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Sample records for survivable tether mast

  1. Design for undex survivability of an integrated modular mast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aanhold, H. van; Pel, S.; Bosman, T.

    2008-01-01

    Thales Naval Netherlands is currently developing a so-called Integrated Modular Mast (IMM), thereby supported by the Royal Netherlands Navy and TNO. There is a need for knowing the response of this IMM to underwater shock in such a way, that this can be used in the design of shock resistant sensor

  2. Parasitic infection improves survival from septic peritonitis by enhancing mast cell responses to bacteria in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel E Sutherland

    Full Text Available Mammals are serially infected with a variety of microorganisms, including bacteria and parasites. Each infection reprograms the immune system's responses to re-exposure and potentially alters responses to first-time infection by different microorganisms. To examine whether infection with a metazoan parasite modulates host responses to subsequent bacterial infection, mice were infected with the hookworm-like intestinal nematode Nippostrongylus brasiliensis, followed in 2-4 weeks by peritoneal injection of the pathogenic bacterium Klebsiella pneumoniae. Survival from Klebsiella peritonitis two weeks after parasite infection was better in Nippostrongylus-infected animals than in unparasitized mice, with Nippostrongylus-infected mice having fewer peritoneal bacteria, more neutrophils, and higher levels of protective interleukin 6. The improved survival of Nippostrongylus-infected mice depends on IL-4 because the survival benefit is lost in mice lacking IL-4. Because mast cells protect mice from Klebsiella peritonitis, we examined responses in mast cell-deficient Kit(W-sh/Kit(W-sh mice, in which parasitosis failed to improve survival from Klebsiella peritonitis. However, adoptive transfer of cultured mast cells to Kit(W-sh/Kit(W-sh mice restored survival benefits of parasitosis. These results show that recent infection with Nippostrongylus brasiliensis protects mice from Klebsiella peritonitis by modulating mast cell contributions to host defense, and suggest more generally that parasitosis can yield survival advantages to a bacterially infected host.

  3. Oak mast production and animal impacts on acorn survival in the central hardwoods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenneth F. Kellner; Jeffery K. Riegel; Nathanael I. Lichti; Robert K. Swihart

    2013-01-01

    As part of the Hardwood Ecosystem Experiment we measured mast production in white (Quercus alba) and black (Q. velutina) oak, and quantified the impacts of seed predators on acorn survival over a 3-year period. Specifically, we measured the proportion of acorns of each species infested with weevils (Curculio spp...

  4. Mast Cell Leukemia: Review of a Rare Disease and Case Report of Prolonged Survival after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Bauer, MD, PhD

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Mast cell leukemia is a rare and aggressive form of mastocytosis characterized by >20% mast cells found in the bone marrow aspirates of patients with signs of systemic mastocytosis-related organ damage. The prognosis for patients with mast cell leukemia is extremely poor, with resistance to both cytoreductive therapies and tyrosine kinase inhibitors being relatively common. While allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has been associated with long-term survival in patients with advanced systemic mastocytosis, reports regarding its effectiveness in mast cell leukemia are limited to fewer than 20 cases described in the literature. Here, we report a patient with mast cell leukemia who remains in complete remission 24 months after allogeneic HSCT at the time of this writing, and briefly review the clinical, diagnostic, and therapeutic approaches to this rare disease.

  5. Galectin-9 enhances cytokine secretion, but suppresses survival and degranulation, in human mast cell line.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reiji Kojima

    Full Text Available Galectin-9 (Gal-9, a lectin having a β-galactoside-binding domain, can induce apoptosis of Th1 cells by binding to TIM-3. In addition, Gal-9 inhibits IgE/Ag-mediated degranulation of mast cell/basophilic cell lines by binding to IgE, thus blocking IgE/Ag complex formation. However, the role of Gal-9 in mast cell function in the absence of IgE is not fully understood. Here, we found that recombinant Gal-9 directly induced phosphorylation of Erk1/2 but not p38 MAPK in a human mast cell line, HMC-1, which does not express FcεRI. Gal-9 induced apoptosis and inhibited PMA/ionomycin-mediated degranulation of HMC-1 cells. On the other hand, Gal-9 induced cytokine and/or chemokine production by HMC-1 cells, dependent on activation of ERK1/2 but not p38 MAPK. In addition, the lectin activity of Gal-9 was required for Gal-9-mediated cytokine secretion by HMC-1 cells. These observations suggest that Gal-9 has dual properties as both a regulator and an activator of mast cells.

  6. Intratumor IL-17-Positive Mast Cells Are the Major Source of the IL-17 That Is Predictive of Survival in Gastric Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Geer; Lin, Xianke; Chen, Chao; Sun, Jianyi; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Qing; Yu, Jiren

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-17 (IL-17) is prevalent in tumor tissue and suppresses effective anti-tumor immune responses. However, the source of the increased tumor-infiltrating IL-17 and its contribution to tumor progression in human gastric cancer remain poorly understood. In this study, we enrolled 112 gastric cancer patients, immunofluorescence was used to evaluate the colocalization of CD3, CD4, CD56, CD20, CD68, and mast cell tryptase (MCT) with IL-17. Immunohistochemistry was used to evaluate the distribution of microvessel density (CD34), CD66b+, CD68+, and FoxP3+ cells in different microanatomical areas. Prognostic value was determined by Kaplan-Meier analysis and a Cox regression model. The results showed that mast cells, but not T cells or macrophages, were the predominant cell type producing IL-17 in gastric cancer. Significant positive correlations were detected between densities of mast cell-derived IL-17 and microvessels, neutrophils, and regulatory T cells (Tregs). Futhermore, we found that the majority of vascular endothelial cells expressing Interleukin-17 receptor (IL-17R). Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that increasing intratumor infiltrated mast cells and IL-17+ cells, as well as MCT+ IL-17+ cells, were significantly associated with worse overall survival. These findings indicated that mast cells were the major source of IL-17 in gastric cancer, and intratumor IL-17 infiltration may have promoted tumor progression by enhancing angiogenesis in the tumor microenvironment through the axis of IL-17/IL-17R. IL-17-positive mast cells showed a prognostic factor in gastric cancer, indicating that immunotherapy targeting mast cells might be an effective strategy to control intratumor IL-17 infiltration, and consequently reverse immunosuppression in the tumor microenvironment, facilitating cancer immunotherapy. PMID:25197971

  7. Mast cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    D. D. Metcalfe; D. Baram; Y. A. Mekori

    1997-01-01

    Mast cells are found resident in tissues throughout the body, particularly in association with structures such as blood vessels and nerves, and in proximity to surfaces that interface the external environment...

  8. Tethered Lubricants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archer, Lynden

    2010-09-15

    We have performed extensive experimental and theoretical studies of interfacial friction, relaxation dynamics, and thermodynamics of polymer chains tethered to points, planes, and particles. A key result from our tribology studies using lateral force microscopy (LFM) measurements of polydisperse brushes of linear and branched chains densely grafted to planar substrates is that there are exceedingly low friction coefficients for these systems. Specific project achievements include: (1) Synthesis of three-tiered lubricant films containing controlled amounts of free and pendent PDMS chains, and investigated the effect of their molecular weight and volume fraction on interfacial friction. (2.) Detailed studies of a family of hairy particles termed nanoscale organic hybrid materials (NOHMs) and demonstration of their use as lubricants.

  9. Development of the flight tether for ProSEDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Leslie; Vaughn, Jason; Welzyn, Ken; Carroll, Joe

    2002-01-01

    The Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System (ProSEDS) space experiment will demonstrate the use of an electrodynamic tether propulsion system to generate thrust in space by decreasing the orbital altitude of a Delta II Expendable Launch Vehicle second stage. ProSEDS will use the flight-proven Small Expendable Deployer System to deploy a newly designed and developed tether which will provide tether generated drag thrust of ~0.4 N. The development and production of very long tethers with specific properties for performance and survivability will be required to enable future tether missions. The ProSEDS tether design and the development process may provide some lessons learned for these future missions. The ProSEDS system requirements drove the design of the tether to have three different sections of tether each serving a specialized purpose. The tether is a total of 15 kilometers long: 10 kilometers of a non-conductive Dyneema lead tether; 5 km of CCOR conductive coated wire; and 220 meters of insulated wire with a protective Kevlar overbraid. Production and joining of long tether lengths involved many development efforts. Extensive testing of tether materials including ground deployment of the full-length ProSEDS tether was conducted to validate the tether design and performance before flight. .

  10. α-Hemolysin enhances Staphylococcus aureus internalization and survival within mast cells by modulating the expression of β1 integrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldmann, Oliver; Tuchscherr, Lorena; Rohde, Manfred; Medina, Eva

    2016-06-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are important sentinels of the host defence against invading pathogens. We previously reported that Staphylococcus aureus evaded the extracellular antimicrobial activities of MCs by promoting its internalization within these cells via β1 integrins. Here, we investigated the molecular mechanisms governing this process. We found that S. aureus responded to the antimicrobial mediators released by MCs by up-regulating the expression of α-hemolysin (Hla), fibronectin-binding protein A and several regulatory systems. We also found that S. aureus induced the up-regulation of β1 integrin expression on MCs and that this effect was mediated by Hla-ADAM10 (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase 10) interaction. Thus, deletion of Hla or inhibition of Hla-ADAM10 interaction significantly impaired S. aureus internalization within MCs. Furthermore, purified Hla but not the inactive HlaH35L induced up-regulation of β1 integrin expression in MCs in a dose-dependent manner. Our data support a model in which S. aureus counter-reacts the extracellular microbicidal mechanisms of MCs by increasing expression of fibronectin-binding proteins and by inducing Hla-ADAM10-mediated up-regulation of β1 integrin in MCs. The up-regulation of bacterial fibronectin-binding proteins, concomitantly with the increased expression of its receptor β1 integrin on the MCs, resulted in enhanced S. aureus internalization through the binding of fibronectin-binding proteins to integrin β1 via fibronectin. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Tethering a new technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Nobie H.; Candidi, Maurizio

    1993-01-01

    In a tethered-satellite system, two satellites travelling in different orbits are forced to circle the earth in the same time period. The lower satellite is dragged by the tether to a higher orbital speed, while the upper one tends to move higher. This generates a tension which maintains the system in a stable configuration; the tether is aligned with a radius projecting outward from the earth's center. Such a system has been demonstrated by the TSS-1 tethered satellite carried by the Space Shuttle's STS-46 mission. The dynamic and the electrodynamic behavior of the system at long tether lengths were not, however, evaluated due to system malfunctions.

  12. Tethered Spinal Cord Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... SEARCH Definition Treatment Prognosis Clinical Trials Organizations Publications Definition Tethered spinal cord syndrome is a neurological disorder caused by tissue attachments that limit the movement of the spinal cord within the ...

  13. GRASP : A Multitasking Tether

    OpenAIRE

    Catherine eRabouille; Adam eLinstedt

    2016-01-01

    Originally identified as Golgi stacking factors in vitro, the Golgi reassembly stacking protein (GRASP) family has been shown to act as membrane tethers with multiple cellular roles. As an update to previous comprehensive reviews of the GRASP family (Giuliani et al., 2011; Vinke et al., 2011; Jarvela and Linstedt, 2012), we outline here the latest findings concerning their diverse roles. New insights into the mechanics of GRASP-mediated tethering come from recent crystal structures. The model...

  14. Mast Wake Reduction by Shaping

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Beauchamp, Charles H

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to various mast shapes, in which the mast shapes minimize the production of visible, electro-optic, infrared and radar cross section wake signatures produced by water surface piercing masts...

  15. First results from MAST

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sykes, A.; Akers, R.J.; Appel, L.C.

    2001-01-01

    MAST is one of the new generation of large, purpose-built spherical tokamaks (STs) now becoming operational, designed to investigate the properties of the ST in large, collisionless plasmas. The first six months of MAST operations have been remarkably successful. Operationally, both merging-compr...

  16. Mast Cell Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Elaine Zayas Marcelino; Jamur, Maria Célia

    2014-01-01

    Since first described by Paul Ehrlich in 1878, mast cells have been mostly viewed as effectors of allergy. It has been only in the past two decades that mast cells have gained recognition for their involvement in other physiological and pathological processes. Mast cells have a widespread distribution and are found predominantly at the interface between the host and the external environment. Mast cell maturation, phenotype and function are a direct consequence of the local microenvironment and have a marked influence on their ability to specifically recognize and respond to various stimuli through the release of an array of biologically active mediators. These features enable mast cells to act as both first responders in harmful situations as well as to respond to changes in their environment by communicating with a variety of other cells implicated in physiological and immunological responses. Therefore, the critical role of mast cells in both innate and adaptive immunity, including immune tolerance, has gained increased prominence. Conversely, mast cell dysfunction has pointed to these cells as the main offenders in several chronic allergic/inflammatory disorders, cancer and autoimmune diseases. This review summarizes the current knowledge of mast cell function in both normal and pathological conditions with regards to their regulation, phenotype and role. PMID:25062998

  17. Low Mast Cell Density Predicts Poor Prognosis in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Reduces Survival in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attramadal, Cecilie Gjøvaag; Kumar, Sheeba; Gao, Jian; Boysen, Morten Ebbe; Halstensen, Trond Sundby; Bryne, Magne

    2016-10-01

    The cellular composition of the tumor microenvironment (TME) at the invading front of oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs) may reflect biologically important cancer features and host responses, and thus be related to disease progression. The TME density of mast cells (MCs), macrophages, cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and endothelial cells were quantified at the invasive front and analyzed regarding their relation to disease recurrence in patients with small T1/2N0M0 OSCCs. mRNA for MC-specific proteins were analyzed in a second patient cohort with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Samples from 62 patients with T1/2N0M0 OSCC were immunohistochemically stained and scored for the cellular expression of mast/stem cell growth factor receptor (c-KIT) (MCs), CD68 (macrophages), α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) (CAFs) and CD31 (endothelial cells) and this was analyzed according to disease recurrence. Data from The Cancer Genome Atlas database were used to examine mRNA expression profiles and clinical data of patients with 399 HNSCC. Increased MC density at the invasive front was significantly associated with reduced disease recurrence, as none of the patients with high MC density experienced relapse. Moreover, increased expression of mRNA for MC specific markers as c-KIT, and α-, β-, and δ-tryptases and the MC-stimulating factor, stem cell factor (SCF), was significantly associated with good prognosis in patients with HNSCC. Decreased MC density at the invasive front may reflect tumor biology related to disease progression and prognosis. Counting MCs seems to be an easy and practical tool, that could be utilized for prognostic evaluation. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  18. GRASP: A multitasking tether

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine eRabouille

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Originally identified as Golgi stacking factors in vitro, the Golgi reassembly stacking protein (GRASP family has been shown to act as membrane tethers with multiple cellular roles. As an update to previous comprehensive reviews of the GRASP family (Vinke et al., 2011 (Giuliani et al., 2011;Jarvela and Linstedt, 2012, we outline here the latest findings concerning their diverse roles. New insights into the mechanics of GRASP-mediated tethering come from recent crystal structures. The models of how GRASP65 and GRASP55 tether membranes relate directly to their role in Golgi ribbon formation in mammalian cells and the unlinking of the ribbon at the onset of mitosis. However, it is also clear that GRASPs act outside the Golgi with roles at the ER and ER exit sites (ERES. Furthermore, the proteins of this family display other roles upon cellular stress, especially in mediating unconventional secretion of both transmembrane proteins (Golgi bypass and cytoplasmic proteins (through secretory autophagosomes.

  19. GRASP: A Multitasking Tether.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabouille, Catherine; Linstedt, Adam D

    2016-01-01

    Originally identified as Golgi stacking factors in vitro, the Golgi reassembly stacking protein (GRASP) family has been shown to act as membrane tethers with multiple cellular roles. As an update to previous comprehensive reviews of the GRASP family (Giuliani et al., 2011; Vinke et al., 2011; Jarvela and Linstedt, 2012), we outline here the latest findings concerning their diverse roles. New insights into the mechanics of GRASP-mediated tethering come from recent crystal structures. The models of how GRASP65 and GRASP55 tether membranes relate directly to their role in Golgi ribbon formation in mammalian cells and the unlinking of the ribbon at the onset of mitosis. However, it is also clear that GRASPs act outside the Golgi with roles at the ER and ER exit sites (ERES). Furthermore, the proteins of this family display other roles upon cellular stress, especially in mediating unconventional secretion of both transmembrane proteins (Golgi bypass) and cytoplasmic proteins (through secretory autophagosomes).

  20. Modelling Tethered Enzymatic Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis Salas, Citlali; Goyette, Jesse; Coker-Gordon, Nicola; Bridge, Marcus; Isaacson, Samuel; Allard, Jun; Maini, Philip; Dushek, Omer

    Enzymatic reactions are key to cell functioning, and whilst much work has been done in protein interaction in cases where diffusion is possible, interactions of tethered proteins are poorly understood. Yet, because of the large role cell membranes play in enzymatic reactions, several reactions may take place where one of the proteins is bound to a fixed point in space. We develop a model to characterize tethered signalling between the phosphatase SHP-1 interacting with a tethered, phosphorylated protein. We compare our model to experimental data obtained using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). We show that a single SPR experiment recovers 5 independent biophysical/biochemical constants. We also compare the results between a three dimensional model and a two dimensional model. The work gives the opportunity to use known techniques to learn more about signalling processes, and new insights into how enzyme tethering alters cellular signalling. With support from the Mexican Council for Science and Technology (CONACyT), the Public Education Secretariat (SEP), and the Mexican National Autonomous University's Foundation (Fundacion UNAM).

  1. GRASP : A Multitasking Tether

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rabouille, Catherine; Linstedt, Adam D

    2016-01-01

    Originally identified as Golgi stacking factors in vitro, the Golgi reassembly stacking protein (GRASP) family has been shown to act as membrane tethers with multiple cellular roles. As an update to previous comprehensive reviews of the GRASP family (Giuliani et al., 2011; Vinke et al., 2011;

  2. Electrodynamic Tethers for Spacecraft Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Les

    2009-01-01

    Electrodynamic (Drag) Tether Thrust Principles: a) Uses both solar energy and consumes no propellant. b) Tether's orbital velocity v (approx. 7500 m/s) through North-pointing geomagnetic field B(sub north) (0.18 - 0.32 Gauss) induces voltage (35 - 160 V/km) in tether. c) Return current is through surrounding plasma. d) Current I produces a drag thrust force F on the tether. e) Magnetic force F from current I through insulated tether of length l: F = lI x B(sub north).

  3. Mast Cell Proteoglycans

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rönnberg, Elin; Melo, Fabio R; Pejler, Gunnar

    2012-01-01

    Mast cells are versatile effector cells of the immune system, contributing to both innate and adaptive immunity toward pathogens but also having profound detrimental activities in the context of inflammatory disease...

  4. Tetraspanins in Mast Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin eKöberle

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Mast cells are key mediators of the immune system, most prominently known for their role in eliciting harmful allergic reactions. Mast cell mediator release (e. g. by degranulation is triggered by Fc{epsilon}RI recognition of antigen – IgE complexes. Until today no therapeutic targeting of this and other mast cell activation pathways is established. Among possible new candidates there are tetraspanins that have been described on mast cells already several years ago.Tetraspanins are transmembrane proteins acting as scaffolds, mediating local clustering of their interaction partners and thus amplify their activities. More recently, tetraspanins were also found to exert intrinsic receptor functions. Tetraspanins have been found to be crucial components of fundamental biological processes like cell motility and adhesion. In immune cells, they not only boost the effectiveness of antigen presentation by clustering MHC molecules, they are also key players in all kinds of degranulation events and immune receptor clustering. This review focuses on the contribution of tetraspanins clustered with Fc{epsilon}RI or residing in granule membranes to classical mast cells functions but also undertakes an outlook on the possible contribution of tetraspanins to newly described mast cell functions and discusses possible drugging strategies.

  5. Electrodynamic Tethers for Spacecraft Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Les; Estes, Robert D.; Lorenzini, Enrico; Martinez-Sanchez, Manuel; Sanmartin, Juan; Vas, Irwin

    1998-01-01

    Relatively short electrodynamic tethers can use solar power to 'push' against a planetary magnetic field to achieve propulsion without the expenditure of propellant. The groundwork has been laid for this type of propulsion. NASA began developing tether technology for space applications in the 1960's. Important recent milestones include retrieval of a tether in space (TSS-1, 1992), successful deployment of a 20-km-long tether in space (SEDS-1, 1993), and operation of an electrodynamic tether with tether current driven in both directions-power and thrust modes (PMG, 1993). The planned Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System (ProSEDS) experiment will demonstrate electrodynamic tether thrust during its flight in early 2000. ProSEDS will use the flight-proven Small Expendable Deployer System (SEDS) to deploy a 5 km bare copper tether from a Delta II upper stage to achieve approximately 0.4 N drag thrust, thus deorbiting the stage. The experiment will use a predominantly 'bare' tether for current collection in lieu of the endmass collector and insulated tether approach used on previous missions. Theory and ground-based plasma chamber testing indicate that the bare tether is a highly-efficient current collector. The flight experiment is a precursor to utilization of the technology on the International Space Station for reboost application and the more ambitious electrodynamic tether upper stage demonstration mission which will be capable of orbit raising, lowering and inclination changes - all using electrodynamic thrust. In addition, the use of this type of propulsion may be attractive for future missions at Jupiter and any other planetary body with a magnetosphere.

  6. Mast cells & Company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friederike eJönsson

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Classically, allergy depends on IgE antibodies and on high-affinity IgE receptors expressed by mast cells and basophils. This long accepted IgE/FcεRI/mast cell paradigm, on which the definition of immediate hypersensitivity was based in the Gell and Coomb’s classification, appears too reductionist. Recently accumulated evidence indeed requires that not only IgE but also IgG antibodies, that not only FcεRI but also FcγR of the different types, that not only mast cells and basophils but also neutrophils, monocytes, macrophages, eosinophils, and other myeloid cells by considered as important players in allergy. This view markedly changes our understanding of allergic diseases and, possibly, their treatment.

  7. Are mast cells instrumental for fibrotic diseases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine eOvered-Sayer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF is a fatal lung disorder of unknown etiology characterised by accumulation of lung fibroblasts and extracellular matrix deposition, ultimately leading to compromised tissue architecture and lung function capacity. IPF has a heterogeneous clinical course; however the median survival after diagnosis is only 3-5 years. The pharmaceutical and biotechnology industry has made many attempts to find effective treatments for IPF, but the disease has so far defied all attempts at therapeutic intervention. Clinical trial failures may arise for many reasons, including disease heterogeneity, lack of readily measurable clinical end points other than overall survival, and, perhaps most of all, a lack of understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms of the progression of IPF.The precise link between inflammation and fibrosis remains unclear, but it appears that immune cells can promote fibrosis by releasing fibrogenic factors. So far, however, therapeutic approaches targeting macrophages, neutrophils, or lymphocytes have failed to alter disease pathogenesis. A new cell to garner research interest in fibrosis is the mast cell. Increased numbers of mast cells have long been known to be present in pulmonary fibrosis and clinically correlations between mast cells and fibrosis have been reported. More recent data suggests that mast cells may contribute to the fibrotic process by stimulating fibroblasts resident in the lung, thus driving the pathogenesis of the disease. In this review, we will discuss the mast cell and its physiological role in tissue repair and remodelling, as well as its pathological role in fibrotic diseases such as IPF, where the process of tissue repair and remodelling is thought to be dysregulated.

  8. Distinguishing Mast Cell Progenitors from Mature Mast Cells in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlin, Joakim S; Ding, Zhoujie; Hallgren, Jenny

    2015-07-15

    Mast cells originate from the bone marrow and develop into c-kit(+) FcɛRI(+) cells. Both mast cell progenitors (MCp) and mature mast cells express these cell surface markers, and ways validated to distinguish between the two maturation forms with flow cytometry have been lacking. Here, we show that primary peritoneal MCp from naïve mice expressed high levels of integrin β7 and had a low side scatter (SSC) light profile; whereas mature mast cells expressed lower levels of integrin β7 and had a high SSC light profile. The maturation statuses of the cells were confirmed using three main strategies: (1) MCp, but not mature mast cells, were shown to be depleted by sublethal whole-body γ-irradiation. (2) The MCp were small and immature in terms of granule formation, whereas the mature mast cells were larger and had fully developed metachromatic granules. (3) The MCp had fewer transcripts of mast cell-specific proteases and the enzyme responsible for sulfation of heparin than mature mast cells. Moreover, isolated peritoneal MCp gave rise to mast cells when cultured in vitro. To summarize, we have defined MCp and mature mast cells in naïve mice by flow cytometry. Using this strategy, mast cell maturation can be studied in vivo.

  9. Space Station tethered elevator system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddock, Michael H.; Anderson, Loren A.; Hosterman, K.; Decresie, E.; Miranda, P.; Hamilton, R.

    1989-01-01

    The optimized conceptual engineering design of a space station tethered elevator is presented. The tethered elevator is an unmanned, mobile structure which operates on a ten-kilometer tether spanning the distance between Space Station Freedom and a platform. Its capabilities include providing access to residual gravity levels, remote servicing, and transportation to any point along a tether. The report discusses the potential uses, parameters, and evolution of the spacecraft design. Emphasis is placed on the elevator's structural configuration and three major subsystem designs. First, the design of elevator robotics used to aid in elevator operations and tethered experimentation is presented. Second, the design of drive mechanisms used to propel the vehicle is discussed. Third, the design of an onboard self-sufficient power generation and transmission system is addressed.

  10. Mast cell and atopy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EL-HAKIM

    dermatitis (AD).36,37 In chronic rhinosinusitis, S. aureus enterotoxin B shifts the cytokine pattern toward Th2 and induces polyclonal IgE production, which might contribute to severe inflammation via the activation of the mast cells.38 In a recent study on 73 patients with moderate to severe AD, the investigators found a high ...

  11. ASI/MET Mast

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder meteorology mast casts a shadow on the lander solar array, as seen in this superpan mosaic. Looking to the southeast during the morning, the windsocks are slightly tilted, indicating the presence of a light wind from the southwest. The MET mast measured the temperature, pressure, and wind speed at the Pathfinder landing site. During the mission, the instrument returned 8.5 million individual measurements from the surface of Mars.Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The IMP was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

  12. Modeling and Control of a Tethered Rotorcraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-30

    compared to the tether sway and surge . This report models the tether using a chain of N bodies connected by spherical joints rather than using stiff...tether drag coefficient CS = tether damping coefficient Cv = viscous damping coefficient d = diameter of the tether En = n x n identity matrix FA...viscous damper with damping coefficient Cv. Visco-elastic line force is written in terms of components Δx, Δy, and Δz, of the difference vector formed

  13. Assay of mast cell mediators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rådinger, Madeleine; Jensen, Bettina M; Swindle, Emily

    2015-01-01

    regulating mast cell activation and for the identification of therapeutic approaches to block mast cell-driven disease. In this chapter, we discuss approaches used for the determination of mast cell degranulation, lipid-derived inflammatory mediator production, and cytokine/chemokine gene expression as well......Mediator release from activated mast cells is a major initiator of the symptomology associated with allergic disorders such as anaphylaxis and asthma. Thus, methods to monitor the generation and release of such mediators have widespread applicability in studies designed to understand the processes...

  14. Concurrent inhibition of kit- and FcepsilonRI-mediated signaling: coordinated suppression of mast cell activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bettina M; Beaven, Michael A; Iwaki, Shoko

    2008-01-01

    Although primarily required for the growth, differentiation, and survival of mast cells, Kit ligand (stem cell factor) is also required for optimal antigen-mediated mast cell activation. Therefore, concurrent inhibition of Kit- and FcepsilonRI-mediated signaling would be an attractive approach...... for targeting mast cell-driven allergic reactions. To explore this concept, we examined the effects of hypothemycin, a molecule that we identified as having such properties, in human and mouse mast cells. Hypothemycin blocked Kit activation and Kit-mediated mast cell adhesion in a similar manner to the well...... for a coordinated approach for the suppression of mast cell activation and provide a rationale for the development of compounds with a similar therapeutic profile....

  15. Pharmacological targeting of the KIT growth factor receptor: a therapeutic consideration for mast cell disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bettina Margrethe; Akin, C; Gilfillan, A M

    2008-01-01

    KIT is a member of the tyrosine kinase family of growth factor receptors which is expressed on a variety of haematopoietic cells including mast cells. Stem cell factor (SCF)-dependent activation of KIT is critical for mast cell homeostasis and function. However, when KIT is inappropriately...... activated, accumulation of mast cells in tissues results in mastocytosis. Such dysregulated KIT activation is a manifestation of specific activating point mutations within KIT, with the human D816V mutation considered as a hallmark of human systemic mastocytosis. A number of other activating mutations...... in KIT have recently been identified and these mutations may also contribute to aberrant mast cell growth. In addition to its role in mast cell growth, differentiation and survival, localized concentration gradients of SCF may control the targeting of mast cells to specific tissues and, once resident...

  16. Survival

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data provide information on the survival of California red-legged frogs in a unique ecosystem to better conserve this threatened species while restoring...

  17. Overview of MAST results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, I. T.; Adamek, J.; Akers, R. J.; Allan, S.; Appel, L.; Asunta, O.; Barnes, M.; Ben Ayed, N.; Bigelow, T.; Boeglin, W.; Bradley, J.; Brünner, J.; Cahyna, P.; Carr, M.; Caughman, J.; Cecconello, M.; Challis, C.; Chapman, S.; Chorley, J.; Colyer, G.; Conway, N.; Cooper, W. A.; Cox, M.; Crocker, N.; Crowley, B.; Cunningham, G.; Danilov, A.; Darrow, D.; Dendy, R.; Diallo, A.; Dickinson, D.; Diem, S.; Dorland, W.; Dudson, B.; Dunai, D.; Easy, L.; Elmore, S.; Field, A.; Fishpool, G.; Fox, M.; Fredrickson, E.; Freethy, S.; Garzotti, L.; Ghim, Y. C.; Gibson, K.; Graves, J.; Gurl, C.; Guttenfelder, W.; Ham, C.; Harrison, J.; Harting, D.; Havlickova, E.; Hawke, J.; Hawkes, N.; Hender, T.; Henderson, S.; Highcock, E.; Hillesheim, J.; Hnat, B.; Holgate, J.; Horacek, J.; Howard, J.; Huang, B.; Imada, K.; Jones, O.; Kaye, S.; Keeling, D.; Kirk, A.; Klimek, I.; Kocan, M.; Leggate, H.; Lilley, M.; Lipschultz, B.; Lisgo, S.; Liu, Y. Q.; Lloyd, B.; Lomanowski, B.; Lupelli, I.; Maddison, G.; Mailloux, J.; Martin, R.; McArdle, G.; McClements, K.; McMillan, B.; Meakins, A.; Meyer, H.; Michael, C.; Militello, F.; Milnes, J.; Morris, A. W.; Motojima, G.; Muir, D.; Nardon, E.; Naulin, V.; Naylor, G.; Nielsen, A.; O'Brien, M.; O'Gorman, T.; Ono, Y.; Oliver, H.; Pamela, S.; Pangione, L.; Parra, F.; Patel, A.; Peebles, W.; Peng, M.; Perez, R.; Pinches, S.; Piron, L.; Podesta, M.; Price, M.; Reinke, M.; Ren, Y.; Roach, C.; Robinson, J.; Romanelli, M.; Rozhansky, V.; Saarelma, S.; Sangaroon, S.; Saveliev, A.; Scannell, R.; Schekochihin, A.; Sharapov, S.; Sharples, R.; Shevchenko, V.; Silburn, S.; Simpson, J.; Storrs, J.; Takase, Y.; Tanabe, H.; Tanaka, H.; Taylor, D.; Taylor, G.; Thomas, D.; Thomas-Davies, N.; Thornton, A.; Turnyanskiy, M.; Valovic, M.; Vann, R.; Walkden, N.; Wilson, H.; van Wyk, F.; Yamada, T.; Zoletnik, S.; MAST; MAST Upgrade Teams

    2015-10-01

    The Mega Ampère Spherical Tokamak (MAST) programme is strongly focused on addressing key physics issues in preparation for operation of ITER as well as providing solutions for DEMO design choices. In this regard, MAST has provided key results in understanding and optimizing H-mode confinement, operating with smaller edge localized modes (ELMs), predicting and handling plasma exhaust and tailoring auxiliary current drive. In all cases, the high-resolution diagnostic capability on MAST is complemented by sophisticated numerical modelling to facilitate a deeper understanding. Mitigation of ELMs with resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) with toroidal mode number nRMP = 2, 3, 4, 6 has been demonstrated: at high and low collisionality; for the first ELM following the transition to high confinement operation; during the current ramp-up; and with rotating nRMP = 3 RMPs. nRMP = 4, 6 fields cause less rotation braking whilst the power to access H-mode is less with nRMP = 4 than nRMP = 3, 6. Refuelling with gas or pellets gives plasmas with mitigated ELMs and reduced peak heat flux at the same time as achieving good confinement. A synergy exists between pellet fuelling and RMPs, since mitigated ELMs remove fewer particles. Inter-ELM instabilities observed with Doppler backscattering are consistent with gyrokinetic simulations of micro-tearing modes in the pedestal. Meanwhile, ELM precursors have been strikingly observed with beam emission spectroscopy (BES) measurements. A scan in beta at the L-H transition shows that pedestal height scales strongly with core pressure. Gyro-Bohm normalized turbulent ion heat flux (as estimated from the BES data) is observed to decrease with increasing tilt of the turbulent eddies. Fast ion redistribution by energetic particle modes depends on density, and access to a quiescent domain with ‘classical’ fast ion transport is found above a critical density. Highly efficient electron Bernstein wave current drive (1 A W-1) has been achieved

  18. Immune regulation by mast cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suurmond, Jolien

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this PhD thesis is to understand mast cell (and basophil) functions and their role in autoimmune disease by focusing on three main aims: 1. To characterize the interaction between innate and Fc receptor triggers on mast cell and basophil function 2. To analyze the interaction

  19. MAST Upgrade - Construction Status

    CERN Document Server

    Milnes, Joe; Dhalla, Fahim; Fishpool, Geoff; Hill, John; Katramados, Ioannis; Martin, Richard; Naylor, Graham; O'Gorman, Tom; Scannell, Rory

    2015-01-01

    The Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST) is the centre piece of the UK fusion research programme. In 2010, a MAST Upgrade programme was initiated with three primary objectives, to contribute to: 1) Testing reactor concepts (in particular exhaust solutions via a flexible divertor allowing Super-X and other extended leg configurations); 2) Adding to the knowledge base for ITER (by addressing important plasma physics questions and developing predictive models to help optimise ITER performance of ITER) and 3) Exploring the feasibility of using a spherical tokamak as the basis for a fusion Component Test Facility. With the project mid-way through its construction phase, progress will be reported on a number of the critical subsystems. This will include manufacture and assembly of the coils, armour and support structures that make up the new divertors, construction of the new set coils that make up the centre column, installation of the new power supplies for powering the divertor coils and enhanced TF coil set, progr...

  20. Enabling Tethered Exploration on Mars Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Strong science motivations exist for exploring hard to reach terrain on Mars and the leading systems proposed to do so require tethers. While tethers are used...

  1. Mast cells can revert dexamethasone-mediated down-regulation of stem cell factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, J M; Mermelstein, C S; Tempone, A J; Borojevic, R

    2001-02-23

    Mast cell hyperplasia can be causally related with chronic inflammation and liver fibrosis. Their survival and proliferation is dependent upon locally produced growth factors, the major one being the stem cell factor (SCF). Glucocorticoids can decrease mastocytosis, down-regulating the mast cell production of pro-inflammatory factors or inhibiting the expression of SCF in stroma. We compared dexamethasone effect on SCF expression in co-cultures of mast cells with NIH/3T3 fibroblasts or with primary cultures of activated hepatic stellate cells. Dexamethasone abrogated the NIH/3T3 stroma capacity to sustain mast cell proliferation, but not of hepatic stellate cells, at the post-transcriptional level. Mast cells reverted completely dexamethasone effect on hepatic stellate cells, increasing their SCF synthesis and transport. In both models, dexamethasone inhibited the mast cell spreading on the stroma, which was thus not required for mast cell survival and proliferation. Liver pathologies associated with mast cell hyperplasia are not expected to be sensitive to glucocorticoid treatments.

  2. Mast cells in viral infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Witczak

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available  There are some premises suggesting that mast cells are involved in the mechanisms of anti-virus defense and in viral disease pathomechanisms. Mast cells are particularly numerous at the portals of infections and thus may have immediate and easy contact with the external environment and invading pathogens. These cells express receptors responsible for recognition of virus-derived PAMP molecules, mainly Toll-like receptors (TLR3, TLR7/8 and TLR9, but also RIG-I-like and NOD-like molecules. Furthermore, mast cells generate various mediators, cytokines and chemokines which modulate the intensity of inflammation and regulate the course of innate and adaptive anti-viral immunity. Indirect evidence for the role of mast cells in viral infections is also provided by clinical observations and results of animal studies. Currently, more and more data indicate that mast cells can be infected by some viruses (dengue virus, adenoviruses, hantaviruses, cytomegaloviruses, reoviruses, HIV-1 virus. It is also demonstrated that mast cells can release pre formed mediators as well as synthesize de novo eicosanoids in response to stimulation by viruses. Several data indicate that virus-stimulated mast cells secrete cytokines and chemokines, including interferons as well as chemokines with a key role in NK and Tc lymphocyte influx. Moreover, some information indicates that mast cell stimulation via TLR3, TLR7/8 and TLR9 can affect their adhesion to extracellular matrix proteins and chemotaxis, and influence expression of some membrane molecules. Critical analysis of current data leads to the conclusion that it is not yet possible to make definitive statements about the role of mast cells in innate and acquired defense mechanisms developing in the course of viral infection and/or pathomechanisms of viral diseases.

  3. Mast cell repopulation of the peritoneal cavity: contribution of mast cell progenitors versus bone marrow derived committed mast cell precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pastor Maria

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mast cells have recently gained new importance as immunoregulatory cells that are involved in numerous pathological processes. One result of these processes is an increase in mast cell numbers at peripheral sites. This study was undertaken to determine the mast cell response in the peritoneal cavity and bone marrow during repopulation of the peritoneal cavity in rats. Results Two mast cell specific antibodies, mAb AA4 and mAb BGD6, were used to distinguish the committed mast cell precursor from more mature mast cells. The peritoneal cavity was depleted of mast cells using distilled water. Twelve hours after distilled water injection, very immature mast cells could be isolated from the blood and by 48 hours were present in the peritoneal cavity. At this same time the percentage of mast cells in mitosis increased fourfold. Mast cell depletion of the peritoneal cavity also reduced the total number of mast cells in the bone marrow, but increased the number of mast cell committed precursors. Conclusions In response to mast cell depletion of the peritoneal cavity, a mast cell progenitor is released into the circulation and participates in repopulation of the peritoneal cavity, while the committed mast cell precursor is retained in the bone marrow.

  4. Mast Cells: Key Contributors to Cardiac Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott P. Levick

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Historically, increased numbers of mast cells have been associated with fibrosis in numerous cardiac pathologies, implicating mast cells in the development of cardiac fibrosis. Subsequently, several approaches have been utilised to demonstrate a causal role for mast cells in animal models of cardiac fibrosis including mast cell stabilising compounds, rodents deficient in mast cells, and inhibition of the actions of mast cell-specific proteases such as chymase and tryptase. Whilst most evidence supports a pro-fibrotic role for mast cells, there is evidence that in some settings these cells can oppose fibrosis. A major gap in our current understanding of cardiac mast cell function is identification of the stimuli that activate these cells causing them to promote a pro-fibrotic environment. This review will present the evidence linking mast cells to cardiac fibrosis, as well as discuss the major questions that remain in understanding how mast cells contribute to cardiac fibrosis.

  5. Cytoskeleton in Mast Cell Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dráber, Pavel; Sulimenko, Vadym; Dráberová, Eduarda

    2012-01-01

    Mast cell activation mediated by the high affinity receptor for IgE (FcεRI) is a key event in allergic response and inflammation. Other receptors on mast cells, as c-Kit for stem cell factor and G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) synergistically enhance the FcεRI-mediated release of inflammatory mediators. Activation of various signaling pathways in mast cells results in changes in cell morphology, adhesion to substrate, exocytosis, and migration. Reorganization of cytoskeleton is pivotal in all these processes. Cytoskeletal proteins also play an important role in initial stages of FcεRI and other surface receptors induced triggering. Highly dynamic microtubules formed by αβ-tubulin dimers as well as microfilaments build up from polymerized actin are affected in activated cells by kinases/phosphatases, Rho GTPases and changes in concentration of cytosolic Ca2+. Also important are nucleation proteins; the γ-tubulin complexes in case of microtubules or Arp 2/3 complex with its nucleation promoting factors and formins in case of microfilaments. The dynamic nature of microtubules and microfilaments in activated cells depends on many associated/regulatory proteins. Changes in rigidity of activated mast cells reflect changes in intermediate filaments build up from vimentin. This review offers a critical appraisal of current knowledge on the role of cytoskeleton in mast cells signaling. PMID:22654883

  6. Mast cells: target and source of neuropeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tore, F; Tuncel, N

    2009-01-01

    Mast cells, originating from bone marrow pluripotential cells are generally populated near to strategic locations of mammalian body. They store a wide variety of biologically active molecules in their granules and also can de novo synthesize an additional spectrum of mediators, depending on their microenvironment, phenotype and status. Mast cells have numerous receptors that can trigger a wide spectrum of cellular responses, some of them which can be preprogrammed against specific pathogens. Mast cells secrete mediators, go under total degranulation, or degranulate only some of the specific granules with required content according to the environmental conditions, pathogens or signaling molecules binding to their receptors. Mast cells are functionally multi faceted cells. A single cell can behave such as an immune cell, an endocrine cell and even as a sensorial neuron. In this context, mast cells can significantly influence inflammation, tissue remodeling, host defense and homeostasis. Specifically the mast cells proximal to nerve fibers, contain, secrete and respond to, several neuropeptides, suggesting many potential functions for mast cells in health and disease. Mast cells are target cells for neuropeptides and, they have distinct profiles of responsiveness to these molecules. This extends the flexibility of neurogenic signaling pathways via reciprocity. Those neuropeptides have direct and indirect effects on mast cells such as inducing or suppression of degranulation, triggering, modulation or amplification of mediator content and release. The exploration of interactions of mast cells and neurons is a promising field of study which may bring treatments to several diseases. Since mast cells seem to form the major link between neurons and inflammation via neuropeptides, mast cell and mast cell mediator connection may lead to a better understanding of the autocrine, paracrine, and neuro-immune-endocrine systems in physiology and physiopathology. Therefore, mast

  7. Tumor-infiltrating tryptase+mast cells predict unfavorable clinical outcome in solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Guoming; Wang, Shimin; Cheng, Pu

    2018-02-15

    The prognostic role of tumor-infiltrating tryptase + mast cells in human solid tumors remains controversial. Herein, we conducted a meta-analysis including 28 published studies with 4224 patients identified from PubMed and EBSCO to assess the prognostic impact of tumor-infiltrating tryptase + mast cells in human solid tumors. We found that tryptase + mast cell infiltration significantly decreased overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) in all types of solid tumors. In stratified analyses, tryptase + mast cell infiltration was significantly associated with worse OS in non-small cell lung cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma and 5-year survival in colorectal cancer. And these cells were inversely associated with DFS in hepatocellular and colorectal cancer. In addition, high density of intratumoral tryptase + mast cells significantly correlated with lymph node metastasis of solid tumor. In conclusion, Tryptase + mast cell infiltration leads to an unfavorable clinical outcome in solid tumors, implicating that it is a valuable biomarker for prognostic prediction for human solid malignances and targeting it may have a potential for effective treatment. © 2017 UICC.

  8. The development of human mast cells. An historical reappraisal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribatti, Domenico, E-mail: domenico.ribatti@uniba.it

    2016-03-15

    The understanding of mast cell (MC) differentiation is derived mainly from in vitro studies of different stages of stem and progenitor cells. The hematopoietic lineage development of human MCs is unique compared to other myeloid-derived cells. Human MCs originate from CD34{sup +}/CD117{sup +}/CD13{sup +}multipotent hematopoietic progenitors, which undergo transendothelial recruitment into peripheral tissues, where they complete differentiation. Stem cell factor (SCF) is a major chemotactic factor for MCs and their progenitors. SCF also elicits cell-cell and cell-substratum adhesion, facilitates the proliferation, and sustains the survival, differentiation, and maturation, of MCs. Because MC maturation is influenced by local microenvironmental factors, different MC phenotypes can develop in different tissues and organs. - Highlights: • Human mast cells originate from CD34/CD117/CD13 positive multipotent hematopoietic progenitors. • Stem cell factor is a major chemotactic factor for mast cells and their progenitors. • Different mast cell phenotypes can develop in different tissues and organs.

  9. Tether dynamics and control results for tethered satellite system's initial flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapel, Jim D.; Flanders, Howard

    The recent Tethered Satellite System-1 (TSS-1) mission has provided a wealth of data concerning the dynamics of tethered systems in space and has demonstrated the effectiveness of operational techniques designed to control these dynamics. In this paper, we review control techniques developed for managing tether dynamics, and discuss the results of using these techniques for the Tethered Satellite System's maiden flight on STS-46. In particular, the flight results of controlling libration dynamics, string dynamics, and slack tether are presented. These results show that tether dynamics can be safely managed. The overall stability of the system was found to be surprisingly good even at relatively short tether lengths. In fact, the system operated in passive mode at a tether length of 256 meters for over 9 hours. Only monitoring of the system was required during this time. Although flight anomalies prevented the planned deployment to 20 km, the extended operations at shorter tether lengths have proven the viability of using tethers in space. These results should prove invaluable in preparing for future missions with tethered objects in space.

  10. Lipid Rafts in Mast Cell Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Maria Mariano Silveira e Souza

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mast cells have long been recognized to have a direct and critical role in allergic and inflammatory reactions. In allergic diseases, these cells exert both local and systemic responses, including allergic rhinitis and anaphylaxis. Mast cell mediators are also related to many chronic inflammatory conditions. Besides the roles in pathological conditions, the biological functions of mast cells include roles in innate immunity, involvement in host defense mechanisms against parasites, immunomodulation of the immune system, tissue repair, and angiogenesis. Despite their growing significance in physiological and pathological conditions, much still remains to be learned about mast cell biology. This paper presents evidence that lipid rafts or raft components modulate many of the biological processes in mast cells, such as degranulation and endocytosis, play a role in mast cell development and recruitment, and contribute to the overall preservation of mast cell structure and organization.

  11. Hypervelocity impact experiments on tether materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabath, D.; Paul, K. G.

    Tethered systems are new and exciting means for various applications, such as the re-entry of small payloads from the space station. Due to payload mass constraints of the launch vehicle, the mass of the tethered system should be minimised. Therefore, fibres are the choice for tether materials. The probability of a severe impact into the tether is very high due its large surface area despite its small diameter. Hence, the risk of an impact of a micrometeoroid or a space debris particle cutting the tether should be investigated prior to flight. This work reports first observations of hypervelocity impact experiments on three different braided materials used for tether applications. The tether samples -- Dyneema, Kevlar and Spectra -- were tested using the plasma drag accelerator (PDA) facility of the Fachgebiet Raumfahrttechnik (LRT), Technische Universität München (TUM). An overview of the morphology of such impacts is presented. The extent of damage is compared to other materials commonly found on spacecraft. A risk assessment of an impact cutting the tether with current meteoroid and debris models and data from LDEF, Eureca and HST solar arrays, is also given.

  12. Modeling and position control of tethered octocopters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Castro Davi Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the modeling and control of a multirotor aerial vehicle with tethered configuration. It is considered an octocopter with a saturated proportional-plus-derivative position control. A viscoelastic model is considered for the tether, which has a tension control. Numerical simulations are carried out to compare the performance of the tethred configuration with the vehicle in free flight.

  13. Mobile tethering: Overview, perspectives and challengess

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Constantinescu, M.; Onur, E.; Durmus, Y.; Nikou, S.; Reuver, M. de; Bouwman, H.; Djurica, M.; Glatz, P.M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to analyze mobile tethering from technological and social perspectives. Mobile tethering allows us to share cellular data connection with others over WiFi, Bluetooth or USB. Although the technology is ready and has promising outcomes, service providers and the

  14. Investigation of force approximations in tethered cells simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Zakrisson, Johan; Axner, Ove; Andersson, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Simulations of tethered cells in viscous sub-layers are frequently performed using the Stokes drag force, but without taking into account contributions from surface corrections, lift forces, buoyancy, the Basset force, the cells finite inertia, or added mass. In this work, we investigate to which extent such contributions influence, under a variety of hydrodynamic conditions, the force at the anchor point of a tethered cell and the survival probability of a bacterium that is attached to a host by either a slip or a catch bond via a tether with a few different biomechanical properties. We show that a consequence of not including some of these contributions is that the force to which a bond is exposed can be significantly underestimated; in general by ~32-46 %, where the influence of the surface corrections dominate (the parallel and normal correction coefficients contribute with ~5-8 or 23-26 %, respectively). The Basset force is a major contributor, up to 20 %, for larger cells and shear rates. The lift force...

  15. Mast cells in human airways: the culprit?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas S. Erjefält

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available By virtue of their undisputed role in allergy, the study of airway mast cells has focused on nasal and bronchial mast cells and their involvement in allergic rhinitis and asthma. However, recent mechanistic and human studies suggest that peripheral mast cells also have an important role in asthma, as well as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, respiratory infections and lung fibrosis. Pathogenic roles include immune-modulatory, pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic activities. Importantly, mast cells also actively downregulate inflammation and participate in the defence against respiratory infections. Another complicating factor is the notorious mast cell heterogeneity, where each anatomical compartment of the lung harbours site-specific mast cell populations. Alveolar mast cells stand out as they lack the cardinal expression of the high affinity IgE receptor. Supporting the emerging concept of alveolar inflammation in asthma, alveolar mast cells shift to a highly FcϵRI-expressing phenotype in uncontrolled asthma. Site-specific and disease-associated mast cell changes have also recently been described in most other inflammatory conditions of the lung. Thus, in the exploration of new anti-mast cell treatment strategies the search has widened to include the lung periphery and the delicate task of identifying which of the countless potential roles are the critical disease modifying ones in a given clinical situation.

  16. Electrodynamic tethers for energy conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobles, W.

    1986-01-01

    Conductive tethers have been proposed as a new method for converting orbital mechanical energy into electrical power for use on-board a satellite (generator mode) or conversely (motor mode) as a method of providing electric propulsion using electrical energy from the satellite. The operating characteristics of such systems are functionally dependent on orbit altitude and inclination. Effects of these relationships are examined to determine acceptable regions of application. To identify system design considerations, a specific set of system performance goals and requirements are selected. The case selected is for a 25 kW auxiliary power system for use on Space Station. Appropriate system design considerations are developed, and the resulting system is described.

  17. Golgi GRASPs: moonlighting membrane tethers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarvela T

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Timothy Jarvela, Adam D LinstedtDepartment of Biological Sciences, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA, USAAbstract: The identification of mammalian Golgi reassembly stacking proteins (GRASPs 15 years ago was followed by experiments implicating them in diverse functions, including two differing structural roles in Golgi biogenesis and at least two distinct roles in the secretion of proteins. GRASP55 and GRASP65 are localized to cis and medial/trans Golgi cisternae, respectively. They are both required for stacking of Golgi membranes in a Golgi reassembly assay. Depletion of either GRASP from cultured cells prevents the linking of Golgi membranes into their normal ribbon-like network. While GRASPs are not required for transport of secretory cargo per se, they are required for ER-to-Golgi transport of certain specific cargo, such as those containing a C-terminal valine motif. Surprisingly, GRASPs also promote secretion of cargo by the so-called unconventional secretory pathway, which bypasses the Golgi apparatus where the GRASPs reside. Furthermore, regulation of GRASP activity is now recognized for its connections to cell cycle control, development, and disease. Underlying these diverse activities is the structurally conserved N-terminal GRASP domain whose crystal structure was recently determined. It consists of a tandem array of atypical PSD95–DlgA–Zo–1 (PDZ domains, which are well-known protein–protein interaction motifs. The GRASP PDZ domains are used to localize the proteins to the Golgi as well as GRASP-mediated membrane tethering and cargo interactions. These activities are regulated, in part, by phosphorylation of the large unstructured C-terminal domain.Keywords: GRASP, review, membrane, tether, PDZ domain, secretory chaperone, unconventional secretion

  18. The space station tethered elevator system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Loren A.

    1989-01-01

    The optimized conceptual engineering design of a space station tethered elevator is presented. The elevator is an unmanned mobile structure which operates on a ten kilometer tether spanning the distance between the Space Station and a tethered platform. Elevator capabilities include providing access to residual gravity levels, remote servicing, and transportation to any point along a tether. The potential uses, parameters, and evolution of the spacecraft design are discussed. Engineering development of the tethered elevator is the result of work conducted in the following areas: structural configurations; robotics, drive mechanisms; and power generation and transmission systems. The structural configuration of the elevator is presented. The structure supports, houses, and protects all systems on board the elevator. The implementation of robotics on board the elevator is discussed. Elevator robotics allow for the deployment, retrieval, and manipulation of tethered objects. Robotic manipulators also aid in hooking the elevator on a tether. Critical to the operation of the tethered elevator is the design of its drive mechanisms, which are discussed. Two drivers, located internal to the elevator, propel the vehicle along a tether. These modular components consist of endless toothed belts, shunt-wound motors, regenerative power braking, and computer controlled linear actuators. The designs of self-sufficient power generation and transmission systems are reviewed. Thorough research indicates all components of the elevator will operate under power provided by fuel cells. The fuel cell systems will power the vehicle at seven kilowatts continuously and twelve kilowatts maximally. A set of secondary fuel cells provides redundancy in the unlikely event of a primary system failure. Power storage exists in the form of Nickel-Hydrogen batteries capable of powering the elevator under maximum loads.

  19. Generation, isolation, and maintenance of rodent mast cells and mast cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bettina M; Swindle, Emily J; Iwaki, Shoko

    2006-01-01

    therapies for the treatment of these disease states. In vitro models of mast cell function have allowed significant progress to be made in the recognition of the fundamental principles of mast cell activation via the high-affinity IgE receptor (FcvarepsilonRI) and, more recently, other receptors expressed......Antigen-mediated mast cell activation, with subsequent mediator release, is a major initiator of the inflammatory allergic response associated with such conditions as asthma. A comprehensive understanding of the principles involved in this process therefore is key to the development of novel...... on mast cells. In addition to human mast cells, the major cell culture systems employed to investigate these responses are rat and mouse peritoneal mast cells, mouse bone-marrow-derived mast cells, the rat basophilic leukemia cell line RBL-2H3, and the mouse MC/9 mast cell line. In this unit, we describe...

  20. Tethered satellite thermal design and test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapter, John J.

    1991-01-01

    The Tethered Satellite System (TSS) is the first Shuttle Orbiter mission that investigates electrodynamic phenomenon of a 20 km conductive tether, in space. The TSS Mission is planned for January 1992. The 'Deployer' that provides the mechanisms that control a tethered satellite is mounted on a Spacelab Pallet. The Deployer thermal design uses Multilayer Insulation (MLI), heaters, and the Spacelab payload freon loop. The pallet and Deployer are isolated from the space thermal environment with MLI that forms an enclosure that is a unique part of the thermal design. This paper describes the TSS thermal design, presents the analysis approach, and details the Deployer thermal balance test.

  1. Mast cells as effectors in atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bot, Ilze; Shi, Guo-Ping; Kovanen, Petri T.

    2014-01-01

    The mast cell is a potent immune cell known for its functions in host defense responses and diseases such as asthma and allergies. In the past years, accumulating evidence established the contribution of the mast cell to cardiovascular diseases as well, in particular by its effects on atherosclerotic plaque progression and destabilization. Through its release of mediators, such as the mast cell-specific proteases chymase and tryptase, but also of growth factors, histamine and chemokines, activated mast cells can have detrimental effects on its immediate surroundings in the vessel wall. This results in matrix degradation, apoptosis and enhanced recruitment of inflammatory cells, thereby actively contributing to cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we will discuss the current knowledge on mast cell function in cardiovascular diseases and speculate on potential novel therapeutic strategies to prevent acute cardiovascular syndromes via targeting of mast cells. PMID:25104798

  2. Solar Array Mast Imagery Discussion for ISIW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgo, Gary

    2017-01-01

    SAW Mast inspection background: In 2012, NASA's Flight Safety Office requested the Micro Meteoroid and Orbital Debris (MMOD) office determine the probability of damage to the Solar Array Wing (SAW) mast based on the exposure over the life time of the ISS program. As part of the risk mitigation of the potential MMOD strikes. ISS Program office along with the Image Science and Analysis Group (ISAG) began developing methods for imaging the structural components of the Mast.

  3. Multi-Axial Simulation Table (MAST)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The MAST delivers an extensive array of testing applications providing rapid, flexible and reliable analysis for ground vehicle components and subassemblies. Using...

  4. Dynamics analysis of electrodynamic satellite tethers. Equations of motion and numerical solution algorithms for the tether

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacozy, P. E.

    1984-01-01

    The equations of motion are developed for a perfectly flexible, inelastic tether with a satellite at its extremity. The tether is attached to a space vehicle in orbit. The tether is allowed to possess electrical conductivity. A numerical solution algorithm to provide the motion of the tether and satellite system is presented. The resulting differential equations can be solved by various existing standard numerical integration computer programs. The resulting differential equations allow the introduction of approximations that can lead to analytical, approximate general solutions. The differential equations allow more dynamical insight of the motion.

  5. Numerical modelling of elastic space tethers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Kristian Uldall; Palmer, P. L.; Roberts, R. M.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper the importance of the ill-posedness of the classical, non-dissipative massive tether model on an orbiting tether system is studied numerically. The computations document that via the regularisation of bending resistance a more reliable numerical integrator can be produced. Furthermore......, the numerical experiments of an orbiting tether system show that bending may introduce significant forces in some regions of phase space. Finally, numerical evidence for the existence of an almost invariant slow manifold of the singularly perturbed, regularised, non-dissipative massive tether model is provided....... It is also shown that on the slow manifold the dynamics of the satellites are well-approximated by the finite dimensional slack-spring model....

  6. Tether as a dynamic transmission line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullahorn, Gordon E.; Hohlfeld, Robert G.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of longitudinal impulses on a satellite when a continuum tether from the Shuttle or Space Station is included is investigated. It is demonstrated that, taking the continuum nature of the tether into account, the sharp onset of a forcing impulse at the Shuttle end is perceived on board the satellite. The magnitude of the satellite response is diminished from that of the forcing impulse, and the response exhibits a broadened exponential tailoff. These are due primarily to the coupling between the tether and the satellite and its influence on an impinging impulsive wave, and not on the whole system as in the spring-mass model. The full impulse response function can be quite complex, showing repeated impulses as the tether wave bounces back and forth between the satellite and Shuttle, and having a different shape at each impingement on the satellite.

  7. FCAPD Protective Coating for Space Tethers Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Alameda Applied Sciences Corporation (AASC) proposes to demonstrate extended service lifetime of space tethers in the Low Earth Orbit (LEO) environment by using...

  8. Independent prognostic value of eosinophil and mast cell infiltration in colorectal cancer tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Hansen, Ulla; Christensen, Ib Jarle

    1999-01-01

    -assisted microscope, which allowed semi-automated quantification of cells within a fixed area. Total white cells and individual counts of eosinophils, neutrophils, mast cells, lymphocytes, and plasma cells were evaluated in every tumour specimen. Stratification into four groups with similar numbers of events was used...... age ( p=0.0003), and tumour location in the rectum predicted poor survival, while high counts of eosinophils ( p=0.006) and mast cells ( p=0.02) predicted good survival. Tumour-associated eosinophilia and mastocytosis appear to be independent prognostic variables in colorectal cancer. Future studies...... should investigate the potential biological role of tumour tissue eosinophils and mast cells in the modulation of tumour growth....

  9. The Model for Assessment of Telemedicine (MAST)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kidholm, Kristian; Clemensen, Jane; Caffery, Liam J

    2017-01-01

    The evaluation of telemedicine can be achieved using different evaluation models or theoretical frameworks. This paper presents a scoping review of published studies which have applied the Model for Assessment of Telemedicine (MAST). MAST includes pre-implementation assessment (e.g. by use...

  10. Mast cells in neuroinflammation and brain disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriksen, Erik; van Bergeijk, Doris; Oosting, Ronald S; Redegeld, Frank A

    2017-01-01

    It is well recognized that neuroinflammation is involved in the pathogenesis of various neurodegenerative diseases. Microglia and astrocytes are major pathogenic components within this process and known to respond to proinflammatory mediators released from immune cells such as mast cells. Mast cells

  11. Mast cells in lung of rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Ivanova

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a short review of scientific literature on lung mast cells in norm and pathology that shows the current state of this problem. Particular attention is paid to the quantity, location and arrangement of the mast cells. The mast cells are a part of immune system whom origin are myeloid stem cells. They are a kind of white blood cells. Many authors from the 19th century to the present day have traced and described the role of mast cells in the human body, their structure and changes depending on the functional state of the organism. Paul Ehrlich is the first author that described in his doctoral thesis the mast cells as effectors of allergy particularly in the beginning of reaction and in acute phase of the process. Research has continued through out the 20th century and researchers' efforts are primarily focused on clarifying the structure and function of mast cells and identifying their role in pathological responses in the human body. Mast cells are found in all organs, but they predominate in peripheral blood, spleen and bone marrow. There are cells in the rat skin that live for about 12 weeks, and more recent studies have found that proliferation of mature mast cells is caused by various factors.

  12. Mast Cell Quantification in Orofacial Granulomatosis | Nwizu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study points to a possible association between mast cells and orofacial granulomatosis, as oedematous area usually associated with OFG showed less numbers of mast cells. This is probably due to degranulation, releasing mediators of inflammation, which is responsible for oedema formation. Further light needs to be ...

  13. Vibration Measurements on the Frejlev Mast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Hansen, Lars Pilegaard

    The present report presents full-scale measurements on the Frejlev-mast which is a 200 meter hight guyed steel mast located 10 km. from Aalborg. The goal of the research was to investigate various techniques which could be used to estimate cable forces from vibration measurements. The cables...

  14. Mast cell distribution in normal adult skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.S. Janssens (Artiena Soe); R. Heide (Rogier); J.C. den Hollander (Jan); P.G.M. Mulder (P. G M); B. Tank (Bhupendra); A.P. Oranje (Arnold)

    2005-01-01

    markdownabstract__AIMS:__ To investigate mast cell distribution in normal adult skin to provide a reference range for comparison with mastocytosis. __METHODS:__ Mast cells (MCs) were counted in uninvolved skin adjacent to basal cell carcinomas and other dermatological disorders in adults.

  15. Laser-induced tether & spouts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delville, Jean-Pierre

    2004-03-01

    Since the seminal work of Ashkin and Dziedzic on the deformation of transparent free-surfaces induced by laser waves, the optical radiation pressure has been recognized as very appealing to locally manipulate liquid interfaces. While the first developments essentially exploited the interface bending for optical applications in adaptive lensing, radiation pressure effects have recently received renewed interest in connection with nano/bio-technologies, as a non-intrusive tool to probe microscopic surface properties of soft materials including cell stretching, or membrane and interface visco-elasticity. However, as the optical bending of a fluid interface is generally weak, these experiments were essentially limited to the linear regime in deformation. Non-linear behaviors can nevertheless be investigated using very soft transparent liquid interfaces to enhance light effects. At large optical excitation, either a large stable tether is formed, or else a break-up of the interface occurs, depending on the direction of the beam propagation. Physically, the reason for this asymmetry can be traced to whether total reflection of light at deformed interface occurs or not. Laser-induced interface instability leads to the formation of a stationary beam-centered liquid micro-jet emitting droplets, which anticipates the bases for new applications in micro-fluidics and liquid micro-spraying. On the other hand, the method can be extended to form microscopic liquid bridges of very large aspect ratio, because optical forces are able to overcome the fundamental Rayleigh-Plateau limitation. As laser-induced micro-jets, laser-sustained liquid columns are tunable in aspect ratio and adjustable in direction. Consequently, the applications range of "opto-hydrodynamic" interface instability is wide, going from micro-optics (i.e. liquid columns also behave as soft optical fibers) to micro-fluidics, as fluid transfer can be optically monitored and directed in three dimensions.

