WorldWideScience

Sample records for survivability susceptibility reduction

  1. Antibiotic Susceptibility Profile and Survival of Bifidobacterium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bifidobacteria are categorized as health-promoting microorganisms (probiotics) in the gastrointestinal tracts of humans and animals. Antibiotic susceptibility is a key criterion for probiotic agent selection. Good survival of probiotics during storage at selected storage temperature(s) is highly desirable. Bifidobacteria isolated ...

  2. Aircraft Survivability: Susceptibility Reduction, Spring 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    EA) is desirable, and gives an overview of some current areas of research. We begin with an often-cited definition of coherency— “Two or more...decoy was also in development at that time. In the late 1980s the Universal Radar Nulling System ( URANUS ) imaging radar jammer test bed was built and...dem- onstrated using analog delay lines. A smaller version of the URANUS , the DRFM based Mini- URANUS , was developed to demonstrate coherent

  3. Aircraft Survivability. Susceptibility Reduction. Fall 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    importance of what we do, and showcased the joint nature of our organization. CDR Fehrle and LT John responded to the scene immediately to begin the...Eye-One Photo SG” spectro-photometer (Gretag Macbeth GRET-0366), which provides 10nm resolution across the 380-730nm spectral range. The paints...Approach The short timelines, prevalence, and portable nature of the aircraft threats described lead us to a change in the paradigm of aircraft

  4. Pancreatic cancer susceptibility loci and their role in survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cosmeri Rizzato

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer has one of the worst mortality rates of all cancers. Little is known about its etiology, particularly regarding inherited risk. The PanScan project, a genome-wide association study, identified several common polymorphisms affecting pancreatic cancer susceptibility. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in ABO, sonic hedgehog (SHH, telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT, nuclear receptor subfamily 5, group A, member 2 (NR5A2 were found to be associated with pancreatic cancer risk. Moreover the scan identified loci on chromosomes 13q22.1 and 15q14, to which no known genes or other functional elements are mapped. We sought to replicate these observations in two additional, independent populations (from Germany and the UK, and also evaluate the possible impact of these SNPs on patient survival. We genotyped 15 SNPs in 690 cases of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC and in 1277 healthy controls. We replicated several associations between SNPs and PDAC risk. Furthermore we found that SNP rs8028529 was weakly associated with a better overall survival (OS in both populations. We have also found that NR5A2 rs12029406_T allele was associated with a shorter survival in the German population. In conclusion, we found that rs8028529 could be, if these results are replicated, a promising marker for both risk and prognosis for this lethal disease.

  5. Naval Survivability and Susceptibility Reduction Study-Surface Ship

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Mirador Electro-Optical Multi-Sensor From [15] ......................................... 8  Figure 9.  EDO Towed Array Sonar From [16...the detonation sensor. Figure 9. EDO Towed Array Sonar From [16] 5. Magnetism The Earth’s magnetic field can be measured, as the ship cuts...Time Fuze HE-VT = High Explosive, Variable Time Fuze HE-CVT = High Explosive, Controlled Variable Time Fuze Range >100 km Launch Platform Surface

  6. CovR Regulates Streptococcus mutans Susceptibility To Complement Immunity and Survival in Blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Lívia A; Nomura, Ryota; Mariano, Flávia S; Harth-Chu, Erika N; Stipp, Rafael N; Nakano, Kazuhiko; Mattos-Graner, Renata O

    2016-11-01

    Streptococcus mutans, a major pathogen of dental caries, may promote systemic infections after accessing the bloodstream from oral niches. In this study, we investigate pathways of complement immunity against S. mutans and show that the orphan regulator CovR (CovRSm) modulates susceptibility to complement opsonization and survival in blood. S. mutans blood isolates showed reduced susceptibility to C3b deposition compared to oral isolates. Reduced expression of covRSm in blood strains was associated with increased transcription of CovRSm-repressed genes required for S. mutans interactions with glucans (gbpC, gbpB, and epsC), sucrose-derived exopolysaccharides (EPS). Consistently, blood strains showed an increased capacity to bind glucan in vitro Deletion of covRSm in strain UA159 (UAcov) impaired C3b deposition and binding to serum IgG and C-reactive protein (CRP) as well as phagocytosis through C3b/iC3b receptors and killing by neutrophils. Opposite effects were observed in mutants of gbpC, epsC, or gtfBCD (required for glucan synthesis). C3b deposition on UA159 was abolished in C1q-depleted serum, implying that the classical pathway is essential for complement activation on S. mutans Growth in sucrose-containing medium impaired the binding of C3b and IgG to UA159, UAcov, and blood isolates but had absent or reduced effects on C3b deposition in gtfBCD, gbpC, and epsC mutants. UAcov further showed increased ex vivo survival in human blood in an EPS-dependent way. Consistently, reduced survival was observed for the gbpC and epsC mutants. Finally, UAcov showed an increased ability to cause bacteremia in a rat model. These results reveal that CovRSm modulates systemic virulence by regulating functions affecting S. mutans susceptibility to complement opsonization. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Association of susceptible genotypes to periodontal disease with the clinical outcome and tooth survival after non-surgical periodontal therapy: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doufexi, Aikaterini-Ellisavet; Kalogirou, Fotini

    2016-01-01

    Background The real clinical utility of genetic testing is the prognostic value of genetic factors in the clinical outcome of periodontal treatment and the tooth survival. A meta-analysis was undertaken to estimate the effect of a susceptible genotype to periodontitis on the clinical outcomes of non-surgical periodontal therapy and the tooth survival. Material and Methods A systematic search of MEDLINE-Pubmed, Cochrane Library and Scopus was performed. Additionally, a hand search was done in three journals. No specific language restriction was applied. Two reviewers screened independently titles and abstracts or full text copies. Quality assessment of all the included studies was held. Results Initial screening of electronic databases resulted in 283 articles. Ten studies met the inclusion criteria, nine of them examined the clinical outcome, while the other one investigated the tooth survival in susceptible individuals after non-surgical periodontal therapy. Eight of included studies were selected for the meta-analysis. IL-1 positive genotypes increase the risk of tooth loss, while no association found between the bleeding on probing (BOP), clinical attachment loss (CAL) and plaque index (PI) with the genotype status. Probing pocket depth (PPD) reduction in the first three months and in long-term results found to have a significant association with the genotype. Conclusions There is no difference in the clinical measurements after non-surgical periodontal treatment, apart from PPD. More publications are needed to identify a cause-effect relationship. Key words:Periodontal disease, periodontitis, periodontal therapy, clinical outcome, tooth loss, susceptibility, polymorphism, genotype, meta-analysis, systematic review. PMID:26595831

  8. Epizootic to enzootic transition of a fungal disease in tropical Andean frogs: Are surviving species still susceptible?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Catenazzi

    Full Text Available The fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd, which causes the disease chytridiomycosis, has been linked to catastrophic amphibian declines throughout the world. Amphibians differ in their vulnerability to chytridiomycosis; some species experience epizootics followed by collapse while others exhibit stable host/pathogen dynamics where most amphibian hosts survive in the presence of Bd (e.g., in the enzootic state. Little is known about the factors that drive the transition between the two disease states within a community, or whether populations of species that survived the initial epizootic are stable, yet this information is essential for conservation and theory. Our study focuses on a diverse Peruvian amphibian community that experienced a Bd-caused collapse. We explore host/Bd dynamics of eight surviving species a decade after the mass extinction by using population level disease metrics and Bd-susceptibility trials. We found that three of the eight species continue to be susceptible to Bd, and that their populations are declining. Only one species is growing in numbers and it was non-susceptible in our trials. Our study suggests that some species remain vulnerable to Bd and exhibit ongoing population declines in enzootic systems where Bd-host dynamics are assumed to be stable.

