model-defined periods of parasite development. The conclusions suggest that infected red cells do reach proximity to lytic rupture regardless of their actual volume, thus requiring a progressive reduction in their hemoglobin concentration to prevent premature lysis.

  7. Multiple imputation of missing blood pressure covariates in survival analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buuren, S. van; Boshuizen, H.C.; Knook, D.L.

    1999-01-01

    This paper studies a non-response problem in survival analysis where the occurrence of missing data in the risk factor is related to mortality. In a study to determine the influence of blood pressure on survival in the very old (85+ years), blood pressure measurements are missing in about 12.5 per

  8. Cryopreservation of Autologous Blood (Red Blood Cells, Platelets and Plasma)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebine, Kunio

    Prevention of post-transfusion hepatitis is still a problem in cardiovascular surgery. We initiated the cryopreservation of autologous blood for the transfusion in elective cardiovascular surgery since 1981. This study includes 152 surgical cases in which autologous frozen, allogeneic frozen, and/or allogeneic non-frozen blood were used. In the 152 surgical cases, there were 69 cases in which autologous blood only (Group I) was used; 12 cases with autologous and allogeneic frozen blood (Group II); 46 cases with autologous and allgeneic frozen plus allogeneic non-frozen blood (Group III); and 25 cases with allogeneic frozen plus allogeneic non-frozen blood (Group IV). No hepatitis developed in Groups I (0%) and II (0%), but there was positive hepatitis in Groups III (4.3%) and IV (8.0%) . In 357 cases of those who underwent surgery with allogeneic non-frozen whole blood during the same period, the incidence rate of hepatitis was 13.7% (49/357). Patients awaiting elective surgery can store their own blood in the frozen state. Patients who undergo surgery with the cryoautotransfusion will not produce any infections or immunologic reactions as opposed to those who undergo surgery with the allogeneic non-frozen blood.

  9. Spatial distributions of red blood cells significantly alter local haemodynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph M Sherwood

    Full Text Available Although bulk changes in red blood cell concentration between vessels have been well characterised, local distributions are generally overlooked. Red blood cells aggregate, deform and migrate within vessels, forming heterogeneous distributions which have considerable effect on local haemodynamics. The present study reports data on the local distribution of human red blood cells in a sequentially bifurcating microchannel, representing the branching geometry of the microvasculature. Imaging methodologies with simple extrapolations are used to infer three dimensional, time-averaged velocity and haematocrit distributions under a range of flow conditions. Strong correlation between the bluntness of the velocity and haematocrit profiles in the parent branch of the geometry is observed and red blood cell aggregation has a notable effect on the observed trends. The two branches of the first bifurcation show similar characteristics in terms of the shapes of the profiles and the extent of plasma skimming, despite the difference in geometric configuration. In the second bifurcation, considerable asymmetry between the branches in the plasma skimming relationship is observed, and elucidated by considering individual haematocrit profiles. The results of the study highlight the importance of considering local haematocrit distributions in the analysis of blood flow and could lead to more accurate computational models of blood flow in microvascular networks. The experimental approaches developed in this work provide a foundation for further examining the characteristics of microhaemodynamics.

  10. Natural Antioxidants Improve Red Blood Cell “Survival” in Non-Leukoreduced Blood Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliya V Kucherenko

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Blood collected in an anticoagulant can be kept refrigerated in an unmodified state within 5 - 6 weeks. Oxidative damage is considered to be a one of the major factors contributing to the development of storage lesions. Lipid and membrane proteins oxidation results in changes in cation gradients that affect the cell survival. Aim: In the present study we used the natural antioxidants and ion channels blockers (L-carnosine, spermine, phloretin and their mixtures to prolong “survival” of red blood cells (RBCs, measured as the lack of PS exposure and cell hemolysis, in the Alsever's preservative solution upon hypothermic storage. Results: We show that the mixture of carnosine (20 mM, spermine (20 µM and phloretin (100 µM effectively blunted phosphatidylserine (PS exposure, Ca2+ accumulation and RBCs hemolysis in non-leukoreduced low (∼2% hematocrit samples after 36 days of storage as well as after 1 day of post-storage incubation of the stored cells in physiological saline solution. In addition, a slight but significant decrease in PS exposure was observed in non-leukoreduced high (∼20% hematocrit samples after 36 days of storage with the mixture of substances. Conclusion: We conclude that the use of the mixture of natural antioxidants (carnosine, spermine, and phloretin as an additive to blood preservative solution provides better RBCs storage and “survival”.

  11. Restrictive versus liberal transfusion strategy for red blood cell transfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Lars B; Petersen, Marie W; Haase, Nicolai

    2015-01-01

    titles and abstracts of trials identified, and relevant trials were evaluated in full text for eligibility. Two reviewers then independently extracted data on methods, interventions, outcomes, and risk of bias from included trials. random effects models were used to estimate risk ratios and mean...... differences with 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS: 31 trials totalling 9813 randomised patients were included. The proportion of patients receiving red blood cells (relative risk 0.54, 95% confidence interval 0.47 to 0.63, 8923 patients, 24 trials) and the number of red blood cell units transfused (mean...... were associated with a reduction in the number of red blood cell units transfused and number of patients being transfused, but mortality, overall morbidity, and myocardial infarction seemed to be unaltered. Restrictive transfusion strategies are safe in most clinical settings. Liberal transfusion...

  12. Quantification of depletion-induced adhesion of Red Blood Cells

    CERN Document Server

    Steffen, Patrick; Wagner, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBC) are known to form aggregates in the forms of rouleaux due to the presence of plasma proteins under physiological conditions. Rouleaux formation can be also induced in vitro by the addition of macromolecules to the RBC solution. Current data on the adhesion strength between red blood cells in their natural discocyte shapes mostly rely on indirect measurements like flow chamber experiments, but on the single cell level data is lacking. Here we present measurements on the dextran induced aggregation of red blood cells by use of atomic force microscopy based single cell force spectroscopy (SCFS). The effects of dextran concentration and molecular weight on the interaction energy of adhering RBCs was determined. The results are in good agreement with a model based on the depletion effect and former experimental studies.

  13. Screening for hemosiderosis in patients receiving multiple red blood cell transfusions

    OpenAIRE

    de Jongh, Adriaan D; van Beers, E J; de Vooght, K M K; Schutgens, R E G

    2017-01-01

    Background: The dramatic impact of hemosiderosis on survival in chronically transfused patients with hereditary anemia is well known. We evaluated whether patients receiving multiple red blood cell (RBC) transfusions are adequately screened for hemosiderosis. Methods: We retrospectively assessed hemosiderosis screening and prevalence in adult patients that received over twenty RBC units in the University Medical Centre Utrecht from 2010 till 2015. Hemosiderosis was defined as ferritin ≥1000 μ...

  14. Salidroside as a Novel Protective Agent to Improve Red Blood Cell Cryopreservation

    OpenAIRE

    Alotaibi, Noha A. S.; Slater, Nigel K. H.; Rahmoune, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Glycerol and trehalose have been widely examined as protective agents in the cryopreservation of red blood cells (RBCs). However, the effectiveness of these reagents alone on cell viability is moderate. Here, the addition of salidroside attenuated oxidative damage of sheep RBCs prior to and post cryostorage. The supplementation of salidroside to the cryopreservation media containing 10% glycerol improved RBC survival by approximately 61.1?4.8% vs 37.9?4.6%. A smaller effect was seen in RBCs c...

  15. Effect on osmotic fragility of red blood cells of whole blood submitted ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Whole body vibration (WBV) exercises in oscillating platforms (OP) have emerged in sports and in the rehabilitation procedures of clinical disorders. The aim of this work was to verify the effects of vibrations on the osmotic fragility (OF) of red blood cells (RBC) isolated from whole blood submitted to OP. Heparinized blood ...

  16. Backward elastic light scattering of malaria infected red blood cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seungjun; Lu, Wei

    2011-08-01

    We investigated the backward light scattering pattern of healthy and malaria (Plasmodium falciparum) parasitized red blood cells. The spectrum could clearly distinguish between predominant ring stage infected blood cells and healthy blood cells. Further, we found that infected samples mixed with different stages of P. falciparum showed different signals, suggesting that even variance in parasite stages could also be detected by the spectrum. These results together with the backward scattering technique suggest the potential of non-invasive diagnosis of malaria through light scattering of blood cells near the surface of human body, such as using eyes or skin surface.

  17. Red blood cell and iron metabolism during space flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Scott M.

    2002-01-01

    Space flight anemia is a widely recognized phenomenon in astronauts. Reduction in circulating red blood cells and plasma volume results in a 10% to 15% decrement in circulatory volume. This effect appears to be a normal physiologic adaptation to weightlessness and results from the removal of newly released blood cells from the circulation. Iron availability increases, and (in the few subjects studied) iron stores increase during long-duration space flight. The consequences of these changes are not fully understood.

  18. In-vitro red blood cell partitioning of doxycycline

    OpenAIRE

    P.V. Deshmukh; Badgujar, P.C.; Gatne, M. M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: In-vitro red blood cell (RBC) partitioning of doxycycline was studied to determine whether doxycycline penetrates RBC and its concentration was assayed keeping in view its high lipophilicity. Materials and Methods: Standardization of doxycycline was performed in whole blood and plasma of cattle by microbiological assay using Bacillus subtillis ATCC 6633 as indicator organizm. Actual concentration of the drug was obtained by comparing zone inhibition with standard graph and the exte...

  19. Allogeneic red blood cell transfusions: efficacy, risks, alternatives and indications

    OpenAIRE

    Madjdpour, C.; Spahn, D. R.

    2017-01-01

    Careful assessment of risks and benefits has to precede each decision on allogeneic red blood cell (RBC) transfusion. Currently, a number of key issues in transfusion medicine are highly controversial, most importantly the influence of different transfusion thresholds on clinical outcome. The aim of this article is to review current evidence on blood transfusions, to highlight ‘hot topics' with respect to efficacy, outcome and risks, and to provide the reader with transfusion guidelines. In a...

  20. Manipulation of microparticles and red blood cells using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-02-13

    Feb 13, 2014 ... set-up was used to manipulate the polystyrene microspheres and red blood cells (RBCs). The RBCs could be attracted or repelled by varying the frequency of the applied AC bias. Keywords. Optoelectronic tweezers; optically-induced dielectrophoresis; AC dielectrophoresis. PACS Nos 87.80.Cc; 87.80.Fe.

  1. Shape of red blood cells in contact with artificial surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzhibovskis, Richards; Krämer, Elisabeth; Bernhardt, Ingolf; Kemper, Björn; Zanden, Carl; Repin, Nikolay V; Tkachuk, Bogdan V; Voinova, Marina V

    2017-03-01

    The phenomenon of physical contact between red blood cells and artificial surfaces is considered. A fully three-dimensional mathematical model of a bilayer membrane in contact with an artificial surface is presented. Numerical results for the different geometries and adhesion intensities are found to be in agreement with experimentally observed geometries obtained by means of digital holographic microscopy.

  2. Challenges for red blood cell biomarker discovery through proteomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barasa, B.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/341538353; Slijper, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/146303989

    2014-01-01

    Red blood cells are rather unique body cells, since they have lost all organelles when mature, which results in lack of potential to replace proteins that have lost their function. They maintain only a few pathways for obtaining energy and reducing power for the key functions they need to fulfill.

  3. Red blood cell antibodies in pregnancy and their clinical consequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordvall, Maria; Dziegiel, Morten Hanefeld; Hegaard, Hanne Kristine

    2009-01-01

    The objective was to determine clinical consequences of various specificities for the infant/fetus. The population was patients referred between 1998 and 2005 to the tertiary center because of detected red blood cell (RBC) alloimmunization. Altogether 455 infants were delivered by 390 alloimmunized...

  4. The effects of cryopreservation on red blood cell rheologic properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henkelman, Sandra; Lagerberg, Johan W. M.; Graaff, Reindert; Rakhorst, Gerhard; van Oeveren, Willem

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In transfusion medicine, frozen red blood cells (RBCs) are an alternative for liquid-stored RBCs. Little is known about the rheologic properties (i.e., aggregability and deformability) of thawed RBCs. In this study the rheologic properties of high-glycerol frozen RBCs and postthaw stored

  5. Micronuclei in red blood cells of armored catfish Hypostomus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present work aims to evaluate the impact of potassium dichromate in armored catfishes' (Hypostomus plecotomus) erythropoiesis, using piscine micronucleus test. Armored catfishes (n = 30) were subjected to 12 mg/L of potassium dichromate, with an equal control group (n = 30). For each 2,000 red blood cells of ...

  6. Red Blood Cell Parameters as Indices of Susceptibility to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The anaemia recorded in infected cattle by 38 days post-infection (pi) was mildest in WF and most severe in SG. It was concluded that low red blood cell values (PCV, Hb and RBC) are some of the markers that are consistently associated with susceptibility of cattle to trypanosomosis. Of the three cattle breeds studied, the ...

  7. Alterations of red blood cell metabolome in overhydrated hereditary stomatocytosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Darghouth, D.; Koehl, B.; Heilier, J.F.; Madalinski, G.; Bovee, P.H.; Bosman, G.J.C.G.M.; Delaunay, J.; Junot, C.; Romeo, P.H.

    2011-01-01

    Overhydrated hereditary stomatocytosis, clinically characterized by hemolytic anemia, is a rare disorder of the erythrocyte membrane permeability to monovalent cations, associated with mutations in the Rh-associated glycoprotein gene. We assessed the red blood cell metabolome of 4 patients with this

  8. Red blood cell transfusion during septic shock in the ICU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perner, A; Smith, S H; Carlsen, S

    2012-01-01

    Transfusion of red blood cells (RBCs) remains controversial in patients with septic shock, but current practice is unknown. Our aim was to evaluate RBC transfusion practice in septic shock in the intensive care unit (ICU), and patient characteristics and outcome associated with RBC transfusion....

  9. Assessment of Red Blood Cell Parameters and Peripheral Smear at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cold agglutination disease (CAD) is characterized by an auto‑antibody which is able to agglutinate red blood cells (RBCs) at temperatures lower than that of the body, and subsequently to activate the complement system responsible for lysis of RBCs. Patients show hemolytic anemia of varying degrees of severity, which ...

  10. Red blood cells aligning inside innovative liquid crystal cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likhomanova, S. V.; Kamanin, A. A.; Kamanina, N. V.

    2017-11-01

    Investigation results of red blood cells (human erythrocytes) aligning and fixing inside the liquid crystal (LC) cell have been presented in the present paper. LC cells have been modified through the improved nanostructured relief and LC sensitized with intermolecular charge transfer complex COANP-C70.

  11. Evaluation of red blood cell stability during immersion blood warming

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Temperature increase within the blood unit being warmed by immersion in warm water is non-uniform, with the outer part showing the largest temperature increases. This was examined at waterbath temperatures of 45°C and 47°C and represented graphically. Temperature decrease in a stainless steel bucket filled with 10 ...

  12. Clearance of stored red blood cells is not increased compared with fresh red blood cells in a human endotoxemia model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, Anna L.; Beuger, Boukje; Mock, Donald M.; Widness, John A.; de Korte, Dirk; Juffermans, Nicole P.; Vlaar, Alexander P. J.; van Bruggen, Robin

    2016-01-01

    It is thought that the clearance of transfused red blood cells (RBCs) is related both to the storage time of the transfusion product and to the inflammatory status of the recipient. We investigated these effects in a randomized, "two-hit," healthy volunteer transfusion model, comparing autologous

  13. Red blood cells: The primary reservoir of macrophage migration inhibitory factor in whole blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsten, Elisabeth; Hill, Cameron J; Herbert, Benjamin R

    2017-12-21

    Red blood cells are widely accepted to be inert carriers of oxygen and haemoglobin, but there is growing evidence that they play a much more critical role in immune function. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a key cytokine in disease with additional oxido-reductase activity, which aids in managing oxidative stress. Although two studies have reported the presence of MIF in red blood cells, no study has quantified the levels of this protein. In this study, freshly isolated plasma, platelets, leukocytes, and red blood cells from healthy individuals were collected and the concentration of MIF was determined using an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. This analysis demonstrated that MIF in red blood cells was present at 25 µg per millilitre of whole blood, which is greater than99% of the total MIF and 1000-fold higher concentration than plasma. This result was supported by electrophoresis and Western blot analysis, which identified MIF in its monomer structural form following sample processing. Furthermore, by assessing the level of tautomerase activity in red blood cell fractions in the presence of a MIF inhibitor, it was determined that the red blood cell-derived MIF was also functionally active. Together, these findings have implications on the effect of haemolysis during sample preparation and provide some clue into the inflammatory processes that occur following haemolysis in vivo. These results support the hypothesis that red blood cells are a major reservoir of this inflammatory protein and may play a role in inflammation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Radiolabeled red blood cells: status, problems, and prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1983-01-01

    Radionuclidic labels for red cells can be divided into two main categories - cohort or pulse labels, and random labels. The random labels are incorporated into circulating cells of all ages and the labeling process is usually carried out in vitro. The red cell labels in predominant use involve random labeling and employ technetium-99m, chromium-51, indium-111, and gallium-68, roughly in that order. The extent of usefulness depends on the properties of the label such as the half-life, decay mode, and in-vivo stability, etc. Labeled cells can be used for red cell survival measurements when the half-life of the radionuclide is sufficiently long. The major portion of this article deals with random labels.

  15. Chaotic Dynamics of Red Blood Cells in a Sinusoidal Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupire, Jules; Abkarian, Manouk; Viallat, Annie

    2010-04-01

    We show that the motion of individual red blood cells in an oscillating moderate shear flow is described by a nonlinear system of three coupled oscillators. Our experiments reveal that the cell tank treads and tumbles either in a stable way with synchronized cell inclination, membrane rotation and hydrodynamic oscillations, or in an irregular way, very sensitively to initial conditions. By adapting our model described previously, we determine the theoretical diagram for the red cell motion in a sinusoidal flow close to physiological shear stresses and flow variation frequencies and reveal large domains of chaotic motions. Finally, fitting our observations allows a characterization of cell viscosity and membrane elasticity.

  16. Partitioning of red blood cell aggregates in bifurcating microscale flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaliviotis, E.; Sherwood, J. M.; Balabani, S.

    2017-03-01

    Microvascular flows are often considered to be free of red blood cell aggregates, however, recent studies have demonstrated that aggregates are present throughout the microvasculature, affecting cell distribution and blood perfusion. This work reports on the spatial distribution of red blood cell aggregates in a T-shaped bifurcation on the scale of a large microvessel. Non-aggregating and aggregating human red blood cell suspensions were studied for a range of flow splits in the daughter branches of the bifurcation. Aggregate sizes were determined using image processing. The mean aggregate size was marginally increased in the daughter branches for a range of flow rates, mainly due to the lower shear conditions and the close cell and aggregate proximity therein. A counterintuitive decrease in the mean aggregate size was apparent in the lower flow rate branches. This was attributed to the existence of regions depleted by aggregates of certain sizes in the parent branch, and to the change in the exact flow split location in the T-junction with flow ratio. The findings of the present investigation may have significant implications for microvascular flows and may help explain why the effects of physiological RBC aggregation are not deleterious in terms of in vivo vascular resistance.

  17. ABO blood group and breast cancer incidence and survival

    OpenAIRE

    Gates, Margaret A.; Xu, Mousheng; Chen, Wendy Y.; Kraft, Peter; Hankinson, Susan E.; Wolpin, Brian M.

    2012-01-01

    ABO blood type has been associated with risk and survival for several malignancies; however, data for an association with breast cancer are inconsistent. Our study population consisted of Nurses’ Health Study participants with self-reported serologic blood type and/or ABO genotype. Using Cox proportional hazards regression, we examined the association between serologic blood type and incident breast cancer among 67,697 women, including 3,107 cases. In addition, we examined the association wit...

  18. Lysis of red blood cells by extracts from benthic dinoflagellates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escalona de Motta, G; Rodríguez-Costas, I; Tosteson, T R; Ballantine, D L; Durst, H D

    1986-12-01

    Samples of the cultured benthic dinoflagellates Gambierdiscus toxicus and Ostreopsis lenticularis, both isolated from a shallow back reef habitat in southwestern Puerto Rico, were extracted in methanol, dried and resuspended in distilled water. After centrifugation, aliquots of the supernatant, or dilutions thereof, were added to suspensions of washed human and mouse red blood cells and incubated at different temperatures for different time periods. Further spectrophotometrical examinations of the samples showed a hemolytic activity against mouse and human red blood cells. The hemolytic activity of G. toxicus extract was 3 to 4 times greater than that of O. lenticularis and was less temperature-dependent. Such findings suggest that these two dinoflagellates produce chemically different hemolysins.

  19. Macromolecular Dynamics in Red Blood Cells Investigated Using Neutron Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Stadler, Andreas Maximilian; Demmel, Franz; Artmann, Gerhard; 10.1098/rsif.2010.0306

    2011-01-01

    We present neutron scattering measurements on the dynamics of hemoglobin (Hb) in human red blood cells in vivo. Global and internal Hb dynamics were measured in the ps to ns time- and {\\AA} length-scale using quasielastic neutron backscattering spectroscopy. We observed the cross-over from global Hb short-time to long-time self-diffusion. Both short- and long-time diffusion coefficients agree quantitatively with predicted values from hydrodynamic theory of non-charged hard-sphere suspensions when a bound water fraction of around 0.23g H2O/ g Hb is taken into account. The higher amount of water in the cells facilitates internal protein fluctuations in the ps time-scale when compared to fully hydrated Hb powder. Slower internal dynamics of Hb in red blood cells in the ns time-range were found to be rather similar to results obtained with fully hydrated protein powders, solutions and E. coli cells.

  20. Aggregation of red blood cells: From rouleaux to clot formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Christian; Steffen, Patrick; Svetina, Saša

    2013-06-01

    Red blood cells are known to form aggregates in the form of rouleaux. This aggregation process is believed to be reversible, but there is still no full understanding on the adhesion mechanism. There are at least two competing models, based either on bridging or on depletion. We review recent experimental results on the single cell level and theoretical analyses of the depletion model and of the influence of the cell shape on the adhesion strength. Another important aggregation mechanism is caused by activation of platelets. This leads to clot formation which is life-saving in the case of wound healing, but also a major cause of death in the case of a thrombus induced stroke. We review historical and recent results on the participation of red blood cells in clot formation.

  1. Magnetic nanoparticle effects on the red blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creanga, D E; Nadejde, C; Curecheriu, L [' Al. I. Cuza' University, Faculty of Physics, 11A Blvd. Carol I, Iasi (Romania)], E-mail: dorinacreanga@yahoo.com; Culea, M [' Babes Bolyai' University, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Oancea, S [University of Veterinary Medicine ' I. Ionescu de la Brad' , Iasi (Romania); Racuciu, M [' Lucian Blaga' University, Sibiu (Romania)

    2009-05-01

    In vitro tests on magnetite colloidal nanoparticles effects upon animal red blood cells were carried out. Magnetite cores were stabilized with citric acid in the form of biocompatible magnetic fluid administrated in different dilutions in the whole blood samples. The hemolysis extent was found increased up to 2.75 in horse blood and respectively up to 2.81 in the dog blood. The electronic transitions assigned to the heme group were found shifted with about 500 cm{sup -1} or, respectively, affected by supplementary vibronic structures. The Raman vibrations assigned to oxyhemoglobin were much diminished in intensity probably due to the bonding of OH group from citrate shell to the heme iron ion.

  2. Magnetic nanoparticle effects on the red blood cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creangă, D. E.; Culea, M.; Nădejde, C.; Oancea, S.; Curecheriu, L.; Racuciu, M.

    2009-05-01

    In vitro tests on magnetite colloidal nanoparticles effects upon animal red blood cells were carried out. Magnetite cores were stabilized with citric acid in the form of biocompatible magnetic fluid administrated in different dilutions in the whole blood samples. The hemolysis extent was found increased up to 2.75 in horse blood and respectively up to 2.81 in the dog blood. The electronic transitions assigned to the heme group were found shifted with about 500 cm-1 or, respectively, affected by supplementary vibronic structures. The Raman vibrations assigned to oxyhemoglobin were much diminished in intensity probably due to the bonding of OH group from citrate shell to the heme iron ion.

  3. Red Blood Cell Membranes in Donors of Different Age Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Moroz

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes an electroporation technique in order to evaluate its action on a biological membrane in donors of different age groups. It is shown that the older the donor is, the higher the rate of hemolysis is. Thus, owing to its simplicity, the electroporation technique may be clinically tested to diagnose the status of red blood cell membranes in subjects from different age groups for further studies.

  4. Differences in survival associated with processed and with nonprocessed red meat consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellavia, Andrea; Larsson, Susanna C; Bottai, Matteo; Wolk, Alicja; Orsini, Nicola

    2014-09-01

    High red meat consumption is associated with an increased mortality risk. This association is partly explained by the negative effect of processed meat consumption, which is widely established. The role of nonprocessed meat is unclear. The objective was to examine the combined association of processed and nonprocessed meat consumption with survival in a Swedish large prospective cohort. In a population-based cohort of 74,645 Swedish men (40,089) and women (34,556), red meat consumption was assessed through a self-administered questionnaire. We estimated differences in survival [15th percentile differences (PDs), differences in the time by which the first 15% of the cohort died] according to levels of total red meat and combined levels of processed and nonprocessed red meat consumption. During 15 y of follow-up (January 1998 to December 2012), we documented 16,683 deaths (6948 women; 9735 men). Compared with no consumption, consumption of red meat >100 g/d was progressively associated with shorter survival--up to 2 y for participants consuming an average of 300 g/d (15th PD: -21 mo; 95% CI: -31, -10). Compared with no consumption, high consumption of processed red meat (100 g/d) was associated with shorter survival (15th PD: -9 mo; 95% CI: -16, -2). High and moderate intakes of nonprocessed red meat were associated with shorter survival only when accompanied by a high intake of processed red meat. We found that high total red meat consumption was associated with progressively shorter survival, largely because of the consumption of processed red meat. Consumption of nonprocessed red meat alone was not associated with shorter survival. © 2014 American Society for Nutrition.

  5. Utilization and quality of cryopreserved red blood cells in transfusion medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henkelman, S.; Noorman, F.; Badloe, J. F.; Lagerberg, J. W. M.

    Cryopreserved (frozen) red blood cells have been used in transfusion medicine since the Vietnam war. The main method to freeze the red blood cells is by usage of glycerol. Although the usage of cryopreserved red blood cells was promising due to the prolonged storage time and the limited cellular

  6. The impact of storage on red cell function in blood transfusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Almac, Emre; Ince, Can

    2007-01-01

    Despite the common use of red-blood-cell transfusions in clinical practice, actual beneficial effects of red blood cells have never been demonstrated. On the contrary, several studies suggest that red-blood-cell transfusions are associated with higher risks of morbidity and mortality. The effects of

  7. Net haemoglobin increase from reinfusion of refrigerated vs. frozen red blood cells after autologous blood transfusions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashenden, M; Mørkeberg, Jakob Sehested

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES  Two main blood storage procedures can be used for storing red blood cells: refrigeration and freezing. Nevertheless, the efficiency of these procedures measured as the increase in haemoglobin after reinfusion compared with baseline has never been examined. The main...... objective was to examine which storage procedure yielded the largest increase in circulating haemoglobin after reinfusion compared to baseline. MATERIALS AND METHODS  Equal volumes of blood from 15 men were withdrawn and stored either frozen or refrigerated as packed red blood cells. Serial measures...... freezing. Nevertheless, frozen storage allowed haemoglobin to fully recover before reinfusion, while the haemoglobin was 10% lower in the refrigerated group compared with baseline. After reinfusion, the haemoglobin levels were 11·5% higher than the baseline values in the group reinfused with frozen blood...

  8. Metabolic pathways that correlate with post-transfusion circulation of stored murine red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wolski, Karen; Fu, Xiaoyoun; Dumont, Larry J; Roback, John D; Waterman, Hayley; Odem-Davis, Katherine; Howie, Heather L; Zimring, James C

    2016-05-01

    Transfusion of red blood cells is a very common inpatient procedure, with more than 1 in 70 people in the USA receiving a red blood cell transfusion annually. However, stored red blood cells are a non-uniform product, based upon donor-to-donor variation in red blood cell storage biology. While thousands of biological parameters change in red blood cells over storage, it has remained unclear which changes correlate with function of the red blood cells, as opposed to being co-incidental changes. In the current report, a murine model of red blood cell storage/transfusion is applied across 13 genetically distinct mouse strains and combined with high resolution metabolomics to identify metabolic changes that correlated with red blood cell circulation post storage. Oxidation in general, and peroxidation of lipids in particular, emerged as changes that correlated with extreme statistical significance, including generation of dicarboxylic acids and monohydroxy fatty acids. In addition, differences in anti-oxidant pathways known to regulate oxidative stress on lipid membranes were identified. Finally, metabolites were identified that differed at the time the blood was harvested, and predict how the red blood cells perform after storage, allowing the potential to screen donors at time of collection. Together, these findings map out a new landscape in understanding metabolic changes during red blood cell storage as they relate to red blood cell circulation. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  9. Image-based red cell counting for wild animals blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauricio, Claudio R M; Schneider, Fabio K; Dos Santos, Leonilda Correia

    2010-01-01

    An image-based red blood cell (RBC) automatic counting system is presented for wild animals blood analysis. Images with 2048×1536-pixel resolution acquired on an optical microscope using Neubauer chambers are used to evaluate RBC counting for three animal species (Leopardus pardalis, Cebus apella and Nasua nasua) and the error found using the proposed method is similar to that obtained for inter observer visual counting method, i.e., around 10%. Smaller errors (e.g., 3%) can be obtained in regions with less grid artifacts. These promising results allow the use of the proposed method either as a complete automatic counting tool in laboratories for wild animal's blood analysis or as a first counting stage in a semi-automatic counting tool.

  10. Depletion induced clustering of red blood cells in microchannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Christian; Brust, Mathias; Podgorski, Thomas; Coupier, Gwennou

    2012-11-01

    The flow properties of blood are determined by the physical properties of its main constituents, the red blood cells (RBC's). At low shear rates RBC's form aggregates, so called rouleaux. Higher shear rates can break them up and the viscosity of blood shows a shear thinning behavior. The physical origin of the rouleaux formation is not yet fully resolved and there are two competing models available. One predicts that the adhesion is induced by bridging of the plasma (macromolecular) proteins in-between two RBC's. The other is based on the depletion effect and thus predicts the absence of macromolecules in-between the cells of a rouleaux. Recent single cell force measurements by use of an AFM support strongly the depletion model. By varying the concentration of Dextran at different molecular weights we can control the adhesions strength. Measurements at low hematocrit in a microfluidic channel show that the number of size of clusters is determined by the depletion induced adhesion strength.

  11. Red blood cell transfusion for people undergoing hip fracture surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunskill, Susan J; Millette, Sarah L; Shokoohi, Ali; Pulford, E C; Doree, Carolyn; Murphy, Michael F; Stanworth, Simon

    2015-04-21

    The incidence of hip fracture is increasing and it is more common with increasing age. Surgery is used for almost all hip fractures. Blood loss occurs as a consequence of both the fracture and the surgery and thus red blood cell transfusion is frequently used. However, red blood cell transfusion is not without risks. Therefore, it is important to identify the evidence for the effective and safe use of red blood cell transfusion in people with hip fracture. To assess the effects (benefits and harms) of red blood cell transfusion in people undergoing surgery for hip fracture. We searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Specialised Register (31 October 2014), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library, 2014, Issue 10), MEDLINE (January 1946 to 20 November 2014), EMBASE (January 1974 to 20 November 2014), CINAHL (January 1982 to 20 November 2014), British Nursing Index Database (January 1992 to 20 November 2014), the Systematic Review Initiative's Transfusion Evidence Library, PubMed for e-publications, various other databases and ongoing trial registers. Randomised controlled trials comparing red blood cell transfusion versus no transfusion or an alternative to transfusion, different transfusion protocols or different transfusion thresholds in people undergoing surgery for hip fracture. Three review authors independently assessed each study's risk of bias and extracted data using a study-specific form. We pooled data where there was homogeneity in the trial comparisons and the timing of outcome measurement. We used GRADE criteria to assess the quality (low, moderate or high) of the evidence for each outcome. We included six trials (2722 participants): all compared two thresholds for red blood cell transfusion: a 'liberal' strategy to maintain a haemoglobin concentration of usually 10 g/dL versus a more 'restrictive' strategy based on symptoms of anaemia or a lower haemoglobin concentration, usually 8 g/dL. The exact

  12. Plasma-depleted versus red cell-reduced umbilical cord blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Wise

    2014-01-01

    Umbilical cord blood banks use two methods to store frozen umbilical cord blood (UCB): red cell reduction (RCR) or plasma depletion (PD). The RCR method centrifuges cord blood in hetastarch or albumin to isolate 21 ml of cord blood containing mostly white blood cells, adds 4 ml of 50% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), and then freezes the resulting 25 ml of cell suspension. The PD method removes plasma, saves all the cells, and freezes the cells in 10% DMSO. PD UCB units are cheaper to process but more expensive to store and somewhat more troublesome to thaw. However, when properly thawed and washed, PD UCB units have as many or more total nucleated cells (TNCs), CD34(+) cells, and colony-forming units (CFU) than RCR units. Two studies suggest that PD units have 20-25% more TNCs, MNCs, and CD34(+) cells, as well as two to three times more CFU than RCR units. Higher TNC, CD34(+), and CFU counts predict engraftment rate with faster neutrophil and platelet recovery. PD units have high engraftment rates with low mortality and high disease-free survival, comparable with clinical results of treatments with RCR units. One recent series of studies suggests that PD units are more effective for treating thalassemia with 2-year survival rates of 88%, disease-free survival rates of 74%, and 100% cure rate for children under age 7, compared to only 61% overall survival and 23% disease-free survival rate in thalassemic children treated with RCR units. These findings suggest that PD units not only have more TNCs, CD34(+) cells, and CFU than RCR units but also have high engraftment rates and may be more effective for treating certain conditions such as β-thalassemia.

  13. Red Wine Polyphenols Do Not Lower Peripheral or Central Blood Pressure in High Normal Blood Pressure and Hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botden, Ilse P. G.; Draijer, Richard; Westerhof, Berend E.; Rutten, Joost H. W.; Langendonk, Janneke G.; Sijbrands, Eric J. G.; Danser, A. H. Jan; Zock, Peter L.; van den Meiracker, Anton H.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Epidemiological data suggest that modest red wine consumption may reduce cardiovascular disease risk. Red wine polyphenols improved human endothelial vascular function and reduced blood pressure (BP) in animal studies, but the results of human intervention studies investigating the effect

  14. Impact of acute blood loss anemia and red blood cell transfusion on mortality after percutaneous coronary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Peter; Dixon, Simon; Eisenbrey, A Bradley; O'Malley, Barbara; Boura, Judy; O'Neill, William

    2007-10-01

    The clinical impact of increasing levels of blood loss has been shown to increase morbidity and mortality after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). The impact of red blood cell (RBC) transfusion for severe bleeding is unknown. We systematically collected baseline and 8-h postprocedure hematocrit (HCT) values on patients undergoing PCI. The incidence of adverse events, including death and recurrent myocardial infarction, was correlated to increasing blood loss. A total of 6,799 patients undergoing PCI (January 2000 to April 2002) had serial HCT levels. Negligible, mild, moderate, and severe blood loss occurred in 43, 25, 25, and 8% of patients, respectively. In-hospital mortality was 0.3, 0.5, 1.4, and 5.7% (p 35 days old had significantly worse 1-year survival rates compared with patients receiving blood <35 days old and patients not transfused (36 vs. 24 vs. 10%, p < 0.0001). In a general PCI population, increasing levels of blood loss are associated with an increased incidence of major adverse cardiac events and in-hospital mortality. RBC transfusion in the setting of severe bleeding is associated with an increased risk of 1-year mortality. Transfusion of aged RBCs may also be detrimental in this setting.

  15. ABO blood group and breast cancer incidence and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Margaret A; Xu, Mousheng; Chen, Wendy Y; Kraft, Peter; Hankinson, Susan E; Wolpin, Brian M

    2012-05-01

    ABO blood type has been associated with risk and survival for several malignancies; however, data for an association with breast cancer are inconsistent. Our study population consisted of Nurses' Health Study participants with self-reported serologic blood type and/or ABO genotype. Using Cox proportional hazards regression, we examined the association between serologic blood type and incident breast cancer among 67,697 women, including 3,107 cases. In addition, we examined the association with ABO genotype in a nested case-control study of 1,138 invasive breast cancer cases and 1,090 matched controls. Finally, we evaluated the association between serologic blood type and survival among 2,036 participants with breast cancer. No clear association was seen between serologic blood type or ABO genotype and risk of total breast cancer, invasive breast cancer or breast cancer subtypes. Compared to women with blood type O, the age-adjusted incidence rate ratios for serologic blood type and total breast cancer were 1.06 (95% CI, 0.98-1.15) for type A, 1.06 (95% CI, 0.93-1.22) for AB and 1.08 (95% CI, 0.96-1.20) for B. In genetic analyses, odds ratios for invasive breast cancer were 1.05 (95% CI, 0.87-1.27) for A/O, 1.21 (95% CI, 0.86-1.69) for A/A, 0.84 (95% CI, 0.56-1.26) for A/B, 0.84 (95% CI, 0.63-1.13) for B/O and 1.17 (95% CI, 0.35-3.86) for B/B, compared to O/O. No significant association was noted between blood type and overall or breast cancer-specific mortality. Our results suggest no association between ABO blood group and breast cancer risk or survival. Copyright © 2011 UICC.

  16. Red blood cell phenotype prevalence in blood donors who self-identify as Hispanic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sheppard, Chelsea A; Bolen, Nicole L; Eades, Beth

    2017-01-01

    CONCLUSIONS: Molecular genotyping platforms provide a quick, high-throughput method for identifying red blood cell units for patients on extended phenotype-matching protocols, such as those with sickle cell disease or thalassemia. Most of the antigen prevalence data reported are for non-Hispanic ...

  17. The evaluation of interaction between red blood cells in blood coagulation by optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bor-Wen; Mu, Yu-Hong; Huang, Kui-Teng; Li, Zhe; Wu, Jie-Lung; Lin, Yu-An

    2010-09-01

    To maintain the life of patients with hemophilia, apoplexy or hemorrhage, appropriate blood coagulation is crucial. To study the microscopic phenomena of blood coagulation and the therapeutic effects of blood medication, optical tweezers were applied to estimate the interaction between red blood cells in the coagulation process. By measuring minimum optical power required to trap the coagulating blood cells, the pN-scale interaction between them can be evaluated. In normal blood sample, the interaction rises in accordance with coagulation time. The addition of heparin attenuates the interaction and postpones the coagulation, whereas the addition of tranexamic acid starts the coagulation early at the beginning and allows the process completed in less time.

  18. Cobalt uptake and binding in human red blood cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Lars Ole; Brown, Anthony M; Harbak, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    The basal uptake and cytoplasmic binding of cobalt was studied in human red cells using (57)Co as tracer. The basal uptake is linear with time, at a rate of about 10 µmol (l cells)(-1) h(-1) at 100 µM [Co(2+)](o), and is almost irreversible, as there is hardly any efflux into excess EDTA. Ionophore......, compared with timed or in-competition whole-blood and serum analysis, an average value for the exposure over the last couple of months....

  19. Topical problems in the biosynthesis of red blood pigment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franck, B.

    1982-05-01

    Uroporphyrinogen III plays a key role in the biosynthesis of heme, the red pigment of blood. In vivo studies with specifically /sup 14/C- and /sup 3/H-labeled precursors have revealed that the formation of uroporphyrinogen III in the organism follows several primary and subsidiary pathways. Model experiments on the pattern of biosynthesis have led to simple and effective methods of synthesizing uroporphyrin analogs and have shown that their production is strongly favored thermodynamically. The biologically important porphyrins thus available permit a mechanistic explanation of the light-induced dermatoses in porphyria diseases and suggest promising medical applications in diagnosis and therapy.

  20. Clustering of red blood cells using digital holographic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaferzadeh, K.; Ahmadzadeh, E.; Moon, I.; Gholami, S.

    2017-05-01

    Digital holographic microscopy can provide quantitative phase images (QPIs) of 3D profile of red blood cell (RBC) with nanometer accuracy. In this paper we propose applying k-means clustering method to cluster RBCs into two groups of young and old RBCs by using a four-dimensional feature vector. The features are RBC thickness average, surface area-volume ratio, sphericity coefficient and RBC perimeter that can be obtained from QPIs. The proposed features are related to the morphology of RBC. The experimental result shows that by utilizing the proposed method two groups of sphero-echinocytes (old RBCs) and non-spheroechinocytes RBCs can be perfectly clustered.

  1. Automatic analysis of microscopic images of red blood cell aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menichini, Pablo A.; Larese, Mónica G.; Riquelme, Bibiana D.

    2015-06-01

    Red blood cell aggregation is one of the most important factors in blood viscosity at stasis or at very low rates of flow. The basic structure of aggregates is a linear array of cell commonly termed as rouleaux. Enhanced or abnormal aggregation is seen in clinical conditions, such as diabetes and hypertension, producing alterations in the microcirculation, some of which can be analyzed through the characterization of aggregated cells. Frequently, image processing and analysis for the characterization of RBC aggregation were done manually or semi-automatically using interactive tools. We propose a system that processes images of RBC aggregation and automatically obtains the characterization and quantification of the different types of RBC aggregates. Present technique could be interesting to perform the adaptation as a routine used in hemorheological and Clinical Biochemistry Laboratories because this automatic method is rapid, efficient and economical, and at the same time independent of the user performing the analysis (repeatability of the analysis).

  2. Methemoglobin reductase activity in intact fish red blood cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Frank B; Nielsen, Karsten

    2018-01-01

    Hb reductase activity in fish offsets their higher Hb autoxidation and higher likelihood of encountering elevated nitrite. Deoxygenation significantly raised the rates of RBC metHb reduction, and more so in rainbow trout than in carp. The temperature sensitivity of metHb reduction in rainbow trout RBCs......Red blood cells (RBCs) possess methemoglobin reductase activity that counters the ongoing oxidation of hemoglobin (Hb) to methemoglobin (metHb), which in circulating blood is caused by Hb autoxidation or reactions with nitrite. We describe an assay for determining metHb reductase activity in intact...... of counteracting oxidation. This assay was used to compare metHb reduction in rainbow trout and carp RBCs under both oxygenated and deoxygenated conditions. Washing resulted in effective wash-out of nitrite to low and safe values (~2μM). The subsequent decline in [metHb] with time followed first-order kinetics...

  3. Red cell properties after different modes of blood transportation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asya Makhro

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Transportation of blood samples is unavoidable for assessment of specific parameters in blood of patients with rare anemias, blood doping testing or for research purposes. Despite the awareness that shipment may substantially alter multiple parameters, no study of that extend has been performed to assess these changes and optimize shipment conditions to reduce transportation-related artifacts. Here we investigate the changes in multiple parameters in blood of healthy donors over 72 hours of simulated shipment conditions. Three different anticoagulants (K3EDTA, Sodium Heparin and citrate-based CPDA for two temperatures (4oC and room temperature were tested to define the optimal transportation conditions. Parameters measured cover common cytology and biochemistry parameters (complete blood count, hematocrit, morphological examination, red blood cell (RBC volume, ion content and density, membrane properties and stability (hemolysis, osmotic fragility, membrane heat stability, patch-clamp investigations and formation of micro vesicles, Ca2+ handling, RBC metabolism, activity of numerous enzymes and O2 transport capacity. Our findings indicate that individual sets of parameter may require different shipment settings (anticoagulants, temperature. Most of the parameters except for ion (Na+, K+, Ca2+ handling and, possibly, reticulocytes counts, tend to favor transportation at 4oC. Whereas plasma and intraerythrocytic Ca2+ cannot be accurately measured in the presence of chelators such as citrate and EDTA, majority of Ca2+-dependent parameters are stabilized in CPDA samples. Even in blood samples from healthy donors transported using optimized shipment protocol the majority of parameters were stable within 24 hours, the condition that may not hold for the samples of patients with rare anemias. This implies for the as short as possible shipping using fast courier services to the closest expert laboratory at reach. Mobile laboratories or the travel of the

  4. Attenuation of Red Blood Cell Storage Lesions with Vitamin C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly Sanford

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Stored red blood cells (RBCs undergo oxidative stress that induces deleterious metabolic, structural, biochemical, and molecular changes collectively referred to as “storage lesions”. We hypothesized that vitamin C (VitC, reduced or oxidized would reduce red cell storage lesions, thus prolonging their storage duration. Whole-blood-derived, leuko-reduced, SAGM (saline-adenine-glucose-mannitol-preserved RBC concentrates were equally divided into four pediatric storage bags and the following additions made: (1 saline (saline; (2 0.3 mmol/L reduced VitC (Lo VitC; (3 3 mmol/L reduced VitC (Hi VitC; or (4 0.3 mmol/L oxidized VitC (dehydroascorbic acid, DHA as final concentrations. Biochemical and rheological parameters were serially assessed at baseline (prior to supplementation and Days 7, 21, 42, and 56 for RBC VitC concentration, pH, osmotic fragility by mechanical fragility index, and percent hemolysis, LDH release, glutathione depletion, RBC membrane integrity by scanning electron microscopy, and Western blot for β-spectrin. VitC exposure (reduced and oxidized significantly increased RBC antioxidant status with varying dynamics and produced trends in reduction in osmotic fragility and increases in membrane integrity. Conclusion: VitC partially protects RBC from oxidative changes during storage. Combining VitC with other antioxidants has the potential to improve long-term storage of RBC.

  5. Of macrophages and red blood cells; a complex love story.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djuna Zoe de Back

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages tightly control the production and clearance of red blood cells (RBC. During steady state haematopoiesis, approximately 1010 red blood cells are produced per hour within erythroblastic islands in humans. In these erythroblastic islands, resident bone marrow macrophages provide erythroblasts with interactions that are essential for erythroid development. New evidence suggests that not only under homeostasis but also under stress conditions, macrophages play an important role in promoting erythropoiesis. Once RBC have matured, these cells remain in circulation for about 120 days. At the end of their life span, RBC are cleared by macrophages residing in the spleen and the liver. Current theories about the removal of senescent RBC and the essential role of macrophages will be discussed as well as the role of macrophages in facilitating the removal of damaged cellular content from the RBC. In this review we will provide an overview on the role of macrophages in the regulation of RBC production, maintenance and clearance. In addition, we will discuss the interactions between these two cell types during transfer of immune complexes and pathogens from RBC to macrophages.

  6. Blood Lead, Bone Turnover, and Survival in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Fang; Peters, Tracy L; Beard, John D; Umbach, David M; Keller, Jean; Mariosa, Daniela; Allen, Kelli D; Ye, Weimin; Sandler, Dale P; Schmidt, Silke; Kamel, Freya

    2017-11-01

    Blood lead and bone turnover may be associated with the risk of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We aimed to assess whether these factors were also associated with time from ALS diagnosis to death through a survival analysis of 145 ALS patients enrolled during 2007 in the National Registry of Veterans with ALS. Associations of survival time with blood lead and plasma biomarkers of bone resorption (C-terminal telopeptides of type I collagen (CTX)) and bone formation (procollagen type I amino-terminal peptide (PINP)) were estimated using Cox models adjusted for age at diagnosis, diagnostic certainty, diagnostic delay, site of onset, and score on the Revised ALS Functional Rating Scale. Hazard ratios were calculated for each doubling of biomarker concentration. Blood lead, plasma CTX, and plasma PINP were mutually adjusted for one another. Increased lead (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.38; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.03, 1.84) and CTX (HR = 2.03; 95% CI: 1.42, 2.89) were both associated with shorter survival, whereas higher PINP was associated with longer survival (HR = 0.59; 95% CI: 0.42, 0.83), after ALS diagnosis. No interactions were observed between lead or bone turnover and other prognostic indicators. Lead toxicity and bone metabolism may be involved in ALS pathophysiology. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  7. Zeroing in on red blood cell unit expiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayyalil, Fathima; Irwin, Greg; Ross, Bryony; Manolis, Michael; Enjeti, Anoop K

    2017-12-01

    Expiry of red blood cell (RBC) units is a significant contributor to wastage of precious voluntary donations. Effective strategies aimed at optimal resource utilization are required to minimize wastage. This retrospective study analyzed the strategic measures implemented to reduce expiry of RBC units in an Australian tertiary regional hospital. The measures, which included inventory rearrangement, effective stock rotation, and the number of emergency courier services required during a 24-month period, were evaluated. There was no wastage of RBC units due to expiry over the 12 months after policy changes. Before these changes, approximately half of RBC wastage (261/511) was due to expiry. The total number of transfusions remained constant in this period and there was no increase in the use of emergency couriers. Policy changes implemented were decreasing the RBC inventory level by one-third and effective stock rotation and using a computerized system to link the transfusion services across the area. Effective stock rotation resulted in a reduction in older blood (>28 days) received in the main laboratory rotated from peripheral hospitals, down from 6%-41% to 0%-2.5%. Age-related expiry of blood products is preventable and can be significantly reduced by improving practices in the pathology service. This study provides proof of principle for "zero tolerance for RBC unit expiry" across a large networked blood banking service. © 2017 The Authors Transfusion published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AABB.

  8. Survival

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data provide information on the survival of California red-legged frogs in a unique ecosystem to better conserve this threatened species while restoring...

  9. Simultaneous measurement of red blood cell aggregation and whole blood coagulation using high-frequency ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Kweon-Ho; Yeom, Eunseop; Ha, Hojin; Lee, Sang Joon

    2012-03-01

    This study aims to investigate the feasibility of using high-frequency ultrasound (HFUS) for simultaneous monitoring of blood coagulation and red blood cell (RBC) aggregation. Using a 35-MHz ultrasound scanner, ultrasound speckle data were acquired from whole blood samples of three experimental groups of rats, including 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DIDS)-treated, noncoagulation and normal control groups. The variations of blood echogenicity, the shape parameters of probability distribution of speckle intensity (skewness and kurtosis) and the correlation coefficient between two consecutive speckle data were calculated as a function of time starting from immediately after taking blood. The blood echogenicity increases rapidly to plateaus at the early stage of measurement for all the experimental groups caused by the formation of RBC aggregates. The DIDS-treated group exhibits the lowest echogenicity level due to the inhibitory effect of DIDS on RBC aggregation. The correlation analysis between consecutive speckle patterns seems to be useful to examine the variation of blood fluidity and the progress of clot formation. Whole blood coagulation is observed to be accelerated by DIDS treatment. In addition, the results of skewness and kurtosis analysis indicated that RBC aggregates may be disrupted during blood coagulation. The present study suggests that HFUS has good potential for simultaneous monitoring of RBC aggregation and blood coagulation to examine the relationship between them. Copyright © 2012 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Leucocyte filtration of salvaged blood during cardiac surgery : effect on red blood cell function in concentrated blood compared with diluted blood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gu, Y. John; de Vries, Adrianus J.; Hagenaars, J. Ans M.; van Oeveren, Willem

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Leucocyte filtration of salvaged blood has been suggested to prevent patients from receiving activated leucocytes during autotransfusion in cardiac surgery. This study examines whether leucocyte filtration of salvaged blood affects the red blood cell (RBC) function and whether there is a

  11. Anemia and red blood cell transfusion in neurocritical care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Andreas H; Zygun, David A

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Anemia is one of the most common medical complications to be encountered in critically ill patients. Based on the results of clinical trials, transfusion practices across the world have generally become more restrictive. However, because reduced oxygen delivery contributes to 'secondary' cerebral injury, anemia may not be as well tolerated among neurocritical care patients. Methods The first portion of this paper is a narrative review of the physiologic implications of anemia, hemodilution, and transfusion in the setting of brain-injury and stroke. The second portion is a systematic review to identify studies assessing the association between anemia or the use of red blood cell transfusions and relevant clinical outcomes in various neurocritical care populations. Results There have been no randomized controlled trials that have adequately assessed optimal transfusion thresholds specifically among brain-injured patients. The importance of ischemia and the implications of anemia are not necessarily the same for all neurocritical care conditions. Nevertheless, there exists an extensive body of experimental work, as well as human observational and physiologic studies, which have advanced knowledge in this area and provide some guidance to clinicians. Lower hemoglobin concentrations are consistently associated with worse physiologic parameters and clinical outcomes; however, this relationship may not be altered by more aggressive use of red blood cell transfusions. Conclusions Although hemoglobin concentrations as low as 7 g/dl are well tolerated in most critical care patients, such a severe degree of anemia could be harmful in brain-injured patients. Randomized controlled trials of different transfusion thresholds, specifically in neurocritical care settings, are required. The impact of the duration of blood storage on the neurologic implications of transfusion also requires further investigation. PMID:19519893

  12. Profile of Blood Transfusion Requests from Hospitals to Bandung Blood Transfusion Unit, Indonesian Red Cross in 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syahla Nisaa Amalia

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Blood transfusion as a part health services should be provided under appropriate indications and in a safe manner. In Indonesia, blood collection is run by the Blood Transfusion Unit of Indonesian Red Cross, where the blood is screened, processed into blood components, and finally distributed to hospitals. The purpose of this study was to describe the profile of blood transfusion requests from hospitals that do not have blood bank facility to the Bandung Blood Transfusion Unit, Indonesian Red Cross. Methods: A descriptive study was carried out using secondary data from Bandung Blood Transfusion Unit Indonesian Red Cross (UTD PMI Bandung. All blood request forms from hospitals during 2011 were collected and analyzed. Variables in this study were the amount of blood units, blood components, blood type, and indications of blood transfusion. Results: The number of blood units requested by hospitals were 35,841 units. The most blood units requested was in August 2011. The blood component requested was the packed red cell (61.1%, whole blood (17.4%, thrombocyte concentrate (10.6%, and fresh frozen plasma (7%. The total percentage of O, A, B and AB blood types were 36.1%, 28.6%, 27.5%, and 7.9% respectively. The most frequent indication for transfusion was anemia (61.7%, followed by surgery and other causes of bleeding. Conclusions: The total blood units requested by hospitals vary each month. The most blood component requested is Packed Red Cell and the type of blood is O blood type. The most frequent indication is anemia.

  13. Structural Changes in the Surface of Red Blood Cell Membranes during Long-Term Donor Blood Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Moroz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study changes in the surface of red blood cell membranes of donor blood at the macro- and ultrastructural level during its storage for 30 days and to evaluate the functional state of the red blood cell membrane during the whole storage period. Material and methods. The investigation was conducted on human whole blood and packed red blood cells placed in the specialized packs containing the preservative CPDA-1, by using calibrated electroporation and atomic force microscopy and measuring plasma pH. Conclusion. The long-term, up to 30-day, storage of whole blood and packed red blood cells at 4°C was attended by lower plasma pH and increased hemolysis rate constant during calibrated electroporation and by the development of oxidative processes. The hemolysis rate constant was also higher in the packed red blood cells than that in the whole blood. On days 5—6, the membrane structure showed defects that developed, as the blood was stored, and caused irreversible cell membrane damage by day 30. Key words: donor blood, red blood cell membranes, atomic force microscopy.

  14. Remote ischemia preconditioning increases red blood cell deformability through red blood cell-nitric oxide synthase activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grau, Marijke; Kollikowski, Alexander; Bloch, Wilhelm

    2016-09-12

    Remote ischemia preconditioning (rIPC), short cycles of ischemia (I) and reperfusion (R) of a region remote from the heart, protects against myocardial I/R injury. This effect is triggered by endothelial derived nitric oxide (NO) production. Red blood cells (RBC) are also capable of NO production and it is hypothesized that the beneficial effect of rIPC in terms of cardioprotection is strengthened by increased RBC dependent NO production and improved RBC function after rIPC maneuver. For this purpose, twenty male participants were subjected to four cycles of no-flow ischemia with subsequent reactive hyperemia within the forearm. Blood sampling and measurement of blood pressures and heart rate were carried out pre intervention, after each cycle and 15 min post intervention at both the non-treated and treated arm. These are the first results that show improved RBC deformability in the treated arm after rIPC cycles 1- 4 caused by significantly increased RBC-NO synthase activation. This in turn was associated to increased NO production in both arms after rIPC cycles 3 + 4. Also, systolic and diastolic blood pressures were decreased after rIPC. The findings lead to the conclusion that the cardioprotective effects associated with rIPC include improvement of the RBC-NOS/NO signaling in RBC.

  15. Measuring osmosis and hemolysis of red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodhead, Lauren K; MacMillan, Frances M

    2017-06-01

    Since the discovery of the composition and structure of the mammalian cell membrane, biologists have had a clearer understanding of how substances enter and exit the cell's interior. The selectively permeable nature of the cell membrane allows the movement of some solutes and prevents the movement of others. This has important consequences for cell volume and the integrity of the cell and, as a result, is of utmost clinical importance, for example in the administration of isotonic intravenous infusions. The concepts of osmolarity and tonicity are often confused by students as impermeant isosmotic solutes such as NaCl are also isotonic; however, isosmotic solutes such as urea are actually hypotonic due to the permeant nature of the membrane. By placing red blood cells in solutions of differing osmolarities and tonicities, this experiment demonstrates the effects of osmosis and the resultant changes in cell volume. Using hemoglobin standard solutions, where known concentrations of hemoglobin are produced, the proportion of hemolysis and the effect of this on resultant hematocrit can be estimated. No change in cell volume occurs in isotonic NaCl, and, by placing blood cells in hypotonic NaCl, incomplete hemolysis occurs. By changing the bathing solution to either distilled water or isosmotic urea, complete hemolysis occurs due to their hypotonic effects. With the use of animal blood in this practical, students gain useful experience in handling tissue fluids and calculating dilutions and can appreciate the science behind clinical scenarios. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Analysis of Red Blood Cell Behavior in a Narrow Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosaka, Haruki; Omori, Toshihiro; Imai, Yohsuke; Yamaguchi, Takami; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2012-11-01

    Red Blood Cell (RBC) is a main component of blood accounting for 40 percent in volume, and enclosed by a twodimensional hyper elastic membrane. RBCs strongly influence rheological properties and mass transport of blood. The deformation of RBCs in capillary and at narrowing is also important in considering mechano-transduction of RBCs and hemolysis, though it has not been clarified in detail. Thus, in this study, we investigated the behavior of a RBC flowing in a narrow tube. To carry out the fluid-structure interaction analysis, we coupled a boundary element method to analyze the velocity of the internal and external fluid with a finite element method to analyze the deformation of the membrane. The boundary element method has good calculation accuracy and its computational cost is low because three-dimensional flow filed can be calculated by a two-dimensional computational mesh. The background flow in a tube is pressure-driven Poiseuille flow. Additionally, to reduce the computational time, we implemented massive parallel computation by using GPUs. The results show that the deformation of a RBC is strongly affected by the Capillary number, which is the ratio of viscous force to the elastic force, radius of the tube, and the initial orientation.

  17. Nucleated red blood cells in infants of smoking mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeruchimovich, M; Dollberg, S; Green, D W; Mimouni, F B

    1999-03-01

    To evaluate whether the absolute nucleated red blood cell (RBC) count is elevated in term, appropriate for gestational age (AGA) infants born to smoking women. We compared absolute nucleated RBC counts taken during the first 12 hours of life in two groups of term, vaginally delivered, AGA infants, one group born to mothers who smoked during pregnancy (n = 30) and the other born to mothers who did not smoke (n = 30). We excluded infants of women with diabetes, hypertension, or alcohol or drug abuse, and infants with heart rate abnormalities, hemolysis, blood loss, or chromosomal anomalies. There were no differences between the groups in birth weight, gestational age, maternal age, gravidity, parity, maternal analgesia during labor, 1- and 5-minute Apgar scores, corrected white blood cell counts, lymphocyte counts, or hematocrits. The median absolute nucleated RBC count in infants of smoking mothers was 0.5 x 10(9)/L (range 0 to 5.0) versus 0.0005 x 10(9)/L (range 0 to 0.6) in nonsmoking controls (P mothers have increased circulating absolute nucleated RBC counts compared with controls. The absolute nucleated RBC count in newborns correlates with the number of cigarettes smoked during pregnancy.

  18. The buckling instability of aggregating red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flormann, Daniel; Aouane, Othmane; Kaestner, Lars; Ruloff, Christian; Misbah, Chaouqi; Podgorski, Thomas; Wagner, Christian

    2017-08-11

    Plasma proteins such as fibrinogen induce the aggregation of red blood cells (RBC) into rouleaux, which are responsible for the pronounced shear thinning behavior of blood, control the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) - a common hematological test - and are involved in many situations of physiological relevance such as structuration of blood in the microcirculation or clot formation in pathological situations. Confocal microscopy is used to characterize the shape of RBCs within rouleaux at equilibrium as a function of macromolecular concentration, revealing the diversity of contact zone morphology. Three different configurations that have only been partly predicted before are identified, namely parachute, male-female and sigmoid shapes, and quantitatively recovered by numerical simulations. A detailed experimental and theoretical analysis of clusters of two cells shows that the deformation increases nonlinearly with the interaction energy. Models indicate a forward bifurcation in which the contacting membrane undergoes a buckling instability from a flat to a deformed contact zone at a critical value of the interaction energy. These results are not only relevant for the understanding of the morphology and stability of RBC aggregates, but also for a whole class of interacting soft deformable objects such as vesicles, capsules or cells in tissues.