  16. Mast Cells Comprise the Major of Interleukin 17-Producing Cells and Predict a Poor Prognosis in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Jian-Fei; Pan, Hong-Ying; Ying, Xi-Hui; Lou, Jian; Ji, Jian-Song; Zou, Hai

    2016-01-01

    Abstract IL-17 and IL-17-producing cells have been found in many types of human cancers and murine models. However, the source of tumor-infiltrating IL-17 and IL-17-producing cells in HCC and the prognostic values remain poorly understood. A total of 57 HCC patients were enrolled in this study, and immunofluorescence double stain was used to evaluate the colocalization of CD3+ T cells, CD4+ T cells, CD56+ NK cells, CD20+ B cells, CD68+ Macrophages, and MCT+ mast cells with IL-17. The prognostic value of IL-17-producing cells was evaluated by Kaplan–Meier analysis and Cox regression model. MCT+ mast cells, but not other cells, were the predominant IL-17-producing cell type. Overall survival analysis revealed that the increasing intratumoral-infiltrated MCT+ mast cells were significantly associated with poor prognosis. Immunofluorescence double stain showed a positive correlation between the number of MCT+ mast cells and MCVs. These findings indicated the major IL-17-producing cells in HCC were MCT+ mast cells and these cells infiltration may promote tumor progression by angiogenesis. Increased MCT+ mast cells was associated with a poor prognosis, indicating therapy targeting MCT+ mast cells might be an effective strategy in controlling intratumor IL-17 infiltration and MCVs. PMID:27043690

  17. A Child with Tethered Cord Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bekti Safarini

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Tethered Cord Syndome (TCS refers to a group of neurological disorders related to malformations of the spinal cord, pulling of the spinal cord at the base of spinal canal. Tethered cord syndrome can be seen at any age but most often during childhood. A few children complain of diffuse pain in lower extremitiesor urological symptoms, 20% - 30 % of the patients will have a neurogenic bladder. A 9 years old girl, complained to have a flank pain and eneuresis. A mass is palpable at right flank. Ultrasound revealed duplex hydronephrosis and hydroureter with trabeculated bladder. Voiding Cystouretrography showed grade V vesicoureteral reflux (VUR and neurogenic bladder appearance. Lumbosacral MRI demonstrated tethered cord with adjacent lipoma and spina bifida (Sains Medika, 4(1:89-96.

  18. High risk of birth defects with PKU in Mast-e Ali village, Kermanshah province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keyvan Moradi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available According to the study conducted on phenylketonuria (PKU patients in Kermanshah province, there were at least 10 PKU patients in Firuzabad district. The prevalence of the disease and frequency of carriers among the population of Mast-e Ali village, a village in Firuzabad district, were calculated to be 1 in 80 and 1 in 5, respectively. This is one of the highest frequencies reported for the prevalence of PKU to date. These findings introduce Mast-e Ali village as a small region in the high risk of birth defects with PKU. It seems that consanguinity has had a major impact on these findings.

  19. Tethers in Space : A propellantless propulsion in-orbit demonstration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruijff, M.

    2011-01-01

    Space tethers are cables that connect satellites or other endmasses in orbit. The emptiness of space and the near-weightlessness there make it possible to deploy very long and thin tethers. By exploiting basic principles of physics, tethers can provide propellantless propulsion and enable unique

  20. Dynamics and offset control of tethered space-tug system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingrui; Yang, Keying; Qi, Rui

    2018-01-01

    Tethered space-tug system is regarded as one of the most promising active debris removal technologies to effectively decrease the steep increasing population of space debris. In order to suppress the spin of space debris, single-tethered space-tug system is employed by regulating the tether. Unfortunately, this system is underactuated as tether length is the only input, and there are two control objectives: the spinning debris and the vibration of tether. Thus, it may suffer great oscillations and result in failure in space debris removal. This paper presents the study of attitude stabilization of the single-tethered space-tug system using not only tether length but also the offset of tether attachment point to suppress the spin of debris, so as to accomplish the space debris removal mission. Firstly, a precise 3D mathematical model in which the debris and tug are both treated as rigid bodies is developed to study the dynamical evolution of the tethered space-tug system. The relative motion equation of the system is described using Lagrange method. Secondly, the dynamic characteristic of the system is analyzed and an offset control law is designed to stabilize the spin of debris by exploiting the variation of tether offset and the regulation of tether length. Besides, an estimation formula is proposed to evaluate the capability of tether for suppressing spinning debris. Finally, the effectiveness of attitude stabilization by the utilization of the proposed scheme is demonstrated via numerical case studies.

  1. Polyamines are present in mast cell secretory granules and are important for granule homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Faroldi, Gianni; Rodríguez, Carlos E; Urdiales, José L; Pérez-Pomares, José M; Dávila, José C; Pejler, Gunnar; Sánchez-Jiménez, Francisca; Fajardo, Ignacio

    2010-11-30

    Mast cell secretory granules accommodate a large number of components, many of which interact with highly sulfated serglycin proteoglycan (PG) present within the granules. Polyamines (putrescine, spermidine and spermine) are absolutely required for the survival of the vast majority of living cells. Given the reported ability of polyamines to interact with PGs, we investigated the possibility that polyamines may be components of mast cell secretory granules. Spermidine was released by mouse bone marrow derived mast cells (BMMCs) after degranulation induced by IgE/anti-IgE or calcium ionophore A23187. Additionally, both spermidine and spermine were detected in isolated mouse mast cell granules. Further, depletion of polyamines by culturing BMMCs with α-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) caused aberrant secretory granule ultrastructure, impaired histamine storage, reduced serotonin levels and increased β-hexosaminidase content. A proteomic approach revealed that DFMO-induced polyamine depletion caused an alteration in the levels of a number of proteins, many of which are connected either with the regulated exocytosis or with the endocytic system. Taken together, our results show evidence that polyamines are present in mast cell secretory granules and, furthermore, indicate an essential role of these polycations during the biogenesis and homeostasis of these organelles.

  2. Polyamines are present in mast cell secretory granules and are important for granule homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianni García-Faroldi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Mast cell secretory granules accommodate a large number of components, many of which interact with highly sulfated serglycin proteoglycan (PG present within the granules. Polyamines (putrescine, spermidine and spermine are absolutely required for the survival of the vast majority of living cells. Given the reported ability of polyamines to interact with PGs, we investigated the possibility that polyamines may be components of mast cell secretory granules.Spermidine was released by mouse bone marrow derived mast cells (BMMCs after degranulation induced by IgE/anti-IgE or calcium ionophore A23187. Additionally, both spermidine and spermine were detected in isolated mouse mast cell granules. Further, depletion of polyamines by culturing BMMCs with α-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO caused aberrant secretory granule ultrastructure, impaired histamine storage, reduced serotonin levels and increased β-hexosaminidase content. A proteomic approach revealed that DFMO-induced polyamine depletion caused an alteration in the levels of a number of proteins, many of which are connected either with the regulated exocytosis or with the endocytic system.Taken together, our results show evidence that polyamines are present in mast cell secretory granules and, furthermore, indicate an essential role of these polycations during the biogenesis and homeostasis of these organelles.

  3. Role of mast cells in cow metritis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang Guo-Qing; Hou Jin-Long; Huang Huan-Yu; Yuan Chao-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Bovine postpartum metritis causes great losses. Mast cell (MC)-released mediators participate in uterine inflammation and immune response, but their role in postpartum metritis in cows has not been...

  4. Mast cells and middle ear effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenfors, L E; Albiin, N; Bloom, G D; Hellström, S; Widemar, L

    1985-01-01

    The mast cell--an important component of connective tissue--carries in its cytoplasmic granules various biologically active substances, such as heparin, histamine, and a broad spectrum of enzymes. This cell type plays a prominent role in inflammatory and allergic conditions. In the middle ear, the mast cells are mainly localized in the pars flaccida of the tympanic membrane and beneath the tracts of secretory and ciliated cells in the middle ear mucosa. Degranulation of the mast cells by the histamine liberator compound 48/80 causes histamine-rich effusion material to accumulate in the middle ear. Plugging of the eustachian tube and/or tympanic isthmus will bring about a similar accumulation. It would thus seem that mast cells in some way participate in the production of middle ear effusion, probably via their potent mediators.

  5. Relating increasing hantavirus incidences to the changing climate: the mast connection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maes Piet

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nephropathia epidemica (NE, an emerging rodent-borne viral disease, has become the most important cause of infectious acute renal failure in Belgium, with sharp increases in incidence occurring for more than a decade. Bank voles are the rodent reservoir of the responsible hantavirus and are known to display cyclic population peaks. We tried to relate these peaks to the cyclic NE outbreaks observed since 1993. Our hypothesis was that the ecological causal connection was the staple food source for voles, being seeds of deciduous broad-leaf trees, commonly called "mast". We also examined whether past temperature and precipitation preceding "mast years" were statistically linked to these NE outbreaks. Results Since 1993, each NE peak is immediately preceded by a mast year, resulting in significantly higher NE case numbers during these peaks (Spearman R = -0.82; P = 0.034. NE peaks are significantly related to warmer autumns the year before (R = 0.51; P Conclusion NE peaks in year 0 are induced by abundant mast formation in year-1, facilitating bank vole survival during winter, thus putting the local human population at risk from the spring onwards of year 0. This bank vole survival is further promoted by higher autumn temperatures in year-1, whereas mast formation itself is primed by higher summer temperatures in year-2. Both summer and autumn temperatures have been rising to significantly higher levels during recent years, explaining the virtually continuous epidemic state since 2005 of a zoonosis, considered rare until recently. Moreover, in 2007 a NE peak and an abundant mast formation occurred for the first time within the same year, thus forecasting yet another record NE incidence for 2008. We therefore predict that with the anticipated climate changes due to global warming, NE might become a highly endemic disease in Belgium and surrounding countries.

  6. Tethered spacecraft in asteroid gravitational environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burov, Alexander A.; Guerman, Anna D.; Kosenko, Ivan I.; Nikonov, Vasily I.

    2018-02-01

    Relative equilibria of a pendulum attached to the surface of a uniformly rotating celestial body are considered. The locations of the tether anchor that correspond to a given spacecraft position are defined. The domains, where the spacecraft can be held with the help of such a pendulum, are also described. Stability of the found relative equilibria is studied.

  7. Ionic-Liquid-Tethered Nanoparticles: Hybrid Electrolytes

    KAUST Repository

    Moganty, Surya S.

    2010-10-22

    A new class of solventless electrolytes was created by tethering ionic liquids to hard inorganic ZrO2 nanostructures (see picture; NIM=nanoscale ionic material). These hybrid fluids exhibit exceptional redox stability windows, excellent thermal stability, good lithium transference numbers, long-term interfacial stability in the presence of a lithium anode and, when doped with lithium salt, reasonable ionic conductivities.

  8. Tethered "kiteplane" design for the Laddermill project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breukels, J.; Ockels, W.

    2005-01-01

    The Laddermill is an innovative concept for generating energy from wind using large kite-like wings on a tether. The wings are able to fly in both the regime of airplanes and kites. We therefore call these structures "kiteplanes". By providing a recurring motion with a large lift during ascending

  9. Nanomechanics of HaloTag tethers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa, Ionel; Berkovich, Ronen; Alegre-Cebollada, Jorge; Badilla, Carmen L; Rivas-Pardo, Jaime Andrés; Taniguchi, Yukinori; Kawakami, Masaru; Fernandez, Julio M

    2013-08-28

    The active site of the Haloalkane Dehydrogenase (HaloTag) enzyme can be covalently attached to a chloroalkane ligand providing a mechanically strong tether, resistant to large pulling forces. Here we demonstrate the covalent tethering of protein L and I27 polyproteins between an atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever and a glass surface using HaloTag anchoring at one end and thiol chemistry at the other end. Covalent tethering is unambiguously confirmed by the observation of full length polyprotein unfolding, combined with high detachment forces that range up to ∼2000 pN. We use these covalently anchored polyproteins to study the remarkable mechanical properties of HaloTag proteins. We show that the force that triggers unfolding of the HaloTag protein exhibits a 4-fold increase, from 131 to 491 pN, when the direction of the applied force is changed from the C-terminus to the N-terminus. Force-clamp experiments reveal that unfolding of the HaloTag protein is twice as sensitive to pulling force compared to protein L and refolds at a slower rate. We show how these properties allow for the long-term observation of protein folding-unfolding cycles at high forces, without interference from the HaloTag tether.

  10. Yielding elastic tethers stabilize robust cell adhesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt J Whitfield

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Many bacteria and eukaryotic cells express adhesive proteins at the end of tethers that elongate reversibly at constant or near constant force, which we refer to as yielding elasticity. Here we address the function of yielding elastic adhesive tethers with Escherichia coli bacteria as a model for cell adhesion, using a combination of experiments and simulations. The adhesive bond kinetics and tether elasticity was modeled in the simulations with realistic biophysical models that were fit to new and previously published single molecule force spectroscopy data. The simulations were validated by comparison to experiments measuring the adhesive behavior of E. coli in flowing fluid. Analysis of the simulations demonstrated that yielding elasticity is required for the bacteria to remain bound in high and variable flow conditions, because it allows the force to be distributed evenly between multiple bonds. In contrast, strain-hardening and linear elastic tethers concentrate force on the most vulnerable bonds, which leads to failure of the entire adhesive contact. Load distribution is especially important to noncovalent receptor-ligand bonds, because they become exponentially shorter lived at higher force above a critical force, even if they form catch bonds. The advantage of yielding is likely to extend to any blood cells or pathogens adhering in flow, or to any situation where bonds are stretched unequally due to surface roughness, unequal native bond lengths, or conditions that act to unzip the bonds.

  11. Yielding Elastic Tethers Stabilize Robust Cell Adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitfield, Matt J.; Luo, Jonathon P.; Thomas, Wendy E.

    2014-01-01

    Many bacteria and eukaryotic cells express adhesive proteins at the end of tethers that elongate reversibly at constant or near constant force, which we refer to as yielding elasticity. Here we address the function of yielding elastic adhesive tethers with Escherichia coli bacteria as a model for cell adhesion, using a combination of experiments and simulations. The adhesive bond kinetics and tether elasticity was modeled in the simulations with realistic biophysical models that were fit to new and previously published single molecule force spectroscopy data. The simulations were validated by comparison to experiments measuring the adhesive behavior of E. coli in flowing fluid. Analysis of the simulations demonstrated that yielding elasticity is required for the bacteria to remain bound in high and variable flow conditions, because it allows the force to be distributed evenly between multiple bonds. In contrast, strain-hardening and linear elastic tethers concentrate force on the most vulnerable bonds, which leads to failure of the entire adhesive contact. Load distribution is especially important to noncovalent receptor-ligand bonds, because they become exponentially shorter lived at higher force above a critical force, even if they form catch bonds. The advantage of yielding is likely to extend to any blood cells or pathogens adhering in flow, or to any situation where bonds are stretched unequally due to surface roughness, unequal native bond lengths, or conditions that act to unzip the bonds. PMID:25473833

  12. Tethered Aerostat Effects on Nearby Seismometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowman, Daniel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-12-01

    This report assesses seismic interference generated by a tethered aerostat. The study was motivated by a planned aerostat deployment within the footprint of the Dry Alluvium Geology seismic network. No evidence was found for seismic interference generated by the aerostat, and thus the e ects on the Dry Alluvium Geology sensors will be negligible.

  13. Histamine Release from Mast Cells and Basophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borriello, Francesco; Iannone, Raffaella; Marone, Gianni

    2017-01-01

    Mast cells and basophils represent the most relevant source of histamine in the immune system. Histamine is stored in cytoplasmic granules along with other amines (e.g., serotonin), proteases, proteoglycans, cytokines/chemokines, and angiogenic factors and rapidly released upon triggering with a variety of stimuli. Moreover, mast cell and basophil histamine release is regulated by several activating and inhibitory receptors. The engagement of different receptors can trigger different modalities of histamine release and degranulation. Histamine released from mast cells and basophils exerts its biological activities by activating four G protein-coupled receptors, namely H1R, H2R, H3R (expressed mainly in the brain), and the recently identified H4R. While H1R and H2R activation accounts mainly for some mast cell- and basophil-mediated allergic disorders, the selective expression of H4R on immune cells is uncovering new roles for histamine (possibly derived from mast cells and basophils) in allergic, inflammatory, and autoimmune disorders. Thus, the in-depth knowledge of mast cell and basophil histamine release and its biologic effects is poised to uncover new therapeutic avenues for a wide spectrum of disorders.

  14. Coordinated coupling control of tethered space robot using releasing characteristics of space tether

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Panfeng; Zhang, Fan; Xu, Xiudong; Meng, Zhongjie; Liu, Zhengxiong; Hu, Yongxin

    2016-04-01

    Tethered space robot (TSR) is a new concept of space robot, which is released from the platform satellite, and retrieved via connected tether after space debris capture. In this paper, we propose a new coordinate control scheme for optimal trajectory and attitude tracking, and use releasing motor torque to instead the tension force, since it is difficult to track in practical. Firstly, the 6-DOF dynamics model of TSR is derived, in which the dynamics of tether releasing system is taken into account. Then, we propose and design the coordinated coupled controller, which is composed of a 6-DOF sliding mode controller and a PD controller tether's releasing. Thrust is treated as control input of the 6-DOF sliding mode controller to control the in-plane and out-of-plane angle of the tether and attitude angles of the TSR. The torque of releasing motor is used as input of PD controller, which controls the length rate of space tether. After the verification of the control scheme, finally, the simulation experiment is presented in order to validate the effectiveness of this control method. The results show that TSR can track the optimal approaching trajectory accurately. Simultaneously, the attitude angles can be changed to the desired attitude angles in control period, and the terminal accuracy is ±0.3°.

  15. Theory and Modeling in Support of Tether

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, C. L.; Bergeron, G.; Drobot, A. D.; Papadopoulos, K.; Riyopoulos, S.; Szuszczewicz, E.

    1999-01-01

    This final report summarizes the work performed by SAIC's Applied Physics Operation on the modeling and support of Tethered Satellite System missions (TSS-1 and TSS-1R). The SAIC team, known to be Theory and Modeling in Support of Tether (TMST) investigation, was one of the original twelve teams selected in July, 1985 for the first TSS mission. The accomplishments described in this report cover the period December 19, 1985 to September 31, 1999 and are the result of a continuous effort aimed at supporting the TSS missions in the following major areas. During the contract period, the SAIC's TMST investigation acted to: Participate in the planning and the execution on both of the TSS missions; Provide scientific understanding on the issues involved in the electrodynamic tether system operation prior to the TSS missions; Predict ionospheric conditions encountered during the re-flight mission (TSS-lR) based on realtime global ionosounde data; Perform post mission analyses to enhance our understanding on the TSS results. Specifically, we have 1) constructed and improved current collection models and enhanced our understanding on the current-voltage data; 2) investigated the effects of neutral gas in the current collection processes; 3) conducted laboratory experiments to study the discharge phenomena during and after tether-break; and 4) perform numerical simulations to understand data collected by plasma instruments SPES onboard the TSS satellite; Design and produce multi-media CD that highlights TSS mission achievements and convey the knowledge of the tether technology to the general public. Along with discussions of this work, a list of publications and presentations derived from the TMST investigation spanning the reporting period is compiled.

  16. Optimal control of electrodynamic tether satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Robert E.

    Low thrust propulsion systems offer a fuel-efficient means to maneuver satellites to new orbits, however they can only perform such maneuvers when they are continuously operated for a long time. Such long-term maneuvers occur over many orbital revolutions often rendering short time scale trajectory optimization methods ineffective. An approach to multirevolution, long time scale optimal control of an electrodynamic tether is investigated for a tethered satellite system in Low Earth Orbit with atmospheric drag. Control is assumed to be periodic over several orbits since under the assumptions of a nearly circular orbit, periodic control yields the only solution that significantly contributes to secular changes in the orbital parameters. The optimal control problem is constructed in such a way as to maneuver the satellite to a new orbit while minimizing a cost function subject to the constraints of the time-averaged equations of motion by controlling current in the tether. To accurately capture the tether orbital dynamics, libration is modeled and controlled over long time scales in a similar manner to the orbital states. Libration is addressed in two parts; equilibrium and stability analysis, and control. Libration equations of motion are derived and analyzed to provide equilibrium and stability criteria that define the constraints of the design. A new libration mean square state is introduced and constrained to maintain libration within an acceptable envelope throughout a given maneuver. Optimal control solutions are achieved using a pseudospectral method that maneuver an electrodynamic tether to new orbits over long time scales while managing librational motion using only current in a wire.

  17. Independent prognostic value of eosinophil and mast cell infiltration in colorectal cancer tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Hansen, Ulla; Christensen, Ib Jarle

    1999-01-01

    Overall peritumoural inflammatory cell infiltration is a prognostic variable in solid tumours, but the survival-related impact of the individual cell types within the infiltrate has still not been fully evaluated and compared with the conventional disease classification. In the present study......-assisted microscope, which allowed semi-automated quantification of cells within a fixed area. Total white cells and individual counts of eosinophils, neutrophils, mast cells, lymphocytes, and plasma cells were evaluated in every tumour specimen. Stratification into four groups with similar numbers of events was used...... age ( p=0.0003), and tumour location in the rectum predicted poor survival, while high counts of eosinophils ( p=0.006) and mast cells ( p=0.02) predicted good survival. Tumour-associated eosinophilia and mastocytosis appear to be independent prognostic variables in colorectal cancer. Future studies...

  18. Titanium-tethered vancomycin prevents resistance to rifampicin in Staphylococcus aureus in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Rottman

    Full Text Available Rifampicin is currently recognized as the most potent drug against Gram positive implant related infections. The use of rifampicin is limited by the emergence of bacterial resistance, which is often managed by coadministration of a second antibiotic. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of soluble rifampicin in combination with vancomycin tethered to titanium metal as a means to control bacterial growth and resistance in vitro. Bacterial growth was inhibited when the vancomycin-tethered titanium discs were treated with Staphylococcus aureus inocula of ≤2×10⁶ CFU, however inocula greater than 2×10⁶ CFU/disc adhered and survived. The combination of surface-tethered vancomycin with soluble rifampicin enhanced the inhibitory effect of rifampicin for an inoculum of 10⁶ CFU/cm² by one dilution (combination MIC of 0.008 mg/L versus 0.015 mg/L for rifampicin alone. Moreover, surface tethered vancomycin prevented the emergence of a rifampicin resistant population in an inoculum of 2×10⁸ CFU.

  19. Titanium-tethered vancomycin prevents resistance to rifampicin in Staphylococcus aureus in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottman, Martin; Goldberg, Joel; Hacking, S Adam

    2012-01-01

    Rifampicin is currently recognized as the most potent drug against Gram positive implant related infections. The use of rifampicin is limited by the emergence of bacterial resistance, which is often managed by coadministration of a second antibiotic. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of soluble rifampicin in combination with vancomycin tethered to titanium metal as a means to control bacterial growth and resistance in vitro. Bacterial growth was inhibited when the vancomycin-tethered titanium discs were treated with Staphylococcus aureus inocula of ≤2×10⁶ CFU, however inocula greater than 2×10⁶ CFU/disc adhered and survived. The combination of surface-tethered vancomycin with soluble rifampicin enhanced the inhibitory effect of rifampicin for an inoculum of 10⁶ CFU/cm² by one dilution (combination MIC of 0.008 mg/L versus 0.015 mg/L for rifampicin alone). Moreover, surface tethered vancomycin prevented the emergence of a rifampicin resistant population in an inoculum of 2×10⁸ CFU.

  20. Any Defining Role of Mast Cell or Mast Cell Density in Oral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mast Cell Density in. Oral Squamous Cell. Carcinoma? Dear Sir,. I read an article by Zaidi et al. titled to “A study on assessment of mast cell (MCs) in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC)” with great interest.[1] We are concerned about ... ovarian cancer.[11] Furthermore, chymase induces apoptosis in different types of cells ...

  1. Overview of physics results from MAST towards ITER/DEMO and the MAST Upgrade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, H.; Abel, I.G.; Akers, R.J.

    2013-01-01

    New diagnostic, modelling and plant capability on the Mega Ampère Spherical Tokamak (MAST) have delivered important results in key areas for ITER/DEMO and the upcoming MAST Upgrade, a step towards future ST devices on the path to fusion currently under procurement. Micro-stability analysis of the...

  2. Overview of physics results from MAST towards ITER/DEMO and the MAST Upgrade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyer, H.; Abel, I. G.; Akers, R. J.; Allan, A.; Allan, S. Y.; Appel, L. C.; Asunta, O.; Barnes, M.; Barratt, N. C.; N. Ben Ayed,; Bradley, J. W.; Canik, J.; Cahyna, P.; Cecconello, M.; Challis, C. D.; Chapman, I.T.; Ciric, D.; Colyer, G.; Conway, N. J.; Cox, M.; Crowley, B. J.; Cowley, S. C.; Cunningham, G.; Danilov, A.; Darke, A.; de Bock, M. F. M.; De Temmerman, G.; Dendy, R. O.; Denner, P.; Dickinson, D.; Dnestrovskij, A. Y.; Dnestrovsky, Y.; Driscoll, M. D.; Dudson, B.; Dunai, D.; Dunstan, M.; Dura, P.; Elmore, S.; Field, A. R.; Fishpool, G.; Freethy, S.; Fundamenski, W.; Garzotti, L.; Ghim, Y. C.; Gibson, K. J.; Gryaznevich, M. P.; Harrison, J.; E. Havlíčková,; Hawkes, N. C.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Hender, T. C.; Highcock, E.; Higgins, D.; Hill, P.; Hnat, B.; Hole, M. J.; J. Horáček,; Howell, D. F.; Imada, K.; Jones, O.; Kaveeva, E.; Keeling, D.; Kirk, A.; M. Kočan,; Lake, R. J.; Lehnen, M.; Leggate, H. J.; Liang, Y.; Lilley, M. K.; Lisgo, S. W.; Liu, Y. Q.; Lloyd, B.; Maddison, G. P.; J. Mailloux,; Martin, R.; McArdle, G. J.; McClements, K. G.; McMillan, B.; Michael, C.; Militello, F.; Molchanov, P.; Mordijck, S.; Morgan, T.; Morris, A. W.; Muir, D. G.; Nardon, E.; Naulin, V.; Naylor, G.; Nielsen, A. H.; O' Brien, M. R.; O' Gorman, T.; Pamela, S.; Parra, F. I.; Patel, A.; Pinches, S. D.; Price, M. N.; Roach, C. M.; Robinson, J. R.; Romanelli, M.; Rozhansky, V.; Saarelma, S.; Sangaroon, S.; Saveliev, A.; Scannell, R.; Seidl, J.; Sharapov, S. E.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Shevchenko, V.; Shibaev, S.; Stork, D.; Storrs, J.; Sykes, A.; Tallents, G. J.; Tamain, P.; Taylor, D.; Temple, D.; Thomas-Davies, N.; Thornton, A.; Turnyanskiy, M. R.; M. Valovič,; Vann, R. G. L.; Verwichte, E.; Voskoboynikov, P.; Voss, G.; Warder, S. E. V.; Wilson, H. R.; Wodniak, I.; Zoletnik, S.; Zagorski, R.; MAST Team,; NBI Team,

    2013-01-01

    New diagnostic, modelling and plant capability on the Mega Ampère Spherical Tokamak (MAST) have delivered important results in key areas for ITER/DEMO and the upcoming MAST Upgrade, a step towards future ST devices on the path to fusion currently under procurement. Micro-stability analysis of the

  3. Serum Total Tryptase Level Confirms Itself as a More Reliable Marker of Mast Cells Burden in Mast Cell Leukaemia (Aleukaemic Variant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Savini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mast cell leukemia (MCL is a very rare form of systemic mastocytosis (SM with a short median survival of 6 months. We describe a case of a 65-year-old woman with aleukaemic variant of MCL with a very high serum total tryptase level of 2255 μg/L at diagnosis, which occurred following an episode of hypotensive shock. She fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of SM, with a bone marrow smear infiltration of 50–60% of atypical mast cells (MCs. She tested negative for the KIT D816V mutation, without any sign of organ damage (no B- or C-findings and only few mediator-related symptoms. She was treated with antihistamine alone and then with imatinib for the appearance of anemia. She maintained stable tryptase level and a very indolent clinical course for twenty-two months; then, she suddenly progressed to acute MCL with a serum tryptase level up to 12960 μg/L. The patient died due to haemorrhagic diathesis twenty-four months after diagnosis. This clinical case maybe represents an example of the chronic form of mast cell leukemia, described as unpredictable disease, in which the serum total tryptase level has confirmed itself as a reliable marker of mast cells burden regardless of the presence of other signs or symptoms.

  4. Recombinant ArtinM activates mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa-Lorenzi, Valéria Cintra; Cecilio, Nerry Tatiana; de Almeida Buranello, Patricia Andressa; Pranchevicius, Maria Cristina; Goldman, Maria Helena S; Pereira-da-Silva, Gabriela; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina; Jamur, Maria Célia; Oliver, Constance

    2016-07-04

    Mast cells are hematopoietically derived cells that play a role in inflammatory processes such as allergy, as well as in the immune response against pathogens by the selective and rapid release of preformed and lipid mediators, and the delayed release of cytokines. The native homotetrameric lectin ArtinM, a D-mannose binding lectin purified from Artocarpus heterophyllus seeds, is one of several lectins that are able to activate mast cells. Besides activating mast cells, ArtinM has been shown to affect several biological responses, including immunomodulation and acceleration of wound healing. Because of the potential pharmacological application of ArtinM, a recombinant ArtinM (rArtinM) was produced in Escherichia coli. The current study evaluated the ability of rArtinM to induce mast cell degranulation and activation. The glycan binding specificity of rArtinM was similar to that of jArtinM. rArtinM, via its CRD, was able to degranulate, releasing β-hexosaminidase and TNF-α, and to promote morphological changes on the mast cell surface. Moreover, rArtinM induced the release of the newly-synthesized mediator, IL-4. rArtinM does not have a co-stimulatory effect on the FcεRI degranulation via. The IgE-dependent mast cell activation triggered by rArtinM seems to be dependent on NFkB activation. The lectin rArtinM has the ability to activate and degranulate mast cells via their CRDs. The present study indicates that rArtinM is a suitable substitute for the native form, jArtinM, and that rArtinM may serve as an important and reliable pharmacological agent.

  5. Mast Cell Activation Disease and Microbiotic Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afrin, Lawrence B; Khoruts, Alexander

    2015-05-01

    This article reviews the diagnostically challenging presentation of mast cell activation disease (MCAD) and current thoughts regarding interactions between microbiota and MCs. A search for all studies on interactions between mast cells, mast cell activation disease, and microbiota published on pubmed.gov and scholar.google.com between 1960 and 2015 was conducted using the search terms mast cell, mastocyte, mastocytosis, mast cell activation, mast cell activation disease, mast cell activation syndrome, microbiome, microbiota. A manual review of the references from identified studies was also conducted. Studies were excluded if they were not accessible electronically or by interlibrary loan. Research increasingly is revealing essential involvement of MCs in normal human biology and in human disease. Via many methods, normal MCs-present sparsely in every tissue-sense their environment and reactively exert influences that, directly and indirectly, locally and remotely, improve health. The dysfunctional MCs of the "iceberg" of MCAD, on the other hand, sense abnormally, react abnormally, activate constitutively, and sometimes (in mastocytosis, the "tip" of the MCAD iceberg) even proliferate neoplastically. MCAD causes chronic multisystem illness generally, but not necessarily, of an inflammatory ± allergic theme and with great variability in behavior among patients and within any patient over time. Furthermore, the range of signals to which MCs respond and react include signals from the body's microbiota, and regardless of whether an MCAD patient has clonal mastocytosis or the bulk of the iceberg now known as MC activation syndrome (also suspected to be clonal but without significant MC proliferation), dysfunctional MCs interact as dysfunctionally with those microbiota as they interact with other human tissues, potentially leading to many adverse consequences. Interactions between microbiota and MCs are complex at baseline. The potential for both pathology and benefit

  6. Do mast cells link obesity and asthma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sismanopoulos, N; Delivanis, D-A; Mavrommati, D; Hatziagelaki, E; Conti, P; Theoharides, T C

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the lungs. Both the number of cases and severity of asthma have been increasing without a clear explanation. Recent evidence suggests that obesity, which has also been increasing alarmingly, may worsen or precipitate asthma, but there is little evidence of how obesity may contribute to lung inflammation. We propose that mast cells are involved in both asthma and obesity by being the target and source of adipocytokines, 'alarmins' such as interleukin-9 (IL-9) and interleukin-33 (IL-33), and stress molecules including corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and neurotensin (NT), secreted in response to the metabolic burden. In particular, CRH and NT have synergistic effects on mast cell secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). IL-33 augments VEGF release induced by substance P (SP) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) release induced by NT. Both IL-9 and IL-33 also promote lung mast cell infiltration and augment allergic inflammation. These molecules are also expressed in human mast cells leading to autocrine effects. Obese patients are also less sensitive to glucocorticoids and bronchodilators. Development of effective mast cell inhibitors may be a novel approach for the management of both asthma and obesity. Certain flavonoid combinations may be a promising new treatment approach. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  7. Mast cell progenitor trafficking and maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallgren, Jenny; Gurish, Michael F

    2011-01-01

    Mast cells are derived from the hematopoietic progenitors found in bone marrow and spleen. Committed mast cell progenitors are rare in bone marrow suggesting they are rapidly released into the blood where they circulate and move out into the peripheral tissues. This migration is controlled in a tissue specific manner. Basal trafficking to the intestine requires expression of α4β7 integrin and the chemokine receptor CXCR2 by the mast cell progenitors and expression of MAdCAM-1 and VCAM-1 in the intestinal endothelium; and is also controlled by dendritic cells expressing the transcriptional regulatory protein T-bet. None of these play a role in basal trafficking to the lung. With the induction of allergic inflammation in the lung, there is marked recruitment of committed mast cell progenitors to lung and these cells must express α4β7 and α4β1 integrins. Within the lung there is a requirement for expression of VCAM-1 on the endothelium that is regulated by CXCR2, also expressed on the endothelium. There is a further requirement for expression of the CCR2/CCL2 pathways for full recruitment of the mast cell progenitors to the antigen-inflamed lung.

  8. Precision tethered satellite attitude control. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline-Schoder, Robert J.

    1990-01-01

    Tethered spacecraft possess unique dynamic characteristics which make them advantageous for certain classes of experiments. One use for which tethers are particularly well suited is to provide an isolated platform for spaceborne observatories. The advantages of tethering a pointing platform 1 or 2 km from a space shuttle or space station are that, compared to placing the observatory on the parent spacecraft, vibrational disturbances are attenuated and contamination is eliminated. In practice, all satellites have some requirement on the attitude control of the spacecraft, and tethered satellites are no exception. It has previously been shown that conventional means of performing attitude control for tethered satellites are insufficient for any mission with pointing requirements more stringent than about 1 deg. This is due mainly to the relatively large force applied by the tether to the spacecraft. A particularly effective method of implementing attitude control for tethered satellites is to use this tether tension force to generate control torques by moving the tether attach point relative to the subsatellite center of mass. A demonstration of this attitude control technique on an astrophysical pointing platform has been proposed for a space shuttle flight test project and is referred to as the Kinetic Isolation Tether Experiment (KITE).

  9. Mast cells play an important role in chlamydia pneumoniae lung infection by facilitating immune cell recruitment into the airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Norika; Shimada, Kenichi; Chen, Shuang; Jones, Heather D; Alsabeh, Randa; Slepenkin, Anatoly V; Peterson, Ellena; Crother, Timothy R; Arditi, Moshe

    2015-04-15

    Mast cells are known as central players in allergy and anaphylaxis, and they play a pivotal role in host defense against certain pathogens. Chlamydia pneumoniae is an important human pathogen, but it is unclear what role mast cells play during C. pneumoniae infection. We infected C57BL/6 (wild-type [WT]) and mast cell-deficient mice (Kit(W-sh/W-sh) [Wsh]) with C. pneumoniae. Wsh mice showed improved survival compared with WT mice, with fewer cells in Wsh bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), despite similar levels of cytokines and chemokines. We also found a more rapid clearance of bacteria from the lungs of Wsh mice compared with WT mice. Cromolyn, a mast cell stabilizer, reduced BALF cells and bacterial burden similar to the levels seen in Wsh mice; conversely, Compound 48/80, a mast cell degranulator, increased the number of BALF cells and bacterial burden. Histology showed that WT lungs had diffuse inflammation, whereas Wsh mice had patchy accumulations of neutrophils and perivascular accumulations of lymphocytes. Infected Wsh mice had reduced amounts of matrix metalloprotease-9 in BALF and were resistant to epithelial integral membrane protein degradation, suggesting that barrier integrity remains intact in Wsh mice. Mast cell reconstitution in Wsh mice led to enhanced bacterial growth and normal epithelial integral membrane protein degradation, highlighting the specific role of mast cells in this model. These data suggest that mast cells play a detrimental role during C. pneumoniae infection by facilitating immune cell infiltration into the airspace and providing a more favorable replicative environment for C. pneumoniae. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  10. The emerging role of mast cells in liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarido, Veronica; Kennedy, Lindsey; Hargrove, Laura; Demieville, Jennifer; Thomson, Joanne; Stephenson, Kristen; Francis, Heather

    2017-08-01

    The depth of our knowledge regarding mast cells has widened exponentially in the last 20 years. Once thought to be only important for allergy-mediated events, mast cells are now recognized to be important regulators of a number of pathological processes. The revelation that mast cells can influence organs, tissues, and cells has increased interest in mast cell research during liver disease. The purpose of this review is to refresh the reader's knowledge of the development, type, and location of mast cells and to review recent work that demonstrates the role of hepatic mast cells during diseased states. This review focuses primarily on liver diseases and mast cells during autoimmune disease, hepatitis, fatty liver disease, liver cancer, and aging in the liver. Overall, these studies demonstrate the potential role of mast cells in disease progression.

  11. Measuring histamine and cytokine release from basophils and mast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bettina M; Falkencrone, Sidsel; Skov, Per S

    2014-01-01

    Basophils and mast cells are known for their capability to release both preformed and newly synthesized inflammatory mediators. In this chapter we describe how to stimulate and detect histamine released from basophils in whole blood, purified basophils, in vitro cultured mast cells, and in situ s...... skin mast cells. We also give an example of an activation protocol for basophil and mast cell cytokine release and discuss approaches for cytokine detection....

  12. Tethered constellation, their utilization as microgravity platforms and relevant features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napolitano, L. G.; Bevilacqua, F.

    1984-10-01

    The gravitational, thermal, and dynamic docking effects on tethered platforms were studied. The near-earth environment has gravitational effects such as g-jitters and intermittencies, g-noise, and frequency and amplitude features which may influence life science, materials processing, and fluid processes research and commercial activities. Artificial gravity is produced by minute accelerations imparted by tethers. The magnitudes of gravitational forces produced by tethers 100 and 100,000 m long at various altitudes from 463-35,786 km are calculated. Thermal analyses were performed for stainless steel and Kevlar tethers, showing the steel tether could vary 300 m in length and the polyamide 25 m during one orbit. Finally, consideration given to docking with a tethered platform revealed that the center of mass could change, which would produce, however, negligible changes in orbit and therefore gravity.

  13. Orbital oscillations of an elastic vertically-tethered satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslanov, V. S.

    2011-10-01

    The motion of a satellite in a circular orbit with respect to its center of mass is considered. The satellite bears an elastic tether system unrolled along the local vertical. The load at the end of the tether oscillates harmonically. The satellite motion under the action of the gravitational moment and the moment due to the tether tension force is studied. The bifurcation diagram is constructed and the hetero- and homoclinic separatrix trajectories are determined. Mel'nikov's method is used to study the satellite chaotic behavior near separatrices under the action of the periodic tether tension force. The results of the present paper can be used to analyze tether systems of gravitational stabilization and to study the orbital behavior of a satellite with an unrolled tether system with respect to the satellite center of mass.

  14. Vibrational Based Inspection Of A Steel Mast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Rytter, A.

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the results from a research project concerning vibrational based inspection of a 20 meter high steel mast containing well defined damages. Introductory analyses dealing with among other things evaluation of potential damage indicators and determination of accep......The aim of this paper is to present the results from a research project concerning vibrational based inspection of a 20 meter high steel mast containing well defined damages. Introductory analyses dealing with among other things evaluation of potential damage indicators and determination...

  15. Gene expression profiles in adenosine-treated human mast cells ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The role of mast cells in allergic diseases and innate immunity has been widely researched and much is known about the expression profiles of immune-related genes in mast cells after bacterial challenges. However, little is known about the gene expression profiles of mast cells in response to adenosine. Herein, we ...

  16. Distribution of mast cells in benign odontogenic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Assis Caldas Pereira, Francisco; Gurgel, Clarissa Araújo Silva; Ramos, Eduardo Antônio Gonçalves; Vidal, Manuela Torres Andion; Pinheiro, Antônio Luiz Barbosa; Jurisic, Vladimir; Sales, Caroline Brandi Schlaepfer; Cury, Patrícia Ramos; dos Santos, Jean Nunes

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of mast cells in a series of odontogenic tumors. Forty-five cases of odontogenic tumors were investigated using immunohistochemistry for mast cell triptase, and differences between groups were statistically evaluated. Mast cells were present in 96% of odontogenic tumors. Mast cells present in solid ameloblastoma were observed in the tumor stroma surrounding more solid and follicular epithelial islands, with or without squamous metaplasia. The odontogenic mixoma showed few mast cells. In odontogenic tumors with a cystic structure, the mast cells were distributed throughout all areas of the lesions, mainly in keratocystic odontogenic tumor. In addition, the total density of mast cells between all odontogenic tumors showed no significant difference (p > 0.05). A greater mast cells distribution was found in keratocystic odontogenic tumor in relation to adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (p odontogenic tumor were compared to the odontogenic myxoma (p odontogenic tumor showed a higher mean of mast cells when compared with the other tumors of the sample. Mast cells values presented by syndrome keratocystic odontogenic tumor were significantly greater than those of the sporadic keratocystic odontogenic tumor that were not associated with the syndrome (p = 0.03). Mast cells are probably one of the major components of the stromal scaffold in odontogenic tumors. We found significant differences of mast cells between syndrome nonsyndrome keratocystic odontogenic tumors, although their distribution did not seem to have any influence on the biologic behavior of benign odontogenic tumors.

  17. Quantification and Localization of Mast Cells in Periapical Lesions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: Mast cells were more in number in radicular cyst. Based on the concept that mast cells play a critical role in the induction of inflammation, it is logical to use therapeutic agents to alter mast cell function and secretion, to thwart inflammation at its earliest phases. These findings may suggest the possible role of ...

  18. Mast cells mediate neutrophil recruitment during atherosclerotic plaque progression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wezel, Anouk; Lagraauw, H Maxime; van der Velden, Daniël; de Jager, Saskia C A; Quax, Paul H A; Kuiper, Johan; Bot, Ilze

    AIMS: Activated mast cells have been identified in the intima and perivascular tissue of human atherosclerotic plaques. As mast cells have been described to release a number of chemokines that mediate leukocyte fluxes, we propose that activated mast cells may play a pivotal role in leukocyte

  19. Nano-mechanics of HaloTag Tethers

    OpenAIRE

    Popa, Ionel; Berkovich, Ronen; Alegre-Cebollada, Jorge; Badilla, Carmen L.; Rivas-Pardo, Jaime Andres; Taniguchi, Yukinori; Kawakami, Masaru; Fernandez, Julio M.

    2013-01-01

    The active site of the Haloalkane Dehydrogenase (HaloTag) enzyme can be covalently attached to a chloroalkane ligand providing a mechanically strong tether, resistant to large pulling forces. Here we demonstrate the covalent tethering of protein L and I27 polyproteins between an AFM cantilever and a glass surface using HaloTag anchoring at one end, and thiol chemistry at the other end. Covalent tethering is unambiguously confirmed by the observation of full length polyprotein unfolding, combi...

  20. Transmission Lines or Poles, Electric, MDTA High Mast lighting, High Mast Lighting along I 95, Maryland Transportation Authority High Mast Lighting poles, Published in 2011, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Maryland Transportation Authority.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — Transmission Lines or Poles, Electric dataset current as of 2011. MDTA High Mast lighting, High Mast Lighting along I 95, Maryland Transportation Authority High Mast...

  1. Chaotic motions of a tethered satellite system in circular orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, D. P.; PANG, Z. J.; Wen, H.; Yu, B. S.

    2016-09-01

    This paper studies the chaotic motions of a tethered satellite system by utilizing a ground-based experimental system. Based on dynamics similarity principle, a dynamical equivalent model between the on-orbit tethered satellite and its ground physical model is obtained. As a result, the space dynamics environment of the tethered satellite can be simulated via the thrust forces and the torque of a momentum wheel on the satellite simulator. The numerical results of the on-orbit tethered satellite show the chaotic motions of the attitude motion of mother satellite. The experiment shows that the torque of momentum wheel as a negative damping is able to suppress the chaotic motion.

  2. Electrodynamic Tether Propulsion for Spacecraft and Upper Stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Les; Gilchrist, Brian; Estes, Robert D.; Lorenzini, Rnrico; Martinez-Sanchez, Manuel; Sanmartin, Juan

    1998-01-01

    Relatively short electrodynamic tethers can use solar power to 'push' against a planetary magnetic field to achieve propulsion without the expenditure of propellant. The groundwork has been laid for this type of propulsion. Important recent milestones include retrieval of a tether in space (TSS-1, 1992), successful deployment of a 20-km-long tether in space (SEDS-1, 1993), and operation of an electrodynamic tether with tether current driven in both directions (PMG, 1993). The planned Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System (ProSEDS) experiment will use the flight-proven Small Expendable Deployer System (SEDS) to deploy a 5 km bare copper tether from a Delta II upper stage to achieve approximately 0.4 N drag thrust, thus deorbiting the stage. The experiment will use a predominantly 'bare' tether for current collection in lieu of the endmass collector and insulated tether approach used on previous missions. The flight experiment is a precursor to utilization of the technology on the International Space Station for reboost and the electrodynamic tether upper stage demonstration mission which will be capable of orbit raising, lowering and inclination changes, all using electrodynamic thrust. In addition, the use of this type of propulsion may be attractive for future missions at Jupiter.

  3. Lyapunov Orbits in the Jupiter System Using Electrodynamic Tethers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokelmann, Kevin; Russell, Ryan P.; Lantoine, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Various researchers have proposed the use of electrodynamic tethers for power generation and capture from interplanetary transfers. The effect of tether forces on periodic orbits in Jupiter-satellite systems are investigated. A perturbation force is added to the restricted three-body problem model and a series of simplifications allows development of a conservative system that retains the Jacobi integral. Expressions are developed to find modified locations of equilibrium positions. Modified families of Lyapunov orbits are generated as functions of tether size and Jacobi integral. Zero velocity curves and stability analyses are used to evaluate the dynamical properties of tether-modified orbits.

  4. Joint ASI/NASA efforts on tether flight demonstrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loria, Alberto; Harrison, James K.

    1989-01-01

    Technological and organizational aspects of joint efforts by NASA and the Italian space agency ASI to develop tethered spacecraft systems are briefly discussed. The members of the ASI/NASA Task Group for Tether Flight Demonstrations are listed; the history of Task Group activities since 1986 is reviewed; and the current status of the main projects is indicated in a series of charts. Particular attention is given to the Tether Initiated Space Recovery System, a 450-lb spacecraft with a 20-km tether scheduled for Space Shuttle or Delta II launch to a 250-km 27.5-deg circular orbit in 1992.

  5. Role of mast cells in cow metritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Guo-Qing

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Bovine postpartum metritis causes great losses. Mast cell (MC-released mediators participate in uterine inflammation and immune response, but their role in postpartum metritis in cows has not been reported. This study investigated the effect of endometrial MC on the disorder.

  6. Role of mast cells in cow metritis

    OpenAIRE

    Wang Guo-Qing; Hou Jin-Long; Huang Huan-Yu; Yuan Chao-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Bovine postpartum metritis causes great losses. Mast cell (MC)-released mediators participate in uterine inflammation and immune response, but their role in postpartum metritis in cows has not been reported. This study investigated the effect of endometrial MC on the disorder.

  7. NESREA and NCC Regulations on Telecommunication Masts ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There have been conflicting findings in studies conducted to determine whether or not electromagnetic radiations (EMR) emitted by telecommunication masts are injurious to human health and the environment. The recent imbroglio between the National Environmental Standards and Regulations Enforcement Agency ...

  8. Overview of physics results from MAST

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lloyd, B.; Akers, R. J.; Alladio, F.; Allan, S.; Appel, L. C.; Barnes, M.; Barratt, N. C.; N. Ben Ayed,; Breizman, B. N.; Cecconello, M.; Challis, C. D.; Chapman, I.T.; Ciric, D.; Colyer, G.; Connor, J. W.; Conway, N. J.; Cox, M.; Cowley, S. C.; Cunningham, G.; Darke, A.; De Bock, M.; Delchambre, E.; De Temmerman, G.; Dendy, R. O.; Denner, P.; Driscoll, M. D.; Dudson, B.; Dunai, D.; Dunstan, M.; Elmore, S.; Field, A. R.; Fishpool, G.; Freethy, S.; Garzotti, L.; Gibson, K. J.; Gryaznevich, M. P.; Guttenfelder, W.; Harrison, J.; Hastie, R. J.; Hawkes, N. C.; Hender, T. C.; Hnat, B.; Howell, D. F.; Hua, M. D.; Hubbard, A.; Huysmans, G.; Keeling, D.; Kim, Y. C.; Kirk, A.; Liang, Y.; Lilley, M. K.; Lisak, M.; Lisgo, S.; Liu, Y. Q.; Maddison, G. P.; Maingi, R.; Manhood, S. J.; Martin, R.; McArdle, G. J.; McCone, J.; Meyer, H.; Michael, C.; Mordijck, S.; Morgan, T.; Morris, A. W.; Muir, D. G.; Nardon, E.; Naylor, G.; O' Brien, M. R.; O' Gorman, T.; Palenik, J.; Patel, A.; Pinches, S. D.; Price, M. N.; Roach, C. M.; Rozhansky, V.; Saarelma, S.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Saveliev, A.; Scannell, R.; Sharapov, S. E.; Shevchenko, V.; Shibaev, S.; Stork, D.; Storrs, J.; Suttrop, W.; Sykes, A.; Tamain, P.; Taylor, D.; Temple, D.; Thomas-Davies, N.; Thornton, A.; Turnyanskiy, M. R.; Valovic, M.; Vann, R. G. L.; Voss, G.; Walsh, M. J.; Warder, S. E. V.; Wilson, H. R.; Windridge, M.; Wisse, M.; Zoletnik, S.

    2011-01-01

    Major developments on the Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST) have enabled important advances in support of ITER and the physics basis of a spherical tokamak (ST) based component test facility (CTF), as well as providing new insight into underlying tokamak physics. For example, L-H transition studies

  9. Mast cell-derived mediators promote murine neutrophil effector functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doener, Fatma; Michel, Anastasija; Reuter, Sebastian; Friedrich, Pamela; Böhm, Livia; Relle, Manfred; Codarri, Laura; Tenzer, Stefan; Klein, Matthias; Bopp, Tobias; Schmitt, Edgar; Schild, Hansjörg; Radsak, Markus Philipp; Taube, Christian; Stassen, Michael; Becker, Marc

    2013-10-01

    Mast cells are able to trigger life-saving immune responses in murine models for acute inflammation. In such settings, several lines of evidence indicate that the rapid and protective recruitment of neutrophils initiated by the release of mast cell-derived pro-inflammatory mediators is a key element of innate immunity. Herein, we investigate the impact of mast cells on critical parameters of neutrophil effector function. In the presence of activated murine bone marrow-derived mast cells, neutrophils freshly isolated from bone marrow rapidly lose expression of CD62L and up-regulate CD11b, the latter being partly driven by mast cell-derived TNF and GM-CSF. Mast cells also strongly enhance neutrophil phagocytosis and generation of reactive oxygen species. All these phenomena partly depend on mast cell-derived TNF and to a greater extend on GM-CSF. Furthermore, spontaneous apoptosis of neutrophils is greatly diminished due to the ability of mast cells to deliver antiapoptotic GM-CSF. Finally, we show in a murine model for acute lung inflammation that neutrophil phagocytosis is impaired in mast cell-deficient Kit (W-sh) /Kit (W-sh) mice but can be restored upon mast cell engraftment. Thus, a previously underrated feature of mast cells is their ability to boost neutrophil effector functions in immune responses.

  10. Expression of the MAST family of serine/threonine kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Patrick; Quraishe, Shmma; French, Pim; O'Connor, Vincent

    2008-02-21

    The Microtubule-Associated Serine/Threonine Kinase family (MAST1-4, and MAST-like) is characterised by the presence of a serine/threonine kinase domain and a postsynaptic density protein-95/discs large/zona occludens-1 domain (PDZ). This latter domain gives the MAST family the capacity to scaffold its own kinase activity. In the present study we have profiled the mRNA for each member of the MAST family transcripts across various tissues, with particular focus on rodent brain. Reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) has shown equivalent patterns of expression for MAST1 and 2 in multiple tissues. Both MAST3 and 4 show more distinct expression in several tissues, and MAST-like appears to be predominantly expressed in heart and testis. In situ hybridisation reveals overlapping expression of MAST1 and 2 in specific brain regions. In contrast, MAST3 shows selective expression in the striatum and cerebral cortex. MAST4 also exhibits distinct expression in oligodendrocytes of white matter containing brain regions. In keeping with previous results, this family member also shows increased expression in the hippocampus following seizure-like activity. Our analysis of MAST family expression provides support for the role of these kinases in a broad range of neural functions.

  11. Mast cell progenitors: origin, development and migration to tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlin, Joakim S; Hallgren, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells in tissues are developed from mast cell progenitors emerging from the bone marrow in a process highly regulated by transcription factors. Through the advancement of the multicolor flow cytometry technique, the mast cell progenitor population in the mouse has been characterized in terms of surface markers. However, only cell populations with enriched mast cell capability have been described in human. In naïve mice, the peripheral tissues have a constitutive pool of mast cell progenitors. Upon infections in the gut and in allergic inflammation in the lung, the local mast cell progenitor numbers increase tremendously. This review focuses on the origin and development of mast cell progenitors. Furthermore, the evidences for cells and molecules that govern the migration of these cells in mice in vivo are described. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Dynamic control of the space tethered system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malashin, A. A.; Smirnov, N. N.; Bryukvina, O. Yu.; Dyakov, P. A.

    2017-02-01

    We discuss the problem of simultaneous dynamical stabilization and suppression of transverse and longitudinal vibrations of the space tethered system deployed along a certain trajectory. The dynamics of the system is described by a system of nonlinear partial differential equations for the longitudinal and transverse waves and we consider a non-classical version of the problem with one moving boundary. We formulate a mathematical model and perform the analytic and numerical analysis of the boundary control problem based on the Lyapunov method. A scheme of the deployment mechanism is suggested. It includes a control torque and transverse displacement of the boundary and ensures stable deployment of the whole system.

  13. Mast cells and IgE in defense against venoms: Possible “good side” of allergy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen J. Galli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Physicians think of mast cells and IgE primarily in the context of allergic disorders, including fatal anaphylaxis. This ‘bad side’ of mast cells and IgE is so well accepted that it can be difficult to think of them in other contexts, particularly those in which they may have beneficial functions. However, there is evidence that mast cells and IgE, as well as basophils (circulating granulocytes whose functions partially overlap with those of mast cells, can contribute to host defense as components of adaptive type 2 immune responses to helminths, ticks and certain other parasites. Accordingly, allergies often are conceptualized as “misdirected” type 2 immune responses, in which IgE antibodies are produced against any of a diverse group of apparently harmless antigens, as well as against components of animal venoms. Indeed, certain unfortunate patients who have become sensitized to venoms develop severe IgE-associated allergic reactions, including fatal anaphylaxis, upon subsequent venom exposure. In this review, we will describe evidence that mast cells can enhance innate resistance to reptile or arthropod venoms during a first exposure to such venoms. We also will discuss findings indicating that, in mice which survive an initial encounter with venom, acquired type 2 immune responses, IgE antibodies, the high affinity IgE receptor (FcɛRI, and mast cells can contribute to acquired resistance to the lethal effects of both honeybee venom and Russell's viper venom. These findings support the hypothesis that mast cells and IgE can help protect the host against venoms and perhaps other noxious substances.

  14. Generation, isolation, and maintenance of human mast cells and mast cell lines derived from peripheral blood or cord blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rådinger, Madeleine; Jensen, Bettina M; Kuehn, Hye Sun

    2010-01-01

    conducted in rodent mast cells. However, to understand how these responses pertain to human disease, and to investigate and develop novel therapies for the treatment of human mast cell-driven disease, human mast cell models may have greater relevance. Recently, a number of systems have been developed......Antigen-mediated mast cell activation is a pivotal step in the initiation of allergic disorders including anaphylaxis and atopy. To date, studies aimed at investigating the mechanisms regulating these responses, and studies designed to identify potential ways to prevent them, have primarily been...... to allow investigators to readily obtain sufficient quantities of human mast cells to conduct these studies. These mast cells release the appropriate suite of inflammatory mediators in response to known mast cell activators including antigen. These systems have also been employed to examine the signaling...

  15. Tether enabled spacecraft systems for ultra long wavelength radio astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemmer, Thomas; Yoder, Christopher D.; Reedy, Jacob; Mazzoleni, Andre P.

    2017-09-01

    This paper describes a proposed CubeSat mission to perform unique experiments involving interferometry and tether dynamics. A 3U CubeSat is to be placed in orbit where it will separate into three 1U CubeSats connected by a total of 100 m of tether. The separation between the three units will allow for the demonstration of high resolution radio interferometry. The increased resolution will provide access to the Ultra-Long Wavelength (ULW) scale of the electromagnetic spectrum, which is largely unexplored. During and after completion of the primary experiment, the CubeSat will be able to gather data on tethered dynamics of a space vehicle. Maneuvers to be performed and studied include direct testing of tether deployment and tethered formation flying. Tether deployment is a vital area where more data is needed as this is the phase where many tethered missions have experienced complications and failures. There are a large number of complex dynamical responses predicted by the theory associated with the deployment of an orbiting tethered system. Therefore, it is imperative to conduct an experiment that provides data on what dynamic responses actually occur.

  16. Climber Motion Optimization for the Tethered Space Elevator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Williams, P.; Ockels, W.J.

    The tethered space elevator could provide a revolutionary means for enabling cheap transportation to geostationary altitude and beyond. Assuming that such a system can be built, one of the dynamic design problems is determining a means of moving the elevator along the tether so as to minimize the

  17. Effects tethering feeding management system on carcass, organ ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sixteen (16) growing West African dwarf goats comprising eight bucks and eight does aged between 8 – 12 months were used in this study to monitor the effect of periodic tethering ... The tethered goats in treatment group T 1 showed higher weight values of the liver (0.95 + 0.1 kg) and kidneys weight of (0.42 + 0.17 kg).

  18. Tethered Contactless Mobile Nuclear Environment Monitoring Robot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, S. Y.; Lee, E. S.; Lee, Kun J.; Kim, Su H.; Rim, C. T. [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    In fact, the nuclear environment monitoring is significantly crucial for early detection of NPP accident, radiological emergency, the estimation of radiation exposure to nearby residents as well as the long term radioactivity. In the UAE, the nuclear environment monitoring is, however, quite challenging because sampling locations are far from NPPs and the outdoor temperature and humidity are very high for NPP workers to collect soil, air, and water samples. Therefore, nuclear environment monitoring robots (Nubos) are strongly needed for the NPPs in the UAE. The Nubos can be remotely controlled to collect samples in extreme environment instead of NPP workers. Moreover, the Nubos can be unmanned ground vehicles (UGVs), unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and unmanned marine vehicles (UMVs) to collect soil, air, and water samples, respectively. In this paper, the prototype development of UGV type Nubos using power cable for a long distance power delivery, called Tethered contactless mobile Nubo is introduced and validated by experiments. In this paper, the prototype development of Tethered Contactless Mobile (TeCoM) Nubo, which can be powered continuously within several km distance and avoid tangled cable, and the indoor test are finished. As further works, outdoor demonstration and a grand scale R and D proposal of practical Nubo will be proceeded.

  19. A space tethered towing method using tension and platform thrusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Zhongjie; Wang, Bingheng; Huang, Panfeng

    2017-01-01

    Orbit maneuver via tether is a promising countermeasure for space debris removal and satellite orbit transfer. A space tethered towing method is explored that utilizes thrust to fulfill transfer and bounded tension to stabilize tether heading. For this purpose, a time-energy optimal orbit is designed by Gauss pseudospectral method. The theoretical attitude commands are obtained by equilibria analysis. An effective attitude control strategy is presented where the commands are optimized first and then feedback controller is designed. To deal with the underactuated problem with tension constraint, hierarchical sliding mode theory is employed and an adaptive anti-windup module is added to mitigate the actuator saturation. Simulation results show that the target is towed effectively by the thrusts, and a smooth tracking for the commands of tether length and in-plane tether heading is guaranteed by the bounded tension. In addition, the designed controller also presents appreciable robustness to model error and determination error.

  20. Granule maturation in mast cells: histamine in control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallgren, Jenny; Gurish, Michael F

    2014-01-01

    Mast cells are derived from committed progenitors that originate in the BM. They mature into histochemically distinguishable, metachromatic mast cells containing numerous cytoplasmic secretory granules. Accumulating evidence demonstrates that mast cell granule maturation is very tightly regulated by many factors including different granule components such as proteoglycans. In this issue of the European Journal of Immunology, Nakazawa et al. [Eur. J. Immunol. 2014. 44: 204-214] highlight a role for mast cell derived histamine as another factor critical for mast cell maturation. Using histidine decarboxylase (HDC) deficient mice that are unable to make histamine, they show poorly formed secretory granules and decreased secretory granule protease expression in peritoneal mast cells. Co-culturing BM-derived mast cells with fibroblasts normally drives granule maturation, but HDC-deficient BM-derived mast cells fail to do so. Exogenously provided histamine partly restores granule differentiation as evidenced by increased tryptase and chymase activity, and this is histamine receptor type H4 -dependent. However, H4 -deficient mice have intact granule formation in peritoneal mast cells, suggesting that when HDC is functional, the intrinsic histamine production is sufficient for most granule maturation processes and H4 is dispensable. This study highlights the role of histamine in the regulation of mast cell maturation, although the cytosolic target remains unknown. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Proposed Mechanisms of Tethered Antimicrobial Peptide Chrysophsin-1 as a Function of Tether Length Using QCM-D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozeau, Lindsay D; Alexander, Todd E; Camesano, Terri A

    2015-10-15

    Rising antibiotic resistance has led to a call for the development of alternative antibiotics. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are promising, but their potential has not been fully explored because of toxicity and lack of stability in vivo. Multiple recent studies have focused on surface immobilization of AMPs to maximize antimicrobial activity and stability while mitigating toxicity. We covalently tethered cysteine-modified chrysophsin-1 (C-CHY1) via PEG of three molecular weights, 866, 2000, and 7500. Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) was used to characterize thickness and grafting density of tethered C-CHY1, which were related to its activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli and found to be important in determining mechanisms leading to activity. The PEG 866 tether promoted an antimicrobial mechanism that caused displacement of positive cations from bacterial membranes. The PEG 7500 tether maintained C-CHY1's ability to effectively form membrane pores, promoting the highest activity. When AMP was tethered with PEG 2000, antimicrobial activity was limited, apparently because neither mechanism of AMP activity was able to occur with this tether. Using QCM-D, we calculated thickness and density of PEG-tethered C-CHY1 and correlated it with antimicrobial effectiveness to determine the mechanisms by which tethered C-CHY1 acts against bacteria.

  2. Spectrum of mast cell activation disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petra, Anastasia I; Panagiotidou, Smaro; Stewart, Julia M; Conti, Pio; Theoharides, Theoharis C

    2014-06-01

    Mast cell (MC) activation disorders present with multiple symptoms including flushing, pruritus, hypotension, gastrointestinal complaints, irritability, headaches, concentration/memory loss and neuropsychiatric issues. These disorders are classified as: cutaneous and systemic mastocytosis with a c-kit mutation and clonal MC activation disorder, allergies, urticarias and inflammatory disorders and mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS), idiopathic urticaria and angioedema. MCs are activated by IgE, but also by cytokines, environmental, food, infectious, drug and stress triggers, leading to secretion of multiple mediators. The symptom profile and comorbidities associated with these disorders, such as chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia, are confusing. We propose the use of the term 'spectrum' and highlight the main symptoms, useful diagnostic tests and treatment approaches.

  3. Changes in Polymeric Tether Properties Due to Atomic Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finckenor, Miria M.; Vaughn, Jason A.; Watts, Edward W.