  9. Deltamethrin-mediated survival, behavior, and oenocyte morphology of insecticide-susceptible and resistant yellow fever mosquitos (Aedes aegypti).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriel, Nadja Biondine; Tomé, Hudson Vaner Ventura; Guedes, Raul Carvalho Narciso; Martins, Gustavo Ferreira

    2016-06-01

    Insecticide use is the prevailing control tactic for the mosquito Aedes aegypti, a vector of several human viruses, which leads to ever-increasing problems of insecticide resistance in populations of this insect pest species. The underlying mechanisms of insecticide resistance may be linked to the metabolism of insecticides by various cells, including oenocytes. Oenocytes are ectodermal cells responsible for lipid metabolism and detoxification. The goal of this study was to evaluate the sublethal effects of deltamethrin on survival, behavior, and oenocyte structure in the immature mosquitoes of insecticide-susceptible and resistant strains of A. aegypti. Fourth instar larvae (L4) of both strains were exposed to different concentrations of deltamethrin (i.e., 0.001, 0.003, 0.005, and 0.007 ppm). After exposure, L4 were subjected to behavioral bioassays. Insecticide effects on cell integrity after deltamethrin exposure (at 0.003 or 0.005 ppm) were assessed by processing pupal oenocytes for transmission electron microscopy or TUNEL reaction. The insecticide resistant L4 survived all the tested concentrations, whereas the 0.007-ppm deltamethrin concentration had lethal effects on susceptible L4. Susceptible L4 were lethargic and exhibited less swimming activity than unexposed larvae, whereas the resistant L4 were hyperexcited following exposure to 0.005 ppm deltamethrin. No sublethal effects and no significant cell death were observed in the oenocytes of either susceptible or resistant insects exposed to deltamethrin. The present study illustrated the different responses of susceptible and resistant strains of A. aegypti following exposure to sublethal concentration of deltamethrin, and demonstrated how the behavior of the immature stage of the two strains varied, as well as oenocyte structure following insecticide exposure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Single nucleotide polymorphisms within interferon signaling pathway genes are associated with colorectal cancer susceptibility and survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun Lu

    Full Text Available Interferon (IFN signaling has been suggested to play an important role in colorectal carcinogenesis. Our study aimed to examine potentially functional genetic variants in interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3, IRF5, IRF7, type I and type II IFN and their receptor genes with respect to colorectal cancer (CRC risk and clinical outcome. Altogether 74 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were covered by the 34 SNPs genotyped in a hospital-based case-control study of 1327 CRC cases and 758 healthy controls from the Czech Republic. We also analyzed these SNPs in relation to overall survival and event-free survival in a subgroup of 483 patients. Seven SNPs in IFNA1, IFNA13, IFNA21, IFNK, IFNAR1 and IFNGR1 were associated with CRC risk. After multiple testing correction, the associations with the SNPs rs2856968 (IFNAR1 and rs2234711 (IFNGR1 remained formally significant (P = 0.0015 and P<0.0001, respectively. Multivariable survival analyses showed that the SNP rs6475526 (IFNA7/IFNA14 was associated with overall survival of the patients (P = 0.041 and event-free survival among patients without distant metastasis at the time of diagnosis, P = 0.034. The hazard ratios (HRs for rs6475526 remained statistically significant even after adjustment for age, gender, grade and stage (P = 0.029 and P = 0.036, respectively, suggesting that rs6475526 is an independent prognostic marker for CRC. Our data suggest that genetic variation in the IFN signaling pathway genes may play a role in the etiology and survival of CRC and further studies are warranted.

  11. Single nucleotide polymorphisms within interferon signaling pathway genes are associated with colorectal cancer susceptibility and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shun; Pardini, Barbara; Cheng, Bowang; Naccarati, Alessio; Huhn, Stefanie; Vymetalkova, Veronika; Vodickova, Ludmila; Buchler, Thomas; Hemminki, Kari; Vodicka, Pavel; Försti, Asta

    2014-01-01

    Interferon (IFN) signaling has been suggested to play an important role in colorectal carcinogenesis. Our study aimed to examine potentially functional genetic variants in interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3), IRF5, IRF7, type I and type II IFN and their receptor genes with respect to colorectal cancer (CRC) risk and clinical outcome. Altogether 74 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were covered by the 34 SNPs genotyped in a hospital-based case-control study of 1327 CRC cases and 758 healthy controls from the Czech Republic. We also analyzed these SNPs in relation to overall survival and event-free survival in a subgroup of 483 patients. Seven SNPs in IFNA1, IFNA13, IFNA21, IFNK, IFNAR1 and IFNGR1 were associated with CRC risk. After multiple testing correction, the associations with the SNPs rs2856968 (IFNAR1) and rs2234711 (IFNGR1) remained formally significant (P = 0.0015 and P<0.0001, respectively). Multivariable survival analyses showed that the SNP rs6475526 (IFNA7/IFNA14) was associated with overall survival of the patients (P = 0.041 and event-free survival among patients without distant metastasis at the time of diagnosis, P = 0.034). The hazard ratios (HRs) for rs6475526 remained statistically significant even after adjustment for age, gender, grade and stage (P = 0.029 and P = 0.036, respectively), suggesting that rs6475526 is an independent prognostic marker for CRC. Our data suggest that genetic variation in the IFN signaling pathway genes may play a role in the etiology and survival of CRC and further studies are warranted.

  12. Multiple paths towards reduced membrane potential and concomitant reduction in aminoglycoside susceptibility in staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Martin; Nøhr-Meldgaard, Katrine; Ingmer, Hanne

    2018-01-01

    the susceptibility towards antibiotics. The aim of this study was to identify genetic determinants that upon inactivation reduce aminoglycoside susceptibility in Staphylococcus aureus. We screened the Nebraska Transposon Mutant Library of 1920 single-gene inactivations in S. aureus strain JE2, for reduced...... susceptibility to gentamicin. 9 mutants were confirmed by E-test to display between 2 and 16-fold reduced susceptibility to this antibiotic. All of the identified genes were associated with the electron transport chain and energy metabolism. Four mutant strains (menD, hemB, aroC and SAUSA300_0355) conferred...... the largest increase in gentamicin susceptibility and exhibited a small colony variant phenotype, whereas the remaining mutants (qoxA, qoxB, qoxC, ndh and hemX) displayed colony morphology similar to the wild type. All of the mutants, except hemX, displayed reduced membrane potential suggesting that reduced...

  13. Association of susceptible genotypes to periodontal disease with the clinical outcome and tooth survival after non-surgical periodontal therapy: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Chatzopoulos, Georgios S.; Doufexi, Aikaterini; Kalogirou, Fotini

    2016-01-01

    Background The real clinical utility of genetic testing is the prognostic value of genetic factors in the clinical outcome of periodontal treatment and the tooth survival. A meta-analysis was undertaken to estimate the effect of a susceptible genotype to periodontitis on the clinical outcomes of non-surgical periodontal therapy and the tooth survival. Material and Methods A systematic search of MEDLINE-Pubmed, Cochrane Library and Scopus was performed. Additionally, a hand search was done in ...

  14. Survival

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data provide information on the survival of California red-legged frogs in a unique ecosystem to better conserve this threatened species while restoring...