  19. Viable Bacteria Associated with Red Blood Cells and Plasma in Freshly Drawn Blood Donations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Christian; Magnussen, Karin; Enevold, Christian

    2015-01-01

    the oral cavity, and to determine the distribution of bacteria revealed in plasma and in the red blood cell (RBC)-fraction. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. Blood were separated into plasma and RBC-suspensions, which were incubated anaerobically or aerobically for 7 days on trypticase soy blood agar (TSA......), self-reported medically healthy. RESULTS: Bacterial growth was observed on plates inoculated with plasma or RBCs from 62% of the blood donations. Growth was evident in 21 (35%) of 60 RBC-fractions and in 32 (53%) of 60 plasma-fractions versus 8 of 60 negative controls (p = 0.005 and p = 2.6x10...... of RBC-fractions for adherent bacteria should be recommended....

  20. Evaluation of hepatic hemangioma by Tc-99 m red blood cell hepatic blood pool scan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Myung Hee [Chonbuk National University Medical School, Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-02-15

    Hemangioma is the most common benign tumor of the liver, with a prevalence estimated as high as 7%. Tc-99m red blood cell (RBC) hepatic blood pool scan with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging is extremely useful for the confirmation or exclusion of hepatic hemangiomas. The classic finding of absent or decreased perfusion and increased blood pooling ('perfusion/blood pool mismatch') is the key diagnostic element in the diagnosis of hemangiomas. The combination of early arterial flow and delayed blood pooling ('perfusion/blood pool match') is shown uncommonly. In giant hemangioma, filling with radioactivity appears first in the periphery, with progressive central fill-in on sequential RBC blood pool scan. However, the reverse filling pattern, which begins first in the center with progressive peripheral filling, is also rarely seen. Studies with false-positive blood pooling have been reported infrequently in nonhemangiomas, including hemangiosarcoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, hepatic adenoma, and metastatic carcinomas (adenocarcinma of the colon, small cell carcinoma of the lung, neruroendocrine carcinoma). False-negative results have been also reported rarely except for small hemagniomas that are below the limits of spatial resolution of gamma camera.

  1. Stretching of red blood cells at high strain rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancuso, J. E.; Ristenpart, W. D.

    2017-10-01

    Most work on the mechanical behavior of red blood cells (RBCs) in flow has focused on simple shear flows. Relatively little work has examined RBC deformations in the physiologically important extensional flow that occurs at the entrance to a constriction. In particular, previous work suggests that RBCs rapidly stretch out and then retract upon entering the constriction, but to date no model predicts this behavior for the extremely high strain rates typically experienced there. In this Rapid Communication, we use high speed video to perform systematic measurements of the dynamic stretching behavior of RBCs as they enter a microfluidic constriction. We demonstrate that both the Kelvin-Voigt and Skalak viscoelastic models capture the observed stretching dynamics, up to strain rates as high as 2000 s-1. The results indicate that the effective elastic modulus of the RBC membrane at these strain rates is an order of magnitude larger than moduli measured by micropipette aspiration or other low strain rate techniques.

  2. Diagnosis and epidemiology of red blood cell enzyme disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Van Wijk

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The red blood cell possess an active metabolic machinery that provides the cell with energy to pump ions against electrochemical gradients, to maintain its shape, to keep hemoglobin iron in the reduced (ferrous form, and to maintain enzyme and hemoglobin sulfhydryl groups. The main source of metabolic energy comes from glucose. Glucose is metabolized through the glycolytic pathway and through the hexose monophosphate shunt. Glycolysis catabolizes glucose to pyruvate and lactate, which represent the end products of glucose metabolism in the erythrocyte. Adenosine diphosphate (ADP is phosphorylated to adenosine triphosphate (ATP, and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+ is reduced to NADH in glycolysis. 2,3- Bisphosphoglycerate, an important regulator of the oxygen affinity of hemoglobin, is generated during glycolysis by the Rapoport-Luebering shunt. The hexose monophosphate shunt oxidizes glucose-6-phosphate, reducing NADP+ to reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH. The red cell lacks the capacity for de novo purine synthesis but has a salvage pathway that permits synthesis of purine nucleotides from purine bases...

  3. Red blood cells ageing markers: a multi-parametric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardyn, Manon; Rappaz, Benjamin; Jaferzadeh, Keyvan; Crettaz, David; Tissot, Jean-Daniel; Moon, Inkyu; Turcatti, Gerardo; Lion, Niels; Prudent, Michel

    2017-05-01

    Red blood cells collected in citrate-phosphate-dextrose can be stored for up to 42 days at 4 °C in saline-adenine-glucose-mannitol additive solution. During this controlled, but nevertheless artificial, ex vivo ageing, red blood cells accumulate lesions that can be reversible or irreversible upon transfusion. The aim of the present study is to follow several parameters reflecting cell metabolism, antioxidant defences, morphology and membrane dynamics during storage. Five erythrocyte concentrates were followed weekly during 71 days. Extracellular glucose and lactate concentrations, total antioxidant power, as well as reduced and oxidised intracellular glutathione levels were quantified. Microvesiculation, percentage of haemolysis and haematologic parameters were also evaluated. Finally, morphological changes and membrane fluctuations were recorded using label-free digital holographic microscopy. The antioxidant power as well as the intracellular glutathione concentration first increased, reaching maximal values after one and two weeks, respectively. Irreversible morphological lesions appeared during week 5, where discocytes began to transform into transient echinocytes and finally spherocytes. At the same time, the microvesiculation and haemolysis started to rise exponentially. After six weeks (expiration date), intracellular glutathione was reduced by 25%, reflecting increasing oxidative stress. The membrane fluctuations showed decreased amplitudes during shape transition from discocytes to spherocytes. Various types of lesions accumulated at different chemical and cellular levels during storage, which could impact their in vivo recovery after transfusion. A marked effect was observed after four weeks of storage, which corroborates recent clinical data. The prolonged follow-up period allowed the capture of deep storage lesions. Interestingly, and as previously described, the severity of the changes differed among donors.

  4. Survival and function of phagocytes in blood culture media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, T K; Prag, J; Kharazmi, A

    1999-01-01

    The survival and function of human phagocytes in sterile aerobic and anaerobic blood culture media were investigated using neutrophil morphology, white blood cell count in a haemoanalyser, flow cytometry, oxidative burst response, and bactericidal effect in Colorbact and Septi-Chek blood culture...... media and Bact/Alert. When comparing agitation to stationary incubation no difference in phagocytic activity was found. The methods showed the same trends demonstrating that the phagocytes' viability and activity were prolonged by oxygen and shortened by anaerobic conditions and sodium polyethanol...... sulfonate (SPS). Best preserved activity and viability were found in the aerobic media containing less than 0.5 g/l SPS, in which significant phagocyte oxidative burst and bactericidal activity were found up to 4 days after inoculation. Considering that the majority of bacteremias are due to aerobic...

  5. Mortality outcomes in patients transfused with fresher versus older red blood cells: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai-Adisaksopha, C; Alexander, P E; Guyatt, G; Crowther, M A; Heddle, N M; Devereaux, P J; Ellis, M; Roxby, D; Sessler, D I; Eikelboom, J W

    2017-04-01

    Among transfused patients, the effect of the duration of red blood cell storage on mortality remains unclear. This study aims to compare the mortality of patients who were transfused with fresher versus older red blood cells. We performed an updated systematic search in the CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL databases, from January 2015 to October 2016. RCTs of hospitalized patients of any age comparing transfusion of fresher versus older red blood cells were eligible. We used a random-effects model to calculate pooled risk ratios (RRs) with corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI). We identified 14 randomized trials that enrolled 26 374 participants. All-cause mortality occurred in 1219 of 9531 (12·8%) patients who received a transfusion of fresher red blood cells and 1810 of 16 843 (10·7%) in those who received older red blood cells (RR: 1·04, 95% CI: 0·98-1·12, P = 0·90, I2 = 0%, high certainty for ruling out benefit of fresh blood, moderate certainty for ruling out harm of fresh blood). In six studies, in-hospital death occurred in 691 of 7479 (9·2%) patients receiving fresher red cells and 1291 of 14 757 (8·8%) receiving older red cells (RR: 1·06, 95% CI: 0·97-1·15, P = 0·81, I2 = 0%, high certainty for ruling out benefit of fresh blood, moderate certainty for ruling out harm of fresh blood). Transfusion of fresher red blood cells does not reduce overall or in-hospital mortality when compared with older red blood cells. Our results support the practice of transfusing patients with the oldest red blood cells available in the blood bank. © 2017 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  6. Red Blood Cell Transfusions in Greece: Results of a Survey of Red Blood Cell Use in 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Valsami

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Greece is ranked as the second highest consumer of blood components in Europe. For an effective transfusion system and in order to reduce variability of transfusion practice by implementing evidence-based transfusion guidelines it is necessary to study and monitor blood management strategies. Our study was conducted in order to evaluate the use of red blood cell units (RBC-U in nationwide scale mapping parameters that contribute to their proper management in Greece. Materials and Methods: The survey was conducted by the Working Committee of Transfusion Medicine&Apheresis of the Hellenic Society of Hematology from January to December 2013. The collected data included the number, ABO/D blood group, patients’ department, and storage age of RBC-U transfused. Results: The number of RBC-U evaluated was 103,702 (17.77% out of 583,457 RBC-U transfused in Greece in 2013. RBC-U transfused by hospital department (mean percentage was as follows: Surgery 29.34%, Internal Medicine 29.48%, Oncology/Hematology 14.65%, Thalassemia 8.87%, Intensive Care Unit 6.55%, Nephrology 1.78%, Obstetrics/Gynecology 1.46%, Neonatal&Pediatric 0.31%, Private Hospitals 8.57%. RBC-U distribution according to ABO/D blood group was: A: 39.02%, B: 12.41%, AB: 5.16%, O: 43.41%, D+: 87.99%, D-: 12.01%. The majority of RBC-U (62.46% was transfused in the first 15 days of storage, 25.24% at 16 to 28 days, and 12.28% at 29-42 days. Conclusion: Despite a high intercenter variability in RBC transfusions, surgical and internal medicine patients were the most common groups of patients transfused with an increasing rate for internal medicine patients. The majority of RBC-U were transfused within the first 15 days of storage, which is possibly the consequence of blood supply insufficiency leading to the direct use of fresh blood. Benchmarking transfusion activity may help to decrease the inappropriate use of blood products, reduce the cost of care, and optimize the use of the

  7. Regulation of red blood cell deformability is independent of red blood cell-nitric oxide synthase under hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grau, Marijke; Lauten, Alexander; Hoeppener, Steffen; Goebel, Bjoern; Brenig, Julian; Jung, Christian; Bloch, Wilhelm; Suhr, Frank

    2016-09-12

    The aim was to study impacts of mild to severe hypoxia on human red blood cell (RBC)-nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-dependent NO production, protein S-nitrosylation and deformability.Ambient air oxygen concentration of 12 healthy subjects was step-wisely reduced from 20.95% to 16.21%, 12.35%, 10% and back to 20.95%. Additional in vitro experiments involved purging of blood (±sodium nitrite) with gas mixtures corresponding to in vivo intervention.Vital and hypoxia-associated parameters showed physiological adaptation to changing demands. Activation of RBC-NOS decreased with increasing hypoxia. RBC deformability, which is influenced by RBC-NOS activation, decreased under mild hypoxia, but surprisingly increased at severe hypoxia in vivo and in vitro. This was causatively induced by nitrite reduction to NO which increased S-nitrosylation of RBC α- and β-spectrins -a critical step to improve RBC deformability. The addition of sodium nitrite prevented decreases of RBC deformability under hypoxia by sustaining S-nitrosylation of spectrins suggesting compensatory mechanisms of non-RBC-NOS-produced NO.The results first time indicate a direct link between maintenance of RBC deformability under severe hypoxia by non-enzymatic NO production because RBC-NOS activation is reduced. These data improve our understanding of physiological mechanisms supporting adequate blood and, thus, oxygen supply to different tissues under severe hypoxia.

  8. Red blood cell distribution width: A simple parameter in preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Zehra Vural; Yılmaz, Elif; Küçüközkan, Tuncay

    2016-10-01

    Preeclampsia is a serious disease and a leading cause of maternal and perinatal mortality and morbidity. Red blood cell distribution width (RDW), a measure of anisocytosis, is used as an inflammation marker in hypertension and cardiovascular diseases. Although the relationship between RDW and hypertension has been well documented, the association between preeclampsia and RDW is not clear. We aimed to investigate the relationship between RDW and preeclampsia and its severity. One hundred eighteen pregnant women with preeclampsia and one hundred twenty uncomplicated pregnant women were included in the study. Blood samples for routine CBC and RDW levels were analyzed. The RDW values were significantly higher in preeclampsia group compared with the control group (15.23±1.96 vs 14.48±1.70, pblood cell count, can be used as a significant diagnostic and prognostic marker in patient with preeclampsia like the other cardiovascular diseases. Copyright © 2016 International Society for the Study of Hypertension in Pregnancy. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Manipulation of red blood cells with electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saboonchi, Hossain; Esmaeeli, Asghar

    2009-11-01

    Manipulation of bioparticles and macromolecules is the central task in many biological and biotechnological processes. The current methods for physical manipulation takes advantage of different forces such as acoustic, centrifugal, magnetic, electromagnetic, and electric forces, as well as using optical tweezers or filtration. Among all these methods, however, the electrical forces are particularly attractive because of their favorable scale up with the system size which makes them well-suited for miniaturization. Currently the electric field is used for transportation, poration, fusion, rotation, and separation of biological cells. The aim of the current research is to gain fundamental understanding of the effect of electric field on the human red blood cells (RBCs) using direct numerical simulation. A front tracking/finite difference technique is used to solve the fluid flow and electric field equations, where the fluid in the cell and the blood (plasma) is modeled as Newtonian and incompressible, and the interface separating the two is treated as an elastic membrane. The behavior of RBCs is investigated as a function of the controlling parameters of the problem such as the strength of the electric field.

  10. Procedure for Microscopic Analysis of Red Blood Cell Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Moroz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Transition from micron to nanometric image sizes creates many problems associated with the emergence of non-uniform scale heterogeneities of objects. To recognize the structural units of membrane heterogeneities is a complex pathophysiological and biophysical task. Objection: to show main methodological approaches to analyzing the heterogeneities of membrane nanostructures when using microscopy and to demonstrate the need for an expert evaluation when investigating red blood cell membranes in health and the influence of exogenous and physicochemical factors on blood. The paper discusses the limits of applicability of optical and atomic force microscopy. It shows the heterogeneities of cell distribution over the ensemble, surface of an individual cell, by the pattern and extent of local membrane damages and by a number of others. To take into account all the types of heterogeneities, to form the qualitative monolayers of cells, and to choose scanning nanoscales adequately with the tasks may contribute to the successful implementation of the research goals set. Key words: membranes, heterogeneities, local defects, optical, atomic force microscopy.

  11. Vitamin E nanoemulsion activity on stored red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, C A L; Azevedo Filho, C A; Pereira, G; Silva, D C N; Castro, M C A B; Almeida, A F; Lucena, S C A; Santos, B S; Barjas-Castro, M L; Fontes, A

    2017-06-01

    Stored red blood cells (RBCs) undergo numerous changes that have been termed RBC storage lesion, which can be related to oxidative damage. Vitamin E is an important antioxidant, acting on cell lipids. Thus, this study aimed to investigate vitamin E activity on stored RBCs. We prepared a vitamin E nanoemulsion that was added to RBC units and stored at 4 °C. Controls, without vitamin E, were kept under the same conditions. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was monitored for up to 35 days of storage. RBC elasticity was also evaluated using an optical tweezer system. Vitamin E-treated samples presented a significant decrease in ROS production. Additionally, the elastic constant for vitamin E-treated RBCs did not differ from the control. Vitamin E decreased the amount of ROS in stored RBCs. Because vitamin E acts on lipid oxidation, results suggest that protein oxidation should also be considered a key factor for erythrocyte elastic properties. Thus, further studies combining vitamin E with protein antioxidants deserve attention, aiming to better preserve overall stored RBC properties. © 2017 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  12. The aging of the red blood cell. A multifactor process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danon, D; Marikovsky, Y

    1988-01-01

    Red blood cell (rbc) senescence is associated with loss of surface sialic acid, which is the principal carrier of surface negative charge and determines the electrokinetic behavior of old rbcs. Loss of sialic acid in an old rbc is demonstrated in its decreased electric mobility and lower negative charge density, determined topographically with cationic particle labeling. Surface sialic acid determines also the mutual attraction--repulsion forces, as demonstrated in enhanced aggluinability with cationic molecules, lectins, and blood group antibodies. Loss of sialic acid accompanies ATP-depletion in vitro; thus, a T-antigen site is unmasked. Macrophages have specific receptors to the site as to newly exposed galactose and N-acetyl galactosamine sugars. Furthermore, the involvement of complement molecules in the recognition of old RBCs by macrophages has been shown. This is possibly due to loss of sialic acid or at least a regrouping--relocation of surface anionic sites due to cell shape changes from discocytes to crenated forms, which accompany both in vivo and in vitro rbc aging. In turn, shape changes are apparently controlled by the cytoskeletal network underlying the rbc membrane, which undergoes structural alteration with physiologic aging in changing the dimensions of oligomeric spectrin and the thickness of the spectrin-actin cytoskeletal assembly.

  13. Viable bacteria associated with red blood cells and plasma in freshly drawn blood donations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Damgaard

    Full Text Available Infection remains a leading cause of post-transfusion mortality and morbidity. Bacterial contamination is, however, detected in less than 0.1% of blood units tested. The aim of the study was to identify viable bacteria in standard blood-pack units, with particular focus on bacteria from the oral cavity, and to determine the distribution of bacteria revealed in plasma and in the red blood cell (RBC-fraction.Cross-sectional study. Blood were separated into plasma and RBC-suspensions, which were incubated anaerobically or aerobically for 7 days on trypticase soy blood agar (TSA or blue lactose plates. For identification colony PCR was performed using primers targeting 16S rDNA.Blood donors attending Capital Region Blood Bank, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Hvidovre, Denmark, October 29th to December 10th 2013.60 donors (≥50 years old, self-reported medically healthy.Bacterial growth was observed on plates inoculated with plasma or RBCs from 62% of the blood donations. Growth was evident in 21 (35% of 60 RBC-fractions and in 32 (53% of 60 plasma-fractions versus 8 of 60 negative controls (p = 0.005 and p = 2.6x10-6, respectively. Propionibacterium acnes was found in 23% of the donations, and Staphylococcus epidermidis in 38%. The majority of bacteria identified in the present study were either facultative anaerobic (59.5% or anaerobic (27.8% species, which are not likely to be detected during current routine screening.Viable bacteria are present in blood from donors self-reported as medically healthy, indicating that conventional test systems employed by blood banks insufficiently detect bacteria in plasma. Further investigation is needed to determine whether routine testing for anaerobic bacteria and testing of RBC-fractions for adherent bacteria should be recommended.

  14. Red blood cell transfusion in preterm neonates: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chirico G

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Gaetano ChiricoNeonatology and Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Children Hospital, Spedali Civili, Brescia, ItalyAbstract: Preterm neonates, especially very low birth weight infants, remain a category of patients with high transfusion needs; about 90% of those with <1,000 g birth weight may be transfused several times during their hospital stay. However, neonatal red blood cells (RBC transfusion is not without risks. In addition to well-known adverse events, several severe side effects have been observed unique to preterm infants, such as transfusion-related acute gut injury, intraventricular hemorrhage, and increased mortality risk. It is therefore important to reduce the frequency of RBC transfusion in critically ill neonates, by delayed clamping or milking the umbilical cord, using residual cord blood for initial laboratory investigations, reducing phlebotomy losses, determining transfusion guidelines, and ensuring the most appropriate nutrition, with the optimal supplementation of iron, folic acid, and vitamins. Ideally, RBC transfusion should be tailored to the individual requirements of the single infant. However, many controversies still remain, and the decision on whether to transfuse or not is often made on an empirical basis. Recently, a few clinical trials have been performed with the aim to compare the risk/benefit ratio of restrictive versus liberal transfusion criteria. No significant differences in short-term outcomes were observed, suggesting that the restrictive criteria may reduce the need for transfusion and the related side effects. Neurodevelopmental long-term outcome seemed more favorable in the liberal group at first evaluation, especially for boys, and significantly better in the restrictive group at a later clinical investigation. Magnetic resonance imaging scans, performed at an average age of 12 years, showed that intracranial volume was substantially smaller in the liberal group compared with controls. When sex effects

  15. The Red Blood Cell Membrane of Preterm Infants in the Early Neonatal Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Perepelitsa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the nanostructure of red blood cell membranes and erythrocyte index in preterm neonatal infants.Subjects and methods. The trial enrolled 47 neonatal infants, including 33 preterm infants who were included in a study group and 14 fullterm infants who formed a comparative group. The gestational age of the preterm infants was 33.3±1.9 weeks and the birth weight was 2065.4±304.8 g. Red blood cell counts, hemoglobin, and erythrocyte indices were estimat ed and the red blood cells were examined using an atomicforce microscope.Results. At birth, the preterm infants showed macrocytosis, intrauterine poikylocytosis, and the impaired nanostructure of red blood cell membranes. Intrauterine hypoxia affects the red blood cell membrane nanostructures: a phospholipid bilayer and a spectrin matrix, without damaging the membrane protein component. The detected changes are reversible and directed to maintaining the functional ability of red blood cells in a critical situation. At birth, gestational age, a baby's weight, hemoglobin, and blood cholesterol and standard bicarbonate levels influence the parameters of a red blood cell component. The early neonatal period was characterized by an active process on the red blood cell membranes and a change of morphological forms, suggesting the continuing postnatal rearrangement of erythropoiesis and a preterm infant's adaptation to new environmental conditions.

  16. SMIM1 underlies the Vel blood group and influences red blood cell traits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cvejic, Ana; Haer-Wigman, Lonneke; Stephens, Jonathan C

    2013-01-01

    and expression of the Vel antigen on SMIM1-transfected cells confirm SMIM1 as the gene underlying the Vel blood group. An expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL), the common SNP rs1175550 contributes to variable expression of the Vel antigen (P = 0.003) and influences the mean hemoglobin concentration of red...... blood cells (RBCs; P = 8.6 × 10(-15)). In vivo, zebrafish with smim1 knockdown showed a mild reduction in the number of RBCs, identifying SMIM1 as a new regulator of RBC formation. Our findings are of immediate relevance, as the homozygous presence of the deletion allows the unequivocal identification......The blood group Vel was discovered 60 years ago, but the underlying gene is unknown. Individuals negative for the Vel antigen are rare and are required for the safe transfusion of patients with antibodies to Vel. To identify the responsible gene, we sequenced the exomes of five individuals negative...

  17. Alterations in cell surface area and deformability of individual human red blood cells in stored blood

    CERN Document Server

    Park, HyunJoo; Lee, SangYun; Kim, Kyoohyun; Sohn, Yong-Hak; Jang, Seongsoo; Park, YongKeun

    2015-01-01

    The functionality and viability of stored human red blood cells (RBCs) is an important clinical issue in transfusion. To systematically investigate changes in stored whole blood, the hematological properties of individual RBCs were quantified in blood samples stored for various periods with and without a preservation solution called CPDA-1. With 3-D quantitative phase imaging techniques, the optical measurements of the 3-D refractive index (RI) distributions and membrane fluctuations were done at the individual cell level. From the optical measurements, the morphological (volume, surface area and sphericity), biochemical (hemoglobin content and concentration), and mechanical parameters (dynamic membrane fluctuation) were simultaneously quantified to investigate the functionalities and their progressive alterations in stored RBCs. Our results show that the stored RBCs without CPDA-1 had a dramatic morphological transformation from discocytes to spherocytes within 2 weeks which was accompanied with significant ...

  18. Survival of northern red oak acorns after fall burning. Forest Service research paper (Final)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auchmoody, L.R.; Smith, H.C.

    1993-01-01

    The survival of recently fallen northern red oak acorns after exposure to a cool fall burn was evaluated in northwestern Pennsylvania. Although no acorns were consumed by the fire, some were charred. Between 40 and 49 percent of the acorns in the litter were destroyed. The fire was not hot enough to kill Curculio larvae within the acorns. Burned acorns infested with Curculio that survived the fire had 20 percent lower germination rates than unburned acorns.

  19. Implementing a routine flow cytometry assay for nucleated red blood cell counts in cord blood units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simard, C; Cloutier, M; Jobin, C; Dion, J; Fournier, D; Néron, S

    2016-12-01

    As required by standards organizations, Héma-Québec Cord Blood Bank performs enumeration of nucleated red blood cells (NRBCs) in cord blood units (CBUs). This study presents the validation and implementation approaches developed to transfer the routine NRBC enumeration from the manual blood film method to a flow cytometric assay. The flow cytometry method was adapted from Tsuji (Cytometry, 37, 1999, 291). This assay was validated to assess the specificity, detection limit, repeatability, and reproducibility of the method, including interoperator and interlaboratory testing. Finally, postimplementation follow-up and adjustments were performed for CBU over a 7-month period. Blood film and flow cytometry NRBC enumerations showed a strong correlation (n = 40; Pearson's r correlation = 0.90). Validation was successful as exemplified by the correlation in interlaboratory testing (n = 30; r = 0.98). During implementation, our routine laboratory analyses revealed that CBU with low NRBC content (≤2%), representing 26% of all CBU tested, resulted in 15% of repeated reading and/or staining and was the principal source of nonconformity. Small adjustments in the standard operating procedures (SOPs), including a fixed 200-event setting in the NRBC gate for the second reading of the replicates, have completely solved this issue. Flow cytometric NRBC enumerations, now implemented in Héma-Québec Public Cord Blood Bank, is an improvement in the efficiency of our operations by integrating the count for NRBC into our flow cytometry platform. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Optically-driven red blood cell rotor in linearly polarized laser tweezers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We have constructed a dual trap optical tweezers set-up around an inverted microscope where both the traps can be independently controlled and manipulated in all the three dimensions. Here we report our observations on rotation of red blood cells (RBCs) in a linearly polarized optical trap. Red blood cells deform and ...

  1. Preoperative factors associated with red blood cell transfusion in hip fracture patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Christian Medom; Jørgensen, Henrik Løvendahl; Norgaard, Astrid

    2014-01-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) transfusion is a frequently used treatment in patients admitted with a fractured hip, but the use remains an area of much debate. The aim of this study was to determine preoperative factors associated with the risk of receiving a red blood cell transfusion in hip fracture...

  2. Meta-analysis of plasma to red blood cell ratios and mortality in massive blood transfusions for trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhangu, Aneel; Nepogodiev, Dmitri; Doughty, Heidi; Bowley, Douglas M

    2013-12-01

    The current military paradigm for blood transfusion in major trauma favours high plasma:RBC ratios. This study aimed determine whether high plasma:red blood cell (RBC) ratios during massive transfusion for trauma decrease mortality, using meta-analysis of contemporaneous groups matched for injury severity score. A systemic review of the published literature for massive blood transfusions in trauma was performed. Patients were categorised into groups based on plasma:RBC transfusion ratios. Meta-analysis was only performed when there were no significant differences in Injury Severity Score (ISS) between ratio groups within studies. The main endpoint was 30-day mortality. Six observational studies reporting outcomes for 1885 patients were included in this meta-analysis. Five studies were from civilian environments and one from a military setting. Ratio cut-offs at 1:2 were the most commonly reported, demonstrating a survival advantage with higher ratios (OR 0.49, 95% CI 0.31-0.80, p=0.004). Ratios≥1:2 showed a significant reduction in mortality compared to lower ratios (OR 0.56, 95% CI 0.40-0.78, p<0.001). Reducing the cut-off level was still protective (ratios between 1:2.5 and 1:4, OR 0.41), although the confidence interval was wide (0.16-1.00, p=0.05) and data heterogenous (I(2)=78%). Ratios of 1:1 were not proven to confer additional benefit beyond ratios of 1:2 (OR 0.50, 95% CI 0.37-0.68, p<0.001). In groups matched for ISS, there was a survival benefit with high plasma:RBC resuscitation ratios. No additional benefits of 1:1 over 1:2 ratios were identified. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Red blood cell phenotype prevalence in blood donors who self-identify as Hispanic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sheppard, Chelsea A; Bolen, Nicole L; Eades, Beth

    2017-01-01

    CONCLUSIONS: Molecular genotyping platforms provide a quick, high-throughput method for identifying red blood cell units for patients on extended phenotype-matching protocols, such as those with sickle cell disease or thalassemia. Most of the antigen prevalence data reported are for non-Hispanic ......CONCLUSIONS: Molecular genotyping platforms provide a quick, high-throughput method for identifying red blood cell units for patients on extended phenotype-matching protocols, such as those with sickle cell disease or thalassemia. Most of the antigen prevalence data reported are for non......-Hispanic populations. Therefore, this study sought to determine the phenotype prevalence in a single blood center's Hispanic population and to compare those results with previously reported rates in non-Hispanic donor populations. We performed a retrospective review of all serologic and molecular typing from donors....... The most prevalent probable Rh phenotypes were R1r (26.6%), R1R2 (21.5%), and R1R1 (20.7%); rr was found in 7.8 percent of donors tested. The percentage of K+ donors in this population was 2.8 percent. The most prevalent Duffy phenotypes were Fy(a+b+) (35.9%), Fy(a+b-) (35.6%), and Fy(a-b+) (27...

  4. Survival and growth of planted northern red oak in northern West Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles A. McNeel; David M. Hix; Edwin C. Townsend

    1993-01-01

    The survival and growth of northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.) seedlings planted beneath a shelterwood in northern West Virginia were evaluated one year after planting. The use of 1.5 m (5 ft) tall TUBEX tree shelters on planted seedlings was also examined. The study was conducted on both excellent and good sites (site indices of 27 m (89 ft) and 22...

  5. The effects of red blood cell preparation method on in vitro markers of red blood cell aging and inflammatory response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radwanski, Katherine; Garraud, Olivier; Cognasse, Fabrice; Hamzeh-Cognasse, Hind; Payrat, Jean-Marc; Min, Kyungyoon

    2013-12-01

    Studies are currently under way examining whether the age of stored red blood cells (RBCs) affects clinical outcome in transfusion recipients. The effects of storage duration on the RBC storage lesion are well documented, while fewer studies are available regarding the effect of RBC production method. In this study, we compared in vitro RBC quality variables and markers of inflammatory response in apheresis and whole blood (WB)-derived RBCs, specifically those prepared after an overnight room temperature hold (RTH) of WB. SAGM RBCs, prepared from WB after overnight RTH (n = 10), were compared to SAGM RBCs prepared using an apheresis device (Alyx, n = 10). As a control, SAGM RBCs were also prepared within 2 hours of WB collection (2-hr WB, n = 10). All RBCs were stored at 4°C for 42 days with weekly assay of in vitro variables, cytokines and/or chemokines, and neutrophil activation after incubation with RBC supernatant. RTH WB RBCs exhibited decreased levels of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate acid (2.3 μmol/g hemoglobin [Hb] ± 2.1 vs. 13.7 ± 1.3 μmol/g Hb) and morphology (160 ± 10 vs. 192 ± 5) on Day 1 and increased hemolysis (0.45 ± 0.21% vs. 0.31 ± 0.09%) and microparticles (6.1 ± 2.8/10(3) RBCs vs. 3.9 ± 1.1/10(3) RBCs) on Day 42 compared to apheresis RBCs. Gro-α and ENA-78 cytokine levels were significantly higher in RTH WB than Alyx RBCs during storage. CD11b expression was highest in neutrophils exposed to supernatant from RTH WB RBCs (p < 0.05). RBC preparation method has a meaningful effect on the RBC storage lesion, which should be taken into account in addition to length of storage. © 2013 American Association of Blood Banks.

  6. A role for activated endothelial cells in red blood cell clearance: implications for vasopathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fens, Marcel H A M; van Wijk, Richard; Andringa, Grietje

    2012-01-01

    Background Phosphatidylserine exposure by red blood cells is acknowledged as a signal that initiates phagocytic removal of the cells from the circulation. Several disorders and conditions are known to induce phosphatidylserine exposure. Removal of phosphatidylserine-exposing red blood cells gener...... cells play a role in red blood cell clearance in vivo. Significant erythrophagocytosis can induce endothelial cell loss, which may contribute to vasopathological effects as seen, for instance, in sickle cell disease.......Background Phosphatidylserine exposure by red blood cells is acknowledged as a signal that initiates phagocytic removal of the cells from the circulation. Several disorders and conditions are known to induce phosphatidylserine exposure. Removal of phosphatidylserine-exposing red blood cells...... generally occurs by macrophages in the spleen and liver. Previously, however, we have shown that endothelial cells are also capable of erythrophagocytosis. Key players in the erythrophagocytosis by endothelial cells appeared to be lactadherin and αv-integrin. Phagocytosis via the phosphatidylserine...

  7. Photoacoustic measurements of red blood cell oxygen saturation in blood bags in situ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Ruben N.; Bagga, Karan; Douplik, Alexandre; Acker, Jason P.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2017-03-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) transfusion is a critical component of the health care services. RBCs are stored in blood bags in hypothermic temperatures for a maximum of 6 weeks post donation. During this in vitro storage period, RBCs have been documented to undergo changes in structure and function due to mechanical and biochemical stress. Currently, there are no assessment methods that monitor the quality of RBCs within blood bags stored for transfusion. Conventional assessment methods require the extraction of samples, consequently voiding the sterility of the blood bags and potentially rendering them unfit for transfusions. It is hypothesized that photoacoustic (PA) technology can provide a rapid and non-invasive indication of RBC quality. In this study, a novel PA setup was developed for the acquisition of oxygen saturation (SO2) of two blood bags in situ. These measurements were taken throughout the lifespan of the blood bags (42 days) and compared against the clinical gold standard method of the blood gas analyzer (BGA). SO2 values of the blood bags increased monotonically throughout the storage period. A strong correlation between PA SO2 and BGA SO2 was found, however, PA values were on average 3.5% lower. Both techniques found the bags to increase by an SO2 of approximately 20%, and measured very similar rates of SO2 change. Future work will be focused on determining the cause of discrepancy between SO2 values acquired from PA versus BGA, as well as establishing links between the measured SO2 increase and other changes in RBC in situ.

  8. Demographic consequences of migratory stopover: linking red knot survival to horseshoe crab spawning abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Conor P.; Hines, James E.; Nichols, James D.; Lyons, James E.; Smith, David; Kalasz, Kevin S.; Niles, Lawrence J.; Dey, Amanda D.; Clark, Nigel A.; Atkinson, Philip W.; Minton, Clive D.T.; Kendall, William

    2011-01-01

    Understanding how events during one period of the annual cycle carry over to affect survival and other fitness components in other periods is essential to understanding migratory bird demography and conservation needs. Previous research has suggested that western Atlantic red knot (Calidris canutus rufa) populations are greatly affected by horseshoe crab (Limulus polyphemus) egg availability at Delaware Bay stopover sites during their spring northward migration. We present a mass-based multistate, capturerecapture/resighting model linking (1) red knot stopover mass gain to horseshoe crab spawning abundance and (2) subsequent apparent annual survival to mass state at the time of departure from the Delaware Bay stopover area. The model and analysis use capture-recapture/resighting data with over 16,000 individual captures and 13,000 resightings collected in Delaware Bay over a 12 year period from 1997–2008, and the results are used to evaluate the central management hypothesis that red knot populations can be influenced by horseshoe crab harvest regulations as part of a larger adaptive management effort. Model selection statistics showed support for a positive relationship between horseshoe crab spawning abundance during the stopover and the probability of red knots gaining mass (parameter coefficient from the top model b = 1.71, SE = 0.46). Our analyses also supported the link between red knot mass and apparent annual survival, although average estimates for the two mass classes differed only slightly. The addition of arctic snow depth as a covariate influencing apparent survival improved the fit of the data to the models (parameter coefficient from the top model b = 0.50, SE = 0.08). Our results indicate that managing horseshoe crab resources in the Delaware Bay has the potential to improve red knot population status.

  9. Multimodal measurements of blood plasma and red blood cell volumes during functional brain activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Peter; Sanganahalli, Basavaraju G; Hyder, Fahmeed

    2009-01-01

    As an alternative to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) contrast, cerebral blood volume (CBV)-weighted fMRI with intravascular contrast agents in animal models have become popular. In this study, dynamic measurements of CBV were performed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and laser-Doppler flowmetry (LDF) in alpha-chloralose anesthetized rats during forepaw stimulation. All recordings were localized to the contralateral primary somatosensory cortex as revealed by BOLD at 11.7 T. Ultra-small superparamagnetic iron oxide (15 mg/kg)--a plasma-borne MRI contrast agent with a half-life of several hours in blood circulation--was used to quantify changes in magnetic field inhomogeneity in blood plasma. The LDF backscattered laser light (805 nm), which reflects the amount of red blood cells, was used to measure alterations in the non-plasma compartment. Dynamic and layer-specific comparisons of the two CBV signals during functional hyperemia revealed excellent correlations (>0.86). These results suggest that CBV measurements from either compartment may be used to reflect dynamic changes in total CBV. Furthermore, by assuming steady-state mass balance and negligible counter flow, these results indicate that volume hematocrit is not appreciably affected during functional activation.

  10. Scientific problems in the regulation of red blood cell products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, John R

    2012-08-01

    For the past 30 years, red blood cell (RBC) storage systems have been licensed in the United States based on the demonstration that 24-hour in vivo recovery was greater than 75% and hemolysis was less than 1%. Now additional requirements for storage system licensure have being added. The meaning and value of these new requirements have been questioned. The literature regarding the performance of present and suggested new tests for RBC licensure was reviewed. (51) Cr 24-hr in vivo recovery has an intrinsic 4% error of measurement whereas the error in measures of hemolysis is less than 0.1%. Both measures have large donor-dependent end-of-storage variability; nevertheless, they have successfully guided RBC storage system development for six decades. Adenosine 5'-triphosphate and 2,3-diphosphoglycerate are difficult to measure accurately and international shared-sample studies suggest 6 and 11% coefficients of variation across laboratories. There is no readily available way to measure the oxygen equilibrium curve accurately. The new failure criteria provide no useful information and randomly fail good products. Attempts to expand the useful regulatory requirements for RBC storage system licensure are limited by poor understanding of the storage lesion and its effect of RBC performance. Measures of (51) Cr 24-hour in vivo recovery remain critical and resources for this measure are limiting. The interaction between limited testing resources and large donor variability remains a major limit on RBC storage system development. It is important that new required tests contribute meaningful information and not make development and licensure of better products more difficult. © 2012 American Association of Blood Banks.

  11. Abnormal red blood cells detection using adaptive neuro-fuzzy system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babazadeh Khameneh, Nahid; Arabalibeik, Hossein; Salehian, Piruz; Setayeshi, Saeed

    2012-01-01

    Features like size, shape, and volume of red blood cells are important factors in diagnosing related blood disorders such as iron deficiency and anemia. This paper proposes a method to detect abnormality in red blood cells using cell microscopic images. Adaptive local thresholding and bounding box methods are used to extract inner and outer diameters of red cells. An adaptive network-based fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) is used to classify blood samples to normal and abnormal. Accuracy of the proposed method and area under ROC curve are 96.6% and 0.9950 respectively.

  12. Characterization of Red Blood Cells with Multiwavelength Transmission Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulia M. Serebrennikova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiwavelength transmission (MWT spectroscopy was applied to the investigation of the morphological parameters and composition of red blood cells (RBCs. The MWT spectra were quantitatively analyzed with a Mie theory based interpretation model modified to incorporate the effects of the nonsphericity and orientation of RBCs. The MWT spectra of the healthy and anemic samples were investigated for the RBC indices in open and blinded studies. When MWT performance was evaluated against a standard reference system, very good agreement between two methods, with R2>0.85 for all indices studied, was demonstrated. The RBC morphological parameters were used to characterize three types of anemia and to draw an association between RBC morphology and anemia severity. The MWT spectra of RBCs infected with malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum at different life cycle stages were analyzed for RBC morphological parameters. The changes in the RBC volume, surface area, aspect ratio, and hemoglobin composition were used to trace the morphological and compositional alterations in the infected RBCs occurring with parasites’ development and to provide insights into parasite-host interactions. The MWT method was shown to be reliable for determination of the RBC morphological parameters and to be valuable for identification of the RBC pathologic changes and disease states.

  13. Amyloid β levels in human red blood cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takehiro Kiko

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: Amyloid β-peptide (Aβ is hypothesized to play a key role by oxidatively impairing the capacity of red blood cells (RBCs to deliver oxygen to the brain. These processes are implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Although plasma Aβ has been investigated thoroughly, the presence and distribution of Aβ in human RBCs are still unclear. In this study, we quantitated Aβ40 and Aβ42 in human RBCs with ELISA assays, and provided evidence that significant amounts of Aβ could be detected in RBCs and that the RBC Aβ levels increased with aging. The RBC Aβ levels increased with aging. On the other hand, providing an antioxidant supplement (astaxanthin, a polar carotenoid to humans was found to decrease RBC Aβ as well as oxidative stress marker levels. These results suggest that plasma Aβ40 and Aβ42 bind to RBCs (possibly with aging, implying a pathogenic role of RBC Aβ. Moreover, the data indicate that RBC Aβ40 and Aβ42 may constitute biomarkers of AD. As a preventive strategy, therapeutic application of astaxanthin as an Aβ-lowering agent in RBCs could be considered as a possible anti-dementia agent. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN42483402.

  14. Lytic resistance of fibrin containing red blood cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohner, Nikolett; Sótonyi, Péter; Machovich, Raymund; Szabó, László; Tenekedjiev, Kiril; Silva, Marta M.C.G.; Longstaff, Colin; Kolev, Krasimir

    2012-01-01

    Objective Arterial thrombi contain variable amounts of red blood cell (RBC), which interact with fibrinogen through an eptifibatide-sensitive receptor and modify the structure of fibrin. Here we evaluate the modulator role of RBCs in the lytic susceptibility of fibrin. Methods and Results If fibrin is formed at increasing RBC counts, scanning electron microscopy evidenced a decrease in fiber diameter from 150 nm to 96 nm at 40 %(v/v) RBC, an effect susceptible to eptifibatide inhibition (restoring 140 nm diameter). RBC prolonged the lysis time in a homogeneous-phase fibrinolytic assay with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) by up to 22.7±1.6 %, but not in the presence of eptifibatide. Confocal laser microscopy using green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled tPA and orange fluorescent fibrin showed that 20-40 %(v/v) RBC significantly slowed down the dissolution of the clots. tPA-GFP did not accumulate on the surface of fibrin containing RBC at any cell count above 10 %. The presence of RBC in the clot suppressed the tPA-induced plasminogen activation resulting in a 45 % less plasmin generated after 30 min activation at 40 %(v/v) RBC. Conclusion RBCs confer lytic resistance to fibrin resulting from modified fibrin structure and impaired plasminogen activation through a mechanism that involves eptifibatide-sensitive fibrinogen-RBC interactions. PMID:21737785

  15. Loss of deformability of malaria-infected red blood cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, S. Majid; Feng, James

    2012-11-01

    The pathogenesis of malaria is largely due to stiffening of the infected red blood cells (RBCs). Contemporary understanding ascribes the loss of RBC deformability to a 10-fold increase in membrane stiffness caused by extra cross-linking in the spectrin network. Local measurements by micropipette aspiration, however, have reported only an increase of 3-fold in the shear modulus. We believe the discrepancy stems from the rigid parasite particles inside infected cells, and have carried out numerical simulations to demonstrate this mechanism. The cell membrane is represented by a set of discrete particles connected by linearly elastic springs. The cytosol is modeled as a homogeneous Newtonian fluid, and discretized by particles as in standard smoothed particle hydrodynamics. The malaria parasite is modeled as an aggregate of particles constrained to rigid-body motion. We simulate RBC stretching tests by optical tweezers in three dimensions. The results demonstrate that the presence of a sizeable parasite greatly reduces the ability of RBCs to deform under stretching. With the solid inclusion, the observed loss of deformability can be predicted quantitatively using the local membrane elasticity measured by micropipettes.

  16. Mechanochemistry of single red blood cells monitored using Raman tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Saurabh; Marro, Mónica; Wojdyla, Michal; Petrov, Dmitri

    2012-01-01

    Two microparticles were biochemically attached to a red blood cell at diametrically opposite parts and held by optical traps allowing to impose deformations. The cell deformation was monitored from the microscopy images. Raman spectra of the cell under tunable deformations were studied. Vibrational spectra analysis at different stretching states was supported with two statistical methods. Principal Component Analysis distinguishes the most prominent changes in spectra while 2D correlation technique monitors the evolution of Raman bands during stretching. The measurements show significant changes in the cell chemical structure with stretching however the changes saturate above 20% of cell deformation. Mechanical deformation of the cell mainly affects the bands corresponding to hemoglobin but contributions from spectrin and membrane proteins can not be excluded. The saturation of bands at higher deformations suggests some structural relaxation that RBC has to undergo to bear extra load. The results confirm widely accepted belief that spectrin released from membrane proteins allows for significant shape changes of the cells. We therefore tentatively suggest that interaction between membrane and cytoskeleton during deformation can be efficiently probed by confocal Raman spectroscopy, in particular via the peak around 1035 cm−1. PMID:22574263

  17. Role of Surface Electric Charge in Red Blood Cell Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Kung-Ming; Chien, Shu

    1973-01-01

    The role of the surface charge of human red blood cells (RBC's) in affecting RBC aggregation by macromolecules was studied by comparing the behavior of normal RBC's with that of RBC's treated with neuraminidase, which removes the sialic acids from the cell membrane and reduces the zeta potential. RBC aggregation in dextrans with different molecular weights (Dx 20, Dx 40, and Dx 80) was quantified by microscopic observation, measurement of erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and determination of low-shear viscosity. Dx 20 did not cause aggregation of normal RBC's, but caused considerable aggregation of neuraminidase-treated RBC's. Neuraminidase-treated RBC's also showed stronger aggregation than normal RBC's in Dx 40 and 80. Together with the electron microscopic findings that the intercellular distance in the RBC rouleaux varies with the molecular size of dextrans used, the present study indicates that the surface charge of RBC's inhibits their aggregation by dextrans and that the electrostatic repulsive force between cell surfaces may operate over a distance of 20 nm. PMID:4705641

  18. A model for rouleaux pattern formation of red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobuchi, Y; Ito, T; Ogiwara, A

    1988-01-21

    Human red blood cells (RBCs) in a solution form rouleaux patterns under various conditions. The degree of rouleaux formation depends on, for example, the concentration and molecular weight of added large molecules. We present a two-dimensional discrete cellular space model in which an RBC is represented by a rectangle and differential adhesion is assumed among the longer (a-site), the shorter (b-site) sides of the rectangle and the solvent. The total sum of the adhesion energy is assumed to guide the step-by-step change of the model cell configuration and also define absolutely stable patterns. We compare the set of absolutely stable patterns and cell aggregate patterns for both actual and computer-simulated cases to obtain the basic validity of our framework. Then we proceed to assess the effects of added high polymers to the adhesion parameters. We first note that under suitable conditions, decrease in a-site-solvent affinity is necessary to have complex patterns rather than increase of a-a affinity. The hypothesis that addition of high polymers reduce the a-site-solvent affinity is concomitant with a newly proposed osmotic stress theory. The parameter fitting results for the experimental phase change curves can also be interpreted as supporting more the new theory than existing traditional explanations.

  19. Does Erythropoietin Regulate TRPC Channels in Red Blood Cells?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Danielczok

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cation channels play an essential role in red blood cells (RBCs ion homeostasis. One set of ion channels are the transient receptor potential channels of canonical type (TRPC channels. The abundance of these channels in primary erythroblasts, erythroid cell lines and RBCs was associated with an increase in intracellular Ca2+ upon stimulation with Erythropoietin (Epo. In contrast two independent studies on Epo-treated patients revealed diminished basal Ca2+ concentration or reduced phosphatidylserine exposure to the outer membrane leaflet. Methods: To resolve the seemingly conflicting reports we challenged mature human and mouse RBCs of several genotypes with Epo and Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 and recorded the intracellular Ca2+ content. Next Generation Sequencing was utilised to approach a molecular analysis of reticulocytes. Results/Conclusions: Our results allow concluding that Epo and PGE2 regulation of the Ca2+ homeostasis is distinctly different between murine and human RBCs and that changes in intracellular Ca2+ upon Epo treatment is a primary rather than a compensatory effect. In human RBCs, Epo itself has no effect on Ca2+ fluxes but inhibits the PGE2-induced Ca2+ entry. In murine mature RBCs functional evidence indicates TRPC4/C5 mediated Ca2+ entry activated by Epo whereas PGE2 leads to a TRPC independent Ca2+ entry.

  20. Red cell exchange to mitigate a delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction in a patient transfused with incompatible red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irani, Mehraboon S; Karafin, Matthew S; Ernster, Luke

    2017-02-01

    A red cell exchange was performed to prevent a potentially fatal hemolytic transfusion reaction in a patient with anti-e who was transfused with e-antigen unscreened red blood cells during liver transplant surgery. A 64-year-old woman with cirrhosis due to hepatitis C was scheduled to receive a liver transplant. She had a previously documented anti-e, an antibody to the Rh(e)-antigen that is known to cause delayed hemolytic transfusion reactions. Pre-operatively and intra-operatively, she had massive hemorrhage which required transfusion of 34 e-antigen unscreened red blood cells (RBCs) most of which were incompatible. The hemoglobin dropped from 9.1 g/dL on post-operative day (POD)1 to 6.6 g/dL on POD6, with no evidence of blood loss. The bilirubin also increased from 5.0 mg/dL on POD 1 to 11.0 mg/dL on POD 6. As she was also becoming more hemodynamically unstable, a red cell exchange with 10 units of e-negative RBCs was performed on POD 6. She improved clinically and was extubated the following day. A few residual transfused e-positive red cells were detected after the red cell exchange until POD 13. This case illustrates how a red cell exchange can mitigate the potentially harmful effects of a delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction caused by red cell antibodies. With massive intraoperative blood loss it may not be possible to have antigen-negative RBCs immediately available, particularly for the e-antigen, which is present in 98% of the donor population. The ability to perform such a procedure may be life-saving in such patients. J. Clin. Apheresis 32:59-61, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Elevated red blood cell distribution width is associated with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vural Yilmaz, Zehra; Gencosmanoglu Turkmen, Gulenay; Daglar, Korkut; Yılmaz, Elif; Kara, Ozgur; Uygur, Dilek

    2017-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy is the most common pregnancy specific liver disease and related with adverse maternal and perinatal outcome. Red blood cell distribution width, an anisocytosis marker in a complete blood count, has been used as an inflammation marker in various diseases. However the association of red blood cell distribution width with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy is unknown. We aimed to evaluate the relationship between red blood cell distribution width and intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy. Ninety pregnant women with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy and ninety healthy pregnant women were included in the study. Their clinical and laboratory characteristics including red blood cell distribution width, liver function tests, fasting and postprandial bile acid concentrations were analyzed. Serum red blood cell distribution width cell levels were significantly higher in pregnants with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy than healthy pregnants. We also demonstrated that red blood cell distribution Width levels were higher in severe disease than mild disease and was significantly correlated with fasting and postprandial bile acid concentration in intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy group. Our study showed that red blood cell distribution width, an easy and inexpensive marker; were associated with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy and can be used as a diagnostic and prognostic marker in intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy.

  2. New Developments in Red Blood Cell Preservation Using Liquid and Freezing Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-04-02

    TI T E (nd Sbli t#)S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED USIN4G LIQUID AND FREEZING PROCEDURES Technical Report S. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7...platelets obtained from units of whole blod Is about $15 per pool. In the last analysis, cost continues to be uppermost in the minds of-blood bankers when...rare type red blood cells, but also as a means of preserving red blood cells during periods of high donation. Many investigators who Initially thought

  3. Effect of Packed Red Blood Cell Cryopreservation on Development of the Storage Lesion and Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    patients indicate that treatment of anemia by transfusion with previously cryopreserved packed red blood cells is superior to that of aged units stored...cells, pRBCs, red blood cell storage lesion, blood storage 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT SAR 18. NUMBER OF...public release. Cleared, 88PA, Case # 2015-6154. 1.0 SUMMARY Recent clinical studies in trauma patients indicate that treatment of anemia by

  4. A smart core-sheath nanofiber that captures and releases red blood cells from the blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Q; Hou, J; Zhao, C; Xin, Z; Jin, J; Li, C; Wong, S-C; Yin, J

    2016-01-28

    A smart core-sheath nanofiber for non-adherent cell capture and release is demonstrated. The nanofibers are fabricated by single-spinneret electrospinning of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm), polycaprolactone (PCL) and nattokinase (NK) solution blends. The self-assembly of PNIPAAm and PCL blends during the electrospinning generates the core-sheath PCL/PNIPAAm nanofibers with PNIPAAm as the sheath. The PNIPAAm-based core-sheath nanofibers are switchable between hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity with temperature change and enhance stability in the blood. When the nanofibers come in contact with blood, the NK is released from the nanofibers to resist platelet adhesion on the nanofiber surface, facilitating the direct capture and isolation of red blood cells (RBCs) from the blood above phase-transition temperature of PNIPAAm. Meanwhile, the captured RBCs are readily released from the nanofibers with temperature stimuli in an undamaged manner. The release efficiency of up to 100% is obtained while maintaining cellular integrity and function. This work presents promising nanofibers to effectively capture non-adherent cells and release for subsequent molecular analysis and diagnosis of single cells.

  5. Changes in the Surface of Red Blood Cell Membranes after Blood Loss and Their Correction with Laser Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Moroz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to reveal changes in the membrane surface microrelief during hypotension and after blood reinfusion and a possibility of correcting these impairments with laser irradiation (LI. Materials and methods. Experiments were carried out on anesthetized male rats weighing 450 g. The model of a terminal state was one-hour hypovolemic hypotension (mean blood pressure 45 mm Hg, followed by exsanguinated blood reinfusion. Two groups of experiments were made. These were control and experimental; in the latter laser irradiation was performed for 2 minutes an hour after blood reinfusion. Rat blood smears were examined on an atomic force microscope 5 and 60 minutes after blood loss and 1 and 3 hours after blood reinfusion. Results. The experiments have shown that after blood reinfusion the activated lipid peroxidation processes increase the size of a red blood cell and change its shape and its membrane surface relief. By producing an antioxidant effect, LI restores the permeability of red blood cell membranes and their surface ultrastructure. Key words: blood loss, red blood cells, membrane, lipid peroxidation, atomic force microscope.

  6. Exploring the relationship of peripheral total bilirubin, red blood cell, and hemoglobin with blood pressure during childhood and adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-Tian; Yang, Song; Yang, Ya-Ming; Zhao, Hai-Long; Chen, Yan-Chun; Zhao, Xiang-Hai; Wen, Jin-Bo; Tian, Yuan-Rui; Yan, Wei-Li; Shen, Chong

    2017-11-04

    Total bilirubin is beneficial for protecting cardiovascular diseases in adults. The authors aimed to investigate the association of total bilirubin, red blood cell, and hemoglobin levels with the prevalence of high blood pressure in children and adolescents. A total of 3776 students (aged from 6 to 16 years old) were examined using cluster sampling. Pre-high blood pressure and high blood pressure were respectively defined as the point of 90th and 95th percentiles based on the Fourth Report on the Diagnosis, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure in Children and Adolescents. Both systolic and diastolic blood pressure were standardized into z-scores. Peripheral total bilirubin, red blood cell and hemoglobin levels were significantly correlated with age, and also varied with gender. Peripheral total bilirubin was negatively correlated with systolic blood pressure in 6- and 9-year-old boys, whilst positively correlated with diastolic blood pressure in the 12-year-old boys and 13- to 15-year-old girls (p0.05). Total bilirubin could be weakly correlated with both systolic and diastolic blood pressure, as correlations varied with age and gender in children and adolescents; in turn, the increased levels of red blood cell and hemoglobin are proposed to be positively associated with the prevalence of high blood pressure. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  7. Transfusion of leukocyte-depleted red blood cells is not a risk factor for nosocomial infections in critically ill children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wal, Judith; van Heerde, Marc; Markhorst, Dick G.; Kneyber, Martin C. J.

    Objectives: Transfusion of red blood cells is increasingly linked with adverse outcomes in critically ill children. We tested the hypothesis that leukocyte-depleted red blood cell transfusions were independently associated with increased development of bloodstream infections, ventilator-associated

  8. Temperature-dependent haemolytic propensity of CPDA-1 stored red blood cells vs whole blood - Red cell fragility as donor signature on blood units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzounakas, Vassilis L; Anastasiadi, Alkmini T; Karadimas, Dimitrios G; Zeqo, Redisa A; Georgatzakou, Hara T; Pappa, Olga D; Papatzitze, Olga A; Stamoulis, Konstantinos E; Papassideri, Issidora S; Antonelou, Marianna H; Kriebardis, Anastasios G

    2017-09-01

    To preserve cellular integrity and avoid bacterial growth, storage and transfer of blood and blood products follow strict guidelines in terms of temperature control. We evaluated the impact of ineligible warming of whole blood donations on the quality of blood components. One-hundred and twenty units of whole blood (WB) from eligible blood donors were collected in CPDA-1 and stored at 4±2 °C. During shipment to the blood processing centre, a gradual warming up to 17 °C was recorded within a period of less than eight hours. The warmed units were processed to packed red blood cells (PRBCs) or stored as WB units at 4±2 °C. In-bag haemolysis, osmotic fragility (mean corpuscular fragility, MCF) and bacterial growth were assessed in blood and blood components throughout the storage period. Normal basal and early storage levels of haemolysis were recorded in both PRBC and WB units. Thereafter, PRBCs exhibited higher average in-bag haemolysis and MCF index compared to the WB units throughout the storage. Moreover, 14.3 and 52.4% of the PRBC units exceeded the upper permissible limit of 0.8% haemolysis at the middle (1.220±0.269%) or late (1.754±0.866%) storage period, respectively. MCF index was similar in all PRBCs at the middle of storage but significantly lower in the non-haemolysed compared to the haemolysed units of PRBCs on the last days. The fragility of stored RBCs was proportional to the donor-related values of day 2 samples (r=0.861, punits of PRBCs. Transient, gradient warming of whole blood from 4 to 17 °C led to increased incidence of in-bag haemolysis in PRBC but not in WB units. Haemolysis is a multi-parametric phenotype of stored blood, and MCF is a donor-related and highly dynamic measure that can, in part, predict the storage lesion.

  9. Survival and growth of Cochlodinium polykrikoides red tide after addition of yellow loess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Sik; Kim, Jung Dong; Lim, Weol Ae; Lee, Sam Geun

    2009-11-01

    We examined the survival rate of Cochlodinium polykrikoides after yellow loess addition and conducted culture experiments to investigate the possibility that red tides maybe caused by C. polykrikoides individuals that are precipitated when loess is added. At least 15% of the C. polykrikoides cells that precipitated to the bottom layer either by the addition of loess or no addition survived for 1 week at all growth phases, rather than disappearing immediately after precipitating. However no live cells were observed after 20 days, regardless of phase or loess addition. In the exponential phase, the number of C. polykrikoides cells increased to >2886 cells ml(-1) after loess was added. However in the stationary phase, the number of cells did not increase until 18 days. In the exponential phase, those C. polykrikoides that survived precipitation caused by scattering loess on cultures did not appear to have the ability to cause red tides again because of the short red tide periods in the field, long lag time after loess addition, and low survival rate after loess addition.

  10. Red blood cell orientation in pulmonary capillaries and its effect on gas diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabors, L Karina; Baumgartner, William A; Janke, Steven J; Rose, James R; Wagner, Wiltz W; Capen, Ronald L

    2003-04-01

    When alveoli are inflated, the stretched alveolar walls draw their capillaries into oval cross sections. This causes the disk-shaped red blood cells to be oriented near alveolar gas, thereby minimizing diffusion distance. We tested these ideas by measuring red blood cell orientation in histological slides from rapidly frozen rat lungs. High lung inflation did cause the capillaries to have oval cross sections, which constrained the red blood cells within them to flow with their broad sides facing alveolar gas. Low lung inflation stretched alveolar walls less and allowed the capillaries to assume a circular cross section. The circular luminal profile permitted the red blood cells to have their edges facing alveolar gas, which increased the diffusion distance. Using a finite-element method to calculate the diffusing capacity of red blood cells in the broad-side and edge-on orientations, we found that edge-on red blood cells had a 40% lower diffusing capacity. This suggests that, when capillary cross sections become circular, whether through low-alveolar volume or through increased microvascular pressure, the red blood cells are likely to be less favorably oriented for gas exchange.

