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Sample records for survival growth development

  1. Effects of Rearing Density on Survival, Growth, and Development of the Ladybird Coleomegilla maculata in Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric W. Riddick

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Our research focuses on developing techniques to rear ladybird beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae. We evaluated the effects of rearing density on survival, growth, and development of Coleomegilla maculata. The hypothesis that a low to moderate rearing density has limited or no effects on survival and development was tested. C. maculata first instars were reared to pupae at a density of 1, 5, 10, 15, or 20 individuals per arena (2.5 cm high, 9.0 cm diameter, and 159 cm3 volume and fed powdered brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana eggs. More larvae survived at the 1 and 5 densities, but no differences were detected between the 10, 15, or 20 densities. Median survival rate was at least 90% for larvae and 100% for pupae at the 10, 15, and 20 densities. Development time, body weight, and sex ratio were unaffected by rearing density. Overall, this study suggests that C. maculata larvae can be reared successfully at a density of 20 larvae/159 cm3 (≈ 0.126 larvae/cm3 in containers provisioned with powdered A. franciscana eggs. Scaling-up the size of containers, and C. maculata density in these containers, should be possible.

  2. Effects of Rearing Density on Survival, Growth, and Development of the Ladybird Coleomegilla maculata in Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddick, Eric W.; Wu, Zhixin

    2015-01-01

    Our research focuses on developing techniques to rear ladybird beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae). We evaluated the effects of rearing density on survival, growth, and development of Coleomegilla maculata. The hypothesis that a low to moderate rearing density has limited or no effects on survival and development was tested. C. maculata first instars were reared to pupae at a density of 1, 5, 10, 15, or 20 individuals per arena (2.5 cm high, 9.0 cm diameter, and 159 cm3 volume) and fed powdered brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana) eggs. More larvae survived at the 1 and 5 densities, but no differences were detected between the 10, 15, or 20 densities. Median survival rate was at least 90% for larvae and 100% for pupae at the 10, 15, and 20 densities. Development time, body weight, and sex ratio were unaffected by rearing density. Overall, this study suggests that C. maculata larvae can be reared successfully at a density of 20 larvae/159 cm3 (≈ 0.126 larvae/cm3) in containers provisioned with powdered A. franciscana eggs. Scaling-up the size of containers, and C. maculata density in these containers, should be possible. PMID:26466904

  3. Effects of 17α-trenbolone and melengestrol acetate on Xenopus laevis growth, development, and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, Bryson E; Blackwell, Brett R; Faust, Derek R; Wooten, Kimberly J; Maul, Jonathan D; Cox, Stephen B; Smith, Philip N

    2013-02-01

    The synthetic growth-promoting hormones trenbolone and melengestrol acetate have been detected in the environment near beef cattle feedlots and are reportedly transported via wind-borne particulate matter. Therefore, movement of synthetic hormones from beef cattle feedlots to water bodies via particulate matter is possible. Our objective was to evaluate potential effects of 17α-trenbolone (17α-TB), melengestrol acetate (MGA), and combinations of both on growth, development, and survival of Xenopus laevis larvae. On post-hatch day 2 (stage 33/34), X. laevis larvae were exposed to three nominal concentrations of 17α-TB (10, 100, and 500 ng/L), MGA (1, 10, and 100 ng/L), a combination of both (1/10, 10/100, and 100/500 ng/L MGA/17α-TB), frog embryo teratogenesis assay-Xenopus medium, or a solvent control. Significant increases in all X. laevis growth metrics were observed among larvae in the 1 ng/L MGA + 10 ng/L 17α-TB and 10 ng/L MGA + 100 ng/L 17α-TB treatments. Stage of development was increased among larvae in the 1 ng/L MGA + 10 ng/L 17α-TB treatment group and significantly decreased among those in the 500 ng/L 17α-TB treatment. Total body mass and snout-vent length of X. laevis larvae were significantly reduced in the 100 ng/L MGA and 100 ng/L MGA + 500 ng/L 17α-TB treatment groups. Larvae exposed to 500 ng/L 17α-TB had decreased total body mass, snout-vent length, and total length. In general, growth measurements decreased with increasing concentration of MGA, 17α-TB, or a combination of both. Survival among all treatments was not significantly different from controls. Amphibians exposed to MGA and 17α-TB in the environment may experience alterations in growth and development.

  4. Testing the effect of dietary carotenoids on larval survival, growth and development in the critically endangered southern corroboree frog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Phillip G; Silla, Aimee J

    2017-03-01

    The success of captive breeding programs (CBPs) for threatened species is often limited due to a lack of knowledge of the nutritional conditions required for optimal growth and survival. Carotenoids are powerful antioxidants known to accelerate vertebrate growth and reduce mortality. However, the effect of carotenoids on amphibian life-history traits remains poorly understood. The aim of our study was to use a manipulative laboratory experiment to test the effect of dietary-carotenoid supplementation during the larval life stage on the survival, growth and development of the critically endangered southern corroboree frog (Pseudophryne corroboree). Larvae were fed either a carotenoid supplemented diet or an unsupplemented diet and the survival, growth and development of individuals was monitored and compared. There was no significant effect of dietary treatment on larval survival, growth rate, time taken to reach metamorphosis, or body size at metamorphosis. Our findings provide no evidence that carotenoid supplementation during the larval life stage improves the growth and development of southern corroboree frogs. However, because the carotenoid dose used in our study did not have any detrimental effects on P. corroboree larvae, but has previously been shown to improve adult coloration, immunity, and exercise performance, carotenoid supplementation should be considered when evaluating the nutritional requirements of P. corroboree in captivity. Carotenoid supplementation studies are now required for a diversity of anuran species to determine the effects of carotenoids on amphibian survival, growth and development. Understanding the effects of dietary carotenoids on different life-history traits may assist with amphibian captive breeding and conservation. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Early development, survival and growth rates of the giant clam Tridacna crocea (Bivalvia: Tridacnidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Mies

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Tridacnid clams are conspicuous inhabitants of Indo-Pacific coral reefs and are traded and cultivated for the aquarium and food industries. In the present study, daily growth rates of larvae of the giant clam Tridacna crocea were determined in the laboratory during the first week of life. Adults were induced to spawn via intra-gonadal serotonin injection through the byssal orifice. After spawning oocytes were collected, fertilized and kept in 3 L glass beakers and raceways treated with antibiotics to avoid culture contamination. Larvae were fed twice with the microalga Isochrysis galbana and zooxanthellae were also offered twice during the veliger stage (days 4 and 6. Larval length was measured using a digitizing tablet coupled to a microcomputer. Larval mortality was exponential during the first 48 hours of life declining significantly afterwards. Mean growth rate was 11.3 μm day-1, increasing after addition of symbionts to 18.0 μm day-1. Survival increased to ca. 75% after the addition of zooxanthellae. The results describe the growth curve for T. crocea larvae and suggest that the acquisition of symbionts by larvae may be useful for larval growth and survival even before larvae have attained metamorphosis.Bivalves tridacnídeos são habitantes conspícuos dos recifes da região do Indo-Pacífico e são cultivados e comercializados para os mercados alimentício e aquarista. No estudo apresentado foram determinadas as taxas de crescimento diário durante a primeira semana de vida da larva do bivalve ornamental Tridacna crocea. As matrizes foram induzidas à desova por meio de uma injeção intragonadal de serotonina realizada através do orifício bissal. Após desova, ovócitos foram coletados, fertilizados e mantidos em béqueres de vidro e tanques de fluxo contínuo tratados com antibióticos para evitar contaminação. Larvas foram alimentadas em duas ocasiões com a microalga Isochrysis galbana e zooxantelas foram oferecidas também por

  6. Effect of Triiodothyronine and Cortisol on Development, Growth and Survival Rate of Sand Goby (Oxyeleotris marmorata, Blkr. Larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.R Sri Pudji

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTThis experiment was conducted to investigate the effect of triiodothyronine and cortisol on the development, growth, and survival rate of sand goby larvae.  The experiment was carried out at Kolan Percobaan Babakan, Faculty of Fisheries and Marine Sciences, IPB Bogor.  The larvae were immersed in solution of A (T3 2 mg/1 + C 1 mg/1, B (T3 2 mg/1 + C 0, 1 mgll, C (T3 2 mg/1 + C 0,0 1 mg/1 dan D (without hormone for one hour.  After treatment, larvae were reared in aquarium (50x50x50 cm.  Larvae were fed by rotifer and phytoplankton, three times a day.  Larval development, growth and survival rate were observed.  Result showed that T3 2 mg/1 +C 1 nig/1 and T3 2 mg/1 + C 0, 1 mg/1 could accelerated development of swim bladder and eyespot of larvae.  Treatment did not effect body pigmentation and growth; but effect survival rate of sand goby larvae.Key words :  Triidothyronine, cortisol, larvae, sand goby fish, development, growth, survival rate ABSTRAKPenelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui pengaruh pemberian hormon triidotironin dan kortisol terhadap perkembangan, pertumbuhan dan kelangsungan hidup larva ikan betutu.  Penelitian ini dilakukan di Kolam Percobaan Babakan, Fakultas Perikanan dan Ilmu Kelautan, Institut Pertanian Bogor.  Larva direndam selama satu jam dalam larutan A (T3 2 mg/1 + C 1 mg/1, B (T3 2 mg/1 + C 0, 1 mg/1, C (T3 2 mg/1 + C 0,0 1 mg/1 dan D (tanpa hormon.  Setelah perlakuan, larva dipelihara dalam akuariun berukuran 50x50x50 cm.  Selama pemeliharaan larva diberi pakan berupa rotifer dan fitoplankton dengan frekuensi tiga kali sehari.  Perkembangan, petumbuhan, dan kelangsungan hidup larva diamati.  Perendaman larva ikan betutu dalam larutan A dan B dapat mempercepat pembentukan gelembung renang dan bintik mata.  Perlakuan yang diberikan tidak mempengaruhi kecepatan terjadinya pigmentasi tubuh dan pertumbuhan, tetapi mempengaruhi derriat kelangsungan hidup larva.Kata kunci :  Triidotironin, kortisol

  7. Hepatocyte growth factor modulates in vitro survival and proliferation of germ cells during postnatal testis development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catizone, A; Ricci, G; Del Bravo, J; Galdieri, M

    2006-04-01

    The hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a pleiotropic cytokine that influences mitogenesis, motility and differentiation of many different cell types by its tyrosine kinase receptor c-Met. We previously demonstrated that the c-Met/HGF system is present and functionally active during postnatal testis development. We found also that spermatozoa express c-Met and that HGF has a positive effect on the maintenance of sperm motility. In the present paper, we extend our study on the germ cells at different stages of differentiation during the postnatal development of the testis. We demonstrate that c-met is present in rat spermatogonia, pachytene spermatocytes and round spermatids and that HGF significantly increases spermatogonial proliferation in 8- to 10-day-old pre-pubertal rats. At this age HGF does not affect Sertoli cells and peritubular myoid cells proliferation. In addition, we studied the effect of the factor on germ cell apoptosis and we show that HGF prevents the germ cell apoptotic process. We also studied the effect of HGF on 18- to 20-day-old and 28- to 30-day-old rat testes. At these ages also the factor significantly increases germ cell duplication and decreases the number of apoptotic cells. However, the effect on programmed cell death is higher in the 8- to 10-day-old rats and declines in the older animals. In conclusion, we report that rat germ cells (spermatogonia, pachytene spermatocytes and round spermatids) express c-met and that HGF modulates germ cell proliferating activity and apoptosis in vitro. These data indicate that the c-Met/HGF system is involved in male germ cell homeostasis and, consequently, has a role in male fertility.

  8. Effects of glyphosate-based herbicides on survival, development and growth of invasive snail (Pomacea canaliculata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yanggui; Li, Adela Jing; Li, Kaibin; Qin, Junhao; Li, Huashou

    2017-12-01

    This study tests the hypotheses that whether environmental relevance of glyphosate would help control spread of the invasive snail Pomacea canaliculata, or benefit its population growth worldwide. Our results showed that glyphosate induced acute toxicity to the snail only at high concentrations (96h LC50 at 175mg/L) unlikely to occur in the environment. Long-term exposures to glyphosate at sublethal levels (20 and 120mg/L) caused inhibition of food intake, limitation of growth performance and alterations in metabolic profiles of the snail. It is worth noting that glyphosate at 2mg/L benefited growth performance in P. canaliculata. Chronic exposures of glyphosate significantly enhanced overall metabolic rate and altered catabolism from protein to carbohydrate/lipid mode. Cellular responses in enzyme activities showed that the exposed snails could increase tolerance by their defense system against glyphosate-induced oxidative stress, and adjustment of metabolism to mitigate energy crisis. Our study displayed that sublethal concentrations of glyphosate might be helpful in control of the invasive species by food intake, growth performance and metabolic interruption; whether environmental relevance of glyphosate (≤2mg/L) benefits population growth of P. canaliculata is still inconclusive, which requires further field study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Interaction between growth differentiation factor 9, insulin-like growth factor I and growth hormone on the in vitro development and survival of goat preantral follicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.S. Martins

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the effects of GDF-9, IGF-I, and GH alone or combined on preantral follicle survival, activation and development after 1 and 7 days of in vitro culture. Either fresh (non-cultured or cultured ovarian tissue was processed for histological and fluorescence analysis. For all media tested, the percent of normal follicles was greater when compared to minimum essential medium supplemented (MEM+ alone, except when ovarian tissue was cultured with GDF-9/IGF-I or GDF-9/GH (P < 0.05. Fluorescence analysis showed that the percent of viable follicles after 7 days of culture was similar for non-cultured tissue and for all treatments tested. The percent of primordial follicles was reduced (P < 0.05 and there was a significant and concomitant increase in the percent of intermediate and primary follicles in all treatments tested after 7 days of culture when compared to non-cultured tissue. After 7 days of culture, the highest percent of intermediate follicles was observed with IGF-I/GH (61.3%, and the highest percent of primary follicles was achieved with IGF-I (57.7%. After 7 days of culture in MEM+ containing GDF-9, IGF-I and GH alone or in all associations, a significant increase in follicular diameter was observed when compared to MEM+ alone and non-cultured tissue. In conclusion, GDF-9, IGF-I and GH alone or in combination maintain preantral follicle survival and promote primordial follicle activation. Nevertheless, the data showed that IGF-I/GH and IGF-I alone are efficient in promoting the transition from primordial to intermediate follicles and from intermediate to primary follicles, respectively.

  10. Bay Scallop Spawning, Survival, Growth Records

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bay Scallops are selected and cultured according to criteria of growth and survival. Morphological attributes have also been selected to assess heretibility....

  11. Development and validation of a predictive microbiology model for survival and growth of Salmonella on chicken stored at 4 to 12 °C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oscar, Thomas P

    2011-02-01

    Salmonella spp. are a leading cause of foodborne illness. Mathematical models that predict Salmonella survival and growth on food from a low initial dose, in response to storage and handling conditions, are valuable tools for helping assess and manage this public health risk. The objective of this study was to develop and to validate the first predictive microbiology model for survival and growth of a low initial dose of Salmonella on chicken during refrigerated storage. Chicken skin was inoculated with a low initial dose (0.9 log) of a multiple antibiotic-resistant strain of Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 (ATCC 700408) and then stored at 4 to 12 °C for 0 to 10 days. A general regression neural network (GRNN) model that predicted log change of Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 as a function of time and temperature was developed. Percentage of residuals in an acceptable prediction zone, from -1 (fail-safe) to 0.5 (fail-dangerous) log, was used to validate the GRNN model by using a criterion of 70% acceptable predictions. Survival but not growth of Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 was observed at 4 to 8 °C. Maximum growth of Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 during 10 days of storage was 0.7 log at 9 °C, 1.1 log at 10 °C, 1.8 log at 11 °C, and 2.9 log at 12 °C. Performance of the GRNN model for predicting dependent data (n=163) was 85% acceptable predictions, for predicting independent data for interpolation (n=77) was 84% acceptable predictions, and for predicting independent data for extrapolation (n=70) to Salmonella Kentucky was 87% acceptable predictions. Thus, the GRNN model provided valid predictions for survival and growth of Salmonella on chicken during refrigerated storage, and therefore the model can be used with confidence to help assess and manage this public health risk. Copyright ©, International Association for Food Protection

  12. Foreign acquisition, plant survival, and employment growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandick, Roger; Görg, Holger

    2010-01-01

    This paper analyzes the effect of foreign acquisition on survival and employment growth of targets using data on Swedish manufacturing plants.We separate targeted plants into those within Swedish MNEs, Swedish exporting non-MNEs, and purely domestic firms. The results, controlling for possible...... acquisitions. We find robust positive employment growth effects only for exporters and only if the takeover is vertical....

  13. Pacific lamprey (Entosphenus tridentatus) ammocoetes exposed to contaminated Portland Harbor sediments: Method development and effects on survival, growth, and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unrein, Julia R; Morris, Jeffrey M; Chitwood, Rob S; Lipton, Joshua; Peers, Jennifer; van de Wetering, Stan; Schreck, Carl B

    2016-08-01

    Many anthropogenic disturbances have contributed to the decline of Pacific lampreys (Entosphenus tridentatus), but potential negative effects of contaminants on lampreys are unclear. Lamprey ammocoetes are the only detritivorous fish in the lower Willamette River, Oregon, USA, and have been observed in Portland Harbor sediments. Their long benthic larval stage places them at risk from the effects of contaminated sediment. The authors developed experimental methods to assess the effects of contaminated sediment on the growth and behavior of field-collected ammocoetes reared in a laboratory. Specifically, they developed methods to assess individual growth and burrowing behavior. Burrowing performance demonstrated high variability among contaminated sediments; however, ammocoetes presented with noncontaminated reference sediment initiated burrowing more rapidly and completed it faster. Ammocoete reemergence from contaminated sediments suggests avoidance of some chemical compounds. The authors conducted long-term exposure experiments on individually held ammocoetes using sediment collected from their native Siletz River, which included the following: contaminated sediments collected from 9 sites within Portland Harbor, 2 uncontaminated reference sediments collected upstream, 1 uncontaminated sediment with characteristics similar to Portland Harbor sediments, and clean sand. They determined that a 24-h depuration period was sufficient to evaluate weight changes and observed no mortality or growth effects in fish exposed to any of the contaminated sediments. However, the effect on burrowing behavior appeared to be a sensitive endpoint, with potentially significant implications for predator avoidance. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2092-2102. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  14. Pacific lamprey (Entosphenus tridentatus) ammocoetes exposed to contaminated Portland Harbor sediments: Method development and effects on survival, growth, and behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unrein, Julia R.; Morris, Jeffrey M.; Chitwood, Rob S.; Lipton, Joshua; Peers, Jennifer; van de Wetering, Stan; Schreck, Carl B.

    2016-01-01

    Many anthropogenic disturbances have contributed to the decline of Pacific lampreys (Entosphenus tridentatus), but potential negative effects of contaminants on lampreys are unclear. Lamprey ammocoetes are the only detritivorous fish in the lower Willamette River, Oregon, USA, and have been observed in Portland Harbor sediments. Their long benthic larval stage places them at risk from the effects of contaminated sediment. The authors developed experimental methods to assess the effects of contaminated sediment on the growth and behavior of field-collected ammocoetes reared in a laboratory. Specifically, they developed methods to assess individual growth and burrowing behavior. Burrowing performance demonstrated high variability among contaminated sediments; however, ammocoetes presented with noncontaminated reference sediment initiated burrowing more rapidly and completed it faster. Ammocoete reemergence from contaminated sediments suggests avoidance of some chemical compounds. The authors conducted long-term exposure experiments on individually held ammocoetes using sediment collected from their native Siletz River, which included the following: contaminated sediments collected from 9 sites within Portland Harbor, 2 uncontaminated reference sediments collected upstream, 1 uncontaminated sediment with characteristics similar to Portland Harbor sediments, and clean sand. They determined that a 24-h depuration period was sufficient to evaluate weight changes and observed no mortality or growth effects in fish exposed to any of the contaminated sediments. However, the effect on burrowing behavior appeared to be a sensitive endpoint, with potentially significant implications for predator avoidance.

  15. A Child Survival and Development Revolution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, Robert

    1986-01-01

    Addresses the problems of child survival and development in developing countries by discussing the biomedical causes and the concomitant social determinants of high infant mortality rates. Describes four intervention strategies recommended by UNICEF: growth monitoring, oral rehydration therapy, breast feeding, and immunization. (HOD)

  16. Growth response and survival of Heterobranchus longifilis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In an effort to utilize feed efficiently, promote growth, increase survival and reduce labour costs associated with feeding, Heterobranchus longifilis ingerlings were placed on one of four feeding frequencies; once/day, twice/day; once every other day, and twice every other day for 56 days. They were fed with a commercial ...

  17. Effects of 17beta-estradiol on survival, growth, sexual development and molting cycles of the marine crustacean mysid shrimp, Americamysis bahia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Masashi; Ishibashi, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Naoko; Matsumura, Naomi; Watanabe, Akiko; Onikura, Norio; Kishi, Katsuyuki; Shiratsuchi, Hideki; Arizono, Koji

    2004-01-01

    A 14-day partial life-cycle test was performed to assess the effects of 17beta-estradiol (E2) on the survival, growth, sexual development and molting cycles of a marine crustacean mysid shrimp (Americamysis bahia). Seven-day-old mysids were exposed to the nominal E2 concentrations of 31.3, 62.5, 125, 250 and 500 microg/l for 14 days. The total length and the body weight of mysids significantly decreased relative to the controls when exposed to 62.5, 250 and 500 microg/l E2 for 14 days. Moreover, the carapace length significantly decreased in the 500 microg/l E2 treatment groups. No significant differences were observed in sex ratio with the appearance of secondary sex characteristics in the all treatment groups including the control and solvent control groups. However, the percentage of females with eggs in the oviduct or brood sac decreased significantly in mysids treated with E2 at 62.5, 125, 250 and 500 microg/l. The cumulative total number of molting cycles when exposed to E2 for 14 days significantly decreased in the treatment groups at 500 microg/l relative to the controls. These results suggest that concentrations of E2 over 62.5 microg/l may cause growth suppression in mysid shrimp, and that the disruption of molting cycles may result in alterations in growth due to a sublethal response to toxicant exposure.

  18. Foreign acquisition, plant survival, and employment growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandick, Roger; Görg, Holger

    This paper analyses the effect of foreign acquisition on survival probability and employment growth of target plant using data on Swedish manufacturing plants during the period 1993-2002.  An improvement over previous studies is that we take into account firm level heterogeneity by separating...... the lifetime of the acquired plants only if the plant was an exporter.  The effect differs depending on whether the acquisition is horizontal or vertical.  We also find robust positive employment growth effects only for exporters, and only if the takeover is vertical, not horizontal....... the targeted plants into those within Swedish MNEs, Swedish exporting non-MNEs, and purely domestic firms before foreign takeover. The results, controlling for possible endogeneity of the acquisition dummy using an IV and propensity score matching approach suggest that acquisition by foreign owners increases...

  19. Transgenic Cotton Plants Expressing Double-stranded RNAs Target HMG-CoA Reductase (HMGR) Gene Inhibits the Growth, Development and Survival of Cotton Bollworms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Geng; Cheng, Linlin; Qi, Xuewei; Ge, Zonghe; Niu, Changying; Zhang, Xianlong; Jin, Shuangxia

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has been developed as a powerful technique in the research of functional genomics as well as plant pest control. In this report, double-stranded RNAs (dsRNA) targeting 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) gene, which catalyze a rate-limiting enzymatic reaction in the mevalonate pathway of juvenile hormone (JH) synthesis in cotton bollworm, was expressed in cotton plants via Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. PCR and Sothern analysis revealed the integration of HMGR gene into cotton genome. RT-PCR and qRT-PCR confirmed the high transcription level of dsHMGR in transgenic cotton lines. The HMGR expression both in transcription and translation level was significantly downregulated in cotton bollworms (helicoverpa armigera) larvae after feeding on the leaves of HMGR transgenic plants. The transcription level of HMGR gene in larvae reared on transgenic cotton leaves was as much as 80.68% lower than that of wild type. In addition, the relative expression level of vitellogenin (Vg, crucial source of nourishment for offspring embryo development) gene was also reduced by 76.86% when the insect larvae were fed with transgenic leaves. The result of insect bioassays showed that the transgenic plant harboring dsHMGR not only inhibited net weight gain but also delayed the growth of cotton bollworm larvae. Taken together, transgenic cotton plant expressing dsRNAs successfully downregulated HMGR gene and impaired the development and survival of target insect, which provided more option for plant pest control.

  20. Normal growth and development

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002456.htm Normal growth and development To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A child's growth and development can be divided into four periods: Infancy Preschool ...

  1. Changes in growth, survival and digestive enzyme activities of Asian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was conducted to determine the effects of different dietary treatments on the growth, survival and digestive enzyme activities of Mystus nemurus larvae. Newly hatched larvae were reared for 14 days in twelve 15 L glass aquaria (for growth and survival) and eight 300 L fiberglass tanks (for enzyme samples) at a ...

  2. Effects of ocean warming and acidification on survival, growth and skeletal development in the early benthic juvenile sea urchin (Heliocidaris erythrogramma).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Kennedy; Dworjanyn, Symon A; Byrne, Maria

    2013-09-01

    Co-occurring ocean warming, acidification and reduced carbonate mineral saturation have significant impacts on marine biota, especially calcifying organisms. The effects of these stressors on development and calcification in newly metamorphosed juveniles (ca. 0.5 mm test diameter) of the intertidal sea urchin Heliocidaris erythrogramma, an ecologically important species in temperate Australia, were investigated in context with present and projected future conditions. Habitat temperature and pH/pCO2 were documented to place experiments in a biologically and ecologically relevant context. These parameters fluctuated diurnally up to 10 °C and 0.45 pH units. The juveniles were exposed to three temperature (21, 23 and 25 °C) and four pH (8.1, 7.8, 7.6 and 7.4) treatments in all combinations, representing ambient sea surface conditions (21 °C, pH 8.1; pCO2 397; ΩCa 4.7; ΩAr 3.1), near-future projected change (+2-4 °C, -0.3-0.5 pH units; pCO2 400-1820; ΩCa 5.0-1.6; ΩAr 3.3-1.1), and extreme conditions experienced at low tide (+4 °C, -0.3-0.7 pH units; pCO2 2850-2967; ΩCa 1.1-1.0; ΩAr 0.7-0.6). The lowest pH treatment (pH 7.4) was used to assess tolerance levels. Juvenile survival and test growth were resilient to current and near-future warming and acidification. Spine development, however, was negatively affected by near-future increased temperature (+2-4 °C) and extreme acidification (pH 7.4), with a complex interaction between stressors. Near-future warming was the more significant stressor. Spine tips were dissolved in the pH 7.4 treatments. Adaptation to fluctuating temperature-pH conditions in the intertidal may convey resilience to juvenile H. erythrogramma to changing ocean conditions, however, ocean warming and acidification may shift baseline intertidal temperature and pH/pCO2 to levels that exceed tolerance limits. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Agonists of fibroblast growth factor receptor induce neurite outgrowth and survival of cerebellar granule neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Shizhong; Christensen, Claus; Køhler, Lene B

    2009-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) signaling is pivotal in the regulation of neurogenesis, neuronal differentiation and survival, and synaptic plasticity both during development and in adulthood. In order to develop low molecular weight agonists of FGFR, seven peptides, termed hexafins...

  4. Research Note Early survival and growth of vegetatively propagated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tuft area differed between species. The often-invasive species E. curvula had the highest average survival rate and the largest tuft area. The often-dominant, unpalatable Aristida junciformis demonstrated surprisingly low survival and growth rates. Themeda triandra and Tristachya leucothrix, species often dominating ...

  5. Longleaf Pine Survival, Growth, and Recruitment Experiment

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This experiment was to determine mean survivorship, growth rate, and recruitment rate of longleaf pine seedlings planted on different soil types on the refuge. Open...

  6. Separating the effects of water physicochemistry and sediment contamination on Chironomus tepperi (Skuse) survival, growth and development: a boosted regression tree approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Robin; Marshall, Stephen; Jeppe, Katherine; Pettigrove, Vincent

    2014-07-01

    More comprehensive ecological risk assessment procedures are needed as the unprecedented rate of anthropogenic disturbances to aquatic ecosystems continues. Identifying the effects of pollutants on aquatic ecosystems is difficult, requiring the individual and joint effects of a range of natural and anthropogenic factors to be isolated, often via the analysis of large, complicated datasets. Ecotoxicologists have traditionally used multiple regression to analyse such datasets, but there are inherent problems with this approach and a need to consider other potentially more suitable methods. Sediment pollution can cause a range of negative effects on aquatic animals, and these are used as the basis for toxicity bioassays to measure the biological impact of pollution and the success of remediation efforts. However, experimental artefacts can also lead to sediments being incorrectly classed as toxic in such studies. Understanding the influence of potentially confounding factors will help more accurate assessments of sediment pollution. In this study, we analysed standardised sediment bioassays conducted using the chironomid Chironomus tepperi, with the aim of modelling the impact of sediment toxicants and water physico-chemistry on four endpoints (survival, growth, median emergence day, and number of emerging adults). We used boosted regression trees (BRT), a method that has a number of advantages over multiple regression, to model bioassay endpoints as a function of water chemistry, sediment quality and underlying geology. Endpoints were generally influenced most strongly by water quality parameters and nutrients, although some metals negatively influenced emergence endpoints. Sub-lethal endpoints were generally better predicted than lethal endpoints; median emergence day was the most sensitive endpoint examined in this study, while the number of emerging adults was the least sensitive. We tested our modelling results by experimentally manipulating sediment and

  7. Aid, growth, and development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arndt, Channing; Jones, Edward Samuel; Tarp, Finn

    2010-01-01

    The micro-macro paradox has been revived. Despite broadly positive evaluations at the micro- and meso-levels, recent literature doubts the ability of foreign aid to foster economic growth and development. This paper assesses the aid-growth literature and, taking inspiration from the program...... evaluation literature, we re-examine key hypotheses. In our findings, aid has a positive and statistically significant causal effect on growth over the long run, with confidence intervals conforming to levels suggested by growth theory. Aid remains a key tool for enhancing the development prospects of poor...

  8. Modeling growth performances, survival, and feed efficiency of four ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Survival, feed efficiency and growth performances of four local breeds of chickens in West Cameroon (normally feathered NF, feathered tarsus FT, crested C and naked neck NN,) have been compared from hatch to 16 weeks, to determine which one could be improved by selection. Gompertz equation was used to fit growth ...

  9. Developing principles of growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Helle; Fleck, Emma

    of the principles of growth among women-owned firms. Using an in-depth case study methodology, data was collected from women-owned firms in Denmark and Ireland, as these countries are similar in contextual terms, e.g. population and business composition, dominated by micro, small and medium-sized enterprises......Although it has been widely recognized that the growth of women-owned businesses is central to wealth creation, innovation and economic development; limited attention has been devoted to understanding small business growth from a female perspective.This research seeks to develop an understanding...

  10. First-Year Growth and Survival Of Long Cottonwood Cuttings

    Science.gov (United States)

    W.K. Randall; R.M. Krinard

    1977-01-01

    When five Stoneville cottonwood clones were grown in a nursery for one season, lifted with about a foot of root, and planted in 3-foot deep holes, they averaged 9.6 feet in height growth and 92 percent survival after 1 year in the field. Planted height averaged 8.3 feet. The same clonal material planted without roots averaged only 36 percent survival. These results...

  11. ECONOMIC GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladen M. Ivic

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Under Economic Growth mean constantly increasing volume of production in a country, or an increase in gross domestic product as the main quantitative indicators of production for a period of one year. Economic development is not only quantitative changes when it comes to the economic position of the country, but also qualitative changes (changing the economic structure, the emergence of new sectors and industries, new jobs, etc... They lead to a better and more complete satisfaction of all human needs. Production per capita is a measure of the ability of a society to achieve their goals of social and economic development, all in order to meet the constantly growing social needs. The increase in output per capita in economic theory is expressed as economic growth, without which no economic development, but does not have any economic growth to be a function of economic development.

  12. Growth and survival at chiller temperatures of Arcobacter butzleri

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldgaard, Jette; Jørgensen, Kirsten; Ingmer, Hanne

    2009-01-01

    . butzleri ATCC 49616 and newly isolated A. butzleri strains under conditions likely to prevail in the slaughterhouse environment using a chicken meat juice medium (CMJ). CMJ supported growth of A. butzleri at 15 degrees C, the recognised minimal growth temperature of this organism, and at 10 degrees C. At 5...... degrees C. Given the ability to survive, multiply and form biofilm under chilled conditions A. butzleri appears well suited for establishment in food processing and slaughterhouse environments....

  13. Survival and growth of 31 Populus clones in South Carolina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coyle, David R.; Coleman, Mark D. [USDA Forest Service, Southern Research Station, P.O. Box 700, New Ellenton, SC 29809 (United States); Durant, Jaclin A.; Newman, Lee A. [Arnold School of Public Health, Department of Environmental Health Sciences, University of South Carolina, 800 Sumter Street, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States)

    2006-08-15

    Populus species and hybrids have many practical applications, but clonal performance is relatively undocumented in the southeastern United States outside of the Mississippi River alluvial floodplain. In spring 2001, 31 Populus clones were planted on two sites in South Carolina, USA. The sandy, upland site received irrigation and fertilization throughout the growing season, while the bottomland site received granular fertilizer yearly and irrigation in the first two years only. Over three growing seasons, tree survival and growth differed significantly among clones at both sites. Hybrid clones I45/51, Eridano, and NM6 had very high survival at both sites, while pure eastern cottonwood (P. deltoides) clones consistently had the lowest survival. Nearly all mortality occurred during the first year. The P. deltoides clone WV416 grew well at both sites, P. deltoides clones S13C20 and Kentucky 8 grew well at the bottomland site, and hybrids 184-411 and 52-225 grew well at the upland site. Based on both survival and growth, clones 311-93, S7C15, 184-411, and WV416 may warrant additional testing in the upper coastal plain region of the southeastern US. Kentucky 8 and S13C20 had excellent growth rates, but initial survival was low. However, this was likely due to planting stock quality. We emphasize this is preliminary information, and that clones should be followed through an entire rotation before large-scale deployment. (author)

  14. Effect of salinity on Rhizobium growth and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleton, P W; El Swaify, S A; Bohlool, B B

    1982-10-01

    This study examines the effect of salinity on the growth and survival of Rhizobium spp. in culture media and soil. Eleven isolates from saline and nonsaline environments were compared. The growth (mean doubling time) of all strains and species tested decreased when the electrical conductivity of the culture medium (yeast extract-mannitol) was raised from 1.2 mS cm to 6.7 mS cm (15% seawater equivalent) or to 13.1 mS cm (28% seawater equivalent). Three of eleven strains failed to grow at 13.1 mS cm. Although growth was affected by salinity, four strains selected from the growth rate study could survive in extremely high concentrations of salt. Two strains with growth rates sensitive to salt and two strains with growth rates relatively unaffected by salt were inoculated into solutions with electrical conductivities of up to 43.0 mS cm (92% seawater equivalent). Not only did all four strains survive the initial osmotic shock (at 5 h after inoculation), but it was not until 27 days after inoculation that the sensitive strains exhibited a significant reduction in viable numbers. The salt-tolerant strains survived for more than 65 days with no reduction in viable counts. The interaction between soil moisture tension and soil salinity in relation to Rhizobium survival in gamma-irradiated soil was also examined. Six treatment combinations were used, ranging from -0.1 bars and 0.2 mS cm to -15 bars and 12 mS cm. Sensitive strains declined from 10 to 10 organisms per g of soil after 84 days of incubation at -15 bars and 12 mS cm. Tolerant strains survived for the same period with no loss in viable numbers. The results of these experiments indicate that many strains of Rhizobium can grow and survive at salt concentrations which are inhibitory to most agricultural legumes. The emphasis of research concerning the effects of salinity on symbiotic nitrogen fixation should, therefore, be directed to aspects of the symbiosis other than the survival of the Rhizobium spp.

  15. Antimicrobial treatment improves mycobacterial survival in nonpermissive growth conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turapov, Obolbek; Waddell, Simon J; Burke, Bernard; Glenn, Sarah; Sarybaeva, Asel A; Tudo, Griselda; Labesse, Gilles; Young, Danielle I; Young, Michael; Andrew, Peter W; Butcher, Philip D; Cohen-Gonsaud, Martin; Mukamolova, Galina V

    2014-05-01

    Antimicrobials targeting cell wall biosynthesis are generally considered inactive against nonreplicating bacteria. Paradoxically, we found that under nonpermissive growth conditions, exposure of Mycobacterium bovis BCG bacilli to such antimicrobials enhanced their survival. We identified a transcriptional regulator, RaaS (for regulator of antimicrobial-assisted survival), encoded by bcg1279 (rv1219c) as being responsible for the observed phenomenon. Induction of this transcriptional regulator resulted in reduced expression of specific ATP-dependent efflux pumps and promoted long-term survival of mycobacteria, while its deletion accelerated bacterial death under nonpermissive growth conditions in vitro and during macrophage or mouse infection. These findings have implications for the design of antimicrobial drug combination therapies for persistent infectious diseases, such as tuberculosis.

  16. Growth performance and survival rate of Clarias gariepinus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of different levels of aflatoxin- contaminated feed (0% toxigenic maize, 25% toxigenic maize +75% good maize, 50% toxigenic maize+50%good maize, 75% toxigenic maize +25% good maize and 100% toxigenic maize) on growth, survival, haematology and histology ...

  17. Coral restoration Bonaire : an evaluation of growth, regeneration and survival

    OpenAIRE

    Meesters, H.W.G.; Boomstra, B.; Hurtado-Lopez, N.; Montbrun, A.; Virdis, F.

    2015-01-01

    The Coral restoration of Staghorn (Acropora cervicornis) and Elkhorn (A. palmata) as practiced by the Coral Restoration Foundation Bonaire (CRFB) is shown to be highly successful in terms of growth and survival of new colonies, in both nurseries and transplant locations. Coral restoration is expected to contribute to ecosystem services and increase coastal protection, biodiversity, fish biomass, and tourism.

  18. Incidence of feeding, growth and survival of the toothed carp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... larvae raised on B. calyciflorus at the end of the experiment. The fresh water rotifer, B. calyciflorus is an important live food organism for raising of the toothed carp, Aphyosemion gardneri. Keywords: rotifer, Brachionus calyciflorus, larvae, algae, growth commercial diet, survival. Tropical Freshwater Biology 2003/2004 Vol.

  19. Growth and Survival of First Feeding Larvae of Clarias gariepinus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was designed to evaluate the growth performance and survival of Clarias gariepinus larvae fed live Zooplankton (LZ), Frozen Zooplnakton (FZ), Dried Zooplankton (DZ) and a mixture of Live and Frozen Zooplankton (LFZ) as well as Live and Dried zooplankton (LDZ). The experiments were conducted in plastic ...

  20. Survival and Growth of Tilapia zillii and Oreochromis urolepis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract—The potential for Tilapia zillii and Oreochromis urolepis urolepis culture in seawater was evaluated by determining their survival and growth in seawater at 35‰. Fingerlings were collected from Pangani River using seine nets and reared in 1 m3 concrete ponds after acclimatization from salinity of. 2‰ to 35‰.

  1. The Growth and Survival of Clarias Anguillaris Fingerlings Fed on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    I970) and Lovell. (I 971) found that-the substitution of marine fish oils, which contain relatively high amounts of Omega - 3 fatty acids with plant oils in catfishdiets improved growth and survival of the fish. This study therefore is aimed at formulating.

  2. Survival, growth, wood basic density and wood biomass of seven ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A performance comparison of seven-year-old individuals of 13 Casuarina species/provenances in terms of survival, growth (diameter, height and volume), wood basic density and wood biomass was undertaken at Kongowe, Kibaha, Tanzania. The trial was laid out using a randomised complete block design with four ...

  3. Effect of inulin and probiotic bacteria on growth, survival, immune ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of inulin and probiotic bacteria on the growth, survival, immune response and viral prevalence of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) in white shrimp was evaluated. Presumptive bacilli and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were characterized for hemolytic and enzymatic activity, hydrophobicity and antagonism against ...

  4. Diameter Growth, Survival, and Volume Estimates for Missouri Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen R. Shifley; W. Brad Smith

    1982-01-01

    Measurements of more than 20,000 Missouri trees were summarized by species and diameter class into tables of mean annual diameter growth, annual probability of survival, net cubic foot volume, and net board foot volume. In the absence of better forecasting techniques, this information can be utilized to project short-term changes for Missouri trees, inventory plots,...

  5. Survival and growth of Clarias gariepinus larvae fed with freshwater ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Survival and growth performance of Clarias gariepinus larvae fed with freshwater zooplankton was compared to those fed with Artémia salina. Clarias gariepinus larvae at the end of yolk sac resorption with 2.8 ± 0.1 mg initial weight were fed ad libitum to live zooplankton for 08 days in concrete basins (without water ...

  6. Toxicity, Growth And Survival Of Clarias Gariepinus Juveniles ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies were carried out on the toxicity, growth and survival of Clarias gariepinus juveniles exposed to different concentrations of oil-polluted water. Thirty-nine aerated aquaria (60 × 30 × 30 cm3), arranged in a 4 × 3 Complete Randomized Block Design were used for the study. Three oil types: the Bonny light crude oil ...

  7. growth performance and survival of local and white leghorn chicken ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    ABSTRACT: This study was conducted to evaluate the comparative growth, sexual maturity, survival, and feed utilization efficiency of local and White Leghorn chicken under intensive management condition. Five groups of each of the two breeds, with 200 baby chicks each, were subjected to appetite feeding with ...

  8. Effect of inulin and probiotic bacteria on growth, survival, immune ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Usuario

    Carmen Flores-Miranda and Héctor A. González-Ocampo. Centro Interdisciplinario de Investigación para el Desarrollo Integral Regional-Instituto Politécnico Nacional,. Unidad Sinaloa, Sinaloa, Mexico. Accepted 17 December, 2012. The effect of inulin and probiotic bacteria on the growth, survival, immune response and ...

  9. Coral restoration Bonaire : an evaluation of growth, regeneration and survival

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meesters, H.W.G.; Boomstra, B.; Hurtado-Lopez, N.; Montbrun, A.; Virdis, F.

    2015-01-01

    The Coral restoration of Staghorn (Acropora cervicornis) and Elkhorn (A. palmata) as practiced by the Coral Restoration Foundation Bonaire (CRFB) is shown to be highly successful in terms of growth and survival of new colonies, in both nurseries and transplant locations. Coral restoration is

  10. Growth and survival of Shigella flexneri in commonly consumed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The incidence of shigellosis is on the increase in Nigeria and foods have been strongly implicated as vehicles of transmission of infection. In this study the survival and growth of Shigella flexneri were investigated in foods that are commonly consumed in the country which include cooked rice, beef, cooked beans, fish, ...

  11. Evaluating the use of enhanced oak seedlings for increased survival and growth: first-year survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshua L. Moree; Andrew W. Ezell; John D. Hodges; Andrew J. Londo; K. David Godwin

    2010-01-01

    Oaks (Quercus spp.) are very important in the southern landscape for timber production and wildlife habitat. More landowners are attempting to establish oak plantations as the demand for wood products and wildlife habitat continues to increase. These attempts are not always successful with early growth and survival becoming major concerns. In this...

  12. Survival and growth of epiphytic ferns depend on resource sharing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua-Zheng eLu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Locally available resources can be shared within clonal plant systems through physiological integration, thus enhancing their survival and growth. Most epiphytes exhibit clonal growth habit, but few studies have tested effects of physiological integration (resource sharing on survival and growth of epiphytes and whether such effects vary with species. We conducted two experiments, one on individuals (single ramets and another on groups (several ramets within a plot, with severed and intact rhizome treatments (without and with physiological integration on two dominant epiphytic ferns (Polypodiodes subamoena and Lepisorus scolopendrium in a subtropical montane moist forest in Southwest China. Rhizome severing (preventing integration significantly reduced ramet survival in the individual experiment and number of surviving ramets in the group experiment, and it also decreased biomass of both species in both experiments. However, the magnitude of such integration effects did not vary significantly between the two species. We conclude that resource sharing may be a general strategy for clonal epiphytes to adapt to forest canopies where resources are limited and heterogeneously distributed in space and time.

  13. Weights, growth, and survival of timber wolf pups in Minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ballenberghe, V.; Mech, L.D.

    1975-01-01

    Weights, growth rates, canine tooth lengths, and survival data were obtained from 73 wild wolf (Canis lupus) pups that were 8 to 28 weeks old when live-trapped in three areas of northern Minnesota from 1969 to 1972. Relative weights of wild pups are expressed as percentages of a standard weight curve based on data from captive pups of similar age. These relative weights varied greatly within litters, between litters, and between years; extremes of 31 to 144 percent of the standard were observed. Growth rates ranging from 0.05 to 0.23 kilograms per day were observed, and similar variations in general devel pment and in replacement and growth of canine teeth were noted. Survival data based on radio-tracking and tag returns indicated that pups with relative weights less than 65 percent of standard have a poor chance of survival, whereas pups of at least 80 percent of standard weight have a high survivability. Pups born in 1972 were especially underweight, probably a result of declining white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) densities in the interior of the Superior National Forest study area.

  14. Triiodothyronine regulates cell growth and survival in renal cell cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecka, Anna M; Matak, Damian; Szymanski, Lukasz; Czarnecka, Karolina H; Lewicki, Slawomir; Zdanowski, Robert; Brzezianska-Lasota, Ewa; Szczylik, Cezary

    2016-10-01

    Triiodothyronine plays an important role in the regulation of kidney cell growth, differentiation and metabolism. Patients with renal cell cancer who develop hypothyreosis during tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) treatment have statistically longer survival. In this study, we developed cell based model of triiodothyronine (T3) analysis in RCC and we show the different effects of T3 on renal cell cancer (RCC) cell growth response and expression of the thyroid hormone receptor in human renal cell cancer cell lines from primary and metastatic tumors along with human kidney cancer stem cells. Wild-type thyroid hormone receptor is ubiquitously expressed in human renal cancer cell lines, but normalized against healthy renal proximal tube cell expression its level is upregulated in Caki-2, RCC6, SKRC-42, SKRC-45 cell lines. On the contrary the mRNA level in the 769-P, ACHN, HKCSC, and HEK293 cells is significantly decreased. The TRβ protein was abundant in the cytoplasm of the 786-O, Caki-2, RCC6, and SKRC-45 cells and in the nucleus of SKRC-42, ACHN, 769-P and cancer stem cells. T3 has promoting effect on the cell proliferation of HKCSC, Caki-2, ASE, ACHN, SK-RC-42, SMKT-R2, Caki-1, 786-0, and SK-RC-45 cells. Tyrosine kinase inhibitor, sunitinib, directly inhibits proliferation of RCC cells, while thyroid hormone receptor antagonist 1-850 (CAS 251310‑57-3) has less significant inhibitory impact. T3 stimulation does not abrogate inhibitory effect of sunitinib. Renal cancer tumor cells hypostimulated with T3 may be more responsive to tyrosine kinase inhibition. Moreover, some tumors may be considered as T3-independent and present aggressive phenotype with thyroid hormone receptor activated independently from the ligand. On the contrary proliferation induced by deregulated VHL and or c-Met pathways may transgress normal T3 mediated regulation of the cell cycle.

  15. Norovirus surrogate survival on spinach during preharvest growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirneisen, Kirsten A; Kniel, Kalmia E

    2013-04-01

    Produce can become contaminated with human viral pathogens in the field through soil, feces, or water used for irrigation; through application of manure, biosolids, pesticides, and fertilizers; and through dust, insects, and animals. The objective of this study was to assess the survival and stability of human noroviruses and norovirus surrogates (Murine norovirus [MNV] and Tulane virus [TV]) on foliar surfaces of spinach plants in preharvest growth conditions. Spinach plants were housed in a biocontrol chamber at optimal conditions for up to 7 days and infectivity was determined by plaque assay. Virus inoculation location had the largest impact on virus survival as viruses present on adaxial leaf surfaces had lower decimal reduction time (D values) than viruses present on abaxial leaf surfaces. Under certain conditions, spinach type impacted virus survival, with greater D values observed from survival on semi-savoy spinach leaves. Additional UVA and UVB exposure to mimic sunlight affected virus survival on adaxial surfaces for both semi-savoy and smooth spinach plants for both viruses. Human GII norovirus inoculated onto semi-savoy spinach had an average D value that was not statistically significant from MNV and TV, suggesting that these surrogates may have similar survival on spinach leaves compared with human noroviruses. An understanding of the behavior of enteric viruses on spinach leaves can be used to enhance growers' guidelines and for risk assessment with certain growing conditions.

  16. Effect of Salinity on Rhizobium Growth and Survival

    OpenAIRE

    Singleton, P. W.; El Swaify, S. A.; Bohlool, B. B.

    1982-01-01

    This study examines the effect of salinity on the growth and survival of Rhizobium spp. in culture media and soil. Eleven isolates from saline and nonsaline environments were compared. The growth (mean doubling time) of all strains and species tested decreased when the electrical conductivity of the culture medium (yeast extract-mannitol) was raised from 1.2 mS cm−1 to 6.7 mS cm−1 (15% seawater equivalent) or to 13.1 mS cm−1 (28% seawater equivalent). Three of eleven strains failed to grow at...

  17. Polyploidy in haloarchaea: advantages for growth and survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolin eZerulla

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The investigated haloarchaeal species, Halobacterium salinarum, Haloferax mediterranii, and H. volcanii, have all been shown to be polyploid. They contain several replicons that have independent copy number regulation, and most have a higher copy number during exponential growth phase than stationary phase. The possible evolutionary advantages of polyploidy for haloarchaea, most of which have experimental support for at least one species, are discussed. These advantages include a low mutation rate and high resistance towards X-ray irradiation and desiccation, which depend on homologous recombination. For H. volcanii, it has been shown that gene conversion operates in the absence of selection, which leads to the equalization of genome copies. On the other hand, selective forces might lead to heterozygous cells, which have been verified in the laboratory. Additional advantages of polyploidy are survival over geological times in halite deposits as well as at extreme conditions on earth and at simulated Mars conditions. Recently, it was found that H. volcanii uses genomic DNA as genetic material and as a storage polymer for phosphate. In the absence of phosphate, H. volcanii dramatically decreases its genome copy number, thereby enabling cell multiplication, but diminishing the genetic advantages of polyploidy. Stable storage of phosphate is proposed as an alternative driving force for the emergence of DNA in early evolution. Several additional potential advantages of polyploidy are discussed that have not been addressed experimentally for haloarchaea. An outlook summarizes selected current trends and possible future developments.

  18. Polyploidy in haloarchaea: advantages for growth and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerulla, Karolin; Soppa, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    The investigated haloarchaeal species, Halobacterium salinarum, Haloferax mediterranei, and H. volcanii, have all been shown to be polyploid. They contain several replicons that have independent copy number regulation, and most have a higher copy number during exponential growth phase than in stationary phase. The possible evolutionary advantages of polyploidy for haloarchaea, most of which have experimental support for at least one species, are discussed. These advantages include a low mutation rate and high resistance toward X-ray irradiation and desiccation, which depend on homologous recombination. For H. volcanii, it has been shown that gene conversion operates in the absence of selection, which leads to the equalization of genome copies. On the other hand, selective forces might lead to heterozygous cells, which have been verified in the laboratory. Additional advantages of polyploidy are survival over geological times in halite deposits as well as at extreme conditions on earth and at simulated Mars conditions. Recently, it was found that H. volcanii uses genomic DNA as genetic material and as a storage polymer for phosphate. In the absence of phosphate, H. volcanii dramatically decreases its genome copy number, thereby enabling cell multiplication, but diminishing the genetic advantages of polyploidy. Stable storage of phosphate is proposed as an alternative driving force for the emergence of DNA in early evolution. Several additional potential advantages of polyploidy are discussed that have not been addressed experimentally for haloarchaea. An outlook summarizes selected current trends and possible future developments.

  19. Water fleas require microbiota for survival, growth and reproduction.

    OpenAIRE

    Sison-Mangus Marilou P; Mushegian Alexandra A; Ebert Dieter

    2015-01-01

    Microbiota have diverse roles in the functioning of their hosts; experiments using model organisms have enabled investigations into these functions. In the model crustacean Daphnia little knowledge exists about the effect of microbiota on host well being. We assessed the effect of microbiota on Daphnia magna by experimentally depriving animals of their microbiota and comparing their growth survival and fecundity to that of their bacteria bearing counterparts. We tested Daphnia coming from bot...

  20. Water fleas require microbiota for survival, growth and reproduction

    OpenAIRE

    Sison-Mangus, Marilou P.; Mushegian, Alexandra A; Ebert, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Microbiota have diverse roles in the functioning of their hosts; experiments using model organisms have enabled investigations into these functions. In the model crustacean Daphnia, little knowledge exists about the effect of microbiota on host well being. We assessed the effect of microbiota on Daphnia magna by experimentally depriving animals of their microbiota and comparing their growth, survival and fecundity to that of their bacteria-bearing counterparts. We tested Daphnia coming from b...

  1. Metabolic pathways promoting cancer cell survival and growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boroughs, Lindsey K; DeBerardinis, Ralph J

    2015-04-01

    Activation of oncogenes and loss of tumour suppressors promote metabolic reprogramming in cancer, resulting in enhanced nutrient uptake to supply energetic and biosynthetic pathways. However, nutrient limitations within solid tumours may require that malignant cells exhibit metabolic flexibility to sustain growth and survival. Here, we highlight these adaptive mechanisms and also discuss emerging approaches to probe tumour metabolism in vivo and their potential to expand the metabolic repertoire of malignant cells even further.

  2. [Survival of Salmonella in spices and growth in cooked food].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urabe, Yurie; Minai, Yuji; Haga, Minoru; Sugita-Konishi, Yoshiko; Ishiguro, Atsushi; Hara-Kudo, Yukiko

    2008-04-01

    Contamination of spices with pathogens has been reported worldwide, and Salmonella might result in foodborne infections. In this study, we investigated the survival of Salmonella in black pepper and red pepper, and the growth of the surviving Salmonella in cooked food. Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Weltevreden and Salmonella Senftenberg were inoculated into spices, and their survival during storage was examined. In black pepper, S. Enteritidis was no longer viable after storage for 28 days, but S. Weltevreden and S. Senftenberg remained viable. In red pepper, S. Weltevreden and S. Senftenberg survived for 28 days although S. Enteritidis was not viable after 7 days. Salmonella Weltevreden and Salmonella Senftenberg were inoculated into cooked food, and their survival during storage was determined. In potato salad, egg salad, namul and kimchi as cooked foods, both pathogens grew at 30 degrees C, but not at 10 degrees C. Our results indicate that cooked food should be stored at low temperature after addition of spices, such as black pepper and red pepper, following the cooking.

  3. Simulating the effects of fluctuating dissolved oxygen on growth, reproduction, and survival of fish and shrimp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller Neilan, Rachael; Rose, Kenneth

    2014-02-21

    Individuals are commonly exposed to fluctuating levels of stressors, while most laboratory experiments focus on constant exposures. We develop and test a mathematical model for predicting the effects of low dissolved oxygen (hypoxia) on growth, reproduction, and survival using laboratory experiments on fish and shrimp. The exposure-effects model simulates the hourly reductions in growth and survival, and the reduction in reproduction (fecundity) at times of spawning, of an individual as it is exposed to constant or hourly fluctuating dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations. The model was applied to seven experiments involving fish and shrimp that included constant and fluctuating DO exposures, with constant exposures used for parameter estimation and the model then used to simulate the growth, reproduction, and survival in the fluctuating treatments. Cumulative effects on growth, reproduction, and survival were predicted well by the model, but the model did not replay the observed episodic low survival days. Further investigation should involve the role of acclimation, possible inclusion of repair effects in reproduction and survival, and the sensitivity of model predictions to the shape of the immediate effects function. Additional testing of the model with other taxa, different patterns of fluctuating exposures, and different stressors is needed to determine the model's generality and robustness. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Advanced dendritic web growth development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    A program to develop the technology of the silicon dendritic web ribbon growth process is examined. The effort is being concentrated on the area rate and quality requirements necessary to meet the JPL/DOE goals for terrestrial PV applications. Closed loop web growth system development and stress reduction for high area rate growth is considered.

  5. Aid, Growth, and Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arndt, Channing; Jones, Edward Samuel; Tarp, Finn

    ) ability to pay, and (iv) level of interaction with public officials. Moreover, when informal firms become formal the probability of paying bribes increases. Becoming formal is also associated with a revenue growth premium that is not driven by self-selection of well-performing firms. On average......, this premium outweighs the additional bribe cost of formalization. Formalization embodies net benefits in spite of the growth hampering effects of bribes....

  6. Smart Growth and Equitable Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page discusses how smart growth, environmental justice, and equitable development can improve communities and provide economic, environmental, health, and social benefits to underserved communities.

  7. Healthy Growth and Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Ken K

    2017-01-01

    Observational and experimental studies indicate a remarkably consistent association between rapid growth and weight gain during infancy and higher risks for obesity in later childhood and adult life. This association appears to be equally relevant to breastfed and formula milk-fed infants, and infants small for gestational age and with normal birth weight. The type of infant milk feeding, energy intake, and milk nutrient composition are important determinants of infant growth and weight gain. There is also accumulating evidence that genetic factors related to adult obesity susceptibility act in the central nervous system to regulate intrinsic levels of infant appetite and satiety, and they impact on infant dietary behaviors to influence growth and weight gain. These genetic factors indicate an early life trajectory to later obesity that starts with rapid infancy gains in weight, length, and fat and lean mass, before the subsequent emergence of high BMI and adiposity. Better understanding of the anthropometric, metabolic and behavioral correlates of this trajectory will help to enable early-life prediction and preventive strategies against obesity and related metabolic disorders. © 2017 Nestec Ltd., Vevey/S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Toddler Growth and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Child: 1 to 2 Years Safety for Your Child: 2 to 4 Years Shoes for Active Toddlers Social Development: 1 Year Olds Social Development: 2 Year Olds Stuttering in Toddlers & Preschoolers: What’s Typical, What’s Not? Teaching Toddlers to Feed Themselves AUDIO Tips for Grandparents of a 1-Year-Old ... Find Us Donate Contact ...

  9. Adolescent growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chulani, Veenod L; Gordon, Lonna P

    2014-09-01

    Adolescence is a developmental stage defined by physical and psychosocial maturation. This article reviews normal pubertal development and the evaluation and management of adolescents with suspected pubertal abnormalities and provides an overview of adolescent psychosocial development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Water fleas require microbiota for survival, growth and reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sison-Mangus, Marilou P; Mushegian, Alexandra A; Ebert, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    Microbiota have diverse roles in the functioning of their hosts; experiments using model organisms have enabled investigations into these functions. In the model crustacean Daphnia, little knowledge exists about the effect of microbiota on host well being. We assessed the effect of microbiota on Daphnia magna by experimentally depriving animals of their microbiota and comparing their growth, survival and fecundity to that of their bacteria-bearing counterparts. We tested Daphnia coming from both lab-reared parthenogenetic eggs of a single genotype and from genetically diverse field-collected resting eggs. We showed that bacteria-free hosts are smaller, less fecund and have higher mortality than those with microbiota. We also manipulated the association by exposing bacteria-free Daphnia to a single bacterial strain of Aeromonas sp., and to laboratory environmental bacteria. These experiments further demonstrated that the Daphnia-microbiota system is amenable to manipulation under various experimental conditions. The results of this study have implications for studies of D. magna in ecotoxicology, ecology and environmental genomics.

  11. Factors affecting growth and survival of neonatal genetically obese and lean swine: cross fostering experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mersmann, H J; Pond, W G; Stone, R T; Yen, J T; Lindvall, R N

    1984-01-01

    Obese and lean lines of pigs were developed previously by genetic selection for thick and thin backfat thickness, respectively. A greater proportion of these obese than lean pigs survive to weaning. A cross-fostering experiment was designed to study neonatal piglet growth and to attempt to decipher some of the causes of the increased survival rate. At about 24 h postpartum, lean and obese sows were paired, the litters standardized to six pigs and three pigs from each sow transferred to a dam of opposite genetic line. The smaller birthweight of obese than lean piglets and the lesser growth of either obese or lean pigs raised on obese compared to lean sows were both observations that might support greater survival of lean rather than obese piglets. Positive factors that might contribute toward the greater survival of obese than lean piglets were the greater lipid content of milk from obese than from lean sows during the first 2 wk postpartum and possibly greater physiological maturity of obese than lean pigs at birth as reflected in greater hemoglobin, hematocrit, plasma protein and plasma albumin.

  12. Growth, survival and bone alterations in Piaractus mesopotamicus larvae under different rearing protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Roque Hernández

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The pacu (Piaractus mesopotamicus is a neotropical freshwater fish. It is one of the most important species farmed in areas of the Parana and Paraguay Rivers basins. The effects of different rearing protocols on growth, survival and incidence of skeletal malformations in pacu larvae were analyzed. A total of six experimental treatments were considered, consisting of: a semi-intensive larviculture (LS in ponds; intensive larviculture (LIn in laboratory (both LS and LIn until 60 days of life; and mixed larviculture, with 20 days of semi-intensive larviculture into cages in ponds after 14 (L1, 21 (L2, 33 (L3 or 40 (L4 days of laboratory larviculture. At the end of the experimental period, LSlarvae showed higher growth rate, with average weight values (2.28g and total length (TL-48.20mm statistically higher than the rest (P1 to L4 treatments showed intermediate growth values, without differences between them (P>0.05, while LIn presented the lowest growth (PS, that presented a significantly lower value (17.5%, PIn and L1 presented the lowest incidence. In no case, visible morphological alterations were found. This study shows that prolonging pacu rearing under laboratory conditions at high densities improves temporal availability and survival of juvenile without affecting growth or subsequent osteological development of fish.

  13. Effects of feed species and HUFA composition on survival and growth of the longsnout seahorse (Hippocampus reidi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick eSchubert

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Globally, wild seahorse populations are threatened due to, habitat destruction and unsustainable human exploitation among others. Furthermore, aquaculture-based mass-scale rearing is still uncommon due to the low survival rates of seahorse juveniles and exceptionally high feed costs. Previous studies have demonstrated the importance of both highly unsaturated fatty acid (HUFA supplies and a copepod-based rearing for seahorse survival and growth. As the latter is expensive, the question arises as to how high survival rates of seahorse juveniles can be assured under low- to moderate-cost feed regimes. In particular, it remains unknown whether the diet species or their dietary HUFA profiles determine the successful development of seahorse fry.Therefore, the aims of this study were to assess the dependence of growth and survival rates of Hippocampus reidi brood on the animal feed and to infer the impact of feed species vs. dietary HUFA profiles on juvenile growth. A nutrition experiment was conducted where juveniles were treated either with enriched Artemia nauplii (low-cost diet Art or with a mixed diet of Artemia and copepods (moderate-cost diet Art/Cop. Larval survival and growth were analyzed using Cox proportional-hazard and mixed linear model analyses. We found that i both diets enabled good survival, ii diet Art/Cop resulted in superior weight and height growth, and iii the differential effects of diets Art/Cop and Art cannot be explained by their different HUFA compositions alone.From an economical point of view, our findings of high survival rates and relatively high growth rates with the medium-cost treatment Art/Cop may open new possibilities for the large-scale rearing of seahorses. Even the application of a low-cost Art diet might be appropriate for seahorse aquacultures as both survival and growth rates are only marginally lower compared to the former diet.

  14. Candida albicans survival, growth and biofilm formation are differently affected by mouthwashes: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulone, Simona; Malavasi, Giulia; Ardizzoni, Andrea; Orsi, Carlotta Francesca; Peppoloni, Samuele; Neglia, Rachele Giovanna; Blasi, Elisabetta

    2017-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most common cause of oral mycoses. The aim of the present study was to investigate in vitro the susceptibility of C. albicans to mouthwashes, in terms of growth, survival and biofilm formation. Candida albicans, laboratory strain SC5314, and 7 commercial mouthwashes were employed: 3 with 0.2% chlorhexidine digluconate; 1 with 0.06% chlorhexidine digluconate and 250 ppm F- sodium fluoride; 3 with fluorine-containing molecules. None of the mouthwashes contained ethanol in their formulations. The anti-Candida effects of the mouthwashes were assessed by disk diffusion, crystal violet and XTT assays. By using five protocols combining different dilutions and contact times the mouthwashes were tested against: 1) C. albicans growth; 2) biofilm formation; 3) survival of fungal cells in early, developing and mature Candida biofilm. Chlorhexidine digluconate-containing mouthwashes consistently exhibited the highest anti-Candida activity, irrespective of the protocols employed. Fungal growth, biofilm formation and survival of Candida cells within biofilm were impaired, the effects strictly depending on both the dilution employed and the time of contact. These in vitro studies provide evidence that mouthwashes exert anti-Candida activity against both planktonic and biofilm fungal structures, but to a different extent depending on their composition. This suggests special caution in the choice of mouthwashes for oral hygiene, whether aimed at prevention or treatment of oral candidiasis.

  15. Early growth and survival of Acacia galpinii after planting in a semi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Trial planting of the species as a decorative tree commenced in 1993 along urban roads in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe. Early growth and survival of the species after planting was investigated in order to assess its suitability for afforestation in semi-arid environments. Growth and survival of trees were measured 3 to 9 years after ...

  16. The effects of tree species and site conditions on gypsy moth survival and growth in Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    John A. Witter; Michael E. Montgomery; Charley A. Chilcote; Jennifer L. Stoyenoff

    1991-01-01

    In 1987, we began a study to determine the relationships between gypsy moth growth and survival and forest site factors. The major objectives of this study were to determine the (1) relationships between gypsy moth survival and growth and different ecosystem conditions, (2) relationships among egg hatch, host phenology, and distribution of small larvae in the...