  15. Peripheral reductive capacity is associated with cognitive performance and survival in Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minghetti, Luisa; Greco, Anita; Puopolo, Maria; Combrinck, Marc; Warden, Donald; Smith, A David

    2006-01-01

    Background Oxidative stress is believed to be an early event and a key factor in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis and progression. In spite of an intensive search for surrogate markers to monitor changes related to oxidative stress in the brain, there is as yet no consensus about which markers to use in clinical studies. The measurement of peripheral anti-oxidants is an alternative way of evaluating the involvement of oxidative stress in the course of the disease. Given the complexity of peripheral anti-oxidant defence, variations in the levels of individual anti-oxidant species may not fully reflect the overall capacity to fight oxidant conditions. We therefore chose to evaluate the total reductive capacity (herein defined as anti-oxidant capacity, AOC) in serum from control subjects and AD patients in order to study the association between peripheral anti-oxidant defence, cognitive impairment and patient survival. Methods We measured the levels of AOC in serum samples from 26 cognitively normal controls and 25 AD patients (12 post-mortem confirmed) who completed the Cambridge Cognitive Assessment. Cognitive decline was assessed in a subgroup of 19 patients who underwent a second cognitive assessment 2 years after the initial visit. Results Serum AOC levels were lower in AD patients than in controls and were correlated with their cognitive test scores, although AOC levels were unrelated to cognitive decline assessed two years later. On the other hand, AOC levels were predictive of the length of patients' survival, with higher levels giving longer survival. Conclusion This study indicates that peripheral anti-oxidant defences are depleted in AD patients. The results suggest that serum AOC is a good index of the general health status and prognosis of patients but does not necessarily reflect the extent to which vulnerable neuronal populations are protected from oxidant processes. Further studies are required to establish whether peripheral AOC measurements may

  16. Peripheral reductive capacity is associated with cognitive performance and survival in Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Combrinck Marc

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oxidative stress is believed to be an early event and a key factor in Alzheimer's disease (AD pathogenesis and progression. In spite of an intensive search for surrogate markers to monitor changes related to oxidative stress in the brain, there is as yet no consensus about which markers to use in clinical studies. The measurement of peripheral anti-oxidants is an alternative way of evaluating the involvement of oxidative stress in the course of the disease. Given the complexity of peripheral anti-oxidant defence, variations in the levels of individual anti-oxidant species may not fully reflect the overall capacity to fight oxidant conditions. We therefore chose to evaluate the total reductive capacity (herein defined as anti-oxidant capacity, AOC in serum from control subjects and AD patients in order to study the association between peripheral anti-oxidant defence, cognitive impairment and patient survival. Methods We measured the levels of AOC in serum samples from 26 cognitively normal controls and 25 AD patients (12 post-mortem confirmed who completed the Cambridge Cognitive Assessment. Cognitive decline was assessed in a subgroup of 19 patients who underwent a second cognitive assessment 2 years after the initial visit. Results Serum AOC levels were lower in AD patients than in controls and were correlated with their cognitive test scores, although AOC levels were unrelated to cognitive decline assessed two years later. On the other hand, AOC levels were predictive of the length of patients' survival, with higher levels giving longer survival. Conclusion This study indicates that peripheral anti-oxidant defences are depleted in AD patients. The results suggest that serum AOC is a good index of the general health status and prognosis of patients but does not necessarily reflect the extent to which vulnerable neuronal populations are protected from oxidant processes. Further studies are required to establish whether

  17. Predicting Structure-Function Relations and Survival following Surgical and Bronchoscopic Lung Volume Reduction Treatment of Emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondoñedo, Jarred R; Suki, Béla

    2017-02-01

    Lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) and bronchoscopic lung volume reduction (bLVR) are palliative treatments aimed at reducing hyperinflation in advanced emphysema. Previous work has evaluated functional improvements and survival advantage for these techniques, although their effects on the micromechanical environment in the lung have yet to be determined. Here, we introduce a computational model to simulate a force-based destruction of elastic networks representing emphysema progression, which we use to track the response to lung volume reduction via LVRS and bLVR. We find that (1) LVRS efficacy can be predicted based on pre-surgical network structure; (2) macroscopic functional improvements following bLVR are related to microscopic changes in mechanical force heterogeneity; and (3) both techniques improve aspects of survival and quality of life influenced by lung compliance, albeit while accelerating disease progression. Our model predictions yield unique insights into the microscopic origins underlying emphysema progression before and after lung volume reduction.

  18. Reduction in alkaline phosphatase is associated with longer survival in primary sclerosing cholangitis, independent of dominant stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, C; Rössler, A; Halibasic, E; Sauer, P; Weiss, K-H; Friedrich, K; Wannhoff, A; Stiehl, A; Stremmel, W; Trauner, M; Gotthardt, D N

    2014-12-01

    Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) is an important serum marker in primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). Patients with obstruction of the large bile ducts due to dominant strictures (DS) are a special, clinically important phenotype. To determine the impact of ALP reduction on liver transplantation-free survival in PSC patients with DS. Prospective cohort study in 215 PSC patients. We performed subgroup analysis for patients without DS (no DS, n = 84), DS at first presentation (DS early, n = 72) and development of DS during the course of the study (DS late, n = 59). We evaluated two scores of ALP reduction. ALP reduction 1 was defined as ALP normalisation, 50% reduction compared with baseline values, or reduction below 1.5 times of upper limit of normal (ULN) within 6 months. ALP reduction 2 was defined as ALP reduction below 1.5 times of ULN within 12 months. Of the patients, 59.5% reached an ALP reduction 1 and 56.7% according to ALP reduction 2. Achievement of each score was associated with longer transplantation-free survival in all three groups (ALP reduction 1: no DS P = 0.001; DS early P alkaline phosphatase values within the first year is associated with improved transplantation-free survival in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis independent of the presence of dominant strictures. Alkaline phosphatase might be an adequate surrogate marker for outcome assessment in clinical studies both for patients with and without dominant strictures. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. [Options for the reduction of magnetic susceptibility artifacts caused by implanted microchips in 0.5 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piesnack, S; Oechtering, G; Ludewig, E

    2015-01-01

    Microchips contain ferromagnetic materials, which lead to severe focal image interferences when performing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Very small animals are particularly prone to these susceptibility artifacts, which may hinder analysis of the neck-region MRI image. We investigated the impact of sequence type on the artifact's size and determined the optimal imaging parameters to minimize these artifacts. Furthermore, the minimum distance between the microchip and the spinal canal required to assess the spinal structures should be determined. Investigations were performed on the cadavers of 26 cats and two dogs using a low-field MRI System (field strength 0.5 Tesla). To quantify susceptibility artifacts, several sequence types (spin echo, turbo-spin echo (TSE), gradient echo) and imaging parameters (echo time (TE), voxel volume, frequency direction) were systematically varied. Additionally, computed tomography imaging was performed to determine the distance between the microchip and the spinal canal. The size of the artifact was smallest with T1-weighted TSE sequences. A short TE (10 ms) and a small voxel size (acquisition matrix 256 x 256 pixels, field of view 160 mm, slice thickness 2 mm) significantly reduced artifact size. Furthermore, it could be shown that by changing the frequency- and phase-encoding direction, the shape and orientation of the maximum dimension of the artifact could be influenced. Even when using an optimized T1-weighted TSE sequence, it was impossible to evaluate the spinal cord when the distance between the microchip and the center of the spinal canal was dogs and cats, microchips can cause severe susceptibility artifacts. Because of the small distance between the microchip and the spinal structures, spinal evaluation may be limited or impossible. The investigations demonstrated that the adjustment of sequence parameters helps to significantly minimize artifact size and shape. The greatest reduction in artifact size was achieved by

  20. Estimates of conditional survival in gastric cancer reveal a reduction of racial disparities with long-term follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luyimbazi, David; Nelson, Rebecca A; Choi, Audrey H; Li, Lily; Chao, Joseph; Sun, Virginia; Hamner, John B; Kim, Joseph