  11. Red blood cells transfusions in oncological patients treated with radio- and chemoterapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antić Ana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Anemia is one of the most frequent hematology disorders in patients with malignant diseases. It has a great influence on reduction of the quality of life, so it requires early diagnosis and an adequate treatment. The aim of this study was to present and analyze the treatment of anemia using red blood cell transfusions in patients with malignancies, to analyze adequate use of red blood cell transfusions according to hemoglobin concentration, and also the influence of the treatment of malignant disease on the level of anemia and use of red blood cells transfusion. Methods. This retrospective analysis included the data on the use of red blood cells in Oncological Clinic of Clinical Center Niš in a period from the 1st January 2008 to the 31st December 2008. Results. None of the patients received the whole blood. In this period, 735 patients received 1,006 units of red blood cells (red blood cell concentrate, resuspended, washed, filtered. An average use of red blood cell transfusion was 1.37 unit per oncological patient who received transfusion. The use of red blood cell units was adequate (87.60% of patients received transfusion of red cells when Hgb < 80 g/L. During radio- and chemotherapy we noticed a decrease of hematological parameter values. The patients of the experimental group were dependant on red blood cells transfusion. Statistically, a significant decrease of hemoglobin level was observed in patients treated only with radiotherapy who are the greatest consumers of red blood cells. Two patients were registered who more likely to have febrile nonhemolytic transfusion reactions. Posttransfusion alloimmunization occurred in 0.68% of the patients. Conclusion. The use of red blood cells in oncological patients is in compliance with the up to date tendencies and recommendations published in clinical guidelines. For the purpose of efficient transfusion support in patients with malignant diseases, we have to follow the newest

  12. On the shape memory of red blood cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordasco, Daniel; Bagchi, Prosenjit

    2017-04-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) undergo remarkably large deformations when subjected to external forces but return to their biconcave discoid resting shape as the forces are withdrawn. In many experiments, such as when RBCs are subjected to a shear flow and undergo the tank-treading motion, the membrane elements are also displaced from their original (resting) locations along the cell surface with respect to the cell axis, in addition to the cell being deformed. A shape memory is said to exist if after the flow is stopped the RBC regains its biconcave shape and the membrane elements also return to their original locations. The shape memory of RBCs was demonstrated by Fischer ["Shape memory of human red blood cells," Biophys. J. 86, 3304-3313 (2004)] using shear flow go-and-stop experiments. Optical tweezer and micropipette based stretch-relaxation experiments do not reveal the complete shape memory because while the RBC may be deformed, the membrane elements are not significantly displaced from their original locations with respect to the cell axis. Here we present the first three-dimensional computational study predicting the complete shape memory of RBCs using shear flow go-and-stop simulations. The influence of different parameters, namely, membrane shear elasticity and bending rigidity, membrane viscosity, cytoplasmic and suspending fluid viscosity, as well as different stress-free states of the RBC is studied. For all cases, the RBCs always exhibit shape memory. The complete recovery of the RBC in shear flow go-and-stop simulations occurs over a time that is orders of magnitude longer than that for optical tweezer and micropipette based relaxations. The response is also observed to be more complex and composed of widely disparate time scales as opposed to only one time scale that characterizes the optical tweezer and micropipette based relaxations. We observe that the recovery occurs in three phases: a rapid compression of the RBC immediately after the flow is stopped

  13. Influence of red blood cell-derived microparticles upon vasoregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Said, Ahmed S; Doctor, Allan

    2017-05-15

    Here we review recent data and the evolving understanding of the role of red blood cell-derived microparticles (RMPs) in normal physiology and in disease progression. Microparticles (MPs) are small membrane vesicles derived from various parent cell types. MPs are produced in response to a variety of stimuli through several cytoskeletal and membrane phospholipid changes. MPs have been investigated as potential biomarkers for multiple disease processes and are thought to have biological effects, most notably in: promotion of coagulation, production and handling of reactive oxygen species, immune modulation, angiogenesis, and in apoptosis. Specifically, RMPs are produced normally during RBC maturation and their production is accelerated during processing and storage for transfusion. Several factors during RBC storage are known to trigger RMP production, including: increased intracellular calcium, increased potassium leakage, and energy failure with ATP depletion. Of note, RMP composition differs from that of intact RBCs, and the nature and composition of RMP components are affected by both storage duration and the character of storage solutions. Recognised RMP bioactivities include: promotion of coagulation, immune modulation, and promotion of endothelial adhesion, as well as influence upon vasoregulation via nitric oxide (NO) scavenging. Of particular relevance, RMPs are more avid NO scavengers than intact RBCs and this feature has been proposed as a mechanism for the impaired oxygen delivery homeostasis that has been observed following transfusion. Preliminary human studies demonstrate that circulating RMP abundance increases with RBC transfusion and is associated with altered plasma vasoactivity and abnormal vasoregulation. In summary, RMPs are submicron particles released from stored RBCs, with demonstrated vasoactive properties that appear to disturb oxygen delivery homeostasis. The clinical impact of RMPs in transfusion recipients is an area of continued

  14. Perioperative red blood cell transfusion in orofacial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, So-Young; Seo, Kwang-Suk; Karm, Myong-Hwan

    2017-09-01

    In the field of orofacial surgery, a red blood cell transfusion (RBCT) is occasionally required during double jaw and oral cancer surgery. However, the question remains whether the effect of RBCT during the perioperative period is beneficial or harmful. The answer to this question remains challenging. In the field of orofacial surgery, transfusion is performed for the purpose of oxygen transfer to hypoxic tissues and plasma volume expansion when there is bleeding. However, there are various risks, such as infectious complications (viral and bacterial), transfusion-related acute lung injury, ABO and non-ABO associated hemolytic transfusion reactions, febrile non-hemolytic transfusion reactions, transfusion associated graft-versus-host disease, transfusion associated circulatory overload, and hypersensitivity transfusion reaction including anaphylaxis and transfusion-related immune-modulation. Many studies and guidelines have suggested RBCT is considered when hemoglobin levels recorded are 7 g/dL for general patients and 8-9 g/dL for patients with cardiovascular disease or hemodynamically unstable patients. However, RBCT is occasionally an essential treatment during surgeries and it is often required in emergency cases. We need to comprehensively consider postoperative bleeding, different clinical situations, the level of intra- and postoperative patient monitoring, and various problems that may arise from a transfusion, in the perspective of patient safety. Since orofacial surgery has an especially high risk of bleeding due to the complex structures involved and the extensive vascular distribution, measures to prevent bleeding should be taken and the conditions for a transfusion should be optimized and appropriate in order to promote patient safety.

  15. Human red blood cells alterations in primary aldosteronism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordin, Luciana; Donà, Gabriella; Sabbadin, Chiara; Ragazzi, Eugenio; Andrisani, Alessandra; Ambrosini, Guido; Brunati, Anna Maria; Clari, Giulio; Armanini, Decio

    2013-06-01

    Aldosterone (Aldo) effects include NADPH oxidase activation involved in Aldo-related oxidative stress. Red blood cells (RBCs) are particularly sensitive to oxidative assault, and both the formation of high molecular weight aggregates (HMWAs) and the diamide-induced Tyr phosphorylation (Tyr-P) level of membrane band 3 can be used to monitor their redox status. The Aldo-related alterations in erythrocytes were evaluated by comparing in vitro evidence. This was a multicenter comparative study. The study included 12 patients affected by primary aldosteronism (PA) and 6 healthy control subjects (HCs), whose RBCs were compared with those of patients with PA. For in vitro experiments, RBCs from HCs were incubated with increasing Aldo concentrations. The Tyr-P level, band 3 HMWA formation, and autologous IgG binding were evaluated. In patients with PA, both Tyr-P levels and band 3 HMWAs were higher than those in HCs. RBCs from HCs were treated with increasing Aldo concentrations in both platelet-poor plasma (PPP) and charcoal-stripped (CS)-PPP. Results showed that Aldo had dose- and time-dependent effects on band 3 Tyr-P and HMWA formation in CS-PPP more than in PPP. These effects were almost completely prevented by canrenone or cortisol. Aldo-related membrane alterations led to increased autologous IgG binding. Erythrocytes from patients with PA show oxidative-like stress evidenced by increased HMWA content and diamide-induced band 3 Tyr-P level. Aldo effects are mediated by the mineralocorticoid receptor, as suggested by the inhibitory effects of canrenone, an antagonist of Aldo. In CS-PPP, in which Aldo induces remarkable membrane alterations leading to IgG binding, Aldo may be responsible for premature RBC removal from circulation.

  16. Phosphatidylserine exposure on stored red blood cells as a parameter for donor-dependent variation in product quality

    OpenAIRE

    Dinkla, Sip; Peppelman, Malou; van der Raadt, Jori; Atsma, Femke; Novotný, Vĕra M.J.; van Kraaij, Marian G.J.; Joosten, Irma; Bosman, Giel J.C.G.M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exposure of phosphatidylserine on the outside of red blood cells contributes to recognition and removal of old and damaged cells. The fraction of phosphatidylserine-exposing red blood cells varies between donors, and increases in red blood cell concentrates during storage. The susceptibility of red blood cells to stress-induced phosphatidylserine exposure increases with storage. Phosphatidylserine exposure may, therefore, constitute a link between donor variation and the quality o...

  17. Effects of storage time and leucocyte burden of packed and buffy-coat depleted red blood cell units on red cell storage lesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamel, Noha; Goubran, Fekry; Ramsis, Neven; Ahmed, Amal Sayed

    2010-01-01

    Background The red cell storage lesion (RCSL) comprises the biochemical and biomechanical changes that take place during red blood cell (RBC) storage, reducing the survival and function of these cells. Contaminating white blood cells have been major contributors to the RCSL. Markers of RCSL, such as CD47 and phosphatidylserine (PS), on RBC are attracting more attention. The aim of this study was to elucidate the effects of storage time and buffy-coat removal on CD47 and PS expression on RBC. Potassium and free haemoglobin levels in the supernatant plasma were also assessed. Materials and methods Forty-three red cell concentrates were divided into two groups [Group 1: packed red cells (n=22); Group 2: red cell units from which the buffy-coat had been removed (n=21)] and samples were collected on days 1, 14 and 28. Flow cytometry was used to monitor changes of CD47 and PS expression on RBC over times. Supernatant potassium was measured and percent of haemolysis calculated. Results A significant, progressive decrease in RBC CD47 expression during storage was observed in both groups. The decrease in RBC CD47 expression was significantly less in the buffy-coat-removed group of units than in the other group. The percentage of annexin V-positive cells increased significantly in both groups. Buffy-coat depleted components showed less expression of PS only in the early samples. There were significant, progressive increases in percentage of haemolysis and supernatant potassium during storage in both groups. Conclusion RBC stored for more than 14 days exhibited reduced CD47 and increased PS. Buffy coat removal reduced the loss of CD47, but had no impact on plasma haemoglobin, potassium or RBC PS exposure. PMID:20967167

  18. Haemolysis following rapid experimental red blood cell transfusion--an evaluation of two infusion pumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tom Giedsing; Sprogøe-Jakobsen, U; Pedersen, C M

    1998-01-01

    The vast majority of infusion pumps used for rapid transfusion of large amounts of blood have never been properly examined regarding their influence on the quality of the red blood cells (RBCs) infused. In this study, we evaluated the effect of two different infusion pumps on the degree of RBC...... destruction following rapid experimental blood transfusion....

  19. Photodynamic effects of protoporphyrin on the architecture of erythrocyte membranes in protoporphyria and in normal red blood cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goeij, A.F.P.M.; Vergaert, P.H.J.Th ver; Steveninck, J. van

    Protoporphyrin causes a photodynamic damage of the red blood cell membrane. After illumination of red blood cells in the presence of protoporphyrin three effects can be observed: 1. 1. Red blood cell membranes show particle aggregation on the outer and inner fracture face, as seen in freeze-etch

  20. Phosphatidylserine exposure on stored red blood cells as a parameter for donor-dependent variation in product quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dinkla, S.; Peppelman, M.; Raadt, J. van der; Atsma, F.; Novotny, V.M.J.; Kraaij, M.G.J. van; Joosten, I.; Bosman, G.J.C.G.M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exposure of phosphatidylserine on the outside of red blood cells contributes to recognition and removal of old and damaged cells. The fraction of phosphatidylserine-exposing red blood cells varies between donors, and increases in red blood cell concentrates during storage. The

  1. Nitric oxide scavenging by red blood cell microparticles and cell-free hemoglobin as a mechanism for the red cell storage lesion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Donadee (Chenell); N.J.H. Raat (Nicolaas); T. Kanias (Tamir); J. Tejero (Jesús); J.S. Lee (Janet); E.E. Kelley (Eric); X. Zhao (Xuejun); C. Liu (Chen); H. Reynolds (Hannah); I. Azarov (Ivan); S. Frizzell (Sheila); E.M. Meyer (Michael); A.D. Donnenberg (Albert); L. Qu (Lirong); D. Triulzi (Darrel); D.B. Kim-Shapiro (Daniel); M.T. Gladwin (Mark)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBacground-: Intravascular red cell hemolysis impairs nitric oxide (NO)-redox homeostasis, producing endothelial dysfunction, platelet activation, and vasculopathy. Red blood cell storage under standard conditions results in reduced integrity of the erythrocyte membrane, with formation of

  2. SOD2-deficiency sideroblastic anemia and red blood cell oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Florent M; Bydlon, Gabriela; Friedman, Jeffrey S

    2006-01-01

    Iron overload is a feature of an array of human disorders such as sideroblastic anemias, a heterogeneous group of erythropoietic disorders without identified cause in most cases. However, sideroblastic anemias appear to result from a disturbance at the interface between mitochondrial function and iron metabolism. A defining feature is excessive iron deposition within mitochondria of developing red cells, the consequences of which are an increase in cellular free radicals production, increased damage to proteins, and reduced cell survival. Because of its mitochondrial location, superoxide dismutase (SOD2) is the principal defense against the toxicity of superoxide anions generated by the oxidative phosphorylation. We have used hematopoietic stem cell transplantation to study blood cells lacking SOD2. We became interested in the role SOD2 plays in the metabolism of superoxide anions during erythroid development, as anemia is the major phenotype in transplanted animals. Our exploration of this model suggests that oxidative stress-and in particular, mitochondrial- derived oxidants-plays an important role in the pathogenesis of the human disorder, sideroblastic anemia. Here we review the relation between mitochondrial dysfunction and sideroblastic anemia, describe several methods for assessing oxidative damage to mature or developing red cells, present data on, and discuss the potential of antioxidant therapy for this disorder.

  3. The effect of chemical weapons incineration on the survival rates of Red-tailed Tropicbirds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, E.A.; Schenk, G.A.; Doherty, P.F.

    2001-01-01

    In 1992, the Johnston Atoll Chemical Agent Disposal System (JACADS) began incinerating U.S. chemical weapons stockpiles on Johnston Atoll (Pacific Ocean) where about 500,000 seabirds breed, including Red-tailed Tropicbirds (Phaethon rubricauda). We hypothesized that survival rates of birds were lower in those nesting downwind of the incinerator smokestack compared to those upwind, and that birds might move away from the area. From 1992 - 2000 we monitored survival and movements between areas upwind and downwind from the JACADS facility. We used a multi-strata mark recapture approach to model survival, probability of recapture and movement. Probability of recapture was significantly higher for birds in downwind areas (owing to greater recapture effort) and thus was an important 'nuisance' parameter to take into account in modeling. We found no differences in survival between birds nesting upwind ( 0.8588) and downwind (0.8550). There was no consistent difference in movement rates between upwind or downwind areas from year to year: differences found may be attributed to differing vegetation growth and human activities between the areas. Our results suggest that JACADS has had no documentable influence on the survival and year to year movement of Red-tailed Tropicbirds.

  4. Application of the ADVIA cerebrospinal fluid assay to count residual red blood cells in blood components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culibrk, B; Stone, E; Levin, E; Weiss, S; Serrano, K; Devine, D V

    2012-10-01

    There is no automated, accurate assay for the enumeration of residual red blood cells (rRBCs) in non-RBC components for transfusion, despite the potential risk of allo-immunization when mismatched components are transfused. The automated ADVIA 120 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) assay, which is approved to count RBCs and WBCs in CSF samples, was optimized and tested to measure rRBC in platelet concentrate (PC) and plasma components. Sample dilution, incubation time and reagent volume were optimized for use with non-RBC blood products. The assay was linear (R(2) = 0·99), even at low rRBCs counts. Intra- and inter-assay variation gave coefficients of variance (CV) between 2·2 and 9·4% and 2·6 and 14·9%, respectively, depending on rRBC levels. Good correlation (r = 0·995) was found between the automated assay and manual counting, which is considered the gold standard. Using the automated assay, the range of rRBCs (count/unit) in buffy-coat platelet concentrate (PCs) was 27-5505 × 10(6) and in apheresis PCs was 1-361 × 10(6). The ADVIA CSF assay is a sensitive, precise and accurate means to assess rRBC counts in non-RBC components. © 2012 The Author(s). Vox Sanguinis © 2012 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  5. Effects of blood transfusion on the immune responsiveness and survival of cancer patients: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintiliani, L; Buzzonetti, A; DiGirolamo, M; Iudicone, P; Guglielmetti, M; Martini, F; Scocchera, R; Terlizzi, F; Lapponi, P; Giuliani, E

    1991-10-01

    To evaluate whether blood transfusion exerts an adverse influence on cancer evolution, a prospective clinical and immunologic investigation was carried out on 58 surgical patients with gastric or colorectal adenocarcinoma. None had had previous transfusion; 35 received perioperative transfusion. Among preoperative variables, only red cell count and hemoglobin concentration were significantly reduced in the patients transfused at operation. Other clinical characteristics and immunologic functions (except interferon-gamma release) did not differ significantly from those of untransfused patients. The survival rate of transfused patients, although shorter, was not significantly different from that of untransfused patients. Immunologic tests done after surgery on 30 patients (17 transfused and 13 untransfused) did not show significant differences in the two groups. Significant increases in interleukin-2-stimulated production and immunoglobulin M synthesis were observed in transfused patients after surgery. Patients transfused perioperatively with more than 3 units of blood had some evidence of decreased immune function, but differences were not significant. While shorter survival and some immunologic changes may correlate with the number of transfusions, more patients must be studied to determine whether this relationship will be confirmed.

  6. Cinnamomum zeylanicum extract on the radiolabelling of blood constituents and the morphometry of red blood cells: In vitro assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benarroz, M.O. [Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Departamento de Biofisica e Biometria, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Avenida 28 de Setembro, 87, 4o Andar, Vila Isabel, 20551-030 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias da Saude, Avenida General Gustavo Cordeiro de Farias, s/n, 59010-180 Natal, RN (Brazil); Fonseca, A.S. [Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Departamento de Biofisica e Biometria, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Avenida 28 de Setembro, 87, 4o Andar, Vila Isabel, 20551-030 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], E-mail: adenilso@uerj.br; Rocha, G.S. [Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Departamento de Biofisica e Biometria, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Avenida 28 de Setembro, 87, 4o Andar, Vila Isabel, 20551-030 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Frydman, J.N.G. [Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Departamento de Biofisica e Biometria, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Avenida 28 de Setembro, 87, 4o Andar, Vila Isabel, 20551-030 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias da Saude, Avenida General Gustavo Cordeiro de Farias, s/n, 59010-180 Natal, RN (Brazil); Rocha, V.C.; Pereira, M.O. [Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Departamento de Biofisica e Biometria, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Avenida 28 de Setembro, 87, 4o Andar, Vila Isabel, 20551-030 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)] (and others)

    2008-02-15

    Effects of Cinnamomum zeylanicum (cinnamon) on the labelling of blood constituents with technetium-99 m({sup 99m}Tc) and on the morphology of red blood cells were studied. Blood samples from Wistar rats were incubated with cinnamon extract for 1hour or with 0.9% NaCl, as control. Labelling of blood constituents with {sup 99m}Tc was performed. Plasma (P) and blood cells (BC), soluble (SF-P and SF-BC) and insoluble (IF-P and IF-BC) fractions were separated. The radioactivity in each fraction was counted and the percentage of radioactivity incorporated (%ATI) was calculated. Blood smears were prepared, fixed, stained and the qualitative and quantitative morphological analysis of the red blood cells was evaluated. The data showed that the cinnamon extract decreased significantly (p<0.05) the %ATI on BC, IF-P and IF-BC. No modifications were verified on shape of red blood cells. Cinnamon extracts could alter the labelling of blood constituents with {sup 99m}Tc, and although our results were obtained with animals, precaution is suggested in interpretations of nuclear medicine examinations involving the labelling of blood constituents in patients who are using cinnamon.

  7. Cinnamomum zeylanicum extract on the radiolabelling of blood constituents and the morphometry of red blood cells: in vitro assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benarroz, M O; Fonseca, A S; Rocha, G S; Frydman, J N G; Rocha, V C; Pereira, M O; Bernardo-Filho, M

    2008-02-01

    Effects of Cinnamomum zeylanicum (cinnamon) on the labelling of blood constituents with technetium-99m(99mTc) and on the morphology of red blood cells were studied. Blood samples from Wistar rats were incubated with cinnamon extract for 1 hour or with 0.9% NaCl, as control. Labelling of blood constituents with 99mTc was performed. Plasma (P) and blood cells (BC), soluble (SF-P and SF-BC) and insoluble (IF-P and IF-BC) fractions were separated. The radioactivity in each fraction was counted and the percentage of radioactivity incorporated (%ATI) was calculated. Blood smears were prepared, fixed, stained and the qualitative and quantitative morphological analysis of the red blood cells was evaluated. The data showed that the cinnamon extract decreased significantly (p<0.05) the %ATI on BC, IF-P and IF-BC. No modifications were verified on shape of red blood cells. Cinnamon extracts could alter the labelling of blood constituents with 99mTc, and although our results were obtained with animals, precaution is suggested in interpretations of nuclear medicine examinations involving the labelling of blood constituents in patients who are using cinnamon.

  8. Early survival and growth of planted Douglas-fir with red alder in four mixed regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall D. Murray; Richard E. Miller

    1986-01-01

    To quantify between-species interactions, we measured and compared survival and growth of planted Douglas-fir and associated planted and volunteer red alder at a location on the west side of the Cascade Range in Washington. The planted alder were wildlings dug either from a nearby area or from a distant, coastal site and interplanted into a 3-year-old Douglas-fir...

  9. Geometrical Aspects During Formation of Compact Aggregates of Red Blood Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cardoso A.V.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past forty years considerable progress has been achieved on the knowledge of human blood as a non-Newtonian shear-thinning suspension, whose initial state, that is at rest (stasis or at very low shear rates, has a gel-like internal structure which is destroyed as shear stress increases. The main goal of this communication is to describe the role of geometrical aspects during RBC (red blood cell aggregate formation, growth and compaction on naturally aggregate (porcine blood and non-aggregate (bovine blood samples. We consider how these aspects coupled with tension equilibrium are decisive to transform red cell linear roleaux to three-dimensional aggregates or clusters. Geometrical aspects are also crucial on the compaction of red blood cell aggregates. These densely packed aggregates could precipitate out of blood- either as dangerous deposits on arterial walls, or as clots which travel in suspension until they block some crucial capillary.

  10. Multi-omics Evidence for Inheritance of Energy Pathways in Red Blood Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisenhorn, Erin M M; van T Erve, Thomas J; Riley, Nicholas M; Hess, John R; Raife, Thomas J; Coon, Joshua J

    2016-12-01

    Each year over 90 million units of blood are transfused worldwide. Our dependence on this blood supply mandates optimized blood management and storage. During storage, red blood cells undergo degenerative processes resulting in altered metabolic characteristics which may make blood less viable for transfusion. However, not all stored blood spoils at the same rate, a difference that has been attributed to variable rates of energy usage and metabolism in red blood cells. Specific metabolite abundances are heritable traits; however, the link between heritability of energy metabolism and red blood cell storage profiles is unclear. Herein we performed a comprehensive metabolomics and proteomics study of red blood cells from 18 mono- and di-zygotic twin pairs to measure heritability and identify correlations with ATP and other molecular indices of energy metabolism. Without using affinity-based hemoglobin depletion, our work afforded the deepest multi-omic characterization of red blood cell membranes to date (1280 membrane proteins and 330 metabolites), with 119 membrane protein and 148 metabolite concentrations found to be over 30% heritable. We demonstrate a high degree of heritability in the concentration of energy metabolism metabolites, especially glycolytic metabolites. In addition to being heritable, proteins and metabolites involved in glycolysis and redox metabolism are highly correlated, suggesting that crucial energy metabolism pathways are inherited en bloc at distinct levels. We conclude that individuals can inherit a phenotype composed of higher or lower concentrations of these proteins together. This can result in vastly different red blood cells storage profiles which may need to be considered to develop precise and individualized storage options. Beyond guiding proper blood storage, this intimate link in heritability between energy and redox metabolism pathways may someday prove useful in determining the predisposition of an individual toward metabolic

  11. Red blood cell motion and deformation in a curved microvessel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Ting; Phan-Thien, Nhan; Lim, Chwee Teck; Li, Yu

    2017-12-08

    The flow of cells through curved vessels is often encountered in various biomedical and bioengineering applications, such as red blood cells (RBCs) passing through the curved arteries in circulation, and cells sorting through a shear-induced migration in a curved channels. Most of past numerical studies focused on the cell deformation in small straight microvessels, or on the flow pattern in large curved vessels without considering the cell deformation. However, there have been few attempts to study the cell deformation and the associated flow pattern in a curved microvessel. In this work, a particle-based method, smoothed dissipative particle dynamics (SDPD), is used to simulate the motion and deformation of a RBC in a curved microvessel of diameter comparable to the RBC diameter. The emphasis is on the effects of the curvature, the type and the size of the curved microvessel on the RBC deformation and the flow pattern. The simulation results show that a small curved shape of the microvessel has negligible effect on the RBC behavior and the flow pattern which are similar to those in a straight microvessel. When the microvessel is high in curvature, the secondary flow comes into being with a pair of Dean vortices, and the velocity profile of the primary flow is skewed toward the inner wall of the microvessel. The RBC also loses the axisymmetric deformation, and it is stretched first and then shrinks when passing through the curved part of the microvessel with the large curvature. It is also found that a pair of Dean vortices arise only under the condition of De>1 (De is the Dean number, a ratio of centrifugal to viscous competition). The Dean vortices are more easily observed in the larger or more curved microvessels. Finally, it is observed that the velocity profile of primary flow is skewed toward the inner wall of curved microvessel, i.e., the fluid close to the inner wall flows faster than that close to the outer wall. This is contrary to the common sense in

  12. Characterization of Microvesicles Released from Human Red Blood Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duc Bach Nguyen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Extracellular vesicles (EVs are spherical fragments of cell membrane released from various cell types under physiological as well as pathological conditions. Based on their size and origin, EVs are classified as exosome, microvesicles (MVs and apoptotic bodies. Recently, the release of MVs from human red blood cells (RBCs under different conditions has been reported. MVs are released by outward budding and fission of the plasma membrane. However, the outward budding process itself, the release of MVs and the physical properties of these MVs have not been well investigated. The aim of this study is to investigate the formation process, isolation and characterization of MVs released from RBCs under conditions of stimulating Ca2+ uptake and activation of protein kinase C. Methods: Experiments were performed based on single cell fluorescence imaging, fluorescence activated cell sorter/flow cytometer (FACS, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, atomic force microscopy (AFM and dynamic light scattering (DLS. The released MVs were collected by differential centrifugation and characterized in both their size and zeta potential. Results: Treatment of RBCs with 4-bromo-A23187 (positive control, lysophosphatidic acid (LPA, or phorbol-12 myristate-13 acetate (PMA in the presence of 2 mM extracellular Ca2+ led to an alteration of cell volume and cell morphology. In stimulated RBCs, exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS and formation of MVs were observed by using annexin V-FITC. The shedding of MVs was also observed in the case of PMA treatment in the absence of Ca2+, especially under the transmitted bright field illumination. By using SEM, AFM and DLS the morphology and size of stimulated RBCs, MVs were characterized. The sizes of the two populations of MVs were 205.8 ± 51.4 nm and 125.6 ± 31.4 nm, respectively. Adhesion of stimulated RBCs and MVs was observed. The zeta potential of MVs was determined in the range from - 40 mV to - 10 m

  13. Role of red cells and plasma composition on blood sessile droplet evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanotte, Luca; Laux, Didier; Charlot, Benoît; Abkarian, Manouk

    2017-11-01

    The morphology of dried blood droplets derives from the deposition of red cells, the main components of their solute phase. Up to now, evaporation-induced convective flows were supposed to be at the base of red cell distribution in blood samples. Here, we present a direct visualization by videomicroscopy of the internal dynamics in desiccating blood droplets, focusing on the role of cell concentration and plasma composition. We show that in diluted suspensions, the convection is promoted by the rich molecular composition of plasma, whereas it is replaced by an outward red blood cell displacement front at higher hematocrits. We also evaluate by ultrasounds the effect of red cell deposition on the temporal evolution of sample rigidity and adhesiveness.

  14. Red blood cell transfusions and tissue oxygenation in anemic hematology outpatients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yuruk, Koray; Bartels, Sebastiaan A.; Milstein, Dan M. J.; Bezemer, Rick; Biemond, Bart J.; Ince, Can

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is little clinical evidence that red blood cell (RBC) transfusions improve oxygen availability at the microcirculatory level. We tested the hypotheses that anemia in chronically anemic patients with relatively healthy microcirculation would be associated with low tissue hemoglobin

  15. A new dihydrochalcone from dragon's blood, red resin of Dracaena cochinchinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Ke-Lan; Lv, Jing-Ci; Zhang, Tian-Bao; Xu, Lu-Rong; Chen, Xu

    2008-12-01

    A new dihydrochalcone, 4'-hydroxy-4,2'-dimethoxy-dihydrochalcone, was isolated from Chinese dragon's blood, the red resin of Dracaena cochinchinensis. Its structure was established by spectrum analysis.

  16. The Effect of Disinfection on Viability and Function of Baboon Red Blood Cells and Platelets

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Valeri, C

    1997-01-01

    .... For the past 10 years our laboratory has used baboons to evaluate the effects of various disinfection treatments on autologous red blood cell and platelet viability and function in vitro and in vivo...

  17. Acute iatrogenic polycythemia induced by massive red blood cell transfusion during subtotal abdominal colectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Chiapaikeo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A 46 year old man was transfused ten units of packed red blood cells during subtotal colectomy after intraoperative point-of-care testing values demonstrated hemoglobin values less than seven grams per deciliter (g/dL. A post-operative hemoglobin analyzed in a standard hematologic laboratory revealed a hemoglobin value of 27.8 g/dL. He underwent emergent red blood cell depletion therapy which decreased his hemoglobin to 7.5 g/dL. The physiologic consequences of iatrogenic polycythemia caused by massive transfusion during major abdominal surgery must take into account the fluid shifts that interplay between the osmotic load, viscosity of blood, and postoperative third spacing of fluid. Treatment of acute iatrogenic polycythemia can be effectively accomplished by red blood cell depletion therapy. However, fluid shifts caused by massive transfusion followed by rapid red cell depletion produce a unique physiologic state that is without a well-described algorithm for management.

  18. Human and murine splenic neutrophils are potent phagocytes of IgG-opsonized red blood cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meinderts, Sanne M.; Oldenborg, Per-Arne; Beuger, Boukje M.; Klei, Thomas R. L.; Johansson, Johanna; Kuijpers, Taco W.; Matozaki, Takashi; Huisman, Elise J.; de Haas, Masja; van den Berg, Timo K.; van Bruggen, Robin

    2017-01-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) clearance is known to occur primarily in the spleen, and is presumed to be executed by red pulp macrophages. Erythrophagocytosis in the spleen takes place as part of the homeostatic turnover of RBCs to remove old RBCs. It can be strongly promoted by immunoglobulin G (IgG)

  19. NHE-1 sequence and expression in toad, snake and fish red blood cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Steffen Nyegaard; Wang, Tobias; Kristensen, Torsten

    Red blood cells (RBC) from reptiles appear not to express regulatory volume increase (RVI) upon shrinkage (Kristensen et al., 2008). In other vertebrates, the RVI response is primarily mediated by activation of the Na+/H+ exchanger (NHE-1) and we, therefore decided to investigate whether red cell...

  20. Statistical dynamics of flowing red blood cells by morphological image processing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M Higgins

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Blood is a dense suspension of soft non-Brownian cells of unique importance. Physiological blood flow involves complex interactions of blood cells with each other and with the environment due to the combined effects of varying cell concentration, cell morphology, cell rheology, and confinement. We analyze these interactions using computational morphological image analysis and machine learning algorithms to quantify the non-equilibrium fluctuations of cellular velocities in a minimal, quasi-two-dimensional microfluidic setting that enables high-resolution spatio-temporal measurements of blood cell flow. In particular, we measure the effective hydrodynamic diffusivity of blood cells and analyze its relationship to macroscopic properties such as bulk flow velocity and density. We also use the effective suspension temperature to distinguish the flow of normal red blood cells and pathological sickled red blood cells and suggest that this temperature may help to characterize the propensity for stasis in Virchow's Triad of blood clotting and thrombosis.

  1. Comparative study of red blood cell method in rat and calves blood as alternatives of Draize eye irritation test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagarto, A; Vega, R; Vega, Y; Guerra, I; González, R

    2006-06-01

    Red blood cell assay (RBC) is used to estimate potential irritation of tensioactive agents and detergents. Cell membrane lysis and cell protein denaturation are measured photometrically. This study was aimed to determine if rat blood cells can be used to predict eye potential irritation in the same way of calves blood cells in RBC assay. We evaluated 20 cosmetic formulations using rat and calves blood according to INVITOX protocol No 37. Data of media hemolysis concentration, denaturation index and the ratio of both parameters were compared with in vivo data of eye irritancy. There was a significant difference (p<0.01) between H50 value when evaluated the standard SDS with red blood cell method in rat and calves blood. According to the exact probability of Fisher taking as approach the acceptance or rejection of the substance there are no significant differences between in vitro assay with calves blood and in vivo results. Not happening the same way for the RBC assay with rat blood where significant differences were obtained (p<0.01) among the classification of in vitro and in vivo test. The RBC assay using calves blood showed better results. Several test substances were false negatives with rat blood. This high false negative rate would be correctly identified by the animal test but it may also lead to increased animal consumption. For that RBC assay with calf blood cells is preferable to the employment of rat blood as screening method with a reduction and refinement strategy.

  2. Red blood cell distribution width: A simple parameter with multiple clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvagno, Gian Luca; Sanchis-Gomar, Fabian; Picanza, Alessandra; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    The red blood cell distribution width (RDW) is a simple and inexpensive parameter, which reflects the degree of heterogeneity of erythrocyte volume (conventionally known as anisocytosis), and is traditionally used in laboratory hematology for differential diagnosis of anemias. Nonetheless, recent evidence attests that anisocytosis is commonplace in human disorders such as cardiovascular disease, venous thromboembolism, cancer, diabetes, community-acquired pneumonia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, liver and kidney failure, as well as in other acute or chronic conditions. Despite some demographic and analytical issues related to the routine assessment that may impair its clinical usefulness, an increased RDW has a high negative predictive value for diagnosing a variety of disorders, but also conveys important information for short- and long-term prognosis. Even more importantly, the value of RDW is now being regarded as a strong and independent risk factor for death in the general population. Although it has not been definitely established whether an increased value of RDW is a risk factor or should only be considered an epiphenomenon of an underlying biological and metabolic imbalance, it seems reasonable to suggest that the assessment of this parameter should be broadened far beyond the differential diagnosis of anemias. An increased RDW mirrors a profound deregulation of erythrocyte homeostasis involving both impaired erythropoiesis and abnormal red blood cell survival, which may be attributed to a variety of underlying metabolic abnormalities such as shortening of telomere length, oxidative stress, inflammation, poor nutritional status, dyslipidemia, hypertension, erythrocyte fragmentation and alteration of erythropoietin function. As such, the aim of this article is to provide general information about RDW and its routine assessment, to review the most relevant implications in health and disease and give some insights about its potential clinical

  3. Direct In Vivo Electrochemical Detection of Haemoglobin in Red Blood Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Rou Jun; Peng, Weng Kung; Han, Jongyoon; Pumera, Martin

    2014-08-01

    The electrochemical behavior of iron ion in haemoglobin provides insight to the chemical activity in the red blood cell which is important in the field of hematology. Herein, the detection of haemoglobin in human red blood cells on glassy carbon electrode (GC) was demonstrated. Red blood cells or raw blood cells was immobilized on a glassy carbon electrode surface with Nafion films employed to sandwich the layer of biological sample firmly on the electrode surface. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) analyses revealed a well-defined reduction peak for haemoglobin at about -0.30 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) at the red blood cell (GC-Nf-RBC-3Nf) and blood (GC-Nf-B-3Nf) film modified GCE in a pH 3.5 phosphate buffer solution. We further demonstrated that the complex biological conditions of a human red blood cell displayed no interference with the detection of haemoglobin. Such findings shall have an implication on the possibilities of studying the electrochemical behaviour of haemoglobin directly from human blood, for various scientific and clinical purposes.

  4. Calculation of Intracellular Pressure of Red Blood Cells at Jaundice According to Atomic Force Microscopy Data

    OpenAIRE

    Yu.S. Nagornov; I.V. Zhilyaev

    2016-01-01

    The present work is devoted to the analysis of three-dimensional data of atomic force microscopy for research of the morphology of red blood cells. In this paper we built a biomechanical model of the erythrocyte, which allowed calculating the intracellular pressure of erythrocyte based on data of atomic force microscopy. As a result, we obtained the dependence intracellular pressure on the morphology of red blood cell. We have proposed a method of estimating of intracellular pressure of eryth...

  5. A role for activated endothelial cells in red blood cell clearance: implications for vasopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fens, Marcel H A M; van Wijk, Richard; Andringa, Grietje; van Rooijen, Karlijn L; Dijstelbloem, Hilde M; Rasmussen, Jan T; de Vooght, Karen M K; Schiffelers, Raymond M; Gaillard, Carlo A J M; van Solinge, Wouter W

    2012-04-01

    Phosphatidylserine exposure by red blood cells is acknowledged as a signal that initiates phagocytic removal of the cells from the circulation. Several disorders and conditions are known to induce phosphatidylserine exposure. Removal of phosphatidylserine-exposing red blood cells generally occurs by macrophages in the spleen and liver. Previously, however, we have shown that endothelial cells are also capable of erythrophagocytosis. Key players in the erythrophagocytosis by endothelial cells appeared to be lactadherin and α(v)-integrin. Phagocytosis via the phosphatidylserine-lactadherin-α(v)-integrin pathway is the acknowledged route for removal of apoptotic innate cells by phagocytes. Endothelial cell phagocytosis of red blood cells was further explored using a more (patho)physiological approach. Red blood cells were exposed to oxidative stress, induced by tert-butyl hydroperoxide. After opsonization with lactadherin, red blood cells were incubated with endothelial cells to study erythrophagocytosis and examine cytotoxicity. Red blood cells exposed to oxidative stress show alterations such as phosphatidylserine exposure and loss of deformability. When incubated with endothelial cells, marked erythrophagocytosis occurred in the presence of lactadherin under both static and flow conditions. As a consequence, intracellular organization was disturbed and endothelial cells were seen to change shape ('rounding up'). Increased expression of apoptotic markers indicated that marked erythrophagocytosis has cytotoxic effects. Activated endothelial cells show significant phagocytosis of phosphatidylserine-exposing and rigid red blood cells under both static and flow conditions. This results in a certain degree of cytotoxicity. We postulate that activated endothelial cells play a role in red blood cell clearance in vivo. Significant erythrophagocytosis can induce endothelial cell loss, which may contribute to vasopathological effects as seen, for instance, in sickle cell

  6. Impairments in the Nanostructure of Red Blood Cell Membranes in Acute Blood Loss and Their Correction with Perfluorocarbon Emulsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Moroz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study impairments in the nanostructure of red blood cell membranes in acute blood loss and methods to correct the membrane structures with perfluorocarbon emulsion. Materials and methods. Experiments were carried out on Nembutal-anesthesized outbred rats. The model of a terminal state was 60-minute hypovolemic hypotension, followed by blood reinfusion and addition of perfluorane or Ringer’s solution. Images of fragments of the red blood cell membrane surface structure were obtained using a Femtoscan atomic force microscope (AFM. Twenty-seven experiments were performed; 186 cells were scanned on the AFM, which provided 720 images of three orders. Results. The paper shows the time course of changes in the index hi for different phases of an experiment. After 5-minute hypotension, h1 increased by more than 4.3 times and after 60-minute hypotension, this value decreased to 4.7 nm. The second-order height rose linearly at the stages: control — at 5 minutes — at 60 minutes of hypotension. At 60 minutes of hypotension, the first- and second-order heights were similar. At 5 minutes of hypotension, the third-order surface slightly changed — it increased by 1.5-fold. But at 60 minutes of hypotension, the changes in the fine structures of the membrane became great — h3 increased by 6.3 times. Conclusion. Blood loss has shown to induce impairments in the microstructure of red blood cell membranes at all levels of its organization: flick in the range of 600—1000 nm, spectrin matrix at 150—350 nm, proteins, band 3, at 30—80 nm. The per-fluorocarbon emulsion «Perftoran» exerts a pronounced modulatory effect on the red blood cell membrane nanostructure at all steps of its organization, by restoring the membrane nanostructure practically to the control level. Key words: blood loss, red blood cell membrane, nanostructure, atomic force microscopy.

  7. Survival of Salmonella and Staphylococcus aureus in mexican red salsa in a food service setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Wendy; Hsu, Wei-Yea; Simonne, Amarat H

    2010-06-01

    Mexican red salsa is one of the most common side dishes in Mexican cuisine. According to data on foodborne illnesses collected by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, salsa was associated with 70 foodborne illness outbreaks between 1990 and 2006. Salsa ingredients such as tomatoes, cilantro, and onions often have been implicated in foodborne illness outbreaks. Mexican-style restaurants commonly prepare a large batch of red salsa, store it at refrigeration temperatures, and then serve it at room temperature. Salmonella is one of the top etiologies in foodborne illness outbreaks associated with salsa, and our preliminary studies revealed the consistent presence of Staphylococcus aureus in restaurant salsa. In the present study, we evaluated the survival of Salmonella Enteritidis and S. aureus inoculated into restaurant-made salsa samples stored at ambient (20 degrees C) and refrigeration (4 degrees C) temperatures. These test temperature conditions represent best-case and worst-case scenarios in restaurant operations. Salmonella survived in all samples stored at room temperature, but S. aureus populations significantly decreased after 24 h of storage at room temperature. No enterotoxin was detected in samples inoculated with S. aureus at 6.0 log CFU/g. Both microorganisms survived longer in refrigerated samples than in samples stored at room temperature. Overall, both Salmonella and S. aureus survived a sufficient length of time in salsa to pose a food safety risk.

  8. Why and how does collective red blood cells motion occur in the blood microcirculation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghigliotti, Giovanni; Selmi, Hassib; Asmi, Lassaad El; Misbah, Chaouqi

    2012-10-01

    The behaviour of red blood cells (RBCs), modelled as vesicles, in Poiseuille flow, mimicking the microvasculature, is studied with numerical simulations in two dimensions. RBCs moving in the centre of the Poiseuille flow (as in blood capillaries) are shown to attract each other and form clusters only due to hydrodynamic interactions, provided that their distance at a given time is below a certain critical value. This distance depends on physical parameters, such as the flow strength. Our simulations reveal that clusters are unstable above a threshold value in the number of forming RBCs, beyond which one or few cells escape the pack by a self-regulating mechanism that select the marginally stable size. This size selection depends on the flow strength as well as on the RBC swelling ratio. The results are interpreted via the analysis of the perturbation of the flow field induced by the vesicles and the interplay with bending and tension forces. This sheds a novel light on the process of collective motion of RBCs observed in vivo.

  9. Effects of Cinnamomum zeylanicum treatment on radiolabeling of blood constituents and morphology of red blood cells in Wistar rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benarroz, Monica Oliveira; Fonseca, Adenilson de Souza da; Bernardo-Filho, Mario [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Biofisica e Biometria]. E-mail: adenilso@uerj.br; Rocha, Gabrielle de Souza; Pereira, Marcia Oliveira [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil); Geller, Mauro [Centro Universitario Serra dos Orgaos, Teresopolis, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias da Saude; Presta, Giuseppe Antonio [Universidade Federal do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UNIRIO), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. Biomedico. Dept. de Fisiologia Humana

    2008-12-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of in vivo treatment with an aqueous cinnamon extract on the labeling of blood constituents with {sup 99m}Tc and on the morphology of red blood cells from Wistar rats. Animals were treated with cinnamon extract at different doses and for different periods of time. As controls, animals treated with 0.9% NaCl. Labeling of blood constituents with {sup 99}mTc was performed. Plasma, blood cells and insoluble fractions were isolated. Radioactivity in each fraction was counted and the percentage of radioactivity (%ATI) was calculated. Also, blood smears were prepared to morphological analysis of red blood cells from. Data showed that in vivo cinnamon extract did not significantly (p>0.05) modify the %ATI of blood constituents and morphology of red blood cells. The results suggest that in vivo aqueous cinnamon could not affect the membrane structures involved in transport of ions or the oxidation state of stannous and pertechnetate ions. (author)

  10. Blood analyte sensing using fluorescent dye-loaded red blood cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Sarah C.; Shao, Xiaole; Cooley, Nicholas; Milanick, Mark A.; Glass, Timothy E.; Meissner, Kenith E.

    2014-02-01

    Measurement of blood analytes provides crucial information about a patient's health. Some such analytes, such as glucose in the case of diabetes, require long-term or near-continuous monitoring for proper disease management. However, current monitoring techniques are far from ideal: multiple-per-day finger stick tests are inconvenient and painful for the patient; implantable sensors have short functional life spans (i.e., 3-7 days). Due to analyte transporters on red blood cell (RBC) membranes that equilibrate intracellular and extracellular analyte levels, RBCs serve as an attractive alternative for encapsulating analyte sensors. Once reintroduced to the blood stream, the functionalized RBCs may continue to live for the remainder of their life span (120 days for humans). They are biodegradable and biocompatible, thereby eliminating the immune system response common for many implanted devices. The proposed sensing system utilizes the ability of the RBCs to swell in response to a decrease in the osmolarity of the extracellular solution. Just before lysis, they develop small pores on the scale of tens of nanometers. While at low temperature, analyte-sensitive dyes in the extracellular solution diffuse into the perforated RBCs and become entrapped upon restoration of temperature and osmolarity. Since the fluorescent signal from the entrapped dye reports on changes in the analyte level of the extracellular solution via the RBC transporters, interactions between the RBCs and the dye are critical to the efficacy of this technique. In this work, we study the use of a near infrared pH sensitive dye encapsulated within RBCs and assess the ability to measure dye fluorescence in vivo.

  11. Salidroside as a Novel Protective Agent to Improve Red Blood Cell Cryopreservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alotaibi, Noha A S; Slater, Nigel K H; Rahmoune, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Glycerol and trehalose have been widely examined as protective agents in the cryopreservation of red blood cells (RBCs). However, the effectiveness of these reagents alone on cell viability is moderate. Here, the addition of salidroside attenuated oxidative damage of sheep RBCs prior to and post cryostorage. The supplementation of salidroside to the cryopreservation media containing 10% glycerol improved RBC survival by approximately 61.1±4.8% vs 37.9±4.6%. A smaller effect was seen in RBCs cryopreserved in 300 mM trehalose where the addition of salidroside improved survival by 7.6±0.3%. Furthermore, the addition of salidroside to cold storage solution demonstrated a significant reduction of haemolysis after 4 days for RBCs loaded with either glycerol or trehalose, compared to cells incubated without salidroside. RBCs survival was 2-fold greater following freezing in trehalose, compared with glycerol. After 10 days, salidroside enabled a lower haemolysis of 16.7±1.3% compared to 29.0±8.4% for cells incubated without salidroside. However, salidroside had no effect on RBCs which had been frozen in glycerol as the resulting haemolysis rate by day 10 was approximately 60%. Salidroside increased glutathione reductase activity and decreased lactate dehydrogenase activity. Furthermore, it led to reduced carbonylation of proteins in both glycerol and trehalose loaded cells. Finally, no effect on lipid peroxidation was found in the glycerol loaded RBCs although this was reduced in RBCs loaded with trehalose and salidroside. The present findings confirm the potential use of salidroside as a novel protective agent in cryopreservation and refrigerated storage of sheep RBCs.

  12. Salidroside as a Novel Protective Agent to Improve Red Blood Cell Cryopreservation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noha A S Alotaibi

    Full Text Available Glycerol and trehalose have been widely examined as protective agents in the cryopreservation of red blood cells (RBCs. However, the effectiveness of these reagents alone on cell viability is moderate. Here, the addition of salidroside attenuated oxidative damage of sheep RBCs prior to and post cryostorage. The supplementation of salidroside to the cryopreservation media containing 10% glycerol improved RBC survival by approximately 61.1±4.8% vs 37.9±4.6%. A smaller effect was seen in RBCs cryopreserved in 300 mM trehalose where the addition of salidroside improved survival by 7.6±0.3%. Furthermore, the addition of salidroside to cold storage solution demonstrated a significant reduction of haemolysis after 4 days for RBCs loaded with either glycerol or trehalose, compared to cells incubated without salidroside. RBCs survival was 2-fold greater following freezing in trehalose, compared with glycerol. After 10 days, salidroside enabled a lower haemolysis of 16.7±1.3% compared to 29.0±8.4% for cells incubated without salidroside. However, salidroside had no effect on RBCs which had been frozen in glycerol as the resulting haemolysis rate by day 10 was approximately 60%. Salidroside increased glutathione reductase activity and decreased lactate dehydrogenase activity. Furthermore, it led to reduced carbonylation of proteins in both glycerol and trehalose loaded cells. Finally, no effect on lipid peroxidation was found in the glycerol loaded RBCs although this was reduced in RBCs loaded with trehalose and salidroside. The present findings confirm the potential use of salidroside as a novel protective agent in cryopreservation and refrigerated storage of sheep RBCs.

  13. Use of remote blood releasing system for red cell transfusion in hospice care center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwok Ying Chan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: It is quite common to have advanced cancer or end-stage renal disease patients for regular or even frequent blood transfusion in palliative care. However, due to geographical reason in some hospice centers, blood transfusion is sometimes difficult if blood bank is closed during non-office hour or not available. Methods: Here, we reported a new blood releasing system, that is, remote blood releasing system, that could be used safely by nursing staff alone when the blood bank was closed during the night time and holiday. Results: On-call nursing staff could collect red cells successful in these two cases. Conclusion: The new blood releasing system seems useful. However, larger sample sizes and longer period of study are required to estimate its efficacy and safety. The provision of antibody-positive red cells and platelet remained a limitation of this system.

  14. Bill redness is positively associated with reproduction and survival in male and female zebra finches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirre J P Simons

    Full Text Available Sexual traits can serve as honest indicators of phenotypic quality when they are costly. Brightly coloured yellow to red traits, which are pigmented by carotenoids, are relatively common in birds, and feature in sexual selection. Carotenoids have been linked to immune and antioxidant function, and the trade-off between ornamentation and these physiological functions provides a potential mechanism rendering carotenoid based signals costly. Mutual ornamentation is also common in birds and can be maintained by mutual mate choice for this ornament or by a correlated response in one sex to selection on the other sex. When selection pressures differ between the sexes this can cause intralocus sexual conflict. Sexually antagonistic selection pressures have been demonstrated for few sexual traits, and for carotenoid-dependent traits there is a single example: bill redness was found to be positively associated with survival and reproductive output in male zebra finches, but negatively so in females. We retested these associations in our captive zebra finch population without two possible limitations of this earlier study. Contrary to the earlier findings, we found no evidence for sexually antagonistic selection. In both sexes, individuals with redder bills showed higher survival. This association disappeared among the females with the reddest bills. Furthermore, females with redder bills achieved higher reproductive output. We conclude that bill redness of male and female zebra finches honestly signals phenotypic quality, and discuss the possible causes of the differences between our results and earlier findings.

  15. 'Spin, cool, and filter' red cells prepared in a regional blood center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callicoat, P A; Hicks, M W; Smith, D M; Clark, D A

    1987-01-01

    Red cells depleted of leukocytes by the "spin, cool, and filter" (SCF) method are effective in preventing most febrile, nonhemolytic transfusion reactions (FNHTR). To determine whether red cell concentrates may be centrifuged in a blood center and filtered subsequently at an outlying facility, the authors examined how leukocyte removal was affected by the transport and storage of centrifuged red cells before microaggregate filtration (MAF). One hundred fourteen red cell units were each divided into two aliquots. After centrifugation, one aliquot from each unit was retained in the blood center, and the other was transported on a truck for 2 to 12 hours. Aliquots were stored for variable periods, after which the residual leukocytes were counted. Neither transportation nor storage significantly affected leukocyte removal by MAF. However, an unacceptable proportion of all SCF units failed to meet American Red Cross standards for leukocyte-poor blood and studies of factors influencing leukocyte depletion were undertaken. A relative centrifugal force of 6700 X g was needed to produce consistently acceptable units when blood was 8 to 15 days old. These results show that making SCF red cells is a practical, inexpensive way for blood centers to provide hospitals with products that prevent most FNHTR; however, each facility that prepares these products must perform quality control carefully.

  16. Atomic Force Microscopy of the Structure of Red Blood Cell Membranes in Acute Blood Loss and Reinfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Moroz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to examine the surface heterogeneities of red blood cell membranes after acute massive blood loss and blood reinfusion, by using atomic force microscopy (AFM. Materials and methods. Experiments were carried out under nembu-tal anesthesia on male rats. Hypovolemic hypotension was induced during 60 minutes, followed by blood reinfusion. The experimental phases were as follows: control before blood loss; 5 minutes after its onset; 1 hour following hypotension; and 1 and 3 hours after reinfusion. Membrane surface images were obtained by AFM in the constant scanning mode. Spatial surface spectral transformation was used. Results. The nano-surface parameters were shown to be intrinsic characteristics of membranes. The greatest changes occurred at the early stages of transient processes: blood loss and reinfusion. Conclusion. The application of AFM permitted the authors to trace the time course of changes in the red blood cell membrane surfaces during acute total blood loss and further blood reinfusion to tolerances of fractions of nanometer. Key words: blood loss, reinfusion, nanostructure, atomic force microscopy.

  17. Certain Red Blood Cell Indices of Maternal and Umbilical Cord ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Uche

    El-Hazmi MAF and Warsy AS. Normal. Reference values for Hematological. Parameters, Red cell indices, HBA2 and. HB-F from early childhood through adolescence in Saudis. Ann Saudi Med. 2001; 21(3-4): 165-169. 22. Nneli RO. Retrospective and Prospective. Studies on the epidemiology of HIV/AIDS in pregnancy and ...

  18. Additive Effects of Rhizophora Racemose (Red Mangrove) On Blood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An experiment was carried out at the Teaching and Research Farm of Rivers State University of Science and Technology, Port Harcourt to determine the additive effect of pulverized Rhizophora racemosa (Red Mangrove) leaves on the hematology and bursa of Fabricus of broilers. Sixty (60) day-old, Anak broiler chicks ...

  19. Transfusion of older red blood cell units, cytokine burst and alloimmunization: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinardo, Carla Luana; Fernandes, Frederico Leon Arrabal; Sampaio, Luciana Ribeiro; Sabino, Ester Cerdeira; Mendrone, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Experimental data have shown that the transfusion of older red blood cell units causes alloimmunization, but the clinical applicability of this statement has never been properly assessed in non-sickle cell patients. It has been hypothesized that older units have higher numbers of cytokines, increasing the risk of alloimmunization related to antigen-presenting events. The goal of this study was to evaluate the association between the transfusion of older red blood cell units subjected to bedside leukodepletion and alloimmunization. All patients submitted to transfusions of bedside leukodepletion red blood cell units proven to have become alloimmunized in one oncologic service between 2009 and 2013 were enrolled in this study. A control group was formed by matching patients without alloimmunization in terms of number of transfusions and medical specialty. The median age of transfused units, the percentage of transfused red blood cell units >14 days of storage in relation to fresher red cell units (≤14 days of storage) and the mean age of transfused units older than 14 days were compared between the groups. Alloimmunized and control groups were homogeneous regarding the most relevant clinical variables (age, gender, type of oncological disease) and inflammatory background (C-reactive protein and Karnofsky scale). The median age of transfused red blood cell units, the ratio of older units transfused compared to fresher units and the mean age of transfused units older than 14 days did not differ between alloimmunized and control patients (17 vs. 17; 68/32 vs. 63.2/36.8 and 21.8±7.0 vs. 21.04±7.9; respectively). The transfusion of older red blood cell units subjected to bedside leukodepletion is not a key risk factor for alloimmunization. Strategies of providing fresh red cell units aiming to avoid alloimmunization are thus not justified. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Hematologia, Hemoterapia e Terapia Celular. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All

  20. Effect of sodium citrate on red blood cell count in wistar rat | Oladipo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of sodium citrate which is the sodium salt of citric acid, a preservative, an additive, an antioxidant and an anticoagulant used in blood transfusion was investigated in this study on red blood cell in wistar rat. Eighteen male adult rats of wistar strain (RattusNorvegicus) weighing between 150-200g were used.

  1. Susceptibility to hyperosmotic stress-induced phosphatidylserine exposure increases during red blood cell storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosman, G.J.C.G.M.; Cluitmans, J.C.A.; Groenen, Y.A.; Werre, J.M.; Willekens, F.L.A.; Novotny, V.M.J.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: During storage of red blood cell (RBCs) before transfusion, RBCs undergo a series of structural and functional changes that include the exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS), a potent removal signal. It was postulated that, during blood bank storage, the susceptibility to stress-induced PS

  2. Alterations in red blood cell deformability during storage: a microfluidic approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cluitmans, J.C.A.; Chokkalingam, V.; Janssen, A.M.; Brock, R.E.; Huck, W.T.S.; Bosman, G.J.C.G.M.

    2014-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) undergo extensive deformation when travelling through the microcapillaries. Deformability, the combined result of properties of the membrane-cytoskeleton complex, the surface area-to-volume ratio, and the hemoglobin content, is a critical determinant of capillary blood flow.

  3. Level of oxidative stress in the red blood cells of patients with liver cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geetha, A; Lakshmi Priya, M D; Jeyachristy, S Annie; Surendran, R

    2007-09-01

    Liver cirrhosis is associated with gastrointestinal haemorrhage and oesophageal variceal bleeding. Altered platelet functions has been reported to be a cause of bleeding complication. We carried out this study to find out the level of oxidative stress in the red blood cells of patients with liver cirrhosis. Fifty patients admitted with the complication of liver cirrhosis (with bleeding complications, n=30 and without bleeding complications, n=20) were included in the study. Age and sex matched normal healthy volunteers (n=45) served as controls. The levels of oxyhaemoglobin and methaemoglobin were assayed in the red blood cells. Oxidative stress markers such as lipid peroxides, lipid hydroperoxides and nitric oxide were determined along with enzymatic antioxidants. Membrane bound adenosine triphosphatases, cytosolic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and NADHmethaemoglobin reductase were also measured. The levels of cholesterol and total phospholipids were assessed in red blood cell membrane. The osmotic fragility of red blood cells was monitored using different concentrations of sodium chloride. The level of methaemoglobin was significantly higher (P blood cells of liver cirrhotic patients with bleeding complication compared to that of non bleeding patients. The activity level of NADH-methaemoglobin reductase was significantly lower (Penzymatic antioxidants were low except of glutathione peroxidase. The activity levels of adenosine triphosphatases were also found to be significantly lower (Pblood cells was also altered in patients. In cirrhotic condition red blood cells are subjected to severe oxidative stress with significant alterations in the membrane properties.

  4. Red blood cell image enhancement techniques for cells with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    quality or challenging conditions of the images such as poor illumination of blood smear and most importantly overlapping RBC. The algorithm comprises of two RBC segmentation that can be selected based on the image quality, circle mask technique and grayscale blood smear image processing. Detail explanations ...

  5. Irradiation shortens the survival time of red cells deficient in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenasee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westerman, M.P. (Rush Medical College, Chicago, IL); Wald, N.; Diloy-Puray, M.

    1980-03-01

    X radiation of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD)-deficient red cells causes distinct shortening of their survival time. This is accompanied by significant lowering of reduced glutathione content and is not observed in similarly prepared and treated normal cells. The damage is most likely related to irradiation-induced formation of activated oxygen products and to their subsequent effects on the cells. Neither methemoglobin increases nor Heinz body formation were observed, suggesting that hemolysis occurred prior to these changes. The study provides a model for examining the effects of irradiation and activated oxygen on red cells and suggests that patients with G6PD deficiency who receive irradiation could develop severe hemolysis in certain clinical settings.

  6. Modifying the red cell surface: towards an ABO-universal blood supply

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, Martin L; Clausen, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    Eliminating the risk for ABO-incompatible transfusion errors and simplifying logistics by creating a universal blood inventory is a challenging idea. Goldstein and co-workers pioneered the field of enzymatic conversion of blood group A and B red blood cells (RBCs) to O (ECO). Using alpha-galactos......Eliminating the risk for ABO-incompatible transfusion errors and simplifying logistics by creating a universal blood inventory is a challenging idea. Goldstein and co-workers pioneered the field of enzymatic conversion of blood group A and B red blood cells (RBCs) to O (ECO). Using alpha......-galactosidase from coffee beans to produce B-ECO RBCs, proof of principle for this revolutionary concept was achieved in clinical trials. However, because this enzyme has poor kinetic properties and low pH optimum the process was not economically viable. Conversion of group A RBCs was only achieved with the weak A2...

  7. Evaluation of the effectiveness of packed red blood cell irradiation by a linear accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Aparecido Olivo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Irradiation of blood components with ionizing radiation generated by a specific device is recommended to prevent transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease. However, a lin- ear accelerator can also be used in the absence of such a device, which is the case of the blood bank facility studied herein. In order to evaluate the quality of the irradiated packed red blood cells, this study aimed to determine whether the procedure currently employed in the facility is effective in inhibiting the proliferation of T lymphocytes without damaging blood components. The proliferation of T lymphocytes, plasma potassium levels, and the degree of hemolysis were evaluated and compared to blood bags that received no irradiation. Packed red blood cell bags were irradiated at a dose of 25 Gy in a linear accelerator. For this purpose, a container was designed to hold the bags and to ensure even distribution of irradiation as evaluated by computed tomography and dose-volume histogram. Irradiation was observed to inhibit the proliferation of lymphocytes. The percentage of hemolysis in irradiated bags was slightly higher than in non-irradiated bags (p-value >0.05, but it was always less than 0.4% of the red cell mass. Although potassium increased in both groups, it was more pronounced in irradiated red blood cells, especially after seven days of storage, with a linear increase over storage time. The findings showed that, at an appropriate dosage and under validated conditions, the irradiation of packed red blood cells in a linear accelerator is effective, inhibiting lymphocyte proliferation but without compromising the viability of the red cells.