  17. Effect of substrate component on the growth and survival of juvenile sunray surf clam ( Mactra chinensis Philippi)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuekai; Li, Zhuang; Huo, Zhongming; Yan, Xiwu; Yang, Feng; Liu, Hui; Zhang, Xingzhi

    2016-08-01

    Substrate is a critical environmental factor affecting the activity of bivalves. To examine the effect of the substrate component on the growth and survival of juvenile sunray surf clam ( Mactra chinensis Philippi), a series of short-term experiments were conducted using a variety of substrates with different ratios of sand to mud. The experimental group cultured without substrate showed poor survival, with all juveniles died after day 20. The juveniles cultured in mud without sand showed a lower survival rate (25.54% ± 0.40% on day 45) than those in other groups. The juveniles cultured in sand without mud, or the mixtures of sand and mud with a ratio of 1:1 and 2:1, respectively, exhibited modest survival at day 45. Maximal weight gain rate ( WGR), shell length growth rate ( LGR), and specific growth rate ( SGR) were observed when the sand concentration was 61.97%, 77.69%, and 64.64%, respectively. As the fast growth and high survival were observed when the sand to mud ratio was 1:1 (50% sand) and 2:1 (67% sand), a sand concentration of more than 50% is optimal. The optimal concentration of sand in the substrate for rearing juvenile sunray surf clams was 67% which resulted in the fastest growth and highest survival. These results can be used to developing a nursery/farming technique of improving the yield of sunray surf clams.

  18. Employment growth and regional development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Rikard; Hansen, Høgni Kalsø; Winther, Lars

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores the potential drivers behind uneven regional development in the context of employment growth in Denmark and Sweden. In particular, we are interested in the roles of urbanization, industrial change and the rise of the new economy as manifested in the growth of the two economies...... in 2002–2007. The aim of this paper is, therefore, to analyse the impact of a number of key industrial sectors on regional employment growth in the two countries. The empirical analysis is based on longitudinal matched employer–employee data retrieved from official registers in each economy from 2002...... to 2007, a period of strong national growth following the crisis of early 2000. Our findings indicate that the two economies follow a similar pattern in addressing total employment growth; but looking at changes in employment levels across the national borders of these two relatively similar open...

  19. Survival, growth and sexual maturation in Atlantic salmon exposed to infectious pancreatic necrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lillehammer, Marie; Ødegård, Jørgen; Madsen, Per

    2013-01-01

    tested on data consisting of 10 972 fish that died and 3959 survivors with recorded growth data. The most complex models (4 and 5) were multivariate normal-binary mixture models including growth, sexual maturity and field survival traits. Growth rate and liability of sexual maturation were treated as two...... (0.39 +/- 0.07 and 0.36 +/- 0.08) and sexual maturation (0.33 +/- 0.05), and high for field survival (0.47 +/- 0.03 and 0.48 +/- 0.03). Growth in healthy animals, runt status and survival showed consistent favourable genetic associations. Sexual maturation showed an unfavourable non...

  20. Growth and survival of Mudfish (Clarias anguillaris) hatchlings fed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    All fish in treatment C (fishmeal only) and H (no feeding) died after the first week of the experiment. Survival in the other treatments ranged between 84.0% and 88.0% but no significant differences (P > 0.05) were observed in the survival values. The greatest increases in body weight (222.5 mg) and total length (25.8 mm) ...

  1. Survival and Growth of Probiotic Lactic Acid Bacteria in Refrigerated Pickle Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Sicun; Breidt, Fred; Price, Robert; Pérez-Díaz, Ilenys

    2017-01-01

    We examined 10 lactic acid bacteria that have been previously characterized for commercial use as probiotic cultures, mostly for dairy products, including 1 Pediococcus and 9 Lactobacilli. Our objectives were to develop a rapid procedure for determining the long-term survivability of these cultures in acidified vegetable products and to identify suitable cultures for probiotic brined vegetable products. We therefore developed assays to measure acid resistance of these cultures to lactic and acetic acids, which are present in pickled vegetable products. We used relatively high acid concentrations (compared to commercial products) of 360 mM lactic acid and 420 mM acetic acid to determine acid resistance with a 1 h treatment. Growth rates were measured in a cucumber juice medium at pH 5.3, 4.2, and 3.8, at 30 °C and 0% to 2% NaCl. Significant differences in acid resistance and growth rates were found among the 10 cultures. In general, the acid resistant strains had slower growth rates than the acid sensitive strains. Based on the acid resistance data, selected cultures were tested for long-term survival in a simulated acidified refrigerated cucumber product. We found that one of the most acid resistant strains (Lactobacillus casei) could survive for up to 63 d at 4 °C without significant loss of viability at 108 CFU/mL. These data may aid in the development of commercial probiotic refrigerated pickle products. © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  2. Growth and Survival of Bagged Lucilia sericata Maggots in Wounds of Patients Undergoing Maggot Debridement Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Čičková

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Maggot debridement therapy (MDT is an established method of debridement of nonhealing wounds. Despite intense clinical research about its efficacy and effects of substances produced by the larvae, growth and development of maggots in the wounds remain largely unexplored. In the present study, the bags with larvae (n=52, which had been used to debride traumatic, ischemic, diabetic and venous ulcers, were collected and examined. Survival, length, width and larval instar of the maggots within each bag were recorded and analyzed with respect to the wound type and duration of the treatment. Survival of maggots after a 48-h cycle of MDT ranged between 63.6 and 82.7%. Maggots in venous ulcers had on average 9–19% higher mortality than maggots within traumatic, ischemic, and diabetic ulcers. Length of larvae after 48 h cycle of MDT reached on average 7.09–9.68 mm, and average width varied between 1.77 and 2.26 mm. Larvae in venous ulcers were significantly smaller after 48 h, but not after 72 h treatment compared to the other wound types. Further studies should be aimed to identify other patient-associated factors which might influence growth and survival of the larvae during maggot debridement therapy.

  3. Linking food availability, body growth and survival in the black-legged kittiwake Rissa tridactyla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincenzi, Simone; Mangel, Marc

    2013-10-01

    Population dynamics of black-legged kittiwakes Rissa tridactyla in Bering Sea colonies are likely to increasingly experience climate-induced changes in the physical environment. Since adult kittiwakes are central place foragers with high energy requirements, increased variability of forage patch dynamics, as predicted for polar regions, may influence both quantity and quality of food available and consequently alter the population dynamics of kittiwake colonies. Here, we describe, conceptualize, and model the effects of environment and energy resources on kittiwake growth, fledging age (from 35 to 50 days) and survival from hatching up to first breeding (post-hatching productivity). For our life-history model, we use a von Bertalanffy growth function for body growth in mass. We model nestling mortality as a function of somatic growth, in order to account for oxidative damage and trade-offs in the allocation of resources, and energy available, since low food availability increases the risk of chicks' starvation and predation risk. In the case of a good environment (i.e., high food availability), the best strategy (i.e., highest post-hatching productivity) is to grow fast (about 18.6 g d-1) and to spend a moderately long time in the nest (up to 45 days), while in the case of a poor environment the best strategy is to grow fast (about 18 g d-1) and leave the nest soon (35-40 days). Different ages at first breeding do not change the optimal strategies. We discuss the implications of optimal growth strategy in terms of evolution of life histories in kittiwakes and how our work, coupled with models of post-breeding survival and reproductive dynamics, could lead to the development of a full life-history model and the exploration of future evolutionary trajectories for traits like body growth and age at first breeding.

  4. SABIA (Mimosa caesalpiniaefolia Benth. SEEDLINGS GROWTH AND SURVIVAL INOCULATED WITH SYMBIOTIC MICROORGANISMS IN FIELD CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marília Malta Cavalcante Mendes

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5902/198050989277Sabia (Mimosa caesalpiniaefolia Benth. has ecological characteristics and symbiotic associations with nitrogen fixing bacteria and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. These associations are used as biological tool that could be used as an able alternative to minimize chemical fertilizer use and benefit plant development at environments under nutritional deficit. The objective of this study was to evaluate the growth of Leguminosae Sabia (Mimosa caesalpiniaefolia Benth. like response to rhizobium and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi inoculation, to establish growth curves to height and stem based diameter, to determine the N and F contents in plants aerial parts and to evaluate plants survival at field. The strain used was BR3405, The arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi used was Glomus clarum and Gigaspora margarita. The Glomus clarum + Gigaspora margarita + BR3405 and Gigaspora margarita inoculation provided better values for the studied variables (height, diameter, N and P , and this last one was the best choice to Sabia plantation. The plants showed 100% survival, regardless the treatment ued. There was not significant statistical difference for N and F content in Sabia aerial part., Nevertheless, it was noticed a faster growth in plants with symbiont.

  5. Individual-tree basal area growth, survival, and total height models for upland hardwoods in the Boston Mountains of Arkansa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul A. Murphy; David L. Graney

    1988-01-01

    Models were developed for individual-tree basal area growth, survival, and total heights for different species of upland hardwoods in the Boston Mountains of north Arkansas. Data used were from 87 permanent plots located in an array of different sites and stand ages; the plots were thinned to different stocking levels and included unthinned controls. To test these...

  6. Genetic variation in survival, growth, and stem form of Pinus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Provenances from central Mexico (Michoacán) were statistically better in productivity than those from the southern part of the country (Oaxaca), which in turn were superior to those from the northern part of the country (Durango). However, provenances from northern Mexico exhibited superior survival to seed sources from ...

  7. Survival and Growth of Tilapia zillii and Oreochromis urolepis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    were fed twice daily using commercial fish feeds (White Rose floating pellets), initially at a rate of 5% of their total body weight (TBW) ... little energy to maintain its osmotic balance. (Febry & Lutz, 1987). As a result, there is a lower ... body weight using a digital balance (Cen-Tech model no: 95364) reading to 0.01 g. Survival.

  8. Early growth, survival and litter size in Ethiopian Horro sheep

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Unknown

    Genetic analysis for birth and weaning weight was done by sire and animal models using AIREML (Gilmour et al.. 1995). Results and Discussion. Least square means of birth and weaning weight and predicted probability of survival are presented in. Table 1. Weaning age was 92.5±0.13 days. Overall birth and weaning ...

  9. Interactive effects of boron, selenium, and dietary protein on survival, growth and physiology in mallard ducklings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, D.J.; Sanderson, C.J.; LeCaptain, L.J.; Cromartie, E.; Pendleton, G.W.

    1991-01-01

    High concentrations of boron (B) and selenium (Se) have been found in aquatic food chains associated with irrigation drainwater. Total biomass of invertebrates, a maJor source of protein for wild ducklings, is sometimes diminished in agricultural drainwater ponds contaminated with Se and B. Dayold mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) ducklings received an untreated diet (controls) containing 22% protein or diets containing 15 ppm (microgram/g) Se (as selenomethionine), 60 ppm Se, 1,000 ppm B (as boric acid), 15 ppm Se with 1,000 ppm B, or 60 ppm Se with 1,000 ppm B. In a concurrent experiment, the above sequence was repeated with a proteinrestricted (7%) but isocaloric diet. After four weeks, blood and tissue samples were collected for biochemical and histological examination. With 22% protein and 60 ppm Se in the diet, duckling survival and growth was reduced and histopathological lesions of the liver occurred. Boron alone caused some reduction in growth. Several interactive effects occurred between B and Se, including further reduction in growth, and increases in plasma glutathione reductase activity, hematocrit, hemoglobin and plasma protein concentrations. With 7% protein, the growth of controls was less than that with 22% protein, 60 ppm Se caused 100% mortality, and growth effects of 15 ppm Se and 1,000 ppm B alone were more pronounced than with 22% protein. Selenium accumulation increased in the liver with 7% protein. Interactive effects were greater for Se and B with 7% protein than with 22% protein and included significant mortality and enhanced accumulation of Se in the liver. These findings suggest the potential for more severe toxicological effects of Se and B independently and interactively on duckling survival and development when dietary protein is diminished.

  10. Employment growth and regional development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Rikard; Hansen, Høgni Kalsø; Winther, Lars

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores the potential drivers behind uneven regional development in the context of employment growth in Denmark and Sweden. In particular, we are interested in the roles of urbanization, industrial change and the rise of the new economy as manifested in the growth of the two economies...... economies, we find that, although in general these economies react relatively similarly to changes, embarking on a narrower analysis of the individual sectors reveals marked national differences. This indicates that context matters in the analysis of regional economic dynamics in terms of structure, system...... in 2002–2007. The aim of this paper is, therefore, to analyse the impact of a number of key industrial sectors on regional employment growth in the two countries. The empirical analysis is based on longitudinal matched employer–employee data retrieved from official registers in each economy from 2002...

  11. Does bedding promote pine survival and growth on ditched wet sands?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralph A. Klawitter

    1970-01-01

    Results from a study of prepared beds for planting slash pine on a wet sandy flat in Florida were inconclusive. Early growth was improved, but survival was not; and differences between a bedded site and an unbedded site were slight.

  12. Five year growth and survival of Eucalyptus hybrid clones in coastal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    -urophylla i.e. GU hybrids) and three local landraces (E. camaldulensis, E. tereticornis and E. urophylla) were established in Gede, Sokoke and Msambweni in the Coast province of Kenya in 2002, to compare growth, survival and adaptability ...

  13. Survival, growth and reproduction of cryopreserved larvae from a marine invertebrate, the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Suquet

    Full Text Available This study is the first demonstration of successful post-thawing development to reproduction stage of diploid cryopreserved larvae in an aquatic invertebrate. Survival, growth and reproductive performances were studied in juvenile and adult Pacific oysters grown from cryopreserved embryos. Cryopreservation was performed at three early stages: trochophore (13±2 hours post fertilization: hpf, early D-larvae (24±2 hpf and late D-larvae (43±2 hpf. From the beginning (88 days at the end of the ongrowing phase (195 days, no mortality was recorded and mean body weights did not differ between the thawed oysters and the control. At the end of the growing-out phase (982 days, survival of the oysters cryopreserved at 13±2 hpf and at 43±2 hpf was significantly higher (P<0.001 than those of the control (non cryopreserved larvae. Only the batches cryopreserved at 24±2 hpf showed lower survival than the control. Reproductive integrity of the mature oysters, formely cryopreserved at 13±2 hpf and 24±2 hpf, was estimated by the sperm movement and the larval development of their offspring in 13 crosses gamete pools (five males and five females in each pool. In all but two crosses out of 13 tested (P<0.001, development rates of the offspring were not significantly different between frozen and unfrozen parents. In all, the growth and reproductive performances of oysters formerly cryopreserved at larval stages are close to those of controls. Furthermore, these performances did not differ between the three initial larval stages of cryopreservation. The utility of larvae cryopreservation is discussed and compared with the cryopreservation of gametes as a technique for selection programs and shellfish cryobanking.

  14. Effects of size and age on the survival and growth of pulp and paper mills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaolei Li; Joseph Buongiorno; Peter J. Ince

    2004-01-01

    The growth of pulp and paper mills in the US from 1970 to 2000 depended mostly on size and age. Mills grew according to Gibrat’s law, and post-1970 mills grew faster than pre-1971 mills. Mills stopped growing at approximately 22 years of age. But most mills survived beyond that, thus growth was not necessary for survival, but characteristic of the early phase of the...

  15. Socio- economic development and child survival

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof Ezechukwu

    2011-12-06

    Dec 6, 2011 ... Strengthening regional economic integration for Af- rica's development: This would help build stronger and more resilient economies promote African econo- mies. Increased South-South collaboration: offers new op- portunities for transforming African economies linking up with China, Brazil, and India.

  16. Survival and growth of three endangered oak species in a Mexican montane cloud forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ofelia Andrea Valdés-Rodríguez

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Cloud forests are amongst the world’s most impacted and endangered forest types, with Mexican cloud forests amongst the most degraded. These species rich forests are characterized by a diversity of congeneric oak species which dominate the canopy of mature forests. An improved understanding of the establishment requirements of oak seedlings in cloud forests is needed for conservation and restoration purposes. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of light conditions during early establishment of three endangered Quercus species. Seedling growth and biomass allocation in Quercus insignis M. Martens & Galeotti, Q. sartorii Liebm. and Q. xalapensis Bonpl. was determined under two light levels: light gap (1338 µmol m-2 s-1 and closed canopy (118 µmol m-2 s-1 in a cloud forest in Veracruz, Mexico. Growth and development were evaluated over the first 13 months. Results suggest there was a significant effect of light conditions on growth rate and biomass allocation. Although survival rate was similar among both environments, the three species showed lower growth rates under the closed canopy during the first nine months, while elongation rate was higher during the last three months under this environment compared to the light gap. Across all species, fresh biomass and dry biomass of roots, stem and leaves were almost 50% higher in light gap than under closed canopy. Q. insignis produced more biomass in shoots and roots than Q. sartorii and Q. xalapensis, which may increase its establishment success in shaded conditions. Results suggest that these three oak species are suited to planting in small gaps, but also in shaded understory conditions, as high early survival (>90% may allow enrichment planting in advance of gap creation.

  17. Effects of basal area on survival and growth of longleaf pine when practicing selection silviculture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kara, F.; Loewenstein, E.F.; Brockway, D.G.

    2017-11-01

    Aim of study: Uneven-aged (UEA) management systems can achieve multiple-use objectives, however, use of UEA techniques to manage longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) forests are still open to question, because of the species’ intolerance of competition. It was our aim to examine the influence of different levels (9.2, 13.8 and 18.4 m2 ha-1) of residual basal area (RBA) on longleaf pine seedling survival and growth following three growing seasons. Area of study: This study was conducted at the Escambia Experimental Forest, located on the Southern Coastal Plain of Alabama, in the southeastern United States. Material and Methods: Selection silviculture was implemented with the Proportional-Basal Area (Pro-B) method. Prescribed burning was conducted before seed dispersal and in the second year after germination. Photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) was measured under the canopy in the study plots. Survival and growth of longleaf pine seedlings were observed for three growing seasons. Main results: An inverse relationship was found between the number of germinants and RBA, but the mortality of germinants and planted seedlings was not affected by RBA. At age three, an inverse relationship was observed between root-collar diameter (RCD) growth of the germinants and RBA, but RCD growth of planted seedlings was not affected by RBA. Most of the study plots contained more than the projected number of seedlings needed to sustain the target diameter structure. Research highlights: Long-term continuous monitoring of seedling development and recruitment into canopy is required to determine the efficacy of UEA management. However, current data suggest that UEA methods may be a viable alternative to the use of even-aged (EA) methods in longleaf ecosystems.

  18. Plant circadian clocks increase photosynthesis, growth, survival, and competitive advantage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Antony N; Salathia, Neeraj; Hall, Anthony; Kévei, Eva; Tóth, Réka; Nagy, Ferenc; Hibberd, Julian M; Millar, Andrew J; Webb, Alex A R

    2005-07-22

    Circadian clocks are believed to confer an advantage to plants, but the nature of that advantage has been unknown. We show that a substantial photosynthetic advantage is conferred by correct matching of the circadian clock period with that of the external light-dark cycle. In wild type and in long- and short-circadian period mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana, plants with a clock period matched to the environment contain more chlorophyll, fix more carbon, grow faster, and survive better than plants with circadian periods differing from their environment. This explains why plants gain advantage from circadian control.

  19. Effects of environmental conditions on growth and survival of Salmonella in pasteurized whole egg

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakociune, Dziuginta; Bisgaard, Magne; Hervé, Gaëlle

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of three parameters (time, temperature and NaCl concentration) on survival and four parameters (temperature, NaCl and lysozyme concentrations and pH) on growth of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) in pasteurized whole egg (PWE). Doehlert...... times between 30 and 210s and a model for prediction of growth rate of S. Enteritidis in PWE in the temperature range of 1-25°C, NaCl concentration of 0-12%, pH between 5 and 9, and lysozyme concentrations of 107-1007 U/mg proteins were developed. The maximum reduction condition was 58°C, 0% of Na......Cl at a fixed heating time of 120s, while maximum growth rate was estimated at 25°C and 0% of NaCl. pH and lysozyme concentration were shown not to influence growth performance significantly in the range of values studied. Results inform industry of the optimal pasteurization and storage parameters for liquid...

  20. Effects of submergence on growth and survival of saplings of three wetland trees differing in adaptive mechanisms for flood tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumiko Iwanaga

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study: Withstanding total submergence and reaeration following submergence is essential for the survival and establishment of wetland species. We focused on “LOES–low oxygen escape syndrome” and “LOQS–low oxygen quiescence syndrome” and compared tolerances to total submergence among wetland woody species differing in morphological adaptation to soil flooding. Area of study, materials and methods: This study examined the survival of 2-year-old saplings of Taxodium distichum and Metasequioia glyptostroboides (LOQS species, and Alnus japonica (LOES species, during and after total submergence. Saplings were completely submerged, then de-submerged to determine trends in survival and growth Main results: The M. glyptostroboides and A. japonica saplings could not survive prolonged submergence for more than 8 weeks, whereas saplings of T. distichum survived for over 2 years. Submerged saplings of all species showed no significant growth or modifications in morphology and anatomy under water, such as shoot elongation, adventitious root formation, and/or aerenchyma development. All T. distichum saplings that were de-submerged in the second year had the same pattern of shoot growth regardless of differences in timing and seasonality of de-submergence. Wood formation in T. distichum saplings ceased during submergence and resumed after de-submergence in spring and summer, but not in autumn. Research highlights: T. distichum saplings, which survived longer submergence periods than A. japonica and M. glyptostroboides, had physiological characteristics, such as suspension of growth and metabolism, which allowed survival of protracted total submergence (at least 2 years when saplings were immersed during the dormant stage before leaf flushing.

  1. Survival and Growth Rates of Tilapia zillii and Oreochromis urolepis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fingerlings were fed twice daily using commercial fish feeds (white Rose floating type), initially at a rate of 5% of their total body weight (TBW) and two weeks later at 10% of their TBW. The growth rate (weight and length) was recorded once a week except for handling control fingerlings which were recorded at the beginning ...

  2. Low light availability affects leaf gas exchange, growth and survival ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The values of dark respiration rate (Rd) and photosynthetic compensation irradiance (Ic) were sufficiently low for a positive carbon balance. Notwithstanding, the interpretation of results of microclimate variables together with leaf gas exchange and growth variables indicated that seedlings at all sites were in a suboptimal ...

  3. Survival of Salmonella on chamomile, peppermint, and green tea during storage and subsequent survival or growth following tea brewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Susanne E; Stam, Christina N; Gradl, Dana R; Chen, Zhengzai; Larkin, Emily L; Pickens, Shannon R; Chirtel, Stuart J

    2015-04-01

    The survival of Salmonella on dried chamomile flowers, peppermint leaves, and green tea leaves stored under different conditions was examined. Survival and growth of Salmonella was also assessed after subsequent brewing using dried inoculated teas. A Salmonella enterica serovar cocktail was inoculated onto different dried tea leaves or flowers to give starting populations of approximately 10 log CFU/g. The inoculum was allowed to dry (at ambient temperature for 24 h) onto the dried leaves or flowers prior to storage under 25 and 35 °C at low (90% RH) humidity levels. Under the four storage conditions tested, survival followed the order 25 °C with low RH > 35 °C with low RH > 25 °C with high RH > 35 °C with high RH. Salmonella losses at 25 °C with low RH occurred primarily during drying, after which populations showed little decline over 6 months. In contrast, Salmonella decreased below detection after 45 days at 35 °C and high RH in all teas tested. The thermal resistance of Salmonella was assessed at 55 °C immediately after inoculation of tea leaves or flowers, after drying (24 h) onto tea leaves or flowers, and after 28 days of storage at 25 °C with low RH. All conditions resulted in similar D-values (2.78 ± 0.12, 3.04 ± 0.07, and 2.78 ± 0.56, at 0 h, 24 h, and 28 days, respectively), indicating thermal resistance of Salmonella in brewed tea did not change after desiccation and 28 days of storage. In addition, all brewed teas tested supported the growth of Salmonella. If Salmonella survives after storage, it may also survive and grow after a home brewing process.

  4. Survival and growth of juvenile Pacific lampreys tagged with passive integrated transponders (PIT) in freshwater and seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesa, Matthew G.; Copeland, Elizabeth S.; Christiansen, Helena E.; Gregg, Jacob L.; Roon, Sean R.; Hershberger, Paul K.

    2012-01-01

    Tagging methods are needed for both adult and juvenile life stages of Pacific lampreys Lampetra tridentata to better understand their biology and factors contributing to their decline. We developed a safe and efficient technique for tagging juvenile Pacific lampreys with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags. We tested the short-term survival of PIT-tagged juvenile lampreys in freshwater at four temperatures (9, 12, 15, and 18°C) and their long-term growth and survival in seawater. For both experiments there was little to no tag loss, and juvenile lampreys in freshwater showed high survival at all temperatures at 7 d (95–100%) and 14 d (88–100%) posttagging. Prolonged holding (40 d) resulted in significantly lower survival (28–79%) at warmer temperatures (12–18°C). For juvenile lampreys tagged in freshwater and then transitioned to seawater, survival was 97% for tagged fish until day 94, and at the end of 6 months, survival was about 58% for both tagged and control fish. About half of the tagged and control fish that survived in seawater grew, but there was no difference in growth between the two groups. In freshwater, but not in seawater, most fish that died had an aquatic fungal infection. In both experiments, survival increased with increasing fish length at tagging. Our results indicate that tags similar in size to a 9-mm PIT tag are a feasible option for tagging metamorphosed juvenile lampreys migrating downstream and that when fungal infections are mitigated—as in seawater—long-term (at least 6 months) survival of tagged juvenile lampreys is high.

  5. Population size, survival, growth, and movements of Rana sierrae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellers, Gary M.; Kleeman, Patrick M.; Miller, David A. W.; Halstead, Brian J.; Link, William

    2013-01-01

    Based on 2431 captures of 757 individual frogs over a 9-yr period, we found that the population of R. sierrae in one meadow–stream complex in Yosemite National Park ranged from an estimated 45 to 115 adult frogs. Rana sierrae at our relatively low elevation site (2200 m) grew at a fast rate (K = 0.73–0.78), had high overwintering survival rates (44.6–95%), lived a long time (up to 16 yr), and tended to be fairly sedentary during the summer (100% minimum convex polygon annual home ranges of 139 m2) but had low year-to-year site fidelity. Even though the amphibian chytrid fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, Bd) has been present in the population for at least 13 yr, there was no clear downward trend as might be expected from reports of R. sierrae population declines associated with Bd or from reports of widespread population decline of R. sierrae throughout its range.

  6. Growth and survival of blowfly Lucilia sericata larvae under simulated wound conditions: implications for maggot debridement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čičková, H; Kozánek, M; Takáč, P

    2015-12-01

    Maggot debridement therapy has become a well-established method of wound debridement. Despite its success, little information is available about the optimum duration of the treatment cycle and larval growth in wounds. This study examines the development of Lucilia sericata (Diptera: Calliphoridae) larvae under two containment conditions (bagged and free range) under simulated wound conditions and assesses the impact of transport and further storage of larvae on their survival and growth. There was no significant difference in size between bagged and free-range larvae over the 72-h experimental period. Larvae grew fastest 8-24 h after inoculation and completed their growth at 40-48 h. Mortality rates were similar (0.12-0.23% per hour) in both containment conditions and did not differ significantly (P = 0.3212). Survival of free-range larvae was on average 16% lower than survival of bagged larvae. Refrigeration of larvae upon simulated delivery for > 1 day reduced their survival to < 50% and caused a reduction in growth of up to 30% at 12 h, but not at 48 h, of incubation. Therefore, it is recommended that free-range larvae are left in the wound for a maximum of 40-48 h, and bagged larvae for 48-72 h. Larvae should be used within 24 h of delivery to avoid high mortality caused by prolonged refrigeration. © 2015 The Royal Entomological Society.

  7. Fibulin-1 Binds to Fibroblast Growth Factor 8 with High Affinity: EFFECTS ON EMBRYO SURVIVAL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresco, Victor M; Kern, Christine B; Mohammadi, Moosa; Twal, Waleed O

    2016-09-02

    Fibulin-1 (FBLN1) is a member of a growing family of extracellular matrix glycoproteins that includes eight members and is involved in cellular functions such as adhesion, migration, and differentiation. FBLN1 has also been implicated in embryonic heart and valve development and in the formation of neural crest-derived structures, including aortic arch, thymus, and cranial nerves. Fibroblast growth factor 8 (FGF8) is a member of a large family of growth factors, and its functions include neural crest cell (NCC) maintenance, specifically NCC migration as well as patterning of structures formed from NCC such as outflow tract and cranial nerves. In this report, we sought to investigate whether FBLN1 and FGF8 have cooperative roles in vivo given their influence on the development of the same NCC-derived structures. Surface plasmon resonance binding data showed that FBLN1 binds tightly to FGF8 and prevents its enzymatic degradation by ADAM17. Moreover, overexpression of FBLN1 up-regulates FGF8 gene expression, and down-regulation of FBLN1 by siRNA inhibits FGF8 expression. The generation of a double mutant Fbln1 and Fgf8 mice (Fbln1(-/-) and Fgf8(-/-)) showed that haplo-insufficiency (Fbln1(+/-) and Fgf8(+/-)) resulted in increased embryonic mortality compared with single heterozygote crosses. The mortality of the FGF8/Fbln1 double heterozygote embryos occurred between 14.5 and 16.5 days post-coitus. In conclusion, FBLN1/FGF8 interaction plays a role in survival of vertebrate embryos, and reduced levels of both proteins resulted in added mortality in utero The FBLN1/FGF8 interaction may also be involved in the survival of neural crest cell population during development. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Expanding functional repertoires of fungal peroxisomes: contribution to growth and survival processes

    OpenAIRE

    Jun-ichi eMARUYAMA; Katsuhiko eKITAMOTO

    2013-01-01

    It has long been regarded that the primary function of fungal peroxisomes is limited to the β-oxidation of fatty acids, as mutants lacking peroxisomal function fail to grow in minimal medium containing fatty acids as the sole carbon source. However, studies in filamentous fungi have revealed that peroxisomes have diverse functional repertoires. This review describes the essential roles of peroxisomes in the growth and survival processes of filamentous fungi. One such survival mechanism involv...

  9. Growth and Survival of Some Probiotic Strains in Simulated Ice Cream Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homayouni, A.; Ehsani, M. R.; Azizi, A.; Razavi, S. H.; Yarmand, M. S.

    A Completely Randomized Design (CRD) experiment was applied in triplicates to evaluate the survival of four probiotic strains in simulated ice cream conditions. The growth and survival rate of these probiotic strains (Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus casei, Bifidobacterium bifidum and Bifidobacterium longum) in varying amount of sucrose (10, 15, 20 and 25%), oxygen scavenging components (0.05% L-cysteine and 0.05% L-ascorbate) and temperatures (4 and -20°C) during different periods of time (1, 2 and 3 months) were evaluated in MRS-broth medium. Optical density at 580 nm was used to measure growth. Lactobacilli strains proved to be highly resistant in comparison with Biffidobacteria strains. The viable cell number of Lactobacillus casei in different sucrose concentrations, different oxidoreduction potentials and refrigeration temperature was 1x1010, 2x108 and 5x107 cfu mL-1, respectively. Growth and survival rate of Lactobacillus casei showed to be the highest.

  10. Survival and growth of eucalypts clones seedlings in response to organic fertilizer application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sula Janaína de Oliveira Fernandes

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed to evaluate the effect of Fert-Bokashi® on survival and seedlings growth of two Eucalyptus urophylla clones propagated by minicutting technique. The experiment was conducted over a period of 28 days using a randomized block design and three replicates in an 6 x 2 factorial arrangement, with six Fert-Bokashi® concentrations (0.0%, 0.1%, 0.3%, 0.5%, 0.7% and 0.9% and two clones. Seedlings survival, height growth and shoot, root and total dry matter were evaluated. Experimental results demonstrated no significant effect of Fert- Bokashi® on survival and seedlings growth of two Eucalyptus urophylla clones.

  11. Early-stage biotech companies: strategies for survival and growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Wendy; Erickson, Stanford

    2006-06-01

    The promise of start-up biotechnology companies is enormous. So are the risks and the uncertainty of product development. The authors present a checklist for young biotech companies, covering environmental factors, alliances, and strategic planning.

  12. Survival

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data provide information on the survival of California red-legged frogs in a unique ecosystem to better conserve this threatened species while restoring...

  13. SURVIVAL ANALYSIS AND GROWTH OF Cordia trichotoma, BORAGINACEAE, LAMIALES, IN MATO GROSSO DO SUL STATE, BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Luiz Salvadori

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5902/1980509812357The evaluation of a plant survival percentage and growth may reflect its competitive ability in plantcommunity. Cordia trichotoma is a common native tree in Mato Grosso do Sul State and one of the mostpromising for planting. This study monitored the survival percentage and growth of Cordia trichotomaunder different conditions such as weeding and receiving or not fertilization. The experiment started inSeptember 2008 and it was concluded in March 2010. The seeds collection and sowing were held in urbanarea of Mundo Novo Municipality and the area for permanent planting to measure seedlings survival andgrowth was set at Japorã Municipality, Fazenda Santa Clara. Seedlings were planted in two categories: theuse or not of fertilizer and crowing resulting in four distinct groups: block fertilizer bare earth (ATN, bareland block without fertilizer (BTN, fertilizer and crown block (AC and without fertilizer and crownedblock (BC. The results indicated high survival of Cordia trichotoma in the seedling transplant system from bed to bags. The BC block showed the highest percentage of survival, but the smaller increments in height.The AC, ATN and BTN blocks presented the same survival pattern and similar average growth. However,there may be differences in nutritional and chemical composition of the soil suggesting sector analysis forfuture studies.

  14. Interact to Survive: Phyllobacterium brassicacearum Improves Arabidopsis Tolerance to Severe Water Deficit and Growth Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresson, Justine; Vasseur, François; Dauzat, Myriam; Labadie, Marc; Varoquaux, Fabrice; Touraine, Bruno; Vile, Denis

    2014-01-01

    Mutualistic bacteria can alter plant phenotypes and confer new abilities to plants. Some plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) are known to improve both plant growth and tolerance to multiple stresses, including drought, but reports on their effects on plant survival under severe water deficits are scarce. We investigated the effect of Phyllobacterium brassicacearum STM196 strain, a PGPR isolated from the rhizosphere of oilseed rape, on survival, growth and physiological responses of Arabidopsis thaliana to severe water deficits combining destructive and non-destructive high-throughput phenotyping. Soil inoculation with STM196 greatly increased the survival rate of A. thaliana under several scenarios of severe water deficit. Photosystem II efficiency, assessed at the whole-plant level by high-throughput fluorescence imaging (Fv/Fm), was related to the probability of survival and revealed that STM196 delayed plant mortality. Inoculated surviving plants tolerated more damages to the photosynthetic tissues through a delayed dehydration and a better tolerance to low water status. Importantly, STM196 allowed a better recovery of plant growth after rewatering and stressed plants reached a similar biomass at flowering than non-stressed plants. Our results highlight the importance of plant-bacteria interactions in plant responses to severe drought and provide a new avenue of investigations to improve drought tolerance in agriculture. PMID:25226036

  15. Interact to survive: Phyllobacterium brassicacearum improves Arabidopsis tolerance to severe water deficit and growth recovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justine Bresson

    Full Text Available Mutualistic bacteria can alter plant phenotypes and confer new abilities to plants. Some plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR are known to improve both plant growth and tolerance to multiple stresses, including drought, but reports on their effects on plant survival under severe water deficits are scarce. We investigated the effect of Phyllobacterium brassicacearum STM196 strain, a PGPR isolated from the rhizosphere of oilseed rape, on survival, growth and physiological responses of Arabidopsis thaliana to severe water deficits combining destructive and non-destructive high-throughput phenotyping. Soil inoculation with STM196 greatly increased the survival rate of A. thaliana under several scenarios of severe water deficit. Photosystem II efficiency, assessed at the whole-plant level by high-throughput fluorescence imaging (Fv/Fm, was related to the probability of survival and revealed that STM196 delayed plant mortality. Inoculated surviving plants tolerated more damages to the photosynthetic tissues through a delayed dehydration and a better tolerance to low water status. Importantly, STM196 allowed a better recovery of plant growth after rewatering and stressed plants reached a similar biomass at flowering than non-stressed plants. Our results highlight the importance of plant-bacteria interactions in plant responses to severe drought and provide a new avenue of investigations to improve drought tolerance in agriculture.

  16. Growth and survival of seven native willow species on highly disturbed coal mine sites in eastern Canada

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mosseler, Alex; Major, John E; Labrecque, Michel

    2014-01-01

    .... Unrooted dormant stem sections collected from clones of five willow species previously field-tested and selected for survival and growth, survived and grew better on the mine site to be reclaimed...

  17. Expression and localization of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family in buffalo ovarian follicle during different stages of development and modulatory role of FGF2 on steroidogenesis and survival of cultured buffalo granulosa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, S R; Thakur, N; Somal, A; Parmar, M S; Reshma, R; Rajesh, G; Yadav, V P; Bharti, M K; Bharati, Jaya; Paul, A; Chouhan, V S; Sharma, G T; Singh, G; Sarkar, M

    2016-10-01

    The present study investigated the expression and localization of FGF and its functional receptors in the follicle of buffalo and the treatment of FGF2 on mRNA expression of CYP19A1 (aromatase), PCNA, and BAX (BCL-2 associated X protein) in cultured buffalo granulosa cells (GCs). Follicles were classified into four groups based on size and E2 level in follicular fluid (FF): F1, 4-6mm diameter, E214mm, E2>180ng/ml. The qPCR studies revealed that the mRNA expression of FGF1, FGF2 and FGF7 were maximum (P<0.05) in theca interna (TI) whereas the transcripts of FGFR1, FGFR2, FGFR2IIIB and FGFR2IIIC were up-regulated (P<0.05) in GCs of F4 follicles. Protein expression of most members were maximum (P<0.05) in F4 follicles except FGFR3 and FGFR4. All members were localized in GC and TI with a stage specific immunoreactivity. Primary culture of GCs with treatment of FGF2 at different dose-time combinations revealed that the mRNA expression and immunoreactivity of CYP19A1 and PCNA were maximum (P<0.05) whereas BAX was minimum (P<0.05) with 200ng/ml at 72h of incubation. The findings indicate that FGF family members are expressed in a regulated manner in buffalo ovarian follicles during different stages of development where FGF2 may promote steroidogenesis and GC survival through autocrine and paracrine manner. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Ten-Year Effect of Six Site-Preparation Treatments on Piedmont Loblolly Pine Survival and Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. Boyd Edwards

    1994-01-01

    Limited information is available on growth responses to different levels of intensity for site preparation in the Piedmont. In the present study, six intensities of site preparation were compared for their effect on survival, height and diameter growth, total volume produced, and basal area per acre for the first 10 years after treatment. Rates of survival and growth...

  19. Perspective: Socio-economic development and child survival | Onike ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Perspective: Socio-economic development and child survival. ... Nigerian Journal of Paediatrics ... Soon after independence in the 1950's and 60's many African countries suffered political unrest, social upheaval and economic instability with military coups and or civil wars, leaving 20 million internally displaced or refugees, ...

  20. Effects of early starvation on the development and survival of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Macrobrachium vollenhovenii (Herklots) has been identified as a crustacean species with great culture potential. The effects of starvation on development and survival of early larval stages of the African river prawn M. vollenhovenii were investigated. As an aspect of the ongoing effort to determine the culturability of the ...

  1. Survival and development of Bactrocera oleae Gmelin (Diptera ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bactrocera oleae Gmelin (Diptera:Tephritidae) is the most important and widespread pest in the olive growing countries in the Mediterranean basin. The development and survival of olive fruit fly, B. oleae from egg to adult stage was studied in the laboratory at 16, 22, 27 and 35°C. The objective of the study was to get ...

  2. The regulation of cell growth and survival by aldosterone.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dooley, Ruth

    2012-02-01

    The steroid hormone aldosterone is synthesized from cholesterol, mainly in the zona glomerulosa of the adrenal cortex. Aldosterone exerts its effects in the epithelial tissues of the kidney and colon and in non-epithelial tissues such as the brain and cardiovasculature. The genomic response to aldosterone involves dimerization of the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), dissociation of heat shock proteins from MR, translocation of the aldosterone-MR complex to the nucleus and the concomitant regulation of gene expression. Rapid responses to aldosterone occur within seconds to minutes, do not involve transcription or translation and can modulate directly or indirectly the later genomic responses. Aside from the well-known effects of aldosterone on the regulation of sodium and water homeostasis, aldosterone can also produce deleterious structural changes in tissues by inducing hypertrophy and the dysregulation of proliferation and apoptosis, leading to fibrosis and tissue remodelling. Here we discuss the involvement of aldosterone-mediated rapid signalling cascades in the development of disease states such as chronic kidney disease and heart failure, and the antagonists that can inhibit these pathophysiological responses.

  3. The regulation of cell growth and survival by aldosterone.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dooley, Ruth

    2011-01-01

    The steroid hormone aldosterone is synthesized from cholesterol, mainly in the zona glomerulosa of the adrenal cortex. Aldosterone exerts its effects in the epithelial tissues of the kidney and colon and in non-epithelial tissues such as the brain and cardiovasculature. The genomic response to aldosterone involves dimerization of the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), dissociation of heat shock proteins from MR, translocation of the aldosterone-MR complex to the nucleus and the concomitant regulation of gene expression. Rapid responses to aldosterone occur within seconds to minutes, do not involve transcription or translation and can modulate directly or indirectly the later genomic responses. Aside from the well-known effects of aldosterone on the regulation of sodium and water homeostasis, aldosterone can also produce deleterious structural changes in tissues by inducing hypertrophy and the dysregulation of proliferation and apoptosis, leading to fibrosis and tissue remodelling. Here we discuss the involvement of aldosterone-mediated rapid signalling cascades in the development of disease states such as chronic kidney disease and heart failure, and the antagonists that can inhibit these pathophysiological responses.

  4. Interactive effects of arsenate, selenium, and dietary protein on survival, growth, and physiology in mallard ducklings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, D.J.; Sanderson, C.J.; LeCaptain, L.J.; Cromartie, E.; Pendleton, G.W.

    1992-01-01

    High concentrations of arsenic (As) and selenium (Se) have been found in aquatic food chains associated with irrigation drainwater. Total biomass of invertebrates, a maJor source of protein for wild ducklings, may vary in environments that are contaminated with selenium. Dayold mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) ducklings received an untreated diet (controls) containing 22% protein or diets containing 15 ppm Se (as selenomethionine), 60 ppm Se, 200 ppm As (as sodium arsenate), 15 ppm Se with 200 ppm As, or 60 ppm Se with 200 ppm As. In a concurrent experiment, the same sequence was repeated with a proteinrestricted (7%) but isocaloric diet. After 4 weeks, blood and tissue samples were collected for biochemical and histological examination. With 22% protein and 60 ppm Se in the diet, duckling survival and growth was reduced and livers had histopathological lesions. Arsenic alone caused some reduction in growth. Antagonistic interactive effects occurred between As and Se, including complete to partial alleviation of the following Se effects: mortality, impaired growth, hepatic lesions and lipid peroxidation, and altered glutathione and thiol status. With 7% protein, survival and growth of controls was less than that with 22% protein, Se (60 ppm) caused 100% mortality, and As (200 ppm) caused mortality, decreased growth, and liver histopathology. These findings suggest the potential for antagonistic effects of Se and As on duckling survival, growth, and physiology with adequate dietary protein but more severe toxicological effects when dietary protein is diminished.

  5. Temperature Impacts the Development and Survival of Common Cutworm (Spodoptera litura: Simulation and Visualization of Potential Population Growth in India under Warmer Temperatures through Life Cycle Modelling and Spatial Mapping.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babasaheb B Fand

    Full Text Available The common cutworm, Spodoptera litura, has become a major pest of soybean (Glycine max throughout its Indian range. With a changing climate, there is the potential for this insect to become an increasingly severe pest in certain regions due to increased habitat suitability. To examine this possibility, we developed temperature-based phenology model for S. litura, by constructing thermal reaction norms for cohorts of single life stages, at both constant and fluctuating temperatures within the ecologically relevant range (15-38°C for its development. Life table parameters were estimated stochastically using cohort updating and rate summation approach. The model was implemented in the geographic information system to examine the potential future pest status of S. litura using temperature change projections from SRES A1B climate change scenario for the year 2050. The changes were visualized by means of three spatial indices demonstrating the risks for establishment, number of generations per year and pest abundance according to the temperature conditions. The results revealed that the development rate as a function of temperature increased linearly for all the immature stages of S. litura until approximately 34-36°C, after which it became non-linear. The extreme temperature of 38°C was found lethal to larval and pupal stages of S. litura wherein no development to the next stage occurred. Females could lay no eggs at the extreme low (15°C and high (> 35°C test temperatures, demonstrating the importance of optimum temperature in determining the suitability of climate for the mating and reproduction in S. litura. The risk mapping predicts that due to temperature increase under future climate change, much of the soybean areas in Indian states like Madhya Pradesh, Maharashtra and Rajasthan, will become suitable for S. litura establishment and increased pest activity, indicating the expansion of the suitable and favourable areas over time. This has

  6. Effects of lithium on the survival, growth, and reproduction of Daphniopsis tibetana Sars (Crustacea: Cladocera)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wen; Huo, Yuanzi; Zhang, Tianmin; Wang, Shan; Shi, Tingting

    2017-07-01

    We evaluated the effects of lithium on the survival, growth, and reproduction of D. tibetana in the laboratory. The safe concentration value was 69.3 mg/L. The time to first brood was significant lower for individuals reared in 5 and 10 mg/L (24.4 and 24.0 d, respectively) compared with individuals reared in 20, 40, or 60 mg/L. Females reared in 5 mg/L lithium produced a mean of 16.5 neonates/brood and had the highest number of broods (3.0±1.95). The rate of egg production ( a), the intrinsic rate of increase ( r m ), net reproduction rate ( R 0), and finite rate of increase ( λ) were highest for D. tibetana reared at 5 and 10 mg/L lithium, and the duration of development was shorter than for the remaining groups. The results indicated that rearing in 5-10 mg/L lithium can accelerate the growth and reproduction of D. tibetana.

  7. Focus on the Positive: The Campaign for Child Survival. Education about Development in School and Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiPeri, Loretta

    1987-01-01

    Health measures promoted by the Campaign for Child Survival include growth monitoring, oral rehydration therapy breastfeeding, and immunization, which together form the cornerstones of the Child Survival Strategy. (CB)

  8. The toxic effect of Cymbush pesticide on growth and survival of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Toxicant effects of cymbush pesticide on growth, and survival levels of Clarias gariepinus fingerlings were studied. Results showed that mortality increased with increase in concentrations. The 96hLC50 was 4.17mgl-1 while the threshold value was 4.15mgl-1. In acute concentrations, there were dark patches on the ...

  9. Survival and growth of planted northern red oak in northern West Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles A. McNeel; David M. Hix; Edwin C. Townsend

    1993-01-01

    The survival and growth of northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.) seedlings planted beneath a shelterwood in northern West Virginia were evaluated one year after planting. The use of 1.5 m (5 ft) tall TUBEX tree shelters on planted seedlings was also examined. The study was conducted on both excellent and good sites (site indices of 27 m (89 ft) and 22...

  10. Survival and Growth of Bottomland Hardwood Seedlings and Natural Woody Invaders Near Forest Edges

    Science.gov (United States)

    John W. McCoy; Bobby D. Keeland; Kristi Wharton

    2004-01-01

    Several oak species are frequently planted for reforestation projects in the Lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley (LMAV), but the success of these plantings has been variable. The survival and growth of planted seed or seedlings are affected by a variety of factors, including competition, herbivory, site preparation, precipitation, planting stock quality, and planting...

  11. Evaluation of different feeds for optimal growth and survival of parthenogenetic brine shrimp, Artemia

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sumitra-Vijayaraghavan; Krishnakumari, L.; Royan, J.P.

    Four types of food, each at 5 levels were evaluated for optimal growth and survival of Artemia larvae (1-4 d and 4-8 d), under laboratory conditions. The food types used were rice bran and 3 species of algae (Porphyra vietnamensis, Enteromorpha...

  12. The effects of transforming growth factor-beta 2 on dopaminergic graft survival

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Macauley, SL; Horsch, AD; Oterdoom, M; Zheng, MH; Stewart, GR

    2004-01-01

    Dopaminergic cell transplantation is a promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. the potential of which is limited due to poor survival and low dopamine content within engrafted tissue. In this study. the ability of transforming growth factor-beta2 (TGF-beta2) to

  13. Growth and survival of Bacillus cereus in mageu, a sour maize beverage

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Byaruhanga, YB

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available .f.u./ml after 12 h. The decrease in E-h seemed to have no inhibitory effect on the growth and survival of B. cereus. No strains of lactic acid bacteria were found to produce bacteriocins antagonistic to Bacillus cereus. Low pH and acidity were found...

  14. A Study on the Factors Influencing the Growth and Survival of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence environmental factors such as salinity and temperature and biological factors such as stocking density and feed type on the growth and survival of juvenile sea cucumbers Holothuria atra. The study was conducted from mid-October 2006 to end of January 2007 ...

  15. Effect of growing medium on early growth and survival of Uapaca ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-07-04

    Jul 4, 2008 ... moisture retention and bulk density. The growing medium comprising 100% forest soils could be prone to water logging condition and this could affect root respiration. Therefore, this could have an adverse effect on growth and survival of U. kirkiana seedlings despite having a higher plant nutrient content.

  16. Sex-specific effects of yolk testosterone on survival, begging and growth of zebra finches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    von Engelhardt, N; Carere, C; Dijkstra, C; Groothuis, TGG

    2006-01-01

    Yolk androgens affect offspring hatching, begging, growth and survival in many bird species. If these effects are sex-specific, yolk androgen deposition may constitute a mechanism for differential investment in male and female offspring. We tested this hypothesis in zebra finches. In this species,

  17. Effect of Salinity on the Survival and Growth of Rufiji Tilapia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Survival and growth of Rufiji tilapia (Oreochromis urolepis urolepis) fry were determined under controlled salinity conditions of 5, 15, 25 and 35 ppt for 56 days. Experiments were carried out in 12 concrete tanks of 1 m3 volume each with three replicates for each treatment. Data was recorded at fourteen days ...

  18. Graphic Aids to Evaluation of Plantation Management Alternatives Involving Survival and Height Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence P. Wilhite; James E. Bethue

    1971-01-01

    Many forest managers are faced with decisions as to whether to invest, or how much to invest, in site preparation or other promising cultural treatments (some so recently introduced that their effects upon merchantable yields cannot be determined for many years). Such decision making can be aided by estimating how much survival or growth must be increased to recoup,...

  19. Survival and growth response of white spruce stock types to site preparation in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew Youngblood; Elizabeth Cole; Michael Newton

    2011-01-01

    To identify suitable methods for reforestation, we evaluated the interacting effects of past disturbance, stock types, and site preparation treatments on white spruce (Picea glauca (Moench) Voss) seedling survival and growth across a range of sites in Alaska. Replicated experiments were established in five regions. At each site, two complete...

  20. Dynamic identification of growth and survival kinetic parameters of microorganisms in foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inverse analysis is a mathematical method used in predictive microbiology to determine the kinetic parameters of microbial growth and survival in foods. The traditional approach in inverse analysis relies on isothermal experiments that are time-consuming and labor-intensive, and errors are accumula...

  1. Survival and growth rate of coastal water Escherichia coli isolates in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of salt concentration on the survival and growth rate of Escherichia coli isolated from Lagos Lagoon surface water was investigated. This was necessitated to ascertain the suitability of using E. coli as feacal pollution indicator in this water body which experiences fluctuation in salinity values. The salinity during the ...

  2. Effect of Bacillus subtilis on the growth and survival rate of shrimp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect ofBacillus subtilis, isolated from digestive tract of Macrobrachium rosenbergii was investigated on growth and survival rate of Litopenaeus vannamei during 60 days of culture. Sixteen aquaria with four replicates were used for treatments and controls. Treatment groups were consisted of Bacillus subtilis, isolated ...

  3. A Study on the Factors Influencing the Growth and Survival of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nafiisah

    rate (SGR) and survival were obtained at temperature of 28°C (1.43 ± 0.15 g and ... Information on growth rates, larval ecology, habitat use, ecological role, and ... 6 specimens per 1.5 square metre. Experiment 2 is an investigation of the effect of temperature. Temperatures (28 and 32 ºC) were adjusted using a Rod Heater.

  4. Effects of feeding frequency variation on the growth and survival of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A 56-day experiment was conducted to consider the effects of feeding frequency variation on the growth and survival of Clarias gariepinus fingerlings. The frequencies of feeding were once daily, twice daily, once in two days and once in three designated as G1, G2, G3 and G4 respectively. One hundred and twenty ...

  5. Sensory neurons in culture: Changing requirements for survival factors during embryonic development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barde, Y.-A.; Edgar, D.; Thoenen, H.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of nerve growth factor (NGF) and medium conditioned by glioma cells (GCM) on the survival of chicken sensory neurons in culture was investigated. Neurons were isolated from embryos 8 days (E8) to 16 days (E16) old and the proportion of surviving neurons was determined after 2 days in culture. In the absence of NGF or GCM, essentially no neurons survived at any age. In the presence of NGF, survival increased from 25% of the neurons at E8 to 40% between E10 and E12 and then decreased to background level (5%) at E16. In contrast, in the presence of GCM, survival increased continuously from 10% of the neurons at E8 to 75% at E16. At early developmental stages, the effect of NGF and GCM together was greater than the sum of their individual effects: at E8, about 80% of the neurons survived, double the number expected for a simple additive effect. Thus, a significant proportion of chicken neurons from dorsal root ganglia require both NGF and GCM for survival, and this may well include neurons from the ventro-lateral population, which do not respond to NGF alone. As neurons matured, the double requirement progressively decreased and, by E16, NGF no longer increased the number of neurons over that surviving in response to GCM alone. The facts that rat brain extracts mimicked the effect of GCM and that the potency of the brain extracts of rat in the postnatal period increased in parallel with the development of the glial cells suggest that glial cells produce a factor(s) both immunologically and functionally different from NGF which supports the survival of sensory neurons. Images PMID:6928668

  6. Bevacizumab reduces the growth rate constants of renal carcinomas: a novel algorithm suggests early discontinuation of bevacizumab resulted in a lack of survival advantage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Wilfred D; Yang, James; Bates, Susan E; Fojo, Tito

    2008-10-01

    To hasten cancer drug development, new paradigms are needed to assess therapeutic efficacy. In a randomized phase II study in patients with renal cell carcinoma, 10 microg/kg bevacizumab (Avastin; Genentech, Inc., South San Francisco, CA) administered every 2 weeks resulted in a longer time to progression but a statistically significant difference in overall survival could not be demonstrated. We developed a novel two-phase equation to estimate concomitant rates of tumor regression (regression rate constant) and tumor growth (growth rate constant). This method allows us to assess therapeutic efficacy using tumor measurements gathered while a patient receives therapy in a clinical trial. The growth rate constants of renal cell carcinomas were significantly lower during therapy with 10 microg/kg bevacizumab than those of tumors in patients receiving placebo. In all cohorts the tumor growth rate constants were correlated with survival. That a survival advantage was not demonstrated with bevacizumab appears to have been a result of early discontinuation of bevacizumab. Single-agent bevacizumab significantly affects the growth rate constants of renal cell carcinoma. Extrapolating from the growth rate constants, we conclude that the failure to demonstrate a survival advantage in the original study was a result of premature discontinuation of bevacizumab. The mathematical model described herein has applications to many tumor types and should aid in evaluating the relative efficacies of different therapies. Quantitating tumor growth rate constants using data gathered while patients are enrolled in a clinical trial, as in the present study, may streamline and assist in drug development.

  7. Microaerobic growth and anaerobic survival of Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium intracellulare and Mycobacterium scrofulaceum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Amy Herndon; Falkinham, Joseph O

    2015-03-01

    Representative strains of Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium intracellulare and Mycobacterium scrofulaceum (MAIS) grew at equal rates in laboratory medium at 21% (air) and 12% oxygen. Growth in 6% oxygen proceeded at a 1.4-1.8-fold lower rate. Colony formation was the same at 21% (air) and 6% oxygen. The MAIS strains survived rapid shifts from aerobic to anaerobic conditions as measured by two experimental approaches (Falkinham (1996) [1]). MAIS cells grown aerobically to log phase in broth were diluted, spread on agar medium, and incubated anaerobically for up to 20 days at 37°C. Although no colonies formed anaerobically, upon transfer to aerobic conditions, greater than 25% of the colony forming units (CFU) survived after 20 days of anaerobic incubation (Prince et al. (1989) [2]). MAIS cells grown in broth aerobically to log phase were sealed and vigorous agitation led to oxygen depletion (Wayne model). After 12 days anaerobic incubation, M. avium and M. scrofulaceum survival were high (>50%), while M. intracellulare survival was lower (22%). M. avium cells shifted to anaerobiosis in broth had increased levels of glycine dehydrogenase and isocitrate lyase. Growth of MAIS strains at low oxygen levels and their survival following a rapid shift to anaerobiosis is consistent with their presence in environments with fluctuating oxygen levels. Copyright © 2015 Asian African Society for Mycobacteriology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Inbreeding depression on growth and survival of full-sib family of Manila clam ( Ruditapes philippinarum)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Zhongming; Li, Na; Zhang, Xuekai; Li, Ying; Yan, Xiwu; Yang, Feng

    2017-02-01

    In present study, the inbreeding depression ( ID) of growth and survival of Manila clam (Ruditapes philippinarum) was investigated at larval and juvenile stages. Nine inbred families ( A 2, B 2, C 2, D 2, E 2, F 2, G 2, H 2 and I 2) were established by mating within nine full-sib families with expected inbreeding coefficient of 0.25. Inbred families showed significant differences in shell length and hatching rate of D-larvae (straight-hinged larvae). The larvae of the nine inbred families grew slower than those of control group ( CG), and their ID value ranged from 0.81% ± 6.09% to 16.10% ± 1.49%. The ID value of larval survival rate varied between 27.47% ± 9.36% and 70.50% ± 13.66%. The ID was also detected for juvenile growth in A 2, B 2, C 2, and D 2, which ranged from 4.60 ± 2.21 to 17.71 ± 7.73. The A 2 family maintained the highest juvenile survival rate, whereas the other inbred families exhibited ID values varying between 62.79% ± 4.54% and 96.14% ± 0.87%. The linear relationship of estimated ID between growth and survival was negatively correlated ( R = -0.434, P clam.

  9. Survival of enteric pathogens during butterhead lettuce growth: crop stage, leaf age, and irrigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Linden, Inge; Cottyn, Bart; Uyttendaele, Mieke; Vlaemynck, Geertrui; Heyndrickx, Marc; Maes, Martine

    2013-06-01

    The survival of Salmonella enterica serovar Thompson and Escherichia coli O157 was investigated on growing butterhead lettuce plants in the plant-growth chamber and greenhouse. All inoculation tests were made under conditions that approximate the greenhouse conditions for butterhead lettuce cultivation in Flanders (Belgium). The survival and proliferation of the pathogens on the leaves was determined at days 0, 4, and 8 after inoculation using standard plating techniques on selective medium. In the growth chamber, the extent to which both pathogens were able to multiply on the lettuce leaves was influenced by crop stage and leaf age. On young plants, the older leaves supported pathogen survival better. On nearly mature plants, pathogen population sizes were significantly higher on the old and young leaves compared with middle-aged leaves (plettuce was enhanced by overhead irrigation. The moist conditions between the folded inner leaves are likely contributing to the survival of enteric pathogens in the lettuce head. Butterhead lettuce grown in greenhouses with a sprinkle irrigation system may present a potential health hazard when contaminated near harvest. Experimental design (growth chamber versus greenhouse) largely influences enteric pathogen behavior on growing lettuce plants.

  10. Efficiency of probiotics (Ecoforce in the growth and survival of Peneaus monodon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Elumalai

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Probiotic supplementation of live microorganisms in aquaculture aids in preventing disease, thereby increasing production and decreasing economic loss. Application of probiotics bacteria in aquaculture systems plays significant role that determines the fate and success rate of culture. The present study was carried out to evaluate the performance of commercially available probiotics (The major active ingredients include Streptococcus faecalis, Streptococcus faecium, Bacillus mesentericus, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus natto, Clostridium butyricum, Saccharomyces cerevivisiae, Alkaline Protease and Lipase in the growth and survival of Peneaus monodon in grow-out conditions. At the end of the culture, the survival rate of Pond I (treatment pond was 76%, whereas for Pond II (control pond it was only 59%. Pond I (29.2g where as shrimps in the Pond II showed the least average body weight of 22.6g. It is evident that application of probiotics has improved the growth and survival of P. monodon and which in turn paved way to reap better profit for the farmers. This investigation showed that administration of mixed Bacillus probiotics significantly improved growth and survival of shrimp, increased beneficial bacteria in shrimp culture and enhanced water quality for parameter., it seems likely that the use of probiotics will gradually increase in the days to come that will open new vistas in the arena of aquaculture.

  11. Feeding, growth, and survival of post-larval abalone Haliotis asinina on different benthic diatoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel C. Capinpin, Jr.

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The feeding behavior, digestive efficiency, growth, and survival of post-larval abalone Haliotis asininafed with 5 species of locally isolated benthic diatom strains (Navicula mollis, N. ramosissima, Stauroneissp., Pleurosigma sp., and Cocconeis sp. were examined in the laboratory. Two 15-day feeding trialsusing 1 mm post-larvae were conducted. No significant differences were observed in sizes of post-larvalabalone after 15 days in all diatom treatments (P>0.05. However, in both trials, Cocconeis sp. resulted inhigh survival rates (88.9±5.6% and 80.0±20.0% for Trials 1 and 2, respectively. Cocconeis sp. wasefficiently digested by post-larval abalone, with most of the cells being ruptured during ingestion and/orpassage through the gut. One diatom strain, Pleurosigma sp., resulted to a high survival but producedthe slowest growth rate (<10 ìm.d-1 SL. It was probably not ingested easily during the experiment due toits large size or mobility. For the other diatom strains, N. mollis and N. ramosissima, most cells passedthrough the gut with the cells left intact. Stauroneis sp. is highly digestible, but did not result to highsurvival, although the remaining live post-larval abalone fed on this diatom as well as on N. mollis grewfaster during the second week of both feeding trials. N. ramosissima resulted to poorest survival rate(<10% due to its poor digestibility. Only Cocconeis sp. showed a fairly high growth rate, digestionefficiency, and survival rate. N. mollis which gave a fairly high survival rate and Stauroneis may be addedtowards the later stages of post-larval rearing as well as other large diatoms. The digestion efficiency ofdiatom strains is considered an important factor determining its dietary value, but other factors may alsobe important such as volume contents, biochemical composition, and other physical characteristics.

  12. Codes That Support Smart Growth Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provides examples of local zoning codes that support smart growth development, categorized by: unified development code, form-based code, transit-oriented development, design guidelines, street design standards, and zoning overlay.

  13. Asociación del color de la concha de reproductores de Argopecten purpuratus (Lamarck, 1819 con la supervivencia, crecimiento y desarrollo larval de sus progenies Association between shell color of breeds (Lamarck, 1819 and the survival, growth and larval development of their progenies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo M García

    2012-07-01

    most frequent shell colors. Knowing that Argopecten purpuratus shell color variation is under genetic control, in this work we test the hypothesis that loci that control shell color variation also affect larvae's growth rate, survival and/or development rate. Survival, growth and development rates were estimated in larvae produced in different crosses between brooders of A. purpuratus having low frequency shell colors (white or orange and "normal" (brown color. Results showed no significant differences in growth rates between larvae produced by crosses that involved brown shell parents, or orange by white parents. However, progenies of self fertilized orange and white parents showed significant differences in growth among them, and a lower growth rate than the remaining crosses. Results suggest that genes that control shell color variation in juvenile and adult A. purpuratus could affect the growth rates of their larvae, but not the development rate or survival.

  14. Long-term monitoring of Sacramento Shade program trees: tree survival, growth and energy-saving performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yekang Ko; Jun-Hak Lee; E. Gregory McPherson; Lara A. Roman

    2015-01-01

    Long-term survival and growth of urban forests are critical to achieve the targeted benefits of urban tree planting programs, such as building energy savings from tree shade. However, little is known about how trees perform in the long-term, especially in residential areas. Given this gap in the literature, we monitored 22-years of post-planting survival, growth, and...

  15. The consequences of crown traits for the growth and survival of tree saplings in a Mexican lowland rain forest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterck, F.J.; Martinez-Ramos, M.; Dryer-Leal, G.; Rodriguez-Velazquez, J.; Poorter, L.

    2003-01-01

    1. Many studies discuss the adaptive value of plant architecture, but few have actually measured architectural effects on plant growth and survival. In this study, sapling growth and survival are related to crown traits for two tree species, Trophis mexicana (Liebm.) Bur. and Pseudolmedia

  16. The Risk of Growing Fast: Does fast growth have a negative impact on the survival rates of firms?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Haibo; van der Zwan, Peter; de Kok, Jan; Hartog, Chantal

    2012-01-01

    Fast-growing firms are considered as the central drivers of job creation in the economy. There is an abundance of literature on the separate subjects of firm growth and firm survival. However, the relationship between survival and growth is neglected. Using the Dutch Longitudinal Enterprise Database

  17. Tumor Cells Growth and Survival Time with the Ketogenic Diet in Animal Models: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodadadi, Soheila; Sobhani, Nafiseh; Mirshekar, Somaye; Ghiasvand, Reza; Pourmasoumi, Makan; Miraghajani, Maryam; Dehsoukhteh, Somayeh Shahraki

    2017-01-01

    Recently, interest in targeted cancer therapies via metabolic pathways has been renewed with the discovery that many tumors become dependent on glucose uptake during anaerobic glycolysis. Also the inability of ketone bodies metabolization due to various deficiencies in mitochondrial enzymes is the major metabolic changes discovered in malignant cells. Therefore, administration of a ketogenic diet (KD) which is based on high in fat and low in carbohydrates might inhibit tumor growth and provide a rationale for therapeutic strategies. So, we conducted this systematic review to assess the effects of KD on the tumor cells growth and survival time in animal studies. All databases were searched from inception to November 2015. We systematically searched the PubMed, Scopus, Google Scholars, Science Direct and Cochrane Library according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement. To assess the quality of included studies we used SYRCLE's RoB tool. 268 articles were obtained from databases by primary search. Only 13 studies were eligible according to inclusion criteria. From included studies, 9 articles indicate that KD had a beneficial effect on tumor growth and survival time. Tumor types were included pancreatic, prostate, gastric, colon, brain, neuroblastoma and lung cancers. In conclusions, although studies in this field are rare and inconsistence, recent findings have demonstrated that KD can potentially inhibit the malignant cell growth and increase the survival time. Because of differences physiology between animals and humans, future studies in cancer patients treated with a KD are needed.