    2015-02-01

    In prior analyses, conditional survival (CS) estimates for gastric cancer have weighed clinical and pathologic factors to predict prognosis at time intervals after surgery. Since racial disparities in gastric cancer outcomes were not considered, our objective was to determine whether race influences CS estimates. Data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results cancer registry were used to identify gastric adenocarcinoma patients who underwent curative surgical intervention between 1988 and 2005. Five-year relative conditional survival (RCS) was computed for patients who survived at least 1 to 5 years after surgery. RCS was calculated by assessing observed and expected survival in an age- and race-matched standard population. Results were compared across time and racial groups (white, black, and Asian) using z test statistics. Of 14,067 patients, 63.8 % were white, 15.5 % black, and 20.7 % Asian. Racial disparities among groups were observed with improved survival of Asians at time point zero and improved RCS at 1 year. At 5 years following curative surgery, each racial group had increased RCS and the greatest magnitude of relative increase was observed in white and black patients (121 and 118 %, respectively). Comparison of RCS at the 5-year time point revealed a reduction of racial disparities in survival among the three groups. Our investigation shows that racial disparities in gastric cancer outcomes are pronounced at the time of curative surgery but diminish after years of survival, thus suggesting race has less influence over outcomes the longer patients survive. The reasons for reduction of racial disparities remain unclear and warrant future study.

  1. Mammographic Density Reduction as a Prognostic Marker for Postmenopausal Breast Cancer: Results Using a Joint Longitudinal-Survival Modeling Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Therese M-L; Crowther, Michael J; Czene, Kamila; Hall, Per; Humphreys, Keith

    2017-11-01

    Previous studies have linked reductions in mammographic density after a breast cancer diagnosis to an improved prognosis. These studies focused on short-term change, using a 2-stage process, treating estimated change as a fixed covariate in a survival model. We propose the use of a joint longitudinal-survival model. This enables us to model long-term trends in density while accounting for dropout as well as for measurement error. We studied the change in mammographic density after a breast cancer diagnosis and its association with prognosis (measured by cause-specific mortality), overall and with respect to hormone replacement therapy and tamoxifen treatment. We included 1,740 women aged 50-74 years, diagnosed with breast cancer in Sweden during 1993-1995, with follow-up until 2008. They had a total of 6,317 mammographic density measures available from the first 5 years of follow-up, including baseline measures. We found that the impact of the withdrawal of hormone replacement therapy on density reduction was larger than that of tamoxifen treatment. Unlike previous studies, we found that there was an association between density reduction and survival, both for tamoxifen-treated women and women who were not treated with tamoxifen. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

  2. Computer based prognosis model with dimensionality reduction and validation of attributes for prolonged survival prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.G. Raji

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Medical databases contain large volume of data about patients and their clinical information. For extracting the features and their relationships from a huge database, various data mining techniques need to be employed. As Liver transplantation is the curative surgical procedure for the patients suffering from end stage liver disease, predicting the survival rate after Liver transplantation has a big impact. Appropriate selection of attributes and methods are necessary for the survival prediction. Liver transplantation data with 256 attributes were collected from 389 attributes of the United Nations Organ Sharing registry for the survival prediction. Initially 59 attributes were filtered manually, and then Principal Component Analysis (PCA was applied for reducing the dimensionality of the data. After performing PCA, 197 attributes were obtained and they were ranked into 27 strong/relevant attributes. Using association rule mining techniques, the association between the selected attributes was identified and verified. Comparison of rules generated by various association rules mining algorithm before and after PCA was also carried out for affirming the results. The various rule mining algorithms used were Apriori, Treap mining and Tertius algorithms. Among these algorithms, Treap mining algorithm generated the rules with high accuracy. A Multilayer Perceptron model was built for predicting the long term survival of patients after Liver transplantation which produced high accuracy prediction result. The model performance was compared with Radial Basis Function model to prove the accuracy of survival of liver patients'. The top ranked attributes obtained from rule mining were fed to the models for effective training. This ensures that Treap mining generated associations of high impact attributes which in-turn made the survival prediction flawless.

  3. Implant survival and marginal bone loss at turned and oxidized implants in periodontitis-susceptible smokers and never-smokers: a retrospective, clinical, radiographic case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayardoust, Shariel; Gröndahl, Kerstin; Johansson, Eva; Thomsen, Peter; Slotte, Christer

    2013-12-01

    Little is known about the long-term outcome of oxidized surface oral implants, especially in periodontitis-susceptible smokers. The aim of this study is to determine implant survival and marginal bone loss at turned and oxidized implants in smokers and never-smokers with periodontitis. Forty smokers and 40 never-smokers with experience of advanced periodontal disease, treated with implants 5 years previously, are included in this study. Groups were matched for sex, oral hygiene, and implant distribution, and patients were subgrouped by implant surface type (turned or oxidized). The overall implant survival rate was 96.9% in never-smokers and 89.6% in smokers. Compared with oxidized implants, turned implants failed more frequently in smokers. In smokers, mean (standard error of the mean) marginal bone loss at 5 years was 1.54 (0.21) mm at turned and 1.16 (0.24) mm at oxidized implants. In never-smokers, significantly greater bone loss was found at oxidized implants, 1.26 (0.15) mm, than at turned implants, 0.84 (0.14) mm. Oxidized implants demonstrated similar bone loss for both groups. Turned implants lost significantly more bone in smokers. Compared with never-smokers, the smokers' likelihood ratio for implant failure was 4.68, 6.40 for turned and 0.00 for oxidized implants. The results of the study underscore the need for prevention and cessation of smoking. Turned implants failed more frequently and lost more marginal bone in smokers. In contrast, oxidized implants showed similar failure rates and bone loss in smokers and never-smokers. Turned implants displayed less bone loss than oxidized implants in never-smokers. Oxidized surface implants are more suitable for patients susceptible to periodontitis who smoke.

  4. SU-E-I-62: Reduction of Susceptibility Artifacts by Increasing the Bandwidth (BW) and Echo Train Length (ETL)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mavroidis, P [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Boci, N; Kostopoulos, S; Ninos, C; Glotsos, D; Oikonomou, G; Bakas, A; Roka, V; Cavouras, D; Lavdas, E [Technological Education Institute of Athens, Athens, Attika (Greece); Sakkas, G; Tsagkalis, A [Animus Kyanoys Larissas Hospital, Larissa, Thessaly (Greece); Chatzivasileiou, V; Batsikas, G [IASO Thessalias Hospital, Larissa, Thessaly (Greece); Papanikolaou, N [University of Texas HSC SA, San Antonio, TX (United States); Stathakis, S [Cancer Therapy and Research Center, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this present study is to increase bandwidth (BW) and echo train length (ETL) in Proton Density Turbo Spin Echo (PD TSE) sequences with and without fat saturation (FS) as well as in Turbo Inversion Recovery Magnitude sequences (TIRM) in order to assess whether these sequences are capable of reducing susceptibility artifacts. Methods: We compared 1) TIRM coronal (COR) with the same sequence with increased both BW and ETL 2) Conventional PD TSE sagittal (SAG) with FS with an increased BW 3) Conventional PD TSE SAG without FS with an increased BW 4) Conventional PD TSE SAG without FS with increased both BW and ETL. A quantitative analysis was performed to measure the extent of the susceptibility artifacts. Furthermore, a qualitative analysis was performed by two radiologists in order to evaluate the susceptibility artifacts, image distortion and fat suppression. The depiction of cartilage, menisci, muscles, tendons and bone marrow were also qualitatively analyzed. Results: The quantitative analysis found that the modified TIRM sequence is significantly superior to the conventional one regarding the extent of the susceptibility artifacts. In the qualitative analysis, the modified TIRM sequence was superior to the corresponding conventional one in eight characteristics out of ten that were analyzed. The modified PD TSE with FS was superior to the corresponding conventional one regarding the susceptibility artifacts, image distortion and depiction of bone marrow and cartilage while achieving effective fat saturation. The modified PD TSE sequence without FS with a high (H) BW was found to be superior corresponding to the conventional one in the case of cartilage. Conclusion: Consequently, TIRM sequence with an increased BW and ETL is proposed for producing images of high quality and modified PD TSE with H BW for smaller metals, especially when FS is used.