  8. Contribution of the Retrovirus Epidemiology Donor Study (REDS to research on blood transfusion safety in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Loureiro

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The Retrovirus Epidemiology Donor Study (REDS program was established in the United States in 1989 with the purpose of increasing blood transfusion safety in the context of the HIV/AIDS and human T-lymphotropic virus epidemics. REDS and its successor, REDS-II were at first conducted in the US, then expanded in 2006 to include international partnerships with Brazil and China. In 2011, a third wave of REDS renamed the Recipient Epidemiology and Donor Evaluation Study-III (REDS-III was launched. This seven-year research program focuses on both blood banking and transfusion medicine research in the United States of America, Brazil, China, and South Africa. The main goal of the international programs is to reduce and prevent the transmission of HIV/AIDS and other known and emerging infectious agents through transfusion, and to address research questions aimed at understanding global issues related to the availability of safe blood. This article describes the contribution of REDS-II to transfusion safety in Brazil. Articles published from 2010 to 2013 are summarized, including database analyses to characterize blood donors, deferral rates, and prevalence, incidence and residual risk of the main blood-borne infections. Specific studies were developed to understand donor motivation, the impact of the deferral questions, risk factors and molecular surveillance among HIV-positive donors, and the natural history of Chagas disease. The purpose of this review is to disseminate the acquired knowledge and briefly summarize the findings of the REDS-II studies conducted in Brazil as well as to introduce the scope of the REDS-III program that is now in progress and will continue through 2018.

  9. A Novel Physiology-Based Mathematical Model to Estimate Red Blood Cell Lifespan in Different Human Age Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Guohua; Widness, John A; Mock, Donald M; Veng-Pedersen, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Direct measurement of red blood cell (RBC) survival in humans has improved from the original accurate but limited differential agglutination technique to the current reliable, safe, and accurate biotin method. Despite this, all of these methods are time consuming and require blood sampling over several months to determine the RBC lifespan. For situations in which RBC survival information must be obtained quickly, these methods are not suitable. With the exception of adults and infants, RBC survival has not been extensively investigated in other age groups. To address this need, we developed a novel, physiology-based mathematical model that quickly estimates RBC lifespan in healthy individuals at any age. The model is based on the assumption that the total number of RBC recirculations during the lifespan of each RBC (denoted by N max) is relatively constant for all age groups. The model was initially validated using the data from our prior infant and adult biotin-labeled red blood cell studies and then extended to the other age groups. The model generated the following estimated RBC lifespans in 2-year-old, 5-year-old, 8-year-old, and 10-year-old children: 62, 74, 82, and 86 days, respectively. We speculate that this model has useful clinical applications. For example, HbA1c testing is not reliable in identifying children with diabetes because HbA1c is directly affected by RBC lifespan. Because our model can estimate RBC lifespan in children at any age, corrections to HbA1c values based on the model-generated RBC lifespan could improve diabetes diagnosis as well as therapy in children.

  10. ABO blood group and breast cancer incidence and survival

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gates, Margaret A; Xu, Mousheng; Chen, Wendy Y; Kraft, Peter; Hankinson, Susan E; Wolpin, Brian M

    2012-01-01

    ...‐reported serologic blood type and/or ABO genotype. Using Cox proportional hazards regression, we examined the association between serologic blood type and incident breast cancer among 67,697 women, including 3,107 cases...

  11. Pilot study on novel blood containers with alternative plasticizers for red cell concentrate storage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Morishita

    Full Text Available Di (2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP, a typical plasticizer used for polyvinyl chloride (PVC blood containers, is eluted from the blood containers and exerts protective effects on red blood cells. However, a concern for detrimental effects of DEHP on human health has led to the development of potential DEHP substitutes. Here, we compared the red blood cell preservation ability of two types of non-DEHP blood containers with safe alternative plasticizers to that of DEHP blood containers. Red cell concentrates in mannitol-adenine-phosphate solution (MAP/RCC were stored for 6 weeks in PVC blood bags containing DEHP, di-isononyl-cyclohexane-1,2-dicarboxylate (DINCH and di (2-ethylhexyl 4-cyclohexene-1,2-dicarboxylate (DOTH, or 4-cyclohexene-1,2-dicarboxylic acid dinonyl ester (DL9TH and DOTH. There was no significant difference in the total amount of plasticizer eluted into MAP/RCC (till 3 weeks from the beginning of the experiment, hemolysis of MAP/RCC, and osmotic fragility of MAP/RCC between the non-DEHP blood containers and DEHP blood containers. Hematological and blood chemical indices of MAP/RCC in all containers were nearly the same. Thus, DOTH/DINCH and DOTH/DL9TH blood containers demonstrate the same quality of MAP/RCC storing as the DEHP blood containers. Since DOTH, DINCH, and DL9TH were reported to be safe, DOTH/DINCH and DOTH/DL9TH blood containers are promising candidate substitutes for DEHP blood containers.

  12. Quantitative assessment of limb blood flow using Tc-99m labeled red blood cells. Radionuclide venous occlusion plethysmography (RAVOP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Kazuo; Shougase, Takashi; Kawamura, Naoyuki; Tsukamoto, Eriko; Nakada, Kunihiro; Sakuma, Makoto; Furudate, Masayori

    1987-10-01

    A quantitative assessment of limb blood flow using a non-diffusible radioindicator, Tc-99m labeled red blood cells, was reported. This was an application of venous occlusion plethysmography using radionuclide which was originally proposed by M. Fukuoka et al. The peripheral blood flow (mean +- s.e.) of 30 legs in a normal control group was 1.87 +- 0.08 ml/100 ml/min. In heart diseases (46 legs), it was 1.49 +- 0.13 ml/100 ml/min. The limb blood flow between a control group and heart diseases was statistically significant (p < 0.01) in the t-test. The peripheral blood flow at rest between diseased legs and normal legs in occlusive arterial disorders was also statistically significant (p < 0.01) in a paired t-test. RAVOP was done after the completion of objective studies such as radionuclide angiography or ventriculography. Technique and calculation of a blood flow were very easy and simple. RAVOP study which was originally proposed by Fukuoka et al. was reappraised to be hopeful for quantitative measurement of limb blood flow as a non-invasive technique using Tc-99m labeled red blood cells.

  13. Screening for hemosiderosis in patients receiving multiple red blood cell transfusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jongh, Adriaan D; van Beers, Eduard J; de Vooght, Karen M K; Schutgens, Roger E G

    2017-05-01

    The dramatic impact of hemosiderosis on survival in chronically transfused patients with hereditary anemia is well known. We evaluated whether patients receiving multiple red blood cell (RBC) transfusions are adequately screened for hemosiderosis. We retrospectively assessed hemosiderosis screening and prevalence in adult patients that received over twenty RBC units in the University Medical Centre Utrecht from 2010 till 2015. Hemosiderosis was defined as ferritin ≥1000 μg/L. Adequate screening for chronically transfused patients was defined as any ferritin determined up to 3 months before or any moment after the last transfusion, while for patients that received all transfusions within 3 months (bulk transfusion), ferritin had to be determined after at least twenty transfusions. Of 471 patients, only 38.6% was adequately screened and hemosiderosis prevalence was 46.7%. Hemosiderosis prevalence was 47% in the chronic transfusion group and 12% in the bulk transfusion group. In patients transfused because of hematological malignancy or cardiothoracic surgery, respectively, 74% and 31% were adequately screened and hemosiderosis prevalence was 53% and 13%, respectively. Hemosiderosis screening in our routine practice is suboptimal. Hemosiderosis is not an exclusive complication of multiple transfusions in the hematology ward. We recommend screening for hemosiderosis in all patients receiving multiple transfusions. © 2017 The Authors. European Journal of Haematology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. In vitro red blood cell assay for oxidant toxicity of petroleum oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couillard, C.M.; Leighton, F.A. (Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon (Canada))

    1993-05-01

    Petroleum oil has caused hemolytic anemia in birds and mammals. In birds, an oxidant damage on circulating red cells has been identified as the primary toxic effect of ingested petroleum oils. An in vitro red blood cell assay was developed to discriminate among the oxidant activities of different petroleum oils. The assay used rabbit red blood cells with a rat liver enzyme system and formation of methemoglobin was measured as an indicator of oxidant damage to the red cells. The assay was applied to five different petroleum oils and to naphthalene, a petroleum hydrocarbon known to cause hemolytic anemia. Different petroleum oils differed in their capacity to induce methemoglobin formation. Methemoglobin levels varied from 2.9% with Arabian light crude oil to 6.2% with South Louisiana crude oil. Naphthalene induced formation of up to 37% methemoglobin. Naphthalene and the five petroleum oils generated methemoglobin only in the presence of liver enzymes.

  15. Evidence for the formation of endothelin by lysed red blood cells from endogenous precursor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tippler, B; Herbst, C; Simmet, T

    1994-12-12

    The release of endothelin from various blood cell fractions was investigated. Human as well as rat blood cell fractions homogenized by sonification were incubated in buffer for up to 60 min. Neither in platelet nor leukocyte homogenates from either species could immunoreactive endothelin be detected. In contrast, homogenates of red blood cells from both species showed a rapid and time-dependent rise of immunoreactive endothelin levels, reaching a peak at 15 min and decreasing thereafter. However, at time point 0 no immunoreactive endothelin could be detected. Reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography showed immunoreactive endothelin to consist of endothelin-1 as well as big endothelin-1. The release of immunoreactive endothelin in human and rat homogenates was concentration-dependently inhibited by the protease inhibitors, leupeptin, phosphoramidon, chymostatin and pepstatin A in order of increasing potency. Intact red blood cells did not incorporate [125I]endothelin-1 nor did they transform exogenous big endothelin-1 to endothelin-1. However, haemolysis of red blood cells with hypotonic saline (0.2%) or incubation with pore-forming staphylococcal alpha-toxin induced the release of immunoreactive endothelin into the buffer samples. Thus, apart from the indirect vasoconstrictor, haemoglobin, red blood cells can also liberate the direct vasoconstrictor, endothelin, a finding expected to be of considerable pathophysiological significance.

  16. Therapeutic low-intensity red laser for herpes labialis on plasmid survival and bacterial transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergio, Luiz Philippe da Silva; Marciano, Roberta da Silva; Teixeira, Gleica Rocha; Canuto, Keila da Silva; Polignano, Giovanni Augusto Castanheira; Guimarães, Oscar Roberto; Geller, Mauro; de Paoli, Flavia; da Fonseca, Adenilson de Souza

    2013-05-01

    A low-intensity laser is used in treating herpes labialis based on the biostimulative effect, albeit the photobiological basis is not well understood. In this work experimental models based on Escherichia coli cultures and plasmids were used to evaluate effects of low-intensity red laser on DNA at fluences for treatment of herpes labialis. To this end, survival and transformation efficiency of plasmids in E. coli AB1157 (wild type), BH20 (fpg/mutM(-)) and BW9091 (xthA(-)), content of the supercoiled form of plasmid DNA, as well as nucleic acids and protein content from bacterial cultures exposed to the laser, were evaluated. The data indicate low-intensity red laser: (i) alters the survival of plasmids in wild type, fpg/mutM(-) and xthA(-)E. coli cultures depending of growth phase, (ii) alters the content of the supercoiled form of plasmids in the wild type and fpg/mutM(-)E. coli cells, (iii) alters the content of nucleic acids and proteins in wild type E. coli cells, (iv) alters the transformation efficiency of plasmids in wild type and fpg/mutM(-)E. coli competent cells. These data could be used to understand positive effects of low-intensity lasers on herpes labialis treatment.

  17. GPU-accelerated Red Blood Cells Simulations with Transport Dissipative Particle Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Blumers, Ansel L; Li, Zhen; Li, Xuejin; Karniadakis, George E

    2016-01-01

    Mesoscopic numerical simulations provide a unique approach for the quantification of the chemical influences on red blood cell functionalities. The transport Dissipative Particles Dynamics (tDPD) method can lead to such effective multiscale simulations due to its ability to simultaneously capture mesoscopic advection, diffusion, and reaction. In this paper, we present a GPU-accelerated red blood cell simulation package based on a tDPD adaptation of our red blood cell model, which can correctly recover the cell membrane viscosity, elasticity, bending stiffness, and cross-membrane chemical transport. The package essentially processes all computational workloads in parallel by GPU, and it incorporates multi-stream scheduling and non-blocking MPI communications to improve inter-node scalability. Our code is validated for accuracy and compared against the CPU counterpart for speed. Strong scaling and weak scaling are also presented to characterizes scalability. We observe a speedup of 10.1 on one GPU over all 16 c...

  18. Computer Simulation Study of Collective Phenomena in Dense Suspensions of Red Blood Cells under Shear

    CERN Document Server

    Krüger, Timm

    2012-01-01

    The rheology of dense red blood cell suspensions is investigated via computer simulations based on the lattice Boltzmann, the immersed boundary, and the finite element methods. The red blood cells are treated as extended and deformable particles immersed in the ambient fluid. In the first part of the work, the numerical model and strategies for stress evaluation are discussed. In the second part, the behavior of the suspensions in simple shear flow is studied for different volume fractions, particle deformabilities, and shear rates. Shear thinning behavior is recovered. The existence of a shear-induced transition from a tumbling to a tank-treading motion is demonstrated. The transition can be parameterized by a single quantity, namely the effective capillary number. It is the ratio of the suspension stress and the characteristic particle membrane stress. At the transition point, a strong increase in the orientational order of the red blood cells and a significant decrease of the particle diffusivity are obser...

  19. Pre-hospital transfusion of packed red blood cells in 147 patients from a UK helicopter emergency medical service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Richard M; de Sausmarez, Eleanor; McWhirter, Emily; Wareham, Gary; Nelson, Magnus; Matthies, Ashley; Hudson, Anthony; Curtis, Leigh; Russell, Malcolm Q

    2017-02-14

    Early transfusion of packed red blood cells (PRBC) has been associated with improved survival in patients with haemorrhagic shock. This study aims to describe the characteristics of patients receiving pre-hospital blood transfusion and evaluate their subsequent need for in-hospital transfusion and surgery. The decision to administer a pre-hospital PRBC transfusion was based on clinical judgment. All patients transfused pre-hospital PRBC between February 2013 and December 2014 were included. Pre-hospital and in-hospital records were retrospectively reviewed. One hundred forty-seven patients were included. 142 patients had traumatic injuries and 5 patients had haemorrhagic shock from a medical origin. Median Injury Severity Score was 30. 90% of patients receiving PRBC had an ISS of >15. Patients received a mean of 2.4(±1.1) units of PRBC in the pre-hospital phase. Median time from initial emergency call to hospital arrival was 114 min (IQR 103-140). There was significant improvement in systolic (p Pre-hospital transfusion of packed red cells has the potential to improvde outcome for trauma patients with major haemorrhage. The pre-hospital time for trauma patients can be several hours, suggesting transfusion needs to start in the pre-hospital phase. Hospital transfusion research suggests a 1:1 ratio of packed red blood cells to plasma improves outcome and further research into pre-hospital adoption of this strategy is needed. Pre-hospital PRBC transfusion significantly reduces the time to transfusion for major trauma patients with suspected major haemorrhage. The majority of patients receiving pre-hospital PRBC were severely injured and required further transfusion in hospital. Further research is warranted to determine which patients are most likely to have outcome benefit from pre-hospital blood products and what triggers should be used for pre-hospital transfusion.

  20. Arterio-venous flow between monochorionic twins determined during intra-uterine transfusion. Nonlinear decay of adult red blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gemert, Martin J C van; Wijngaard, Jeroen P H M van den [Laser Centre and Department of Obstetrics, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Pasman, Suzanne A; Vandenbussche, Frank P H A [Division of Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden (Netherlands); Lopriore, Enrico [Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden (Netherlands)], E-mail: m.j.vangemert@amc.uva.nl

    2008-07-07

    Recently, we derived equations relating the flow of adult red blood cells through a placental arterio-venous anastomosis with intra-uterine and post-natal measured adult hemoglobin concentrations. In this letter, we re-derived the equations, now including a more realistic nonlinear decay of adult red blood cells, and re-evaluated the measurement accuracy of the arterio-venous flow and the lifetime of the red blood cells. (letter to the editor)

  1. Red blood cell morphology and plasma proteins electrophoresis of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The European pond terrapin(Emys orbicularis) is a turtle found in southern and central Europe, West Asia and North Africa. In this study, we used juvenile E. orbicularis (females of 4 - 5 years old) which was captured from the different area of the Mazandaran province in April 2006. Blood was collected from the dorsal sinus ...

  2. Additive Effects of Rhizophora Racemose (Red Mangrove) On Blood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results showed that the values of the PVC, WBC and Hb concentration of the groups that received R. racemosa (B, C and D) were higher than those of the control group. The bursa of Fabricus also weighed more in the R. racemosa groups than the control. It was therefore concluded that R. racemosa blood improvement ...

  3. Nationwide outbreak of red eye syndrome associated with transfusion of leukocyte-reduced red blood cell units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Echanove, Juan; Sippy, Brian D; Chin, Arthur E; Cairns, Lisa; Haley, Rebecca; Epstein, Jay S; Richards, Michael J; Edelhauser, Henry; Hedberg, Katrina; Kuehnert, Matthew J; Jarvis, William R; Pearson, Michele L

    2006-11-01

    To characterize red eye reactions occurring within 24 hours after receipt of units of leukocyte-reduced red blood cells, determine their etiology, and investigate their potential link to transfusion. We conducted a survey of transfusion facilities nationwide to determine the scope and magnitude of the reactions; performed case-control and cohort studies among transfused patients at the facility where most reactions occurred; and performed animal experiments, using cellulose acetate derivatives extracted from leukocyte-reduction filters and filter precursors, to reproduce reactions. From January 1, 1997, through January 15, 1998, we identified 159 reactions in 117 patients from 17 states. Reactions were characterized by conjunctival erythema or hemorrhage (in 100% of patients), eye pain (in 62%), photophobia (in 46%), and decreased visual acuity (in 32%). Symptom onset occurred 1-24 hours after initiation of transfusion and resolved within a median of 5 days. Reactions were associated with transfusion sessions that included units of red blood cells filtered with a specific brand of filter, the LeukoNet filter (HemaSure) (odds ratio, 100.4; Pred eye syndrome was linked to a specific brand of leukocyte-reduction filter and likely resulted from cellulose acetate derivatives leached from the filter membrane.

  4. Clinical Decision Support Reduces Overuse of Red Blood Cell Transfusions: Interrupted Time Series Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassakian, Steven Z; Yackel, Thomas R; Deloughery, Thomas; Dorr, David A

    2016-06-01

    Red blood cell transfusion is the most common procedure in hospitalized patients in the US. Growing evidence suggests that a sizeable percentage of these transfusions are inappropriate, putting patients at significant risk and increasing costs to the health care system. We performed a retrospective quasi-experimental study from November 2008 until November 2014 in a 576-bed tertiary care hospital. The intervention consisted of an interruptive clinical decision support alert shown to a provider when a red blood cell transfusion was ordered in a patient whose most recent hematocrit was ≥21%. We used interrupted time series analysis to determine whether our primary outcome of interest, rate of red blood cell transfusion in patients with hematocrit ≥21% per 100 patient (pt) days, was reduced by the implementation of the clinical decision support tool. The rate of platelet transfusions was used as a nonequivalent dependent control variable. A total of 143,000 hospital admissions were included in our analysis. Red blood cell transfusions decreased from 9.4 to 7.8 per 100 pt days after the clinical decision support intervention was implemented. Interrupted time series analysis showed that significant decline of 0.05 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.03-0.07; P clinical decision support tool. There was no statistical change in the rate of platelet transfusion resulting from the intervention. The implementation of an evidence-based clinical decision support tool was associated with a significant decline in the overuse of red blood cell transfusion. We believe this intervention could be easily replicated in other hospitals using commercial electronic health records and a similar reduction in overuse of red blood cell transfusions achieved. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Biochemical Storage Lesions Occurring in Nonirradiated and Irradiated Red Blood Cells: A Brief Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Adams

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Red blood cells undergo a series of biochemical fluctuations during 35–42-day storage period at 1°C to 6°C. The sodium/potassium pump is immobilised causing a decrease in intracellular potassium with an increase in cytoplasmic sodium levels, glucose levels decline, and acidosis occurs as a result of low pH levels. The frailty of stored erythrocytes triggers the formation of haemoglobin-containing microparticles and the release of cell-free haemoglobin which may add to transfusion difficulties. Lipid peroxidation, oxidative stress to band 3 structures, and other morphological and structural molecular changes also occur leading to spheroechinocytes and osmotic fragility. These changes that transpire in the red cells during the storage period are referred to as “storage lesions.” It is well documented that gamma irradiation exacerbates storage lesions and the reports of increased potassium levels leading to adverse reactions observed in neonates and infants have been of particular concern. There are, however, remarkably few systematic studies comparing the in vitro storage lesions of irradiated and nonirradiated red cell concentrates and it has been suggested that the impact of storage lesions on leucocyte reduced red blood cell concentrate (RBCC is incomplete. The review examines storage lesions in red blood cells and their adverse effects in reference to blood transfusion.

  6. Theoretical and experimental study of electroporation of red blood cells using MEMS technology

    KAUST Repository

    Deng, Peigang

    2010-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental study of electroporation (EP) of red blood cells (RBCs) was presented in this paper. With additional strain energy, an energy-based model of an electropore induced on a RBC\\'s membrane at different electric fields was proposed to predict the critical EP electric field strength. In addition, EP experiments with red blood cells at single-cell level was carried out on a micro EP chip. The measured critical EP electric field strengths are in agreement with the numerical predictions. ©2010 IEEE.

  7. Mortality outcomes in trauma patients undergoing prehospital red blood cell transfusion: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Gregory S; Dunham, C Michael

    2017-01-01

    The value of prehospital red blood cell (RBC) transfusion for trauma patients is controversial. The purposes of this literature review were to determine the mortality rate of trauma patients with hemodynamic instability and the benefit of prehospital RBC transfusion. A 30-year systematic literature review was performed in 2016. Eligible studies were combined for meta-analysis when tests for heterogeneity were insignificant. The synthesized mortality was 35.6% for systolic blood pressure ≤ 90 mmHg; 51.1% for ≤ 80 mmHg; and 63.9% for ≤ 70 mmHg. For patients with either hypotension or emergency trauma center transfused RBCs, the synthesized Injury Severity Score (ISS) was 27.0 and mortality was 36.2%; the ISS and mortality correlation was r = 0.766 (P = 0.0096). For civilian patients receiving prehospital RBC transfusions, the synthesized ISS was 27.5 and mortality was 39.5%. One civilian study suggested a decrement in mortality with prehospital RBC transfusion; however, patient recruitment was only one per center per year and mortality was prehospital RBC transfusion and a matched control subset showed that the synthesized mortality was similar for those transfused (37.5%) and not transfused (38.7%; P = 0.8933). A study of civilian helicopter patients demonstrated a similar 30-day mortality for those with and without prehospital blood product availability (22% versus 21%; P = 0.626). Mortality in a study of matched military patients was better for those receiving prehospital blood or plasma (8%) than the controls (20%; P = 0.013). However, transfused patients had a shorter prehospital time, more advanced airway procedures, and higher hospital RBC transfusion (P 16 showed similar mortality with and without prehospital RBC availability (27.6% versus 32.0%; P = 0.343). Trauma patient mortality increases with the magnitude of hemodynamic instability and anatomic injury. Some literature evidence indicates no survival advantage with prehospital RBC availability

  8. Sucralose sweetener in vivo effects on blood constituents radiolabeling, red blood cell morphology and radiopharmaceutical biodistribution in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, G S; Pereira, M O; Benarroz, M O; Frydman, J N G; Rocha, V C; Pereira, M J; Fonseca, A S; Medeiros, A C; Bernardo-Filho, M

    2011-01-01

    Effects of sucralose sweetener on blood constituents labelled with technetium-99m ((99m)Tc) on red blood cell (RBC) morphology, sodium pertechnetate (Na(99m)TcO(4)) and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid labeled with (99m)Tc ((99m)Tc-DTPA) biodistribution in rats were evaluated. Radiolabeling on blood constituents from Wistar rats was undertaken for determining the activity percentage (%ATI) on blood constituents. RBC morphology was also evaluated. Na(99m)TcO(4) and (99m)Tc-DTPA biodistribution was used to determine %ATI/g in organs. There was no alteration on RBC blood constituents and morphology %ATI. Sucralose sweetener was capable of altering %ATI/g of the radiopharmaceuticals in different organs. These findings are associated to the sucralose sweetener in specific organs. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Sucralose sweetener in vivo effects on blood constituents radiolabeling, red blood cell morphology and radiopharmaceutical biodistribution in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha, G.S.; Pereira, M.O. [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Departamento de Biofisica e Biometria, Avenida 28 de Setembro, 87, Vila Isabel, 20551030 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias da Saude, Avenida General Gustavo Cordeiro de Farias, s/n, 59010180 Natal, Rio Grande do Norte (Brazil); Benarroz, M.O.; Frydman, J.N.G.; Rocha, V.C. [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Departamento de Biofisica e Biometria, Avenida 28 de Setembro, 87, Vila Isabel, 20551030 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Pereira, M.J. [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Departamento de Fisiologia, Avenida 28 de Setembro, 87, Vila Isabel, 20551030 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Fonseca, A.S., E-mail: adnfonseca@ig.com.b [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Departamento de Biofisica e Biometria, Avenida 28 de Setembro, 87, Vila Isabel, 20551030 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Universidade Federal do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto Biomedico, Departamento de Ciencias Fisiologicas, Rua Frei Caneca, 94, Rio de Janeiro 20211040 (Brazil); Medeiros, A.C. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias da Saude, Avenida General Gustavo Cordeiro de Farias, s/n, 59010180 Natal, Rio Grande do Norte (Brazil); Bernardo-Filho, M. [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Departamento de Biofisica e Biometria, Avenida 28 de Setembro, 87, Vila Isabel, 20551030 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Instituto Nacional do Cancer, Coordenadoria de Pesquisa Basica, Praca Cruz Vermelha, 23, 20230130 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2011-01-15

    Effects of sucralose sweetener on blood constituents labelled with technetium-99m ({sup 99m}Tc) on red blood cell (RBC) morphology, sodium pertechnetate (Na{sup 99m}TcO{sub 4}) and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid labeled with {sup 99m}Tc ({sup 99m}Tc-DTPA) biodistribution in rats were evaluated. Radiolabeling on blood constituents from Wistar rats was undertaken for determining the activity percentage (%ATI) on blood constituents. RBC morphology was also evaluated. Na{sup 99m}TcO{sub 4} and {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA biodistribution was used to determine %ATI/g in organs. There was no alteration on RBC blood constituents and morphology %ATI. Sucralose sweetener was capable of altering %ATI/g of the radiopharmaceuticals in different organs. These findings are associated to the sucralose sweetener in specific organs.

  10. An audit on the current practice of red blood cell transfusion following elective primary hip arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozgönenel, Bülent; Kanhere, Rujuta; O'Malley, Barbara; Balasubramaniam, Mamtha; Eisenbrey, A Bradley

    2007-08-01

    This audit encompassing a six-month period on the current practice of red blood cell transfusion following elective primary total hip arthroplasty showed that the rate of allogeneic blood avoidance was 84.8% for preoperative autologous blood donors and 47.8% for non-donors (p<0.001). Lower preoperative hemoglobin level was associated with an increased allogeneic unit transfusion (p<0.001). The intraoperative use of autologous blood collection and transfusion systems did not reduce the transfusion risk, and the use of the colloid volume expander was associated with a 1.8-fold increased risk of transfusion (p=0.022).

  11. Biomechanics and biorheology of red blood cells in sickle cell anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuejin; Dao, Ming; Lykotrafitis, George; Karniadakis, George Em

    2017-01-04

    Sickle cell anemia (SCA) is an inherited blood disorder that causes painful crises due to vaso-occlusion of small blood vessels. The primary cause of the clinical phenotype of SCA is the intracellular polymerization of sickle hemoglobin resulting in sickling of red blood cells (RBCs) in deoxygenated conditions. In this review, we discuss the biomechanical and biorheological characteristics of sickle RBCs and sickle blood as well as their implications toward a better understanding of the pathophysiology and pathogenesis of SCA. Additionally, we highlight the adhesive heterogeneity of RBCs in SCA and their specific contribution to vaso-occlusive crisis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. [Evaluation of non-compliance of transfusion requests of packed red blood cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Romdhane, Asma Rym; Ben Ayoub, Wided; Gouider, Emna

    2015-06-01

    Despite legislative acts develloped, many deficiencies were identified in blood requests at the National Blood TransfusionCenter impedding board and blood safety. to evaluate the conformity of the different topics of packed red blood cells requests to the legislation. Our study was prospective descriptive lasting six months (March-August 2011). It assessed all packed red blood cells requests which reached the national blood transfusion center. 16064 packed red blood cells requests from 21 public institutions and 28 private institutions were studied. There was different deficiencies in each item.The absence of birth date in 67.18% of request represented the largest non-compliance within administrative information. A predominance of shortcomings related to transfusion and obstetric history was recorded for clinical information with absence of date of the last transfusion in 91.72% cases, lack of accuracy of any previous transfusion reactions in 88.63% cases and absence of the number of previous pregnancies in 93.15% of transfusion requests prescribed to women. Non-conformities related to the prescribing physician concerned mainly the phone number which was absent in 55.82% of cases. This study revealed a significant lack of awareness of physicians in relation to the law governing transfusion. It is therefore essential to develop training for prescribers to improve transfusion safety.

  13. Hyperkalemia after irradiation of packed red blood cells: Possible effects with intravascular fetal transfusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thorp, J.A.; Plapp, F.V.; Cohen, G.R.; Yeast, J.D.; O' Kell, R.T.; Stephenson, S. (St. Luke' s Perinatal Center, Kansas City, MO (USA))

    1990-08-01

    Plasma potassium, calcium, and albumin concentrations in irradiated blood, and in fetal blood before and after transfusion, were measured. Dangerously high plasma potassium levels were observed in some units of irradiated packed red blood cells (range, 13.9 to 66.5 mEq/L; mean, 44.7 mEq/L) and could be one possible explanation for the high incidence of fetal arrhythmia associated with fetal intravascular transfusion. There are many factors operative in the preparation of irradiated packed red blood cells that may predispose to high potassium levels: the age of the red blood cells, the number of procedures used to concentrate the blood, the duration of time elapsed from concentration, the duration of time elapsed from irradiation, and the hematocrit. Use of fresh blood, avoidance of multiple packing procedures, limiting the hematocrit in the donor unit to less than or equal to 80%, and minimizing the time between concentration, irradiation and transfusion may minimize the potassium levels, and therefore making an additional washing procedure unnecessary.

  14. MORPHOMETRIC CHARACTERISTICS OF RED BLOOD CELLS OF Telestes metohiensis (Steindachner, 1901

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radoslav Dekić

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the morphometric characteristics of red blood cells of endemic fish species of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Telestes metohiensis (Steindachner, 1901 inhabiting the Vrijeka river in the Dabar field. A total of 30 fish were sampled during August, 2010. Morphological measurements included the following parameters: axes of the red blood cells and nuclei, the surface of the red blood cells and nuclei and the thickness of the red blood cells. Morphometric characteristics of the erythrocyte maturation stages (acidophilic and polychromatic erythroblasts were also studied as well as their proportion in the peripheral blood. 100 mature forms were measured for each individual. The propotion of the immature forms was expressed per 1000 erythrocytes. Results showed that dimensions of the erythrocytes differed in systematic categories as well as fish types. Dimensions of mature erythrocytes and their maturation stages of the same species differed in shape and size of the nuclei. Proportion of the erythrocyte maturation stages was very low in comparison with the mature erythrocytes, indicating the optimal environmental conditions for the studied species.Key words: morphometric characteristics, erythrocytes, Telestes metohiensis, proportion of immature stages

  15. Effects of He-Ne laser irradiation on red blood cells in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadage, Vijay H.; Kulkarni, Gauri R.

    2011-03-01

    Laser radiation has many applications in biomedical field, such as wound healing, tissue repairing, heating and ablation processes. Intravenous low power laser radiation is used clinically for skin and vascular disorders. Laser radiation improves microcirculation and modulates the rheological properties of blood. FTIR (Fourier Transform Infra Red Spectra) is used to see the structural changes in erythrocyte membrane. In the present work He Ne laser (λ= 632nm, power=2mW) is used to irradiate human Red blood cells. Red blood cells are separated from human whole blood using centrifugation method (time=10 min., temperature=15°C and RPM=3000) and then exposed to HeNe laser radiation. Laser exposure time is varied from 10 min. to 40min for Red blood cells. Absorption spectrum, FTIR and fluorescence spectra of RBC are compared before and after HeNe laser irradiation. The absorption spectrum of RBC after exposure to HeNe laser shows a significant decrease in absorbance. The FTIR spectrum of non irradiated RBC clearly show the peaks due to O-H (free group), C=O (amide I group), N=O (nitro group), C-O (anhydride group) and C-H (aromatic group). Laser radiation changes in transmittance in FTIR spectra related to C=O group and percentage of transmittance increases for O-H, C=C, N=O, C-O and C-H group.

  16. A microfluidics approach for the isolation of nucleated red blood cells (NRBCs) from the peripheral blood of pregnant women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, R.; Barber, T. A.; Schmidt, M. A.; Tompkins, R. G.; Toner, M.; Bianchi, D. W.; Kapur, R.; Flejter, W. L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Nucleated red blood cells (NRBCs) have been identified in maternal circulation and potentially provide a resource for the monitoring and diagnosis of maternal, fetal, and neonatal health and disease. Past strategies used to isolate and enrich for NRBCs are limited to complex approaches that result in low recovery and less than optimal cell purity. Here we report the development of a high-throughput and highly efficient microfluidic device for isolating rare NRBCs from maternal blood. Material and Methods NRBCs were isolated from the peripheral blood of 58 pregnant women using a microfluidic process that consists of a microfluidic chip for size-based cell separation and a magnetic device for hemoglobin-based cell isolation. Results The microfluidic–magnetic combination removes nontarget red blood cells and white blood cells at a very high efficiency (∼99.99%). The device successfully identified NRBCs from the peripheral blood of 58/58 pretermination samples with a mean of 37.44 NRBC/mL (range 0.37–274.36 NRBC/mL). These results were compared with those from previous studies. Conclusion The microfluidic device results in an approximate 10- to 20-fold enrichment of NRBCs over methods described previously. The reliability of isolation and the purity of the NRBC product have the potential to enable the subsequent application of molecular diagnostic assays. PMID:18821715

  17. Morphological analysis of red blood cells by polychromatic interference microscopy of thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyachenko, A. A.; Malinova, L. I.; Ryabukho, V. P.

    2016-11-01

    Red blood cells (RBC) distribution width (RDW) is a promising hematological parameter with broadapplications in clinical practice; in various studies RDWhas been shown to be associated with increased risk of heart failure (HF) in general population. It predicts mortality and other major adverse events in HF patients. In this report new method of RDWmeasurement is presented. It's based on interference color analysis of red blood cells in blood smear and further measurement of its optical thickness. Descriptive statistics of the of the RBC optical thickness distribution in a blood smear were used for RDW estimation in every studied sample. Proposed method is considered to be avoiding type II errors and minimizing the variability of measured RDW.

  18. Blood Transfusion and Survival for Resected Adrenocortical Carcinoma: A Study from the United States Adrenocortical Carcinoma Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorman, Caroline E; Postlewait, Lauren M; Ethun, Cecilia G; Tran, Thuy B; Prescott, Jason D; Pawlik, Timothy M; Wang, Tracy S; Glenn, Jason; Hatzaras, Ioannis; Shenoy, Rivfka; Phay, John E; Keplinger, Kara; Fields, Ryan C; Jin, Linda X; Weber, Sharon M; Salem, Ahmed; Sicklick, Jason K; Gad, Shady; Yopp, Adam C; Mansour, John C; Duh, Quan-Yang; Seiser, Natalie; Solorzano, Carmen C; Kiernan, Colleen M; Votanopoulos, Konstantinos I; Levine, Edward A; Staley, Charles A; Poultsides, George A; Maithel, Shishir K

    2017-07-01

    Perioperative blood transfusion is associated with decreased survival in pancreatic, gastric, and liver cancer. The effect of transfusion in adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) has not been studied. Patients with available transfusion data undergoing curative-intent resection of ACC from 1993 to 2014 at 13 institutions comprising the United States Adrenocortical Carcinoma Group were included. Factors associated with blood transfusion were determined. Primary and secondary end points were recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS), respectively. Out of 265 patients, 149 were included for analysis. Out of these, 57 patients (38.3%) received perioperative transfusions. Compared to nontransfused patients, transfused patients more commonly had stage 4 disease (46% vs 24%, P = 0.01), larger tumors (15.8 vs 10.2 cm, P Transfusion was associated with decreased RFS (8.9 vs 24.7 months, P = 0.006) and OS (22.8 vs 91.0 months, P transfusion, stage IV, hormonal hypersecretion, and adjuvant therapy were associated with decreased RFS. On multivariable analysis, only transfusion [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.7, 95% confidence interval (CI) =1.0-2.9, P = 0.04], stage IV (HR = 3.2, 95% CI = 1.7-5.9, P transfusion HR = 2.0, 95% CI = 1.1-3.8, P = 0.02; stage 4 HR = 6.2, 95% CI = 3.1-12.4, P 2 units of packed red blood cells in median RFS (8.9 vs 8.4 months, P = 0.95) or OS (26.5 vs 18.6 months, P = 0.63). Perioperative transfusion is associated with earlier recurrence and decreased survival after curative-intent resection of ACC. Strategies and protocols to minimize blood transfusion should be developed and followed.

  19. Interaction of Jet Fuel Hydrocarbon Components with Red Blood Cells and Hemoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-24

    number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 24-06-2014 2. REPORT TYPE Interim Technical Report 3...affinity for hemoglobin may be the rate limiting step for RBC return to the dicocyte (normal) structure. Of the chemical series tested, octane... Danon D1, Marikovsky Y. The aging of the red blood cell. A multifactor process. Blood Cells. (1988) 14:7-18. 36. Furchgott RF, Ponder E

  20. Microparticles from stored red blood cells promote a hypercoagulable state in a murine model of transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young; Xia, Brent T; Jung, Andrew D; Chang, Alex L; Abplanalp, William A; Caldwell, Charles C; Goodman, Michael D; Pritts, Timothy A

    2018-02-01

    Red blood cell-derived microparticles are biologically active, submicron vesicles shed by erythrocytes during storage. Recent clinical studies have linked the duration of red blood cell storage with thromboembolic events in critically ill transfusion recipients. In the present study, we hypothesized that microparticles from aged packed red blood cell units promote a hypercoagulable state in a murine model of transfusion. Microparticles were isolated from aged, murine packed red blood cell units via serial centrifugation. Healthy male C57BL/6 mice were transfused with microparticles or an equivalent volume of vehicle, and whole blood was harvested for analysis via rotational thromboelastometry. Serum was harvested from a separate set of mice after microparticles or saline injection, and analyzed for fibrinogen levels. Red blood cell-derived microparticles were analyzed for their ability to convert prothrombin to thrombin. Finally, mice were transfused with either red blood cell microparticles or saline vehicle, and a tail bleeding time assay was performed after an equilibration period of 2, 6, 12, or 24 hours. Mice injected with red blood cell-derived microparticles demonstrated an accelerated clot formation time (109.3 ± 26.9 vs 141.6 ± 28.2 sec) and increased α angle (68.8 ± 5.0 degrees vs 62.8 ± 4.7 degrees) compared with control (each P microparticles exhibited a hundredfold greater conversion of prothrombin substrate to its active thrombin form (66.60 ± 0.03 vs 0.70 ± 0.01 peak OD; Pmicroparticles-injected mice compared with saline vehicle, suggesting thrombin-mediated conversion to insoluble fibrin (14.0 vs 16.5 µg/mL, Pmicroparticles-injected mice as compared with saline vehicle (each Pmicroparticles induce a transient hypercoagulable state through accelerated activation of clotting factors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Image-based model of the spectrin cytoskeleton for red blood cell simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fai, Thomas G; Leo-Macias, Alejandra; Stokes, David L; Peskin, Charles S

    2017-10-01

    We simulate deformable red blood cells in the microcirculation using the immersed boundary method with a cytoskeletal model that incorporates structural details revealed by tomographic images. The elasticity of red blood cells is known to be supplied by both their lipid bilayer membranes, which resist bending and local changes in area, and their cytoskeletons, which resist in-plane shear. The cytoskeleton consists of spectrin tetramers that are tethered to the lipid bilayer by ankyrin and by actin-based junctional complexes. We model the cytoskeleton as a random geometric graph, with nodes corresponding to junctional complexes and with edges corresponding to spectrin tetramers such that the edge lengths are given by the end-to-end distances between nodes. The statistical properties of this graph are based on distributions gathered from three-dimensional tomographic images of the cytoskeleton by a segmentation algorithm. We show that the elastic response of our model cytoskeleton, in which the spectrin polymers are treated as entropic springs, is in good agreement with the experimentally measured shear modulus. By simulating red blood cells in flow with the immersed boundary method, we compare this discrete cytoskeletal model to an existing continuum model and predict the extent to which dynamic spectrin network connectivity can protect against failure in the case of a red cell subjected to an applied strain. The methods presented here could form the basis of disease- and patient-specific computational studies of hereditary diseases affecting the red cell cytoskeleton.

  2. The plasma protein fibrinogen stabilizes clusters of red blood cells in microcapillary flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brust, M.; Aouane, O.; Thiébaud, M.; Flormann, D.; Verdier, C.; Kaestner, L.; Laschke, M. W.; Selmi, H.; Benyoussef, A.; Podgorski, T.; Coupier, G.; Misbah, C.; Wagner, C.

    2014-03-01

    The supply of oxygen and nutrients and the disposal of metabolic waste in the organs depend strongly on how blood, especially red blood cells, flow through the microvascular network. Macromolecular plasma proteins such as fibrinogen cause red blood cells to form large aggregates, called rouleaux, which are usually assumed to be disaggregated in the circulation due to the shear forces present in bulk flow. This leads to the assumption that rouleaux formation is only relevant in the venule network and in arterioles at low shear rates or stasis. Thanks to an excellent agreement between combined experimental and numerical approaches, we show that despite the large shear rates present in microcapillaries, the presence of either fibrinogen or the synthetic polymer dextran leads to an enhanced formation of robust clusters of red blood cells, even at haematocrits as low as 1%. Robust aggregates are shown to exist in microcapillaries even for fibrinogen concentrations within the healthy physiological range. These persistent aggregates should strongly affect cell distribution and blood perfusion in the microvasculature, with putative implications for blood disorders even within apparently asymptomatic subjects.

  3. Vesicles and red blood cells in flow: From individual dynamics to rheology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlahovska, Petia M.; Podgorski, Thomas; Misbah, Chaouqi

    2009-11-01

    The rheology of suspensions of soft particles, such as red blood cells, is a long-standing problem in science and engineering due to the complex interplay between deformable microstructure and the macroscale flow. The major challenge stems from the free-boundary nature of the particle interface. Lipid bilayer membranes that envelop cells and vesicles are particularly complex interfaces because of their unusual mechanics: the molecularly thin membrane is a highly-flexible incompressible fluid sheet. As a result, particles made of closed lipid bilayers (red cells and vesicles) can exhibit richer dynamics than would capsules and drops. We overview the key experimental observations and recent advances in the theoretical modeling of the vesicles and red blood cells in flow. To cite this article: P.M. Vlahovska et al., C. R. Physique 10 (2009).

  4. Optically-driven red blood cell rotor in linearly polarized laser tweezers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The torque generated from the unbalanced force causes the trapped RBC to rotate. Addition of Ca++ ions in the ... The speed of rotation is less in the case of malaria infected red blood cells. In contrast, it was ... reported the rotation of malaria infected RBCs under linearly polarized optical trap. We have done a systematic ...

  5. Selection for antibody response against sheep red blood cells and layer age affect egg quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, van den H.; Parmentier, H.K.; Kemp, B.

    2004-01-01

    1. After 22 generations of divergent selection for antibody response against sheep red blood cells (SRBC), hatchability differed between the selected lines. Whether there is a relationship between hatchability and egg traits in these lines is not clear. 2. The aim of the present study was to

  6. Red Blood Cell Proteomics: Challenges in biomarker discovery for clinical applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barasa, B.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/341538353

    2017-01-01

    Introduction This thesis describes the application of mass-spectrometry-based approaches on the cytosolic red blood cell (RBC) proteome in gaining improved understanding and insight into the metabolic effects and mechanisms of rare hereditary RBC defects that result in hemolytic anemia. Whilst the

  7. Protective role of Withaferin-a on red blood cell integrity during 7,12 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The protective effect of Withaferin-A was assessed by measuring the status of glycoconjugates, membrane bound enzyme activity and red blood cell osmotic fragility. Oral squamous cell carcinoma was induced in the buccal pouch of Syrian golden hamsters by painting with 0.5% DMBA in liquid paraffin thrice a week for 14 ...

  8. Effect of inositol hexaphosphate-loaded red blood cells (RBCs) on the rheology of sickle RBCs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamarre, Yann; Bourgeaux, Vanessa; Pichon, Aurélien; Hardeman, Max R.; Campion, Yannick; Hardeman-Zijp, Marise; Martin, Cyril; Richalet, Jean-Paul; Bernaudin, Françoise; Driss, Françoise; Godfrin, Yann; Connes, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The recent in vitro demonstration that inositol hexaphosphateloaded red blood cells (IHP-RBCs) may reduce the risks of sickling of sickle RBCs (SS RBCs) exposed to hypoxia make these modified RBCs potentially useful in transfused sickle cell anemia (SCA) patients. STUDY DESIGN AND

  9. Abnormal properties of red blood cells suggest a role in the pathophysiology of Gaucher disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franco, Melanie; Collec, Emmanuel; Connes, Philippe; van den Akker, Emile; Billette de Villemeur, Thierry; Belmatoug, Nadia; von Lindern, Marieke; Ameziane, Nejma; Hermine, Olivier; Colin, Yves; Le van Kim, Caroline; Mignot, Cyril

    2013-01-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by glucocerebrosidase deficiency. It is notably characterized by splenomegaly, complex skeletal involvement, ischemic events of the spleen and bones, and the accumulation of Gaucher cells in several organs. We hypothesized that red blood

  10. ENDOTOXEMIA RESULTS IN TRAPPING OF TRANSFUSED RED BLOOD CELLS IN LUNGS WITH ASSOCIATED LUNG INJURY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Straat, Marleen; Tuip, Anita; Klei, Thomas R. L.; Beuger, Boukje M.; Roelofs, Joris J. T. H.; van Bruggen, Robin; Juffermans, Nicole P.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Red blood cell (RBC) transfusion is associated with organ failure, in particular in the critically ill. We hypothesized that endotoxemia contributes to increased trapping of RBCs in organs. Furthermore, we hypothesized that this effect is more pronounced following transfusion of stored

  11. Accelerated clearance of human red blood cells in a rat transfusion model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Straat, M.; Klei, Trl; de Korte, D.; van Bruggen, R.; Juffermans, N. P.

    2015-01-01

    Animal models are valuable in transfusion research. Use of human red blood cells (RBCs) in animal models facilitates extrapolation of the impact of storage conditions to the human condition but may be hampered by the use of cross species. Investigation of clearance and posttransfusion recovery in a

  12. Exercise performance, red blood cell deformability, and lipid peroxidation: effects of fish oil and vitamin E

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostenbrug, G. S.; Mensink, R. P.; Hardeman, M. R.; de Vries, T.; Brouns, F.; Hornstra, G.

    1997-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that fish oil supplementation increases red blood cell (RBC) deformability, which may improve exercise performance. Exercise alone, or in combination with an increase in fatty acid unsaturation, however, may enhance lipid peroxidation. Effects of a bicycle time trial

  13. Exome Genotyping Identifies Pleiotropic Variants Associated with Red Blood Cell Traits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chami, N. (Nathalie); M.-H. Chen (Ming-Huei); Slater, A.J. (Andrew J.); Eicher, J.D. (John D.); E. Evangelou (Evangelos); Tajuddin, S.M. (Salman M.); Love-Gregory, L. (Latisha); T. Kacprowski (Tim); U.M. Schick (Ursula); Nomura, A. (Akihiro); Giri, A. (Ayush); Lessard, S. (Samuel); J. Brody (Jennifer); C. Schurmann (Claudia); V.S. Pankratz (Shane); L.R. Yanek (Lisa); A. Manichaikul (Ani); R. Pazoki (Raha); E. Mihailov (Evelin); W.D. Hill (W. David); Raffield, L.M. (Laura M.); A.D. Burt (Alastair); T.M. Bartz (Traci M.); D.M. Becker (Diane); L.C. Becker (Lewis); E.A. Boerwinkle (Eric); J. Bork-Jensen (Jette); E.P. Bottinger (Erwin); M.L. O'Donoghue (Michelle L.); D.R. Crosslin (David); de Denus, S. (Simon); Dubé, M.-P. (Marie-Pierre); P. Elliott (Paul); G. Engström; M. Evans (Michele); J. Floyd (James); M. Fornage (Myriam); Gao, H. (He); A. Greinacher (Andreas); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); T. Hansen (T.); T.B. Harris (Tamara); C. Hayward (Caroline); Hernesniemi, J. (Jussi); H. Highland (Heather); J.N. Hirschhorn (Joel); Hofman, A. (Albert); Irvin, M.R. (Marguerite R.); M. Kähönen (Mika); E.M. Lange (Ethan); Launer, L.J. (Lenore J.); T. Lehtimäki (Terho); Li, J. (Jin); D.C. Liewald (David C.); A. Linneberg (Allan); Y. Liu (YongMei); Y. Lu (Yingchang); L.-P. Lyytikäinen (Leo-Pekka); R. Mägi (Reedik); J. Mathias (Jasmine); O. Melander (Olle); A. Metspalu (Andres); K. Mononen (Kari); M.A. Nalls (Michael); D.A. Nickerson (Deborah); K. Nikus (Kjell); C.J. O'Donnell (Christopher); M. Orho-Melander (Marju); O. Pedersen (Oluf); A. Petersmann (Astrid); Polfus, L. (Linda); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); O.T. Raitakari (Olli T.); Raitoharju, E. (Emma); Richard, M. (Melissa); K.M. Rice (Kenneth); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); Rotter, J.I. (Jerome I.); Schmidt, F. (Frank); A.V. Smith (Albert Vernon); J.M. Starr (John); K.D. Taylor (Kent); A. Teumer (Alexander); Thuesen, B.H. (Betina H.); Torstenson, E.S. (Eric S.); R.P. Tracy (Russell); I. Tzoulaki; N.A. Zakai (Neil); Vacchi-Suzzi, C. (Caterina); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia); F.J.A. van Rooij (Frank); M. Cushman (Mary Ann); I.J. Deary (Ian J.); Velez Edwards, D.R. (Digna R.); Vergnaud, A.-C. (Anne-Claire); L.C. Wallentin (Lars); D. Waterworth (Dawn); White, H.D. (Harvey D.); J.F. Wilson (James); A.B. Zonderman; S. Kathiresan (Sekar); N. Grarup (Niels); T. Esko (Tõnu); R.J.F. Loos (Ruth); L.A. Lange (Leslie); Faraday, N. (Nauder); Abumrad, N.A. (Nada A.); T.L. Edwards (Todd L.); S.K. Ganesh (Santhi); P. Auer (Paul); A.D. Johnson (Andrew); A. Reiner (Alexander); G. Lettre (Guillaume)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractRed blood cell (RBC) traits are important heritable clinical biomarkers and modifiers of disease severity. To identify coding genetic variants associated with these traits, we conducted meta-analyses of seven RBC phenotypes in 130,273 multi-ethnic individuals from studies genotyped on an

  14. Strain hardening of red blood cells by accumulated cyclic supraphysiological stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, Sung S.; Antaki, James F.; Kameneva, Marina V.; Dobbe, Johannes G.; Hardeman, Max R.; Ahn, Kyung H.; Lee, Seung J.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of elevated shear stress upon cellular trauma has been studied for many years, but the effect of long-term cyclic stress trauma on hemorheology has never been explored systematically. This study investigated sublytic trauma of red blood cells (RBCs) caused by repeated exposure to shear

  15. Acetylcholinesterase provides new insights into red blood cell ageing in vivo and in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leal, J.K.; Adjobo-Hermans, M.J.W.; Brock, R.E.; Bosman, G.J.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: During its 120 days sojourn in the circulation, the red blood cell (RBC) remodels its membrane. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-linked enzyme that may serve as a marker for membrane processes occurring this ageing-associated remodelling process.

  16. DETERMINANTS OF RED-BLOOD-CELL DEFORMABILITY IN RELATION TO CELL AGE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BOSCH, FH; WERRE, JM; ROERDINKHOLDERSTOELWINDER, B; HULS, T; WILLEKENS, FLA; WICHERS, G; HALIE, MR

    Red blood cell (RBC) deformability was determined with an ektacytometer in fractions separated on the basis of differences in cell volume or density. Deformability was measured with ektacytometry (rpm-scan and osmo-scan). We studied three groups of RBC fractions:l. By counterflow centrifugation we

  17. Automatic tracking of red blood cells in micro channels using OpenCV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Vânia; Rodrigues, Pedro J.; Pereira, Ana I.; Lima, Rui

    2013-10-01

    The present study aims to developan automatic method able to track red blood cells (RBCs) trajectories flowing through a microchannel using the Open Source Computer Vision (OpenCV). The developed method is based on optical flux calculation assisted by the maximization of the template-matching product. The experimental results show a good functional performance of this method.

  18. Differences in the red blood cell elution times of strains of Newcastle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Elution times of velogenic, mesogenic and lentogenic strains of Newcastle disease virus were determined. Four samples each of velogenic (VGF2), mesogenic (Komarov) and lentogenic (Lasota) strains were used for haemaglutination test with 0.6% chicken red blood cells. The time it took for wells of the end ...

  19. A Comprehensive Review of Our Current Understanding of Red Blood Cell (RBC Glycoproteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiko Aoki

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Human red blood cells (RBC, which are the cells most commonly used in the study of biological membranes, have some glycoproteins in their cell membrane. These membrane proteins are band 3 and glycophorins A–D, and some substoichiometric glycoproteins (e.g., CD44, CD47, Lu, Kell, Duffy. The oligosaccharide that band 3 contains has one N-linked oligosaccharide, and glycophorins possess mostly O-linked oligosaccharides. The end of the O-linked oligosaccharide is linked to sialic acid. In humans, this sialic acid is N-acetylneuraminic acid (NeuAc. Another sialic acid, N-glycolylneuraminic acid (NeuGc is present in red blood cells of non-human origin. While the biological function of band 3 is well known as an anion exchanger, it has been suggested that the oligosaccharide of band 3 does not affect the anion transport function. Although band 3 has been studied in detail, the physiological functions of glycophorins remain unclear. This review mainly describes the sialo-oligosaccharide structures of band 3 and glycophorins, followed by a discussion of the physiological functions that have been reported in the literature to date. Moreover, other glycoproteins in red blood cell membranes of non-human origin are described, and the physiological function of glycophorin in carp red blood cell membranes is discussed with respect to its bacteriostatic activity.

  20. Seventy-five genetic loci influencing the human red blood cell

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Harst, P.; Zhang, W.; Mateo Leach, I.; Rendon, A.; Verweij, N.; Sehmi, J.; Paul, D.S.; Elling, U.; Allayee, H.; Li, X.; Radhakrishnan, A.; Tan, S.T.; Voss, K.; Weichenberger, C.X.; Albers, C.A.; Al-Hussani, A.; Asselbergs, F.W.; Ciullo, M.; Danjou, F.; Dina, C.; Esko, T.; Evans, D.M.; Franke, L; Gögele, M.; Hartiala, J.; Hersch, M.; Holm, H.; Hottenga, J.J.; Kanoni, S.; Kleber, M.E.; Lagou, V.; Langenberg, C.; Lopez, L.M.; Lyytikäinen, L.P.; Melander, O.; Murgia, F.; Nolte, I.M.; O'Reilly, P.F.; Padmanabhan, S.; Parsa, A.; Pirastu, N.; Porcu, E.; Portas, L.; Prokopenko, I.; Ried, J.S.; Shin, S.Y.; Tang, C.S.; Teumer, A.; Traglia, M.; Ulivi, S.; Westra, H.J.; Yang, J.; Zhao, J.H.; Anni, F.; Abdellaoui, A.; Attwood, A.; Balkau, B.; Bandinelli, S.; Bastardot, F.; Benyamin, B.; Boehm, B.O.; Cookson, W.O.; Das, D.; de Bakker, P.I.; de Boer, R.A.; de Geus, E.J.C.; de Moor, M.H.M.; Dimitriou, M.; Domingues, F.S.; Döring, A.; Engström, G.; Eyjolfsson, G.I.; Ferrucci, L.; Fischer, K.; Galanello, R.; Garner, S.F.; Genser, B.; Gibson, Q.D.; Girotto, G.; Gudbjartsson, D.F.; Harris, S.E.; Hartikainen, A.L.; Hastie, C.E.; Hedblad, B.; Illig, T.; Jolley, J.; Kähönen, M.; Kema, I.P.; Kemp, J.P.; Liang, L.; Lloyd-Jones, H.; Loos, R.J.; Meacham, S.; Medland, S.E.; Meisinger, C.; Memari, Y.; Mihailov, E.; Miller, K.; Moffatt, M.F.; Nauck, M.; Novatchkova, M.; Nutile, T.; Olafsson, I.; Onundarson, P.T.; Parracciani, D.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; Perseu, L.; Piga, A.; Pisits, G.; Pouta, A.; Puc, U.; Raitakari, O.; Ring, S.M.; Robino, A.; Ruggiero, D.; Ruokonen, A.; Saint-Pierre, A.; Sala, C.; Salumets, A.; Sambrook, J.; Schepers, H.; Schmidt, C.O.; Silljé, H.H.; Sladek, R.; Smit, J.H.; Starr, J.M.; Stephens, J.; Sulem, P.; Tanaka, T.; Thorsteinsdottir, U.; Tragante, V.; van Gilst, W.H.; van Pelt, L.J.; van Veldhuisen, D.J.; Völker, U.; Whitfield, J.B.; Willemsen, G.; Winkelmann, B.R.; Wirnsberger, G.; Algra, A.; Cucca, F.; d'Adamo, A.P.; Danesh, J.; Deary, I.J.; Dominiczak, A.F.; Elliott, P.; Fortina, P.; Froguel, P.; Gasparini, P.; Greinacher, A.; Hazen, S.L.; Jarvelin, M.-R.; Khaw, K.T.; Lehtimäki, T.; Maerz, W.; Martin, N.G.; Metspalu, A.; Mitchell, B.D.; Montgomery, G.W.; Moore, C.; Navis, G.; Pirastu, M.; Pramstaller, P.P.; Ramirez-Solis, R.; Schadt, E.; Scott, J.; Shuldiner, A.R.; Smith, G.D.; Smith, J.G.; Snieder, H.; Sorice, R.; Spector, T.D.; Stefansson, K.; Stumvoll, M.; Tang, W.H.; Toniolo, D.; Tönjes, A.; Visscher, P.M.; Vollenweider, P.; Wareham, N.J.; Wolffenbuttel, B.H.R.; Boomsma, D.I.; Beckmann, J.S.; Dedoussis, G.V.; Deloukas, P.; Ferreira, M.A.; Sanna, S.; Uda, M.; Hicks, A.A.; Penninger, J.M.; Gieger, C.; Kooner, J.S.; Ouwehand, W.H.; Soranzo, N.; Chambers, J.C.

    2012-01-01

    Anaemia is a chief determinant of global ill health, contributing to cognitive impairment, growth retardation and impaired physical capacity. To understand further the genetic factors influencing red blood cells, we carried out a genome-wide association study of haemoglobin concentration and related

  1. Hemoglobin Aggregation in Single Red Blood Cells of Sickle Cell Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, Izumi; Tanaka, Toyoichi; Sun, Shao-Tang; Imanishi, Yuri; Tsuyoshi Ohnishi, S.

    1983-06-01

    A laser light scattering technique was used to observe the extent of hemoglobin aggregation in solitary red blood cells of sickle cell anemia. Hemoglobin aggregation was confirmed in deoxygenated cells. The light scattering technique can also be applied to cytoplasmic studies of any biological cell.

  2. GPU-accelerated red blood cells simulations with transport dissipative particle dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumers, Ansel L.; Tang, Yu-Hang; Li, Zhen; Li, Xuejin; Karniadakis, George E.