  18. Tumor cells growth and survival time with the ketogenic diet in animal models: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soheila Khodadadi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, interest in targeted cancer therapies via metabolic pathways has been renewed with the discovery that many tumors become dependent on glucose uptake during anaerobic glycolysis. Also the inability of ketone bodies metabolization due to various deficiencies in mitochondrial enzymes is the major metabolic changes discovered in malignant cells. Therefore, administration of a ketogenic diet (KD which is based on high in fat and low in carbohydrates might inhibit tumor growth and provide a rationale for therapeutic strategies. So, we conducted this systematic review to assess the effects of KD on the tumor cells growth and survival time in animal studies. All databases were searched from inception to November 2015. We systematically searched the PubMed, Scopus, Google Scholars, Science Direct and Cochrane Library according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement. To assess the quality of included studies we used SYRCLE's RoB tool. 268 articles were obtained from databases by primary search. Only 13 studies were eligible according to inclusion criteria. From included studies, 9 articles indicate that KD had a beneficial effect on tumor growth and survival time. Tumor types were included pancreatic, prostate, gastric, colon, brain, neuroblastoma and lung cancers. In conclusions, although studies in this field are rare and inconsistence, recent findings have demonstrated that KD can potentially inhibit the malignant cell growth and increase the survival time. Because of differences physiology between animals and humans, future studies in cancer patients treated with a KD are needed.

  19. Survival, recruitment, and population growth rate of an important mesopredator: the northern raccoon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth M Troyer

    Full Text Available Populations of mesopredators (mid-sized mammalian carnivores are expanding in size and range amid declining apex predator populations and ever-growing human presence, leading to significant ecological impacts. Despite their obvious importance, population dynamics have scarcely been studied for most mesopredator species. Information on basic population parameters and processes under a range of conditions is necessary for managing these species. Here we investigate survival, recruitment, and population growth rate of a widely distributed and abundant mesopredator, the northern raccoon (Procyon lotor, using Pradel's temporal symmetry models and >6 years of monthly capture-mark-recapture data collected in a protected area. Monthly apparent survival probability was higher for females (0.949, 95% CI = 0.936-0.960 than for males (0.908, 95% CI = 0.893-0.920, while monthly recruitment rate was higher for males (0.091, 95% CI = 0.078-0.106 than for females (0.054, 95% CI = 0.042-0.067. Finally, monthly realized population growth rate was 1.000 (95% CI = 0.996-1.004, indicating that our study population has reached a stable equilibrium in this relatively undisturbed habitat. There was little evidence for substantial temporal variation in population growth rate or its components. Our study is one of the first to quantify survival, recruitment, and realized population growth rate of raccoons using long-term data and rigorous statistical models.

  20. Evidence for the involvement of NOD2 in regulating colonic epithelial cell growth and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruickshank, Sheena-M; Wakenshaw, Louise; Cardone, John; Howdle, Peter-D; Murray, Peter-J; Carding, Simon-R

    2008-10-14

    To investigate the function of NOD2 in colonic epithelial cells (CEC). A combination of in vivo and in vitro analyses of epithelial cell turnover in the presence and absence of a functional NOD2 protein and, in response to enteric Salmonella typhimurium infection, were used. shRNA interference was also used to investigate the consequences of knocking down NOD2 gene expression on the growth and survival of colorectal carcinoma cell lines. In the colonic mucosa the highest levels of NOD2 expression were in proliferating crypt epithelial cells. Muramyl dipeptide (MDP), that is recognized by NOD2, promoted CEC growth in vitro. By contrast, the growth of NOD2-deficient CECs was impaired. In vivo CEC proliferation was also reduced and apoptosis increased in Nod2(-/-) mice, which were also evident following enteric Salmonella infection. Furthermore, neutralization of NOD2 mRNA expression in human colonic carcinoma cells by shRNA interference resulted in decreased survival due to increased levels of apoptosis. These findings are consistent with the involvement of NOD2 protein in promoting CEC growth and survival. Defects in proliferation by CECs in cases of CD may contribute to the underlying pathology of disrupted intestinal homeostasis and excessive inflammation.

  1. The immunoregulatory mechanisms of carcinoma for its survival and development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Du Caigan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The immune system in patients detects and eliminates tumor cells, but tumors still progress persistently. The mechanisms by which tumor cells survive under the pressure of immune surveillance are not fully understood. This review is to present the evidence from clinical studies, showing a significant correlation of clinicopathological features of carcinoma with: (1 the loss of classical human leukocyte antigen class I, (2 the up-regulation of non-classical human leukocyte antigen class I, pro-apoptotic Fas ligand and receptor-binding cancer antigen expressed on SiSo cells I, and (3 the formation of immunosuppressive microenvironment by up-regulation of transforming growth factor-beta, Galectin-1, inhibitory ligand B7s, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase and arginase, as well as by recruitment of tumor-induced myeloid-derived suppressor cells and regulatory T cells. All of these factors may together protect carcinoma cells from the immune-cytotoxicity.

  2. Effect of salinity on survival and growth of giant freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii (de Man

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.K. Chand

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Two independent experiments were performed to determine the effects of salinity on survival and growth of juvenile Macrobrachium rosenbergii, first one was to determine the median lethal salinity (MLS-5096 h and second one was to assess the survival and growth at different sub-lethal salinities under field condition. In MLS-5096 h study 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 ppt salinities were used to initially find out the salinity tolerance range. Accordingly, a definitive salinity tolerance test was done in next phase to find out exact median lethal salinity by directly transferring the test species to 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26 and 27 ppt salinity for 96 h. The median lethal salinity of M. rosenbergii was estimated at 24.6 ppt. In the second experiment, survival and growth performances of the prawn were recorded at different sub-lethal salinities viz., 5, 10, 15 and 20 ppt along with 0 ppt as control during 60 days culture period. The prawn exhibited lowest final average weight at 20 ppt salinity and significantly highest at 10 ppt salinity. Highest SGR and weight gain were obtained at 10 ppt followed by 5 ppt, 15 ppt and 0 ppt salinity but differences among treatment were not significant (P > 0.05. Survival rate of prawn varied between 91% (at 0 ppt and 78% (at 20 ppt. The prawn grew and survived satisfactorily at 0–15 ppt salinities, implying that the species can be cultured commercially at wide salinity range. M. rosenbergii can be considered as an ideal species to promote, in view of current and future climate variables as more and more coastal areas of India are going to be vulnerable to saline water inundation.

  3. The agony of choice: how plants balance growth and survival under water-limiting conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claeys, Hannes; Inzé, Dirk

    2013-08-01

    When confronted with water limitation, plants actively reprogram their metabolism and growth. Recently, it has become clear that growing tissues show specific and highly dynamic responses to drought, which differ from the well-studied responses in mature tissues. Here, we provide an overview of recent advances in understanding shoot growth regulation in water-limiting conditions. Of special interest is the balance between maintained growth and competitiveness on the one hand and ensured survival on the other hand. A number of master regulators controlling this balance have been identified, such as DELLAs and APETALA2/ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR-type transcription factors. The possibilities of engineering or breeding crops that maintain growth in periods of mild drought, while still being able to activate protective tolerance mechanisms, are discussed.

  4. The Agony of Choice: How Plants Balance Growth and Survival under Water-Limiting Conditions1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claeys, Hannes; Inzé, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    When confronted with water limitation, plants actively reprogram their metabolism and growth. Recently, it has become clear that growing tissues show specific and highly dynamic responses to drought, which differ from the well-studied responses in mature tissues. Here, we provide an overview of recent advances in understanding shoot growth regulation in water-limiting conditions. Of special interest is the balance between maintained growth and competitiveness on the one hand and ensured survival on the other hand. A number of master regulators controlling this balance have been identified, such as DELLAs and APETALA2/ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR-type transcription factors. The possibilities of engineering or breeding crops that maintain growth in periods of mild drought, while still being able to activate protective tolerance mechanisms, are discussed. PMID:23766368

  5. Effects of passive integrated transponder tags on survival and growth of juvenile Atlantic salmon Salmo salar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Martin Hage; Thorn, Aske N.; Skov, Christian

    2013-01-01

    following 23 mm PIT-tag implantation had a positive impact on growth of fish smaller than 100 mm FL, we advise against the use of sutures due to high rates of fungal infection around the incision site. Hence, results suggest that surgical implantation of 23 mm PIT tags without suture closure of the incision......Background: A laboratory experiment was conducted to assess the potential impacts of surgically implanted 23 and 32 mm passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags on survival, growth, and body condition of juvenile Atlantic salmon Salmo salar. Rate of tag retention and healing of the tagging incision...... with and without suture closure of the incision, and 32 mm PIT-tag implantation without suture closure. Results: Over the 35-day experiment, mortality occurred only among fish tagged with 32 mm PIT tags (14%) and all fish larger than 103 mm FL survived. Non-sutured Atlantic salmon between 80 and 99 mm FL implanted...

  6. Dietary lutein modulates growth and survival genes in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafi, Mohamed M; Kanakasabai, Saravanan; Gokarn, Sarita V; Krueger, Eric G; Bright, John J

    2015-02-01

    Lutein is a carotenoid pigment present in fruits and vegetables that has anti-inflammatory and antitumor properties. In this study, we examined the effect of lutein on proliferation and survival-associated genes in prostate cancer (PC-3) cells. We found that in vitro culture of PC-3 cells with lutein induced mild decrease in proliferation that improved in combination treatment with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) agonists and other chemotherapeutic agents. Flow cytometry analyses showed that lutein improved drug-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in prostate cancer. Gene array and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analyses showed that lutein altered the expression of growth and apoptosis-associated biomarker genes in PC-3 cells. These findings highlight that lutein modulates the expression of growth and survival-associated genes in prostate cancer cells.

  7. Effects of food quality on trade-offs among growth, immunity and survival in the greater wax moth Galleria mellonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krams, Indrikis; Kecko, Sanita; Kangassalo, Katariina; Moore, Fhionna R; Jankevics, Eriks; Inashkina, Inna; Krama, Tatjana; Lietuvietis, Vilnis; Meija, Laila; Rantala, Markus J

    2015-03-01

    The resources available to an individual in any given environment are finite, and variation in life history traits reflect differential allocation of these resources to competing life functions. Nutritional quality of food is of particular importance in these life history decisions. In this study, we tested trade-offs among growth, immunity and survival in 3 groups of greater wax moth (Galleria mellonella) larvae fed on diets of high and average nutritional quality. We found rapid growth and weak immunity (as measured by encapsulation response) in the larvae of the high-energy food group. It took longer to develop on food of average nutritional quality. However, encapsulation response was stronger in this group. The larvae grew longer in the low-energy food group, and had the strongest encapsulation response. We observed the highest survival rates in larvae of the low-energy food group, while the highest mortality rates were observed in the high-energy food group. A significant negative correlation between body mass and the strength of encapsulation response was found only in the high-energy food group revealing significant competition between growth and immunity only at the highest rates of growth. The results of this study help to establish relationships between types of food, its nutritional value and life history traits of G. mellonella larvae. © 2014 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  8. Effects of algae-mat thickness on survival and growth of eelgrass (Zostera marina) seedlings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jonas; Olesen, Birgit

    for the mortality we here focus on the potential negative impact of macroalgal mats on seedling growth and survival. The high productivity of these fast-growing algae results in large diurnal variations in the oxygen concentrations within the mats and the lower parts may experience prolonged periods of anoxia......: Chaetomorpha linum and artificial macroalgae. The two types of mats were used to separate physical and metabolic effects of algal presence. During the growth period concentrations of oxygen and sulphide and their diurnal variations in the mats were measured using microelectrodes....

  9. Financial development, uncertainty and economic growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lensink, B.W.

    By performing a cross-country growth regression for the 1970-1998 period this paper finds evidence for the fact that the impact of policy uncertainty on economic growth depends on the development of the financial sector. It appears that a higher level of financial development partly mitigates the

  10. Growth and nutrition effects on gilt development

    Science.gov (United States)

    The growth and development of gilts are a component of their lifetime potential for productivity. Growth and development affects not only their ability to reach puberty, they also likely affect their reproductive performance through later parities and their physical soundness as they age. Because of...

  11. Effects of food resources on the fatty acid composition, growth and survival of freshwater mussels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, Michelle; Bartsch, Lynn; Richardson, William B.; Vallazza, Jon; Moraska Lafrancois, Brenda

    2017-01-01

    Increased nutrient and sediment loading in rivers have caused observable changes in algal community composition, and thereby, altered the quality and quantity of food resources available to native freshwater mussels. Our objective was to characterize the relationship between nutrient conditions and mussel food quality and examine the effects on fatty acid composition, growth and survival of juvenile mussels. Juvenile Lampsilis cardium and L. siliquoidea were deployed in cages for 28 d at four riverine and four lacustrine sites in the lower St. Croix River, Minnesota/Wisconsin, USA. Mussel foot tissue and food resources (four seston fractions and surficial sediment) were analyzed for quantitative fatty acid (FA) composition. Green algae were abundant in riverine sites, whereas cyanobacteria were most abundant in the lacustrine sites. Mussel survival was high (95%) for both species. Lampsilis cardium exhibited lower growth relative to L. siliquoidea (p diet. In contrast, growth of L. siliquiodea was negatively related to nearly all FAs in the largest size fraction (i.e., >63 μm) of seston, including the bacterial FAs, and several of the FAs associated with sediments. Reduced mussel growth was observed in L. siliquoidea when the abundance of cyanobacteria exceeded 9% of the total phytoplankton biovolume. Areas dominated by cyanobacteria may not provide sufficient food quality to promote or sustain mussel growth.

  12. Financial Development, Environmental Quality and Economic Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shushu Li

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the relationships between financial development, environmental quality and economic growth are studied based on data from 102 countries over the period 1980–2010 using the generalized method of moments (GMM estimation. The econometric results show the following three basic conclusions: First, both financial development and environmental quality have a significant impact on economic growth and should be included in the production function of the economic growth model as important variables. Second, there is a significant and robust “inverted U-shaped” relationship between financial development and economic growth; with the improvement of the level of financial development, economic growth would first increase and then decrease, which is consistent with the results of previous studies. Third, there is also a significant and robust “inverted U-shaped” relationship between economic growth and carbon emissions, indicating that there exists a “critical point” at which achieving economic growth comes at the expense of environmental quality, and after passing the critical point, the deterioration of environmental quality will lead to a significant slowdown in economic growth. In addition, the econometric analysis in this paper also shows that there was a mutually promoting and strengthening relationship between financial development and environmental quality. Specifically, the degree of financial development can further strengthen the promoting effect of environmental quality on economic growth; meanwhile, an improvement in environmental quality can also strengthen the promoting effect of financial development on economic growth. Financial development and environmental quality could influence economic growth through strengthening the marginal product effects of capital and labor, which further indicates the that both financial and environmental factors play an important role in modern economic development.

  13. Early survival and growth of planted Douglas-fir with red alder in four mixed regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall D. Murray; Richard E. Miller

    1986-01-01

    To quantify between-species interactions, we measured and compared survival and growth of planted Douglas-fir and associated planted and volunteer red alder at a location on the west side of the Cascade Range in Washington. The planted alder were wildlings dug either from a nearby area or from a distant, coastal site and interplanted into a 3-year-old Douglas-fir...

  14. Predictive model for survival and growth of Salmonella typhimurium DT104 on chicken skin during temperature abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oscar, T P

    2009-02-01

    To better predict risk of Salmonella infection from chicken subjected to temperature abuse, a study was undertaken to develop a predictive model for survival and growth of Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 on chicken skin with native flora. For model development, chicken skin portions (2.14 cm2) were inoculated with 0.85 log of Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 (ATCC 700408) and then stored at 5 to 50 degrees C for 8 h. Kinetic data from the storage trials were fit to a primary model to determine lag time (lamda), specific growth rate (micrro), and the 95% prediction interval (PI). Secondary models for lamda, mu, and PI as a function of storage temperature were developed and then combined with the primary model to create a tertiary model. Performance of the tertiary model was evaluated against dependent data, independent data for interpolation, and independent data for extrapolation to kosher chicken skin by using an acceptable prediction zone from -1 (fail-safe) to 0.5 (fail-dangerous) log per skin portion. Survival of Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 on chicken skin was observed during 8 h of storage at 5 to 20 degrees C and at 50 degrees C, whereas growth was observed from 25 to 45 degrees C and was optimal at 40 degrees C with a lamda of 2.5 h and a mu of 1.1 log/h. Variation of pathogen growth, as assessed by PI, increased in a nonlinear manner as a function of temperature and was greater for growth conditions than no-growth conditions. The percentage of acceptable prediction errors was 82.6% for dependent data, 83.7% for independent data for interpolation, and 81.6% for independent data for extrapolation to kosher skin, which all exceeded the performance criterion of 70% acceptable predictions. Thus, it was concluded that the tertiary model provided valid predictions for survival and growth of Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 from a low initial dose on both nonkosher and kosher chicken skin with native flora.

  15. Growth and Survival of the American Oyster Crassostrea virginica in Jamaica Bay, New York.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarinsky, Gary; Carroll, Margaret A; Nduka, Ebere; Catapane, Edward J

    2005-01-01

    Jamaica Bay is a major inlet opening to the Atlantic Ocean. It was abundant with oysters until early 1900's. Over-harvesting, pressure from predators, parasitic invasion and declining water quality often are cited as causes. Despite actions to arrest and reverse the pollution, oysters are not reestablished. We are studying factors relating to the rehabitation of Crassostrea virginica in Jamaica Bay to determine if the water quality and environmental conditions are suitable for their survival. Oysters placed in Jamaica Bay grew well when housed in protective containers and growth was influenced by placement near the sediment as compared to the surface. Oysters placed 1 foot above the sediment grew larger that those suspended 1 foot below the surface. Water temperature, pH, turbidity, salinity, conductivity, chlorophyll-a and dissolved O2 were taken to compare water quality at each site. To study growth and survival in a more natural condition, oyster seed and adults were placed just off the bottom in unprotected containers and photographed. After 1 year they are growing and surviving well and there has been evidence of reproduction. Thus far there are no serious signs of predation by crabs or starfish. The study shows that Jamaica Bay water quality is suitable for oyster growth under the various conditions of our experiments.

  16. Effect of growth phase and parental cell survival in river water on plasmid transfer between Escherichia coli strains.

    OpenAIRE

    Muela, A; Pocino, M; Arana, I; Justo, J I; Iriberri, J; Barcina, I

    1994-01-01

    We evaluated the transfer to and from Escherichia coli of endogenously isolated plasmid material from the River Butrón during the growth of three donor strains and two recipient strains as well as after the survival of these parental cells in river water. Transfer frequency varied greatly during the growth of donor cells, with minimum values in the exponential phase; frequency remained constant, however, during the growth of recipient strains. After survival in river water, donor cells lost t...

  17. Effect of lighting conditions on zebrafish growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villamizar, Natalia; Vera, Luisa María; Foulkes, Nicholas Simon; Sánchez-Vázquez, Francisco Javier

    2014-04-01

    In the underwater environment, the properties of light (intensity and spectrum) change rapidly with depth and water quality. In this article, we have described how and to what extent lighting conditions can influence the development, growth, and survival of zebrafish. Fertilized eggs and the corresponding larvae were exposed to different visible light wavelengths (violet, blue, green, yellow, red, and white) in a 12-h light-12-h dark (LD) cycle until 30 days posthatching (dph), when the expression of morphometric parameters and growth (igf1a, igf2a)- and stress-related (crh and pomca) genes were examined. Another group of larvae was raised under constant darkness (DD) until 5 or 10 dph, after which they were transferred to a LD of white light. A third group remained under DD to investigate the effects of light deprivation upon zebrafish development. The results revealed that the hatching rate was highest under blue and violet light, while total length at 30 dph was greatest under blue, white, and violet light. Red light led to reduced feeding activity and poor survival (100% mortality). Larvae raised under constant white light (LL) showed a higher proportion of malformations, as did larvae raised under LD violet light. The expression of growth and stress factors was upregulated in the violet (igf1a, igf2a, pomca, and chr) and blue (igf2a) groups, which is consistent with the higher growth recorded and the higher proportion of malformations detected under the violet light. All larvae kept under DD died before 18 dph, but the survival rates improved in larvae transferred to LD at 5 dph and at 10 dph. In summary, these findings revealed that lighting conditions are crucial factors influencing zebrafish larval development and growth.

  18. Survival and development of chicken ascarid eggs in temperate pastures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thapa, Sundar; Thamsborg, Stig Milan; Meyling, Nicolai Vitt

    2017-01-01

    Eggs of chicken ascarids (Ascaridia galli and Heterakis spp.) are believed to be hardy and survive for long periods. However, this has not been evaluated quantitatively and our study therefore aimed to determine development and recovery of chicken ascarid eggs after burying in pasture soil....... Unembryonated eggs were mixed with soil, placed in sealed nylon bags and buried at 7 cm depth in pasture plots April (spring, n = 72) and December 2014 (winter, n = 72). Eight randomly selected bags per season were used to estimate pre-burial egg recovery [0 week post-burial (wpb)]. Eight random bags were...... removed at 5, 12, 23, 38, 52, 71 wpb per season and additionally at 104 wpb for spring burial. The content of each bag was analysed for numbers and development stages of eggs. Eggs buried in spring were fully embryonated within 12 wpb. In contrast, eggs buried in winter were developing between 23 and 38...

  19. Impacts of Bokashi on survival and growth rates of Pinus pseudostrobus in community reforestation projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo-López, P F; Ramírez, M I; Pérez-Salicrup, D R

    2015-03-01

    Community-based small-scale reforestation practices have been proposed as an alternative to low-efficiency massive reforestations conducted by external agents. These latter conventional reforestations are often carried out in soils that have been seriously degraded and this has indirectly contributed to the introduction of non-native species and/or acceptance of very low seedling survival rates. Bokashi is a fermented soil organic amendment that can be made from almost any available agricultural byproduct, and its beneficial effects in agriculture have been reported in various contexts. Here, we report the results of a community-based small-scale experimental reforestation where the provenance of pine seedlings (local and commercial) and the use of Bokashi as a soil amendment were evaluated. Bokashi was prepared locally by members of a small rural community in central Mexico. Almost two years after the establishment of the trial, survival rates for the unamended and amended local trees were 97-100% while survival of the commercial trees from unamended and amended treatments were 87-93%. Consistently through time, local and commercial seedlings planted in Bokashi-amended soils were significantly taller (x̅ = 152 cm) than those planted in unamended soils (̅x = 86 cm). An unplanned infection by Cronartium quercuum in the first year of the experiment was considered as a covariable. Infected seedlings showed malformations but this did not affect survival and growth rates. Bokashi amendment seems as an inexpensive, locally viable technology to increase seedling survival and growth and to help recover deforested areas where soils have been degraded. This allows local stakeholders to see more rapid results while helping them to maintain their interest in conservation activities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The Effect of Various Species of Macroalgae on the Growth, Survival, and Toxicity of Karenia brevis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, K. G.; Lovko, V. J.; Henry, M. S.

    2016-02-01

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) caused by the dinoflagellate Karenia brevis produce toxins that result in negative impacts to both humans and the environment. Little is known about the termination stages of these blooms, and few viable control mechanisms have been suggested. Natural, algae derived compounds have been proposed as a way to limit bloom growth and reduce brevetoxins in the water column. The work presented here examines the ability of macroalgae to inhibit the growth or survival of K. brevis, similar to what has been demonstrated with other red tide species. Additionally, we attempted to determine if macroalgae decreases water column brevetoxins which, to our knowledge, has not been tested with macroalgae but has been demonstrated in other studies with microalgal species. The macroalgae species Dictyota sp. and Gracilaria sp. caused 100% mortality of K. brevis in under 24 hours. Compared to the control, 7 other species significantly decreased the growth rate of K. brevis. The Dictyota treatments showed significant toxin reduction and increase of the antitoxin brevanol. These results indicate that some combination of compounds produced by macroalgae inhibit growth and survival of K. brevis and possibly limit their toxin production. Future studies will attempt to isolate and identify these compounds and test their effects on other marine organisms such as diatoms. Determining the interactions between HAB species K. brevis and macroalgal species will provide insights on the mechanism of bloom termination and a potential control method.

  1. Early spring leaf out enhances growth and survival of saplings in a temperate deciduous forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augspurger, Carol K

    2008-05-01

    Saplings of many canopy tree species in winter deciduous forests receive the major portion of their light budget for their growing season prior to canopy closure in the spring. This period of high light may be critical for achieving a positive carbon (C) gain, thus contributing strongly to their growth and survival. This study of saplings of Aesculus glabra and Acer saccharum in Trelease Woods, Illinois, USA, tested this hypothesis experimentally by placing tents of shade cloth over saplings during their spring period of high light prior to canopy closure in three consecutive years. Leaf senescence began 16 days (year 0) and 60 days (year 1) earlier for shaded A. glabra saplings than control saplings. No change in senescence occurred for A. saccharum. The annual absolute growth in stem diameter of both species was negligible or negative for shaded saplings, but positive for control saplings. Only 7% of the shaded A. glabra saplings were alive after 2 years, while all control saplings survived for 3 years; only 20% of the shaded A. saccharum saplings survived for 3 years, while 73% of control saplings were alive after the same period. Early spring leaf out is a critical mechanism that allows the long-term persistence of saplings of these species in this winter deciduous forest. Studies and models of C gain, growth, and survival of saplings in deciduous forests may need to take into account their spring phenology because saplings of many species are actually "sun" individuals in the spring prior to their longer period in the summer shade.

  2. The morphological growth patterns of colorectal liver metastases are prognostic for overall survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kåre; Rolff, Hans C; Eefsen, Rikke L

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal metastases in the liver grow according to three histological patterns: a pushing pattern, a replacement pattern, and a desmoplastic pattern. The objective of the current study was to explore the prognostic significance of these three growth patterns for survival. The study included 217...... consecutive patients, liver resected between 2007 and 2011 due to hepatic metastases from colorectal adenocarcinoma. The growth patterns were assessed on archival hematoxylin and eosin-stained tissue sections. In 150 metastases, the density of the immune cell infiltrate at the tumor periphery was judged....... Eventually, the growth patterns may contribute to a histology-based prognostic biomarker for patients with colorectal liver metastases.Modern Pathology advance online publication, 23 May 2014; doi:10.1038/modpathol.2014.4....

  3. Effect of artificial regulations of Artemia n-3 HUFA content on growth and survival of black seabream ( Sparus macrocephalus) larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing-Ke

    1998-06-01

    The requirement for dietary n-3 HUFA (highly unsaturated fatty acid) for growth and survival of black seabream ( Sparus macrocephalus) larvae was tested using Artemia with various levels of n-3 HUFA. Four treatments with Artemia differing in their n-3 HUFA were prepared by feeding them various oil emulsions. The results indicated that dietary n-3 HUFA significantly influences fish n-3 HUFA levels and are necessary for good growth and survival of black seabream larvae. The proper value of n-3 HUFA level and DHA, EPA level in Artemia should be 4.273% and 0.873% (wet weight) for good growth and survival in black seabream larvae respectively.

  4. Targeting A20 decreases glioma stem cell survival and tumor growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita B Hjelmeland

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastomas are deadly cancers that display a functional cellular hierarchy maintained by self-renewing glioblastoma stem cells (GSCs. GSCs are regulated by molecular pathways distinct from the bulk tumor that may be useful therapeutic targets. We determined that A20 (TNFAIP3, a regulator of cell survival and the NF-kappaB pathway, is overexpressed in GSCs relative to non-stem glioblastoma cells at both the mRNA and protein levels. To determine the functional significance of A20 in GSCs, we targeted A20 expression with lentiviral-mediated delivery of short hairpin RNA (shRNA. Inhibiting A20 expression decreased GSC growth and survival through mechanisms associated with decreased cell-cycle progression and decreased phosphorylation of p65/RelA. Elevated levels of A20 in GSCs contributed to apoptotic resistance: GSCs were less susceptible to TNFalpha-induced cell death than matched non-stem glioma cells, but A20 knockdown sensitized GSCs to TNFalpha-mediated apoptosis. The decreased survival of GSCs upon A20 knockdown contributed to the reduced ability of these cells to self-renew in primary and secondary neurosphere formation assays. The tumorigenic potential of GSCs was decreased with A20 targeting, resulting in increased survival of mice bearing human glioma xenografts. In silico analysis of a glioma patient genomic database indicates that A20 overexpression and amplification is inversely correlated with survival. Together these data indicate that A20 contributes to glioma maintenance through effects on the glioma stem cell subpopulation. Although inactivating mutations in A20 in lymphoma suggest A20 can act as a tumor suppressor, similar point mutations have not been identified through glioma genomic sequencing: in fact, our data suggest A20 may function as a tumor enhancer in glioma through promotion of GSC survival. A20 anticancer therapies should therefore be viewed with caution as effects will likely differ depending on the tumor type.

  5. Political Mechanisms for Long-Range Survival and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, W.

    As the first species aware of extinction and capable of proactively ensuring our long-term survival and development, it is striking that we do not do so with the rigor, formality, and foresight it requires. Only from a reactive posture have we responded to the challenges of global warfare, human rights, environmental concerns, and sustainable development. Despite our awareness of the possibility for extinction and apocalyptic set-backs to our evolution, and despite the existence of long-range studies-which must still be dramatically increased-proactive global policy implementation regarding our long-term survival and development is arguably non-existent. This lack of long-term policy making can be attributed in part to the lack of formal political mechanisms to facilitate longer-range policy making that extends 30 years or more into the future. Political mechanisms for infusing long-range thinking, research, and strategic planning into the policy-making process can help correct this shortcoming and provide the motivation needed to adequately address long-term challenges with the political rigor required to effectively establish and implement long-term policies. There are some efforts that attempt to address longer-range issues, but those efforts often do not connect to the political process, do not extend 30 or more years into the future, are not well-funded, and are not sufficiently systemic. Political mechanisms for long-range survival and prosperity could correct these inadequacies by raising awareness, providing funding, and most importantly, leveraging political rigor to establish and enforce long-range strategic planning and policies. The feasibility of such mechanisms should first be rigorously studied and assessed in a feasibility study, which could then inform implementation. This paper will present the case for such a study and suggest some possible political mechanisms that should be investigated further in the proposed study. This work is being further

  6. Trade-offs between seedling growth and survival in deciduous broadleaved trees in a temperate forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiwa, Kenji

    2007-03-01

    In spatially heterogeneous environments, a trade-off between seedling survival and relative growth rate may promote the coexistence of plant species. In temperate forests, however, little support for this hypothesis has been found under field conditions, as compared with shade-house experiments. Performance trade-offs were examined over a large resource gradient in a temperate hardwood forest. The relationship between seedling survival and seedling relative growth rate in mass (RGR(M)) or height (RGR(H)) was examined at three levels of canopy cover (forest understorey, FU; small gap, SG; and large gap, LG) and at two microsites within each level of canopy cover (presence or absence of leaf litter) for five deciduous broad-leaved tree species with different seed sizes. Within each species, both RGR(M) and RGR(H) usually increased with increasing light levels (in the order FU temperate forests, and that further species diversity would be promoted by increased spatial heterogeneity. The intraspecific trade-off between survival and RGR in Acer suggests that it has broad habitat requirements, whereas Betula has narrow habitat requirements and specializes in high-light environments.

  7. Effects of the artificial sweetener sucralose on Daphnia magna and Americamysis bahia survival, growth and reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggett, D B; Stoddard, K I

    2011-10-01

    The artificial sweetener sucralose has been detected in municipal wastewater effluent and surface waters at concentrations ranging from ng/L to low μg/L. Few chronic ecotoxicological data are available in the peer reviewed literature with respect to sucralose. To address this data gap, 21 d Daphnia magna and 28 d Americamysis bahia (mysid shrimp) studies were conducted to assess the effects of sucralose on the survival, growth and reproduction of these organisms. Concentrations ⩽1800mg/L resulted in no statistically significant reduction in D. magna survival or reproduction. Survival, growth and reproduction of mysid shrimp were unaffected by ⩽93mg/L sucralose. The no observable effect concentration (NOEC) and lowest observable effect concentration (LOEC) for the D. magna study were 1800 and >1800mg/L, respectively. The NOEC and LOEC for the mysid study were 93 and >93mg/L, respectively. Collectively, these data suggest that the concentrations of sucralose detected in the environment are well below those required to elicit chronic effects in freshwater or marine invertebrates. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Survival and growth of Cochlodinium polykrikoides red tide after addition of yellow loess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Sik; Kim, Jung Dong; Lim, Weol Ae; Lee, Sam Geun

    2009-11-01

    We examined the survival rate of Cochlodinium polykrikoides after yellow loess addition and conducted culture experiments to investigate the possibility that red tides maybe caused by C. polykrikoides individuals that are precipitated when loess is added. At least 15% of the C. polykrikoides cells that precipitated to the bottom layer either by the addition of loess or no addition survived for 1 week at all growth phases, rather than disappearing immediately after precipitating. However no live cells were observed after 20 days, regardless of phase or loess addition. In the exponential phase, the number of C. polykrikoides cells increased to >2886 cells ml(-1) after loess was added. However in the stationary phase, the number of cells did not increase until 18 days. In the exponential phase, those C. polykrikoides that survived precipitation caused by scattering loess on cultures did not appear to have the ability to cause red tides again because of the short red tide periods in the field, long lag time after loess addition, and low survival rate after loess addition.

  9. Environmental factors influencing growth and pubertal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delemarre-van de Waal, H A

    1993-07-01

    Postnatal growth is based on hereditary signals and environmental factors in a complex regulatory network. Each factor must be in an optimal state for normal growth of the child. Fetal conditions may also have consequences on postnatal height. Intrauterine growth retardation can be recovered postnatally, although postnatal growth remains depressed in about one-third of cases. After birth, the environment may exert either a positive or negative effect on growth. In underdeveloped countries, malnutrition plays a major role in inhibiting the growth process. Children from families of higher socioeconomic classes are taller than their coevals in the lower socioeconomic groups. Urbanization also has a positive effect on growth. Better child care is supported by sufficient food supply, appropriate health and sanitation services, and a higher level of education. Over the last century, these factors have induced a taller stature and a more rapid maturity in Europe, North America, and Australia; a phenomenon which has been referred to as "the secular trend" in growth. Recently, a secular trend has also been reported in some developing countries. Although urbanization in general appears to be associated with better conditions of living, this is not the case in the slums of South America or in Africa where rural children are better off than children living in the poor cities. This paper describes in more detail the different hereditary and environmental factors that act during the fetal period and postnatally, and which play a role in human growth and pubertal development.

  10. IAN family critically regulates survival and development of T lymphocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Nitta

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The IAN (immune-associated nucleotide-binding protein family is a family of functionally uncharacterized GTP-binding proteins expressed in vertebrate immune cells and in plant cells during antibacterial responses. Here we show that all eight IAN family genes encoded in a single cluster of mouse genome are predominantly expressed in lymphocytes, and that the expression of IAN1, IAN4, and IAN5 is significantly elevated upon thymic selection of T lymphocytes. Gain-of-function experiments show that the premature overexpression of IAN1 kills immature thymocytes, whereas short hairpin RNA-mediated loss-of-function studies show that IAN4 supports positive selection. The knockdown of IAN5 perturbs the optimal generation of CD4/CD8 double-positive thymocytes and reduces the survival of mature T lymphocytes. We also show evidence suggesting that IAN4 and IAN5 are associated with anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, whereas IAN1 is associated with pro-apoptotic Bax. Thus, the IAN family is a novel family of T cell-receptor-responsive proteins that critically regulate thymic development and survival of T lymphocytes and that potentially exert regulatory functions through the association with Bcl-2 family proteins.

  11. Jasmonate action in plant growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huang; Liu, Bei; Liu, Liangyu; Song, Susheng

    2017-03-01

    Phytohormones, including jasmonates (JAs), gibberellin, ethylene, abscisic acid, and auxin, integrate endogenous developmental cues with environmental signals to regulate plant growth, development, and defense. JAs are well- recognized lipid-derived stress hormones that regulate plant adaptations to biotic stresses, including herbivore attack and pathogen infection, as well as abiotic stresses, including wounding, ozone, and ultraviolet radiation. An increasing number of studies have shown that JAs also have functions in a remarkable number of plant developmental events, including primary root growth, reproductive development, and leaf senescence. Since the 1980s, details of the JA biosynthesis pathway, signaling pathway, and crosstalk during plant growth and development have been elucidated. Here, we summarize recent advances and give an updated overview of JA action and crosstalk in plant growth and development. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Effects of filamentous macroalgae on growth and survival of eelgrass, Zostera marina, seedlings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jonas; Krause-Jensen, Dorte; Olesen, Birgit

    Seedling survival and patch establishment is a major bottle-neck for eelgrass (Zostera marina) re-colonization as mortality rates among the young seedlings are high, even in areas where conditions should support survival. We here focus on the potential negative effects of drifting macroalgal mats...... on a 2-factorial laboratory experiment. Eelgrass seedlings were grown with three different heights and two different types of algae mats: Chaetomorpha linum and artificial macroalgae. The two types of mats were used to separate the physical and metabolic effects of algal presence. Concentrations...... and effects on seedling growth can thus be attributed to reduced light caused by shading of the algae. Generally, the seedlings are shown to be robust to short-term reductions in light availability, but further experiments are needed to elucidate the relative contributions of reduced light vs. anoxic...

  13. POVERTY, GROWTH AND INEQUALITY IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES

    OpenAIRE

    Guiga Housseima; Jaleleddine Ben Rejeb

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to assess the position of some developing countries in relation to different theories about the relationship between poverty, growth and inequality. We conducted an econometric analysis through a study using panel data from 52 developing countries over the period 1990-2005, to determine the main sources of poverty reduction and show the interdependence between poverty, inequality and growth by using a system of simultaneous equations. This method is rarely applied...

  14. The growth and survival of plants in urban green roofs in a dry climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzaghmanesh, M; Beecham, S; Kazemi, F

    2014-04-01

    Green roofs as one of the components of water-sensitive urban design have become widely used in recent years. This paper describes performance monitoring of four prototype-scale experimental green roofs in a northern suburb of Adelaide, South Australia, undertaken over a 1-year period. Four species of indigenous Australian ground cover and grass species comprising Carpobrotus rossii, Lomandra longifolia 'Tanika,' Dianella caerula 'Breeze' and Myoporum parvifolium were planted in extensive and intensive green roof configurations using two different growing media. The first medium consisted of crushed brick, scoria, coir fibre and composted organics while the second comprised scoria, composted pine bark and hydro-cell flakes. Plant growth indices including vertical and horizontal growth rate, leaf succulence, shoot and root biomasses, water use efficiency and irrigation regimes were studied during a 12-month period. The results showed that the succulent species, C. rossii, can best tolerate the hot, dry summer conditions of South Australia, and this species showed a 100% survival rate and had the maximum horizontal growth rate, leaf succulence, shoot biomass and water use efficiency. All of the plants in the intensive green roofs with the crushed brick mix media survived during the term of this study. It was shown that stormwater can be used as a source of irrigation water for green roofs during 8 months of the year in Adelaide. However, supplementary irrigation is required for some of the plants over a full annual cycle. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of UV-B irradiation on growth, survival, pigmentation and nitrogen metabolism enzymes in Cyanobacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, R.P.; Hader, D.P. [Institut fuer Botanik und Pharmazeutische Biologie, Friedrich-Alexander Universitaet, Erlangen (Germany); Kumar, H.D.; Kumar, A. [Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi (India)

    1995-12-31

    The effects of artificial UV-B irradiation on growth, survival, pigmentation, nitrate reductase (NR), glutamine synthetase (GS) and total protein profile have been studied in a number of N{sub 2}-fixing cyanobacterial strains isolated from rice (paddy) fields in India. Different organisms show different effects in terms of growth and survival. Complete killing of Anabaena sp. and Nostoc carmium occurs after 120 min of UV-B exposure, whereas the same occurs only after 150 min of exposure in the case of Nostoc commune and Scytonema sp. Growth patterns of the cells treated with UV-B revealed that Nostoc commune and Scytonema sp. are comparatively more tolerant than Anabaena sp. and Nostoc carmium. Pigment content, particularly phycocyanin, was severely decreased following UV-B irradiation in all strains tested so far. In vivo NR activity was found to increase, while in vivo GS activity was decreased following exposure to UV-B for different durations in all test organisms; although complete inhibition of GS activity did not occur even after 120 min of UV-B exposure. (author). 37 refs, 6 figs.

  16. glpx Gene in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Is Required for In Vitro Gluconeogenic Growth and In Vivo Survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiten J Gutka

    Full Text Available Several enzymes involved in central carbon metabolism and gluconeogenesis play a critical role in survival and pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb. The only known functional fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase in Mtb is encoded by the glpX gene and belongs to the Class II sub-family of FBPase. We describe herein the generation of a ΔglpX strain using homologous recombination. Although the growth profile of ΔglpX is comparable to that of wild type Mtb when grown on the standard enrichment media, its growth is dysgonic with individual gluconeogenic substrates such as oleic acid, glycerol and acetate. In mice lung CFU titers of ΔglpX were 2-3 log10 lower than the wild-type Mtb strain. The results indicate that glpX gene encodes a functional FBPase and is essential for both in vitro and in vivo growth and survival of Mtb. Loss of glpX results in significant reduction of FBPase activity but not complete abolition. These findings verify that the glpX encoded FBPase II in Mtb can be a potential target for drug discovery.

  17. Ant Mutualism Increases Long-Term Growth and Survival of a Common Amazonian Tree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Báez, Selene; Donoso, David A; Queenborough, Simon A; Jaramillo, Liliana; Valencia, Renato; Dangles, Olivier

    2016-11-01

    How ecological context shapes mutualistic relationships remains poorly understood. We combined long-term tree census data with ant censuses in a permanent 25-ha Amazonian forest dynamics plot to evaluate the effect of the mutualistic ant Myrmelachista schumanni (Formicinae) on the growth and survival of the common Amazonian tree Duroia hirsuta (Rubiaceae), considering its interactions with tree growth, population structure, and habitat. We found that the mutualist ant more than doubled tree relative growth rates and increased odds of survival. However, host tree size and density of conspecific neighbors modified the effect of the ant. Smaller trees hosting the mutualist ant consistently grew faster when surrounded by higher densities of conspecifics, suggesting that the benefit to the tree outweighs any negative effects of high conspecific densities. Moreover, our findings suggest that the benefit afforded by the ant diminishes with plant age and also depends on the density of conspecific neighbors. We provide the first long-term large-scale evidence of how mutualism affects the population biology of an Amazonian tree species.

  18. Environmental influence on life-history traits: Growth, survival, and fecundity in Black Brant (Branta bernicla)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedinger, James S.; Flint, Paul L.; Lindberg, Mark S.

    1995-01-01

    We studied relationships between body size of female Black Brant goslings (Branta bernicla nigricans) late in their growth period and first year survival, eventual adult body size, breeding propensity, and size and volume of clutches they eventually produced to examine the relationship between growth and fitness in this population. We indexed body size by calculating PC1 scores based on either culmen and tarsus, or culmen, tarsus, and mass. Gosling (PC scores based on culmen and tarsus) size was positively correlated with resighting rate (P = 0.005), indicating that larger goslings survived at a higher rate than did smaller goslings. Gosling size was correlated with adult size of the same individuals (P = 0.0004). Larger goslings were more likely to breed as 2- or 3-yr-olds than were medium or small goslings (P = 0.008). Larger adult brant laid more eggs (P = 0.03) and produced clutches with greater total volume (P = 0.03) than did smaller brant. Given the important role of foraging environment in growth of goslings, these data suggest an important role of early environment in determining life-history traits.

  19. Salt marshes as nurseries for nekton: testing hypotheses on density, growth and survival through meta-analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thomas J. Minello; Kenneth W. Able; Michael P. Weinstein; Cynthia G. Hays

    2003-01-01

    We examined the nursery role of salt marshes for transient nekton by searching the literature for data on density, growth, and survival of juvenile fishes and decapod crustaceans in marshes and using...

  20. Changes in growth and survival of Bifidobacterium by coculture with Propionibacterium in soy milk, cow's milk, and modified MRS medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qian Qian; You, Hyun Ju; Ahn, Hyung Jin; Kwon, Bin; Ji, Geun Eog

    2012-06-15

    Bifidobacterium adolescentis Int57 (Int57) and Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii ATCC 13673 (ATCC 13673) were grown either in coculture or as pure cultures in different media, such as cow's milk, soybean milk, and modified MRS medium. The viable cell counts of bacteria, changes in pH, concentrations of organic acids, and contents of various sugars were analyzed during incubation up to 7days. In soy milk, the survival of cocultured Int57 was six times higher than the monocultured cells, and ATCC 13673 cocultured with Int57 consumed 69.4% of lactic acid produced by Int57 at the end of fermentation. In cow's milk, coculture with ATCC 13673 increased the growth of Int57 from 24h until 120h by approximately tenfold and did not affect the survival of Int57 cells. After 96h of fermentation of modified MRS, the survival of ATCC 13673 cells cocultured with Int57 increased by 3.2- to 7.4-folds as compared with ATCC 13673 monoculture, whereas the growth of Int57 cells was unaffected. The growth and metabolic patterns of two strains during coculture showed noticeable differences between food grade media and laboratory media. The consumption of stachyose in soy milk during coculture of Int57 with ATCC 13673 was increased by more than twice compared with Int57 monoculture, and completed within 24h. The combinational use of Bifidobacterium and Propionibacterium could be applied to the development of fermented milk or soy milk products. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of functionalized fullerenes on bifenthrin and tribufos toxicity to Daphnia magna: Survival, reproduction, and growth rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brausch, Kathryn A; Anderson, Todd A; Smith, Philip N; Maul, Jonathan D

    2010-11-01

    Incorporation of carbon nanomaterials into industrial and consumer products is increasing, yet their impact on aquatic ecosystems alone and in chemical mixtures is largely unknown. Carbon nanomaterials may be found in the aquatic environment as mixtures with pesticides because of their proposed use in agriculture as smart delivery systems and nanosensors. The interaction effects of a functionalized fullerene ([1,2-methanofullerene C₆₀]-61-carboxylic acid) (fC₆₀) at 52.8 µg/L and the hydrophobic pesticides bifenthrin and tribufos were examined. The test organism was Daphnia magna, and response variables included 48-h survival, reproduction (bifenthrin, 70-d; tribufos, 21-d), and 10-d growth. Both pesticides reduced D. magna survival and reproduction (p Fullerenes significantly increased bifenthrin acute toxicity but did not significantly affect chronic endpoints or growth (p > 0.05). Median lethal concentrations (LC50s), median inhibition concentrations (IC50s) for days surviving, and IC50s for reproduction were 0.86, 0.55, and 0.49 µg/L for bifenthrin; 0.22, 0.39, and 0.77 µg/L for fC₆₀-bifenthrin mix; 6.63, 9.89, and 5.79 µg/L for tribufos; and 9.17, 8.17, and 6.59 µg/L for fC₆₀-tribufos mix. Mixtures did not affect instantaneous growth rate (p > 0.05). These results suggest that fC₆₀ had little effect on pesticide chronic toxicity but influenced acute toxicity. Given the widespread application of nanotechnology, the influence of nanomaterials on environmental contaminants is an important consideration. Thus, our results may be useful in the development and use of nanotechnology in agricultural practices. © 2010 SETAC.

  2. Sodium chloride inhibits the growth and infective capacity of the amphibian chytrid fungus and increases host survival rates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Pirrie Stockwell

    Full Text Available The amphibian chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis is a recently emerged pathogen that causes the infectious disease chytridiomycosis and has been implicated as a contributing factor in the global amphibian decline. Since its discovery, research has been focused on developing various methods of mitigating the impact of chytridiomycosis on amphibian hosts but little attention has been given to the role of antifungal agents that could be added to the host's environment. Sodium chloride is a known antifungal agent used routinely in the aquaculture industry and this study investigates its potential for use as a disease management tool in amphibian conservation. The effect of 0-5 ppt NaCl on the growth, motility and survival of the chytrid fungus when grown in culture media and its effect on the growth, infection load and survivorship of infected Peron's tree frogs (Litoria peronii in captivity, was investigated. The results reveal that these concentrations do not negatively affect the survival of the host or the pathogen. However, concentrations greater than 3 ppt significantly reduced the growth and motility of the chytrid fungus compared to 0 ppt. Concentrations of 1-4 ppt NaCl were also associated with significantly lower host infection loads while infected hosts exposed to 3 and 4 ppt NaCl were found to have significantly higher survival rates. These results support the potential for NaCl to be used as an environmentally distributed antifungal agent for the prevention of chytridiomycosis in susceptible amphibian hosts. However, further research is required to identify any negative effects of salt exposure on both target and non-target organisms prior to implementation.

  3. Effects of simulated Mars conditions on the survival and growth of Escherichia coli and Serratia liquefaciens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Bonnie J; Jenkins, David G; Schuerger, Andrew C

    2010-04-01

    Escherichia coli and Serratia liquefaciens, two bacterial spacecraft contaminants known to replicate under low atmospheric pressures of 2.5 kPa, were tested for growth and survival under simulated Mars conditions. Environmental stresses of high salinity, low temperature, and low pressure were screened alone and in combination for effects on bacterial survival and replication, and then cells were tested in Mars analog soils under simulated Mars conditions. Survival and replication of E. coli and S. liquefaciens cells in liquid medium were evaluated for 7 days under low temperatures (5, 10, 20, or 30 degrees C) with increasing concentrations (0, 5, 10, or 20%) of three salts (MgCl(2), MgSO(4), NaCl) reported to be present on the surface of Mars. Moderate to high growth rates were observed for E. coli and S. liquefaciens at 30 or 20 degrees C and in solutions with 0 or 5% salts. In contrast, cell densities of both species generally did not increase above initial inoculum levels under the highest salt concentrations (10 and 20%) and the four temperatures tested, with the exception that moderately higher cell densities were observed for both species at 10% MgSO(4) maintained at 20 or 30 degrees C. Growth rates of E. coli and S. liquefaciens in low salt concentrations were robust under all pressures (2.5, 10, or 101.3 kPa), exhibiting a general increase of up to 2.5 orders of magnitude above the initial inoculum levels of the assays. Vegetative E. coli cells were maintained in a Mars analog soil for 7 days under simulated Mars conditions that included temperatures between 20 and -50 degrees C for a day/night diurnal period, UVC irradiation (200 to 280 nm) at 3.6 W m(-2) for daytime operations (8 h), pressures held at a constant 0.71 kPa, and a gas composition that included the top five gases found in the martian atmosphere. Cell densities of E. coli failed to increase under simulated Mars conditions, and survival was reduced 1 to 2 orders of magnitude by the interactive

  4. Growth and survival of Apache Trout under static and fluctuating temperature regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recsetar, Matthew S.; Bonar, Scott A.; Feuerbacher, Olin

    2014-01-01

    Increasing stream temperatures have important implications for arid-region fishes. Little is known about effects of high water temperatures that fluctuate over extended periods on Apache Trout Oncorhynchus gilae apache, a federally threatened species of southwestern USA streams. We compared survival and growth of juvenile Apache Trout held for 30 d in static temperatures (16, 19, 22, 25, and 28°C) and fluctuating diel temperatures (±3°C from 16, 19, 22 and 25°C midpoints and ±6°C from 19°C and 22°C midpoints). Lethal temperature for 50% (LT50) of the Apache Trout under static temperatures (mean [SD] = 22.8 [0.6]°C) was similar to that of ±3°C diel temperature fluctuations (23.1 [0.1]°C). Mean LT50 for the midpoint of the ±6°C fluctuations could not be calculated because survival in the two treatments (19 ± 6°C and 22 ± 6°C) was not below 50%; however, it probably was also between 22°C and 25°C because the upper limb of a ±6°C fluctuation on a 25°C midpoint is above critical thermal maximum for Apache Trout (28.5–30.4°C). Growth decreased as temperatures approached the LT50. Apache Trout can survive short-term exposure to water temperatures with daily maxima that remain below 25°C and midpoint diel temperatures below 22°C. However, median summer stream temperatures must remain below 19°C for best growth and even lower if daily fluctuations are high (≥12°C).

  5. Expanding functional repertoires of fungal peroxisomes: contribution to growth and survival processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-ichi eMARUYAMA

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available It has long been regarded that the primary function of fungal peroxisomes is limited to the β-oxidation of fatty acids, as mutants lacking peroxisomal function fail to grow in minimal medium containing fatty acids as the sole carbon source. However, studies in filamentous fungi have revealed that peroxisomes have diverse functional repertoires. This review describes the essential roles of peroxisomes in the growth and survival processes of filamentous fungi. One such survival mechanism involves the Woronin body, a Pezizomycotina-specific organelle that plugs the septal pore upon hyphal lysis to prevent excessive cytoplasmic loss. A number of reports have demonstrated that Woronin bodies are derived from peroxisomes. Specifically, the Woronin body protein Hex1 is targeted to peroxisomes by peroxisomal targeting sequence 1 (PTS1 and forms a self-assembled structure that buds from peroxisomes to form the Woronin body. Peroxisomal deficiency reduces the ability of filamentous fungi to prevent excessive cytoplasmic loss upon hyphal lysis, indicating that peroxisomes contribute to the survival of these multicellular organisms. Peroxisomes were also recently found to play a vital role in the biosynthesis of biotin, which is an essential cofactor for various carboxylation and decarboxylation reactions. In biotin-prototrophic fungi, peroxisome-deficient mutants exhibit growth defects when grown on glucose as a carbon source due to biotin auxotrophy. The biotin biosynthetic enzyme BioF (7-keto-8-aminopelargonic acid synthase contains a PTS1 motif that is required for both peroxisomal targeting and biotin biosynthesis. In plants, the BioF protein contains a conserved PTS1 motif and is also localized in peroxisomes. These findings indicate that the involvement of peroxisomes in biotin biosynthesis is evolutionarily conserved between fungi and plants, and that peroxisomes play a key role in fungal growth.

  6. Opioid growth factor improves clinical benefit and survival in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill P Smith

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Jill P Smith1, Sandra I Bingaman1, David T Mauger2, Harold H Harvey1, Laurence M Demers3, Ian S Zagon41Departments of Medicine, 2Public Health Sciences, 3Pathology, and 4Neurosciences and Anatomy, Pennsylvania State University, College of Medicine, Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, PA, USABackground: Advanced pancreatic cancer carries the poorest prognosis of all gastrointestinal malignancies. Once the tumor has spread beyond the margins of the pancreas, chemotherapy is the major treatment modality offered to patients; however, chemotherapy does not significantly improve survival.Objective: Opioid growth factor (OGF; [Met5]-enkephalin is a natural peptide that has been shown to inhibit growth of pancreatic cancer in cell culture and in nude mice. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of OGF biotherapy on subjects with advanced pancreatic cancer who failed chemotherapy.Methods: In a prospective phase II open-labeled clinical trial, 24 subjects who failed standard chemotherapy for advanced pancreatic cancer were treated weekly with OGF 250 μg/kg intravenously. Outcomes measured included clinical benefit, tumor response by radiographic imaging, quality of life, and survival.Results: Clinical benefit response was experienced by 53% of OGF-treated patients compared to historical controls of 23.8% and 4.8% for gemcitabine and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU, respectively. Of the subjects surviving more than eight weeks, 62% showed either a decrease or stabilization in tumor size by computed tomography. The median survival time for OGF-treated patients was three times that of untreated patients (65.5 versus 21 days, p < 0.001. No adverse effects on hematologic or chemistry parameters were noted, and quality of life surveys suggested improvement with OGF. Limitations: Measurements other than survival were not allowed in control patients, and clinical benefit comparisons were made to historical controls.Conclusion: OGF biotherapy improves the

  7. Treatment Challenges and Survival Analysis of Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-positive Breast Cancer in Real World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adusumilli, Praveen; Konatam, Meher Lakshmi; Gundeti, Sadashivudu; Bala, Stalin; Maddali, Lakshmi Srinivas

    2017-01-01

    Advent of trastuzumab has brought tremendous changes in the survival of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (Her2)-positive breast cancer patients. Despite the availability of the drug, it is still out of reach for many patients. There is very limited real world data regarding treatment challenges and survival analysis of these patients. Primary objective is disease-free survival (DFS) and secondary objective is overall survival (OS) and toxicity profile. Statistical analysis is done using GraphPad Prism 7.02. This is a retrospective study of all patients diagnosed with Her2-positive (Her2+) nonmetastatic invasive breast cancer from January 2007 to December 2013. In the period of this study, 885 patients are diagnosed with carcinoma breast, of which 212 are Her2/neu positive (23.9%). Of the 212 patients, only 76 (35.8%) patients received trastuzumab along with chemotherapy. Patients receiving trastuzumab with chemotherapy have longer 5-year DFS compared to those receiving chemotherapy alone, 92% and 52.6%, respectively (P = 0.0001). Five-year OS is 90.5% and 41.7% in those patients who received chemotherapy with and without trastuzumab, respectively (P = 0.0001). Seven patients (9.45%) developed Grade II reversible diastolic dysfunction. Grade II/III peripheral neuropathy due to paclitaxel is the main adverse effect seen in 21 patients. In spite of improvement in DFS and OS with trastuzumab, the number of patient receiving targeted therapy is very low due to financial constraints which need to be addressed to bridge the gap in survival of Her2+ patients.

  8. Survival and growth of probiotic lactic acid bacteria in refrigerated pickle products

    Science.gov (United States)

    We examined 10 lactic acid bacteria that have been previously characterized for commercial use as probiotic cultures, mostly for dairy products, including 1 Pediococcus and 9 Lactobacilli. Our objectives were to develop a rapid procedure for determining the long-term survivability of these cultures ...

  9. Effects of environmental factors on growth, survival, and metamorphosis of geoduck clam (Panopea japonica A. Adams, 1850 larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongming Huo

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A series of experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of temperature, salinity, diet, and stocking density on the growth, survival, and metamorphosis of geoduck clam Panopea japonica larvae. The larvae all died at a temperature of 22 °C after day 12, suggesting that the larvae of P. japonica could not survive when the temperature was higher than 22 °C. P. japonica could be incubated at 19 °C for the fast growth, high survival and metamorphosis of larvae. The embryos all died when the salinity was below 25 ppt. The larvae showed poor survival when the salinity was below 25 ppt, with all larvae dying before day 12, suggesting that larvae are sensitive to low salinity. The optimum salinity for the growth, survival and metamorphosis of larvae was 32 ppt. The use of a mixture of Isochrysis galbana and Nitzschia closterium (1:1 as a food source for the P. japonica larvae improved their growth, survival, and metamorphosis. A density of 20 individuals/ml appeared to be optimal for normal D-larvae of Panopea japonica, and 3–9 larvae/ml was optimal for the growth and survival of the P. japonica larvae raised in the hatchery.

  10. Survival and growth of conservation shrubs and trees, with thin-cover reclamation on acid substrate, Iowa, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, L

    1986-09-01

    Many abandoned strip-mine sites in midwestern USA are highly acidic and require a separate layer of low-acidity cover materials for successful revegetation. Economics and logistics often constrain this reclamation to a very thin cover. Twenty-two species of shrubs and trees were tested for 6 years of survival and growth on a thin wedge of silt loess (up to 0.75m thick) emplaced over highly acid spoils, in south-central Iowa. No weed control or maintenance was provided. The performance of 21 of the species could be categorized into 3 groups: Group 1-consistent survival (10 species); Group 2-irregular survival and growth (6 species); Group 3-little suitability for survival (5 species). Mouldy nursery stock precluded evaluation of 1 species.For most species, the most favourable survival and growth was not on the thickest loess cover (0.75 meters) because weeds became too well established. In general, the shrubs survived severe weed competition in dwarfed form until they could break through the weed canopy. But the tree species had to penetrate the weed canopy within their first few years of growth or perish. There is evidence that if weed competition were reduced or eliminated, the species in Group 2 would probably have survival and growth equivalent to those in Group 1. The use of "tubelings" for establishing shrubs and trees on thincover reclamation sites is suggested.

  11. Effects of salinity on growth and survival in five Artemia franciscana (Anostraca: Artemiidae populations from Mexico Pacific Coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Castro-Mejía

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Salinity is an important factor influencing growth and survival of aquatic organisms such as Artemia, a valuable aquaculture species. This study evaluated the effects of salinity on A. franciscana populations from different water bodies in Mexico’s Pacific Coast. With this purpose, five autochthonous bisexual Artemia populations were tested to assess their survival and growth values against salinities of 40, 60, 80, 100 and 120g/l, under laboratory conditions (25±2ºC; pH 8-10; constant light and aeration. The organisms were fed with 100mL of rice bran and 2L of Tetraselmis suecica (500 000cel/ml. The culture experiments were made in 200L plastic tanks, and survival and growth final values were obtained after 21 culture days. Survival and growth curves were determined by a regression analysis (R². The significant differences between salinities were determined by ANOVA test (p<0.05. The best survival and growth rates were found at salinities of 100-120g/l. When the Mexican Artemia populations were cultivated at 40g/l of salinity, 100% mortality was observed in the juvenile stage. This study determined that survival and growth values of A. franciscana populations increased with salinity. The five A. franciscana populations presented significant differences in their survival rate under various salinity regimes. The studied populations experienced high mortality at salinities under 60g/l and over 200g/l, and especially during the metanauplius stage. The present study confirms that growth rates in Mexican A. franciscana populations from Pacific Coast habitats are not inversely proportional to salinity. These A. franciscana populations should be cultured at 100-120g/l of salinity to obtain better survival and growth rates. This data is useful to improve culture systems in aquaculture biomass production systems. Rev. Biol. Trop. 59 (1: 199-206. Epub 2011 March 01.

  12. Survival and Growth of Epidemically Successful and Nonsuccessful Salmonella enterica Clones after Freezing and Dehydration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Karoline; Aabo, Søren; Birk, Tina

    2012-01-01

    The spread of epidemically successful nontyphoidal Salmonella clones has been suggested as the most important cause of salmonellosis in industrialized countries. Factors leading to the emergence of success clones are largely unknown, but their ability to survive and grow after physical stress may...... contribute. During epidemiological studies, a mathematical model was developed that allowed estimation of a factor (q) accounting for the relative ability of Salmonella serovars with different antimicrobial resistances to survive in the food chain and cause human disease. Based on this q-factor, 26...

  13. Association between fertilizer-mediated changes in microbial communities and Aedes albopictus growth and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muturi, Ephantus J; Ramirez, Jose L; Rooney, Alejandro P; Dunlap, Chris

    2016-12-01

    Contamination of aquatic habitats with anthropogenic nutrients has been associated with an increase in mosquito larval populations but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. We examined the individual and combined effects of two synthetic fertilizers (ammonium sulfate and potassium chloride) on Aedes albopictus survival, development time, and sex ratio. The bacterial and fungal communities of water samples from different fertilizer treatments were also characterized by MiSeq sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene (bacteria) and internal transcribed spacer 1 (fungi) and their relationship with mosquito survival and development determined. Mosquitoes from ammonium sulfate treatment had significantly lower survival rates and longer development times compared to those from control, potassium chloride or a mixture of the two fertilizers. Fertilizer treatment had no significant effects on Ae. albopictus sex ratio although ammonium sulfate treatment tended to be more biased towards males relative to the other treatments. There were no significant effects of fertilizer treatment on fungal communities. However, potassium chloride treatments had lower bacterial diversity compared to the other treatments and the bacterial community structure of control and potassium chloride treatments differed significantly from that of ammonium sulfate and a mixture of the two fertilizers. Microbial composition but not diversity was significantly associated with mosquito survival and development. These findings suggest that anthropogenic nutrients can have a profound impact on mosquito survival and development. In addition to any potential direct effects on mosquito physiology, our results suggest that fertilizers can act indirectly by disrupting the microbial communities that provide a critical food resource for mosquito larvae. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Growth performance and survival of larval Atlantic herring, under the combined effects of elevated temperatures and CO2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Sswat

    Full Text Available In the coming decades, environmental change like warming and acidification will affect life in the ocean. While data on single stressor effects on fish are accumulating rapidly, we still know relatively little about interactive effects of multiple drivers. Of particular concern in this context are the early life stages of fish, for which direct effects of increased CO2 on growth and development have been observed. Whether these effects are further modified by elevated temperature was investigated here for the larvae of Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus, a commercially important fish species. Over a period of 32 days, larval survival, growth in size and weight, and instantaneous growth rate were assessed in a crossed experimental design of two temperatures (10°C and 12°C with two CO2 levels (400 μatm and 900 μatm CO2 at food levels mimicking natural levels using natural prey. Elevated temperature alone led to increased swimming activity, as well as decreased survival and instantaneous growth rate (Gi. The comparatively high sensitivity to elevated temperature in this study may have been influenced by low food levels offered to the larvae. Larval size, Gi and swimming activity were not affected by CO2, indicating tolerance of this species to projected "end of the century" CO2 levels. A synergistic effect of elevated temperature and CO2 was found for larval weight, where no effect of elevated CO2 concentrations was detected in the 12°C treatment, but a negative CO2 effect was found in the 10°C treatment. Contrasting CO2 effects were found for survival between the two temperatures. Under ambient CO2 conditions survival was increased at 12°C compared to 10°C. In general, CO2 effects were minor and considered negligible compared to the effect of temperature under these mimicked natural food conditions. These findings emphasize the need to include biotic factors such as energy supply via prey availability in future studies on interactive

  15. Tree survival and growth on land reclaimed in accord with Public Law 95-87

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaney, W.R.; Pope, P.E.; Byrnes, W.R. [Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States). Dept. of Forestry and Natural Resources

    1995-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine survival and growth of black walnut ({ital Juglans nigra} L.) and northern red oak ({ital Quercus alba} L.) 12 yr after planting on a surface-mined site in southern Indiana reclaimed according to specifications of Public Law 95-87, the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977. A stocking level adequate to meet the requirements for forest land use (1112 trees/ha, or 450 trees/acre) was attained only for black walnut and only if competing ground cover vegetation was controlled in the tree rows. Height of both tree species was significantly greater when ground cover vegetation was controlled during the first 2 yr, but the growth rate, approximately 10 cm/yr, was very slow. 19 refs., 3 figs.