    2003-01-01

    The Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System (ProSEDS) mission is designed to provide an on-orbit demonstration of the electrodynamic propulsion capabilities of tethers in space. The ProSEDS experiment will be a secondary payload on a Delta II unmanned expendable booster. A 5-km conductive tether is attached to the Delta II second stage and collects current fiom the low Earth orbit (LEO) plasma to facilitate de-orbit of the spent stage. The conductive tether is attached to a 10-km non-conductive tether, which is then attached to an endmass containing several scientific instruments. Atomic oxygen (AO) erodes most organic materials. As the orbit of the Delta II second stage decas, the AO flux (atoms/sq cm sec) increases. A nominal AO fluence of 1 x l0(exp 21) atoms/sq cm was agreed upon by the investigators as an adequate level for evaluating the performance of the tether materials. A test series was performed to determine the effect of atomic oxygen (AO) on the mechanical integrity and possible strength loss of ProSEDS tether materials. The tether materials in this study were Dyneema, an ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene material used as the non-conducting portion of the ProSEDS tether, and the Kevlar core strength fiber used in the conductive tether. Samples of Dyneema and Kevlar were exposed to various levels of atomic oxygen up to 1.07 x 10(exp 21) atoms/sq cm in the Marshall Space Flight Center Atomic Oxygen Beam Facility (AOBF). Changes in mass were noted after AO exposure. The tethers were then tensile-tested until failure. AO affected both the Dyneema and Kevlar tether material strength. Dyneema exposed to 1.07 x 10(exp 21) atoms/sq cm of atomic oxygen failed due to normal handling when removed fiom the AOBF and was not tensile-tested. Another test series was performed to determine the effect of AO on the electrical properties of the ProSEDS conductive tether. The conductive tether consists of seven individually coated strands of 28 AWG 1350

  4. Assessing Tether Anchor Labeling and Usability in Pickup Trucks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinich, Kathleen D; Manary, Miriam A; Malik, Laura A; Flannagan, Carol A; Jermakian, Jessica S

    2017-10-30

    Investigate vehicle factors associated with child restraint tether use and misuse in pickup trucks and evaluate four labeling interventions designed to educate consumers on proper tether use. Volunteer testing was performed with 24 subjects and four different pickup trucks. Each subject performed eight child restraint installations among the four pickups using two forward-facing restraints: a Britax Marathon G4.1 and an Evenflo Triumph. Vehicles were selected to represent four different implementations of tether anchors among pickups: plastic loop routers (Chevrolet Silverado), webbing routers (Ram), back wall anchors (Nissan Frontier), and webbing routers plus metal anchors (Toyota Tundra). Interventions included a diagram label, QR Code linked to video instruction, coordinating text label, and contrasting text tag. Subjects used the child restraint tether in 93 percent of trials. However, tether use was completely correct in only 9 percent of trials. An installation was considered functional if the subject attached the tether to a tether anchor and had a tight installation (ignoring routing and head restraint position); 28 percent of subjects achieved a functional installation. The most common installation error was attaching the tether hook to the anchor/router; directly behind the child restraint (near the top of the seatback) rather than placing the tether through the router and attaching it to the anchor in the adjacent seating position. The Nissan Frontier, with the anchor located on the back wall of the cab, had the highest rate of correct installations but also had the highest rate of attaching the tether to components other than the tether anchor (seat adjustor, child restraint storage hook, around head restraint). None of the labeling interventions had a significant effect on correct installation; not a single subject scanned the QR Code to access the video instruction. Subjects with the most successful installations spent extensive time reviewing the

  5. Overview of recent physics results from MAST

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirk, A.; Adamek, J.; Akers, R.J.

    2017-01-01

    New results from MAST are presented that focus on validating models in order to extrapolate to future devices. Measurements during start-up experiments have shown how the bulk ion temperature rise scales with the square of the reconnecting field. During the current ramp-up, models are not able to...... kink response minimised. The mitigation of intrinsic error fields with toroidal mode number n > 1 has been shown to be important for plasma performance....

  6. The role of mast cells in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swetha Gudiseva

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The mast cells are initial effective lineage in both humoral and adaptive immunity. They are ubiquitous in skin, mucosa, and in function. They contain biologically essential and dynamic mediators in healthy and harmful conditions of tissue. Mast cell malfunctioning could be attributed to various chronic allergic diseases. Considerately, emerging evidence of mast cell involvement in various cancers shows them to have both positive and negative roles in tumour growth. It mostly indulges in tumour progression and metastasis via angiogenesis, extracellular matrix degradation, and mitogenic activity in the tumour microenvironment. The current paper reviewed research papers on mast cells in oral squamous cell carcinoma through the PubMed database from 1980 to the present date. The present paper is an attempt to summarise the research reports on the role of mast cells in oral squamous cell carcinoma. Further to this note, this paper also outlines the role of mast cells in normal physiological processes and tumour biology.

  7. The validity of the Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test (MAST)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storgaard, H; Nielsen, S D; Gluud, C

    1994-01-01

    This review examines the validity of the Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test (MAST) as a screening instrument for alcohol problems. Studies that compare the MAST-questionnaire with other defined diagnostic criteria of alcohol problems were retrieved through MEDLINE and a cross-bibliographic check....... A total of 20 validity studies were included. The studies varied considerably regarding the prevalence of alcohol problems, the diagnostic criteria, and the examined patient categories. The MAST compared with other diagnostic criteria of alcohol problems gave validity measures with the following span...... and the specificities show substantial variations. The variables that seem to have the largest influence on the PVpos seem to be the prevalence of alcohol problems, the diagnostic method against which the MAST-questionnaire is validated, and the populations on which the MAST is applied. The MAST should in the future...

  8. The complexity of the complicity of mast cells in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nechushtan, Hovav

    2010-05-01

    Mast cells are evolutionarly ancient cells of the immune cells which can secrete a variety of effector molecules. Animal and pathologic studies suggest that mast cells may promote tumor growth in some cancer types but may act in an opposite manner in others. In several mouse models a critical role of mast cells for tumor promotion was demonstrated. In humans mast cells are dependent upon the tyrosine kinase receptor c-Kit. This receptor is inhibited by many of the new anti-cancer tyrosine kinase inhibitors including Pazopanib, Imatinib and Masitinib. These drugs probably ablate some tumor mast cells, in addition to their other known antitumor effects. Understanding the complex roles of mast cells in cancer should aid in understanding mechanisms of current tyrosine kinase inhibitors, and the development of innovative anti-cancer therapies. 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Quantifying mast cells in bladder pain syndrome by immunohistochemical analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, M.S.; Mortensen, S.; Nordling, J.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To evaluate a simple method for counting mast cells, thought to have a role in the pathophysiology of bladder pain syndrome (BPS, formerly interstitial cystitis, a syndrome of pelvic pain perceived to be related to the urinary bladder and accompanied by other urinary symptoms, e. g....... frequency and nocturia), as > 28 mast cells/mm(2) is defined as mastocytosis and correlated with clinical outcome. PATIENTS AND METHODS The current enzymatic staining method (naphtolesterase) on 10 mu m sections for quantifying mast cells is complicated. In the present study, 61 patients had detrusor...... sections between, respectively. Mast cells were counted according to a well-defined procedure. RESULTS The old and the new methods, on 10 and 3 mu m sections, showed a good correlation between mast cell counts. When using tryptase staining and 3 mu m sections, the mast cell number correlated well...

  10. Project 'VOLCANO': Electronics of tethered satellite system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savich, N. A.

    The main goal of the 'VOLCANO' project developed jointly by the Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics and space concern 'ENERGIA' is experimental investigation of the current-voltage characteristics of the 'Collector-Boom-Emitter' system simulating the long Tethered Satellite System (TSS) in the real space flight conditions on the transport ship 'PROGRESS'. These measurements will allow scientists to determine the attainable current values for different combinations of collectors and emitters (passive metallic sphere, thermocathode, hollow cathodes and show up some prospects of active TSS. The report is concerned with the concept, purpose and tasks of the project, the planned set up of the measurement equipment on the 'PROGRESS' ship and in the container extended on the deployable 100 m long boom end.

  11. Central nervous system mast cells in peripheral inflammatory nociception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellmeier Wilfried

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Functional aspects of mast cell-neuronal interactions remain poorly understood. Mast cell activation and degranulation can result in the release of powerful pro-inflammatory mediators such as histamine and cytokines. Cerebral dural mast cells have been proposed to modulate meningeal nociceptor activity and be involved in migraine pathophysiology. Little is known about the functional role of spinal cord dural mast cells. In this study, we examine their potential involvement in nociception and synaptic plasticity in superficial spinal dorsal horn. Changes of lower spinal cord dura mast cells and their contribution to hyperalgesia are examined in animal models of peripheral neurogenic and non-neurogenic inflammation. Results Spinal application of supernatant from activated cultured mast cells induces significant mechanical hyperalgesia and long-term potentiation (LTP at spinal synapses of C-fibers. Lumbar, thoracic and thalamic preparations are then examined for mast cell number and degranulation status after intraplantar capsaicin and carrageenan. Intradermal capsaicin induces a significant percent increase of lumbar dural mast cells at 3 hours post-administration. Peripheral carrageenan in female rats significantly increases mast cell density in the lumbar dura, but not in thoracic dura or thalamus. Intrathecal administration of the mast cell stabilizer sodium cromoglycate or the spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk inhibitor BAY-613606 reduce the increased percent degranulation and degranulated cell density of lumbar dural mast cells after capsaicin and carrageenan respectively, without affecting hyperalgesia. Conclusion The results suggest that lumbar dural mast cells may be sufficient but are not necessary for capsaicin or carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia.

  12. Windkraftanlage mit einem höhenverstellbaren Mast

    OpenAIRE

    Stammler, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Source: DE102013215852A1 [DE] Die Erfindung betrifft eine Windkraftanlage (1) mit einem hoehenverstellbaren Mast (2) fuer einen drehbar gelagerten Rotor (5), wobei der hoehenverstellbare Mast (2) zumindest einen oberen (4) sowie einen unteren Mastteil (3) und zumindest eine Betriebsstellung und eine weitere Stellung aufweist. Des Weiteren umfasst die Windkraftanlage eine Druckvorrichtung fuer eine pneumatische oder hydraulische Hoehenverstellung des Mastes (2) sowie einen Drucksensor (11) zum...

  13. Interaction of the Space Shuttle on-orbit autopilot with tether dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Edward V.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of Orbiter flight control on tether dynamics is studied by simulation. Open-loop effects of Orbiter jet firing on tether dynamics are shown, and the potential for closed-loop interaction between tether dynamics and Orbiter flight control is determined. The significance of these effects on Orbiter flight control and tether control is assessed.

  14. Mast cells in human and experimental cardiometabolic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Guo-Ping; Bot, Ilze; Kovanen, Petri T

    2015-11-01

    Mast cells, like many other types of inflammatory cell, perform pleiotropic roles in cardiometabolic diseases such as atherosclerosis, abdominal aortic aneurysms, obesity, and diabetes mellitus, as well as complications associated with these diseases. Low numbers of mast cells are present in the heart, aorta, and adipose tissue of healthy humans, but patients with cardiometabolic diseases and animals with experimentally-induced cardiometabolic pathologies have high numbers of mast cells with increased activity in the affected tissues. Mediators released by the activated mast cells, such as chemokines, cytokines, growth factors, heparin, histamine, and proteases, not only function as biomarkers of cardiometabolic diseases, but might also directly contribute to the pathogenesis of such diseases. Mast-cell mediators impede the functions of vascular cells, the integrity of the extracellular matrix, and the activity of other inflammatory cells, thereby contributing to the pathobiology of the conditions at multiple levels. In mouse models, mast-cell activation aggravates the progression of various cardiometabolic pathologies, whereas a genetic deficiency or pharmacological stabilization of mast cells, or depletion or inhibition of specific mast-cell mediators, tends to delay the progression of such conditions. Pharmacological inhibition of mast-cell activation or their targeted effector functions offers potential novel therapeutic strategies for patients with cardiometabolic disorders.

  15. Mast cells promote lung vascular remodelling in pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, J; Yin, J; Kukucka, M; Yin, N; Saarikko, I; Sterner-Kock, A; Fujii, H; Leong-Poi, H; Kuppe, H; Schermuly, R T; Kuebler, W M

    2011-06-01

    Left heart disease (LHD) frequently causes lung vascular remodelling and pulmonary hypertension (PH). Yet pharmacological treatment for PH in LHD is lacking and its pathophysiological basis remains obscure. We aimed to identify candidate mechanisms of PH in LHD and to test their relevance and therapeutic potential. In rats, LHD was induced by supracoronary aortic banding. Whole genome microarray analyses were performed, candidate genes were confirmed by RT-PCR and Western blots and functional relevance was tested in vivo by genetic and pharmacological strategies. In lungs of LHD rats, mast cell activation was the most prominently upregulated gene ontology cluster. Mast cell gene upregulation was confirmed at RNA and protein levels and remodelled vessels showed perivascular mast cell accumulations. In LHD rats treated with the mast cell stabiliser ketotifen, or in mast cell deficient Ws/Ws rats, PH and vascular remodelling were largely attenuated. Both strategies also reduced PH and vascular remodelling in monocrotaline-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension, suggesting that the role of mast cells extends to non-cardiogenic PH. In PH of different aetiologies, mast cells accumulate around pulmonary blood vessels and contribute to vascular remodelling and PH. Mast cells and mast cell-derived mediators may present promising targets for the treatment of PH.

  16. Passivity-Based Control of a Rigid Electrodynamic Tether

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Martin Birkelund; Blanke, Mogens

    2011-01-01

    parts, a feedback connection, which stabilizes the open-loop equilibrium, and a bias term, which is able to drive the system trajectory away from this equilibrium, a feature necessary to obtain orbit adjustment capabilities of the electrodynamic tether. It is then shown how the periodic solutions......Electrodynamic tethers provide actuation for performing orbit correction of spacecrafts. When an electrodynamic tether system is orbiting the Earth in an inclined orbit, periodic changes in the magnetic field result in a family of unstable periodic solutions in the attitude motion. This paper shows...

  17. Fiber Optic Shape Sensing for Tethered Marsupial Rovers Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Building upon the successful proof of concept work in Phase I, Luna Innovations Incorporated is proposing to design, build, and test a sensing tether for marsupial...

  18. An updated review of nanotechnologies for the space elevator tether

    OpenAIRE

    Brambilla, G.

    2010-01-01

    The space elevator tether requires an extraordinary specific ultimate strength (ratio between ultimate strength and density) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been identified as the ideal candidate because of their astonishing strength. This paper reviews CNT manufacture and measured strengths.

  19. Fiber Optic Shape Sensing for Tethered Marsupial Rovers Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Luna Innovations Incorporated is proposing to design, build, and test a shape, length, and tension sensing tether for robotic exploration and sample-gathering...

  20. Stationary Tether Device for Buoy Apparatus and System for Using

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A rigid, neutrally buoyant hydrodynamicaly-faired tether and associated fastening hardware that loosely holds a bathymetric float at a predetermined distance from a...

  1. Reconstitution of Cholesterol-Dependent Vaginolysin into Tethered Phospholipid Bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Budvytyte, Rima; Pleckaityte, M.; Zvirbliene, A.

    2013-01-01

    Functional reconstitution of the cholesterol-dependent cytolysin vaginolysin (VLY) from Gardnerella vaginalis into artificial tethered bilayer membranes (tBLMs) has been accomplished. The reconstitution of VLY was followed in real-time by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Changes...

  2. Development of a Tethered Formation Flight Testbed for ISS Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The development of a testbed for the development and demonstration of technologies needed by tethered formation flying satellites is proposed. Such a testbed would...

  3. Precession and circularization of elliptical space-tether motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapel, Jim D.; Grosserode, Patrick

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, we present a simplified analytic model for predicting motion of long space tethers. The perturbation model developed here addresses skip rope motion, where each end of the tether is held in place and the middle of the tether swings with a motion similar to that of a child's skip rope. If the motion of the tether midpoint is elliptical rather than circular, precession of the ellipse complicates the procedures required to damp this motion. The simplified analytic model developed in this paper parametrically predicts the precession of elliptical skip rope motion. Furthermore, the model shows that elliptic skip rope motion will circularize when damping is present in the longitudinal direction. Compared with high-fidelity simulation results, this simplified model provides excellent predictions of these phenomena.

  4. Tethered catalysts for the hydration of carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, Carlos A; Satcher, Jr., Joe H; Aines, Roger D; Wong, Sergio E; Baker, Sarah E; Lightstone, Felice C; Stolaroff, Joshuah K

    2014-11-04

    A system is provided that substantially increases the efficiency of CO.sub.2 capture and removal by positioning a catalyst within an optimal distance from the air-liquid interface. The catalyst is positioned within the layer determined to be the highest concentration of carbon dioxide. A hydrophobic tether is attached to the catalyst and the hydrophobic tether modulates the position of the catalyst within the liquid layer containing the highest concentration of carbon dioxide.

  5. e Ciências Afins (MAST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Granato

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available MAST is a science and technology museum located in the grounds and architectural complex belonging to the former Observatório Nacional in Rio de Janeiro. This complex, concluded in 1921, comprises of 16 buildings, and was listed by the Artistic and Historic National (1986 and State (1987 Heritage. This complex features three pavilions sheltering the equatorial telescopes, typical examples of Architecture and Engineering buildings for Astronomic purposes. Two of these pavilions, all of which are under the care of MAST, shelter the 21 cm and 32 cm telescopes, plus a third, part of the National Observatory, which houses the 46 cm equatorial telescope. The present study is the result of the work undertaken by MAST to preserve and restore the historical buildings under its responsibility. Thanks to a partnership set up with the Vitae Foundation, it has been possible to develop restoration work covering all aspects of the pavilions (moving metal dome, building, scientific instrument, as well as the area’s museography, with a view to informing visitors about the restoration work undertaken. The project, based on the historical research on the complex, was carried out by a multidisciplinary team over two years. Each stage of the work was comprehensively photographed, including the intervention project design, which was based on architectural surveys and the diagnosis of the complex’s state of repair, plus the restoration per se. This is a groundbreaking initiative in Latin America and will serve as an example for future actions to be taken on historical buildings, especially those built for scientific and technological purposes.

  6. ICPP: Results from the MAST Spherical Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykes, Alan

    2000-10-01

    The MAST (Mega-Amp Spherical Tokamak) experiment is now fully operational, producing 1MA plasmas with MW level auxiliary heating from Neutral Beam Injection and 60GHz Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating. Central electron and ion temperatures are both of order 1keV (measured by 30-point Thomson Scattering, Neutral Particle Analyzer and Charge-Exchange spectroscopy respectively). Following boronisation, the Greenwald density limit has been exceeded in double-null divertor discharges by 50operation has been achieved in both Ohmic and NBI heated plasmas. In addition to conventional plasma induction, MAST can employ the `merging-compression' scheme (pioneered on START) producing initial spherical tokamak plasmas of up to 0.5MA without use of flux from the central solenoid. The central solenoid can then be applied to further increase the current at ramp rates of up to 13MA/s; plasma current of 1MA is reached at only one-half of the full solenoid swing. Studies of strike point power loading in both Ohmic and beam heated plasmas have confirmed the result from START that the fraction of power loading on the inboard strike point is lower than predicted from simple models. Comprehensive arrays of halo detectors indicate tolerable levels of halo currents with low asymmetries; an encouraging result for the ST concept, and providing key data to test models. Results from MAST will be used both to extend the conventional tokamak database, and to determine the potential of the ST as a route to fusion power in its own right. Acknowledgement: this work is funded jointly by the UK Department of Trade and Industry and EURATOM. The NBI equipment is on loan from ORNL, the NPA from PPPL.

  7. Overview of physics results from MAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, B.; Akers, R. J.; Alladio, F.; Allan, S.; Appel, L. C.; Barnes, M.; Barratt, N. C.; Ben Ayed, N.; Breizman, B. N.; Cecconello, M.; Challis, C. D.; Chapman, I. T.; Ciric, D.; Colyer, G.; Connor, J. W.; Conway, N. J.; Cox, M.; Cowley, S. C.; Cunningham, G.; Darke, A.; De Bock, M.; Delchambre, E.; De Temmerman, G.; Dendy, R. O.; Denner, P.; Driscoll, M. D.; Dudson, B.; Dunai, D.; Dunstan, M.; Elmore, S.; Field, A. R.; Fishpool, G.; Freethy, S.; Garzotti, L.; Gibson, K. J.; Gryaznevich, M. P.; Guttenfelder, W.; Harrison, J.; Hastie, R. J.; Hawkes, N. C.; Hender, T. C.; Hnat, B.; Howell, D. F.; Hua, M.-D.; Hubbard, A.; Huysmans, G.; Keeling, D.; Kim, Y. C.; Kirk, A.; Liang, Y.; Lilley, M. K.; Lisak, M.; Lisgo, S.; Liu, Y. Q.; Maddison, G. P.; Maingi, R.; Manhood, S. J.; Martin, R.; McArdle, G. J.; McCone, J.; Meyer, H.; Michael, C.; Mordijck, S.; Morgan, T.; Morris, A. W.; Muir, D. G.; Nardon, E.; Naylor, G.; O'Brien, M. R.; O'Gorman, T.; Páleník, J.; Patel, A.; Pinches, S. D.; Price, M. N.; Roach, C. M.; Rozhansky, V.; Saarelma, S.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Saveliev, A.; Scannell, R.; Sharapov, S. E.; Shevchenko, V.; Shibaev, S.; Stork, D.; Storrs, J.; Suttrop, W.; Sykes, A.; Tamain, P.; Taylor, D.; Temple, D.; Thomas-Davies, N.; Thornton, A.; Turnyanskiy, M. R.; Valovic, M.; Vann, R. G. L.; Voss, G.; Walsh, M. J.; Warder, S. E. V.; Wilson, H. R.; Windridge, M.; Wisse, M.; Zoletnik, S.; MAST, the; NBI Teams.

    2011-09-01

    Major developments on the Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST) have enabled important advances in support of ITER and the physics basis of a spherical tokamak (ST) based component test facility (CTF), as well as providing new insight into underlying tokamak physics. For example, L-H transition studies benefit from high spatial and temporal resolution measurements of pedestal profile evolution (temperature, density and radial electric field) and in support of pedestal stability studies the edge current density profile has been inferred from motional Stark effect measurements. The influence of the q-profile and E × B flow shear on transport has been studied in MAST and equilibrium flow shear has been included in gyro-kinetic codes, improving comparisons with the experimental data. H-modes exhibit a weaker q and stronger collisionality dependence of heat diffusivity than implied by IPB98(y,2) scaling, which may have important implications for the design of an ST-based CTF. ELM mitigation, an important issue for ITER, has been demonstrated by applying resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) using both internal and external coils, but full stabilization of type-I ELMs has not been observed. Modelling shows the importance of including the plasma response to the RMP fields. MAST plasmas with q > 1 and weak central magnetic shear regularly exhibit a long-lived saturated ideal internal mode. Measured plasma braking in the presence of this mode compares well with neo-classical toroidal viscosity theory. In support of basic physics understanding, high resolution Thomson scattering measurements are providing new insight into sawtooth crash dynamics and neo-classical tearing mode critical island widths. Retarding field analyser measurements show elevated ion temperatures in the scrape-off layer of L-mode plasmas and, in the presence of type-I ELMs, ions with energy greater than 500 eV are detected 20 cm outside the separatrix. Disruption mitigation by massive gas injection has

  8. Overview of physics results from MAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lloyd, B. [EURATOM CCFE Fus Assoc, Culham Sci Ctr, Abingdon, Oxon, England; Akers, R. J. [EURATOM CCFE Fus Assoc, Culham Sci Ctr, Abingdon, Oxon, England; Alladio, F. [Assoc EURATOM ENEA Fus. Rome, Italy; Appel, L. C. [EURATOM CCFE Fus Assoc, Culham Sci Ctr, Abingdon, Oxon, England; Barnes, M. [EURATOM CCFE Fus Assoc, Culham Sci Ctr, Abingdon, Oxon, England; Barratt, N. C. [Univ. York, Dept. Phys. York YO10 5DD, N Yorkshire, England; Ben Ayed, N. [EURATOM CCFE Fus Assoc, Culham Sci Ctr, Abingdon, Oxon, England; Breizman, B. N. [University of Texas, Austin; Cecconello, M. [Uppsala Univ., EURATOM VR Assoc., SE-75120 Uppsala, Sweden; Challis, C. D. [EURATOM CCFE Fus Assoc, Culham Sci Ctr, Abingdon, Oxon, England; Chapman, I. T. [EURATOM CCFE Fus Assoc, Culham Sci Ctr, Abingdon, Oxon, England; Ciric, D. [EURATOM CCFE Fus Assoc, Culham Sci Ctr, Abingdon, Oxon, England; Colyer, G. [EURATOM CCFE Fus Assoc, Culham Sci Ctr, Abingdon, Oxon, England; Connor, J. W. [EURATOM CCFE Fus Assoc, Culham Sci Ctr, Abingdon, Oxon, England; Conway, N. J. [EURATOM CCFE Fus Assoc, Culham Sci Ctr, Abingdon, Oxon, England; Cox, M. [EURATOM CCFE Fus Assoc, Culham Sci Ctr, Abingdon, Oxon, England; Cowley, S. C. [EURATOM CCFE Fus Assoc, Culham Sci Ctr, Abingdon, Oxon, England; Cunningham, G. [EURATOM CCFE Fus Assoc, Culham Sci Ctr, Abingdon, Oxon, England; Darke, A. [EURATOM CCFE Fus Assoc, Culham Sci Ctr, Abingdon, Oxon, England; De Bock, M. [EURATOM CCFE Fus Assoc, Culham Sci Ctr, Abingdon, Oxon, England; Delchambre, E. [Assoc. Euratom CEA, CEA Cadarache, F-13108, St. Paul Les Durance, France; De Temmerman, G. [EURATOM CCFE Fus Assoc, Culham Sci Ctr, Abingdon, Oxon, England; Dendy, R. O. [EURATOM CCFE Fus Assoc, Culham Sci Ctr, Abingdon, Oxon, England; Denner, P. [Univ. York, Dept. Phys. York YO10 5DD, N Yorkshire, England; Driscoll, M. [EURATOM CCFE Fus Assoc, Culham Sci Ctr, Abingdon, Oxon, England; Dudson, B. [Univ. York, Dept. Phys. York YO10 5DD, N Yorkshire, England; Dunai, D. [EURATOM, KFKI RMKI, H-1525 Budapest, Hungary; Dunstan, M. [EURATOM CCFE Fus Assoc, Culham Sci Ctr, Abingdon, Oxon, England; Elmore, S. [Univ. Liverpool, Dept. Elect. Engn. & Elect., Liverpool L69 3BX, Merseyside, England; Field, A. R. [EURATOM CCFE Fus Assoc, Culham Sci Ctr, Abingdon, Oxon, England; Fishpool, G. [EURATOM CCFE Fus Assoc, Culham Sci Ctr, Abingdon, Oxon, England; Freethy, S. [Univ. York, Dept. Phys. York YO10 5DD, N Yorkshire, England; Garzotti, L. [EURATOM, Culham Sci Ctr, Abingdon, Oxon England; Gibson, K. J. [Univ. York, Dept. Phys. York YO10 5DD, N Yorkshire, England; Gryaznevich, M. P. [EURATOM CCFE Fus Assoc, Culham Sci Ctr, Abingdon, Oxon, England; Guttenfelder, W. [Univ. Warwick, Dept. Phys. Ctr. Fus. Space & Astrophys., Coventry CV4 7AL, W. Midlands, England; Harrison, J. [EURATOM CCFE Fus Assoc, Culham Sci Ctr, Abingdon, Oxon, England; Hastie, R. [EURATOM CCFE Fus Assoc, Culham Sci Ctr, Abingdon, Oxon, England; Hawkes, N. C. [EURATOM CCFE Fus Assoc, Culham Sci Ctr, Abingdon, Oxon, England; Hender, T. C. [EURATOM CCFE Fus Assoc, Culham Sci Ctr, Abingdon, Oxon, England; Hnat, B. [Univ. Warwick, Dept. Phys. Ctr. Fus. Space & Astrophys., Coventry CV4 7AL, W. Midlands, England; Howell, D. F. [EURATOM CCFE Fus Assoc, Culham Sci Ctr, Abingdon, Oxon, England; Hua, M. D. [Univ. London Imperial Coll. Sci. Technol. & Med., London, England; Hubbard, A. [MIT Plasma Sci. & Fus. Ctr, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA; Huysmans, G. [Assoc. Euratom CEA, CEA Cadarache, F-13108, St. Paul Les Durance, France; Keeling, D. [EURATOM CCFE Fus Assoc, Culham Sci Ctr, Abingdon, Oxon, England; Kim, Y. C. [Univ. Oxford, Rudolph Peierls Ctr. Theoret. Phys., Oxford, England; Kirk, A. [EURATOM CCFE Fus Assoc, Culham Sci Ctr, Abingdon, Oxon, England; Liang, Y. [Assoc. Euratom FZ Julich, D-52425, Julich, Germany; Lilley, M. [Chalmers, S-41296, Gothenburg, Sweden; et al.

    2011-01-01

    Major developments on the Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST) have enabled important advances in support of ITER and the physics basis of a spherical tokamak (ST) based component test facility (CTF), as well as providing new insight into underlying tokamak physics. For example, L H transition studies benefit from high spatial and temporal resolution measurements of pedestal profile evolution (temperature, density and radial electric field) and in support of pedestal stability studies the edge current density profile has been inferred from motional Stark effect measurements. The influence of the q-profile and E B flow shear on transport has been studied in MAST and equilibrium flow shear has been included in gyro-kinetic codes, improving comparisons with the experimental data. H-modes exhibit a weaker q and stronger collisionality dependence of heat diffusivity than implied by IPB98(y,2) scaling, which may have important implications for the design of an ST-based CTF. ELM mitigation, an important issue for ITER, has been demonstrated by applying resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) using both internal and external coils, but full stabilization of type-I ELMs has not been observed. Modelling shows the importance of including the plasma response to the RMP fields. MAST plasmas with q > 1 and weak central magnetic shear regularly exhibit a long-lived saturated ideal internal mode. Measured plasma braking in the presence of this mode compares well with neo-classical toroidal viscosity theory. In support of basic physics understanding, high resolution Thomson scattering measurements are providing new insight into sawtooth crash dynamics and neo-classical tearing mode critical island widths. Retarding field analyser measurements show elevated ion temperatures in the scrape-off layer of L-mode plasmas and, in the presence of type-I ELMs, ions with energy greater than 500 eV are detected 20 cm outside the separatrix. Disruption mitigation by massive gas injection has

  9. The effects of tether placement on antibody stability on surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grawe, Rebecca W.; Knotts, Thomas A.

    2017-06-01

    Despite their potential benefits, antibody microarrays have fallen short of performing reliably and have not found widespread use outside of the research setting. Experimental techniques have been unable to determine what is occurring on the surface of an atomic level, so molecular simulation has emerged as the primary method of investigating protein/surface interactions. Simulations of small proteins have indicated that the stability of the protein is a function of the residue on the protein where a tether is placed. The purpose of this research is to see whether these findings also apply to antibodies, with their greater size and complexity. To determine this, 24 tethering locations were selected on the antibody Protein Data Bank (PDB) ID: 1IGT. Replica exchange simulations were run on two different surfaces, one hydrophobic and one hydrophilic, to determine the degree to which these tethering sites stabilize or destabilize the antibody. Results showed that antibodies tethered to hydrophobic surfaces were in general less stable than antibodies tethered to hydrophilic surfaces. Moreover, the stability of the antibody was a function of the tether location on hydrophobic surfaces but not hydrophilic surfaces.

  10. Rate limit of protein elastic response is tether dependent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkovich, Ronen; Hermans, Rodolfo I.; Popa, Ionel; Stirnemann, Guillaume; Garcia-Manyes, Sergi; Berne, Bruce J.; Fernandez, Julio M.

    2012-01-01

    The elastic restoring force of tissues must be able to operate over the very wide range of loading rates experienced by living organisms. It is surprising that even the fastest events involving animal muscle tissues do not surpass a few hundred hertz. We propose that this limit is set in part by the elastic dynamics of tethered proteins extending and relaxing under a changing load. Here we study the elastic dynamics of tethered proteins using a fast force spectrometer with sub-millisecond time resolution, combined with Brownian and Molecular Dynamics simulations. We show that the act of tethering a polypeptide to an object, an inseparable part of protein elasticity in vivo and in experimental setups, greatly reduces the attempt frequency with which the protein samples its free energy. Indeed, our data shows that a tethered polypeptide can traverse its free-energy landscape with a surprisingly low effective diffusion coefficient Deff ∼ 1,200 nm2/s. By contrast, our Molecular Dynamics simulations show that diffusion of an isolated protein under force occurs at Deff ∼ 108 nm2/s. This discrepancy is attributed to the drag force caused by the tethering object. From the physiological time scales of tissue elasticity, we calculate that tethered elastic proteins equilibrate in vivo with Deff ∼ 104–106 nm2/s which is two to four orders magnitude smaller than the values measured for untethered proteins in bulk. PMID:22895787

  11. Dynamics of the Space Tug System with a Short Tether

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiafu Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of the space tug system with a short tether similar to the ROGER system during deorbiting is presented. The kinematical characteristic of this system is significantly different from the traditional tethered system as the tether is tensional and tensionless alternately during the deorbiting process. The dynamics obtained based on the methods for the traditional tethered system is not suitable for the space tug system. Therefore, a novel method for deriving dynamics for the deorbiting system similar to the ROGER system is proposed by adopting the orbital coordinates of the two spacecraft and the Euler angles of ROGER spacecraft as the generalized coordinates instead of in- and out-plane librations and the length of the tether and so forth. Then, the librations of the system are equivalently obtained using the orbital positions of the two spacecraft. At last, the geostationary orbit (GEO and the orbit whose apogee is 300 km above GEO are chosen as the initial and target orbits, respectively, to perform the numerical simulations. The simulation results indicate that the dynamics can describe the characteristic of the tether-net system conveniently and accurately, and the deorbiting results are deeply affected by the initial conditions and parameters.

  12. Mast-sipping in EPR trademark plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langenberger, Jan [AREVA NP GmbH, Erlangen (Germany). Fuel Service; Schienbein, Marcel; Geier, Roland [AREVA NP GmbH, Erlangen (Germany). Radiochemical Lab.

    2010-05-15

    For more than 20 years, AREVA applies and develops different sipping techniques to identify fuel assemblies with leaking fuel rods. For the EPR trademark reactors a Mast Sipping System with newest developments will be implemented considering radiation protection and latest standards requirements. The innovative EPR trademark Sipping System differs from previous systems in many ways. One of the main innovations is that all the necessary processes of the Sipping system have been fully digitized. Second, several ALARA design modifications have been implemented to meet the current radiation protection requirements. An additional implementable multilingual assistance program facilitates the handling of the system and helps to prevent incorrect operation. (orig.)

  13. Contribution of engineered nanomaterials physicochemical properties to mast cell degranulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Monica M.; Mendoza, Ryan; Raghavendra, Achyut J.; Podila, Ramakrishna; Brown, Jared M.

    2017-03-01

    The rapid development of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) has grown dramatically in the last decade, with increased use in consumer products, industrial materials, and nanomedicines. However, due to increased manufacturing, there is concern that human and environmental exposures may lead to adverse immune outcomes. Mast cells, central to the innate immune response, are one of the earliest sensors of environmental insult and have been shown to play a role in ENM-mediated immune responses. Our laboratory previously determined that mast cells are activated via a non-FcεRI mediated response following silver nanoparticle (Ag NP) exposure, which was dependent upon key physicochemical properties. Using bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs), we tested the hypothesis that ENM physicochemical properties influence mast cell degranulation. Exposure to 13 physicochemically distinct ENMs caused a range of mast degranulation responses, with smaller sized Ag NPs (5 nm and 20 nm) causing the most dramatic response. Mast cell responses were dependent on ENMs physicochemical properties such as size, apparent surface area, and zeta potential. Surprisingly, minimal ENM cellular association by mast cells was not correlated with mast cell degranulation. This study suggests that a subset of ENMs may elicit an allergic response and contribute to the exacerbation of allergic diseases.

  14. The Hazards of Non-Ionizing Radiation of Telecommunication Mast ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study therefore establishes that there are health implications of exposure to mast radiation and minimizing them will go a long way to improve healthy living. Keywords: Hazard, non-ionizing radiation, telecommunication, mast, electromagnetic radiation, radio-frequency radiation, exposure, wireless telephone, antenna.

  15. Preliminary validation of the Multi-Attitude Suicide Tendency (MAST ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective:The factor structure of the Multi-Attitude Suicide Tendency (MAST) scale was examined using a sample of non-white South African adolescents. Method: The MAST scale was administered to 205 secondary school students between 13 and 20 years of age. Results: The scale demonstrated satisfactory internal ...

  16. Mast cell synapses and exosomes: membrane contacts for information exchange.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carroll-Portillo, A.; Surviladze, Z.; Cambi, A.; Lidke, D.S.; Wilson, B.S.

    2012-01-01

    In addition to their central role in allergy, mast cells are involved in a wide variety of cellular interactions during homeostasis and disease. In this review, we discuss the ability of mast cells to extend their mechanisms for intercellular communication beyond the release of soluble mediators.

  17. Mast Cells: A Pivotal Role in Pulmonary Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veerappan, Arul; O'Connor, Nathan J.; Brazin, Jacqueline; Reid, Alicia C.; Jung, Albert; McGee, David; Summers, Barbara; Branch-Elliman, Dascher; Stiles, Brendon; Worgall, Stefan; Kaner, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is characterized by an inflammatory response that includes macrophages, neutrophils, lymphocytes, and mast cells. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether mast cells play a role in initiating pulmonary fibrosis. Pulmonary fibrosis was induced with bleomycin in mast-cell-deficient WBB6F1-W/Wv (MCD) mice and their congenic controls (WBB6F1-+/+). Mast cell deficiency protected against bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis, but protection was reversed with the re-introduction of mast cells to the lungs of MCD mice. Two mast cell mediators were identified as fibrogenic: histamine and renin, via angiotensin (ANG II). Both human and rat lung fibroblasts express the histamine H1 and ANG II AT1 receptor subtypes and when activated, they promote proliferation, transforming growth factor β1 secretion, and collagen synthesis. Mast cells appear to be critical to pulmonary fibrosis. Therapeutic blockade of mast cell degranulation and/or histamine and ANG II receptors should attenuate pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:23570576

  18. Computerized video analysis of tethered bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Howard C.; Block, Steven M.; Conley, M. Patricia; Nathan, Andrew R.; Power, John N.; Wolfe, Alan J.

    1987-03-01

    When a flagellar filament of a bacterial cell such as Escherichia coli is fixed to a glass surface, the cell body spins alternately clockwise and counterclockwise at speeds of up to 15 Hz. In cells wild type for chemotaxis, reversals occur about once per second. A typical experiment on bacterial behavior involves data collected from as many as 30 such cells over periods of about an hour. A system is described that makes practical detailed analysis of such a large body of data. Microscopic fields, each containing many tethered cells, were recorded on VHS cassettes with a shuttered multiframe video camera. The tapes were played back through hardware that encoded information from successive images of a given cell and passed that information on to a minicomputer. This computer, following instructions provided in an editing session, identified intervals during which the cell was rotating clockwise, rotating counterclockwise, or remained stationary. Output files were generated listing the times at which transitions between these states occurred and the speeds of the cell averaged over successive time periods. This output was then combined with that from other cells and/or processed by various applications programs.

  19. Mast cell function modulating IgE-mediated allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruby Pawankar

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Allergic diseases, such as atopic rhinitis, bronchial asthma and urticaria, are prevalent and increasing in frequency. Mast cells are known to play a central role in the immediate phase reaction of allergic diseases through the IgE-mediated release of a variety of chemical mediators, such as histamine, leukotrienes and prostaglandins. In contrast, T lymphocytes, basophils and eosinophils are thought to be responsible for inducing the late phase response. However, whether the mast cell can be simplistically assigned a role in the immediate phase allergic response and whether mast cells are necessary for the ongoing allergic response, including the development of hyperresponsiveness, remains to be completely studied. In the present article, the author will discuss the integrated roles of mast cells in IgE-mediated allergic inflammation, with specific emphasis on the roles of mast cell-derived cytokines in the late phase allergic response and chronic allergic inflammation.

  20. Stereological quantification of mast cells in human synovium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, T E; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Herlin, T

    1999-01-01

    Mast cells participate in both the acute allergic reaction as well as in chronic inflammatory diseases. Earlier studies have revealed divergent results regarding the quantification of mast cells in the human synovium. The aim of the present study was therefore to quantify these cells in the human...... synovium, using stereological techniques. Different methods of staining and quantification have previously been used for mast cell quantification in human synovium. Stereological techniques provide precise and unbiased information on the number of cell profiles in two-dimensional tissue sections of......, in this case, human synovium. In 10 patients suffering from osteoarthritis a median of 3.6 mast cells/mm2 synovial membrane was found. The total number of cells (synoviocytes, fibroblasts, lymphocytes, leukocytes) present was 395.9 cells/mm2 (median). The mast cells constituted 0.8% of all the cell profiles...

  1. The mast cell integrates the splanchnic and systemic inflammatory response in portal hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arias Jorge-Luis

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Portal hypertension is a clinical syndrome that is difficult to study in an isolated manner since it is always associated with a greater or lesser degree of liver functional impairment. The aim of this review is to integrate the complications related to chronic liver disease by using both, the array of mast cell functions and mediators, since they possibly are involved in the pathophysiological mechanisms of these complications. The portal vein ligated rat is the experimental model most widely used to study this syndrome and it has been considered that a systemic inflammatory response is produced. This response is mediated among other inflammatory cells by mast cells and it evolves in three linked pathological functional systems. The nervous functional system presents ischemia-reperfusion and edema (oxidative stress and would be responsible for hyperdynamic circulation; the immune functional system causes tissue infiltration by inflammatory cells, particularly mast cells and bacteria (enzymatic stress and the endocrine functional system presents endothelial proliferation (antioxidative and antienzymatic stress and angiogenesis. Mast cells could develop a key role in the expression of these three phenotypes because their mediators have the ability to produce all the aforementioned alterations, both at the splanchnic level (portal hypertensive enteropathy, mesenteric adenitis, liver steatosis and the systemic level (portal hypertensive encephalopathy. This hypothetical splanchnic and systemic inflammatory response would be aggravated during the progression of the chronic liver disease, since the antioxidant ability of the body decreases. Thus, a critical state is produced, in which the appearance of noxious factors would favor the development of a dedifferentiation process protagonized by the nervous functional system. This system rapidly induces an ischemia-reperfusion phenotype with hydration and salinization of the body (hepatorenal

  2. Study of mast cell count in skin tags

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaher Hesham

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Skin tags or acrochordons are common tumors of middle-aged and elderly subjects. They consist of loose fibrous tissue and occur mainly on the neck and major flexures as small, soft, pedunculated protrusions. Objectives: The aim was to compare the mast cells count in skin tags to adjacent normal skin in diabetic and nondiabetic participants in an attempt to elucidate the possible role of mast cells in the pathogenesis of skin tags. Participants and Methods: Thirty participants with skin tags were divided into group I (15 nondiabetic participants and group II (15 diabetic participants. Three biopsies were obtained from each participant: a large skin tag, a small skin tag and adjacent normal skin. Mast cell count from all the obtained sections was carried out, and the mast cell density was expressed as the average mast cell count/high power field (HPF. Results: A statistically significant increase in mast cells count in skin tags in comparison to normal skin was detected in group I and group II. There was no statistically significant difference between mast cell counts in skin tags of both the groups. Conclusion: Both the mast cell mediators and hyperinsulinemia are capable of inducing fibroblast proliferation and epidermal hyperplasia that are the main pathologic abnormalities seen in all types of skin tags. However, the presence of mast cells in all examined skin tags regardless of diabetes and obesity may point to the possible crucial role of mast cells in the etiogenesis of skin tags through its interaction with fibroblasts and keratinocytes.

  3. Overview of recent physics results from MAST

    CERN Document Server

    Kirk, A; Akers, RJ; Allan, S; Appel, L; Lucini, F Arese; Barnes, M; Barrett, T; Ayed, N Ben; Boeglin, W; Bradley, J; Browning, P K; Brunner, J; Cahyna, P; Carr, M; Casson, F; Cecconello, M; Challis, C; Chapman, IT; Chapman, S; Conroy, S; Conway, N; Cooper, WA; Cox, M; Crocker, N; Crowley, B; Cardnell, S; Chorley, J; Cunningham, G; Danilov, A; Darrow, D; Dendy, R; Dickinson, D; Dorland, W; Dudson, B; Easy, L; Elmore, S; Evans, M; Farley, T; Fedorczak, N; Field, A; Fitzgerald, I; Fox, M; Freethy, S; Garzotti, L; Ghim, YC; Gi, K; Gorelenkova, M; Gracias, W; Gurl, C; Guttenfelder, W; Ham, C; Harting, D; Havlickova, E; Hawkes, N; Hender, T; Henderson, S; Hillesheim, J; Hnat, B; Horacek, J; Howard, J; Howell, D; Dunai, D; Fishpool, G; Gibson, K; Harrison, J; Highcock, E; Huang, B; Inomoto, M; Imazawa, R; Jones, O; Kadowaki, K; Kaye, S; Keeling, D; Kocan, M; Kogan, L; Komm, M; Lai, W; Leddy, J; Leggate, H; Imada, K; Klimek, I; Hollocombe, J; Lipschultz, B; Lisgo, S; Liu, YQ; Lloyd, B; Lomanowski, B; Lukin, V; Maddison, G; Madsen, J; Mailloux, J; Martin, R; McArdle, G; Lupelli, I; McClements, K; McMillan, B; Meakins, A; Meyer, H; Michael, C; Militello, F; Milnes, J; Motojima, G; Muir, D; Naylor, G; Nielsen, A; O'Brien, M; O'Mullane, M; Olsen, J; Omotani, J; Ono, Y; Pamela, S; Morris, AW; O'Gorman, T; Pangione, L; Parra, F; Patel, A; Peebles, W; Perez, R; Pinches, S; Piron, L; Price, M; Reinke, M; Ricci, P; Riva, F; Roach, C; Romanelli, M; Ryan, D; Saarelma, S; Saveliev, A; Scannell, R; Schekochihin, A; Sharapov, S; Sharples, R; Shevchenko, V; Shinohara, K; Silburn, S; Simpson, J; Stanier, A; Storrs, J; Summers, H; Takase, Y; Tamain, P; Tanabe, H; Tanaka, H; Tani, K; Taylor, D; Thomas, D; Thomas-Davies, N; Thornton, A; Turnyanskiy, M; Valovic, M; Vann, R; Van Wyk, F; Walkden, N; Watanabe, T; Wilson, H; Wischmeier, M; Yamada, T; Young, J; Zoletnik, S

    2016-01-01

    New results from MAST are presented that focus on validating models in order to extrapolate to future devices. Measurements during start-up experiments have shown how the bulk ion temperature rise scales with the square of the reconnecting field. During the current ramp up models are not able to correctly predict the current diffusion. Experiments have been performed looking at edge and core turbulence. At the edge detailed studies have revealed how filament characteristic are responsible for determining the near and far SOL density profiles. In the core the intrinsic rotation and electron scale turbulence have been measured. The role that the fast ion gradient has on redistributing fast ions through fishbone modes has led to a redesign of the neutral beam injector on MAST Upgrade. In H-mode the turbulence at the pedestal top has been shown to be consistent with being due to electron temperature gradient modes. A reconnection process appears to occur during ELMs and the number of filaments released determines...

  4. Overview of recent physics results from MAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, A.; Adamek, J.; Akers, R. J.; Allan, S.; Appel, L.; Arese Lucini, F.; Barnes, M.; Barrett, T.; Ben Ayed, N.; Boeglin, W.; Bradley, J.; Browning, P. K.; Brunner, J.; Cahyna, P.; Cardnell, S.; Carr, M.; Casson, F.; Cecconello, M.; Challis, C.; Chapman, I. T.; Chapman, S.; Chorley, J.; Conroy, S.; Conway, N.; Cooper, W. A.; Cox, M.; Crocker, N.; Crowley, B.; Cunningham, G.; Danilov, A.; Darrow, D.; Dendy, R.; Dickinson, D.; Dorland, W.; Dudson, B.; Dunai, D.; Easy, L.; Elmore, S.; Evans, M.; Farley, T.; Fedorczak, N.; Field, A.; Fishpool, G.; Fitzgerald, I.; Fox, M.; Freethy, S.; Garzotti, L.; Ghim, Y. C.; Gi, K.; Gibson, K.; Gorelenkova, M.; Gracias, W.; Gurl, C.; Guttenfelder, W.; Ham, C.; Harrison, J.; Harting, D.; Havlickova, E.; Hawkes, N.; Hender, T.; Henderson, S.; Highcock, E.; Hillesheim, J.; Hnat, B.; Horacek, J.; Howard, J.; Howell, D.; Huang, B.; Imada, K.; Inomoto, M.; Imazawa, R.; Jones, O.; Kadowaki, K.; Kaye, S.; Keeling, D.; Klimek, I.; Kocan, M.; Kogan, L.; Komm, M.; Lai, W.; Leddy, J.; Leggate, H.; Hollocombe, J.; Lipschultz, B.; Lisgo, S.; Liu, Y. Q.; Lloyd, B.; Lomanowski, B.; Lukin, V.; Lupelli, I.; Maddison, G.; Madsen, J.; Mailloux, J.; Martin, R.; McArdle, G.; McClements, K.; McMillan, B.; Meakins, A.; Meyer, H.; Michael, C.; Militello, F.; Milnes, J.; Morris, A. W.; Motojima, G.; Muir, D.; Naylor, G.; Nielsen, A.; O'Brien, M.; O'Gorman, T.; O'Mullane, M.; Olsen, J.; Omotani, J.; Ono, Y.; Pamela, S.; Pangione, L.; Parra, F.; Patel, A.; Peebles, W.; Perez, R.; Pinches, S.; Piron, L.; Price, M.; Reinke, M.; Ricci, P.; Riva, F.; Roach, C.; Romanelli, M.; Ryan, D.; Saarelma, S.; Saveliev, A.; Scannell, R.; Schekochihin, A.; Sharapov, S.; Sharples, R.; Shevchenko, V.; Shinohara, K.; Silburn, S.; Simpson, J.; Stanier, A.; Storrs, J.; Summers, H.; Takase, Y.; Tamain, P.; Tanabe, H.; Tanaka, H.; Tani, K.; Taylor, D.; Thomas, D.; Thomas-Davies, N.; Thornton, A.; Turnyanskiy, M.; Valovic, M.; Vann, R.; Van Wyk, F.; Walkden, N.; Watanabe, T.; Wilson, H.; Wischmeier, M.; Yamada, T.; Young, J.; Zoletnik, S.; the MAST Team; the EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2017-10-01

    New results from MAST are presented that focus on validating models in order to extrapolate to future devices. Measurements during start-up experiments have shown how the bulk ion temperature rise scales with the square of the reconnecting field. During the current ramp-up, models are not able to correctly predict the current diffusion. Experiments have been performed looking at edge and core turbulence. At the edge, detailed studies have revealed how filament characteristics are responsible for determining the near and far scrape off layer density profiles. In the core the intrinsic rotation and electron scale turbulence have been measured. The role that the fast ion gradient has on redistributing fast ions through fishbone modes has led to a redesign of the neutral beam injector on MAST Upgrade. In H-mode the turbulence at the pedestal top has been shown to be consistent with being due to electron temperature gradient modes. A reconnection process appears to occur during edge localized modes (ELMs) and the number of filaments released determines the power profile at the divertor. Resonant magnetic perturbations can mitigate ELMs provided the edge peeling response is maximised and the core kink response minimised. The mitigation of intrinsic error fields with toroidal mode number n  >  1 has been shown to be important for plasma performance.

  5. MAST CELL TUMOR IN DOGS: RETROSPECTIVE STUDY MASTOCITOMA CANINO: ESTUDO RETROSPECTIVO

    OpenAIRE

    Duvaldo Eurides; Áureo Evangelista Santana; Gener Tadeu Pereira; Andrigo Barboza De Nardi; Felipe Antonio Mendes Vicenti; Carlos Roberto Daleck; Juliana Maziero Furlani; Luiz Antônio Franco da Silva

    2008-01-01

    This retrospective study included 49 dogs, 28 males and 21 females, of several breeds, between two and 17 years old. The majority of dogs were mixed breed or Boxers and Teckels, six to nine years old. Eleven animals showed grade I mast cell tumor, 10 grade II and nine grade III. Surgery alone or associated with chemotherapy were performed in the most of cases. The results from our study indicate that surgery alone promotes the highest survival time because surgery procedure is indicated in ca...

  6. Mast Cell Leukaemia: c-KIT Mutations Are Not Always Positive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magalie Joris

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mast cell leukemia (MCL is a rare and aggressive disease with poor prognosis and short survival time. D816V c-KIT mutation is the most frequent molecular abnormality and plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis and development of the disease. Thus, comprehensive diagnostic investigations and molecular studies should be carefully carried out to facilitate the therapeutic choice. A MCL patient’s case with rare phenotypic and genotypic characteristics is described with review of major clinical biological and therapeutic approaches in MCL.

  7. Factors affecting tether use and correct use in child restraint installations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jermakian, Jessica S; Klinich, Kathleen D; Orton, Nichole R; Flannagan, Carol A C; Manary, Miriam A; Malik, Laura A; Narayanaswamy, Prabha

    2014-12-01

    Field studies show that top tethers go unused in half of forward-facing child restraint installations. In this study, parent volunteers were asked to use the Lower Anchors and Tethers for Children (LATCH) to install child restraints in several vehicles to identify tether anchor characteristics that are associated with tether use. Thirty-seven volunteers were assigned to four groups. Each group tested two forward-facing child restraints in four of 16 vehicle models. Logistic regression models were used to identify predictors of tether use and correct use. Subjects used the tether in 89% of the 294 forward-facing child restraint installations and attached the tether correctly in 57% of the installations. Tethers were more likely to be used when the anchor was located on the rear deck as typically found in sedans compared with the seatback, floor, or roof. Tethers were less likely to be attached correctly when there was potentially confusing hardware present. No vehicle tether hardware characteristics or vehicle manual directions were associated specifically with correct tether routing and head restraint position. This study provides laboratory evidence that specific vehicle features are associated with tether use and correct use. Modifications to vehicles that make tether anchors easier to find and identify likely will result in increases in tether use and correct use. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Mast Cells: Key Players in the Shadow in Oral Inflammation and in Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaje, Pusa Nela; Amalia Ceausu, Raluca; Jitariu, Adriana; Stratul, Stefan Ioan; Rusu, Laura-Cristina; Popovici, Ramona Amina; Raica, Marius

    2016-01-01

    Although mast cells (MCs) have been discovered over 130 years ago, their function was almost exclusively linked to allergic affections. At the time being, it is well known that MCs possess a great variety of roles, in both physiologic and pathologic conditions. In the oral tissues, MCs release different proinflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), that promote leukocyte infiltration in various inflammatory states of the oral cavity. These cells play a key role in the inflammatory process and, as a consequence, their number changes in different pathologic conditions of the oral cavity, like gingivitis, periodontitis, and so on. MCs also represent a rich source of proteases, especially of mast cell tryptase and chymase, which directly degrade the extracellular matrix through their proteolytic activity and thus indirectly stimulate angiogenesis and facilitate invasion and metastasis. It may be stated that mast cells could have an impact on primary tumor development, progression, and metastases in oral squamous cell carcinoma. By understanding the role of mast cells in the pathogenesis of different inflammatory and tumor diseases of the oral cavity, these cells may become therapeutic targets that could possibly improve the prognosis and survival of these patients.

  9. Adult idiopathic scoliosis: the tethered spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyte Ferguson, Lucy

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on an observational and treatment study using three case histories to describe common patterns of muscle and fascial asymmetry in adults with idiopathic scoliosis (IS) who have significant scoliotic curvatures that were not surgically corrected and who have chronic pain. Rather than being located in the paraspinal muscles, the myofascial trigger points (TrPs) apparently responsible for the pain were located at some distance from the spine, yet referred pain to locations throughout the thoracolumbar spine. Asymmetries in these muscles appear to tether the spine in such a way that they contribute to scoliotic curvatures. Evaluation also showed that each of these individuals had major ligamentous laxity and this may also have contributed to development of scoliotic curvatures. Treatment focused on release of TrPs found to refer pain into the spine, release of related fascia, and correction of related joint dysfunction. Treatment resulted in substantial relief of longstanding chronic pain. Treatment thus validated the diagnostic hypothesis that myofascial and fascial asymmetries were to some extent responsible for pain in adults with significant scoliotic curvatures. Treatment of these patterns of TrPs and muscle and fascial asymmetries and related joint dysfunction was also effective in relieving pain in each of these individuals after they were injured in auto accidents. Treatment of myofascial TrPs and asymmetrical fascial tension along with treatment of accompanying joint dysfunction is proposed as an effective approach to treating both chronic and acute pain in adults with scoliosis that has not been surgically corrected. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The Role of Mast Cells in Parathyroid Bone Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Russell T; Iwaniec, Urszula T; Marley, Kevin; Sibonga, Jean D

    2010-01-01

    Chronic hyperparathyroidism (HPT) is a common cause of metabolic bone disease. These studies investigated the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for the detrimental actions of elevated parathyroid hormone (PTH) on the skeleton. Bone biopsies from hyperparathyroid patients revealed an association between parathyroid bone disease and increased numbers of bone marrow mast cells. We therefore evaluated the role of mast cells in the etiology of parathyroid bone disease in a rat model for chronic HPT. In rats, mature mast cells were preferentially located at sites undergoing bone turnover, and the number of mast cells at the bone–bone marrow interface was greatly increased following treatment with PTH. Time-course studies and studies employing parathyroid hormone–related peptide (PTHrP), as well as inhibitors of platelet-derived growth factor-A (PDGF-A, trapidil), kit (gleevec), and PI3K (wortmannin) signaling revealed that mature mast cell redistribution from bone marrow to bone surfaces precedes and is associated with osteitis fibrosa, a hallmark of parathyroid bone disease. Importantly, mature mast cells were not observed in the bone marrow of mice. Mice, in turn, were resistant to the development of PTH-induced bone marrow fibrosis. These findings suggest that the mast cell may be a novel target for treatment of metabolic bone disease. © 2010 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:20200965

  11. Mast cells in atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease - Activators and actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovanen, Petri T; Bot, Ilze

    2017-10-12

    Mast cells are potent actors involved in inflammatory reactions in various tissues, including both in the intimal and the adventitial layers of atherosclerotic arteries. In the arterial intima, the site of atherogenesis, mast cells are activated to degranulate, and thereby triggered to release an abundance of preformed inflammatory mediators, notably histamine, heparin, neutral proteases and cytokines stored in their cytoplasmic secretory granules. Depending on the stimulus, mast cell activation may also launch prolonged synthesis and secretion of single bioactive molecules, such as cytokines and derivatives of arachidonic acid. The mast cell-derived mediators may impede the functions of different types of cells present in atherosclerotic lesions, and also compromise the structural and functional integrity of the intimal extracellular matrix. In the adventitial layer of atherosclerotic coronary arteries, mast cells locate next to peptidergic sensory nerve fibers, which, by releasing neuropeptides may activate mast cells to release vasoactive compounds capable of triggering local vasoconstriction. The concerted actions of arterial mast cells have the potential to contribute to the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis, and ultimately to destabilization and rupture of an advanced atherosclerotic plaque with ensuing atherothrombotic complications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Mast Cells and IgE: From History to Today

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirohisa Saito

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Role of mast cells in allergy had remained undetermined until the discovery of IgE in 1966. Then, IgE purified from many Liters of plasma, which had been donated from a patient with fatal myeloma, was distributed to researchers all over the world, and thus accelerated exploring the mechanisms involved in allergic reactions, particularly about the role of mast cells and basophils in the IgE-mediated reactions. Identification of mast cells as a progeny of a bone marrow hematopoietic stem cell in 1977 led us to successful in vitro culture of human mast cells. Along with the development of molecular biological techniques, the structure of the high affinity IgE receptor (FceRI was determined in 1989. These findings and subsequent investigations brought deeper understanding of IgE-mediated allergic diseases in the past half century, especially where mast cells are involved. We have now even obtained the information about whole genome expression of FceRI-dependently activated mast cells. In sharp contrast to our comprehension of allergic diseases where IgE and mast cells are involved, the mechanisms involved in non-IgE-mediated allergic diseases or non-IgE-mediated phase of IgE-mediated diseases are almost left unsolved and are waiting for devoted investigators to reveal it.

  13. Tethered Pyrotechnic Apparatus for Acquiring a Ground Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jack; Zimmerman, Wayne; Wu, Jiunn Jenq; Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart

    2009-01-01

    A proposed alternative design for the balloon-borne ground-sampling system described in the immediately preceding article would not rely on free fall to drive a harpoonlike sample-collecting device into the ground. Instead, the harpoon-like sample-collecting device would be a pyrotechnically driven, tethered projectile. The apparatus would include a tripod that would be tethered to the gondola. A gun for shooting the projectile into the ground would be mounted at the apex of the tripod. The gun would include an electronic trigger circuit, a chamber at the breech end containing a pyrotechnic charge, and a barrel. A sabot would be placed in the barrel just below the pyrotechnic charge, and the tethered projectile would be placed in the barrel just below the sabot. The tripod feet would be equipped with contact sensors connected to the trigger circuit. In operation, the tripod would be lowered to the ground on its tether. Once contact with the ground was detected by the sensors on all three tripod feet, the trigger circuit would fire the pyrotechnic charge to drive the projectile into the ground. (Requiring contact among all three tripod feet and the ground would ensure that the projectile would be fired into the ground, rather than up toward the gondola or the balloon.) The tethered projectile would then be reeled back up to the gondola for analysis of the sample.

  14. Tethered Nanoparticle–Polymer Composites: Phase Stability and Curvature

    KAUST Repository

    Srivastava, Samanvaya

    2012-04-17

    Phase behavior of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) tethered silica nanoparticles dispersed in PEG hosts is investigated using small-angle X-ray scattering. Phase separation in dispersions of densely grafted nanoparticles is found to display strikingly different small-angle X-ray scattering signatures in comparison to phase-separated composites comprised of bare or sparsely grafted nanoparticles. A general diagram for the dispersion state and phase stability of polymer tethered nanoparticle-polymer composites incorporating results from this as well as various other contemporary studies is presented. We show that in the range of moderate to high grafting densities the dispersion state of nanoparticles in composites is largely insensitive to the grafting density of the tethered chains and chemistry of the polymer host. Instead, the ratio of the particle diameter to the size of the tethered chain and the ratio of the molecular weights of the host and tethered polymer chains (P/N) are shown to play a dominant role. Additionally, we find that well-functionalized nanoparticles form stable dispersions in their polymer host beyond the P/N limit that demarcates the wetting/dewetting transition in polymer brushes on flat substrates interacting with polymer melts. A general strategy for achieving uniform nanoparticle dispersion in polymers is proposed. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  15. Numerical Simulation of Tethered Underwater Kites for Power Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, Amirmahdi; Olinger, David; Tryggvason, Gretar

    2015-11-01

    An emerging renewable energy technology, tethered undersea kites (TUSK), which is used to extract hydrokinetic energy from ocean and tidal currents, is studied. TUSK systems consist of a rigid-winged ``kite,'' or glider, moving in an ocean current which is connected by tethers to a floating buoy on the ocean surface. The TUSK kite is a current speed enhancement device since the kite can move in high-speed, cross-current motion at 4-6 times the current velocity, thus producing more power than conventional marine turbines. A computational simulation is developed to simulate the dynamic motion of an underwater kite and extendable tether. A two-step projection method within a finite volume formulation, along with an Open MP acceleration method, is employed to solve the Navier-Stokes equations. An immersed boundary method is incorporated to model the fluid-structure interaction of the rigid kite (with NACA 0012 airfoil shape in 2D and NACA 0021 airfoil shape in 3D simulations) and the fluid flow. PID control methods are used to adjust the kite angle of attack during power (tether reel-out) and retraction (reel-in) phases. Two baseline simulations (for kite motions in two and three dimensions) are studied, and system power output, flow field vorticity, tether tension, and hydrodynamic coefficients (lift and drag) for the kite are determined. The simulated power output shows good agreement with established theoretical results for a kite moving in two-dimensions.