    2017-08-01

    Mesoscopic numerical simulations provide a unique approach for the quantification of the chemical influences on red blood cell functionalities. The transport Dissipative Particle Dynamics (tDPD) method can lead to such effective multiscale simulations due to its ability to simultaneously capture mesoscopic advection, diffusion, and reaction. In this paper, we present a GPU-accelerated red blood cell simulation package based on a tDPD adaptation of our red blood cell model, which can correctly recover the cell membrane viscosity, elasticity, bending stiffness, and cross-membrane chemical transport. The package essentially processes all computational workloads in parallel by GPU, and it incorporates multi-stream scheduling and non-blocking MPI communications to improve inter-node scalability. Our code is validated for accuracy and compared against the CPU counterpart for speed. Strong scaling and weak scaling are also presented to characterize scalability. We observe a speedup of 10 . 1 on one GPU over all 16 cores within a single node, and a weak scaling efficiency of 91% across 256 nodes. The program enables quick-turnaround and high-throughput numerical simulations for investigating chemical-driven red blood cell phenomena and disorders.

  3. FISH analysis of fetal nucleated red blood cells from CVS washings in cases of aneuploidy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuring-Blom, G. H.; Hoovers, J. M.; van Lith, J. M.; Knegt, A. C.; Leschot, N. J.

    2001-01-01

    In chorionic villus sampling (CVS) the chromosome analysis is inconclusive in 1-2% of the samples. In many cases follow-up amniocentesis is performed. Fetal nucleated red blood cells (FNRBCs) are present in washings of chorionic villus samples. We wanted to establish whether analysis of these true

  4. Statistical mechanics of red blood cell aggregation: The distribution of rouleaux in thermal equilibrium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegel, F.W.; Perelson, Alan S.

    1982-01-01

    When placed in suspension red blood cells adhere face-to-face and form long, cylindrical, and sometimes branched structures called rouleaux. We use methods developed in statistical mechanics to compute various statistical properties describing the size and shape of rouleaux in thermodynamic

  5. Mechanics of extracellular vesicles derived from malaria parasiteinfected Red Blood Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sorkin, Raya; Vorselen, Daan; Ofir-Birin, Yifat; Roos, Wouter H.; MacKintosh, Fred C.; Regev-Rudzki, Neta; Wuite, Gijs J. L.

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is a life-threatening disease caused by parasites that are transmitted through the bites of infected mosquitoes, with Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) causing the most severe form of malaria (1). Very recently it was discovered that Pf infected red blood cells (iRBC) directly transfer information

  6. Inborn defects in the antioxidant systems of human red blood cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zwieten, Rob; Verhoeven, Arthur J.; Roos, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) contain large amounts of iron and operate in highly oxygenated tissues. As a result, these cells encounter a continuous oxidative stress. Protective mechanisms against oxidation include prevention of formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), scavenging of various forms of

  7. Evaluation of Red Blood Cell Distribution Width in Patients with Cardiac Syndrome X

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Qing

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cardiac syndrome X (CSX is a condition characterized by chest pain with normal coronary arteries. However, its pathogenesis has not fully been understood yet. Red blood cell distribution width (RDW has recently been suggested as a marker of acute and chronic cardiovascular diseases, while no data is available in patients with CSX.

  8. GPU-accelerated Red Blood Cells Simulations with Transport Dissipative Particle Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumers, Ansel L; Tang, Yu-Hang; Li, Zhen; Li, Xuejin; Karniadakis, George E

    2017-08-01

    Mesoscopic numerical simulations provide a unique approach for the quantification of the chemical influences on red blood cell functionalities. The transport Dissipative Particles Dynamics (tDPD) method can lead to such effective multiscale simulations due to its ability to simultaneously capture mesoscopic advection, diffusion, and reaction. In this paper, we present a GPU-accelerated red blood cell simulation package based on a tDPD adaptation of our red blood cell model, which can correctly recover the cell membrane viscosity, elasticity, bending stiffness, and cross-membrane chemical transport. The package essentially processes all computational workloads in parallel by GPU, and it incorporates multi-stream scheduling and non-blocking MPI communications to improve inter-node scalability. Our code is validated for accuracy and compared against the CPU counterpart for speed. Strong scaling and weak scaling are also presented to characterizes scalability. We observe a speedup of 10.1 on one GPU over all 16 cores within a single node, and a weak scaling efficiency of 91% across 256 nodes. The program enables quick-turnaround and high-throughput numerical simulations for investigating chemical-driven red blood cell phenomena and disorders.

  9. Stem Cell Physics. Laser Manipulation of Blood Types: Laser-Stripping-Away of Red Blood Cell Surface Antigens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    2014-03-01

    A novel mechanism of importance for the transfusion medicine[2] is proposed. The interaction of ultrashort wavelength multilaser beams with the flowing blood thin films can lead to a conversion of blood types A, B, and AB into O type.[3] The stripping away of antigens is done by the scanning-multiple-lasers of a high repetition rate in the blue-purple frequency domain. The guiding-lasers are in the red-green frequency domain. The laser force, (parametric interaction with the antigen eigen-oscillation),[4] upon the antigen protein molecule must exceed its weight. Supported by Nikola Tesla Labs, La Jolla, CA.

  10. Effects of low power violet laser irradiation on red blood cells volume and erythrocyte sedimentation rate in human blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Musawi, Mustafa S.; Jafaar, M. S.; Ahmed, Naser M.; Al-Gailani, B. T.; Suhaimi, Fatanah M.

    2017-08-01

    This study is designed in vitro to examine the effects of low power violet laser irradiation on some human blood samples rheological factors such as mean red blood cell volume (MCV) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). Blood samples were collected into EDTA contained tubes and separated into two equal aliquots to be attended as irradiated and control. Samples were irradiated for 20, 30, 40 or 50 min with a laser of power 10 mW. The measurements were done directly after irradiation by applying westergen method and using a computerized hemtoanalyzer. The RBCs volume and ESR were decreased after irradiation for 40min by 0.44% and 6.7% respectively. It is possible to suggest that laser irradiation can reduction red blood cells volume because of the increased concentrations of free intracellular Ca+². The result shows that ESR reduction exposed to low power laser is mostly by reason of the effect of laser on composition of the plasma that finally affects in ESR of whole blood.

  11. Blood shortage situation: An audit of red blood cells order and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this work is to audit blood utilization by different specialties in the hospital using the Cross-match ratio as a guide to achieving effective transfusion practices. This was a prospective study. The blood bank of University Teaching Hospital in Benin City, Nigeria was used for the study. We analysed all blood ...

  12. Mean remaining life span: a new clinically relevant parameter to assess the quality of transfused red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuruvilla, Denison J; Nalbant, Demet; Widness, John A; Veng-Pedersen, Peter

    2014-10-01

    The quality of transfused red blood cells (RBCs) to treat anemia depends on its potential for oxygen delivery, governed by two properties: 1) initial posttransfusion recovery and 2) life span of initially surviving RBCs. The latter property is poorly evaluated by the traditional mean potential life span (MPL) or mean cell age (MA), because these parameters do not evaluate how long transfused RBCs remain in circulation. Furthermore, evaluation of MPL is based on two problematic assumptions regarding transfused RBCs: 1) they were produced at a constant steady-state rate and 2) they have similar storage life spans. This work introduces a new parameter, the mean remaining life span (MRL) to quantify transfused RBC survival (TRCS) and presents a simple algorithm for its evaluation. The MRL was calculated for four adult subjects with sickle cell disease and four adult diabetic and nondiabetic subjects using RBC survival data sets with existing TRCS parameters. The RBC survival curves in the sickle cell subjects were nonlinear with rapid decline in survival within the first 5 days. The MRL was approximately 4.6 days. Thus, the MRL was indicative of the survival of all transfused RBCs. For the diabetic and nondiabetic subjects, the RBC disappearance curves did not deviate substantially from a linear decline. Thus, the estimates for MRL ranging from 39 to 51 days are similar to the MA previously computed. MRL overcomes limitations of previously proposed TRCS parameters, is simpler to calculate, and is physiologically and clinically more appropriate. © 2014 AABB.

  13. Acquired red blood cell alloantibodies in transfused patients of 80 years or over: a 2008-2013 national haemovigilance survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncharmont, Pierre; Barday, Grégory; Py, Jean-Yves; Meyer, Francis

    2017-05-01

    As transfusion in the elderly patients has increased over the last decades, and with the aim of improving blood policy, post-transfusion red blood cell alloimmunisation, a delayed serological transfusion reaction, was investigated in patients 80 years old or over. For every adverse reaction to a transfusion, a report is sent to the French haemovigilance database. All cases of red blood cell alloimmunisation reported in the haemovigilance database were collected, and an analysis was performed on those cases in transfused patients 80 years old or over. There were 11,625 reports of red blood cell alloimmunisation from 1 January, 2008 to 31 December, 2013, of which 3,617 (31.1%) occurred in patients 80 years old or over. Among this subgroup, red blood cell concentrates were the most frequently involved blood component (3,482 reports, 96.3%). Red blood cell alloimmunisation after transfusion of platelet concentrates was also notified (132 reports, 3.7%). Anti-KEL1 was the most frequent antibody (874 reports, 24.2%). The imputability of the blood component was certain in 2,340 cases (64.7%) and probable in 1,078 (29.8%). In 2013, the incidence of red blood cell alloimmunisation was 4.14 per 1,000 transfused patients aged 80 years old or over. In a 6-year national survey in which 40,570 reports were made, there were 3,617 cases of red blood cell alloimmunisation in transfused recipients of 80 years old or over. This delayed serological transfusion reaction is not rare. Red blood cell concentrates were predominantly involved, but cases caused by platelet concentrates were also described. In order to prevent alloimmunisation in the elderly, several factors must be evaluated before transfusing matched red blood cell concentrates: the patient's age, pathology and its outcome, the type of transfusion support (chronic or not), life expectancy, and blood product availability.

  14. Acquired red blood cell alloantibodies in transfused patients of 80 years or over: a 2008–2013 national haemovigilance survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncharmont, Pierre; Barday, Grégory; Py, Jean-Yves; Meyer, Francis

    2017-01-01

    Background As transfusion in the elderly patients has increased over the last decades, and with the aim of improving blood policy, post-transfusion red blood cell alloimmunisation, a delayed serological transfusion reaction, was investigated in patients 80 years old or over. Materials and methods For every adverse reaction to a transfusion, a report is sent to the French haemovigilance database. All cases of red blood cell alloimmunisation reported in the haemovigilance database were collected, and an analysis was performed on those cases in transfused patients 80 years old or over. Results There were 11,625 reports of red blood cell alloimmunisation from 1 January, 2008 to 31 December, 2013, of which 3,617 (31.1%) occurred in patients 80 years old or over. Among this subgroup, red blood cell concentrates were the most frequently involved blood component (3,482 reports, 96.3%). Red blood cell alloimmunisation after transfusion of platelet concentrates was also notified (132 reports, 3.7%). Anti-KEL1 was the most frequent antibody (874 reports, 24.2%). The imputability of the blood component was certain in 2,340 cases (64.7%) and probable in 1,078 (29.8%). In 2013, the incidence of red blood cell alloimmunisation was 4.14 per 1,000 transfused patients aged 80 years old or over. Discussion In a 6-year national survey in which 40,570 reports were made, there were 3,617 cases of red blood cell alloimmunisation in transfused recipients of 80 years old or over. This delayed serological transfusion reaction is not rare. Red blood cell concentrates were predominantly involved, but cases caused by platelet concentrates were also described. In order to prevent alloimmunisation in the elderly, several factors must be evaluated before transfusing matched red blood cell concentrates: the patient’s age, pathology and its outcome, the type of transfusion support (chronic or not), life expectancy, and blood product availability. PMID:27416567

  15. Volume-dependent K+ transport in rabbit red blood cells comparison with oxygenated human SS cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Rohil, N.; Jennings, M.L.

    1989-07-01

    In this study the volume-dependent or N-ethylmaleimide (NEM)-stimulated, ouabain-insensitive K+ influx and efflux were measured with the tracer 86Rb+ in rabbit red blood cells. The purpose of the work was to examine the rabbit as a potential model for cell volume regulation in human SS red blood cells and also to investigate the relationship between the NEM-reactive sulfhydryl group(s) and the signal by which cell swelling activates the transport. Ouabain-resistant K+ efflux and influx increase nearly threefold in cells swollen hypotonically by 15%. Pretreatment with 2 mM NEM stimulates efflux 5-fold and influx 10-fold (each measured in an isotonic medium). The ouabain-resistant K+ efflux was dependent on the major anion in the medium. The anion dependence of K+ efflux in swollen or NEM-stimulated cells was as follows: Br- greater than Cl- much greater than NO3- = acetate. The magnitudes of both the swelling- and the NEM-stimulated fluxes are much higher in young cells (density separated but excluding reticulocytes) than in older cells. Swelling- or NEM-stimulated K+ efflux in rabbit red blood cells was inhibited 50% by 1 mM furosemide, and the inhibitory potency of furosemide was enhanced by extracellular K+, as is known to be true for human AA and low-K+ sheep red blood cells. The swelling-stimulated flux in both rabbit and human SS cells has a pH optimum at approximately 7.4. We conclude that rabbit red blood cells are a good model for swelling-stimulated K+ transport in human SS cells.

  16. Dramatic impact of blood transfusion on cancer-specific survival after radical cystectomy irrespective of tumor stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchner, Alexander; Grimm, Tobias; Schneevoigt, Birte-Swantje; Wittmann, Georg; Kretschmer, Alexander; Jokisch, Friedrich; Grabbert, Markus; Apfelbeck, Maria; Schulz, Gerald; Gratzke, Christian; Stief, Christian G; Karl, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the influence of intraoperative and postoperative blood transfusion on cancer-specific outcome. Follow-up data were collected from 722 patients undergoing radical cystectomy for urothelial carcinoma of the bladder (UCB) between 2004 and 2014. Median follow-up was 26 months (interquartile range 12-61 months). Outcome was analyzed in relation to the amount of intraoperative and postoperative blood transfusion and different tumor stages. The primary endpoint was cancer-specific survival (CSS) after cystectomy. Kaplan-Meier analysis with log-rank test and Cox regression models were used. Intraoperative blood transfusion was given in 36% (263/722) and postoperative blood transfusion in 18% (132/722). In patients with and without intraoperative blood transfusion, 5 year CSS was 48% and 67%, respectively (p blood transfusion, 5 year CSS was 48% and 63%, respectively (p transfused red blood cell (RBC) units [intraoperatively: hazard ratio (HR) = 1.08, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01-1.15, p = .023; postoperatively: HR = 1.14, 95% CI 1.07-1.21, p transfusions was also found in favorable subgroups (pT1 tumor, hemoglobin ≥13 mg/dl, p = .004) and in a high-volume surgeon subgroup (n = 244, p Blood transfusions during and after radical cystectomy were independent prognostic factors for CSS in this retrospective study. Therefore, efforts should be made to reduce the necessity of intraoperative and postoperative blood transfusion in cystectomy patients.

  17. Transfusion rate and prevalence of unexpected red blood cell alloantibodies in women undergoing hysterectomy for benign disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoestesen, Lisbeth M; Rasmussen, Kjeld L; Lauszus, Finn F

    2011-01-01

    To determine transfusion rates, risk factors for transfusion and the prevalence of unexpected red blood cell alloantibodies in women undergoing hysterectomy for benign disease. In addition, we aimed to evaluate the necessity of the pretransfusion testing for red blood cell alloantibodies....

  18. Red blood cells sensitivity to oxidative stress in the presence of low concentrations of uranium compound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shevchenko, O.G. [Institute of Biology, Komi Scientific Centre, Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, 167982, Syktyvkar (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    Uranium is a natural radioactive element widespread in biosphere. There are a few works that examined cellular and molecular mechanisms of uranium toxicity. Red blood cells are classical model to investigate toxicity mechanisms on cell membrane system. The aim of present work is to study the effect of uranyl ion in nano-molar concentrations on erythrocytes sensitivity (in vitro) to factors provoking acute oxidative stress. Uranyl ions were added to suspension of mice red blood cells in PBS as UO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} solution. Samples were incubated in a thermostatic shaker at 37 deg. C during 3-5 hours. Than acute oxidative stress was induced by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (0.9 mM) or AAPH (5 mM) solutions. Destabilization of the membrane was induced by nonionic detergent Triton X-100. The hemolysis degree and the content of LPO secondary products reacting with 2-thiobarbituric acid in the incubation mixture were determined spectrophotometrically. The ratio of hemoglobin various forms (oxyHb, metHb and ferrylHb) was calculated taking into account extinction coefficients. It was shown that uranyl chloride enhances cell sensitivity to nonionic detergent Triton X-100 effects, indicating alterations of membrane acyl chain order due to contact with the radionuclide ions. Uranium exposure also caused an increase in the cell sensitivity to the AAPH effects, resulted in a decrease in red cell survival rate, a sharp increase in accumulation of hemoglobin oxidation products and a slight increase in the concentration of LPO secondary products. Thus, uranyl ions change physicochemical properties of the erythrocyte membranes that resulted in increased sensitivity to effects of peroxyl radicals formed by thermal decomposition of AAPH. On the contrary, use of another source of free radicals - H{sub 2}O{sub 2} - after uranyl ions exposure resulted in marked decrease of oxidative hemolysis, inhibition of LPO and hemoglobin oxidation. Since the uranium chemical properties similar to properties of

  19. Adaptive and automatic red blood cell counting method based on microscopic hyperspectral imaging technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xi; Zhou, Mei; Qiu, Song; Sun, Li; Liu, Hongying; Li, Qingli; Wang, Yiting

    2017-12-01

    Red blood cell counting, as a routine examination, plays an important role in medical diagnoses. Although automated hematology analyzers are widely used, manual microscopic examination by a hematologist or pathologist is still unavoidable, which is time-consuming and error-prone. This paper proposes a full-automatic red blood cell counting method which is based on microscopic hyperspectral imaging of blood smears and combines spatial and spectral information to achieve high precision. The acquired hyperspectral image data of the blood smear in the visible and near-infrared spectral range are firstly preprocessed, and then a quadratic blind linear unmixing algorithm is used to get endmember abundance images. Based on mathematical morphological operation and an adaptive Otsu’s method, a binaryzation process is performed on the abundance images. Finally, the connected component labeling algorithm with magnification-based parameter setting is applied to automatically select the binary images of red blood cell cytoplasm. Experimental results show that the proposed method can perform well and has potential for clinical applications.

  20. Increased survival in the red flour beetle after oral priming with bacteria-conditioned media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milutinović, Barbara; Fritzlar, Svenja; Kurtz, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Immune priming is defined as enhanced protection upon secondary exposure to a pathogen. Such enhanced resistance after prior exposure has been demonstrated for a number of insect species including the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum. In testing this phenomenon, the majority of studies have focused on introducing the pathogen into the insect's hemocoel via septic wounding through the cuticle. Although such septic injury can occur in nature, many pathogens enter their hosts via the oral route, i.e. by ingestion. Bacillus thuringiensis bacteria are well-known insect pathogens that infect their host orally. We found that T. castaneum larvae showed increased survival after oral exposure to B. thuringiensis, when they had been orally primed with filter-sterilized media in which spores of B. thuringiensis had been raised. Such priming was achieved only with a naturally pathogenic strain of B. thuringiensis and a strain that was made pathogenic by transfer of plasmids. Moreover, primed larvae were smaller in size 24 h after priming and had a longer developmental time, indicating that investment in such a response comes at a cost. However, the increased survival in primed larvae was not caused by larval size differences upon challenge. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Thermosensitivity of red blood cells from Down's syndrome individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybylska, M; Bryszewska, M; K dziora, J

    2000-12-01

    Biochemical disturbances of the reactive oxygen species metabolism revealed in subjects with Down's syndrome (DS), and the findings indicating that heat-induced cell alterations have been, at least, partly mediated by reactive oxygen species, made the elucidation of the response of trisomic cells to elevated temperatures of special interest. Kinetic analysis of cell-survival curves, accompanied by the flow cytometry and the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examinations, and their relationship with the cell membrane fluidity, were undertaken. At each temperature (48-54 degrees C), Dq parameters, representing the ability to accumulate sublethal damages, were similar for both cell groups. D0 parameters (inverse leakage rates; D0 = 1/k) were greater for DS cells at each temperature below 54 degrees C. The haemolysis sensitivity ratio (HSR) showed that DS erythrocytes were, in average, 1.60 times more resistant to heat injury than those from normal subjects. Activation energies of haemolysis, calculated according to the Arrhenius equation, were similar both for normal (290.8 +/- 6.5 [kJ/mol]) and DS erythrocytes (288.0 +/- 5.5 [kJ/mol]). Flow cytometry studies showed that the scattering properties of intact DS erythrocytes (reflecting size, volume, shape and cell membrane surface morphology) were different than those of normal cells. Scanning electron micrographs and scattering diagrams obtained for cells submitted to heat stress (51 degrees C) confirmed that DS erythrocytes were more resistant, to a certain extent, to heat-induced disruption than normal cells. The steady-state fluorescence anisotropy of TMA-DPH (1-(4-trimethyl-ammoniumphenyl)-6-phenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene) showed that untreated DS erythrocytes had substantially lower fluidity (r = 0.356 +/- 0.008) of the outer monolayer of cell membranes as compared to normal cells (r = 0.324 +/- 0.011). The increase of the cell membrane fluidity during exposure to heat was observed. The greatest elevation of cell

  2. Resistance to malaria through structural variation of red blood cell invasion receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leffler, Ellen M; Band, Gavin; Busby, George B J; Kivinen, Katja; Le, Quang Si; Clarke, Geraldine M; Bojang, Kalifa A; Conway, David J; Jallow, Muminatou; Sisay-Joof, Fatoumatta; Bougouma, Edith C; Mangano, Valentina D; Modiano, David; Sirima, Sodiomon B; Achidi, Eric; Apinjoh, Tobias O; Marsh, Kevin; Ndila, Carolyne M; Peshu, Norbert; Williams, Thomas N; Drakeley, Chris; Manjurano, Alphaxard; Reyburn, Hugh; Riley, Eleanor; Kachala, David; Molyneux, Malcolm; Nyirongo, Vysaul; Taylor, Terrie; Thornton, Nicole; Tilley, Louise; Grimsley, Shane; Drury, Eleanor; Stalker, Jim; Cornelius, Victoria; Hubbart, Christina; Jeffreys, Anna E; Rowlands, Kate; Rockett, Kirk A; Spencer, Chris C A; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P

    2017-06-16

    The malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum invades human red blood cells by a series of interactions between host and parasite surface proteins. By analyzing genome sequence data from human populations, including 1269 individuals from sub-Saharan Africa, we identify a diverse array of large copy-number variants affecting the host invasion receptor genes GYPA and GYPB We find that a nearby association with severe malaria is explained by a complex structural rearrangement involving the loss of GYPB and gain of two GYPB-A hybrid genes, which encode a serologically distinct blood group antigen known as Dantu. This variant reduces the risk of severe malaria by 40% and has recently increased in frequency in parts of Kenya, yet it appears to be absent from west Africa. These findings link structural variation of red blood cell invasion receptors with natural resistance to severe malaria. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  3. Perioperative blood transfusion: does it influence survival and cancer progression in metastatic spine tumor surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaw, Aye Sandar; Kantharajanna, Shashidhar B; Maharajan, Karthikeyan; Tan, Barry; Vellayappan, Balamurugan; Kumar, Naresh

    2017-02-01

    Despite advances in surgical techniques for spinal metastases, there is often substantial blood loss, resulting in patients requiring blood transfusion during the perioperative period. Allogeneic blood transfusion (ABT) has been the main replenishment method for lost blood. However, the impact of ABT on cancer-related outcomes has been controversial in various studies. We aimed to evaluate the influence of perioperative ABT on disease progression and survival in patients undergoing metastatic spinal tumor surgery (MSTS). We conducted a retrospective study that included 247 patients who underwent MSTS at a single tertiary institution between 2005 and 2014. The impact of using perioperative ABT (either exposure to or quantities of transfusion) on disease progression and survival was assessed using Cox regression analyses while adjusting for potential confounding variables. Of 247 patients, 133 (54%) received ABT. The overall median number of blood units transfused was 2 (range, 0-10 units). Neither blood transfusion exposure nor quantities of transfusion were associated with overall survival (hazard ratio [HR], 1.15 [p = 0.35] and 1.10 [p = 0.11], respectively) and progression-free survival (HR, 0.87 [p = 0.18] and 0.98 [p = 0.11], respectively). The factors that influenced overall survival were primary tumor type and preoperative Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status, whereas primary tumor type was the only factor that had an impact on progression-free survival. This is the first study providing evidence that disease progression and survival in patients who undergo MSTS are less likely to be influenced by perioperative ABT. The worst oncologic outcomes are more likely to be caused by the clinical circumstances necessitating blood transfusion, but not transfusion itself. However, because ABT can have a propensity toward developing postoperative infections, including surgical site infection, the use of patient blood management

  4. Quantification of Cell-Free DNA in Red Blood Cell Units in Different Whole Blood Processing Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew W. Shih

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Whole blood donations in Canada are processed by either the red cell filtration (RCF or whole blood filtration (WBF methods, where leukoreduction is potentially delayed in WBF. Fresh WBF red blood cells (RBCs have been associated with increased in-hospital mortality after transfusion. Cell-free DNA (cfDNA is released by neutrophils prior to leukoreduction, degraded during RBC storage, and is associated with adverse patient outcomes. We explored cfDNA levels in RBCs prepared by RCF and WBF and different storage durations. Methods. Equal numbers of fresh (stored ≤14 days and older RBCs were sampled. cfDNA was quantified by spectrophotometry and PicoGreen. Separate regression models determined the association with processing method and storage duration and their interaction on cfDNA. Results. cfDNA in 120 RBC units (73 RCF, 47 WBF were measured. Using PicoGreen, WBF units overall had higher cfDNA than RCF units (p=0.0010; fresh WBF units had higher cfDNA than fresh RCF units (p=0.0093. Using spectrophotometry, fresh RBC units overall had higher cfDNA than older units (p=0.0031; fresh WBF RBCs had higher cfDNA than older RCF RBCs (p=0.024. Conclusion. Higher cfDNA in fresh WBF was observed compared to older RCF blood. Further study is required for association with patient outcomes.

  5. Effects of Cinnamomum zeylanicum treatment on radiolabeling of blood bonstituents and morphology of red blood cells in Wistar rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Oliveira Benarroz

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of in vivo treatment with an aqueous cinnamon extract on the labeling of blood constituents with 99mTc and on the morphology of red blood cells from Wistar rats. Animals were treated with cinnamon extract at different doses and for different periods of time. As controls, animals treated with 0.9% NaCl. Labeling of blood constituents with 99mTc was performed. Plasma, blood cells and insoluble fractions were isolated. Radioactivity in each fraction was counted and the percentage of radioactivity (%ATI was calculated. Also, blood smears were prepared to morphological analysis of red blood cells from. Data showed that in vivo cinnamon extract did not significantly (p>0.05 modify the %ATI of blood constituents and morphology of red blood cells. The results suggest that in vivo aqueous cinnamon could not affect the membrane structures involved in transport of ions or the oxidation state of stannous and pertechnetate ions.O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar efeitos do tratamento in vivo com um extrato aquoso de canela na marcação de constituintes sangüíneos com 99mTc e na morfologia de hemácias de ratos Wistar. Os animais foram tratados com diferentes doses ou por diferentes tempos com extrato de canela Como controles, animais tratados com NaCl 0,9%. A marcação de constituintes sangüíneos com 99mTc foi realizada, plasma, células sangüíneas e frações insolúveis foram isoladas. A radioatividade em cada fração foi contada e a porcentagem de radioatividade (%ATI foi calculada. Distensões sangüíneas foram preparadas para análise morfológica de hemácias. Os dados mostraram que o tratamento in vivo com extrato de canela não modificaria significativamente (p>0,05 a %ATI nos constituintes sangüíneos e a morfologia de hemácias. Os resultados sugerem que o extrato aquoso de canela não afetaria in vivo as estruturas da membrana envolvidas no transporte de íons ou o estado de oxida

  6. Association Among Blood Transfusion, Sepsis, and Decreased Long-term Survival After Colon Cancer Resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquina, Christopher T; Blumberg, Neil; Becerra, Adan Z; Boscoe, Francis P; Schymura, Maria J; Noyes, Katia; Monson, John R T; Fleming, Fergal J

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the potential additive effects of blood transfusion and sepsis on colon cancer disease-specific survival, cardiovascular disease-specific survival, and overall survival after colon cancer surgery. Perioperative blood transfusions are associated with infectious complications and increased risk of cancer recurrence through systemic inflammatory effects. Furthermore, recent studies have suggested an association among sepsis, subsequent systemic inflammation, and adverse cardiovascular outcomes. However, no study has investigated the association among transfusion, sepsis, and disease-specific survival in postoperative patients. The New York State Cancer Registry and Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System were queried for stage I to III colon cancer resections from 2004 to 2011. Propensity-adjusted survival analyses assessed the association of perioperative allogeneic blood transfusion, sepsis, and 5-year colon cancer disease-specific survival, cardiovascular disease-specific survival, and overall survival. Among 24,230 patients, 29% received a transfusion and 4% developed sepsis. After risk adjustment, transfusion and sepsis were associated with worse colon cancer disease-specific survival [(+)transfusion: hazard ratio (HR) 1.19, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.09-1.30; (+)sepsis: HR 1.84, 95% CI 1.44-2.35; (+)transfusion/(+)sepsis: HR 2.27, 95% CI 1.87-2.76], cardiovascular disease-specific survival [(+)transfusion: HR 1.18, 95% CI 1.04-1.33; (+)sepsis: HR 1.63, 95% CI 1.14-2.31; (+)transfusion/(+)sepsis: HR 2.04, 95% CI 1.58-2.63], and overall survival [(+)transfusion: HR 1.21, 95% CI 1.14-1.29; (+)sepsis: HR 1.76, 95% CI 1.48-2.09; (+)transfusion/(+)sepsis: HR 2.36, 95% CI 2.07-2.68] relative to (-)transfusion/(-)sepsis. Additional analyses suggested an additive effect with those who both received a blood transfusion and developed sepsis having even worse survival. Perioperative blood transfusions are associated with shorter survival

  7. Qualitative assessment of red blood cell parameters for signs of anemia in patients with chronic periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Nubesh S; Luke, Roji; Soman, Rino Roopak; Krishna, Praveen M; Safar, Iqbal P; Swaminathan, Senthil Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Anemia of chronic disease is defined as anemia occurring in chronic infections and inflammatory conditions that is not caused by marrow deficiencies or other diseases and in the presence of adequate iron stores and vitamins. The present case control study was aimed to assess the red blood cell parameters for signs of anemia in patients with mild, moderate, and severe chronic periodontitis. A simple random sampling method was used to select 80 healthy male patients, who were divided into four groups based on full mouth periodontal examination as follows: group I patients comprised the control group (n = 20), which included patients with a clinically healthy periodontium, group II patients (n = 20) were diagnosed with mild chronic periodontitis, group III (n = 20) included moderate chronic periodontitis patients, and patients with severe chronic periodontitis formed group IV (n = 20). Laboratory blood investigations included total number of erythrocytes, hemoglobin concentration, packed cell volume, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration. Data analysis showed a statistically significant decrease in red blood cell parameters with increase in different grades of periodontitis. Results of the present study show a substantial decrease in red blood cell parameters with increase in the severity of periodontal destruction.

  8. Using qualitative research methods in biomedical innovation: the case of cultured red blood cells for transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyall, Catherine; King, Emma

    2016-05-11

    Qualitative research has a key role to play in biomedical innovation projects. This article focuses on the appropriate use of robust social science methodologies (primarily focus group studies) for identifying the public's willingness and preference for emerging medical technologies. Our study was part of the BloodPharma project (now known as the Novosang project) to deliver industrially generated red blood cells for transfusion. Previous work on blood substitutes shows that the public prefers donated human blood. However, no research has been conducted concerning attitudes to stem cell derived red blood cells. Qualitative research methods including interviews and focus groups provide the methodological context for this paper. Focus groups were used to elicit views from sub-sections of the UK population about the potential use of such cultured red blood cells. We reflect on the appropriateness of that methodology in the context of the BloodPharma project. Findings are in the form of lessons transferable to other interdisciplinary, science-led teams about what a social science dimension can bring; why qualitative research should be included; and how it can be used effectively. Qualitative data collection offers the strength of exploring ambivalence and investigating the reasons for views, but not necessarily their prevalence in wider society. The inherent value of a qualitative method, such as focus groups, therefore lies in its ability to uncover new information. This contrasts with a quantitative approach to simply 'measuring' public opinion on a topic about which participants may have little prior knowledge. We discuss a number of challenges including: appropriate roles for embedded social scientists and the intricacies of doing upstream engagement as well as some of the design issues and limitations associated with the focus group method.

  9. NEUROTROPIC AND DIURETIC ACTIVITY OF THICK EXTRACT OF THE BLOOD-RED HAWTHORN’S FRUITS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Kurkin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Blood-red hawthorn (Crataegi fructus are a popular cardiotonic herbal materials, which widely used in medical practice in our country and abroad. In order to prevent diseases of the cardiovascular system is appropriate to prescribe herbal medicines, because they combine the breadth and softness of therapeutic action, along with the absence of a significant number of side effects and contraindications.The purpose was to study diuretic and antidepressant activity of thick fruit extract of blood-red hawthorn.Material and methods. Under laboratory conditions we obtained a thick extract of blood-red hawthorn fruits. This phytopharmaceutical was studied by us for any diuretic and antidepressant activity. Investiga- tions were carried out on white rats of both sexes weighing 200–220 g. Each experimental group consist- ed of ten animals. Study drug was administered intragastrically by stomach tube. Control in both cases served as purified water. For determination of diuretic activity, we used a thick extract of hawthorn fruits in a dose of 20 mg/kg against the background of the water load in the amount of 3% of body weight of the animal. Reference preparation was chosen dichlorthiazid 20 mg/kg. It was administered once. After ad- ministration the animals were placed in metabolic cages for urine collection for 24 hours. The study de- termined diuresis, natriuresis, kaliuresis, and kreatininuresis for 4 h and 24 h of the experiment. On the day of the experiment the animals of the control group was administered water load of 3%, and experi- enced – intragastrically drug in an identical amount. Animals were placed in a metabolic cage for a day. Collected 4 h and 24-h urine sample. Determined by renal excretion of water was recorded concentration of sodium and potassium by flame photometry in the fiery liquid analyzer PAG-1, creatinine – colorimet- ric method for photocolorimeter CFC-3. For determining antidepressant activity we used a thick hawthorn

  10. A Randomized Clinical Trial of Red Blood Cell Transfusion Triggers in Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Colleen G; Sessler, Daniel I; Mascha, Edward J; Sabik, Joseph F; Li, Liang; Duncan, Andra I; Zimmerman, Nicole M; Blackstone, Eugene H

    2017-10-01

    Class I evidence supporting a threshold for transfusion in the cardiac surgical setting is scarce. We randomly allocated patients to a transfusion hematocrit trigger of 24% versus 28% to compare morbidity, mortality, and resource use. From March 2007 to August 2014, two centers randomly assigned 722 adults undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery or valve procedures to a 24% hematocrit trigger (n = 363, low group) or 28% trigger (n = 354, high group). One unit of red blood cells was transfused if the hematocrit fell below the designated threshold. The primary endpoint was a composite of postoperative morbidities and mortality. Treatment effect was primarily assessed using an average relative effect generalized estimating equation model. At the second planned interim analysis, the a priori futility boundary was crossed, and the study was stopped. There was no detected treatment effect on the composite outcome (average relative effect odds ratio, low versus high, 0.86, 95% confidence interval: 0.29 to 2.54, p = 0.71). However, the low group received fewer red blood cell transfusions than the high group (54% versus 75%, p < 0.001), mostly administered in the operating room (low group, 112 [31%]; high group, 208 [59%]), followed by intensive care unit (low, 105 [31%]; high, 115 [34%]) and floor (low, 41 [12%]; high, 42 [13%]). The low group was exposed to lower hematocrits: median before transfusion, 22% (Q1 = 21%, Q3 = 23%) versus 24% (Q1 = 22%, Q3 = 25%). Negative exposures differed between treatment groups, with lower hematocrit in the 24% trigger group and more red blood cells used in the 28% group, but adverse outcomes did not differ. Because red blood cell use was less with a 24% trigger without adverse effects, our randomized trial results support aggressive blood conservation efforts in cardiac surgery. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. In vitro combinations of red blood cell, plasma and platelet components evaluated by thromboelastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agren, Anna; Edgren, Gustaf; Kardell, Malin; Ostlund, Anders; Wikman, Agneta Taune

    2014-10-01

    Thromboelastography is increasingly used to evaluate coagulation in massively bleeding patients. The aim of this study was to investigate how different combinations of blood components affect in vitro whole blood clotting measured by thromboelastography. Packed red blood cells, plasma and platelets from fresh and old blood components were mixed in vitro, in proportions of 4:4:1, 5:5:2, 8:4:1 and 2:1:0, and analysed with thromboelastography. For the ratio 4:4:1 the experiment was done at both 37 °C and 32 °C. Thromboelastography curves were within normal reference values for the blood component proportions of 4:4:1 and 5:5:2. For 8:4:1, the angle and maximal amplitude were reduced below normal values, indicating low levels of fibrinogen and/or platelets. For the 2:1:0 proportion, all parameters were affected resulting in severely impaired in vitro clot formation. The reaction-time, reflecting the coagulation factor-dependent, initial clot formation, was slightly increased at a low temperature. Prolonged storage of the components did not affect the curve. With the introduction of guidelines on the management of massive bleeding it is important to have tools for the assessment of the new protocols. In vitro evaluation of mixtures of packed red blood cells, plasma and platelets by thromboelastography may be relevant in the prediction of in vivo clot formation and haemostasis.

  12. The Effect of Perinatal Hypoxia on Red Blood Cell Morphology in Newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Perepelitsa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the red blood cell (RBC morphology in newborn infants with a history of perinatal hypoxia using the atomic-force microscopy. Material and methods. The state of RBC membranes of 10 newborns with a history of perinatal hypoxia was studied. All infants were born with low Apgar scoring; the following resuscitative measures were carried out at birth: tracheal intubation, mechanical ventilation (MV. The study group newborns were transferred from the delivery room to the ICU, where MV was started. To obtain images of normal red blood cells in the field of the atomic force microscope (AFM, 14 full-term newborns delivered after a favorable course of pregnancy and normal term labor were enrolled in a reference group. Results. Discocytes and planocytes comprised 36% of the total red blood cell count in the residual umbilical cord blood of newborns with a history of perinatal hypoxia; there was a decreased amount of normal RBC forms, thus demonstrating an unfavorable effect of hypoxia on newborn's RBC membrane. Poikilocytosis was typical for infants exposed to perinatal hypoxia; transitional forms of RBCs (stomatocytes and echynocytes were visualized. Stomatocytosis and echynocytosis were typical for 80% of newborns. Stomatocytosis persisted in full-term newborns exposed to hypoxia complicated with aspiration of neonatal meconium. The analysis of RBC membrane nanostructure demonstrated that the first-order height (h1 experienced the greatest alterations at birth in newborns with perinatal hypoxia; it was 4.2 times as much as the similar parameter in healthy newborns. Estimations of second-order height (h2 parameter values demonstrated a two-fold increase showing that the spectrin matrix also changed under the effect of hypoxia. The third order value (h3 was significantly higher in newborns with perinatal hypoxia, than that in healthy infants. Therefore, perinatal hypoxia causes antenatal complete damage of nanostructures of RBC membranes

  13. Red blood cell and leukocyte alloimmunization in patients awaiting kidney transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Silvia Fernandes Ribeiro; Ferreira, Gláucia Maria; da Silva, Sonia Leite; Alves, Tânia Maria de Oliveira; Ribeiro, Ilana Farias; Ribeiro, Thyciana Rodrigues; Cavalcante, Maria do Carmo Serpa

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the rates of red blood cell and leukocyte alloimmunization in patients with chronic kidney disease awaiting kidney transplantation. Methods In this cross-sectional and prospective study, the serum of 393 chronic kidney disease patients on a transplant waiting list in Ceará, Northeastern Brazil were tested for red cell and leukocyte antibodies. In addition, demographic, clinical and laboratory data were collected. Results The average age in the sample of 393 patients was 34.1 ± 14 years. Slightly more than half (208; 52.9%) were male. The average numbers of transfusions and gestations were 3.1 ± 3.3 and 1.6 ± 6, respectively. One third (33.6%) were alloimmunized: 78% with leukocyte antibodies, 9.1% with red cell antibodies and 12.9% with both. Red cell antibodies were detected in 29 cases (7.4%), 17 of whom were women, who had received more transfusions than the males (p-value < 0.0001). The most frequently detected red cell antibodies belonged to the Rh (24.1%) and Kell (13.8%) blood group systems. Leukocyte antibodies were detected in 30.5% of cases, 83 of whom were women, who had received more transfusions than the males (p-value < 0.0001) and were more reactive to panel reactive antibodies (p-value < 0.0001). The mean alloreactivity to panel reactive antibodies was 47.7 ± 31.2%. Conclusion Chronic kidney disease patients on the transplant waiting list in Ceará, Brazil, display high rates of red cell (7.4%) and leukocyte (30.5%) alloimmunization. In this sample, alloimmunization was significantly associated with the number of transfusions and gender. PMID:23904808

  14. Numerical simulation of rheology of red blood cell rouleaux in microchannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, T.; Pan, T.-W.; Xing, Z. W.; Glowinski, R.

    2009-04-01

    An elastic spring model is applied to simulate the skeletal structure of the red blood cell (RBC) membrane and to study the dynamical behaviors of the red blood cell rouleaux (aggregates) in microchannels. The biconcave shape of RBCs in static plasma and the tank-treading phenomenon of single RBCs in simple shear flows have been successfully captured using this model. The aggregation and dissociation of RBCs with different deformability have been investigated in both shear and Poiseuille flows by taking into consideration the rheology of the cells and the intercellular interaction kinetics. It is found that the equilibrium configuration of the rouleaux formed under no-flow condition, the motion of the rouleaux in the flows, and the rheological behavior of individual cells in the rouleaux is closely related to the intercellular interaction strength, hydrodynamic viscous forces, and the deformability of the cell membrane.

  15. Paper-based analytical devices for electrochemical study of the breathing process of red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiang-Yun; Wu, Ling-Ling; Pan, Zhong-Qin; Shi, Chuan-Guo; Bao, Ning; Gu, Hai-Ying

    2015-04-01

    Herein we utilized the filter paper to physically trap red blood cells (RBC) to observe the breathing process of red blood cells based on the permeability of the filter paper. By integrating double-sided conductive carbon tape as the working electrodes, the device could be applied to monitor electrochemical responses of RBC for up to hundreds of minutes. The differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) peak currents increased under oxygen while decreased under nitrogen, indicating that RBC could take in and release oxygen. Further studies demonstrated that the RBC suspension could more effectively take in oxygen than the solution of hemoglobin and the supernatant of RBC, suggesting the natural advantage of RBC on oxygen transportation. This study implied that simple paper-based analytical devices might be effectively applied in the study of gas-participating reactions and biochemical detections. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The Red Blood Cell as a Gender-Associated Biomarker in Metabolic Syndrome: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Straface

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present pilot study (56 patients, some red blood cell parameters in samples from patients with metabolic syndrome and subclinical atherosclerosis, but without any sign of coronary artery disease, have been analyzed. The main goal of this work was to determine, in this preclinical state, new peripheral gender-associated bioindicators of possible diagnostic or prognostic value. In particular, three different “indicators” of red blood cell injury and aging have been evaluated: glycophorin A, CD47, and phosphatidylserine externalization. Interestingly, all these determinants appeared significantly modified and displayed gender differences. These findings could provide novel and useful hints in the research for gender-based real-time bioindicators in the progression of metabolic syndrome towards coronary artery disease. Further, more extensive studies are, however, necessary in order to validate these findings.

  17. [Detection of fetal nucleated red blood cells in the maternal circulation by Kleihauer test].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei-Yu; Jin, Chun-Lian; Liu, Li-Ying; Lin, Chang-Kun; Wang, Yan; Sun, Kai-Lai

    2007-03-01

    Maternal blood was obtained from 18 pregnant women at 7 to 25 weeks of gestation. After Percoll discontinuous density gradient centifugation, the fetal nucleated red blood cells (NRBCs) were stained with Kleihauer test. Positive fetal cells appeared with an intense red cytoplasmic staining while maternal cells with adult haemoglobin were colourless. Individual positive NRBC was collected by micromanipulator and whole genome amplification was then performed to determine sex and STR status. This allowed the simultaneous verification of the fetal origin of NRBC and prenatal diagnosis of genetic diseases. The non-invasive prenatal genetic diagnosis of 9 fetuses at high risk of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) was completed successfully. The Kleihauer test is a rapid, simple and direct chemical staining method to select fetal cells and can be applied in prenatal diagnosis.

  18. Atypical appearance of an hepatic hemangioma with technetium-99m red blood cell scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larcos, G.; Farlow, D.C.; Gruenewald, S.M.; Antico, V.F. (Westmead Hospital, NSW (Australia))

    1989-11-01

    Three-phase 99mTc red blood cell scintigraphy is an established technique for distinguishing hemangiomas from other focal liver lesions. The most widely recognized feature is the perfusion to blood-pool mismatch characterized by decreased or normal arterial perfusion, with lesion activity which progressively increases over 1-2 hr. Although increased arterial vascularity of hemangiomas has been described, such cases either involved small portions of the lesion only or occurred in lesions not conclusively proven to be hemangiomas. We report a case of an angiography proven hemangioma with increased arterial vascularity involving a significant portion of the lesion as well as intense early blood-pool activity similar to that seen on delayed imaging. This case emphasizes the diverse appearance of hepatic hemangiomas using 99mTc blood cell scintigraphy.

  19. Measurement of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content in single red blood cells using the firefly bioluminescent reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostuk, R.K.; Muhs, A.G.; Kirkpatrick, F.H.; Gabel, C.W.

    1977-01-01

    A unique optical instrument is described which uses the firefly bioluminscent reaction to measure adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels in single red blood cells. The method allows chemical content level to be associated with individual cell features. The optical instrument consists of a phase contrast microscope to view cells, a pulsed argon-ion laser to rupture the cell membrane, and a photon counting system to measure the bioluminescent yield. The technique has been calibrated against a standard ATP measurement using bulk analysis methods. The ATP loss mechanism for blood cells in a controlled depletion experiment was also investigated.

  20. Elastic energy of curvature-driven bump formation on red blood cell membrane.

    OpenAIRE

    Waugh, R.E.

    1996-01-01

    Model calculations were performed to explore quantitative aspects of the discocyte-echinocyte shape transformation in red blood cells. The shape transformation was assumed to be driven by changes in the preferred curvature of the membrane bilayer and opposed by the elastic shear rigidity of the membrane skeleton. The energy required for echinocyte bump formation was calculated for a range of bump shapes for different preferred curvatures. Energy minima corresponding to nonzero bump heights we...

  1. Haemoglobin-Triton X-100 conjugate as model system for red blood cell lysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pop, Simona-Florentina; Ion, Rodica-Mariana; Doncea, Sanda

    2010-11-01

    The action of detergents is thought to be connected primarily with micelle formation. However, detergent monomers can also affect biological systems. It was found that human red blood cells can be disintegrated with Triton X-100 non-ionic detergent at a concentration of 0.007%, lower than the critical micellar concentration (CMC). The lytic membrane of non-ionic detergent Triton X-100 (as a model), and its ability to lyse red blood cells in vitro used as an indicator of conjugate conformation at different pHs. The time dependent release of hemoglobin (Hb) and potassium from red blood cells was detected at 37 °C and both were sigmoid in character. Although Triton X-100 was highly lytic at pH 5.5, 7.4 and 8.0, the conjugate only show a lysis concentration-dependent of red blood cell at pH 5.5. Triton X-100 causes the Hb to aggregate, a condition that can be simulated when this non-ionic surfactant is incubated with Hb in vitro. The determination of Triton-X was done by HPLC, in accordance to characterize the surfactant. The increased stability in micellar medium can be attributed to deep penetration with the polar group -OH oriented towarded to the micelle surface. Thermal stability of hemoglobin has been investigated in order to evaluate the nature of thermal behavior of this compound. We studied the effects of surfactant Triton -X on the rate constants for the destroying of hemoglobin.

  2. Risk Factors of Red Blood Cell Transfusion in Isolate off Pump Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Eui Suk; Park, Kay-Hyun; Lim, Cheong; Choi, Jinho

    2012-01-01

    Background Perioperative transfusion of red blood cell (RBC) may cause adverse effects. Bloodless-cardiac surgery has been spotlighted to avoid those problems. Off pump coronary artery bypass (OPCAB) surgery can decrease the transfusion. However, the risk factors of transfusions in OPCAB have not been investigated properly. Materials and Methods One hundred and thirteen patients (male:female=35:78, mean age=66.7±9.9 years) who received isolated OPCAB were retrospectively analyzed from March 2...

  3. Optimal Fluxes, Reaction Replaceability, and Response to Enzymopathies in the Human Red Blood Cell

    OpenAIRE

    De Martino, A.; Granata, D.; Marinari, E; Martelli, C.; Van Kerrebroeck, V.

    2010-01-01

    Characterizing the capabilities, key dependencies, and response to perturbations of genome-scale metabolic networks is a basic problem with important applications. A key question concerns the identification of the potentially most harmful reaction knockouts. The integration of combinatorial methods with sampling techniques to explore the space of viable flux states may provide crucial insights on this issue. We assess the replaceability of every metabolic conversion in the human red blood cel...

  4. Detachment of agglutinin-bonded red blood cells. III. Mechanical analysis for large contact areas.

    OpenAIRE

    Berk, D.; Evans, E

    1991-01-01

    An experimental method and analysis are introduced which provide direct quantitation of the strength of adhesive contact for large agglutinin-bonded regions between macroscopically smooth membrane capsules (e.g., red blood cells). The approach yields intrinsic properties for separation of adherent regions independent of mechanical deformation of the membrane capsules during detachment. Conceptually, the micromechanical method involves one rigid test-capsule surface (in the form of a perfect s...

  5. Multifocal peritoneal splenosis in Tc-99m-labeled heat-denatured red blood cell scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Min Ki; Hwang, Kyung Hoon; Choe, Won Sick [Gachon University Gil Medical Center, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-06-15

    A 44-year-old man with a past medical history of splenectomy came to hospital because of epigastric pain abdominopelvic computed tomography(CT) showed a soft tissue mass and multifocal variable-sized nodules as well as finding suggestive of cholecystitis. Subsequently, he underwent Tc-99m-labeled heat- denatured red blood cell(RBC) scintigraphy to evaluate the mass and nodules. The scintigraphy confirmed multifocal peritoneal splenosis in the abdominopelvic cavity.

  6. Qualitative assessment of red blood cell parameters for signs of anemia in patients with chronic periodontitis

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Nubesh S.; Luke, Roji; Soman, Rino Roopak; Krishna, Praveen M.; Safar, Iqbal P.; Swaminathan, Senthil Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Anemia of chronic disease is defined as anemia occurring in chronic infections and inflammatory conditions that is not caused by marrow deficiencies or other diseases and in the presence of adequate iron stores and vitamins. The present case control study was aimed to assess the red blood cell parameters for signs of anemia in patients with mild, moderate, and severe chronic periodontitis. Materials and Methods: A simple random sampling method was used to select 80 healthy male patients,...

  7. Statistical mechanics of red blood cell aggregation: The distribution of rouleaux in thermal equilibrium

    OpenAIRE

    Wiegel, F.W.; Perelson, Alan S.

    1982-01-01

    When placed in suspension red blood cells adhere face-to-face and form long, cylindrical, and sometimes branched structures called rouleaux. We use methods developed in statistical mechanics to compute various statistical properties describing the size and shape of rouleaux in thermodynamic equilibrium. This leads to analytical expressions for (1) the average number of rouleaux consisting ofn cells and havingm branch points; (2) the average number of cells per rouleau; (3) the average number ...

  8. Adverse effects to transfusion with red donor blood cells are frequent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Nørgaard, Astrid; Burcharth, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    Adverse effects to transfusion with red donor blood cells are potentially life-threatening. Due to screening, transmission of infectious diseases has decreased; however, the risk is still present. Various immune reactions are common including simple allergic reactions as well as devastating...... conditions such as transfusion-related acute lung injury and circulatory overload in patients with heart disease. Knowledge of the clinical signs of transfusion-related complications is important for clinicians in order to provide the best possible treatment....

  9. [Adverse effects to transfusion with red donor blood cells are frequent].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Nørgaard, Astrid; Burcharth, Jakob; Larsen, Rune; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2014-03-31

    Adverse effects to transfusion with red donor blood cells are potentially life-threatening. Due to screening, transmission of infectious diseases has decreased; however, the risk is still present. Various immune reactions are common including simple allergic reactions as well as devastating conditions such as transfusion-related acute lung injury and circulatory overload in patients with heart disease. Knowledge of the clinical signs of transfusion-related complications is important for clinicians in order to provide the best possible treatment.

  10. Image-based red blood cell counter for multiple species of wild and domestic animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.R.M. Mauricio

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT RBC count plays an important role in animal diagnosis. Despite the many technologies available in different automated hematology analyzers, when it comes to the blood of wild animals it is still difficult to find an easy and affordable solution for multiple species. This study aims to evaluate the proposed automatic red blood cell counter. Blood samples (1 ocelot - Leopardus pardalis, 1 monkey - Cebus apella, 1 coati - Nasua nasua, 62 dogs - Canis familiaris, and 5 horses - Equus caballus were analyzed using three methods: 1-manual count, 2-automatic count by image, and 3-semi-automatic count by image; blood from dogs and horses were also analyzed by a fourth method: 4-automatic count by impedance. The counts in methods 2 and 3 were produced by the proposed red blood cell counter. Results were compared using Pearson's correlation and plots with different methods as the criterion standard. RBC counts in methods 1, 2, and 3 correlated very well with those in the method 4 (r ≥ 0.94. RBC counts produced by method 2 were highly correlated with method 3 (r = 0.998. The results indicate that the proposed method can be used as an automatic or semi-automatic counting method in clinics that are currently using the manual method for RBC assessment.

  11. Measurement of the Local Tension of Red Blood Cell Membranes by Atomic Force Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Sergunova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the average local tension of a membrane upon exposure to its modifiers. Materials and methods. Blood from 3 healthy donors was sampled into ethylene diamine tetraacetate-containing microvettes (Sarstedt AG and Co., Germany during prophylactic examinations. In this series of experiments, the red blood cells were exposed to the membrane nanosurface modifier hemin (muriatic hematin. Hemin disrupts the conformation of spectrin, a band 4.1 protein, and weakens their bond [19]. Hemin was added to blood in vitro. Its blood concentration was 1.8 mM. The images of cells and their membranes were obtained on a NTEGRA Prima atomic force microscope (NT-MDT, Russia [16]. The membrane tension was estimated by atomic force spectroscopy. Results. After exposure to hemin, 68% of cases showed a 2.1-fold increase in the average tension as compared to the mean control value (p<0.05, which could reduce ID by «30 %. Subsequent exposure to perftoran returned the membrane tension to the baseline values in 85% of cases. The membrane tension of other 15% of the areas on the cells remained high — 2.3 times higher than the control values (p<0.05 even despite the action of perftoran. Conclusion. Thus, atomic force spectroscopy was used to measure the average local tension of the membrane, which depended on exposure to its modifiers, such as hemin. Key words: red blood cell, membrane tension, atomic force spectroscopy, hemin.

  12. Red Ear Fungi (Auricularia Auricula Infusion Reduce Blood Triglyceride Level in Dyslipidemic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nareswara Anugrah Widi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available ackground: Dyslipidemia is a risk fastor in atherosclerosis. In the long run, it can cause complications such as coronary artery disease and stroke. Dyslipidemia can be halted by beta glucan, a soluble fiber found in some species of fungi. This study was conducted to find the effect of red ear fungi infusion in reducing blood triglyceride level and the concentration that will give optimal reduction of blood triglyceride level. Methods: This was an analytical study using experimental laboratoric method. The study conducted in 25 male Wistar rats sorted in 5 groups during the period of September to October 2012 in Pharmacology Laboratory of General Hospital Hasan Sadikin, Bandung. Results: The result showed that mean difference of all three treatment group, which is group 3, group 4, and group 5 (87.08, 90.40, and 82.70 respectively showed significancy compared to the positive control (group 2. Out of the three group, group 4 with 36% infusion concentration has the lowest mean difference from all of the treatment groups. Conclusions: Red ear fungi infusion reduce blood triglyceride level and infusion with 36% concentration was the optimal concentration in reducing blood triglyceride level. A further study can be done to find concentration range in which the infusion reduce blood triglyceride level optimally.

  13. Composition and biological activities of slaughterhouse blood from red deer, sheep, pig and cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bah, Clara S F; Bekhit, Alaa El-Din A; Carne, Alan; McConnell, Michelle A

    2016-01-15

    Animal blood is a large-volume by-product of the meat industry. Besides blood meal fertiliser, blood is marketed for human consumption as a supplement. Minimal comparative work on slaughterhouse animal blood fractions has been carried out. In this study, slaughterhouse deer, sheep, pig and cattle blood parameters were compared. Some blood constituents were determined. Fractionated blood was assessed for antioxidant activity (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging, oxygen radical scavenging capacity and ferric reducing antioxidant power). Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity and antimicrobial activity were also assessed. Serum iron ranged from 35.3 ± 0.6 µmol L(-1) in cattle to 16.3 ± 3.1 µmol L(-1) in deer. Cattle had the highest total plasma proteins (81.7 ± 1.5 g L(-1)). While the plasma fractions contained considerable antioxidant activity, the red blood cell fractions of all four animal species contained higher antioxidant activity (P slaughterhouses contains native proteins that possess antioxidant activity and antimicrobial activity. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. Metagenomics analysis of red blood cell and fresh-frozen plasma units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Pierre; Cordey, Samuel; Brito, Francisco; Tirefort, Diderik; Petty, Thomas J; Turin, Lara; Guichebaron, Arthur; Docquier, Mylène; Zdobnov, Evgeny M; Waldvogel-Abramowski, Sophie; Lecompte, Thomas; Kaiser, Laurent; Preynat-Seauve, Olivier

    2017-07-01

    Although the risk of transmitting infectious agents by blood transfusion is dramatically reduced after donor selection, leukoreduction, and laboratory testing, some could still be present in donor's blood. A description of metagenomes in blood products eligible for transfusion represents relevant information to evaluate the risk of pathogen transmission by transfusion. Detection of viruses, bacteria, and fungi genomes was made by high-throughput sequencing (HTS) of 600 manufactured blood products eligible for transfusion: 300 red blood cell (RBC) and 300 fresh-frozen plasma (FFP) units. Anelloviruses and human pegivirus, frequent in the blood of healthy individuals, were found. Human papillomavirus type 27 and Merkel cell polyomavirus, present on the skin, were also detected. Unexpectedly, astrovirus MLB2 was identified and characterized in a FFP unit. The presence of astrovirus MLB2 was confirmed in donor's blood and corresponded to an asymptomatic acute viremia. Sequences of bacteria and fungi were also detected; they are likely the result of environmental contamination. This study demonstrates that HTS is a promising tool for detecting common and less frequent infectious pathogens in blood products. © 2017 AABB.

  15. Characterization at the individual cell level and in whole blood samples of shear stress preventing red blood cells aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K; Kinnunen, M; Danilina, A V; Ustinov, V D; Shin, S; Meglinski, I; Priezzhev, A V

    2016-05-03

    The aggregation of red blood cells (RBC) is an intrinsic feature of blood that has a strong impact on its microcirculation. For a number of years it has been attracting a great attention in basic research and clinical studies. Here, we study a relationship between the RBC aggregation parameters measured at the individual cell level and in a whole blood sample. The home made optical tweezers were used to measure the aggregating and disaggregating forces for a pair of interacting RBCs, at the individual cell level, in order to evaluate the corresponding shear stresses. The RheoScan aggregometer was used for the measurements of critical shear stress (CSS) in whole blood samples. The correlation between CSS and the shear stress required to stop an RBC pair from aggregating was found. The shear stress required to disaggregate a pair of RBCs using the double channel optical tweezers appeared to be about 10 times higher than CSS. The correlation between shear stresses required to prevent RBCs from aggregation at the individual cell level and in whole blood samples was estimated and assessed quantitatively. The experimental approach developed has a high potential for advancing hemorheological studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Morphological changes of the red blood cells treated with metal oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozelskaya, A I; Panin, A V; Khlusov, I A; Mokrushnikov, P V; Zaitsev, B N; Kuzmenko, D I; Vasyukov, G Yu

    2016-12-01

    The toxic effect of Al2O3, SiО2 and ZrО2 nanoparticles on red blood cells of Wistar rats was studied in vitro using the atomic force microscopy and the fluorescence analysis. Transformation of discocytes into echinocytes and spherocytes caused by the metal oxide nanoparticles was revealed. It was shown that only extremely high concentration of the nanoparticles (2mg/ml) allows correct estimating of their effect on the cell morphology. Besides, it was found out that the microviscosity changes of red blood cell membranes treated with nanoparticles began long before morphological modifications of the cells. On the contrary, the negatively charged ZrO2 and SiO2 nanoparticles did not affect ghost microviscosity up to concentrations of 1μg/ml and 0.1mg/ml, correspondingly. In its turn, the positively charged Al2O3 nanoparticles induced structural changes in the lipid bilayer of the red blood cells already at a concentration of 0.05μg/ml. A decrease in microviscosity of the erythrocyte ghosts treated with Al2O3 and SiO2 nanoparticles was shown. It was detected that the interaction of ZrO2 nanoparticles with the cells led to an increase in the membrane microviscosity and cracking of swollen erythrocytes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Membrane transport of anandamide through resealed human red blood cell membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojesen, I.N.; Hansen, Harald S.