  5. Extension of the survival dimensionality reduction algorithm to detect epistasis in competing risks models (SDR-CR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beretta, Lorenzo; Santaniello, Alessandro

    2013-02-01

    The discovery and the description of the genetic background of common human diseases is hampered by their complexity and dynamic behavior. Appropriate bioinformatic tools are needed to account all the facets of complex diseases and to this end we recently described the survival dimensionality reduction (SDR) algorithm in the effort to model gene-gene interactions in the context of survival analysis. When one event precludes the occurrence of another event under investigation in the 'competing risk model', survival algorithms require particular adjustment to avoid the risk of reporting wrong or biased conclusions. The SDR algorithm was modified to incorporate the cumulative incidence function as well as an adapted version of the Brier score for mutually exclusive outcomes, to better search for epistatic models in the competing risk setting. The applicability of the new SDR algorithm (SDR-CR) was evaluated using synthetic lifetime epistatic datasets with competing risks and on a dataset of scleroderma patients. The SDR-CR algorithms retains a satisfactory power to detect the causative variants in simulated datasets under different scenarios of sample size and degrees of type I or type II censoring. In the real-world dataset, SDR-CR was capable of detecting a significant interaction between the IL-1α C-889T and the IL-1β C-511T single-nucleotide polymorphisms to predict the occurrence of restrictive lung disease vs. isolated pulmonary hypertension. We provide an useful extension of the SDR algorithm to analyze epistatic interactions in the competing risk settings that may be of use to unveil the genetic background of complex human diseases. http://sourceforge.net/projects/sdrproject/files/. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Carnitine protects the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans from glucose-induced reduction of survival depending on the nuclear hormone receptor DAF-12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deusing, Dorothé Jenni, E-mail: Dorothe.J.Deusing@ernaehrung.uni-giessen.de; Beyrer, Melanie, E-mail: m.beyrer@web.de; Fitzenberger, Elena, E-mail: Elena.Fitzenberger@ernaehrung.uni-giessen.de; Wenzel, Uwe, E-mail: uwe.wenzel@ernaehrung.uni-giessen.de

    2015-05-08

    Besides its function in transport of fatty acids into mitochondria in order to provide substrates for β-oxidation, carnitine has been shown to affect also glucose metabolism and to inhibit several mechanisms associated with diabetic complications. In the present study we used the mev-1 mutant of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans fed on a high glucose concentration in liquid media as a diabetes model and tested the effects of carnitine supplementation on their survival under heat-stress. Carnitine at 100 μM completely prevented the survival reduction that was caused by the application of 10 mM glucose. RNA-interference for sir-2.1, a candidate genes mediating the effects of carnitine revealed no contribution of the sirtuin for the rescue of survival. Under daf-12 RNAi rescue of survival by carnitine was abolished. RNA-interference for γ-butyrobetaine hydroxylase 2, encoding the key enzyme for carnitine biosynthesis did neither increase glucose toxicity nor prevent the rescue of survival by carnitine, suggesting that the effects of carnitine supplementation on carnitine levels were significant. Finally, it was demonstrated that neither the amount of lysosomes nor the proteasomal activity were increased by carnitine, excluding that protein degradation pathways, such as autophagy or proteasomal degradation, are involved in the protective carnitine effects. In conclusion, carnitine supplementation prevents the reduction of survival caused by glucose in C. elegans in dependence on a nuclear hormone receptor which displays high homologies to the vertebrate peroxisomal proliferator activated receptors. - Highlights: • Carnitine protects from glucose-induced reduction of stress-resistance. • Carnitine acts via the PPAR homolog DAF-12 on glucose toxicity. • Carnitine protects from glucose toxicity independent of protein degradation.

  7. Carnitine protects the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans from glucose-induced reduction of survival depending on the nuclear hormone receptor DAF-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deusing, Dorothé Jenni; Beyrer, Melanie; Fitzenberger, Elena; Wenzel, Uwe

    2015-05-08

    Besides its function in transport of fatty acids into mitochondria in order to provide substrates for β-oxidation, carnitine has been shown to affect also glucose metabolism and to inhibit several mechanisms associated with diabetic complications. In the present study we used the mev-1 mutant of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans fed on a high glucose concentration in liquid media as a diabetes model and tested the effects of carnitine supplementation on their survival under heat-stress. Carnitine at 100 μM completely prevented the survival reduction that was caused by the application of 10 mM glucose. RNA-interference for sir-2.1, a candidate genes mediating the effects of carnitine revealed no contribution of the sirtuin for the rescue of survival. Under daf-12 RNAi rescue of survival by carnitine was abolished. RNA-interference for γ-butyrobetaine hydroxylase 2, encoding the key enzyme for carnitine biosynthesis did neither increase glucose toxicity nor prevent the rescue of survival by carnitine, suggesting that the effects of carnitine supplementation on carnitine levels were significant. Finally, it was demonstrated that neither the amount of lysosomes nor the proteasomal activity were increased by carnitine, excluding that protein degradation pathways, such as autophagy or proteasomal degradation, are involved in the protective carnitine effects. In conclusion, carnitine supplementation prevents the reduction of survival caused by glucose in C. elegans in dependence on a nuclear hormone receptor which displays high homologies to the vertebrate peroxisomal proliferator activated receptors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Host plant resistance against tomato spotted wilt virus in peanut (Arachis hypogaea) and its impact on susceptibility to the virus, virus population genetics, and vector feeding behavior and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaraj, Sivamani; Srinivasan, Rajagopalbabu; Culbreath, Albert K; Riley, David G; Pappu, Hanu R

    2014-02-01

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) severely affects peanut production in the southeastern United States. Breeding efforts over the last three decades resulted in the release of numerous peanut genotypes with field resistance to TSWV. The degree of field resistance in these genotypes has steadily increased over time, with recently released genotypes exhibiting a higher degree of field resistance than older genotypes. However, most new genotypes have never been evaluated in the greenhouse or laboratory against TSWV or thrips, and the mechanism of resistance is unknown. In this study, TSWV-resistant and -susceptible genotypes were subjected to TSWV mechanical inoculation. The incidence of TSWV infection was 71.7 to 87.2%. Estimation of TSWV nucleocapsid (N) gene copies did not reveal significant differences between resistant and susceptible genotypes. Parsimony and principal component analyses of N gene nucleotide sequences revealed inconsistent differences between virus isolates collected from resistant and susceptible genotypes and between old (collected in 1998) and new (2010) isolates. Amino acid sequence analyses indicated consistent differences between old and new isolates. In addition, we found evidence for overabundance of nonsynonymous substitutions. However, there was no evidence for positive selection. Purifying selection, population expansion, and differentiation seem to have influenced the TSWV populations temporally rather than positive selection induced by host resistance. Choice and no-choice tests indicated that resistant and susceptible genotypes differentially affected thrips feeding and survival. Thrips feeding and survival were suppressed on some resistant genotypes compared with susceptible genotypes. These findings reveal how TSWV resistance in peanut could influence evolution, epidemiology, and management of TSWV.