  16. Inula japonica extract inhibits mast cell-mediated allergic reaction and mast cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yue; Li, Ying; Jin, Meihua; Yang, Ju Hye; Li, Xian; Chao, Guang Hsuan; Park, Hyo-Hyun; Park, Young Na; Son, Jong Keun; Lee, Eunkyung; Chang, Hyeun Wook

    2012-08-30

    The flowers of Inula japonica (Inulae Flos) have long been used in traditional medicine for the treatment of bronchitis, digestive disorders, and inflammation. However, the mechanisms underlying its anti-inflammatory effects remain yet to be elucidated. The objectives of this study were 1) to assess the anti-allergic activity of the ethanol extract of flowers of Inula japonica extract (IFE) in vivo, 2) to investigate the mechanism of its action on mast cells in vitro, and 3) to identify its major phytochemical compositions. The anti-allergic activity of IFE was evaluated using mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) in vitro and a passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) animal model in vivo. The effects of IFE on mast cell activation were evaluated in terms of degranulation, eicosanoid generation, Ca(2+) influx, and immunoblotting of various signaling molecules. IFE inhibited degranulation and the generation of eicosanoids (PGD(2) and LTC(4)) in stem cell factor (SCF)-stimulated BMMCs. Biochemical analysis of the SCF-mediated signaling pathways demonstrated that IFE inhibited the activation of multiple downstream signaling processes including mobilization of intracellular Ca(2+) and phosphorylation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), PLCγ1, and cPLA(2) pathways. When administered orally, IFE attenuated the mast cell-mediated PCA reaction in IgE-sensitized mice. Its major phytochemical composition included three sesquiterpenes, 1-O-acetylbritannilactone, britanin and tomentosin. This study suggests that IFE modulates eicosanoids generation and degranulation through the suppression of SCF-mediated signaling pathways that would be beneficial for the prevention of allergic inflammatory diseases. Anti-allergic activity of IFE may be in part attributed particularly to the presence of britanin and tomentosin as major components evidenced by a HPLC analysis. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Histamine and TNF-α release by rat peritoneal mast cells stimulated with Trichomonas vaginalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Im S.J.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Mast cells have been reported to be predominant in the vaginal smears of patients infected with T. vaginalis. In this study, we investigated whether T. vaginalis could induce mast cells to migrate and to produce TNF-α and histamine. Rat peritoneal mast cells (RPMC, a primary mast cell, were used for the study. T. vaginalis induced an increase in chemotactic migration of the mast cells toward excretory and secretory product (ESP of T. vaginalis, and the mast cells activated with T. vaginalis showed an increased release of histamine and TNF-α. Therefore, mast cells may be involved in the inflammatory response caused by T. vaginalis.

  18. MAST CELLS DISTINGUISH EOSINOPHILIC ESOPHAGITIS IN PEDIATRIC PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizete Aparecida LOMAZI

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Mast cells exert a substantial role in gastrointestinal allergic diseases. Therefore, it is reasonable to presume that mast cell may aid diagnosis in eosinophilic gastroenteropathy. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether mast cell count in the esophageal epithelium can discriminate eosinophilic esophagitis, proton-pump inhibitor (PPI-responsive eosinophilic esophagitis and gastroesophageal reflux esophagitis. METHODS: Retrospectively we reviewed the files of 53 consecutive patients (age: 7.8 years; range: 8-14 years with definitive diagnose established during clinical follow up in a universitary outpatient clinic as follow: eosinophilic esophagitis (N=23, PPI-responsive eosinophilic esophagitis (N=15 and gastroesophageal reflux esophagitis (N=15. Eosinophil count in the esophageal epithelium in slides stained with H-E was reviewed and immunohistochemistry for mast cell tryptase was performed. RESULTS: Count of eosinophils/high-power field (HPF higher than 15 were found in 14 out of 15 reflux esophagitis patients. The mean count of eosinophils/HPF was similar in eosinophilic esophagitis patients and in those with PPI-responsive eosinophilic esophagitis (42 and 39 eosinophils/HPF, respectively, P=0.47. Values of mast cell tryptase (+ were higher in eosinophilic esophagitis [median: 25 mast cells/HPF; range (17-43 ] and in PPI-responsive eosinophilic esophagitis patients [25 (16-32 ], compared to reflux esophagitis [4 (2-14 ], P<0.001. There was no difference between the mean count of mast cells/HPF in the esophageal epithelium of eosinophilic esophagitis patients and PPI-responsive eosinophilic esophagitis patients, respectively, 26 and 24 mast cells/HPF, P=0.391. CONCLUSION: Tryptase staining of mast cells differentiates eosinophilic esophagitis from reflux esophagitis.

  19. Mast cells and gastrointestinal dysmotility in the cystic fibrosis mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert C De Lisle

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cystic fibrosis (CF has many effects on the gastrointestinal tract and a common problem in this disease is poor nutrition. In the CF mouse there is an innate immune response with a large influx of mast cells into the muscularis externa of the small intestine and gastrointestinal dysmotility. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential role of mast cells in gastrointestinal dysmotility using the CF mouse (Cftr(tm1UNC, Cftr knockout. METHODOLOGY: Wild type (WT and CF mice were treated for 3 weeks with mast cell stabilizing drugs (ketotifen, cromolyn, doxantrazole or were treated acutely with a mast cell activator (compound 48/80. Gastrointestinal transit was measured using gavage of a fluorescent tracer. RESULTS: In CF mice gastric emptying at 20 min post-gavage did not differ from WT, but was significantly less than in WT at 90 min post-gavage. Gastric emptying was significantly increased in WT mice by doxantrazole, but none of the mast cell stabilizers had any significant effect on gastric emptying in CF mice. Mast cell activation significantly enhanced gastric emptying in WT mice but not in CF mice. Small intestinal transit was significantly less in CF mice as compared to WT. Of the mast cell stabilizers, only doxantrazole significantly affected small intestinal transit in WT mice and none had any effect in CF mice. Mast cell activation resulted in a small but significant increase in small intestinal transit in CF mice but not WT mice. CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate that mast cells are not involved in gastrointestinal dysmotility but their activation can stimulate small intestinal transit in cystic fibrosis.

  20. Mast Cells in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Guo-Ping; Lindholt, Jes Sanddal

    2013-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are proinflammatory cells that play important roles in allergic responses, tumor growth, obesity, diabetes, atherosclerosis, and abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Although the presence and function of MCs in atherosclerotic lesions have been thoroughly studied in human specimens......, in primary cultured vascular cells, and in atherosclerosis in animals, their role in AAA was recognized only recently. Via multiple activation pathways, MCs release a spectrum of mediators � including histamine, inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, proteoglycans, and proteases � to activate...... neighboring cells, degrade extracellular matrix proteins, process latent bioactive molecules, promote angiogenesis, recruit additional inflammatory cells, and stimulate vascular cell apoptosis. These activities associate closely with medial elastica breakdown, medial smooth-muscle cell loss and thinning...

  1. MAST CELL TUMOR IN DOGS: RETROSPECTIVE STUDY MASTOCITOMA CANINO: ESTUDO RETROSPECTIVO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duvaldo Eurides

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available This retrospective study included 49 dogs, 28 males and 21 females, of several breeds, between two and 17 years old. The majority of dogs were mixed breed or Boxers and Teckels, six to nine years old. Eleven animals showed grade I mast cell tumor, 10 grade II and nine grade III. Surgery alone or associated with chemotherapy were performed in the most of cases. The results from our study indicate that surgery alone promotes the highest survival time because surgery procedure is indicated in cases with better prognosis. Teckels and Boxers show highest survival time. Dogs with multiple lesions have lowest survival time. The histologic grades of mast cell tumors have similar incidence, however the incidence tends to decrease from grade I to III. High-grade tumors promote lowest survival time. Fine needle aspiration cytology allow accurate diagnosis of canine mast cell tumors, although the histopathology is required to determine the histologic grade allowing an adequate treatment and so a highest survival time. Both incomplete chemotherapy and untreated groups have poor prognosis. In the most of cases the survival time is low. Este estudo retrospectivo incluiu um total de 49 cães, 28 machos e 21 fêmeas, de diversas raças, entre dois e 17 anos de idade. A maioria dos cães acometidos era mestiça ou da raça Boxer e Teckel, apresentavam idade entre seis e nove anos. Onze animais apresentaram mastocitoma grau I, 10 grau II e nove grau III. Na maioria dos casos, empreitou-se apenas a intervenção cirúrgica ou esta associada à quimioterapia. Conclui-se que a intervenção cirúrgica isolada, utilizada em casos de prognóstico favorável, proporciona maior sobrevida. Cães das raças Teckel e Boxer apresentam sobrevida maior. Cães acometidos em múltiplas regiões do corpo apresentam menor sobrevida. A incidência dos graus histológicos do mastocitoma canino se dá de forma semelhante, porém tende a decrescer do grau I ao III. Mastocitomas de

  2. Modeling of tethered satellite formations using graph theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Martin Birkelund; Smith, Roy S; Blanke, Mogens

    2011-01-01

    Tethered satellite formations have recently gained increasing attention due to future mission proposals. Several different formations have been investigated for their dynamic properties and control schemes have been suggested. Formulating the equations of motion and investigation which geometries...... satellite formation and proposes a method to deduce the equations of motion for the attitude dynamics of the formation in a compact form. The use of graph theory and Lagrange mechanics together allows a broad class of formations to be described using the same framework. A method is stated for finding...... could form stable formations in space are cumbersome when done at a case to case basis, and a common framework providing a basic model of the dynamics of tethered satellite formations can therefore be advantageous. This paper suggests the use of graph theoretical quantities to describe a tethered...

  3. Reliability of tethered swimming evaluation in age group swimmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaro, Nuno; Marinho, Daniel A; Batalha, Nuno; Marques, Mário C; Morouço, Pedro

    2014-06-28

    The aim of the present study was to examine the reliability of tethered swimming in the evaluation of age group swimmers. The sample was composed of 8 male national level swimmers with at least 4 years of experience in competitive swimming. Each swimmer performed two 30 second maximal intensity tethered swimming tests, on separate days. Individual force-time curves were registered to assess maximum force, mean force and the mean impulse of force. Both consistency and reliability were very strong, with Cronbach's Alpha values ranging from 0.970 to 0.995. All the applied metrics presented a very high agreement between tests, with the mean impulse of force presenting the highest. These results indicate that tethered swimming can be used to evaluate age group swimmers. Furthermore, better comprehension of the swimmers ability to effectively exert force in the water can be obtained using the impulse of force.

  4. Reliability of Tethered Swimming Evaluation in Age Group Swimmers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amaro Nuno

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to examine the reliability of tethered swimming in the evaluation of age group swimmers. The sample was composed of 8 male national level swimmers with at least 4 years of experience in competitive swimming. Each swimmer performed two 30 second maximal intensity tethered swimming tests, on separate days. Individual force-time curves were registered to assess maximum force, mean force and the mean impulse of force. Both consistency and reliability were very strong, with Cronbach's Alpha values ranging from 0.970 to 0.995. All the applied metrics presented a very high agreement between tests, with the mean impulse of force presenting the highest. These results indicate that tethered swimming can be used to evaluate age group swimmers. Furthermore, better comprehension of the swimmers ability to effectively exert force in the water can be obtained using the impulse of force.

  5. Progressive coxa vara by eccentric growth tethering in immature pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia-Hsieh; Chi, Chau-Hwa; Lee, Zhon-Liau

    2006-07-01

    The present study tested progressive coxa vara by eccentric growth tethering that might be used to correct coxa valga in cerebral palsy. Eight young pigs received screw fixation at inferior portion of right femoral head at age 4 months and were killed at age 7.25 months for bilateral femurs for comparison. The neck-shaft angle at the tethered side was significantly less than that at the control side (129.8 vs. 138.3 degrees , P<0.05). Histological study showed bony bar formation. Eccentric growth tethering by one screw resulted in a reduction of neck-shaft angle by 8.5 degrees and shortening of femoral length by 4%.

  6. Behavior During Tethered Kicking in Infants With Periventricular Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Suzann K; Cole, Whitney; Boynewicz, Kara; Zawacki, Laura A; Clark, April; Gaebler-Spira, Deborah; deRegnier, Raye-Ann; Kuroda, Maxine M; Kale, Dipti; Bulanda, Michele; Madhavan, Sangeetha

    2015-01-01

    To describe behavior of children with periventricular brain injury (PBI) in a tethered-kicking intervention. Sixteen infants with PBI were randomly assigned to exercise or no-training in a longitudinal pilot study. Frequencies of leg movements and interlimb coordination were described from videos at 2 and 4 months' corrected age (CA). Eight of the 13 children (62%) with longitudinal data increased the frequency of leg movements while tethered to a mobile between 2 and 4 months' CA. Movement frequency was correlated with scores on the Test of Infant Motor Performance, but no differences between experimental groups were found. Children with typical development at 12 months' CA increased the proportion of leg movements that were synchronous between 2 and 4 months, as did a child with cerebral palsy in the experimental group. The tethered-kicking intervention facilitates movement in infants with PBI, but effects on development remain to be demonstrated.

  7. Anchoring a Leviathan: How the Nuclear Membrane Tethers the Genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafal eCzapiewski

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that the nuclear envelope has many distinct direct connections to chromatin that contribute to genome organization. The functional consequences of genome organization on gene regulation are less clear. Even less understood is how interactions of lamins and nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins (NETs with chromatin can produce anchoring tethers that can withstand the physical forces of and on the genome. Chromosomes are the largest molecules in the cell, making megadalton protein structures like the nuclear pore complexes and ribosomes seem small by comparison. Thus to withstand strong forces from chromosome dynamics an anchoring tether is likely to be much more complex than a single protein-protein or protein-DNA interaction. Here we will briefly review known NE-genome interactions that likely contribute to spatial genome organization, postulate in the context of experimental data how these anchoring tethers contribute to gene regulation, and posit several hypotheses for the physical nature of these tethers that need to be investigated experimentally. Significantly, disruption of these anchoring tethers and the subsequent consequences for gene regulation could explain how mutations in nuclear envelope proteins cause diseases ranging from muscular dystrophy to lipodystrophy to premature ageing progeroid syndromes. The two favored hypotheses for nuclear envelope protein involvement in disease are 1 weakening nuclear and cellular mechanical stability, and 2 disrupting genome organization and gene regulation. Considerable experimental support has been obtained for both. The integration of both mechanical and gene expression defects in the disruption of anchoring tethers could provide a unifying hypothesis consistent with both.

  8. Salmonella exploits the host endolysosomal tethering factor HOPS complex to promote its intravacuolar replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindhwani, Aastha; Kaur, Harmeet; Tuli, Amit

    2017-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium extensively remodels the host late endocytic compartments to establish its vacuolar niche within the host cells conducive for its replication, also known as the Salmonella-containing vacuole (SCV). By maintaining a prolonged interaction with late endosomes and lysosomes of the host cells in the form of interconnected network of tubules (Salmonella-induced filaments or SIFs), Salmonella gains access to both membrane and fluid-phase cargo from these compartments. This is essential for maintaining SCV membrane integrity and for bacterial intravacuolar nutrition. Here, we have identified the multisubunit lysosomal tethering factor—HOPS (HOmotypic fusion and Protein Sorting) complex as a crucial host factor facilitating delivery of late endosomal and lysosomal content to SCVs, providing membrane for SIF formation, and nutrients for intravacuolar bacterial replication. Accordingly, depletion of HOPS subunits significantly reduced the bacterial load in non-phagocytic and phagocytic cells as well as in a mouse model of Salmonella infection. We found that Salmonella effector SifA in complex with its binding partner; SKIP, interacts with HOPS subunit Vps39 and mediates recruitment of this tethering factor to SCV compartments. The lysosomal small GTPase Arl8b that binds to, and promotes membrane localization of Vps41 (and other HOPS subunits) was also required for HOPS recruitment to SCVs and SIFs. Our findings suggest that Salmonella recruits the host late endosomal and lysosomal membrane fusion machinery to its vacuolar niche for access to host membrane and nutrients, ensuring its intracellular survival and replication. PMID:29084291

  9. An experimental study of tether reel system: A laboratory model

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshimura, Shoichi; Okamoto, Osamu; 吉村 庄市; 岡本 修

    1992-01-01

    A laboratory prototype model of a reel system has been made as the first step of an in-house hardware study of the tether system in space. The model is consisted of two main parts, i. e., a Reel Drum Driving (RDD) unit (25 kg weight) and a Power Supply/Signal Processing (PSSP) unit (32 kg weight). The tether (0.8 mm in diameter and 300 m long) consists of a Kevlar fiber core and a nylon fiber jacket. Following the preliminary functional test, a computer-controlled functional test has been car...

  10. Regulation of mast cell activation by complement-derived peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdei, Anna; Andrásfalvy, Márton; Péterfy, Hajna; Tóth, Gábor; Pecht, Israel

    2004-03-29

    It is known for more than 25 years that the complement-derived anaphylatoxic peptides, C3a, C4a and C5a are potent activators of basophils and certain types of mast cells. Although tissue distribution of receptors for C3a and C5a well exceeds myeloid cells, apparently they are not expressed on mucosal type mast cells, consequently these cells are not activated by C3a and C5a. Our results do however demonstrate that C3a and peptides related to this complement activation product are able to inhibit FcRI-clustering induced activation of mucosal type mast cells-such as RBL-2H3 cells and bone-marrow derived mast cells. Based on the current results we propose the presence of separate "activator" and "inhibitor" sequence motifs in C3a which are in balance under physiologic conditions.

  11. Quantification and Localization of Mast Cells in Periapical Lesions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of the potential range of mast cell function and interactions in. Quantification and .... [4] A great variety of bacterial antigens may stimulate host immune responses ... the thickness of the cyst capsule indicated that they were more prevalent just ...

  12. Fatigue failure and cracking in high mast poles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    This report presents the findings of a comprehensive research project to investigate the fatigue : cracking and failure of galvanized high mast illumination poles (HMIP). Ultrasonic inspection of : poles throughout the state has revealed the presence...

  13. Mast Cell Inhibition Improves Pulmonary Vascular Remodeling in Pulmonary Hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartelds, Beatrijs; van Loon, Rosa Laura E.; Mohaupt, Saffloer; Wijnberg, Hans; Dickinson, Michael G.; Takens, Janny; van Albada, Mirjam; Berger, Rolf M. F.; Boersma, B.

    Background: Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a progressive angioproliferative disease with high morbidity and mortality. Although the histopathology is well described, its pathogenesis is largely unknown. We previously identified the increased presence of mast cells and their markers in a

  14. Membrane tethers formed from blood cells with available area and determination of their adhesion energy.

    OpenAIRE

    Hochmuth, Robert M; Marcus, Warren D.

    2002-01-01

    Fundamental to all mammalian cells is the adherence of the lipid bilayer membrane to the underlying membrane associated cytoskeleton. To investigate this adhesion, we physically detach the lipid membrane from the cell by mechanically forming membrane tethers. For the most part these have been tethers formed from either neutrophils or red cells. Here we do a simple thermodynamic analysis of the tether formation process using the entire cell, including tether, as the control volume. For a neutr...

  15. Optimal Electrostatic Space Tower (Mast, New Space Elevator)

    OpenAIRE

    Bolonkin, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    Author offers and researched the new and revolutionary inflatable electrostatic AB space towers (mast, new space elevator) up to one hundred twenty thousands kilometers (or more) in height. The main innovation is filling the tower by electron gas, which can create pressure up one atmosphere, has negligible small weight and surprising properties. The suggested mast has following advantages in comparison with conventional space elevator: 1. Electrostatic AB tower may be built from Earth surface...

  16. Optimal Trajectories for Tethered Kite Mounted on a Vertical Axis Generator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Williams, P.; Lansdorp, B.; Ockels, W.

    2007-01-01

    Tethered kite technology promises the enable the efficient extraction of energy from high altitude winds. One possible concept for converting the wind energy into electricity is to generate useful work at the ground by using a tether. The tether is able to drive a generator in one of two ways:

  17. Nonlinear Control of Electrodynamic Tether in Equatorial or Somewhat Inclined Orbits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Martin Birkelund; Blanke, Mogens

    2007-01-01

    This paper applies different control design methods to a tethered satellite system (TSS) to investigate essential control properties of this under-actuated and nonlinear system. When the tether position in the orbit plane is controlled by the tether current, out of orbit plane motions occur...

  18. Mast cells protect against Pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junkins, Robert D; Carrigan, Svetlana O; Wu, Zhengli; Stadnyk, Andrew W; Cowley, Elizabeth; Issekutz, Thomas; Berman, Jason; Lin, Tong-Jun

    2014-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen, is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in immune-compromised individuals. Maintaining the integrity of the respiratory epithelium is critical for an effective host response to P. aeruginosa. Given the close spatial relationship between mast cells and the respiratory epithelium, and the importance of tightly regulated epithelial permeability during lung infections, we examined whether mast cells influence airway epithelial integrity during P. aeruginosa lung infection in a mouse model. We found that mast cell-deficient Kit(W-sh)/Kit(W-sh) mice displayed greatly increased epithelial permeability, bacterial dissemination, and neutrophil accumulation compared with wild-type animals after P. aeruginosa infection; these defects were corrected on reconstitution with mast cells. An in vitro Transwell co-culture model further demonstrated that a secreted mast cell factor decreased epithelial cell apoptosis and tumor necrosis factor production after P. aeruginosa infection. Together, our data demonstrate a previously unrecognized role for mast cells in the maintenance of epithelial integrity during P. aeruginosa infection, through a mechanism that likely involves prevention of epithelial apoptosis and tumor necrosis factor production. Our understanding of mechanisms of the host response to P. aeruginosa will open new avenues for the development of successful preventative and treatment strategies. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The role of mast cells in vascularized recurrent pterygium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Riza Cenk Celebi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine and compare the mast cell count in primary and recurrent vascularized pterygium, and in normal bulbar conjunctiva. Methods: The study included 22 patients with primary pterygium (PP group and 28 patients with vascularized recurrent pterygium (VRP group that underwent excision via the limbal conjunctival autograft technique. Normal conjunctiva samples were collected from the superotemporal bulbar conjunctival region, just temporal to the site from which the autograft conjunctival tissue was harvested. The total number of mast cells in the pterygium (primary and recurrent and control tissue samples was calculated microscopically using 1% toluidine blue stain under 400× magnification. Results: The mean mast cell count in primary and vascularized recurrent pterygium tissue was 7.45 ± 2.06 mm–2 and 16.11 ± 4.33 mm–2, respectively, and the difference was significant (independent samples t-test, P<0.001. The mean mast cell count in pterygium tissue was significantly higher than that in normal conjunctiva tissue in both groups (Student's t-test, P<0.001. Conclusion: An increase in the number of mast cells might play a role in the pathogenesis of recurrent pterygium. Determination of a mast cell count cut-off value could be of diagnostic significance for recurrent pterygium.

  20. Mast cell-derived histamine mediates cystitis pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles N Rudick

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Mast cells trigger inflammation that is associated with local pain, but the mechanisms mediating pain are unclear. Interstitial cystitis (IC is a bladder disease that causes debilitating pelvic pain of unknown origin and without consistent inflammation, but IC symptoms correlate with elevated bladder lamina propria mast cell counts. We hypothesized that mast cells mediate pelvic pain directly and examined pain behavior using a murine model that recapitulates key aspects of IC.Infection of mice with pseudorabies virus (PRV induces a neurogenic cystitis associated with lamina propria mast cell accumulation dependent upon tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF, TNF-mediated bladder barrier dysfunction, and pelvic pain behavior, but the molecular basis for pelvic pain is unknown. In this study, both PRV-induced pelvic pain and bladder pathophysiology were abrogated in mast cell-deficient mice but were restored by reconstitution with wild type bone marrow. Pelvic pain developed normally in TNF- and TNF receptor-deficient mice, while bladder pathophysiology was abrogated. Conversely, genetic or pharmacologic disruption of histamine receptor H1R or H2R attenuated pelvic pain without altering pathophysiology.These data demonstrate that mast cells promote cystitis pain and bladder pathophysiology through the separable actions of histamine and TNF, respectively. Therefore, pain is independent of pathology and inflammation, and histamine receptors represent direct therapeutic targets for pain in IC and other chronic pain conditions.

  1. The Mast Cell, Contact, and Coagulation System Connection in Anaphylaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mar Guilarte

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Anaphylaxis is the most severe form of allergic reaction, resulting from the effect of mediators and chemotactic substances released by activated cells. Mast cells and basophils are considered key players in IgE-mediated human anaphylaxis. Beyond IgE-mediated activation of mast cells/basophils, further mechanisms are involved in the occurrence of anaphylaxis. New insights into the potential relevance of pathways other than mast cell and basophil degranulation have been unraveled, such as the activation of the contact and the coagulation systems. Mast cell heparin released upon activation provides negatively charged surfaces for factor XII (FXII binding and auto-activation. Activated FXII, the initiating serine protease in both the contact and the intrinsic coagulation system, activates factor XI and prekallikrein, respectively. FXII-mediated bradykinin (BK formation has been proven in the human plasma of anaphylactic patients as well as in experimental models of anaphylaxis. Moreover, the severity of anaphylaxis is correlated with the increase in plasma heparin, BK formation and the intensity of contact system activation. FXII also activates plasminogen in the fibrinolysis system. Mast cell tryptase has been shown to participate in fibrinolysis through plasmin activation and by facilitating the degradation of fibrinogen. Some usual clinical manifestations in anaphylaxis, such as angioedema or hypotension, or other less common, such as metrorrhagia, may be explained by the direct effect of the activation of the coagulation and contact system driven by mast cell mediators.

  2. Mast cells, peptides and cardioprotection - an unlikely marriage?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, S K

    2012-01-31

    1 Mast cells have classically been regarded as the \\'bad guys\\' in the setting of acute myocardial ischaemia, where their released contents are believed to contribute both to tissue injury and electrical disturbances resulting from ischaemia. Recent evidence suggests, however, that if mast cell degranulation occurs in advance of ischaemia onset, this may be cardioprotective by virtue of the depletion of mast cell contents that can no longer act as instruments of injury when the tissue becomes ischaemic. 2 Many peptides, such as ET-1, adrenomedullin, relaxin and atrial natriuretic peptide, have been demonstrated to be cardioprotective when given prior to the onset of myocardial ischaemia, although their physiological functions are varied and the mechanisms of their cardioprotective actions appear to be diverse and often ill defined. However, one common denominator that is emerging is the ability of these peptides to modulate mast cell degranulation, raising the possibility that peptide-induced mast cell degranulation or stabilization may hold the key to a common mechanism of their cardioprotection. 3 The aim of this review was to consolidate the evidence implying that mast cell degranulation could play both a detrimental and protective role in myocardial ischaemia, depending upon when it occurs, and that this may underlie the cardioprotective effects of a range of diverse peptides that exerts physiological effects within the cardiovascular system.

  3. Quantitation of mast cells and collagen fibers in skin tags

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Safoury Omar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Skin tags are common benign skin tumors usually occurring on the neck and major flexors of elder people. Aims: The aim of this study is to perform quantitation of mast cells and collagen fibers in skin tags and normal skin in diabetics and nondiabetics, to find a possible correlation between mast cells and collagen fibers in the pathogenesis of skin tags. Methods: Thirty participants with skin tags were divided into two groups (15 diabetic and 15 nondiabetic. Three biopsies were obtained from one anatomical site: A large skin tag, a small skin tag, and adjacent normal skin. Mast cells stained with Bismarck brown were counted manually in ten different fields of each section with magnification Χ1000 and the average count was correlated with the percentage of mean collagen area in five fields done by the image analyzer. Results: A statistically significant correlation between mast cell count and percentage of collagen mean area was detected in both studied groups (except in large skin tags of the nondiabetic group. Conclusion: The positive correlation between mast cell count and percentage of collagen mean area suggests the critical role of mast cells in the etiogenesis of skin tags through its interaction with fibroblasts.

  4. Overview of physics results from MAST towards ITER/DEMO and the MAST Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, H.; Abel, I. G.; Akers, R. J.; Allan, A.; Allan, S. Y.; Appel, L. C.; Asunta, O.; Barnes, M.; Barratt, N. C.; Ben Ayed, N.; Bradley, J. W.; Canik, J.; Cahyna, P.; Cecconello, M.; Challis, C. D.; Chapman, I. T.; Ciric, D.; Colyer, G.; Conway, N. J.; Cox, M.; Crowley, B. J.; Cowley, S. C.; Cunningham, G.; Danilov, A.; Darke, A.; De Bock, M. F. M.; De Temmerman, G.; Dendy, R. O.; Denner, P.; Dickinson, D.; Dnestrovsky, A. Y.; Dnestrovsky, Y.; Driscoll, M. D.; Dudson, B.; Dunai, D.; Dunstan, M.; Dura, P.; Elmore, S.; Field, A. R.; Fishpool, G.; Freethy, S.; Fundamenski, W.; Garzotti, L.; Ghim, Y. C.; Gibson, K. J.; Gryaznevich, M. P.; Harrison, J.; Havlíčková, E.; Hawkes, N. C.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Hender, T. C.; Highcock, E.; Higgins, D.; Hill, P.; Hnat, B.; Hole, M. J.; Horáček, J.; Howell, D. F.; Imada, K.; Jones, O.; Kaveeva, E.; Keeling, D.; Kirk, A.; Kočan, M.; Lake, R. J.; Lehnen, M.; Leggate, H. J.; Liang, Y.; Lilley, M. K.; Lisgo, S. W.; Liu, Y. Q.; Lloyd, B.; Maddison, G. P.; Mailloux, J.; Martin, R.; McArdle, G. J.; McClements, K. G.; McMillan, B.; Michael, C.; Militello, F.; Molchanov, P.; Mordijck, S.; Morgan, T.; Morris, A. W.; Muir, D. G.; Nardon, E.; Naulin, V.; Naylor, G.; Nielsen, A. H.; O'Brien, M. R.; O'Gorman, T.; Pamela, S.; Parra, F. I.; Patel, A.; Pinches, S. D.; Price, M. N.; Roach, C. M.; Robinson, J. R.; Romanelli, M.; Rozhansky, V.; Saarelma, S.; Sangaroon, S.; Saveliev, A.; Scannell, R.; Seidl, J.; Sharapov, S. E.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Shevchenko, V.; Shibaev, S.; Stork, D.; Storrs, J.; Sykes, A.; Tallents, G. J.; Tamain, P.; Taylor, D.; Temple, D.; Thomas-Davies, N.; Thornton, A.; Turnyanskiy, M. R.; Valovič, M.; Vann, R. G. L.; Verwichte, E.; Voskoboynikov, P.; Voss, G.; Warder, S. E. V.; Wilson, H. R.; Wodniak, I.; Zoletnik, S.; Zagôrski, R.; MAST, the; NBI Teams

    2013-10-01

    New diagnostic, modelling and plant capability on the Mega Ampère Spherical Tokamak (MAST) have delivered important results in key areas for ITER/DEMO and the upcoming MAST Upgrade, a step towards future ST devices on the path to fusion currently under procurement. Micro-stability analysis of the pedestal highlights the potential roles of micro-tearing modes and kinetic ballooning modes for the pedestal formation. Mitigation of edge localized modes (ELM) using resonant magnetic perturbation has been demonstrated for toroidal mode numbers n = 3, 4, 6 with an ELM frequency increase by up to a factor of 9, compatible with pellet fuelling. The peak heat flux of mitigated and natural ELMs follows the same linear trend with ELM energy loss and the first ELM-resolved Ti measurements in the divertor region are shown. Measurements of flow shear and turbulence dynamics during L-H transitions show filaments erupting from the plasma edge whilst the full flow shear is still present. Off-axis neutral beam injection helps to strongly reduce the redistribution of fast-ions due to fishbone modes when compared to on-axis injection. Low-k ion-scale turbulence has been measured in L-mode and compared to global gyro-kinetic simulations. A statistical analysis of principal turbulence time scales shows them to be of comparable magnitude and reasonably correlated with turbulence decorrelation time. Te inside the island of a neoclassical tearing mode allow the analysis of the island evolution without assuming specific models for the heat flux. Other results include the discrepancy of the current profile evolution during the current ramp-up with solutions of the poloidal field diffusion equation, studies of the anomalous Doppler resonance compressional Alfvén eigenmodes, disruption mitigation studies and modelling of the new divertor design for MAST Upgrade. The novel 3D electron Bernstein synthetic imaging shows promising first data sensitive to the edge current profile and flows.

  5. The value of intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring in tethered cord surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoving, Eelco W.; Haitsma, Esther; Ophuis, Charlotte M. C. Oude; Journee, Henricus L.

    The value of intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IONM) with surgical detethering in dysraphic patients has been questioned. A retrospective analysis of our series of 65 patients is presented with special focus on technical set-up and outcome. All patients were diagnosed with a tethered

  6. 75 FR 47316 - Centennial Challenges 2010 Strong Tether Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-05

    ... Challenge will be conducted at the 2010 Space Elevator Conference held at the Microsoft Conference Center... SPACE ADMINISTRATION Centennial Challenges 2010 Strong Tether Challenge AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This notice is issued in accordance with 42 U.S.C...

  7. 76 FR 41526 - Centennial Challenges 2011 Strong Tether Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-14

    ... Challenge will be conducted at the 2011 Space Elevator Conference held at the Microsoft Conference Center... SPACE ADMINISTRATION Centennial Challenges 2011 Strong Tether Challenge AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This notice is issued in accordance with 42 U.S.C...

  8. Three dimensional dynamics of a flexible Motorised Momentum Exchange Tether

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, N. A.; Cartmell, M. P.

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a new flexural model for the three dimensional dynamics of the Motorised Momentum Exchange Tether (MMET) concept. This study has uncovered the relationships between planar and nonplanar motions, and the effect of the coupling between these two parameters on pragmatic circular and elliptical orbits. The tether sub-spans are modelled as stiffened strings governed by partial differential equations of motion, with specific boundary conditions. The tether sub-spans are flexible and elastic, thereby allowing three dimensional displacements. The boundary conditions lead to a specific frequency equation and the eigenvalues from this provide the natural frequencies of the orbiting flexible motorised tether when static, accelerating in monotonic spin, and at terminal angular velocity. A rotation transformation matrix has been utilised to get the position vectors of the system's components in an assumed inertial frame. Spatio-temporal coordinates are transformed to modal coordinates before applying Lagrange's equations, and pre-selected linear modes are included to generate the equations of motion. The equations of motion contain inertial nonlinearities which are essentially of cubic order, and these show the potential for intricate intermodal coupling effects. A simulation of planar and non-planar motions has been undertaken and the differences in the modal responses, for both motions, and between the rigid body and flexible models are highlighted and discussed.

  9. Tethered Nanoparticle -Polymer Composites: Phase behavior and rheology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangal, Rahul; Archer, Lynden A.

    2014-03-01

    Polymer nanocomposites with particle radius (a) approaching the radius of gyration (Rg) of entangled host polymer have been reported to exhibit an unusual negative reinforcement effect, which leads to an anomalous reduction in relative an anomalous reduction in relative viscosity at low particle loadings (φ) . This so-called Non-Einsteinian flow behavior is understood to be sensitive to the dispersion state of particles in host polymer. We studied suspensions of SiO2 nanoparticles tethered with polethylene glycol (PEG) in polymethylmethacralate (PMMA) with molecular weights (Mw) from 17 KDa to 280 KDa. Due to strong enthalpic interactions between PEG and PMMA (χ = -0.65), nanoparticles are expected to be well-dispersed, independent of Mw of PMMA. Using small angle x-ray scattering measurements we show that the phase stability of suspensions depends on Mw of the tethered PEG, host PMMA, and φ. Particles functionalized with low molecular weight PEG aggregate at low φ, but disperse at high φ. In contrast, nanoparticles functionalized with higher molecular weight PEG are well dispersed for host chain lengths (P) to tethered chain length (N), (P/N), is as high as 160. The stability boundary of these suspensions extends well beyond expectations for nanocomposites based on tethered PEG chains suspended in PEG. Through in-depth analysis of rheology and x-ray photon correlation spectra we explore the fundamental origins of non-Einsteinian flow behavior. King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Advanced Photon Source (APS).

  10. Power and charge dissipation from an electrodynamic tether

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hite, Gerald E.

    1987-01-01

    The Plasma Motor-Generator project utilizes the influence of the geomagnetic field on a conductive tether attached to a LEO spacecraft to provide a reversible conversion of orbital energy into electrical energy. The behavior of the current into the ionospheric plasma under the influence of the geomagnetic field is of significant experimental and theoretical interest. Theoretical calculations are reviewed which start from Maxwell's equations and treat the ionospheric plasma as a linear dielectric medium. These calculations show a charge emitting tether moving in a magnetic field will generate electromagnetic waves in the plasma which carry the charge in the direction of the magnetic field. The ratio of the tether's speed to the ion cyclotron frequency which is about 25 m for a LEO is a characteristic length for the phenomena. Whereas for the dimensions of the contact plasma much larger than this value the waves are the conventional Alfven waves, when the dimensions are comparable or smaller, diffraction effects occur similar to those associated with Fresnel diffraction in optics. The power required to excite these waves for a given tether current is used to estimate the impedance associated with this mode of charge dissipation.

  11. Metal-ligand cooperation at tethered pi-ligands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, Dide G. A.; Moret, Marc-Etienne

    2016-01-01

    Metal–ligand cooperativity in homogeneous catalysis is emerging as a powerful tool for the design of efficient transition-metal catalysts. This perspective highlights recent advances in the use of neutral π-coordinating ligands, tethered to a transition-metal center by other donor ligands, as

  12. Hierarchical Structure in Semicrystalline Polymers Tethered to Nanospheres

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Sung A

    2014-01-28

    We report on structural and dynamic transitions of polymers tethered to nanoparticles. In particular, we use X-ray diffraction, vibrational spectroscopy, and thermal measurements to investigate multiscale structure and dynamic transitions of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) chains densely grafted to SiO2 nanoparticles. The approach used for synthesizing these hybrid particles leads to homogeneous SiO2-PEG composites with polymer grafting densities as high as 1.5 chains/nm2, which allows the hybrid materials to exist as self-suspended suspensions with distinct hierarchical structure and thermal properties. On angstrom and nanometer length scales, the tethered PEG chains exhibit more dominant TTG conformations and helix unit cell structure, in comparison to the untethered polymer. The nanoparticle tethered PEG chains are also reported to form extended crystallites on tens of nanometers length scales and to exhibit more stable crystalline structure on small dimensions. On length scales comparable to the size of each hybrid SiO 2-PEG unit, the materials are amorphous presumably as a result of the difficulty fitting the nanoparticle anchors into the PEG crystal lattice. This structural change produces large effects on the thermal transitions of PEG molecules tethered to nanoparticles. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  13. Nano-mechanics of HaloTag Tethers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa, Ionel; Berkovich, Ronen; Alegre-Cebollada, Jorge; Badilla, Carmen L.; Rivas-Pardo, Jaime Andres; Taniguchi, Yukinori; Kawakami, Masaru; Fernandez, Julio M.

    2013-01-01

    The active site of the Haloalkane Dehydrogenase (HaloTag) enzyme can be covalently attached to a chloroalkane ligand providing a mechanically strong tether, resistant to large pulling forces. Here we demonstrate the covalent tethering of protein L and I27 polyproteins between an AFM cantilever and a glass surface using HaloTag anchoring at one end, and thiol chemistry at the other end. Covalent tethering is unambiguously confirmed by the observation of full length polyprotein unfolding, combined with high detachment forces that range up to ~2000 pN. We use these covalently anchored polyproteins to study the remarkable mechanical properties of HaloTag proteins. We show that the force that triggers unfolding of the HaloTag protein exhibits a four-fold increase, from 131 pN to 491 pN, when the direction of the applied force is changed from the C-terminus to the N-terminus. Force-clamp experiments reveal that unfolding of the HaloTag protein is twice more sensitive to pulling force compared to protein L, and refolds at a slower rate. We show how these properties allow for the long-term observation of protein folding-unfolding cycles at high forces, without interference from the HaloTag tether. PMID:23909704

  14. Fortissimo: A Japanese Space Test Of Bare Wire Anode Tethers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Les; Fujii, H. A.; Sanmartin, J. R.

    2008-01-01

    A Japanese led international team is developing a suborbital test of orbital-motion-limited (OML) bare wire anode current collection for application to electrodynamic tether (EDT) propulsion. The tether is a tape with a width of 25 mm, thickness of 0.05 mm, and is 300 m in length. This will be the first space test of OML theory. The mission will launch in the summer of 2009 using an S520 Sounding Rocket. During ascent, and above approx. 100 km in attitude, the tape tether will be deployed at a rate of approx. 8 m/s. Once deployed, the tape tether will serve as an anode, collecting ionospheric electrons. The electrons will be expelled into space by a hollow cathode device, thereby completing the circuit and allowing current to flow. The total amount of current collected will be used to assess the validity of OML theory. This paper will describe the objectives of the proposed mission, the technologies to be employed, and the application of the results to future space missions using EDTs for propulsion or power generation.

  15. Flight control and stability of a multiple kites tethered system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Podgaets, A.R.; Ockels, W.J.

    2006-01-01

    One of novel concepts to use the energy of high altitude winds is by launching a series of kite on a long rope and let them pull the rope thus driving the generator. A mathematical model of tethered kites system has been developed consisting of models of kites and of the cable that links them

  16. Position Control of an X4-Flyer Using a Tether

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    , Keigo Watanabe

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In Japan, aging of infrastructures, such as roads, bridges, and water and sewer services, etc. poses a problem, and it is required to extend the life-span of such infrastructures by maintenance. Among infrastructures, especially bridges are periodically inspected by short range visual observations, which check the damage and deterioration of the surface. However, since there are some cases where the short range visual observation is difficult, an alternative method is required so as to replace the short range visual observation with it. So, "X4-Flyer" is very attractive because of realizing a movement at high altitude easily. The objective of this study is to develop a tethered X4- Flyer, so that the conventional short range visual observation of bridges is replaced by it. In this paper, a method for the measurement and control of the position is described by using a tether for controlling the position of the X4-Flyer. In addition, it is checked whether the tethered X4-Flyer can control the position using the proposed method or not, letting it fly in a state in which a tether is being attached.

  17. T-Rex: A Japanese Space Tether Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Les

    2009-01-01

    Electrodynamic tether (EDT) thrusters work by virtue of the force a magnetic field exerts on a wire carrying an electrical current. The force, which acts on any charged particle moving through a magnetic field (including the electrons moving in a current-carrying wire), were concisely expressed by Lorentz in 1895 in an equation that now bears his name. The force acts in a direction perpendicular to both the direction of current flow and the magnetic field vector. Electric motors make use of this force: a wire loop in a magnetic field is made to rotate by the torque the Lorentz Force exerts on it due to an alternating current in the loop times so as to keep the torque acting in the same sense. The motion of the loop is transmitted to a shaft, thus providing work. Although the working principle of EDT thrusters is not new, its application to space transportation may be significant. In essence, an EDT thruster is just a clever way of getting an electrical current to flow in a long orbiting wire (the tether) so that the Earth s magnetic field will accelerate the wire and, consequently the payload attached to the wire. The direction of current flow in the tether, either toward or away from the Earth along the local vertical, determines whether the magnetic force will raise or lower the orbit. The bias voltage of a vertically deployed metal tether, which results just from its orbital motion (assumed eastward) through Earth s magnetic field, is positive with respect to the ambient plasma at the top and negative at the bottom. This polarization is due to the action of the Lorentz force on the electrons in the tether. Thus, the natural current flow is the result of negative electrons being attracted to the upper end and then returned to the plasma at the lower end. The magnetic force in this case has a component opposite to the direction of motion, and thus leads to a lowering of the orbit and eventually to re-entry. In this generator mode of operation the Lorentz Force

  18. Autonomous Vision-Based Tethered-Assisted Rover Docking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Dorian; Nesnas, Issa A.D.; Zarzhitsky, Dimitri

    2013-01-01

    Many intriguing science discoveries on planetary surfaces, such as the seasonal flows on crater walls and skylight entrances to lava tubes, are at sites that are currently inaccessible to state-of-the-art rovers. The in situ exploration of such sites is likely to require a tethered platform both for mechanical support and for providing power and communication. Mother/daughter architectures have been investigated where a mother deploys a tethered daughter into extreme terrains. Deploying and retracting a tethered daughter requires undocking and re-docking of the daughter to the mother, with the latter being the challenging part. In this paper, we describe a vision-based tether-assisted algorithm for the autonomous re-docking of a daughter to its mother following an extreme terrain excursion. The algorithm uses fiducials mounted on the mother to improve the reliability and accuracy of estimating the pose of the mother relative to the daughter. The tether that is anchored by the mother helps the docking process and increases the system's tolerance to pose uncertainties by mechanically aligning the mating parts in the final docking phase. A preliminary version of the algorithm was developed and field-tested on the Axel rover in the JPL Mars Yard. The algorithm achieved an 80% success rate in 40 experiments in both firm and loose soils and starting from up to 6 m away at up to 40 deg radial angle and 20 deg relative heading. The algorithm does not rely on an initial estimate of the relative pose. The preliminary results are promising and help retire the risk associated with the autonomous docking process enabling consideration in future martian and lunar missions.

  19. The International Tethered Cord Partnership: Beginnings, process, and status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulholland, Celene B.; Aranda, Guzmán; Arredondo, Luis Angel; Calgua, Erwin; Contreras, Fernando; Espinoza, Dulce Maria; Gonzalez, Juan Bosco; Hoil, Jose A.; Komolafe, Edward; Lazareff, Jorge A.; Liu, Yunhui; Soto-Mancilla, Juan Luis; Mannucci, Graciela; Nan, Bao; Portillo, Santiago; Zhao, Hongyu

    2011-01-01

    Background: Spina bifida presents a significant cause of childhood morbidity in lower- and middle-income nations. Unfortunately, there is a paucity of literature examining outcomes among children with spina bifida in these countries. The goal of the International Tethered Cord Parternship is twofold: (1) to establish an international surveillance database to examine the correlation between time of repair and clinical outcomes in children with spina bifida and tethered cord; and (2) to foster collaboration among international institutions around pediatric neurosurgical concerns. Methods: Twelve institutions in 7 countries committed to participating in the International Tethered Cord Partnership. A neurosurgeon at each institution will evaluate all children presenting with spina bifida and/or tethered cord using the survey instrument after appropriate consent is obtained. The instrument was developed collaboratively and based on previous measures of motor and sensory function, ambulation, and continence. All institutions who have begun collecting data received appropriate Institutional Review Board approval. All data will be entered into a Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) compliant database. In addition, a participant restricted internet forum was created to foster communication and includes non–project-specific communications, such as case and journal article discussion. Results: From October 2010 to December 2010, 82 patients were entered from the various study sites. Conclusion: To our knowledge this is the first international pediatric neurosurgical database focused on clinical outcomes and predictors of disease progression. The collaborative nature of the project will not only increase knowledge of spina bifida and tethered cord, but also foster discussion and further collaboration between neurosurgeons internationally. PMID:21541204

  20. The International Tethered Cord Partnership: Beginnings, process, and status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulholland, Celene B; Aranda, Guzmán; Arredondo, Luis Angel; Calgua, Erwin; Contreras, Fernando; Espinoza, Dulce Maria; Gonzalez, Juan Bosco; Hoil, Jose A; Komolafe, Edward; Lazareff, Jorge A; Liu, Yunhui; Soto-Mancilla, Juan Luis; Mannucci, Graciela; Nan, Bao; Portillo, Santiago; Zhao, Hongyu

    2011-03-23

    Spina bifida presents a significant cause of childhood morbidity in lower- and middle-income nations. Unfortunately, there is a paucity of literature examining outcomes among children with spina bifida in these countries. The goal of the International Tethered Cord Parternship is twofold: (1) to establish an international surveillance database to examine the correlation between time of repair and clinical outcomes in children with spina bifida and tethered cord; and (2) to foster collaboration among international institutions around pediatric neurosurgical concerns. Twelve institutions in 7 countries committed to participating in the International Tethered Cord Partnership. A neurosurgeon at each institution will evaluate all children presenting with spina bifida and/or tethered cord using the survey instrument after appropriate consent is obtained. The instrument was developed collaboratively and based on previous measures of motor and sensory function, ambulation, and continence. All institutions who have begun collecting data received appropriate Institutional Review Board approval. All data will be entered into a Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) compliant database. In addition, a participant restricted internet forum was created to foster communication and includes non-project-specific communications, such as case and journal article discussion. From October 2010 to December 2010, 82 patients were entered from the various study sites. To our knowledge this is the first international pediatric neurosurgical database focused on clinical outcomes and predictors of disease progression. The collaborative nature of the project will not only increase knowledge of spina bifida and tethered cord, but also foster discussion and further collaboration between neurosurgeons internationally.

  1. Relaxation Dynamics of Nanoparticle-Tethered Polymer Chains

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Sung A

    2015-09-08

    © 2015 American Chemical Society. Relaxation dynamics of nanoparticle-tethered cis-1,4-polyisoprene (PI) are investigated using dielectric spectroscopy and rheometry. A model system composed of polymer chains densely grafted to spherical SiO2 nanoparticles to form self-suspended suspensions facilitates detailed studies of slow global chain and fast segmental mode dynamics under surface and geometrical confinement-from experiments performed in bulk materials. We report that unentangled polymer molecules tethered to nanoparticles relax far more slowly than their tethered entangled counterparts. Specifically, at fixed grafting density we find, counterintuitively, that increasing the tethered polymer molecular weight up to values close to the entanglement molecular weight speeds up chain relaxation dynamics. Decreasing the polymer grafting density for a fixed molecular weight has the opposite effect: it dramatically slows down chain relaxation, increases interchain coupling, and leads to a transition in rheological response from simple fluid behavior to viscoelastic fluid behavior for tethered PI chains that are unentangled by conventional measures. Increasing the measurement temperature produces an even stronger elastic response and speeds up molecular relaxation at a rate that decreases with grafting density and molecular weight. These observations are discussed in terms of chain confinement driven by crowding between particles and by the existence of an entropic attractive force produced by the space-filling constraint on individual chains in a self-suspended material. Our results indicate that the entropic force between densely grafted polymer molecules couples motions of individual chains in an analogous manner to reversible cross-links in associating polymers.

  2. Modelling a tethered mammalian sperm cell undergoing hyperactivation

    KAUST Repository

    Curtis, M.P.

    2012-09-01

    The beat patterns of mammalian sperm flagella can be categorised into two different types. The first involves symmetric waves propagating down the flagellum with a net linear propulsion of the sperm cell. The second, hyperactive, waveform is classified by vigorous asymmetric waves of higher amplitude, lower wavenumber and frequency propagating down the flagellum resulting in highly curved trajectories. The latter beat pattern is part of the capacitation process whereby sperm prepare for the prospective penetration of the zona pellucida and fusion with the egg. Hyperactivation is often observed to initiate as sperm escape from epithelial and ciliary bindings formed within the isthmic regions of the female oviducts, leading to a conjecture in the literature that this waveform is mechanically important for sperm escape. Hence, we explore the mechanical effects of hyperactivation on a tethered sperm, focussing on a Newtonian fluid. Using a resistive force theory model we demonstrate that hyperactivation can indeed generate forces that pull the sperm away from a tethering point and consequently a hyperactivated sperm cell bound to an epithelial surface need not always be pushed by its flagellum. More generally, directions of the forces generated by tethered flagella are insensitive to reductions in beat frequency and the detailed flagellar responses depend on the nature of the binding at the tethering point. Furthermore, waveform asymmetry and amplitude increases enhance the tendency for a tethered flagellum to start tugging on its binding. The same is generally predicted to be true for reductions in the wavenumber of the flagellum beat, but not universally so, emphasising the dynamical complexity of flagellar force generation. Finally, qualitative observations drawn from experimental data of human sperm bound to excised female reproductive tract are also presented and are found to be consistent with the theoretical predictions. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  3. MAST Upgrade Status and Future Enhancements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, James; MAST Upgrade Team Team

    2017-10-01

    The MAST Upgrade spherical tokamak has unique capabilities to address some of the key issues facing the development of fusion energy. Its main objectives are: 1) development of novel exhaust concepts, 2) contribution to the knowledge base for ITER and 3) to explore potential routes to smaller/cheaper fusion reactors. To fulfil these aims, it is equipped with 19 new poloidal field coils and closed divertors with Super-X capability. BT has been increased by 50% and the pulse length and Ip have increased to 5s and 2MA respectively. Auxiliary heating is provided by on and off axis NBI. The gas fuelling system allows for injection from 10 poloidal locations. The divertors are diagnosed with probes, bolometers, Thomson scattering, IR, visible imaging and spectroscopy. Fast ion physics studies are enhanced with a new fast ion loss detector. Following the construction phase, further enhancements are underway including new diagnostics, a cryoplant to serve the cryopumps and 2 additional neutral beams to increase the heating power from 5 to 10MW. Work supported by the RCUK Energy Programme [Grant Number EP/P012450/1] and EURATOM.

  4. Acupuncture causes serotonin release by mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, Nikolay; Atanasova, Dimitrinka; Tomov, Nikola; Sivrev, Dimitar; Lazarov, Nikolai

    2017-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are important object in experimental acupuncture due to their putative involvement in local reactions to needling. In the rat, they are shown to contain in their granules, among other tissue mediators, serotonin, also called 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT). The aim of this study is to examine the normal distribution of 5-HT-containing MCs in soft tissues of Zusanli (ST36) acupuncture point (acupoint) and their morphological changes caused by experimental acupuncture. We observed 5-HT-immunopositive MCs in the tissues and in the vicinity of the needle tract formed after acupuncture. As a result of acupuncture needling, the tissue integrity is disrupted and certain folds are formed in the direction of the needle tract. Connective tissue in the vicinity of the needle tract gets compressed and displaced, together with the 5-HT-immunoreactive MCs seen there. Some of those 5-HT-immunopositive MCs showed signs of degranulation with numerous discharged granules, some of them found at a considerable distance form the cell. Furthermore, 5-HT-immunopositive MCs are unevenly distributed in soft tissues of ST36 acupoint. Larger numbers of 5-HT-containing MCs were visualized in subcutis and dermis, compared to the observed in striated muscles. Placing the acupuncture needle into the rat skin caused a formation of an apparent needle tract, tissue displacement and degranulation of 5-HT-immunopositive MCs. The demonstrated serotonin release by means of MC degranulation might be involved in the local tissue response to acupuncture.

  5. Eosinophils and mast cells in leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Nilda E; Wilson, Mary E

    2014-08-01

    Leishmania spp. are parasitic protozoa endemic in tropical and subtropical regions and the causative agent of leishmaniasis, a collection of syndromes whose clinical manifestations vary according to host and pathogen factors. Leishmania spp. are inoculated into the mammalian host by the bite of an infected sand fly, whereupon they are taken up by phagocytosis, convert into the replicative amastigote stage within macrophages, reproduce, spread to new macrophages and cause disease manifestations. A curative response against leishmaniasis depends in the classical activation of macrophages and the IL-12-dependent onset of an adaptive type 1 response characterized by the production of IFN-γ. Emerging evidence suggests that neutrophils, dendritic cells and other immune cells can serve as either temporary or stable hosts for Leishmania spp. Furthermore, it is becoming apparent that the initial interactions of the parasite with resident or early recruited immune cells can shape both the macrophage response and the type of adaptive immune response being induced. In this review, we compile a growing number of studies demonstrating how the earliest interactions of Leishmania spp. with eosinophils and mast cells influence the macrophage response to infection and the development of the adaptive immune response, hence, determining the ultimate outcome of infection.

  6. Mast cell chemotaxis – Chemoattractants and signaling pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana eHalova

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Migration of mast cells is essential for their recruitment within target tissues where they play an important role in innate and adaptive immune responses. These processes rely on the ability of mast cells to recognize appropriate chemotactic stimuli and react to them by a chemotactic response. Another level of intercellular communication is attained by production of chemoattractants by activated mast cells, which results in accumulation of mast cells and other hematopoietic cells at the sites of inflammation. Mast cells express numerous surface receptors for various ligands with properties of potent chemoattractants. They include the stem cell factor recognized by c-Kit, antigen, which binds to immunoglobulin E (IgE anchored to the high affinity IgE receptor (FcRI, highly cytokinergic IgE recognized by FcRI, lipid mediator sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P, which binds to G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs. Other large groups of chemoattractants are eicosanoids [prostaglandin E2 and D2, leukotriene (LT B4, LTD4 and LTC4, and others] and chemokines (CC, CXC, C and CX3X, which also bind to various GPCRs. Further noteworthy chemoattractants are isoforms of transforming growth factor (TGF , which are sensitively recognized by TGF- serine/threonine type I and II  receptors, adenosine, C1q, C3a, and C5a components of the complement, 5-hydroxytryptamine, neuroendocrine peptide catestatin, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor- and others. Here we discuss the major types of chemoattractants recognized by mast cells, their target receptors, as well as signaling pathways they utilize. We also briefly deal with methods used for studies of mast cell chemotaxis and with ways of how these studies profited from the results obtained in other cellular systems.

  7. The role of TRP proteins in mast cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc eFreichel

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available TRP proteins form cation channels that are regulated through strikingly diverse mechanisms including multiple cell surface receptors, changes in temperature, in pH and osmolarity, in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i and by phosphoinositides. The 28 TRP proteins identified in mammals are classified into 6 subfamilies: TRPC, TRPV, TRPM, TRPA, TRPML, and TRPP. When activated, they contribute to cell depolarization and Ca2+ entry, which makes them polymodal sensors for fine tuning of many cellular and systemic processes in the body. In mast cells, the increase of [Ca2+]i is fundamental for their biological activity, and several entry pathways for Ca2+ and other cations were described including Ca2+ release activated Ca2+ channels (CRAC. Like in other nonexcitable cells, TRP channels could directly contribute to Ca2+ influx via the plasma membrane as constituents of Ca2+ conducting channel complexes or indirectly by shifting the membrane potential and regulation of the driving force for Ca2+ entry through independent Ca2+ entry channels. Here, we summarize the current knowledge about the expression of individual Trp genes with the majority of the 28 members being yet identified in different mast cell models, and we highlight mechanisms how they can regulate mast cell functions. Since specific agonists or blockers are still lacking for most members of the TRP family, studies to unravel their function and activation mode still rely on experiments using genetic approaches and transgenic animals. RNAi approaches suggest a functional role for TRPC1, TRPC5 and TRPM7 in mast cell derived cell lines or primary mast cells, and studies using Trp gene knock out mice reveal a critical role for TRPM4 in mast cell activation and for mast cell mediated cutaneous anaphylaxis, whereas a direct role of cold- and menthol-activated TRPM8 channels seems to be unlikely for the development of cold urticaria at least in mice.

  8. Blockade of mast cell activation reduces cutaneous scar formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Chen

    Full Text Available Damage to the skin initiates a cascade of well-orchestrated events that ultimately leads to repair of the wound. The inflammatory response is key to wound healing both through preventing infection and stimulating proliferation and remodeling of the skin. Mast cells within the tissue are one of the first immune cells to respond to trauma, and upon activation they release pro-inflammatory molecules to initiate recruitment of leukocytes and promote a vascular response in the tissue. Additionally, mast cells stimulate collagen synthesis by dermal fibroblasts, suggesting they may also influence scar formation. To examine the contribution of mast cells in tissue repair, we determined the effects the mast cell inhibitor, disodium cromoglycate (DSCG, on several parameters of dermal repair including, inflammation, re-epithelialization, collagen fiber organization, collagen ultrastructure, scar width and wound breaking strength. Mice treated with DSCG had significantly reduced levels of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1α, IL-1β, and CXCL1. Although DSCG treatment reduced the production of inflammatory mediators, the rate of re-epithelialization was not affected. Compared to control, inhibition of mast cell activity caused a significant decrease in scar width along with accelerated collagen re-organization. Despite the reduced scar width, DSCG treatment did not affect the breaking strength of the healed tissue. Tryptase β1 exclusively produced by mast cells was found to increase significantly in the course of wound healing. However, DSCG treatment did not change its level in the wounds. These results indicate that blockade of mast cell activation reduces scar formation and inflammation without further weakening the healed wound.

  9. Emerging concepts: mast cell involvement in allergic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modena, Brian D; Dazy, Kristen; White, Andrew A

    2016-08-01

    In a process known as overt degranulation, mast cells can release all at once a diverse array of products that are preformed and present within cytoplasmic granules. This occurs typically within seconds of stimulation by environmental factors and allergens. These potent, preformed mediators (ie, histamine, heparin, serotonin, and serine proteases) are responsible for the acute symptoms experienced in allergic conditions such as allergic conjunctivitis, allergic rhinitis, allergy-induced asthma, urticaria, and anaphylaxis. Yet, there is reason to believe that the actions of mast cells are important when they are not degranulating. Mast cells release preformed mediators and inflammatory cytokines for periods after degranulation and even without degranulating at all. Mast cells are consistently seen at sites of chronic inflammation, including nonallergic inflammation, where they have the ability to temper inflammatory processes and shape tissue morphology. Mast cells can trigger actions and chemotaxis in other important immune cells (eg, eosinophils and the newly discovered type 2 innate lymphocytes) that then make their own contributions to inflammation and disease. In this review, we will discuss the many known and theorized contributions of mast cells to allergic diseases, focusing on several prototypical allergic respiratory and skin conditions: asthma, chronic rhinosinusitis, aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease, allergic conjunctivitis, atopic dermatitis, and some of the more common medication hypersensitivity reactions. We discuss traditionally accepted roles that mast cells play in the pathogenesis of each of these conditions, but we also delve into new areas of discovery and research that challenge traditionally accepted paradigms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Tether-mission design for multiple flybys of moon Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanmartin, J. R. S.; Charro, M. C.; Sanchez-Arriaga, G. S. A.; Sanchez-Torres, A. S. T.

    2015-10-01

    A tether mission to carry out multiple flybys of Jovian moon Europa is here presented. There is general agreement on elliptic-orbit flybys of Europa resulting in cost to attain given scientific goals lower than if actually orbiting the moon, tethers being naturally fit to fly-by rather than orbit moons1. The present mission is similar in this respect to the Clipper mission considered by NASA, the basic difference lying in location of periapsis, due to different emphasis on mission-challenge metrics. Clipper minimizes damaging radiation-dose by avoiding the Jupiter neighborhood and its very harsh environment; periapsis would be at Europa, apoapsis as far as moon Callisto. As in all past outer-planet missions, Clipper faces, however, critical power and propulsion needs. On the other hand, tethers can provide both propulsion and power, but must reach near the planet to find high plasma density and magnetic field values, leading to high induced tether current, and Lorentz drag and power. The bottom line is a strong radiation dose under the very intense Radiation Belts of Jupiter. Mission design focuses on limiting dose. Perijove would be near Jupiter, at about 1.2-1.3 Jovian radius, apojove about moon Ganymede, corresponding to 1:1 resonance with Europa, so as to keep dose down: setting apojove at Europa, for convenient parallel flybys, would require two perijove passes per flyby (the Ganymede apojove, resulting in high eccentricity, about 0.86, is also less requiring on tether operations). Mission is designed to attain reductions in eccentricity per perijove pass as high as Δe ≈ - 0.04. Due the low gravity-gradient, tether spinning is necessary to keep it straight, plasma contactors placed at both ends taking active turns at being cathodic. Efficiency of capture of the incoming S/C by the tether is gauged by the ratio of S/C mass to tether mass; efficiency is higher for higher tape-tether length and lower thickness and perijove. Low tether bowing due to the Lorentz

  11. Imaging immune response of skin mast cells in vivo with two-photon microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunqiang; Pastila, Riikka K.; Lin, Charles P.

    2012-02-01

    Intravital multiphoton microscopy has provided insightful information of the dynamic process of immune cells in vivo. However, the use of exogenous labeling agents limits its applications. There is no method to perform functional imaging of mast cells, a population of innate tissue-resident immune cells. Mast cells are widely recognized as the effector cells in allergy. Recently their roles as immunoregulatory cells in certain innate and adaptive immune responses are being actively investigated. Here we report in vivo mouse skin mast cells imaging with two-photon microscopy using endogenous tryptophan as the fluorophore. We studied the following processes. 1) Mast cells degranulation, the first step in the mast cell activation process in which the granules are released into peripheral tissue to trigger downstream reactions. 2) Mast cell reconstitution, a procedure commonly used to study mast cells functioning by comparing the data from wild type mice, mast cell-deficient mice, and mast-cell deficient mice reconstituted with bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs). Imaging the BMMCs engraftment in tissue reveals the mast cells development and the efficiency of BMMCs reconstitution. We observed the reconstitution process for 6 weeks in the ear skin of mast cell-deficient Kit wsh/ w-sh mice by two-photon imaging. Our finding is the first instance of imaging mast cells in vivo with endogenous contrast.