  16. Survival and growth of selected pathogens in fermented kocho (Ensete ventricosum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigatu, A; Gashe, B A

    1994-08-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the antagonistic potential of fermented kocho, aqueous extract of fermented kocho and spent media from lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from it on Salmonella sp, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella sp, Bacillus cereus and Staphylococcus aureus. Fermented kocho (pH 4.3) inhibited growth of the test bacteria soon after their introduction into the food. The spent media from all of the four LAB, isolated from fermented kocho, namely Pediococcus sp, Leuconostoc sp, Lactobacillus sp and Streptococcus sp prevented the survival and growth of the test bacteria. The spent medium from Streptococcus sp showed the best antagonistic effect amongst all the LAB isolates. In all cases the inhibitory effects were independent of pH.

  17. Salinity fluctuation of the brine discharge affects growth and survival of the seagrass Cymodocea nodosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrote-Moreno, A; Fernández-Torquemada, Y; Sánchez-Lizaso, J L

    2014-04-15

    The increase of seawater desalination plants may affect seagrasses as a result of its hypersaline effluents. There are some studies on the salinity tolerance of seagrasses under controlled laboratory conditions, but few have been done in situ. To this end, Cymodocea nodosa shoots were placed during one month at four localities: two close to a brine discharge; and the other two not affected by the discharge, and this experiment was repeated four times. The results obtained showed a decrease in growth and an increased mortality at the localities affected by the brine discharge. An increase was detected in the percentage of horizontal shoots in respect to vertical shoots at the impacted localities. It is probably that not only the average salinity, but also the constant salinity fluctuations and slightly higher temperatures associated with the brine that may have caused physiological stress thus reducing C. nodosa growth and survival. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Population growth and development: an unexplained boom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesnais, J C

    1987-01-01

    The usual paradign of classical theory are unable to expalin an historical change as striking as the economic expansion of the poor countries. This failure is the result of 2 flaws in the initial approach. 1st, the "population question" is normally described as a race between 2 rates. Not only do population growth and economic development have common structural origins, but they are also both subject to dynamic and cumulative interaction. Consequently, a policy of improving cultural techniques, of building canals, or providing irrigation remove obstacles not only income growth but also to improved health conditions (resulting in further population growth). In turn, an improvement in health conditions is a powerful enough force to eliminate some traditional restraints on technological change and innovation. 2nd, the excessive attention paid to high fertility has led to neglect of the key role of declining mortality in today's population dynamics. A change in perspective has, from the economic standpoint, a decisive influence, for contrary to what was long accepted, the decline in mortality is far from an exogenous factor in economic development. On the contrary, a reduction in mortality is a precondition for long-term savings and private investment (because it extends the time frame of economic units). In this sense, income growth and population growth are linked a priori; they are 2 facets of the same phenomenon: development. Demographic growth and economic development are capable of reinforcing each other.

  19. Ecological implications of reduced forage quality on growth and survival of sympatric geese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, Samantha E; Leafloor, James O; Karasov, William H; McWilliams, Scott R

    2015-01-01

    Allometric constraints associated with digesting leaves require relatively small avian herbivores to consume high-quality forage. How such constraints are overcome during ontogeny when energy and nutrient requirements are relatively high has not been adequately explored. We compared growth trajectories of Canada and lesser snow goose goslings raised on grass-based diets that differed in protein (10%, 14% or 18%) and fibre (30% or 45%) with those of free-living goslings on Akimiski Island, Canada. This common-garden experiment allowed us to test the hypotheses that (i) smaller-bodied geese are more negatively affected by reduced forage quality than larger-bodied geese, and (ii) goslings from subarctic brood-rearing areas have a limited capacity to slow growth in response to reduced forage quality. Canada goose goslings fed low-protein (10%) diets were on average 44% lighter in body mass, had slower growth rates and were delayed >20 days in reaching 90% of asymptotic size compared with Canada goose goslings fed 18% protein. In contrast, snow goose goslings were unable to survive on the low-protein diets, and those fed high- or medium-protein diets grew at a similar rate and achieved similar asymptotic size. Canada and snow goose goslings fed low-protein diets had reduced growth rates of the tarsus and delayed emergence of the 9th primary. Free-ranging Canada goslings on Akimiski Island were similar in mass and structural size to captive-reared goslings fed low-protein diets. In contrast, snow goslings were similar in mass and structural size to the captive-reared goslings fed the high- and medium-protein diets. This suggests that degraded habitats with mostly low-protein forage may be able to support Canada goslings better than snow goslings which require higher-quality forage to survive. Size-related differences in gosling growth and survival in response to diminished diet quality may influence population size when available food reaches a lower threshold in

  20. Survival and growth of foodborne microorganisms in processed and individually wrapped cheese slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linton, Richard H; Harper, Nigel

    2008-03-01

    The objectives of the research reported here were to determine the growth, survival, or inactivation of selected microorganisms on individually wrapped processed cheese (IWC) slices stored at 5 degrees C and 22 degrees C, and to compare quality indices. IWC slices were spot-inoculated with foodborne pathogenic bacteria (Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, and Salmonella spp.), spoilage bacteria (Pseudomonas spp. and Lactobacillus spp.), and spoilage molds (Penicillium spp. and Cladosporium spp.). Each bacterium was inoculated at 10(5) CFUs/g for determination of growth, survival, or inactivation. Molds were inoculated at 10(2) spores per gram and observed for growth. Fifty percent of the inoculated product samples were held at 5 degrees C (to simulate refrigeration), and the other 50 percent were held at 22 degrees C (to simulate ambient temperature) throughout shelf life. Samples taken on days 0, 3, 7,10, 14, and 28 and after 2, 3, 6, and 9 months, and were evaluated for surviving cells (by means of appropriate selective media), color (with the cheese color guide), and lipid oxidation (by means of peroxide values). Bacterial inactivation was observed in all conditions. At 14 days, a 5-log reduction was observed for Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella, while a 3-log reduction was observed for Staphylococcus aureus. For Pseudomonas spp. and Lactobacillus spp., a 2-log reduction was observed within 3 days, with an additional 1-log reduction noted after several months. Mold levels showed no change during the first several weeks of storage. At 84 days, mold levels decreased at 5 degrees C, but they showed growth at 22 degrees C, to approximately 10(5) CFUs/g. Visual color was evaluated on a 10-point National Cheese Institute scale. During storage at 5 degrees C or 22 degrees C, color became darker and values increased from 4 to 5 and 4 to 7, respectively. Higher peroxide values were also obtained for the samples held at 22 degrees C versus 5 degrees C

  1. POVERTY, GROWTH AND INEQUALITY IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES

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    Guiga Housseima

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to assess the position of some developing countries in relation to different theories about the relationship between poverty, growth and inequality. We conducted an econometric analysis through a study using panel data from 52 developing countries over the period 1990-2005, to determine the main sources of poverty reduction and show the interdependence between poverty, inequality and growth by using a system of simultaneous equations. This method is rarely applied econometric panel data and especially in the case studies on poverty. Our results indicate that the state investment in social sectors such as education and health and improving the living conditions of the rural population can promote economic growth and reducing inequality. Therefore, the Kuznets hypothesis is based on a relationship between economic growths to income inequality is most appropriate.

  2. Initial effects of quinclorac on the survival and growth of high biomass tree species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua P. Adams

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Increasingly, short rotation woody crops are being planted for biofuel/biomass production on unused lands or marginal agricultural lands. Many of these plantations occur near agriculture land which is intensively managed including yearly herbicide applications. Herbicide drift from these applications may cause tree stress and decreasing yields impacting potential biomass production. Quinclorac, a rice herbicide, is often cited as a potential source of tree damage and is the focal herbicide of this study. Five planting stocks, including three eastern cottonwood clones, a hybrid poplar clone, and American sycamore, were assessed for herbicide affects and deployed at three sites across south Arkansas. Stocks were exposed to a full rate labeled for rice (3.175 L ha-1, two rates simulating drift (1/100th and 1/10th the full rate, and a no-spray control. Survival of all Populus clones decreased drastically as quinclorac rate increased, while there was little observed effect on American sycamore. Some variability in treatment response among poplars occurred below the full herbicide rate; however, direct spraying a full herbicide rate on poplars resulted in survival rates below 65 percent and negative growth rates due to dieback. Conversely, photosynthetic rates of remaining leaves increased as quinclorac rate increased. Survival and damage scores of American sycamore, regardless of herbicide rate, remained nearly constant.

  3. Growth, survival, proliferation and pathogenesis of Listeria monocytogenes under low oxygen or anaerobic conditions: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lungu, B; Ricke, S C; Johnson, M G

    2009-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram positive facultative anaerobe that causes listeriosis, a disease that mainly affects the immune-compromised, the elderly, infants and pregnant women. In the susceptible immune challenged population, listeriosis is very severe and has a fatality rate of up to 30%. Control of L. monocytogenes is difficult due to its: 1) widespread presence in the environment, 2) intrinsic physiological resistance, 3) ability to adapt to external stresses and 4) ability to grow at a wide range of temperatures. L. monocytogenes encounters anaerobic conditions in the external environment as well as during pathogenesis. Although L. monocytogenes is a facultative anaerobe, the differential effects of O(2) and oxidation-reduction potential on the multiplication of L. monocytogenes have not been established. In addition, most laboratory studies to determine the growth, survival and persistence of this pathogen in foods as well as in the environment have emphasized the response of this pathogen under aerobic conditions. Consequently, this has led to a limited understanding of the metabolic and physiological responses of L. monocytogenes in low oxygen environments. Therefore, the objective of our review was to highlight the progress that has been made in L. monocytogenes research with emphasis on the role of low oxygen and/or anaerobiosis in the growth, survival and proliferation of this pathogen in the environment as well as during pathogenesis.

  4. The Effect of Weaning Tecnique to Survival Rate and Height Growth of Nyamplung (Calophyllum inophyllum Plant

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    Ady Suryawan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Technical rehabilitation planning of BPDAS Tondano on coastal area has reached 10,000 hectares, thus require many seedlings. Nyamplung has potential as rehabilitation plant in coastal at the same time it can support national demand of biofuel. However the nurseries of nyamplung in North Sulawesi are not optimal and need appropriate information of weaning method. This research used completely randomized design with three treatment factors, namely 1 Cutting the leaves consist of two levels ie D1 (pair leaves and D2 (intact leaf; 2 Cutting intact seeds, consists of two levels i.e B1 (removed seed and B2 (intact seeds; and 3 Cutting the roots lenght consist of three levels i.e A1 (5 cm, A2 (10 cm and A3 (15 cm. There were 180 seedlings taken from seed that germinated using cocopeat media. Results of variance analysis showed that the applied treatment only affect the heigth growth. The survival rate is not affected by all treatments or in the other words survival rate reached 100 %. The treatments on leaves and seeds gave significant effect, on the contrary with root treatment. The treatment of intact leaf (D2 and intact seeds (B2 produced the best height growth responses i.e 4.60 cm and 4.63 cm.

  5. Cardiac metabolism and its interactions with contraction, growth, and survival of cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolwicz, Stephen C; Purohit, Suneet; Tian, Rong

    2013-08-16

    The network for cardiac fuel metabolism contains intricate sets of interacting pathways that result in both ATP-producing and non-ATP-producing end points for each class of energy substrates. The most salient feature of the network is the metabolic flexibility demonstrated in response to various stimuli, including developmental changes and nutritional status. The heart is also capable of remodeling the metabolic pathways in chronic pathophysiological conditions, which results in modulations of myocardial energetics and contractile function. In a quest to understand the complexity of the cardiac metabolic network, pharmacological and genetic tools have been engaged to manipulate cardiac metabolism in a variety of research models. In concert, a host of therapeutic interventions have been tested clinically to target substrate preference, insulin sensitivity, and mitochondrial function. In addition, the contribution of cellular metabolism to growth, survival, and other signaling pathways through the production of metabolic intermediates has been increasingly noted. In this review, we provide an overview of the cardiac metabolic network and highlight alterations observed in cardiac pathologies as well as strategies used as metabolic therapies in heart failure. Lastly, the ability of metabolic derivatives to intersect growth and survival are also discussed.

  6. Cardiac Metabolism and Its Interactions with Contraction, Growth, and Survival of the Cardiomyocte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolwicz, Stephen C.; Purohit, Suneet; Tian, Rong

    2013-01-01

    The network for cardiac fuel metabolism contains intricate sets of interacting pathways that result in both ATP producing and non-ATP producing end-points for each class of energy substrates. The most salient feature of the network is the metabolic flexibility demonstrated in response to various stimuli, including developmental changes and nutritional status. The heart is also capable of remodeling the metabolic pathways in chronic pathophysiological conditions, which results in modulations of myocardial energetics and contractile function. In a quest to understand the complexity of the cardiac metabolic network, pharmacological and genetic tools have been engaged to manipulate cardiac metabolism in a variety of research models. In concert, a host of therapeutic interventions have been tested clinically to target substrate preference, insulin sensitivity, and mitochondrial function. In addition, the contribution of cellular metabolism to growth, survival, and other signaling pathways through the production of metabolic intermediates has been increasingly noted. In this review, we provide an overview of the cardiac metabolic network and highlight alterations observed in cardiac pathologies as well as strategies employed as metabolic therapies in heart failure. Lastly, the ability of metabolic derivatives to intersect growth and survival are also discussed. PMID:23948585

  7. Resource availability and competition shape the evolution of survival and growth ability in a bacterial community.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minna Pekkonen

    Full Text Available Resource availability is one of the main factors determining the ecological dynamics of populations or species. Fluctuations in resource availability can increase or decrease the intensity of resource competition. Resource availability and competition can also cause evolutionary changes in life-history traits. We studied how community structure and resource fluctuations affect the evolution of fitness related traits using a two-species bacterial model system. Replicated populations of Serratia marcescens (copiotroph and Novosphingobium capsulatum (oligotroph were reared alone or together in environments with intergenerational, pulsed resource renewal. The comparison of ancestral and evolved bacterial clones with 1 or 13 weeks history in pulsed resource environment revealed species-specific changes in life-history traits. Co-evolution with S. marcescens caused N. capsulatum clones to grow faster. The evolved S. marcescens clones had higher survival and slower growth rate then their ancestor. The survival increased in all treatments after one week, and thereafter continued to increase only in the S. marcescens monocultures that experienced large resource pulses. Though adaptive radiation is often reported in evolution studies with bacteria, clonal variation increased only in N. capsulatum growth rate. Our results suggest that S. marcescens adapted to the resource renewal cycle whereas N. capsulatum was more affected by the interspecific competition. Our results exemplify species-specific evolutionary response to both competition and environmental variation.

  8. Interactive effects of selenium, methionine, and dietary protein on survival, growth, and physiology in mallard ducklings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, D.J.; Sanderson, C.J.; LeCaptain, L.J.; Cromartie, E.; Pendleton, G.W.

    1992-01-01

    Concentrations of over 100 ppm (100 mg/kg) selenium (Se) have been found in aquatic food chains associated with irrigation drainwater. Both quantity and composition of dietary protein for wild ducklings may vary in selenium-contaminated environments. Day-old mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) ducklings received one of the following diets containing 22% protein: unsupplemented (controls), 15 ppm Se (as selenomethionine), 60 ppm Se, methionine supplemented, 15 ppm Se with methionine supplement, or 60 ppm Se with methionine supplement. In a second concurrent experiment the above sequence was repeated with a protein-restricted (11%) but isocaloric diet. In a third concurrent experiment all ducklings received 44% protein with 0, 15, or 60 ppm Se added. After 4 weeks, blood and tissue samples were collected for biochemical and histological examination. With 22% protein and 60 ppm Se in the diet, duckling survival and growth was reduced and histopathological lesions of the liver occurred. Antagonistic interactive effects occurred between supplementary methionine and Se, including complete to partial alleviation of the following Se effects by methionine: mortality, hepatic lesions, and altered glutathione and thiol status. With 11% protein, growth of controls was less than that with 22% protein, Se (60 ppm) caused 100% mortality, and methionine supplementation, although protective afforded less protection than it did with 22% protein. With 44% protein, ducklings experienced physiological stress, and Se was more toxic than with methionine-supplemented 22% protein. These findings suggest the potential for antagonistic effects of Se, methionine, and protein on duckling survival and physiology.

  9. Differential survival and growth of wild and cultivated seedlings of columnar cacti: Consequences of domestication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillén, Susana; Casas, Alejandro; Terrazas, Teresa; Vega, Ernesto; Martínez-Palacios, Alejandro

    2013-12-01

    Studies of domestication of cacti in the Tehuacán Valley have identified morphophysiological divergences between wild and cultivated populations. To determine whether such divergences are associated with differential survivorship in xeric and mesic environments characterizing wild and cultivated habitats, respectively, we hypothesized that seedlings from cultivated populations are less tolerant of xeric environments and that differences between wild and cultivated populations are greater in species with higher management intensity. We compared size, survivorship, and absolute and relative growth rates (AGRs, RGRs) in shade and humidity gradients of seedlings from wild and cultivated populations of Stenocereus pruinosus, S. stellatus, Polaskia chichipe, and Escontria chiotilla. These species represent a range of management intensity, from highest to lowest, respectively. Seedlings of cultivated populations were larger than those of wild populations in all species studied. The AGRs were significantly different in P. chichipe and E. chiotilla associated with management, whereas the RGRs and seedling survival were significantly different in S. pruinosus and P. chichipe throughout the shade gradient tested. We also found significant differences in seedling survival among humidity treatments in E. chiotilla and among shade treatments in P. chichipe. Artificial selection favoring larger fruits favors larger seeds and seedlings. Seedling survivorship and growth of managed plants are generally higher in mesic environments apparently because of natural selection associated with habitat conditions. Such differences may contribute to morphophysiological divergences between wild and cultivated populations. Interspecific differences might be associated with adaptations to the natural environments where each species occurs.

  10. Ripping Improves Tree Survival and Growth on Unused Reclaimed Mined Lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields-Johnson, Christopher W.; Burger, James A.; Evans, Daniel M.; Zipper, Carl E.

    2014-06-01

    There is renewed interest in re-establishing trees on 0.6 million ha of mining-disturbed lands in the Appalachian mountains of Eastern United States. Many coal-mined lands reclaimed to meet requirements of US federal law have thick herbaceous vegetation and compacted soils which impede tree establishment. Mitigation practices were applied on three mine sites and evaluated for success in enabling planted trees to become established. Eastern white pine ( Pinus strobus), hybrid poplar ( Populus deltoids × Populus trichocarpa), and mixed Appalachian hardwoods were established using weed control only and weed control with subsoil ripping. Trees were measured in October of 2008 after 5 years of growth. Subsoil ripping increased mixed hardwood survival from 43 to 71 %, hybrid poplar biomass index from 1.51 to 8.97 Mg ha-1, and Eastern white pine biomass index from 0.10 to 0.32 Mg ha-1. When restoring trees to unused mined sites, subsoil ripping can aid survival and growth to an extent that will result in a valuable forest.

  11. Immune investment impairs growth, female reproduction and survival in the house cricket, Acheta domesticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bascuñán-García, Ana Priscila; Lara, Carlos; Córdoba-Aguilar, Alex

    2010-02-01

    We investigated whether an immune response is associated with growth, female reproduction and survival costs in the house cricket. Using different intensities of challenge immune (implantation of one piece of nylon (1N) and two nylons (2N), with their respective sham-challenge and control groups) with body size and exoskeleton thickness as response variables, growth costs were determined for both sexes. A similar methodology was followed for reproduction costs, in which egg number and size, and female survival were measured as response variables. It was also determined whether mated and virgin females showed different immune responses. Body size decreased with immune challenge but only in the 2N treatment. Exoskeleton thickness increased in both sham-challenge groups and the 1N group but decreased in the 2N group. Egg number decreased more in the sham-challenge groups followed by the 1N and 2N groups. The 2N group showed the largest egg size at the end of the experiment. In these females, 2N group died first followed by the 1N, two nylon sham and one nylon sham groups. Finally, mated females showed a lower immune response than virgin females. These results are consistent with ecological immunity theory. The discovery of exoskeleton-related costs of immunity and injury may have important implications for experimental design in studies of the cost of immunity. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Predicting the Performance and Survival of Islamic Banks in Malaysia to Achieve Growth Sustainability

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    Mazuin Sapuan Noraina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In Malaysia, the growth of the Islamic financial industry has increased tremendously in line with the Government’s ambition to make Malaysia as an international hub for Islamic finance since 2010. With the increasing number of foreign players in this industry plus with the increasing demand from domestic and foreign customers would further enhance the possibility for Malaysia to achieve this ambition. Currently, according to the Economic Transformation Programme, 2012 Malaysia is the world’s third largest market for Shariah assets that cover Islamic banks, Takaful, and sukuk. Malaysia as one of the main contributors to the global Islamic financial assets with Islamic assets in Malaysia grew by 23.8% in 2011 from RM350.8bil to RM434.6bil. The issues of predicting the performance and the survival of Islamic Banks in Malaysia become amongst crucial issues in academic research. By employing multi – layer perceptron neural network and pooled regression, we found that total assets/ size of the Islamic banks (GROWTH have high weightage and significantly influence in predicting the performance and the survival of Islamic banks in Malaysia. With the increasing number of Islamic banking institutions in Malaysia, this study can give insight on the sustainability of the Islamic banking system in Malaysia for the benefit of the investors, shareholder and depositors.

  13. Effect of hygiene and medication on preweaning survival and growth of Djallonké sheep in Atacora, Benin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doko, Sanni Y; Degla, Pamphile; Edoun, Gilbert O; Bosma, Roel H

    2013-01-01

    Low sheep productivity in North Benin hampers economic development, and improvement can contribute to reduction of rural poverty and food insecurity. To reduce one of the constraints to the productivity of Djallonké sheep, high mortality during suckling in full rainy and start dry season, we tested hygienic measures and medication in improved housing. The effect of the two treatments and their combination on lamb performance and the internal rate of return (IRR) were compared to a control. For each treatment, survival and growth were observed in 20 lambs, living in 38 herds. Good housing and hygiene (daily cleaning and fortnightly disinfection of stable and water and feed troughs) reduced mortality and increased growth of suckling lambs until 3 months. Good housing plus medication (unique injection of vitamins and amino acids and with ivermectine for deworming, weekly tick treatment by spraying, and in case of diarrhea, antibiotic treatment) reduced mortality, but growth was not higher than the control. Accounting labor opportunity, the IRR was about equal for both, but capital investment was lower for the hygiene treatment which is thus more accessible to poor farmers. The combination of both treatments increased growth and benefits compared with the hygiene treatment, but decreased the IRR.

  14. Implications of Changing Temperatures on the Growth, Fecundity and Survival of Intermediate Host Snails of Schistosomiasis: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinda, Chester; Chimbari, Moses; Mukaratirwa, Samson

    2017-01-13

    Climate change has been predicted to increase the global mean temperature and to alter the ecological interactions among organisms. These changes may play critical roles in influencing the life history traits of the intermediate hosts (IHs). This review focused on studies and disease models that evaluate the potential effect of temperature rise on the ecology of IH snails and the development of parasites within them. The main focus was on IH snails of schistosome parasites that cause schistosomiasis in humans. A literature search was conducted on Google Scholar, EBSCOhost and PubMed databases using predefined medical subject heading terms, Boolean operators and truncation symbols in combinations with direct key words. The final synthesis included nineteen published articles. The studies reviewed indicated that temperature rise may alter the distribution, optimal conditions for breeding, growth and survival of IH snails which may eventually increase the spread and/or transmission of schistosomiasis. The literature also confirmed that the life history traits of IH snails and their interaction with the schistosome parasites are affected by temperature and hence a change in climate may have profound outcomes on the population size of snails, parasite density and disease epidemiology. We concluded that understanding the impact of temperature on the growth, fecundity and survival of IH snails may broaden the knowledge on the possible effects of climate change and hence inform schistosomiasis control programmes.

  15. Implications of Changing Temperatures on the Growth, Fecundity and Survival of Intermediate Host Snails of Schistosomiasis: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chester Kalinda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Climate change has been predicted to increase the global mean temperature and to alter the ecological interactions among organisms. These changes may play critical roles in influencing the life history traits of the intermediate hosts (IHs. This review focused on studies and disease models that evaluate the potential effect of temperature rise on the ecology of IH snails and the development of parasites within them. The main focus was on IH snails of schistosome parasites that cause schistosomiasis in humans. A literature search was conducted on Google Scholar, EBSCOhost and PubMed databases using predefined medical subject heading terms, Boolean operators and truncation symbols in combinations with direct key words. The final synthesis included nineteen published articles. The studies reviewed indicated that temperature rise may alter the distribution, optimal conditions for breeding, growth and survival of IH snails which may eventually increase the spread and/or transmission of schistosomiasis. The literature also confirmed that the life history traits of IH snails and their interaction with the schistosome parasites are affected by temperature and hence a change in climate may have profound outcomes on the population size of snails, parasite density and disease epidemiology. We concluded that understanding the impact of temperature on the growth, fecundity and survival of IH snails may broaden the knowledge on the possible effects of climate change and hence inform schistosomiasis control programmes.

  16. Cholesterol Effect on Survival and Development of Larval Mud Crab Scylla serrata

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    MUHAMMAD AGUS SUPRAYUDI

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of cholesterol on the survival and development of larval mud crab Scylla serrata were examined by feeding larvae with Artemia enriched with different level of cholesterol. Artemia enriched with four stated levels of cholesterol i.e., 0, 5, 10, and 20 ul/l (Chol 0, 5, 10, and 20. All treatments were mixed with DHA70G at 25 ul/l. All the oil was adjusted to 100 ul/l by adding the oleic acid. Survival rate, intermolt period, and carapace width at the fisrt crab stage of mud crab larvae fed Chol 0, 5, and 10 were higher compared to that of Chol 20 (P < 0.05. We suggest that free sterol contained in Artemia at 1.37% was harmful to the growth performance of mud crab larvae. This study suggests that mud crab larvae required at least 0.61% cholesterol for maintaining good survival and development and therefore no need to enrich Artemia by cholesterol for the practical purpose.

  17. Variability in the effects of macroalgae on the survival and growth of corals: the consumer connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulleri, Fabio; Couraudon-Réale, Marine; Lison de Loma, Thierry; Claudet, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    Shifts in dominance from corals to macroalgae are occurring in many coral reefs worldwide. Macroalgal canopies, while competing for space with coral colonies, may also form a barrier to herbivorous and corallivorous fish, offering protection to corals. Thus, corals could either suffer from enhanced competition with canopy-forming and understorey macroalgae or benefit from predator exclusion. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the effects of the brown, canopy-forming macroalga, Turbinaria ornata, on the survival and growth of corals can vary according to its cover, to the presence or absence of herbivorous and corallivorous fish and to the morphological types of corals. Over a period of 66 days, two coral species differing in growth form, Acropora pulchra and Porites rus, were exposed to three different covers of T. ornata (absent versus medium versus high), in the presence or absence of fish. Irrespective of the cover of T. ornata, fish exclusion reduced mortality rates of A. pulchra. Following fish exclusion, a high cover of T. ornata depressed the growth of this branched coral, whilst it had no effect when fish species were present. P. rus suffered no damage from corallivorous fish, but its growth was decreased by high covers of T. ornata, irrespective of the presence or absence of fish. These results show that negative effects of T. ornata on some coral species are subordinate to those of fish predation and are, therefore, likely to manifest only on reefs severely depleted of predators. In contrast, space dominance by T. ornata may decrease the growth of other coral species regardless of predation intensity. In general, this study shows that susceptibility to predation may determine the severity of the effects of canopy-forming macroalgae on coral growth.

  18. Survival, growth and stress response of juvenile tidewater goby, Eucyclogobius newberryi, to interspecific competition for food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, Daniel A; Flynn, Erin E; Todgham, Anne E

    2016-01-01

    Reintroduction of endangered fishes to historic habitat has been used as a recovery tool; however, these fish may face competition from other fishes that established in their native habitat since extirpation. This study investigated the physiological response of tidewater goby, Eucyclogobius newberryi, an endangered California fish, when competing for food with threespine stickleback, Gasterosteus aculeatus, a native species, and rainwater killifish, Lucania parva, a non-native species. Survival, growth and physiological indicators of stress (i.e. cortisol, glucose and lactate concentrations) were assessed for juvenile fish held for 28 days in two food-limited conditions. When fed a 75% ration, survival of E. newberryi was significantly lower when held with G. aculeatus. In all fish assemblages, weight and relative condition decreased then stabilized over the 28 day experiment, while length remained unchanged. Whole-body cortisol in E. newberryi was not affected by fish assemblage; however, glucose and lactate concentrations were significantly higher with conspecifics than with other fish assemblages. When fed a 50% ration, survival of E. newberryi decreased during the second half of the experiment, while weight and relative condition decreased and length remained unchanged in all three fish assemblages. Cortisol concentrations were significantly higher for all fish assemblages compared with concentrations at the start of the experiment, whereas glucose and lactate concentrations were depressed relative to concentrations at the start of the experiment, with the magnitude of decrease dependent on the species assemblage. Our findings indicate that E. newberryi exhibited reduced growth and an elevated generalized stress response during low food availability. In response to reduced food availability, competition with G. aculeatus had the greatest physiological effect on E. newberryi, with minimal effects from the non-native L. parva. This study presents the first

  19. Filial cannibalism improves survival and development of beaugregory damselfish embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Adam G; Smith, Carl; Campbell, Andrew C

    2002-01-01

    Cannibalism of small numbers of offspring by a parent has been proposed as an adaptive parental strategy, by providing energy to support parental care. However, there are few empirical studies to support this hypothesis. We conducted field and laboratory experiments to investigate partial filial cannibalism in Stegastes leucostictus, a coral reef fish with paternal care. Partial cannibalism was shown to be common, and males were found to remove developing embryos from throughout a clutch in a random pattern, rather than in the more aggregated pattern seen during embryo predation. Males that received a diet supplement grew faster than control males, but did not engage in less cannibalism. Also, males did not concentrate cannibalism on early embryonic stages with the highest energetic value. Experimental reduction of embryo densities was found to significantly increase embryo development rate and survival from egg deposition to hatching, and experimental reduction of oxygen levels significantly increased rates of partial filial cannibalism by males. Artificial spawning sites with low oxygen levels were avoided by spawning females, and cannibalism rates by males were higher. We propose that partial filial cannibalism serves as an adaptive parental strategy to low oxygen levels in S. leucostictus by increasing the hatching success of embryos. PMID:12396483

  20. Recombinant Human Keratinocyte Growth Factor Induces Akt Mediated Cell Survival Progression in Emphysematous Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash Muyal, Jai; Kumar, Dhananjay; Kotnala, Sudhir; Muyal, Vandana; Kumar Tyagi, Amit

    2015-07-01

    Emphysema has been associated with decreased VEGF and VEGFR-2 expression and the presence of high numbers of apoptotic alveolar cells. Keratinocyte growth factor stimulates VEGF synthesis which in turn confers normal lung structure maintenance via the Akt pathway. In this study the potential role of rHuKGF in the improvement of deregulated Akt mediated cell survival pathway in emphysematous mice was investigated. Three experimental groups, i.e., emphysema, treatment and control groups, were prepared. Lungs of mice were treated on 3 occasions by oropharyngeal instillation of 10mg rHuKGF per kg body weight after induction of emphysema with porcine pancreatic elastase. Subsequently, lung tissues from mice were collected for histopathology and molecular biology studies. Histopathology photomicrographs and destructive index analysis have shown that elastase-induced airspace enlargement and loss of alveoli recovered in the treatment group. rHuKGF stimulates VEGF production which in turn induces the Akt mediated cell survival pathway in emphysematous lungs. mRNA expression of VEGF, VEGFR, PI3K and Akt was significantly increased while Pten, Caspase-9 and Bad was notably decreased in treatment group when compared with emphysema group, being comparable with the control group. Moreover, VEGF protein expression was in accordance with that found for mRNA. Therapeutic rHuKGF supplementation improves the deregulated Akt pathway in emphysema, resulting in alveolar cell survival through activation of the endogenous VEGF-dependent cell survival pathway. Hence rHuKGF may prove to be a potential drug in the treatment of emphysema. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Espana.

  1. Wnt5a mediates nerve growth factor-dependent axonal branching and growth in developing sympathetic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodmer, Daniel; Levine-Wilkinson, Seamus; Richmond, Alissa; Hirsh, Sarah; Kuruvilla, Rejji

    2009-06-10

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is a potent survival and axon growth factor for neuronal populations in the peripheral nervous system. Although the mechanisms by which target-derived NGF influences survival of innervating neurons have been extensively investigated, its regulation of axonal growth and target innervation are just being elucidated. Here, we identify Wnt5a, a member of the Wnt family of secreted growth factors, as a key downstream effector of NGF in mediating axonal branching and growth in developing sympathetic neurons. Wnt5a is robustly expressed in sympathetic neurons when their axons are innervating NGF-expressing targets. NGF:TrkA signaling enhances neuronal expression of Wnt5a. Wnt5a rapidly induces axon branching while it has a long-term effect on promoting axon extension. Loss of Wnt5a function revealed that it is necessary for NGF-dependent axonal branching and growth, but not survival, in vitro. Furthermore, Wnt5a(-/-) mice display reduced innervation of NGF-expressing target tissues, and a subsequent increase in neuronal apoptosis, in vivo. Wnt5a functions in developing sympathetic neurons by locally activating protein kinase C in axons. Together, our findings define a novel regulatory pathway in which Wnt5a, expressed in sympathetic neurons in response to target-derived NGF, regulates innervation of peripheral targets.

  2. p70S6 kinase signals cell survival as well as growth, inactivating the pro-apoptotic molecule BAD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harada, H; Andersen, Jens S.; Mann, M

    2001-01-01

    Cytokines often deliver simultaneous, yet distinct, cell growth and cell survival signals. The 70-kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p70S6K) is known to regulate cell growth by inducing protein synthesis components. We purified membrane-based p70S6K as a kinase responsible for site-specific phospho...

  3. Growth and Survival Rate of Redclaw Crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus Reared with Different Density in Recirculation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatag Budiardi

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to know the growth and survival rate of redclaw crayfish (Cherax quadricarinatus reared in recirculation system with density 20, 30, 40 and 50 m-2. Lobster with 6.02 ± 0.13 cm length and 6.23 ± 0.51 gram initial body weights were cultured in 60 x 30 x 40 cm aquarium and compiled in recirculation system, for 42 days. Result of research showed that there are statistically difference at growth rate daily weight, coefficient of variances and feed efficiency (p0.05. From this research it can be concluded that the best density for freshwater crayfish (Cherax quadricarinatus was 50 m-2.Keywords: density, growth, survival rate, redclaw crayfish,  Cherax quadricarinatus ABSTRAKPenelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui pertumbuhan dan kelangsungan hidup lobster capit merah (Cherax quadricarinatus yang dipelihara pada sistem resirkulasi dengan kepadatan 20, 30, 40 dan 50 ekor/m2. Benih lobster yang digunakan memiliki panjang awal rata-rata 6,02 ± 0,13 cm dan berat 6,23 ± 0,51 gram, dipelihara pada akuarium dengan ukuran 60 x 30 x 40 cm yang diisi air setinggi 20 cm dan disusun dalam sistem resirkulasi, selama 42 hari. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa terdapat perbedaan nyata pada laju pertumbuhan bobot harian, koefisien keragaman dan efisiensi pakan (p0,05. Dari hasil penelitian ini, dapat disimpulkan bahwa padat penebaran yang dapat memberikan hasil maksimum adalah 50 ekor/m2.Kata kunci: padat penebaran, pertumbuhan, kelangsungan hidup, lobster capit merah, Cherax quadricarinatus

  4. Public Education and Growth in Developing Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schuppert, Christiane; Wirz, Nadja

    Human capital plays a key role in fostering technology adoption, the major source of economic growth in developing countries. Consequently, enhancing the level of human capital should be a matter of public concern. The present paper studies public education incentives in an environment in which...... governments can invest in human capital to facilitate the adoption of new technologies invented abroad or, instead, focus on consumptive public spending. Although human capital is pivotal for growth, the model reveals that incentives to invest in public education vanish if a country is poorly endowed...... with human capital. Rather, governments of these poorly-endowed countries focus on consumptive public spending. As a result, while their better-endowed counterparts build up human capital thereby promoting technology adoption and growth, the growth process in poorly-endowed countries stagnates....

  5. Effects of salinity on growth and survival in five Artemia franciscana (Anostraca: Artemiidae) populations from Mexico Pacific Coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Mejía, Jorge; Castro-Barrera, Talía; Hernández-Hernández, Luis Héctor; Arredondo-Figueroa, José Luis; Castro-Mejía, Germán; de Lara-Andrade, Ramón

    2011-03-01

    Salinity is an important factor influencing growth and survival of aquatic organisms such as Artemia, a valuable aquaculture species. This study evaluated the effects of salinity on A. franciscana populations from different water bodies in Mexico's Pacific Coast. With this purpose, five autochthonous bisexual Artemia populations were tested to assess their survival and growth values against salinities of 40, 60, 80, 100 and 120 g/l, under laboratory conditions (25 +/- 2 degrees C; pH 8-10; constant light and aeration). The organisms were fed with 100 mL of rice bran and 2L of Tetraselmis suecica (500 000 cel/ml). The culture experiments were made in 200L plastic tanks, and survival and growth final values were obtained after 21 culture days. Survival and growth curves were determined by a regression analysis (R2). The significant differences between salinities were determined by ANOVA test (p salinities of 100-120 g/l. When the Mexican Artemia populations were cultivated at 40 g/l of salinity, 100% mortality was observed in the juvenile stage. This study determined that survival and growth values of A. franciscana populations increased with salinity. The five A. franciscana populations presented significant differences in their survival rate under various salinity regimes. The studied populations experienced high mortality at salinities under 60 g/l and over 200 g/l, and especially during the metanauplius stage. The present study confirms that growth rates in Mexican A. franciscana populations from Pacific Coast habitats are not inversely proportional to salinity. These A. franciscana populations should be cultured at 100-120 g/l of salinity to obtain better survival and growth rates. This data is useful to improve culture systems in aquaculture biomass production systems.

  6. The effect of nest box temperature on kit growth rate and survival in the American mink (Neovison vison)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Toke Munk; Malmkvist, Jens

    2015-01-01

    In this study we investigate the effect of nest box temperature and humidity on the growth and survival of approx. 700 mink litters. Surprisingly this study did not find any general biological explanatory temperature and/or humidity effects within days on the number of live born kits dying and kits...... growth. Instead parameters concerning litter composition did have significant effects on kit growth and survival. Litters with high number of Totborn and kit AliveD1 affected kit growth and kit viability negatively (increased number of live born kits dying), which indicates that factors acting...... on the female/litter prior to or during the parturition are an important determent of early kit growth and viability. The results indicate that females with large litters have less success by taken care of the kits compared to females with small litters. In addition litters with high mean growth were also...

  7. The emergence, growth and decline of political priority for newborn survival in Bolivia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Stephanie L

    2014-12-01

    Bolivia is expected to achieve United Nations Millennium Development Goal Four, reducing under-five child mortality by two-thirds between 2021 and 2025. However, progress on child mortality reduction masks a disproportionately slow decline in newborn deaths during the 2000s. Bolivia's neonatal mortality problem emerged on the policy agenda in the mid-1990s and grew through 2004 in relationship to political commitments to international development goals and the support of a strong policy network. Network status declined later in the decade. This study draws upon a framework for analysing determinants of political priority for global health initiatives to understand the trajectory of newborn survival policy in Bolivia from the early 1990s. A process-tracing case study methodology is used, informed by interviews with 26 individuals with close knowledge of newborn survival policy in the country and extensive document analysis. The case of newborn survival in Bolivia highlights the significance of political commitments to international development goals, health policy network characteristics (cohesion, composition, status and key actor support) and political transitions and instability in shaping agenda status, especially decline-an understudied phenomenon considering the transitory nature of policy priorities. The study suggests that the sustainability of issue attention therefore become a focal point for health policy networks and analyses. Published by Oxford University Press in association with The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine © The Author 2013; all rights reserved.

  8. Transgenic poplars with reduced lignin show impaired xylem conductivity, growth efficiency and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelker, Steven L; Lachenbruch, Barbara; Meinzer, Frederick C; Kitin, Peter; Strauss, Steven H

    2011-04-01

    We studied xylem anatomy and hydraulic architecture in 14 transgenic insertion events and a control line of hybrid poplar (Populus spp.) that varied in lignin content. Transgenic events had different levels of down-regulation of two genes encoding 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase (4CL). Two-year-old trees were characterized after growing either as free-standing trees in the field or as supported by stakes in a greenhouse. In free-standing trees, a 20 to 40% reduction in lignin content was associated with increased xylem vulnerability to embolism, shoot dieback and mortality. In staked trees, the decreased biomechanical demands on the xylem was associated with increases in the leaf area to sapwood area ratio and wood specific conductivity (k(s)), and with decreased leaf-specific conductivity (k(l)). These shifts in hydraulic architecture suggest that the bending stresses perceived during growth can affect traits important for xylem water transport. Severe 4CL-downregulation resulted in the patchy formation of discoloured, brown wood with irregular vessels in which water transport was strongly impeded. These severely 4CL-downregulated trees had significantly lower growth efficiency (biomass/leaf area). These results underscore the necessity of adequate lignification for mechanical support of the stem, water transport, tree growth and survival. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Growth and survival of Escherichia coli and enterococci populations in the macro-alga Cladophora (Chlorophyta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byappanahalli, M.N.; Shively, D.A.; Nevers, M.B.; Sadowsky, M.J.; Whitman, R.L.

    2003-01-01

    The macro-alga Cladophora glomerata is found in streams and lakes worldwide. High concentrations of Escherichia coli and enterococci have been reported in Cladophora along the Lake Michigan shore. The objective of this study was to determine if Cladophora supported growth of these indicator bacteria. Algal leachate readily supported in vitro multiplication of E. coli and enterococci, suggesting that leachates contain necessary growth-promoting substances. Growth was directly related to the concentration of algal leachate. E. coli survived for over 6 months in dried Cladophora stored at 4°C; residual E. coli grew after mat rehydration, reaching a carrying capacity of 8 log CFU g-1 in 48 h. Results of this study also show that the E. coli strains associated with Cladophora are highly related; in most instances they are genetically different from each other, suggesting that the relationship between E. coli and Cladophora may be casual. These findings indicate that Cladophora provides a suitable environment for indicator bacteria to persist for extended periods and to grow under natural conditions.

  10. Development of Rations for the Enhanced Survival of Salmon, 1983-1984 Progress (Annual) Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, David L.

    1985-04-01

    Hydroelectric development coupled with numerous other encroachments on the supply and quality of water has reduced the natural habitat for the spawning and rearing of salmon in the Columbia river system. Artificial production in hatcheries has become a critical link in the restoration of natural stocks of salmon. Released hatchery salmon must survive predation, be able to acquire sustainable nutrients under natural conditions, possess the vitality to surmount man-made impediments to seaward migration and adapt to a sea water environment. Survival of hatchery salmonids is dependent upon a number of factors. Time of release, natural food abundance, fish size and the health and/or quality of smolts all play synergistic roles. The nutritional and physical characteristics of ration regimes for hatchery fish plays a major role in determining the effectiveness of hatchery production and the health and/or quality of smolts.Ration regimes containing high quality components in uniform and fine-free pellet forms produce efficient growth response and minimize loss of nutrients maintaining the quality of hatchery water supply. Under such feed regimes, fish are less susceptible to disease and more uniform and desirable fish sizes can be achieved at release time. High quality smolts would help to optimize out-migration survival and successful adaptation to salt water.

  11. C. elegans AMPKs promote survival and arrest germline development during nutrient stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masamitsu Fukuyama

    2012-08-01

    Mechanisms controlling development, growth, and metabolism are coordinated in response to changes in environmental conditions, enhancing the likelihood of survival to reproductive maturity. Much remains to be learned about the molecular basis underlying environmental influences on these processes. C. elegans larvae enter a developmentally dormant state called L1 diapause when hatched into nutrient-poor conditions. The nematode pten homologue daf-18 is essential for maintenance of survival and germline stem cell quiescence during this period (Fukuyama et al., 2006; Sigmond et al., 2008, but the details of the signaling network(s in which it functions remain to be elucidated. Here, we report that animals lacking both aak-1 and aak-2, which encode the two catalytic α subunits of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK, show reduced viability and failure to maintain mitotic quiescence in germline stem cells during L1 diapause. Furthermore, failure to arrest germline proliferation has a long term consequence; aak double mutants that have experienced L1 diapause develop into sterile adults when returned to food, whereas their continuously fed siblings are fertile. Both aak and daf-18 appear to maintain germline quiescence by inhibiting activity of the common downstream target, TORC1 (TOR Complex 1. In contrast, rescue of the lethality phenotype indicates that aak-2 acts not only in the intestine, as does daf-18, but also in neurons, likely promoting survival by preventing energy deprivation during L1 diapause. These results not only provide evidence that AMPK contributes to survival during L1 diapause in a manner distinct from that by which it controls dauer diapause, but they also suggest that AMPK suppresses TORC1 activity to maintain stem cell quiescence.

  12. Endogenous growth theory and regional development policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cvetanović Slobodan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The numerous versions of endogenous explanations of economic growth emphasize the importance of technological change driving forces, as well as the existence of appropriate institutional arrangements. Endogenous growth theory contributes to a better understanding of various experiences with long-term growth of countries and regions. It changes the key assumptions of the Neoclassical growth theory and participates in the modern regional development physiology explanation. Based on these conclusions, the paper: a explicates the most important theoretical postulates of the theory, b explains the most important factors of economic growth in the regions in light of the Endogenous growth theory messages and c emphasizes the key determinants of regional competitiveness which in our view is conceptually between the phenomena of micro- and macro-competitiveness and represents their necessary and unique connection. First of all, micro-competitiveness is transformed into a regional competitiveness; then regional competitiveness is transformed into a macro-competitiveness. In turn, macro - influences the microeconomic competitiveness, and the circle is closed. After that, the process starts over again.

  13. Intrinsic competition and its effects on the survival and development of three species of endoparasitoid wasps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Jeffrey A; Gols, Rieta; Strand, Michael R

    2009-02-09

    In natural systems, pre-adult stages of some insect herbivores are known to be attacked by several species of parasitoids. Under certain conditions, hosts may be simultaneously parasitised by more than one parasitoid species (= multiparasitism), even though only one parasitoid species can successfully develop in an individual host. Here, we compared development, survival, and intrinsic competitive interactions amongst three species of solitary larval endoparasitoids, Campoletis sonorensis (Cameron) (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae), Microplitis demolitor Wilkinson, and Microplitis croceipes (Cresson) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), in singly parasitised and multiparasitised hosts. The three species differed in certain traits, such as in host usage strategies and adult body size. Campoletis sonorensis and M. demolitor survived equally well to eclosion in two host species that differed profoundly in size, Pseudoplusia includens (Walker) and the larger Heliothis virescens (Fabricius) (both Lepidoptera: Noctuidae). Egg-to-adult development time in C. sonorensis and M. demolitor also differed in the two hosts. Moreover, adult body mass in C. sonorensis (and not M. demolitor) was greater when developing in H. virescens larvae. We then monitored the outcome of competitive interactions in host larvae that were parasitised by one parasitoid species and subsequently multiparasitised by another species at various time intervals (0, 6, 24, and 48 h) after the initial parasitism. These experiments revealed that M. croceipes was generally a superior competitor to the other two species, whereas M. demolitor was the poorest competitor, with C. sonorensis being intermediate in this capacity. However, competition sometimes incurred fitness costs in M. croceipes and C. sonorensis, with longer development time and/or smaller adult mass observed in surviving wasps emerging from multiparasitised hosts. Our results suggest that rapid growth and large size relative to competitors of a similar age

  14. Effect of Adding the White Legged Shrimp (Penaeus vannamei on Growth and Survival of Tiger Shrimp (Penaeus monodon in Intensive Farming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    . Tarsim

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This experiment was carried out in the framework of a project to develop a viable shrimp polyculture technology under intensive farming. The objectives were to assess the effect of adding white legged shrimp (Penaeus vannamei on growth and survival of tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon in intensive Farming. Tiger shrimp were stocked in 2800-3400 m2 earthen ponds at 40 individuals/m2 and reared for 133 days. White legged shrimp added at 70 day at 8±2 individuals/m2. Growth rate and total yield affected by addition of this species. Final  affected by white legged shrimp addition. No adding effects were found on the water quality parameters. The results indicate that, at densities tested, white legged shrimp addition to the intensive farming of tiger shrimp polyculture is viable as species increase crop production Key words: Penaeus vannamei, P. monodon, growth, survival, polyculture

  15. A Study of Myometrial Growth and Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Stewart F; Oshri, Assaf; Heller, Debra S

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate myometrial growth and development. Thirty-five autopsy uteri, ranging from 10 weeks' gestation to age 18 years, acquired over 3 decades from 2 hospitals, were studied based on specimen availability, photographed for documentation, and reviewed at the end of the study. Most were embedded in toto, with 1 block and 1 slide per case. Some were immunostained for actin, CD10, MIB-1, and/or trichrome stain for collagen and muscle. Myometrial thickness was measured by ocular micrometry when sections were nontangential and analyzed by paired-sample t tests and bivariate linear regression. Two university-affiliated hospitals. From 20 to 34 weeks, lateral wall corpus thickness increased 6-fold, with a 4- to 6-fold perinatal burst of growth (P development. There was a pubertal burst of inframucosal myometaplasia. Myometaplasia accounted for most myometrial growth, especially in the perinatal and pubertal bursts of growth. Pressure effects, related to myometrial tone, appeared to affect myometrial development. True endocervix, with a fibrous wall and mucinous epithelium, appeared late in development. Copyright © 2015 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [Effect of different plant growth regulators on transplanting survival ratio of Haloxylon ammodendron seedling and parasitic ratio of Cistanche deserticola].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xia; Ma, Yong-qing; Song, Yu-xia; Shui, Jun-feng; Li, Xiu-wei

    2009-11-01

    To study the effect of different plant growth regulators on the transplanting survival ratio of Haloxylon ammodendron seedlings and parasitic ratio of Cistanche deserticola. Different combinations of PDJ and rooting powder were used for rooting soaking with Haloxylon ammodendron seedlings, then the survival ratio of Haloxylon ammodendron and parasitic conditions of Cistanche deserticola were statistical analyzed by SAS software. PDJ had promotable effect on the inoculating survival ratio of Haloxylon ammodendron and the parasitic ratio, parasitic number and size of Cistanche deserticola, but had no significant effect on the transplanting survival ratio. High concentration of PDJ (1 x 10(-5) mol/L) and rooting powder treatment improved the inoculation survival ratio, and low concentration of PDJ (1 x 10(6) mol/L) treatment improved the parasitic ratio of Cistanche deserticola, but PDJ with rooting powder treatment had inhibitive effect on the parasitism of Cistanche deserticola. Principal component analysis showed that the transplanting survival ratio, inoculating survival ratio, parasitic ratio and the parasited number of Cistanche deserticola could be taken to evaluate the effect of different plant growth regulators, and the comprehensive effect was the best with PDJ treatment. Rooting soaking with PDJ can be used to improve the survival ratio of Haloxylon ammodendron seedling and parasitic ratio of Cistanche deserticola.

  17. Survivability of Salmonella typhimurium L1388 and Salmonella enteritidis L1225 under stressful growth conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ngwai YB

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available In an earlier study with Salmonella typhimurium L1388 (ST and Salmonella enteritidis L1225 (SE isolated from diseased chickens, we found that SE formed more biofilm than ST on abiotic surfaces in a time-dependent manner. Since the ability of salmonellae to survive extreme environment is related to their virulence, the present study examined the survival of Salmonella typhimurium L1388 and Salmonella nteritidis L1225 under the usual stresses that salmonellae encounter during their life cycle. This is with a view to understanding the strains’ stress tolerance that could be used to explain their virulence. Incubation at 37oC for various time periods was done for: i stationary phase (SP cells at pH 2.6; ii log-phase (LP cells at pH 4.0; log-phase or stationary phase cells in broth containing iii hydrogen peroxide, iv sodium chloride and v ethanol; vi stationary phase cells in Hank’s balanced salt solution (single strength containing 10% human serum; and vii prolong stationary phase cells. Stationary phase cells were also incubated at 52oC for 15 min. Surviving cells at the various incubation times were counted on trypticase soy agar (TSA after appropriate dilution in saline and overnight incubation at 37oC. Growth iron-poor medium was determined by growing a single bacterial colony in Medium A with shaking at 37oC or 40oC for 24 h. Statistics was done by one-way analysis-of-variance (ANOVA at P = 0.05. Differences in the survival of ST and SE were insignificant (p>0.05 in acid pH at both pH 4.0 (p = 0.3783 and pH 2.6 (p = 0.4711; at high salinity for log-phase (p = 0.1416 and stationary phase (p = 0.1816 cells; in ethanol (p = 0.5984, human serum (p = 0.8139, prolonged stationary phase (p = 0.3506; and under heat (p = 0.5766. SE was significantly (p<0.05; p = 0.0031 more tolerant to oxidative-killing by hydrogen peroxide. Culturable growth of the ST and SE in an iron-poor medium A revealed insignificant differences at 37oC (p = 0.8381 but

  18. Proteomic analysis reveals the mechanisms of Mycena dendrobii promoting transplantation survival and growth of tissue culture seedlings of Dendrobium officinale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, X B; Ma, X Y; Lei, H H; Song, H M; Ying, Q C; Xu, M J; Liu, S B; Wang, H Z

    2015-06-01

    Dendrobium officinale is an important traditional Chinese medicinal herb. Its seedlings generally show low survival and growth when transferred from in vitro tissue culture to a greenhouse or field environment. In this study, the effect of Mycena dendrobii on the survival and growth of D. officinale tissue culture seedlings and the mechanisms involved was explored. Mycena dendrobii were applied underneath the roots of D. officinale tissue culture seedlings. The seedling survival and growth were analysed. The root proteins induced by M. dendrobii were identified using two-dimensional (2-D) electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight MS (MALDI-TOF-MS). Mycena dendrobii treatment significantly enhanced survival and growth of D. officinale seedlings. Forty-one proteins induced by M. dendrobii were identified. Among them, 10 were involved in defence and stress response, two were involved in the formation of root or mycorrhizae, and three were related to the biosynthesis of bioactive constituents. These results suggest that enhancing stress tolerance and promoting new root formation induced by M. dendrobii may improve the survival and growth of D. officinale tissue culture seedlings. This study provides a foundation for future use of M. dendrobii in the large-scale cultivation of Dendrobiums. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  19. Survival and growth of catfish Pangasionodon sp. larvae fed on vitamin C-enriched Artemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mia Setiawati

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The research was conducted to evaluate effect of the administration of Artemia enriched with vitamin C on the survival, total body length, and average body weight of Pangasionodon sp. larvae. Artemia were enriched with either 0, 50, 100, or 150 mg/L vitamin C immersed in the culture medium for 13 hours. Two days old larvae were fed on enriched Artemia 12 times/day for seven days. At the end of feeding experiment, it was found that fish fed on Artemia enriched with 100 mg/L culture medium had the highest survival, total length and body weight, respectively 76.17±12.78%, 1.63±0.34 cm, and 20.6±3.8 mg. Keywords: survival, growth, Artemia, vitamin C, catfish, Pangasionodon sp.  ABSTRAK Penelitian ini dilakukan untuk mengetahui pengaruh Artemia yang diperkaya dengan vitamin C dosis berbeda terhadap kelangsungan hidup, panjang total, dan bobot tubuh larva ikan patin Pangasionodon sp. Pada penelitian ini, Artemia diperkaya dengan vitamin C dosis 0, 50, 100, atau 150 mg/L media pengayaan. Larva yang berumur dua hari diberi pakan Artemia hasil pengayaan sebanyak 12 kali sehari selama tujuh hari masa pemeliharaan. Pada akhir percobaan, didapatkan bahwa larva ikan yang diberi Artemia diperkaya vitamin C dosis 100 mg/L media pengayaan memberikan kelangsungan hidup 76,17±12,78%, panjang total 1,63±0,34 cm, dan bobot tubuh paling tinggi 20,6±3,8 mg. Kata kunci: kelangsungan hidup, pertumbuhan, Artemia, vitamin C, ikan patin, Pangasionodon sp. 

  20. Green economic growth premise for sustainable development

    OpenAIRE

    Carmen Lenuţa TRICĂ; Marilena PAPUC

    2013-01-01

    Accelerating the global issues such as natural resource depletion, damage to the natural environment, economic and financial crises and consumption growth led to the shift of the development paradigm from consumption to sustainable development and recognition of the new path, namely green economy. At the European level a number of international organizations discussed issues of transition to green economy (EC, UNEP, OECD). In 2008, UNEP launched “Green Economy Initiative to Get the Global Mar...

  1. Enhanced Survival and Engraftment of Transplanted Stem Cells using Growth Factor Sequestering Hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Amit K.; Tharp, Kevin M.; Ye, Jianqin; Santiago-Ortiz, Jorge L.; Jackson, Wesley M.; Stahl, Andreas; Schaffer, David V.; Yeghiazarians, Yerem; Healy, Kevin E.

    2015-01-01

    We have generated a bioinspired tunable system of hyaluronic acid (HyA)-based hydrogels for Matrix-Assisted Cell Transplantation (MACT). With this material, we have independently evaluated matrix parameters such as adhesion peptide density, mechanical properties, and growth factor sequestering capacity, to engineer an environment that imbues donor cells with a milieu that promotes survival and engraftment with host tissues after transplantation. Using a versatile population of Sca-1+/CD45− cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs), we demonstrated that the addition of heparin in the HyA hydrogels was necessary to coordinate the presentation of TGFβ1 and to support the trophic functions of the CPCs via endothelial cell differentiation and vascular like tubular network formation. Presentation of exogenous TGFβ1 by binding with heparin improved differentiated CPC function by sequestering additional endogenously-produced angiogenic factors. Finally, we demonstrated that TGFβ1 and heparin-containing HyA hydrogels can promote CPC survival when implanted subcutaneously into murine hind-limbs and encouraged their participation in the ensuing neovascular response, including blood vessels that had anastomosed with the host’s blood vessels. PMID:25682155

  2. A flavonoid chrysin suppresses hypoxic survival and metastatic growth of mouse breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lirdprapamongkol, Kriengsak; Sakurai, Hiroaki; Abdelhamed, Sherif; Yokoyama, Satoru; Maruyama, Takeyuki; Athikomkulchai, Sirivan; Viriyaroj, Amornrat; Awale, Suresh; Yagita, Hideo; Ruchirawat, Somsak; Svasti, Jisnuson; Saiki, Ikuo

    2013-11-01

    Tumor hypoxia commonly occurs in solid tumors, and correlates with metastasis. Current cancer therapies are inefficient in curing metastatic disease. Herein, we examined effect of Thai propolis extract and its major constituent, chrysin, on hypoxic survival of 4T1 mouse breast cancer cells in vitro, and investigated its underlying mechanism. In vivo effect of chrysin on metastatic progression of cancer cells was studied, both as a single agent and in combination with another antimetastatic agent, agonistic monoclonal antibody targeting the DR5 TRAIL receptor (DR5 mAb). Thai propolis extract and chrysin decreased survival of 4T1 cells after exposure to hypoxia (1% O2), for 2 days. Immunoblot analysis revealed that chrysin inhibited hypoxia-induced STAT3 phosphorylation without affecting HIF-1α protein level. Chrysin also abrogated hypoxia-induced VEGF gene expression as determined by qRT-PCR. The in vivo effect of chrysin was determined in a spontaneous metastasis mouse model of breast cancer, either alone or in combination with DR5 mAb. Daily oral administration of chrysin in Balb/c mice implanted with 4T1 cells significantly suppressed growth of lung metastatic colonies. Moreover, antimetastatic activity of DR5 mAb was enhanced when given in combination with chrysin. We demonstrate that chrysin has potential in controlling metastatic progression.

  3. Survival Rate and Growth of Fighting Fish Larvae (Betta splendens Regan Fed on Various Live Foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Budiardi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Larval of fighting fish (Betta splendens Regan requires precise live foods for its growth and survival. In this experiment, fish larvae were fed on either Paramecium + Artemia, Paramecium + Artemia + Tubifex, Paramecium + Moina, or Paramecium + Moina + Tubifex. The fish were fed Paramecium from day-2 till day-7 after hatching. There after, the live food was changed according to the treatments till day-28.  Results showed that fish fed on Paramecium + Artemia significantly had the highest total length (12.63 mm than other treatments (11.86 mm. On the other hand, survival rate of fish had no significant affected by the treatments. Keywords: fighting fish, Betta splendens, Paramecium, Moina, Artemia, Tubifex, larvae   ABSTRAK Larva ikan betta (Betta splendens Regan membutuhkan jenis pakan alami yang tepat bagi kelangsungan hidup dan pertumbuhannya. Pada penelitian ini, larva ikan diberi pakan berupa Paramecium + Artemia, Paramecium + Artemia + Tubifex, Paramecium + Moina, atau Paramecium + Moina + Tubifex.  Ikan diberi pakan pakan berupa Paramecium dari hari ke-2 hingga hari ke-7. Setelah itu, pemberian pakan alami diubah berdasarkan masing-masing perlakuan hingga hari ke-28.  Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa ikan yang diberi pakan Paramecium + Artemia memiliki tubuh secara signifikan lebih panjang (12,63 mm dibandingkan perlakuan lainnya (11,86 mm.  Sementara itu, kelangsungan hidup tidak dipengatuhi oleh perlakuan. Kata kunci: ikan betta, Betta splendens, Paramecium, Moina, Artemia, Tubifex, larva

  4. Survival and growth of wildlife shrubs and trees on acid mine spoil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, D.K.; Adkisson, L.F.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the survival and growth of selected wildlife plants over a wide range of acid mine spoil conditions and to identify species suitable for surface mine reclamation. A major criterion in selection of study sites was inclusion of a wide range of spoil acidity conditions. The Ollis Creek (Study Area A) and Farrell (Study Area B) coal surface mines located in Campbell and Scott Counties, Tennessee, were selected for study. Seven plant species, all of which had been used in past reclamation demonstrations, were introduced on the 22 plots during March 1972. Autumn olive (Elaeagnus umbellata) was included as a control plant. Ten additional plant species were introduced during March 1973. With the exception of highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum var.). European filbert (Corylus avellana), and red maple (Acer rubrum), these species had not been used in TVA reclamation demonstrations. To assess the effects of spoil pH on the plants, the plots were grouped into seven pH categories, and mean percent survival and growth for each species were calculated. Results indicate that autumn olive, elaeagnus cherry, arnot locust, sawtooth oak, red maple, and Toringo crabapple are suitable for quick improvement of surface mine habitat over a wide range of spoil acidity in the Appalachian coalfield. Bessey cherry and European filbert need further study before a decision can be made regarding their reclamation utility. Species that are not recommended for quick habitat improvement over a wide range of surface mine spoil pH conditions include bush honeysuckle, barberry, Siberian crabapple, Manchu cherry, American beautyberry, bear oak, blueberry, rem-red honeysuckle, and redcedar.

  5. Survival and growth of micro-organisms on air filtration media during initial loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, P. C.; Neumeister-Kemp, H. G.; Lysek, G.; Murray, F.

    A new type of air filtration medium made from a hygroscopic polymer fibre and constructed in three layers was investigated to measure the survival and growth of micro-organisms on this medium in comparison to a widely used fibreglass medium. Both materials were supplied by the manufacturer and tested "blind". The materials were loaded in an Airotester unit. Micro-organisms were analysed at 2 weekly intervals for 8 weeks by washing filter samples and plating the solution on to agar media and by vital fluorescence microscopy. Filter samples were also weighed to calculate water content and the pH value of the filter material was measured in the wash out eluate. Vital fluorescence microscopy revealed fungi were able to grow on fibreglass medium, but not on the multi-layered polymer. The colony forming unit (CFU) counts did not increase at a steady rate. There was a significant increase on both materials ( P<0.001) during the first 2 weeks which was then followed by a significant decrease in 4 weeks ( P<0.001) but the CFU then significantly increased in 6 weeks ( P<0.05) which were the highest CFU counts during the 2-month trial. There was a significant difference in CFU counts between the filter materials only in week 2 ( P⩽0.001) and week 4 ( P=0.04). Fewer micro-organisms were extracted from the multi-layered polymer than from the fibreglass medium. Fewer fungal species were identified on the multi-layered polymer (nine species) than on the fibreglass medium (13 species). The pH value on the multi-layered polymer was significantly higher than the fibreglass material but only when clean ( P<0.010) and after 2 weeks ( P<0.001). A significantly higher water content on the fibreglass medium ( P<0.001) also indicated a habitat where a wider range of fungal species and bacteria are able to survive. While there was a reduced survival and growth of micro-organisms on the multi-layered polymer material in the initial month of service life, this advantage was cancelled by

  6. Evaluation of the influence of distinct diets on the survival and growth of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus (Echinodermata; Echinoidea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mafalda Maximino Rojão Sobreiro Catarino

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Sea urchins are an expensive delicacy in several regions of the world. Some species, like Paracentrotus lividus, have even been over-exploited in the wild, with relevant declines of their populations. Developing and improving aquaculture techniques, such as suitable feeding diets for their rearing, is therefore necessary. Paracentrotus lividus is preferably herbivorous, feeding mainly on macroalgae. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of 3 different types of diet on the survival and growth of P. lividus: Ulva sp., Asparagopsis armata and animal feed. A total of 45 wild individuals were subjected to an acclimation period at the laboratory. For each diet, 3 replicates, each one consisting of a tank containing 5 individuals, were assembled. The study lasted 6 consecutive weeks, and regular determinations of weight and diameter of the test of each animal, were performed. At the end, the gonadal index was also estimated. Mortality in the 3 diets was not very relevant, and a high survival was therefore observed. The variations in weight were not statistically different, but for the test diameter a small increase in the individuals fed with A. armata was detected. With the animal feed, the values of both variables decreased towards the end of the study. As for the gonadal index, statistical differences between the diets were not obtained. In conclusion, P. lividus adapted easily to captivity and the macroalgae diets were the most favourable for their development. Asparagopsis armata sustained the animals’ growth, while the animal feed proved to be the less suitable diet for P. lividus juveniles. Due to their low cost and ease of harvesting, macroalgal diets may be advantageous for small scale closed systems. Such an option may also assist in the environmental management of coastal areas, since Ulva sp. is abundant in eutrophic systems and A. armata is an invasive species in Europe.