    2005-01-01

    at 0°C and pH 7.3 with albumin-free and albumin-filled human red blood cell ghosts. The efflux kinetics is biexponential and is analyzed in terms of compartment models. The distribution of anandamide on the membrane inner to outer leaflet pools is determined to be 0.275 ± 0.023, and the rate constant......The use of resealed red blood cell membranes (ghosts) allows the study of the transport of a compound in a nonmetabolizing system with a biological membrane. Transmembrane movements of anandamide (N-arachidonoylethanolamine, arachidonoylethanolamide) have been studied by exchange efflux experiments...... of unidirectional flux from inside to outside is 0.361 ± 0.023 s. The rate constant of unidirectional flux from the membrane to BSA in the medium ([BSA]) increases with the square root of [BSA] in accordance with the theory of an unstirred layer around ghosts. Anandamide passed through the red blood cell membrane...

  18. Morphometric study of red blood cells in Sloughi and German Shepherd dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Adili

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of the age, the sex and the breed on the diameter, the circumference and the surface area of red blood cells in the dog. Samples were taken from 88 local Sloughi and German shepherd dogs, and the morphometric study was done using OPTIKATM Vision Pro software. The obtained data indicated that the age and the sex had no influence on the three morphometric parameters of erythrocytes (P>0.05. However, the breed seemed to have a significant effect only on the diameter of erythrocytes, in this case: red blood cells of local Sloughi dogs were bigger than those of the German Shepherd (P<0.001. The breed had no influence on the circumference and surface area of ​​erythrocytes. This study allows us to propose new reference values ​​for the circumference and the surface of ​​erythrocytes in Sloughi and German Shepherd dogs; these both parameters appear most representative as to mark changes in the morphometry of red blood cells.

  19. Associations of red and processed meat with survival after colorectal cancer and differences according to timing of dietary assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Prudence R; Jansen, Lina; Walter, Viola; Kloor, Matthias; Roth, Wilfried; Bläker, Hendrik; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Brenner, Hermann; Hoffmeister, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the prognostic impact of red and processed meat intake or about changes in consumption after a diagnosis of colorectal cancer (CRC). We investigated associations of baseline red and processed meat with survival outcomes and explored changes in intake among CRC survivors 5 y after diagnosis. A total of 3122 patients diagnosed with CRC between 2003 and 2010 were followed for a median of 4.8 y [DACHS (Darmkrebs: Chancen der Verhütung durch Screening) study]. Patients provided information on diet and other factors in standardized questionnaires at baseline and at the 5-y follow-up. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate HRs and 95% CIs. Among patients with stage I-III CRC, baseline red and processed meat intake was not associated with overall (>1 time/d compared with processed meat at the 5-y follow-up than at baseline (concordance rate: 39%; κ-value: 0.10; 95% CI: 0.07, 0.13). Our findings suggest that baseline red and processed meat intake is not associated with poorer survival among patients with CRC. The potential interaction with KRAS mutation status warrants further evaluation. Major changes in consumption measured at the 5-y follow-up may have had an impact on our survival estimates. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  20. RED BLOOD CELL AND WHOLE BLOOD GLUTATHIONE REDOX STATUS IN ENDURANCE-TRAINED MEN FOLLOWING A SKI MARATHON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eve Unt

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate the changes in glutathione redox ratio (GSSG·GSH-1 in red blood cells (RBCs and whole blood in well-trained men following a ski marathon. 16 male subjects (27.0 ± 4.7 yrs, 1.81 ± 0.06 m, 77.6 ± 9.6 kg, VO2max 66.2 ± 5.7 ml·kg-1·min-1 were examined before the competition (pre- COMP, after the competition (post-COMP and during an 18-hour recovery period (RECOV. There was a slight decrease in reduced glutathione (GSH in blood and in RBCs in post-COMP. During RECOV, the GSH level in blood was reduced, the GSH level in RBCs was significantly elevated (a statistically significant difference as compared to the pre-COMP level. The post-COMP GSSG·GSH-1 in full blood did not increase significantly, but its increase was statistically significant during the 18-hour recovery period. During the post-COMP and RECOV, the GSSG·GSH-1 in RBCs slightly decreased in comparison with the pre-COMP. Vitamin C concentration in serum increased in post-COMP (49% vs. pre- COMP and decreased to the baseline level during RECOV. In conclusion, our data show that acute exercise slightly increases the GSSG·GSH-1 in whole blood, while GSSG·GSH-1 in RBCs significantly decreases. Thus, exercise-related changes in the non-enzymatic components of the glutathione system (GSSG and GSH in whole blood and RBCs are not identical

  1. 18F-FDG-labeled red blood cell PET for blood-pool imaging: preclinical evaluation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsusaka, Yohji; Nakahara, Tadaki; Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Iwabuchi, Yu; Nishime, Chiyoko; Kajimura, Mayumi; Jinzaki, Masahiro

    2017-12-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) labeled with single-photon emitters have been clinically used for blood-pool imaging. Although some PET tracers have been introduced for blood-pool imaging, they have not yet been widely used. The present study investigated the feasibility of labeling RBCs with 18F-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose (18F-FDG) for blood-pool imaging with PET. RBCs isolated from venous blood of rats were washed with glucose-free phosphate-buffered saline and labeled with 18F-FDG. To optimize labeling efficiency, the effects of glucose deprivation time and incubation (labeling) time with 18F-FDG were investigated. Post-labeling stability was assessed by calculating the release fraction of radioactivity and identifying the chemical forms of 18F in the released and intracellular components of 18F-FDG-labeled RBCs incubated in plasma. Just after intravenous injection of the optimized autologous 18F-FDG-labeled RBCs, dynamic PET scans were performed to evaluate in vivo imaging in normal rats and intraabdominal bleeding models (temporary and persistent bleeding). The optimal durations of glucose deprivation and incubation (labeling) with 18F-FDG were 60 and 30 min, respectively. As low as 10% of 18F was released as the form of 18F-FDG from 18F-FDG-labeled RBCs after a 60-min incubation. Dynamic PET images of normal rats showed strong persistence in the cardiovascular system for at least 120 min. In the intraabdominal bleeding models, 18F-FDG-labeled RBC PET visualized the extravascular blood clearly and revealed the dynamic changes of the extravascular radioactivity in the temporary and persistent bleeding. RBCs can be effectively labeled with 18F-FDG and used for blood-pool imaging with PET in rats.

  2. Effect of Intraoperative Red Blood Cell Transfusion on Postoperative Complications After Open Radical Cystectomy: Old Versus Fresh Stored Blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Jun; Seo, Hyungseok; Kim, Hyun-Chang; Lim, Seon-Min; Yoon, So Jeong; Kim, Hyung Suk; Ku, Ja Hyeon; Park, Hee-Pyoung

    2015-12-01

    Transfusion with red blood cells (RBCs) is associated with adverse clinical outcomes. We determined whether an intraoperative RBC transfusion is related to postoperative complications in patients undergoing open radical cystectomy. We also compared the effect of transfusion with fresh versus old blood on postoperative complications. A total of 261 patients undergoing open radical cystectomy were divided into no-transfusion or transfusion groups. Transfused patients were divided according to RBC storage duration (fresh, ≤ 14 days; old, > 14 days). Postoperative complications, such as infection, paralytic ileus, urinary tract obstruction, and anastomotic leak, were noted. Infection (26.5%) was the most common postoperative complication, followed by procedural (17.6%), gastrointestinal (16.7%), renal (13.7%), and vascular (10.5%) problems. Age (odds ratio [OR], 1.04; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.00-1.07; P = .029), urinary diversion with a neobladder (OR, 2.30; 95% CI, 1.29-4.11; P = .005), and intraoperative RBC transfusion (OR, 1.77; 95% CI, 1.02-3.07; P = .042) were independent predictors of postoperative complications in a binary logistic analysis. Patients (n = 172; old blood, n = 47; fresh blood, n = 116; mixed blood, n = 9) who received an intraoperative RBC transfusion had a higher incidence of postoperative complications than those (n = 89) who did not undergo intraoperative transfusion (65.1% vs. 49.4%, P transfusions with old blood and fresh blood was observed (63.8% vs. 65.5%). Intraoperative RBC transfusion is associated with increased postoperative complications in patients undergoing open radical cystectomy. The RBC storage duration may not affect the incidence of postoperative complications in this study population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Role of red blood cells in the anemia-associated bleeding under high shear conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaoi, H; Shida, Y; Ogiwara, K; Hosokawa, K; Shima, M; Nogami, K

    2017-09-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) contribute to hemostasis under blood-flow, and anemia might contribute to a hemorrhagic diathesis. The majority of current laboratory techniques to assess hemostasis do not consider the effects of RBCs. An assay to determine the role of RBCs in hemostasis could be beneficial for clinical management. To investigate the influence of RBCs in hemostasis. Hemostasis was investigated using a novel microchip flow-chamber system (T-TAS ® ) in an anemic patient with von Willebrand disease. Subsequently, the effects of RBCs in total thrombus analysis system (T-TAS) were examined using reconstituted whole blood at various hematocrit levels. In vivo: When the patient was anemic and demonstrated persisted hemorrhagic symptoms despite the maintained adequate von Willebrand factor ristocetin cofactor activity levels, thrombus formation determined by T-TAS was delayed. However, transfusions of RBCs resolved bleeding symptom and, accordingly, the thrombus formation in T-TAS improved. In vitro: Thrombus formation determined by T-TAS at 1000 s -1 was dose-dependent on hematocrit (the time to reach 10 kPa (T 10 ): 10.0 ± 0, 9.5 ± 1.4, 6.7 ± 2.4, 2.8 ± 1.6 min at hematocrits of 0%, 12.5%, 25% and 50%, respectively). Markedly defective thrombus formation (T 10 >10 min) was confirmed at a hematocrit <25% at 2000 s -1 . Red blood cells play an essential role in hemostasis under high shear, and RBC transfusions could be effective for refractory bleeding in patients with anemia. T-TAS measurements appear to reflect the hemostatic consequences of diminished red cell numbers under blood-flow, and could provide a valuable means for monitoring patients. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Mechanistic modeling of hemoglobin glycation and red blood cell kinetics enables personalized diabetes monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malka, Roy; Nathan, David M; Higgins, John M

    2016-10-05

    The amount of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in diabetic patients' blood provides the best estimate of the average blood glucose concentration over the preceding 2 to 3 months. It is therefore essential for disease management and is the best predictor of disease complications. Nevertheless, substantial unexplained glucose-independent variation in HbA1c makes its reflection of average glucose inaccurate and limits the precision of medical care for diabetics. The true average glucose concentration of a nondiabetic and a poorly controlled diabetic may differ by less than 15 mg/dl, but patients with identical HbA1c values may have true average glucose concentrations that differ by more than 60 mg/dl. We combined a mechanistic mathematical model of hemoglobin glycation and red blood cell kinetics with large sets of within-patient glucose measurements to derive patient-specific estimates of nonglycemic determinants of HbA1c, including mean red blood cell age. We found that between-patient variation in derived mean red blood cell age explains all glucose-independent variation in HbA1c. We then used our model to personalize prospective estimates of average glucose and reduced errors by more than 50% in four independent groups of greater than 200 patients. The current standard of care provided average glucose estimates with errors >15 mg/dl for one in three patients. Our patient-specific method reduced this error rate to 1 in 10. Our personalized approach should improve medical care for diabetes using existing clinical measurements. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  5. Blood Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... maternity. Learn About Blood Blood Facts and Statistics Blood Components Whole Blood and Red Blood Cells Platelets Plasma ... About Blood Blood Facts and Statistics Blood Types Blood Components What Happens to Donated Blood Blood and Diversity ...

  6. Microwave Blood Thawing: Biochemical Analysis of Small Samples of Thawed Red Blood Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    lactate + NAD+ ( Lehninger , 1977) The large increase in pyruvate observed at 6 hours post-wash was most likely due to the large lactate concentrations at...Storage of Blood. London: Academic Press. Lehninger , A.L. 1977. Biochemistry. New York: Worth Publishers, Inc. Lewis, G.P. 1965. Method using o-tolidine

  7. Effects of dietary triglycerides on rheological properties of human red blood cells (abstract).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicha, I; Suzuki, Y; Tateishi, N; Maeda, N

    2004-01-01

    Atherogenic diets rich in saturated fat and cholesterol influence the blood viscosity and red blood cell (RBC) aggregability, the parameters associated with increased risk of circulatory disorders. However, little is known about the effect of triglycerides, which are the major dietary lipid form in humans, on blood rheology. Therefore, we studied the effects of postprandial plasma triglyceride levels on human RBC indices, hematological parameters, RBCs aggregation velocity and whole blood viscosity. For this purpose, whole blood was collected 2 hours after high-fat or low-fat meal. Proteins, triglycerides and cholesterol levels of plasma were analysed, and RBCs rouleaux formation rate was measured in 70% autologous plasma using a low-shear rheoscope. There were no significant differences in hematological parameters, RBC indices, whole blood viscosity, plasma protein and cholesterol content between high-fat and low-fat blood samples. However, a significant increase in rouleaux formation rate was observed in samples with high postprandial triglyceride levels, when compared with low-triglyceride samples. Plasma triglyceride levels correlated significantly with rouleaux formation rate. In conclusion, these results suggest that diet-dependent alterations of plasma triglyceride levels as well as possible changes in the cell membrane lipid composition lead to RBC hyperaggregability. Copyright 2004 IOS Press

  8. Effect of lactoferrin protein on red blood cells and macrophages: mechanism of parasite-host interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Namrata; Kanwar, Rupinder K; Dubey, Mohan Lal; Vahishta, R K; Sehgal, Rakesh; Verma, Anita K; Kanwar, Jagat R

    2015-01-01

    Lactoferrin is a natural multifunctional protein known to have antitumor, antimicrobial, and anti-inflammatory activity. Apart from its antimicrobial effects, lactoferrin is known to boost the immune response by enhancing antioxidants. Lactoferrin exists in various forms depending on its iron saturation. The present study was done to observe the effect of lactoferrin, isolated from bovine and buffalo colostrum, on red blood cells (RBCs) and macrophages (human monocytic cell line-derived macrophages THP1 cells). Lactoferrin obtained from both species and in different iron saturation forms were used in the present study, and treatment of host cells were given with different forms of lactoferrin at different concentrations. These treated host cells were used for various studies, including morphometric analysis, viability by MTT assay, survivin gene expression, production of reactive oxygen species, phagocytic properties, invasion assay, and Toll-like receptor-4, Toll-like receptor-9, and MDR1 expression, to investigate the interaction between lactoferrin and host cells and the possible mechanism of action with regard to parasitic infections. The mechanism of interaction between host cells and lactoferrin have shown various aspects of gene expression and cellular activity depending on the degree of iron saturation of lactoferrin. A significant increase (Plactoferrin when compared with an untreated control group. However, there was no significant (P>0.05) change in percentage viability in the different groups of host cells treated, and no downregulation of survivin gene expression was found at 48 hours post-incubation. Upregulation of the Toll-like receptor and downregulation of the P-gp gene confirmed the immunomodulatory potential of lactoferrin protein. The present study details the interaction between lactoferrin and parasite host cells, ie, RBCs and macrophages, using various cellular processes and expression studies. The study reveals the possible mechanism of

  9. Effect of lactoferrin protein on red blood cells and macrophages: mechanism of parasite–host interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Namrata; Kanwar, Rupinder K; Dubey, Mohan Lal; Vahishta, R K; Sehgal, Rakesh; Verma, Anita K; Kanwar, Jagat R

    2015-01-01

    Background Lactoferrin is a natural multifunctional protein known to have antitumor, antimicrobial, and anti-inflammatory activity. Apart from its antimicrobial effects, lactoferrin is known to boost the immune response by enhancing antioxidants. Lactoferrin exists in various forms depending on its iron saturation. The present study was done to observe the effect of lactoferrin, isolated from bovine and buffalo colostrum, on red blood cells (RBCs) and macrophages (human monocytic cell line-derived macrophages THP1 cells). Methods Lactoferrin obtained from both species and in different iron saturation forms were used in the present study, and treatment of host cells were given with different forms of lactoferrin at different concentrations. These treated host cells were used for various studies, including morphometric analysis, viability by MTT assay, survivin gene expression, production of reactive oxygen species, phagocytic properties, invasion assay, and Toll-like receptor-4, Toll-like receptor-9, and MDR1 expression, to investigate the interaction between lactoferrin and host cells and the possible mechanism of action with regard to parasitic infections. Results The mechanism of interaction between host cells and lactoferrin have shown various aspects of gene expression and cellular activity depending on the degree of iron saturation of lactoferrin. A significant increase (Plactoferrin when compared with an untreated control group. However, there was no significant (P>0.05) change in percentage viability in the different groups of host cells treated, and no downregulation of survivin gene expression was found at 48 hours post-incubation. Upregulation of the Toll-like receptor and downregulation of the P-gp gene confirmed the immunomodulatory potential of lactoferrin protein. Conclusion The present study details the interaction between lactoferrin and parasite host cells, ie, RBCs and macrophages, using various cellular processes and expression studies. The study

  10. The Proteome of the Red Blood Cell: An Auspicious Source of New Insights into Membrane-Centered Regulation of Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosman, Giel J C G M

    2016-11-25

    During the past decade, the hand-in-hand development of biotechnology and bioinformatics has enabled a view of the function of the red blood cell that surpasses the supply of oxygen and removal of carbon dioxide. Comparative proteomic inventories have yielded new clues to the processes that regulate membrane-cytoskeleton interactions in health and disease, and to the ways by which red blood cells communicate with their environment. In addition, proteomic data have revealed the possibility that many, hitherto unsuspected, metabolic processes are active in the red blood cell cytoplasm. Recent metabolomic studies have confirmed and expanded this notion. Taken together, the presently available data point towards the red blood cell membrane as the hub at which all regulatory processes come together. Thus, alterations in the association of regulatory proteins with the cell membrane may be a sine qua non for the functional relevance of any postulated molecular mechanism. From this perspective, comparative proteomics centered on the red blood cell membrane constitute a powerful tool for the identification and elucidation of the physiologically and pathologically relevant pathways that regulate red blood cell homeostasis. Additionally, this perspective provides a focus for the interpretation of metabolomic studies, especially in the development of biomarkers in the blood.

  11. A Gaussian process and derivative spectral-based algorithm for red blood cell segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yingying; Wang, Jianbiao; Zhou, Mei; Hou, Xiyue; Li, Qingli; Liu, Hongying; Wang, Yiting

    2017-07-01

    As an imaging technology used in remote sensing, hyperspectral imaging can provide more information than traditional optical imaging of blood cells. In this paper, an AOTF based microscopic hyperspectral imaging system is used to capture hyperspectral images of blood cells. In order to achieve the segmentation of red blood cells, Gaussian process using squared exponential kernel function is applied first after the data preprocessing to make the preliminary segmentation. The derivative spectrum with spectral angle mapping algorithm is then applied to the original image to segment the boundary of cells, and using the boundary to cut out cells obtained from the Gaussian process to separated adjacent cells. Then the morphological processing method including closing, erosion and dilation is applied so as to keep adjacent cells apart, and by applying median filtering to remove noise points and filling holes inside the cell, the final segmentation result can be obtained. The experimental results show that this method appears better segmentation effect on human red blood cells.

  12. Controlled lecithin release from a hierarchical architecture on blood-contacting surface to reduce hemolysis of stored red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Qiang; Fan, Qunfu; Ye, Wei; Hou, Jianwen; Wong, Shing-Chung; Xu, Xiaodong; Yin, Jinghua

    2014-06-25

    Hemolysis of red blood cells (RBCs) caused by implant devices in vivo and nonpolyvinyl chloride containers for RBC preservation in vitro has recently gained much attention. To develop blood-contacting biomaterials with long-term antihemolysis capability, we present a facile method to construct a hydrophilic, 3D hierarchical architecture on the surface of styrene-b-(ethylene-co-butylene)-b-styrene elastomer (SEBS) with poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO)/lecithin nano/microfibers. The strategy is based on electrospinning of PEO/lecithin fibers onto the surface of poly [poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate] [P(PEGMEMA)]-modified SEBS, which renders SEBS suitable for RBC storage in vitro. We demonstrate that the constructed 3D architecture is composed of hydrophilic micro- and nanofibers, which transforms to hydrogel networks immediately in blood; the controlled release of lecithin is achieved by gradual dissolution of PEO/lecithin hydrogels, and the interaction of lecithin with RBCs maintains the membrane flexibility and normal RBC shape. Thus, the blood-contacting surface reduces both mechanical and oxidative damage to RBC membranes, resulting in low hemolysis of preserved RBCs. This work not only paves new way to fabricate high hemocompatible biomaterials for RBC storage in vitro, but provides basic principles to design and develop antihemolysis biomaterials for implantation in vivo.

  13. Current topics in red cell biology: report on the Red Cell Special Interest Group meeting held at NHS Blood and Transplant Bristol on 30 October 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, T; Bruce, L J; Ridgwell, K

    2016-08-01

    The Red Cell Special Interest Group (SIG) meeting, hosted by the British Blood Transfusion Society, provides an annual forum for the presentation of UK- and European-based red cell research. The 2015 meeting was held on Friday 30 October at the National Health Service Blood & Transplant (NHSBT) facility in Filton, Bristol and provided an exciting and varied programme on the themes of erythropoiesis, malaria biology and pathophysiology and red cells properties in stress and disease. Ten speakers presented on these topics over the course of one day. The meeting was well attended by over 90 delegates. Posters were presented during the lunch break, and abstracts from the posters are published at the end of this issue. © 2016 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  14. Vasovagal reactions in whole blood donors at three REDS-II blood centers in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalez, Thelma T; Sabino, Ester C; Schlumpf, Karen S; Wright, David J; Leao, Silvana; Sampaio, Divaldo; Takecian, Pedro L; Proietti, Anna B; Proitetti, Anna B; Murphy, Edward; Busch, Michael; Custer, Brian

    2012-05-01

    In Brazil little is known about adverse reactions during donation and the donor characteristics that may be associated with such events. Donors are offered snacks and fluids before donating and are required to consume a light meal after donation. For these reasons the frequency of reactions may be different than those observed in other countries. A cross-sectional study was conducted of eligible whole blood donors at three large blood centers located in Brazil between July 2007 and December 2009. Vasovagal reactions (VVRs) along with donor demographic and biometric data were collected. Reactions were defined as any presyncopal or syncopal event during the donation process. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to identify predictors of VVRs. Of 724,861 donor presentations, 16,129 (2.2%) VVRs were recorded. Rates varied substantially between the three centers: 53, 290, and 381 per 10,000 donations in Recife, São Paulo, and Belo Horizonte, respectively. Although the reaction rates varied, the donor characteristics associated with VVRs were similar (younger age [18-29 years], replacement donors, first-time donors, low estimated blood volume [EBV]). In multivariable analysis controlling for differences between the donor populations in each city younger age, first-time donor status, and lower EBV were the factors most associated with reactions. Factors associated with VVRs in other locations are also evident in Brazil. The difference in VVR rates between the three centers might be due to different procedures for identifying and reporting the reactions. Potential interventions to reduce the risk of reactions in Brazil should be considered. © 2011 American Association of Blood Banks.

  15. Method of evaluation of process of red blood cell sedimentation based on photometry of droplet samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aristov, Alexander; Nosova, Ekaterina

    2017-04-01

    The paper focuses on research aimed at creating and testing a new approach to evaluate the processes of aggregation and sedimentation of red blood cells for purpose of its use in clinical laboratory diagnostics. The proposed method is based on photometric analysis of blood sample formed as a sessile drop. The results of clinical approbation of this method are given in the paper. Analysis of the processes occurring in the sample in the form of sessile drop during the process of blood cells sedimentation is described. The results of experimental studies to evaluate the effect of the droplet sample focusing properties on light radiation transmittance are presented. It is shown that this method significantly reduces the sample volume and provides sufficiently high sensitivity to the studied processes.

  16. Correlation of Red Blood Cell Aggregate Size with Transmitted Light Intensity Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitt, Darren L.

    1998-11-01

    Under sufficiently low shear rates, such as those encountered in the microcirculation, human red blood cells are known to form aggregate structures (`rouleaux'). These aggregates may range in size from a simple chain containing only a few cells to complex three-dimensional structures containing tens of cells. Previous studies have attempted to characterize the aggregate size by examining the spatial distribution of transmitted light intensity resulting from transillumination of the blood flow. For experiments performed in vitro and in vivo, spectral analysis of the transmitted light intensities has shown that the presence of aggregates in the flow can linked with an increase in the spectral power at small wavenumbers. The magnitudes of the affected wavenumbers correspond to structures considerably larger than individual cells. A precise numerical correlation, however, is difficult to establish. In this work, computer simulations of aggregating blood flow are used along with statistical considerations in an attempt to better correlate the observed spectral trends with actual aggregate size.

  17. Technetium-99m labeled red blood cells in the evaluation of hemangiosarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph, U.A.; Jhingran, S.G.

    1987-11-01

    Imaging with Tc-99m labeled red blood cells (RBC) is increasingly being used in the detection of acute gastro-intestinal bleeding, especially in patients with intermittent bleeding. A patient is presented in whom the labeled RBC scan was helpful in the incidental discovery of a previously unsuspected probable angiosarcoma of the right femur and adjacent soft tissues of the right hip due to the blood pool or blush effect of the labeled cells. The labeled RBC scan also identified extravasation due to active gastrointestinal bleeding from a previously unknown angiosarcoma of the ascending colon. Thus, the Tc-99m labeled RBC scan was useful in simultaneously detecting extravasation and blood pool effect at two remote tumor sites in the same patient.

  18. Early diagnosis of diabetic vascular complications: impairment of red blood cell deformability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sehyun; Ku, Yunhee; Park, Cheol-Woo; Suh, Jang-Soo

    2006-02-01

    Reduced deformability of red blood cells (RBCs) may play an important role on the pathogenesis of chronic vascular complications of diabetes mellitus. However, available techniques for measuring RBC deformability often require washing process after each measurement, which is not optimal for day-to-day clinical use at point of care. The objectives of the present study are to develop a device and to delineate the correlation of impaired RBC deformability with diabetic nephropathy. We developed a disposable ektacytometry to measure RBC deformability, which adopted a laser diffraction technique and slit rheometry. The essential features of this design are its simplicity (ease of operation and no moving parts) and a disposable element which is in contact with the blood sample. We studied adult diabetic patients divided into three groups according to diabetic complications. Group I comprised 57 diabetic patients with normal renal function. Group II comprised 26 diabetic patients with chronic renal failure (CRF). Group III consisted of 30 diabetic subjects with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on hemodialysis. According to the renal function for the diabetic groups, matched non-diabetic groups were served as control. We found substantially impaired red blood cell deformability in those with normal renal function (group I) compared to non-diabetic control (P = 0.0005). As renal function decreases, an increased impairment in RBC deformability was found. Diabetic patients with chronic renal failure (group II) when compared to non-diabetic controls (CRF) had an apparently greater impairment in RBC deformability (P = 0.07). The non-diabetic cohort (CRF), on the other hand, manifested significant impairment in red blood cell deformability compared to healthy control (P = 0.0001). The newly developed slit ektacytometer can measure the RBC deformability with ease and accuracy. In addition, progressive impairment in cell deformability is associated with renal function loss in all

  19. Estimating Physical Splenic Filtration of Plasmodium falciparum Infected Red Blood Cells in Malaria Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herricks, Thurston; Seydel, Karl B.; Molyneux, Malcolm; Taylor, Terrie; Rathod, Pradipsinh K.

    2012-01-01

    Splenic filtration of Plasmodium falciparum infected red blood cells has been hypothesized to influence malaria pathogenesis. We have developed a minimum cylindrical diameter (MCD) filtration model which estimates physical splenic filtration during malaria infection. The key parameter in the model is the minimum cylindrical diameter (MCD), the smallest tube or cylinder that a red blood cell (RBC) can traverse without lysing. The MCD is defined by a relationship between the RBC surface area and volume. In the MCD filtration model, the MCD filtration function represents the probability of a cell becoming physically removed from circulation. This modeling approach was implemented at a field site in Blantyre, Malawi. We analyzed peripheral blood samples from 120 study participants in 4 clinically defined groups (30 subjects each): cerebral malaria, uncomplicated malaria, aparasitemic coma, and healthy controls. We found statistically significant differences in the surface area and volumes of uninfected RBCs when healthy controls were compared to malaria patients. The estimated filtration rates generated by the MCD model corresponded to previous observations in ex vivo spleen experiments and models of red blood cell loss during acute malaria anemia. There were no differences in the estimated splenic filtration rates between cerebral malaria and uncomplicated malaria patients. The MCD filtration model estimates that at time of admission, 1 ring-stage infected RBC is physically filtered by the spleen for each parasite that remains in peripheral circulation. This field study is the first to use microfluidic devices to identify rheological diversity in RBC populations associated with malaria infection and illness in well characterized groups of children living in a malaria endemic area. PMID:22892025

  20. The involvement of cation leaks in the storage lesion of red blood cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna F Flatt

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Stored blood components are a critical life-saving tool provided to patients by health services worldwide. Red cells may be stored for up to 42 days, allowing for efficient blood bank inventory management, but with prolonged storage comes an unwanted side-effect known as the ‘storage lesion’, which has been implicated in poorer patient outcomes. This lesion is comprised of a number of processes that are inter-dependent. Metabolic changes include a reduction in glycolysis and ATP production after the first week of storage. This leads to an accumulation of lactate and drop in pH. Longer term damage may be done by the consequent reduction in anti-oxidant enzymes, which contributes to protein and lipid oxidation via reactive oxygen species. The oxidative damage to the cytoskeleton and membrane is involved in increased vesiculation and loss of cation gradients across the membrane. The irreversible damage caused by extensive membrane loss via vesiculation alongside dehydration is likely to result in immediate splenic sequestration of these dense, spherocytic cells. Although often overlooked in the literature, the loss of the cation gradient in stored cells will be considered in more depth in this review as well as the possible effects it may have on other elements of the storage lesion. It has now become clear that blood donors can exhibit quite large variations in the properties of their red cells, including microvesicle production and the rate of cation leak. Further study of stored red blood cells from donors known to have a high or low-rate of cation leak will shed more light on the relationship between cation gradients and the manifestation of the various elements of the storage lesion.

  1. Red blood cell deformability in patients with claudication after pain-free treadmill training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mika, Piotr; Spodaryk, Krzysztof; Cencora, Andrzej; Mika, Anna

    2006-07-01

    To assess the effect of pain-free treadmill training on red blood cell deformability and walking distance in patients with claudication. Randomized-controlled trial of exercise training. Patients were recruited from the primary care, vascular outpatient clinic. A total of 60 patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease (stage II according to Leriche-Fontaine) were randomized into the treadmill program or a control group. Fifty-five patients completed the study (27 in the exercising group and 28 in the control group). Patients in the exercising group were walking on the treadmill 3 times a week for 3 months. Each session consisted of 1 hour repetitive walking [performed to 85% of the pain-free walking time (PFWT)] was supervised by a qualified physiotherapist. Changes in erythrocyte deformability and treadmill walking performance (PFWT, maximal walking time) were assessed in both groups before the study and after 3 months. After 3 months of treadmill training, red blood cell deformability in the exercising group significantly increased (Ppain-free treadmill training is associated with a significant increase in red cell deformability in patients with claudication.

  2. [Anesthesiologists' knowledge about packed red blood cells transfusion in surgical patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Joyce Mendes; Queiroz, Athos Gabriel Vilela; Queiroz, Vaniely Kaliny Pinheiro de; Falbo, Ana Rodrigues; Silva, Marcelo Neves; Couceiro, Tania Cursino de Menezes; Lima, Luciana Cavalcanti

    Blood is an important resource in several lifesaving interventions, such as anemia correction and improvement of oxygen transport capacity. Despite advances, packed red blood cell (PRBC) transfusion still involves risks. The aim of this study was to describe the knowledge of anesthesiologists about the indications, adverse effects, and alternatives to red blood cell transfusion intraoperatively. Cross-sectional study using a questionnaire containing multiple choice questions and clinical cases related to relevant factors on the decision whether to perform PRBC transfusion, its adverse effects, hemoglobin triggers, preventive measures, and blood conservation strategies. The questionnaire was filled without the presence of the investigator. Likert scale was used and the average rank of responses was calculated. The Epi Info 7 software was used for data analysis. 79% of the institution's anesthesiologists answered the questionnaire; 100% identified the main adverse effects related to blood transfusion. When asked about the factors that influence the transfusion decision, hemoglobin level had the highest agreement (MR=4.46) followed by heart disease (MR=4.26); hematocrit (MR=4.34); age (RM=4.1) and microcirculation evaluation (MR=4.22). Respondents (82.3%) identified levels of Hb=6g.dL-1 as a trigger to transfuse healthy patient. Regarding blood conservation strategies, hypervolemic hemodilution (MR=2.81) and decided by drugs (MR=2.95) were the least reported. We identify a good understanding of anesthesiologists about PRBC transfusion; however, there is a need for refresher courses on the subject. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  3. Partial Red Blood Cell Exchange in Children and Young Patients with Sickle Cell Disease: Manual Versus Automated Procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, Carlos; Moniz, Marta; Nunes, Pedro; Abadesso, Clara; Ferreira, Teresa; Barra, António; Lichtner, Anabela; Loureiro, Helena; Dias, Alexandra; Almeida, Helena

    2017-10-31

    The benefits of manual versus automated red blood cell exchange have rarely been documented and studies in young sickle cell disease patients are scarce. We aim to describe and compare our experience in these two procedures. Young patients (≤ 21 years old) who underwent manual- or automated-red blood cell exchange for prevention or treatment of sickle cell disease complications were included. Clinical, technical and hematological data were prospectively recorded and analyzed. Ninety-four red blood cell exchange sessions were performed over a period of 68 months, including 57 manual and 37 automated, 63 for chronic complications prevention, 30 for acute complications and one in the pre-operative setting. Mean decrease in sickle hemoglobin levels was higher in automated-red blood cell exchange (p red blood cell exchange and access alarm on automated-red blood cell exchange. No major complication or alloimunization was recorded. Automated-red blood cell exchange decreased sickle hemoglobin levels more efficiently than manual procedure in the setting of acute and chronic complications of sickle cell disease, with minor technical concerns mainly due to vascular access. The threshold of sickle hemoglobin should be individualized for clinical and hematological goals. In our cohort of young patients, the need for an acceptable venous access was a limiting factor, but iron-overload was avoided. Automated red blood cell exchange is safe and well tolerated. It permits a higher sickle hemoglobin removal efficacy, better volume status control and iron-overload avoidance.

  4. Associations of red and processed meat with survival among patients with cancers of the upper aerodigestive tract and lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Fayth L; Chang, Shen-Chih; Morgenstern, Hal; Tashkin, Donald; Rao, Jian-Yu; Cozen, Wendy; Mack, Thomas; Lu, Qing-Yi; Zhang, Zuo-Feng

    2016-06-01

    The effect of red and processed meats on cancer survival is unclear. We sought to examine the role of total and processed red meat consumption on all-cause mortality among patients with cancers of the upper aerodigestive tract (UADT) and lung, in order to test our hypothesis that red or processed meat was associated with overall mortality in these patients. Using data from a population-based case-control study conducted in Los Angeles County, we conducted a case-only analysis to examine the association of red or processed meat consumption on mortality after 12 years of follow-up, using a diet history questionnaire. Cox regression was used to estimate adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), adjusting for potential confounders. Of 601 UADT cancer cases and 611 lung cancer cases, there were 248 and 406 deaths, respectively, yielding crude mortality rates of 0.07 and 0.12 deaths per year. Comparing the highest with lowest quartile of red meat consumption, the adjusted HR was 1.64 (95% CI, 1.04-2.57) among UADT cancer cases; for red or processed meat, the adjusted HR was 1.76 (95% CI, 1.10-2.82). A dose-response trend was observed. A weaker association was observed with red meat consumption and overall mortality among lung cancer cases. In conclusion, this case-only analysis demonstrated that increased consumption of red or processed meats was associated with mortality among UADT cancer cases and WAS weakly associated with mortality among lung cancer cases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Relationship between adiponectin and leptin, and blood lipids in hyperlipidemia patients treated with red yeast rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chien-Ying; Jan, Ming-Shiou; Yu, Min-Chien; Lin, Chun-Che; Wei, James Cheng-Chung; Shih, Hung-Che

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the possible relationships between adiponectin and leptin, blood lipids such as total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and triglycerides (TG) as well as other clinical biomarkers in hyperlipidemia patients treated with red yeast rice. 30 patients with primary hyperlipidemia were recruited, treated with red rice yeast capsules 600 mg twice a day for 8 weeks, and followed up for 4 weeks. The primary endpoint was the mean difference in LDL-C from baseline to week 8, while the secondary endpoints were the mean percentage changes from baseline of total cholesterol, TG, HDL-C, adiponectin, and leptin. At week 8, the decrease in LDL-C and total cholesterol was -38.11 ± 30.90 mg/dl (p Red yeast rice can significantly increase adiponectin and can significantly lower LDL-C and total cholesterol levels. Adiponectin correlates positively with HDL-C while serum leptin correlates negatively with TG. Red yeast rice has a potentially protective effect in obesity-related and cardiovascular diseases. © 2013 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  6. Red blood cell alloimmunization in 184 patients with myeloid neoplasms treated with azacitidine - A retrospective single center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leisch, M; Weiss, L; Lindlbauer, N; Jungbauer, C; Egle, A; Rohde, E; Greil, R; Grabmer, C; Pleyer, L

    2017-08-01

    Alloimmunization to Red Blood Cell (RBC) antigens frequently occurs in patients with myeloid neoplasms (AML, MDS and CMML) and potentially poses the patient at risk for delayed hemolytic transfusion reactions and limited supply of compatible RBC-units. However, there is comparatively little data on transfusion associated characteristics in this patient cohort. We therefore retrospectively analyzed transfusion requirements and clinical outcomes of 184 patients with myloid neoplasms treated with azacitidine at the Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg, which were included in the Austrian Registry of Hypomethylating Agents. The mean blood component requirements for AML, MDS and CMML were 39.8, 67.4 and 31.4 RBC units and 31.7, 27.6 and 19.1 platelet (PLT) units respectively. In spite of an extended and stringent RBC unit matching policy (ABO, RhD, RhCcEe and K antigens), 20 (11%) patients formed at least one alloantibody ("allo-group"), whereas 164 patients (89%) did not ("non-allo-group"). The most frequent antibody specificity was anti-E, followed by anti-Wra -Lua, -D, -C and -Jka. Alloimmunization was associated with higher numbers of transfused RBC units (68 vs. 38; p=0.001), as well as with longer time under transfusion (16.7 vs. 9.4 months; p=0.014). Median overall survival (OS) did not differ significantly between the "allo"- and "non-allo-group". Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Evaluation of droplet digital PCR for quantification of residual leucocytes in red blood cell concentrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doescher, A; Loges, U; Petershofen, E K; Müller, T H

    2017-11-01

    Enumeration of residual white blood cells in leucoreduced blood components is essential part of quality control. Digital PCR has substantially facilitated quantitative PCR and was thus evaluated for measurements of leucocytes. Target for quantification of leucocytes by digital droplet PCR was the blood group gene RHCE. The SPEF1 gene was added as internal control for the entire assay starting with automated DNA extraction. The sensitivity of the method was determined by serial dilutions of standard samples. Quality control samples were analysed within 24 h, 7 days and 6 months after collection. Routine samples from leucodepleted red blood cell concentrates (n = 150) were evaluated in parallel by flow-cytometry (LeucoCount) and by digital PCR. Digital PCR reliably detected at least 0·4 leucocytes per assay. The mean difference between PCR and flow-cytometric results from 150 units was -0·01 (±1·0). DNA samples were stable for up to at least six months. PCR measurement of leucocytes in samples from plasma and platelet concentrates also provided valid results in a pilot study. Droplet digital PCR to enumerate leucocytes offers an alternative for quality control of leucoreduced blood products. Sensitivity, specificity and reproducibility are comparable to flow-cytometry. The option to collect samples over an extended period of time and the automatization introduce attractive features for routine quality control. © 2017 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  8. What is your diagnosis? Blood smear from an injured red-tailed hawk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, Jennifer L; Luff, Jennifer A; Shooshtari, Mahrokh P; Zehnder, Ashley M; Borjesson, Dori L

    2009-06-01

    An injured juvenile red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) was evaluated at the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital at the University of California, Davis. The hawk was quiet, alert, and emaciated, and had a closed comminuted, mid-diaphyseal ulnar fracture. CBC results included heterophilia with a left shift, monocytosis, and increased plasma fibrinogen concentration. The blood smear included rare heterophils containing small, dark blue inclusions approximately 1-2 mum in diameter that ranged from round to coccobacillary in shape and formed variably shaped aggregates; the morphology of the inclusions was suspicious for Chlamydophila or Ehrlichia spp. pathogens. The hawk died, and histopathologic examination of tissues obtained at necropsy found severe multifocal histiocytic and heterophilic splenitis in addition to chronic hepatitis, myocarditis and epicarditis, meningoencephalitis, and airsacculitis. Using immunohistochemistry the presence of Chlamydia/Chlamydophila spp. antigen within multiple tissues was confirmed. Chlamydophila psittaci DNA was demonstrated in whole blood and fresh splenic tissue via real-time PCR. Direct fluorescent antibody staining of air-dried blood smears was positive in rare leukocytes for Chlamydia/Chlamydophila spp. antigen, and immunocytochemical staining of blood smears for Chlamydia/Chlamydophila spp. antigen was focally positive in rare heterophils. These findings may represent the first reported diagnosis of natural avian C. psittaci infection by visualization of organisms in peripheral blood heterophils. Immunocytochemical evaluation of blood smears was valuable in confirming the diagnosis and may be a useful antemortem test to discriminate between bacteria and other inclusions within heterophils.

  9. Vasovagal reactions in whole blood donors at 3 REDS-II blood centers in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncalez, T. T.; Sabino, E. C.; Schlumpf, K.S.; Wright, D.J.; Leao, S.; Sampaio, D.; Takecian, P. L.; Carneiro-Proietti, AB; Murphy, E.; Busch, M.; Custer, B.

    2013-01-01

    Background In Brazil little is known about adverse reactions during donation and the donor characteristics that may be associated with such events. Donors are offered snacks and fluids prior to donating and are required to consume a light meal after donation. For these reasons the frequency of reactions may be different than those observed in other countries. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted of eligible whole blood donors at three large blood centers located in Brazil between July 2007 and December 2009. Vasovagal reactions (VVRs) along with donor demographic and biometric data were collected. Reactions were defined as any presyncopal or syncopal event during the donation process. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to identify predictors of VVRs. Results Of 724,861 donor presentations, 16,129 (2.2%) VVRs were recorded. Rates varied substantially between the three centers: 53, 290 and 381 per 10,000 donations in Recife, São Paulo and Belo Horizonte, respectively. Although the reaction rates varied, the donor characteristics associated with VVRs were similar [younger age (18–29), replacement donors, first time donors, low estimated blood volume (EBV)]. In multivariable analysis controlling for differences between the donor populations in each city younger age, first-time donor status and lower EBV were the factors most associated with reactions. Conclusion Factors associated with VVRs in other locations are also evident in Brazil. The difference in VVR rates between the three centers might be due to different procedures for identifying and reporting the reactions. Potential interventions to reduce the risk of reactions in Brazil should be considered. PMID:22073941

  10. Effects of clove (Caryophyllus aromaticus L.) on the labeling of blood constituents with technetium-99m and on the morphology of red blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paoli, Severo de; Giani, Tania Santos; Presta, Giuseppe Antonio; Brandao-Neto, Jose; Medeiros, Aldo da Cunha; Santos-Filho, Sebastiao David [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, RN (Brazil). Programa de Pos-graduacao em Ciencias da Saude]. E-mail: severodepaoli@gmail.com; Pereira, Marcia Oliveira; Fonseca, Adenilson de Souza da [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes. Dept. de Biofisica e Biometria; Bernardo-Filho, Mario [Instituto Nacional do Cancer (INCa), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenadoria de Pesquisa Basica

    2007-09-15

    Clove (Caryophyllus aromaticus L.) has been used for clinical procedures. Blood constituents labeled with technetium-99m (99mTc) are used in nuclear medicine. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of clove extract on the labeling blood constituents with 99mTc and on the morphology of red blood cells. Blood samples were incubated with clove, stannous chloride and 99mTc. Plasma, blood cells, insoluble fractions of plasma and blood cells were separated. The radioactivity was counted and percentage of radioactivity (%ATI) to each blood fraction was calculated. The shape and morphometric parameter (perimeter/area ratio) were evaluated. Clove extract altered significantly (p<0.05) the %ATI of blood constituents and the shape of red blood cells without modifying the perimeter/area ratio. The results indicate that clove extract presents chemical compounds that interfere with the radiolabeling of blood constituents and alter the morphology of red blood cells by oxidative/chelating actions or interacting with the cellular membrane structure. (author)

  11. Mortality risk is dose-dependent on the number of packed red blood cell transfused after coronary artery bypass graft

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Antônio Alceu; Sousa, Alexandre Gonçalves; Piotto, Raquel Ferrari; Pedroso, Juan Carlos Montano

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Transfusions of one or more packed red blood cells is a widely strategy used in cardiac surgery, even after several evidences of increased morbidity and mortality. The world's blood shortage is also already evident. Objective To assess whether the risk of mortality is dose-de>pendent on the number of packed red blood cells transfused after coronary artery bypass graft. Methods Between June 2009 and July 2010, were analyzed 3010 patients: transfused and non-transfused. Transfused patients were divided into six groups according to the number of packed red blood cells received: one, two, three, four, five, six or more units, then we assess the mortality risk in each group after a year of coronary artery bypass graft. To calculate the odds ratio was used the multivariate logistic regression model. Results The increasing number of allogeneic packed red blood cells transfused results in an increasing risk of mortality, highlighting a dose-dependent relation. The odds ratio values increase with the increased number of packed red blood cells transfused. The death's gross odds ratio was 1.42 (P=0.165), 1.94 (P=0.005), 4.17; 4.22, 8.70, 33.33 (P<0.001) and the adjusted death's odds ratio was 1.22 (P=0.43), 1.52 (P=0.08); 2.85; 2.86; 4.91 and 17.61 (P<0.001), as they received one, two, three, four, five, six or more packed red blood cells, respectively. Conclusion The mortality risk is directly proportional to the number of packed red blood cells transfused in coronary artery bypass graft. The greater the amount of allogeneic blood transfused the greater the risk of mortality. The current transfusion practice needs to be reevaluated. PMID:24598957

  12. Shape reconstruction and height fluctuations of red blood cells using defocusing microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Siman, L; Amaral, F T; Agero, U; Mesquita, O N

    2014-01-01

    In this paper the bright-field defocusing microscopy (DM) technique is presented. DM is able to obtain quantitative information of each plane/surface of pure phase objects, as live unlabeled cells, and its application to red blood cells (RBCs) is demonstrated. Based on contrast, simple methods to obtain thickness profile and three dimensional (3D) total reconstruction of RBCs are proposed and the actual height profiles of upper and lower surface-membranes (lipid bilayer$/$cytoskeleton) of discocyte and stomatocyte red cells are presented as examples. In addition, using the mean square contrast fluctuation and modeling the RBC membranes fluctuations spectra as dependent of a bending modulus $(\\kappa_c)$, a surface tension $(\\sigma)$ and a confining potential $(\\gamma)$ term, slowly varying quantities along the cell radius, a genetic algorithm (GA) is used and the radial height fluctuations of each surface-membrane are accessed, separately. The radial behaviors of $\\kappa_c$, $\\sigma$ and $\\gamma$ are also obta...

  13. Multispectral quantitative phase imaging of human red blood cells using inexpensive narrowband multicolor LEDs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Vishesh; Singh, Gyanendra; Singh, Veena; Ahmad, Azeem; Mehta, Dalip Singh

    2016-04-01

    We report multispectral phase-shifting interference microscopy for quantitative phase imaging of human red blood cells (RBCs). A wide range of wavelengths are covered by means of using multiple color light emitting diodes (LEDs) with narrow spectral bandwidth ranging from violet to deep red color. The multicolor LED light source was designed and operated sequentially, which works as a multispectral scanning light source. Corresponding to each color LED source, five phase-shifted interferograms were recorded sequentially for the measurement of phase maps, as well as the refractive index of RBCs within the entire visible region. The proposed technique provides information about the effect of wavelengths on the morphology and refractive index of human RBCs. The system does not require expensive multiple color filters or any wavelength scanning mechanism along with broadband light source.

  14. 3-D refractive index tomograms and deformability of individual human red blood cells from cord blood of newborn infants and maternal blood

    CERN Document Server

    Park, HyunJoo; Kim, Kyoohyun; Lee, Sangyun; Kook, Songyi; Lee, Dongheon; Suh, In Bum; Nab, Sunghun; Park, YongKeun

    2015-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) from the cord blood of newborn infants have distinctive functions for fetal and infant development. To systematically investigate the biophysical characteristics of individual cord RBCs in newborn infants, a comparative study was performed of RBCs from cord blood of newborn infants, and of adult RBCs from mothers or non-pregnant women, employing optical holographic micro-tomography. Optical measurements of 3-D refractive index distributions, and of dynamic membrane fluctuations of individual RBCs, enabled retrieval of the morphological, biochemical, and mechanical properties of cord, maternal, and adult RBCs at the individual cell level. The volume and surface area of the cord RBCs were significant larger than those of RBCs from non-pregnant women, and cord RBCs have more flattened shapes than RBCs in adults. In addition, the Hb content in the cord RBCs of newborns was significantly greater. The Hb concentration in cord RBCs was higher than for non-pregnant women or maternal RBCs, but t...

  15. Fragmented red blood cells automated measurement is a useful parameter to exclude schistocytes on the blood film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesesve, J-F; Asnafi, V; Braun, F; Zini, G

    2012-12-01

      The diagnosis of thrombotic microangiopathies (TMA) or disorders that may mimic their features remains difficult. Mechanical hemolytic anemia with the detection of shistocytes on the blood smear is a cornerstone finding to assess the diagnosis, but microscopic evaluation of shistocytes is still problematic with wide interobserver variations. Some of the latest generation automated blood cell counters (ABCC) propose an original quantitative approach of fragmented red cells (FRC), aiming to be equivalent to the microscopic count. This parameter has been poorly evaluated.   To assess the predictive value (PV) of this test, we conducted studies comparing automated and microscopic counts of FRC/schistocytes, based on the analysis of thousands samples in four university hospitals and using the 2 ABCC currently available (Siemens ADVIA series, Sysmex XE-2100). Reference range for FRC was blood smear, but in relationship with a poor PV value. Our study validated the utility of the immediately available FRC parameter on ABCC to exclude schistocytes and the diagnosis of TMA. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Red blood cell components: time to revisit the sources of variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrow, Rosemary L

    2017-03-01

    Quality and safety of red blood cell (RBC) components is managed by screening of donors and strict regulatory controls of blood collection, processing and storage procedures. Despite these efforts, variations in RBC component quality exist as exemplified by the wide range in storage-induced haemolysis. This article provides a brief overview of the variables that contribute or potentially contribute to the quality of stored RBC components, including blood collection, processing, and donor-related variables. Particular focus is made on donor health and lifestyle factors that are not specifically screened and may impact on the physicobiochemical properties of RBCs and their storability. Inflammatory and oxidative stress states may be especially relevant as RBCs are susceptible to oxidative injury. Few studies have investigated the effect of specific donor-related variables on the quality of stored RBC components. Donor-related variables may be unaccounted confounders in the "age of blood" clinical studies that compared outcomes following transfusion of fresher or longer-stored RBC components. The conclusion is drawn that the blood donor is the greatest source of RBC component variability and the least "regulated" aspect of blood component production. It is proposed that more research is needed to better understand the connection between donor-related variables and quality consistency of stored RBC components. This could be very important given the impact of modern lifestyles that sees escalating rates of non-communicable health conditions that are associated with increased oxidative stress, such as hypertension, obesity and diabetes in children and adults, as well as an ageing population in many countries. The effect of these changes to global health and population demographics will impact on blood donor panels, and without significant new research, the consequences on the quality of stored blood components and transfusion outcomes are unknown.

  17. Freeze drying of red blood cells: the use of directional freezing and a new radio frequency lyophilization device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arav, Amir; Natan, Dity

    2012-08-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) units are administered routinely into patients expressing a wide range of acute and chronic conditions (e.g., anemia, traumatic bleeding, chronic diseases, and surgery). The modern blood banking system has been designed to answer this need and assure a continuous, high quality blood supply to patients. However, RBCs units can be stored under hypothermic conditions for only up to 42 days, which leads to periodic shortages. Cryopreservation can solve these shortages, but current freezing methods employ high glycerol concentrations, which need to be removed and the cells washed prior to transfusion, resulting in a long (more than 1 hour) and cumbersome washing step. Thus, frozen RBCs have limited use in acute and trauma situations. In addition, transportation of frozen samples is complicated and costly. Freeze drying (lyophilization) of RBCs has been suggested as a solution for these problems, since it will allow for a low weight sample to be stored at room temperature, but reaching this goal is not a simple task. We studied the effect of different solutions (IMT2 and IMT3) containing trehalose and antioxidants or trehalose and human serum albumin, respectively, on freezing/thawing and freeze drying of RBCs. In addition, we evaluated the effect of cells concentrations and cooling rates on the post thaw and post rehydration recoveries of the RBCs. Finally, we developed a new radio frequency (RF) lyophilization device for a more rapid and homogeneous sublimation process of the frozen RBCs samples. Recovery and free Hb were measured as well as oxygen association/dissociation and cell's deformability. We found that IMT3 (0.3 M trehalose and 10% HSA) solution that was directionally frozen at a rapid interface velocity of 1 mm/sec (resulting in a cooling rate of 150°C/min) yielded the best results (better than IMT2 solution and slow interface velocity). Freeze thawing gave 100% survival, while freeze drying followed by rehydration with 20% dextran-40k

  18. Characterizations of individual mouse red blood cells parasitized by Babesia microti using 3-D holographic microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Park, HyunJoo; Kim, Kyoohyun; Cho, Shin-Hyeong; Lee, Won-Ja; Kim, Youngchan; Lee, SangEun; Park, YongKeun

    2015-01-01

    Babesia microti causes emergency human babesiosis. However, little is known about the alterations in B. microti invaded red blood cells (Bm-RBCs) at the individual cell level. Through quantitative phase imaging techniques based on laser interferometry, we present the simultaneous measurements of structural, chemical, and mechanical modifications in individual mouse Bm-RBCs. 3-D refractive index maps of individual RBCs and in situ parasite vacuoles are imaged, from which total contents and concentration of dry mass are also precisely quantified. In addition, we examine the dynamic membrane fluctuation of Bm-RBCs, which provide information on cell membrane deformability.

  19. Flavonoid oligomers from Chinese dragon’s blood, the red resins of Dracaena cochinchinensis

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Qing-An; Xu, Min; Yang, Chong-Ren; Wang, Dong; Li, Hai-Zhou; Zhu, Hong-Tao; Zhang, Ying-Jun

    2012-01-01

    A detailed chemical investigation of the red resins from Dracaena cochinchinensis (Chinese dragon’s blood) yielded five new flavonoid oligomers, named cochinchinenins D-H (1–5), together with a known biflavonoid, cinnabarone (6), and a mixture of two known biflavonoids, socotrin-4′-ol (7) and homoisosocotrin-4′-ol (8). Of these new compounds, 1–3 were biflavonoids and 4 and 5 were triflavonoids. Their structures were determined on the basis of spectroscopic analysis. The isolated compounds we...

  20. Orientation of red blood cells and rouleaux disaggregation in interference laser fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruchenok, J V; Bushuk, S B; Kurilo, G I; Nemkovich, N A; Rubinov, A N

    2005-01-01

    The effect of interference laser fields on red blood cells (RBCs) was investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The optical trapping and orientation of individual RBC in interference fringes were observed. It was found that RBC rouleaux undergo disaggregation under the action of interference laser fields. To describe the effect of RBC orientation in interference fringes, we used the equation for torque exerted on a discoid dielectric particle in a gradient light field. The experimental results are in agreement with the predictions of the developed theoretical model.

  1. Korean Red Ginseng Improves Blood Pressure Stability in Patients with Intradialytic Hypotension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Ju Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Intradialytic hypotension (IDH is a common complication during hemodialysis which may increase mortality risks. Low dose of Korean red ginseng (KRG has been reported to increase blood pressure. Whether KRG can improve hemodynamic stability during hemodialysis has not been examined. Methods. The 8-week study consisted of two phases: observation phase and active treatment phase. According to prehemodialysis blood pressure (BP, 38 patients with IDH were divided into group A (BP ≥ 140/90 mmHg, n = 18 and group B (BP < 140/90 mmHg, n = 20. Patients were instructed to chew 3.5 gm KRG slices at each hemodialysis session during the 4-week treatment phase. Blood pressure changes, number of sessions disturbed by symptomatic IDH, plasma levels of vasoconstrictors, blood biochemistry, and adverse effects were recorded. Results. KRG significantly reduced the degree of blood pressure drop during hemodialysis (P<0.05 and the frequency of symptomatic IDH (P<0.05. More activation of vasoconstrictors (endothelin-1 and angiotensin II during hemodialysis was found. The postdialytic levels of endothelin-1 and angiotensin II increased significantly (P<0.01. Conclusion. Chewing KRG renders IDH patients better resistance to acute BP reduction during hemodialysis via activation of vasoconstrictors. Our results suggest that KRG could be an adjuvant treatment for IDH.

  2. In-vitro stem cell derived red blood cells for transfusion: are we there yet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Ok

    2014-03-01

    To date, the use of red blood cells (RBCs) produced from stem cells in vitro has not proved practical for routine transfusion. However, the perpetual and widespread shortage of blood products, problems related to transfusion-transmitted infections, and new emerging pathogens elicit an increasing demand for artificial blood. Worldwide efforts to achieve the goal of RBC production through stem cell research have received vast attention; however, problems with large-scale production and cost effectiveness have yet to prove practical usefulness. Some progress has been made, though, as cord blood stem cells and embryonic stem cells have shown an ability to differentiate and proliferate, and induced pluripotent stem cells have been shown to be an unlimited source for RBC production. However, transfusion of stem cell-derived RBCs still presents a number of challenges to overcome. This paper will summarize an up to date account of research and advances in stem cell-derived RBCs, delineate our laboratory protocol in producing RBCs from cord blood, and introduce the technological developments and limitations to current RBC production practices.

  3. Paramagnetic Gd(3+) labeled red blood cells for magnetic resonance angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryal, Santosh; Stigliano, Cinzia; Key, Jaehong; Ramirez, Maricela; Anderson, Jeff; Karmonik, Christof; Fung, Steve; Decuzzi, Paolo

    2016-08-01

    Despite significant advances in contrast enhanced-magnetic resonance angiography, the lack of truly blood-pool agents with long circulating property is limiting the clinical impact of this imaging technique. The terminal half-life for blood elimination of most small molecular weight gadolinium (Gd) based extracellular fluid agents is about 1.5 h when administered intravenously to subjects with normal renal function. The small size of these extracellular fluid agents does not prevent them from extravasating, especially from damaged vessels which are generally hyperpermeable. Therefore, the development of novel, clinically relevant blood pool contrast agents is critically needed to improve outcomes in the prevention, detection, and treatment of vascular diseases. We have demonstrated the fusion strategies in which the Gd-liposome without any stealth property radically fuses with red blood cells (RBCs) forming MR glowing Gd-RBC with the order of magnitude enhancements in circulation half-life (t1/2 = 50 h) and r1 relaxivity (r1 = 19.0 mM(-1) s(-1)) of Gd. The in vivo contrast enhancement of Gd-RBC was studied by using 3T clinical MR scanner for extended period of time, which clearly visualized the abdominal aorta. In summary, the vascular delivery of blood pool agents may benefit from carriage by RBCs because it naturally stays within the vascular lumen. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Overweight explains the increased red blood cell aggregation in patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinnapah, Stéphane; Cadelis, Gilbert; Waltz, Xavier; Lamarre, Yann; Connes, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Sleep apnea patients and obese subjects are overexposed to cardiovascular diseases. These two health conditions may be associated with hemorheological alterations which could increase the cardiovascular risk. The present study investigated the hemorheological characteristics in patients with overweight and/or sleep apnea to identify the main predictor of red blood cell (RBC) abnormalities in sleep apnea patients. Ninety-seven patients were subjected to one night sleep polygraphy to determine their sleep apnea status. Body mass index (BMI) and the apnea/hypopnea index (AHI) were determined for categorization of obesity and sleep apnea status. Blood was sampled for hematocrit, blood viscosity, RBC deformability, aggregation and disaggregation threshold measurements. BMI and AHI were positively associated and were both positively associated with RBC aggregation. Analyses of covariance and multiple regression analyses revealed that BMI was more predictive of RBC aggregation than AHI. No association of BMI classes and AHI classes with RBC deformability or blood viscosity was observed. This study shows that increased RBC aggregation in sleep apnea patients is caused by overweight. Therapies to improve blood rheology in sleep apnea patients, and therefore reduce the risk for cardiovascular disorders, should focus on weight-loss.