  12. Mercury induces inflammatory mediator release from human mast cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peterson Erika

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mercury is known to be neurotoxic, but its effects on the immune system are less well known. Mast cells are involved in allergic reactions, but also in innate and acquired immunity, as well as in inflammation. Many patients with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD have "allergic" symptoms; moreover, the prevalence of ASD in patients with mastocytosis, characterized by numerous hyperactive mast cells in most tissues, is 10-fold higher than the general population suggesting mast cell involvement. We, therefore, investigated the effect of mercuric chloride (HgCl2 on human mast cell activation. Methods Human leukemic cultured LAD2 mast cells and normal human umbilical cord blood-derived cultured mast cells (hCBMCs were stimulated by HgCl2 (0.1-10 μM for either 10 min for beta-hexosaminidase release or 24 hr for measuring vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and IL-6 release by ELISA. Results HgCl2 induced a 2-fold increase in β-hexosaminidase release, and also significant VEGF release at 0.1 and 1 μM (311 ± 32 pg/106 cells and 443 ± 143 pg/106 cells, respectively from LAD2 mast cells compared to control cells (227 ± 17 pg/106 cells, n = 5, p 2 (0.1 μM to the proinflammatory neuropeptide substance P (SP, 0.1 μM had synergestic action in inducing VEGF from LAD2 mast cells. HgCl2 also stimulated significant VEGF release (360 ± 100 pg/106 cells at 1 μM, n = 5, p 6 cells, and IL-6 release (466 ± 57 pg/106 cells at 0.1 μM compared to untreated cells (13 ± 25 pg/106 cells, n = 5, p 2 (0.1 μM to SP (5 μM further increased IL-6 release. Conclusions HgCl2 stimulates VEGF and IL-6 release from human mast cells. This phenomenon could disrupt the blood-brain-barrier and permit brain inflammation. As a result, the findings of the present study provide a biological mechanism for how low levels of mercury may contribute to ASD pathogenesis.

  13. Structural alterations in fibroblast monolayers caused by mast cell degranulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsburg, H; Amira, M; Padawer, J; Davidson, S

    1989-06-01

    Populations of mature, long-lived, nondividing mast cells develop on embryonic fibroblast monolayers after 1 mo growth of lymph node cells taken from mice immunized with horse serum. Total mast cell degranulation with 80-90% histamine release has been obtained by monoclonal anti-2,4-dinitrophenol (anti-DNP) IgE and the antigen. This degranulation process was studied by time-lapse cinematography and scanning electron microscopy. Excitation of the mast cells began as early as 10 s after addition of the antigen and lasted for about 15 s. Consequently, the fibroblast cytoplasm was displaced by short 5-10 s movements. Before degranulation, due to an extracellular film that coated the cells and the extracellular fibers, the monolayer appeared as a continuous, uninterrupted layer. After degranulation and fibroblast cytoplasm displacement, the fibrous network was exposed. Several inhibitors and antagonists of mast cell mediators were introduced to the cultures prior to addition of the antigen. So far, only with soybean trypsin inhibitor was the cytoplasm dislocation inhibited. Histamine H1 and H2 and serotonin receptor antagonists, as well as indomethacin, cortisol, aprotinin, and phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, did not inhibit. These results suggest that chymase, which constitutes the greater part of the mast cell granule protein, is the causative agent.

  14. Microvessel and mast cell densities in malignant laryngeal neoplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balica Nicolae Constantin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Laryngeal neoplasm contributes to 30-40% of carcinomas of the head and neck. Mast cells are normal connective tissue residents, well represented in the respiratory tract. Experimental evidence suggests that the growth of a tumor beyond a certain size requires angiogenesis, which may also permit metastasis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation between mast cell density, microvascular density, histopathological type and histological grade. Our study included 38 laryngeal carcinomas as follows: adenoid cystic carcinoma (2 cases, malignant papilloma (2 cases and squamous cell carcinoma (34 cases. The combined technique of CD 34-alcian blue safranin (ABS was used to identify microvessel and mast cell density, which was quantified by the hot spot method. A significant correlation was found between both mast cell and microvascular density, and G1/G2 histological grade (p=0.002 and p=0.004, respectively. Squamous cell carcinoma was significantly correlated with mast cell density (p=0.003, but not with microvascular density (p=0.454.

  15. Mast cell subsets and neuropeptides in leprosy reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antunes Sérgio Luiz Gomes

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The immunohistochemical identification of neuropeptides (calcitonin gene-related peptide, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, substance P, alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone and gamma-melanocyte stimulating hormone quantification of mast cells and their subsets (tryptase/chymase-immunoreactive mast cells = TCMC and tryptase-immunoreactive mast cells = TMC were determined in biopsies of six patients with leprosy reactions (three patients with type I reaction and three with type II. Biopsies were compared with those taken from the same body site in the remission stage of the same patient. We found a relative increase of TMC in the inflammatory infiltrate of the reactional biopsies compared to the post-reactional biopsy. Also, the total number of mast cells and the TMC/TCMC ratio in the inflammatory infiltrate was significantly higher than in the intervening dermis of the biopsies of both periods. No significant difference was found regarding neuroptide expression in the reactional and post-reactional biopsies. The relative increase of TMC in the reactional infiltrates could implicate this mast cell subset in the reported increase of the immune response in leprosy reactions.

  16. The Role of Mast Cells in Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Nyeong Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS is one of the most common functional gastrointestinal disorders, but its treatment is unsatisfactory as its pathophysiology is multifactorial. The putative factors of IBS pathophysiology are visceral hypersensitivity and intestinal dysmotility, also including psychological factors, dysregulated gut-brain axis, intestinal microbiota alterations, impaired intestinal permeability, and mucosal immune alterations. Recently, mucosal immune alterations have received much attention with the role of mast cells in IBS. Mast cells are abundant in the intestines and function as intestinal gatekeepers at the interface between the luminal environment in the intestine and the internal milieu under the intestinal epithelium. As a gatekeeper at the interface, mast cells communicate with the adjacent cells such as epithelial, neuronal, and other immune cells throughout the mediators released when they themselves are activated. Many studies have suggested that mast cells play a role in the pathophysiology of IBS. This review will focus on studies of the role of mast cell in IBS and the limitations of studies and will also consider future directions.

  17. Evaluation of risk and clinical outcome of mast cell tumours in pug dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNiel, E A; Prink, A L; O'Brien, T D

    2006-03-01

    Mast cell tumours (MCT) are common in dogs and characterized by diverse biologic behaviour. Our objective was to evaluate the risk of MCT in pugs and to describe the clinical behaviour of MCT in this breed. Data obtained from the Veterinary Medicine Database demonstrate significantly increased frequency of MCT in pugs compared with other dogs (OR = 2.28, 95% CI = 1.81-2.86). The medical records for 25 purebred pugs with a histologic diagnosis of MCT were reviewed. Multiple cutaneous tumours were documented in 14 (56 %) of the dogs. Histologic review of 64 tumours from these dogs confirmed that most tumours (94%) were low to intermediate grade. Sixty-four per cent of these dogs are still living, while only three dogs (12%) have died due to mast cell disease. A median survival time has not been reached. The median follow-up time is 660 days from the diagnosis of the first MCT. We conclude that MCT in pugs are relatively benign, despite the presence of multiple cutaneous tumours in most cases. Multiple tumours in breeds with predisposition to MCT may indicate separate primaries rather than advanced stage disease.

  18. Mast species composition alters seed fate in North American rodent-dispersed hardwoods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichti, Nathanael I; Steele, Michael A; Zhang, Hao; Swihart, Robert K

    2014-07-01

    Interactions between plants and scatter-hoarding animals may shift from mutualism to predation as a function of the resources available to those animals. Because seed species differ in their nutrient content and defenses to predation, resource selection and cache management by scatter-hoarders, and thus seed fate, may also depend on the relative availability of different seed types. We tracked the fates of tagged Castanea dentata, Quercus alba, and Q. rubra seeds presented to rodents in pairwise combinations and found that C. dentata, which has moderate dormancy prior to germination, survived better in the presence of Q. alba (no dormancy) than with Q. rubra (longer dormancy). Decisions made by scatter-hoarders in response to the composition of available seed resources can alter the relationship between masting and seed dispersal effectiveness in individual tree species and may have influenced the evolution of asynchrony among species-specific masting patterns in temperate forests. In theory, preferential allocation of certain seed species to storage or consumption could also result in indirect apparent predation by one seed species on another.

  19. Tether pointing platform and space elevator mechanisms analysis of the key concepts for SATP and scaled SATP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turci, E.

    1986-01-01

    The key concepts for a scaled and full model Science and Applications Tethered Platform (SATP) are analysized. This includes a tether pointing platform and a space elevator. The mechanism concepts and technological solutions are given. The idea of the tether pointing platform mechanism is to control and stabilize the attitude of a platform by means of a movable tether. The idea of the space elevator mechanism for a scaled SATP is to drag the tether gripping it between two rotating wheels.

  20. SINYAL INTRASEL PEMICU REORGANISASI SITOSKELETON SEL MAST PADA REAKSI HIPERSENSITIVITAS TIPE I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safari Wahyu Jatmiko

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Sel mast mempunyai peranan yang penting dalam terjadinya reaksi hipersensitivitas tipe I. Degranulasi sel mast diyakini mendasari peran sel mast dalam memunculkan reaksi tersebut. Proses degranulasi sel mast terjadi karena berpindahnya granula sel mast dari sitoplasma menuju ke membran sel dan memuntahkan isi granula ke lingkungan sekitarnya. Proses transport ini sangat ditentukan oleh reorganisasi  sitoskeleton yang terdiri atas mikrotubulus, aktin mikrofilamen, dan intermediate filament. Reorganisasi sitoskeleton diawali dengan aktifasi sel mast oleh ikatan antara alergen dengan IgE yang menempel pada FcεR. Aktfasi sel mast diperkuat dengan adanya ikatan antara c-Kit pada permukaan membran sel mast dengan c-Kit ligan. Aktifasi ini menimbulkan serangkaian proses intrasel yang memicu inisiasi reorganisasi.

  1. Increased dermal mast cell prevalence and susceptibility to development of basal cell carcinoma in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grimbaldeston, Michele A; Skov, Lone; Finlay-Jones, John J

    2002-01-01

    eliminate them. Studies in a range of inbred mouse strains as well as mast cell-depleted mice reconstituted with mast cell precursors support a functional link between histamine-staining dermal mast cells and the extent of susceptibility to UVB-induced systemic immunomodulation. Humans, like mouse strains......, display variations in dermal mast cell prevalence. In a study of Danish and South Australian BCC patients and control subjects, one 4-mm punch biopsy of non-sun-exposed buttock skin was sampled from each participant. This skin site was investigated to avoid any changes in mast cell prevalence caused...... by sun exposure. Two sections (4 microm) per biopsy were immunohistochemically stained for detection of histamine-containing dermal mast cells. Computer-generated image analysis evaluated dermal mast cell prevalence in both sections by quantifying the total number of mast cells according to the total...

  2. Cellular hormetic response to 27-hydroxycholesterol promotes neuroprotection through AICD induction of MAST4 abundance and kinase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gongol, Brendan; Marin, Traci L; Jeppson, John D; Mayagoitia, Karina; Shin, Samuel; Sanchez, Nicholas; Kirsch, Wolff M; Vinters, Harry V; Wilson, Christopher G; Ghribi, Othman; Soriano, Salvador

    2017-10-24

    The function of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) in brain health remains unclear. This study elucidated a novel cytoprotective signaling pathway initiated by the APP transcriptionally active intracellular domain (AICD) in response to 27-hydroxycholesterol (27OHC), an oxidized cholesterol metabolite associated with neurodegeneration. The cellular response to 27OHC was hormetic, such that low, but not high, doses promoted AICD transactivation of microtubule associated serine/threonine kinase family member 4 (MAST4). MAST4 in turn phosphorylated and inhibited FOXO1-dependent transcriptional repression of rhotekin 2 (RTKN2), an oxysterol stress responder, to optimize cell survival. A palmitate-rich diet, which increases serum 27OHC, or APP ablation, abrogated this response in vivo. Further, this pathway was downregulated in human Alzheimer's Disease (AD) brains but not in frontotemporal dementia brains. These results unveil MAST4 as functional kinase of FOXO1 in a 27OHC AICD-driven, hormetic pathway providing insight for therapeutic approaches against cholesterol associated neuronal disorders.

  3. The gestational power of mast cells in the injured tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aller, Maria-Angeles; Arias, Natalia; Martínez, Vicente; Vergara, Patri; Arias, Jaime

    2018-02-01

    The inflammatory response expressed after wound healing would be the recapitulation of systemic extra-embryonic functions, which would focus on the interstitium of the injured tissue. In the injured tissue, mast cells, provided for a great functional heterogeneity, could play the leading role in the re-expression of extra-embryonic functions, i.e., coelomic-amniotic and trophoblastic-vitelline. Moreover, mast cells would favor the production of a gastrulation-like process, which in certain tissues and organs would induce the regeneration of the injured tissue. Therefore, the engraftment of mesenchymal stem cells and mast cells, both with an extra-embryonic regenerative phenotype, would achieve a blastema, from the repaired and regenerated injured tissue, rather than by fibrosis, which is commonly made through wound-healing.

  4. Tethered elevator: A unique opportunity for space processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monti, R.

    1986-01-01

    The latest fluid dynamic and material science experiments in the microgravity environment have emphasized the importance of the residual gravity level and of the g-jitter on fluid physics phenomena. The tethered elevator presents the possibility of providing variable g-levels (both steady and g-jitter) around a very low steady g-level (that can be realized when the elevator is near the center of mass of the space station-tether complex). When positioning a variable periodic oscillation to the payload a clean g-jitter disturbance can be obtained that would not be otherwise obtainable by other systems. These two possibilities make the elevator a facility to help resolve a number of still open questions that are preventing wider utilization of the space environment in the microgravity area.

  5. Tethered naphthalene diimide intercalators enhance DNA triplex stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianolio, D A; McLaughlin, L W

    2001-09-01

    Naphthalene diimides function as effective intercalators and when tethered to the 5'-terminus of a pyrimidine-rich oligonucleotide can contribute significantly to the overall stabilization of DNA triplexes. This stabilization can be further enhanced by alterations to the linker tethering the DNA sequence and the intercalator. Less flexible linkers, and particularly one with a phenyl ring present, appear to permit the stabilization afforded by the bound intercalator to be transferred more effectively to the three-stranded complex. The conjugate containing the phenyl linker exhibits a T(M) value that is increased by 28 degrees C relative to the unconjugated triplex. That the linker itself contributes to the observed stabilization is clear since introduction of the phenyl linker increases the observed T(M) by 11 degrees C relative to a simple flexible linker.

  6. Synthesis and insertion chemistry of mixed tether uranium metallocene complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siladke, Nathan A.; LeDuc, Jennifer; Ziller, Joseph W.; Evans, William J. [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2012-11-12

    The synthesis of mixed tethered alkyl uranium metallocenes has been investigated by examining the reactivity of the bis(tethered alkyl) metallocene [(η{sup 5}-C{sub 5}Me{sub 4}SiMe{sub 2}CH{sub 2}-κC){sub 2}U] (1) with substrates that react with only one of the U-C linkages. The effect of these mixed tether coordination environments on the reactivity of the remaining U-C bond has been studied by using CO insertion chemistry. One equivalent of azidoadamantane (AdN{sub 3}) reacts with 1 to yield the mixed tethered alkyl triazenido complex [(η{sup 5}-C{sub 5}Me{sub 4}SiMe{sub 2}CH{sub 2}-κC)U(η{sup 5}-C{sub 5}Me{sub 4}SiMe{sub 2}-CH{sub 2}NNN-Ad-κ{sup 2}N{sup 1,3})]. Similarly, a single equivalent of CS{sub 2} reacts with 1 to form the mixed tethered alkyl dithiocarboxylate complex [(η{sup 5}-C{sub 5}Me{sub 4}SiMe{sub 2}CH{sub 2}-κC)U(η{sup 5}-C{sub 5}Me{sub 4}SiMe{sub 2}- CH{sub 2}C(S){sub 2}-κ{sup 2}S,S{sup '})], a reaction that constitutes the first example of CS{sub 2} insertion into a U{sup 4+}-C bond. Complex 1 reacts with one equivalent of pyridine N-oxide by C-H bond activation of the pyridine ring to form a mixed tethered alkyl cyclometalated pyridine N-oxide complex [(η{sup 5}-C{sub 5}Me{sub 4}SiMe{sub 2}CH{sub 2}-κC)(η{sup 5}-C{sub 5}Me{sub 4}SiMe{sub 3})U(C{sub 6}H{sub 4}NO-κ{sup 2} C,O)]. The remaining (η{sup 5}-C{sub 5}Me{sub 4}SiMe{sub 2}CH{sub 2}-κC){sup 2-} ligand in each of these mixed tethered species show reactivity towards CO and tethered enolate ligands form by insertion. Subsequent rearrangement have been identified in [(η{sup 5}-C{sub 5}Me{sub 4}SiMe{sub 3})U(C{sub 5}H{sub 4}NO-κ{sup 2}C,O)(η{sup 5}-C{sub 5}Me{sub 4}SiMe{sub 2}C(=CH{sub 2})O- κO)] and [(η{sup 5}-C{sub 5}Me{sub 4}SiMe{sub 2}CH{sub 2}NNN-Ad-κ{sup 2}N{sup 1,3})U(η{sup 5}-C{sub 5}Me{sub 4}SiMe{sub 2}C(=CH{sub 2})O-κO)]. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. The tethered satellite system for low density aerothermodynamics studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlomagno, Giovanni M.; De Luca, Luigi; Siemers, P. M., III; Wood, George M., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The feasibility of the operation of the Tethered Satellite System (TSS) as a continuous open wind tunnel for low-density aerothermodynamic studies (applicable to the design of hypersonic space vehicles including STARFAC, AOTV, and ERV) is considered. The Shuttle Continuous Open Wind Tunnel (SCOWT) program, for the study of the energy and momentum transfer between the tethered satellite and its environmental medium during the TSS/2 mission, is described. Instrumentation and TSS design requirements to meet SCOWT objectives are also considered. SCOWT will provide information on the gasdynamic processes occurring downstream of the bow wave standing in front of the TS, the chemistry and physics of the upper atmosphere related to satellite aerothermodynamics, and TSS's overall experimental envelope of operation.

  8. Asteroid rotation control via a tethered solar sail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Youtao; Wu, Jingyun

    2016-12-01

    The rotation of asteroids causes difficulties in the exploration of asteroids or prevention of asteroids impact on the Earth. We propose to use a solar sail to control, i.e., slow down or stop the rotational motion of an asteroid. First, the dynamic model of a tethered solar sail in the rotating gravitational field of an asteroid is presented. An optimal control method is employed to determine the control law of the tethered solar sail. The optimal control problem is converted into a nonlinear programming problem with the Gauss pseudospectral method. Simulation results show that this method can effectively slow down or even stop the rotation of an asteroid. A solar sail of 105 m2 can stop the rotation of the asteroid Apophis in 1000 days.

  9. Nature beyond Linearity: Meteorological Variability and Jensen's Inequality Can Explain Mast Seeding Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Marcos Fernández-Martínez; Michał Bogdziewicz; Espelta, Josep M.; Josep Peñuelas

    2017-01-01

    Mast seeding, the extremely variable and synchronized production of fruits, is a common reproductive behavior in plants. Weather is centrally involved in driving masting. Yet, it is often claimed that it cannot be the sole proximate cause of masting because weather is less variable than fruit production and because the shape of their distributions differ. We used computer simulations to demonstrate that the assumption that weather cannot be the main driver of masting was only valid for linear...

  10. Familial occurrence of systemic mast cell activation disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard J Molderings

    Full Text Available Systemic mast cell activation disease (MCAD comprises disorders characterized by an enhanced release of mast cell mediators accompanied by accumulation of dysfunctional mast cells. Demonstration of familial clustering would be an important step towards defining the genetic contribution to the risk of systemic MCAD. The present study aimed to quantify familial aggregation for MCAD and to investigate the variability of clinical and molecular findings (e.g. somatic mutations in KIT among affected family members in three selected pedigrees. Our data suggest that systemic MCAD pedigrees include more systemic MCAD cases than would be expected by chance, i.e., compared with the prevalence of MCAD in the general population. The prevalence of MCAD suspected by symptom self-report in first-degree relatives of patients with MCAD amounted to approximately 46%, compared to prevalence in the general German population of about 17% (p<0.0001. In three families with a high familial loading of MCAD, the subtype of MCAD and the severity of mediator-related symptoms varied between family members. In addition, genetic alterations detected in KIT were variable, and included mutations at position 816 of the amino acid sequence. In conclusion, our data provide evidence for common familial occurrence of MCAD. Our findings observed in the three pedigrees together with recent reports in the literature suggest that, in familial cases (i.e., in the majority of MCAD, mutated disease-related operator and/or regulator genes could be responsible for the development of somatic mutations in KIT and other proteins important for the regulation of mast cell activity. Accordingly, the immunohistochemically different subtypes of MCAD (i.e. mast cell activation syndrome and systemic mastocytosis should be more accurately regarded as varying presentations of a common generic root process of mast cell dysfunction, than as distinct diseases.

  11. Currents between tethered electrodes in a magnetized laboratory plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Laboratory experiments on important plasma physics issues of electrodynamic tethers were performed. These included current propagation, formation of wave wings, limits of current collection, nonlinear effects and instabilities, charging phenomena, and characteristics of transmission lines in plasmas. The experiments were conducted in a large afterglow plasma. The current system was established with a small electron-emitting hot cathode tethered to an electron-collecting anode, both movable across the magnetic field and energized by potential difference up to V approx.=100 T(sub e). The total current density in space and time was obtained from complete measurements of the perturbed magnetic field. The fast spacecraft motion was reproduced in the laboratory by moving the tethered electrodes in small increments, applying delayed current pulses, and reconstructing the net field by a linear superposition of locally emitted wavelets. With this technique, the small-amplitude dc current pattern is shown to form whistler wings at each electrode instead of the generally accepted Alfven wings. For the beam electrode, the whistler wing separates from the field-aligned beam which carries no net current. Large amplitude return currents to a stationary anode generate current-driven microinstabilities, parallel electric fields, ion depletions, current disruptions and time-varying electrode charging. At appropriately high potentials and neutral densities, excess neutrals are ionized near the anode. The anode sheath emits high-frequency electron transit-time oscillations at the sheath-plasma resonance. The beam generates Langmuir turbulence, ion sound turbulence, electron heating, space charge fields, and Hall currents. An insulated, perfectly conducting transmission line embedded in the plasma becomes lossy due to excitation of whistler waves and magnetic field diffusion effects. The implications of the laboratory observations on electrodynamic tethers in space are discussed.

  12. Crowded, Confined, and Frustrated: Dynamics of Molecules Tethered to Nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Agarwal, Praveen

    2012-12-01

    Above a critical chemistry-dependent molecular weight, all polymer molecules entangle and, as a result, exhibit slow dynamics, enhanced viscosity, and elasticity. Herein we report on the dynamics of low molecular weight polymers tethered to nanoparticles and find that even conventionally unentangled chains manifest dynamical features similar to entangled, long-chain molecules. Our findings are shown to imply that crowding and confinement of polymers on particles produce topological constraints analogous to those in entangled systems. © 2012 American Physical Society.

  13. Deorbit efficiency assessment through numerical simulation of electromagnetic tether devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru IONEL

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the deorbit efficiency of an electromagnetic tether deorbit device when used to deorbit an upper stage at end of mission from low Earth orbit. This is done via a numerical simulation in Matlab R2013a, using ode45, taking into account perturbations on the upper stage’s trajectory. The perturbations taken into account are the atmospheric drag, the 3rd body (Sun and Moon, and Earth’s gravitational potential expanded into spherical harmonics.

  14. Looking at the end of the ROV tether

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grange, P.

    1983-06-01

    It is expected that eventually the remotely operated vehicle (ROV) will discard its clumsy, expensive, and restrictive umbilical, but for the moment virtually all these vehicles remain tethered to their mother service vessels. Lack of power has been the persistent problem with these vehicles but this could be effectively overcome with the development of closed loop internal combustion engines. The development of these engines for integration into ROV's is discussed.

  15. Cracking pressure control of parylene checkvalve using slanted tensile tethers

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Jeffrey Chun-Hui; Yu, Feiqiao; Tai, Yu-Chong

    2010-01-01

    MEMS check valves with fixed cracking pressures are important in micro-fluidic applications where the pressure, flow directions and flow rates all need to be carefully controlled. This work presents a new surface-micromachined parylene check valve that uses residual thermal stress in the parylene to control its cracking pressure. The new check valve uses slanted tethers to allow the parylene tensile stress to apply a net downward force on the valving seat against the orifice. The angle of the...

  16. Shuttle Tethered Aerothermodynamics Research Facilty (STARFAC) instrumentation requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, G. M.; Siemers, P. M.; Carlomagno, G. M.; Hoffman, J.

    1986-01-01

    The instrumentation requirements for the Shuttle Tethered Aerothermodynamic Research Facility (STARFAC) are presented. The typical physical properties of the terrestrial atmosphere are given along with representative atmospheric daytime ion concentrations and the equilibrium and nonequilibrium gas property comparison from a point away from a wall. STARFAC science and engineering measurements are given as are the TSS free stream gas analysis. The potential nonintrusive measurement techniques for hypersonic boundary layer research are outlined along with the quantitative physical measurement methods for aerothermodynamic studies.

  17. Downward-deployed tethered platforms for high enthalpy aerothermodynamic research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, George M.; Siemers, Paul M.; Squires, R. Kenneth; Wolf, Henry; Carlomagno, Giovanni M.

    1988-01-01

    The data on aerothermodynamic and aerodynamic interactions at altitudes above 50 km is extremely limited because of the relative inaccessibility of the region to research vehicles of any sort. This paper addresses the practicability of using downward deployed satellites tethered to an orbiting host vehicle in order to obtain steady-state data in the upper reaches of the region above 80 or 90 km.

  18. Review of the ProSEDS Electrodynamic Tether Mission Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, Jason A.; Curtis, Leslie; Gilchrist, Brian E.; Bilen, Sven; Lorenzini, Enrico

    2004-01-01

    The Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System (ProSEDS) space experiment was ready to fly as a secondary payload on a Delta-II expendable launch vehicle in late March 2003. Concerns raised in February 2003 by the International Space Station resulted in the delay of the launch of ProSEDS. Issues associated with the delayed launch date and a change in starting altitude resulted in the cancellation of the mission. ProSEDS was intended to deploy a tether (5 km bare wire plus 10 km non-conducting Dyneema) from a Delta I1 second stage to achieve adequate drag thrust that would lower the orbit of the system over days as opposed to months due to atmospheric drag. It was also designed to utilize the tether-generated current to provide limited spacecraft power. Considerable effort and testing went in to developing the ProSEDS system by a dedicated team. Through this effort, important technological issues were identified and addressed and this presentation will discuss some of the important technical issues and hurdles that had to be addressed to successfully prepare for flight. It is intended that this information will be of use for future tether mission and experiment designers.

  19. A Tether-Based Variable-Gravity Research Facility Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Kirk

    2006-01-01

    The recent announcement of a return to the Moon and a mission to Mars has made the question of human response to lower levels of gravity more important. Recent advances in tether technology spurred by NASA s research in MXER tethers has led to a re-examination of the concept of a variable-gravity research facility (xGRF) for human research in low Earth orbit. Breakthroughs in simplified inertial tracking have made it possible to consider eliminating the despun section of previous designs. This, in turn, improves the prospect of a facility based entirely around a tether, with the human module on one end and a countermass on the other. With such a configuration, propellantless spinup and spindown is also possible based on the conservation of angular momentum from a gravity-gradient configuration to a spinning configuration. This not only saves large amounts of propellant but vastly simplifies crew and consumable resupply operations, since these can now be done in a microgravity configuration. The importance of the science to be obtained and the performance improvements in this new design argue strongly for further investigation.

  20. Position Control of an X4-Flyer Using a Tether

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Ouchi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In Japan, aging of infrastructures, such as roads,bridges, and water and sewer services, etc. poses a problem, andit is required to extend the life-span of such infrastructures bymaintenance. Among infrastructures, especially bridges areperiodically inspected by short range visual observations, whichcheck the damage and deterioration of the surface. However,since there are some cases where the short range visualobservation is difficult, an alternative method is required so as toreplace the short range visual observation with it. So, "X4-Flyer"is very attractive because of realizing a movement at high altitudeeasily. The objective of this study is to develop a tethered X4-Flyer, so that the conventional short range visual observation ofbridges is replaced by it. In this paper, a method for themeasurement and control of the position is described by using atether for controlling the position of the X4-Flyer. In addition, itis checked whether the tethered X4-Flyer can control the positionusing the proposed method or not, letting it fly in a state in whicha tether is being attached

  1. Artificial auroral effects from a bare conducting tether

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Sanchez, M.; Sanmartín, J. R.

    1997-12-01

    An electrically floating metallic bare tether in a low Earth orbit would be highly negative with respect to the ambient plasma over most of its length, and would be bombarded by ambient ions. This would liberate secondary electrons, which, after acceleration through the same voltage, would form a magnetically guided two-sided planar e beam, and result in auroral effects (ionization and light emission) upon impact on the atmospheric E layer, at about 120-140 km altitude. This paper examines in a preliminary way the feasibility of using this effect as an upper atmospheric probe. Ionization rates can reach up to 105cm-3s-1 if a tape, instead of a wire, is used as tether. Contrary to standard e beams, the beam from the tether is free of spacecraft charging and plasma interaction problems, and its energy flux varies across the cross section, which is quite large; this would make possible continuous observation from the satellite, with high resolution, both spectral and vertical, of the induced optical emissions. Ground observation might be possible at latitudes around 40°, for night, magnetically quiet conditions.

  2. On the functioning of folded dipole antennas on conducting masts

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mcnamara, DA

    1993-11-01

    Full Text Available between the folded dipole and mast (distance d in Fig. 1) for a given mast diameter (D). Since comprehensive quantitative data for the geometry of Fig. 1 do not appear to be available elsewhere, the results of a theoretical parametric study... forward gain versus d/A curve, there are 2(n - 1) additional pattern maxima, with a lobe in the forward direction whose gain level is just slightly less than that in the direction of the additional maxima. The angular locations...

  3. Edusta 2011. Data processed Expert System for the Evaluation of Mast Security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Lorenz

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The expert system EDUSTA 2011 is a new software solution designed to determinate the stability of mast-systems, like lamp-posts and anchor masts. The operators, mainly the municipalities and the cities but also operating companies at airports for instance, are responsible for the stability of there masts and the traffic safety.

  4. Products from mast cells influence T lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine production--relevant to allergic asthma?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Pater-Huijsen, F. L.; Pompen, M.; Jansen, H. M.; Out, T. A.

    1997-01-01

    In IgE allergic diseases both mast cells and T lymphocytes play an important role. Whereas mast cels have been implicated in immediate allergic responses, T lymphocytes mediate subsequent late phase responses and chronic inflammation. Here we review possible links between the early mast cell

  5. Immunoglobulin free light chains: new insights in mast cell activation and immunology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thio, M.

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis, several studies are described that elaborate on the biological properties of immunoglobulin free light chains (Ig-fLC) related to the activation of mast cells and effects on other cells. Mast cell degranulation through Ig-fLC requires two events. At first, mast cell-bound Ig-fLCs

  6. File list: Oth.Bld.10.AllAg.Mast_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Bld.10.AllAg.Mast_Cells mm9 TFs and others Blood Mast Cells SRX310205,SRX310206...04,SRX310199 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Bld.10.AllAg.Mast_Cells.bed ...

  7. File list: ALL.Bld.10.AllAg.Mast_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Bld.10.AllAg.Mast_Cells mm9 All antigens Blood Mast Cells SRX310205,SRX310206,S...,SRX310204,SRX310199 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Bld.10.AllAg.Mast_Cells.bed ...

  8. File list: ALL.Bld.50.AllAg.Mast_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Bld.50.AllAg.Mast_Cells mm9 All antigens Blood Mast Cells SRX310205,SRX310198,S...,SRX310204,SRX310199 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Bld.50.AllAg.Mast_Cells.bed ...

  9. Mast cells and atopic dermatitis. Stereological quantification of mast cells in atopic dermatitis and normal human skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, T E; Olesen, A B; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    1997-01-01

    Stereological quantification of mast cell numbers was applied to sections of punch biopsies from lesional and nonlesional skin of atopic dermatitis patients and skin of healthy volunteers. We also investigated whether the method of staining and/or the fixative influenced the results...... of the determination of the mast cell profile numbers. The punch biopsies were taken from the same four locations in both atopic dermatitis patients and normal individuals. The locations were the scalp, neck and flexure of the elbow (lesional skin), and nates (nonlesional skin). Clinical scoring was carried out...... at the site of each biopsy. After fixation and plastic embedding, the biopsies were cut into 2 microns serial sections. Ten sections, 30 microns apart, from each biopsy were examined and stained alternately with either toluidine blue or Giemsa stain and mast cell profile numbers were determined. The study...

  10. A Method to Predict the Orbital Lifetimes of Free Tethers and Tether-Trailing Satellites using Artificial Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-08-28

    done by Freud .’ Prior to his psychoanalysis investigations, Freud attempted to ".... represent psychical processes as quantitatively determinate states...parent vehicle for (1) tether initiated reentry or orbit transfer of a subsatellite, and/or (2) local area operations requiring return to the space...performing flow analyses routinely use empirically- derived expressions to calculate convection heat transfer coefficients.ś Another example occurs in

  11. Dynamic analysis of the tether transportation system using absolute nodal coordinate formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xin; Xu, Ming; Zhong, Rui

    2017-10-01

    Long space tethers are becoming a rising concern as an alternate way for transportation in space. It benefits from fuel economizing. This paper focuses on the dynamics of the tether transportation system, which consists of two end satellites connected by a flexible tether, and a movable vehicle driven by the actuator carried by itself. The Absolute Nodal Coordinate Formulation is applied to the establishment of the equation of motion, so that the influence caused by the distributed mass and elasticity of the tether is introduced. Moreover, an approximated method for accelerating the calculation of the generalized gravitational forces on the tether is proposed by substituting the volume integral every step into summation of finite terms. Afterwards, dynamic evolutions of such a system in different configurations are illustrated using numerical simulations. The deflection of the tether and the trajectory of the crawler during the transportation is investigated. Finally, the effect on the orbit of the system due to the crawler is revealed.

  12. Circadian regulation of allergic reactions by the mast cell clock in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yuki; Nakano, Nobuhiro; Ishimaru, Kayoko; Hara, Mutsuko; Ikegami, Takako; Tahara, Yu; Katoh, Ryohei; Ogawa, Hideoki; Okumura, Ko; Shibata, Shigenobu; Nishiyama, Chiharu; Nakao, Atsuhito

    2014-02-01

    It remains elusive how allergic symptoms exhibit prominent 24-hour variations. In mammals the circadian clocks present in nearly all cells, including mast cells, drive the daily rhythms of physiology. Recently, we have shown that the circadian clocks drive the daily rhythms in IgE/mast cell-mediated allergic reactions. However, the precise mechanisms, particularly the specific roles of the mast cell-intrinsic clockwork in temporal regulation, remain unclear. We determined whether the mast cell clockwork contributes to the temporal regulation of IgE/mast cell-mediated allergic reaction. The kinetics of a time of day-dependent variation in passive cutaneous anaphylactic reactions were compared between mast cell-deficient mice reconstituted with bone marrow-derived cultured mast cells generated from mice with a wild-type allele and a dominant negative type mutation of the key clock gene Clock. We also examined the temporal responses of wild-type and Clock-mutated bone marrow-derived cultured mast cells to IgE stimulation in vitro. Furthermore, factors influencing the mast cell clockwork were determined by using in vivo imaging. The Clock mutation in mast cells resulted in the absence of temporal variations in IgE-mediated degranulation in mast cells both in vivo and in vitro associated with the loss of temporal regulation of FcεRI expression and signaling. Additionally, adrenalectomy abolished the mast cell clockwork in vivo. The mast cell-intrinsic clockwork, entrained by humoral factors from the adrenal gland, primarily contributes to the temporal regulation of IgE/mast cell-mediated allergic reactions. Our results reveal a novel regulatory mechanism for IgE-mediated mast cell responses that might underlie the circadian pathophysiology in patients with allergic diseases. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Association between mast cells of different phenotypes and angiogenesis in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauro, Laura V; Bellido, Mariana; Morandi, Ana; Bonadeo, Fernando; Vaccaro, Carlos; Quintana, Guillermo Ojea; Pallotta, María Guadalupe; Lastiri, José; Puricelli, Lydia I; De Cidre, Lilia Lauría

    2008-01-01

    It is known that mast cells proliferate in solid tumours and increase tumour angiogenesis. Nevertheless, there is no consensus regarding their role in colorectal cancer (CRC). In this study, we aimed to clarify the relationship of mast cells positive for tryptase (MCts) and tryptase-chymase (MCtcs) with microvessel density (MVD) in the intratumoral zone and the invasive edge of 80 CRC patient tumours. We evaluated these parameters and associated their expression with clinicopathological parameters, including survival rate. Tumour sections from each patient were immunostained for tryptase to evaluate MCts, chymase to evaluate MCtcs, and CD34 to evaluate microvessel counts under x100 microscopy. The number of MCs of both phenotypes and the MVD counts were higher in the invasive edge than in the intratumoral zone (p<0.001). MCt numbers were higher than those of MCtcs in all Astler-Coller stages in both regions. A positive correlation between MVD and MCts or MCtcs was observed (Pearson's test p<0.001). Neither the number of MCs nor MVD was associated with overall survival (log rank test). However, only 8.3% of patients with low numbers of MCtcs in the invasive edge succumbed to the disease, compared to 32% with high numbers of MCtcs. Our results indicate that angiogenesis and MC hyperplasia are events which appear early during CRC development. The correlation of MC phenotypes with MVD is in agreement with the role attributed to MCs, that of angiogenesis enhancement. Collectively, these findings suggest that screening during the early malignization of CRC can provide valuable clinical information.

  14. design, construction and evaluation of a meteorological mobile mast

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vincent

    in such a way that it can be collapsed like the electronic - controlled car radio antenna. It is made up of steel pipes of different diameters driven manually or by an electric motor via a pulley system. The sensors were calibrated with standard instruments and attached to different height of the mast for sample data acquisition.

  15. Aged Lymphatic Vessels and Mast Cells in Perilymphatic Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Sarit; Meininger, Cynthia J; Gashev, Anatoliy A

    2017-05-03

    This review provides a comprehensive summary of research on aging-associated alterations in lymphatic vessels and mast cells in perilymphatic tissues. Aging alters structure (by increasing the size of zones with low muscle cell investiture), ultrastructure (through loss of the glycocalyx), and proteome composition with a concomitant increase in permeability of aged lymphatic vessels. The contractile function of aged lymphatic vessels is depleted with the abolished role of nitric oxide and an increased role of lymphatic-born histamine in flow-dependent regulation of lymphatic phasic contractions and tone. In addition, aging induces oxidative stress in lymphatic vessels and facilitates the spread of pathogens from these vessels into perilymphatic tissues. Aging causes the basal activation of perilymphatic mast cells, which, in turn, restricts recruitment/activation of immune cells in perilymphatic tissues. This aging-associated basal activation of mast cells limits proper functioning of the mast cell/histamine/NF-κB axis that is essential for the regulation of lymphatic vessel transport and barrier functions as well as for both the interaction and trafficking of immune cells near and within lymphatic collecting vessels. Cumulatively, these changes play important roles in the pathogenesis of alterations in inflammation and immunity associated with aging.

  16. Determination of Safety Distance for Installing GSM Mast in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    Keywords: Power Density, Fuzzy Logic, Risk, Distance, Specific Absorption Rate and Safety. The introduction of global system for mobile communication (GSM) has significantly solved the problems of communication in Nigeria. However, the health risk of using mobile equipment (ME), living under or near the GSM mast has ...

  17. Getting NuSTAR on target: predicting mast motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, Karl; Madsen, Kristin K.; Miyasaka, Hiromasa; Craig, William W.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Rana, Vikram R.; Markwardt, Craig B.; Grefenstette, Brian W.

    2016-07-01

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) is the first focusing high energy (3-79 keV) X-ray observatory operating for four years from low Earth orbit. The X-ray detector arrays are located on the spacecraft bus with the optics modules mounted on a flexible mast of 10.14m length. The motion of the telescope optical axis on the detectors during each observation is measured by a laser metrology system and matches the pre-launch predictions of the thermal flexing of the mast as the spacecraft enters and exits the Earths shadow each orbit. However, an additional motion of the telescope field of view was discovered during observatory commissioning that is associated with the spacecraft attitude control system and an additional flexing of the mast correlated with the Solar aspect angle for the observation. We present the methodology developed to predict where any particular target coordinate will fall on the NuSTAR detectors based on the Solar aspect angle at the scheduled time of an observation. This may be applicable to future observatories that employ optics deployed on extendable masts. The automation of the prediction system has greatly improved observatory operations efficiency and the reliability of observation planning.

  18. Relevance of mast cell-nerve interactions in intestinal nociception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Diest, Sophie A.; Stanisor, Oana I.; Boeckxstaens, Guy E.; de Jonge, Wouter J.; van den Wijngaard, René M.

    2012-01-01

    Cross-talk between the immune- and nervous-system is considered an important biological process in health and disease. Because mast cells are often strategically placed between nerves and surrounding (immune)cells they may function as important intermediate cells. This review summarizes the current

  19. Intestinal mast cells in gut inflammation and motility disturbances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Winter, Benedicte Y.; van den Wijngaard, Rene M.; de Jonge, Wouter J.

    2012-01-01

    Mast cells may be regarded as prototypes of innate immune cells that can be controlled by neuronal mediators. Their activation has been implicated in many types of neuro-inflammatory responses, and related disturbances of gut motility, via direct or indirect mechanisms that involve several

  20. Increased mast cell numbers in a calcaneal tendon overuse model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pingel, Jessica; Wienecke, Jacob; Kongsgaard Madsen, Mads

    2013-01-01

    Tendinopathy is often discovered late because the initial development of tendon pathology is asymptomatic. The aim of this study was to examine the potential role of mast cell involvement in early tendinopathy using a high-intensity uphill running (HIUR) exercise model. Twenty-four male Wistar ra...

  1. Review article: Mast cell activation disease | Abd El Lateef | Egyptian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Egyptian Journal of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology (The). Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 11, No 2 (2013) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Review article: Mast cell activation disease.

  2. Influence of the Meteorology Mast on a Cup Anemometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin O. L.; Pedersen, B.M.

    1999-01-01

    The actuator disc model is applied on lattice-type meteorological masts to estimate the influence of the tower on the accuracy of the measured wind speed. Combining the results with corrections for the boom, on which the anemometer is mounted, good agreement is found for measurements made on the ...

  3. Purinergic Signaling in Mast Cell Degranulation and Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhan-Guo Gao

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Mast cells are responsible for the majority of allergic conditions. It was originally thought that almost all allergic events were mediated directly only via the high-affinity immunoglobulin E receptors. However, recent evidence showed that many other receptors, such as G protein-coupled receptors and ligand-gated ion channels, are also directly involved in mast cell degranulation, the release of inflammatory mediators such as histamine, serine proteases, leukotrienes, heparin, and serotonin. These mediators are responsible for the symptoms in allergic conditions such as allergic asthma. In recent years, it has been realized that purinergic signaling, induced via the activation of G protein-coupled adenosine receptors and P2Y nucleotide receptors, as well as by ATP-gated P2X receptors, plays a significant role in mast cell degranulation. Both adenosine and ATP can induce degranulation and bronchoconstriction on their own and synergistically with allergens. All three classes of receptors, adenosine, P2X and P2Y are involved in tracheal mucus secretion. This review will summarize the currently available knowledge on the role of purinergic signaling in mast cell degranulation and its most relevant disease, asthma.

  4. Mast cells as key players in periodontal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popovici Ramona Amina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mast cell (MC active mediators promote inflammation through changes induced in the connective tissue components of human gingiva. The aim of this study was to evaluate the distribution, mast cell density and their relationship with the degree of inflammatory infiltrate in gingiva from patients with periodontal disease. Thirty-nine cases with periodontal disease and 12 cases without significant changes to the gingival mucosa were investigated. MCs were identified on paraffin-embedded specimens by immunohistochemistry using anti-mast cell tryptase. The inflammatory infiltrate was scored from 0 to 3, and the MCs were counted using the hotspot method. Intraepithelial MCs were scored from 0 to 2. We found a significant increase of mast cell density in cases with mild and moderate inflammatory changes, and a slight decrease in patients with severe periodontal disease. We noticed a higher degranulation rate in patients with periodontal disease compared to those with healthy mucosa. Intraepithelial MCs were found in cases with periodontal disease only and were correlated with the severity of the inflammatory lesion. MCs are important cellular components of the early stages of periodontal disease. Contrary to other studies, we found that MC density and activation increases with moderate inflammation but decreases in severe inflammatory lesions. Our data suggest that MCs are key players in the progression of inflammatory lesions of the gingiva. In advanced-stage periodontal disease, intraepithelial MCs apparently play an important role, although their biological significance remains to be fully understood.

  5. Design, construction and evaluation of a meteorological mobile mast ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The mechanical mast is designed in such a way that it can be collapsed like the electronic - controlled car radio antenna. It is made up of steel pipes of different diameters driven manually or by an electric motor via a pulley system. The sensors were calibrated with standard instruments and attached to different height of the ...

  6. Design and Development of the Space Shuttle Tail Service Masts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandage, S. R.; Herman, N. A.; Godfrey, S. E.; Uda, R. T.

    1977-01-01

    The successful launch of a space shuttle vehicle depends on the proper operation of two tail service masts (TSMs). Reliable TSM operation is assured through a comprehensive design, development, and testing program. The results of the concept verification test (CVT) and the resulting impact on prototype TSM design are presented. The design criteria are outlined, and the proposed prototype TSM tests are described.

  7. Tethered elevator and platforms as space station facilities: Systems studies and demonstrative experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    Several key concepts of the science and applications tethered platforms were studied. Some conclusions reached are herein listed. Tether elevator and platform could improve the space station scientific and applicative capabilities. The space elevator presents unique characteristics as microgravity facility and as a tethered platform servicing vehicle. Pointing platforms could represent a new kind of observation facility for large class of payloads. The dynamical, control and technological complexity of these concepts advised demonstrative experiments. The on-going tethered satellite system offers the opportunity to perform such experiments. And feasibility studies are in progress.

  8. Novel Roaming and Stationary Tethered Aerial Robots for Continuous Mobile Missions in Nuclear Power Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beom W. Gu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, new tethered aerial robots including roaming tethered aerial robots (RTARs for radioactive material sampling and stationary tethered aerial robots (STARs for environment monitoring are proposed to meet extremely-long-endurance missions of nuclear power plants. The flight of the proposed tethered aerial robots may last for a few days or even a few months as long as the tethered cable provides continuous power. A high voltage AC or DC power system was newly adopted to reduce the mass of the tethered cable. The RTAR uses a tethered cable spooled from the aerial robot and an aerial tension control system. The aerial tension control system provides the appropriate tension to the tethered cable, which is accordingly laid down on the ground as the RTAR roams. The STAR includes a tethered cable spooled from the ground and a ground tension control system, which enables the STAR to reach high altitudes. Prototypes of the RTAR and STAR were designed and successfully demonstrated in outdoor environments, where the load power, power type, operating frequency, and flight attitude of the RTAR and STAR were: 180 W, AC 100 kHz, and 20 m; and 300 W, AC or DC 100 kHz, and 80 m, respectively.

  9. Configuration maintaining control of three-body ring tethered system based on thrust compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Panfeng; Liu, Binbin; Zhang, Fan

    2016-06-01

    Space multi-tethered systems have shown broad prospects in remote observation missions. This paper mainly focuses on the dynamics and configuration maintaining control of space spinning three-body ring tethered system for such mission. Firstly, we establish the spinning dynamic model of the three-body ring tethered system considering the elasticity of the tether using Newton-Euler method, and then validate the suitability of this model by numerical simulation. Subsequently, LP (Likins-Pringle) initial equilibrium conditions for the tethered system are derived based on rigid body's equilibrium theory. Simulation results show that tether slack, snapping and interaction between the tethers exist in the three-body ring system, and its' configuration can not be maintained without control. Finally, a control strategy based on thrust compensation, namely thrust to simulate tether compression under LP initial equilibrium conditions is designed to solve the configuration maintaining control problem. Control effects are verified by numerical simulation compared with uncontrolled situation. Simulation results show that the configuration of the three-body ring tethered system could maintain under this active control strategy.

  10. Three-dimensional characterization of tethered microspheres by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumberg, Seth; Gajraj, Arivalagan; Pennington, Matthew W.; Meiners, Jens-Christian

    2005-01-01

    Tethered particle microscopy is a powerful tool to study the dynamics of DNA molecules and DNA-protein complexes in single-molecule experiments. We demonstrate that stroboscopic total internal reflection microscopy can be used to characterize the three-dimensional spatiotemporal motion of DNA-tethered particles. By calculating characteristic measures such as symmetry and time constants of the motion, well-formed tethers can be distinguished from defective ones for which the motion is dominated by aberrant surface effects. This improves the reliability of measurements on tether dynamics. For instance, in observations of protein-mediated DNA looping, loop formation is distinguished from adsorption and other nonspecific events.

  11. Novel roaming and stationary tethered aerial robots for continuous mobile missions in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Beom W.; Choi, Su Y.; Rim, Chun T. [Dept. of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Young Soo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cai, Guowei; Seneviratne, Lakmal [Dept. of Aerospace Engineering, Khalifa University, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates)

    2016-08-15

    In this paper, new tethered aerial robots including roaming tethered aerial robots (RTARs) for radioactive material sampling and stationary tethered aerial robots (STARs) for environment monitoring are proposed to meet extremely-long-endurance missions of nuclear power plants. The flight of the proposed tethered aerial robots may last for a few days or even a few months as long as the tethered cable provides continuous power. A high voltage AC or DC power system was newly adopted to reduce the mass of the tethered cable. The RTAR uses a tethered cable spooled from the aerial robot and an aerial tension control system. The aerial tension control system provides the appropriate tension to the tethered cable, which is accordingly laid down on the ground as the RTAR roams. The STAR includes a tethered cable spooled from the ground and a ground tension control system, which enables the STAR to reach high altitudes. Prototypes of the RTAR and STAR were designed and successfully demonstrated in outdoor environments, where the load power, power type, operating frequency, and flight attitude of the RTAR and STAR were: 180 W, AC 100 kHz, and 20 m; and 300 W, AC or DC 100 kHz, and 80 m, respectively.

  12. New Kepler Data Products At MAST For Stellar Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Scott W.; Shiao, B.; Tseng, S.; Million, C.; Thompson, R.; Seibert, M.; Abney, F.; Donaldson, T.; Dower, T.; Fraquelli, D. A.; Handy, S.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Levay, K.; Matuskey, J.; McLean, B.; Quick, L.; Rogers, A.; Wallace, G.; White, R. L.

    2014-01-01

    The Kepler Mission has collected high-precision, time-series photometry of over 200,000 stars. The reduced lightcurves, target pixel files, and a variety of catalog metadata are already available at MAST. We present new data products and services at MAST that will further aid researchers as Kepler begins its transition to a legacy mission, particularly in the realm of stellar astrophysics. New photometric catalogs to accompany the Kepler targets have arrived at MAST within the past year, and several more will be coming in the relative future. These include the second half of the Kepler INT survey (U,g,r,i,H_alpha; available now), an improved GALEX source catalog (NUV and FUV; available now), PanSTARRS (g,r,i,z; available soon), and WISE (3.4, 4.6, 12, and 22 microns; planned). We expect searches for variability will become one of the most active areas of archive use, so MAST is including a wide range of variability statistics as part of the archive database. In addition to being searchable through database queries and web forms, each Preview page will now include a summary of these variability indices for each of the target's lightcurves within a Quarter. Along with updated NUV and FUV fluxes, a new tool at MAST called gPhoton will allow users to create time-series lightcurves, including animated movies and intensity images, from any set of GALEX photons with arbitrary aperture and bin sizes. We show some examples of the ways GALEX UV lightcurves generated with gPhoton can be used in conjunction with the Kepler data. Finally, MAST has released an initial version of its Data Discovery Portal. This one-stop, interactive web application gives users the ability to search and access data from any of MAST's missions (HST, GALEX, Kepler, FUSE, IUE, JWST, etc.), as well as any data available through the Virtual Observatory. It includes filtering options, access to interactive displays, an accompanying AstroViewer with data footprints on-sky, the ability to upload your own

  13. Mast cells are important modifiers of autoimmune disease: With so much evidence, why is there controversy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Ann Brown

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available There is abundant evidence that mast cells are active participants in events that mediate tissue damage in autoimmune disease. Disease-associated increases in mast cell numbers accompanied by mast cell degranulation and elaboration of numerous mast cell mediators at sites of inflammation are commonly observed in many human autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis and bullous pemphigoid. In animal models, treatment with mast cell stabilizing drugs or mast cell ablation can result in diminished disease. A variety of receptors including those engaged by antibody, complement, pathogens and intrinsic danger signals are implicated in mast cell activation in disease. Similar to their role as first responders in infection settings, mast cells likely orchestrate early recruitment of immune cells, including neutrophils, to the sites of autoimmune destruction. This co-localization promotes cellular crosstalk and activation and results in the amplification of the local inflammatory response thereby promoting and sustaining tissue damage. Despite the evidence, there is still a debate regarding the relative role of mast cells in these processes. However, by definition, mast cells can only act as accessory cells to the self-reactive T and/or antibody driven autoimmune responses. Thus, when evaluating mast cell involvement using existing and somewhat imperfect animal models of disease, their importance is sometimes obscured. However, these potent immune cells are undoubtedly major contributors to autoimmunity and should be considered as important targets for therapeutic disease intervention.

  14. Mast Cell Targeted Chimeric Toxin Can Be Developed as an Adjunctive Therapy in Colon Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan Wang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The association of colitis with colorectal cancer has become increasingly clear with mast cells being identified as important inflammatory cells in the process. In view of the relationship between mast cells and cancer, we studied the effect and mechanisms of mast cells in the development of colon cancer. Functional and mechanistic insights were gained from ex vivo and in vivo studies of cell interactions between mast cells and CT26 cells. Further evidence was reversely obtained in studies of mast cell targeted Fcε-PE40 chimeric toxin. Experiments revealed mast cells could induce colon tumor cell proliferation and invasion. Cancer progression was found to be related to the density of mast cells in colonic submucosa. The activation of MAPK, Rho-GTPase, and STAT pathways in colon cancer cells was triggered by mast cells during cell-to-cell interaction. Lastly, using an Fcε-PE40 chimeric toxin we constructed, we confirmed the promoting effect of mast cells in development of colon cancer. Mast cells are a promoting factor of colon cancer and thus also a potential therapeutic target. The Fcε-PE40 chimeric toxin targeting mast cells could effectively prevent colon cancer in vitro and in vivo. Consequently, these data may demonstrate a novel immunotherapeutic approach for the treatment of tumors.

  15. Estimation of the total number of mast cells in the human umbilical cord. A methodological study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg Damsgaard, T M; Windelborg Nielsen, B; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    1992-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to estimate the total number of mast cells in the human umbilical cord. Using 50 microns-thick paraffin sections, made from a systematic random sample of umbilical cord, the total number of mast cells per cord was estimated using a combination of the optical...... disector and fractionated sampling. The mast cell of the human umbilical cord was found in Wharton's jelly, most frequently in close proximity to the three blood vessels. No consistent pattern of variation in mast cell numbers from the fetal end of the umbilical cord towards the placenta was seen....... The total number of mast cells found in the umbilical cord was 5,200,000 (median), range 2,800,000-16,800,000 (n = 7), that is 156,000 mast cells per gram umbilical cord (median), range 48,000-267,000. Thus, the umbilical cord constitutes an adequate source of mast cells for further investigation...

  16. Induction of Microglial Activation by Mediators Released from Mast Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Zhang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Microglia are the resident immune cells in the brain and play a pivotal role in immune surveillance in the central nervous system (CNS. Brain mast cells are activated in CNS disorders and induce the release of several mediators. Thus, brain mast cells, rather than microglia, are the “first responders” due to injury. However, the functional aspects of mast cell-microglia interactions remain uninvestigated. Methods: Conditioned medium from activated HMC-1 cells induces microglial activation similar to co-culture of microglia with HMC-1 cells. Primary cultured microglia were examined by flow cytometry analysis and confocal microscopy. TNF- alpha and IL-6 were measured with commercial ELISA kits. Cell signalling was analysed by Western blotting. Results: In the present study, we found that the conditioned medium from activated HMC-1 cells stimulated microglial activation and the subsequent production of the pro-inflammatory factors TNF-α and IL-6. Co-culture of microglia and HMC-1 cells with corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH for 24, 48 and 72 hours increased TNF-α and IL-6 production. Antagonists of histamine receptor 1 (H1R, H4R, proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR2 or Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 reduced HMC-1-induced pro-inflammatory factor production and MAPK and PI3K/AKT pathway activation. Conclusions: These results imply that activated mast cells trigger microglial activation. Interactions between mast cells and microglia could constitute a new and unique therapeutic target for CNS inflammation-related diseases.

  17. Effect of methylmercury on histamine release from rat mast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graevskaya, Elizabeth E.; Rubin, Andrew B. [Moscow State University, Biological Faculty, Department of Biophysics, 119899, Vorobjovy Gory, Moscow (Russian Federation); Yasutake, Akira; Aramaki, Ryoji [National Institute for Minamata Disease, 4058-18 Hama, Minamata, Kumamoto 867-0008 (Japan)

    2003-01-01

    Methylmercury chloride (MeHgCl) is well known as a significant environmental hazard, particularly as a modulator of the immune system. As it is acknowledged that the critical effector cells in the host response participating in various biological responses are mast cells, we tried to define the possible contribution of mast cells in the development of methylmercury-evoked effects. We investigated the effects of methylmercury on the rat mast cell degranulation induced by non-immunological stimuli (the selective liberator of histamine, compound 48/80, and calcium ionophore A23187) both in vivo and in vitro. Using the cells prepared from methylmercury-intoxicated rats through a 5-day treatment of MeHgCl (10 mg/kg/day), we observed the suppression of calcium ionophore A23187- and 48/80-induced histamine release, which was enhanced with time after treatment. Similar suppression was observed in the ionophore-stimulated release, when cells were prepared from rat with a single treatment of MeHgCl (20 mg/kg). It should be noted that when cells from the control rat were pre-incubated with methylmercury in vitro at a 10{sup -8} M concentration for 10 min, A23187 and compound 48/80-stimulated histamine release was significantly enhanced. However, when the pre-incubation period was prolonged to 30 min, the release was suppressed. An increase in the methylmercury concentration to 10{sup -6} M also suppressed the histamine release. These results show that methylmercury treatment can modify mast cell function depending on concentration and time, and might provide an insight into the role of mast cells in the development of methylmercury-stimulated effects. (orig.)

  18. Generation, isolation, and maintenance of human mast cells and mast cell lines derived from peripheral blood or cord blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rådinger, Madeleine; Jensen, Bettina M; Kuehn, Hye Sun

    2010-01-01

    Antigen-mediated mast cell activation is a pivotal step in the initiation of allergic disorders including anaphylaxis and atopy. To date, studies aimed at investigating the mechanisms regulating these responses, and studies designed to identify potential ways to prevent them, have primarily been...

  19. Tethered Transition Metals Promoted Photocatalytic System for Efficient Hydrogen Evolutions

    KAUST Repository

    Takanabe, Kazuhiro

    2015-03-05

    The present invention is directed, at least in part, to a process for improving the efficiency of a photocatalyst (a semiconductor photocatalyst) by tethering (depositing) a metal (e.g., metal ions of a late transition metal, such as nickel) to the semiconductor (photocatalyst) surface through the use of an organic ligand. More specifically, 1,2-ethanedithiol (EDT) functions as an excellent molecular linker (organic ligand) to attach a transition metal complex (e.g., nickel (Ni.sup.2+ ions)) to the semiconductor surface, which can be in the form of a cadmium sulfide surface. The photocatalyst has particular utility in generating hydrogen from H.sub.2S.

  20. Flight control and stability of a multiple kites tethered system

    OpenAIRE

    Podgaets, A.R.; Ockels, W.J.

    2006-01-01

    One of novel concepts to use the energy of high altitude winds is by launching a series of kite on a long rope and let them pull the rope thus driving the generator. A mathematical model of tethered kites system has been developed consisting of models of kites and of the cable that links them together and to the generator on the ground energy station. The model described is then investigated for stability in various wind conditions including random wind gusts which require stochastic stabilit...

  1. Tethered bimolecular lipid membranes - A novel model membrane platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoll, Wolfgang; Koeper, Ingo; Naumann, Renate; Sinner, Eva-Kathrin [Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, 55128 Mainz (Germany)

    2008-10-01

    This contribution summarizes some of our efforts in designing, synthesizing, assembling, and characterizing functional tethered bimolecular lipid membranes (tBLMs) as a novel platform for biophysical studies of and with artificial membranes or for sensor development employing, e.g., membrane integral receptor proteins. Chemical coupling schemes based on thiol groups for Au substrates or silanes used in the case of oxide surfaces allow for the covalent and, hence, chemically and mechanically robust attachment of anchor lipids to the solid support, stabilizing the proximal layer of a tethered membrane on the transducer surface. Surface plasmon optics, the quartz crystal microbalance, fluorescence- and IR spectroscopies, and electrochemical techniques are used to characterize the build-up of these complex supramolecular interfacial architectures. We demonstrate, in particular, that bilayers with a specific electrical resistance of better than 10 M{omega} cm{sup 2} can be achieved routinely with this approach. The functionalization of the lipid membranes by the incorporation of peptides is demonstrated for the carrier valinomycin which shows in our tBLMs the expected discrimination by four orders of magnitude between the translocation of K{sup +}- and Na{sup +}-ions across the hydrophobic barrier. For the synthetic channel-forming peptide M2 the high electrical resistance of the bilayer with the correspondingly low background current allows for the recording of even single channel current fluctuations. From the many membrane proteins that we reconstituted so far we describe results obtained with the redox-protein cytochrome c oxidase. Here, we also use a genetically modified mutant with a His-tag at either the C- or the N-terminus for the oriented attachment of the protein via the NTA/Ni{sup 2+} approach. With this strategy, we not only can control the density of the immobilized functional units, we introduce a completely new and alternative concept for the

  2. Emerging insights into the roles of membrane tethers from analysis of whole organisms: The tip of an iceberg?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Hong eToh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Membrane tethers have been identified throughout different compartments of the endomembrane system. It is now well established that a number of membrane tethers mediate docking of membrane carriers in anterograde and retrograde transport and in regulating the organization of membrane compartments. Much of our information on membrane tethers have been obtained from the analysis of individual membrane tethers in cultured cells. In the future it will be important to better appreciate the network of interactions mediated by tethers and the potential co-ordination of their collective functions in vivo. There are now a number of studies which have analyzed membrane tethers in tissues and organisms which are providing new insights into the role of this class of membrane protein at the physiological level. Here we review recent advances in the understanding of the function of membrane tethers from knock outs (or knock downs in whole organisms and from mutations in tethers associated with disease.

  3. Wnt-β-Catenin Signaling Promotes the Maturation of Mast Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko Yamaguchi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mast cells play an important role in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases. Immature mast cells migrate into peripheral tissues from the bone marrow and undergo complete maturation. Interestingly, mast cells have characteristics similar to hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs, such as self-renewal and c-kit expression. In HSCs, Wnt signaling is involved in their maintenance and differentiation. On the other hand, the relation between Wnt signaling and mast cell differentiation is poorly understood. To study whether Wnt signals play a role in the maturation of mast cells, we studied the effect of Wnt proteins on mast cell maturation of bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs. The expression levels of CD81 protein and histidine decarboxylase mRNA and activity of mast cell-specific protease were all elevated in BMMCs treated with Wnt5a. In addition, Wnt5a induced the expression of Axin2 and TCF mRNA in BMMCs. These results showed that Wnt5a could promote the maturation of mast cells via the canonical Wnt signaling pathway and provide important insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the differentiation of mast cells.

  4. Dynamic modeling and Super-Twisting Sliding Mode Control for Tethered Space Robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yakun; Huang, Panfeng; Zhang, Fan

    2018-02-01

    Recent years, tethered space capturing systems have been considered as one of the most promising solutions for active space debris removal due to the increasing threat of space debris to spacecraft and astronauts. In this paper, one of the tethered space capturing systems, Tethered Space Robot (TSR), is investigated. TSR includes a space platform, a space tether, and a gripper as the terminal device. Based on the assumptions that the platform and the gripper are point masses and the tether is rigid, inextensible and remaining straight, the dynamic model of TSR is presented, in which the disturbances from space environment is considered. According to the previous study, the in-plane and out-of-plane angles of the tether oscillate periodically although the tether is released to the desired length. A super-twisting adaptive sliding mode control scheme is designed for TSR to eliminate the vibration of the tether to assure a successful capture in station-keeping phase. Both uncontrolled and controlled situations are simulated. The simulation results show that the proposed controller is effective. Additionally, after comparing with normal sliding mode control algorithm, it is verified that the proposed control scheme can avoid the chattering of normal sliding mode control and is robust for unknown boundary perturbations.