  7. Do multiple micronutrient interventions improve child health, growth, and development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Usha; Goldenberg, Tamar; Allen, Lindsay H

    2011-11-01

    Micronutrient deficiencies are common and often co-occur in many developing countries. Several studies have examined the benefits of providing multiple micronutrient (MMN) interventions during pregnancy and childhood, but the implications for programs remain unclear. The key objective of this review is to summarize what is known about the efficacy of MMN interventions during early childhood on functional outcomes, namely, child health, survival, growth, and development, to guide policy and identify gaps for future research. We identified review articles including meta-analyses and intervention studies that evaluated the benefits of MMN interventions (3 or more micronutrients) in children (child morbidity, anemia, and growth. Two studies found no effects on child mortality. The findings for respiratory illness and diarrhea are mixed, although suggestive of benefit when provided as fortified foods. There is evidence from several controlled trials (>25) and 2 meta-analyses that MMN interventions improve hemoglobin concentrations and reduce anemia, but the effects were small compared to providing only iron or iron with folic acid. Two recent meta-analyses and several intervention trials also indicated that MMN interventions improve linear growth compared to providing a placebo or single nutrients. Much less is known about the effects on MMN interventions during early childhood on motor and mental development. In summary, MMN interventions may result in improved outcomes for children in settings where micronutrient deficiencies are widespread.

  8. Physiology and genetics of Listeria monocytogenes survival and growth at cold temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Yvonne C; Wiedmann, Martin

    2009-03-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen that can cause serious invasive human illness in susceptible patients, notably immunocompromised, pregnant women, and adults > 65 years old. Most human listeriosis cases appear to be caused by consumption of refrigerated ready-to-eat foods that are contaminated with high levels of L. monocytogenes. While initial L. monocytogenes levels in contaminated foods are usually low, the ability of L. monocytogenes to survive and multiply at low temperatures allows it to reach levels high enough to cause human disease, particularly if contaminated foods that allow for L. monocytogenes growth are stored for prolonged times under refrigeration. In this review, relevant knowledge on the physiology and genetics of L. monocytogenes' ability to adapt to and multiply at low temperature will be summarized and discussed, including selected relevant findings on the physiology and genetics of cold adaptation in other Gram-positive bacteria. Further improvement in our understanding of the physiology and genetics of L. monocytogenes cold growth will hopefully enhance our ability to design successful intervention strategies for this foodborne pathogen.

  9. The cancer glycocalyx mechanically primes integrin-mediated growth and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paszek, Matthew J; DuFort, Christopher C; Rossier, Olivier; Bainer, Russell; Mouw, Janna K; Godula, Kamil; Hudak, Jason E; Lakins, Jonathon N; Wijekoon, Amanda C; Cassereau, Luke; Rubashkin, Matthew G; Magbanua, Mark J; Thorn, Kurt S; Davidson, Michael W; Rugo, Hope S; Park, John W; Hammer, Daniel A; Giannone, Grégory; Bertozzi, Carolyn R; Weaver, Valerie M

    2014-07-17

    Malignancy is associated with altered expression of glycans and glycoproteins that contribute to the cellular glycocalyx. We constructed a glycoprotein expression signature, which revealed that metastatic tumours upregulate expression of bulky glycoproteins. A computational model predicted that these glycoproteins would influence transmembrane receptor spatial organization and function. We tested this prediction by investigating whether bulky glycoproteins in the glycocalyx promote a tumour phenotype in human cells by increasing integrin adhesion and signalling. Our data revealed that a bulky glycocalyx facilitates integrin clustering by funnelling active integrins into adhesions and altering integrin state by applying tension to matrix-bound integrins, independent of actomyosin contractility. Expression of large tumour-associated glycoproteins in non-transformed mammary cells promoted focal adhesion assembly and facilitated integrin-dependent growth factor signalling to support cell growth and survival. Clinical studies revealed that large glycoproteins are abundantly expressed on circulating tumour cells from patients with advanced disease. Thus, a bulky glycocalyx is a feature of tumour cells that could foster metastasis by mechanically enhancing cell-surface receptor function.

  10. The cancer glycocalyx mechanically primes integrin-mediated growth and survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paszek, Matthew J.; DuFort, Christopher C.; Rossier, Olivier; Bainer, Russell; Mouw, Janna K.; Godula, Kamil; Hudak, Jason E.; Lakins, Jonathon N.; Wijekoon, Amanda C.; Cassereau, Luke; Rubashkin, Matthew G.; Magbanua, Mark J.; Thorn, Kurt S.; Davidson, Michael W.; Rugo, Hope S.; Park, John W.; Hammer, Daniel A.; Giannone, Grégory; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.; Weaver, Valerie M.

    2015-01-01

    Malignancy is associated with altered expression of glycans and glycoproteins that contribute to the cellular glycocalyx. We constructed a glycoprotein expression signature, which revealed that metastatic tumours upregulate expression of bulky glycoproteins. A computational model predicted that these glycoproteins would influence transmembrane receptor spatial organization and function. We tested this prediction by investigating whether bulky glycoproteins in the glycocalyx promote a tumour phenotype in human cells by increasing integrin adhesion and signalling. Our data revealed that a bulky glycocalyx facilitates integrin clustering by funnelling active integrins into adhesions and altering integrin state by applying tension to matrix-bound integrins, independent of actomyosin contractility. Expression of large tumour-associated glycoproteins in non-transformed mammary cells promoted focal adhesion assembly and facilitated integrin-dependent growth factor signalling to support cell growth and survival. Clinical studies revealed that large glycoproteins are abundantly expressed on circulating tumour cells from patients with advanced disease. Thus, a bulky glycocalyx is a feature of tumour cells that could foster metastasis by mechanically enhancing cell-surface receptor function. PMID:25030168

  11. Growth and survival larvae of Argopecten nucleus fed with different microalgae diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yenia Katerine Carreño Hernández

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the diet on larval growth of the scallops Argopecten nucleus was studied, testing six microalgae diets composed by single-algae and mixed diets of the species Isochrysis galbana, Chaetoceros calcitrans y Tetraselmis suecica, handling a concentration per mL equivalent to 40000 cells of I. galbana and the response through the variables surviving, growth, appearance of the eye spot and state of condition (full, half-full and empty larvae was measured. The diets containing I. galbana showed greater results over all the measured variables, with regard to those where it was not present. In particular, the mixed diet I. galbana + C. calcitrans presented superiority over all variables, although in the most cases was statistically similar to I. galbana + C. calcitrans + T. suecica, I. galbana + T. suecica and I. galbana alone. For the opposite, the diets with the lowest results were C. calcitrans and C. calcitrans +T. suecica. The results obtained are principally attributed to the nutritional composition mainly of high unsaturated fatty acids (HUFA of each microalgae and each mixture supply, which is discussed in detail.

  12. The effects of grading on the growth and survival of juvenile Dover sole (Solea solea L)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overton, Julia Lynne; Steenfeldt, Svend Jørgen; Pedersen, Per Bovbjerg

    2010-01-01

    A 3-month study was carried out to investigate the effects of grading on the overall production, growth performance and survival of juvenile Dover sole (Solea solea L.). Juvenile fish (4.0–40.4 g) were sorted into three size groups: small (4.0–15.5 g), medium (16.0–21.5 g) and large (22.0–40.5 g...... the mean weight and distribution of sorted and unsorted fish by the end of the trial. An increased overall productivity in combined sorted fish was observed. Regular grading could therefore still be beneficial for sole farming as long as the grading interval supports maximum growth (in this case over 90......). In addition, a group of unsorted fish was followed for comparison. The fish from each sorted group and the unsorted group were divided between triplicate tanks at a stocking density of 1.5 kg m−2. The fish were weighed and counted 21, 42, 63 and 92 days after stocking. In addition, 30 randomly chosen fish...

  13. Sphingosine kinase-1 is central to androgen-regulated prostate cancer growth and survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey Dayon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sphingosine kinase-1 (SphK1 is an oncogenic lipid kinase notably involved in response to anticancer therapies in prostate cancer. Androgens regulate prostate cancer cell proliferation, and androgen deprivation therapy is the standard of care in the management of patients with advanced disease. Here, we explored the role of SphK1 in the regulation of androgen-dependent prostate cancer cell growth and survival. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Short-term androgen removal induced a rapid and transient SphK1 inhibition associated with a reduced cell growth in vitro and in vivo, an event that was not observed in the hormono-insensitive PC-3 cells. Supporting the critical role of SphK1 inhibition in the rapid effect of androgen depletion, its overexpression could impair the cell growth decrease. Similarly, the addition of dihydrotestosterone (DHT to androgen-deprived LNCaP cells re-established cell proliferation, through an androgen receptor/PI3K/Akt dependent stimulation of SphK1, and inhibition of SphK1 could markedly impede the effects of DHT. Conversely, long-term removal of androgen support in LNCaP and C4-2B cells resulted in a progressive increase in SphK1 expression and activity throughout the progression to androgen-independence state, which was characterized by the acquisition of a neuroendocrine (NE-like cell phenotype. Importantly, inhibition of the PI3K/Akt pathway--by negatively impacting SphK1 activity--could prevent NE differentiation in both cell models, an event that could be mimicked by SphK1 inhibitors. Fascinatingly, the reversability of the NE phenotype by exposure to normal medium was linked with a pronounced inhibition of SphK1 activity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We report the first evidence that androgen deprivation induces a differential effect on SphK1 activity in hormone-sensitive prostate cancer cell models. These results also suggest that SphK1 activation upon chronic androgen deprivation may serve as a

  14. Survival and development of Bactrocera oleae Gmelin (Diptera ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-07-18

    Jul 18, 2008 ... All developmental and survivorship tests were replicated five times. Multiple factorial design and analyses of variance (ANOVA) were used to test the effects of treatment on developmental time or survival rate. When a significant F value was obtained in the. ANOVA, means were then separated by Duncan's ...

  15. Surviving coral bleaching events: porites growth anomalies on the Great Barrier Reef.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neal E Cantin

    Full Text Available Mass coral bleaching affected large parts of the Great Barrier Reef (GBR in 1998 and 2002. In this study, we assessed if signatures of these major thermal stress events were recorded in the growth characteristics of massive Porites colonies. In 2005 a suite of short (<50 cm cores were collected from apparently healthy, surviving Porites colonies, from reefs in the central GBR (18-19°S that have documented observations of widespread bleaching. Sites included inshore (Nelly Bay, Pandora Reef, annually affected by freshwater flood events, midshelf (Rib Reef, only occasionally affected by freshwater floods and offshore (Myrmidon Reef locations primarily exposed to open ocean conditions. Annual growth characteristics (extension, density and calcification were measured in 144 cores from 79 coral colonies and analysed over the common 24-year period, 1980-2003. Visual examination of the annual density bands revealed growth hiatuses associated with the bleaching years in the form of abrupt decreases in annual linear extension rates, high density stress bands and partial mortality. The 1998 mass-bleaching event reduced Porites calcification by 13 and 18% on the two inshore locations for 4 years, followed by recovery to baseline calcification rates in 2002. Evidence of partial mortality was apparent in 10% of the offshore colonies in 2002; however no significant effects of the bleaching events were evident in the calcification rates at the mid shelf and offshore sites. These results highlight the spatial variation of mass bleaching events and that all reef locations within the GBR were not equally stressed by the 1998 and 2002 mass bleaching events, as some models tend to suggest, which enabled recovery of calcification on the GBR within 4 years. The dynamics in annual calcification rates and recovery displayed here should be used to improve model outputs that project how coral calcification will respond to ongoing warming of the tropical oceans.

  16. Growth and survival of Salmonella in ground black pepper (Piper nigrum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Susanne E; VanDoren, Jane M; Grasso, Elizabeth M; Halik, Lindsay A

    2013-05-01

    A four serovar cocktail of Salmonella was inoculated into ground black pepper (Piper nigrum) at different water activity (aw) levels at a starting level of 4-5 log cfu/g and incubated at 25 and at 35 °C. At 35 °C and aw of 0.9886 ± 0.0006, the generation time in ground black pepper was 31 ± 3 min with a lag time of 4 ± 1 h. Growth at 25 °C had a longer lag, but generation time was not statistically different from growth at 35 °C. The aw threshold for growth was determined to be 0.9793 ± 0.0027 at 35 °C. To determine survival during storage conditions, ground black pepper was inoculated at approximately 8 log cfu/g and stored at 25 and 35 °C at high (97% RH) and ambient (≤40% RH) humidity. At high relative humidity, aw increased to approximately 0.8-0.9 after approximately 20 days at both temperatures and no Salmonella was detected after 100 and 45 days at 25 and 35 °C, respectively. Under ambient humidity, populations showed an initial decrease of 3-4 log cfu/g, then remained stable for over 8 months at 25 and 35 °C. Results of this study indicate Salmonella can readily grow at permissive aw in ground black pepper and may persist for an extended period of time under typical storage conditions. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Basic fibroblast growth factor promotes the development of human ovarian early follicles during growth in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tian-ren; Yan, Li-ying; Yan, Jie; Lu, Cui-ling; Xia, Xi; Yin, Tai-lang; Zhu, Xiao-hui; Gao, Jiang-man; Ding, Ting; Hu, Wei-hong; Guo, Hong-yan; Li, Rong; Qiao, Jie

    2014-03-01

    What is the effect of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) on the growth of individual early human follicles in a three-dimensional (3D) culture system in vitro? The addition of 200 ng bFGF/ml improves human early follicle growth, survival and viability during growth in vitro. It has been demonstrated that bFGF enhances primordial follicle development in human ovarian tissue culture. However, the growth and survival of individual early follicles in encapsulated 3D culture have not been reported. The maturation in vitro of human ovarian follicles was investigated. Ovarian tissue (n= 11) was obtained from 11 women during laparoscopic surgery for gynecological disease, after obtaining written informed consent. One hundred and fifty-four early follicles were isolated by enzymic digestion and mechanical disruption. They were individually encapsulated into alginate (1% w/v) and randomly assigned to be cultured with 0, 100, 200 or 300 ng bFGF/ml for 8 days. Individual follicles were cultured in minimum essential medium α (αMEM) supplemented with bFGF. Follicle survival and growth were assessed by microscopy. Follicle viability was evaluated under confocal laser scanning microscope following Calcein-AM and Ethidium homodimer-I (Ca-AM/EthD-I) staining. After 8 days in culture, all 154 follicles had increased in size. The diameter and survival rate of the follicles and the percentage with good viability were significantly higher in the group cultured with 200 ng bFGF/ml than in the group without bFGF (P < 0.05). The percentage of follicles in the pre-antral stage was significantly higher in the 200 ng bFGF/ml group than in the group without bFGF (P < 0.05), while the percentages of primordial and primary follicles were significantly lower (P < 0.05). The study focuses on the effect of bFGF on the development of individual human early follicles in 3D culture in vitro and has limited ability to reveal the specific effect of bFGF at each different stage. The findings

  18. Redox control of plant growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocsy, Gábor; Tari, Irma; Vanková, Radomíra; Zechmann, Bernd; Gulyás, Zsolt; Poór, Péter; Galiba, Gábor

    2013-10-01

    Redox changes determined by genetic and environmental factors display well-organized interactions in the control of plant growth and development. Diurnal and seasonal changes in the environmental conditions are important for the normal course of these physiological processes and, similarly to their mild irregular alterations, for stress adaptation. However, fast or large-scale environmental changes may lead to damage or death of sensitive plants. The spatial and temporal redox changes influence growth and development due to the reprogramming of metabolism. In this process reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and antioxidants are involved as components of signalling networks. The control of growth, development and flowering by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and antioxidants in interaction with hormones at organ, tissue, cellular and subcellular level will be discussed in the present review. Unsolved problems of the field, among others the need for identification of new components and interactions in the redox regulatory network at various organization levels using systems biology approaches will be also indicated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Microorganisms Taken to Far Extreme: an Update on Their Survival adn Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, A.

    2006-12-01

    The questions that make geology at extremes so fascinating involve attempts on understanding the deep subsurface processes and their effect on what we find directly relevant at near surface short time scale interactions. What is the base of the biosphere? What are the various niches life as we know can persist? These are few of the questions that are relevant to deep subsurface geology. Not unlike any other scientific inquiry, along with extensive field and theoretical studies, these geomicrobiological questions need an experiment-based evaluation that can help constrain the geochemical parameters relevant to life's survival. Sharma et al. (2002) have taken a direct approach in constraining the microbial activity at extreme conditions by making observations within diamond anvil cells. Specific chemical component (formate) was used to constrain the metabolic activity of ambient pressure microbes at high pressures. This study opened up the possibility of life in radically extreme environments, often deficient of liquid water and showed that microbial life can find niches within the organic rich veins and inclusions, such as in (dense phase) ice. High resolution imaging within the diamond cell has provided a better insight into the state of the ambient pressure microbes. The author will present newer results on microbial survival at high pressures that provide in insight into the heterogeneous effect of high hydrostatic pressure affecting some microbes differently such that they do perish, while others remain largely viable. By monitoring microbial growth upon decompression, these experiments show the viability of the microbes at high pressures and hence the feasibility of a deep biosphere. The author will also present a combination of high temperature and pressure on the microbiological system at such far extreme conditions that show some surprising behavior.

  20. Growth and survival of Hippocampus erectus (Perry, 1810 juveniles fed on Artemia with different HUFA levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolás Vite-Garcia

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Survival during first months after birth is one of the bottlenecks for consolidating the seahorse farming industry. In this work, Artemia metanauplii enriched with two highly unsaturated fatty acids (HUFA rich commercial emulsions with different docosahexaenoic acid (DHA levels (63% and 14% of total lipids, a vegetable oil with no DHA, and non-enriched Artemia as control, were used to feed 5-day-old juvenile Hippocampus erectus for 60 days. Enriched Artemia had similar levels of DHA (13% and 9%, despite great differences of DHA in the emulsions, with traces of DHA in non-enriched and vegetable oil enriched Artemia. More than 20% of DHA was found in 24 h starved juveniles fed both DHA-enriched treatments, similar to values in newly born juveniles, but those fed vegetable oil enriched Artemia or non-enriched Artemia had 5% of DHA. Total lipid and protein levels were similar in juveniles from the four treatments. The n-3/n-6 ratio was almost four-fold higher in seahorses fed DHA-enriched treatments compared to juveniles fed the non-enriched treatments. Survival of seahorses only partially reflected the DHA levels: it was lower in the vegetable oil treatment, similar in the seahorses fed Artemia with higher DHA and in the control treatment, and higher in seahorses fed the HUFA-enriched Artemia with lower DHA levels, although growth was similar in the two DHA-enriched Artemia treatments. Juvenile H. erectus seahorses perform better when they have at least 20% of DHA in their tissues, and these levels can be attained with no more than 14% of DHA in emulsions, eliminating the need for more expensive emulsions with higher DHA levels.

  1. The influence of thymol+DMSO on survival, growth and reproduction of Bradybaena similaris (Mollusca: Bradybaenidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Ferreira

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Bradybaena similaris (Férussac, 1821, commonly known as the Asian trampsnail, is a terrestrial snail native to Asia, introduced in other regions of the world. In Brazil, populations of this land snail are distributed from the state of Amapá in the North to Rio Grande do Sul in the South. This species acts as an intermediate host for parasites and is a difficult-to-control agricultural pest as well, causing great losses to crops and ornamental plant cultivation. This land snail is easily reared in the laboratory and has been successfully used as a biological model in studies that aim at verifying molluscicidal effects of plant extracts. Several studies have demonstrated that B. similaris, like many other species of land and freshwater snails, is physiologically adapted to survival over transitory unfavorable environmental conditions. Moreover, this species seems to have a life history strategy characterized by a short life span and a maximal opportunistic reproductive effort during transient favorable periods. Such biological features may potentially lead to the inefficacy of control attempts and, simultaneously, make this species able to repopulate sites previously treated with biocides. For this reason, studies that aim at verifying the effect of molluscicides on the reproduction, growth and survival of molluscs are greatly required. Molluscicides of plant origin may represent a safe and effective way of controlling these animals. Thymol is a substance of plant origin which has bactericidal, fungicidal and anti-inflammatory properties and has been presented as a promissory biocide of mollusc species. The aim of this work was to assess the molluscicidal property of thymol in combination with DMSO against eggs and adults of B. similaris. During 120 days, we evaluated the effect of thymol+DMSO at different concentrations (2.5 g/L and 5 g/L on the hatching success, hatchling survival, growth and reproduction of B. similaris under laboratory

  2. Reflections of testicular damage on psychosexual development in adolescent males who survived childhood malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ropponen, P; Aalberg, V; Rautonen, J; Siimes, M A

    1994-01-01

    We studied testicular growth and psychosexual development in 41 young males who had survived malignancies in childhood. The focus of the study was evaluation of the connection between the possible pathologies of these two phenomena. The size of the testicles was measured in millilitres and compared with reference values. The psychosexual development was evaluated using three approaches: the interviewer's evaluation, the patient's subjective assessment and information gained by specific questions. On the basis of the developmental theory of adolescence described by Blos, the appropriate development in each criterion was defined. Our results indicated that both psychosexual and somatic development were impaired. A significant relationship existed between testicular size and three criteria assessed by the patients: the patients who felt that their pubertal development was different from that of their peers, those who felt that their developmental failures were related to their personal medical histories, and those who did not feel that they had the ability to have sexual intercourse and/or children. The last group had significantly smaller testicles than the others. We speculate that the perception of the small size of testicles may trigger the psychological experiences of failed development, leading to narcissistic problems in adolescent development. In order to prevent these harmful consequences it will be necessary for different specialists to work together with the families and patients.

  3. The influence of alternative plant propagation and stand establishment techniques on survival and growth of eastern cottonwood (Populus deltoides Bartr.) clones.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaczmarek, Donald J.; et. al.,

    2014-02-09

    Four eastern cottonwood clones, including standard operational clone ST66 and three advanced clonal selections were produced and included in a test utilizing five different plant propagation methods. Despite relatively large first-year growth differences among clones, all clones demonstrated similar responses to the treatments and clone 9 cutting treatment interactions were generally non-significant. The effects of changing cutting lengths are consistent with previous studies which indicated the potential for increased plant survival and growth with increased cutting lengths. Differences in stored carbohydrate reserves alone do not appear to completely control first-year growth and development of cuttings. First-year growth of 51 cm long cuttings planted 30.5 cm deep was greater than the same cuttings planted 48 cm deep. Stem form of plants derived from whip-tip propagation did not differ from plants derived from standard, unrooted cuttings. This propagation method offers the potential of far greater production capacity from a cutting orchard and rapid bulk-up of new or limited clones. Stand uniformity assessments suggest that surviving trees of each individual cutting treatment exhibit similar levels of growth variation. Optimization of plantation establishment techniques has the potential to increase growth of young Populus plantations.

  4. Effect of Different Medium on Survival Rate and Growth of Chironomus sp. Larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    . Widanarni

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available In the ornamental fish and fish for food culture, feeding by natural feed is very suitable since they are easy to digest and their size is suitable with  to larval mouth.  One of natural foods is blood worm Chironomus sp. larvae that has high protein content (till  65.2% of  protein. Until now, blood worm is obtained from nature and their stock depends on the weather.  That problem  may be overcome by culturing blood worm in appropriate culture medium.  Naturally, Chironomus sp. grows well in the water containing sago waste.  This study was carried out to examine the growth of Chironomus sp. reared in the medium containing mud, solid sago waste, solid tapioca wastes and water with no waste in depth of 0.5 cm. After 35-day rearing, survival rate of Chironomus sp was different among the treatments, while growth in length was similar. The best survival rate, 58.93% was obtained in the media containing solid sago waste.   Keywords: Chironomus, blood worm, sago waste, tapioca waste   ABSTRAK Dalam usaha budidaya ikan hias maupun ikan konsumsi, pemberian pakan alami sangat cocok karena mudah dicerna dan sesuai dengan bukaan mulut larva. Salah satu contoh pakan alami adalah Chironomus sp. (blood worm yang mempunyai kandungan protein mencapai 65,2%. Selama ini cacing darah diperoleh dari alam dan suplainya tergantung pada kondisi musim. Hal ini mungkin dapat diatasi dengan membudidayakan cacing darah dengan  media yang sesuai sebagai tempat hidupnya. Secara alami, Chironomus sp. dapat tumbuh dan berkembang dengan baik pada limbah sagu. Penelitian ini dilakukan untuk mengetahui pertumbuhan Chironomus sp. yang dipelihara pada media berupa lumpur, limbah sagu padat, limbah tapioka padat dan air tanpa limbah dengan ketebalan media 0,5 cm. Setelah 35 hari masa pemeliharaan, diketahui bahwa penggunaan media limbah padat sagu, limbah padat tapioka, lumpur dan air tanpa limbah pada pemeliharaan Chironomus sp. masing-masing menghasilkan tingkat

  5. Effect of oxygen stress on growth and survival of Clostridium perfringens, Campylobacter jejuni, and Listeria monocytogenes under different storage conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qadiri, Hamzah; Sablani, Shyam S; Ovissipour, Mahmoudreza; Al-Alami, Nivin; Govindan, Byju; Rasco, Barbara

    2015-04-01

    This study investigated the growth and survival of three foodborne pathogens (Clostridium perfringens, Campylobacter jejuni, and Listeria monocytogenes) in beef (7% fat) and nutrient broth under different oxygen levels. Samples were tested under anoxic (perfringens could grow in beef at 22 °C, with an increase of approximately 5 log under anoxic conditions and a 1-log increase under microoxic conditions. However, C. perfringens could not survive in beef held at 7 °C under microoxic and oxic storage conditions after 14 days. In an anoxic environment, C. perfringens survived in beef samples held at 7 °C, with a 1-log reduction. A cell decline was observed at 2 log under these conditions, with no surviving cells at the 1-log level. However, the results show that C. jejuni under microoxic conditions survived with declining cell numbers. Significant increases in L. monocytogenes (5 to 7 log) were observed in beef held at 22 °C for 5 days, with the lowest levels recovered under anoxic conditions. L. monocytogenes in refrigerated storage increased by a factor of 2 to 4 log. It showed the greatest growth under oxic conditions, with significant growth under anoxic conditions. These findings can be used to enhance food safety in vacuum-packed and modified atmosphere-packaged food products.

  6. A Comparison of Growth and Survival of Aquacultured Juvenile Florida Pompano fed Fishmeal and Plant-Based Diets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budden, D.

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the growth and survival of aquacultured juvenile Florida Pompano (Trachinotus carolinus) fed two different diets. Pompano (initial weight 7.7 g /fish) were randomly assigned to one of two dietary treatments: Zeigler pellets (fishmeal; 35% protein, 5% lipid) and a plant-based Repashy Soilent Green algae gel (plant-based; 35% protein, 6% lipid). Fish were fed rations of 5% body weight twice daily for eight weeks. Despite nearly equivalent proximate compositions for the two feeds, survival rates were significantly affected by diet. All fish fed the Zeigler diet survived; however, mortality was observed in 92% of the fish fed the Repashy diet. At the end of the trial, mean weight gain of surviving pompano was highest in fish fed Zeigler pellets. Mean specific growth rate (SGR) for fish fed the Zeigler diet (0.24% per day) was higher than for fish fed Repashy (-2.44%).While plant-based feeds have been successfully used with the species, these results suggest that the plant-based Repashy diet is not suitable for survival or growth of aquacultured Florida pompano.

  7. Distinct effectors of platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α signaling are required for cell survival during embryogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Stry, Melanie; Kazlauskas, Andrius; Schreiber, Stuart L.; Symes, Karen

    2005-01-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) signaling is essential for normal embryonic development in many organisms, including frog, mouse, zebrafish, and sea urchin. The mode of action of PDGFR signaling during early development is poorly understood, however, mostly because inhibition of signaling through either the PDGFRα or PDGFRβ is embryonic lethal. In Xenopus embryos, disruption of PDGFRα signaling causes migrating anterior mesoderm cells to lose direction and undergo apoptosis through the mitochondrial pathway. To understand the mechanism of PDGFRα function in this process, we have analyzed all known effector-binding sites in vivo. By using a chemical inducer of dimerization to activate chimera PDGFRαs, we have identified a role for phospholipase Cγ (PLCγ) in protecting cells from death. PDGFRα-mediated cell survival requires PLCγ and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling, and that PDGFRα with binding sites for these two signaling factors is sufficient for this activity. Other effectors of PDGFRα signaling, Shf, SHP-2, and Crk, are not required for this process. Thus, our findings show that PDGFRα signaling through PLCγ and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase has a protective role in preventing apoptosis in early development. Furthermore, we demonstrate that small molecule inducers of dimerization provide a powerful system to manipulate receptor function in developing embryos. PMID:15919820

  8. Distinct effectors of platelet-derived growth factor receptor-alpha signaling are required for cell survival during embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Stry, Melanie; Kazlauskas, Andrius; Schreiber, Stuart L; Symes, Karen

    2005-06-07

    Platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) signaling is essential for normal embryonic development in many organisms, including frog, mouse, zebrafish, and sea urchin. The mode of action of PDGFR signaling during early development is poorly understood, however, mostly because inhibition of signaling through either the PDGFRalpha or PDGFRbeta is embryonic lethal. In Xenopus embryos, disruption of PDGFRalpha signaling causes migrating anterior mesoderm cells to lose direction and undergo apoptosis through the mitochondrial pathway. To understand the mechanism of PDGFRalpha function in this process, we have analyzed all known effector-binding sites in vivo. By using a chemical inducer of dimerization to activate chimera PDGFRalphas, we have identified a role for phospholipase Cgamma (PLCgamma) in protecting cells from death. PDGFRalpha-mediated cell survival requires PLCgamma and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling, and that PDGFRalpha with binding sites for these two signaling factors is sufficient for this activity. Other effectors of PDGFRalpha signaling, Shf, SHP-2, and Crk, are not required for this process. Thus, our findings show that PDGFRalpha signaling through PLCgamma and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase has a protective role in preventing apoptosis in early development. Furthermore, we demonstrate that small molecule inducers of dimerization provide a powerful system to manipulate receptor function in developing embryos.

  9. Nutrition and bone growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prentice, Ann; Schoenmakers, Inez; Laskey, M Ann; de Bono, Stephanie; Ginty, Fiona; Goldberg, Gail R

    2006-11-01

    The growth and development of the human skeleton requires an adequate supply of many different nutritional factors. Classical nutrient deficiencies are associated with stunting (e.g. energy, protein, Zn), rickets (e.g. vitamin D) and other bone abnormalities (e.g. Cu, Zn, vitamin C). In recent years there has been interest in the role nutrition may play in bone growth at intakes above those required to prevent classical deficiencies, particularly in relation to optimising peak bone mass and minimising osteoporosis risk. There is evidence to suggest that peak bone mass and later fracture risk are influenced by the pattern of growth in childhood and by nutritional exposures in utero, in infancy and during childhood and adolescence. Of the individual nutrients, particular attention has been paid to Ca, vitamin D, protein and P. There has also been interest in several food groups, particularly dairy products, fruit and vegetables and foods contributing to acid-base balance. However, it is not possible at the present time to define dietary reference values using bone health as a criterion, and the question of what type of diet constitutes the best support for optimal bone growth and development remains open. Prudent recommendations (Department of Health, 1998; World Health Organization/Food and Agriculture Organization, 2003) are the same as those for adults, i.e. to consume a Ca intake close to the reference nutrient intake, optimise vitamin D status through adequate summer sunshine exposure (and diet supplementation where appropriate), be physically active, have a body weight in the healthy range, restrict salt intake and consume plenty of fruit and vegetables.

  10. Development of the larval amphibian growth and development ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Larval Amphibian Growth and Development Assay (LAGDA) is a Tier II test guideline being developed by the US Environmental Protection Agency under the Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program. The LAGDA was designed to evaluate effects of chronic chemical exposure on growth, thyroid-mediated amphibian metamorphosis and reproductive development. To evaluate the assay’s performance, two model chemicals targeting the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis were tested; a weak estrogen receptor agonist, 4-tert-octylphenol (tOP), and an androgen receptor agonist, 17β-trenbolone (TB). Xenopus laevis embryos were constantly exposed in flow-through conditions to various test concentrations of tOP (nominal: 6.25, 12.5, 25, 50 μg/L) or TB (nominal: 12.5, 25, 50, 100 ng/L) and clean water controls until 8 weeks post-metamorphosis, at which time growth measurements were taken and histopathology assessments were made on gonads, reproductive ducts, liver and kidneys. There were no effects on growth in either study and no signs of overt toxicity, sex reversal or gonad dysgenesis at the concentrations tested. Exposure to tOP caused a treatment-related decrease in circulating thyroxine and an increase in thyroid follicular cell hypertrophy and hyperplasia (25, 50 μg/L). Müllerian duct development was clearly affected following exposure to both chemicals; tOP exposure caused dose-dependent maturation of oviducts in both male and female frogs, whereas TB exposure ca

  11. Effects of disking, bedding, and subsoiling on survival and growth of three oak species in central Mississippi

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. Paul Jeffreys; Emily B. Schultz; Thomas G. Matney; W. Cade Booth; Jason M. Morris

    2010-01-01

    A replicated split-plot design experiment to evaluate the effects of three site preparation methods (disking, bedding, and subsoiling plus bedding) on survival and growth of three oak species (cherrybark, Quercus pagoda Raf.; Shumard, Quercus shumardii Buckl.; and Nuttall, Quercus texana Buckl.) was established...

  12. Effect of directed-spray glyphosate applications on survival and growth of planted oaks after three growing seasons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew B. Self; Andrew W. Ezell; Josh L. Moree; Rory O. Thornton

    2013-01-01

    Thousands of acres of oak (Quercus spp.) plantations are established across the South annually. Survival and growth of these plantings have been less than desirable. Several techniques have been utilized in attempts to achieve improved success in these areas. One such technique that has been recommended is the application of directed-spray herbicide...

  13. Survival and growth of restored Piedmont riparian forests as affected by site preparation, planting stock, and planting aids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelsea M. Curtis; W. Michael Aust; John R. Seiler; Brian D. Strahm

    2015-01-01

    Forest mitigation sites may have poor survival and growth of planted trees due to poor drainage, compacted soils, and lack of microtopography. The effects of five replications of five forestry mechanical site preparation techniques (Flat, Rip, Bed, Pit, and Mound), four regeneration sources (Direct seed, Bare root, Tubelings, and Gallon), and three planting aids (None...

  14. Eastern Baltic cod : Perspectives from existing data on processes affecting growth and survival of eggs and larvae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    MacKenzie, Brian; St. John, Michael; Wieland, Kai

    1996-01-01

    exist in our knowledge of processes affecting egg and larval growth and survival, but some promising areas of research are indicated. In particular the seasonality of spawning, deep water oxygen concentrations, predation on eggs, and larval food production require further investigation....

  15. Implanting 8-mm passive integrated transponder tags into small Brook Trout: Effects on growth and survival in the laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Matthew J.; Letcher, Benjamin H.

    2017-01-01

    Passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags are commonly used to investigate relationships between individual fish and their environment. The recent availability of smaller tags has provided the opportunity to tag smaller fish. In this study, we implanted 8-mm PIT tags into small Brook Trout Salvelinus fontinalis (35–50 mm FL; 0.35–1.266 g) and compared tag retention, growth rates, and survival of PIT-tagged fish with those of fish subjected to handling only or to handling plus fin clipping. We also examined how initial size at tagging affected absolute and specific growth rates of PIT-tagged individuals over time. We found that survival was 100%, tag retention was 96.7%, and fish size did not vary across treatments at 29 and 64 d posttagging. Additionally, there was no evidence that growth rate (FL or mass) was influenced by the initial size of the fish that were PIT tagged. Our results indicate that retention rates of 8-mm PIT tags surgically implanted into small Brook Trout are high and that there is no discernible effect on growth or survival in the laboratory. The ability to implant smaller PIT tags into smaller fish earlier in the season would allow researchers conducting PIT tag studies to expand demographic models to estimate survival of age-0 fish through the summer of their first year.

  16. Comparison of Renal Growth, Proteinuria and Graft Survival between Recipients of Pediatric and Adult Cadaveric Kidney Transplants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basiri, A; Zare, S; Simforoosh, N; Tabibi, A; Shakibi, M H

    2017-01-01

    The shortage of cadaveric kidney donors has prompted transplant teams to expanding the donor selection criteria. The usage of pediatric cadaveric kidneys is one of those expanded criteria. But the main concern is the probability of hyperfiltration syndrome due to small renal mass of pediatric donors. To compare the graft and patient survivals, post-transplantation complications, rate and severity of proteinuria secondary to hyperfiltration injury and the kidney growth of recipients who underwent transplantation from adult (group 1) and pediatric deceased donors (group 2). In this historical cohort study, each group contains 36 patients. Outcome measures included patient and graft survivals, quality of graft function as assessed by serum creatinine (SCr) and estimated GFR (eGFR), surgical complications, proteinuria that was detected by routine urinalysis and then confirmed by a 24-h urine protein >150 mg, blood pressure, and kidney length and volume measured by early and follow-up ultrasonography. The mean donor age in groups 1 and 2 was 36 and 6.5 years, respectively. 9 (25%) kidneys taken from pediatric donors (group 2) were offered en-bloc . The mean follow-up was 28 month. The two groups were not significantly different in terms of the incidence of DGF, rate of acute rejection, 1-year graft survival, SCr and eGFR levels, rates of surgical complications requiring surgical interventions, development of proteinuria, and rate of post-transplantation rise in blood pressure. The mean±SD kidney length within 24 hours of transplantation was significantly higher in group 1 compared to group 2 recipients (112±14 vs . 75±12 mm; p=0.001), but the rate of increase in kidney length in group 2 was significantly higher than that in group 1 recipients (43±4 vs . 10±2 mm; p=0.002) during the follow-up period. 80% of the increase in the kidney size was observed during the first 12 months of surgery; another 20% happened between 12 and 18 months. We found that obligatory and

  17. Notch activation inhibits AML growth and survival: a potential therapeutic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Sankaranarayanan; Sutphin, Robert M.; Hall, Mandy G.; Golfman, Leonard S.; Fang, Wendy; Nolo, Riitta M.; Akers, Lauren J.; Hammitt, Richard A.; McMurray, John S.; Kornblau, Steven M.; Melnick, Ari M.; Figueroa, Maria E.

    2013-01-01

    Although aberrant Notch activation contributes to leukemogenesis in T cells, its role in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) remains unclear. Here, we report that human AML samples have robust expression of Notch receptors; however, Notch receptor activation and expression of downstream Notch targets are remarkably low, suggesting that Notch is present but not constitutively activated in human AML. The functional role of these Notch receptors in AML is not known. Induced activation through any of the Notch receptors (Notch1–4), or through the Notch target Hairy/Enhancer of Split 1 (HES1), consistently leads to AML growth arrest and caspase-dependent apoptosis, which are associated with B cell lymphoma 2 (BCL2) loss and enhanced p53/p21 expression. These effects were dependent on the HES1 repressor domain and were rescued through reexpression of BCL2. Importantly, activated Notch1, Notch2, and HES1 all led to inhibited AML growth in vivo, and Notch inhibition via dnMAML enhanced proliferation in vivo, thus revealing the physiological inhibition of AML growth in vivo in response to Notch signaling. As a novel therapeutic approach, we used a Notch agonist peptide that led to significant apoptosis in AML patient samples. In conclusion, we report consistent Notch-mediated growth arrest and apoptosis in human AML, and propose the development of Notch agonists as a potential therapeutic approach in AML. PMID:23359069

  18. Long-term survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica on butterhead lettuce seeds, and their subsequent survival and growth on the seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Linden, Inge; Cottyn, Bart; Uyttendaele, Mieke; Vlaemynck, Geertrui; Maes, Martine; Heyndrickx, Marc

    2013-02-15

    The long-term survival of enteric pathogens on butterhead lettuce seeds, and their subsequent survival and growth on seedlings were investigated. Lettuce seeds were inoculated at a high level with two Salmonella enterica and two Escherichia coli O157:H7 strains each (±8 log₁₀ CFU/g seed) and the survival of the pathogens was monitored over two years using standard plating techniques on selective medium. The Salmonella strains (serovars Typhimurium and Thompson) survived significantly better on the seeds than the E. coli O157:H7 strains (MB3885 and NCTC12900). When individual seeds were tested two years after inoculation, Salmonella was recovered from each individual seed, whereas E. coli O157:H7 only from 4% to 14% of the seeds, depending on the recovery method. When contaminated stored seeds were germinated and the seedlings examined for presence of the pathogens, it was clear that both pathogens were able to proliferate on the seedlings. Pathogen counts up to 5.92 log₁₀ CFU and 4.41 log₁₀ CFU per positive seedling were observed for Salmonella and E. coli O157:H7, respectively. Our study not only confirms the long-term survival of enteric pathogens on seeds but also shows that the pathogens maintain their ability to resuscitate and proliferate on the seedlings. Seeds or seedlings should be considered as contamination sources for the cultivation of leafy vegetables such as butterhead lettuce grown in greenhouses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Fecundity, growth, and survival of the angelfish Pterophyllum scalare (Perciformes: Cichlidae under laboratory conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando A Ortega-Salas

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The freshwater angelfishes (Pterophyllum are South American cichlids that have become very popular among aquarists, yet scarce information on their culture and aquarium husbandry exists. We studied Pterophyllum scalare to analyze dietary effects on fecundity, growth, and survival of eggs and larvae during 135 days. Three diets were used: A decapsulated cysts of Artemia, B commercial dry fish food, and C a mix diet of the rotifer Brachionus plicatilis and the cladoceran Daphnia magna. The initial larval density was 100 organisms in each 40L aquarium. With diet A, larvae reached a maximum weight of 3.80g, a total length of 6.3 cm, and a height of 5.8cm; with diet B: 2.80g, 4.81cm, and 4.79cm, and with diet C: 3.00g, 5.15cm, and 5.10cm, respectively. Significant differences were observed between diet A, and diet B and C, but no significantly differences were observed between diets B and C. Fecundity varied from 234 to 1 082 eggs in 20 and 50g females, respectively. Egg survival ranged from 87.4% up to 100%, and larvae survival (80 larvae/40L aquarium from 50% to 66.3% using diet B and A, respectively. Live food was better for growing fish than the commercial balanced food diet. Fecundity and survival are important factors in planning a good production of angelfish. Rev. Biol. Trop. 57 (3: 741-747. Epub 2009 September 30.Se realizaron estudios de cultivo en laboratorio del pez ángel, Pterophyllum scalare, para analizar los efectos de su dieta en la fecundidad, crecimiento y sobrevivencia en huevos y larvas por un período 135 días. Tres dietas diferentes se utilizaron A quistes decapsulados de Artemia, B comida comercial seca para pez, C una mezcla de rotíferos, Brachionus plicatilis y el cladocero, Daphnia magna. La densidad inicial de larvas en acuarios de 40L fue de 100 organismos. Utilizando la dieta A, las larvas alcanzaron un peso máximo de 3.80g, una longitud total de 6.3cm y una altura de 5.8cm; utilizando la dieta B, fue de 2.80g, 4

  20. Testing Romanian seed sources of Norway spruce (Picea abies: results on growth traits and survival at age 30

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Budeanu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Growth traits and survival rate were evaluated in two field trialsconsisting of 33 provenances (seed stands spread across the entire natural distribution range of Norway spruce in Romania. Total tree height, diameter at breast height (DBH and survival rate were measured at 30 years after planting. Both growth and adaptation traits show substantial genetic variation among the tested seed stands. The amplitude of variation depends markedly on trait and testing site. This fact suggests that the best performing seed stands for growth and adaptation traits at each testing site can be selected. Two groups of valuable populations from Romanian Carpathians - the Northern and Western part (Apuseni Mountains - were identified. Survival rate was negatively correlated with growth traits, the average values in the two field trials were 68% and 70%. By analyzing growth and adaptation traits together with stem and wood qualitative traits, the best performing populations will be considered as tested seed sourcesand the forest reproductive material they can provide will be recommended for use in the regions of provenance where the two field trials are located.

  1. Effect of Lyophilization on Survivability and Growth Kinetic of Trichoderma Strains Preserved on Various Agriculture By-Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkowska, Danuta; Buska-Pisarek, Katarzyna; Łaba, Wojciech; Piegza, Michał; Kancelista, Anna

    2017-07-06

    Growth of four Trichoderma strains were tested on lignocellulosic by-products in solid state fermentation (SSF). The strains were also analyzed for their survival rate and growth after lyophilization on these carriers. All applied monocomponent and bicomponent media were substrates for the production and preservation of Trichoderma biomass. However, the maximum number of colony forming units (CFU/g dm) was acquired on bicomponent media based on dried grass and beet pulp or grass with corn cobs, when compared to monocomponent media. Although the process of lyophilization reduced the survival rate by 50%-60%, the actual number of viable cells in obtained biopreparations remained relatively high (0.58 × 108-1.68 × 108 CFU/g dm). The studied strains in the preserved biopreparations were characterized by a high growth rate, as evaluated in microcultures using the Bioscreen C system.

  2. Sesquiterpene lactones of Vernonia - influence of glaucolide-A on the growth rate and survival of Lepidopterous larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Samuel B; Burnett, William C; Coile, Nancy C; Mabry, Tom J; Betkouski, M F

    1979-01-01

    Sesquiterpene lactone glaucolide-A from Vernonia, incorporated in the rearing diets of five species of Lepidoptera, significantly reduced the rate of growth of larvae of the southern armyworm, Spodoptera eridania; fall armyworm, S. frugiperda; and yellowstriped armyworm, S. ornithogalli. Quantitative feeding tests demonstrated that decreased feeding levels and reduced growth resulted from ingestion of a sesquiterpene lactone. Ingestion of glaucolide-A increased the number of days to pupation in four of the species. In the southern armyworm, it significantly reduced pupal weight. Glaucolide-A decidedly reduced percentage of survival of southern and fall armyworms. Yellow woollybear, Diacrisia virginica, and cabbage looper, Trichoplusia ni, larvae were essentially uneffected by the ingestion of the sesquiterpene lactone. Sesquiterpene lactones adversely affect growth rate and survival of certain insects that feed upon plants containing them. They apparently function as defensive products, screening out a portion of the potential herbivores.

  3. Environmentally relevant concentrations of polyethylene microplastics negatively impact the survival, growth and emergence of sediment-dwelling invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziajahromi, Shima; Kumar, Anupama; Neale, Peta A; Leusch, Frederic D L

    2018-02-05

    Microplastics are a widespread environmental pollutant in aquatic ecosystems and have the potential to eventually sink to the sediment, where they may pose a risk to sediment-dwelling organisms. While the impacts of exposure to microplastics have been widely reported for marine biota, the effects of microplastics on freshwater organisms at environmentally realistic concentrations are largely unknown, especially for benthic organisms. Here we examined the effects of a realistic concentration of polyethylene microplastics in sediment on the growth and emergence of a freshwater organism Chironomus tepperi. We also assessed the influence of microplastic size by exposing C. tepperi larvae to four different size ranges of polyethylene microplastics (1-4, 10-27, 43-54 and 100-126 μm). Exposure to an environmentally relevant concentration of microplastics, 500 particles/kg sediment , negatively affected the survival, growth (i.e. body length and head capsule) and emergence of C. tepperi. The observed effects were strongly dependent on microplastic size with exposure to particles in the size range of 10-27 μm inducing more pronounced effects. While growth and survival of C. tepperi were not affected by the larger microplastics (100-126 μm), a significant reduction in the number of emerged adults was observed after exposure to the largest microplastics, with the delayed emergence attributed to exposure to a stressor. While scanning electron microscopy showed a significant reduction in the size of the head capsule and antenna of C. tepperi exposed to microplastics in the 10-27 μm size range, no deformities to the external structure of the antenna and mouth parts in organisms exposed to the same size range of microplastics were observed. These results indicate that environmentally relevant concentrations of microplastics in sediment induce harmful effects on the development and emergence of C. tepperi, with effects greatly dependent on particle size. Copyright

  4. SURVIVAL AND GROWTH OF BARU (Dipterix alata Vog. TREATED WITH SEWAGE SLUDGE, COMPOSTED GARBAGE OR CATTLE MANURE ON MINED SPOILS IN THE BRAZILIAN CERRADO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane de Queiroz Pinheiro

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Sewage sludge and composted garbage are available in large quantities to be employed assources of organic matter for revegetation projects of mined spoils in the Brazilian FederalDistrict (DF. These sources were used for growing baru (Dipterix alata Vog. on minedspoils in the Brazilian Cerrado and the growth and mortality of 99 seedlings treated with theseorganic matter soruces were measured. In 4 months, rates of survival ranged from 56.7%, fortrees treated with compost, to 96.7% for plants treated with sewage sludge. The compostseems to have toxic effects on seedlings, since the treatments with 35, 45 and 50 L/hollow hadno survivals. After the first period of growth, the study was able to show that the best rate forplant development with sewage sludge was 20 and 30 L/hollow (57% and 47. For plantstreated with compost, the best result was obtained with the smallest dosage (5L/hollow,where the growth is similar to the best results obtained with the sludge (47%. In larger dosesthe growth varied between 6% and 24%, span in which the results obtained in the controltreatments, chemical treatment (16% and no treatment (12% are also found. Therefore, theincrease in growth of the seedlings is a function of the dosage and type of organic materialemployed.

  5. Survival and growth of food poisoning bacteria following inoculation into cottage cheese varieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, G R; Glenister, D A; Brocklehurst, T F; Lund, B M

    1989-11-01

    Following inoculation into cottage cheese varieties with and without sorbic acid, obtained directly from the manufacturer, strains of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli and other E. coli survived but failed to multiply during storage at 7, 10 or 25 degrees C. In the absence of sorbic acid spoilage due to Pseudomonas fluorescens occurred after storage for 5-13 days at 7 or 10 degrees C and 1-2 days at 25 degrees C. Salmonella enteritidis, S. hadar, S. saint-paul, S. typhimurium and S. virchow survived but failed to multiply at 10 degrees C and, in the case of most strains, at 20 or 25 degrees C. S. typhimurium multiplied 100-fold in one batch of cottage cheese with peppers and onion in the absence of sorbic acid during storage at 25 degrees C for 2 days; spoilage of this batch occurred due to yeasts or yeasts and moulds after storage for 4-8 days at 10 degrees C and 0-2 days at 20 or 25 degrees C. Following inoculation into cottage cheese varieties, prepared in the laboratory and which did not contain sorbic acid, as contaminants of the added protein or vegetable ingredients the numbers of Staphylococcus aureus declined during storage at 10 and 20 degrees C, the numbers of Bacillus cereus and S. typhimurium increased at both temperatures, and the numbers of Yersinia enterocolitica increased at 10 degrees C, but declined at 20 degrees C. Spoilage occurred due to the growth of moulds and P. fluorescens after storage for 5-14 days at 10 degrees C, and due to P. fluorescens after storage for up to 2 days at 20 degrees C. In products inoculated in a similar way but which contained sorbic acid (500-530 mg/kg), the numbers of S. aureus and B. cereus declined and in most products the numbers of S. typhimurium and Y. enterocolitica remained constant. In cottage cheese with chicken, however, the numbers of Y. enterocolitica increased 100-fold during storage of the product for 14 days at 10 degrees and the numbers of S. typhimurium increased 100-fold during storage for 2 days

  6. Fecundity, survival, and growth of the seahorse Hippocampus ingens (Pisces: Syngnathidae under semi-controlled conditions

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    A.A Ortega-Salas

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Estudiamos la fecundidad, supervivencia, y crecimiento del caballito de mar, Hippocampus ingens en condiciones semi-controladas. Tres machos reproductores silvestres de 14.8, 24.5 y 32.0 g produjeron 1 598, 1 703 y 1 658 jóvenes. La densidad utilizada fue de 12 jóvenes por acuario de 60 l. Se agruparon en 1, 12 y 20 días de nacidos por acuario. La supervivencia fue de 78.5, 38.1 y 41.0 % en 35 días. Se les alimentó con una mezcla de rotíferos B. plicatilis y nauplios de Artemia para después transferirlos a estanques de 100 000 l a una densidad de 50/1 000 l, donde se les alimentó con Artemia adulta durante 60 días más. Crecieron de un promedio de 0.7, 1.5, y 2.7 a 4.5, 5.4 6.7 cm, respectivamente, en 95 días. La temperatura del agua marina utilizada varió de 17 a 23 ºC.We studied fecundity, survival, and growth of the seahorse Hippocampus ingens under semi-controlled conditions. Three wild brood stock mature males of 14.8, 24.5, and 32.0 g released 1 598, 1 703, and 1 658 juveniles. Juvenile stocking densities of 12 were settled in 60-l aquariums in groups of 1, 12, and 20 days old organisms. The rate of survival was 21.5, 61.9, and 59.0 %, respectively, in 35 days. Juveniles were fed a mix diet of rotifers B. plicatilis and Artemia nauplii, then they were transferred to a cement tank of 100 000 l at a density of 50/1 000 l and fed with live adult Artemia for 60 days more. They grew from an average of 0.7, 1.5, and 2.7 to 4.5, 5.4, and 6.7 cm, respectively, in 95 days. The seawater temperature varied from 17 to 23 ºC. Rev. Biol. Trop. 54 (4: 1099-1102. Epub 2006 Dec. 15.

  7. Effects of microcosm scaling and food resources on growth and survival of larval Culex pipiens

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    Paradise Christopher J

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We used a simple experimental design to test for the effects of microcosm scaling on the growth and survival of the mosquito, Culex pipiens. Microcosm and mesocosm studies are commonly used in ecology, and there is often an assumption that scaling doesn't affect experimental outcomes. The assumption is implicit in the design; choice of mesocosms may be arbitrary or based on convenience or cost. We tested the hypothesis that scale would influence larvae due to depth and surface area effects. Larvae were predicted to perform poorly in microcosms that were both deep and had small openings, due to buildup of waste products, less exchange with the environment, and increased competition. To determine if the choice of scale affected responses to other factors, we independently varied leaf litter quantity, whose effects on mosquitoes are well known. Results We found adverse effects of both a lower wall surface area and lower horizontal surface area, but microcosm scale interacted with resources such that C. pipiens is affected by habitat size only when food resources are scarce. At low resource levels mosquitoes were fewer, but larger, in microcosms with smaller horizontal surface area and greater depth than in microcosms with greater horizontal surface area and shallower depth. Microcosms with more vertical surface area/volume often produced larger mosquitoes; more food may have been available since mosquitoes browse on walls and other substrates for food. Conclusions The interaction between habitat size and food abundance is consequential to aquatic animals, and choice of scale in experiments may affect results. Varying surface area and depth causes the scale effect, with small horizontal surface area and large depth decreasing matter exchange with the surrounding environment. In addition, fewer resources leads to less leaf surface area, and the effects of varying surface area will be greater under conditions of limiting resources

  8. Inclusive growth versus pro-poor growth: Implications for tourism development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, Martine; Messerli, H.R.

    2017-01-01

    Inclusive growth and pro-poor growth are terms embraced but not fully understood in the tourism community. This paper discusses the main concepts of inclusive growth and their implication for tourism development across the developing world. Is inclusive growth simply another term for pro-poor in

  9. Evaluation of Octhylphenol Effect on Development and Survival on Zebra Fish (Danio Rerio During Different Ontogenic Period

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    Gabi Dumitrescu

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper is part of a complex study of our research collective that studies the toxic effect of the ethinylestradiolum, and some of the polyethoxylated alkylphenols on the growth and reproduction of the Zebra fish (Danio rerio and of the common Carp (Cyprinus carpio. Our study aim was to evaluate the effect of octylphenol on growth and survival of zebra fish, from 21-115 days, and within 21-75 days of life. For this purpose, for each period under study, fishes were divided into three groups of 30 individuals, named: Lot 1 - Control, respectively lots 2 and 3, at which the administrated octylphenol concentrations were of 60 μg L-1, respectively 100 μg L-1. Fishes of the six groups were raised in 30-liters aquariums (30 fish / aquarium. The growth was measured by weighing and biometric measurements (total length, standard length, the length of the head, maximal height, minimal height and the mass of the body, while the surviving rate was established at the end of every period and at the end of the experiment, when we were able to calculate the total number of dead fish. Biometric study of the analysis performed in 75 days, 115 days respectively shows that octylphenol has negative influence on body development, and survival both, the highest percentage of mortality (46,66% was registered at 100 μgL-1 concentration, between 21 -75 days.

  10. Assessing development assistance for child survival between 2000 and 2014: A multi-sectoral perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chunling; Chu, Annie; Li, Zhihui; Shen, Jian; Subramanian, Subu; Hill, Kenneth

    2017-01-01

    The majority of Countdown countries did not reach the fourth Millennium Development Goal (MDG 4) on reducing child mortality, despite the fact that donor funding to the health sector has drastically increased. When tracking aid invested in child survival, previous studies have exclusively focused on aid targeting reproductive, maternal, newborn, and child health (RMNCH). We take a multi-sectoral approach and extend the estimation to the four sectors that determine child survival: health (RMNCH and non-RMNCH), education, water and sanitation, and food and humanitarian assistance (Food/HA). Using donor reported data, obtained mainly from the OECD Creditor Reporting System and Development Assistance Committee, we tracked the level and trends of aid (in grants or loans) disbursed to each of the four sectors at the global, regional, and country levels. We performed detailed analyses on missing data and conducted imputation with various methods. To identify aid projects for RMNCH, we developed an identification strategy that combined keyword searches and manual coding. To quantify aid for RMNCH in projects with multiple purposes, we adopted an integrated approach and produced the lower and upper bounds of estimates for RMNCH, so as to avoid making assumptions or using weak evidence for allocation. We checked the sensitivity of trends to the estimation methods and compared our estimates to that produced by other studies. Our study yielded time-series and recipient-specific annual estimates of aid disbursed to each sector, as well as their lower- and upper-bounds in 134 countries between 2000 and 2014, with a specific focus on Countdown countries. We found that the upper-bound estimates of total aid disbursed to the four sectors in 134 countries rose from US$ 22.62 billion in 2000 to US$ 59.29 billion in 2014, with the increase occurring in all income groups and regions with sub-Saharan Africa receiving the largest sum. Aid to RMNCH has experienced the fastest growth (12

  11. Assessing development assistance for child survival between 2000 and 2014: A multi-sectoral perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunling Lu

    Full Text Available The majority of Countdown countries did not reach the fourth Millennium Development Goal (MDG 4 on reducing child mortality, despite the fact that donor funding to the health sector has drastically increased. When tracking aid invested in child survival, previous studies have exclusively focused on aid targeting reproductive, maternal, newborn, and child health (RMNCH. We take a multi-sectoral approach and extend the estimation to the four sectors that determine child survival: health (RMNCH and non-RMNCH, education, water and sanitation, and food and humanitarian assistance (Food/HA.Using donor reported data, obtained mainly from the OECD Creditor Reporting System and Development Assistance Committee, we tracked the level and trends of aid (in grants or loans disbursed to each of the four sectors at the global, regional, and country levels. We performed detailed analyses on missing data and conducted imputation with various methods. To identify aid projects for RMNCH, we developed an identification strategy that combined keyword searches and manual coding. To quantify aid for RMNCH in projects with multiple purposes, we adopted an integrated approach and produced the lower and upper bounds of estimates for RMNCH, so as to avoid making assumptions or using weak evidence for allocation. We checked the sensitivity of trends to the estimation methods and compared our estimates to that produced by other studies. Our study yielded time-series and recipient-specific annual estimates of aid disbursed to each sector, as well as their lower- and upper-bounds in 134 countries between 2000 and 2014, with a specific focus on Countdown countries. We found that the upper-bound estimates of total aid disbursed to the four sectors in 134 countries rose from US$ 22.62 billion in 2000 to US$ 59.29 billion in 2014, with the increase occurring in all income groups and regions with sub-Saharan Africa receiving the largest sum. Aid to RMNCH has experienced the

  12. Growth, human development, and trade: the Asian experience

    OpenAIRE

    Mustafa,Ghulam; Rizov, Marian; Kernohan, David

    2017-01-01

    This study looks at the three-way relationship between economic growth, human development, and openness to trade in a large panel of developing Asian economies. Using a theoretically motivated simultaneous equations system, we find that although human development contributes positively to economic growth, in the case of our Asian sample growth does not appear to have had a positive influence on human development. Uneven growth accompanied by lagging institutional development, preventing human...

  13. Trends in Rainbow Trout recruitment, abundance, survival, and growth during a boom-and-bust cycle in a tailwater fishery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korman, Josh; Yard, Micheal D.; Kennedy, Theodore A.

    2017-01-01

    Data from a large-scale mark-recapture study was used in an open population model to determine the cause for long-term trends in growth and abundance of a Rainbow Trout Oncorhynchus mykiss population in the tailwater of Glen Canyon Dam, AZ. Reduced growth affected multiple life stages and processes causing negative feedbacks that regulated the abundance of the population, including: higher mortality of larger fish; lower rates of recruitment (young of year) in years when growth was reduced; and lower rates of sexual maturation the following year. High and steady flows during spring and summer of 2011 resulted in very large recruitment event. The population declined 10-fold by 2016 due a combination of lower recruitment and reduced survival of larger trout. Survival rates for trout ≥ 225 mm in 2014, 2015, and 2016 were 11%, 21%, and 22% lower than average survival rates between 2012 and 2013, respectively. Abundance at the end of the study would have been three- to five-fold higher had survival rates for larger trout remained at the elevated levels estimated for 2012 and 2013. Growth declined between 2012 and 2014 owing to reduced prey availability, which led to very poor fish condition by fall of 2014 (~0.9-0.95). Poor condition in turn resulted in low survival rates of larger fish during fall of 2014 and winter of 2015, which contributed to the population collapse. In Glen Canyon, large recruitment events driven by high flows can lead to increases in the population that cannot be sustained due to limitations in prey supply. In the absence of being able to regulate prey supply, flows which reduce the probability of large recruitment events can be used to avoid boom-and-bust population cycles. Our study demonstrates that mark-recapture is a very informative approach for understanding the dynamics of tailwater trout populations.

  14. Green economic growth premise for sustainable development

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    Carmen Lenuţa TRICĂ

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Accelerating the global issues such as natural resource depletion, damage to the natural environment, economic and financial crises and consumption growth led to the shift of the development paradigm from consumption to sustainable development and recognition of the new path, namely green economy.At the European level a number of international organizations discussed issues of transition to green economy (EC, UNEP, OECD. In 2008, UNEP launched “Green Economy Initiative to Get the Global Markets Back to Work”, aiming to mobilize and re-focuse the global economy towards.This is the twin challenge of moving towards a green economy: radically reducing the footprint of developed countries, while simultaneously raising levels of social and material well being in developing countries.Without public intervention, the related market failures (i.e. market prices that do not fully reflect the environmental degradation generated by economic activity may delay or even prevent the development of environmentally-friendly technologies.Furthermore, in sectors such as electricity, network effects arising from existing infrastructures create additional barriers to the adoption of alternative sources of power, further hampering incentives to invest in new technologies.Given that the transition to a green economy requires increasing of investment in economic sectors that contribute to enhancing of natural capital and reduce environmental risks, we intend to analyze the main measures taken by Romania to ensure transition to green economy.

  15. Comparative Growth and Survival of Hylurgus ligniperda (Coleoptera: Scolytinae) and Arhopalus ferus (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) Reared on Artificial or Natural Diet at 15 or 25°C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romo, C M; Bader, M K-F; Pawson, S M

    2016-02-01

    Two saproxylic forest insects, Hylurgus ligniperda (F.) (Coleoptera: Scolytinae) and Arhopalus ferus (Mulsant)(Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), were reared on artificial or natural diet at 15 or 25°C to compare larval growth rates and survival. A significant diet by temperature interaction was observed in the growth of H. ligniperda larvae,which developed faster when reared on natural diet at 15°C, but grew faster and pupated significantly earlier when reared on artificial diet at 25°C. However, H. ligniperda survival by the end of the experiment was low on both diets when reared at 25°C (10.1%, 95% CI: 5.2–15.1%), which suggests that rearing at lower temperatures may be required. A. ferus larvae gained significantly larger body size when reared on artificial diet than on natural diet at both temperatures. Survival of A. ferus reared on artificial diet was significantly lower than larvae reared on natural diet at 25°C. The significant differences between A. ferus larval development rates when reared on artificial and natural diets preclude the use of artificial diet to collect meaningful data to construct temperature development models for ecological comparisons. Artificial diet provided a suitable medium for mass production of individuals for research purposes, e.g., test mortality in response to treatments. However, additional rearing studies are needed to determine whether the larger artificially reared larvae result in adults that are healthier, more productive, and live longer.

  16. Individual and co-expression patterns of nerve growth factor and heme oxygenase-1 predict shorter survival of gastric carcinoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Sang Jae; Kim, Kyoung Min; Jang, Kyu Yun

    2017-07-05

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is a neurotrophic factor which regulates cell development and proliferation. Recently, it has been suggested that NGF induces heme oxygenase-1 (HO1) expression, and that both NGF and HO1 are involved in the progression of malignant human tumors. However, exact roles of NGF and HO1 in tumorigenesis remain controversial. Therefore, we investigated the expression and correlation of NGF and HO1 in human gastric carcinoma tissues. We examined immunohistochemical expression of NGF and HO1 in 167 gastric carcinomas and compared with various prognostic clinicopathological factors. The expression of NGF and HO1 was positive in 40% (67/167) and 51% (85/167) of cases, respectively, and their expression was significantly correlated with each other (p < 0.001). Individual expression patterns of NGF and HO1, and co-expression pattern of these two molecules were significantly associated with shorter survival by univariate analysis. HO1 expression (overall survival; p < 0.001, relapse-free survival; p = 0.002) and co-expression pattern of NGF and HO1 (overall survival; p = 0.002, relapse-free survival; p = 0.003) were independent poor prognostic indicators of gastric carcinoma patients by multivariate analysis. These results demonstrate that the individual and co-expression patterns of NGF and HO1 might be used as prognostic indicators for gastric carcinoma patients.