  9. Asiatic acid protects against cognitive deficits and reductions in cell proliferation and survival in the rat hippocampus caused by 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pornthip Chaisawang

    Full Text Available The chemotherapy drug, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU, has been reported to cause cognitive impairments in cancer patients. The drug also reduces cell proliferation and survival in the brain. Asiatic acid (AA is a triterpene compound found in Centella asiatica that can protect against reduction of neurogenesis in the hippocampus and memory deficits induced by valproic acid (VPA. In the present study, we investigated the preventive effects of AA on the deficits in spatial working memory and cell proliferation and survival caused by 5-FU chemotherapy in a rat model. Male Sprague Dawley rats received 5-FU (5 i.v. injections, 25 mg/kg on day 8, 11, 14, 17 and 20 of the study. This was co-administered with AA (30 mg/kg, oral gavage tube either 20 days before receiving 5-FU (preventive, after receiving 5-FU (recovery, or for the entire period of the experiment (throughout. Spatial working memory was determined using the novel object location (NOL test and hippocampal cell proliferation and survival of dividing cells were quantified using immunohistochemistry. Rats in the 5-FU alone and recovery groups showed memory deficits in the NOL test and reductions in cell proliferation and cell survival in the subgranular zone (SGZ of the hippocampal dentate gyrus. Rats in the control, AA alone, and both preventive and throughout co-administration groups, however, did not exhibit these characteristics. The results showed that 5-FU chemotherapy impaired memory and reduced cell proliferation and cell survival in the SGZ of the hippocampal dentate gyrus. However, these impairments in the animals receiving 5-FU chemotherapy were restored to control levels when AA was co-administered before and during 5-FU treatment. These data demonstrate that AA can prevent the spatial working memory and hippocampal neurogenesis impairments caused by 5-FU chemotherapy.

  10. Reduction in Tumor Volume by Cone Beam Computed Tomography Predicts Overall Survival in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Chemoradiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jabbour, Salma K., E-mail: jabbousk@cinj.rutgers.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Kim, Sinae [Division of Biometrics, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Department of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Haider, Syed A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Xu, Xiaoting [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Soochow (China); Wu, Alson [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Surakanti, Sujani; Aisner, Joseph [Division of Medical Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Langenfeld, John [Division of Surgery, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Yue, Ning J.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Zou, Wei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: We sought to evaluate whether tumor response using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) performed as part of the routine care during chemoradiation therapy (CRT) could forecast the outcome of unresectable, locally advanced, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: We manually delineated primary tumor volumes (TV) of patients with NSCLC who were treated with radical CRT on days 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, 36, and 43 on CBCTs obtained as part of the standard radiation treatment course. Percentage reductions in TV were calculated and then correlated to survival and pattern of recurrence using Cox proportional hazard models. Clinical information including histologic subtype was also considered in the study of such associations. Results: We evaluated 38 patients with a median follow-up time of 23.4 months. The median TV reduction was 39.3% (range, 7.3%-69.3%) from day 1 (D1) to day 43 (D43) CBCTs. Overall survival was associated with TV reduction from D1 to D43 (hazard ratio [HR] 0.557, 95% CI 0.39-0.79, P=.0009). For every 10% decrease in TV from D1 to D43, the risk of death decreased by 44.3%. For patients whose TV decreased ≥39.3 or <39.3%, log-rank test demonstrated a separation in survival (P=.02), with median survivals of 31 months versus 10 months, respectively. Neither local recurrence (HR 0.791, 95% CI 0.51-1.23, P=.29), nor distant recurrence (HR 0.78, 95% CI 0.57-1.08, P=.137) correlated with TV decrease from D1 to D43. Histologic subtype showed no impact on our findings. Conclusions: TV reduction as determined by CBCT during CRT as part of routine care predicts post-CRT survival. Such knowledge may justify intensification of RT or application of additional therapies. Assessment of genomic characteristics of these tumors may permit a better understanding of behavior or prediction of therapeutic outcomes.

  11. Reduction of cardiac cell death after helium postconditioning in rats: transcriptional analysis of cell death and survival pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oei, Gezina T M L; Heger, Michal; van Golen, Rowan F; Alles, Lindy K; Flick, Moritz; van der Wal, Allard C; van Gulik, Thomas M; Hollmann, Markus W; Preckel, Benedikt; Weber, Nina C

    2015-01-20

    Helium, a noble gas, has been used safely in humans. In animal models of regional myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) it was shown that helium conditioning reduces infarct size. Currently, it is not known how helium exerts its cytoprotective effects and which cell death/survival pathways are affected. The objective of this study, therefore, was to investigate the cell protective effects of helium postconditioning by PCR array analysis of genes involved in necrosis, apoptosis and autophagy. Male rats were subjected to 25 min of ischemia and 5, 15 or 30 min of reperfusion. Semiquantitative histological analysis revealed that 15 min of helium postconditioning reduced the extent of I/R-induced cell damage. This effect was not observed after 5 and 30 min of helium postconditioning. Analysis of the differential expression of genes showed that 15 min of helium postconditioning mainly caused upregulation of genes involved in autophagy and inhibition of apoptosis versus I/R alone. The results suggest that the cytoprotective effects of helium inhalation may be caused by a switch from pro-cell-death signaling to activation of cell survival mechanisms, which appears to affect a wide range of pathways.

  12. Distinct Effects of miR-210 Reduction on Neurogenesis: Increased Neuronal Survival of Inflammation But Reduced Proliferation Associated with Mitochondrial Enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voloboueva, Ludmila A; Sun, Xiaoyun; Xu, Lijun; Ouyang, Yi-Bing; Giffard, Rona G

    2017-03-15

    Neurogenesis is essential to brain development and plays a central role in the response to brain injury. Stroke and head trauma stimulate proliferation of endogenous neural stem cells (NSCs); however, the survival of young neurons is sharply reduced by postinjury inflammation. Cellular mitochondria are critical to successful neurogenesis and are a major target of inflammatory injury. Mitochondrial protection was shown to improve survival of young neurons. This study tested whether reducing cellular microRNA-210 (miR-210) would enhance mitochondrial function and improve survival of young murine neurons under inflammatory conditions. Several studies have demonstrated the potential of miR-210 inhibition to enhance and protect mitochondrial function through upregulation of mitochondrial proteins. Here, miR-210 inhibition significantly increased neuronal survival and protected the activity of mitochondrial enzymes cytochrome c oxidase and aconitase in differentiating NSC cultures exposed to inflammatory mediators. Unexpectedly, we found that reducing miR-210 significantly attenuated NSC proliferation upon induction of differentiation. Further investigation revealed that increased mitochondrial function suppressed the shift to primarily glycolytic metabolism and reduced mitochondrial length characteristic of dividing cells. Activation of AMP-regulated protein kinase-retinoblastoma signaling is important in NSC proliferation and the reduction of this activation observed by miR-210 inhibition is one mechanism contributing to the reduced proliferation. Postinjury neurogenesis occurs as a burst of proliferation that peaks in days, followed by migration and differentiation over weeks. Our studies suggest that mitochondrial protective miR-210 inhibition should be delayed until after the initial burst of proliferation, but could be beneficial during the prolonged differentiation stage.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Increasing the success of endogenous neurogenesis after brain injury

  13. A Metronidazole-Resistant Isolate of Blastocystis spp. Is Susceptible to Nitric Oxide and Downregulates Intestinal Epithelial Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase by a Novel Parasite Survival Mechanism ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Haris; Wu, Zhaona; Kidwai, Fahad; Tan, Kevin S. W.