  5. Label-free measurements of membrane tether thickness using optical tweezers combined with SLIM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarshar, Mohammad; Wong, Winson T.; Anvari, Bahman

    2015-03-01

    Various cellular activities such as motility, division, and endocytosis involve a change in the cell shape. The mechanical interactions between the cell membrane and cytoskeleton play an important role in regulating changes in the cell shape. Tether formation from cell membranes provides a technique to characterize the mechanical properties of cell membranes and membrane-cytoskeleton interactions. Accurate measurement of the nano-scale tether diameter is relevant to quantification of membrane tension, bending modulus, and adhesion energy of the membrane-cytoskeleton structure. We have integrated optical tweezers with quantitative phase imaging, based on spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM), to simultaneously form tethers from HEK-293 cells and measure their diameters. Tether thickness along the illumination axis was measured using the quantitative phase map of the sample, and the refractive index (RI) mismatch between the sample and the surrounding media. The RI of the tethers ranged from 1.354 to 1.368 (cell culture medium RI=1.337). Our SLIM imaging system provided a 38 nm resolution in tether thickness measurements. Tether diameter fluctuations of <100 nm were resolved on tethers that ranged between 600-900 nm in diameter. Our integrated platform also provides the ability to simultaneously manipulate and image cell organelles in a non-contact and marker-free manner at nanometer spatial resolution.

  6. The development and significance of abnormal stereotyped behaviours in tethered sows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cronin, G.M.

    1985-01-01

    The development and performance of abnormal stereotyped behaviours (stereotypies) by tethered sows were studied in order to investigate the consequences of the behaviours for animal welfare and sow productivity.

    In Chapter 2, the behaviour of 36 tethered sows in a commercial herd

  7. Long-term evaluation of intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring-assisted tethered cord surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dulfer, S E; Drost, G; Lange, F; Journee, H L; Wapstra, F H; Hoving, E W

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: Patients with tethered spinal cord have been investigated for short-term effects after tethered spinal cord surgery in the past. However, little is known about the long-term effects in this patient group. In this retrospective, longitudinal, observational study, a patient sample of a

  8. Tethered Cord Syndrome with Syrinx in A Nigerian Adult Female: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alasia Datonye

    modern imaging tools like MRI, the diagnosis of TCS is no more as rare as it is ... Keywords: Tethered cord; Syringomyelia; MRI; Adult;. Nigeria. ... DISCUSSION. Tethered cord syndrome (TCS) is a pull-induced functional disease of the spinal cord with its caudal part anchored by an. 3 inelastic structure . Garcean first ...

  9. Acquisition of Ice-Tethered Profilers with Velocity (ITP-V) Instruments for Future Arctic Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-15

    San Diego, CA, IEEE Xplore . Toole, J. M., R. A. Krishfield, M.-L. Timmennans, and A. Proshutinsky, 2011: The Ice-Tethered Profiler: Argo ofthe Arctic, Oceanogr., 24, 126-135. 4 ...observations from Ice-Tethered Profilers, MTS/ IEEE Oceans’ 2015, Washington DC, 1-10. Krishfield, R., J. Toole, A. Proshutinsky, and M.-L. Timmennans, 2008

  10. Rolling neutrophils form tethers and slings under physiologic conditions in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marki, Alex; Buscher, Konrad; Mikulski, Zbigniew; Pries, Axel; Ley, Klaus

    2017-08-18

    Human and mouse neutrophils are known to form tethers when rolling on selectins in vitro. Tethers are ∼0.2 μm thin, ∼5-10 μm-long structures behind rolling cells that can swing around to form slings that serve as self-adhesive substrates. Here, we developed a mouse intravital imaging method, where the neutrophil surface is labeled by injecting fluorescently labeled mAb to Ly-6G. Venules in the cremaster muscle of live mice were imaged at a high frame rate using a confocal microscope equipped with a fast resonant scanner. We observed 270 tethers (median length 3.5 μm) and 31 slings (median length 6.9 µm) on 186 neutrophils of 15 mice. Out of 199 tether break events, 123 were followed by immediate acceleration of the rolling cell, which shows that tethers are load-bearing structures in vivo. In venules with a high wall shear stress (WSS; > 12 dyn/cm2), median rolling velocity was higher (19 μm/s), and 43% of rolling neutrophils had visible tethers. In venules with WSS < 12 dyn/cm2, only 26% of rolling neutrophils had visible tethers. We conclude that neutrophil tethers are commonly present and stabilize rolling in vivo. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  11. Tethered Cord Syndrome with Syrinx in A Nigerian Adult Female: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There were no cutaneous stigmata (hypertrichosis). Laboratory investigations showed normal hematological indices. Urinalysis was also normal. An impression of acute transverse myelitis was made. Magnetic resonance imaging showed tethered cord and syrinx in the lumbar region. Conclusion: Tethered cord association ...

  12. Flexible Tethered Kite with Moveable Attachment Points, Part I: Dynamics and Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Williams, P.; Lansdorp, B.; Ockels, W.

    2007-01-01

    Tethered kite technology is one potential means of harnessing energy available in high altitude winds. In an efficient and practical system, the kite is required to fly in cyclic patterns that maximize net power produced per cycle. At the same time, the tether length must be controlled to ensure the

  13. In-plane adaptive retrieval control for a noncooperative target by tethered space robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongjie Meng

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Using tether to replace rigid arms, the tethered space robot has more flexibility and security than the traditional space robot, which gives it a wide application prospect in the satellite retrieval. After a noncooperative satellite is captured by the tethered space robot, the tethered space robot and the satellite compose a combination with uncertain mass, inertia, and tether junction position. The tether length, tether deflection, and combination attitude are coupled seriously and control inputs are strictly limited, which make the retrieval of tethered space robot very difficult. First, a retrieval dynamic model of in-plane motion is derived using Lagrangian method. Then, in order to solve the uncertainty problems of dynamics parameters, an adaptive controller and its parameter updating law are proposed using the dynamic inversion theory. Moreover, an anti-windup strategy with auxiliary variables is derived to compensate the limited control inputs. Simulation results validate the feasibility of the proposed adaptive anti-windup control method. The noncooperative satellite is retrieved along the desired trajectory effectively.

  14. Yolk granule tethering: a role in cell resealing and identification of several protein components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, Anna; McNeil, Paul L

    2005-10-15

    Homotypic fusion among echinoderm egg yolk granules has previously been reconstituted in vitro, and shown to be a rapid, Ca2+-triggered reaction that can produce extremely large (>10 microm diameter) fusion products. We here show that, prior to Ca2+-triggered fusion, yolk granules in vitro, if isolated in an appropriate buffer, became tethered to one another, forming large aggregates of more than 100 granules. Granule washing with mildly chaotropic salt abolished this tethering reaction, and prevented Ca2+-triggered formation of the large fusion products characteristic of tethered granules. Protein factors present in the wash restored tethering activity and these factors could be substantially enriched by anion exchange chromatography. The enriched fraction behaved under native conditions as a high molecular weight (approximately 670 kDa), multisubunit complex of at least seven proteins. Monoclonal antibodies directed against this complex of proteins were capable of immunodepleting tethering activity, confirming the role of the complex in granule tethering. These antibodies selectively stained the surface of yolk granules in the intact egg. We therefore propose a new role for tethering: it can promote the formation of large vesicular fusion products, such as those required for successful resealing. We have, moreover, identified several proteins that may be critical to this tethering mechanism.

  15. Cellulose Microfibril Formation by Surface-Tethered Cellulose Synthase Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Snehasish; Omadjela, Okako; Gaddes, David; Tadigadapa, Srinivas; Zimmer, Jochen; Catchmark, Jeffrey M

    2016-02-23

    Cellulose microfibrils are pseudocrystalline arrays of cellulose chains that are synthesized by cellulose synthases. The enzymes are organized into large membrane-embedded complexes in which each enzyme likely synthesizes and secretes a β-(1→4) glucan. The relationship between the organization of the enzymes in these complexes and cellulose crystallization has not been explored. To better understand this relationship, we used atomic force microscopy to visualize cellulose microfibril formation from nickel-film-immobilized bacterial cellulose synthase enzymes (BcsA-Bs), which in standard solution only form amorphous cellulose from monomeric BcsA-B complexes. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques show that surface-tethered BcsA-Bs synthesize highly crystalline cellulose II in the presence of UDP-Glc, the allosteric activator cyclic-di-GMP, as well as magnesium. The cellulose II cross section/diameter and the crystal size and crystallinity depend on the surface density of tethered enzymes as well as the overall concentration of substrates. Our results provide the correlation between cellulose microfibril formation and the spatial organization of cellulose synthases.

  16. Piperidinium tethered nanoparticle-hybrid electrolyte for lithium metal batteries

    KAUST Repository

    Korf, Kevin S.

    2014-06-23

    We report on the synthesis of novel piperidinium-based ionic liquid tethered nanoparticle hybrid electrolytes and investigate their physical and electrochemical properties. Hybrid electrolytes based on the ionic liquid 1-methyl-1-propylpiperidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfone) imide covalently tethered to silica nanoparticles (SiO2-PP-TFSI) were blended with propylene carbonate-1 M lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfone) imide (LiTFSI). We employed NMR analysis to confirm the successful creation of the hybrid material. Dielectric and rheological measurements show that these electrolytes exhibit exceptional room-temperature DC ionic conductivity (10-2 to 10 -3 S cm-1) as well as high shear mechanical moduli (105 to 106 Pa). Lithium transference numbers were found to increase with particle loading and to reach values as high as 0.22 at high particle loadings where the particle jam to form a soft glassy elastic medium. Analysis of lithium electrodeposits obtained in the hybrid electrolytes using SEM and EDX spectra show that the SiO2-PP-TFSI nanoparticles are able to smooth lithium deposition and inhibit lithium dendrite proliferation in Li metal batteries. LTOSiO2-PP-TFSI/PC in 1 M LiTFSILi half-cells based on the SiO2-PP-TFSI hybrid electrolytes exhibit attractive voltage profiles and trouble-free extended cycling behavior over more than 1000 cycles of charge and discharge. This journal is © the Partner Organisations 2014.

  17. Dynamics of tethered versus free-swimming animals: A wake structure comparison in jellyfish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katija, Kakani; Dabiri, John O.

    2006-11-01

    Previous research has shown that jellyfish utilize the formation and shedding of vortices to help feed and move the animal. Laboratory experiments often require restricting the motion of an animal by tethering/fluming to allow for repeatable results. However, past research has not addressed the differences that arise when the motion of an animal is restricted/confined. This presentation will attend to this issue by comparing the wake structure of a tethered and free-swimming Aurelia aurita. Digital Particle Image Velocimetry is used to collect measurements of the velocity field surrounding an animal that is either tethered or swimming freely. Dynamical systems methods are used to compute Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS), which is used to identify the geometries of structures in the wake of the animal. Using LCS, a comparison between the wake of a tethered and free-swimming animal can be made. This research provides a quantitative measure of the differences between a tethered and freely moving jellyfish.

  18. Transport vesicle tethering at the trans Golgi network: coiled coil proteins in action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pak-yan Patricia Cheung

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Golgi complex is decorated with so-called Golgin proteins that share a common feature: a large proportion of their amino acid sequences are predicted to form coiled-coil structures. The possible presence of extensive coiled coils implies that these proteins are highly elongated molecules that can extend a significant distance from the Golgi surface. This property would help them to capture or trap inbound transport vesicles and to tether Golgi mini-stacks together. This review will summarize our current understanding of coiled coil tethers that are needed for the receipt of transport vesicles at the trans Golgi network. How do long tethering proteins actually catch vesicles? Golgi-associated, coiled coil tethers contain numerous binding sites for small GTPases, SNARE proteins, and vesicle coat proteins. How are these interactions coordinated and are any or all of them important for the tethering process? Progress towards understanding these questions and remaining, unresolved mysteries will be discussed.

  19. Interplay of matrix stiffness and protein tethering in stem cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jessica H; Vincent, Ludovic G; Fuhrmann, Alexander; Choi, Yu Suk; Hribar, Kolin C; Taylor-Weiner, Hermes; Chen, Shaochen; Engler, Adam J

    2014-10-01

    Stem cells regulate their fate by binding to, and contracting against, the extracellular matrix. Recently, it has been proposed that in addition to matrix stiffness and ligand type, the degree of coupling of fibrous protein to the surface of the underlying substrate, that is, tethering and matrix porosity, also regulates stem cell differentiation. By modulating substrate porosity without altering stiffness in polyacrylamide gels, we show that varying substrate porosity did not significantly change protein tethering, substrate deformations, or the osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stromal cells and marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells. Varying protein-substrate linker density up to 50-fold changed tethering, but did not affect osteogenesis, adipogenesis, surface-protein unfolding or underlying substrate deformations. Differentiation was also unaffected by the absence of protein tethering. Our findings imply that the stiffness of planar matrices regulates stem cell differentiation independently of protein tethering and porosity.

  20. The development of optimal control laws for orbiting tethered platform systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainum, P. M.

    1986-01-01

    A mathematical model of the open and closed loop in orbit plane dynamics of a space platform-tethered-subsatellite system is developed. The system consists of a rigid platform from which an (assumed massless) tether is deploying (retrieving) a subsatellite from an attachment point which is, in general, offset from the platform's mass center. A Langrangian formulation yields equations describing platform pitch, subsatellite tetherline swing, and varying tether length motions. These equations are linearized about the nominal station keeping motion. Control can be provided by both modulation of the tether tension level and by a momentum type platform-mounted device; system controllability depends on the presence of both control inputs. Stability criteria are developed in terms of the control law gains, the platform inertia ratio, and tether offset parameter. Control law gains are obtained based on linear quadratic regulator techniques. Typical transient responses of both the state and required control effort are presented.

  1. Diffusive transport of molecular cargo tethered to a DNA origami platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopperger, Enzo; Pirzer, Tobias; Simmel, Friedrich C

    2015-04-08

    Fast and efficient transport of molecular cargoes along tracks or on supramolecular platforms is an important prerequisite for the development of future nanorobotic systems and assembly lines. Here, we study the diffusive transport of DNA cargo strands bound to a supramolecular DNA origami structure via an extended tether arm. For short distances (on the order of a few nanometers), transport from a start to a target site is found to be less efficient than for direct transfer without tether. For distances on the scale of the origami platform itself, however, cargo transfer mediated by a rigid tether arm occurs very fast and robust, whereas a more flexible, hinged tether is found to be considerably less efficient. Our results suggest diffusive motion on a molecular tether as a highly efficient mechanism for fast transfer of cargoes over long distances.

  2. Shortest Path Planning for a Tethered Robot or an Anchored Cable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xavier, P.G.

    1999-02-22

    We consider the problem of planning shortest paths for a tethered robot with a finite length tether in a 2D environment with polygonal obstacles. We present an algorithm that runs in time O((k{sub 1} + 1){sup 2}n{sup 4}) and finds the shortest path or correctly determines that none exists that obeys the constraints; here n is the number obstacle vertices, and k{sub 1} is the number loops in the initial configuration of the tether. The robot may cross its tether but nothing can cross obstacles, which cause the tether to bend. The algorithm applies as well for planning a shortest path for the free end of an anchored cable.

  3. Role And Relevance Of Mast Cells In Fungal Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohit eSaluja

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In addition to their detrimental role in allergic diseases, mast cells (MCs are well known to be important cells of the innate immune system. In the last decade, they have been shown to contribute significantly to optimal host defense against numerous pathogens including parasites, bacteria, and viruses. The contribution of MCs to the immune responses in fungal infections, however, is largely unknown. In this review, we first discuss key features of mast cell responses to pathogens in general and then summarize the current knowledge on the function of MCs in the defense against fungal pathogens. We especially focus on the potential and proven mechanisms by which MC can detect fungal infections and on possible MC effector mechanisms in protecting from fungal infections.

  4. Microstability analysis of pellet fuelled discharges in MAST

    CERN Document Server

    Garzotti, L; Roach, C M; Valovic, M; Dickinson, D; Naylor, G; Romanelli, M; Scannell, R; Szepesi, G

    2014-01-01

    Reactor grade plasmas are likely to be fuelled by pellet injection. This technique transiently perturbs the profiles, driving the density profile hollow and flattening the edge temperature profile. After the pellet perturbation, the density and temperature profiles relax towards their quasi-steady-state shape. Microinstabilities influence plasma confinement and will play a role in determining the evolution of the profiles in pellet fuelled plasmas. In this paper we present the microstability analysis of pellet fuelled H-mode MAST plasmas. Taking advantage of the unique capabilities of the MAST Thomson scattering system and the possibility of synchronizing the eight lasers with the pellet injection, we were able to measure the evolution of the post-pellet electron density and temperature profiles with high temporal and spatial resolution. These profiles, together with ion temperature profiles measured using a charge exchange diagnostic, were used to produce equilibria suitable for microstability analysis of th...

  5. Damage Assessment of a Steel Lattice Mast under Natural Excitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Rytter, A.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper the possibility of detecting and locating damages in a 20 m high steel lattice mast subjected to natural excitation has been investigated. For the damaged mast seven different damage states were considered. In these damage states a damage was assumed in one of the lower diagonals....... These diagonals were cut and provided with a bolted joint implying that a damage could be simulated. Based on 20 periodical measurements during 6 months the sensitivity of the modal parameters, identified by an ARMA-model, to environmental conditions such as wind-direction, wind-speed and air-temperature have....... The measured bending natural frequencies and the measured rotational frequency approximately decrease few per cent and more than ten per cents, respectively, due to a damage corresponding to a removal of one of the lower diagonals. The results also show that a neural network trained with simulated data...

  6. Electromagnetic pollution from phone masts. Effects on wildlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmori, Alfonso

    2009-08-01

    A review on the impact of radiofrequency radiation from wireless telecommunications on wildlife is presented. Electromagnetic radiation is a form of environmental pollution which may hurt wildlife. Phone masts located in their living areas are irradiating continuously some species that could suffer long-term effects, like reduction of their natural defenses, deterioration of their health, problems in reproduction and reduction of their useful territory through habitat deterioration. Electromagnetic radiation can exert an aversive behavioral response in rats, bats and birds such as sparrows. Therefore microwave and radiofrequency pollution constitutes a potential cause for the decline of animal populations and deterioration of health of plants living near phone masts. To measure these effects urgent specific studies are necessary.

  7. The function of mast cells in autoimmune glomerulonephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Renato C; Beghdadi, Walid; Madjene, Lydia Celia; Pons, Maguelonne; Peuchmaur, Michel; Blank, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Immune-mediated glomerulonephritis is caused by deposition of immune complexes on the glomerular basement membrane or of autoantibodies directed against the glomerular basement membrane. Depositions lead to an inflammatory response that can ultimately destroy renal function and lead to chronic kidney disease. However, the pathological processes leading to the development of renal injury and disease progression remain poorly understood. To investigate the mechanisms of disease development in glomerulonephritis various animal models have been developed, which include as the most popular one the induction of glomerulonephritis by the injection of heterologous antibodies directed to the glomerular basement membrane. The role of mast cells and mast cell-derived mediators has been evaluated in these models. In this chapter we describe the methods that allow to set up and study the disease parameters of immune-mediated glomerulonephritis development.

  8. Asthma: Eosinophil Disease, Mast Cell Disease, or Both?

    OpenAIRE

    Bradding, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Although there is much circumstantial evidence implicating eosinophils as major orchestrators in the pathophysiology of asthma, recent studies have cast doubt on their importance. Not only does anti-interleukin-5 treatment not alter the course of the disease, but some patients with asthma do not have eosinophils in their airways, whereas patients with eosinophilic bronchitis exhibit a florid tissue eosinophilia but do not have asthma. In contrast, mast cells are found in all airways and loca...

  9. Communication between mast cells and rat submucosal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Anna; Althaus, Mike; Diener, Martin

    2015-08-01

    Histamine is a mast cell mediator released e.g. during food allergy. The aim of the project was to identify the effect of histamine on rat submucosal neurons and the mechanisms involved. Cultured submucosal neurons from rat colon express H1, H2 and H3 receptors as shown by immunocytochemical staining confirmed by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with messenger RNA (mRNA) isolated from submucosal homogenates as starting material. Histamine evoked a biphasic rise of the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration in cultured submucosal neurons, consisting in a release of intracellularly stored Ca(2+) followed by an influx from the extracellular space. Although agonists of all three receptor subtypes evoked an increase in the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration, experiments with antagonists revealed that mainly H1 (and to a lesser degree H2) receptors mediate the response to histamine. In coculture experiments with RBL-2H3 cells, a mast cell equivalent, compound 48/80, evoked an increase in the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration of neighbouring neurons. Like the response to native histamine, the neuronal response to the mast cell degranulator was strongly inhibited by the H1 receptor antagonist pyrilamine and reduced by the H2 receptor antagonist cimetidine. In rats sensitized against ovalbumin, exposure to the antigen induced a rise in short-circuit current (I sc) across colonic mucosa-submucosa preparations without a significant increase in paracellular fluorescein fluxes. Pyrilamine strongly inhibited the increase in I sc, a weaker inhibition was observed after blockade of protease receptors or 5-lipoxygenase. Consequently, H1 receptors on submucosal neurons seem to play a pivotal role in the communication between mast cells and the enteric nervous system.

  10. Evaluating the stability of a freestanding Mast Climbing Work Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimer, Bryan; Pan, Christopher; Lutz, Tim; Hause, Mat; Warren, Chris; Dong, Ren; Xu, Sherry

    2017-09-01

    Mast Climbing Work Platforms (MCWPs) are becoming more common at construction sites and are being used as an alternative to traditional scaffolding. Although their use is increasing, little to no published information exists on the potential safety hazards they could pose for workers. As a last line of defense, a personal fall-arrest system can be used to save a worker in a fall incident from the platform. There has been no published information on whether it is safe to use such a personal fall-arrest system with MCWPs. In this study, the issues of concern for occupational safety included: (a) the overall stability of the freestanding mast climber during a fall-arrest condition and (b) whether that fall-arrest system could potentially present safety hazards to other workers on the platform during a fall-arrest condition. This research project investigated those safety concerns with respect to the mast climber stability and the workers using it by creating fall-arrest impact forces that are transmitted to the equipment and by subsequently observing the movement of the mast climber and the working deck used by the workers. This study found that when the equipment was erected and used according to the manufacturer's recommendations during a fall-arrest condition, destabilizing forces were very small and there were no signs of potential of MCWP collapse. However, potential fall hazards could be presented to other workers on the platform during a fall arrest. Workers near an open platform are advised to wear a personal fall-arrest system to reduce the risk of being ejected. Due to the increasing use of MCWPs at construction sites, there is a corresponding need for evidence and science-based safety guidelines or regulations and further research should be conducted to continue to fill the knowledge gap with MCWP equipment. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Degranulating mast cells in fibrotic regions of human tumors and evidence that mast cell heparin interferes with the growth of tumor cells through a mechanism involving fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanakubo Emi

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that mast cells that are present in fibrotic regions of cancer can suppress the growth of tumor cells through an indirect mechanism involving peri-tumoral fibroblasts. Methods We first immunostained a wide variety of human cancers for the presence of degranulated mast cells. In a subsequent series of controlled in vitro experiments, we then co-cultured UACC-812 human breast cancer cells with normal fibroblasts in the presence or absence of different combinations and doses of mast cell tryptase, mast cell heparin, a lysate of the human mast cell line HMC-1, and fibroblast growth factor-7 (FGF-7, a powerful, heparin-binding growth factor for breast epithelial cells. Results Degranulating mast cells were localized predominantly in the fibrous tissue of every case of breast cancer, head and neck cancer, lung cancer, ovarian cancer, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and Hodgkin's disease that we examined. Mast cell tryptase and HMC-1 lysate had no significant effect on the clonogenic growth of cancer cells co-cultured with fibroblasts. By contrast, mast cell heparin at multiple doses significantly reduced the size and number of colonies of tumor cells co-cultured with fibroblasts, especially in the presence of FGF-7. Neither heparin nor FGF-7, individually or in combination, produced any significant effect on the clonogenic growth of breast cancer cells cultured without fibroblasts. Conclusion Degranulating mast cells are restricted to peri-tumoral fibrous tissue, and mast cell heparin is a powerful inhibitor of clonogenic growth of tumor cells co-cultured with fibroblasts. These results may help to explain the well-known ability of heparin to inhibit the growth of primary and metastatic tumors.

  12. Weather model verification using Sodankylä mast measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangas, Markku; Rontu, Laura; Fortelius, Carl; Aurela, Mika; Poikonen, Antti

    2016-04-01

    Sodankylä, in the heart of Arctic Research Centre of the Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI ARC) in northern Finland, is an ideal site for atmospheric and environmental research in the boreal and sub-Arctic zone. With temperatures ranging from -50 to +30 °C, it provides a challenging testing ground for numerical weather forecasting (NWP) models as well as weather forecasting in general. An extensive set of measurements has been carried out in Sodankylä for more than 100 years. In 2000, a 48 m-high micrometeorological mast was erected in the area. In this article, the use of Sodankylä mast measurements in NWP model verification is described. Starting in 2000, with the NWP model HIRLAM and Sodankylä measurements, the verification system has now been expanded to include comparisons between 12 NWP models and seven measurement masts, distributed across Europe. A case study, comparing forecasted and observed radiation fluxes, is also presented. It was found that three different radiation schemes, applicable in NWP model HARMONIE-AROME, produced somewhat different downwelling longwave radiation fluxes during cloudy days, which however did not change the overall cold bias of the predicted screen-level temperature.

  13. Asthma: Eosinophil Disease, Mast Cell Disease, or Both?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradding Peter

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Although there is much circumstantial evidence implicating eosinophils as major orchestrators in the pathophysiology of asthma, recent studies have cast doubt on their importance. Not only does anti-interleukin-5 treatment not alter the course of the disease, but some patients with asthma do not have eosinophils in their airways, whereas patients with eosinophilic bronchitis exhibit a florid tissue eosinophilia but do not have asthma. In contrast, mast cells are found in all airways and localize specifically to key tissue structures such as the submucosal glands and airway smooth muscle within asthmatic bronchi, irrespective of disease severity or phenotype. Here they are activated and interact exclusively with these structural cells via adhesive pathways and through the release of soluble mediators acting across the distance of only a few microns. The location of mast cells within the airway smooth muscle bundles seems particularly important for the development and propagation of asthma, perhaps occurring in response to, and then serving to aggravate, an underlying abnormality in asthmatic airway smooth muscle function. Targeting this mast cell-airway smooth muscle interaction in asthma offers exciting prospects for the treatment of this common disease.

  14. Mediators of Mast Cells in Bullous Pemphigoid and Dermatitis Herpetiformis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Zebrowska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bullous pemphigoid (BP and dermatitis herpetiformis (DH are skin diseases associated with inflammation. However, few findings exist concerning the role of mast cells in autoimmune blistering disease. Skin biopsies were taken from 27 BP and 14 DH patients, as well as 20 healthy individuals. Immunohistochemistry was used to identify the localization and mast cell expression of TNFα and MMP9 in skin lesions and perilesional skin. The serum concentrations of TNFα, MMP9, chymase, tryptase, PAF, and IL-4 were measured by immunoassay. TNFα and MMP9 expression in the epidermis and in inflammatory influxed cells in the dermis was detected in skin biopsies from patients. Although these mediators were found to be expressed in the perilesional skin of all patients, the level was much lower than that in lesional skin. Increased serum PAF levels were observed in BP patients. Mast cells may play an essential role in activating inflammation, which ultimately contributes to the tissue damage observed in BP and DH. Our findings suggest that differences in the pattern of cytokine expression directly contribute to variations in cellular infiltration in DH and BP.

  15. Induction of Mast Cell Accumulation by Tryptase via a Protease Activated Receptor-2 and ICAM-1 Dependent Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mast cells are primary effector cells of allergy, and recruitment of mast cells in involved tissue is one of the key events in allergic inflammation. Tryptase is the most abundant secretory product of mast cells, but little is known of its influence on mast cell accumulation. Using mouse peritoneal model, cell migration assay, and flow cytometry analysis, we investigated role of tryptase in recruiting mast cells. The results showed that tryptase induced up to 6.7-fold increase in mast cell numbers in mouse peritoneum following injection. Inhibitors of tryptase, an antagonist of PAR-2 FSLLRY-NH2, and pretreatment of mice with anti-ICAM-1, anti-CD11a, and anti-CD18 antibodies dramatically diminished tryptase induced mast cell accumulation. On the other hand, PAR-2 agonist peptides SLIGRL-NH2 and tc-LIGRLO-NH2 provoked mast cell accumulation following injection. These implicate that tryptase induced mast cell accumulation is dependent on its enzymatic activity, activation of PAR-2, and interaction between ICAM-1 and LFA-1. Moreover, induction of trans-endothelium migration of mast cells in vitro indicates that tryptase acts as a chemoattractant. In conclusion, provocation of mast cell accumulation by mast cell tryptase suggests a novel self-amplification mechanism of mast cell accumulation. Mast cell stabilizers as well as PAR-2 antagonist agents may be useful for treatment of allergic reactions.

  16. Nature beyond Linearity: Meteorological Variability and Jensen's Inequality Can Explain Mast Seeding Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Fernández-Martínez

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Mast seeding, the extremely variable and synchronized production of fruits, is a common reproductive behavior in plants. Weather is centrally involved in driving masting. Yet, it is often claimed that it cannot be the sole proximate cause of masting because weather is less variable than fruit production and because the shape of their distributions differ. We used computer simulations to demonstrate that the assumption that weather cannot be the main driver of masting was only valid for linear relationships between weather and fruit production. Non-linear relationships between interannual variability in weather and crop size, however, can account for the differences in their variability and the shape of their distributions because of Jensen's inequality. Exponential relationships with weather can increase the variability of fruit production, and sigmoidal relationships can produce bimodal distributions. These results challenge the idea that meteorological variability cannot be the main proximate driver of mast seeding, returning meteorological variability to the forefront of masting research.

  17. Role of mast cells in mucosal diseases: current concepts and strategies for treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beunk, Lianne; Verwoerd, Anouk; van Overveld, Frans J; Rijkers, Ger T

    2013-01-01

    Mast cells are well known for their role in type I hypersensitivity. However, their role in the immune system as well as their pathophysiological role in other diseases is underacknowledged. The role of mast cells in inflammatory bowel disease, allergic contact dermatitis and asthma is illustrated in this review. The contribution of mast cell activation in these diseases is controversial and two alternative means are proposed: activation via stress response pathways and immunoglobulin-free light chains. Activation of the mast cells leads to release of preformed mediators and to generation of other potent biological substances that have both physiological and pathophysiological effects. The role of these mediators in the aforementioned diseases is also outlined in this review. When the roles of mast cells are better understood, drugs specifically targeting mast cells may be developed to effectively treat a wide range of diseases.

  18. A study on mast cell variation in neoplastic and non neoplastic disease of uterine cervix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Mainali

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mast cells are heterogeneous group of immune cells involved in multiple biological events. The significance of mast cells in uterine tumor surveillance has been studied with conflicting results. The presence of mast cell in tumor has been described as evidence of a host immunologic anti tumor response and if they are abundant the prognosis is good. However in other studies, with the help of different granules of mast cell, it is said to be very closely related with angiogenesis and tumor invasion. The study aims to analyze the histomorphologic changes with special reference to mast cells in different neoplastic and non neoplastic disease of uterine cervix, and also the relationship of the mast cell population with degree of anaplasia and mitotic figures.Materials and methods: Cervical biopsies received in the department of Pathology for HPE were stained with H& E stain and toludine blue for the identification of mast cellResult: Out of a total of 100 cases, 82 were non neoplastic cases with the mean mast cell count of 83.73 and mean age of patient being 44.30 year. Eighteen neoplastic cases were included which had mean mast cell count of 13.5 and mean age of 49.5 year.Conclusion: Mast cell was found to be highest in non Neoplastic lesion with increase count in polypoidal cervicitis. There was a statistical significance variation between mast cell count in neoplastic and non Neoplastic disease of the cervix. However,role of age in mast cell count was least significant.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jpn.v4i8.11594 Journal of Pathology of Nepal; Vol.4,No. 8 (2014 658-662

  19. The dark side of mast cell-targeted therapy in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittoni, Paola; Colombo, Mario Paolo

    2012-02-15

    Tumor development requires accomplices among white blood cells. Other than macrophages, mast cells have been observed to support the outgrowth of certain neoplasias because of their proangiogenic properties. In some tumor settings, however, mast cells may have a protective role, exerted by their proinflammatory mediators. In prostate cancer, no conclusive data on mast cell function were available. Here, we discuss recent work on the role of mast cells in mouse and human prostate cancer, showing that mast cells can behave alternatively as dangerous promoters, innocent bystanders, or essential guardians of tumors, according to the stage and origin of transformed cells. In particular, mast cells are essential for the outgrowth of early-stage tumors due to their matrix metalloproteinase-9 production, become dispensable in advanced-stage, post-epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, and are protective against neuroendocrine prostate tumor variants. The common expression of c-Kit by mast cells and neuroendocrine clones suggests a possible competition for the ligand Stem cell factor and offers the chance of curing early-stage disease while preventing neuroendocrine tumors using c-Kit-targeted therapy. This review discusses the implications of these findings on the advocated mast cell-targeted cancer therapy and considers future directions in the study of mast cells and their interactions with other c-Kit-expressing cells.

  20. Protective Role of Mast Cells in Primary Systemic Vasculitis: A Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Jason M; Raveendran, Vineesh V; Gierer, Selina A; Maz, Mehrdad; Dileepan, Kottarappat N

    2017-01-01

    Mast cells are important cells of the immune system. Although traditionally considered as key players in allergic and hypersensitivity reactions, emerging evidence suggests that mast cells have many complex roles in vascular disease. These include regulation of vasodilation, angiogenesis, activation of matrix metalloproteinases, apoptosis of smooth muscle cells, and activation of the renin angiotensin system. Mast cells are also known to play an immunomodulatory role via modulation of regulatory T-cell (Treg), macrophage and endothelial cell functions. This dual role of the mast cells is evident in myeloperoxidase anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies-mouse model of glomerulonephritis in which mast cell deficiency worsens glomerulonephritis, whereas inhibition of mast cell degranulation is effective in abrogating the development of glomerulonephritis. Our previous work demonstrated that mast cell degranulation inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced interleukin 6 (IL-6) production in mice. This effect was not seen in histamine-1-receptor knockout (H1R(-/-)) mice suggesting a role for histamine in IL-6 homeostasis. In addition, mast cell degranulation-mediated decrease in IL-6 production was associated with an upregulation of suppressor of cytokine signaling-1 protein in the aorta. We propose that mast cells regulate large artery inflammation through T-cells, shifting a primarily Th1 and Th17 toward a Th2 response and leading to enhanced IL-10 production, activation Treg cells, and the inhibition of macrophage functions.

  1. Dexamethasone rapidly suppresses IL-33-stimulated mast cell function by blocking transcription factor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paranjape, Anuya; Chernushevich, Oksana; Qayum, Amina Abdul; Spence, Andrew J; Taruselli, Marcela T; Abebayehu, Daniel; Barnstein, Brian O; McLeod, Jamie Josephine Avila; Baker, Bianca; Bajaj, Gurjas S; Chumanevich, Alena P; Oskeritzian, Carole A; Ryan, John J

    2016-12-01

    Mast cells are critical effectors of allergic disease and can be activated by IL-33, a proinflammatory member of the IL-1 cytokine family. IL-33 worsens the pathology of mast cell-mediated diseases, but therapies to antagonize IL-33 are still forthcoming. Because steroids are the mainstay of allergic disease treatment and are well known to suppress mast cell activation by other stimuli, we examined the effects of the steroid dexamethasone on IL-33-mediated mast cell function. We found that dexamethasone potently and rapidly suppressed cytokine production elicited by IL-33 from murine bone marrow-derived and peritoneal mast cells. IL-33 enhances IgE-mediated mast cell cytokine production, an activity that was also antagonized by dexamethasone. These effects were consistent in human mast cells. We additionally observed that IL-33 augmented migration of IgE-sensitized mast cells toward antigen. This enhancing effect was similarly reversed by dexamethasone. Simultaneous addition of dexamethasone with IL-33 had no effect on the phosphorylation of MAP kinases or NFκB p65 subunit; however, dexamethasone antagonized AP-1- and NFκB-mediated transcriptional activity. Intraperitoneal administration of dexamethasone completely abrogated IL-33-mediated peritoneal neutrophil recruitment and prevented plasma IL-6 elevation. These data demonstrate that steroid therapy may be an effective means of antagonizing the effects of IL-33 on mast cells in vitro and in vivo, acting partly by suppressing IL-33-induced NFκB and AP-1 activity. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  2. Two-step differentiation of mast cells from induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Tomoko; Tashiro, Katsuhisa; Tanaka, Satoshi; Katayama, Sumie; Ishida, Waka; Fukuda, Ken; Fukushima, Atsuki; Araki, Ryoko; Abe, Masumi; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Kawabata, Kenji

    2013-03-01

    Mast cells play important roles in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases. They are generally classified into 2 phenotypically distinct populations: connective tissue-type mast cells (CTMCs) and mucosal-type mast cells (MMCs). The number of mast cells that can be obtained from tissues is limited, making it difficult to study the function of mast cells. Here, we report the generation and characterization of CTMC-like mast cells derived from mouse induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. iPS cell-derived mast cells (iPSMCs) were generated by the OP9 coculture method or embryoid body formation method. The number of Safranin O-positive cells, expression levels of CD81 protein and histidine decarboxylase mRNA, and protease activities were elevated in the iPSMCs differentiated by both methods as compared with those in bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs). Electron microscopic analysis revealed that iPSMCs contained more granules than BMMCs. Degranulation was induced in iPSMCs after stimulation with cationic secretagogues or vancomycin. In addition, iPSMCs had the ability to respond to stimulation with the IgE/antigen complex in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, when iPSMCs generated on OP9 cells were cocultured with Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts, protease activities as maturation index were more elevated, demonstrating that mature mast cells were differentiated from iPS cells. iPSMCs can be used as an in vitro model of CTMCs to investigate their functions.

  3. Macrophages and mast cells in dystrophic masseter muscle: a light and electron microscopic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, S; Mikkelsen, H

    1988-01-01

    Macrophages and mast cells in masseter muscle from normal and dystrophic mice were studied by light and electron microscopy. Acid phosphatase activity and FITC-dextran were used to identify and describe macrophages. Toluidine blue was used as a marker for mast cells. In dystrophic muscle, the num......Macrophages and mast cells in masseter muscle from normal and dystrophic mice were studied by light and electron microscopy. Acid phosphatase activity and FITC-dextran were used to identify and describe macrophages. Toluidine blue was used as a marker for mast cells. In dystrophic muscle...

  4. Recognition and tethering of transport vesicles at the Golgi apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkos, Tomasz M; Lowe, Martin

    2017-08-01

    The Golgi apparatus occupies a central position within the secretory pathway where it is a hub for vesicle trafficking. Distinct classes of transport vesicles traffic diverse cargoes into and out of this organelle, as well as between the different Golgi subcompartments. A key feature of Golgi trafficking is the specific recognition of transport vesicles at the different regions of the Golgi apparatus, required for the correct cargo delivery. Specificity is ensured by coiled-coil golgins and multi-subunit tethering complexes (MTCs), which act together to capture vesicles and promote their subsequent fusion with the Golgi membrane. In this review we discuss our current understanding of how golgins and MTCs function together to mediate the specific recognition of vesicles at the Golgi apparatus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Metal-ligand cooperation at tethered π-ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoeven, Dide G A; Moret, Marc-Etienne

    2016-10-12

    Metal-ligand cooperativity in homogeneous catalysis is emerging as a powerful tool for the design of efficient transition-metal catalysts. This perspective highlights recent advances in the use of neutral π-coordinating ligands, tethered to a transition-metal center by other donor ligands, as cooperative reaction centers. The state-of-the-art organometallic complexes, including π-coordinating ligands originating from C[double bond, length as m-dash]C, C[double bond, length as m-dash]E (E = O, N) and boron containing moieties, are described here, with special attention on their specific reactivity. Geometric and electronic aspects of ligand design and their influence on the coordination mode and reactivity of the π-system are discussed.

  6. Physisorbed Polymer-Tethered Lipid Bilayer with Lipopolymer Gradient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph A. Naumann

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Physisorbed polymer-tethered lipid bilayers consisting of phospholipids and lipopolymers represent an attractive planar model membrane platform, in which bilayer fluidity and membrane elastic properties can be regulated through lipopolymer molar concentration. Herein we report a method for the fabrication of such a planar model membrane system with a lateral gradient of lipopolymer density. In addition, a procedure is described, which leads to a sharp boundary between regions of low and high lipopolymer molar concentrations. Resulting gradients and sharp boundaries are visualized on the basis of membrane buckling structures at elevated lipopolymer concentrations using epifluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Furthermore, results from spot photobleaching experiments are presented, which provide insight into the lipid lateral fluidity in these model membrane architectures. The presented experimental data highlight a planar, solid-supported membrane characterized by fascinating length scale-dependent dynamics and elastic properties with remarkable parallels to those observed in cellular membranes.

  7. DOE Geothermal Data Repository - Tethering Data to Information: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weers, J.; Anderson, A.

    2014-02-01

    Data are not inherently information. Without context, data are just numbers, figures, names, or points on a line. By assigning context to data, we can validate ideas, form opinions, and generate knowledge. This is an important distinction to information scientists, as we recognize that the context in which we keep our data plays a big part in generating its value. The mechanisms used to assign this context often include their own data, supplemental to the data being described and defining semantic relationships, commonly referred to as metadata. This paper provides the status of the DOE Geothermal Data Repository (DOE GDR), including recent efforts to tether data submissions to information, discusses the important distinction between data and information, outlines a path to generate useful knowledge from raw data, and details the steps taken in order to become a node on the National Geothermal Data System (NGDS).

  8. Circular Orbit Target Capture Using Space Tether-Net System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang Zhai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The space tether-net system for on-orbit capture is proposed in this paper. In order to research the dynamic behaviors during system deployment, both free and nonfree deployment dynamics in circular orbit are developed; the system motion with respect to Local Vertical and Local Horizontal frame is also researched with analysis and simulation. The results show that in the case of free deployment, the capture net follows curve trajectories due to the relative orbit dynamic perturbation, and the initial deployment velocities are planned by state transformation equations for static and floating target captures; in the case of non-free deployment, the system undergoes an altitude libration along the Local Vertical, and the analytical solutions that describe the attitude libration are obtained by using variable separation and integration. Finally, the dynamics of postdeployment system is also proved marginally stable if the critical initial conditions are satisfied.

  9. Tethered and Polymer Supported Bilayer Lipid Membranes: Structure and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob Andersson

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Solid supported bilayer lipid membranes are model systems to mimic natural cell membranes in order to understand structural and functional properties of such systems. The use of a model system allows for the use of a wide variety of analytical tools including atomic force microscopy, impedance spectroscopy, neutron reflectometry, and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy. Among the large number of different types of model membranes polymer-supported and tethered lipid bilayers have been shown to be versatile and useful systems. Both systems consist of a lipid bilayer, which is de-coupled from an underlying support by a spacer cushion. Both systems will be reviewed, with an emphasis on the effect that the spacer moiety has on the bilayer properties.

  10. The Effect of Tethers on Artificial Cell Membranes: A Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamics Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Hoiles

    Full Text Available Tethered bilayer lipid membranes (tBLMs provide a stable platform for modeling the dynamics and order of biological membranes where the tethers mimic the cytoskeletal supports present in biological cell membranes. In this paper coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CGMD is applied to study the effects of tethers on lipid membrane properties. Using results from the CGMD model and the overdamped Fokker-Planck equation, we show that the diffusion tensor and particle density of water in the tBLM is spatially dependent. Further, it is shown that the membrane thickness, lipid diffusion, defect density, free energy of lipid flip-flop, and membrane dielectric permittivity are all dependent on the tether density. The numerically computed results from the CGMD model are in agreement with the experimentally measured results from tBLMs containing different tether densities and lipids derived from Archaebacteria. Additionally, using experimental measurements from Escherichia coli bacteria and Saccharomyces Cerevisiae yeast tethered membranes, we illustrate how previous molecular dynamics results can be combined with the proposed model to estimate the dielectric permittivity and defect density of these membranes as a function of tether density.

  11. Probing tethered targets of a single biomolecular complex with atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Na; Wang, Qi; Zhou, Xingfei; Jia, Si Si; Fan, Youjie; Hu, Jun; Li, Bin

    2013-12-01

    DNA origami shows tremendous promise as templates for the assembly of nano-components and detection of molecular recognition events. So far, the method of choice for evaluating these structures has been atomic force microscopy (AFM), a powerful tool for imaging nanoscale objects. In most cases, tethered targets on DNA origami have proven to be highly effective samples for investigation. Still, while maximal assembly of the nanostructures might benefit from the greatest flexibility in the tether, AFM imaging requires a sufficient stability of the adsorbed components. The balance between the tether flexibility and sample stability is a major, poorly understood, concern in such studies. Here, we investigated the dependence of the tethering length on molecular capture events monitored by AFM. In our experiments, single biotin molecules were attached to DNA origami templates with various linker lengths of thymidine nucleotides, and their interaction with streptavidin was observed with AFM. Our results show that the streptavidin-biotin complexes are easily detected with short tethered lengths, and that their morphological features clearly change with the tethering length. We identify the functionally useful tether lengths for these investigations, which are also expected to prove useful in the construction and further application of DNA origami in bio-nanotechnology studies. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Viewpoint animation with a dynamic tether for supporting navigation in a virtual environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenbi; Milgram, Paul

    2009-06-01

    This study examined the concept of dynamic viewpoint tethering for enhancing performance in 3-D avatar control tasks. Dynamic viewpoint tethering refers to a viewpoint animation technique that couples a display viewpoint to a controlled avatar through a virtual tether. A dynamic tether, modeled as a mass spring damper system, can potentially generate desirable viewpoint behavior because of its ability to produce frequency-separated viewpoint responses. This study investigated the impact of a tether's rigidity and damping properties on users' navigational performance. Twelve participants took part in a simulated 3-D aerial navigational task. Performance was evaluated with respect to local guidance and global awareness. Root mean square error scores revealed a decrease in local guidance performance when (a) the tether was either severely underdamped or overdamped and (b) the tether's rigidity approached either zero or infinity. In addition, (c) global performance was better for higher-frequency forcing functions. Critical damping and medium rigidity can be optimized during design for enhancing users' navigational efficiency. Guidelines generated from this study support future viewpoint design in interactive virtual reality applications.

  13. Minimally invasive tethered cord release in children: A technical note

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kağan Başarslan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Tethered cord release is commonly performed in pediatric neurosurgery. Nowadays, minimally invasive procedures are created growing interest due to its highly tolerable nature for surgery. It has been main purpose a minimal damaging on access route and maximum protection of normal structures in surgery. We present a surgical treatment of tethered cord syndrome, by which is provided the cord releasing unlike the many methods being applied with tissue removal. The main advantage of performing this surgery through 2 cm hole is to avoid removing ligamentum flavum and bony structure like lamina in addition to reduce the length of the incision and the related scar tissue. J Clin Exp Invest 2014; 5 (1: 115-117 Technical note: the patient was taken on the operating table in the sitting-prone position, and L5-S1 distance was determined by fluoroscopy. The skin and subcutaneous tissues was passed via a 2 cm vertical incision settled in 0.5 cm laterally from midline. L5-S1 distance and its covering ligamentum flavum are displayed by the guidance of L5 lamina. Williams’s retractor was placed in the distance after fetching microscope. The foregoing procedures are the same with microdiscectomic surgery. By a vertical incision made on the flavum, its both layer was lifted up and hanged with simple suture on the back tissue for a comfortable exposure of the Dura. Thecal sac was opened by 0.5 cm long vertical incision on the Dura after obtaining secure CSF drainage with the help of yellow-tipped syringe needle. With finding by a nerve hook, the phylum was burned and released securely. Then the Dura was sutured primarily for the closure by means of microsurgery instruments, and flavum was laid on it again.

  14. Heterobifunctional crosslinkers for tethering single ligand molecules to scanning probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riener, Christian K.; Kienberger, Ferry; Hahn, Christoph D.; Buchinger, Gerhard M.; Egwim, Innocent O.C.; Haselgruebler, Thomas; Ebner, Andreas; Romanin, Christoph; Klampfl, Christian; Lackner, Bernd; Prinz, Heino; Blaas, Dieter; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Gruber, Hermann J

    2003-11-14

    Single molecule recognition force microscopy (SMRFM) is a versatile atomic force microscopy (AFM) method to probe specific interactions of cognitive molecules on the single molecule level. It allows insights to be gained into interaction potentials and kinetic barriers and is capable of mapping interaction sites with nm positional accuracy. These applications require a ligand to be attached to the AFM tip, preferably by a distensible poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) chain between the measuring tip and the ligand molecule. The PEG chain greatly facilitates specific binding of the ligand to immobile receptor sites on the sample surface. The present study contributes to tip-PEG-ligand tethering in three ways: (i) a convenient synthetic route was found to prepare NH{sub 2}-PEG-COOH which is the key intermediate for long heterobifunctional crosslinkers; (ii) a variety of heterobifunctional PEG derivatives for tip-PEG-ligand linking were prepared from NH{sub 2}-PEG-COOH; (iii) in particular, a new PEG crosslinker with one thiol-reactive end and one terminal nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) group was synthesized and successfully used to tether His{sub 6}-tagged protein molecules to AFM tips via noncovalent NTA-Ni{sup 2+}-His{sub 6} bridges. The new crosslinker was applied to link a recombinant His{sub 6}-tagged fragment of the very-low density lipoprotein receptor to the AFM tip whereupon specific docking to the capsid of human rhinovirus particles was observed by force microscopy. In a parallel study, the specific interaction of the small GTPase Ran with the nuclear import receptor importin {beta}1 was studied in detail by SMRFM, using the new crosslinker to link His{sub 6}-tagged Ran to the measuring tip [Nat. Struct. Biol. (2003), 10, 553-557].

  15. Experiments and simulation of a net closing mechanism for tether-net capture of space debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharf, Inna; Thomsen, Benjamin; Botta, Eleonora M.; Misra, Arun K.

    2017-10-01

    This research addresses the design and testing of a debris containment system for use in a tether-net approach to space debris removal. The tether-net active debris removal involves the ejection of a net from a spacecraft by applying impulses to masses on the net, subsequent expansion of the net, the envelopment and capture of the debris target, and the de-orbiting of the debris via a tether to the chaser spacecraft. To ensure a debris removal mission's success, it is important that the debris be successfully captured and then, secured within the net. To this end, we present a concept for a net closing mechanism, which we believe will permit consistently successful debris capture via a simple and unobtrusive design. This net closing system functions by extending the main tether connecting the chaser spacecraft and the net vertex to the perimeter and around the perimeter of the net, allowing the tether to actuate closure of the net in a manner similar to a cinch cord. A particular embodiment of the design in a laboratory test-bed is described: the test-bed itself is comprised of a scaled-down tether-net, a supporting frame and a mock-up debris. Experiments conducted with the facility demonstrate the practicality of the net closing system. A model of the net closure concept has been integrated into the previously developed dynamics simulator of the chaser/tether-net/debris system. Simulations under tether tensioning conditions demonstrate the effectiveness of the closure concept for debris containment, in the gravity-free environment of space, for a realistic debris target. The on-ground experimental test-bed is also used to showcase its utility for validating the dynamics simulation of the net deployment, and a full-scale automated setup would make possible a range of validation studies of other aspects of a tether-net debris capture mission.

  16. Electrodynamic Tether Operations beyond the Ionosphere in the Low-Density Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Nobie H.

    2007-01-01

    In the classical concept for the operation of electrodynamic tethers in space, a voltage is generated across the tether, either by the tether's orbital motion through the earth's planetary magnetic field or by a power supply; electrons are then collected from the ionospheric plasma at the positive pole; actively emitted back into space at the negative pole; and the circuit is closed by currents driven through the ambient conducting ionosphere. This concept has been proven to work in space by the Tethered Satellite System TSS-1 and TSS-1R Space Shuttle missions; and the Plasma Motor-Generator (PMG) tether flight experiment. However, it limits electrodynamic tether operations to the F-region of the ionosphere where the plasma density is sufficient to conduct the required currents--in other words, between altitudes of approximately 200 to 1000 km in sunlight. In the earth's shadow, the ionospheric density drops precipitously and tether operations, using the above approach, are not effective--even within this altitude range. There are numerous missions that require in-space propulsion in the Earth's shadow and/or outside of the above altitude range. This paper will, therefore, present the fundamentals of a concept that would allow electrodynamic tethers to operate almost anywhere within the magnetosphere, the region of space containing the earth's planetary magnetic field. In other words, because operations would be virtually independent of any ambient plasma, the range of electrodynamic operations would be extended into the earth's shadow and out to synchronous orbit--forty times the present operational range. The key to this concept is the active generation of plasma at each pole of the tether so that current generation ,does not depend on the conductivity of the ambient ionosphere. Arguments will be presented, based on ,existing flight data, which shed light on the behavior of charge emissions in space and show the plausibility of the concept.

  17. Catalyst system comprising a first catalyst system tethered to a supported catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelici, Robert J.; Gao, Hanrong

    1998-08-04

    The present invention provides new catalyst formats which comprise a supported catalyst tethered to a second and different catalyst by a suitable tethering ligand. A preferred system comprises a heterogeneous supported metal catalyst tethered to a homogeneous catalyst. This combination of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts has a sufficient lifetime and unusually high catalytic activity in arene hydrogenations, and potentially many other reactions as well, including, but not limited to hydroformylation, hydrosilation, olefin oxidation, isomerization, hydrocyanation, olefin metathesis, olefin polymerization, carbonylation, enantioselective catalysis and photoduplication. These catalysts are easily separated from the products, and can be reused repeatedly, making these systems very economical.

  18. Comparison of Mast Cells and Inflammatory Cells within Periapical Lesions and Comparison of Degranulated Mast Cells Between Fibrous and Inflamed Area in Radicular Cysts: An Immunohistochemical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiromany, Aseem; Sood, Rahul; Akifuddin, Syed; Sidhu, Gagandeep Kaur; Khan, Nadia; Singla, Kapil

    2014-12-01

    The role of mast cells as the key effector of allergic inflammation, anaphylactic inflammatory reactions and in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammation, is well-known. The present study is adopted to compare mast cells and inflammatory cells within periapical granuloma and cysts and localize the mast cells and quantify their number in the periapical cysts so as to propose a role of mast cells in the pathogenesis of this lesion. Biopsy specimens of 30 periapical lesions were stained with hematoxylin-eosin, and immunohistochemical Mast Cell Tryptase from Bio SB (IHC detection system kit) antibody. The tryptase positive mast cells and mononuclear inflammatory cells were counted in 10 consecutive high power fields (100X) using the binocular microscope from Motic attached to a computer with Motic Advanced Images 3.2 software. Comparative microscopic analysis indicated that periapical cyst shows more percentage of mast cells and less percentage of inflammatory cell than periapical granuloma (comparison of mean and standard deviation of total number of mast cells and inflammatory cells, mast cells 3.15±1.39 in the granuloma group and 4.43±1.91in the cyst group, inflammatory cells, 67.11±1.2 in the granuloma group and 52.66±0.8 in the cyst group). Numerous degranulated mast cells were observed in the fibrous wall than the inflammatory infiltrate of the periapical cysts. The mean and standard deviation of degranulated mast cells between the inflammatory and fibrous zone within the cyst group, being 0.95±1.10 and1.68±1.34 respectively. The values varied significantly between the two zones. The number of inflammatory cells in the cyst group is less than periapical granuloma and total number of mast cells in the cyst group is more as compared to periapical granuloma. The degranulated cells were quantified and they were higher in the fibrous area of the cysts than the inflammatory zone. This study could support the fact that the various mediators released on

  19. Listeria monocytogenes alters mast cell phenotype, mediator and osteopontin secretion in a listeriolysin-dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine E Jobbings

    Full Text Available Whilst mast cells participate in the immune defence against the intracellular bacterium Listeria monocytogenes, there is conflicting evidence regarding the ability of L. monocytogenes to infect mast cells. It is known that the pore-forming toxin listeriolysin (LLO is important for mast cell activation, degranulation and the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Mast cells, however, are a potential source of a wide range of cytokines, chemokines and other mediators including osteopontin, which contributes to the clearing of L. monocytogenes infections in vivo, although its source is unknown. We therefore aimed to resolve the controversy of mast cell infection by L. monocytogenes and investigated the extent of mediator release in response to the bacterium. In this paper we show that the infection of bone marrow-derived mast cells by L. monocytogenes is inefficient and LLO-independent. LLO, however, is required for calcium-independent mast cell degranulation as well as for the transient and selective downregulation of cell surface CD117 (c-kit on mast cells. We demonstrate that in addition to the key pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-6, mast cells release a wide range of other mediators in response to L. monocytogenes. Osteopontin, IL-2, IL-4, IL-13 and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF, and chemokines including CCL2, CCL3, CCL4 and CCL5 are released in a MyD88-dependent manner. The wide range of mediators released by mast cells in response to L. monocytogenes may play an important role in the recruitment and activation of a variety of immune cells in vivo. The cocktail of mediators, however, is unlikely to skew the immune response to a particular effector response. We propose that mast cells provide a hitherto unreported source of osteopontin, and may provide an important role in co-ordinating the immune response during Listeria infection.

  20. A distinct biomolecular profile identifies monoclonal mast cell disorders in patients with idiopathic anaphylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Melody C; Desai, Avanti; Komarow, Hirsh D; Bai, Yun; Clayton, Sarah T; Clark, Alicia S; Ruiz-Esteves, Karina N; Long, Lauren M; Cantave, Daly; Wilson, Todd M; Scott, Linda M; Simakova, Olga; Jung, Mi-Yeon; Hahn, Jamie; Maric, Irina; Metcalfe, Dean D

    2017-06-16

    Clonal mast cell disorders are known to occur in a subset of patients with systemic reactions to Hymenoptera stings. This observation has prompted the question of whether clonal mast cell disorders also occur in patients with idiopathic anaphylaxis (IA). We sought to determine the prevalence of clonal mast cell disorders among patients with IA, criteria to identify those patients who require a bone marrow biopsy, and whether the pathogenesis of IA involves a hyperresponsive mast cell compartment. We prospectively enrolled patients with IA (≥3 episodes/y) who then underwent a medical evaluation that included a serum tryptase determination, allele-specific quantitative PCR (ASqPCR) for the KIT D816V mutation, and a bone marrow examination. Mast cells were cultured from peripheral blood CD34(+) cells and examined for releasability after FcεRI aggregation. Clonal mast cell disease was diagnosed in 14% of patients referred with IA. ASqPCR for the KIT D816V mutation was a useful adjunct in helping identify those with systemic mastocytosis but not monoclonal mast cell activation syndrome. A modified overall clonal prediction model was developed by using clinical findings, a serum tryptase determination, and ASqPCR. There was no evidence of a hyperresponsive mast cell phenotype in patients with IA. Patients with clonal mast cell disease can present as having IA. Distinct clinical and laboratory features can be used to select those patients more likely to have an underlying clonal mast cell disorder (monoclonal mast cell activation syndrome or systemic mastocytosis) and thus candidates for a bone marrow biopsy. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Activated MCTC mast cells infiltrate diseased lung areas in cystic fibrosis and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Löfdahl Claes-Göran

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although mast cells are regarded as important regulators of inflammation and tissue remodelling, their role in cystic fibrosis (CF and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF has remained less studied. This study investigates the densities and phenotypes of mast cell populations in multiple lung compartments from patients with CF, IPF and never smoking controls. Methods Small airways, pulmonary vessels, and lung parenchyma were subjected to detailed immunohistochemical analyses using lungs from patients with CF (20 lung regions; 5 patients, IPF (21 regions; 7 patients and controls (16 regions; 8 subjects. In each compartment the densities and distribution of MCT and MCTC mast cell populations were studied as well as the mast cell expression of IL-6 and TGF-β. Results In the alveolar parenchyma in lungs from patients with CF, MCTC numbers increased in areas showing cellular inflammation or fibrosis compared to controls. Apart from an altered balance between MCTC and MCT cells, mast cell in CF lungs showed elevated expression of IL-6. In CF, a decrease in total mast cell numbers was observed in small airways and pulmonary vessels. In patients with IPF, a significantly elevated MCTC density was present in fibrotic areas of the alveolar parenchyma with increased mast cell expression of TGF-β. The total mast cell density was unchanged in small airways and decreased in pulmonary vessels in IPF. Both the density, as well as the percentage, of MCTC correlated positively with the degree of fibrosis. The increased density of MCTC, as well as MCTC expression of TGF-β, correlated negatively with patient lung function. Conclusions The present study reveals that altered mast cell populations, with increased numbers of MCTC in diseased alveolar parenchyma, represents a significant component of the histopathology in CF and IPF. The mast cell alterations correlated to the degree of tissue remodelling and to lung function parameters. Further

  2. Picea glehnii (F. Schmidt) Mast. (Pinaceae) in Saint Petersburg

    OpenAIRE

    Firsov Gennadiy Afanasyevich; Volchanskaya Аleksandra Vladimirovna; Tkachenko Kirill Gavriilovich

    2015-01-01

    Picea glehnii (F. Schmidt) Mast. (the Glehns Spruce) is a rare endangered species of the Russian Far East, a plant included into the Red Book of the Russian Federation. This species is in need of protection In situ and Ex situ. The Glehns Spruce is introduced in general cultivation in 1877. In Saint Petersburg it became known after the expedition of F. Schmidt and P.P Glehn to Sakhalin Island (in 1860-1861). In hand-written general catalogues of living collections of Peter the Great Botanical...

  3. A mast-seeding desert shrub regulates population dynamics and behavior of its heteromyid dispersers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janene Auger; Susan E. Meyer; Stephen H. Jenkins

    2016-01-01

    Granivorous rodent populations in deserts are primarily regulated through precipitation-driven resource pulses rather than pulses associated with mast-seeding, a pattern more common in mesic habitats. We studied heteromyid responses to mast-seeding in the desert shrub blackbrush (Coleogyne ramosissima), a regionally dominant species in the Mojave–Great Basin...

  4. Adaptive and innate immune reactions regulating mast cell activation: from receptor-mediated signaling to responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tkaczyk, Christine; Jensen, Bettina M; Iwaki, Shoko

    2006-01-01

    In this article, we have described studies that have demonstrated that mast cells can be activated as a consequence of adaptive and innate immune reactions and that these responses can be modified by ligands for other receptors expressed on the surface of mast cells. These various stimuli...

  5. Only Two Can Tango: Mast Cells Displace Epithelial Cells to Dance with ILC2s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchery, Tiffany; Harris, Nicola L

    2017-05-16

    Mast cells have been implicated in protective immunity to helminth infection, but the precise mechanism remains unclear. In this issue of Immunity, Shimokawa et al., 2017 report that mast cells are a bridge linking dying epithelial cells with effector type 2 innate lymphoid cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Regulation of endothelial cell adhesion molecule expression by mast cells, macrophages, and neutrophils

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhang, Jie; Alcaide, Pilar; Liu, Li; Sun, Jiusong; He, Aina; Luscinskas, Francis W; Shi, Guo-Ping

    2011-01-01

    .... Using bone marrow-derived mast cells from wild-type, Tnf(-/-), Ifng(-/-), Il6(-/-) mice, we demonstrated that all three of these pro-inflammatory cytokines from mast cells induced the expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1...