  17. Retinoblastoma protein controls growth, survival and neuronal migration in human cerebral organoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Takeshi; Nieto-Estévez, Vanesa; Kyrychenko, Sergii; Schneider, Jay W; Hsieh, Jenny

    2017-03-15

    The tumor suppressor retinoblastoma protein (RB) regulates S-phase cell cycle entry via E2F transcription factors. Knockout (KO) mice have shown that RB plays roles in cell migration, differentiation and apoptosis, in developing and adult brain. In addition, the RB family is required for self-renewal and survival of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). Since little is known about the role of RB in human brain development, we investigated its function in cerebral organoids differentiated from gene-edited hESCs lacking RB. We show that RB is abundantly expressed in neural stem and progenitor cells in organoids at 15 and 28 days of culture. RB loss promoted S-phase entry in DCX + cells and increased apoptosis in Sox2 + neural stem and progenitor cells, and in DCX + and Tuj1 + neurons. Associated with these cell cycle and pro-apoptotic effects, we observed increased CCNA2 and BAX gene expression, respectively. Moreover, we observed aberrant Tuj1 + neuronal migration in RB-KO organoids and upregulation of the gene encoding VLDLR, a receptor important in reelin signaling. Corroborating the results in RB-KO organoids in vitro , we observed ectopically localized Tuj1 + cells in RB-KO teratomas grown in vivo Taken together, these results identify crucial functions for RB in the cerebral organoid model of human brain development. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  18. The use of landscape fabric and supplemental irrigation to enhance survival and growth of woody perennials planted on reclaimed surface mine lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    R .C. Musselman; F. W. Smith; W. D. Shepperd; L. A. Asherin; B. W. Gee

    2009-01-01

    A study was initiated to determine the effectiveness of landscape fabric and supplemental irrigation in survival and growth of woody perennials planted on reclaimed surface coal mine lands. The study compared growth and survival of nursery grown potted aspen and serviceberry planted with or without landscape fabric, and with or without biweekly supplemental irrigation...

  19. Growth and development of school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignerová, J; Bláha, P; Kobzová, J; Krejcovský, L; Paulová, M; Riedlová, J

    2000-02-01

    With the support of the Internal Grant Agency of the Ministry of Health of the Czech Republic in 1997-1999 work proceeded on the grant "Semi-longitudinal study of the somatic growth of school children in the Czech Republic". The objective of this project is to assess the growth rate of the basic bodily characteristics in children and youth aged 6 to 14 years, to confirm the positive secular trend in height and body weight or its slowing or stagnation, and also to evaluate the growth and development of children under the new socio-economic conditions. In addition to thirty somatic characteristics which are assessed repeatedly every six months, in 1,925 children some supplementary data were obtained from parents. From hitherto assembled data ensues that there was no significant change of the mean length at birth nor of the birth weight as compared with 1989. The increase in height up to adolescence continues, in the higher age groups probably stagnation occurs. Despite a slight increase of mean body weight values since 1981, a gradual decline of the BMI values was observed. In boys this tendency is less marked than in girls, in particular in the oldest age groups. This trend was confirmed also by the results of the present investigation. As compared with the results of the 5th Nationwide Anthropological Survey in 1991 the group of overweight children, i.e. those above the 90th percentile of BMI comprises 6.9% boys and 8.9% girls from a total of almost 2,000 children, as compared with the expected 10%.

  20. Ecophysiological traits sustaining tree growth and survival under drying climate in the Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakir, D.; Klein, T.; Cohen, S.

    2011-12-01

    The rate of evolutionary adaptation in long-lived organisms such as forest trees cannot compete with the current and predicted rate of climate change. Tree growth and survival under warming and drying climate, such as predicted for the Mediterranean and other regions, will depend therefore on the existing plasticity of physiological and phenological traits. We examined seven physiological and phenological parameters in Pinus halepensis, a drought resistant Mediterranean tree species, using five ecotypes growing under meso-Mediterranean (MM), thermo-Mediterranean (TM), and semi-arid (SA) climates. The results revealed that both phenotypic plasticity and locally adapted ecotypes contributed, differentially, to the success of this species across a wide range of climatic conditions. While some ecotypes had an inherent xylem resistance to embolism (percent loss of conductivity halepensis performs well under drought conditions it has a sensitive hydraulic system. This was reflected in 50% loss of hydraulic conductivity at relatively high leaf water potential of -3.1 MPa. This, however, was compensated for by a narrow safety margin allowing leaf gas exchange up to leaf water potential of -2.8 MPa. The hydraulic sensitivity also requires fast cavitation reversal, which was indeed observed in the dry season on hourly time-scale: Two cycles of cavitation and reversal observed during morning and afternoon, which were also reflected in a decoupling between sap flow and leaf transpiration. The results indicate newly observed hydraulic capabilities of trees that together with plasticity of other traits facilitate the adjustment to increasingly dry conditions, and the potential of P. halepensis to maintain its current geographical distribution even in face of predicted warming and drying trends.

  1. Evolution of invasive traits in nonindigenous species: increased survival and faster growth in invasive populations of rusty crayfish (Orconectes rusticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, Lindsey W; Lodge, David M

    2014-09-01

    The importance of evolution in enhancing the invasiveness of species is not well understood, especially in animals. To evaluate evolution in crayfish invasions, we tested for differences in growth rate, survival, and response to predators between native and invaded range populations of rusty crayfish (Orconectes rusticus). We hypothesized that low conspecific densities during introductions into lakes would select for increased investment in growth and reproduction in invasive populations. We reared crayfish from both ranges in common garden experiments in lakes and mesocosms, the latter in which we also included treatments of predatory fish presence and food quality. In both lake and mesocosm experiments, O. rusticus from invasive populations had significantly faster growth rates and higher survival than individuals from the native range, especially in mesocosms where fish were present. There was no influence of within-range collection location on growth rate. Egg size was similar between ranges and did not affect crayfish growth. Our results, therefore, suggest that growth rate, which previous work has shown contributes to strong community-level impacts of this invasive species, has diverged since O. rusticus was introduced to the invaded range. This result highlights the need to consider evolutionary dynamics in invasive species mitigation strategies.

  2. Effect of gamma radiation on the growth, survival, hematology and histological parameters of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) larvae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oujifard, Amin, E-mail: oujifard.amin@gmail.com [Fisheries Department, Faculty of Agriculture and Natural Resources, Persian Gulf University, Borazjan, Bushehr (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Amiri, Roghayeh [Department of Veterinary, Agricultural Medical and Industrial Research School, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, AEOI, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shahhosseini, Gholamreza [Fisheries Department, Faculty of Natural Resources and Marine Sciences, TarbiatModares University, Noor, Mazandaran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Davoodi, Reza [Fisheries Department, Faculty of Agriculture and Natural Resources, Persian Gulf University, Borazjan, Bushehr (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Moghaddam, Jamshid Amiri [Fisheries Department, Faculty of Natural Resources and Marine Sciences, TarbiatModares University, Noor, Mazandaran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Incrementing of gamma radiation reveals the negative effects on fish larvae. • Radiation adversely affected the weight, blood cells and intestinal morphology of the larvae. • No mortality was observed at low dosage of gamma radiation on fish larvae. - Abstract: Effects of low (1, 2.5 and 5 Gy) and high doses (10, 20 and 40 Gy) of gamma radiation were examined on the growth, survival, blood parameters and morphological changes of the intestines of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) larvae (103 ± 20 mg) after 12 weeks of exposure. Negative effects of gamma radiation on growth and survival were observed as radiation level and time increased. Changes were well documented at 10 and 20 Gy. All the fish were dead at the dose of 40 Gy. In all the treatments, levels of red blood cells (RBC), hematocrit (HCT) and hemoglobin (HB) were significantly (P < 0.05) declined as the irradiation levels increased, whereas the amount of mean corpuscular volume (MCV) and mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH) did not change. No significant differences (P > 0.05) were found in the levels of white blood cells (WBC), lymphocytes and monocytes. Destruction of the intestinal epithelium cells was indicated as the irradiation levels increased to 1 Gy and above. The highest levels of growth, survival, specific growth rate (SGR), condition factor (CF) and protein efficiency rate (PER) were obtained in the control treatment. The results showed that gamma rays can be a potential means for damaging rainbow trout cells.

  3. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 activation is associated with bladder cancer cell growth and survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsieh Fu-Chuan

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Constitutive activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3 signaling pathway plays an important role in several human cancers. Activation of Stat3 is dependent on the phosphorylation at the tyrosine residue 705 by upstream kinases and subsequent nuclear translocation after dimerization. It remains unclear whether oncogenic Stat3 signaling pathway is involved in the oncogenesis of bladder cancer. Results We found that elevated Stat3 phosphorylation in 19 of 100 (19% bladder cancer tissues as well as bladder cancer cell lines, WH, UMUC-3 and 253J. To explore whether Stat3 activation is associated with cell growth and survival of bladder cancer, we targeted the Stat3 signaling pathway in bladder cancer cells using an adenovirus-mediated dominant-negative Stat3 (Y705F and a small molecule compound, STA-21. Both prohibited cell growth and induction of apoptosis in these bladder cancer cell lines but not in normal bladder smooth muscle cell (BdSMC. The survival inhibition might be mediated through apoptotic caspase 3, 8 and 9 pathways. Moreover, down-regulation of anti-apoptotic genes (Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and survivin and a cell cycle regulating gene (cyclin D1 was associated with the cell growth inhibition and apoptosis. Conclusion These results indicated that activation of Stat3 is crucial for bladder cancer cell growth and survival. Therefore, interference of Stat3 signaling pathway emerges as a potential therapeutic approach for bladder cancer.

  4. Growth, straightness and survival at age 32 in a Pinus strobus x P. wallichiana F1 hybrid population (Experiment 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan Blada

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available By using an incomplete factorial mating design between twentyPinus strobus L. female and seven P. wallichiana Jack. male trees, a number of 34 full-sib families were obtained. The objective of this experiment was to combine the fast growing of the former species with moderately to high resistance to blister rust (Cronartium ribicola Fich. in Rabenh. of the latter one. The hybrid families were artificially inoculated at age two, and field planted at age four. The plantation took place within an old black current (Ribes nigrum L. heavy infected by blister rust. In order to provoke new infections, this time naturally, the pine rows were planted in between theblack currant ones. Diameters at breast height, tree height, tree growth rate volume, stem straightness and tree survivals were the traits measured at age 32 from seed. The first trial thinning was simultaneously applied with the present measurements. The average tree survival was 74.8% in hybrids, 8.3% in Pinus strobus and 27.8% in P. wallichiana. Highly significant (p < 0.01 differences were found between hybrid families for all traits except stem straightness. Genetic coefficient of variation at family level was 13.7% fortree volume growth rate and 15.9% for tree survival, but only 2.1% for tree straightness. Broad-sense family heritability estimates were 0.530 for diameter at breast height, 0.596 for stem height, and 0.564 for stem volume growth rate, 0.166 for stem straightness, and 0.539 for tree survivals. Similarly, the individual tree narrow-sense heritability estimates were 0.138 for diameter at breast height, 0.209 for stem height, 0.149 for stem volume growth rate, and 0.022 for stem straightness. If the best 5, 10 and 15 of 34 families wereselected, a genetic gain of 17.7%, 13.4% and 10.2%, respectively, may be achieved in tree survival or blister rust resistance. Similarly, if the best 5%, 10% and 15% individuals within the best hybrid families were selected, a genetic gain of 4

  5. Growth, straightness and survival at age 32 in a Pinus strobus x P. wallichiana F1 hybrid population (Experiment 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan Blada

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available By using an incomplete factorial mating design between twenty Pinus strobus L. female and seven P. wallichiana Jack. male trees, a number of 34 full-sib families were obtained. The objective of this experiment was to combine the fast growing of the former species with moderately to high resistance to blister rust (Cronartium ribicola Fich. in Rabenh. of the latter one. The hybrid families were artificially inoculated at age two, and field planted at age four. The plantation took place within an old black current (Ribes nigrum L. heavy infected by blister rust. In order to provoke new infections, this time naturally, the pine rows were planted in between the black currant ones. Diameters at breast height, tree height, tree growth rate volume, stem straightness and tree survivals were the traits measured at age 32 from seed. The first trial thinning was simultaneously applied with the present measurements. The average tree survival was 74.8% in hybrids, 8.3% in Pinus strobus and 27.8% in P. wallichiana. Highly significant (p < 0.01 differences were found between hybrid families for all traits except stem straightness. Genetic coefficient of variation at family level was 13.7% for tree volume growth rate and 15.9% for tree survival, but only 2.1% for tree straightness. Broad-sense family heritability estimates were 0.530 for diameter at breast height, 0.596 for stem height, and 0.564 for stem volume growth rate, 0.166 for stem straightness, and 0.539 for tree survivals. Similarly, the individual tree narrow-sense heritability estimates were 0.138 for diameter at breast height, 0.209 for stem height, 0.149 for stem volume growth rate, and 0.022 for stem straightness. If the best 5, 10 and 15 of 34 families were selected, a genetic gain of 17.7%, 13.4% and 10.2%, respectively, may be achieved in tree survival or blister rust resistance. Similarly, if the best 5%, 10% and 15% individuals within the best hybrid families were selected, a genetic gain of

  6. Childhood cognitive development after fetal growth restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llurba, E; Baschat, A A; Turan, O M; Harding, J; McCowan, L M

    2013-04-01

    To examine the relationship between prenatal umbilical artery (UA) and internal carotid artery (ICA) Doppler findings and cognitive development at 3 and 6 years in low-birth-weight children. This was a study of 209 low-birth-weight (Cognitive ability at 3 and 6 years' corrected age was assessed using the fourth edition of the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale (SBIS) and compared between SGA and FGR groups. An SBIS score development. The median gestational age at diagnosis of abnormal fetal growth was 36.6 (range, 28-41) weeks. There were 87 (41.6%) children classified as having FGR and 122 (58.4%) as SGA. The mean global SBIS score at 3 years was 109.4 (SD, 22.8) and at 6 years it was 110.5 (SD, 13.9). Overall, 22 (10.5%) children had delayed development at 3 years. Total SBIS scores and individual domain scores did not differ between FGR and SGA groups at 3 or 6 years and similar proportions in each group had delayed development. Abnormal prenatal UA and ICA Doppler findings are not associated with lower developmental scores in low-birth-weight children delivered in the third trimester of pregnancy. Copyright © 2013 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Effects of temperature on survival and development of early life stage Pacific and western brook lampreys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeuwig, M.H.; Bayer, J.M.; Seelye, J.G.

    2005-01-01

    We examined the effects of temperature (10, 14, 18, and 22??C) on survival and development of Pacific lampreys Lampetra tridentata and western brook lampreys L. richardsoni during embryological and early larval stages. The temperature for zero development was estimated for each species, and the response to temperature was measured as the proportion of individuals surviving to hatch, surviving to the larval stage, and exhibiting abnormalities at the larval stage (i.e., malformations of the body). The estimated temperature for zero development was 4.850C for Pacific lampreys and 4.97??C for western brook lampreys. Survival was greatest at 18??C, followed by 14, 10, and 22??C, significant differences being observed between 22??C and the other temperatures. Overall survival was significantly greater for western brook lampreys than for Pacific lampreys; however, the overall difference in proportion of individuals surviving was only 0.02. Overall survival significantly decreased from the time of hatch (proportion surviving = 0.85) to the larval stage (0.82; i.e., during the free-embryo stage). The proportion of individuals exhibiting abnormalities at the larval stage was greatest at 22??C, followed by 18, 10, and 14??C, significant differences being observed between 22??C and the other temperatures. These data provide baseline information on the thermal requirements of early life stage Pacific and western brook lampreys and will aid in assessment and prediction of suitable spawning and rearing habitats for these species.

  8. Triennial Growth Symposium: Dietary regulation of growth development

    Science.gov (United States)

    The 2010 Triennial Growth Symposium was held immediately before the Joint Annual Meeting of the American Dairy Science Association, Poultry Science Association, Asociación Mexicana de Producción Animal, Canadian Society of Animal Science, Western Section American Society of Animal Science, and Ameri...

  9. Survival and growth compared between wild and farmed eel stocked in freshwater ponds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Michael Ingemann; Jepsen, Niels; Rasmussen, Gorm

    2017-01-01

    conducted in a series of shallow, open ponds of approximately 200 m2. Wild and farmed eels were batch tagged, mixed and released in the ponds at an initial density of 0.5 individual/m2. Survival was rather high (34–88%) with variations between ponds. No significant difference in survival was found between...

  10. The effects of varying sampling intervals on the growth and survival ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The sampling intervals were-weekly, biweekly, triweekly and no sampling until at harvest. The highest percentage survival (72.0%) was recorded where the fish were sampled biweekly while the lowest survival (17.1 %) was recorded in the treatment where fish was not sampled until at harvest. Similarly, the total biomass of ...

  11. Mammalian target of rapamycin is essential for cardiomyocyte survival and heart development in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Pengpeng [Key Laboratory of Swine Genetics and Breeding, Ministry of Agriculture, College of Animal Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Key Laboratory of Agricultural Animal Genetics, Breeding and Reproduction, Ministry of Education, College of Animal Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Department of Animal Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Shan, Tizhong; Liang, Xinrong [Department of Animal Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Deng, Changyan [Key Laboratory of Swine Genetics and Breeding, Ministry of Agriculture, College of Animal Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Key Laboratory of Agricultural Animal Genetics, Breeding and Reproduction, Ministry of Education, College of Animal Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Kuang, Shihuan, E-mail: skuang@purdue.edu [Department of Animal Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2014-09-12

    Highlights: • mTOR is a critical regulator of many biological processes yet its function in heart is not well understood. • MCK-Cre/Mtor{sup flox/flox} mice were established to delete Mtor in cardiomyocytes. • The mTOR-mKO mice developed normally but die prematurely within 5 weeks after birth due to heart disease. • The mTOR-mKO mice had dilated myocardium and increased cell death. • mTOR-mKO hearts had reduced expression of metabolic genes and activation of mTOR target proteins. - Abstract: Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a critical regulator of protein synthesis, cell proliferation and energy metabolism. As constitutive knockout of Mtor leads to embryonic lethality, the in vivo function of mTOR in perinatal development and postnatal growth of heart is not well defined. In this study, we established a muscle-specific mTOR conditional knockout mouse model (mTOR-mKO) by crossing MCK-Cre and Mtor{sup flox/flox} mice. Although the mTOR-mKO mice survived embryonic and perinatal development, they exhibited severe postnatal growth retardation, cardiac muscle pathology and premature death. At the cellular level, the cardiac muscle of mTOR-mKO mice had fewer cardiomyocytes due to apoptosis and necrosis, leading to dilated cardiomyopathy. At the molecular level, the cardiac muscle of mTOR-mKO mice expressed lower levels of fatty acid oxidation and glycolysis related genes compared to the WT littermates. In addition, the mTOR-mKO cardiac muscle had reduced Myh6 but elevated Myh7 expression, indicating cardiac muscle degeneration. Furthermore, deletion of Mtor dramatically decreased the phosphorylation of S6 and AKT, two key targets downstream of mTORC1 and mTORC2 mediating the normal function of mTOR. These results demonstrate that mTOR is essential for cardiomyocyte survival and cardiac muscle function.

  12. Growth and regression in bovine corpora lutea: regulation by local survival and death pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarzynski, D J; Piotrowska-Tomala, K K; Lukasik, K; Galvão, A; Farberov, S; Zalman, Y; Meidan, R

    2013-09-01

    The bovine corpus luteum (CL) is a transient gland with a life span of only 18 days in the cyclic cow. Mechanisms controlling CL development and secretory function may involve factors produced both within and outside this gland. Although luteinizing hormone (LH) surge is the main trigger of ovulation and granulosa cells luteinization, many locally produced agents such as arachidonic acid (AA) metabolites, growth factors and cytokines were shown to complement gonadotropins action in the process of CL development. Bovine CL is a highly vascular gland, where the very rapid angiogenesis rate (until Day 5 of the cycle) results in the development of a capillary network, endowing this gland with one of the highest blood flow rate per unit mass in the body. Angiogenesis in the developing CL is later followed by either controlled regression of the microvascular tree in the non-fertile cycle or maintenance and stabilization of the blood vessels, as seen during pregnancy. Different luteal cell types (both steroidogenic and accessory luteal cells: immune cells, endothelial cells, pericytes and fibroblasts) are involved in the pro- and/or anti-angiogenic responses. The balance between pro- and anti-angiogenic responses to the main luteolysin - prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α) could be decisive in whether or not PGF2α induces CL regression. Fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2) may be one of the factors that modulate the angiogenic response to PGF2α. Manipulation of local production and action of FGF2 will provide new tools for reproductive management of dairy cattle. Luteolysis is characterized by a rapid decrease in progesterone production, followed by structural regression. Factors like endothelin-1, cytokines (tumour necrosis factorα, interferons) and nitric oxide were all shown to play critical roles in functional and structural regression of the CL by inhibiting steroidogenesis and inducting apoptosis. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  13. Environmental influences on kelp performance across the reproductive period: an ecological trade-off between gametophyte survival and growth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohring, Margaret B; Kendrick, Gary A; Wernberg, Thomas; Rule, Michael J; Vanderklift, Mathew A

    2013-01-01

    Most kelps (order Laminariales) exhibit distinct temporal patterns in zoospore production, gametogenesis and gametophyte reproduction. Natural fluctuations in ambient environmental conditions influence the intrinsic characteristics of gametes, which define their ability to tolerate varied conditions. The aim of this work was to document seasonal patterns in reproduction and gametophyte growth and survival of Ecklonia radiata (C. Agardh) J. Agardh in south-western Australia. These results were related to patterns in local environmental conditions in an attempt to ascertain which factors explain variation throughout the season. E. radiata was fertile (produced zoospores) for three and a half months over summer and autumn. Every two weeks during this time, gametophytes were grown in a range of temperatures (16-22 °C) in the laboratory. Zoospore densities were highly variable among sample periods; however, zoospores released early in the season produced gametophytes which had greater rates of growth and survival, and these rates declined towards the end of the reproductive season. Growth rates of gametophytes were positively related to day length, with the fastest growing recruits released when the days were longest. Gametophytes consistently survived best in the lowest temperature (16 °C), yet exhibited optimum growth in higher culture temperatures (20-22 °C). These results suggest that E. radiata releases gametes when conditions are favourable for growth, and E. radiata gametophytes are tolerant of the range of temperatures observed at this location. E. radiata releases the healthiest gametophytes when day length and temperature conditions are optimal for better germination, growth, and sporophyte production, perhaps as a mechanism to help compete against other species for space and other resources.

  14. Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis and Listeria monocytogenes in mango (Mangifera indica L.) pulp: growth, survival and cross-contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penteado, Ana L; de Castro, M Fernanda P M; Rezende, Ana C B

    2014-10-01

    This study examined the ability of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis and Listeria monocytogenes to grow or survive in mango pulp stored at -20°C, 4°C, 10°C and 25°C, as well as to cross-contaminate mangoes by means of a knife contaminated with different levels of these pathogens. At 25°C lag phase durations of 19 h and 7.2 h and generation times of 0.66 and 1.44 were obtained, respectively, for S. Enteritidis and L. monocytogenes. At 10°C only the growth of L. monocytogenes was observed. At 4°C both bacteria survived for 8 days. At -20°C S. Enteritidis was able to survive for 5 months while L. monocytogenes survived for 8 months. Cross-contamination was observed for knives contaminated with 10⁶, 10⁵ and 10⁴ CFU mL⁻¹ of S. Enteritidis and 10⁶ and 10⁵ CFU mL⁻¹ of L. monocytogenes. Both microorganisms can grow well in mango pulp at 25°C, thus lower temperatures for the maintenance of the pulps are crucial to avoid growth of these microorganisms. A refrigeration temperature of 10°C will avoid only the growth of S. Enteritidis. Thus good handling practices should be rigidly enforced to avoid any contamination as even at refrigeration and freezing temperatures survival of these pathogens may occur. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  15. Edema control by cediranib, a vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-targeted kinase inhibitor, prolongs survival despite persistent brain tumor growth in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamoun, Walid S; Ley, Carsten D; Farrar, Christian T

    2009-01-01

    by an increase in plasma collagen IV. These rapid changes in tumor vascular morphology and function led to edema alleviation -- as measured by MRI and by dry/wet weight measurement of water content -- but did not affect tumor growth. By immunohistochemistry, we found a transient decrease in macrophage...... infiltration and significant but minor changes in tumor cell proliferation and apoptosis. Systemically, cediranib increased plasma VEGF and placenta growth factor levels, and the number of circulating CXCR4(+)CD45(+) cells. However, by controlling edema, cediranib significantly increased survival of mice...

  16. Survival and development of immature stages of the Mediterranean fruit fly (Diptera: Tephritidae) in citrus fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papachristos, Dimitrios P; Papadopoulos, Nikos T; Nanos, George D

    2008-06-01

    We studied, under laboratory conditions, the performance of the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Tephritidae), immature stages in intact whole fruit of three sweet orange varieties, lemon, and bitter oranges. Both citrus variety and fruit part (flavedo, albedo, and pulp) had strong effects on larval performance, smaller effects on pupae, and no effects on eggs. Fruit peel was the most critical parameter for larval development and survival, drastically affecting larval survival (inducing very high mortality rates). Among fruit regions, survival of larvae placed in flavedo was zero for all varieties tested except for bitter orange (22.5% survival), whereas survival in albedo was very low (9.8-17.4%) for all varieties except for bitter orange (76%). Survival of pupae obtained from larvae placed in the above-mentioned fruit regions was high for all varieties tested (81.1-90.7%). Fruit pulp of all citrus fruit tested was favorable for larval development. The highest survival was observed on bitter oranges, but the shortest developmental times and heaviest pupae were obtained from orange cultivars. Pulp chemical properties, such as soluble solid contents, acidity, and pH had rather small effects on larval and pupal survival and developmental time (except for juice pH on larvae developmental duration), but they had significant effects on pupal weight.

  17. Data and analyses of woody restoration planting survival and growth as a function of wild ungulate herbivory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua P. Averett

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available These data and analyses support the research article “Wild ungulate herbivory suppresses deciduous woody plant establishment following salmonid stream restoration” Averett et al. (2017 [1]. The data and analyses presented here include: (1 planting density, survival and growth (two years post restoration of riparian plantings along an ~11 km stream reach in northeastern Oregon as a function of herbivory treatment (protected/not protected from wild ungulate herbivory, habitat type, and planting species; and (2 abundance and height distributions of naturally occurring deciduous woody species along the restored stream reach two years post restoration. Survival and growth analyses are provided as output from multiple logistic and mixed effect regression models respectively.

  18. Effect of inactive yeast cell wall on growth performance, survival rate and immune parameters in Pacific White Shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rutchanee Chotikachinda

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Effects of dietary inactive yeast cell wall on growth performance, survival rate, and immune parameters in pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei was investigated. Three dosages of inactive yeast cell wall (0, 1, and 2 g kg-1 were tested in three replicate groups of juvenile shrimps with an average initial weight of 7.15±0.05 g for four weeks. There was no significant difference in final weight, survival rate, specific growth rate, feed conversion ratio, feed intake, protein efficiency ratio, and apparent net protein utilization of each treatments. However, different levels of inactive yeast cell wall showed an effect on certain immune parameters (p<0.05. Total hemocyte counts, granular hemocyte count, and bacterial clearance were better in shrimp fed diets supplemented with 1 and 2 g kg-1 inactive yeast cell wall as compared with thecontrol group.

  19. Salinity tolerance of cultured Eurasian perch, Perca fluviatilis L.: Effects on growth and on survival as a function of temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overton, Julia Lynne; Bayley, M.; Paulsen, Helge

    2008-01-01

    Eurasian perch is generally only considered to be a candidate for freshwater aquaculture even though wild populations are found in estuarine and brackish water habitats. Little knowledge exists on two issues a) the effect of temperature on the salinity tolerance of perch and b) the long......-term effects of brackish water on their overall growth performance. The present study addresses these two questions. Firstly, the effect of temperature (12, 15, 20 and 25°C) on perch survival of a salinity challenge at either 13 or 18‰ was determined. Survival was unaffected by 13‰ at the two lowest...... temperatures whereas higher temperature and higher salinities had a dramatic detrimental effect (at 25°C, 50% mortality was reach at 62h and 39h for 13‰ and 18‰, respectively). Secondly, we examined the effect of salinity on growth, which was assessed by measuring standard length and body weight at regular...

  20. Growth and annual survival estimates to examine the ecology of larval lamprey and the implications of ageing error in fitting models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, L D; Chasco, B E; Whitlock, S L; Meeuwig, M H; Schreck, C B

    2017-04-01

    This study used existing western brook lamprey Lampetra richardsoni age information to fit three different growth models (i.e. von Bertalanffy, Gompertz and logistic) with and without error in age estimates. Among these growth models, there was greater support for the logistic and Gompertz models than the von Bertalanffy model, regardless of ageing error assumptions. The von Bertalanffy model, however, appeared to fit the data well enough to permit survival estimates; using length-based estimators, annual survival varied between 0·64 (95% credibility interval: 0·44-0·79) and 0·81 (0·79-0·83) depending on ageing and growth process error structure. These estimates are applicable to conservation and management of L. richardsoni and other western lampreys (e.g. Pacific lamprey Entosphenus tridentatus) and can potentially be used in the development of life-cycle models for these species. These results also suggest that estimators derived from von Bertalanffy growth models should be interpreted with caution if there is high uncertainty in age estimates. © 2016 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  1. Survival and psychomotor development with early betaine treatment in patients with severe methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diekman, E.F.; Koning, T.J. de; Verhoeven-Duif, N.M.; Rovers, M.M.; Hasselt, P.M. van

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The impact of betaine treatment on outcome in patients with severe methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) deficiency is presently unclear. OBJECTIVE To investigate the effect of betaine treatment on development and survival in patients with severe MTHFR deficiency. DATA SOURCES

  2. Survival and Psychomotor Development With Early Betaine Treatment in Patients With Severe Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase Deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diekman, Eugene F.; de Koning, Tom J.; Verhoeven-Duif, Nanda M.; Rovers, Maroeska M.; van Hasselt, Peter M.

    IMPORTANCE The impact of betaine treatment on outcome in patients with severe methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) deficiency is presently unclear. OBJECTIVE To investigate the effect of betaine treatment on development and survival in patients with severe MTHFR deficiency. DATA SOURCES

  3. Survival and growth of tree seedlings as a function of seed size in a gallery forest under restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Gallo Macera

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Seed size is commonly related to higher rates of emergence and survival, and biomass of seedlings when introduced by direct seeding. However, few studies have evaluated whether this relationship persists when species are reintroduced as seedlings or if this effect persists after seed reserves decline. This study evaluated the effect of seed size (mass on the probability of survival and growth of seedlings of nine native tree species introduced into a pasture area, which was originally a gallery forest in the state of São Paulo in Southeastern Brazil. The experiment occurred over the course of 24 months, in which was divided into three separate time intervals: 14 to 61 days, 61 days to 12 months, and 12 to 24 months. Seedling survival in the field was high for all three time-intervals. Seed mass positively influenced the probability of seedling survival throughout all three time-intervals after planting, but the intensity of this effect decreased with time. Species with smaller seeds exhibited higher relative growth rates (height, but only until the end of the first year. Our results suggest that seed mass is a functional trait that can predict the probability of the establishment of individual trees during forest restoration.

  4. Effects of sand burial on the survival and growth of two shrubs dominant in different habitats of northern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Hao; Zhao, Ha-Lin; Zhao, Xue-Yong; Zuo, Xiao-An; Wang, Shao-Kun; Chen, Min

    2017-04-01

    Plants that grow in dune ecosystems always suffer from sand burial. Shrubs play implications on the healthy functioning of dune ecosystems due to control blowing sand. However, the survival and growth responses of shrubs to sand burial remain poorly understood. The survival rate and seedling height of two shrubs (Artemisia halodendron and Lespedeza davurica) along with the soil properties under different burial depths were examined in order to reveal the causing ecophysiological attributes of sand burial on shrubs in the desertified region. It was found that A. halodendron can survive a burial depth of 6 cm greater than its seedling height, which is a dominant shrub in mobile dunes with intense burial, whereas a burial depth equivalent to three fourths of its seedling height is detrimental to L. davurica, which is dominant in fixed dunes with less burial. The reasons for the shrub death under sand burial were associated with the physical barrier to vertical growth and the reduction in photosynthetic area. In conclusion, A. halodendron can facilitate the stabilization of mobile dunes because of their high tolerance to the frequent and intensive sand burial, while L. davurica can be beneficial for the recovery process because of their higher survival rates under shallow burial following restoration of mobile dunes.

  5. Transgenic mouse milk expressing human bile salt-stimulated lipase improves the survival and growth status of premature mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Sheng, Zheya; Wang, Yuhang; Li, Qinghe; Gao, Yu; Wang, Yuhui; Dai, Yunping; Liu, George; Zhao, Yaofeng; Li, Ning

    2015-03-01

    The lactating human mammary gland and the pancreas both produce bile salt-stimulated lipase (BSSL), a lipolytic enzyme acting on a wide range of substrates, including triglyceride, cholesterol esters, and fat-soluble vitamins esters. Breast milk BSSL has a particularly important role in the digestion of milk fat by newborn infants. We report the generation of transgenic mice that harbored a human BSSL gene controlled by a mammary gland-specific promoter. BSSL levels in transgenic mouse milk were raised to 376.8 μg/ml, corresponding to an activity of 9.15 U/ml. Premature wild-type neonates nursed by transgenic dams exhibited significantly higher survival rate than did the control neonates nursed by wild dams (95 vs. 83.3 % and, P < 0.05). They also showed 43.8 % greater body weight gain and 33.3 % lesser fecal crude fat levels than did the controls. This study provides significant evidence that increased levels of BSSL in milk may reduce mortality and improve the growth and fat absorption in premature mice during neonatal development.

  6. Chronic stress increases experimental pancreatic cancer growth, reduces survival and can be antagonised by beta-adrenergic receptor blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partecke, Lars Ivo; Speerforck, Sven; Käding, André; Seubert, Florian; Kühn, Sandra; Lorenz, Eric; Schwandke, Sebastian; Sendler, Matthias; Keßler, Wolfram; Trung, Dung Nguyen; Oswald, Stefan; Weiss, Frank Ulrich; Mayerle, Julia; Henkel, Christin; Menges, Pia; Beyer, Katharina; Lerch, Markus M; Heidecke, Claus-Dieter; von Bernstorff, Wolfram

    2016-01-01

    Chronic stress could promote tumour growth and reduce survival of pancreatic cancer patients via beta-adrenergic receptors of tumour cells. We have tested the impact of chronic acoustic and restraint stress on tumour development in an orthotopic syngeneic murine model of pancreatic cancer. Tumour-bearing C57BL/6 mice exposed to chronic stress had 45% (p = 0.0138) higher circulating steroid and 111% (p = 0.0052) higher adrenal tyrosine hydroxylase levels. Their immune response was significantly suppressed: The in vitro LPS response of splenocytes was significantly reduced regarding Th1- and Th2-cytokines including IFN-gamma, IL-6, IL-10 and MCP-1 (0.0011  0.05). TGF-beta in vitro was increased by 23.4% using catecholamines (p Beta-catecholamines increased proliferation in tumour cells by 18% (p beta-blocker propranolol reduced these effects by 25% (p beta-blockers of patients with pancreatic cancer or other malignancies should be further evaluated as an adjuvant anti-neoplastic agent in clinical trials. Copyright © 2016 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Investigation on possibility of survival and growth enhancing by selected seaweeds from Persian Gulf in post larvae shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei

    OpenAIRE

    Dashtiannasab, Aghil

    2015-01-01

    The use of antibiotics in aquaculture has been limited. Scientifics seeking for natural substitutes to prevent of aquatic animals diseases. Considering seaweeds are rich of nutritions and bioactive compounds, the purpose of this study is: investigation the potential and use possibility of native seaweeds from Persian Gulf in shrimp aquculture industry to improve growth, survival of postlarvae and to resistance against pathogens such as vibriosis. For this propose 7 macroalgae species from Bus...

  8. Survival and growth of fish (Lates calcarifer under integrated mangrove-aquaculture and open-aquaculture systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanmugaarasu Venkatachalam

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The potential use of mangrove swamp for fish farming industry is not clearly known. Therefore, current study was conducted to assess the growth performance of the Asian Seabass, Lates calcarifer cultivated in integrated mangrove-aquaculture system (IMAS and open aquaculture system without mangroves (OAS. Fish survival and biomass production were higher by 11% and 12.5% respectively in the IMAS than those in the OAS. The fish growth performance was higher in monsoon than that in other seasons. It was in association with water quality parameters such as, high levels of DO, chlorophylls-a,b, nitrate-N, DOC, TOC; low levels of light intensity, temperature (air, water, SPM, chlorophyll-c, nitrite-N, ammonia, total phosphate, reactive silicate, and POC; as well with moderate salinity. The water quality seemed to be favourable for growth and survival of the fish. Therefore, integrating the mangroves with fish farming of the Asian seabass is beneficial for better fish survival and biomass production.

  9. Mechanical forces in plant growth and development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, D. D.; Cyr, R. J.

    2000-01-01

    Plant cells perceive forces that arise from the environment and from the biophysics of plant growth. These forces provide meaningful cues that can affect the development of the plant. Seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana were used to examine the cytoplasmic tensile character of cells that have been implicated in the gravitropic response. Laser-trapping technology revealed that the starch-containing statoliths of the central columella cells in root caps are held loosely within the cytoplasm. In contrast, the peripheral cells have starch granules that are relatively resistant to movement. The role of the actin cytoskeleton in affecting the tensile character of these cells is discussed. To explore the role that biophysical forces might play in generating developmental cues, we have developed an experimental model system in which protoplasts, embedded in a synthetic agarose matrix, are subjected to stretching or compression. We have found that protoplasts subjected to these forces from five minutes to two hours will subsequently elongate either at right angles or parallel to the tensive or compressive force vector. Moreover, the cortical microtubules are found to be organized either at right angles or parallel to the tensive or compressive force vector. We discuss these results in terms of an interplay of information between the extracellular matrix and the underlying cytoskeleton.

  10. Seeds of survival | IDRC - International Development Research Centre

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2011-07-12

    Jul 12, 2011 ... These are the words of Chinna Narsamma, a farmer who works the thin red soils of India's Deccan Plateau. Narsamma, like other farmers in her community, copes with the drought-prone climate of southern India by using strategies that have been developed over generations. Traditional farming practices ...

  11. A comparison of the survival and development of the seedlings of four upland oak species grown in four different understory light environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick Brose; Joanne Rebbeck

    2017-01-01

    Oak (Quercus spp.) research and management often focus on northern red oak (Quercus rubra) and assume that associated upland oaks have similar growth patterns. To test this premise, we measured the survival and development of four species of acorn-origin oak seedlings growing in four different levels of understory sunlight for...

  12. Do Technological Developments and Financial Development Promote Economic Growth: Fresh Evidence from Romania

    OpenAIRE

    Ur Rehman, Ijaz; SHAHBAZ, Muhammad; Kyophilavong, Phouphet

    2013-01-01

    We study the relationship between financial development, technological development and economic growth in Romania. We construct aggregate indices of financial development and technological development using principal component analysis. The ARDL bounds testing approach shows the presence of cointegration between financial development, technological development and economic growth. Financial development and technological development contribute to economic growth. Moreover, financial developmen...

  13. Survival, growth, and tag retention in age-0 Chinook Salmon implanted with 8-, 9-, and 12-mm PIT tags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiffan, Kenneth F.; Perry, Russell W.; Connor, William P.; Mullins, Frank L.; Rabe, Craig; Nelson, Doug D

    2015-01-01

    The ability to represent a population of migratory juvenile fish with PIT tags becomes difficult when the minimum tagging size is larger than the average size at which fish begin to move downstream. Tags that are smaller (e.g., 8 and 9 mm) than the commonly used 12-mm PIT tags are currently available, but their effects on survival, growth, and tag retention in small salmonid juveniles have received little study. We evaluated growth, survival, and tag retention in age-0 Chinook Salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha of three size-groups: 40–49-mm fish were implanted with 8- and 9-mm tags, and 50– 59-mm and 60–69-mm fish were implanted with 8-, 9-, and 12-mm tags. Survival 28 d after tagging ranged from 97.8% to 100% across all trials, providing no strong evidence for a fish-size-related tagging effect or a tag size effect. No biologically significant effects of tagging on growth in FL (mm/d) or weight (g/d) were observed. Although FL growth in tagged fish was significantly reduced for the 40–49-mm and 50–59-mm groups over the first 7 d, growth rates were not different thereafter, and all fish were similar in size by the end of the trials (day 28). Tag retention across all tests ranged from 93% to 99%. We acknowledge that actual implantation of 8- or 9-mm tags into small fish in the field will pose additional challenges (e.g., capture and handling stress) beyond those observed in our laboratory. However, we conclude that experimental use of the smaller tags for small fish in the field is supported by our findings.

  14. Growth and Development of Four Oaks Through Age 10 Planted at Five Spacings in a Minor Stream Bottom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey E. Kennedy; Roger M. Krinard; Bryce E. Schlaegel

    1987-01-01

    The growth and development of four species of oak, planted at five spacings in a minor stream bottom in southeast Arkansas, illustrate differences among ,species and by spacing. Spacing and species affected all tree size and biomass variables except survival. Water oak developed most rapidly, while swamp chestnut oak developed most slowly. Ten year results show that...

  15. Survival and growth of newly transformed Lampsilis cardium and Lampsilis siliquoidea in a flow-through, continuous feeding test system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinertz, Jeffery R.; Schreier, Theresa M.; Hess, Karina R.; Bartsch, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    A test system was evaluated for assessing chronic toxicity of waterborne chemicals with early life stage mussels. To determine if the test system could result in ≥80% survival in a control (unexposed) group, fat mucket mussels (Lampsilis siliquoidea Barnes, 1823) and plain pocketbook mussels (L. cardium Rafinesque, 1820) 1 day post transformation were stocked into test chambers (250 mL beakers, water volume, 200 mL, 21 °C, 40 mussels of 1 species per chamber) within a test system constructed for conducting chronic, continuous exposure, flow-through toxicity tests. The test system contained 60 chambers containing silica sand, 30 chambers with L. siliquoidea, and 30 with L. cardium. Each chamber in the continuous feeding system received 1 of 6 food types prepared with concentrated algal products. After 28 days, mussels were harvested from chambers to assess survival and growth. For L. siliquoidea, mean survival ranged from 34 to 80% and mean shell length ranged from 464 to 643 µm. For L. cardium, mean survival ranged from 12 to 66% and mean shell length ranged from 437 to 612 µm. The maximum mean growth rate for L. siliquoidea was 12.7 µm/d and for L. cardium was 11.8 µm/d. When offered a continuous diet of Nannochloropsis, Tetraselmis, and Chlorella for 28 days in the test system, the survival of 1 day post transformation L. siliquoidea was 80%. The test system can be easily enhanced with a pumping system continuously delivering test chemical to the test system's flow stream allowing for chronic toxicity tests with 1 day post transformation mussels.

  16. Growth and survival of a diallel cross for five strains of climbing perch (Anabas testudineus Bloch, 1792 in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitikorn Piwpong

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A complete diallel cross experiment was conducted with five strains of climbing perch (Anabas testudineus representing three wild populations collected from main river basins in Thailand and two farm populations in southern Thailand. Growth performance was recorded from 794 individually tagged progeny of the 24 different strain combinations after a grow-out period of about 130 d in an earthen pond. Least squares means of body weight at harvest and absolute growth rates were computed for each strain combination. The Chumphon strain showed the highest growth performance (81.1 ± 1.1 g. The Surat Thani × Chumphon (the first strain represents the sire showed the highest survival (65.4± 25.50% among the purebreds and the crossbreds. The domesticated gene pool had much better growth in aquaculture than the wild gene pool. The correlation between the least squares means of body weight and the survival rates in the 24 strain combinations was 0.51 (p < 0.05. The mean heterosis of all crossbreds across traits was negative (−10.2± 22.7%. Heterosis appeared to decrease when different gene pools were crossed. This suggests that there may be outbreeding depression. The advantage of crossbred performance was clearly not shown in the study.

  17. Chitin mixed in potting soil alters lettuce growth, the survival of zoonotic bacteria on the leaves and associated rhizosphere microbiology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane eDebode

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Chitin is a promising soil amendment for improving soil quality, plant growth and plant resilience. The objectives of this study were twofold. First, to study the effect of chitin mixed in potting soil on lettuce growth and on the survival of two zoonotic bacterial pathogens, Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica on the lettuce leaves. Second, to assess the related changes in the microbial lettuce rhizosphere, using phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA analysis and amplicon sequencing of a bacterial 16S rRNA gene fragment and the fungal ITS2. As a result of chitin addition, lettuce fresh yield weight was significantly increased. S. enterica survival in the lettuce phyllosphere was significantly reduced. The E. coli O157:H7 survival was also lowered, but not significantly. Moreover, significant changes were observed in the bacterial and fungal community of the lettuce rhizosphere. PLFA analysis showed a significant increase in fungal and bacterial biomass. Amplicon sequencing showed no increase in fungal and bacterial biodiversity, but relative abundances of the bacterial phyla Acidobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Proteobacteria and the fungal phyla Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, and Zygomycota were significantly changed. More specifically, a more than tenfold increase was observed for operational taxonomic units (OTUs belonging to the bacterial genera Cellvibrio, Pedobacter, Dyadobacter, and Streptomyces and to the fungal genera Lecanicillium and Mortierella. These genera include several species previously reported to be involved in biocontrol, plant growth promotion, the nitrogen cycle and chitin degradation. These results enhance the understanding of the response of the rhizosphere microbiome to chitin amendment. Moreover, this is the first study to investigate the use of soil amendments to control the survival of S. enterica on plant leaves.

  18. Family Growth and Survival Response to Two Simulated Water Temperature Environments in the Sea Urchin Strongylocentrotus intermedius

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaqing Chang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Heat tolerance is a target trait in the selective breeding of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus intermedius, as it plays an important role in the survival and growth of cultured S. intermedius during summer. We investigated family growth and survival response to two temperature treatments to evaluate the genotype by temperature interaction (GEI in the family selection of S. intermedius. Sea urchins from 11 families were exposed to two simulated water temperature environments—high temperature (HE and control temperature (CE—for 12 months, with each experiment divided into four periods (P1, stress-free period I; P2, stress-full high period; P3, stress-response period; and P4, stress-free period II based on the temperature changes and the survival. Test diameter (TD, body weight (BW, and survival rate (SR in HE and CE were measured monthly. Effects of family, temperature, and family-temperature interaction on TD, BW, SR, and specific growth rate (SGR for BW were examined. In CE, BW differed significantly between families in P2, P3, and P4, while TD differed significantly between families in P3 and P4 (p < 0.05. In HE, family had significant effects on BW in P4, and on TD in P3 and P4, while temperature had significant effects on SR, TD, and BW in P3 and P4 (p < 0.05. GEI effects were not significant for TD or BW; however, family ranking changes revealed the existence of GEI in SR. The GEI results indicate the necessity of applying family selection in CE and HE for SR, but not for TD or BW. These results may provide a guide for aquaculture and selective breeding of S. intermedius under temperature pressure.

  19. Chitin Mixed in Potting Soil Alters Lettuce Growth, the Survival of Zoonotic Bacteria on the Leaves and Associated Rhizosphere Microbiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debode, Jane; De Tender, Caroline; Soltaninejad, Saman; Van Malderghem, Cinzia; Haegeman, Annelies; Van der Linden, Inge; Cottyn, Bart; Heyndrickx, Marc; Maes, Martine

    2016-01-01

    Chitin is a promising soil amendment for improving soil quality, plant growth, and plant resilience. The objectives of this study were twofold. First, to study the effect of chitin mixed in potting soil on lettuce growth and on the survival of two zoonotic bacterial pathogens, Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica on the lettuce leaves. Second, to assess the related changes in the microbial lettuce rhizosphere, using phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis and amplicon sequencing of a bacterial 16S rRNA gene fragment and the fungal ITS2. As a result of chitin addition, lettuce fresh yield weight was significantly increased. S. enterica survival in the lettuce phyllosphere was significantly reduced. The E. coli O157:H7 survival was also lowered, but not significantly. Moreover, significant changes were observed in the bacterial and fungal community of the lettuce rhizosphere. PLFA analysis showed a significant increase in fungal and bacterial biomass. Amplicon sequencing showed no increase in fungal and bacterial biodiversity, but relative abundances of the bacterial phyla Acidobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Proteobacteria and the fungal phyla Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, and Zygomycota were significantly changed. More specifically, a more than 10-fold increase was observed for operational taxonomic units belonging to the bacterial genera Cellvibrio, Pedobacter, Dyadobacter, and Streptomyces and to the fungal genera Lecanicillium and Mortierella. These genera include several species previously reported to be involved in biocontrol, plant growth promotion, the nitrogen cycle and chitin degradation. These results enhance the understanding of the response of the rhizosphere microbiome to chitin amendment. Moreover, this is the first study to investigate the use of soil amendments to control the survival of S. enterica on plant leaves. PMID:27148242

  20. Life Insurance Contribution, Insurance Development and Economic Growth in China

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang Ying, Yin Linsen, Pan Wenjie

    2017-01-01

    ... (including life insurance and non-life insurance) and economic growth, reveals the contribution law of the insurance development in economic growth in the short and long term from both economic scale and quality respectively...

  1. Tumour cells expressing single VEGF isoforms display distinct growth, survival and migration characteristics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chryso Kanthou

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF is produced by most cancer cells as multiple isoforms, which display distinct biological activities. VEGF plays an undisputed role in tumour growth, vascularisation and metastasis; nevertheless the functions of individual isoforms in these processes remain poorly understood. We investigated the effects of three main murine isoforms (VEGF188, 164 and 120 on tumour cell behaviour, using a panel of fibrosarcoma cells we developed that express them individually under endogenous promoter control. Fibrosarcomas expressing only VEGF188 (fs188 or wild type controls (fswt were typically mesenchymal, formed ruffles and displayed strong matrix-binding activity. VEGF164- and VEGF120-producing cells (fs164 and fs120 respectively were less typically mesenchymal, lacked ruffles but formed abundant cell-cell contacts. On 3D collagen, fs188 cells remained mesenchymal while fs164 and fs120 cells adopted rounded/amoeboid and a mix of rounded and elongated morphologies respectively. Consistent with their mesenchymal characteristics, fs188 cells migrated significantly faster than fs164 or fs120 cells on 2D surfaces while contractility inhibitors accelerated fs164 and fs120 cell migration. VEGF164/VEGF120 expression correlated with faster proliferation rates and lower levels of spontaneous apoptosis than VEGF188 expression. Nevertheless, VEGF188 was associated with constitutively active/phosphorylated AKT, ERK1/2 and Stat3 proteins. Differences in proliferation rates and apoptosis could be explained by defective signalling downstream of pAKT to FOXO and GSK3 in fs188 and fswt cells, which also correlated with p27/p21 cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor over-expression. All cells expressed tyrosine kinase VEGF receptors, but these were not active/activatable suggesting that inherent differences between the cell lines are governed by endogenous VEGF isoform expression through complex interactions that are independent of tyrosine

  2. Effects of reproduction on growth and survival in Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua, assessed by comparison to triploids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trippel, Edward A.; Butts, Ian; Babin, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    in captive iteroparous, batch-spawning Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), utilizing diploids and triploids, knowing that triploid females invest little to no energy into gametogenesis. Based on annual specific growth rate, there was no evidence for a somatic cost of reproduction at ages 2 (virgin year) and 4....... years, but there was at age 3. years. At age 2. years, low investment in reproduction likely accounted for the lack of a somatic cost of reproduction, whereas at age 4 the absence was associated with heightened growth post-spawning enabling mature fish to catch up to immature fish. At age 3......, compensatory growth during post-spawning was below that of immature fish. Survival represented a significant component of the cost of reproduction. Laboratory experiments examining the cost of reproduction have traditionally focused on shorter time periods, commonly spanning several months, whereas ours...

  3. Neuronal Survival, Morphology and Outgrowth of Spiral Ganglion Neurons Using a Defined Growth Factor Combination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Schwieger

    Full Text Available The functionality of cochlear implants (CI depends, among others, on the number and excitability of surviving spiral ganglion neurons (SGN. The spatial separation between the SGN, located in the bony axis of the inner ear, and the CI, which is inserted in the scala tympani, results in suboptimal performance of CI patients and may be decreased by attracting the SGN neurites towards the electrode contacts. Neurotrophic factors (NTFs can support neuronal survival and neurite outgrowth.Since brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF is well known for its neuroprotective effect and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF increases neurite outgrowth, we evaluated if the combination of BDNF and CNTF leads to an enhanced neuronal survival with extended neurite outgrowth. Both NTFs were added in effective high concentrations (BDNF 50 ng/ml, CNTF 100 ng/ml, alone and in combination, to cultured dissociated SGN of neonatal rats for 48 hours.The neuronal survival and neurite outgrowth were significantly higher in SGN treated with the combination of the two NTFs compared to treatment with each factor alone. Additionally, with respect to the morphology, the combination of BDNF and CNTF leads to a significantly higher number of bipolar neurons and a decreased number of neurons without neurites in culture.The combination of BDNF and CNTF shows a great potential to increase the neuronal survival and the number of bipolar neurons in vitro and to regenerate retracted nerve fibers.

  4. Inhibition of Decay-Accelerating Factor (CD55 Attenuates Prostate Cancer Growth and Survival In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert D. Loberg

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Decay-accelerating factor (CD55 is a member of membrane-bound complement-regulatory proteins. CD55 expression correlates with poor survival in patients with colorectal cancer and has been implicated in the survival and tumorigenesis of blood-borne malignancies. Histologic analysis of clinical specimens from patients with advanced prostate cancer revealed an increase in CD55 expression in prostate tumor epithelial cells. CD55 was shown to be functionally active and to inhibit complement-mediated lysis in PC-3 and DU145 cells. The percentage of lysis was correlative with the CD55 expression profile observed in these prostate cancer cell lines. These data suggest that CD55 is an important regulator of prostate cancer cell survival. As a result, we have hypothesized that CD55 expression on prostate cancer cells promotes cell survival and contributes to the metastatic potential of prostate cancer cells. To determine the role of CD55 in prostate cancer tumorigenesis and metastasis, we generated PC-3Luc prostate cancer cells with CD55 siRNA-targeted disruption. We found that PC-3Luc/CD55 siRNA constructs in SCID mice resulted in a significant attenuation of overall tumor burden. Further investigation into the mechanisms of CD55-mediated tumor cell/microenvironment interaction is necessary to understand the role of CD55 in tumor cell survival and metastatic lesion formation.

  5. BEHAVIOR QUALITY DECIDES OUR CONDITIONS OF SURVIVAL AND DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tu Runsheng

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background of the topic: The unusual significance of quality has been found, attribute quality concept (quality is the general nature of its supporter has been found, the quality exchange law and the standard to one's liking with quality have been advanced in the process that present wit research the connotation of quality and the value of quality. (2 Current issue: The theory of knowledge economy, the theory of quality first, the theory of distribution according to work and the subjective quality concept all have theirs aggravated limitation. (3 the purpose of this research: Propel the theory of quality forward strengthen the confidence of quality people, spur them to apply quality knowledge and improve their behavior quality in their work, quicken the tempo human to raise the living quality finally. (4 Research method and conclusion: The conclusion of "behavior quality decides resources created, owned and disposed and can further decide the living state and the developing state of personality, organization, nationality and county" has been epitomized out by analyzing the connotation of quality concept, the value of quality and society law; the theory of quality world have obtained. The main reasons that behavior quality decides resources appropriated and disposed are the action of natural law, society law, the system of society value. The specific important reasons still are: the consciousness of protecting good and punishing inferior, popular feeling is partial to the things of high quality; Behavior is controlled by the ideology (thinking of fair deal; Behavior quality decides the efficiency of work; Quality has value; the latent rule about mankind to continue and excellent.

  6. Growth, straightness and survival at age 32 in a Pinus strobus x P. wallichiana F1 hybrid population (Experiment 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan Blada

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available An interspecific factorial hybridization was made, where seven P. strobus female parent trees were mated to four P. wallichiana male trees, in order to transfer genes for resistance to blister-rust from the blue pine to the F1 hybrids. The hybrid seedlings and the open pollinated families of the two parents were three times consecutivelyinoculated with blister-rust. The six years old seedlings were transplanted in the field in the so called Văliug Experiment 1. The experimental design consisted in 28 hybrid full-sib families and two open pollinated families of the parent species. Plantation took place in a complete randomized block design with three blocks, with 6 to 12 seedlings per linear plot and 3 x 3 m spacing. This paper is based on the measurements made at age 32, just after the first thinning. Diameter at breast height, tree height, tree volume, stem straightness and tree survival were the five measured traits. According to ANOVA, significant (p < 0.05 and highly significant (p< 0.001 differences for diameter at breast height, tree height, volume growth rate, stem straightness and tree survival were detected between hybrid families. Highly significant (p < 0.01, p < 0.001 differences were found between eastern white pine female parents for survival, stem straightness and all growth traits, suggestingthat nuclear additive genes are controlling the respective characters. Consequently, high survival or genetic resistance to blister-rust can be found within the P. strobus species even though it is highly susceptible to this pathogen. The P. wallichiana parents exhibited significant additive effects on straightness and breast height diameter, but no significance in height, volume, and tree survival. The contribution of the additive variance to the phenotypic one was 65.7% for diameter, 58.6% for height, 50.5% for volume, 70.4% for stem straightness and 73.4% for tree survival. Hence, additive variance should be employed in a breeding program

  7. Environmental levels of atrazine and its degradation products impair survival skills and growth of red drum larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Carmen Alvarez, María; Fuiman, Lee A

    2005-09-10

    Red drum larvae (Sciaenops ocellatus) were exposed to environmentally realistic and sublethal levels of the herbicide atrazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamin-6-isopropylamino-S-triazine) to evaluate its effects on ecologically critical traits: growth, behavior, survival potential, and resting respiration rate. Settlement size larvae (7 mm total length) were given an acute exposure of atrazine at 0, 40, and 80 microg l(-1) for 4 days. Tests of 96 h survival confirmed that these naturally occurring concentrations were sublethal for red drum larvae. Growth, routine swimming, antipredator responses to artificial and actual predators, and resting respiration rate were monitored 1 and 3 days after onset of exposure. Atrazine exposure significantly reduced growth rate. Atrazine-exposed larvae also exhibited significantly higher routine swimming speeds, swam in more convoluted paths, and were hyperactive. Responses to artificial and actual predators were not affected by atrazine exposure nor were resting respiration rates. The higher rate of travel (86% higher in atrazine-treated larvae) resulted in higher predicted encounter rates with prey (up to 71%) and slow moving predators (up to 63%). However, hyperactivity and faster active swimming speeds of exposed larvae indicated that naturally occurring sublethal levels of atrazine will result in an elevated rate of energy utilization (doubling the total metabolic rate), which is likely to increase the risk of death by starvation. Moreover, atrazine effects on growth will prolong the larval period, which could reduce the juvenile population by as much as 24%. We conclude that environmentally realistic levels of atrazine induce behavioral and physiological effects on fish larvae that would compromise their survival expectations.

  8. Effects of cadmium and a one-time drought stress on survival, growth, and yield of native plant species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miles, L.J.; Parker, G.R.

    1980-04-01

    Andropogon scoparius, Monarda fistulosa, and Rudbeckia hirta were grown from seed for 6 weeks in an uncontaminated rural site soil and a heavy metal-contaminated urban site soil. The rural site soil was amended with cadmium chloride. Plants grown in both soils were subjected to a one-time drought stress. Survival, shoot weight, root weight, total weight, height, and weekly growth of Andropogon and Monarda were adversely affected by cadmium (Cd) addition and drought stress. Results were similar for Rudbeckia except that shoot, root, and total weight were not significantly affected by drought stress. Root weights of Monarda and Andropogon were more severely affected by Cd addition than were shoot weights. Root-shoot ratios were not significantly affected by drought stress for any species. Drought stress and Cd addition effects were found to be additive for Monarda and Andropogon. The effect of soil Cd addition on growth was found to be primarily due to an initial delay in growth rather than a reduction in the overall rate of growth. However, on the heavy metal contamination urban site soil the growth rate was found to be reduced. This was especially true for Andropogon which was found to be most tolerant of Cd addition to the rural site soil for the species tested. The reduction in growth rate of plants on the urban site soil was probably not due to Cd alone.

  9. Growth and development after oesophageal atresia surgery: Need for long-term multidisciplinary follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    IJsselstijn, Hanneke; Gischler, Saskia J; Toussaint, Leontien; Spoel, Marjolein; Zijp, Monique H M van der Cammen-van; Tibboel, Dick

    2016-06-01

    Survival rates in oesophageal atresia patients have reached over 90%. In long-term follow-up studies the focus has shifted from purely surgical or gastrointestinal evaluation to a multidisciplinary approach. We reviewed the literature on the long-term morbidity of these patients and discuss mainly issues of physical growth and neurodevelopment. We conclude that growth problems - both stunting and wasting - are frequently seen, but that sufficient longitudinal data are lacking. Therefore, it is unclear whether catch-up growth into adolescence and adulthood occurs. Data on determinants of growth retardation are also lacking in current literature. Studies on neurodevelopment beyond preschool age are scarce but oesophageal atresia patients seem at risk for academic problems and motor function delay. Many factors contribute to the susceptibility to growth and development problems and we propose a multidisciplinary follow-up schedule into adulthood future care which may help improve quality of life. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The effects of DDT upon the survival and growth of nestling songbirds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, R.T.; Blagbrough, H.P.; VanEtten, R.C.

    1953-01-01

    In an experiment conducted during the summers of 1949 and 1950 at the Patuxent Research Refuge, Laurel, Maryland, two aerial applications of DDT were made at the rate of 3 pounds per acre. Sprayings were made over an experimental area of about 20 acres of abandoned fields bordered by woods and hedgerows. T\\vo hundred and ninetythree bird boxes, with three different sizes of openings to accommodate various species of hole-nesting birds, were distributed throughout this area and in a similar check area of the same size. House wrens were the most numerous and most productive of the species restricting their activities to the areas under study, and therefore they provided the most reliable information on survival and growth-rate after spraying. A total of 149 nestling wrens were under observation in 1949 and 154 in 1950. .....There were only slight decreases in the total adult bird populations, no increase in the number of cases of desertion, no significant differences in feeding ranges through the reduction of insect food, nor any apparent avoidance of the sprayed area by nesting birds. DDT at the 3 pounds-per-acre dosage caused considerable mortality to young nestlings. The fledging success in six active first-brood wren nests in 1949 was 28 percent compared to 86 percent in the unsprayed check. In 1950, when the area was sprayed at an earlier date in respect to both the calendar and the nesting progress of the first-brood wrens, fledging success in the sprayed area was 70 percent compared to 73 percent in the check. Average weights of first-brood wren nestlings in the sprayed area in both 1949 and 1950 were significantly lower than those in the check area. The weights of second-brood nestlings in 1949 were lover than those of the checks but the differences were not significant statistically. In 1950 the weights of second-brood house wrens in the sprayed area closely approximated those of the check.....Insect-sampling showed that shortly after spraying, the check

  11. Financial development and economic growth. An empirical analysis for Ireland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonios Adamopoulos

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the relationship between financial development and economicgrowth for Ireland for the period 1965-2007 using a vector error correction model (VECM.Questions were raised whether financial development causes economic growth or reverselytaking into account the positive effect of industrial production index. Financial marketdevelopment is estimated by the effect of credit market development and stock marketdevelopment on economic growth. The objective of this study was to examine the long-runrelationship between these variables applying the Johansen cointegration analysis takinginto account the maximum eigenvalues and trace statistics tests. Granger causality testsindicated that economic growth causes credit market development, while there is a bilateralcausal relationship between stock market development and economic growth. Therefore, itcan be inferred that economic growth has a positive effect on stock market development andcredit market development taking into account the positive effect of industrial productiongrowth on economic growth for Ireland.

  12. Sex-specific early survival drives adult sex ratio bias in snowy plovers and impacts mating system and population growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhart-Phillips, Luke J; Küpper, Clemens; Miller, Tom E X; Cruz-López, Medardo; Maher, Kathryn H; Dos Remedios, Natalie; Stoffel, Martin A; Hoffman, Joseph I; Krüger, Oliver; Székely, Tamás

    2017-07-03

    Adult sex ratio (ASR) is a central concept in population biology and a key factor in sexual selection, but why do most demographic models ignore sex biases? Vital rates often vary between the sexes and across life history, but their relative contributions to ASR variation remain poorly understood-an essential step to evaluate sex ratio theories in the wild and inform conservation. Here, we combine structured two-sex population models with individual-based mark-recapture data from an intensively monitored polygamous population of snowy plovers. We show that a strongly male-biased ASR (0.63) is primarily driven by sex-specific survival of juveniles rather than adults or dependent offspring. This finding provides empirical support for theories of unbiased sex allocation when sex differences in survival arise after the period of parental investment. Importantly, a conventional model ignoring sex biases significantly overestimated population viability. We suggest that sex-specific population models are essential to understand the population dynamics of sexual organisms: reproduction and population growth are most sensitive to perturbations in survival of the limiting sex. Overall, our study suggests that sex-biased early survival may contribute toward mating system evolution and population persistence, with implications for both sexual selection theory and biodiversity conservation.