    2011-01-01

    Blastocystis, one of the most common parasites colonizing the human intestine, is an extracellular, noninvasive, luminal protozoan with controversial pathogenesis. Blastocystis infections can be asymptomatic or cause intestinal symptoms of vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal pain. Although chronic infections are frequently reported, Blastocystis infections have also been reported to be self-limiting in immunocompetent patients. Characterizing the host innate response to Blastocystis would lead to a better understanding of the parasite's pathogenesis. Intestinal epithelial cells produce nitric oxide (NO), primarily on the apical side, in order to target luminal pathogens. In this study, we show that NO production by intestinal cells may be a host defense mechanism against Blastocystis. Two clinically relevant isolates of Blastocystis, ST-7 (B) and ST-4 (WR-1), were found to be susceptible to a range of NO donors. ST-7 (B), a metronidazole-resistant isolate, was found to be more sensitive to nitrosative stress. Using the Caco-2 model of human intestinal epithelium, Blastocystis ST-7 (B) but not ST-4 (WR-1) exhibited dose-dependent inhibition of Caco-2 NO production, and this was associated with downregulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Despite its higher susceptibility to NO, Blastocystis ST-7 (B) may have evolved unique strategies to evade this potential host defense by depressing host NO production. This is the first study to highlight a strain-to-strain variation in the ability of Blastocystis to evade the host antiparasitic NO response. PMID:21930763

  14. A metronidazole-resistant isolate of Blastocystis spp. is susceptible to nitric oxide and downregulates intestinal epithelial inducible nitric oxide synthase by a novel parasite survival mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Haris; Wu, Zhaona; Kidwai, Fahad; Tan, Kevin S W

    2011-12-01

    Blastocystis, one of the most common parasites colonizing the human intestine, is an extracellular, noninvasive, luminal protozoan with controversial pathogenesis. Blastocystis infections can be asymptomatic or cause intestinal symptoms of vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal pain. Although chronic infections are frequently reported, Blastocystis infections have also been reported to be self-limiting in immunocompetent patients. Characterizing the host innate response to Blastocystis would lead to a better understanding of the parasite's pathogenesis. Intestinal epithelial cells produce nitric oxide (NO), primarily on the apical side, in order to target luminal pathogens. In this study, we show that NO production by intestinal cells may be a host defense mechanism against Blastocystis. Two clinically relevant isolates of Blastocystis, ST-7 (B) and ST-4 (WR-1), were found to be susceptible to a range of NO donors. ST-7 (B), a metronidazole-resistant isolate, was found to be more sensitive to nitrosative stress. Using the Caco-2 model of human intestinal epithelium, Blastocystis ST-7 (B) but not ST-4 (WR-1) exhibited dose-dependent inhibition of Caco-2 NO production, and this was associated with downregulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Despite its higher susceptibility to NO, Blastocystis ST-7 (B) may have evolved unique strategies to evade this potential host defense by depressing host NO production. This is the first study to highlight a strain-to-strain variation in the ability of Blastocystis to evade the host antiparasitic NO response.

  15. Hazagora: will you survive the next disaster? - A serious game to raise awareness about geohazards and disaster risk reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossoux, S.; Delcamp, A.; Poppe, S.; Michellier, C.; Canters, F.; Kervyn, M.

    2016-01-01

    Natural disasters are too often presented as resulting from extreme natural phenomena affecting helpless populations, with people being insufficiently aware of the factors leading to disasters and of the existing strategies to mitigate their impacts. We developed a board game aimed at raising awareness about geohazards and disaster risk reduction strategies. The target groups are (1) secondary school students and citizens and (2) scientists and stakeholders involved in risk management activities. For the first group, the aim is to induce a better understanding of the geohazards and disasters they are confronted with in the media or in their daily lives; for the second, the objective is to generate discussion about risk management strategies. The game was tested with students in Belgium and with citizens, earth scientists, and risk managers in several African countries. Based on analysis of the most common game strategies observed, the players' reactions during the game, and their answers to a short questionnaire, we analyzed the main learning outcomes conveyed by this game. The game Hazagora appears to positively enhance the players' insights into processes involved in disasters. As such, the game is an effective, fun learning tool to introduce participants to the concepts of geohazards and disasters and to generate discussion.

  16. Survival dimensionality reduction (SDR): development and clinical application of an innovative approach to detect epistasis in presence of right-censored data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beretta, Lorenzo; Santaniello, Alessandro; van Riel, Piet L C M; Coenen, Marieke J H; Scorza, Raffaella

    2010-08-06

    Epistasis is recognized as a fundamental part of the genetic architecture of individuals. Several computational approaches have been developed to model gene-gene interactions in case-control studies, however, none of them is suitable for time-dependent analysis. Herein we introduce the Survival Dimensionality Reduction (SDR) algorithm, a non-parametric method specifically designed to detect epistasis in lifetime datasets. The algorithm requires neither specification about the underlying survival distribution nor about the underlying interaction model and proved satisfactorily powerful to detect a set of causative genes in synthetic epistatic lifetime datasets with a limited number of samples and high degree of right-censorship (up to 70%). The SDR method was then applied to a series of 386 Dutch patients with active rheumatoid arthritis that were treated with anti-TNF biological agents. Among a set of 39 candidate genes, none of which showed a detectable marginal effect on anti-TNF responses, the SDR algorithm did find that the rs1801274 SNP in the Fc gamma RIIa gene and the rs10954213 SNP in the IRF5 gene non-linearly interact to predict clinical remission after anti-TNF biologicals. Simulation studies and application in a real-world setting support the capability of the SDR algorithm to model epistatic interactions in candidate-genes studies in presence of right-censored data. http://sourceforge.net/projects/sdrproject/.

  17. Survival dimensionality reduction (SDR: development and clinical application of an innovative approach to detect epistasis in presence of right-censored data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beretta Lorenzo

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epistasis is recognized as a fundamental part of the genetic architecture of individuals. Several computational approaches have been developed to model gene-gene interactions in case-control studies, however, none of them is suitable for time-dependent analysis. Herein we introduce the Survival Dimensionality Reduction (SDR algorithm, a non-parametric method specifically designed to detect epistasis in lifetime datasets. Results The algorithm requires neither specification about the underlying survival distribution nor about the underlying interaction model and proved satisfactorily powerful to detect a set of causative genes in synthetic epistatic lifetime datasets with a limited number of samples and high degree of right-censorship (up to 70%. The SDR method was then applied to a series of 386 Dutch patients with active rheumatoid arthritis that were treated with anti-TNF biological agents. Among a set of 39 candidate genes, none of which showed a detectable marginal effect on anti-TNF responses, the SDR algorithm did find that the rs1801274 SNP in the FcγRIIa gene and the rs10954213 SNP in the IRF5 gene non-linearly interact to predict clinical remission after anti-TNF biologicals. Conclusions Simulation studies and application in a real-world setting support the capability of the SDR algorithm to model epistatic interactions in candidate-genes studies in presence of right-censored data. Availability: http://sourceforge.net/projects/sdrproject/

  18. Perfusion reduction at transcatheter intraarterial perfusion MR imaging: a promising intraprocedural biomarker to predict transplant-free survival during chemoembolization of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dingxin; Gaba, Ron C; Jin, Brian; Lewandowski, Robert J; Riaz, Ahsun; Memon, Khairuddin; Ryu, Robert K; Sato, Kent T; Kulik, Laura M; Mulcahy, Mary F; Larson, Andrew C; Salem, Riad; Omary, Reed A