  5. The dual roles of red blood cells in tissue oxygen delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Frank Bo

    2009-01-01

    Vertebrate red blood cells (RBCs) seem to serve tissue oxygen delivery in two distinct ways. Firstly, RBCs enable the adequate transport of O2 between respiratory surfaces and metabolizing tissues by means of their high intracellular concentration of hemoglobin (Hb), appropriate allosteric...... interactions between Hb ligand-binding sites, and an adjustable intracellular chemical environment that allows fine-tuning of Hb O2 affinity. Secondly, RBCs may sense tissue O2 requirements via their degree of deoxygenation when they travel through the microcirculation and release vasodilatory compounds...... that enhance blood flow in hypoxic tissues. This latter function could be important in matching tissue O2 delivery with local O2 demand. Three main mechanisms by which RBCs can regulate their own distribution in the microcirculation have been proposed. These are: (1) deoxygenation-dependent release of ATP from...

  6. Hydrodynamic instability in a magnetically driven suspension of paramagnetic red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashevsky, B E; Zholud, A M; Kashevsky, S B

    2015-09-07

    We investigate the magnetically driven motion in suspensions of paramagnetic particles. Our object is diluted deoxygenated whole blood with paramagnetic red blood cells (RBCs). We use direct observations in a closed vertical Hele-Shaw channel, and a well-defined magnetic force field applied horizontally in the channel plane. At very low cell concentrations, we register single-particle motion mode, track individual cells and determine their hydrodynamic and magnetic characteristics. Above 0.2 volume percent concentration, we observe local swirls and a global transient quasi-periodic vortex structure, intensifying with increasing cell concentration, but surprisingly this does not influence the time and purity of the magnetic extraction of RBCs. Our observations shed light on the behavioral complexity of magnetically driven submagnetic suspensions, an important issue for the emerging microfluidic technology of direct magnetic cell separation and intriguing for the mechanics of particulate soft matter.

  7. Structural damage of chicken red blood cells exposed to platinum nanoparticles and cisplatin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kutwin, Marta; Sawosz, Ewa; Jaworski, Sławomir

    2014-01-01

    of platinum nanoparticles (NP-Pt) and cisplatin with blood compartments are important for future applications. This study investigated structural damage, cell membrane deformation and haemolysis of chicken embryo red blood cells (RBC) after treatment with cisplatin and NP-Pt. Cisplatin (4 μg/ml) and NP-Pt (2......,6 μg/ml), when incubated with chicken embryo RBC, were detrimental to cell structure and induced haemolysis. The level of haemolytic injury was increased after cisplatin and NP-Pt treatments compared to the control group. Treatment with cisplatin caused structural damage to cell membranes...... and the appearance of keratocytes, while NP-Pt caused cell membrane deformations (discoid shape of cells was lost) and the formation of knizocytes and echinocytes. This work demonstrated that NP-Pt have potential applications in anticancer therapy, but potential toxic side effects must be explored in future...

  8. Volumetric measurement of human red blood cells by MOSFET-based microfluidic gate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jinhong; Ai, Ye; Cheng, Yuanbing; Li, Chang Ming; Kang, Yuejun; Wang, Zhiming

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we present a MOSFET-based (metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor) microfluidic gate to characterize the translocation of red blood cells (RBCs) through a gate. In the microfluidic system, the bias voltage modulated by the particles or biological cells is connected to the gate of MOSFET. The particles or cells can be detected by monitoring the MOSFET drain current instead of DC/AC-gating method across the electronic gate. Polystyrene particles with various standard sizes are utilized to calibrate the proposed device. Furthermore, RBCs from both adults and newborn blood sample are used to characterize the performance of the device in distinguishing the two types of RBCs. As compared to conventional DC/AC current modulation method, the proposed device demonstrates a higher sensitivity and is capable of being a promising platform for bioassay analysis. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Red blood cell components: Meeting the quantitative and qualitative transfusion needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Richard O; Spitalnik, Steven L

    2016-01-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) transfusion is a very common therapeutic intervention. However, because of multiple recent studies improving our understanding of appropriate transfusion scenarios, the total number of RBC units transfused per year is actually decreasing in the developed world and there are no longer major shortages of RBC products for general use. Nonetheless, there are an increasing number of "special" uses, which can put strains on the blood supply for particular types of products; these may produce shortages of specific types of RBCs or require collections targeting certain types of donors. This review will focus on several broad topics, including providing some examples of "special" settings that require, or could require, special types of RBC products. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Collection and storage of red blood cells with anticoagulant and additive solution with a physiologic pH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burger, Patrick; Korsten, Herbert; Verhoeven, Arthur J.; de Korte, Dirk; van Bruggen, Robin

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A donation of whole blood is most commonly collected in acidic citrate-phosphate-dextrose (CPD) variants with pH 5.2 to 6.2 as anticoagulants. Previously, we have shown that the initial pH after red blood cell (RBC) preparation can have an effect on RBCs during storage. First, we

  11. A single assay for multiple storage-sensitive red blood cell characteristics by means of infrared spectroscopy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pistorius, A.M.A.; Luten, M.; Bosman, G.J.C.G.M.; Grip, W.J. de

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To maintain a high quality of red blood cells (RBCs), RBC characteristics must be followed during storage under blood bank conditions. By means of infrared (IR) spectroscopy, several characteristics can be measured simultaneously. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: IR spectra were acquired for

  12. Autologous Doping with Cryopreserved Red Blood Cells - Effects on Physical Performance and Detection by Multivariate Statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malm, Christer B; Khoo, Nelson S; Granlund, Irene; Lindstedt, Emilia; Hult, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of erythropoietin (EPO) simplified blood doping in sports, but improved detection methods, for EPO has forced cheating athletes to return to blood transfusion. Autologous blood transfusion with cryopreserved red blood cells (RBCs) is the method of choice, because no valid method exists to accurately detect such event. In endurance sports, it can be estimated that elite athletes improve performance by up to 3% with blood doping, regardless of method. Valid detection methods for autologous blood doping is important to maintain credibility of athletic performances. Recreational male (N = 27) and female (N = 11) athletes served as Transfusion (N = 28) and Control (N = 10) subjects in two different transfusion settings. Hematological variables and physical performance were measured before donation of 450 or 900 mL whole blood, and until four weeks after re-infusion of the cryopreserved RBC fraction. Blood was analyzed for transferrin, iron, Hb, EVF, MCV, MCHC, reticulocytes, leucocytes and EPO. Repeated measures multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) and pattern recognition using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Orthogonal Projections of Latent Structures (OPLS) discriminant analysis (DA) investigated differences between Control and Transfusion groups over time. Significant increase in performance (15 ± 8%) and VO2max (17 ± 10%) (mean ± SD) could be measured 48 h after RBC re-infusion, and remained increased for up to four weeks in some subjects. In total, 533 blood samples were included in the study (Clean = 220, Transfused = 313). In response to blood transfusion, the largest change in hematological variables occurred 48 h after blood donation, when Control and Transfused groups could be separated with OPLS-DA (R2 = 0.76/Q2 = 0.59). RBC re-infusion resulted in the best model (R2 = 0.40/Q2 = 0.10) at the first sampling point (48 h), predicting one false positive and one false negative. Over all, a 25% and 86% false positives ratio was

  13. Men with Sickle Cell Anemia and Priapism Exhibit Increased Hemolytic Rate, Decreased Red Blood Cell Deformability and Increased Red Blood Cell Aggregate Strength.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kizzy-Clara Cita

    Full Text Available To investigate the association between priapism in men with sickle cell anemia (SCA and hemorheological and hemolytical parameters.Fifty-eight men with SCA (median age: 38 years were included; 28 who had experienced priapism at least once during their life (priapism group and 30 who never experienced this complication (control group. Twenty-two patients were treated with hydroxycarbamide, 11 in each group. All patients were at steady state at the time of inclusion. Hematological and biochemical parameters were obtained through routine procedures. The Laser-assisted Optical Rotational Cell Analyzer was used to measure red blood cell (RBC deformability at 30 Pa (ektacytometry and RBC aggregation properties (laser backscatter versus time. Blood viscosity was measured at a shear rate of 225 s-1 using a cone/plate viscometer. A principal component analysis was performed on 4 hemolytic markers (i.e., lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, aspartate aminotransferase (ASAT, total bilirubin (BIL levels and reticulocyte (RET percentage to calculate a hemolytic index.Compared to the control group, patients with priapism exhibited higher ASAT (p = 0.01, LDH (p = 0.03, RET (p = 0.03 levels and hemolytic indices (p = 0.02. Higher RBC aggregates strength (p = 0.01 and lower RBC deformability (p = 0.005 were observed in patients with priapism compared to controls. After removing the hydroxycarbamide-treated patients, RBC deformability (p = 0.01 and RBC aggregate strength (p = 0.03 were still different between the two groups, and patients with priapism exhibited significantly higher hemolytic indices (p = 0.01 than controls.Our results confirm that priapism in SCA is associated with higher hemolytic rates and show for the first time that this complication is also associated with higher RBC aggregate strength and lower RBC deformability.

  14. Red blood cell distribution width: a potential laboratory parameter for monitoring inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yujue; Liu, Can; Zeng, Zhiyong; Ye, Weilin; Lin, Jinpiao; Ou, Qishui

    2017-11-03

    Correlation analysis of red blood cell distribution width (RDW) and C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-10 in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) to investigate whether RDW can serve as a potential parameter for indicating inflammation in RA patients. A total of 670 RA patients from October 2014 to April 2016 were enrolled in our study. The white blood cell (WBC), red blood cell (RBC), platelet (PLT), hemoglobin (HGB), RDW, CRP, and ESR in peripheral blood of patients with RA were retrospectively analyzed. The relative expression of TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10 was detected by RT-qPCR. Correlation analysis between RDW and CRP, ESR, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10 in RA was conducted by Microsoft Excel. RDW level was significantly increased in RA patients compared to osteoarthritis (OA) patients (P < 0.001) and healthy donors (HDs) (P < 0.001), and RDW was positively associated with inflammatory markers, such as CRP and ESR. In ROC curve analysis, the area under the curve (AUC) of RDW for the identification of RA was 0.881, with a 95% confidence interval (CI) from 0.864 to 0.898. Moreover, correlation analysis showed that RDW level was positively associated with TNF-α and IL-6, however negatively associated with IL-10. RDW was increased in patients with RA which was associated with inflammation in RA, suggesting that RDW may be a potential auxiliary marker for indicating inflammation process in RA conveniently.

  15. Predictive value of red blood cell distribution width for coronary artery lesions in patients with Kawasaki disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Haiyan; Fu, Songling; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Qing; Hu, Jian; Gao, Lichao; Zhu, Weihua; Gong, Fangqi

    2016-08-01

    Recent studies have shown that elevated red blood cell distribution width is associated with poor outcome in cardiovascular diseases. In order to assess the predictive value of red blood cell distribution width, before treatment with intravenous immunoglobulins, for coronary artery lesions in patient with Kawasaki disease, we compared 83 patients with coronary artery lesions and 339 patients without coronary artery lesions before treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin. Clinical, echocardiographic, and biochemical values were evaluated along with red blood cell distribution width. A total of 422 consecutive patients with Kawasaki disease were enrolled into our study. According to receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, the optimal red blood cell distribution width cut-off value for predicting coronary artery lesions was 14.55% (area under the curve was 0.721; p=0.000); eighty-three patients (19.7%) had coronary artery lesions, and 70% of the patients with coronary artery lesions had red blood cell distribution width level >14.55%. Logistic regression analysis revealed that fever duration >14 days (odds ratio was 3.42, 95% confidence interval was 1.27-9.22; p=0.015), intravenous immunoglobulin resistance (odds ratio was 2.33, 95% confidence interval was 1.02-5.29; p=0.04), and red blood cell distribution width >14.55% (odds ratio was 3.49, 95% confidence interval was 2.01-6.05; p=0.000) were independent predictors of coronary artery lesions in patients with Kawasaki disease. In Conclusion, red blood cell distribution width may be helpful for predicting coronary artery lesions in patients with Kawasaki disease.

  16. Red blood cell use outside the operating theater: a prospective observational study with modeling of potential blood conservation during severe blood shortages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Bridgid G; Hendry, Catrina; Walsh, Timothy S

    2009-10-01

    National guidance recommends planning for future blood shortages, but few studies have evaluated how reduced demand could be achieved acutely. A trained observer collected data concerning red blood cell (RBC) transfusion events outside the operating theater during 68 hours of blood bank monitoring over 7 weeks. Data were gathered at the patients' bedside from clinical staff and charts. Transfusions were classified according to the presence of bleeding and medical specialty (medical, surgical, other). Hemoglobin (Hb) transfusion triggers, RBCs transfused, and posttransfusion Hb values were collected. Evidence-based scenarios were used to model the potential RBC savings that could be achieved if acute shortages occurred, incorporating ischemic heart disease as a potential decision modifier. A total of 83 patients received 100 transfusion events, comprising 207 RBC units, during the sampling periods. The relative use of RBC units across specialties was as follows: medical, 74%; surgical, 22%; and other, 4%. For medical and surgical patients, respectively, 31 and 10% of all RBC units were transfused for anemia without evidence of bleeding, and 38 and 12% were transfused for non-life-threatening bleeding. Eight-five percent of all patients who received transfusions had stable vital signs before transfusion. Our model suggested that only 11% of RBCs would be conserved by cancellation of major surgery, whereas 23% to 47% of all RBCs could be conserved by controlling transfusions to medical patients. In institutions with patterns of blood use similar to ours, control of transfusions to medical patients is the most effective response to acute blood shortages.

  17. Low Red Blood Cell Vitamin C Concentrations Induce Red Blood Cell Fragility: A Link to Diabetes Via Glucose, Glucose Transporters, and Dehydroascorbic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongbin Tu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Strategies to prevent diabetic microvascular angiopathy focus on the vascular endothelium. Because red blood cells (RBCs are less deformable in diabetes, we explored an original concept linking decreased RBC deformability to RBC ascorbate and hyperglycemia. We characterized ascorbate concentrations from human and mouse RBCs and plasma, and showed an inverse relationship between RBC ascorbate concentrations and deformability, measured by osmotic fragility. RBCs from ascorbate deficient mice were osmotically sensitive, appeared as spherocytes, and had decreased β-spectrin. These aberrancies reversed with ascorbate repletion in vivo. Under physiologic conditions, only ascorbate's oxidation product dehydroascorbic acid (DHA, a substrate for facilitated glucose transporters, was transported into mouse and human RBCs, with immediate intracellular reduction to ascorbate. In vitro, glucose inhibited entry of physiologic concentrations of dehydroascorbic acid into mouse and human RBCs. In vivo, plasma glucose concentrations in normal and diabetic mice and humans were inversely related to respective RBC ascorbate concentrations, as was osmotic fragility. Human RBC β-spectrin declined as diabetes worsened. Taken together, hyperglycemia in diabetes produced lower RBC ascorbate with increased RBC rigidity, a candidate to drive microvascular angiopathy. Because glucose transporter expression, DHA transport, and its inhibition by glucose differed for mouse versus human RBCs, human experimentation is indicated.

  18. Normal versus sickle red blood cells: hemodynamic and permeability characteristics in reperfusion lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, J; Seibert, A; Shah, A; Taylor, A

    1990-01-01

    Decreased deformability and increased internal viscosity of the sickle red blood cell (SRBC) contribute to abnormal flow in the microcirculation. Since the lungs are commonly affected in sickle cell disease, we compared the hemodynamics of the normal human red blood cell (NRBC) with the SRBC in the pulmonary circulation. The SRBC has decreased antioxidant enzyme activities compared with the NRBC. Thus, using the capillary filtration coefficient (Kfc), we determined the ability of the NRBC and the SRBC to attenuate the increased permeability and resulting edema seen in the oxidant stress of reperfusion lung injury (RLI). We found that lungs perfused with a 5% SRBC perfusate had higher pulmonary arterial pressures (Ppa) and resistances than lungs perfused with a 5% NRBC perfusate. Lungs made ischemic and reperfused with a physiologic cell-free perfusate resulted in a significant increase (P less than .05) in Kfc compared with the preischemic Kfc (.45 +/- .06 to 1.4 +/- 22 mL.min-1.cm H2O.100 g-1). In lungs reperfused with 5% RBC-containing perfusates, the Kfc did not change from preischemic Kfc with NRBCs and decreased from the preischemic Kfc with SRBCs. These findings suggest that the SRBC causes physiologically significant increases in Ppa and resistances and the SRBC, like the NRBC, offers apparent protection in RLI.

  19. From artificial red blood cells, oxygen carriers, and oxygen therapeutics to artificial cells, nanomedicine, and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Thomas M S

    2012-06-01

    The first experimental artificial red blood cells have all three major functions of red blood cells (rbc). However, the first practical one is a simple polyhemoglobin (PolyHb) that only has an oxygen-carrying function. This is now in routine clinical use in South Africa and Russia. An oxygen carrier with antioxidant functions, PolyHb-catalase-superoxide dismutase, can fulfill two of the three functions of rbc. Even more complete is one with all three functions of rbc in the form of PolyHb-catalase-superoxide dismutase-carbonic anhydrase. The most advanced ones are nanodimension artificial rbc with either PEG-lipid membrane or PEG-PLA polymer membrane. Extensions into oxygen therapeutics include a PolyHb-tyrosinase that suppresses the growth of melanoma in a mice model. Another is a PolyHb-fibrinogen that is an oxygen carrier with platelet-like function. Research has now extended well beyond the original research on artificial rbc into many areas of artificial cells. These include nanoparticles, nanotubules, lipid vesicles, liposomes, polymer-tethered lipid vesicles, polymersomes, microcapsules, bioencapsulation, nanocapules, macroencapsulation, synthetic cells, and others. These are being used in nanotechnology, nanomedicine, regenerative medicine, enzyme/gene therapy, cell/stem cell therapy, biotechnology, drug delivery, hemoperfusion, nanosensers, and even by some groups in agriculture, industry, aquatic culture, nanocomputers, and nanorobotics.

  20. Surface-emitting superconductor laser spectroscopy for characterizing normal and sickled red blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gourley, P.L.; Meissner, K.E.; Brennan, T.M.; Hammons, B.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gourley, M.F. [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1995-02-01

    We have developed a new intracavity laser technique that uses a living or a fixed cell as an integral component of the laser. The cells are placed on an AlGaAs/GaAs surface-emitting semiconductor wafer and covered with a glass dielectric mirror to form a laser resonator. In this arrangement, the cells serve as optical waveguides (or lens elements) to confine (or focus) light generated in the resonator by the semiconductor. Because of the high transparency, the cells aid the lasing process to generate laser light. This ultra sensitive laser provides a novel imaging/spectroscopic technique for histologic examination which we demonstrate with normal and sickled human red blood cells. Extremely high contrast microscopic images of the cells are observed near 830-850 nm. These images correspond to electromagnetic modes of cell structures and are sensitive to shape of the cell. Using a high resolution spectrometer, we resolve the light emitted from these images into very narrow spectral peaks associated with the lasing modes. Analysis of the spectra reveals that the distribution of peaks is quite different for normal and sickled red blood cells. This technique, in a more developed form, may be useful for the rapid analysis of other kinds of normal and abnormal cells.

  1. Prophylactic Plasma Transfusion Is Not Associated With Decreased Red Blood Cell Requirements in Critically Ill Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Matthew A; Chandran, Arun; Jenkins, Gregory; Kor, Daryl J

    2017-05-01

    Critically ill patients frequently receive plasma transfusion under the assumptions that abnormal coagulation test results confer increased risk of bleeding and that plasma transfusion will decrease this risk. However, the effect of prophylactic plasma transfusion remains poorly understood. The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between prophylactic plasma transfusion and bleeding complications in critically ill patients. This is a retrospective cohort study of adults admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) at a single academic institution between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2013. Inclusion criteria included age ≥18 years and an international normalized ratio measured during ICU admission. Multivariable propensity-matched analyses were used to evaluate associations between prophylactic plasma transfusion and outcomes of interest with a primary outcome of red blood cell transfusion in the ensuing 24 hours and secondary outcomes of hospital- and ICU-free days and mortality within 30 days of ICU discharge. A total of 27,561 patients were included in the investigation with 2472 (9.0%) receiving plasma therapy and 1105 (44.7%) for which plasma transfusion was prophylactic in nature. In multivariable propensity-matched analyses, patients receiving plasma had higher rates of red blood cell transfusion (odds ratio: 4.3 [95% confidence interval: 3.3-5.7], P plasma in the critically ill was not associated with improved clinical outcomes. Further investigation examining the utility of plasma transfusion in this population is warranted.

  2. Neonatal nucleated red blood cells in infants of overweight and obese mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheffer-Mimouni, Galit; Mimouni, Francis B; Dollberg, Shaul; Mandel, Dror; Deutsch, Varda; Littner, Yoav

    2007-06-01

    The perinatal outcome of the infant of obese mother is adversely affected and in theory, may involve fetal hypoxia. We hypothesized that an index of fetal hypoxia, the neonatal nucleated red blood cell (NRBC) count, is elevated in infants of overweight and obese mothers. Absolute NRBC counts taken during the first 12 hours of life in 41 infants of overweight and obese mothers were compared to 28 controls. Maternal body mass index and infant birthweight were significantly higher in the overweight and obese group (P cell and lymphocyte counts did not differ between groups. The absolute NRBC count was higher (P = 0.01), and the platelet count lower (P = 0.05) in infants of overweight and obese mothers than in controls. In stepwise regression analysis, the absolute NRBC count in infants of overweight and obese mothers remained significantly higher even after taking into account birthweight or gestational age and Apgar scores (P mothers have increased nucleated red blood cells at birth compared with controls. We speculate that even apparently healthy fetuses of overweight and obese mothers are exposed to a subtle hypoxemic environment.

  3. Mechanisms of Slower Nitric Oxide Uptake by Red Blood Cells and Other Hemoglobin-containing Vesicles*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarov, Ivan; Liu, Chen; Reynolds, Hannah; Tsekouras, Zaharo; Lee, Janet S.; Gladwin, Mark T.; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.

    2011-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) acts as a smooth muscle relaxation factor and plays a crucial role in maintaining vascular homeostasis. NO is scavenged rapidly by hemoglobin (Hb). However, under normal physiological conditions, the encapsulation of Hb inside red blood cells (RBCs) significantly retards NO scavenging, permitting NO to reach the smooth muscle. The rate-limiting factors (diffusion of NO to the RBC surface, through the RBC membrane or inside of the RBC) responsible for this retardation have been the subject of much debate. Knowing the relative contribution of each of these factors is important for several reasons including optimization of the development of blood substitutes where Hb is contained within phospholipid vesicles. We have thus performed experiments of NO uptake by erythrocytes and microparticles derived from erythrocytes and conducted simulations of these data as well as that of others. We have included extracellular diffusion (that is, diffusion of the NO to the membrane) and membrane permeability, in addition to intracellular diffusion of NO, in our computational models. We find that all these mechanisms may modulate NO uptake by membrane-encapsulated Hb and that extracellular diffusion is the main rate-limiting factor for phospholipid vesicles and erythrocytes. In the case of red cell microparticles, we find a major role for membrane permeability. These results are consistent with prior studies indicating that extracellular diffusion of several gas ligands is also rate-limiting for erythrocytes, with some contribution of a low membrane permeability. PMID:21808057

  4. From artificial red blood cells, oxygen carriers, and oxygen therapeutics to artificial cells, nanomedicine, and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Thomas M. S.

    2013-01-01

    The first experimental artificial red blood cells have all three major functions of red blood cells (rbc). However, the first practical one is a simple polyhemoglobin (PolyHb) that only has an oxygen-carrying function. This is now in routine clinical use in South Africa and Russia. An oxygen carrier with antioxidant functions, PolyHb-catalase-superoxide dismutase, can fulfill two of the three functions of rbc. Even more complete is one with all three functions of rbc in the form of PolyHb-catalase-superoxide dismutase-carbonic anhydrase. The most advanced ones are nanodimension artificial rbc with either PEG-lipid membrane or PEG-PLA polymermembrane. Extensions in to oxygen therapeutics include a PolyHb-tyrosinase that suppresses the growth of melanoma in a mice model. Another is a PolyHb-fibrinogen that is an oxygen carrier with platelet-like function. Research has now extended well beyond the original research on artificial rbc into many areas of artificial cells. These include nanoparticles, nanotubules, lipid vesicles, liposomes, polymer-tethered lipid vesicles, polymersomes, microcapsules, bioencapsulation, nanocapules, macroencapsulation, synthetic cells, and others. These are being used in nanotechnology, nanomedicine, regenerative medicine, enzyme/gene therapy, cell/stem cell therapy, biotechnology, drug delivery, hemoperfusion, nanosensers, and even by some groups in agriculture, industry, aquatic culture, nanocomputers, and nanorobotics. PMID:22409281

  5. Cellular function reinstitution of offspring red blood cells cloned from the sickle cell disease patient blood post CRISPR genome editing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianguo Wen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sickle cell disease (SCD is a disorder of red blood cells (RBCs expressing abnormal hemoglobin-S (HbS due to genetic inheritance of homologous HbS gene. However, people with the sickle cell trait (SCT carry a single allele of HbS and do not usually suffer from SCD symptoms, thus providing a rationale to treat SCD. Methods To validate gene therapy potential, hematopoietic stem cells were isolated from the SCD patient blood and treated with CRISPR/Cas9 approach. To precisely dissect genome-editing effects, erythroid progenitor cells were cloned from single colonies of CRISPR-treated cells and then expanded for simultaneous gene, protein, and cellular function studies. Results Genotyping and sequencing analysis revealed that the genome-edited erythroid progenitor colonies were converted to SCT genotype from SCD genotype. HPLC protein assays confirmed reinstallation of normal hemoglobin at a similar level with HbS in the cloned genome-edited erythroid progenitor cells. For cell function evaluation, in vitro RBC differentiation of the cloned erythroid progenitor cells was induced. As expected, cell sickling assays indicated function reinstitution of the genome-edited offspring SCD RBCs, which became more resistant to sickling under hypoxia condition. Conclusions This study is an exploration of genome editing of SCD HSPCs.

  6. The wall traction induced by flowing red blood cells in model microvessels and its potential mechanotransduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Jonathan; Vermot, Julien

    2013-11-01

    There is evidence in early embryonic development, even well before advective oxygen transport is important, that the presence of red bloods cells per se trigger essential steps of normal vascular development. For example, showed that sequestration of blood cells early in the development of a mouse, such that the hematocrit is reduced, suppresses normal vascular network development. Vascular development also provides a model for remodeling and angiogenesis. We consider the transient stresses associated with blood cells flowing in model microvessels of comparable diameter to those at early stages of development (6 μm to 12 μm). A detailed simulation tool is used to show that passing blood cells present a significant fluctuating traction signature on the vessel wall, well above the mean stresses. This is particularly pronounced for slow flows (<= 50 μm/s) or small diameters (<= 7 μm), for which root-mean-square wall traction fluctuations can exceed their mean. These events potentially present mechanotranduction triggers that direct development or remodeling. Attenuation of such fluctuating tractions by a viscoelastic endothelial glycocalyx layer is also considered. NSF supported.

  7. Identification of red blood cell rouleaux formation using photoacoustic ultrasound spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibria, Fayruz; Hysi, Eno; Strohm, Eric M.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2014-03-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) rouleaux formation is a reversible phenomenon that occurs during low blood flow and small shearing forces in circulation. Certain pathological conditions can alter the molecular constituents of blood and properties of the RBCs leading to enhanced rouleaux formation, which results in impaired perfusion and tissue oxygenation. In this study rouleaux were artificially generated using Dextran-70 and examined using a photoacoustic (PA) microscope. Individual rouleau were irradiated with a 532 nm pulsed laser focused to a 10 μm spot size, and the resulting PA signals recorded with a 200 MHz transducer. The laser and transducer were co-aligned, with the sample positioned between them. The frequency-domain PA ultrasound spectra were calculated for rouleaux with lengths ranging from 10 to 20 μm. For the rouleaux, a single spectral minimum at 269+/-4 MHz was observed. The spectral minima were in good agreement with a theoretical thermoelastic expansion model using an infinite length cylindrical absorber, bearing a diameter equivalent to an average human RBC (7.8 μm). These results suggest that PA ultrasound spectroscopy can be potentially used as a tool for monitoring blood samples for the presence of rouleaux.

  8. Age of red blood cells and mortality in the critically ill

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Pettila, Ville

    2011-04-15

    Abstract Introduction In critically ill patients, it is uncertain whether exposure to older red blood cells (RBCs) may contribute to mortality. We therefore aimed to evaluate the association between the age of RBCs and outcome in a large unselected cohort of critically ill patients in Australia and New Zealand. We hypothesized that exposure to even a single unit of older RBCs may be associated with an increased risk of death. Methods We conducted a prospective, multicenter observational study in 47 ICUs during a 5-week period between August 2008 and September 2008. We included 757 critically ill adult patients receiving at least one unit of RBCs. To test our hypothesis we compared hospital mortality according to quartiles of exposure to maximum age of RBCs without and with adjustment for possible confounding factors. Results Compared with other quartiles (mean maximum red cell age 22.7 days; mortality 121\\/568 (21.3%)), patients treated with exposure to the lowest quartile of oldest RBCs (mean maximum red cell age 7.7 days; hospital mortality 25\\/189 (13.2%)) had an unadjusted absolute risk reduction in hospital mortality of 8.1% (95% confidence interval = 2.2 to 14.0%). After adjustment for Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation III score, other blood component transfusions, number of RBC transfusions, pretransfusion hemoglobin concentration, and cardiac surgery, the odds ratio for hospital mortality for patients exposed to the older three quartiles compared with the lowest quartile was 2.01 (95% confidence interval = 1.07 to 3.77). Conclusions In critically ill patients, in Australia and New Zealand, exposure to older RBCs is independently associated with an increased risk of death.

  9. Genetic basis of persistent red blood cell microcytosis in the Chinese unexplained by phenotypical testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Chi-Chiu; Liu, Ada K; Tsang, Mandy H; Ngai, Donna Y; Leung, Kin-Sang; Chan, Amy Y

    2015-01-01

    Hypochromic microcytic anaemia is the hallmark phenotype of thalassaemia. Current phenotypical tests do not provide a diagnosis in a small proportion of patients with red blood cell microcytosis. We aim to evaluate the genetic basis of red cell microcytosis in these cases in our Chinese population. We identified from a large cohort of 1684 unselected requests for thalassaemia testing 23 Chinese subjects who had unexplained microcytosis after phenotypical iron and haemoglobin studies. In 18 of these subjects with available DNA, extensive genotypical analysis of the α and β globin gene cluster was performed, including gap-PCR, multiplex amplification-refractory mutation system, Sanger sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. Occult single and double α globin gene (HBA1, HBA2) deletions and α thalassaemic haemoglobinopathies (Haemoglobin Quong Sze, Haemoglobin Constant Spring) were the genetic basis for the microcytosis. Occult β globin gene (HBB) mutations and δ globin gene (HBD) abnormalities masking β thalassaemia are not seen. A cost-effective genotyping approach for the detection of these occult globin gene mutations can be proposed. The identification of these mutations is important for making a diagnosis and for the provision of accurate genetic counselling. (This paper adds to our understanding of the genetic basis of red blood cell microcytosis in clinical practice, and it provides a cost-effective approach for genotyping in diagnostic laboratories). Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  10. Demographic consequences of chromatic leaf defence in tropical tree communities: do red young leaves increase growth and survival?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queenborough, Simon A.; Metz, Margaret R.; Valencia, Renato; Wright, S. Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Background Many tropical forest tree species delay greening their leaves until full expansion. This strategy is thought to provide newly flushing leaves with protection against damage by herbivores by keeping young leaves devoid of nutritive value. Because young leaves suffer the greatest predation from invertebrate herbivores, delayed greening could prevent costly tissue loss. Many species that delay greening also produce anthocyanin pigments in their new leaves, giving them a reddish tint. These anthocyanins may be fungicidal, protect leaves against UV damage or make leaves cryptic to herbivores blind to the red part of the spectrum. Methods A comprehensive survey was undertaken of seedlings, saplings and mature trees in two diverse tropical forests: a rain forest in western Amazonia (Yasuní National Park, Ecuador) and a deciduous forest in Central America (Barro Colorado Island, Panamá). A test was made of whether individuals and species with delayed greening or red-coloured young leaves showed lower mortality or higher relative growth rates than species that did not. Key results At both Yasuní and Barro Colorado Island, species with delayed greening or red young leaves comprised significant proportions of the seedling and tree communities. At both sites, significantly lower mortality was found in seedlings and trees with delayed greening and red-coloured young leaves. While there was little effect of leaf colour on the production of new leaves of seedlings, diameter relative growth rates of small trees were lower in species with delayed greening and red-coloured young leaves than in species with regular green leaves, and this effect remained when the trade-off between mortality and growth was accounted for. Conclusions Herbivores exert strong selection pressure on seedlings for the expression of defence traits. A delayed greening or red-coloured young leaf strategy in seedlings appears to be associated with higher survival for a given growth rate, and may

  11. Critical evaluation of justifications for the transfusion of red blood cells: the reality of a government emergency hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Diego Agra de Souza; Silva,Felipe Gama e; Paulo Jose Medeiros de Souza Costa

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Blood products and derivatives are indispensable resources in medical therapies. However, it is important to note that the number of donations is far from ideal. Despite constant campaign efforts, a deficit of 1 million units is expected by 2030. OBJECTIVES: To determine the adequacy of the indications for red blood cell transfusion in an emergency hospital in Alagoas. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional observational study conducted at the Alagoas Blood Center. Of a total o...

  12. Perceived changes in behavior and values after a red blood cell transfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Broccolo M

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Marianna Broccolo,1 Nicolas Favez,2 Oliver Karam3,4 1School of Medicine, 2Clinical Psychology Unit, Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, University of Geneva, Geneva, 3Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva, Switzerland; 4Division of Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU, Richmond, VA, USA Background: Several studies have evaluated perceived changes in patients’ behavior after an organ transplant, especially a heart transplant. Although blood transfusions are much more frequent and have many connotations, derived from religious values, mass culture, or personal ideas, there is no study of the perception the patients have of changes in their behavior and values after a transfusion. This study’s objective was to assess perceived changes in behavior and values after a red blood cell transfusion.Materials and methods: Exploratory study through semistructured interviews with seven adults transfused after orthopedic surgery.Results: Blood had strong symbolic values for all subjects. Each of the seven participants mentioned positive characteristics that they would like to receive from the donor. Six subjects out of the seven acknowledged the possibility that transfusions might induce changes in behavior or values. Three subjects clearly stated that they would refuse to receive blood from a criminal for fear that some negative characteristic may be transmitted to them. Furthermore, three subjects acknowledged that their transfusion might have changed their own behavior or values.Discussion: This study shows that patients might feel that transfusions could modify their behavior or values and that certain personality traits of the donor could be transmitted. Further research in a larger population is warranted to evaluate the incidence of a perceived changed in behavior or values after a blood transfusion, which would then lead to changes in the way information is provided to

  13. A comparative study of the effect of leukoreduction and pre-storage leukodepletion on red blood cells during storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thelma Aguiar Pertinhez

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Blood transfusion is a fundamental therapy in numerous pathological conditions. Regrettably, many clinical reports describe adverse transfusion's drawbacks due to red blood cells alterations during storage. Thus, the possibility for a blood bank to ameliorate the quality of the erythrocyte concentrates units is crucial to improve clinical results and reduce transfusion adverse occurrences. Leukodepletion is a pre-storage treatment recognized to better preserve the quality of red blood cells with respect to leukoreduction. Aim of this work is to unravel the biochemical and biophysical basis that sustain the good clinical outcomes associated to the use of leukodepleted erythrocytes units.Erythrocytes concentrates were prepared as leukoreduced (n=8 and pre-storage leukodepleted (n=8 and then studied during 6 weeks in blood bank conditions.Overall, the data indicate that leukodepletion not only provide red blood cells with an appropriate amount of nutrients for a longer time but also selects red blood cells characterized by a more resilient plasma membrane fit to prolong their viability. We believe these results will stimulate new ideas to further optimize the current storage protocols.

  14. Effect of lactoferrin protein on red blood cells and macrophages: mechanism of parasite–host interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Namrata Anand,1 Rupinder K Kanwar,2 Mohan Lal Dubey,1 R K Vahishta,3 Rakesh Sehgal,1,* Anita K Verma,4 Jagat R Kanwar2,*1Department of Medical Parasitology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India; 2Nanomedicine Laboratory of Immunology and Molecular Biomedical Research, School of Medicine, Molecular and Medical Research Strategic Research Centre, Faculty of Health, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC, Australia; 3Department of Histopathology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, 4Nanobiotech Laboratory, Department of Zoology, Kirorimal College, University of Delhi, Delhi, India*These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: Lactoferrin is a natural multifunctional protein known to have antitumor, antimicrobial, and anti-inflammatory activity. Apart from its antimicrobial effects, lactoferrin is known to boost the immune response by enhancing antioxidants. Lactoferrin exists in various forms depending on its iron saturation. The present study was done to observe the effect of lactoferrin, isolated from bovine and buffalo colostrum, on red blood cells (RBCs and macrophages (human monocytic cell line-derived macrophages THP1 cells.Methods: Lactoferrin obtained from both species and in different iron saturation forms were used in the present study, and treatment of host cells were given with different forms of lactoferrin at different concentrations. These treated host cells were used for various studies, including morphometric analysis, viability by MTT assay, survivin gene expression, production of reactive oxygen species, phagocytic properties, invasion assay, and Toll-like receptor-4, Toll-like receptor-9, and MDR1 expression, to investigate the interaction between lactoferrin and host cells and the possible mechanism of action with regard to parasitic infections.Results: The mechanism of interaction between host cells and lactoferrin have shown various aspects of gene

  15. Effect of first cannulation time and dialysis machine blood flows on survival of arteriovenous fistulas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmink, Teun; Powers, Sarah; Hollingworth, Lee; Stevenson, Tamasin

    2017-10-16

    To study the effect of cannulation time on arteriovenous fistula (AVF) survival. Analysis of two prospective databases of access operations and dialysis sessions from 12 January 2002 through 4 January 2015 with follow-up until 4 January 2016. First cannulation time (FCT), defined from operation to first cannulation, was categorized as machine blood flow rate (BFR) for the first 29 dialysis sessions on AVF was analysed. Altogether, 1167 AVF with functional dialysis use were analysed: 667 (57%) radial cephalic AVF, 383 (33%) brachiocephalic AVF and 117 (10%) brachiobasilic AVF. The 631 (54%) AVF created in on-dialysis patients were analysed separately from 536 (46%) AVF created in pre-dialysis patients. AVF survival was similar between cannulation categories for both pre-dialysis patients (P = 0.19) and on-dialysis patients (P = 0.83). Early cannulation was associated with similar AVF survival in both pre-dialysis patients (P = 0.82) and on-dialysis patients (P = 0.17). Six consecutive successful cannulations from the start were associated with improved AVF survival (P = 0.0002). A below-median BFR at the start of dialysis was associated with better AVF survival (P machine BFR in the first week of dialysis are associated with decreased AVF survival.

  16. Effectiveness of Provider Education Followed by Computerized Provider Order Entry Alerts in Reducing Inappropriate Red Blood Cell Transfusion

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    Vijay M. Patel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To reduce the rate of inappropriate red blood cell transfusion, a provider education program, followed by alerts in the computerized provider order entry system (CPOE, was established to encourage AABB transfusion guidelines. Metrics were established for nonemergent inpatient transfusions. Service lines with high order volume were targeted with formal education regarding AABB 2012 transfusion guidelines. Transfusion orders were reviewed in real time with email communications sent to ordering providers falling outside of AABB recommendations. After 12 months of provider education, alerts were activated in CPOE. With provider education alone, the incidence of pretransfusion hemoglobin levels greater than 8 g/dL decreased from 16.64% to 6.36%, posttransfusion hemoglobin levels greater than 10 g/dL from 14.03% to 3.78%, and number of nonemergent two-unit red blood cell orders from 45.26% to 22.66%. Red blood cell utilization decreased by 13%. No additional significant reduction in nonemergent two-unit orders was observed with CPOE alerts. Provider education, an effective and low-cost method, should be considered as a first-line method for reducing inappropriate red blood cell transfusion rates in stable adult inpatients. Alerts in the computerized order entry system did not significantly lower the percentage of two-unit red blood cells orders but may help to maintain educational efforts.

  17. Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) in American Red Cross adult blood donors, 2000-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Geary W; Mair, David C; Lange, Cleston C; Harrington, Laura M; Church, Timothy R; Goldberg, Corinne L; Herron, Ross M; Hanna, Hank; Nobiletti, John B; Rios, Jorge A; Reagen, William K; Ley, Carol A

    2017-08-01

    In 2015, thirteen per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), including perfluorohexanesulfonate (PFHxS), perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS), perfluorooctanoate (PFOA), perfluorononanoate (PFNA), and perfluorodecanoate (PFDA) were analyzed in human plasma that were collected from a total of 616 American Red Cross male and female blood donors (ages 20-69) at 6 regional blood collection centers. Plasma samples were analyzed using a validated solvent precipitation-isotope dilution direction-liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method. The data were analyzed in conjunction with prior cross-sectional investigations [2000-2001 (n =645), 2006 (n =600), and 2010 (n =600)] to determine PFAS trends. Age- and sex-adjusted geometric mean serum (2000-2001) and plasma (2006, 2010, 2015) concentrations (ng/mL) were, respectively: PFHxS (2.3, 1.5, 1.3, 0.9); PFOS (35.1, 14.5, 8.4, 4.3); PFOA (4.7, 3.4, 2.4, 1.1); PFNA (0.6, 1.0, 0.8, 0.4); and PFDA (0.2, 0.3, 0.3, 0.1). The percentage decline in these geometric mean concentrations from 2000-2001 to 2015 were: PFHxS (61%); PFOS (88%); PFOA (77%); PFNA (33%); and PFDA (50%). The results indicate a continued decline of PFHxS, PFOS, and PFOA concentrations in American Red Cross blood donors. For the remaining PFAS measured in 2015, including the shorter chain perfluoroalkyls perfluorobutanesulfonate (PFBS) and perfluorohexanoate (PFHxA), the majority of samples were below the lower limit of quantitation. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Proteins involved in invasion of human red blood cells by malaria parasites

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    Ewa Jaśkiewicz

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is a disease caused by parasites of Plasmodium species. It is responsible for around 1-2 million deaths annually, mainly children under the age of 5. It occurs mainly in tropical and subtropical areas.Malaria is caused by five Plasmodium species:[i] P. falciparum, P. malariae, P. vivax, P. knowlesi[/i] and [i]P. ovale[/i]. Mosquitoes spread the disease by biting humans. The malaria parasite has two stages of development: the human stage and the mosquito stage. The first stage occurs in the human body and is divided into two phases: the liver phase and the blood phase.The invasion of erythrocytes by [i]Plasmodium[/i] merozoites is a multistep process of specific protein interactions between the parasite and red blood cell. The first step is the reversible merozoite attachment to the erythrocyte followed by its apical reorientation, then formation of an irreversible “tight” junction and finally entry into the red cell in a parasitophorous vacuole.The blood phase is supported by a number of proteins produced by the parasite. The merozoite surface GPI-anchored proteins (MSP-1, 2, 4, 5, 8 and 10 assist in the process of recognition of susceptible erythrocytes, apical membrane antigen (AMA-1 may be directly responsible for apical reorientation of the merozoite and apical proteins which function in tight junction formation. These ligands are members of two families: Duffy binding-like (DBL and reticulocyte binding-like (RBL proteins. In [i]Plasmodium[/i] [i]falciparum[/i] the DBL family includes: EBA-175, EBA-140 (BAEBL, EBA-181 (JESEBL, EBA-165 (PEBL and EBL-1 ligands.To date, no effective antimalarial vaccine has been developed, but there are several studies for this purpose. Therefore, it is crucial to understand the molecular basis of host cells invasion by parasites. Major efforts are focused on developing a multiantigenic and multiepitope vaccine preventing all steps of [i]Plasmodium[/i] invasion.

  19. [Proteins involved in invasion of human red blood cells by malaria parasites].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaśkiewicz, Ewa; Graczyk, Jakub; Rydzak, Joanna

    2010-11-30

    Malaria is a disease caused by parasites of Plasmodium species. It is responsible for around 1-2 million deaths annually, mainly children under the age of 5. It occurs mainly in tropical and subtropical areas. Malaria is caused by five Plasmodium species: P. falciparum, P. malariae, P. vivax, P. knowlesi and P. ovale. Mosquitoes spread the disease by biting humans. The malaria parasite has two stages of development: the human stage and the mosquito stage. The first stage occurs in the human body and is divided into two phases: the liver phase and the blood phase. The invasion of erythrocytes by Plasmodium merozoites is a multistep process of specific protein interactions between the parasite and red blood cell. The first step is the reversible merozoite attachment to the erythrocyte followed by its apical reorientation, then formation of an irreversible "tight" junction and finally entry into the red cell in a parasitophorous vacuole. The blood phase is supported by a number of proteins produced by the parasite. The merozoite surface GPI-anchored proteins (MSP-1, 2, 4, 5, 8 and 10) assist in the process of recognition of susceptible erythrocytes, apical membrane antigen (AMA-1) may be directly responsible for apical reorientation of the merozoite and apical proteins which function in tight junction formation. These ligands are members of two families: Duffy binding-like (DBL) and reticulocyte binding-like (RBL) proteins. In Plasmodium falciparum the DBL family includes: EBA-175, EBA-140 (BAEBL), EBA-181 (JESEBL), EBA-165 (PEBL) and EBL-1 ligands. To date, no effective antimalarial vaccine has been developed, but there are several studies for this purpose. Therefore, it is crucial to understand the molecular basis of host cells invasion by parasites. Major efforts are focused on developing a multiantigenic and multiepitope vaccine preventing all steps of Plasmodium invasion.

  20. The Effects of Terminalia catappa L. Leaves Extract on the Water Quality Properties, Survival and Blood Profile of Ornamental fish (Betta sp Cultured

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    Rudy Agung Nugroho

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed to determine the phytochemicals content of Terminalia catappa leaves extract (TCL and its effects on the survival and blood profiles of ornamental fish (Betta sp Ninety fish were randomly assigned into six triplicates groups and reared in various concentration of TCL: 0 (control, 125, 250, 375, 500, 625 ppm for 30 days. Temperature, Dissolve oxygen (DO, and pH were monitored during the trial. After 30 days, survival, Red Blood Cells (RBC, White Blood Cells (WBC, haemoglobin (Hb, lymphocyte, and total protein serum (TPS were analyzed. Based on the phytochemicals test, saponin, triterpenoid, quinon, phenolic, tannin, and flavonoid were detected on the TCL. Temperature and DO were not affected by any concentration of TCL. The lowest pH (5.05 was found in fish medium immersed with 625 ppm of TCL. Adding TCL above 375 ppm resulted in significantly higher survival, RBC, and Hb. The highest WBC was found in fish immersed with 625 ppm whereas the lowest lymphocyte was found in fish immersed with 375 of TCL. However, immersing any various concentration of TCL did not affect on the TPS. In summary, immersing TCL above 375 ppm is beneficial to enhance survival, RBC, WBC, and Hb of Betta sp.How to CiteNugroho, R. A., Manurung, H., Saraswati, D., Ladyescha, D. & Nur, F. M. (2016. The Effects of Terminalia catappa L. Leaves Extract on the Water Quality Properties, Survival and Blood Profile of Ornamental fish (Betta sp Cultured. Biosaintifika: Journal of Biology & Biology Education, 8(2, 240-247.

  1. Pf155/RESA protein influences the dynamic microcirculatory behavior of ring-stage Plasmodium falciparum infected red blood cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez-Silva, Monica; Park, YongKeun; Huang, Sha; Bow, Hansen; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile; Deplaine, Guillaume; Lavazec, Catherine; Perrot, Sylvie; Bonnefoy, Serge; Feld, Michael S.; Han, Jongyoon; Dao, Ming; Suresh, Subra

    2012-01-01

    Proteins exported by Plasmodium falciparum to the red blood cell (RBC) membrane modify the structural properties of the parasitized RBC (Pf-RBC). Although quasi-static single cell assays show reduced ring-stage Pf-RBCs deformability, the parameters influencing their microcirculatory behavior remain unexplored. Here, we study the dynamic properties of ring-stage Pf-RBCs and the role of the parasite protein Pf155/Ring-Infected Erythrocyte Surface Antigen (RESA). Diffraction phase microscopy revealed RESA-driven decreased Pf-RBCs membrane fluctuations. Microfluidic experiments showed a RESA-dependent reduction in the Pf-RBCs transit velocity, which was potentiated at febrile temperature. In a microspheres filtration system, incubation at febrile temperature impaired traversal of RESA-expressing Pf-RBCs. These results show that RESA influences ring-stage Pf-RBCs microcirculation, an effect that is fever-enhanced. This is the first identification of a parasite factor influencing the dynamic circulation of young asexual Pf-RBCs in physiologically relevant conditions, offering novel possibilities for interventions to reduce parasite survival and pathogenesis in its human host. PMID:22937223

  2. Congo red dye affects survival and reproduction in the cladoceran Ceriodaphnia dubia. Effects of direct and dietary exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Zamora, Miriam; Martínez-Jerónimo, Fernando; Cristiani-Urbina, Eliseo; Cañizares-Villanueva, Rosa Olivia

    2016-12-01

    Nearly 7 00000 tons of dyes are produced annually throughout the world. Azo dyes are widely used in the textile and paper industries due to their low cost and ease of application. Their extensive use results in large volumes of wastewater being discharged into aquatic ecosystems. Large volume discharges constitute a health risk since many of these dyes, such as Congo Red, are elaborated with benzidine, a known carcinogenic compound. Information regarding dye toxicity in aquatic ecosystems is limited. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of Congo Red on survival and reproduction of Ceriodaphnia dubia. We determined the 48 h median lethal concentration (LC50) and evaluated the effects of sublethal concentrations in subchronic exposures by using as food either fresh algae or algae previously exposed to the dye. LC50 was 13.58 mg L(-1). In subchronic assays, survival was reduced to 80 and 55 %, and fertility to 40 and 70 %, as compared to the control, in C. dubia fed with intoxicated cells or with the mix of intoxicated + fresh algae, respectively, so the quantity and type of food had a significant effect. We determined that Congo Red is highly toxic to C. dubia since it inhibits survival and fertility in concentrations exceeding 3 mg L(-1). Our results show that this dye produces negative effects at very low concentrations. Furthermore, our findings warn of the risk associated with discharging dyes into aquatic environments. Lastly, the results emphasize the need to regulate the discharge of effluents containing azo dyes.

  3. Local membrane deformations activate Ca2+-dependent K+ and anionic currents in intact human red blood cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyrda, Agnieszka; Cytlak, Urszula; Ciuraszkiewicz, Anna

    2010-01-01

    by such flow, as well as the local membrane deformations generated in certain pathological conditions, such as sickle cell anemia, have been shown to increase membrane permeability, based largely on experimentation with red cell suspensions. We attempted here the first measurements of membrane currents......-activated transient PCa observed here under local membrane deformation is a likely contributor to the Ca(2+)-mediated effects observed during the normal aging process of red blood cells, and to the increased Ca(2+) content of red cells in certain hereditary anemias such as thalassemia and sickle cell anemia.......BACKGROUND: The mechanical, rheological and shape properties of red blood cells are determined by their cortical cytoskeleton, evolutionarily optimized to provide the dynamic deformability required for flow through capillaries much narrower than the cell's diameter. The shear stress induced...

  4. Packed red blood cells are an abundant and proximate potential source of nitric oxide synthase inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles F Zwemer

    Full Text Available We determined, for packed red blood cells (PRBC and fresh frozen plasma, the maximum content, and ability to release the endogenous nitric oxide synthase (NOS inhibitors asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA and monomethylarginine (LNMMA.ADMA and LNMMA are near equipotent NOS inhibitors forming blood's total NOS inhibitory content. The balance between removal from, and addition to plasma determines their free concentrations. Removal from plasma is by well-characterized specific hydrolases while formation is restricted to posttranslational protein methylation. When released into plasma they can readily enter endothelial cells and inhibit NOS. Fresh rat and human whole blood contain substantial protein incorporated ADMA however; the maximum content of ADMA and LNMMA in PRBC and fresh frozen plasma has not been determined.We measured total (free and protein incorporated ADMA and LNMMA content in PRBCs and fresh frozen plasma, as well as their incubation induced release, using HPLC with fluorescence detection. We tested the hypothesis that PRBC and fresh frozen plasma contain substantial inhibitory methylarginines that can be released chemically by complete in vitro acid hydrolysis or physiologically at 37°C by enzymatic blood proteolysis.In vitro strong-acid-hydrolysis revealed a large PRBC reservoir of ADMA (54.5 ± 9.7 µM and LNMMA (58.9 ± 28.9 μM that persisted over 42-d at 6° or -80°C. In vitro 5h incubation at 37°C nearly doubled free ADMA and LNMMNA concentration from PRBCs while no change was detected in fresh frozen plasma.The compelling physiological ramifications are that regardless of storage age, 1 PRBCs can rapidly release pathologically relevant quantities of ADMA and LNMMA when incubated and 2 PRBCs have a protein-incorporated inhibitory methylarginines reservoir 100 times that of normal free inhibitory methylarginines in blood and thus could represent a clinically relevant and proximate risk for iatrogenic NOS inhibition upon

  5. Optical tweezers for measuring the interaction of the two single red blood cells in flow condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kisung; Muravyov, Alexei; Semenov, Alexei; Wagner, Christian; Priezzhev, Alexander

    2017-03-01

    Aggregation of red blood cells (RBCs) is an intrinsic property of blood, which has direct effect on the blood viscosity and therefore affects overall the blood circulation throughout the body. It is attracting interest for the research in both fundamental science and clinical application. Despite of the intensive research, the aggregation mechanism is remaining not fully clear. Recent advances in methods allowed measuring the interaction between single RBCs in a well-defined configuration leading the better understanding of the mechanism of the process. However the most of the studies were made on the static cells. Thus, the measurements in flow mimicking conditions are missing. In this work, we aim to study the interaction of two RBCs in the flow conditions. We demonstrate the characterization of the cells interaction strength (or flow tolerance) by measuring the flow velocity to be applied to separate two aggregated cells trapped by double channel optical tweezers in a desired configuration. The age-separated cells were used for this study. The obtained values for the minimum flow velocities needed to separate the two cells were found to be 78.9 +/- 6.1 μm/s and 110 +/- 13 μm/s for old and young cells respectively. The data obtained is in agreement with the observations reported by other authors. The significance of our results is in ability for obtaining a comprehensible and absolute physical value characterizing the cells interaction in flow conditions (not like the Aggregation Index measured in whole blood suspensions by other techniques, which is some abstract parameter)

  6. Hyperventilation and blood acid-base balance in hypercapnia exposed red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ern, Rasmus; Esbaugh, Andrew J

    2016-05-01

    Hyperventilation is a common response in fish exposed to elevated water CO2. It is believed to lessen the respiratory acidosis associated with hypercapnia by lowering arterial PCO2, but the contribution of hyperventilation to blood acid-base compensation has yet to be quantified. Hyperventilation may also increase the flux of irons across the gill epithelium and the cost of osmoregulation, owing to the osmo-respiratory compromise. Therefore, hypercapnia exposed fish may increase standard metabolic rate (SMR) leaving less energy for physiological functions such as foraging, migration, growth and reproduction. Here we show that gill ventilation, blood PCO2 and total blood [CO2] increased in red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) exposed to 1000 and 5000 µatm water CO2, and that blood PCO2 and total blood [CO2] decrease in fish during hypoxia induced hyperventilation. Based on these results we estimate the ventilatory contributions to total acid-base compensation in 1000 and 5000 µatm water CO2. We find that S. ocellatus only utilize a portion of its ventilatory capacity to reduce the acid-base disturbance in 1000 µatm water CO2. SMR was unaffected by both salinity and hypercapnia exposure indicating that the cost of osmoregulation is small relative to SMR, and that the lack of increased ventilation in 1000 µatm water CO2 despite the capacity to do so is not due to an energetic tradeoff between acid-base balance and osmoregulation. Therefore, while ocean acidification may impact ventilatory parameters, there will be little impact on the overall energy budget of S. ocellatus.

  7. [HIV retrospective study of the German Red Cross blood donation service in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glück, D; Elbert, G; Dengler, T; Gossrau, E; Grässmann, W; Grimm, M; Holzberger, G; Sternberger, J; Weise, W; Kubanek, B

    1994-12-01

    It was tried to retrospectively identify HIV infections in recipients of transfusions from donors who were tested HIV positive at a subsequent donation. These lookback data were traced back to answer the following questions: 1. How many transfusion recipients were infected before the start of the routine HIV testing in 1985? 2. How great is the risk of HIV infections from infected but not yet HIV antibody-positive donors? 3. Furthermore, the transfusion of HIV-infected transfusion recipients was traced back to the involved donor to establish causality. Retrospective ('lookback') study. HIV Study Group of the Red Cross Blood Banks of the Federal Republic of Germany. Preceding donations of HIV antibody-positive repeat donors were traced back to the transfusion recipients in order to establish their HIV antibody status. In a second lookback study, HIV-infected transfusion recipients and their corresponding donors were investigated after they had been reported to the blood bank as infected by transfusion-associated HIV. None. Recipients of 156 respectively 133 transfusions from repeat donors found to be Western blot-positive were investigated from 1985 to 1987 and from 1987 to 1992, respectively. About 50% of the recipients had died. About 40% of the recipients could not be examined, because they either were not available for testing or refused to be tested or because it was impossible to clarify the fate of the blood products. 25 HIV recipients were identified from 1981 to 1985, when routine HIV testing began. Nine transfusion-associated HIV infections were identified from 1985 to 1992. 25 million units of blood were prepared during this period. The risk of HIV transmission by tested transfusions is extremely rare (in the order of 1:1 million). The second lookback study suggests that in more than 50% of the blood recipients in whom HIV infection was attributed to transfusion, a causal relationship to an infected donor could not be established.

  8. Lacking deoxygenation-linked interaction between cytoplasmic domain of band 3 and HbF from fetal red blood cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Roy E.

    2007-01-01

    Aim: Several of the red blood cell's metabolic and membrane functions display dependence on haemoglobin oxygenation. In adult human red cells, the increased glycolytic rate at low O2 tension results from binding of deoxygenated HbA at negatively charged, N-terminal, cytoplasmic domain...... of the membrane protein band 3, which liberates glycolytic enzymes from this site. This study aims to investigate the role of fetal HbF (that has lower anion-binding capacity than HbA) in fetal red cells (that are subjected to low O2 tensions), and to elucidate possible linkage (e.g. via the major red cell...... membrane organising centre, band 3) between the individual oxygenation-linked reactions encountered in red cells. Methods: The interaction between band 3 and Hb is analysed in terms of the effects, measured under different conditions, of a 10-mer peptide that corresponds to the N-terminus of human band 3...

  9. Indolic Uremic Solutes Enhance Procoagulant Activity of Red Blood Cells through Phosphatidylserine Exposure and Microparticle Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunyan Gao

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Increased accumulation of indolic uremic solutes in the blood of uremic patients contributes to the risk of thrombotic events. Red blood cells (RBCs, the most abundant blood cells in circulation, may be a privileged target of these solutes. However, the effect of uremic solutes indoxyl sulfate (IS and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA on procoagulant activity (PCA of erythrocyte is unclear. Here, RBCs from healthy adults were treated with IS and IAA (mean and maximal concentrations reported in uremic patients. Phosphatidylserine (PS exposure of RBCs and their microparticles (MPs release were labeled with Alexa Fluor 488-lactadherin and detected by flow cytometer. Cytosolic Ca2+ ([Ca2+] with Fluo 3/AM was analyzed by flow cytometer. PCA was assessed by clotting time and purified coagulation complex assays. We found that PS exposure, MPs generation, and consequent PCA of RBCs at mean concentrations of IS and IAA enhanced and peaked in maximal uremic concentrations. Moreover, 128 nM lactadherin, a PS inhibitor, inhibited over 90% PCA of RBCs and RMPs. Eryptosis or damage, by indolic uremic solutes was due to, at least partially, the increase of cytosolic [Ca2+]. Our results suggest that RBC eryptosis in uremic solutes IS and IAA plays an important role in thrombus formation through releasing RMPs and exposing PS. Lactadherin acts as an efficient anticoagulant in this process.

  10. Transdifferentiation of Human Hair Follicle Mesenchymal Stem Cells into Red Blood Cells by OCT4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijing Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Shortage of red blood cells (RBCs, erythrocytes can have potentially life-threatening consequences for rare or unusual blood type patients with massive blood loss resulting from various conditions. Erythrocytes have been derived from human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs, but the risk of potential tumorigenicity cannot be ignored, and a majority of these cells produced from PSCs express embryonic ε- and fetal γ-globins with little or no adult β-globin and remain nucleated. Here we report a method to generate erythrocytes from human hair follicle mesenchymal stem cells (hHFMSCs by enforcing OCT4 gene expression and cytokine stimulation. Cells generated from hHFMSCs expressed mainly the adult β-globin chain with minimum level of the fetal γ-globin chain. Furthermore, these cells also underwent multiple maturation events and formed enucleated erythrocytes with a biconcave disc shape. Gene expression analyses showed that OCT4 regulated the expression of genes associated with both pluripotency and erythroid development during hHFMSC transdifferentiation toward erythroid cells. These findings show that mature erythrocytes can be generated from adult somatic cells, which may serve as an alternative source of RBCs for potential autologous transfusion.