  13. Sex-specific early survival drives adult sex ratio bias in snowy plovers and impacts mating system and population growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küpper, Clemens; Miller, Tom E. X.; Cruz-López, Medardo; Maher, Kathryn H.; dos Remedios, Natalie; Stoffel, Martin A.; Hoffman, Joseph I.; Krüger, Oliver; Székely, Tamás

    2017-01-01

    Adult sex ratio (ASR) is a central concept in population biology and a key factor in sexual selection, but why do most demographic models ignore sex biases? Vital rates often vary between the sexes and across life history, but their relative contributions to ASR variation remain poorly understood—an essential step to evaluate sex ratio theories in the wild and inform conservation. Here, we combine structured two-sex population models with individual-based mark–recapture data from an intensively monitored polygamous population of snowy plovers. We show that a strongly male-biased ASR (0.63) is primarily driven by sex-specific survival of juveniles rather than adults or dependent offspring. This finding provides empirical support for theories of unbiased sex allocation when sex differences in survival arise after the period of parental investment. Importantly, a conventional model ignoring sex biases significantly overestimated population viability. We suggest that sex-specific population models are essential to understand the population dynamics of sexual organisms: reproduction and population growth are most sensitive to perturbations in survival of the limiting sex. Overall, our study suggests that sex-biased early survival may contribute toward mating system evolution and population persistence, with implications for both sexual selection theory and biodiversity conservation. PMID:28634289

  14. Relationship between Plasma Fibroblast Growth Factor-23 Concentration and Survival Time in Cats with Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geddes, R F; Elliott, J; Syme, H M

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23) and parathyroid hormone (PTH) are commonly increased in cats with azotemic chronic kidney disease (CKD). Both are predictors of survival time in human patients, but these relationships have not previously been examined in the cat. To investigate the relationship between plasma FGF-23 and PTH concentrations at diagnosis of CKD in cats with survival time and with disease progression over 12 months. 214 azotemic, client-owned cats (≥9 years). Retrospective study: Biochemical and urinary variables at diagnosis of azotemic CKD, including plasma FGF-23 and PTH concentrations were assessed as predictors of survival time (all-cause mortality) using Cox regression, and as predictors of CKD progression over 12 months using logistic regression. In the final multivariable Cox regression model, survival was negatively associated with plasma creatinine (P = .002) and FGF-23 concentrations (P = .014), urine protein-to-creatinine ratio (P cats with CKD, independent of other factors including plasma creatinine and phosphate concentrations. Further work is required to assess if FGF-23 contributes directly to CKD progression, but regardless these findings may make FGF-23 a useful biomarker for predicting poorer outcomes in cats with CKD. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  15. δ-Catenin promotes prostate cancer cell growth and progression by altering cell cycle and survival gene profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Yan-Hua

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background δ-Catenin is a unique member of β-catenin/armadillo domain superfamily proteins and its primary expression is restricted to the brain. However, δ-catenin is upregulated in human prostatic adenocarcinomas, although the effects of δ-catenin overexpression in prostate cancer are unclear. We hypothesized that δ-catenin plays a direct role in prostate cancer progression by altering gene profiles of cell cycle regulation and cell survival. Results We employed gene transfection and small interfering RNA to demonstrate that increased δ-catenin expression promoted, whereas its knockdown suppressed prostate cancer cell viability. δ-Catenin promoted prostate cancer cell colony formation in soft agar as well as tumor xenograft growth in nude mice. Deletion of either the amino-terminal or carboxyl-terminal sequences outside the armadillo domains abolished the tumor promoting effects of δ-catenin. Quantitative RT2 Profiler™ PCR Arrays demonstrated gene alterations involved in cell cycle and survival regulation. δ-Catenin overexpression upregulated cyclin D1 and cdc34, increased phosphorylated histone-H3, and promoted the entry of mitosis. In addition, δ-catenin overexpression resulted in increased expression of cell survival genes Bcl-2 and survivin while reducing the cell cycle inhibitor p21Cip1. Conclusion Taken together, our studies suggest that at least one consequence of an increased expression of δ-catenin in human prostate cancer is the alteration of cell cycle and survival gene profiles, thereby promoting tumor progression.

  16. Effects of ammonia on fertilization, development, and larval survival in the Northern Pacific asteroid, Asterias amurensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang-Hoon; Sung, Chan-Gyoung; Moon, Seong-Dae; Lee, Jong-Hyeon

    2013-07-01

    For developing a complementary test organism to sea urchin during winter in Korea, sensitivities of sperm, embryo, and larvae of Asterias amurensis to un-ionized ammonia were evaluated. The EC₅₀s (Mean ± SD, n = 3) for fertilization and development were 169 ± 62 and 70 ± 19 μg/L, respectively. The 48, 72, and 96-h LC₅₀s for larval survival were 1,674 ± 583, 498 ± 221, and 336 ± 107 μg/L, respectively. The sensitivities of fertilization, development, and larval survival tests with A. amurensis are higher than or comparable to those of sea urchin and other taxonomic groups. Therefore, fertilization, development, and larval survival tests using A. amurensis are suitable for assessing pore water toxicity of marine sediments in Korea.

  17. General regression neural network and Monte Carlo simulation model for survival and growth of Salmonella on raw chicken skin as a function of serotype, temperature and time for use in risk assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    A general regression neural network and Monte Carlo simulation model for predicting survival and growth of Salmonella on raw chicken skin as a function of serotype (Typhimurium, Kentucky, Hadar), temperature (5 to 50C) and time (0 to 8 h) was developed. Poultry isolates of Salmonella with natural r...

  18. Life History theory hypotheses on child growth: Potential implications for short and long-term child growth, development and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Said-Mohamed, Rihlat; Pettifor, John M; Norris, Shane A

    2018-01-01

    Life history theory integrates ecological, physiological, and molecular layers within an evolutionary framework to understand organisms' strategies to optimize survival and reproduction. Two life history hypotheses and their implications for child growth, development, and health (illustrated in the South African context) are reviewed here. One hypothesis suggests that there is an energy trade-off between linear growth and brain growth. Undernutrition in infancy and childhood may trigger adaptive physiological mechanisms prioritizing the brain at the expense of body growth. Another hypothesis is that the period from conception to infancy is a critical window of developmental plasticity of linear growth, the duration of which may vary between and within populations. The transition from infancy to childhood may mark the end of a critical window of opportunity for improving child growth. Both hypotheses emphasize the developmental plasticity of linear growth and the potential determinants of growth variability (including the role of parent-offspring conflict in maternal resources allocation). Implications of these hypotheses in populations with high burdens of undernutrition and infections are discussed. In South Africa, HIV/AIDS during pregnancy (associated with adverse birth outcomes, short duration of breastfeeding, and social consequences) may lead to a shortened window of developmental plasticity of growth. Furthermore, undernutrition and infectious diseases in children living in South Africa, a country undergoing a rapid nutrition transition, may have adverse consequences on individuals' cognitive abilities and risks of cardio-metabolic diseases. Studies are needed to identify physiological mechanisms underlying energy allocation between biological functions and their potential impacts on health. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Effect of different commercial feeds on growth and survival of African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... no significant difference in growth between fish fed with Ajanla and ARAC feed (P>0.05). Best performance observed in fish fed with Coppens feed could be as a result of inclusion of phosphorus and higher dose of vitamin C supplement in the feed. Key Words: Aquaculture, nutrition, Clarias gariepinus, growth parameters ...

  20. Survival, growth, detoxifying and antioxidative responses of earthworms (Eisenia fetida) exposed to soils with industrial DDT contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yajuan; Zhang, Qiangbin; Huang, Dunqi; Zheng, Xiaoqi; Shi, Yajing

    2016-03-01

    The survival, growth, activity of the biotransformation system phase II enzyme glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and the oxidative defense enzyme catalase (CAT) of earthworms exposed to the contaminated soils from a former DDT plant and reference soils were investigated, and compared with the corresponding indicators in simulated soil-earthworm system, unpolluted natural soils with spiked-in DDT series, to identify the toxic effects of DDT on earthworms and their cellular defense system in complex soil system. The results indicated that DDT level in the contaminated soils was significantly higher than that in the reference soils with similar level of other pollutants and soil characters. The mortality, growth inhibition rates, GST and CST activities of earthworms exposed to the contaminated soils were significantly higher than that in reference soils. The contribution of historical DDT in contaminated soils to earthworms was confirmed by the DDT spiked tests. DDT spiked in soils at rates of higher than 200 mg·kg(-1) was significantly toxic to both the survival and the growth of earthworms. DDT significantly stimulated GST and CAT activity in earthworms after 14 days. The CAT and GST activities were also stimulated by DDT exposure at rates of 100 mg·kg(-1) after chronic exposure (42 days). The results provide implications for validating the extrapolation from laboratory simulated soils criteria to contaminated soils and for making site risk assessments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of Tree Shelters on the Survival and Growth of Argania spinosa Seedlings in Mediterranean Arid Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chamchelmaarif Defaa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The argan tree is endemic species of Morocco. It occupies an area of more than 8700 km2 and plays essential ecological and economical roles. In spite of their value, the argan woodlands are subject to rapid and uncontrolled degradation during the last decades, mainly due to overgrazing and systematic collection of argan nuts. The present study was carried out to investigate the effects of two types of tree shelters on survival and growth of Argania spinosa seedlings planted in the southwest of Morocco in order to improve the results of reforestation programs which usually end by repeated failures. The experiment was conducted in the Mesguina forest for two growing seasons after transplantation in the field. After two years, the use of tree shelters significantly increased tree survival and allowed a gain of 20%. Height growth was positively affected by tree shelters. The use of tree shelters showed no significant decrease in basal diameter. In contrast, the height to diameter ratios of sheltered trees were much higher compared to the control. Thus, the use of the tree shelters could aid the early establishment and growth of Argania spinosa under conditions similar to those of the experiment.

  2. Effect of estradiol-17β on the sex ratio, growth and survival of juvenile common snook (Centropomus undecimalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Vaz Avelar de Carvalho

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Sex control in fish is a promising technique for aquaculture, since it gives advantages associated with one sex. The aim of this study was to investigate the feminization of common snook (Centropomus undecimalis by oral administration of two doses of estradiol-17β (50 and 100 mg E2 kg-1 feed and control treatment for 45 days and to evaluate their effects on the sex ratio, growth and survival of common snook juveniles. After this period, fish were fed only with commercial feed without hormone supplementation. During the period of E2 administration, the control fish grew more than those in the other treatments. At the end of the experiment in the treatment with 50 mg E2 kg-1, 26.32% of the fish were male, 68.42% were female, and 5.26% were intersex. In the treatment with 100 mg E2 kg-1, 10% of the fish were male, and 90% were female. There was no difference in growth among the treatments after 11 months. This study showed that it is possible to obtain 90% common snook females using feeds with 100 mg E2 kg-1 for 45 days without impairing the fish growth or survival.

  3. Accumulation of dietary methylmercury and effects on growth and survival in two estuarine forage fish: Cyprinodon variegatus and Menidia beryllina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefansson, Emily S; Heyes, Andrew; Rowe, Christopher L

    2013-04-01

    Dietary methylmercury (MeHg) uptake by fish in relation to life stage, species, and level of exposure is poorly understood in lower trophic levels, particularly in estuarine species. The authors compared accumulation of dietary MeHg as well as sensitivity (survival and growth) to dietary MeHg exposure in two species of estuarine forage fish, Cyprinodon variegatus and Menidia beryllina. Fish were fed one of five dietary MeHg concentrations (ranging from 0.04 to 14 µg/g dry wt) over a period of 70 d. Growth rate and the level of dietary exposure influenced MeHg tissue concentrations in both species. Mercury in the diet exhibited a strong linear relationship with fish Hg tissue concentrations. Additionally, the authors found that M. beryllina was more sensitive to dietary MeHg exposure than C. variegatus. Both species showed some decreases in growth related to MeHg exposure, although these patterns were not consistent among treatments. Overall, C. variegatus and M. beryllina were found to have a high tolerance for dietary MeHg exposure. If fish occupying low trophic levels are capable of surviving with high Hg body burdens, this tolerance has important implications for Hg exposure of organisms occupying higher trophic levels. Copyright © 2013 SETAC.

  4. Education at the service of man in promoting child survival and development: the special role of primary schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyamwaya, D

    1987-03-01

    The importance of health education in primary schools is a major concern in Southern and Eastern Africa. Although health education may not always cause changes in behavior that are needed for survival, it is the first crucial step. Parents, especially mothers with just 1 additional year of schooling results in a reduction of 9/1000 in infant mortality. Since 20% of the total population are in primary schools, if their education reaches 2 other people then 1/2 the country's population would be affected. These schools have the infrastructure that can be used to distribute health services. Since teachers are respected, their influence on the community would be taken seriously, and students are likely to participate in many activities outside the school to promote child survival and development. The basic causes for high infant mortality in Africa are malnutrition and communicable diseases; activities necessary for child survival are, growth monitoring, oral rehydration, breast feeding, and immunization. Female education, nutrition and food production, and family planning are also important elements. In addition, components such as water and personal hygiene, environmental sanitation, psychosocial stimulation and development, and maternal health must be monitored. The educational process must be applicable to real life situations and be taught in an environment where students enjoy learning. In addition to the knowledge, behavioral change must be emphasized. Since teachers see themselves as more in academic roles changes will be needed to make them more effective.

  5. Role of Growth Factors in the Development of Mandible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepu Leander

    2011-01-01

    Growth factors are a large family of polypeptide molecules that regulate cell division in many tissues by autocrine or paracrine mechanisms. Depending on what receptors are activated, growth factors can initiate mitogenic, antiproliferative or trophic effects, that is growth factors act as positive or negative modulators of cell proliferation. The synergistic and orchestrated influences of various growth factors and other regulatory factors that are endogenously expressed in the condyle have been well documented. Growth factors do not only play an important role in embryonic development and adult tissue homeostasis but also in pathological situations, like infection and wound healing. Consequently, the applications of growth factors have therapeutic applications.

  6. Long-Term Growth and Fiscal Development Policies: The Ghanaian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The article aims at clarifying the relationship between long-term growth and fiscal policy variables. Growth equations are derived from a structural macroeconomic model. The model developed here postulates that the steady-growth rate of output becomes endogenous and is influenced by government policies.

  7. In vitro spore germination and gametophytic growth development of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-06-04

    Jun 4, 2014 ... plant growth regulators on both spore sprouting rate and gametophytes growth. Moreover, these physical and chemical factors affect the processes involved in growth and development of prothallium (Fernandez et al., 1997a, b, 1999). Different morphological structures like fila- mentous, spatulate and heart ...

  8. The evolution of development of vascular cambia and secondary growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew Groover; Rachel Spicer

    2010-01-01

    Secondary growth from vascular cambia results in radial, woody growth of stems. The innovation of secondary vascular development during plant evolution allowed the production of novel plant forms ranging from massive forest trees to flexible, woody lianas. We present examples of the extensive phylogenetic variation in secondary vascular growth and discuss current...

  9. Hatch Dates, Growth, Survival, and Overwinter Mortality of Age-0 Alewives in Lake Michigan: Implications for Habitat-Specific Recruitment Success

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Höök, Tomas O; Rutherford, Edward S; Mason, Doran M; Carter, Glenn S

    2007-01-01

    ... (a drowned river mouth lake connected to Lake Michigan). We characterized alewife hatch dates, individual condition, growth, mortality, and size-dependent overwinter survival to infer differences in habitat-specific recruitment success...

  10. Growth and development and their environmental and biological determinants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly da Rocha Neves

    2016-05-01

    Conclusion: The results showed a high prevalence of stunting and below‐average results for cognitive/language development among the participating children. Both environmental and biological factors were related to growth and development. However, biological variables showed a greater association with growth, whereas environmental variables were associated with development.

  11. Breast cancer and leptomeningeal disease (LMD): hormone receptor status influences time to development of LMD and survival from LMD diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yust-Katz, S; Garciarena, P; Liu, D; Yuan, Y; Ibrahim, N; Yerushalmi, R; Penas-Prado, M; Groves, M D

    2013-09-01

    Leptomeningeal disease (LMD) occurs in 5 % of breast cancer patients. The aim of this study was to identify risk factors related to survival and time to development of LMD in breast cancer patients. A retrospective analysis of breast cancer patients with LMD, evaluated in MDACC between 1995 and 2011. 103 patients with diagnosis of breast cancer and LMD were identified (one male). The median age at LMD diagnosis was 49.2 years. 78.2 % had invasive ductal carcinoma. Hormone receptors (HRs) were positive in 55.3 % of patients, 47.4 % were human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive and 22.8 % were triple negative. 52 % of the patients were treated with WBRT, 19 % with spinal radiation, 36 % with systemic chemotherapy and 55 % with intrathecal chemotherapy. Estimated median overall survival from time of breast cancer diagnosis was 3.66 years. Median survival from time of LMD diagnosis was 4.2 months. Time from breast cancer diagnosis to LMD was 2.48 years. In multivariate analysis, HR status and stage at diagnosis were significantly associated with time to LMD diagnosis (p < 0.05). In triple negative patients, time to LMD was shorter. In patients who were HR positive, time to LMD was longer. Survival from LMD diagnosis was significantly associated with both treatment, as well as positive HR status (multivariate analysis p < 0.05). In conclusion LMD has dismal prognosis in breast cancer patients. HR status contributes to time to LMD diagnosis and survival from LMD diagnosis. The impact of treatment aimed at LMD cannot be ascertained in our retrospective study due to the inherent bias associated with the decision to treat.

  12. Survival and growth responses of Jatropha curcas L. to three restoration techniques on degraded soils in Burkina Faso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Wenemi Kagambèga

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Land degradation is a major problem in the Sahelian countries. Erosion control through establishment of vegetation cover is at important strategy to reverse the trend. Our research objective was to analyse the e-ffects of three restoration techniques on Jatropha curcas L. seedlings growth and survivorship. Were conducted two separate field trials, involving the sowing and planting of J. curcas, in which several different soil restoration techniques were applied. The trial was monitored using a ran-domized block study design over a period of two years. The design included ten different treatments, six in the sowing trial and four in the planting trial, each with three replicates. In the first experiment, growth rate was found to be significantly higher in the Sub-Soiling treatment, that received additional organic matter than other treatments. However, overall survival rate was low (18%. In the second experiment, the Half-moon treatment yielded a significantly higher growth both in height (df = 3, F = 56.74, p < 0.05 and diameter (df = 3, F = 31.76, p < 0.05 and survival rate compared to those of the other treatments (df = 3, F = 50.4, p < 0.05. In conclusion, planting seedlings produced a greater survival rate than sowing seeds. Among tested the soil restoration and water conservation techniques the Half-moon technique was found as the most effective. This is recommended to be used for improving the revegetation of J. curcas in the future. 

  13. Impact of elevated temperature on the growth, survival and trophic dynamics of winter flounder larvae: a mesocosm study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, A. A.; Klein-MacPhee, G. [Rhode Island Univ., Narragansett, RI (United States)

    2000-12-01

    The impact of increased temperature on the growth, survival and trophic dynamics of winter flounder larvae was studied in a land-based mesocosm, in order to gain a better understanding of the factors controlling the recruitment of winter flounder, the dominant commercial fish in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island. The investigation was prompted by a number of recent studies suggesting that the declining flounder population observed over the past 14 years was in some manner related to warmer winter temperatures which cause to increase the mortality of flounder larvae as well as predator activity. The paper describes the impact of increasing water temperature by three degrees relative to control systems in six enclosed mesocosms over a diatom post-winter-spring bloom period. The study focused on the effects of the altered temperature on food availability, abundance of active predators and the growth and survival of winter flounder larvae. It was observed that cooler temperature tended to prolong the incubation period of the larvae, resulting in hatching at a larger size in the cool mesocosm relative to the warm. Daily instantaneous growth and mortality rates showed a significant inverse relationship. The cumulative impact of warmer temperatures resulted in a 10 to 16 per cent decline of larvae surviving to metamorphosis (about six weeks). Increased temperature-mediated egg predation effects were also observed. It was concluded that chronic over-exploitation is associated with a long-term decline in winter flounder stock abundance despite production of good year-classes. Incorporation of the effect of warmer temperatures into fishing management plans, e. g. reducing fishing pressure following periods of successive warm winters, might be the most likely way to arrest declining stocks of winter flounder in the affected area. 34 refs., 4 tabs., 10 figs.

  14. Vascular endothelial growth factor secretion is an independent prognostic factor for relapse-free survival in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bont, ESJM; Fidler, [No Value; Meeuwsen, T; Scherpen, F; Hahlen, K; Kamps, WA

    Substantial improvements in long-term survival have been made with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, the overall success rate in treatment of AML is around 50%, despite intensive chemotherapeutic regimens. AML cell survival seems to be related to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The

  15. Agricultural Growth, Poverty and Inequality in Developing Countries

    OpenAIRE

    Imai, Katsushi; Cheng, Wenya; Gaiha, Raghav

    2015-01-01

    Drawing upon cross-country panel data for developing countries, the present study shows that agricultural growth is the most important factor in reducing inequality and poverty, and growth acceleration. This is in striking contrast to the dominant view that urbanization is key to growth and elimination of extreme poverty. There is thus a case for a drastic shift away from rural-urban migration and urbanization as main drivers of growth and elimination of extreme poverty, and towards revival o...

  16. Effect of brine marination on survival and growth of spoilage and pathogenic bacteria during processing and subsequent storage of ready-to-eat shrimp (Pandalus borealis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejlholm, Ole; Devitt, Tina D; Dalgaard, Paw

    2012-06-15

    The effect of brine marination at chill temperatures on survival and growth of spoilage and pathogenic bacteria during processing and subsequent storage of ready-to-eat cold water shrimp was studied. Survival and growth of Lactobacillus sakei, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella, Staphylococcus aureus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus were examined. The effect of brine composition and pH was determined in 12 screening experiments without addition of shrimp. Sixteen challenge tests with shrimp were then carried out to examine the effect of brine composition and storage temperature on survival and growth during processing and subsequent storage of brined and drained shrimp in modified atmosphere packaging (MAP). Different brines with (i) acetic and lactic acids (AL) or (ii) benzoic, citric and sorbic acids (BCS) were studied. V. parahaemolyticus was inactivated in brine AL without shrimp whereas concentrations of all the examined microorganisms were reduced in brine BCS. A significant effect of brine pH on inactivation was observed and inactivation during chill marination of shrimp in brine was reduced compared to the effect of brine alone. This was explained by a relatively fast increase of pH in the brine during marination of shrimp. For shrimp in brine BCS, reductions were observed for V. parahaemolyticus and Salmonella, whereas inactivation in shrimp was only noticed for Salmonella in brine AL. The observed reductions were too small to be used in practise for decontamination of shellfish. None of the examined pathogens was able to grow at 7°C in brined and drained MAP shrimp that resembled commercial products. However, reducing the concentration of acetic and lactic acids by 50% resulted in relatively fast growth of L. monocytogenes in brined and drained MAP shrimp at 7°C. Growth of S. aureus and Salmonella was observed in similar products stored at 15°C. V. parahaemolyticus was reduced in brined and drained MAP shrimp stored at both 7 and 15°C. Based on the results

  17. Effects of moisture content of food waste on residue separation, larval growth and larval survival in black soldier fly bioconversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jack Y K; Chiu, Sam L H; Lo, Irene M C

    2017-09-01

    In order to foster sustainable management of food waste, innovations in food waste valorization technologies are crucial. Black soldier fly (BSF) bioconversion is an emerging technology that can turn food waste into high-protein fish feed through the use of BSF larvae. The conventional method of BSF bioconversion is to feed BSF larvae with food waste directly without any moisture adjustment. However, it was reported that difficulty has been experienced in the separation of the residue (larval excreta and undigested material) from the insect biomass due to excessive moisture. In addition to the residue separation problem, the moisture content of the food waste may also affect the growth and survival aspects of BSF larvae. This study aims to determine the most suitable moisture content of food waste that can improve residue separation as well as evaluate the effects of the moisture content of food waste on larval growth and survival. In this study, pre-consumer and post-consumer food waste with different moisture content (70%, 75% and 80%) was fed to BSF larvae in a temperature-controlled rotary drum reactor. The results show that the residue can be effectively separated from the insect biomass by sieving using a 2.36mm sieve, for both types of food waste at 70% and 75% moisture content. However, sieving of the residue was not feasible for food waste at 80% moisture content. On the other hand, reduced moisture content of food waste was found to slow down larval growth. Hence, there is a trade-off between the sieving efficiency of the residue and the larval growth rate. Furthermore, the larval survival rate was not affected by the moisture content of food waste. A high larval survival rate of at least 95% was achieved using a temperature-controlled rotary drum reactor for all treatment groups. The study provides valuable insights for the waste management industry on understanding the effects of moisture content when employing BSF bioconversion for food waste recycling

  18. REFLECTIONS ON THE GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Shittu

    distinctions between the Islamic philosophy and Western philosophy. Keywords: Islam, Philosophy, Reason, Revelation. Introduction. From the onset of the growth of Islam as a religious and political movement, Muslim thinkers have sought to understand the theoretical aspects of their faith by using philosophical concepts.

  19. Growth and Survival of the American Oyster Crassostrea virginica in Jamaica Bay, New York

    OpenAIRE

    Sarinsky, Gary; Carroll, Margaret A; Nduka, Ebere; Catapane, Edward J.

    2005-01-01

    Jamaica Bay is a major inlet opening to the Atlantic Ocean. It was abundant with oysters until early 1900's. Over-harvesting, pressure from predators, parasitic invasion and declining water quality often are cited as causes. Despite actions to arrest and reverse the pollution, oysters are not reestablished. We are studying factors relating to the rehabitation of Crassostrea virginica in Jamaica Bay to determine if the water quality and environmental conditions are suitable for their survival....

  20. Development of a Summarized Health Index (SHI for use in predicting survival in sea turtles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsung-Hsien Li

    Full Text Available Veterinary care plays an influential role in sea turtle rehabilitation, especially in endangered species. Physiological characteristics, hematological and plasma biochemistry profiles, are useful references for clinical management in animals, especially when animals are during the convalescence period. In this study, these factors associated with sea turtle surviving were analyzed. The blood samples were collected when sea turtles remained alive, and then animals were followed up for surviving status. The results indicated that significantly negative correlation was found between buoyancy disorders (BD and sea turtle surviving (p < 0.05. Furthermore, non-surviving sea turtles had significantly higher levels of aspartate aminotranspherase (AST, creatinine kinase (CK, creatinine and uric acid (UA than surviving sea turtles (all p < 0.05. After further analysis by multiple logistic regression model, only factors of BD, creatinine and UA were included in the equation for calculating summarized health index (SHI for each individual. Through evaluation by receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve, the result indicated that the area under curve was 0.920 ± 0.037, and a cut-off SHI value of 2.5244 showed 80.0% sensitivity and 86.7% specificity in predicting survival. Therefore, the developed SHI could be a useful index to evaluate health status of sea turtles and to improve veterinary care at rehabilitation facilities.

  1. A classification proposal for coefficients of variation in Eucalyptus experiments involving survival, growth and wood quality variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freddy Mora

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objective of this study was to present a classification proposal for coefficients of variation (CV in Eucalyptus experiments, aiming at providing a useful tool for experiments involving growth, survival and wood quality traits. Ninety-four studies were selected from a search for peer-reviewed journals yielding a total of 508 data. The CVs were classified as low, moderate, high and very high. The mean, standard deviation, maximum and minimum values, skewness and kurtosis were estimated to describe the distribution shape. The Shapiro-Wilk test confirmed that all variables satisfied the assumption of normality (p < 0.05. The results indicated that the growth traits had the highest variability, being variables strongly affected by the environment. In contrast, all variables related to wood quality (except extractives had the lowest range of CVs. In summary, the classification proposed in this report provides a useful tool for researchers interested in estimating the accuracy of their experiments.

  2. Effects of temperature on development, survival and reproduction of insects: experimental design, data analysis and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Régnière, Jacques; Powell, James; Bentz, Barbara; Nealis, Vincent

    2012-05-01

    The developmental response of insects to temperature is important in understanding the ecology of insect life histories. Temperature-dependent phenology models permit examination of the impacts of temperature on the geographical distributions, population dynamics and management of insects. The measurement of insect developmental, survival and reproductive responses to temperature poses practical challenges because of their modality, variability among individuals and high mortality near the lower and upper threshold temperatures. We address this challenge with an integrated approach to the design of experiments and analysis of data based on maximum likelihood. This approach expands, simplifies and unifies the analysis of laboratory data parameterizing the thermal responses of insects in particular and poikilotherms in general. This approach allows the use of censored observations (records of surviving individuals that have not completed development after a certain time) and accommodates observations from temperature transfer treatments in which individuals pass only a portion of their development at an extreme (near-threshold) temperature and are then placed in optimal conditions to complete their development with a higher rate of survival. Results obtained from this approach are directly applicable to individual-based modeling of insect development, survival and reproduction with respect to temperature. This approach makes possible the development of process-based phenology models that are based on optimal use of available information, and will aid in the development of powerful tools for analyzing eruptive insect population behavior and response to changing climatic conditions. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Financial Development and Economic Growth: A Panel Data Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno Carlos LEITÃO

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between financial development and economic growth has been studied long time in economics (Adam Smith and Schumpeter. Structural reforms and the integration of financial markets have been attracting the interest of the academic community. This manuscript examines the link between financial development and economic growth. The European Union Countries (EU-27, and BRIC (Brazil, Russia, India and China were examined, between 1980 and 2006. Using a static and dynamic panel data approach, the results demonstrate that the financial development contribute to economic growth. Our study also consider productivity and trade, these proxies confirm the positive effect on economic growth.

  4. Evolution of development of vascular cambia and secondary growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spicer, Rachel; Groover, Andrew

    2010-05-01

    Secondary growth from vascular cambia results in radial, woody growth of stems. The innovation of secondary vascular development during plant evolution allowed the production of novel plant forms ranging from massive forest trees to flexible, woody lianas. We present examples of the extensive phylogenetic variation in secondary vascular growth and discuss current knowledge of genes that regulate the development of vascular cambia and woody tissues. From these foundations, we propose strategies for genomics-based research in the evolution of development, which is a next logical step in the study of secondary growth.

  5. Development of Technology Transfer Economic Growth Metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastrangelo, Christina M.

    1998-01-01

    The primary objective of this project is to determine the feasibility of producing technology transfer metrics that answer the question: Do NASA/MSFC technical assistance activities impact economic growth? The data for this project resides in a 7800-record database maintained by Tec-Masters, Incorporated. The technology assistance data results from survey responses from companies and individuals who have interacted with NASA via a Technology Transfer Agreement, or TTA. The goal of this project was to determine if the existing data could provide indications of increased wealth. This work demonstrates that there is evidence that companies that used NASA technology transfer have a higher job growth rate than the rest of the economy. It also shows that the jobs being supported are jobs in higher wage SIC codes, and this indicates improvements in personal wealth. Finally, this work suggests that with correct data, the wealth issue may be addressed.

  6. Analysing growth and development of plants jointly using developmental growth stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dambreville, Anaëlle; Lauri, Pierre-Éric; Normand, Frédéric; Guédon, Yann

    2015-01-01

    Plant growth, the increase of organ dimensions over time, and development, the change in plant structure, are often studied as two separate processes. However, there is structural and functional evidence that these two processes are strongly related. The aim of this study was to investigate the co-ordination between growth and development using mango trees, which have well-defined developmental stages. Developmental stages, determined in an expert way, and organ sizes, determined from objective measurements, were collected during the vegetative growth and flowering phases of two cultivars of mango, Mangifera indica. For a given cultivar and growth unit type (either vegetative or flowering), a multistage model based on absolute growth rate sequences deduced from the measurements was first built, and then growth stages deduced from the model were compared with developmental stages. Strong matches were obtained between growth stages and developmental stages, leading to a consistent definition of integrative developmental growth stages. The growth stages highlighted growth asynchronisms between two topologically connected organs, namely the vegetative axis and its leaves. Integrative developmental growth stages emphasize that developmental stages are closely related to organ growth rates. The results are discussed in terms of the possible physiological processes underlying these stages, including plant hydraulics, biomechanics and carbohydrate partitioning. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. THE INVESTMENTS, ECONOMIC GROWTH FACTORS OR CONSUMPTION OF DEVELOPMENT POTENTIAL?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huru Dragos

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available In Romania, in the last year the economic growth is a real phenomenon that is not our subject for demonstration or for analyze in this paper. Our concern is related with the way of manifestation for economic growth in the economic system. We study if not the economic growth on the contrary of development for current or further performance (regardless of economic aspect or level of analyze can unstuck in consumption of the availed resources for consolidate potential for development.

  8. Plasma Rich in Growth Factors Induces Cell Proliferation, Migration, Differentiation, and Cell Survival of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maravillas Mellado-López

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs are a promising therapeutic alternative for tissue repair in various clinical applications. However, restrictive cell survival, differential tissue integration, and undirected cell differentiation after transplantation in a hostile microenvironment are complications that require refinement. Plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF from platelet-rich plasma favors human and canine ASC survival, proliferation, and delaying human ASC senescence and autophagocytosis in comparison with serum-containing cultures. In addition, canine and human-derived ASCs efficiently differentiate into osteocytes, adipocytes, or chondrocytes in the presence of PRGF. PRGF treatment induces phosphorylation of AKT preventing ASC death induced by lethal concentrations of hydrogen peroxide. Indeed, AKT inhibition abolished the PRGF apoptosis prevention in ASC exposed to 100 μM of hydrogen peroxide. Here, we show that canine ASCs respond to PRGF stimulus similarly to the human cells regarding cell survival and differentiation postulating the use of dogs as a suitable translational model. Overall, PRGF would be employed as a serum substitute for mesenchymal stem cell amplification to improve cell differentiation and as a preconditioning agent to prevent oxidative cell death.

  9. Effect of growth on the thermal resistance and survival of Salmonella Tennessee and Oranienburg in peanut butter, measured by a new thin-layer thermal death time device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Susanne E; Grasso, Elizabeth M; Halik, Lindsay A; Fleischman, Gregory J; Chirtel, Stuart J; Grove, Stephen F

    2012-06-01

    In published data the thermal destruction of Salmonella species in peanut butter deviates from pseudo-first-order kinetics. The reasons for such deviation are unknown. This study examined both the method used to measure the thermal destruction rate and the method of growth of the microorganisms to explain variations in destruction kinetics. Growth on a solid matrix results in a different physiological state that may provide greater resistance to adverse environments. In this study, Salmonella Tennessee and Oranienburg were grown for 24 h at 37°C under aerobic conditions in broth and agar media to represent planktonic and sessile cell growth, respectively. Peanut butter was held at 25°C and tested for Salmonella levels immediately after inoculation and at various time intervals up to 2 weeks. Thermal resistance was measured at 85°C by use of a newly developed thin-layer metal sample holder. Although thermal heat transfer through the metal device resulted in longer tau values than those obtained with plastic bags (32.5 ± 0.9 versus 12.4 ± 1.9 s), the bags have a relative variability of about 15 % compared with about 3 % in the plates, allowing improved uniformity of sample treatment. The two serovars tested in the thin-layer device showed similar overall thermal resistance levels in peanut butter regardless of growth in sessile or planktonic states. However, thermal destruction curves from sessile cultures exhibited greater linearity than those obtained from planktonic cells (P = 0.0198 and 0.0047 for Salmonella Oranienburg and Salmonella Tennessee, respectively). In addition, both Salmonella serovars showed significantly higher survival in peanut butter at 25°C when originally grown on solid media (P = 0.001) with a survival of Salmonella at different temperatures in a low-water-activity environment such as peanut butter.

  10. Targeting the Pro-Survival Protein MET with Tivantinib (ARQ 197) Inhibits Growth of Multiple Myeloma Cells12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, Shadia; Shentu, Shujun; Yang, Jing; He, Jin; Orlowski, Robert Z.; Stellrecht, Christine M.; Gandhi, Varsha

    2015-01-01

    The hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)/MNNG HOS transforming gene (MET) pathway regulates cell growth, survival, and migration. MET is mutated or amplified in several malignancies. In myeloma, MET is not mutated, but patients have high plasma concentrations of HGF, high levels of MET expression, and gene copy number, which are associated with poor prognosis and advanced disease. Our previous studies demonstrated that MET is critical for myeloma cell survival and its knockdown induces apoptosis. In our current study, we tested tivantinib (ARQ 197), a small-molecule pharmacological MET inhibitor. At clinically achievable concentrations, tivantinib induced apoptosis by > 50% in all 12 human myeloma cell lines tested. This biologic response was associated with down-regulation of MET signaling and inhibition of the mitogen-activated protein kinase and phosphoinositide 3-kinase pathways, which are downstream of the HGF/MET axis. Tivantinib was equally effective in inducing apoptosis in myeloma cell lines resistant to standard chemotherapy (melphalan, dexamethasone, bortezomib, and lenalidomide) as well as in cells that were co-cultured with a protective bone marrow microenvironment or with exogenous cytokines. Tivantinib induced apoptosis in CD138 + plasma cells from patients and demonstrated efficacy in a myeloma xenograft mouse model. On the basis of these data, we initiated a clinical trial for relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma (MM). In conclusion, MET inhibitors may be an attractive target-based strategy for the treatment of MM. PMID:25810013

  11. Targeting the pro-survival protein MET with tivantinib (ARQ 197) inhibits growth of multiple myeloma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, Shadia; Shentu, Shujun; Yang, Jing; He, Jin; Orlowski, Robert Z; Stellrecht, Christine M; Gandhi, Varsha

    2015-03-01

    The hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)/MNNG HOS transforming gene (MET) pathway regulates cell growth, survival, and migration. MET is mutated or amplified in several malignancies. In myeloma, MET is not mutated, but patients have high plasma concentrations of HGF, high levels of MET expression, and gene copy number, which are associated with poor prognosis and advanced disease. Our previous studies demonstrated that MET is critical for myeloma cell survival and its knockdown induces apoptosis. In our current study, we tested tivantinib (ARQ 197), a small-molecule pharmacological MET inhibitor. At clinically achievable concentrations, tivantinib induced apoptosis by >50% in all 12 human myeloma cell lines tested. This biologic response was associated with down-regulation of MET signaling and inhibition of the mitogen-activated protein kinase and phosphoinositide 3-kinase pathways, which are downstream of the HGF/MET axis. Tivantinib was equally effective in inducing apoptosis in myeloma cell lines resistant to standard chemotherapy (melphalan, dexamethasone, bortezomib, and lenalidomide) as well as in cells that were co-cultured with a protective bone marrow microenvironment or with exogenous cytokines. Tivantinib induced apoptosis in CD138+ plasma cells from patients and demonstrated efficacy in a myeloma xenograft mouse model. On the basis of these data, we initiated a clinical trial for relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma (MM). In conclusion, MET inhibitors may be an attractive target-based strategy for the treatment of MM. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparison of all morphotype males and various types stocking density of Macrobrachium rosenbergii (De Man on growth and survival rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mst. Rubia Banu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted to appraise the effect of different stocking densities on three male morphotypes named blue claw (BC, orange claw (OC and small male (SM at harvest in all-male culture and assess the growth performance of BC, OC and SM in each isolated culture. Trials involving three stocking densities of all-male prawn viz., 20, 30 and 40 juvenile m−2 were carried out in replicates. After 4 months of culture, BC, OC and SM were sorted from all tanks and restocked at 5 m−2 in treatments BC, OC and SM respectively for 80 days. A difference in prawn density was significant (P < 0.05 affect adversely on morphotypes. The highest survival rate combined with good yields performance was from 20 juvenile m−2 stocking density with 21% BC, 62.5% OC and 16.5% SM respectively. In isolation culture, the average specific growth rate of the SM population (1.22 was significantly higher than that of the OC (1.01 and the BC (0.43 population. The survival rate of the SM population was 100% while others were 72%. Absolute weight of prawn was significantly greater in the OC male (23.87 g than the SM (19.57 g and the BC male (6.31 g. Impacts of isolated culture on population structure were much more pronounced in the SM population than others.

  13. Explaining long-distance dispersal: effects of dispersal distance on survival and growth in a stream salamander.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Winsor H

    2010-10-01

    Long-distance dispersal (LDD) may contribute disproportionately to range expansions, the creation of new evolutionary lineages, and species persistence in human-dominated landscapes. However, because data on the individual consequences of dispersal distance are extremely limited, we have little insight on how LDD is maintained in natural populations. I used six years of spatially explicit capture-mark-recapture (CMR) data to test the prediction that individual performance increases with dispersal distance in the stream salamander Gyrinophilus porphyriticus. Dispersal distance was total distance moved along the 1-km study stream, ranging from 0 to 565 m. To quantify individual performance, I used CMR estimates of survival and individual growth rates based on change in body length. Survival and growth rates increased significantly with dispersal distance. These relationships were not confounded by pre-dispersal body condition or by ecological gradients along the stream. Individual benefits of LDD were likely caused by an increase in the upper limit of settlement site quality with dispersal distance. My results do not support the view that the fitness consequences of LDD are unpredictable and instead suggest that consistent evolutionary mechanisms may explain the prevalence of LDD in nature. They also highlight the value of direct CMR data for understanding the individual consequences of variation in dispersal distance and how that variation is maintained in natural populations.

  14. Mastic oil from Pistacia lentiscus var. chia inhibits growth and survival of human K562 leukemia cells and attenuates angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loutrari, Heleni; Magkouta, Sophia; Pyriochou, Anastasia; Koika, Vasiliki; Kolisis, Fragiskos N; Papapetropoulos, Andreas; Roussos, Charis

    2006-01-01

    Mastic oil from Pistacia lentiscus var. chia, a natural plant extract traditionally used as a food additive, has been extensively studied for its antimicrobial activity attributed to the combination of its bioactive components. One of them, perillyl alcohol (POH), displays tumor chemopreventive, chemotherapeutic, and antiangiogenic properties. We investigated whether mastic oil would also suppress tumor cell growth and angiogenesis. We observed that mastic oil concentration and time dependently exerted an antiproliferative and proapoptotic effect on K562 human leukemia cells and inhibited the release of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) from K562 and B16 mouse melanoma cells. Moreover, mastic oil caused a concentration-dependent inhibition of endothelial cell (EC) proliferation without affecting cell survival and a significant decrease of microvessel formation both in vitro and in vivo. Investigation of underlying mechanism(s) demonstrated that mastic oil reduced 1) in K562 cells the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (Erk1/2) known to control leukemia cell proliferation, survival, and VEGF secretion and 2) in EC the activation of RhoA, an essential regulator of neovessel organization. Overall, our results underscore that mastic oil, through its multiple effects on malignant cells and ECs, may be a useful natural dietary supplement for cancer prevention.

  15. Sponge Farming Trials: Survival, Attachment, and Growth of Two Indo-Pacific Sponges, Neopetrosia sp. and Stylissa massa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Schiefenhövel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sponges, an important part of the reef ecosystem, are of commercial value for public aquaria, pharmacology and chemistry. With the growing demand for sponges, natural resources are at risk of being overexploited. Growing of sponges in artificial or semi natural farms is an alternative. In this study different farming methods were tested on two Indo-Pacific sponge species, Neopetrosia sp. and Stylissa massa. Survival, growth and attachment ability were observed with different substrates (suspended ropes, coral boulders and artificial substrate, two types of aquaria with different water volume and two different field sites in Indonesia. The two species responded differently to their individual locations and environmental stresses. Survival, growth and attachment rates of Neopetrosia sp. at the field site are depending on the cultivation method, we found highest volume increment (27–35% for a horizontal line in the field. Whereas the volume increase for S. massa did not show any differences for the different transplantation methods, Neopetrosia sp. generally showed higher rates than S. massa. Further aquaria experiments, for example, on nutrient supply, should be tested to receive more detailed data about sponges, particularly because almost all fragments of both species showed a decline or steady state in mean length.

  16. Models of economic growth and development in the context of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Countries like New Zealand, Iceland, and Denmark offer evidence of this. Models of African development such as the Lagos Plan of Action in terms of the whole continent are discussed within the context of existing impediments to such progress. Keywords: economic growth, economic development, human capital, growth ...

  17. Developing Life-Long Learners through Personal Growth Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Barry; Williams, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    Leaders must become life-long learners if they are to remain effective in an environment that is both global and changing at an exponential pace. As Day (1992) noted, personal growth is essential in the leadership development process. In a personal leadership development course, students are required to complete a personal growth project in order…

  18. The Role of Stock Market Development on Economic Growth in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the role of stock market development on economic growth of Nigeria using a 15-year time series data from 1994 - 2008. The method of analysis used is Ordinary Least Square (OLS) techniques. The study measures the relationship between stock market development indices and economic growth.

  19. Western and Chinese Development Discourses: Education, Growth and Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordtveit, Bjorn Harald

    2009-01-01

    This article examines Western and Chinese discourses of education, sustainable growth and development. Education is increasingly considered as a means to fuel economic growth, especially since the 1980s, when conservative economic values became predominant in Western development thought. Despite a discourse on sustainability favouring ecologically…

  20. Natural histroy of trisomy 18 and trisomy 13: I. Growth, physical assessment, medical histories, survival, and recurrence risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baty, B.J.; Blackburn, B.L.; Carey, J.C. [Univ. of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1994-01-15

    The natural history of trisomy 18 and trisomy 13 was investigated using data derived from parent questionnaires and medical records from 98 families with an index case of trisomy 18 and 32 families with an index case of trisomy 13. Data are presented on pregnancy, delivery, survival, medical complications, immunizations, growth, cause of death, cytogenetics, and recurrence risk. Half of the trisomy 18 babies were delivered by C-section. Fetal distress was a factor in half, and the only reason in a third of C-section deliveries. One minute Apgar scores were significantly lower in C-section and breech deliveries. There were more small-for-gestational-age babies than in the general population, but most of the low-birth-weight newborns were small for gestational age, unlike the general population. Survival in this group of children was better than in other studies due to ascertainment bias. There were more girls than boys at all ages for both conditions, and the sex ratio decreased with time. Growth curves for length, weight, head circumference, and weight vs height are provided. Long-term survival did not appear to be due to mosaicism. There were no adverse reactions attributable to immunizations. At age 1 year there was an average of approximately 2 operations per living child. The authors report the second case of successful major cardiac surgery in a trisomy 18 child. Almost 70% of deaths were attributed to cardiopulmonary arrest. The sibling recurrence risk for trisomy 18 or trisomy 13 was 0.55%. 86 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Best Development Practices: A Primer for Smart Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best Development Practices: A Primer for Smart Growth lists specific practices to achieve development principles that mix land uses, support transportation options, protect natural systems, and provide housing choices.

  2. Effects of a freezing event during hibernation on further survival, reproduction and growth in the partially freezing tolerant land snail Helix aspersa muller (Gastropoda: helicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansart, Armelle; Vernon, Philippe; Daguzan, Jacques

    2002-01-01

    Tolerance of ectothermic animals to freezing is often estimated by assessing survival a few days after the treatment. However, in the long term, ice formation in the body tissues can affect survival, as well as reproductive capability and growth. The land snail Helix aspersa survives only short durations with ice in its tissues, to a lethal limit of 40 to 60 % of its body water frozen. Adult and immature snails were treated during their winter dormancy period to a freezing event above this limit; their survival was observed both in the short and long term, as well as their ability to reproduce (adults) and grow (immature snails). Treated snails were compared with a control group, which was not frozen. No difference appeared in the survival, reproduction and growth of control and frozen snails. This study confirms partial freezing tolerance in this population of Helix aspersa.

  3. The effects of water type on growth, survival and condition of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-02-01

    Feb 1, 2010 ... Better hardness means better calcium and magnesium in water. Fish take calcium from both water and diet to build up formation of skeletal structures such as bone, fins and scales (Boyd, 1990; Lovell, 1998). High hardness (Ca2+ and Mg2+ cation concentrations) suppor- ted velifera growth in this system.

  4. Germination, survival, and growth of grass and forb seedlings: effects of soil moisture variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seed germination and seedling growth, survivorship, and final biomass and their responses to varying numbers of days between watering were studied in two grass and six forb species native to the U.S. Central Plains grasslands. Our object was to assess the potential role of germination and seedling g...

  5. Enhancing selective breeding for growth, slaughter traits and overall survival in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sae-Lim, P.; Komen, J.; Kause, A.; Martin, K.E.; Crooijmans, R.P.M.A.; Arendonk, van J.A.M.; Parsons, J.E.

    2013-01-01

    Enhancing selection using two-stage selection is normally implemented by pre-selection for tagging weight (BWT) and by final selection for ungutted harvest weight (BWH) and thermal growth coefficient from tagging to harvest (TGCTH). However, selection on harvest traits, i.e., gutted weight (GBWH),

  6. Selenium nanoparticle-enriched biomass of Yarrowia lipolytica enhances growth and survival of Artemia salina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamza, Faseela; Vaidya, Amogh; Apte, Mugdha; Kumar, Ameeta Ravi; Zinjarde, Smita

    2017-11-01

    Controlling disease outbreaks is a major challenge in aquaculture farms and conventional methods are often ineffective. Nutritional supplementation and probiotic preparations help in reducing severity of such infections. The generally regarded as safe yeast (Yarrowia lipolytica) was used in the current study. A marine strain of Y. lipolytica exhibited tolerance towards sodium selenite and formed cell associated selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs). The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FE-SEM) observations. Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy indicated the role of carboxylic and amine groups in the synthesis of nanoparticles. This SeNP-enriched biomass was used as feed for the model aquaculture system, Artemia salina and compared with normal feed, baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). A. salina fed with SeNP-enriched biomass, showed increased survival rates (96.66%) as compared to those fed with S. cerevisiae (60.0%). The size of the larvae fed with SeNP-enriched biomass of Y. lipolytica was also found to be larger. Additionally, larval groups fed with SeNP-enriched biomass were better protected (70.0% survival) against V. harveyi infection when compared with groups fed with S. cerevisiae (24.44%). This combination of selenium in the nanoparticle form associated with the biomass of Y. lipolytica has potential application in improving health of aquaculture species in farms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Survival and growth of invasive Indo-Pacific lionfish at low salinities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, Pamela J.; Huge, Dane H.; Rezek, Troy C.; Slone, Daniel H.; Morris, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Invasive Indo-Pacific lionfish [Pterois volitans (Linnaeus, 1758) and P. miles (Bennett, 1828)] are now established throughout the Western North Atlantic. Several studies have documented negative effects of lionfish on marine fauna including significant changes to reef fish community composition. Established populations of lionfish have been documented in several estuaries, and there is concern that the species may invade other low-salinity environments where they could potentially affect native fauna. To gain a better understanding of their low-salinity tolerance, we exposed lionfish to four salinities [5, 10, 20 and 34 (control)]. No lionfish mortality was observed at salinities of 34, 20 or 10, but all fish died at salinity = 5 within 12 days. Lionfish survived for at least a month at a salinity of 10 and an average of about a week at 5. Fish started the experiment at an average mass of 127.9 g, which increased at a rate of 0.55 g per day while they were alive, regardless of salinity treatment. Our research indicated lionfish can survive salinities down to 5 for short periods and thus may penetrate and persist in a variety of estuarine habitats. Further study is needed on effects of salinity levels on early life stages (eggs, larvae).

  8. Effect of intermittent fasting with or without caloric restriction on prostate cancer growth and survival in SCID mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschemeyer, W Cooper; Klink, Joseph C; Mavropoulos, John C; Poulton, Susan H; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Hursting, Stephen D; Cohen, Pinchas; Hwang, David; Johnson, Tracy L; Freedland, Stephen J

    2010-07-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) delays cancer growth in animals, though translation to humans is difficult. We hypothesized intermittent fasting (i.e., intermittent extreme CR), may be better tolerated and prolong survival of prostate cancer (CaP) bearing mice. We conducted a pilot study by injecting 105 male individually-housed SCID mice with LAPC-4 cells. When tumors reached 200 mm(3), 15 mice/group were randomized to one of seven diets and sacrificed when tumors reached 1,500 mm(3): Group 1: ad libitum 7 days/week; Group 2: fasted 1 day/week and ad libitum 6 days/week; Group 3: fasted 1 day/week and fed 6 days/week via paired feeding to maintain isocaloric conditions to Group 1; Group 4: 14% CR 7 days/week; Group 5: fasted 2 days/week and ad libitum 5 days/week; Group 6: fasted 2 day/week and fed 5 days/week via paired feeding to maintain isocaloric conditions to Group 1; Group 7: 28% CR 7 days/week. Sera from mice at sacrifice were analyzed for IGF-axis hormones. There were no significant differences in survival among any groups. However, relative to Group 1, there were non-significant trends for improved survival for Groups 3 (HR 0.65, P = 0.26), 5 (0.60, P = 0.18), 6 (HR 0.59, P = 0.16), and 7 (P = 0.59, P = 0.17). Relative to Group 1, body weights and IGF-1 levels were significantly lower in Groups 6 and 7. This exploratory study found non-significant trends toward improved survival with some intermittent fasting regimens, in the absence of weight loss. Larger appropriately powered studies to detect modest, but clinically important differences are necessary to confirm these findings.

  9. Survival and growth of Listeria monocytogenes on whole cantaloupes is dependent on site of contamination and storage temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyarko, Esmond; Kniel, Kalmia E; Millner, Patricia D; Luo, Yaguang; Handy, Eric T; Reynnells, Russell; East, Cheryl; Sharma, Manan

    2016-10-03

    Whole cantaloupes (Cucumis melo L.), marketed as 'Rocky Ford', were implicated in a large multi-state outbreak of listeriosis in the United States in 2011; however, survival and growth of Listeria monocytogenes on whole cantaloupes remains relatively unexplored. The research presented here evaluated three different storage temperatures, two sites of contamination of cantaloupes, and two cantaloupe varieties to determine their effect on the survival of L. monocytogenes. 'Athena' and 'Rocky Ford' cantaloupe cultivars were grown in soil and harvested, and individual melons subsequently received a multi-strain inoculum of L. monocytogenes (6 log CFU/melon), which were then stored at 4°C, 10°C, and 25°C. Changes in L. monocytogenes populations on the rinds and stem scars of cantaloupes stored at each temperature were determined at selected times for up to 15days. An analysis of variance revealed that inoculation site and storage temperature significantly affected survival of L. monocytogenes on cantaloupes during storage (pmonocytogenes (p>0.05). Populations of L. monocytogenes on stem scars of cantaloupes stored at 25°C increased by 1-2 log CFU/melon on day 1, and were significantly greater than those on cantaloupes stored at 4°C or 10°C (pmonocytogenes occurred on the rinds of cantaloupes during storage by day 7, and were not significantly different at the three different storage temperatures (p>0.05). In trials performed in rind juice extracts, populations of L. monocytogenes decreased by 3 log CFU/mL when stored at 25°C by day 3, but grew by 3-4 log CFU/mL when stored at 4°C over 7days. Overall, site of contamination and storage temperature influenced the survival of L. monocytogenes on cantaloupes more than cantaloupe cultivar type. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Providing supplemental milk to piglets preweaning improves the growth but not survival of gilt progeny compared with sow progeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Y J; Collins, A M; Smits, R J; Thomson, P C; Holyoake, P K

    2012-12-01

    Gilt progeny have lighter weaning weights and greater postweaning medication and mortality rates compared with the progeny of older parity sows. Because weaning weight has been positively correlated with postweaning survival, this study aimed to determine whether the provision of supplemental milk preweaning could improve weaning weight and subsequent weights as well as postweaning survival of gilt progeny. The study was replicated in summer and winter as the effects of supplemental milk were expected to vary with season. The progeny of 80 gilts (parity 0) and 80 sows (parity 2 to 5) were allocated to both treatments: with or without supplemental milk in these 2 seasons with 5 sheds/season. Litter size was standardized (10 to 11 piglets) and each piglet was weighed at birth, d 21, weaning (4 wk), and 10 wk of age. Medications and mortalities were recorded both preweaning and postweaning. Pigs were housed within treatment groups postweaning, and ADFI and G:F were measured. Gilt progeny were 200 g lighter at birth in both replicates (P gilt and sow progeny by 800 g in summer (P gilts or sows (P > 0.05). Supplemental milk disappearance (the daily difference between the volume of milk provided and the residue left in the drinker) was greater in summer than winter (by 130 mL/piglet d(-1); P gilt progeny reached or exceeded that of nonsupplemented sow progeny. Gilt progeny had greater postweaning mortality (2.6%) and medication rates (6.2%) than sow progeny (1 and 2.2%, respectively; both P Gilt progeny also had less postweaning ADFI than sow progeny in winter (528 and 636 g, respectively; P 0.05). The hypothesis that supplemental milk provision did increase gilt progeny weaning weight was supported (especially in summer) but the supplementation had no effect on postweaning weights and survival. Efforts to improve gilt progeny postweaning growth and survival need to be aimed at improving health and immunity, not just weaning weight.

  11. Plant quantity affects development and survival of a gregarious insect herbivore and its endoparasitoid wasp.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fei, M.; Gols, R.; Zhu, F.; Harvey, J.A.

    2016-01-01

    Virtually all studies of plant-herbivore-natural enemy interactions focus on plant quality as the major constraint on development and survival. However, for many gregarious feeding insect herbivores that feed on small or ephemeral plants, the quantity of resources is much more limiting, yet this

  12. The effect of unilateral ovariectomy on early embryonic survival and embryo development in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Peiró

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Unilateral ovariectomy can be used to study uterine capacity in rabbits because an overcrowding of the functional uterine horn is produced. Due to the uterus duplex, the rabbit is the ideal model for such studies. However, this technique may affect embryo survival. The aim of this work is to study the effect of unilateral ovariectomy on early embryo survival and development in rabbit. A total of 101 unilateral ovariectomised females and 52 intact females were compared after slaughter at 30 h post-mating. Early embryo survival was estimated as the ratio between number of embryo recovered and ovulation rate. No differences were found between intact and unilaterally ovariectomised females in this trait. Unilateral ovariectomy did not change embryo development, measured as the number of embryo cells. Variability of embryo development was not affected either. At 30 h post-mating, the majority of embryos (86.2% were 4-cell stage. Embryo quality was evaluated according to morphological criteria. No difference in embryo quality between intact and unilaterally ovariectomised females was found. Therefore, unilateral ovariectomy performed before puberty in rabbit does not modify early embryo survival and development.

  13. Survival after resection of perihilar cholangiocarcinoma-Development and external validation of a prognostic nomogram

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Groot Koerkamp (Bas); J.K. Wiggers (Jimme K.); M. Gonen (Mithat); A. Doussot (Alexandre); P.J. Allen (Peter); M.G. Besselink (Marc); L.H. Blumgart; O.R. Busch (O.); M.I. D'Angelica (Michael I.); R.P. DeMatteo (Ronald P.); D.J. Gouma (Dirk); T.P. Kingham (T. Peter); T.M. van Gulik (Thomas); W.R. Jarnagin (William R.)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The objective of this study was to derive and validate a prognostic nomogram to predict disease-specific survival (DSS) after a curative intent resection of perihilar cholangiocarcinoma (PHC). Patients and methods: A nomogram was developed from 173 patients treated at

  14. Temperature-mediated survival, development and hatching variation of Pacific cod Gadus macrocephalus eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, X; Zhang, X; Sakrai, Y; Jin, X; Gao, T; Wan, R; Yamamoto, J

    2014-01-01

    Laboratory-validated data on the survival, development and hatching responses of fertilized Pacific cod Gadus macrocephalus eggs from the northern Japan stock were determined through an incubation experiment. The optimum temperature for survival until hatching ranged from 4 to 8°C. No significant difference in development rates was found between the populations from Mutsu Bay, Japan, and western Canadian coastal waters even though the samples may belong to different G. macrocephalus stocks. Gadus macrocephalus larvae hatched asynchronously from egg batches despite incubation under the same environment during their development. Both incubation temperature and temperature-mediated hatch rank affect size and yolk reserve. These data suggest that variations in water temperatures within an ecological range markedly influence the development rates, survival and hatching of the eggs, as well as the stage at hatch larvae of G. macrocephalus. Asynchronous hatching and the production of offspring with variable sizes and yolk reserves are considered evolutionary bet-hedging strategies that enable the species to maximize their likelihood of survival in an environment with variable temperatures. © 2013 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  15. Oxygen-sensitive regulation and neuroprotective effects of growth hormone-dependent growth factors during early postnatal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Susan; Boie, Gudrun; Doerr, Helmuth-Guenther; Trollmann, Regina

    2017-04-01

    Perinatal hypoxia severely disrupts metabolic and somatotrophic development, as well as cerebral maturational programs. Hypoxia-inducible transcription factors (HIFs) represent the most important endogenous adaptive mechanisms to hypoxia, activating a broad spectrum of growth factors that contribute to cell survival and energy homeostasis. To analyze effects of systemic hypoxia and growth hormone (GH) therapy (rhGH) on HIF-dependent growth factors during early postnatal development, we compared protein (using ELISA) and mRNA (using quantitative RT PCR) levels of growth factors in plasma and brain between normoxic and hypoxic mice (8% O2, 6 h; postnatal day 7, P7) at P14. Exposure to hypoxia led to reduced body weight (P < 0.001) and length (P < 0.04) compared with controls and was associated with significantly reduced plasma levels of mouse GH (P < 0.01) and IGF-1 (P < 0.01). RhGH abrogated these hypoxia-induced changes of the GH/IGF-1 axis associated with normalization of weight and length gain until P14 compared with controls. In addition, rhGH treatment increased cerebral IGF-1, IGF-2, IGFBP-2, and erythropoietin mRNA levels, resulting in significantly reduced apoptotic cell death in the hypoxic, developing mouse brain. These data indicate that rhGH may functionally restore hypoxia-induced systemic dysregulation of the GH/IGF-1 axis and induce upregulation of neuroprotective, HIF-dependent growth factors in the hypoxic developing brain. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Influence of human development and predators on nest survival of tundra birds, Arctic Coastal Plain, Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebezeit, J R; Kendall, S J; Brown, S; Johnson, C B; Martin, P; McDonald, T L; Payer, D C; Rea, C L; Streever, B; Wildman, A M; Zack, S

    2009-09-01

    Nest predation may influence population dynamics of birds on the Arctic Coastal Plain (ACP) of Alaska, USA. Anthropogenic development on the ACP is increasing, which may attract nest predators by providing artificial sources of food, perches, den sites, and nest sites. Enhanced populations or concentrations of human-subsidized predators may reduce nest survival for tundra-nesting birds. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that nest survival decreases in proximity to human infrastructure. We monitored 1257 nests of 13 shorebird species and 619 nests of four passerine species at seven sites on the ACP from 2002 to 2005. Study sites were chosen to represent a range of distances to infrastructure from 100 m to 80 km. We used Cox proportional hazards regression models to evaluate the effects of background (i.e., natural) factors and infrastructure on nest survival. We documented high spatial and temporal variability in nest survival, and site and year were both included in the best background model. We did not detect an effect of human infrastructure on nest survival for shorebirds as a group. In contrast, we found evidence that risk of predation for passerine nests increased within 5 km of infrastructure. This finding provides quantitative evidence of a relationship between infrastructure and nest survival for breeding passerines on the ACP. A posteriori finer-scale analyses (within oil field sites and individual species) suggested that Red and Red-necked Phalaropes combined (Phalaropus fulicarius, P. lobatus) had lower productivity closer to infrastructure and in areas with higher abundance of subsidized predators. However, we did not detect such a relationship between infrastructure and nest survival for Semipalmated and Pectoral Sandpipers (Calidris pusilla, C. melanotos), the two most abundant shorebirds. High variability in environmental conditions, nest survival, and predator numbers between sites and years may have contributed to these inconsistent results

  17. Wealth, welfare and sustainable growth and development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moe, Thorvald

    2011-07-01

    This Policy Note discuses, based on modern development theory and wealth accounting, challenges for economic- and fiscal policies in resource-producing countries defined as countries - both developed and developing low income countries - which rely heavily on non-renewable or exhaustible natural wealth.(Author)

  18. Influence of planting stocks on the survival and growth of Nuttall and cherrybark oak planted on lands damaged by Hurricane Katrina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derek K. Alkire; James C. Rainer; Andrew B. Self; Andrew W. Ezell; Andrew J. Londo; Emily B. Schultz

    2013-01-01

    Bare-root, container, and root production method (RPMTM) seedlings of Nuttall oak (Quercus texana Buckley) and cherrybark oak (Q. pagoda Ell.) were planted on lands damaged by Hurricane Katrina in southern Mississippi to compare the height growth, groundline diameter (GLD) growth, and survival of the...

  19. Growth and survival of Salmonella Paratyphi A in roasted marinated chicken during refrigerated storage: Effect of temperature abuse and computer simulation for cold chain management

    Science.gov (United States)

    This research was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of using a one-step dynamic numerical analysis and optimization method to directly construct a tertiary model to describe the growth and survival of Salmonella Paratyphi A (SPA) in a marinated roasted chicken product. Multiple dynamic growth a...

  20. Early marine growth of pink salmon in Prince William Sound and the coastal gulf of Alaska during years of low and high survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, A.D.; Beauchamp, D.A.; Myers, K.W.; Moss, J.H.

    2008-01-01

    Although early marine growth has repeatedly been correlated with overall survival in Pacific salmon Oncorhynchus spp., we currently lack a mechanistic understanding of smolt-to-adult survival. Smolt-to-adult survival of pink salmon O. gorbuscha returning to Prince William Sound was lower than average for juveniles that entered marine waters in 2001 and 2003 (3% in both years), and high for those that entered the ocean in 2002 (9%) and 2004 (8%). We used circulus patterns from scales to determine how the early marine growth of juvenile pink salmon differed (1) seasonally during May-October, the period hypothesized to be critical for survival; (2) between years of low and high survival; and (3) between hatchery and wild fish. Juvenile pink salmon exhibited larger average size, migrated onto the continental shelf and out of the sampling area more quickly, and survived better during 2002 and 2004 than during 2001 and 2003. Pink salmon were consistently larger throughout the summer and early fall during 2002 and 2004 than during 2001 and 2003, indicating that larger, faster-growing juveniles experienced higher survival. Wild juvenile pink salmon were larger than hatchery fish during low-survival years, but no difference was observed during high-survival years. Differences in size among years were determined by some combination of growing conditions and early mortality, the strength of which could vary significantly among years. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2008.