  7. Transcriptional regulation of human-specific SVAF₁ retrotransposons by cis-regulatory MAST2 sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabolotneva, Anastasia A; Bantysh, Olga; Suntsova, Maria V; Efimova, Nadezhda; Malakhova, Galina V; Schumann, Gerald G; Gayfullin, Nurshat M; Buzdin, Anton A

    2012-08-15

    SVA elements represent the youngest family of hominid non-LTR retrotransposons. Recently, a human-specific subfamily (termed SVA(F1), CpG-SVA, or MAST2-SVA) was discovered representing fusion of the CpG island-containing exon 1 of the MAST2 gene and a 5'-truncated SVA. SVA(F1) includes at least 84 members, which suggests exceptionally high retrotransposition level. We investigated if the acquirement of the MAST2 CpG-island might play a role in the success of the SVA(F1) subfamily. We observed that in 16 samples representing seven human tissues, MAST2 was cotranscribed with the members of the SVA(F1) subfamily, but not with other retrotransposons. We found that the methylation status of the MAST2-derived sequences of SVA(F1) elements reversely correlates with the transcriptional activity of MAST2. The MAST2 sequence at the 5' end of SVA(F1) acts as a positive transcriptional regulator in human germ cells. Finally, in various testicular tissue samples we uncovered a transcriptional correlation of MAST2 with the human L1, Alu and SVA retrotransposons. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Modeling Pharmacological Inhibition of Mast Cell Degranulation as a Therapy for Insulinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Soucek

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Myc, a pleiotropic transcription factor that is deregulated and/or overexpressed in most human cancers, instructs multiple extracellular programs that are required to sustain the complex microenvironment needed for tumor maintenance, including remodeling of tumor stroma, angiogenesis, and inflammation. We previously showed in a model of pancreatic β-cell tumorigenesis that acute Myc activation in vivo triggers rapid recruitment of mast cells to the tumor site and that this is absolutely required for angiogenesis and macroscopic tumor expansion. More-over, systemic inhibition of mast cell degranulation with sodium cromoglycate induced death of tumor and endothelial cells in established tumors. Hence, mast cells are required both to establish and to maintain the tumors. Whereas this intimates that selective inhibition of mast cell function could be therapeutically efficacious, cromoglycate is not a practical drug for systemic delivery in humans, and no other systemic inhibitor of mast cell degranulation has hitherto been available. PCI-32765 is a novel inhibitor of Bruton tyrosine kinase (Btk that blocks mast cell degranulation and is currently in clinical trial as a therapy for B-cell non–Hodgkin lymphoma. Here, we show that systemic treatment of insulinoma-bearing mice with PCI-32765 efficiently inhibits Btk, blocks mast cell degranulation, and triggers collapse of tumor vasculature and tumor regression. These data reinforce the notion that mast cell function is required for maintenance of certain tumor types and indicate that the Btk inhibitor PCI-32765 may be useful in treating such diseases.

  9. A study on assessment of mast cells in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Apart from the role of mast cells in maintenance of homeostasis and inflammation, their association with tumors has been described recently. In several malignancies, mast cell density has been found to correlate with angiogenesis, increased risk of metastasis and poor prognosis. Aim: The aim of the following ...

  10. Mast cell numbers in airway smooth muscle and PC(20)AMP in asthma and COPD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liesker, J. J. W.; ten Hacken, N. H. T.; Rutgers, S. R.; Zeinstra-Smith, M.; Postma, D. S.; Timens, W.

    Introduction: Most patients with asthma and many patients with COPD show bronchial hyperresponsiveness to adenosine (BHRAMP). BHRAMP may be caused by release of mast cell histamine, which induces smooth muscle contraction. Aim of the study: To evaluate whether mast cell numbers in airway smooth

  11. The Mastocytosis Society survey on mast cell disorders: patient experiences and perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Susan; Russell, Nancy; Jennings, Blair; Slee, Valerie; Sterling, Lisa; Castells, Mariana; Valent, Peter; Akin, Cem

    2014-01-01

    Mast cell diseases include mastocytosis and mast cell activation syndromes, some of which have been shown to involve clonal defects in mast cells that result in abnormal cellular proliferation or activation. Numerous clinical studies of mastocytosis have been published, but no population-based comprehensive surveys of patients in the United States have been identified. Few mast cell disease specialty centers exist in the United States, and awareness of these mast cell disorders is limited among nonspecialists. Accordingly, information concerning the experiences of the overall estimated population of these patients has been lacking. To identify the experiences and perceptions of patients with mastocytosis, mast cell activation syndromes, and related disorders, The Mastocytosis Society (TMS), a US based patient advocacy, research, and education organization, conducted a survey of its members and other people known or suspected to be part of this patient population. A Web-based survey was publicized through clinics that treat these patients and through TMS's newsletter, Web site, and online blogs. Both online and paper copies of the questionnaire were provided, together with required statements of consent. The first results are presented for 420 patients. These results include demographics, diagnoses, symptoms, allergies, provoking factors of mast cell symptoms, and disease impact. Patients with mastocytosis and mast cell activation syndromes have provided clinical specialists, collaborators, and other patients with information to enable them to explore and deepen their understanding of the experiences and perceptions of people coping with these disorders. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Dissecting components of population-level variation in seed production and the evolution of masting behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. D. Koenig; D. Kelly; V. L. Sork; R. P. Duncan; J. S. Elkinton; M.S. Peltonen; R. D. Westfall

    2003-01-01

    Mast-fruiting or masting behavior is the cumulative result of the reproductive patterns of individuals within a population and thus involves components of individual variability, between-individual synchrony, and endogenous cycles of temporal autocorrelation. Extending prior work by Herrera, we explore the interrelationships of these components using data on individual...

  13. Administration of the Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test (MAST) at a Student Health Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silber, Thomas J.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    This study evaluated the usefulness of the Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test (MAST) in the medical assessment of college students. The MAST was administered randomly to 200 students at a student health center and was found to be useful as part of individual health assessments. (Author/MT)

  14. Thermographic study of heat load asymmetries during MAST L-mode discharges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Temmerman, G.; Delchambre, E.; Dowling, J.; Kirk, A.; Lisgo, S.; Tamain, P.

    2010-01-01

    A long wavelength range infrared (LWIR) camera has been installed on MAST to compliment the existing medium wave infrared (MWIR) system. Simultaneous LWIR/MWIR temperature measurements have been made in the lower and upper divertors of MAST. As expected, the LWIR system is less sensitive to

  15. Pleurocidin, a novel antimicrobial peptide, induces human mast cell activation through the FPRL1 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pundir, P; Catalli, A; Leggiadro, C; Douglas, S E; Kulka, M

    2014-01-01

    Pleurocidins are a novel family of α-helical cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAPs) that are structurally and functionally similar to cathelicidins, one of the major CAP families. As cathelicidins stimulate mast cell chemotaxis and mediator release, we postulated that pleurocidins similarly activate mast cells. A screen of 20 pleurocidin peptides revealed that some were capable of degranulating the human mast cell line LAD2 (Laboratory of Allergic Diseases 2). Pleurocidin NRC-04 caused LAD2 to adhere, migrate, degranulate, and release cysteinyl leukotrienes and prostaglandin D2. Moreover, pleurocidin increased intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization in mast cells and induced the production of proinflammatory chemokines such as monocyte chemotactic protein-1/C-C motif chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2) and macrophage inflammatory protein-1β/CCL4. Our evaluation of possible cellular mechanisms suggested that G proteins, phosphoinositol-3 kinase (PI3K), phospholipase C (PLC), and phosphokinase C (PKC) were involved in pleurocidin-induced mast cell activation as evidenced by the inhibitory effects of pertussis toxin (G protein inhibitor), wortmanin (PI3K inhibitor), U-73122 (PLC inhibitor), and Ro-31-8220 (PKC inhibitor), respectively. We also found that human mast cells expressed the N-formyl-peptide receptor 1 (FPRL1) receptor and FPRL1-specific inhibitor affected pleurocidin-mediated activation of mast cell. Our finding that the novel CAP pleurocidin activated human mast cell through G protein-coupled receptor signaling suggests that this peptide might have immunomodulatory functions.

  16. The Neuropeptide Substance P Mediates Adventitial Mast Cell Activation and Induces Intraplaque Hemorrhage in Advanced Atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bot, Ilze; de Jager, Saskia C. A.; Bot, Martine; van Heiningen, Sandra H.; de Groot, Paul; Veldhuizen, Roel W.; van Berkel, Theo J. C.; von der Thüsen, Jan H.; Biessen, Erik A. L.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale: Although we and others have recently shown that mast cells play an important role in plaque progression and destabilization, the nature of the actual trigger for (peri) vascular mast cell activation during atherosclerosis is still unresolved. Objective: In this study, we confirm that

  17. Critical role of mast cell chymase in mouse abdominal aortic aneurysm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, J; Zhang, J; Lindholt, Jes S.

    2009-01-01

    Mast cell chymase may participate in the pathogenesis of human abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), yet a direct contribution of this serine protease to AAA formation remains unknown.......Mast cell chymase may participate in the pathogenesis of human abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), yet a direct contribution of this serine protease to AAA formation remains unknown....

  18. 30 CFR 77.807-2 - Booms and masts; minimum distance from high-voltage lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...-voltage lines. 77.807-2 Section 77.807-2 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface High-Voltage Distribution § 77.807-2 Booms and masts; minimum distance from high-voltage lines. The booms and masts of equipment operated on the surface of any...

  19. Tethered gravity laboratories study - The center-of-gravity management concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevilacqua, Franco; Merlina, Pietro; Lorenzini, Enrico Carlo; Cosmo, Mario; Bergamaschi, Silvio

    A tether system deployed from the Space Station (SS) can provide a facility for controlling the vertical position of the system center of mass at low frequencies or in the dc mode. A review of the force field on board the SS is presented, and a classification is given of the sources of external perturbations modifying the g-field at the microgravity laboratory. This provides a set of constraints to be taken into account. A complete analysis of possible configurations (single tether system, double tether system) is performed, including design criteria, SS impacts, and configuration tradeoff. Basic results are presented from an analysis aimed at identifying the acceleration noise level transmitted to the SS when a tethered system is acted upon by environmental perturbations. Possible benefits achievable by implementing the center-of-graivty management concept are assessed on the basis of development risks and expected hardware complexity.

  20. UV-Curable Hybrid Nanocomposite Coating to Protect Tether Polymer Materials Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To address the NASA need for coatings to protect and strengthen tether materials for Momentum-exchange Electrodynamic Reboost (MXER) technology, Luminit, LLC,...

  1. Computational study of small molecule binding for both tethered and free conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ytreberg, F Marty

    2010-04-29

    Using a calix[4]arene-benzene complex as a test system, we compare the potential of mean force for when the calix[4]arene is tethered versus free. When the complex is in vacuum, our results show that the difference between tethered and free is primarily due to the entropic contribution to the potential of mean force resulting in a significant binding free energy difference of 6.6 kJ/mol. By contrast, when the complex is in water, our results suggest that there is no appreciable difference between tethered and free. This study elucidates the roles of entropy and enthalpy for this small molecule system and emphasizes the point that tethering the receptor has the potential to dramatically impact the binding properties. These findings should be taken into consideration when using calixarene molecules in nanosensor design.

  2. Materials for Advancement of MXER Tether Design (1000-549) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — There exist a need to develop, identify, and classify various materials that can be used in the fabrication of electrodynamic tethers for various applications. These...

  3. Materials for advancement of MXER tether design (1000-371) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — There exist a need to develop, identify, and classify various materials that can be used in the fabrication of electrodynamic tethers for various applications. These...

  4. The use of the Tethered Satellite System to perform low density aerothermodynamics studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlomagno, Giovanni M.; De Luca, Luigi; Siemers, Paul M.; Wood, George M., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The Tethered Satellite System (TSS) is a cooperative space system development activity being carried out by USA and Italy. Within TSS, the Shuttle Tethered Aerothermodynamic Research Facility (STARFAC) concept has the potential to provide access to vast portions of the upper atmosphere for the purpose of atmospheric and aerothermodynamic research. The implementation of this capability will push Tether System (TS) state of the art to its limits; the primary problems being tether/satellite drag, heating, tension control, deployment/retrieval control. In this paper parametric studies are accomplished to assess some of these problems and to delineate the tradeoffs available to missions design to meet the engineering constraints. The utilization of aerodynamic rather than spherical shapes - (TSS) - as well as elementary satellite thrusting and lift are included in the present study.

  5. Advanced Particle-in-Cell (PIC) Tools for Simulation of Electrodynamic Tether Plasma Interactions Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Electrodynamic tethers are optimally suited for use in Low-Earth-Orbit (LEO) to generate thrust or drag maneuver satellites. LEO region is polluted with space debris...

  6. Antibacterial agent triclosan suppresses RBL-2H3 mast cell function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, Rachel K., E-mail: rachel.palmer@maine.edu [Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Maine, Orono, ME 04469 (United States); Department of Molecular and Biomedical Sciences, University of Maine, Orono, ME 04469 (United States); Hutchinson, Lee M.; Burpee, Benjamin T.; Tupper, Emily J.; Pelletier, Jonathan H.; Kormendy, Zsolt; Hopke, Alex R.; Malay, Ethan T.; Evans, Brieana L.; Velez, Alejandro [Department of Molecular and Biomedical Sciences, University of Maine, Orono, ME 04469 (United States); Gosse, Julie A., E-mail: julie.gosse@umit.maine.edu [Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Maine, Orono, ME 04469 (United States); Department of Molecular and Biomedical Sciences, University of Maine, Orono, ME 04469 (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Triclosan is a broad-spectrum antibacterial agent, which has been shown previously to alleviate human allergic skin disease. The purpose of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that the mechanism of this action of triclosan is, in part, due to effects on mast cell function. Mast cells play important roles in allergy, asthma, parasite defense, and carcinogenesis. In response to various stimuli, mast cells degranulate, releasing allergic mediators such as histamine. In order to investigate the potential anti-inflammatory effect of triclosan on mast cells, we monitored the level of degranulation in a mast cell model, rat basophilic leukemia cells, clone 2H3. Having functional homology to human mast cells, as well as a very well defined signaling pathway leading to degranulation, this cell line has been widely used to gain insight into mast-cell driven allergic disorders in humans. Using a fluorescent microplate assay, we determined that triclosan strongly dampened the release of granules from activated rat mast cells starting at 2 μM treatment, with dose-responsive suppression through 30 μM. These concentrations were found to be non-cytotoxic. The inhibition was found to persist when early signaling events (such as IgE receptor aggregation and tyrosine phosphorylation) were bypassed by using calcium ionophore stimulation, indicating that the target for triclosan in this pathway is likely downstream of the calcium signaling event. Triclosan also strongly suppressed F-actin remodeling and cell membrane ruffling, a physiological process that accompanies degranulation. Our finding that triclosan inhibits mast cell function may explain the clinical data mentioned above and supports the use of triclosan or a mechanistically similar compound as a topical treatment for allergic skin disease, such as eczema. -- Highlights: ►The effects of triclosan on mast cell function using a murine mast cell model. ►Triclosan strongly inhibits degranulation of mast cells.

  7. Ultraviolet B radiation increases hairless mouse mast cells in a dose-dependent manner and alters distribution of UV-induced mast cell growth factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kligman, L.H.; Murphy, G.F. [Pennsylvania Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). School of Medicine

    1996-01-01

    In studies of the effects of chronic UVB irradiation on dermal connective tissue in the hairless mouse, we observed that the number and size of mast cells was increased. Because mast cells are known to be associated with connective tissue remodeling, we examined and quantified the effect of increasing UVB (290-320 nm)doses on this cell. Groups of mice were exposed to filtered FS-40 Westinghouse lamps (290-400 nm: peak irradiance 313 nm) for 1-5 minimal erythema doses (MED) thrice weekly for 10 weeks. Appropriate controls were included. Biopsies, processed for light microscopy, were stained with toluidine blue. Mast cells were counted in 15 high-magnification fields per specimen with upper and lower dermis scored separately. Significant increases in large densely granular mast cells occurred at 2 MED in the lower dermic in association with the UVB-exacerbated granulomatous reaction. In the upper dermis, mast cells were significantly increased with 3 MED. These findings suggest that mast cells may play a dual role in UV-irradiated skin with those in the lower dermis related to inflammation processes and those in the upper dermis involved in connective tissue modeling. To gain understanding of the mechanism of mast cell recruitment and maturation, we examined the effect of UVB on mast cell growth factor expression. This was enhanced in the epidermis by UVB, with a shift from cytoplasmic staining to membrane-associated or intercellular staining at 2 MED and higher. Dermal dendritic and mononuclear cells also showed increased reactivity. (Author).

  8. The evaluation of brake mechanisms in the deployment of Electrodynamic Tether for space debris removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-30

    increase of space debris is becoming a serious problem and active removal of large debris is required. The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA...mechanism, Deployment friction, Electrodynamic tether system, Space debris , Tether. Introduction The increase of space debris , which are defunct or...to exponentially increase [1] [2]. Consequently, the active removal of large space debris from crowded economically useful orbits (800-1500km alt

  9. Control by damping Injection of Electrodynamic Tether System in an Inclined Orbit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Martin Birkelund; Blanke, Mogens

    2009-01-01

    Control of a satellite system with an electrodynamic tether as actuator is a time-periodic and underactuated control problem. This paper considers the tethered satellite in a Hamiltonian framework and determines a port-controlled Hamiltonian formulation that adequately describes the nonlinear...... of the closed loop system is treated using Floquet theory, investigating the closed loop properties for their dependency of the controller gain and orbit inclination....

  10. Simulation of a tethered microgravity robot pair and validation on a planar air bearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantellato, R.; Lorenzini, E. C.; Sternberg, D.; Roascio, D.; Saenz-Otero, A.; Zachrau, H. J.

    2017-09-01

    A software model has been developed to simulate the on-orbit dynamics of a dual-mass tethered system where one or both of the tethered spacecraft are able to produce propulsive thrust. The software simulates translations and rotations of both spacecraft, with the visco-elastic tether being simulated as a lumped-mass model. Thanks to this last feature, tether longitudinal and lateral modes of vibration and tether tension can be accurately assessed. Also, the way the spacecraft motion responds to sudden tether tension spikes can be studied in detail. The code enables the simulation of different scenarios, including space tug missions for deorbit maneuvers in a debris mitigation context and general-purpose tethered formation flight missions. This study aims to validate the software through a representative test campaign performed with the MIT Synchronized Position Hold Engage and Reorient Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) planar air bearing system. Results obtained with the numerical simulator are compared with data from direct measurements in different testing setups. The studied cases take into account different initial conditions of the spacecraft velocities and relative attitudes, and thrust forces. Data analysis is presented comparing the results of the simulations with direct measurements of acceleration and Azimuth rate of the two bodies in the planar air bearing test facility using a Nylon tether. Plans for conducting a microgravity test campaign using the SPHERES satellites aboard the International Space Station are also being scheduled in the near future in order to further validate the simulation using data from the relevant operational environment of extended microgravity with full six degree of freedom (per body) motion.

  11. Magnetically Tuning Tether Mobility of Integrin Ligand Regulates Adhesion, Spreading, and Differentiation of Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Dexter S H; Li, Jinming; Yan, Xiaohui; Wang, Ben; Li, Rui; Zhang, Li; Bian, Liming

    2017-03-08

    Cells sense and respond to the surrounding microenvironment through binding of membranous integrin to ligands such as the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptide. Previous studies show that the RGD tether properties on substrate influence cell adhesion and spreading, but few studies have reported strategies to control the tether mobility of RGD on substrate via a physical and noncontact approach. Herein, we demonstrate a novel strategy to tune the tether mobility of RGD on substrate via magnetic force. We conjugate a monolayer of RGD-bearing magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) on a glass substrate via the flexible and coiled poly(ethylene glycol) linker of large molecular weight (PEG, average MW: 2000), and this increases the RGD tether mobility, which can be significantly reduced by applying magnetic attraction on MNPs. Our data show that high RGD tether mobility delays the early adhesion and spreading of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs), leading to compromised osteogenic differentiation at later stage. In contrast, hMSCs cultured on substrate with restricted RGD tether mobility, achieved either via a shorter PEG linker (MW: 200) or magnetic force, show significantly better adhesion, spreading, and osteogenic differentiation. The control utilizing RGD-bearing nonmagnetic nanoparticles shows no such enhancing effect of magnetic field on cellular events, further supporting our conjecture of magnetic tuning of RGD tether mobility. We hypothesize that high tether mobility of RGD entails additional time and effort by the cells to fully develop traction force and mechanical feedback, thereby delaying the maturation of FAs and activation of subsequent mechanotransduction signaling. Our staining results of vinculin, a critical component of FAs, and Yes-associated protein (YAP), an important mechanosensitive transcriptional factor, support our hypothesis. We believe that our work not only sheds light on the impact of dynamic presentation of cell adhesive ligands on cellular behaviors

  12. Data Tethers: Preventing Information Leakage by Enforcing Environmental Data Access Policies

    OpenAIRE

    Fleming, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Protecting data from accidental loss or theft is crucial in today's world ofmobile computing. Data Tethers provides environmental policy control of information at the data level, rather than the file level. Data Tethers uses dynamic recompilation to add label tracking instructions to existing applications in the OpenSolaris operating system, allowing fine-grain data flow tracking in legacy applications without the need to recompile from source. We demonstrate the system's feasibility with mi...

  13. Immunohistochemical analysis of mast cell infiltrates and microvessel density in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyziak, L; Stasikowska-Kanicka, O; Danilewicz, M; Wągrowska-Danilewicz, M

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate mast cell concentration and microvessel density in perilesional and intralesional regions of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and furthermore to assess the possible relationship between the above-mentioned parameters. Paraffin-embedded specimens from 47 cases of OSCC and 12 cases of normal mucosa were investigated immunohistochemically with anti-CD-31 antibody to stain microvessels and anti-tryptase antibody to visualize mast cells. The degree of vascularization and mast cell infiltration was measured with an image analysis system. The study revealed considerably increased microvessel density and mast cell abundance in intralesional and perilesional regions of OSCCs in comparison to normal mucosa. There was a significant positive correlation between microvessel density and mast cell concentration in both localizations of OSCCs (p therapeutic significance which require further research.

  14. The role of large environmental noise in masting: general model and example from pistachio trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyles, Danielle; Rosenstock, Todd S; Hastings, Alan; Brown, Patrick H

    2009-08-21

    Masting is synchronous, highly variable reproduction in a plant population, or synchronized boom-bust cycles of reproduction. These pulses of resources have cascading effects through ecosystems, and thus it is important to understand where they come from. How does masting happen and synchronize? In this paper, we suggest a mechanism for this. The mechanism is inspired by data from a pistachio orchard, which suggest that large environmental noise may play a crucial role in inducing masting in plant populations such as pistachio. We test this idea through development and analysis of a mathematical model of plant reproduction. We start with a very simple model, and generalize it based on the current models of plant reproduction and masting. Our results suggest that large environmental noise may indeed be a crucial part of the mechanism of masting in certain types of plant populations, including pistachio. This is a specific example of an important functional consequence of the interactions between stochasticity and nonlinearity.

  15. Initial response of individual soft mast-producing plants to different forest regeneration methods in the Ouachita Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger W. Perry; Ronald E. Thill; Philip A. Tappe; David G. Peitz

    2004-01-01

    Abstract - Recent policy changes have eliminated clearcutting as the primary pine regeneration method on Federal lands in the Southern United States. However, the effects of alternative natural regeneration methods on soft mast production are unknown. We compared plant coverage and mast production of 37 soft mast-producing plants among four...

  16. Utilization of adenosine triphosphate in rat mast cells during histamine release induced by the ionophore A23187

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Torben

    1979-01-01

    The role of endogenous adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in histamine release from rat mast cells induced by the ionophore A23187 in vitro has been studied. 2 The amount of histamine released by calcium from rat mast cells primed with the ionophore A23187 was dependent on the ATP content of the mast...

  17. Isolation of Mature (Peritoneum-Derived Mast Cells and Immature (Bone Marrow-Derived Mast Cell Precursors from Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen K Meurer

    Full Text Available Mast cells (MCs are a versatile cell type playing key roles in tissue morphogenesis and host defence against bacteria and parasites. Furthermore, they can enhance immunological danger signals and are implicated in inflammatory disorders like fibrosis. This granulated cell type originates from the myeloid lineage and has similarities to basophilic granulocytes, both containing large quantities of histamine and heparin. Immature murine mast cells mature in their destination tissue and adopt either the connective tissue (CTMC or mucosal (MMC type. Some effector functions are executed by activation/degranulation of MCs which lead to secretion of a typical set of MC proteases (MCPT and of the preformed or newly synthesized mediators from its granules into the local microenvironment. Due to the potential accumulation of mutations in key signalling pathway components of corresponding MC cell-lines, primary cultured MCs are an attractive mean to study general features of MC biology and aspects of MC functions relevant to human disease. Here, we describe a simple protocol for the simultaneous isolation of mature CTMC-like murine MCs from the peritoneum (PMCs and immature MC precursors from the bone marrow (BM. The latter are differentiated in vitro to yield BM-derived MCs (BMMC. These cells display the typical morphological and phenotypic features of MCs, express the typical MC surface markers, and can be propagated and kept in culture for several weeks. The provided protocol allows simple amplification of large quantities of homogenous, non-transformed MCs from the peritoneum and bone marrow-derived mast cells for cell- and tissue-based biomedical research.

  18. Biomimicry enhances sequential reactions of tethered glycolytic enzymes, TPI and GAPDHS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, Chinatsu; Gao, Lizeng; Bergkvist, Magnus; Nelson, Jacquelyn L; Hinchman, Meleana M; Travis, Alexander J

    2013-01-01

    Maintaining activity of enzymes tethered to solid interfaces remains a major challenge in developing hybrid organic-inorganic devices. In nature, mammalian spermatozoa have overcome this design challenge by having glycolytic enzymes with specialized targeting domains that enable them to function while tethered to a cytoskeletal element. As a step toward designing a hybrid organic-inorganic ATP-generating system, we implemented a biomimetic site-specific immobilization strategy to tether two glycolytic enzymes representing different functional enzyme families: triose phosphoisomerase (TPI; an isomerase) and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDHS; an oxidoreductase). We then evaluated the activities of these enzymes in comparison to when they were tethered via classical carboxyl-amine crosslinking. Both enzymes show similar surface binding regardless of immobilization method. Remarkably, specific activities for both enzymes were significantly higher when tethered using the biomimetic, site-specific immobilization approach. Using this biomimetic approach, we tethered both enzymes to a single surface and demonstrated their function in series in both forward and reverse directions. Again, the activities in series were significantly higher in both directions when the enzymes were coupled using this biomimetic approach versus carboxyl-amine binding. Our results suggest that biomimetic, site-specific immobilization can provide important functional advantages over chemically specific, but non-oriented attachment, an important strategic insight given the growing interest in recapitulating entire biological pathways on hybrid organic-inorganic devices.

  19. Biomimicry enhances sequential reactions of tethered glycolytic enzymes, TPI and GAPDHS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinatsu Mukai

    Full Text Available Maintaining activity of enzymes tethered to solid interfaces remains a major challenge in developing hybrid organic-inorganic devices. In nature, mammalian spermatozoa have overcome this design challenge by having glycolytic enzymes with specialized targeting domains that enable them to function while tethered to a cytoskeletal element. As a step toward designing a hybrid organic-inorganic ATP-generating system, we implemented a biomimetic site-specific immobilization strategy to tether two glycolytic enzymes representing different functional enzyme families: triose phosphoisomerase (TPI; an isomerase and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDHS; an oxidoreductase. We then evaluated the activities of these enzymes in comparison to when they were tethered via classical carboxyl-amine crosslinking. Both enzymes show similar surface binding regardless of immobilization method. Remarkably, specific activities for both enzymes were significantly higher when tethered using the biomimetic, site-specific immobilization approach. Using this biomimetic approach, we tethered both enzymes to a single surface and demonstrated their function in series in both forward and reverse directions. Again, the activities in series were significantly higher in both directions when the enzymes were coupled using this biomimetic approach versus carboxyl-amine binding. Our results suggest that biomimetic, site-specific immobilization can provide important functional advantages over chemically specific, but non-oriented attachment, an important strategic insight given the growing interest in recapitulating entire biological pathways on hybrid organic-inorganic devices.

  20. Study of dynamical stability of tethered systems during space tug maneuvers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantellato, R.; Olivieri, L.; Lorenzini, E. C.

    2017-09-01

    The dynamics of a space tether system composed of one active spacecraft, an uncontrolled large debris (e.g., a defunct satellite), and a visco-elastic tether connecting the two bodies are investigated in this paper. The active spacecraft is assumed to be equipped with a propulsive system for carrying out a tug maneuver that forces the orbital decay of the debris. The dynamical stability and the eigenfrequencies of the tethered system under the action of the thrust are investigated with both numerical and analytical models. A more complex numerical lumped-masses model provides the reference to validate the results hailing from the simplified models. Simplified models of orbital decay, tether, and debris attitude motions were derived using the Clohessy-Wiltshire equations. The results obtained with the simplified models fit very well with those from the lumped-masses model for a wide range of initial conditions. Thanks to the analytical models two resonance conditions were found, both of them affecting the attitude dynamics of the debris, that could represent a serious issue for the safety of the tug maneuver. Also, an instability mechanism that could induce the dual mass system to rotate around its center of mass under certain conditions was identified. These findings make it possible to pinpoint the set of initial conditions of the tethered system at the beginning of the thrust event that provides a dynamically stable tug maneuver for different configurations of the system (e.g., low/high thrust, stiff/elastic tethers).

  1. Tethered cord syndrome with spina bifida aperta in cats: two case reports of different types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Masahiro; Oji, Takashi; Une, Satoshi; Mukaino, Makiko; Bekki, Tatsuro; Tado, Masaki; Koyama, Hiromi; Kagawa, Yumiko; Kawata, Mutsumi

    2017-01-01

    Case summary Two castrated male cats, aged 8 months old (case 1) and 10 months old (case 2), showed a history of progressive paraparesis, an over-reaching pelvic limb gait, urinary incontinence and a palpable dermoid fistula. In case 1, the fistula was connected to the dural sac on the conus medullaris, and the tethered spinal cord was retracted caudally. In case 2, the tubular structure was connected to the dural sac on the thoracic spinal cord, and the tethered spinal cord was retracted dorsally. Tethered cord syndrome secondary to spina bifida aperta was suspected in both cats. Excision of the fistula and release of the tethered spinal cord was performed. A histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of a meningomyelocele in case 1 and a meningocele in case 2. Paraparesis improved postoperatively in both cats. However, urinary incontinence in case 1 remained partially unresolved. Relevance and novel information This is the first report to describe the imaging characteristics, surgical treatments and outcomes of two different types of tethered cord syndrome with spina bifida aperta in cats. Tethered cord syndrome with spina bifida aperta needs to be included in the differential diagnosis of slowly progressive paraparesis in younger cats with or without vesicorectal failure and a palpable dermoid fistula. PMID:28546867

  2. Tethered cord syndrome with spina bifida aperta in cats: two case reports of different types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Tamura

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Case summary Two castrated male cats, aged 8 months old (case 1 and 10 months old (case 2, showed a history of progressive paraparesis, an over-reaching pelvic limb gait, urinary incontinence and a palpable dermoid fistula. In case 1, the fistula was connected to the dural sac on the conus medullaris, and the tethered spinal cord was retracted caudally. In case 2, the tubular structure was connected to the dural sac on the thoracic spinal cord, and the tethered spinal cord was retracted dorsally. Tethered cord syndrome secondary to spina bifida aperta was suspected in both cats. Excision of the fistula and release of the tethered spinal cord was performed. A histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of a meningomyelocele in case 1 and a meningocele in case 2. Paraparesis improved postoperatively in both cats. However, urinary incontinence in case 1 remained partially unresolved. Relevance and novel information This is the first report to describe the imaging characteristics, surgical treatments and outcomes of two different types of tethered cord syndrome with spina bifida aperta in cats. Tethered cord syndrome with spina bifida aperta needs to be included in the differential diagnosis of slowly progressive paraparesis in younger cats with or without vesicorectal failure and a palpable dermoid fistula.

  3. Tethered motion of uniflagellated bacteria at the liquid-solid surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Jordan; Tang, Jay

    Direct evidence of the bacterial flagellar motor's rotation was first noted when multiflagellated bacterial cells were observed (under the optical microscope) to rotate when tethered to glass by a single flagellum. The tethered cell assay has continued to play a significant role throughout the subsequent studies of motor characteristics and behavior. Such studies have expanded to include uniflagellated bacteria, such as Vibrio alginolyticus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Caulobacter crescentus. Here we show that such cells are not necessarily tethered by their flagellum, but rather elsewhere on the cell body. The observed cell body rotation is actually due to the flagellum either ``rolling'' against the glass surface, or pushing the cell body at the flagellar base. These motions are directly observed for Vibrio alginolyticus with darkfield microscopy. Additionally, our recently measured distributions of intervals between motor switches for tethered Caulobacter crescentus also confirm this more complicated mode of tethering. Therefore, the rotational speed of tethered uniflagellated bacteria may not equate to that of the motor itself, as is commonly assumed.

  4. Tethered Swimming for the Evaluation and Prescription of Resistance Training in Young Swimmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papoti, Marcelo; da Silva, Adelino S R; Kalva-Filho, Carlos Augusto; Araujo, Gustavo Gomes; Santiago, Vanessa; Martins, LuizEduardo Barreto; Cunha, Sérgio Augusto; Gobatto, Claudio Alexandre

    2017-02-01

    The aims of the present study were 1) to evaluate the effects of 11 weeks of a typical free-swimming training program on aerobic and stroke parameters determined in tethered swimming (Study 1; n=13) and 2) to investigate the responses of tethered swimming efforts, in addition to free-swimming sessions, through 7 weeks of training (Study 2; n=21). In both studies, subjects performed a graded exercise test in tethered swimming (GET) to determine anaerobic threshold (AnT), stroke rate at AnT (SRAnT), peak force at GET (PFGET) and peak blood lactate ([La-]GET). Participants also swam 100-, 200- and 400-m lengths to evaluate performance. In Study 2, swimmers were divided into control (i. e., only free-swimming; GC [n=11]) and tethered swimming group (i. e., 50% of the main session; GTS [n=10]). The results of Study 1 demonstrate that AnT, PFGET, [La(-)]GET and 200-m performance were improved with free-swimming training. The SRAnT decreased with training. In Study 2, free-swimming performance and most of the graded exercise test parameters were not altered in either group. However, [La-]GET improved only for GTS. These results demonstrate that aerobic parameters obtained in tethered swimming can be used to evaluate free-swimming training responses, and the addition of tethered efforts during training routine improves the lactate production capacity of swimmers. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. AFM/TIRF force clamp measurements of neurosecretory vesicle tethers reveal characteristic unfolding steps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark C Harris

    Full Text Available Although several proteins have been implicated in secretory vesicle tethering, the identity and mechanical properties of the components forming the physical vesicle-plasma membrane link remain unknown. Here we present the first experimental measurements of nanomechanical properties of secretory vesicle-plasma membrane tethers using combined AFM force clamp and TIRF microscopy on membrane sheets from PC12 cells expressing the vesicle marker ANF-eGFP. Application of pulling forces generated tether extensions composed of multiple steps with variable length. The frequency of short (<10 nm tether extension events was markedly higher when a fluorescent vesicle was present at the cantilever tip and increased in the presence of GTPγS, indicating that these events reflect specifically the properties of vesicle-plasma membrane tethers. The magnitude of the short tether extension events is consistent with extension lengths expected from progressive unfolding of individual helices of the exocyst complex, supporting its direct role in forming the physical vesicle-plasma membrane link.

  6. AFM/TIRF force clamp measurements of neurosecretory vesicle tethers reveal characteristic unfolding steps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Mark C; Cislo, Dillon; Lenz, Joan S; Umbach, Christopher; Lindau, Manfred

    2017-01-01

    Although several proteins have been implicated in secretory vesicle tethering, the identity and mechanical properties of the components forming the physical vesicle-plasma membrane link remain unknown. Here we present the first experimental measurements of nanomechanical properties of secretory vesicle-plasma membrane tethers using combined AFM force clamp and TIRF microscopy on membrane sheets from PC12 cells expressing the vesicle marker ANF-eGFP. Application of pulling forces generated tether extensions composed of multiple steps with variable length. The frequency of short (<10 nm) tether extension events was markedly higher when a fluorescent vesicle was present at the cantilever tip and increased in the presence of GTPγS, indicating that these events reflect specifically the properties of vesicle-plasma membrane tethers. The magnitude of the short tether extension events is consistent with extension lengths expected from progressive unfolding of individual helices of the exocyst complex, supporting its direct role in forming the physical vesicle-plasma membrane link.

  7. Differential usage of COX-1 and COX-2 in prostaglandin production by mast cells and basophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoyuki Bando

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Basophils have been erroneously considered as minor relatives of mast cells, due to some phenotypic similarity between them. While recent studies have revealed non-redundant roles for basophils in various immune responses, basophil-derived effector molecules, including lipid mediators, remain poorly characterized, compared to mast cell-derived ones. Here we analyzed and compared eicosanoids produced by mouse basophils and mast cells when stimulated with IgE plus allergens. The production of 5-LOX metabolites such as LTB4 and 5-HETE was detected as early as 0.5 h post-stimulation in both cell types, even though their amounts were much smaller in basophils than in mast cells. In contrast, basophils and mast cells showed distinct time course in the production of COX metabolites, including PGD2, PGE2 and 11-HETE. Their production by mast cells was detected at both 0.5 and 6 h post-stimulation while that by basophils was detectable only at 6 h. Of note, mast cells showed 8–9 times higher levels of COX-1 than did basophils at the resting status. In contrast to unaltered COX-1 expression with or without stimulation, COX-2 expression was up-regulated in both cell types upon activation. Importantly, when activated, basophils expressed 4–5 times higher levels of COX-2 than did mast cells. In accordance with these findings, the late-phase production of the COX metabolites by basophils was completely ablated by COX-2 inhibitor whereas the early-phase production by mast cells was blocked by COX-1 but not COX-2 inhibitor. Thus, the production of COX metabolites is differentially regulated by COX-1 and COX-2 in basophils and mast cells.

  8. Influence of MRI contrast media on histamine release from mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kun, Tomasz; Jakubowski, Lucjusz

    2012-07-01

    Mast cells, owing to diversity of secreted mediators, play a crucial role in the regulation of inflammatory response. Together with basophils, mast cells constitute a central pathogenetic element of anaphylactic (IgE-dependent) and anaphylactoid (IgE-independent) reactions. In severe cases, generalized degranulation of mast cells may cause symptoms of anaphylactic shock. The influence of the classical, iodine-based contrast media on mastocyte degranulation has been fully described. Our objective was to determine the influence of the gadolinium-based MRI contrast media on histamine release from mast cells and to compare the activity of ionic and non-ionic preparations of contrast media. To determine the intensity of mast cell degranulation, we used an experimental model based on mastocytes isolated from rat peritoneal fluid. Purified suspensions of mast cells were incubated with various concentrations of Gd-DTPA and Gd-DTPA-BMA, and solutions of PEG 600 which served as a non-toxic osmotic stimulus. The intensity of mast cell activation was presented as mean percentage of histamine released from cells after incubation. The obtained results demonstrate that both ionic and non-ionic preparations of the MRI contrast media are able to induce mast cell degranulation in vitro. It was also proved that the non-ionic MRI contrast media stimulate mast cells markedly more weakly than ionic contrast media at identical concentration. The aforementioned results may suggest a more profitable safety profile of the non-ionic contrast preparations. We may also conclude that triggering of mast cell degranulation after incubation with the solutions of MRI contrast media results from non-specific osmotic stimulation and direct toxicity of free ionic residues.

  9. MAST's Integrated Data Access Management system: IDAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muir, D.G. [EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)], E-mail: david.g.muir@ukaea.org.uk; Appel, L.; Conway, N.J.; Kirk, A.; Martin, R.; Meyer, H.; Storrs, J.; Taylor, D.; Thomas-Davies, N.; Waterhouse, J. [EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2008-04-15

    A new Integrated Data Access Management system, IDAM, has been created to address specific data management issues of the MAST spherical Tokamak. For example, this system enables access to numerous file formats, both legacy and modern (IDA, Ufile, netCDF, HDF5, MDSPlus, PPF, JPF). It adds data quality values at the signal level, and automatically corrects for problems in data: in timings, calibrations, and labelling. It also builds new signals from signal components. The IDAM data server uses a hybrid XML-relational database to record how data are accessed, whether locally or remotely, and how alias and generic signal names are mapped to true names. Also, XML documents are used to encode the details of data corrections, as well as definitions of composite signals and error models. The simple, user friendly, API and accessor function library, written in C on Linux, is available for applications in C, C++, IDL and Fortran-90/95/2003 with good performance: a MAST plasma current trace (28 kbytes of data), requested using a generic name and with data corrections applied, is delivered over a 100 Mbit/s network in {approx}13 ms.

  10. Electron and ion heating characteristics during magnetic reconnection in MAST

    CERN Document Server

    Tanabe, H; Watanabe, T; Gi, K; Kadowaki, K; Inomoto, M; Imazawa, R; Gryaznevich, M; Michael, C; Crowley, B; Conway, N; Scannell, R; Harrison, J; Fitzgerald, I; Meakins, A; Hawkes, N; Cheng, C Z; Ono, Y

    2015-01-01

    Local electron and ion heating characteristics during merging reconnection startup on the MAST spherical tokamak have been revealed for the first time using a 130 channel YAG-TS system and a new 32 chord ion Doppler tomography diagnostic. 2D local profile measurement of $T_e$, $n_e$ and $T_i$ detect highly localized electron heating at the X point and bulk ion heating downstream. For the push merging experiment under high guide field condition, thick layer of closed flux surface formed by reconnected field sustains the heating profile for more than electron and ion energy relaxation time $\\tau^E_{ei}\\sim4-10$ms, both heating profiles finally form triple peak structure at the X point and downstream. Toroidal guide field mostly contributes the formation of peaked electron heating profile at the X point. The localized heating increases with higher guide field, while bulk downstream ion heating is unaffected by the change in the guide field under MAST conditions ($B_t>3B_{rec}$).

  11. Lipoproteins tethered dendrimeric nanoconstructs for effective targeting to cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Anupriya; Jain, Keerti, E-mail: keertijain02@gmail.com; Mehra, Neelesh Kumar, E-mail: neelesh81mph@gmail.com; Jain, N. K., E-mail: dr.jnarendr@gmail.com [Dr. H. S. Gour University, Pharmaceutics Research Laboratory, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences (India)

    2013-10-15

    In the present investigation, poly (propylene imine) dendrimers up to fifth generation (PPI G5.0) were synthesized using ethylene diamine and acrylonitrile. Lipoproteins (high-density lipoprotein; HDL and low-density lipoprotein; LDL) were isolated from human plasma by discontinuous density gradient ultracentrifugation, characterized and tethered to G5.0 PPI dendrimers to construct LDL- and HDL-conjugated dendrimeric nanoconstructs for tumor-specific delivery of docetaxel. Developed formulations showed sustained release characteristics in in vitro drug release and in vivo pharmacokinetic studies. The cancer targeting potential of lipoprotein coupled dendrimers was investigated by ex vivo cytotoxicity and cell uptake studies using human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines (HepG2 cells) and biodistribution studies in albino rats of Sprague-Dawley strain. Lipoprotein anchored dendrimeric nanoconstructs showed significant uptake by cancer cells as well as higher biodistribution of docetaxel to liver and spleen. It is concluded that these precisely synthesized engineered dendrimeric nanoconstructs could serve as promising drug carrier for fighting with the fatal disease, i.e., cancer, attributed to their defined targeting and therapeutic potential.

  12. Lipoproteins tethered dendrimeric nanoconstructs for effective targeting to cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Anupriya; Jain, Keerti; Mehra, Neelesh Kumar; Jain, N. K.

    2013-10-01

    In the present investigation, poly (propylene imine) dendrimers up to fifth generation (PPI G5.0) were synthesized using ethylene diamine and acrylonitrile. Lipoproteins (high-density lipoprotein; HDL and low-density lipoprotein; LDL) were isolated from human plasma by discontinuous density gradient ultracentrifugation, characterized and tethered to G5.0 PPI dendrimers to construct LDL- and HDL-conjugated dendrimeric nanoconstructs for tumor-specific delivery of docetaxel. Developed formulations showed sustained release characteristics in in vitro drug release and in vivo pharmacokinetic studies. The cancer targeting potential of lipoprotein coupled dendrimers was investigated by ex vivo cytotoxicity and cell uptake studies using human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines (HepG2 cells) and biodistribution studies in albino rats of Sprague-Dawley strain. Lipoprotein anchored dendrimeric nanoconstructs showed significant uptake by cancer cells as well as higher biodistribution of docetaxel to liver and spleen. It is concluded that these precisely synthesized engineered dendrimeric nanoconstructs could serve as promising drug carrier for fighting with the fatal disease, i.e., cancer, attributed to their defined targeting and therapeutic potential.

  13. Tethered naphthalene diimide-based intercalators for DNA triplex stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianolio, Diego A.; Segismundo, Joanna M.; McLaughlin, Larry W.

    2000-01-01

    The synthesis and triplex stabilizing properties of oligodeoxyribonucleotides functionalized at the 5′- and/or 3′-termini with a naphthalene diimide-based (NDI) intercalator is described. The NDI intercalator was prepared in a single step from the corresponding dianhydride and was attached to the 5′-terminus of an oligodeoxyribonucleotide following a reverse coupling procedure. The DMT protecting group was removed and the sequence phosphitylated to generate the phosphoramidite derivative on the 5′-terminus of the support-bound oligodeoxyribonucleotide. The NDI intercalator with a free hydroxyl was then added in the presence of tetrazole. Attachment of the NDI to the 3′-terminus relied upon a tethered amino group that could be functionalized first with the naphthalene dianhydride, which was subsequently converted to the diimide. Using both procedures, an oligonucleotide conjugate was prepared having the NDI intercalator at both the 5′- and 3′-termini. Thermal denaturation studies were used to determine the remarkable gain in stability for triplexes formed when the NDI-conjugated oligonucleotide was present as the third strand in the complex. PMID:10773082

  14. Critical adsorption of copolymer tethered on selective surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong; Qian, Chang-Ji; Luo, Meng-Bo

    2016-04-01

    Critical adsorption behaviors of flexible copolymer chains tethered to a flat homogeneous surface are studied by using Monte Carlo simulations. We have compared the critical adsorption temperature Tc, estimated by a finite-size scaling method, for different AB copolymer sequences with A the attractive monomer and B the inert monomer. We find that Tc increases with an increase in the fraction of monomers A, fA, in copolymers, and it increases with an increase in the length of block A for the same fA. In particular, Tc of copolymer (AnBn)r can be expressed as a function of the block length, n, and Tc of copolymer (AnB)r and (ABm)r can be expressed as a linear function of fA. Tc of random copolymer chains also can be expressed as a linear function of fA and it can be estimated by using weight-average of Tc of different diblocks in the random copolymer. However, the crossover exponent is roughly independent of AB sequence distributions either for block copolymers or for random copolymers.

  15. Flow structures around a beetle in a tethered flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Boogeon; Oh, Sehyeong; Park, Hyungmin; Choi, Haecheon

    2017-11-01

    In the present study, through a wind-tunnel experiment, we visualize the flow in a tethered flight of a rhinoceros beetle using a smoke-wire visualization technique. Measurements are done at five side planes along the wind span while varying the body angle (angle between the horizontal and the body axis) to investigate the influence of the stroke plane angle that was observed to change depending on the flight mode such as hovering, forward and takeoff flights so on. Observing that a large attached leading-edge vortex is only found on the hindwing, it is inferred that most of the aerodynamic forces would be generated by hindwings (flexible inner wings) compared to the elytra (hard outer wings). In addition, it is observed to use unsteady lift-generating mechanisms such as clap-and-fling, wing-wing interaction and wake capture. Finally, we discuss the relation between the advance ratio and Strouhal number by adjusting free-stream velocity and the body angle (i.e., angle of wake-induced flow). Supported by a Grant to Bio-Mimetic Robot Research Center Funded by Defense Acquisition Program Administration, and by ADD, Korea (UD130070ID).

  16. Survivability design for a hybrid underwater vehicle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Biao; Wu, Chao; Li, Xiang; Zhao, Qingkai; Ge, Tong [State Key Lab of Ocean Engineering, School of Naval Architecture, Ocean and Civil Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2015-03-10

    A novel hybrid underwater robotic vehicle (HROV) capable of working to the full ocean depth has been developed. The battery powered vehicle operates in two modes: operate as an untethered autonomous vehicle in autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) mode and operate under remote control connected to the surface vessel by a lightweight, fiber optic tether in remotely operated vehicle (ROV) mode. Considering the hazardous underwater environment at the limiting depth and the hybrid operating modes, survivability has been placed on an equal level with the other design attributes of the HROV since the beginning of the project. This paper reports the survivability design elements for the HROV including basic vehicle design of integrated navigation and integrated communication, emergency recovery strategy, distributed architecture, redundant bus, dual battery package, emergency jettison system and self-repairing control system.

  17. Mast cell gastritis: Children complaining of chronic abdominal pain with histologically normal gastric mucosal biopsies except for increase in mast cells, proposing a new entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pourpak Zahra

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mast cells reside within the connective tissue of a variety of tissues and all vascularized organs. Since 1996, few studies have been performed on mast cell density in gastrointestinal biopsies, mainly in adult age group. We recently studied mast cell density in pediatric age group on rather larger number of cases in a referral children hospital. Mast cell density was 12.6 ± 0.87 in 0.25 mm2 (range: 0-81 in our study. Since we frequently encounter cases with rather normal gastric biopsies with no H.pylori, which mainly complain of chronic abdominal pain, we gathered those cases with mast cell density more than 30/0.25 mm2. from 895 gastric biopsies and wanted to study their clinical and endoscopic findings and propose a new entity. Methods Between April 2005 and May 2008, 895 children (2, were chosen and a questionnaire was filled for each patient including clinical, endoscopic and pathologic findings. The statistical analysis was performed using SPSS, version 13 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA. Results Over a 3 year period of study, of 895 selected children, 86 patients fulfilled the entrance criteria. The major complaint of patients was recurrent abdominal pain. The mean mast cell density was 45.59 ± 13.81 in 0.25 mm2 (range: 30-93. Among our cases, about 67.4% (n = 58 had 30 to 49, 23.3% (n = 20 had 50 to 69, 8.1% (n = 7 had 70 to 89 and 1.2% (n = 1 had 93 mast cells/0.25 mm2 in their specimens Discussion In 29% of our cases, neither endoscopic nor pathologic change was detected and only increase in mast cell number was reported and in others endoscopic and histopathological findings were negligible except increase in mast cells. In updated Sydney system (classification and grading of gastritis, no term is introduced which is in concordance with this group but we think that increased density of mast cells in these cases should not be overlooked and it may contribute to clinical manifestations in some way. We hope that

  18. CADM1 is a key receptor mediating human mast cell adhesion to human lung fibroblasts and airway smooth muscle cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena P Moiseeva

    Full Text Available Mast cells (MCs play a central role in the development of many diseases including asthma and pulmonary fibrosis. Interactions of human lung mast cells (HLMCs with human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMCs are partially dependent on adhesion mediated by cell adhesion molecule-1 (CADM1, but the adhesion mechanism through which HLMCs interact with human lung fibroblasts (HLFs is not known. CADM1 is expressed as several isoforms (SP4, SP1, SP6 in HLMCs, with SP4 dominant. These isoforms differentially regulate HLMC homotypic adhesion and survival.In this study we have investigated the role of CADM1 isoforms in the adhesion of HLMCs and HMC-1 cells to primary HASMCs and HLFs.CADM1 overexpression or downregulation was achieved using adenoviral delivery of CADM1 short hairpin RNAs or isoform-specific cDNAs respectively.Downregulation of CADM1 attenuated both HLMC and HMC-1 adhesion to both primary HASMCs and HLFs. Overexpression of either SP1 or SP4 isoforms did not alter MC adhesion to HASMCs, whereas overexpression of SP4, but not SP1, significantly increased both HMC-1 cell and HLMC adhesion to HLFs. The expression level of CADM1 SP4 strongly predicted the extent of MC adhesion; linear regression indicated that CADM1 accounts for up to 67% and 32% of adhesion to HLFs for HMC-1 cells and HLMCs, respectively. HLFs supported HLMC proliferation and survival through a CADM1-dependent mechanism. With respect to CADM1 counter-receptor expression, HLFs expressed both CADM1 and nectin-3, whereas HASMCs expressed only nectin-3.Collectively these data indicate that the CADM1 SP4 isoform is a key receptor mediating human MC adhesion to HASMCs and HLFs. The differential expression of CADM1 counter-receptors on HLFs compared to HASMCs may allow the specific targeting of either HLMC-HLF or HLMC-HASMC interactions in the lung parenchyma and airways.

  19. CADM1 Is a Key Receptor Mediating Human Mast Cell Adhesion to Human Lung Fibroblasts and Airway Smooth Muscle Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moiseeva, Elena P.; Roach, Katy M.; Leyland, Mark L.; Bradding, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Background Mast cells (MCs) play a central role in the development of many diseases including asthma and pulmonary fibrosis. Interactions of human lung mast cells (HLMCs) with human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) are partially dependent on adhesion mediated by cell adhesion molecule-1 (CADM1), but the adhesion mechanism through which HLMCs interact with human lung fibroblasts (HLFs) is not known. CADM1 is expressed as several isoforms (SP4, SP1, SP6) in HLMCs, with SP4 dominant. These isoforms differentially regulate HLMC homotypic adhesion and survival. Objective In this study we have investigated the role of CADM1 isoforms in the adhesion of HLMCs and HMC-1 cells to primary HASMCs and HLFs. Methods CADM1 overexpression or downregulation was achieved using adenoviral delivery of CADM1 short hairpin RNAs or isoform-specific cDNAs respectively. Results Downregulation of CADM1 attenuated both HLMC and HMC-1 adhesion to both primary HASMCs and HLFs. Overexpression of either SP1 or SP4 isoforms did not alter MC adhesion to HASMCs, whereas overexpression of SP4, but not SP1, significantly increased both HMC-1 cell and HLMC adhesion to HLFs. The expression level of CADM1 SP4 strongly predicted the extent of MC adhesion; linear regression indicated that CADM1 accounts for up to 67% and 32% of adhesion to HLFs for HMC-1 cells and HLMCs, respectively. HLFs supported HLMC proliferation and survival through a CADM1-dependent mechanism. With respect to CADM1 counter-receptor expression, HLFs expressed both CADM1 and nectin-3, whereas HASMCs expressed only nectin-3. Conclusion and Clinical Relevance Collectively these data indicate that the CADM1 SP4 isoform is a key receptor mediating human MC adhesion to HASMCs and HLFs. The differential expression of CADM1 counter-receptors on HLFs compared to HASMCs may allow the specific targeting of either HLMC-HLF or HLMC-HASMC interactions in the lung parenchyma and airways. PMID:23620770

  20. Human Rab small GTPase- and class V myosin-mediated membrane tethering in a chemically defined reconstitution system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoshita, Motoki; Mima, Joji

    2017-11-10

    Membrane tethering is a fundamental process essential for the compartmental specificity of intracellular membrane trafficking in eukaryotic cells. Rab-family small GTPases and specific sets of Rab-interacting effector proteins, including coiled-coil tethering proteins and multisubunit tethering complexes, are reported to be responsible for membrane tethering. However, whether and how these key components directly and specifically tether subcellular membranes remains enigmatic. Using chemically defined proteoliposomal systems reconstituted with purified human Rab proteins and synthetic liposomal membranes to study the molecular basis of membrane tethering, we established here that Rab-family GTPases have a highly conserved function to directly mediate membrane tethering, even in the absence of any types of Rab effectors such as the so-called tethering proteins. Moreover, we demonstrate that membrane tethering mediated by endosomal Rab11a is drastically and selectively stimulated by its cognate Rab effectors, class V myosins (Myo5A and Myo5B), in a GTP-dependent manner. Of note, Myo5A and Myo5B exclusively recognized and cooperated with the membrane-anchored form of their cognate Rab11a to support membrane tethering mediated by trans-Rab assemblies on opposing membranes. Our findings support the novel concept that Rab-family proteins provide a bona fide membrane tether to physically and specifically link two distinct lipid bilayers of subcellular membranes. They further indicate that Rab-interacting effector proteins, including class V myosins, can regulate these Rab-mediated membrane-tethering reactions. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Pan-neurotrophin receptor p75NTR expression is strongly induced in lesional atopic mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, T C; Lauenstein, H-D; Serowka, F; Pilzner, C; Groneberg, D A; Welker, P

    2008-07-01

    Neurotrophins such as nerve growth factor or brain-derived neurotrophic factor influence neuronal proliferation and differentiation via the low-affinity pan-neurotrophin receptor p75NTR that may play a pivotal role in linking the immune with the nervous system. Because the precise regulation of p75NTR gene transcription in mast cells under states of allergic inflammation has not been investigated in detail so far, the present studies assessed the gene regulation and expression of this receptor. Transcriptional expression of p75NTR in human skin was studied in isolated cutaneous cells by means of RT-PCR. In situ lesional mast cell p75NTR expression was analysed by immunohistochemistry. The p75NTR mRNA expression was found in isolated human skin mast cells and keratinocytes. Lower mRNA levels were present in fibroblasts and melanocytes but no transcripts were found in endothelial cells. The p75NTR protein expression was found in situ in lesional and non-lesional mast cells. A significantly increased expression of p75NTR protein was found in atopic dermatitis lesional mast cells when compared with control mast cell expression (Pneurotrophin receptor sensitivity of mast cells under states of allergic inflammation. Topically administered neurotrophin receptor-modulating compounds may act as anti-inflammatory mediators in cutaneous allergic inflammation.

  2. Cardiac mast cells regulate myocyte ANP release via histamine H2 receptor in beating rabbit atria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Wen, Jin Fu; Jin, Jing Yu; Quan, He Xiu; Cho, Kyung Woo

    2009-06-05

    It has been shown that histamine inhibits atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) release. Because cardiac mast cells are the principal source of histamine in the heart, we hypothesized that cardiac mast cells are involved in the regulation of atrial ANP release. To test the hypothesis, experiments were performed in perfused beating rabbit atria allowing atrial pacing and measurements of changes in atrial stroke volume, intraatrial pulse pressure and myocyte ANP release. Mast cell degranulation with Compound 48/80 decreased atrial myocyte ANP release, and the response was blocked by a selective histamine H(2) receptor blocker, cimetidine, indicating that histamine was responsible for the decrease in ANP release. Mast cell stabilization with cromolyn blocked the Compound 48/80-induced decrease in ANP release. These data suggest that mast cell-derived histamine is involved in the regulation of cardiac ANP release. Thus, the cardiac mast cell-cardiomyocyte communication via the histamine-ANP pathway may implicate in the cardiac disorder associated with mast cell degranulation such as in acute coronary syndrome or cardiac hypertrophy.

  3. A comparative survey of the mast cells of the mammalian brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiernan, J A

    1976-01-01

    A search for mast cells has been made in the brains of 18 mammalian species in 13 families in the orders Insectivora, Primates, Rodentia and Carnivora. In the larger animals, only the diencephalon and olfactory bulbs were examined. Mast cells were identified by virtue of their heparin-containing granules, which are stained by Alcian blue 8GX and, metachromatically, by toluidine blue 0. Within the cerebral parenchyma, mast cells were confined to the dorsal diencephalon of Erinaceus europaeus (hedgehog), Tupaia glis (tree-shrew) and Nycticebus coucang (slow loris). Some cells were next to capillaries; others were not. Mast cells were sometimes found, though rarely, in the intracerebral perivascular connective tissue leptomeninges and choroid plexuses of some of the other species examined. It is concluded that pericapillary cells (pericytes), which have been called mast cells by some investigators, are not in fact mast cells since there is no evidence for the presence of heparin. The functions of mast cells in the brain are unknown. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:819404

  4. [A comparative study of MAST and CAP RAST with 90 patients with bronchial asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mita, S; Oda, N; Adachi, M

    1995-12-01

    We measured serum IgE antibodies by the MAST and the CAP RAST in 90 patients refered to our asthma clinic and compared their results. Furthermore the patients with CAP positive/MAST negative were investigated by bronchial provocation test with allergen, skin test and CAP RAST inhibition test. Significant correlations were obtained between the results of the MAST and those of the CAP RAST for house dust 2 (r = 0.617), for Dermatophagoides farinae (r = 0.776) and for Japanese cedar (r = 0.609), but not for all 3 mold allergens. CAP positive/MAST negative results were found in 1.4-27.8% and MAST positive/CAP negative results were found in 0-2.7%. The presences of specific IgE antibodies were confirmed by a positive bronchial provocation test with allergen, skin test and CAP RAST inhibition test in CAP positive/MAST negative results. Those results indicate that the CAP RAST is more sensitive than the MAST.

  5. Hydrogen inhalation ameliorated mast cell mediated brain injury after ICH in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manaenko, Anatol; Lekic, Tim; Ma, Qingyi; Zhang, John H.; Tang, Jiping

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Hydrogen inhalation was neuroprotective in several brain injury models. Its mechanisms are believed to be related to anti-oxidative stress. We investigated the potential neurovascular protective effect of hydrogen inhalation especially effect on mast cell activation in a mouse model of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). DESIGN Controlled in vivo laboratory study. SETTING Animal research laboratory SUBJECTS 171, 8 weeks old male CD-1 mice were used. INTERVENTIONS Collagenase-induced ICH model in 8 weeks old, male, CD-1 mice was used. Hydrogen was administrated via spontaneous inhalation. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability and neurological deficits were investigated at 24 and 72 hours after ICH. Mast cell activation was evaluated by Western blot and immuno-staining. The effects of hydrogen inhalation on mast cell activation were confirmed in an autologous blood injection model ICH. MEASURMENT AND MAIN RESULTS At 24 and 72 hours post-ICH, animals showed BBB disruption, brain edema, neurological deficits, accompanied with phosphorylation of Lyn kinase and release of tryptase, indicating mast cell activation. Hydrogen treatment diminished phosphorylation of Lyn kinase and release of tryptase, decreased accumulation and degranulation of mast cells, attenuated BBB disruption and improved neurobehavioral function. CONCLUSION Activation of mast cells following ICH contributed to increase of BBB permeability and brain edema. Hydrogen inhalation preserved BBB disruption by prevention of mast cell activation after ICH. PMID:23388512

  6. Mast Cell Subsets and Their Functional Modulation by the Acanthocheilonema viteae Product ES-62

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimity H. Ball

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available ES-62, an immunomodulator secreted by filarial nematodes, exhibits therapeutic potential in mouse models of allergic inflammation, at least in part by inducing the desensitisation of FcεRI-mediated mast cell responses. However, in addition to their pathogenic roles in allergic and autoimmune diseases, mast cells are important in fighting infection, wound healing, and resolving inflammation, reflecting that mast cells exhibit a phenotypic and functional plasticity. We have therefore characterised the differential functional responses to antigen (via FcεRI and LPS and their modulation by ES-62 of the mature peritoneal-derived mast cells (PDMC; serosal and those of the connective tissue-like mast cells (CTMC and the mucosal-like mast cells derived from bone marrow progenitors (BMMC as a first step to produce disease tissue-targeted therapeutics based on ES-62 action. All three mast cell populations were rendered hyporesponsive by ES-62 and whilst the mechanisms underlying such desensitisation have not been fully delineated, they reflect a downregulation of calcium and PKCα signalling. ES-62 also downregulated MyD88 and PKCδ in mucosal-type BMMC but not PDMC, the additional signals targeted in mucosal-type BMMC likely reflecting that these cells respond to antigen and LPS by degranulation and cytokine secretion whereas PDMC predominantly respond in a degranulation-based manner.

  7. Myocardial remodeling in diabetic cardiomyopathy associated with cardiac mast cell activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Gang Huang

    Full Text Available Diabetic cardiomyopathy is a specific disease process distinct from coronary artery disease and hypertension. The disease features cardiac remodeling stimulated by hyperglycemia of the left ventricle wall and disrupts contractile functions. Cardiac mast cells may be activated by metabolic byproducts resulted from hyperglycermia and then participate in the remodeling process by releasing a multitude of cytokines and bioactive enzymes. Nedocromil, a pharmacologic stabilizer of mast cells, has been shown to normalize cytokine levels and attenuate cardiac remodeling. In this study, we describe the activation of cardiac mast cells by inducing diabetes in normal mice using streptozotocin (STZ. Next, we treated the diabetic mice with nedocromil for 12 weeks and then examined their hearts for signs of cardiac remodeling and quantified contractile function. We observed significantly impaired heart function in diabetic mice, as well as increased cardiac mast cell density and elevated mast cell secretions that correlated with gene expression and aberrant cytokine levels associated with cardiac remodeling. Nedocromil treatment halted contractile dysfunction in diabetic mice and reduced cardiac mast cell density, which correlated with reduced bioactive enzyme secretions, reduced expression of extracellular matrix remodeling factors and collagen synthesis, and normalized cytokine levels. However, the results showed nedocromil treatments did not return diabetic mice to a normal state. We concluded that manipulation of cardiac mast cell function is sufficient to attenuate cardiomyopathy stimulated by diabetes, but other cellular pathways also contribute to the disease process.