  11. The dielectric spectroscopy of human red blood cells: the differentiation of old from fresh cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Marcelo; Levy, Evgeniya; Feldman, Yuri; Ben Ishai, Paul; Zelig, Orly; Yedgar, Saul; Barshtein, Gregory

    2017-06-22

    The objective of the study was to gauge the effect of storage lesions on the dielectric response of red blood cells (RBC), in particular those processes linked to deformations of the cellular membrane known as the β-dispersion. The dielectric response of RBC suspensions, exposed to blood-bank cold storage, was studied using time-domain dielectric spectroscopy (TDDS) in the frequency range of 500 kHz up to 1 GHz. The measured dielectric processes are characterized by their dielectric strength (Δε) and relaxation time (τ). Changes in the dielectric properties of the RBC suspensions due to storage-related lesions were evaluated. For a quantitative characterization of RBC lesions, we measured the deformability of fresh and stored RBC as expressed by their elongation ratio (ER), which was achieved under a shear stress of 3.0 Pa. The results show that the storage of RBC induced a statistically significant decrease of dielectric relaxation times. In addition, a sound correlation between the mean values of ER and the relaxation times was observed (Spearman's correlation coefficient ρ  =  0.847). We draw the conclusion that those alterations in the relaxation time are induced by changes in the shape of the RBC that happen during cold-storage. The evolution of the β-dispersion of RBC opens new possibilities in the blood bank inventory management.

  12. The Quality Assessment of Stored Red Blood Cells Probed Using Atomic-Force Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. M. Lamzin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available At the moment the suitability of stored red blood cells (sRBC for transfusion is checked by routine methods such as haemoglobin estimation and the level of haemolysis. These methods cannot characterize directly the quality of the membranes of sRBC. The aim of this work is to assess the quality of sRBC based on such criteria as the membrane’s stiffness and the size and the form of sRBC. Materials and Methods. We have investigated 5 series of dry cytosmears of the sRBC which had been kept in blood bank in a period from 1 to 35 days. After AFM imaging, in every specimen, 5 RBC were chosen at random; the diameter, the height, and the stiffness were measured on each of them. Results. The present study shows high increase of the mean values of YM and height of RBC after 35 days of storage and decrease of the mean values of their diameter. Conclusion. Statistically significant high increase of the mean values of YM indicates the decrease of the elasticity of the cells in the course of storing of the RBC. This parameter along with the morphological characteristics can be used as criterion for assessment of applicability of the sRBC for blood transfusion.

  13. [Artificial oxygen carriers as an alternative to red blood cell transfusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habler, O; Pape, A; Meier, J; Zwissler, B

    2005-08-01

    The expected cost-explosion in transfusion medicine (increasing imbalance between donors and recipients, treatment of transfusion-associated complications) increases the socio-economic significance of the development of safe and effective synthetic oxygen carriers as an alternative to the transfusion of allogeneic red blood cells. Currently two types of artificial oxygen carriers have been tested for safety and efficacy in cases of severe anemia otherwise requiring transfusion. Solutions based on human or bovine hemoglobin (HBOC) possess vasoconstrictor properties in addition to their oxygen transport capacity. The impact of vasoconstriction on tissue perfusion and organ function is however not yet fully understood. Nevertheless, in 2001 the bovine HBOC Hemopure was approved in South Africa for treatment of acutely anemic surgical patients. The purely synthetic perfluorocarbon (PFC) emulsions increase the physically dissolved portion of arterial oxygen content. Due to their particulate nature (emulsion droplets) PFCs may only be infused in low doses to avoid overload and malfunction of phagocytic cells of the reticulo-endothelial system. As part of a multimodal blood conservation program (including normovolemic hemodilution and hyperoxia) the low-dose administration of Oxygent effectively increases intraoperative anemia tolerance. Although reduction of perioperative allogeneic blood transfusion has already been demonstrated for HBOC and PFC, the global clinical establishment of artificial oxygen carriers is not to be expected in the near future.

  14. Variation of Red Blood Cell Distribution Width and Mean Platelet Volume after Moderate Endurance Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Lippi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although physical exercise strongly influences several laboratory parameters, data about the hematological changes after medium distance running are scarce. We studied 31 middle-trained athletes (mean training regimen 217±32 min/week who performed a 21.1 km, half-marathon run. Blood samples were collected before the run, at the end, and 3 and 20 hours thereafter. The complete blood count was performed on Advia 2120 and included red blood cell (RBC, reticulocyte, and platelet counts; hemoglobin; mean corpuscular volume (MCV; mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH; reticulocyte haemoglobin content (Ret CHR; RBC distribution width (RDW, mean platelet volume (MPV. No significant variations were observed for MCH and Ret CHR. The RBC, reticulocyte, and hemoglobin values modestly decreased after the run. The MCV significantly increased at the end of running but returned to baseline 3 hours thereafter. The RDW constantly increased, reaching a peak 20 hours after the run. The platelet count and MPV both increased after the run and returned to baseline 3 hours thereafter. These results may have implications for definition of reference ranges and antidoping testing, and may also contribute to explaining the relationship between endurance exercise and mortality, since previous studies reported that RDW and MPV may be significantly associated with cardiovascular disease.

  15. A benchmarking program to reduce red blood cell outdating: implementation, evaluation, and a conceptual framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barty, Rebecca L; Gagliardi, Kathleen; Owens, Wendy; Lauzon, Deborah; Scheuermann, Sheena; Liu, Yang; Wang, Grace; Pai, Menaka; Heddle, Nancy M

    2015-07-01

    Benchmarking is a quality improvement tool that compares an organization's performance to that of its peers for selected indicators, to improve practice. Processes to develop evidence-based benchmarks for red blood cell (RBC) outdating in Ontario hospitals, based on RBC hospital disposition data from Canadian Blood Services, have been previously reported. These benchmarks were implemented in 160 hospitals provincewide with a multifaceted approach, which included hospital education, inventory management tools and resources, summaries of best practice recommendations, recognition of high-performing sites, and audit tools on the Transfusion Ontario website (http://transfusionontario.org). In this study we describe the implementation process and the impact of the benchmarking program on RBC outdating. A conceptual framework for continuous quality improvement of a benchmarking program was also developed. The RBC outdating rate for all hospitals trended downward continuously from April 2006 to February 2012, irrespective of hospitals' transfusion rates or their distance from the blood supplier. The highest annual outdating rate was 2.82%, at the beginning of the observation period. Each year brought further reductions, with a nadir outdating rate of 1.02% achieved in 2011. The key elements of the successful benchmarking strategy included dynamic targets, a comprehensive and evidence-based implementation strategy, ongoing information sharing, and a robust data system to track information. The Ontario benchmarking program for RBC outdating resulted in continuous and sustained quality improvement. Our conceptual iterative framework for benchmarking provides a guide for institutions implementing a benchmarking program. © 2015 AABB.

  16. Factors affecting the frequency of red blood cell outdates: an approach to establish benchmarking targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heddle, Nancy M; Liu, Yang; Barty, Rebecca; Webert, Kathryn E; Whittaker, Susan; Gagliardi, Kate; Lauzon, Deborah; Owens, Wendy

    2009-02-01

    Benchmarking is a useful tool to identify best practices and to compare an organization's performance with that of similar peers, allowing for continuous quality improvement. In this study, a provincial database of red blood cell (RBC) product inventory/disposition in hospitals was analyzed to identify factors that affected RBC outdates and to systematically establish optimal target levels for RBC outdates. RBC inventory/disposition data for a 21-month period from 156 hospitals were analyzed using logistic regression techniques to identify factors that affected RBC outdating (month of the year, distance from the blood supplier, monthly transfusion activity, hospital type, and provincial region). The results were used to categorize hospitals into groupings that accounted for the factors affecting wastage. Within each grouping, the lower quartile was selected as the optimal target threshold. Three factors were identified as significantly affecting RBC outdating: distance from the blood supplier, mean monthly transfusion activity, and month of the year. Accounting for these variables, three hospital groupings were identified and benchmarking targets were established for mean monthly RBC outdating: There were 73 hospitals in Group 1 and their target level was 0.4 percent, 59 hospitals in Group 2 with a target of 1.1 percent, and 24 hospitals in Group 3 with a target of 20.3 percent. A method is described for establishing evidence-based benchmarking targets for RBC outdating that allows for hospitals to be grouped with similar peers taking into account logistic factors that impact on product outdating.

  17. An extended convection diffusion model for red blood cell-enhanced transport of thrombocytes and leukocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hund, S J; Antaki, J F

    2011-01-01

    Transport phenomena of platelets and white blood cells (WBCs) are fundamental to the processes of vascular disease and thrombosis. Unfortunately, the dilute volume occupied by these cells is not amenable to fluid-continuum modeling, and yet the cell count is large enough that modeling each individual cell is impractical for most applications. The most feasible option is to treat them as dilute species governed by convection and diffusion; however, this is further complicated by the role of the red blood cell (RBC) phase on the transport of these cells. We therefore propose an extended convection–diffusion (ECD) model based on the diffusive balance of a fictitious field potential, Ψ, that accounts for the gradients of both the dilute phase and the local hematocrit. The ECD model was applied to the flow of blood in a tube and between parallel plates in which a profile for the RBC concentration field was imposed and the resulting platelet concentration field predicted. Compared to prevailing enhanced-diffusion models that dispersed the platelet concentration field, the ECD model was able to simulate a near-wall platelet excess, as observed experimentally. The extension of the ECD model depends only on the ability to prescribe the hematocrit distribution, and therefore may be applied to a wide variety of geometries to investigate platelet-mediated vascular disease and device-related thrombosis. PMID:19809124

  18. A study of red blood cell deformability in diabetic retinopathy using optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Thomas J.; Richards, Christopher J.; Bhatnagar, Rhythm; Pavesio, Carlos; Agrawal, Rupesh; Jones, Philip H.

    2015-08-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus (DM) in which high blood sugar levels cause swelling, leaking and occlusions in the blood vessels of the retina, often resulting in a loss of sight. The microvascular system requires red blood cells (RBCs) to undergo significant cellular deformation in order to pass through vessels whose diameters are significantly smaller than their own. There is evidence to suggest that DM impairs the deformability of RBCs, and this loss of deformability has been associated with diabetic kidney disease (or nephropathy) - another microvascular complication of DM. However, it remains unclear whether reduced deformability of RBCs correlates with the presence of DR. Here we present an investigation into the deformability of RBCs in patients with diabetic retinopathy using optical tweezers. To extract a value for the deformability of RBCs we use a dual-trap optical tweezers set-up to stretch individual RBCs. RBCs are trapped directly (i.e. without micro-bead handles), so rotate to assume a `side-on' orientation. Video microscopy is used to record the deformation events, and shape analysis software is used to determine parameters such as initial and maximum RBC length, allowing us to calculate the deformability for each RBC. A small decrease in deformability of diabetes cells subject to this stretching protocol is observed when compared to control cells. We also report on initial results on three dimensional imaging of individual RBCs using defocussing microscopy.

  19. Trends in Red Blood Cell Transfusion and 30-Day Mortality among Hospitalized Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roubinian, Nareg H; Escobar, Gabriel J; Liu, Vincent; Swain, Bix E; Gardner, Marla N; Kipnis, Patricia; Triulzi, Darrell J; Gottschall, Jerome L; Wu, Yan; Carson, Jeffrey L; Kleinman, Steven H; Murphy, Edward L

    2014-01-01

    Background Blood conservation strategies have been shown to be effective in decreasing red blood cell (RBC) utilization in specific patient groups. However, few data exist describing the extent of RBC transfusion reduction or their impact on transfusion practice and mortality in a diverse inpatient population. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study using comprehensive electronic medical record data from 21 medical facilities in Kaiser Permanente Northern California (KPNC). We examined unadjusted and risk-adjusted RBC transfusion and 30-day mortality coincident with implementation of RBC conservation strategies. Findings The inpatient study cohort included 391,958 patients who experienced 685,753 hospitalizations. From 2009 to 2013, the incidence of RBC transfusion decreased from 14.0% to 10.8% of hospitalizations; this change coincided with a decline in pre-transfusion hemoglobin levels from 8.1 to 7.6 g/dL. Decreased RBC utilization affected broad groups of admission diagnoses and was most pronounced in patients with a nadir hemoglobin level between 8 and 9 g/dL (n=73,057; 50.8% to 19.3%). During the study period, the standard deviation of risk adjusted RBC transfusion incidence across hospitals decreased by 44% (p blood conservation strategies, RBC transfusion incidence and pre-transfusion hemoglobin levels decreased broadly across medical and surgical patients. Variation in RBC transfusion incidence across hospitals decreased from 2010 to 2013. Consistent with clinical trial data, more restrictive transfusion practice did not appear to impact 30-day mortality. PMID:25135770

  20. Effect of red wine and red grape extract on blood lipids, haemostatic factors, and other risk factors for cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Alice Schmidt; Marckmann, P.; Dragsted, L.O.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Some epidemiological studies found a lower risk of cardiovascular disease among wine drinkers than among drinkers of other types of ethanol. This difference might be due to an effect of nonalcohol compounds in wine on important cardiovascular risk factors. The objective of this study...... was to compare the effect of red wine, nonalcohol compounds of red wine and placebo on established cardiovascular risk factors. Design: A parallel, four-armed intervention study. Subjects: A total of 69 healthy 38 - 74- y-old men and women. Interventions: Subjects were randomised to either 1: red wine ( males...... compared with drinking water with or without red grape extract. The impact of wine on the measured cardiovascular risk factors thus seems primarily explained by an alcohol effect. Our finding suggests that the putative difference in cardiac risk associated with wine vs other alcoholic beverages might...

  1. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Soft Grains: Malaria-Infected Red Blood Cells Motion within Obstructed 2-D Capillary Vessel

    CERN Document Server

    Haris, Luman; Haryanto, Freddy; Viridi, Sparisoma

    2013-01-01

    Molecular dynamics has been widely used to numerically solve equation of motion of classical many-particle system. It can be used to simulate many systems including biophysics, whose complexity level is determined by the involved elements. Based on this method, a numerical model had been constructed to mimic the behaviour of malaria-infected red blood cells within capillary vessel. The model was governed by three forces namely Coulomb force, normal force, and Stokes force. By utilizing two dimensional four-cells scheme, theoretical observation was carried out to test its capability. Although the parameters were chosen deliberately, all of the quantities were given arbitrary value. Despite this fact, the results were quite satisfactory. Combined with the previous results, it can be said that the proposed model were sufficient enough to mimic the malaria-infected red blood cells motion within obstructed capillary vessel. Keywords: molecular dynamics, two-dimensional model, red-blood cell motion, malaria

  2. LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Arterio-venous flow between monochorionic twins determined during intra-uterine transfusion. Nonlinear decay of adult red blood cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gemert, Martin J. C.; Pasman, Suzanne A.; van den Wijngaard, Jeroen P. H. M.; Lopriore, Enrico; Vandenbussche, Frank P. H. A.

    2008-07-01

    Recently, we derived equations relating the flow of adult red blood cells through a placental arterio-venous anastomosis with intra-uterine and post-natal measured adult hemoglobin concentrations. In this letter, we re-derived the equations, now including a more realistic nonlinear decay of adult red blood cells, and re-evaluated the measurement accuracy of the arterio-venous flow and the lifetime of the red blood cells.

  3. Development and application of resistive pulse spectroscopy: studies on the size, form and deformability of red blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yee, J.P.

    1979-01-01

    The following studies were conducted using the resistive pulse spectroscopy (RPS) technique: cumulative spectra and individual pulse forms for rigid latex polymer spheres; acquisition and analysis of RPS spectral data by means of special computer program; interaction of red blood cells with glutaraldehyde; membrane properties of erythrocytes undergoing abrupt osmotic hemolysis; reversible effects of the binding of chlorpromazine HCl at the red cell membrane surface; effects of high cholesterol diet on erythrocytes of guinea pigs; and multi-population analysis for a mixture of fetal and maternal red cells. (HLW)

  4. Long-term Effects on the Histology and Function of Livers and Spleens in Rats after 33% Toploading of PEG-PLA-nano Artificial Red Blood Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zun Chang; Chang, Thomas M.S.

    2012-01-01

    This study is to investigate the long-term effects of nanodimension PEG-PLA artificial red blood cells containing hemoglobin and red blood cell enzymes on the liver and spleen after 1/3 blood volume top loading in rats. The experimental rats received one of the following infusions: Nano artificial red blood cells in Ringer lactate, Ringer lactate, stroma-free hemoglobin, polyhemoglobin, and autologous rat whole blood. Blood samples were taken before infusions and on days 1, 7, and 21 after infusions for analysis. Nano artificial red blood cells, polyhemoglobin, Ringer lactate and rat red blood cells did not have any significant adverse effects on alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, creatine kinase, amylase and creatine kinase. On the other hand, stroma-free hemoglobin induced significant adverse effects on liver as shown by elevation in alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase throughout the 21 days. On day 21 after infusions rats were sacrificed and livers and spleens were excised for histological examination. Nano artificial red blood cells, polyhemoglobin, Ringer lactate and rat red blood cells did not cause any abnormalities in the microscopic histology of the livers and spleens. In the stroma-free hemoglobin group the livers showed accumulation of hemoglobin in central veins and sinusoids, and hepatic steatosis. In conclusion, injected nano artificial red blood cells can be efficiently metabolized and removed by the reticuloendothelial system, and do not have any biochemical or histological adverse effects on the livers or the spleens. PMID:19043818

  5. Hyperemic peripheral red marrow in a patient with sickle cell anemia demonstrated on Tc-99m labeled red blood cell venography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiden, R.A.; Locko, R.C.; Stent, T.R. (Columbia Univ. College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY (USA))

    1991-03-01

    A 25-year-old gravid woman, homozygous for sickle cell anemia, with a history of recent deep venous thrombosis, was examined using Tc-99m labeled red blood cell venography for recurrent thrombosis. Although negative for thrombus, the study presented an unusual incidental finding: the patient's peripheral bone marrow was hyperemic in a distribution consistent with peripheral red bone marrow expansion. Such a pattern has not been documented before using this technique. This report supports other literature that has demonstrated hyperemia of peripheral red bone marrow in other hemolytic anemias. This finding may ultimately define an additional role of scintigraphy in assessing the pathophysiologic status of the sickle cell patient.

  6. Red blood cell depletion with a semiautomated system or hydroxyethyl starch sedimentation for routine cord blood banking: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solves, Pilar; Mirabet, Vicente; Planelles, Dolores; Blasco, Ignacio; Perales, Alfredo; Carbonell-Uberos, Francisco; Soler, M Angeles; Roig, Roberto

    2005-06-01

    The major problem with long-term cord blood (CB) banking is the required storage space. In this sense, many studies have been performed to establish techniques for volume reduction of CB units. We compared two different methods for CB volume reduction in both development and routine phases: hydroxyethyl starch (HES) sedimentation and top-and-bottom fractionation with the Optipress II (Baxter Healthcare). Monitoring the total nucleated cell (TNC) count, lymphocytes, CD34+ cells, and colony-forming unit (CFU) content in both preprocess and postprocess CB units assessed the volume reduction process. The CB units processed in both groups had comparable volume and cells counts before and after volume reduction, except for number of red blood cells (RBCs), which was significantly greater for the Optipress II group. Recoveries of CD34+ and RBC depletion were significantly better for the HES group. For routine processing, TNC and lymphocyte recoveries were significantly better for CB units processed by the Optipress II system. There was, however, significantly less depletion of RBCs for this group. The time required for CB processing with the Optipress II was significantly shorter than the time needed for volume reduction by addition of HES (25+/-5 min vs. 55+/-10 min). The volume reduction method with the Optipress II is a closed time-saving system that allows good cell recoveries. In contrast, the main advantage of the HES method is the higher RBC depletion that influences CFU content. Reducing RBC content must be the object of further improvements for volume reduction using the Optipress II method.

  7. Effect of an Arctium lappa (burdock) extract on the labeling of blood constituents with technetium-99m and on the morphology of the red blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neves, Rosane de Figueiredo; Rebello, Bernardo Machado; Medeiros, Aldo da Cunha [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, RN (Brazil). Programa de Pos-graduacao em Ciencias da Saude]. E-mail: nevesrosane@yahoo.com.br; Moreno, Silvana Ramos Farias; Fonseca, Adenilson de Souza da [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes. Lab. de Radiofarmacia Experimental; Caldas, Luiz Querino de Araujo [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias Medicas; Bernardo-Filho, Mario [Instituto Nacional do Cancer (INCa), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenadoria de Pesquisa

    2007-09-15

    Arctium lappa (burdock) has been used to treat inflammatory processes. Blood constituents labeled with technetium-99m ({sup 99m}Tc) have been utilized in nuclear medicine. It was evaluated the influence of a burdock extract on the labeling of blood constituents with {sup 99m}Tc and on the morphometry of red blood cells. Blood samples from Wistar rats were incubated with burdock extract and the radiolabeling procedure was carried out. Plasma and blood cells, soluble and insoluble fractions of plasma and blood cells were separated. The radioactivity in each fraction was counted and the percentages of radioactivity (%ATI) were determined. Morphology and morphometric (perimeter/area ratio) measurements of red blood cells (RBC) were performed. The incubation with burdock extract significantly (p<0.05) altered the %ATI on the blood compartments and the perimeter/area ratio of RBC, as well as, induced modifications on the shape of RBC. Alterations on membrane could justify the decrease of labeling of blood cells with {sup 99m}Tc obtained in this study. (author)

  8. Blood serum and BSA, but neither red blood cells nor hemoglobin can support vitellogenesis and egg production in the dengue vector Aedes aegypti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina K. Gonzales

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Aedes aegypti is the major vector of dengue, yellow fever and chikungunya viruses that put millions of people in endemic countries at risk. Mass rearing of this mosquito is crucial for strategies that use modified insects to reduce vector populations and transmission of pathogens, such as sterile insect technique or population replacement. A major problem for vector mosquito mass rearing is the requirement of vertebrate blood for egg production since it poses significant costs as well as potential health hazards. Also, regulations for human and animal use as blood source can pose a significant obstacle. A completely artificial diet that supports egg production in vector mosquitoes can solve this problem. In this study, we compared different blood fractions, serum and red blood cells, as dietary protein sources for mosquito egg production. We also tested artificial diets made from commercially available blood proteins (bovine serum albumin (BSA and hemoglobin. We found that Ae. aegypti performed vitellogenesis and produced eggs when given whole bovine blood, serum, or an artificial diet containing BSA. Conversely, egg production was impaired after feeding of the red blood cell fraction or an artificial diet containing only hemoglobin. We also found that egg viability of serum-fed mosquitoes were comparable to that of whole blood and an iron supplemented BSA meal produced more viable eggs than a meal containing BSA alone. Our results indicate that serum proteins, not hemoglobin, may replace vertebrate blood in artificial diets for mass mosquito rearing.

  9. Opening of brain blood barrier induced by red light and central analgesic improvement of cobra neurotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yong; Li, Yue; Fang, Fei

    2014-05-05

    Cobra neurotoxin (NT) has central analgesic effects, but it is difficult to pass through brain blood barrier (BBB). A novel method of red light induction is designed to help NT across BBB, which is based on photosensitizer activation by red light to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) to open BBB. The effects were evaluated on cell models and animals in vivo with illumination by semiconductor laser at 670nm on photosensitizer pheophorbide isolated from silkworm excrement. Brain microvascular endothelial cells and astrocytes were co-cultured to build up BBB cell model. The radioactivity of (125)I-NT was measured in cells and tissues for NT permeation. Three ways of cranial irradiation, nasal cavity and intravascular irradiation were tested with combined injection of (125)I-NT 20μg/kg and pheophorbide 100μg/kg to rats, and organs of rats were separated and determined the radioactivity. Paw pressure test in rats, hot plate and writhing test in mice were applied to appraise the analgesic effects. NT across BBB cell model increased with time of illumination, and reached stable level after 60min. So did ROS in cells. NT mainly distributed in liver and kidney of rats, significantly increased in brain after illumination, and improved analgesic effects. Excitation of pheophorbide at red light produces ROS to open BBB, help NT enter brain, and enhance its central action. This research provides a new method for drug across BBB to improve its central role. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Numerical simulation of the red blood cell aggregation and deformation behaviors in ultrasonic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaojian; Huang, Biao; Wang, Guoyu; Fu, Xiaoying; Qiu, Sicong

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this paper is to propose an immersed boundary lattice Boltzmann method (IB-LBM) considering the ultrasonic effect to simulate red blood cell (RBC) aggregation and deformation in ultrasonic field. Numerical examples involving the typical streamline, normalized out-of-plane vorticity contours and vector fields in pure plasma under three different ultrasound intensities are presented. Meanwhile, the corresponding transient aggregation behavior of RBCs, with special emphasis on the detailed process of RBC deformation, is shown. The numerical results reveal that the ultrasound wave acted on the pure plasma can lead to recirculation flow, which contributes to the RBCs aggregation and deformation in microvessel. Furthermore, increasing the intensity of the ultrasound wave can significantly enhance the aggregation and deformation of the RBCs. And the formation of the RBCs aggregation leads to the fluctuated and dropped vorticity value of plasma in return. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Numerical simulations of deformation and aggregation of red blood cells in shear flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Hong-Tong; Ju, M; Sui, Y; Nazir, T; Namgung, B; Kim, Sangho

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews numerical simulations of red blood cells (RBCs) mainly using the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), focusing on the 2-dimensional deformation and aggregation of the cells in simple shear flow. We outline the incorporation of the immersed boundary method into the LBM, in which the membrane forces are obtained from the membrane model. The RBCs are simulated as a single biconcave capsule and as a doublet of biconcave capsules. The transition from swinging to tumbling motions of the RBCs, as induced by reducing the shear rate or increasing the membrane bending stiffness, is discussed. Also discussed is the aggregation tendency of the doublet of RBCs, for which homogenous deformability maintained RBC aggregation, whereas an increased deformability difference resulted in RBC dissociation.

  12. Changes in hemoglobin-oxygen affinity with shape variations of red blood cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Aniket; Dasgupta, Raktim; Majumder, Shovan K.

    2017-10-01

    Shape variations of red blood cells (RBCs) are known to occur upon exposure to various drugs or under diseased conditions. The commonly observed discocytic RBCs can be transformed to echinocytic or stomatocytic shape under such conditions. Raman spectra of the three major shape variations, namely discocyte, echinocyte, and stomatocyte, of RBCs were studied while subjecting the cells to oxygenated and deoxygenated conditions. Analysis of the recorded spectra suggests an increased level of hemoglobin (Hb)-oxygen affinity for the echinocytes. Also, some level of Hb degradation could be noticed for the deoxygenated echinocytes. The effects may arise from a reduced level of intracellular adenosine triphosphate in echinocytic cells and an increased fraction of submembrane Hb.

  13. Design of artificial red blood cells using polymeric hydrogel microcapsules: hydrogel stability improvement and polymer selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wujie; Bissen, Matthew J; Savela, Emily S; Clausen, Joshua N; Fredricks, Samantha J; Guo, Xiaoru; Paquin, Zachary R; Dohn, Ryan P; Pavelich, Ian J; Polovchak, Alec L; Wedemeyer, Michael J; Shilling, Brock E; Dufner, Emily N; O'Donnell, Anna C; Rubio, Gerardo; Readnour, Logan R; Brown, Tyler F; Lee, Jung C; Kaltchev, Matey G; Chen, Junhong; Tritt, Charles S

    2016-11-16

    To improve the stability of pectin-oligochitosan hydrogel microcapsules under physiological conditions. Two different approaches were examined: change of the cross-linker length and treatment of the hydrogel microcapsules with 150 Mm CaCl2. Replacement of pectin with alginate was also studied. It was observed that the molecular weight of the cross-linker oligochiotsan had no significant improvement on microcapsule stability. On the other hand, the treatment of pectin-oligochitosan microcapsules with Ca2+ increased the microcapsule stability significantly. Different types of alginate were used; however, no red-blood-cell-shaped microcapsules could be produced, which is likely due to the charge-density difference between deprotonated pectin and alginate polymers.

  14. On the birefringence of healthy and malaria-infected red blood cells

    CERN Document Server

    Dharmadhikari, Aditya K; Dharmadhikari, Jayashree A; Sharma, Shobhona; Mathur, Deepak

    2013-01-01

    We have probed how the birefringence of a healthy red blood cell (RBC) changes as it becomes infected by a malarial parasite. By analyzing the polarization properties of light transmitted through a single, optically-trapped cell we demarcate two types of birefringence: form birefringence which depends on the shape of the cell and intrinsic birefringence which is brought about by the presence of the parasite. We quantitatively measure changes in the refractive index as normal RBS become infected by a malarial parasite. Malarial infections are found to induce changes in the cell's refractive index whose magnitude depends on the stage of malarial infection; such changes were quantitatively explored and found to be large, in the range 1.2 to 3$\\times10^{-2}$. Our results have implications for the development and use of non-invasive techniques that seek to quantify changes in cell properties induced by pathological states accompanying diseases like malaria. From a broader prespective, information forthcoming from ...

  15. Effect of Strain Rate on the Mechanical Behavior of Red Blood Cells Entering a Constriction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancuso, Jordan; Ristenpart, William

    2014-11-01

    Most work on the effect of hydrodynamic stress on red blood cells (RBCs) has focused on linear velocity profiles. Microfluidic devices have provided a means to examine the mechanical behavior of RBCs undergoing a sudden increase in shear stress at the entrance of a constriction, with previous work primarily focused on a fixed constriction taper angle and corresponding hydrodynamic strain rate. Here we investigate the effect of strain rate on the stretching dynamics exhibited by RBCs as they enter a microfluidic constriction. Systematic variations in the constriction taper angle allow the strain rate to be precisely tuned, and high speed video yields precise measurements of the corresponding RBC deformations. We demonstrate that maximal RBC stretching occurs at an intermediate constriction taper angle, despite the lower magnitude of the strain rate. We interpret the results in terms of the time integral of the elongational strain rate, and we discuss the implications for shear-induced mechanotransduction.

  16. Change in spectrum of Brownian fluctuations of optically trapped red blood cells due to malarial infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraogi, Vishal; Padmapriya, P.; Paul, Apurba; Tatu, Utpal S.; Natarajan, Vasant

    2010-05-01

    We study the properties of single red blood cells (RBCs) held in an optical-tweezers trap. We observe a change in the spectrum of Brownian fluctuations between RBCs from normal and malaria-infected samples. The change, caused by infection-induced structural changes in the cell, appears as a statistical increase in the mean (by 25%) and standard deviation (by 200%) of the corner frequency measured over ~100 cells. The increase is observed even though the ensemble of cells being measured consists mostly of cells that do not actually host the parasite, but are from an infected pool. This bystander effect appears to vindicate other observations that infected cells can affect the biomechanical properties of uninfected cells. The change is also observed to be independent of the stage of infection and its duration, highlighting its potential for disease detection.

  17. Total 3D imaging of phase objects using defocusing microscopy: application to red blood cells

    CERN Document Server

    Roma, P M S; Amaral, F T; Agero, U; Mesquita, O N

    2014-01-01

    We present Defocusing Microscopy (DM), a bright-field optical microscopy technique able to perform total 3D imaging of transparent objects. By total 3D imaging we mean the determination of the actual shapes of the upper and lower surfaces of a phase object. We propose a new methodology using DM and apply it to red blood cells subject to different osmolality conditions: hypotonic, isotonic and hypertonic solutions. For each situation the shape of the upper and lower cell surface-membranes (lipid bilayer/cytoskeleton) are completely recovered, displaying the deformation of RBCs surfaces due to adhesion on the glass-substrate. The axial resolution of our technique allowed us to image surface-membranes separated by distances as small as 300 nm. Finally, we determine volume, superficial area, sphericity index and RBCs refractive index for each osmotic condition.

  18. Curcuma longa extract as a histological dye for collagen fibres and red blood cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avwioro, O G; Onwuka, S K; Moody, J O; Agbedahunsi, J M; Oduola, T; Ekpo, O E; Oladele, A A

    2007-01-01

    Crude ethanolic extract and column chromatographic fractions of the Allepey cultivar of Curcuma longa Roxb, commonly called turmeric (tumeric) in commerce, were used as a stain for tissue sections. Staining was carried out under basic, acidic and neutral media conditions. Inorganic and organic dissolution solvents were used. The stain was used as a counterstain after alum and iron haematoxylins. C. longa stained collagen fibres, cytoplasm, red blood cells and muscle cells yellow. It also stained in a fashion similar to eosin, except for its intense yellow colour. Preliminary phytochemical evaluation of the active column fraction revealed that it contained flavonoids, free anthraquinone and deoxy sugar. A cheap, natural dye can thus be obtained from C. longa. PMID:17451535

  19. Full-field velocity imaging of red blood cells in capillaries with spatiotemporal demodulation autocorrelation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingyi; Zeng, Yaguang; Dong, Nannan; Liao, Riwei; Yang, Guojian

    2016-03-01

    We propose a full-field optical method for the label-free and quantitative mapping of the velocities of red blood cells (RBCs) in capillaries. It integrates spatiotemporal demodulation and an autocorrelation algorithm, and measures RBC velocity according to the ratio of RBC length to lag time. Conventionally, RBC length is assumed to be a constant and lag time is taken as a variable, while our method treats both of them as variables. We use temporal demodulation and the Butterworth spatial filter to separate RBC signal from background signal, based on which we obtain the RBC length by image segmentation and lag time by autocorrelation analysis. The RBC velocity calculated now is more accurate. The validity of our method is verified by an in vivo experiment on a mouse ear. Owing to its higher image signal-to-noise ratio, our method can be used for mapping RBC velocity in the turbid tissue case.

  20. Dihydrochalcones and homoisoflavanes from the red resin of Dracaena cochinchinensis (Chinese dragon's blood).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiao-Qin; Song, Yue-Lin; Zhang, Jing; Huo, Hui-Xia; Huang, Zheng; Zheng, Jiao; Zhang, Qian; Zhao, Yun-Fang; Xiao, Wei; Li, Jun; Tu, Peng-Fei

    2014-12-01

    Two new dihydrochalcones, 4-hydroxy-2,4'-dimethoxydihydrochalcone (1) and 3,4'-dihydroxy-2,4,6-trimethoxydihydrochalcone (2), and a new homoisoflavane, 7,3'-dihydroxy-8,4'-dimethoxyhomoisoflavane (3), along with 12 known compounds (4-15), were isolated from the red resin of Dracaena cochinchinensis (Chinese dragon's blood). Their structures were assigned by a variety of spectroscopic techniques. Diversity of cleavage pathways were proposed for dihydrochalcones and homoisoflavanes based on the mass spectroscopic behaviors of those identified compounds using hybrid ion trap-time of flight mass spectrometry. All the compounds were evaluated for their inhibitory effects on nitric oxide production in lipopolysaccharide-induced RAW 264.7 macrophages, and compound 9 exhibited mild inhibition of NO production in this assay with IC₅₀ value of 50.3 μM. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Electron probe microanalysis of red blood cells. I. Methods and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, R G; Bronner, C; Barba, W; Tosteson, D C

    1978-11-01

    The concentrations of potassium, sodium, and iron in human and sheep red blood cells were measured with an electron probe. Cells were prepared for analysis by spraying them on pyrolytic graphite supports. The results obtained with this spray technique agreed well with values measured on similar cells that were prepared for analysis by freezing, sectioning, and freeze-drying. Higher Na concentrations and lower K concentrations were found to be associated with lower cell volumes in human and high-potassium sheep cells. In low-potassium sheep cells the reverse was found, lower Na and higher K concentrations were associated with lower cell volumes. However, the amounts of iron were found to remain relatively constant in all human cells.

  2. Artificial oxygen carriers as red blood cell substitutes: a selected review and current status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hae Won; Greenburg, A Gerson

    2004-09-01

    Two distinct approaches are being explored in red blood cell substitute (RCS) development: hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers (HBOCs) and perfluorocarbon-based oxygen carriers (PFBOCs). HBOCs are based on intra- and/or intermolecularly "engineered" human or animal hemoglobins (Hbs), optimized for O2 delivery and longer intravascular circulation. Some are currently being evaluated in Phase II/III clinical studies. PFBOCs are aqueous emulsions of perfluorocarbon derivatives that dissolve relatively large amounts of O2. A PFBOC based on a 60% (wt/vol) emulsion of perfluorooctyl bromide has been evaluated in Phase II/III clinical trials. Although current PFBOC products generally require patients to breathe O2 enriched air, they render certain advantages since they are totally synthetic. This article provides a short review of the basic principles, approaches, and current status of RCS development. Results of preclinical and clinical studies including recent Phase II/III clinical studies are discussed.

  3. Holographic analysis on deformation and restoration of malaria-infected red blood cells by antimalarial drug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byeon, Hyeokjun; Ha, Young-Ran; Lee, Sang Joon

    2015-11-01

    Malaria parasites induce morphological, biochemical, and mechanical changes in red blood cells (RBCs). Mechanical variations are closely related to the deformability of individual RBCs. The deformation of various RBCs, including healthy and malaria-infected RBCs (iRBCs), can be directly observed through quantitative phase imaging (QPI). The effects of chloroquine treatment on the mechanical property variation of iRBCs were investigated using time-resolved holographic QPI of single live cells on a millisecond time scale. The deformabilities of healthy RBCs, iRBCs, and drug-treated iRBCs were compared, and the effect of chloroquine on iRBC restoration was experimentally examined. The present results are beneficial to elucidate the dynamic characteristics of iRBCs and the effect of the antimalarial drug on iRBCs.

  4. Estimation of red blood cell aggregate velocity during sedimentation using the Hough transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempczyński, A.; Grzegorzewski, B.

    2008-11-01

    A method for velocity estimation of sedimenting three-dimensional (3D) red blood cell (RBC) aggregates by means of an image processing technique is proposed. Successive images of RBC suspension near the wall of a container reveal rouleaux formation, sedimentation of 3D RBC aggregates and formation of the deposit of the cells. Plots of the position versus time for the 3D RBC aggregates were extracted by a processing of successive images of the suspension. The plots exhibit a quasi-linear structures in noisy background. With the use of the Hough transform the detection of the slope of the structures was performed and the velocity of the aggregates was estimated. To show the potential of the method spatio-temporal dependence of the aggregate velocity is presented for RBCs in plasma, RBCs in Dextran and for hardened cells at haematocrit 5%.

  5. Statistical mechanics of red blood cell aggregation: The distribution of rouleaux in thermal equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegel, Frederik W.; Perelson, Alan S.

    1982-12-01

    When placed in suspension red blood cells adhere face-to-face and form long, cylindrical, and sometimes branched structures called rouleaux. We use methods developed in statistical mechanics to compute various statistical properties describing the size and shape of rouleaux in thermodynamic equilibrium. This leads to analytical expressions for (1) the average number of rouleaux consisting of n cells and having m branch points; (2) the average number of cells per rouleau; (3) the average number of branch points per rouleau; and (4) the number of rouleaux with n cells in a system containing a total of N cells. We also derive asymptotic formulas that simplify these analytic expressions, and present numerical comparisons of the exact and asymptotic results.

  6. Comparison of red blood cells from gastric cancer patients and healthy persons using FTIR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Su, Qinglong; Sheng, Daping; Zheng, Wei; Wang, Xin

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, FTIR spectroscopy was used to compare gastric cancer patients' red blood cells (RBCs) with healthy persons' RBCs. IR spectra were acquired with high resolution. The A1653/A1543 (the protein secondary structures), A1543/A2958 (the relative content of proteins and lipids), A1106/A1166 (the structure and content changes of sugars) and A1543/A1106 (the relative content of proteins and sugars) ratios of gastric cancer patients' RBCs were significantly different from those of healthy persons' RBCs. Curve fitting results showed that the protein secondary structures and sugars' structures had differences between gastric cancer patients' and healthy persons' RBCs. Additionally, FTIR spectroscopy could obtain 95% sensitivity, 70% specificity, 84.2% accuracy and 80.9% positive predictive value in combination with canconical discriminant analysis. The above results indicate FTIR spectroscopy may be useful for diagnosing gastric cancer.

  7. Rhythmic potassium transport regulates the circadian clock in human red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henslee, Erin A; Crosby, Priya; Kitcatt, Stephen J; Parry, Jack S W; Bernardini, Andrea; Abdallat, Rula G; Braun, Gabriella; Fatoyinbo, Henry O; Harrison, Esther J; Edgar, Rachel S; Hoettges, Kai F; Reddy, Akhilesh B; Jabr, Rita I; von Schantz, Malcolm; O'Neill, John S; Labeed, Fatima H

    2017-12-07

    Circadian rhythms organize many aspects of cell biology and physiology to a daily temporal program that depends on clock gene expression cycles in most mammalian cell types. However, circadian rhythms are also observed in isolated mammalian red blood cells (RBCs), which lack nuclei, suggesting the existence of post-translational cellular clock mechanisms in these cells. Here we show using electrophysiological and pharmacological approaches that human RBCs display circadian regulation of membrane conductance and cytoplasmic conductivity that depends on the cycling of cytoplasmic K+ levels. Using pharmacological intervention and ion replacement, we show that inhibition of K+ transport abolishes RBC electrophysiological rhythms. Our results suggest that in the absence of conventional transcription cycles, RBCs maintain a circadian rhythm in membrane electrophysiology through dynamic regulation of K+ transport.

  8. Red Blood Cell Transfusion Independence Following the Initiation of Iron Chelation Therapy in Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maha A. Badawi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron chelation therapy is often used to treat iron overload in patients requiring transfusion of red blood cells (RBC. A 76-year-old man with MDS type refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia, intermediate-1 IPSS risk, was referred when he became transfusion dependent. He declined infusional chelation but subsequently accepted oral therapy. Following the initiation of chelation, RBC transfusion requirement ceased and he remained transfusion independent over 40 months later. Over the same time course, ferritin levels decreased but did not normalize. There have been eighteen other MDS patients reported showing improvement in hemoglobin level with iron chelation; nine became transfusion independent, nine had decreased transfusion requirements, and some showed improved trilineage myelopoiesis. The clinical features of these patients are summarized and possible mechanisms for such an effect of iron chelation on cytopenias are discussed.

  9. Red Blood Cells and Other Nonspherical Capsules in Shear Flow: Oscillatory Dynamics and the Tank-Treading-to-Tumbling Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skotheim, J. M.; Secomb, T. W.

    2007-02-01

    We consider the motion of red blood cells and other nonspherical microcapsules dilutely suspended in a simple shear flow. Our analysis indicates that depending on the viscosity, membrane elasticity, geometry, and shear rate, the particle exhibits either tumbling, tank-treading of the membrane about the viscous interior with periodic oscillations of the orientation angle, or intermittent behavior in which the two modes occur alternately. For red blood cells, we compute the complete phase diagram and identify a novel tank-treading-to-tumbling transition as the shear rate decreases. Observations of such motions coupled with our theoretical framework may provide a sensitive means of assessing capsule properties.

  10. Study of red blood cell alloimmunization in multitransfused thalassemic children of Jammu region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashu Dogra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Thalassemia is one of the most common genetic disorder of hemoglobin synthesis in Jammu region. Although RBC transfusion is life saving for these patients, it may be associated with some complications like RBC alloimmunization. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine the frequency of alloimmunization and the most common alloantibodies involved. Material and Methods: This was a descriptive study involving a total of 70 thalassemic patients in the age range of 2-17 years receiving regular blood transfusions, registered at SMGS Blood Bank, Jammu. Relevant clinical and laboratory data was collected with reference to age at the start of transfusions, total number of transfusions received and splenectomy status. Antibodies screening, antibody identification, and cross matching was done on allpatient samples included in the study, during the period between November 2009 and October 2010. Results: In this study, a total of six alloantibodies six patients (8.5% and one autoantibody (1.42% was detected. All identified alloantibodies belonged to Rh system (i.e. anti-E, in 3 patients (50%, anti D, in one patient (16.66% and Kell system (anti-K, in two patients (33.34%. Higher frequency of alloimmunization was found, with increase in number of transfusions and in those who received transfusions after 1 year of age. Alloimmunization was not significantly associated with gender and splenectomy status (P-value > 0.05. Conclusion: Red cell alloantibodies developed in 8.5% of thalassemic patients and 1.42% had autoantibodies. The most common alloantibodies identified were anti Rh system antibodies (anti-E and anti-D present in 50% and 16.66% of patients respectively. Alloimmunization is not an uncommon problem faced by blood banks and finding compatible units for regularly transfused thalassemic patients may become very difficult. In order to reduce alloimmunization, a policy for performing extended red cell phenotyping of these patients is

  11. [Effectiveness of a nursing intervention on patient anxiety before transfusion of packed red blood cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín Díaz, Jesús Fernando; Hidalgo Gutiérrez, M Jesús; Cerezo Solana, M Fátima; Martín Morcillo, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of an educational intervention regarding anxiety and satisfaction in patients requiring a red blood cell transfusion. Randomised, controlled, single-blind clinical trial in patients requiring a packed red blood cell transfusion. alpha=.05, beta=.10, to detect a 10% difference, 70 subjects in each group. The sampling recruitment was randomised to the intervention group (IG) and the control group (CG). an intervention protocol with oral and written information using a published guide on the safety, risks and benefits of haemotherapy for the IG, and an equivalent one on general health topics for the CG. pre- and post-anxiety state; Spielberger's validated questionnaire: STAI. Satisfaction, by an ad hoc questionnaire. Sociodemographic and clinical variables: description, reason for transfusion, prescription knowledge, incidents, records. There was a total of 144 subjects, 73 (50.69%) in the IG, and 71 (49.31%) in the CG. The mean age was 55.80 years, with 56.94% males, and a first transfusion in 52.08%. Comparability between the IG and the CG was tested and confirmed. The decrease in anxiety after the intervention for the IG was 19.99, compared to 25.48 in CG. The difference was greater than the proposed 10%, and was statistically significant. The preference for information was 98.60% in IG, compared to 43.70% in CG. The hypothesis was confirmed; a protocolised nursing educational intervention protocol increased patient satisfaction with nursing care, and decreased patient anxiety, thus preventing complications and providing greater safety to the users. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  12. Testosterone Administration Inhibits Hepcidin Transcription and is Associated with Increased Iron Incorporation into Red Blood Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wen; Bachman, Eric; Li, Michelle; Roy, Cindy N.; Blusztajn, Jerzy; Wong, Siu; Chan, Stephen Y.; Serra, Carlo; Jasuja, Ravi; Travison, Thomas G.; Muckenthaler, Martina U.; Nemeth, Elizabeta; Bhasin, Shalender

    2013-01-01

    Testosterone administration increases hemoglobin levels and has been used to treat anemia of chronic disease. Erythrocytosis is the most frequent adverse event associated with testosterone therapy of hypogonadal men, especially older men. However, the mechanisms by which testosterone increases hemoglobin remain unknown. Testosterone administration in male and female mice was associated with a greater increase in hemoglobin and hematocrit, reticulocyte count, reticulocyte hemoglobin concentration, and serum iron and transferring saturation than placebo. Testosterone downregulated hepatic hepcidin mRNA expression, upregulated renal erythropoietin mRNA expression, and increased erythropoietin levels. Testosterone-induced suppression of hepcidin expression was independent of its effects on erythropoietin or hypoxia-sensing mechanisms. Transgenic mice with liver-specific constitutive hepcidin over-expression failed to exhibit the expected increase in hemoglobin in response to testosterone administration. Testosterone upregulated splenic ferroportin expression and reduced iron retention in spleen. After intravenous administration of transferrin-bound 58Fe, the amount of 58Fe incorporated into red blood cells was significantly greater in testosterone-treated mice than in placebo-treated mice. Serum from testosterone-treated mice stimulated hemoglobin synthesis in K562 erythroleukemia cells more than that from vehicle-treated mice. Testosterone administration promoted the association of androgen receptor (AR) with Smad1 and Smad4 to reduce their binding to BMP-response elements in hepcidin promoter in the liver. Ectopic expression of AR in hepatocytes suppressed hepcidin transcription; this effect was blocked dose-dependently by AR antagonist flutamide. Testosterone did not affect hepcidin mRNA stability. Conclusion: Testosterone inhibits hepcidin transcription through its interaction with BMP-Smad signaling. Testosterone administration is associated with increased iron

  13. AQP1 in red blood cells of uremic patients during hemodialytic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buemi, M; Floccari, F; Di Pasquale, G; Cutroneo, G; Sturiale, A; Aloisi, C; Ruello, A; Romeo, A; Favaloro, A; Corica, F; Frisina, N; Anastasi, G

    2002-12-01

    Hemodialysis influences the transport of water through the erythrocytic membrane, and induces morphologic and functional modifications. Recently water channels, called aquaporins (AQP), have been identified on the membrane of red blood cells. The aim of the present study was, therefore, to evaluate any relationships between volumetric changes in erythrocytes (MCV), plasma osmolarity and membrane expression of AQP1 in 22 uremic patients during a hemodialysis session, and compare value with those in a control group of 22 healthy volunteers. Membranal AQP1 expression was evaluated using three methods: indirect immunofluorescence under confocal microscopy, immunoenzymatic method after membrane extraction, and immunoblotting. In uremic subjects, at baseline membrane AQP1 expression was significantly lower, whereas plasma osmolality was higher than in controls. At 1 and 2 h of replacement therapy, a progressive increase was observed in erythrocytic AQP1, values similar to those in controls being attained after 3.5 h. During the session osmolality values reduced progressively, becoming significantly lower than basal values. The mean erythrocytic corpuscular volume in patients with ESRD was significantly lower than in cntrols at baseline. This value increased during hemodialysis, attaining statistical significance with respect to the basal value at 3.5 h of dialysis. Close correlations were found between plasma osmolality and AQP1 values (r = -0.930; p < 0.05), and also between MCV and plasma osmolality trend (r = -0.909; p < 0.05). There was a linear correlation (r = 0.63, p < 0.05) between plasma AVP concentrations and plasma osmolality. The variations found in plasma osmolarity during hemodialysis, may induce AQP1 expression on the membrane of intact red blood cells. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  14. Development of a bifunctional filter for prion protein and leukoreduction of red blood cell components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokomizo, Tomo; Kai, Takako; Miura, Morikazu; Ohto, Hitoshi

    2015-02-01

    Leukofiltration of blood components is currently implemented worldwide as a precautionary measure against white blood cell-associated adverse effects and the potential transmission of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD). A newly developed bifunctional filter (Sepacell Prima, Asahi Kasei Medical) was assessed for prion removal, leukoreduction (LR), and whether the filter significantly affected red blood cells (RBCs). Sepacell Prima's postfiltration effects on RBCs, including hemolysis, complement activation, and RBC chemistry, were compared with those of a conventional LR filter (Sepacell Pure RC). Prion removal was measured by Western blot after spiking RBCs with microsomal fractions derived from scrapie-infected hamster brain homogenate. Serially diluted exogenous prion solutions (0.05 mL), with or without filtration, were injected intracerebrally into Golden Syrian hamsters. LR efficiency of 4.44 log with the Sepacell Prima was comparable to 4.11 log with the conventional LR filter. There were no significant differences between the two filters in hemoglobin loss, hemolysis, complement activation, and RBC biomarkers. In vitro reduction of exogenously spiked prions by the filter exceeded 3 log. The titer, 6.63 (log ID50 /mL), of prefiltration infectivity of healthy hamsters was reduced to 2.52 (log ID50 /mL) after filtration. The reduction factor was calculated as 4.20 (log ID50 ). With confirmed removal efficacy for exogenous prion protein, this new bifunctional prion and LR filter should reduce the residual risk of vCJD transmission through blood transfusion without adding complexity to component processing. © 2014 AABB.

  15. Exploratory in vitro study of red blood cell storage containers formulated with an alternative plasticizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Larry J; Baker, Sharry; Dumont, Deborah F; Herschel, Louise; Waters, Susan; Calcagni, Kristin; Sandford, Craig; Radwanski, Katherine; Min, Kyungyoon; David, Raymond M; Otter, Rainer

    2012-07-01

    The plasticizer di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) is a common component in medical plastics. There is motivation to replace this component; however, DEHP is necessary to prevent excessive hemolysis in stored red blood cells (RBCs). Our objective is to evaluate a candidate replacement plasticizer (Hexamoll, di-isononyl cyclohexane-1,2-dicarboxylic acid [DINCH], BASF Corp.) compared to DEHP in an in vitro feasibility study. We hypothesize that the candidate will provide at least equivalent protection against hemolysis for RBCs stored for 42 days and periodic mixing of RBCs will add additional protection against hemolysis. Whole blood was collected into citrate-phosphate-dextrose; combined into pools of 2 ABO identical whole blood units; and divided, leukoreduced, centrifuged, and separated into plasma and RBCs. Additive solution was added, and the RBCs were stored for 42 days at 1 to 6°C. In three parts of this study, split pools were paired as DINCH-polyvinyl chloride (PVC) with weekly mixing versus DINCH-PVC with no mixing, DINCH-PVC mixed versus DEHP-PVC no mix, and DINCH-PVC versus DEHP-PVC with neither mixed. A standard panel of in vitro RBC characteristics was determined on Days 0 and 42. Mixing DINCH-PVC weekly improved Day 42 hemolysis (0.36 ± 0.07% vs.0.56 ± 0.15%, p = 0.002), and mixed DINCH-PVC bags were noninferior to unmixed DEHP-PVC bags (p ≤ 0.05). DINCH-PVC bags stored without weekly mixing were inferior to unmixed DEHP-PVC bags for hemolysis on Day 42, although no individual bag exceeded 0.8% hemolysis. Periodic mixing of RBCs stored in DINCH-PVC provides additional protection against hemolysis. Unmixed DINCH-PVC bags were inferior to DEHP-PVC bags for prevention of hemolysis, but remain a candidate for replacement DEHP in RBC storage bags. © 2011 American Association of Blood Banks.

  16. Application of image flow cytometry for the characterization of red blood cell morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Ruben N.; Sebastian, Joseph A.; Parsons, Michael; Chang, Tim C.; Acker, Jason P.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2017-02-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) stored in hypothermic environments for the purpose of transfusion have been documented to undergo structural and functional changes over time. One sign of the so-called RBC storage lesion is irreversible damage to the cell membrane. Consequently, RBCs undergo a morphological transformation from regular, deformable biconcave discocytes to rigid spheroechinocytes. The spherically shaped RBCs lack the deformability to efficiently enter microvasculature, thereby reducing the capacity of RBCs to oxygenate tissue. Blood banks currently rely on microscope techniques that include fixing, staining and cell counting in order to morphologically characterize RBC samples; these methods are labor intensive and highly subjective. This study presents a novel, high-throughput RBC morphology characterization technique using image flow cytometry (IFC). An image segmentation template was developed to process 100,000 images acquired from the IFC system and output the relative spheroechinocyte percentage. The technique was applied on samples extracted from two blood bags to monitor the morphological changes of the RBCs during in vitro hypothermic storage. The study found that, for a given sample of RBCs, the IFC method was twice as fast in data acquisition, and analyzed 250-350 times more RBCs than the conventional method. Over the lifespan of the blood bags, the mean spheroechinocyte population increased by 37%. Future work will focus on expanding the template to segregate RBC images into more subpopulations for the validation of the IFC method against conventional techniques; the expanded template will aid in establishing quantitative links between spheroechinocyte increase and other RBC storage lesion characteristics.

  17. Quality of red blood cells washed using a second wash sequence on an automated cell processor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Adele L; Turner, Tracey R; Kurach, Jayme D R; Acker, Jason P

    2015-10-01

    Washed red blood cells (RBCs) are indicated for immunoglobulin (Ig)A-deficient recipients when RBCs from IgA-deficient donors are not available. Canadian Blood Services recently began using the automated ACP 215 cell processor (Haemonetics Corporation) for RBC washing, and its suitability to produce IgA-deficient RBCs was investigated. RBCs produced from whole blood donations by the buffy coat (BC) and whole blood filtration (WBF) methods were washed using the ACP 215 or the COBE 2991 cell processors and IgA and total protein levels were assessed. A double-wash procedure using the ACP 215 was developed, tested, and validated by assessing hemolysis, hematocrit, recovery, and other in vitro quality variables in RBCs stored after washing, with and without irradiation. A single wash using the ACP 215 did not meet Canadian Standards Association recommendations for washing with more than 2 L of solution and could not consistently reduce IgA to levels suitable for IgA-deficient recipients (24/26 BC RBCs and 0/9 WBF RBCs had IgA levels < 0.05 mg/dL). Using a second wash sequence, all BC and WBF units were washed with more than 2 L and had levels of IgA of less than 0.05 mg/dL. During 7 days' postwash storage, with and without irradiation, double-washed RBCs met quality control criteria, except for the failure of one RBC unit for inadequate (69%) postwash recovery. Using the ACP 215, a double-wash procedure for the production of components for IgA-deficient recipients from either BC or WBF RBCs was developed and validated. © 2015 AABB.

  18. Continuous removal of glycerol from frozen-thawed red blood cells in a microfluidic membrane device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusianti, Ratih E; Higgins, Adam Z

    2014-09-01

    Cryopreservation of human red blood cells (RBCs) in the presence of 40% glycerol allows a shelf-life of 10 years, as opposed to only 6 weeks for refrigerated RBCs. Nonetheless, cryopreserved blood is rarely used in clinical therapy, in part because of the requirement for a time-consuming (∼1 h) post-thaw wash process to remove glycerol before the product can be used for transfusion. The current deglycerolization process involves a series of saline washes in an automated centrifuge, which gradually removes glycerol from the cells in order to prevent osmotic damage. We recently demonstrated that glycerol can be extracted in as little as 3 min without excessive osmotic damage if the composition of the extracellular solution is precisely controlled. Here, we explore the potential for carrying out rapid glycerol extraction using a membrane-based microfluidic device, with the ultimate goal of enabling inline washing of cryopreserved blood. To assist in experimental design and device optimization, we developed a mass transfer model that allows prediction of glycerol removal, as well as the resulting cell volume changes. Experimental measurements of solution composition and hemolysis at the device outlet are in reasonable agreement with model predictions, and our results demonstrate that it is possible to reduce the glycerol concentration by more than 50% in a single device without excessive hemolysis. Based on these promising results, we present a design for a multistage process that is predicted to safely remove glycerol from cryopreserved blood in less than 3 min.

  19. Study of Osmotic Fragility Status of Red Blood Cell in Type II Diabetes Mellitus Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nihad Rownak

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes Mellitus (DM is one of the most prevalent non-communicable diseases in the world. Cell membrane injury is an important mechanism for pathophysoilogical changes in DM. Osmotic fragility (OF status of Red blood cell (RBC in hyperglycemic patients is expected to be increased. This study was conducted in Chittagong medical college hospital and Chittagong Diabetic Hospital from January 2015 to December 2015. 100 newly diagnosed (duration ≤ 3 years type II diabetes mellitus patients (Fasting blood glucose is ≥7 mmol/L were selected as cases. Age, sex and BMI matched 100 healthy subjects were included as control. OF of RBC was measured by traditional method with a series of hypotonic solution of NaCl of different strength in twelve test tubes numbered serially. The relationship of OF with Fasting blood sugar (FBS and two hours post prandial blood sugar (2 HPPBS were evaluated. Unpaired Student ‘t’ test and Pearson’s correlation coefficient test were done for statistical analysis. p value <0.05 was considered as significant. 87% of cases showed normal hemolysis and only 12% had early hemolysis. Mean value of NaCl solution for partial and complete hemolysis in cases were 0.44±0.06(% and 0.32±0.02(% respectively; for control group the findings were 0.04±0.06(% and 0.32±0.02(%. Significant relationship (p<0.001 was found regarding osmotic fragility with FBS ≥ 7 mmol/L and 2 HPPBS ≥ 11.1 mmol/L. OF of RBC is increased in type II diabetes mellitus.

  20. Red blood cell membrane viscoelasticity, agglutination and zeta potential measurements with double optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontes, Adriana; Fernandes, Heloise P.; Barjas-Castro, Maria L.; de Thomaz, André A.; de Ysasa Pozzo, Liliana; Barbosa, Luiz C.; Cesar, Carlos L.

    2006-02-01

    The red blood cell (RBC) viscoelastic membrane contains proteins and glycolproteins embedded in, or attached, to a fluid lipid bilayer and are negatively charged, which creates a repulsive electric (zeta) potential between the cells and prevents their aggregation in the blood stream. There are techniques, however, to decrease the zeta potential to allow cell agglutination which are the basis of most of the tests of antigen-antibody interactions in blood banks. This report shows the use of a double optical tweezers to measure RBC membrane viscosity, agglutination and zeta potential. In our technique one of the optical tweezers trap a silica bead that binds strongly to a RBC at the end of a RBCs rouleaux and, at the same time, acts as a pico-Newton force transducer, after calibration through its displacement from the equilibrium position. The other optical tweezers trap the RBC at the other end. To measure the membrane viscosity the optical force is measured as a function of the velocity between the RBCs. To measure the adhesion the tweezers are slowly displaced apart until the RBCs disagglutination happens. The RBC zeta potential is measured in two complimentary ways, by the force on the silica bead attached to a single RBC in response to an applied electric field, and the conventional way, by the measurement of terminal velocity of the RBC after released from the optical trap. These two measurements provide information about the RBC charges and, also, electrolytic solution properties. We believe this can improve the methods of diagnosis in blood banks.