  1. Experimental manipulation of dietary lead levels in great tit nestlings: limited effects on growth, physiology and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eeva, Tapio; Rainio, Miia; Berglund, Åsa; Kanerva, Mirella; Stauffer, Janina; Stöwe, Mareike; Ruuskanen, Suvi

    2014-07-01

    We manipulated dietary lead (Pb) levels of nestlings in wild populations of the great tit (Parus major L) to find out if environmentally relevant Pb levels would affect some physiological biomarkers (haematocrit [HT], fecal corticosterone metabolites [CORT], heat shock proteins [HSPs], erythrocyte delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase activity [ALAd]), growth (body mass, wing length), phenotype (plumage coloration) or survival of nestlings. The responses to three experimental manipulation (control, low and high: 0, 1 and 4 μg/g body mass/day) are compared with those in a P. major population breeding in the vicinity of a heavy metal source, a copper smelter. Our Pb supplementation was successful in raising the fecal concentrations to the levels found in polluted environments (high: 8.0 μg/g d.w.). Despite relatively high range of exposure levels we found only few effects on growth rates or physiology. The lack of blood ALAd inhibition suggests that the circulating Pb levels were generally below the toxic level despite that marked accumulation of Pb in femur (high: 27.8 μg/g d.w.) was observed. Instead, birds in the metal polluted environment around the smelter showed decreased growth rates, lower HT, higher CORT, less colorful plumage and lower survival probabilities than any of the Pb treated groups. These effects are likely related to decreased food quality/quantity for these insectivorous birds at the smelter site. In general, the responses of nestlings to metal exposure and/or associated resource limitation were not gender specific. One of the stress proteins (HSP60), however, was more strongly induced in Pb exposed males and further studies are needed to explore if this was due to higher accumulation of Pb or higher sensitivity of males. In all, our results emphasize the importance of secondary pollution effects (e.g. via food chain disruption) on reproductive output of birds.

  2. Growth of Salmonella Enteritidis phage type 30 in almond hull and shell slurries and survival in drying almond hulls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uesugi, Aaron R; Harris, Linda J

    2006-04-01

    Traceback investigation of a 2000 to 2001 outbreak of salmonellosis associated with consumption of raw almonds led to isolation of the outbreak strain Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis phage type (PT) 30 on three geographically linked almond farms. Interviews with these growers revealed that significant rain fell during the 2000 harvest when many almonds were drying on the ground. The objectives of this study were to document weather conditions during the 2000 harvest, determine the potential for growth of Salmonella Enteritidis PT 30 in hull or shell slurries, and evaluate survival of Salmonella Enteritidis PT 30 on wet almond hulls during drying. Dry almond hulls and in-shell kernels wetted for 24 h increased in weight by 250 to 300% and 100%, respectively. Both hull and shell slurries supported rapid growth of Salmonella Enteritidis PT 30 at 24 degrees C; slurries containing hulls also supported growth at 15 degrees C. Maximum Salmonella Enteritidis PT 30 concentrations of 6.2 and 7.8 log CFU/ml were observed at 15 and 24 degrees C, respectively. Salmonella Enteritidis PT 30 grown in wet hulls that were incubated at 24 degrees C survived drying at either 15 or 37 degrees C. Reductions of 1 to 3 log CFU/g of dry hull were observed during drying; reductions generally declined as incubation time increased from 2 to 7 days. Evaluation of shipping records revealed that approximately 60% of outbreak-associated almonds had not been exposed to rain, eliminating this factor as the sole cause of the outbreak. However, the data provide evidence that wet almonds may be a greater risk for high concentrations of Salmonella, and specific guidelines should be established for harvesting and processing almonds that have been exposed to rain or other water sources.

  3. [Effects of temperature on the growth and development of Aglossa dimidiata parasitized on Litsea coreana].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Xiao-Li; Yang, Mao-Fa; Huang, Li; Gou, Guang-Qian

    2012-11-01

    In order to reveal the effects of temperature on the growth and development of Aglossa dimidiata parasitized on Litsea coreana, a laboratory experiment was conducted to study the mean development duration, development rate, and survival rate of A. dimidiata at its different growth stages at 31 degrees C, 28 degrees C, 25 degrees C, 22 degrees C, and 19 degrees C, with the development threshold temperature and effective accumulated temperature for different growth stages calculated. Temperature had significant effects on the developmental duration. Except that the development duration of egg was shortened with increasing temperature, the development durations of larva, pupa, and immature A. dimidiata were the shortest at 25 degrees C, being 249.53 +/- 23.83, 12.94 +/- 1.27, and 273.00 +/- 24.19 days, respectively. There existed significant relationships between the development rates of A. dimidiata at its different growth stages and temperature, with positive linear relationship at egg stage, and quadratic relationship at larva, pupa, and immature stages. Temperature also had significant effects on the survival rate of A. dimidiata. The survival rates of A. dimidiata at its different growth stages were all the highest at 25 degrees C, being 94.0%, 73.8%, 91.3%, and 63.4% for the egg, larva, pupa, and immature A. dimidiata, respectively, followed by at 22 degrees C and 19 degrees C, and the lowest at 31 degrees C. No larva and pupa could survive at 31 degrees C, suggesting that A. dimidiata was not resistant to high temperature. The development threshold temperature for egg, larva, pupa, and immature A. dimidiata was 13.21 degrees C, 17.12 degrees C, 14.76 degrees C, and 16.47 degrees C, and the effective accumulated temperature was 117.94, 870.88, 149.70, and 1442.75 day-degree, respectively. The results coincided with the fact that the A. dimidiata reproduced 2 or 3 generations a year in Xifeng area of Guizhou, Southwest China.

  4. On the Effect of Planetary Stable Isotope Compositions on Growth and Survival of Terrestrial Organisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueshu Xie

    Full Text Available Isotopic compositions of reactants affect the rates of chemical and biochemical reactions. Usually it is assumed that heavy stable isotope enrichment leads to progressively slower reactions. Yet the effect of stable isotopes may be nonlinear, as exemplified by the "isotopic resonance" phenomenon. Since the isotopic compositions of other planets of Solar system, including Mars and Venus, are markedly different from terrestrial (e.g., deuterium content is ≈5 and ≈100 times higher, respectively, it is far from certain that terrestrial life will thrive in these isotopic conditions. Here we found that Martian deuterium content negatively affected survival of shrimp in semi-closed biosphere on a year-long time scale. Moreover, the bacterium Escherichia coli grows slower at Martian isotopic compositions and even slower at Venus's compositions. Thus, the biological impact of varying stable isotope compositions needs to be taken into account when planning interplanetary missions.

  5. The regulation of function, growth and survival of GLP-1-producing L-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhre, Rune Ehrenreich; Holst, Jens Juul; Kappe, Camilla

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a peptide hormone, released from intestinal L-cells in response to hormonal, neural and nutrient stimuli. In addition to potentiation of meal-stimulated insulin secretion, GLP-1 signalling exerts numerous pleiotropic effects on various tissues, regulating energy...... absorption and disposal, as well as cell proliferation and survival. In Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) reduced plasma levels of GLP-1 have been observed, and plasma levels of GLP-1, as well as reduced numbers of GLP-1 producing cells, have been correlated to obesity and insulin resistance. Increasing endogenous...... secretion of GLP-1 by selective targeting of the molecular mechanisms regulating secretion from the L-cell has been the focus of much recent research. An additional and promising strategy for enhancing endogenous secretion may be to increase the L-cell mass in the intestinal epithelium, but the mechanisms...

  6. On the Effect of Planetary Stable Isotope Compositions on Growth and Survival of Terrestrial Organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xueshu; Zubarev, Roman A

    2017-01-01

    Isotopic compositions of reactants affect the rates of chemical and biochemical reactions. Usually it is assumed that heavy stable isotope enrichment leads to progressively slower reactions. Yet the effect of stable isotopes may be nonlinear, as exemplified by the "isotopic resonance" phenomenon. Since the isotopic compositions of other planets of Solar system, including Mars and Venus, are markedly different from terrestrial (e.g., deuterium content is ≈5 and ≈100 times higher, respectively), it is far from certain that terrestrial life will thrive in these isotopic conditions. Here we found that Martian deuterium content negatively affected survival of shrimp in semi-closed biosphere on a year-long time scale. Moreover, the bacterium Escherichia coli grows slower at Martian isotopic compositions and even slower at Venus's compositions. Thus, the biological impact of varying stable isotope compositions needs to be taken into account when planning interplanetary missions.

  7. Effects of lanthanum and lanthanum-modified clay on growth, survival and reproduction of Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lürling, Miquel; Tolman, Yora

    2010-01-01

    The novel lanthanum-modified clay water treatment technology (Phoslock seems very promising in remediation of eutrophied waters. Phoslock is highly efficient in stripping dissolved phosphorous from the water column and in intercepting phosphorous released from the sediments. The active phosphorous-sorbent in Phoslock is the Rare Earth Element lanthanum. A leachate experiment revealed that lanthanum could be released from the clay, but only in minute quantities of 0.13-2.13microgl(-1) for a worst-case Phoslock dosage of 250mgl(-1). A life-history experiment with the zooplankton grazer Daphnia magna revealed that lanthanum, up to the 1000microgl(-1) tested, had no toxic effect on the animals, but only in medium without phosphorous. In the presence of phosphorous, rhabdophane (LaPO(4).nH(2)O) formation resulted in significant precipitation of the food algae and consequently affected life-history traits. With increasing amounts of lanthanum, in the presence of phosphate, animals remained smaller, matured later, and reproduced less, resulting in lower population growth rates. Growth rates were not affected at 33microgLal(-1), but were 6% and 7% lower at 100 and 330microgl(-1), respectively, and 20% lower at 1000microgl(-1). A juvenile growth assay with Phoslock tested in the range 0-5000mgl(-1), yielded EC(50) (NOEC) values of 871 (100) and 1557 (500)mg Phoslock l(-1) for weight and length based growth rates, respectively. The results of this study show that no major detrimental effects on Daphnia are to be expected from Phoslock or its active ingredient lanthanum when applied in eutrophication control.

  8. Effects of Dietary Palm Oil Levels on Growth and Survival of Clarias ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The highest weight gain (2.24 + 0.31g), specific growth rate (1.08 + 0.26% day-1), condition factor (0.77 + 0.09), feed conversion ratio (4.46 + 0.14) and protein efficiency ratio (0.122+ 0.21) were obtained in C. gariepinus fingerlings fed 9% palm oil diet. These values were significantly different (p < 0.05) from those fed other ...

  9. STAT5A Regulates the Survival of Mammary Epithelial Cells and the Development of Mammary Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Humphreys, Robin

    2000-01-01

    The in vivo relationship between epidermal growth factor (EGF) and prolactin/Jak/Stat signaling pathways in mammary gland development and tumorigenesis was explored in transgenic nice overexpressing the TGF alpha gene (TGFalphaTG...

  10. Growth and overwinter survival of the Asiatic clam, Corbicula fluminea, in the St. Clair River, Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, John R. P.; Schloesser, Donald W.

    1991-01-01

    We report the discovery in April 1986 of the first population of Asiatic clam, Corbicula fluminea, known to occupy a lotic environment in the Laurentian Great Lakes system. This population occupied a 3.8 km long sandy shoal in the discharge plume of a steam-electric power plant on the St. Clair River (Michigan), the outflow of Lake Huron. Samples collected April 1986 to April 1987 revealed the growth of one-year-old Corbicula (1985 cohort) began after mid-May and ended by mid-November, while water temperatures were higher than 9°C. Maximum growth (0.78 mm wk-1) occurred between mid-August and mid-September, while water temperatures were about 16-23°C. We recorded a substantial overwinter mortality of the 1986 cohort, but not the 1985 cohort; this was particularly evident at sampling locations more remote from the heated discharge of the power plant, suggesting low water temperature wast the major mortality agent. The available information suggests low water temperature in the St. Clair River may limit the success of Corbicula in the river, including portions of populations inhabiting thermal plumes, by reducing growth, delaying the onset of sexual maturity and reproduction, and causing heavy overwinter mortality in the first year of life.

  11. Survival, growth and condition of freshwater mussels: effects of municipal wastewater effluent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trey Nobles

    Full Text Available Freshwater mussels (Family Unionidae are among the most imperiled group of organisms in the world, with nearly 65% of North American species considered endangered. Anthropogenic disturbances, including altered flow regimes, habitat alteration, and pollution, are the major driver of this group's decline. We investigated the effects of tertiary treated municipal wastewater effluent on survivorship, growth, and condition of freshwater mussels in experimental cages in a small Central Texas stream. We tested the effluent effects by measuring basic physical parameters of native three ridge mussels (Amblema plicata and of non-native Asian clams (Corbicula fluminea, before and after 72-day exposure at four sites above and below a municipal wastewater treatment plant outfall. Survivorship and growth of the non-native Asian clams and growth and condition indices of the native three ridge mussels were significantly higher at the reference site above the outfall than in downstream sites. We attribute this reduction in fitness below the outfall to elevated nutrient and heavy metal concentrations, and the potential presence of other untested-for compounds commonly found in municipal effluent. These results, along with an absence of native mussels below the discharge, indicate a significant negative impact of wastewater effluent on both native and non-native mussels in the stream.

  12. Population growth and development of Liposcelis pearmani (Psocoptera: Liposcelididae) at constant temperatures and relative humidities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminatou, B A; Gautam, S G; Opit, G P; Talley, J; Shakya, K

    2011-08-01

    Psocids of genus Liposcelis are now considered serious pests of stored products. We investigated the effects of eight temperatures (22.5, 25.0, 27.5, 30.0, 32.5, 35.0, 37.5, and 40.0°C) and four relative humidities (43, 55, 63, and 75%) on population growth and development of the psocid Liposcelis pearmani Lienhard. L. pearmani did not survive at 37.5 and 40.0°C, at all relative humidities tested; at 43% RH, at all temperatures tested; and at 55% RH, at 32.5 and 35°C. The greatest population growth was recorded at 32.5°C and 75% RH (32-fold growth). L. pearmani males have two to four nymphal instars, and the percentages of males with two, three, and four instars were 17, 63, and 20%, respectively. Female L. pearmani have two to five instars, and the percentages of females with two, three, four, and five instars were 5, 39, 55, and 1%, respectively. We developed temperature-dependent development equations for male and female eggs, individual nymphal, combined nymphal, and combined immature stages. Based on 30-d population growth, L. pearmani cannot survive at temperatures >35.0°C; does not thrive at low relative humidities (55%), at temperatures above 25°C; and has a high optimum relative humidity for population growth (75%). Therefore, we expect it to have a more limited distribution compared with other Liposcelis species. These data provide a better understanding of how temperature and RH may influence L. pearmani population dynamics and can be used in population growth models to help develop effective management strategies for this psocid, and to predict its occurrence.

  13. Growth and development after hematopoietic cell transplant in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, J E

    2008-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) following high-dose chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy for children with malignant or nonmalignant hematologic disorders has resulted in an increasing number of long-term disease-free survivors. The preparative regimens include high doses of alkylating agents, such as CY with or without BU, and may include TBI. These agents impact the neuroendocrine system in growing children and their subsequent growth and development. Children receiving high-dose CY or BUCY have normal thyroid function, but those who receive TBI-containing regimens may develop thyroid function abnormalities. Growth is not impacted by chemotherapy-only preparative regimens, but TBI is likely to result in growth hormone deficiency and decreased growth rates that need to be treated with synthetic growth hormone therapy. Children who receive high-dose CY-only have normal development through puberty, whereas those who receive BUCY have a high incidence of delayed pubertal development. Following fractionated TBI preparative regimens, approximately half of the patients have normal pubertal development. These data demonstrate that the growth and development problems after HCT are dependent upon the preparative regimen received. All children should be followed for years after HCT for detection of growth and development abnormalities that are treatable with appropriate hormone therapy.

  14. Genotype-temperature interaction in the regulation of development, growth, and morphometrics in wild-type, and growth-hormone transgenic coho salmon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mare Lõhmus

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The neuroendocrine system is an important modulator of phenotype, directing cellular genetic responses to external cues such as temperature. Behavioural and physiological processes in poikilothermic organisms (e.g. most fishes, are particularly influenced by surrounding temperatures. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By comparing the development and growth of two genotypes of coho salmon (wild-type and transgenic with greatly enhanced growth hormone production at six different temperatures, ranging between 8 degrees and 18 degrees C, we observed a genotype-temperature interaction and possible trend in directed neuroendocrine selection. Differences in growth patterns of the two genotypes were compared by using mathematical models, and morphometric analyses of juvenile salmon were performed to detect differences in body shape. The maximum hatching and alevin survival rates of both genotypes occurred at 12 degrees C. At lower temperatures, eggs containing embryos with enhanced GH production hatched after a shorter incubation period than wild-type eggs, but this difference was not apparent at and above 16 degrees C. GH transgenesis led to lower body weights at the time when the yolk sack was completely absorbed compared to the wild genotype. The growth of juvenile GH-enhanced salmon was to a greater extent stimulated by higher temperatures than the growth of the wild-type. Increased GH production significantly influenced the shape of the salmon growth curves. CONCLUSIONS: Growth hormone overexpression by transgenesis is able to stimulate the growth of coho salmon over a wide range of temperatures. Temperature was found to affect growth rate, survival, and body morphology between GH transgenic and wild genotype coho salmon, and differential responses to temperature observed between the genotypes suggests they would experience different selective forces should they ever enter natural ecosystems. Thus, GH transgenic fish would be expected to

  15. Effects of acidifying ocean conditions on growth and survival of two life stages of the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giltz, S.; Taylor, C.

    2016-02-01

    Blue crabs, Callinectes sapidus, begin their larval phase offshore and circulate for approximately 30 days before settling near shore. As crabs transition to the juvenile stage, they move into coastal or estuarine environments characterized by lower salinity. Presently the average pH of the ocean is 8.1, 30% down from the beginning of the industrial revolution and is forecasted to drop to 7.8 by 2100. Decreasing pH causes dissolution of calcium carbonate shells, but the overall effects on crustaceans, such as blue crabs, are unknown. This study investigated the effect of a lower pH environment on the growth, survival, carapace hardness and molt frequency of larval and juvenile blue crabs in the Northern Gulf of Mexico. Larval crabs showed delayed growth under low pH (7.8) conditions compared to crabs in a control (present day) pH (8.1) environment. Population crashes (complete mortality) were experienced in 55% of the low pH aquaria but not in any of the control aquaria, suggesting that acidification poses a mortality risk. Under low pH conditions the intermolt duration decreased in juveniles, but the body length and weight did not differ from crabs raised in the control pH. Larvae (in tanks that did not crash) and juveniles did not experience increased mortality from a lower pH, but there do appear to be sublethal effects on growth and molting that differ between life history stages.

  16. Water-soluble Moringa oleifera lectin interferes with growth, survival and cell permeability of corrosive and pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, M C; Napoleão, T H; Coriolano, M C; Paiva, P M G; Figueiredo, R C B Q; Coelho, L C B B

    2015-09-01

    This work evaluated the antibacterial activity of a water-soluble Moringa oleifera seed lectin (WSMoL) by evaluating its effect on growth, survival and cell permeability of Bacillus sp., Bacillus cereus, Bacillus pumillus, Bacillus megaterium, Micrococcus sp., Pseudomonas sp., Pseudomonas fluorescens, Pseudomonas stutzeri and Serratia marcescens. In addition, the effect of lectin on membrane integrity of most sensitive species was also evaluated. All the tested bacteria are able to cause biocorrosion and some are also responsible for human infections. WSMoL inhibited the bacterial growth, induced agglutination and promoted the leakage of proteins from cells of all strains. Bactericidal effect was detected against Bacillus sp., B. pumillus, B. megaterium, Ps. fluorescens and Ser. marcescens. The bacteriostatic effect of lectin was evident with only 6 h of incubation. Fluorescence microscopy of Ser. marcescens showed that WSMoL caused loss of cell integrity and indicated an anti-biofilm activity of the lectin. WSMoL was active against the bacteria by inhibiting growth and affecting cell permeability. The lectin also interfered with membrane integrity of Ser. marcescens, the most sensitive species. The study indicates that WSMoL was active against bacteria that cause serious problems in both industrial and health sectors. Also, the study contributes for the 'state-of-art' on antibacterial mechanisms of lectins. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  17. Survival and growth of foodborne pathogens in pesticide solutions routinely used in leafy green vegetables and tomato production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobhal, Shefali; Zhang, Guodong; Royer, Tom; Damicone, John; Ma, Li Maria

    2014-11-01

    The consumption of fresh produce has increased tremendously in the past few years as have outbreaks of foodborne illnesses associated with these commodities. Pesticides routinely used in crop production could influence the outcomes of foodborne pathogen contamination of fresh produce. Experiments were performed to determine the effects of pesticides on the survival and growth characteristics of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella spp. Eight commercial fungicides and insecticides commonly used for disease and insect pest control on leafy green vegetables and tomatoes were evaluated. Among the pesticides tested, copper hydroxide, acetamiprid, cypermethrin and permethrin were found to be significantly (P effect was observed for chlorothalonil, flonicamid and methoxyfenozide. At the highest concentration tested (2.66%), azoxystrobin had a significant (P effect on the growth of E. coli O157:H7 after 24 h incubation. The results indicated that some pesticides can stimulate the growth of human pathogens if contaminated water is used in their preparation, whereas others were likely to inhibit or reduce pathogen populations. This information is helpful in mitigating the risk of microbial contamination in fresh produce, which is critical to public health and safety. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. Comparative effect of local and foreign commercial feeds on the growth and survival of Clarias gariepinus juveniles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moshood Keke Mustapha

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Growth and survival of Clarias gariepinus juveniles fed with a local feed and coppens commercial feed were observed for 16 weeks at the laboratory of the Department of Zoology, University of Ilorin, Nigeria. The proximate compositions and economics of the feeds and the water quality of the cultured tanks were assessed. Fish fed with coppens showed significant (P<0.05 higher weight increase, specific growth rate, protein efficiency ratio and low food conversion ratio than fish fed with local feed. Significant (P<0.05 higher mortality were recorded in fish fed with the local feed. The growth performance was a reflection of the proximate composition of the feeds with local feed having low crude protein (10.95%, lipid (3.95% and ash (4.92% when compared to coppens which had 42% crude protein, 12% lipid and 9.5% ash with protein being most significant. Carbohydrate (69.90% and crude fiber (2.88% were higher in the local feed than in coppens with an imbalance in carbohydrate and lipid ratio. Mortality was attributed to stress resulting from the poor quality of the feed. Cost of feeding with local feed to a weight gain of 31.67g was ₦80, while the cost of feeding with coppens to a weight gain of 148.58g was ₦16.

  19. Population Growth and Economic Development: New Empirical Evidence from Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Fumitaka Furuoka

    2009-01-01

    Population growth has a substantial impact on economic development. There are two schools of thought regarding this issue. Some researchers maintain that population has a negative impact on economic development while others are convinced that the effect is positive. This paper aims to provide additional evidence by employing the bounds test (Pesaran et al., 2001) to analyse a long-run relationship between population growth and economic development in Thailand. The findings of this study indic...

  20. Financial development and economic growth : views and agenda

    OpenAIRE

    Levine, Ross

    1996-01-01

    The author argues that the preponderance of theoretical reasoning and empirical evidence suggests a positive first order relationship between financial development and economic growth. There is evidence that the financial development level is a good predictor of future rates of economic growth, capital accumulation, and technological change. Moreover, cross-country, case-style, industry level and firm-level analysis document extensive periods when financial development crucially affects the s...

  1. Assessment of chronic effects of tebuconazole on survival, reproduction and growth of Daphnia magna after different exposure times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancho, E; Villarroel, M J; Ferrando, M D

    2016-02-01

    The effect of the fungicide tebuconazole (0.41, 0.52, 0.71 and 1.14mg/L) on survival, reproduction and growth of Daphnia magna organisms was monitored using 14 and 21 days exposure tests. A third experiment was performed by exposing D. magna to the fungicide for 14 days followed by 7 days of recovery (14+7). In order to test fungicide effects on D. magna, parameters as survival, mean whole body length, mean total number of neonates per female, mean number of broods per female, mean brood size per female, time to first brood/reproduction and intrinsic rate of natural increase (r) were used. Reproduction was seriously affected by tebuconazole. All tebuconazole concentrations tested affected the number of broods per female and day to first brood. At 14-days test, number of neonates per female and body size decreased by concentrations of tebuconazole higher than 0.52mg/L, whereas at 21-days test both parameters were affected at all the concentrations tested. Survival of the daphnids after 14 days fungicide exposure did not exhibited differences among experimental and control groups. In this experiment r value was reduced (in a 22%) when animals were exposed to concentrations of 0.71mg/L and 1.14mg/L. Survival of daphnids exposed during 21 days to 1.14mg/L declined, and the intrinsic rate of natural increase (r) decreased in a 30 % for tebuconazole concentrations higher than 0.41mg/L. Longevity of daphnids pre-exposed to tebuconazole for 14 days and 7 days in clean water did not show differences from control values and all of them survived the 21 days of the test. However, after 7 days in fungicide free medium animals were unable to restore control values for reproductive parameters and length. The maximum acceptable toxicant concentration (MATC) was calculated using the r values as parameter of evaluation. MATC estimations were 0.61mg/L and 0.46mg/L for 14 and 21 days, respectively. Results showed that the number of neonates per female was the highest sensitive

  2. Growth, straightness and survival at age 32 in a Pinus strobus x P. wallichiana F1 hybrid population (Experiment 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan Blada

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available An interspecific factorial hybridization was made, where seven P. strobus female parent trees were mated to four P. wallichiana male trees, in order to transfer genes for resistance to blister-rust from the blue pine to the F1 hybrids. The hybrid seedlings and the open pollinated families of the two parents were three times consecutively inoculated with blister-rust. The six years old seedlings were transplanted in the fi eld in the so called Valiug Experiment 1. The experimental design consisted in 28 hybrid full-sib families and two open pollinated families of the parent species. Plantation took place in a complete randomized block design with three blocks, with 6 to 12 seedlings per linear plot and 3 x 3 m spacing. This paper is based on the measurements made at age 32, just after the fi rst thinning. Diameter at breast height, tree height, tree volume, stem straightness and tree survival were the fi ve measured traits. According to ANOVA, signifi cant (p < 0.05 and highly signifi cant (p < 0.001 differences for diameter at breast height, tree height, volume growth rate, stem straightness and tree survival were detected between hybrid families. Highly signifi cant (p< 0.01, p < 0.001 differences were found between eastern white pine female parents for survival, stem straightness and all growth traits, suggesting that nuclear additive genes are controlling the respective characters. Consequently, high survival or genetic resistance to blister-rust can be found within the P. strobus species even though it is highly susceptible to this pathogen. The P. wallichiana parents exhibited signifi cant additive effects on straightness and breast height diameter, but no signifi cance in height, volume, and tree survival. The contribution of the additive variance to the phenotypic one was 65.7% for diameter, 58.6% for height, 50.5% for volume, 70.4% for stem straightness and 73.4% for tree survival. Hence, additive variance should be employed

  3. Beyond Survival: Educational Development and the Maturing of the POD Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortquist-Ahrens, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    Scholarship about the growth of educational development has charted major shifts in developers' focuses and roles through time and, especially in recent years, has explored the professionalization of the field around the globe. This essay uses a lifecycle analogy to consider the development of one organization, the POD Network (The Professional…

  4. Differences in growth and survival between cod Gadus morhua and herring Clupea harengus early stages co-reared at variable prey concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folkvord, A; Vollset, K W; Catalán, I A

    2015-11-01

    It was hypothesized that the survival and growth strategies of herring Clupea harengus, displaying a flexible reproductive activity, are adapted to coping with longer periods of prey deprivation (i.e. more variable prey availability), in contrast to cod Gadus morhua, which are adapted to match growth and survival at high prey concentrations. Experimental larval growth and survival data for the two naturally co-occurring species reared either in separate tanks or in combination are presented to test this hypothesis. Natural zooplankton was supplied either ad libitum or in a periodically restricted manner to mimic natural suboptimal conditions. Periodically restricted feeding significantly reduced initial growth of G. morhua larvae co-reared with C. harengus, while no such initial effect was seen for co-reared C. harengus. Overall survival of G. morhua was higher when reared together with C. harengus (32 v. 24%), while C. harengus had higher survival without the presence of G. morhua (59 v. 44%), indicating that both species were affected by higher densities of G. morhua larvae. Furthermore, the final survival in G. morhua was inversely related to average final size, while in C. harengus an opposite trend was observed. How potential behavioural interactions may drive the present results are discussed and contended that a better insight into field vital rates may be gained from further exploration of co-rearing experiments. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Fish Biology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  5. Surviving coral bleaching events: porites growth anomalies on the Great Barrier Reef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantin, Neal E; Lough, Janice M

    2014-01-01

    Mass coral bleaching affected large parts of the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) in 1998 and 2002. In this study, we assessed if signatures of these major thermal stress events were recorded in the growth characteristics of massive Porites colonies. In 2005 a suite of short (reefs in the central GBR (18-19°S) that have documented observations of widespread bleaching. Sites included inshore (Nelly Bay, Pandora Reef), annually affected by freshwater flood events, midshelf (Rib Reef), only occasionally affected by freshwater floods and offshore (Myrmidon Reef) locations primarily exposed to open ocean conditions. Annual growth characteristics (extension, density and calcification) were measured in 144 cores from 79 coral colonies and analysed over the common 24-year period, 1980-2003. Visual examination of the annual density bands revealed growth hiatuses associated with the bleaching years in the form of abrupt decreases in annual linear extension rates, high density stress bands and partial mortality. The 1998 mass-bleaching event reduced Porites calcification by 13 and 18% on the two inshore locations for 4 years, followed by recovery to baseline calcification rates in 2002. Evidence of partial mortality was apparent in 10% of the offshore colonies in 2002; however no significant effects of the bleaching events were evident in the calcification rates at the mid shelf and offshore sites. These results highlight the spatial variation of mass bleaching events and that all reef locations within the GBR were not equally stressed by the 1998 and 2002 mass bleaching events, as some models tend to suggest, which enabled recovery of calcification on the GBR within 4 years. The dynamics in annual calcification rates and recovery displayed here should be used to improve model outputs that project how coral calcification will respond to ongoing warming of the tropical oceans.

  6. Problems of urban development and growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlach, A. C.; Wray, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    The increase in the density of human population in urban areas and the effects on various aspects of the environment are discussed. The application of remote sensors to measure, analyze, and predict urban changes and their environmental impact is described. Examples of urban area mapping by aerial photography are included. The methods which have been developed to acquire, analyze, utilize, and preserve remotely sensed data on urban development are presented.

  7. Development of prognostic indicators using Classification And Regression Trees (CART) for survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunn, Martha E.; Fan, Juanjuan; Su, Xiaogang; McGuire, Michael K.

    2014-01-01

    The development of an accurate prognosis is an integral component of treatment planning in the practice of periodontics. Prior work has evaluated the validity of using various clinical measured parameters for assigning periodontal prognosis as well as for predicting tooth survival and change in clinical conditions over time. We critically review the application of multivariate Classification And Regression Trees (CART) for survival in developing evidence-based periodontal prognostic indicators. We focus attention on two distinct methods of multivariate CART for survival: the marginal goodness-of-fit approach, and the multivariate exponential approach. A number of common clinical measures have been found to be significantly associated with tooth loss from periodontal disease, including furcation involvement, probing depth, mobility, crown-to-root ratio, and oral hygiene. However, the inter-relationships among these measures, as well as the relevance of other clinical measures to tooth loss from periodontal disease (such as bruxism, family history of periodontal disease, and overall bone loss), remain less clear. While inferences drawn from any single current study are necessarily limited, the application of new approaches in epidemiologic analyses to periodontal prognosis, such as CART for survival, should yield important insights into our understanding, and treatment, of periodontal diseases. PMID:22133372

  8. Networks: Innovation, Growth and Sustainable Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Johnston

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of the Internet as a measureable manifestation of our social and economic relationships changed the domination of networks in our lives. From about 2000, the internet has allowed us to study and understand the type of networks in which we live, and to model their behaviour. The Internet has fundamentally changed the distribution of wealth. The rich became richer simply because of the larger scale of the trading network and stretched national wealth distributions. Network effects are therefore likely to be responsible for much of the perceived increases in inequalities in the last 20-30 years, and policies to tackle poverty must therefore address the extent to which the poor can engage with society's networks of wealth creation. The greatest challenge to continued growth and prosperity, and therefore to peace and justice, is climate change. The potential cost of inaction on climate change could be as high. Our self-organising social networks have structured our societies and economies, and are now reflected in our technology networks. We can now replicate their evolution in computer simulations and can therefore better assess how to deal with the greatest challenges facing us in the next few decades.

  9. Remittances, financial development and economic growth: Empirical evidence from Lesotho

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athenia Bongani Sibindi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Increasingly remittances now constitute a great source of foreign currency inflows for many developing countries. In some instances remittances have outpaced the growth of foreign direct investment (FDI. Amongst others, remittances can be used as a vehicle of savings mobilisation as well as fostering the supply of credit by providing liquidity to the market. In this article we investigate the causal relationship between the remittances, financial development and economic growth in Lesotho for the period 1975 to 2010. We make use of per capita remittances, real per capita broad money supply and real per capita growth domestic product as the proxies for remittances, financial development and economic growth respectively. We then test for cointegration amongst the variables by applying the Johansen procedure and then test for Granger causality based on the vector error correction model (VECM. Our results confirm the existence of at least one cointegrating relationship and also indicate that the direction of causality runs from remittances to the economy without feedback. The results also suggest that financial development Granger causes economic growth without feedback which is consistent with ‘supply-leading’ growth hypothesis. The results also confirm a causal relationship running from financial development to remittances without feedback. The results also lend credence to the “complementarity’ hypothesis in that, remittances complement rather than substitute financial development in bringing about economic growth.

  10. How Stock Markets Development Affect Endogenous Growth Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najeb Masoud

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper can bedescribed as a significant exploratory study that will provide a significantcontribution to knowledge to consider crucial issues which need to be barriersto understanding or a temptation/ requirement to judge some practices as‘better’ than others for stock market development effective approach andimplement successful stock market performance and economic growth. Recentanalysis of the link between financial development and growth, gained frominsights acquired as a result of using the technique of endogenous growthmodels, has illustrated that growth without exogenous technical progress andthat growth rates could be related to technology, income distribution andinstitutional arrangements. This provides the theoretical background thatempirical studies have lacked; illustrating that financial intermediationaffects the level of economic growth. Resulting models have provided newimpetus to empirical research of the effects of financial development. Thebirth of the new endogenous growth theory has facilitated the development ofimproved growth models where the long-term rate could be affected by a numberof elements. These included technology, education and health policies in theprocess of economic development, capital accumulation, government policies andinstitutional activities in the role of financial development in economicgrowth.

  11. Africa's Growth and Development Strategies: A Critical Review1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-12-17

    Dec 17, 2012 ... promouvoir la productivité et de bonnes relations de travail. Introduction2. The growth .... Africa in the context of the neo-liberal growth and development strategies it has adopted over the years. Further ..... buying and selling of foreign exchange is now market-based and abolishing previous restrictions on ...

  12. 525 Population Growth, Hysteresis and Development Outcomes in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    unemployment in Nigeria and that population growth does not play a role in the persistence of unemployment ... presupposes that the world population has to be controlled so as to avoid global food crisis due to an impending .... they predicted that high population growth causes poor socio-economic development due to ...

  13. International Trade as an Engine of Growth in Developing Countries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examines international trade as an engine of growth in developing countries, a case study of Nigeria. A review of the literature reveals that countries that are more open to international trade tends to experience higher growth rate and per-capital income than countries who do not trade or closed economy.

  14. Intellectual College Development Related to Alumni Perceptions of Personal Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwin, T. Dary

    2012-01-01

    Alumni self-ratings of their personal growth were linked to their intellectual development during college four to seven years earlier. Graduates that were satisfied with their personal growth in the arts, creative thinking, making logical inferences, learning independently, exercising initiative, and tolerating other points of view had higher…

  15. Symbiotic regulation of plant growth, development and reproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell J. Rodriguez; D. Carl Freeman; E. Durant McArthur; Yong Ok Kim; Regina S. Redman

    2009-01-01

    The growth and development of rice (Oryzae sativa) seedlings was shown to be regulated epigenetically by a fungal endophyte. In contrast to un-inoculated (nonsymbiotic) plants, endophyte colonized (symbiotic) plants preferentially allocated resources into root growth until root hairs were well established. During that time symbiotic roots expanded at...

  16. Africa's Growth and Development Strategies: A Critical Review ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    At independence in the late 1950s and early 1960s, there were high hopes about the growth prospects of the new politically independent. African states. Economic conditions, such as per capita real income, were comparable to other developing countries like South Korea and. Taiwan. By the mid-1970s, the growth profile ...

  17. The Use of Twitter for Professional Growth and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerstein, Jackie

    2011-01-01

    Twitter, the micro blogging tool, has seen unprecedented growth in the past year and is expected to continue into the future. Twitter's power, engagement, and popularity lie in its endless networking opportunities. Its potential as a venue for professional growth and development needs to be explored, discussed, and ultimately used as such. A brief…

  18. Growth, development, and behavior: confronting the issues of international adoption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Shelly

    2011-02-01

    In evaluating children who have been adopted internationally, health care providers must consider the psychosocioemotional risk factors these children bring with them that ultimately affect their physical growth, development, and emotional, behavioral, and cognitive functioning. This third-in-a-series article explores these considerations and offers information regarding growth and developmental delays and the potential for behavioral and psychosocial concerns.

  19. Effect of peppermint essential oil on growth and survival of some foodborne pathogenic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Boniadian

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to determine the effects of peppermint essential oils on Bacillus cereus, Salmonella typhimurium, Listeria monocytogenes and Yersinia enterocolitica. In the first step, Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC and Minimum Bactericidal Concentration (MBC of peppermint essential were determined by the tube dilution method in tryptic soy broth (TSB. Then, the growth behavior of each of the aforementioned bacteria was assessed in presence of peppermint essential oil in concentration of less than MIC. The result of first step showed that Y. enterocolitica is more sensitive to peppermint essential oil than other tested bacteria (MIC = 0.1% & MBC = 0.22%, followed by L. monocytogenes (MIC = 0.12% & MBC = 0.15%, S. typhimurium (MIC = 0.22% & MBC = 0.25% and B. cereus (MIC = 0.3% & MBC = 5%, respectively. The results revealed that, the peppermint essential oils in low concentration inhibited the growth rate of bacteria thus may use as a natural preservative and flavoring in foods.

  20. Survival, food consumption and growth of Norway lobster (Nephrops norvegicus) kept in laboratory conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mente, Elena

    2010-09-01

    Successful commercial aquaculture of crustacean species is dependent on satisfying their nutritional requirements and on producing rapidly growing and healthy animals. The results of the present study provide valuable information for feeding habits and growth of Nephrops norvegicus L., 1758) under laboratory conditions. The aim of the present study was to examine food consumption, growth and physiology of the Norway lobster N. norvegicus under laboratory conditions. N. norvegicus (15 g wet weight) were distributed into 1001 tanks consisting of five numbered compartments each. They were fed the experimental diets (frozen mussels and pellets) for a period of 6 months. A group of starved Nephrops was stocked and fasted for 8 months. Although Nephrops grew well when fed the frozen mussels diet, feeding on a dry pellet feed was unsatisfactory. The starvation group, despite the fact that showed the highest mortality (50%), exhibited a remarkable tolerance to the lack of food supply. The study offers further insight by correlating the amino acid profiles of Nephrops tail muscle with the two diets. The deviations from the mussel's diet for asparagine, alanine and glutamic acid suggest a deficiency of these amino acids in this diet. The results of the present study showed that the concentrations of free amino acids are lower in relative amount than those of protein-bound amino acids, except for arginine, proline and glycine. The present study contributes to the improvement of our knowledge on nutritional requirements of the above species. © 2010 ISZS, Blackwell Publishing and IOZ/CAS.

  1. Effects of filamentous macroalgae mats on growth and survival of eelgrass, Zostera marina, seedlings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jonas; Olesen, Birgit; Krause-Jensen, Dorte

    2012-01-01

    A laboratory experiment was conducted to assess the effect of filamentous algae mats on the performance of seedlings of the eelgrass, Zostera marina. The seedlings were covered by three levels (3, 6 and 9 cm) of natural (Chaetomorpha linum) and imitation algae mats and it was hypothesized that th...... enriched sediments and longer duration of exposure than applied here may result in oxygen depletion thereby intensifying the negative effects of light attenuation by algal mats on seedling performance.......A laboratory experiment was conducted to assess the effect of filamentous algae mats on the performance of seedlings of the eelgrass, Zostera marina. The seedlings were covered by three levels (3, 6 and 9 cm) of natural (Chaetomorpha linum) and imitation algae mats and it was hypothesized...... that the effects of the natural algae on seedling growth may be more severe because of the metabolic demands of the algae. Results show that coverage by both C. linum and imitation algae significantly reduced seedling growth and increased allocation of resources to above ground tissues. No clear effects of algae...

  2. Trypanosoma cruzi Polyamine Transporter: Its Role on Parasite Growth and Survival Under Stress Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reigada, Chantal; Sayé, Melisa; Vera, Edward Valera; Balcazar, Darío; Fraccaroli, Laura; Carrillo, Carolina; Miranda, Mariana R; Pereira, Claudio A

    2016-08-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiological agent of Chagas disease, a major health problem in Latin America. Polyamines are polycationic compounds that play a critical role as regulators of cell growth and differentiation. In contrast with other protozoa, T. cruzi is auxotrophic for polyamines because of its inability to synthesize putrescine due to the lack of both, arginine and ornithine decarboxylase; therefore, the intracellular availability of polyamines depends exclusively on transport processes. In this work, the polyamine transporter TcPAT12 was overexpressed in T. cruzi epimastigotes demonstrating that growth rates at different concentrations of polyamines strongly depend on the regulation of the polyamine transport. In addition, parasites overexpressing TcPAT12 showed a highly increased resistance to hydrogen peroxide and the trypanocidal drugs nifurtimox and benznidazole, which act by oxidative stress and interfering the synthesis of polyamine derivatives, respectively. Finally, the presence of putative polyamine transporters was analyzed in T. cruzi, Trypanosoma brucei, and Leishmania major genomes identifying 3-6 genes in these trypanosomatids.

  3. DNA as a Phosphate Storage Polymer and the Alternative Advantages of Polyploidy for Growth or Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerulla, Karolin; Chimileski, Scott; Näther, Daniela; Gophna, Uri; Papke, R. Thane; Soppa, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Haloferax volcanii uses extracellular DNA as a source for carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorous. However, it can also grow to a limited extend in the absence of added phosphorous, indicating that it contains an intracellular phosphate storage molecule. As Hfx. volcanii is polyploid, it was investigated whether DNA might be used as storage polymer, in addition to its role as genetic material. It could be verified that during phosphate starvation cells multiply by distributing as well as by degrading their chromosomes. In contrast, the number of ribosomes stayed constant, revealing that ribosomes are distributed to descendant cells, but not degraded. These results suggest that the phosphate of phosphate-containing biomolecules (other than DNA and RNA) originates from that stored in DNA, not in rRNA. Adding phosphate to chromosome depleted cells rapidly restores polyploidy. Quantification of desiccation survival of cells with different ploidy levels showed that under phosphate starvation Hfx. volcanii diminishes genetic advantages of polyploidy in favor of cell multiplication. The consequences of the usage of genomic DNA as phosphate storage polymer are discussed as well as the hypothesis that DNA might have initially evolved in evolution as a storage polymer, and the various genetic benefits evolved later. PMID:24733558

  4. Grass Pollen Affects Survival and Development of Larval Anopheles arabiensis (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmare, Yelfwagash; Hopkins, Richard J; Tekie, Habte; Hill, Sharon R; Ignell, Rickard

    2017-09-01

    Nutrients in breeding sites are critical for the survival and development of malaria mosquitoes, having a direct impact on vectorial capacity. Yet, there is a limited understanding about the natural larval diet and its impact on the individual fitness of mosquitoes. Recent studies have shown that gravid Anopheles arabiensis Patton (Diptera: Culicidae) are attracted by and oviposit in grass-associated habitats. The pollen provided by these grasses is a potential source of nutrients for the larvae. Here, we assess the effect of Typha latifolia L. (Poales: Typhaceae), Echinochloa pyramidalis Lamarck, Pennisetum setaceum Forsskål, and Zea mays L. pollen on larval survival and rate of development in An. arabiensis under laboratory conditions. In addition, we characterize the carbon to nitrogen ratio and the size of pollen grains as a measure of diet quality. Carbon-rich pollen with a small grain size (T. latifolia and P. setaceum; 9.7 ± 0.3 × 103 and 5.5 ± 0.2 × 104 µm3, respectively) resulted in enhanced rates of development of An. arabiensis. In contrast, the larva fed on the nitrogen-rich control diet (TetraMin) was slower to develop, but demonstrated the highest larval survival. Larvae fed on carbon-rich and large-grained Z. mays pollen (4.1 ± 0.2 × 105 µm3) survived at similar levels as those fed on the control diet and also took a longer time to develop compared with larvae fed on the other pollens. While males and females did not appear to develop differently on the different pollen diets, males consistently emerged faster than their female counterparts. These results are discussed in relation to integrated vector management. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America.

  5. Maximum growth and survival of estrogen receptor-alpha positive breast cancer cells requires the Sin3A transcriptional repressor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alarid Elaine T

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sin3A is an evolutionarily conserved transcriptional repressor which regulates gene expression as part of the multi-protein Sin3 repressive complex. It functions as a scaffold upon which proteins with enzymatic activity dock, including chromatin modifying histone deacetylases. Although regulation of transcription by Sin3A has been studied in detail, little is understood about the function of Sin3A in cancer cells. We previously showed that Sin3A is expressed in breast cancer cells and is a repressor of estrogen receptor-alpha (ERα, ESR1 gene expression. Here, we expand our previous studies to elucidate the function of Sin3A in the control of gene expression and growth of breast cancer cells. Results Analysis of gene expression following knockdown of Sin3A revealed changes in both basal and regulated gene transcription. Genes of known importance in breast cancer and estrogen signaling, including ERBB2, PGR, MYC, CLU, and NCOA2, were among those identified as Sin3A-responsive. The mechanism of Sin3A action varied among genes and was found to be mediated through both HDAC1/2 -dependent and -independent activities. Loss of Sin3A inhibited breast cancer cell growth by increasing apoptosis without affecting cell cycle progression. Analysis of both ERα-positive and ERα-negative cell lines revealed that the effects of Sin3A on growth were cell-type specific, as Sin3A expression promoted maximum growth of only the ERα-positive cells, and, notably, Sin3A protein itself was increased by estrogen. Further gene expression experiments revealed that Sin3A repressed expression of key apoptotic genes, including TRAIL, TRAILR1, CASP10, and APAF1, in ERα-positive, but not ERα-negative, cell lines, which could provide a mechanistic explanation for cell-type differences in growth. Conclusions This study identifies Sin3A as a regulator of gene expression, survival, and growth in ERα-positive breast cancer cells. Sin3A regulates the

  6. Metabolic maturity at birth and neonate lamb survival and growth: the effects of maternal low-dose dexamethasone treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, D R; Jackson, R B; Blache, D; Roche, J R

    2009-10-01

    Perinatal mortality is a major contributing factor to reproductive wastage in grazing sheep industries. Enhanced metabolic and endocrine maturity at birth may improve the behavioral competency and thermoregulatory ability of neonates, potentially improving lamb survival over the first 72 h of life. Maternal glucocorticoid treatment in late gestation was investigated as a mechanism for manipulating metabolic and endocrine maturity in the ovine neonate. Multiparous, fine-wool Merino ewes (n = 150) were divided into 3 groups to lamb on pasture. Within each group, 5 single-lamb and 5 twin-lamb bearing ewes were randomly allocated to 1 of 5 treatments. Treatments included a saline control (1 mL), or dexamethasone (2 mg/mL as the sodium phosphate) injected intramuscularly at 1 of 2 dose rates (1.5 or 3.0 mg) at d 130 or 141 of gestation. One-half of the control ewes were injected at d 130 and the remainder at d 141. Dexamethasone treatment had no effect on lamb survival to 72 h after birth, although there tended (P = 0.09) to be a smaller proportion of lambs dying due to dystocia than for control lambs. Heart girth at birth in singleton and twin lambs was reduced (P ghrelin concentrations in singleton and male lambs. Behavioral interactions between ewes and neonatal lambs were generally unaffected, although treatment at d 130 produced lambs that took longer to bleat than lambs of untreated ewes (P ghrelin concentrations, survival in the first 72 h of life, and lamb growth performance were unaffected by periparturient maternal glucocorticoid treatment.

  7. Effects of dietary biotin and avidin on growth, survival, feed conversion, biotin status and gene expression of zebrafish Danio rerio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yossa, Rodrigue; Sarker, Pallab K; Karanth, Santhosh; Ekker, Marc; Vandenberg, Grant W

    2011-12-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary avidin on growth, survival, food conversion, biotin status and gene expression of zebrafish (Danio rerio Hamilton-Buchanan) juveniles (average wet mass 0.178 g) fed 7 purified diets for 12 weeks. Experimental diets were formulated to provide 0×, 1×, 15×, 30×, 60× and 120× excess avidin versus biotin kg(-1) diet, on a molar basis; a control diet contained neither supplemental biotin nor avidin. Fish fed the control diet had the lowest percentage weight gain and the highest mortality, while the highest percentage weight gain and the lowest mortality was observed with the 0× diet (Pdietary avidin (r=0.876; Pdietary biotin requirement level will cause biotin deficiency signs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Genetic differences in growth, migration, and survival between hatchery and wild steelhead and Chinook salmon: Introduction and executive summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Steve P.; Reisenbichler, Reginald; Wetzel, Lisa A.; Hayes, Michael C.

    2012-01-01

    This report presents results of studies testing for genetically based differences in performance (growth, migration, and survival) between hatchery and wild populations of steelhead and Chinook salmon (Project Number 90-052). The report is organized into 10 chapters with a general study introduction preceding the first chapter. A growing body of data shows that domestication and a resulting loss of fitness for natural rearing occur in hatchery populations of anadromous salmonids; however, the magnitude of domestication will vary among species and hatchery programs. Better information on domestication is needed to accurately predict the consequences when hatchery and wild fish interbreed. The intent of hatchery supplementation is to increase natural production through introduction of hatchery fish into natural production areas. The goal of this study was to provide managers with information on the genetic risks of hatchery supplementation to wild populations of Columbia River Basin summer steelhead and spring Chinook salmon.

  9. Effects of salinity on growth and survival in five Artemia franciscana (Anostraca: Artemiidae populations from Mexico Pacific Coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Castro-Mejía

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Salinity is an important factor influencing growth and survival of aquatic organisms such as Artemia, a valuable aquaculture species. This study evaluated the effects of salinity on A. franciscana populations from different water bodies in Mexico’s Pacific Coast. With this purpose, five autochthonous bisexual Artemia populations were tested to assess their survival and growth values against salinities of 40, 60, 80, 100 and 120g/l, under laboratory conditions (25±2ºC; pH 8-10; constant light and aeration. The organisms were fed with 100mL of rice bran and 2L of Tetraselmis suecica (500 000cel/ml. The culture experiments were made in 200L plastic tanks, and survival and growth final values were obtained after 21 culture days. Survival and growth curves were determined by a regression analysis (R². The significant differences between salinities were determined by ANOVA test (pLa salinidad es el factor más importante que modifica el crecimiento y la sobrevivencia de las poblaciones mexicanas de Artemia en el mundo. El efecto de este factor en las poblaciones costeras del Pacífico Mexicano ha sido poco estudiado. Cinco poblaciones bisexuales de Artemia provenientes de cuerpos de aguas costeras del Pacífico Mexicano, se estudiaron para determinar el efecto que tiene la salinidad de 40, 60, 80, 100 y 120g/l sobre la sobrevivencia y el crecimiento, en condiciones de laboratorio (25±2ºC, pH 8-10; luz y aireación continua. Los experimentos de cultivo fueron realizados en tanques de plástico de 200l. Los valores finales de sobrevivencia y crecimiento fueron determinados después de 21 días de cultivo. Los organismos fueron alimentados con 100ml de salvado de arroz y 2l de Tetraselmis suecica (500cel/ml. Las curvas de sobrevivencia y crecimiento fueron determinadas usando un análisis de regresión (R². Las diferencias significativas entre los valores promedio a las distintas salinidades fueron determinadas por una prueba de ANDEVA (p<0

  10. Survival and growth of isolated pre-antral follicles from human ovarian medulla tissue during long-term 3D culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, H; Kristensen, S G; Jiang, H; Rasmussen, A; Andersen, C Yding

    2016-07-01

    Can human pre-antral follicles isolated enzymatically from surplus medulla tissue survive and grow in vitro during long-term 3D culture? Secondary human follicles can develop to small antral follicles and remain hormonally active in an alginate-encapsulation culture system for more than 30 days. Ovarian tissue cryopreservation followed by transplantation is a promising fertility preservation approach for cancer patients. However, transplantation of cryopreserved tissue to patients may carry the risk of re-implanting malignant cells. Grafting of follicles enzymatically isolated from ovarian tissue or developing a method for follicular culture and maturation in vitro may provide fertility to such patients without the risk of reintroducing the malignancy. However, the growth of pre-antral follicles isolated by enzymatic digestion from medulla tissue during long-term culture has received only little attention. Two to ten human pre-antral follicles were encapsulated together within an alginate bead and cultured with or without ovarian interstitial tissue for either 7 days or >30 days. Follicles were cultured in either 20% oxygen or 5% oxygen or encapsulated in a lower concentration of alginate together with a lower concentration of FSH in high oxygen. A total of 395 pre-antral follicles from 16 cancer patients, aged 9-37 years, were co-cultured for either 7 days or >30 days. A proportion of follicle (64) were removed from culture on Day 7 and assessed for viability using confocal fluorescence microscopy following calcein-AM and ethidium homodimer-1 staining or histology. The remaining follicles (331) were continued in culture for >30 days then assessed for survival and growth. Anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) and estradiol levels were quantified in the medium. An optimized protocol for isolation of intact healthy pre-antral follicles from ovarian medulla was developed. After 7 days of culture, secondary follicles had a significantly higher survival rates compared with

  11. Will inclusive growth succeed? | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2017-05-15

    May 15, 2017 ... In the Canadian context, our guests spoke of policies and programs such as child transfer benefits, skills development for the workforce, and investing in infrastructure. From abroad, a former minister from Peru indicated how poverty was drastically reduced by coordinating government reinvestments in the ...

  12. Differential Listeria monocytogenes Strain Survival and Growth in Katiki, a Traditional Greek Soft Cheese, at Different Storage Temperatures▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagkli, Dafni-Maria; Iliopoulos, Vassilios; Stergiou, Virginia; Lazaridou, Anna; Nychas, George-John

    2009-01-01

    Katiki Domokou is a traditional Greek cheese, which has received the Protected Designation of Origin recognition since 1994. Its microfloras have not been studied although its structure and composition may enable (or even favor) the survival and growth of several pathogens, including Listeria monocytogenes. The persistence of L. monocytogenes during storage at different temperatures has been the subject of many studies since temperature abuse of food products is often encountered. In the present study, five strains of L. monocytogenes were aseptically inoculated individually and as a cocktail in Katiki Domokou cheese, which was then stored at 5, 10, 15, and 20°C. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was used to monitor strain evolution or persistence during storage at different temperatures in the case of the cocktail inoculum. The results suggested that strain survival of L. monocytogenes was temperature dependent since different strains predominated at different temperatures. Such information is of great importance in risk assessment studies, which typically consider only the presence or absence of the pathogen. PMID:19376914

  13. Differential Listeria monocytogenes strain survival and growth in Katiki, a traditional Greek soft cheese, at different storage temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagkli, Dafni-Maria; Iliopoulos, Vassilios; Stergiou, Virginia; Lazaridou, Anna; Nychas, George-John

    2009-06-01

    Katiki Domokou is a traditional Greek cheese, which has received the Protected Designation of Origin recognition since 1994. Its microfloras have not been studied although its structure and composition may enable (or even favor) the survival and growth of several pathogens, including Listeria monocytogenes. The persistence of L. monocytogenes during storage at different temperatures has been the subject of many studies since temperature abuse of food products is often encountered. In the present study, five strains of L. monocytogenes were aseptically inoculated individually and as a cocktail in Katiki Domokou cheese, which was then stored at 5, 10, 15, and 20 degrees C. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was used to monitor strain evolution or persistence during storage at different temperatures in the case of the cocktail inoculum. The results suggested that strain survival of L. monocytogenes was temperature dependent since different strains predominated at different temperatures. Such information is of great importance in risk assessment studies, which typically consider only the presence or absence of the pathogen.

  14. Impact of Microplastic Beads and Fibers on Waterflea (Ceriodaphnia dubia) Survival, Growth, and Reproduction: Implications of Single and Mixture Exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziajahromi, Shima; Kumar, Anupama; Neale, Peta A; Leusch, Frederic D L

    2017-11-03

    There is limited knowledge regarding the adverse effects of wastewater-derived microplastics, particularly fibers, on aquatic biota. In this study, we examined the acute (48 h) and chronic (8 d) effects of microplastic polyester fibers and polyethylene (PE) beads on freshwater zooplankton Ceriodaphnia dubia. We also assessed the acute response of C. dubia to a binary mixture of microplastic beads and fibers for the first time. Acute exposure to fibers and PE beads both showed a dose-dependent effect on survival. An equitoxic binary mixture of beads and fibers resulted in a toxic unit of 1.85 indicating less than additive effects. Chronic exposure to lower concentrations did not significantly affect survival of C. dubia, but a dose-dependent effect on growth and reproduction was observed. Fibers showed greater adverse effects than PE beads. While ingestion of fibers was not observed, scanning electron microscopy showed carapace and antenna deformities after exposure to fibers, with no deformities observed after exposure to PE beads. While much of the current research has focused on microplastic beads, our study shows that microplastic fibers pose a greater risk to C. dubia, with reduced reproductive output observed at concentrations within an order of magnitude of reported environmental levels.

  15. Role of 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate on the epidermal growth factor dependent survival in mammary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinman, Diego Y; Romorini, Leonardo; Presman, Diego M; Rocha-Viegas, Luciana; Coso, Omar A; Davio, Carlos; Pecci, Adali

    2016-01-05

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) has been suggested to play a key role in the maintenance of epithelial cell survival during lactation. Previously, we demonstrated that EGF dependent activation of PI3K pathway prevents apoptosis in confluent murine HC11 cells cultured under low nutrient conditions. The EGF protective effect is associated with increased levels of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-XL. Here, we identify the EGF-dependent mechanism involved in cell survival that converges in the regulation of bcl-X expression by activated CREB. EGF induces Bcl-XL expression through activation of a unique bcl-X promoter, the P1; being not only the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway but also the increase in cAMP levels and the concomitant PKA/CREB activation necessary for both bcl-XL upregulation and apoptosis avoidance. Results presented in this work suggest the existence of a novel connection between the EGF receptor and the adenylate cyclase that would have an impact in preventing apoptosis under low nutrient conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Growth and survival of the fish pathogenic bacterium, Flavobacterium columnare, in tilapia mucus and porcine gastric mucin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, Craig A; LaFrentz, Benjamin R

    2015-02-01

    Flavobacterium columnare, an economically important Gram-negative bacterium of freshwater farmed fish, colonizes the skin and gills in the initial steps of pathogenesis. The surface of fish is coated with mucus made up of high molecular weight glycoproteins. Limited studies have described the ability of bacterial pathogens to grow in fish mucus. Our objective was to determine if F. columnare isolates could grow and survive in formulated water (FW) containing autoclaved tilapia mucus or porcine gastric mucin. We demonstrated the ability of F. columnare genomovars I, II, II-B and III to replicate (2-3 logs) and survive (21 to >100 days) in FW containing tilapia mucus. In a second experiment, genomovar I and II isolates were found to replicate in FW containing tilapia mucus or porcine mucin but not in FW only. From a practical standpoint, fish handling and/or hauling results in stress that leads to mucus sloughing often with subsequent F. columnare infection. Flavobacterium columnare utilizes fish mucus as a nutrient source, and studies are underway to determine if growth in mucus or mucin results in differential protein expression and/or increased virulence of F. columnare towards fish. © FEMS 2014. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Demographic consequences of chromatic leaf defence in tropical tree communities: do red young leaves increase growth and survival?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queenborough, Simon A.; Metz, Margaret R.; Valencia, Renato; Wright, S. Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Background Many tropical forest tree species delay greening their leaves until full expansion. This strategy is thought to provide newly flushing leaves with protection against damage by herbivores by keeping young leaves devoid of nutritive value. Because young leaves suffer the greatest predation from invertebrate herbivores, delayed greening could prevent costly tissue loss. Many species that delay greening also produce anthocyanin pigments in their new leaves, giving them a reddish tint. These anthocyanins may be fungicidal, protect leaves against UV damage or make leaves cryptic to herbivores blind to the red part of the spectrum. Methods A comprehensive survey was undertaken of seedlings, saplings and mature trees in two diverse tropical forests: a rain forest in western Amazonia (Yasuní National Park, Ecuador) and a deciduous forest in Central America (Barro Colorado Island, Panamá). A test was made of whether individuals and species with delayed greening or red-coloured young leaves showed lower mortality or higher relative growth rates than species that did not. Key results At both Yasuní and Barro Colorado Island, species with delayed greening or red young leaves comprised significant proportions of the seedling and tree communities. At both sites, significantly lower mortality was found in seedlings and trees with delayed greening and red-coloured young leaves. While there was little effect of leaf colour on the production of new leaves of seedlings, diameter relative growth rates of small trees were lower in species with delayed greening and red-coloured young leaves than in species with regular green leaves, and this effect remained when the trade-off between mortality and growth was accounted for. Conclusions Herbivores exert strong selection pressure on seedlings for the expression of defence traits. A delayed greening or red-coloured young leaf strategy in seedlings appears to be associated with higher survival for a given growth rate, and may

  18. Growth and survival of pacific coho salmon smolts exposed as juveniles to pesticides within urban streams in western Washington, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Kerensa A; Grue, Christian E; Grassley, James M; Fisk, Robert J; Conquest, Loveday L

    2014-07-01

    Pesticides are frequently detected in urban streams, with concentrations often exceeding those reported in surface waters within agricultural areas. The authors studied growth, survival, and return rates of coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) smolts exposed to a pesticide mixture ("cocktail") representative of the pesticides most frequently reported within urban streams in western Washington State, USA, in fall through early spring. Exposure concentrations were selected to represent a reasonable worst-case scenario based on field monitoring data. Smolts were continuously exposed to pulses of the cocktail either from fertilization through swim-up (2007-2008) or from fertilization through smoltification (2007-2008 and 2008-2009), coded wire tagged, and released in 2008 and 2009. Pre-release endpoints (growth, survival, sex ratio, brain acetylcholinesterase activity, and gonado- and hepatosomatic indices) were not affected. However, the number of returning adults exposed to the cocktail to swim-up (0.90%, n = 42) was more than double that of unexposed controls (0.38%, n = 26) in 2008, whereas in 2009, fish exposed through smoltification returned in lower numbers (0.15%, n = 18) than controls (0.37%, n = 30). Variability in return rates among treatments between years was comparable to that observed in previous whole life cycle studies with Pacific salmon and other contaminants. Results suggest that exposure to pesticides in urban streams does not directly impair early life stages of coho salmon, and that additional studies incorporating releases of larger numbers of smolts across several years are necessary to adequately quantify effects on return rates. © 2014 SETAC.

  19. Effects of temperature and salinity on survival, growth and DNA methylation of juvenile Pacific abalone, Haliotis discus hannai Ino

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Ning; Liu, Xiao; Li, Junyuan; Mu, Wendan; Lian, Jianwu; Xue, Yanjie; Li, Qi

    2017-09-01

    Temperature and salinity are two of the most potent abiotic factors influencing marine mollusks. In this study, we investigated the individual and combined effects of temperature and salinity on the survival and growth of juvenile Pacific abalone, Haliotis discus hannai Ino, and also examined the DNA methylation alteration that may underpin the phenotypic variation of abalone exposed to different rearing conditions. The single-factor data showed that the suitable ranges of temperature and salinity were 16-28°C at a constant salinity of 32, and 24-40 at a constant temperature of 20°C, respectively. The two-factor data indicated that both survival and growth were significantly affected by temperature, salinity and their interaction. The optimal temperature-salinity combination for juveniles was 23-25°C and 30-36. To explore environment-induced DNA methylation alteration, the methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism (MSAP) technique was used to analyze the genomic methylation profiles of abalone reared in optimal and adverse conditions. Neither temperature nor salinity induced evident changes in the global methylation level, but 67 and 63 differentially methylated loci were identified in temperature and salinity treatments, respectively. The between-group eigen analysis also showed that both temperature and salinity could induce epigenetic differentiation in H. discus hannai Ino. The results of our study provide optimal rearing conditions for juvenile H. discus hannai Ino, and represent the first step toward revealing the epigenetic regulatory mechanism of abalone in response to thermal and salt stresses.

  20. Financial Development and Inclusive Growth in Nigeria: A Threshold Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taofeek Olusola Ayinde

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the relationship between financial development and inclusive growth in Nigeria for the period 1980 – 2013. The technique of analysis is the quantile regression; which is to obtain a threshold for which the former impacts on the latter. The result shows a threshold level of 90th percentile. Interestingly, the study also found that the impact of financial development on inclusive growth depends on the measure of the former up to the threshold level and not beyond. Through a granger causality test, the direction of causality is through the inclusive growth rather than through financial development; through the financial deepening measure. While the study found that either a low level or high level of openness on trade and capital investment are desirable for inclusive growth in Nigeria, the results also reveal that government involvement in the workings of the Nigeria economy and financial openness are sensitive to the pattern of financial development. With financial deepening, both are negatively related to inclusive growth but positively related to inclusive growth when financial widening is considered. This suggests that government intervention in the activities of the private sector is detrimental when the latter are to drive financial development process. However, the involvement of government in ensuring the appropriate level of financial widening, through the central bank operations, produces a positive impact on growth.