  8. Grass pollen immunotherapy decreases the number of mast cells in the skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, S R; Varney, V A; Gaga, M; Jacobson, M R; Varga, E M; Frew, A J; Kay, A B

    1999-11-01

    Allergen injection immunotherapy is effective for summer hay fever and reduces cutaneous sensitivity to grass pollen. We have addressed whether this effect of immunotherapy may be due to a decrease in mast cell numbers in the skin. Total mast cells and mast cell subtypes in the dermis were measured by dual immunocytochemistry in 40 adult patients who had received either 'active' grass pollen immunotherapy or placebo injections for 9 months in a double-blind clinical trial. Clinical improvement in hay fever was accompanied by a greater than 10-fold reduction in the immediate cutaneous response to grass pollen (P = 0. 0002) and a sevenfold decrease in mast cell numbers in the skin (P = 0.0001). The number of mast cells after immunotherapy correlated with the clinical response in terms of seasonal symptoms (r = 0.61, P = 0.001) and rescue medication use (r = 0.75, P = 0.0001). Specific double immunostaining showed that the majority of mast cells (greater than 60%) were tryptase/chymase-positive (MCTC) and the remainder tryptase-only (MCT) cells. Following immunotherapy both subtypes were equally reduced. One mechanism by which immunotherapy may act is to reduce mast cell numbers with a consequent reduction in immediate allergic sensitivity.

  9. Mucosal Mast Cells Response in the Jejunum of Ascaridia galli-Infected Laying Hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darmawi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal defense mechanism against helminthes parasitic nematode to be associated with mucosal mast cells reaction. The aim of this research was to examine the effect of infection by Ascaridia galli parasite to trigger mucosal defense based on mucosal mast cells response in laying hens. Amount of ten head laying hens 12-wk old were divided into two groups containing five chickens of each. The first group, chickens were left as un-infected controls. The second group, chickens were infected orally with 1,000 embryonated eggs of A. galli. Mucosal mast cell responses were assayed by in situ jejunal mast cell counts in stained serial histological sections with Alcian blue (pH 0.3 and Safranin-O (pH 0.1 of the jejunum. Mucosal mast cells response were observed and counted on days 14 post infection. The result showed that A. galli infection was able to increase significantly (P<0.05 mast cells response. This research concluded that the A. galli infection can trigger the involment of mucosal mast cells response in jejunal defense of laying hens against parasitic diseases caused by A. galli.

  10. Developmental changes of mast cell populations in the cerebral meninges of the rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaloudi, Helen; Batzios, Christos; Chiotelli, Maria; Papadopoulos, Georgios C

    2007-01-01

    It is known that both the dura and the pia mater attract and support the differentiation of mast cells. The present study shows that unevenly distributed mast cells in the cerebral meninges of the rat can be found in perivascular sites and vessel ramification points, but can also be unrelated to the meningeal vasculature. It also documents changes in the number, localization and staining preferences of the mast cells in the two meninges of the developing and mature rat brain. Quantitative examination of all types of histochemically differentiated meningeal mast cells reveals no major (although some exist) differences between right and left side subpopulations, but strongly suggests a different origin and fate of the dural and the pial mast cells. The number of dural mast cells, already high from postnatal day 0, although declining from postnatal day 21 onwards, remains conspicuous up to postnatal day 180. In contrast, pial mast cells are comparatively very few in the first day of the postnatal life, and despite a transient significant increase in the following two weeks, they reach almost zero levels from postnatal day 21. PMID:17822416

  11. [Identification of a novel human MAST4 gene, a new member of the microtubule associated serine-threonine kinase family].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, L; Gu, S; Li, X; Sun, Y; Zheng, D; Yu, K; Ji, C; Tang, R; Xie, Y; Mao, Y

    2006-01-01

    Human protein kinases make up a large superfamily of homologous proteins, which are related by virtue of their kinase domains (also known as catalytic domains). Here we report the cloning and characterization of a novel human MAST4 (microtubule associated serine/threonine kinase family member 4) gene, which locates on human chromosome 5q13. The MAST4 cDNA is 7587 base pairs in length and encodes a putative protein of 2435 amino acids which contains a serine/threonine kinase domain and a PDZ domain. MAST4 protein has 64%, 63%, 59% and 39% identical aminoacid residues with MAST1, MAST2, MAST3 and MASTL respectively. RT-PCR analysis revealed relatively high expression level of MAST4 in most normal human tissues, with an exception of in testis, small intestine, colon and peripheral blood leukocyte.

  12. Codeine induces human mast cell chemokine and cytokine production: involvement of G-protein activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheen, C. H.; Schleimer, R. P.; Kulka, M.

    2007-01-01

    Background Activation of mast cells and the systemic release of histamine are common side effects of opiates such as codeine and morphine. In some individuals, codeine not only elicits a sizable early response due to mast cell degranulation, but can also lead to late cutaneous allergic inflammation possibly through the production of chemokines. However, individuals who exhibit a late phase reaction to codeine often do not react to its synthetic analog, meperidine. The goal of this study was to test whether codeine and meperidine induce secretion of inflammatory mediators in human mast cells. Methods To characterize opiate activation of human mast cells, we stimulated cultured human (LAD2 cell line and CD34+-derived) mast cells with codeine and meperidine and measured degranulation and chemokine production. Results Codeine, but not meperidine, activated human mast cell degranulation within 30 min in a dose-dependent manner. Degranulation was blocked by the phosphoinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, wortmannin, and pertussis toxin but not by Ro-31-8220, a PKC inhibitor or forskolin, a cyclic adenylyl cyclase activator. After 3 and 8 h of stimulation, codeine, but not meperidine, activated human mast cells to release monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (CCL2), regulated on activation, normal T expressed and secreted (RANTES, CCL5) and interleukin-8 (CXCL 8) but not inducible protein-10 (CXCL10). Conclusions Codeine activates human mast cell degranulation and chemokine production by activating protein kinase A and PI3 kinase, possibly leading to NF-κB activation. Therefore, opiates may regulate late phase allergic inflammation by activating chemokine production by human mast cells. PMID:17441793

  13. Histamine from brain resident MAST cells promotes wakefulness and modulates behavioral states.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachiko Chikahisa

    Full Text Available Mast cell activation and degranulation can result in the release of various chemical mediators, such as histamine and cytokines, which significantly affect sleep. Mast cells also exist in the central nervous system (CNS. Since up to 50% of histamine contents in the brain are from brain mast cells, mediators from brain mast cells may significantly influence sleep and other behaviors. In this study, we examined potential involvement of brain mast cells in sleep/wake regulations, focusing especially on the histaminergic system, using mast cell deficient (W/W(v mice. No significant difference was found in the basal amount of sleep/wake between W/W(v mice and their wild-type littermates (WT, although W/W(v mice showed increased EEG delta power and attenuated rebound response after sleep deprivation. Intracerebroventricular injection of compound 48/80, a histamine releaser from mast cells, significantly increased histamine levels in the ventricular region and enhanced wakefulness in WT mice, while it had no effect in W/W(v mice. Injection of H1 antagonists (triprolidine and mepyramine significantly increased the amounts of slow-wave sleep in WT mice, but not in W/W(v mice. Most strikingly, the food-seeking behavior observed in WT mice during food deprivation was completely abolished in W/W(v mice. W/W(v mice also exhibited higher anxiety and depression levels compared to WT mice. Our findings suggest that histamine released from brain mast cells is wake-promoting, and emphasizes the physiological and pharmacological importance of brain mast cells in the regulation of sleep and fundamental neurobehavior.

  14. The mast cell-B cell axis in lung vascular remodeling and pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitling, Siegfried; Hui, Zhang; Zabini, Diana; Hu, Yijie; Hoffmann, Julia; Goldenberg, Neil M; Tabuchi, Arata; Buelow, Roland; Dos Santos, Claudia; Kuebler, Wolfgang M

    2017-05-01

    Over past years, a critical role for the immune system and, in particular, for mast cells in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension (PH) has emerged. However, the way in which mast cells promote PH is still poorly understood. Here, we investigated the mechanisms by which mast cells may contribute to PH, specifically focusing on the interaction between the innate and adaptive immune response and the role of B cells and autoimmunity. Experiments were performed in Sprague-Dawley rats and B cell-deficient JH-KO rats in the monocrotaline, Sugen/hypoxia, and the aortic banding model of PH. Hemodynamics, cell infiltration, IL-6 expression, and vascular remodeling were analyzed. Gene array analyses revealed constituents of immunoglobulins as most prominently regulated mast cell-dependent genes in the lung in experimental PH. IL-6 was shown to link mast cells to B cells, as 1 ) IL-6 was upregulated and colocalized with mast cells and was reduced by mast-cell stabilizers and 2 ) IL-6 or mast cell blockade reduced B cells in lungs of monocrotaline-treated rats. A functional role for B cells in PH was demonstrated in that either blocking B cells by an anti-CD20 antibody or B-cell deficiency in JH-KO rats attenuated right ventricular systolic pressure and vascular remodeling in experimental PH. We here identify a mast cell-B cell axis driven by IL-6 as a critical immune pathway in the pathophysiology of PH. Our results provide novel insights into the role of the immune system in PH, which may be therapeutically exploited by targeted immunotherapy. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Relationship between numerous mast cells and early follicular development in neonatal MRL/MpJ mouse ovaries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teppei Nakamura

    Full Text Available In the neonatal mouse ovary, clusters of oocytes called nests break into smaller cysts and subsequently form individual follicles. During this period, we found numerous mast cells in the ovary of MRL/MpJ mice and investigated their appearance and morphology with follicular development. The ovarian mast cells, which were already present at postnatal day 0, tended to localize adjacent to the surface epithelium. Among 11 different mouse strains, MRL/MpJ mice possessed the greatest number of ovarian mast cells. Ovarian mast cells were also found in DBA/1, BALB/c, NZW, and DBA/2 mice but rarely in C57BL/6, NZB, AKR, C3H/He, CBA, and ICR mice. The ovarian mast cells expressed connective tissue mast cell markers, although mast cells around the surface epithelium also expressed a mucosal mast cell marker in MRL/MpJ mice. Some ovarian mast cells migrated into the oocyte nests and directly contacted the compressed and degenerated oocytes. In MRL/MpJ mice, the number of oocytes in the nest was significantly lower than in the other strains, and the number of oocytes showed a positive correlation with the number of ovarian mast cells. The gene expression of a mast cell marker also correlated with the expression of an oocyte nest marker, suggesting a link between the appearance of ovarian ? 4mast cells and early follicular development. Furthermore, the expression of follicle developmental markers was significantly higher in MRL/MpJ mice than in C57BL/6 mice. These results indicate that the appearance of ovarian mast cells is a unique phenotype of neonatal MRL/MpJ mice, and that ovarian mast cells participate in early follicular development, especially nest breakdown.

  16. Increased Releasability of Skin Mast Cells after Exercise in Patients with Exercise-induced Asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Inseon S Choi; Koh, Youngil I.; Chung, Se-Woong; Lim, Ho

    2004-01-01

    The role of lung mast cells in exercise-induced asthma (EIA) is controversial. To investigate whether the skin mast cell releasability is increased after exercise in EIA, 49 young atopic men with or without asthma took part in a free-running test for 6 min and were given skin prick tests using morphine, a mast cell secretagogue, before and after the exercise. The mean diameters of the wheal induced by morphine in patients with EIA were not significantly different from those in patients withou...

  17. Scaling Issues in the Determination of Wind loads on Lattice Masts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koss, Holger; Srouji, Robin G.

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents a study conducted to investigate the influence of geometric scale and flow condition on the wind load coefficients for lattice masts structures. An initial study in 2008 on a full size mast section indicated a possible contingency, which could be used to add equipment on teleco...... reflecting model scale behavior than full scale aerodynamics. This reveals the main challenge if for reasons of economic production and operation of telecommunication towers and masts a more accurate wind load description is required: full size testing....

  18. Histamine release from gut mast cells from patients with inflammatory bowel diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nolte, Hendrik; Spjeldnæs, Nikolaj; Kruse, Aksel

    1990-01-01

    of macroscopically inflamed and normal tissue. Mast cells and corresponding basophils were challenged with anti-IgE, anti-IgG, subclass anti-IgG4, and formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP) and results were compared with those from nine patient control subjects. The mast cell count in patients with ulcerative...... colitis was increased compared with that in control subjects and patients with Crohn's disease, and the mast cell count obtained from inflamed tissue was greater than that of normal tissue. The study also shows the heterogeneity of the responsiveness of the histamine releasing cells to various...

  19. ELM mitigation via rotating resonant magnetic perturbations on MAST

    CERN Document Server

    Thornton, A J; Cahyna, P; Chapman, I T; Fishpool, G; Harrison, J R; Liu, Y Q; Kripner, L; Peterka, M

    2014-01-01

    The application of resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) produces splitting of the divertor strike point due to the interaction of the RMP field and the plasma field. The application of a rotating RMP field causes the strike point splitting to rotate, distributing the particle and heat flux evenly over the divertor. The RMP coils in MAST have been used to generate a rotating perturbation with a toroidal mode number n=3. The ELM frequency is doubled with the application of the RMP rotating field, whilst maintaining the H mode. During mitigation, the ELM peak heat flux is seen to be reduced by 50% for a halving in the ELM energy and motion of the strike point, consistent with the rotation of the applied RMP field, is seen using high spatial resolution (1.5mm at the target) heat flux profiles measured using infrared (IR) thermography.

  20. Martian Arctic Dust Devil and Phoenix Meteorology Mast

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The Surface Stereo Imager on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander caught this dust devil in action west-southwest of the lander at 11:16 a.m. local Mars time on Sol 104, or the 104th Martian day of the mission, Sept. 9, 2008. Dust devils have not been detected in any Phoenix images from earlier in the mission, but at least six were observed in a dozen images taken on Sol 104. Dust devils are whirlwinds that often occur when the Sun heats the surface of Mars, or some areas on Earth. The warmed surface heats the layer of atmosphere closest to it, and the warm air rises in a whirling motion, stirring dust up from the surface like a miniature tornado. The vertical post near the left edge of this image is the mast of the Meteorological Station on Phoenix. The dust devil visible at the horizon just to the right of the mast is estimated to be 600 to 700 meters (about 2,000 to 2,300 feet) from Phoenix, and 4 to 5 meters (10 to 13 feet) in diameter. It is much smaller than dust devils that have been observed by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit much closer to the equator. It is closer in size to dust devils seen from orbit in the Phoenix landing region, though still smaller than those. The image has been enhanced to make the dust devil easier to see. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  1. Uptake and distribution of fullerenes in human mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellinger, Anthony; Zhou, Zhiguo; Norton, Sarah K; Lenk, Robert; Conrad, Daniel; Kepley, Christopher L

    2010-08-01

    Fullerenes are carbon cages of variable size that can be derivatized with various side chain moieties resulting in compounds that are being developed into nanomedicines. Although fullerene use in several preclinical in vitro and in vivo models of disease has demonstrated their potential as diagnostic and therapeutic agents, little is known about how they enter cells, what organelles they target, and the time course for their cellular deposition. Fullerenes (C(70)) that have already been shown to be potent inhibitors of mast cell (MC)-mediated allergic inflammation were conjugated with Texas red (TR) and used in conjunction with confocal microscopy to determine mechanisms of uptake, the organelle localization, and the duration they can be detected in situ. We show that C(70)-TR are nonspecifically endocytosed into MCs, where they are shuttled throughout the cytoplasm, lysosomes, mitochondria, and into endoplasmic reticulum at different times. No nuclear or secretory granule localization was observed. The C(70)-TR remained detectable within cells at 1 week. These studies show that MCs endocytose fullerenes, where they are shuttled to organelles involved with calcium and reactive oxygen species production, which may explain their efficacy as cellular inhibitors. From the clinical editor: Fullerenes are carbon cages of variable size that have already been shown to be potent inhibitors of mast cell (MC)-mediated allergic inflammation. These were conjugated with Texas red (TR) and used in conjunction with confocal microscopy to determine mechanisms of uptake, the organelle localization, and duration, demonstrating that MCs endocytose fullerenes, which are shuttled to organelles involved with calcium and reactive oxygen species production. This intracellular trafficking may explain the efficacy of fullerenes as cellular inhibitors. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Differential effects of protoporphyrin and uroporphyrin on murine mast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, H.W.; Gigli, I.; Wasserman, S.I.

    1987-03-01

    To investigate the mechanisms responsible for the distinct cutaneous manifestations of erythropoietic protoporphyria and porphyria cutanea tarda, the effects of protoporphyrin (PP) and uroporphyrin (URO), the predominant porphyrins in the respective disease, on mast cells were examined. Release of preformed and generated mediators was assessed by the release of radioactivity from cells labeled with (/sup 3/H)serotonin and (/sup 14/C)arachidonic acid, respectively. Clinically relevant doses of PP (25-500 ng/ml) and 396-407 nm irradiation (3-16 X 10(2)J/m2) induced maximal net release of preformed mediators ,f 44.52 +/- 6.6 to 58.01 +/- 4.0% (mean +/- SE). In contrast, irradiation in the presence of URO (50-5000 ng/ml) resulted in less than 5% net release. (3H)Serotonin release induced by PP and irradiation was calcium-independent, and was not enhanced by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, a known activator of protein kinase C. This release was suppressed by catalase, a scavenger of hydrogen peroxide. Furthermore, irradiation in the presence of PP, but not in the presence of URO, resulted in perturbation of cell membrane. Irradiation in the presence of PP also resulted in a maximal net release of generated mediators of 9.98 +/- 3.5% (mean +/- SE), whereas similar treatment in the presence of URO induced less than 0.5% net release. These results suggested that the burning, stinging, erythema, and edema experienced by patients with erythropoietic protoporphyria following sun exposure, and the lack of such findings in patients with porphyria cutanea tarda, may be explained, at least in part, by the differential effects of PP and URO on mast cells.

  3. Mast cell - Melanocyte axis mediates pathogenesis in Oral Lichen Planus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komali Rajkumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral Lichen Planus (OLP is a cell-mediated inflammatory condition of the oral cavity with propensity for malignant transformation. Often classified as an autoimmune disorder, the pathogenesis of the lesion is still under debate. The presence of mast cells (MCs and melanocytes (MNs has been identified as an integral part of the cellular reaction in all stages of the disorder. Aims: The present study aims to qualify, localize and quantify MCs and MNs in OLP and normal oral mucosa (NOM using special stains and image analysis software. Computations and correlations between the numbers and localization of the cells in different layers of the tissue were done.Materials and Methods: Thirty cases of OLP and 10 cases of NOM were included. MCs were identified by their metachromasia using Toluidine blue and the MNs by Masson′s Fontana stain. A localization and quantification of the numbers of the two cell groups was done by image analysis and statistically correlated by two sample t-test. Results: The total count of mast cells and melanocytes was more in OLP in comparison to that of NOM. The MCs were present in the deeper tissues in contrast to MNs which were localized only to the basal and sub-basal areas. MNs appeared to proliferate and migrate to the subepithelial areas in OLPs in contrast to their strong localization to the basal layer in NOM. The ratio of MCs/MNs was higher in OLP compared with NOM. Interestingly the toluidine blue stain showed cross-sensitivity in expression of both MCs and MNs in OLP. Conclusion: MCs and MNs are expressed in increased numbers in OLP and probably have a synergistic mode of action in the pathogenesis of the disorder. The spilling out of MNs in OLP to the sub-basal areas is consistent with the clinical observation of pigmentation in healed/under remission OLP cases.

  4. LAT is essential for the mast cell stabilising effect of tHGA in IgE-mediated mast cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Ji Wei; Israf, Daud Ahmad; Md Hashim, Nur Fariesha; Cheah, Yoke Kqueen; Harith, Hanis Hazeera; Shaari, Khozirah; Tham, Chau Ling

    2017-11-15

    Mast cells play a central role in the pathogenesis of allergic reaction. Activation of mast cells by antigens is strictly dependent on the influx of extracellular calcium that involves a complex interaction between signalling molecules located within the cells. We have previously reported that tHGA, an active compound originally isolated from a local shrub known as Melicope ptelefolia, prevented IgE-mediated mast cell activation and passive systemic anaphylaxis by suppressing the release of interleukin-4 (IL-4) and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α from activated rat basophilic leukaemia (RBL)-2H3 cells. However, the mechanism of action (MOA) as well as the molecular target underlying the mast cell stabilising effect of tHGA has not been previously investigated. In this study, DNP-IgE-sensitised RBL-2H3 cells were pre-treated with tHGA before challenged with DNP-BSA. To dissect the MOA of tHGA in IgE-mediated mast cell activation, the effect of tHGA on the transcription of IL-4 and TNF-α mRNA was determined using Real Time-Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR) followed by Calcium Influx Assay to confirm the involvement of calcium in the activation of mast cells. The protein lysates were analysed by using Western Blot to determine the effect of tHGA on various important signalling molecules in the LAT-PLCγ-MAPK and PI3K-NFκB pathways. In order to identify the molecular target of tHGA in IgE-mediated mast cell activation, the LAT and LAT2 genes in RBL-2H3 cells were knocked-down by using RNA interference to establish a LAT/LAT2 competition model. The results showed that tHGA inhibited the transcription of IL-4 and TNF-α as a result of the suppression of calcium influx in activated RBL-2H3 cells. The results from Western Blot revealed that tHGA primarily inhibited the LAT-PLCγ-MAPK pathway with partial inhibition on the PI3K-p65 pathway without affecting Syk. The results from RNAi further demonstrated that tHGA failed to inhibit the release of mediators associated with

  5. Thrust Control During Towing of Space Debris using an Elastic Tether

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Ledkov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers a maneuver for deorbiting the large space debris using an active spacecraft connected with the debris by an elastic tether. Tether slacking during the maneuver can lead to the tether rupture, kinking, and winding on the descending object. Therefore it is important to prevent slacking. The objective of this work is to find the law of thrust force control of the active spacecraft to ensure a continuously strained tether during the maneuver.Using Lagrange formalism a mathematical model to describe the system plane motion is developed. This model considers the active spacecraft as a mass point, the space debris as a rigid body, and the tether as a weightless elastic rod. A thrust force is directed along the local horizon of the spacecraft. Linearization of nonlinear differential equation describing longitudinal oscillations of the tether length is performed. Its phase portrait is analyzed. An approximate expression describing the position of the center on the phase portrait is obtained. A time-optimal control with full feedback to ensure that the tether is in the strained state is found by solving the Bellman equation. To use the obtained optimal law it is necessary to set the measuring equipment on the spacecraft, which is capable of accurate measuring a distance to the space debris and its relative velocity. An alternative control law, which is simpler in terms of the practical implementation, is proposed. As an example, the descent from an orbit of nonfunctioning Soviet satellite Meteor-2 is considered. It is shown that both proposed laws provide continuous strain of the tether during deorbiting of the satellite. Moreover, slack does not occur even at the first period of oscillation of the tether length. It is shown that the use of the proposed control laws leads to slight increase of deorbiting time as compared to the case of using the constant thrust.The results can be used to develop the control systems of small spacecrafts

  6. The shear flow processing of controlled DNA tethering and stretching for organic molecular electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guihua; Kushwaha, Amit; Lee, Jungkyu K; Shaqfeh, Eric S G; Bao, Zhenan

    2011-01-25

    DNA has been recently explored as a powerful tool for developing molecular scaffolds for making reproducible and reliable metal contacts to single organic semiconducting molecules. A critical step in the process of exploiting DNA-organic molecule-DNA (DOD) array structures is the controlled tethering and stretching of DNA molecules. Here we report the development of reproducible surface chemistry for tethering DNA molecules at tunable density and demonstrate shear flow processing as a rationally controlled approach for stretching/aligning DNA molecules of various lengths. Through enzymatic cleavage of λ-phage DNA to yield a series of DNA chains of various lengths from 17.3 μm down to 4.2 μm, we have investigated the flow/extension behavior of these tethered DNA molecules under different flow strengths in the flow-gradient plane. We compared Brownian dynamic simulations for the flow dynamics of tethered λ-DNA in shear, and found our flow-gradient plane experimental results matched well with our bead-spring simulations. The shear flow processing demonstrated in our studies represents a controllable approach for tethering and stretching DNA molecules of various lengths. Together with further metallization of DNA chains within DOD structures, this bottom-up approach can potentially enable efficient and reliable fabrication of large-scale nanoelectronic devices based on single organic molecules, therefore opening opportunities in both fundamental understanding of charge transport at the single molecular level and many exciting applications for ever-shrinking molecular circuits.

  7. Shuttle tethered operations: The effect on orbital trajectory and inertial navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lardas, Mark N.

    1989-01-01

    The first full scale test of a large tethered satellite system is planned. The Orbiter will be linked to a 500 kg payload by a 20 km tether, an action with a profound effect on the trajectory of the Orbiter. For the first time in the history of the Shuttle program, the vehicle will conduct prolonged operations with the center of mass of the orbiting system a significant distance from the center of mass of the Space Shuttle Orbiter, a violation of the fundamental assumption made in both the Orbiter ground-based and onboard navigation software. Inertial navigation of tethered operations with the Shuttle is further complicated by the presence of non-conservative forces in the system: Reaction Control System (RCS) translational effects, atmospheric drag, and electro-magnetic dynamics. These can couple with the conservative tether dynamics effects, and degrade the navigation software performance. The primary effects are examined on the Orbiter's trajectory, coupling by conservative forces during tethered operations, and the impact of both on the ability to meet inertial navigation constraints. The impact of electrodynamics, different RCS control modes, commanded attitudes, and attitude deadbands are presented. Operational guidelines which optimize successful mission navigation, and necessary navigation constraints are discussed.

  8. Determination of a quantitative parameter to evaluate swimming technique based on the maximal tethered swimming test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soncin, Rafael; Mezêncio, Bruno; Ferreira, Jacielle Carolina; Rodrigues, Sara Andrade; Huebner, Rudolf; Serrão, Julio Cerca; Szmuchrowski, Leszek

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to propose a new force parameter, associated with swimmers' technique and performance. Twelve swimmers performed five repetitions of 25 m sprint crawl and a tethered swimming test with maximal effort. The parameters calculated were: the mean swimming velocity for crawl sprint, the mean propulsive force of the tethered swimming test as well as an oscillation parameter calculated from force fluctuation. The oscillation parameter evaluates the force variation around the mean force during the tethered test as a measure of swimming technique. Two parameters showed significant correlations with swimming velocity: the mean force during the tethered swimming (r = 0.85) and the product of the mean force square root and the oscillation (r = 0.86). However, the intercept coefficient was significantly different from zero only for the mean force, suggesting that although the correlation coefficient of the parameters was similar, part of the mean velocity magnitude that was not associated with the mean force was associated with the product of the mean force square root and the oscillation. Thus, force fluctuation during tethered swimming can be used as a quantitative index of swimmers' technique.

  9. Optimal Trajectory Planning and Coordinated Tracking Control Method of Tethered Space Robot Based on Velocity Impulse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panfeng Huang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The tethered space robot (TSR is a new concept of space robot which consists of a robot platform, space tether and operation robot. This paper presents a multi-objective optimal trajectory planning and a coordinated tracking control scheme for TSR based on velocity impulse in the approaching phase. Both total velocity impulse and flight time are included in this optimization. The non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm is employed to obtain the optimal trajectory Pareto solution using the TSR dynamic model and optimal trajectory planning model. The coordinated tracking control scheme utilizes optimal velocity impulse. Furthermore, the PID controller is designed in order to compensate for the distance measurement errors. The PID control force is optimized and distributed to thrusters and the space tether using a simulated annealing algorithm. The attitude interferential torque of the space tether is compensated a using time-delay algorithm through reaction wheels. The simulation results show that the multi-objective optimal trajectory planning method can reveal the relationships among flight time, fuel consumption, planar view angle and velocity impulse number. This method can provide a series of optimal trajectory according to a number of special tasks. The coordinated control scheme can significantly save thruster fuel for tracking the optimal trajectory, restrain the attitude interferential torque produced by space tether and maintain the relative attitude stability of the operation robot.

  10. Myo1c binding to submembrane actin mediates insulin-induced tethering of GLUT4 vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boguslavsky, Shlomit; Chiu, Tim; Foley, Kevin P.; Osorio-Fuentealba, Cesar; Antonescu, Costin N.; Bayer, K. Ulrich; Bilan, Philip J.; Klip, Amira

    2012-01-01

    GLUT4-containing vesicles cycle between the plasma membrane and intracellular compartments. Insulin promotes GLUT4 exocytosis by regulating GLUT4 vesicle arrival at the cell periphery and its subsequent tethering, docking, and fusion with the plasma membrane. The molecular machinery involved in GLUT4 vesicle tethering is unknown. We show here that Myo1c, an actin-based motor protein that associates with membranes and actin filaments, is required for insulin-induced vesicle tethering in muscle cells. Myo1c was found to associate with both mobile and tethered GLUT4 vesicles and to be required for vesicle capture in the total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) zone beneath the plasma membrane. Myo1c knockdown or overexpression of an actin binding–deficient Myo1c mutant abolished insulin-induced vesicle immobilization, increased GLUT4 vesicle velocity in the TIRF zone, and prevented their externalization. Conversely, Myo1c overexpression immobilized GLUT4 vesicles in the TIRF zone and promoted insulin-induced GLUT4 exposure to the extracellular milieu. Myo1c also contributed to insulin-dependent actin filament remodeling. Thus we propose that interaction of vesicular Myo1c with cortical actin filaments is required for insulin-mediated tethering of GLUT4 vesicles and for efficient GLUT4 surface delivery in muscle cells. PMID:22918957

  11. The HOPS/class C Vps complex tethers membranes by binding to one Rab GTPase in each apposed membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Ruoya; Stroupe, Christopher

    2015-07-15

    Many Rab GTPase effectors are membrane-tethering factors, that is, they physically link two apposed membranes before intracellular membrane fusion. In this study, we investigate the distinct binding factors needed on apposed membranes for Rab effector-dependent tethering. We show that the homotypic fusion and protein-sorting/class C vacuole protein-sorting (HOPS/class C Vps) complex can tether low-curvature membranes, that is, liposomes with a diameter of ∼100 nm, only when the yeast vacuolar Rab GTPase Ypt7p is present in both tethered membranes. When HOPS is phosphorylated by the vacuolar casein kinase I, Yck3p, tethering only takes place when GTP-bound Ypt7p is present in both tethered membranes. When HOPS is not phosphorylated, however, its tethering activity shows little specificity for the nucleotide-binding state of Ypt7p. These results suggest a model for HOPS-mediated tethering in which HOPS tethers membranes by binding to Ypt7p in each of the two tethered membranes. Moreover, because vacuole-associated HOPS is presumably phosphorylated by Yck3p, our results suggest that nucleotide exchange of Ypt7p on multivesicular bodies (MVBs)/late endosomes must take place before HOPS can mediate tethering at vacuoles. © 2015 Ho and Stroupe. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  12. Development of a continuous manufacturing method for a CFRP collapsible tube mast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, D. H.; Davidson, R.; Lee, R. J.; Thorpe, T.

    1986-06-01

    A sequential molding process was developed for forming continuous lengths of profiled carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) sheet, and for the edge-bonding of two identical profiles to produce a lenticular-shaped collapsible tube mast (CTM). The process was designed to enable a wide range of CTM sizes, characterized by the shape radius r, to be produced, and it will accept either thermosetting or thermoplastic matrix composites. The Tube Manufacturing Method (TMM) was proved by the construction of a laboratory scale rig and its use to produce continuously 10 m lengths of mast profile of uniform section and surface finish. The mechanical properties of the fabrics impregnated with the two resins were measured to provide basic tube mast design data. Viscoelastic relaxations in both types of composites were determined after storing sections of mast profile in the flattened condition over periods of time as a function of temperature.

  13. Incidence of Mast Cells in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A Short Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Anuradha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mast cells are regarded as complex and multifunctional cells, playing a significant role in immunopathology and a substantial role in tumor angiogenesis. Angiogenesis is a complex process that is tightly regulated by various growth factors in which mast cells act directly by releasing angiogenic factors and henceforth promoting tumor growth and metastasis. The aim of this study is to evaluate the number of mast cells in tissue sections of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC in comparison with normal mucosa. A total of 40 cases (20 OSCC and 20 normal mucosa were stained with 1% toluidine blue and the quantitative analysis was done by using light microscope under 400x magnification. A significant increase in the mast cell count was observed in the sections of OSCC when compared to normal mucosa suggesting their contributing role in tumor growth and progression.

  14. Mast cells infiltration and decreased E-cadherin expression in ketamine-induced cystitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengqiang Li

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Increased mast cells in bladder wall and downregulated expression of E-cadherin junction protein in epithelial cells were probably associated with interstitial inflammation and fissures in mucosa. It implied that ketamine induced an interstitial cystitis.

  15. Lysophosphatidic acid triggers mast cell-driven atherosclerotic plaque destabilization by increasing vascular inflammation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bot, M.; , van, Berkel T.J.C.

    2013-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a bioactive lysophospholipid, accumulates in the atherosclerotic plaque. It has the capacity to activate mast cells, which potentially exacerbates plaque progression. In this study, we thus aimed to investigate whether LPA contributes to plaque destabilization by

  16. Precision Deployable Mast for the SWOT KaRIn Instrument Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Design and prototype a lightweight, precision-deployable mast for the Ka-band Radar Interferometer (KaRIn) antennas in the Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT)...

  17. Energy metabolism in rat mast cells in relation to histamine secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, T

    1987-01-01

    1. The relation between the energy metabolism and the secretory activity of rat peritoneal mast cells has been studied by determination of the cellular content of ATP and the rate of lactate production reflecting the rate of ATP synthesis under various experimental conditions. Secretion...... and the cellular ATP content at the time of cell activation was demonstrated. This may indicate a direct link between ATP and the secretory mechanism. 3. The possibility of an increased utilization of ATP during histamine secretion was explored in mast cells exposed to metabolic inhibitors. Incubation of mast...... cells with 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) decreased the ATP content of the cells, and a long-lasting and stable level of mast cell ATP was observed. This is explained by a small decrease in the rate of ATP-synthesis by 2-DG. In 2-DG-treated cells secretion of histamine in response to compound 48...

  18. No long-lasting or intermittent mast cell activation in acute coronary syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Haelst, PL; Timmer, [No Value; Crijns, HJGM; Kauffman, HF; Gans, ROB; van Doormaal, JJ

    Background: Unstable coronary syndromes, such as acute myocardial infarction and unstable angina pectoris are mostly due to rupture of an atherosclerotic plaque. Recently mast cells were found to participate actively in the inflammatory process of atherosclerosis by excreting proteolytic and

  19. Targeting mast cells and basophils in allergy and beyond: emerging concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heneberg, Petr

    2011-11-01

    Since the times of P. Ehrlich, F. D. von Recklinghausen, and O.Westphal, the research on mast cells and basophils made significant progression towards the recognition of their involvement in antimicrobial functions and of their role in mobilizing inflammation in wound healing, allergy, and autoimmunity. However, the role of mast cells in normal physiology is still poorly understood. Only in recent years, these cells are increasingly recognized as important effectors in number of pathways related mostly to tissue remodeling. The mast cells are capable to orchestrate inflammatory reactions and angiogenesis, they are frequently present near pre-neoplastic epithelial cells, etc. Absolute mast cell deficiency, as in the cross of Min mice to the C57BL/6-KitWsh/Wsh mice, can have overreaching immunological consequences.

  20. Monterey Area Ship Tracks (MAST) MODIS Airborne Simulator (MAS) Level-1B Data Products

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of the Monterey Area Ship Tracks (MAST) campaign was to study cloud formation from ocean vessels off of the central California coast. The data was...

  1. Transcription factor IRF8 plays a critical role in the development of murine basophils and mast cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Haruka; Kurotaki, Daisuke; Osato, Naoki; Sato, Hideaki; Sasaki, Izumi; Koizumi, Shin-ichi; Wang, Hongsheng; Kaneda, Chika; Nishiyama, Akira; Kaisho, Tsuneyasu; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Morse, Herbert C.; Ozato, Keiko

    2015-01-01

    Basophils and mast cells play critical roles in host defense against pathogens and allergic disorders. However, the molecular mechanism by which these cells are generated is not completely understood. Here we demonstrate that interferon regulatory factor-8 (IRF8), a transcription factor essential for the development of several myeloid lineages, also regulates basophil and mast cell development. Irf8−/− mice displayed a severe reduction in basophil counts, which was accounted for by the absence of pre-basophil and mast cell progenitors (pre-BMPs). Although Irf8−/− mice retained peripheral tissue mast cells, remaining progenitors from Irf8−/− mice including granulocyte progenitors (GPs) were unable to efficiently generate either basophils or mast cells, indicating that IRF8 also contributes to the development of mast cells. IRF8 appeared to function at the GP stage, because IRF8 was expressed in GPs, but not in basophils, mast cells, and basophil/mast cell-restricted progenitor cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that GATA2, a transcription factor known to promote basophil and mast cell differentiation, acts downstream of IRF8. These results shed light on the pathways and mechanism underlying the development of basophils and mast cells. PMID:25398936

  2. Differential effect of plant lectins on mast cells of different origins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.C. Lopes

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Histamine release induced by plant lectins was studied with emphasis on the carbohydrate specificity, external calcium requirement, metal binding sites, and mast cell heterogeneity and on the importance of antibodies bound to the mast cell membrane to the lectin effect. Peritoneal mast cells were obtained by direct lavage of the rat peritoneal cavity and guinea pig intestine and hamster cheek pouch mast cells were obtained by dispersion with collagenase type IA. Histamine release was induced with concanavalin A (Con A, lectins from Canavalia brasiliensis, mannose-specific Cymbosema roseum, Maackia amurensis, Parkia platycephala, Triticum vulgaris (WGA, and demetallized Con A and C. brasiliensis, using 1-300 µg/ml lectin concentrations applied to Wistar rat peritoneal mast cells, peaking on 26.9, 21.0, 29.1, 24.9, 17.2, 10.7, 19.9, and 41.5%, respectively. This effect was inhibited in the absence of extracellular calcium. The lectins were also active on hamster cheek pouch mast cells (except demetallized Con A and on Rowett nude rat (animal free of immunoglobulins peritoneal mast cells (except for mannose-specific C. roseum, P. platycephala and WGA. No effect was observed in guinea pig intestine mast cells. Glucose-saturated Con A and C. brasiliensis also released histamine from Wistar rat peritoneal mast cells. These results suggest that histamine release induced by lectins is influenced by the heterogeneity of mast cells and depends on extracellular calcium. The results also suggest that this histamine release might occur by alternative mechanisms, because the usual mechanism of lectins is related to their binding properties to metals from which depend the binding to sugars, which would be their sites to bind to immunoglobulins. In the present study, we show that the histamine release by lectins was also induced by demetallized lectins and by sugar-saturated lectins (which would avoid their binding to other sugars. Additionally, the lectins

  3. Mast cells in common wolffish Anarhichas lupus L.: ontogeny, distribution and association with lymphatic vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellberg, Hege; Bjerkås, Inge; Vågnes, Øyvind B; Noga, Edward J

    2013-12-01

    The morphology, ontogeny and tissue distribution of mast cells were studied in common wolffish(Anarhichas lupus L.) at the larval, juvenile and adult life stages using light and electron-microscopy and immunohistochemistry. Fish were sampled at 1 day, 1, 2, 3, 4, 8 and 12 weeks post-hatching in addition to 6 and 9 months and 2 years and older. From 8 weeks post-hatching, mast cells in common wolffish mainly appeared as oval or rounded cells 8-15 mm in diameter with an eccentrically placed, ovoid nucleus and filled with cytoplasmic granules up to 1.2 mm in diameter. Granules were refractile and eosinophilic to slightly basophilic in H&E and stained bright red with Martius-scarlet-blue and purple with pinacyanol erythrosinate in formalin-fixed tissues. Mast cells stained positive for piscidin 4 and Fc ε RI by immunohistochemistry. From 1 day to 4 weeks post-hatching, immature mast cell containing only a few irregularly sized cytoplasmic granules were observed by light and electron-microscopy in loose connective tissue of cranial areas. From 1 day post-hatching, these cells stained positive for piscidin 4 and Fc ε RI by immunohistochemistry. From 12 weeks post-hatching, mast cells showed a primarily perivascular distribution and were particularly closely associated with lymphatic vessels and sinuses. Mast cells were mainly located at the peripheral border of the adventitia of arteries and veins, while they were in intimate contact with the endothelium of the lymphatic vessels. Numerous mast cells were observed in the intestine. A stratum compactum, as described in salmonids, was not observed in wolffish intestine,nor were mast cells confined to a separate layer, a stratum granulosum. Lymphatic vessels consisting of endothelium, intimal connective tissue and a poorly developed basal lamina were observed in the intestine. Scanning electron microscopy was used to compare the structure and localization of intestinal mast cells of common wolffish and rainbow trout

  4. [Pattern recognition and activation effect of mast cells in vitro infected by Brucella suis S2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zhiran; Yan, Weijiao; Wang, Bei; Rong, Ruixue; Ding, Jiabo; Zhang, Leifang; Hao, Manliang; Mao, Kairong; Wang, Jiaxin

    2013-11-01

    To study the pattern recognition and activation effect of mast cells infected by Brucella (B.) suis S2. Mast cells derived from bone marrow in vitro were infected by B.suis S2. The change in the cell morphology was observed with Wrights-Giemsa's staining, and cell degranulation was tested with toluidine blue staining. The extracellular levels of histamine, IFN-γ and IL-12 of mast cells at 1 and 12 h after infection were detected by indirect ELISA. The uptake pattern of mast cells to B.suis S2 was determined by laser-scanning confocal microscopy. The expressions of TLR4 and TLR8 mRNA were detected by RT-PCR at 12 and 24 h after infection by B.suis S2, and the TLR4 and TLR8 protein expressions were detected by flow cytometry at 24 h. The form of mast cells infected by B.suis S2 was obviously changed. Significant degranulation was observed at 1 h, and at 1, 12 h post-infection by B.suis S2, the content of histamine secreted by mast cells was significantly higher than that of normal control group (PB.suis S2 bound to the mast cell surface and were not uptaken into the mast cells. Compared with the control group, the expression of TLR4 mRNA increased after 12 h infection by B.suis S2, and was reduced at 24 h. The expression of TLR4 protein rose at 24 h, but the expression of TLR8 mRNA and protein did not alter at 12 and 24 h after infection by B.suis S2. B.suis S2 can bind to the cell surface and activate mast cells, cause their degranulation, induce the release of histamine, but IFN-γ and IL-12 were not found during the observing time. The mechanism may be that B.suis S2 can be recognized by mast cells through TLR4 but can not be phagocytosed by mast cells.

  5. Diamond surface functionalization with biomimicry – Amine surface tether and thiol moiety for electrochemical sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sund, James B., E-mail: jim@jamessund.com [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Causey, Corey P. [Departments of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Wolter, Scott D. [Department of Physics, Elon University, Elon, NC 27244 (United States); Parker, Charles B., E-mail: charles.parker@duke.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Stoner, Brian R. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Research Triangle Institute (RTI) International, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Toone, Eric J. [Departments of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Glass, Jeffrey T. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • Diamond surfaces were functionalized with organic molecules using a novel approach. • Used biomimicry to select a molecule to bind NO, similar to the human body. • Molecular orbital theory predicted the molecule-analyte oxidation behavior. • A thiol moiety was attached to an amine surface tether on the diamond surface. • XPS analysis verified each surface functionalization step. - Abstract: The surface of conducting diamond was functionalized with a terminal thiol group that is capable of binding and detecting nitrogen–oxygen species. The functionalization process employed multiple steps starting with doped diamond films grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition followed by hydrogen termination and photochemical attachment of a chemically protected amine alkene. The surface tether was deprotected to reveal the amine functionality, which enabled the tether to be extended with surface chemistry to add a terminal thiol moiety for electrochemical sensing applications. Each step of the process was validated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis.

  6. Modeling and Control of Electrodynamic Tethers - an Energy and Topology Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Martin Birkelund

    , and separate derivations of the dynamical equations can be cumbersome. It can therefore be advantageous to be able to model a formation independent of its topology, i.e. the way tethers and satellites are interconnected. The thesis treats a class of formations in a generic framework, using graph theory......-flying spacecrafts, since a predetermined geometry of spacecrafts is easily maintained. This thesis investigates the use of electrodynamic tethers for such tethered satellite formaii tions with focus on the modeling and control aspects. One can think of many different structures for solving tasks in space...... to describe the topology of the formations. The framework can be used both to deduce the equations of motion for the attitude motion of the formation and for control design regarding the same motion. The main part of the thesis consists of five scientific papers which have been submitted for international...

  7. Low density aerothermodynamics studies performed by means of the tethered satellite system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlomagno, Giovanni M.; De Luca, Luigi; Siemers, Paul M.; Wood, George M., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Low density gas flow modeling and current ground wind-tunnel technologies are not presently able to produce fully reliable data concerning low density flow regimes. In order to answer some of these issues, the Shuttle Continuous Open Wind Tunnel (SCOWT) program has been proposed, which makes use of the tethered satellite system (TSS). SCOWT's objective is to investigate the energy and momentum transfer between the tethered satellite and its environmental medium within the range of the thermofluid-dynamic conditions experienced by TSS during its atmospheric flights. The feasibility and capability of SCOWT to perform low density aerothermodynamics studies are investigated. Some of the results, obtained by means of a tether simulation program, and the instrumentation and TSS design main requirements to meet SCOWT objectives are described.

  8. Self-Assembled Array of Tethered Manganese Oxide Nanoparticles for the Next Generation of Energy Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Tyler E.; Pearce, Charles J.; Whitten, Caleah N.; Grant, Richard P.; Monson, Todd C.

    2017-03-01

    Many challenges must be overcome in order to create reliable electrochemical energy storage devices with not only high energy but also high power densities. Gaps exist in both battery and supercapacitor technologies, with neither one satisfying the need for both large power and energy densities in a single device. To begin addressing these challenges (and others), we report a process to create a self-assembled array of electrochemically active nanoparticles bound directly to a current collector using extremely short (2 nm or less) conductive tethers. The tethered array of nanoparticles, MnO in this case, bound directly to a gold current collector via short conducting linkages eliminates the need for fillers, resulting in a material which achieves 99.9% active material by mass (excluding the current collector). This strategy is expected to be both scalable as well as effective for alternative tethers and metal oxide nanoparticles.

  9. Antibodies against nonstructural protein 1 protect mice from dengue virus-induced mast cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Ya-Ting; Wan, Shu-Wen; Chang, Yu-Chang; Lee, Chien-Kuo; Wu-Hsieh, Betty A; Anderson, Robert; Lin, Yee-Shin

    2017-02-27

    Dengue virus (DENV) infection causes dengue fever, dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), and dengue shock syndrome (DSS). DHF/DSS patients have been reported to have increased levels of urinary histamine, chymase, and tryptase, which are major granule-associated mediators from mast cells. Previous studies also showed that DENV-infected human mast cells induce production of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, suggesting a role played by mast cells in vascular perturbation as well as leukocyte recruitment. In this study, we show that DENV but not UV-inactivated DENV enhanced degranulation of mast cells and production of chemokines (MCP-1, RANTES, and IP-10) in a mouse model. We have previously shown that antibodies (Abs) against a modified DENV nonstructural protein 1 (NS1), designated DJ NS1, provide protection in mice against DENV challenge. In the present study, we investigate the effects of DJ NS1 Abs on mast cell-associated activities. We showed that administration of anti-DJ NS1 Abs into mice resulted in a reduction of mast cell degranulation and macrophage infiltration at local skin DENV infection sites. The production of DENV-induced chemokines (MCP-1, RANTES, and IP-10) and the percentages of tryptase-positive activated mast cells were also reduced by treatment with anti-DJ NS1 Abs. These results indicate that Abs against NS1 protein provide multiple therapeutic benefits, some of which involve modulating DENV-induced mast cell activation.Laboratory Investigation advance online publication, 27 February 2017; doi:10.1038/labinvest.2017.10.

  10. Innervation of enteric mast cells by primary spinal afferents in guinea pig and human small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guo-Du; Wang, Xi-Yu; Liu, Sumei; Qu, Meihua; Xia, Yun; Needleman, Bradley J; Mikami, Dean J; Wood, Jackie D

    2014-10-01

    Mast cells express the substance P (SP) neurokinin 1 receptor and the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor in guinea pig and human small intestine. Enzyme-linked immunoassay showed that activation of intramural afferents by antidromic electrical stimulation or by capsaicin released SP and CGRP from human and guinea pig intestinal segments. Electrical stimulation of the afferents evoked slow excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) in the enteric nervous system. The slow EPSPs were mediated by tachykinin neurokinin 1 and CGRP receptors. Capsaicin evoked slow EPSP-like responses that were suppressed by antagonists for protease-activated receptor 2. Afferent stimulation evoked slow EPSP-like excitation that was suppressed by mast cell-stabilizing drugs. Histamine and mast cell protease II were released by 1) exposure to SP or CGRP, 2) capsaicin, 3) compound 48/80, 4) elevation of mast cell Ca²⁺ by ionophore A23187, and 5) antidromic electrical stimulation of afferents. The mast cell stabilizers cromolyn and doxantrazole suppressed release of protease II and histamine when evoked by SP, CGRP, capsaicin, A23187, electrical stimulation of afferents, or compound 48/80. Neural blockade by tetrodotoxin prevented mast cell protease II release in response to antidromic electrical stimulation of mesenteric afferents. The results support a hypothesis that afferent innervation of enteric mast cells releases histamine and mast cell protease II, both of which are known to act in a diffuse paracrine manner to influence the behavior of enteric nervous system neurons and to elevate the sensitivity of spinal afferent terminals. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Active structural control design and experiment for the Mini-Mast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wie, Bong; Horta, Lucas; Sulla, Jeff

    1990-01-01

    Control system design and closed-loop test results for the Mini-Mast truss structure located at the NASA Langley Research Center are presented. The simplicity and effectiveness of a classical control approach to the active structural control design are demonstrated by ground experiments. The concepts of robust nonminimum phase compensation and periodic disturbance rejection are also experimentally validated. The practicality of a sensor output decoupling approach is demonstrated for the inherent, multivariable control problem of the Mini-Mast.

  12. Mast cells modulate acute ozone-induced inflammation of the murine lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleeberger, S.R.; Seiden, J.E.; Levitt, R.C.; Zhang, L.Y. (Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD (United States))

    1993-11-01

    We hypothesized that mast cells modulate lung inflammation that develops after acute ozone (O3) exposure. Two tests were done: (1) genetically mast-cell-deficient (WBB6F1-W/Wv, WCB6F1-SI/SId) and bone-marrow-transplanted W/Wv mice were exposed to O3 or filtered air, and the inflammatory responses were compared with those of mast-cell-sufficient congenic mice (WBB6F1-(+)/+, WCB6F1-(+)/+); (2) genetically O3-susceptible C57BL/6J mice were treated pharmacologically with putative mast-cell modulators or vehicle, and the O3-induced inflammatory responses were compared. Mice were exposed to 1.75 ppm O3 or air for 3 h, and lung inflammation was assessed by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) 6 and 24 h after exposure. Relative to O3-exposed W/Wv and SI/SId mice, the mean numbers of lavageable polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and total BAL protein concentration (a marker of permeability) were significantly greater in the respective O3-exposed normal congenic +/+ mice (p < 0.05). Mast cells were reconstituted in W/Wv mice by transplantation of bone marrow cells from congenic +/+ mice, and O3-induced lung inflammation was assessed in the mast-cell-replete W/Wv mice. After O3 exposure, the changes in lavageable PMNs and total protein of mast-cell-replete W/Wv mice were not different from age-matched normal +/+ control mice, and they were significantly greater than those of sham-transplanted W/Wv mice (p < 0.05). Genetically susceptible C57BL/6J mice were pretreated with a mast-cell stabilizer (nedocromil sodium), secretagogue (compound 48/80), or vehicle, and the mice were exposed to O3.

  13. Association of mast cell-derived VEGF and proteases in Dengue shock syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahisa Furuta

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent in-vitro studies have suggested that mast cells are involved in Dengue virus infection. To clarify the role of mast cells in the development of clinical Dengue fever, we compared the plasma levels of several mast cell-derived mediators (vascular endothelial cell growth factor [VEGF], soluble VEGF receptors [sVEGFRs], tryptase, and chymase and -related cytokines (IL-4, -9, and -17 between patients with differing severity of Dengue fever and healthy controls. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The study was performed at Children's Hospital No. 2, Ho Chi Minh City, and Vinh Long Province Hospital, Vietnam from 2002 to 2005. Study patients included 103 with Dengue fever (DF, Dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF, and Dengue shock syndrome (DSS, as diagnosed by the World Health Organization criteria. There were 189 healthy subjects, and 19 febrile illness patients of the same Kinh ethnicity. The levels of mast cell-derived mediators and -related cytokines in plasma were measured by ELISA. VEGF and sVEGFR-1 levels were significantly increased in DHF and DSS compared with those of DF and controls, whereas sVEGFR-2 levels were significantly decreased in DHF and DSS. Significant increases in tryptase and chymase levels, which were accompanied by high IL-9 and -17 concentrations, were detected in DHF and DSS patients. By day 4 of admission, VEGF, sVEGFRs, and proteases levels had returned to similar levels as DF and controls. In-vitro VEGF production by mast cells was examined in KU812 and HMC-1 cells, and was found to be highest when the cells were inoculated with Dengue virus and human Dengue virus-immune serum in the presence of IL-9. CONCLUSIONS: As mast cells are an important source of VEGF, tryptase, and chymase, our findings suggest that mast cell activation and mast cell-derived mediators participate in the development of DHF. The two proteases, particularly chymase, might serve as good predictive markers of Dengue disease severity.

  14. Involvement of mast cells and histamine in edema induced in mice by Scolopendra viridicornis centipede venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Távora, Bianca C L F; Kimura, Louise F; Antoniazzi, Marta M; Chiariello, Thiago M; Faquim-Mauro, Eliana L; Barbaro, Katia C

    2016-10-01

    Bites caused by Scolopendra viridicornis centipede are mainly characterized by burning pain, paresthesia and edema. On this regard, the aim of this work was to study the involvement of mast cells and histamine in edema induced by Scolopendra viridicornis (Sv) centipede venom. The edema was analyzed on mice paws. The mice were pretreated with cromolyn (mast cell degranulation inhibitor) and antagonists of histamine receptors, such as promethazine (H1R), cimetidine (H2R) and thioperamide (H3/H4R). The analyses were carried out at different times after the injection of Sv venom (15 μg) or PBS in the footpad of mice. Our results showed a significant inhibition of the edema induced by Sv venom injection in mice previously treated: cromolyn (38-91%), promethazine (50-59%) and thioperamide (around 30%). The treatment with cimetidine did not alter the edema induced by Sv venom. Histopathological analysis showed that Sv venom injection (15 μg) induced edema, leukocyte recruitment and mast cells degranulation, when compared with the PBS-injected mice. Direct effects of the Sv venom on mast cells were studied in PT-18 line (mouse mast cell) and RBL-2H3 cells (rat mast cells). The data showed that higher doses (3.8 and 7.5 μg) of Sv venom were cytotoxic for both cell lineages and induced morphological changes. However, lower doses of the venom induced degranulation of both mast cell lines, as well as the secretion of MCP-1, IL-6 and IL-1β. The production of PGD2 was only observed in the RBL-2H3 line incubated with Sv venom. Taking our results together, we demonstrated that upon Sv venom exposure, mast cells and histamine are crucial for the establishment of the local inflammatory reaction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Biogeography of the uncultured marine picoeukaryote MAST-4: temperature-driven distribution patterns

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez-Martínez, Raquel; Rocap, Gabrielle; Salazar, Guillem; Massana, Ramon

    2013-01-01

    The MAST-4 (marine stramenopile group 4) is a widespread uncultured picoeukaryote that makes up an important fraction of marine heterotrophic flagellates. This group has low genetic divergence and is composed of a small number of putative species. We combined ARISA (automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis) and ITS (Internal Transcribed Spacer) clone libraries to study the biogeography of this marine protist, examining both spatial and temporal trends in MAST-4 assemblages and associate...

  16. Aspergillus oryzae lectin induces anaphylactoid oedema and mast cell activation through its interaction with fucose of mast cell-bound non-specific IgE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaki, K; Yoshino, S

    2011-11-01

    We investigated whether Aspergillus oryzae lectin (AOL), a fucose-specific lectin, induces anaphylactoid reactions and mast cell activation. The injection of AOL into footpads of mice produced a dose-related acute paw oedema. The AOL-induced oedema was attenuated by predose of histamine H1 receptor blocker or pretreatment of the lectin with fucose before injection and was not observed in SCID and mast cell-deficient WBB6F1-W/Wv mice. These results suggested that the AOL-induced anaphylactoid reaction was mediated by histamine released from mast cells. In addition, the activation of mast cells was seemed to be induced by the crosslinking of IgE on the cell surface following the binding of AOL to fucose residues in IgE. Consistent with the in vivo results, AOL induced the degranulation of the rat mast cell line RBL2H3 sensitized with monoclonal IgE. As AOL induced the increase in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration of IgE-sensitized RBL2H3 cells as well as antigen stimulation, AOL could input signals from FcεRI. The degranulation of IgE-sensitized RBL2H3 cells by AOL was diminished by pretreatment of AOL with fucose. Defucosylated IgE did not induce degranulation of RBL2H3 cells in response to AOL stimulation, in spite of its ability to induce degranulation by antigen stimulation as intact IgE. These results indicated that AOL bound to fucose residue of IgE causing antigen-independent IgE-mediated mast cell activation and anaphylactoid reactions in vitro and in vivo, respectively. AOL bound to human IgE as well as to mouse IgE, suggesting the possible implication of AOL in the allergic response to Aspergillus oryzae in humans. © 2011 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Immunology © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Unilateral pedicle screws asymmetric tethering: an innovative method to create idiopathic deformity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Xuesong

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To evaluate the feasibility of the method that unilateral pedicle screws asymmetric tethering in concave side in combination with convex rib resection for creating idiopathic deformity. Summary of background data Various methods are performed to create idiopathic deformity. Among these methods, posterior asmmetric tethering of the spine shows satisfying result, but some drawbacks related to the current posterior asymmetric tether were still evident. Materials and methods Unilateral pedicle screws asymmetric tethering was performed to 14 female goats (age: 5–8 week-old, weight: 6–8 kg in concave side in combination with convex rib resection. Dorsoventral and lateral plain radiographs were taken of each thoracic spine in the frontal and sagittal planes right after the surgery and later every 4 weeks. Results All animals ambulated freely after surgery. For technical reasons, 2 goats were excluded (one animal died for anesthetic during the surgery, and one animal was lost for instrumental fail due to postoperative infection. Radiography showed that 11 goats exhibited scoliosis with convex toward to the right side, and as the curve increased with time, only 1 goat showed nonprogressive. The initial scoliosis generated in the progressors after the procedures measured 29.0° on average (range 23.0°–38.5° and increased to 43.0° on average (range 36.0°–58.0° over 8 to 10 weeks. The average progression of 14.0° was measured. The curvature immediately after tethering surgery (the initial Cobb angle did have a highly significant correlation with the final curvature (p Conclusion Unilateral pedicle screws asymmetric tethering is a practical method to create experimental scoliosis, especially for those who would like to study the correction of this deformity.

  18. Differential regulation of synaptic vesicle tethering and docking by UNC-18 and TOM-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena O Gracheva

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The assembly of SNARE complexes between syntaxin, SNAP-25 and synaptobrevin is required to prime synaptic vesicles for fusion. Since Munc18 and tomosyn compete for syntaxin interactions, the interplay between these proteins is predicted to be important in regulating synaptic transmission. We explored this possibility, by examining genetic interactions between C. elegans unc-18(Munc18, unc-64(syntaxin and tom-1(tomosyn. We have previously demonstrated that unc-18 mutants have reduced synaptic transmission, whereas tom-1 mutants exhibit enhanced release. Here we show that the unc-18 mutant release defect is associated with loss of two morphologically distinct vesicle pools; those tethered within 25nm of the plasma membrane and those docked with the plasma membrane. In contrast, priming defective unc-13 mutants accumulate tethered vesicles, while docked vesicles are greatly reduced, indicating tethering is UNC-18-dependent and occurs in the absence of priming. C. elegans unc-64 mutants phenocopy unc-18 mutants, losing both tethered and docked vesicles, whereas overexpression of open syntaxin preferentially increases vesicle docking, suggesting UNC-18/closed syntaxin interactions are responsible for vesicle tethering. Given the competition between vertebrate tomosyn and Munc18, for syntaxin binding, we hypothesized that C. elegans TOM-1 may inhibit both UNC-18-dependent vesicle targeting steps. Consistent with this hypothesis, tom-1 mutants exhibit enhanced UNC-18 plasma membrane localization and a concomitant increase in both tethered and docked synaptic vesicles. Furthermore, in tom-1;unc-18 double mutants the docked, primed vesicle pool is preferentially rescued relative to unc-18 single mutants. Together these data provide evidence for the differential regulation of two vesicle targeting steps by UNC-18 and TOM-1 through competitive interactions with syntaxin

  19. The Disulfide Bonds within BST-2 Enhance Tensile Strength during Viral Tethering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du Pont, Kelly E; McKenzie, Aidan M; Kokhan, Oleksandr; Sumner, Isaiah; Berndsen, Christopher E

    2016-02-16

    Human BST-2/tetherin is a host factor that inhibits the release of enveloped viruses, including HIV-1, HIV-2, and SIV, from the cell surface by tethering viruses to the host cell membrane. BST-2 has an α-helical ectodomain that forms disulfide-linked dimers between two monomers forming a coiled coil. The ectodomain contains three cysteine residues that can participate in disulfide bond formation and are critical for viral tethering. The role of the disulfides in viral tethering is unknown but proposed to be for maintaining the dimer. We explored the role of the disulfides in the structure of BST-2 using experimental, biophysical methods. To understand the role of the disulfides in viral tethering, we used a new approach in viral tethering, steered molecular dynamics. We find that the disulfides coordinate the unfolding of the BST-2 monomers, which adds tensile strength to the coiled coil. Structural differences between oxidized and reduced BST-2 are apparent during unfolding, showing the monomers slide past each other in the absence of the disulfides. We found no evidence to support dissociation of the dimer upon reduction of the disulfide bonds. Moreover, the structure of BST-2 in the absence of the disulfides is similar to that of the oxidized form of BST-2, supporting previous X-ray crystallography and cellular work that showed the disulfides are not required for expression of BST-2. These data provide new insights into viral tethering by using novel techniques in the analysis of BST-2 to give amino acid level insight into functions of BST-2.

  20. Conserved TCP domain of Sas-4/CPAP is essential for pericentriolar material tethering during centrosome biogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiangdong; Gooi, Li Ming; Wason, Arpit; Gabriel, Elke; Mehrjardi, Narges Zare; Yang, Qian; Zhang, Xingrun; Debec, Alain; Basiri, Marcus L.; Avidor-Reiss, Tomer; Pozniakovsky, Andrei; Poser, Ina; Šarić, Tomo; Hyman, Anthony A.; Li, Haitao; Gopalakrishnan, Jay

    2014-01-01

    Pericentriolar material (PCM) recruitment to centrioles forms a key step in centrosome biogenesis. Deregulation of this process leads to centrosome aberrations causing disorders, one of which is autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH), a neurodevelopmental disorder where brain size is reduced. During PCM recruitment, the conserved centrosomal protein Sas-4/CPAP/MCPH6, known to play a role in centriole formation, acts as a scaffold for cytoplasmic PCM complexes to bind and then tethers them to centrioles to form functional centrosomes. To understand Sas-4’s tethering role, we determined the crystal structure of its T complex protein 10 (TCP) domain displaying a solvent-exposed single-layer of β-sheets fold. This unique feature of the TCP domain suggests that it could provide an “extended surface-like” platform to tether the Sas-4–PCM scaffold to a centriole. Functional studies in Drosophila, human cells, and human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neural progenitor cells were used to test this hypothesis, where point mutations within the 9–10th β-strands (β9–10 mutants including a MCPH-associated mutation) perturbed PCM tethering while allowing Sas-4/CPAP to scaffold cytoplasmic PCM complexes. Specifically, the Sas-4 β9–10 mutants displayed perturbed interactions with Ana2, a centrosome duplication factor, and Bld-10, a centriole microtubule-binding protein, suggesting a role for the β9–10 surface in mediating protein–protein interactions for efficient Sas-4–PCM scaffold centriole tethering. Hence, we provide possible insights into how centrosomal protein defects result in human MCPH and how Sas-4 proteins act as a vehicle to tether PCM complexes to centrioles independent of its well-known role in centriole duplication. PMID:24385583