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the predictive value of transcatheter intraarterial perfusion (TRIP) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-measured tumor perfusion changes during transarterial chemoembolization on transplant-free survival (TFS) in patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). This HIPAA-compliant prospective study was approved by the institutional review board. Written informed consent was obtained from all patients. Fifty-one consecutive adult patients with surgically unresectable single or multifocal measurable HCC and adequate laboratory parameters who underwent chemoembolization in a combined MR imaging-interventional radiology suite between February 2006 and June 2010 were studied. Tumor perfusion changes during chemoembolization were measured by using TRIP MR imaging with area under the time-signal intensity curve calculation. The end point of the study was TFS. The authors assessed the correlation between the percentage perfusion reduction in the tumor during chemoembolization and TFS by using univariate and multivariate analyses. Fifty patients (mean age, 61 years; 39 men aged 42-87 years [mean age, 61 years] and 11 women aged 49-83 years [mean age, 62 years]) were eligible for the analysis. Patients with 35%-85% intraprocedural tumor area under the time-signal intensity curve reduction (n = 32) showed significantly improved median TFS compared with patients with an area under the time-signal intensity curve reduction outside this range (n = 18) (16.6 months [95% confidence interval: 11.2, 22.0 months] vs 9.3 months [95% confidence interval: 6.6, 12.0 months], respectively; P = .046; hazard ratio: 0.46; 95% confidence interval: 0.21, 1.00). The cumulative TFS rates in the 35%-85% and less than 35% or more than 85% perfusion reduction groups at 1, 2, and 5 years after chemoembolization were 66.4%, 42.2%, and 28.2% versus 33.8%, 16.9%, and 0%, respectively. The study shows evidence of an association between intraprocedural tumor perfusion reduction

  19. A low frequency persistent reservoir of a genomic island in a pathogen population ensures island survival and improves pathogen fitness in a susceptible host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neale, Helen C; Laister, Robert; Payne, Joseph; Preston, Gail; Jackson, Robert W; Arnold, Dawn L

    2016-11-01

    The co-evolution of bacterial plant pathogens and their hosts is a complex and dynamic process. Host resistance imposes stress on invading pathogens that can lead to changes in the bacterial genome enabling the pathogen to escape host resistance. We have observed this phenomenon with the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola where isolates that have lost the genomic island PPHGI-1 carrying the effector gene avrPphB from its chromosome are infective against previously resistant plant hosts. However, we have never observed island extinction from the pathogen population within a host suggesting the island is maintained. Here, we present a mathematical model which predicts different possible fates for the island in the population; one outcome indicated that PPHGI-1 would be maintained at low frequency in the population long term, if it confers a fitness benefit. We empirically tested this prediction and determined that PPHGI-1 frequency in the bacterial population drops to a low but consistently detectable level during host resistance. Once PPHGI-1-carrying cells encounter a susceptible host, they rapidly increase in the population in a negative frequency-dependent manner. Importantly, our data show that mobile genetic elements can persist within the bacterial population and increase in frequency under favourable conditions. © 2016 The Authors. Environmental Microbiology published by Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Effects of cIAP-1, cIAP-2 and XIAP triple knockdown on prostate cancer cell susceptibility to apoptosis, cell survival and proliferation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gill, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Manipulating apoptotic resistance represents an important strategy for the treatment of hormone refractory prostate cancer. We hypothesised that the Inhibitor of Apoptosis (IAP) Proteins may be mediating this resistance and knockdown of cIAP-1, cIAP-2 and XIAP would increase sensitivity to apoptosis. METHODS: cIAP-1, cIAP-2 and XIAP where knocked down either individually or in combination using siRNA in androgen independent prostate cancer PC-3 cells as confirmed by real-time PCR and western blotting. Cells were then treated with TRAIL, Etoposide, or Tunicamycin, and apoptosis assessed by PI DNA staining. Apoptosis was confirmed with Annexin V labelling and measurement of PARP cleavage, and was inhibited using the pan-caspase inhibitor, zVAD.fmk. Clonogenic assays and assessment of ID-1 expression by western blotting were used to measure recovery and proliferation. RESULTS: PC-3 are resistant to TRAIL induced apoptosis and have elevated expression of cIAP-1, cIAP-2 and XIAP. Combined knockdown sensitised PC-3 to TRAIL induced apoptosis, but not to Etoposide or Tunicmycin, with corresponding increases in caspase activity and PARP cleavage which was inhibited by ZVAD.fmk. Triple knock down decreased proliferation which was confirmed by decreased ID-1 expression. CONCLUSION: Simultaneous knock down of the IAPs not only sensitised the PC-3 to TRAIL but also inhibited their proliferation rates and clonogenic survival. The inability to alter sensitivity to other triggers of apoptosis suggests that this effect is specific for death receptor pathways and knock down might facilitate immune-surveillance mechanisms to counter cancer progression and, in combination with therapeutic approaches using TRAIL, could represent an important treatment strategy.

  1. Effects of cIAP-1, cIAP-2 and XIAP triple knockdown on prostate cancer cell susceptibility to apoptosis, cell survival and proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dowling Catherine

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Manipulating apoptotic resistance represents an important strategy for the treatment of hormone refractory prostate cancer. We hypothesised that the Inhibitor of Apoptosis (IAP Proteins may be mediating this resistance and knockdown of cIAP-1, cIAP-2 and XIAP would increase sensitivity to apoptosis. Methods cIAP-1, cIAP-2 and XIAP where knocked down either individually or in combination using siRNA in androgen independent prostate cancer PC-3 cells as confirmed by real-time PCR and western blotting. Cells were then treated with TRAIL, Etoposide, or Tunicamycin, and apoptosis assessed by PI DNA staining. Apoptosis was confirmed with Annexin V labelling and measurement of PARP cleavage, and was inhibited using the pan-caspase inhibitor, zVAD.fmk. Clonogenic assays and assessment of ID-1 expression by western blotting were used to measure recovery and proliferation. Results PC-3 are resistant to TRAIL induced apoptosis and have elevated expression of cIAP-1, cIAP-2 and XIAP. Combined knockdown sensitised PC-3 to TRAIL induced apoptosis, but not to Etoposide or Tunicmycin, with corresponding increases in caspase activity and PARP cleavage which was inhibited by ZVAD.fmk. Triple knock down decreased proliferation which was confirmed by decreased ID-1 expression. Conclusion Simultaneous knock down of the IAPs not only sensitised the PC-3 to TRAIL but also inhibited their proliferation rates and clonogenic survival. The inability to alter sensitivity to other triggers of apoptosis suggests that this effect is specific for death receptor pathways and knock down might facilitate immune-surveillance mechanisms to counter cancer progression and, in combination with therapeutic approaches using TRAIL, could represent an important treatment strategy.

  2. Variable slice thickness (VAST) EPI for the reduction of susceptibility artifacts in whole-brain GE-EPI at 7 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunheim, Sascha; Johst, Sören; Pfaffenrot, Viktor; Maderwald, Stefan; Quick, Harald H; Poser, Benedikt A

    2017-07-10

    A new technique for 2D gradient-recalled echo echo-planar imaging (GE-EPI) termed 'variable slice thickness' (VAST) is proposed, which reduces signal losses caused by through-slice susceptibility artifacts, while keeping the volume repetition time (TR) manageable. The slice thickness is varied across the brain, with thinner slices being used in the inferior brain regions where signal voids are most severe. Various axial slice thickness schemes with identical whole-brain coverage were compared to regular EPI, which may either suffer from unfeasibly long TR if appropriately thin slices are used throughout, or signal loss if no counter-measures are taken. Evaluation is based on time-course signal-to-noise (tSNR) maps from resting state data and a statistical group-level region of interest (ROI) analysis on breath-hold fMRI measurements. The inferior brain region signal voids with static B0 inhomogeneities could be markedly reduced with VAST GE-EPI in contrast to regular GE-EPI. ROI-averaged event-related signal changes showed 48% increase in VAST compared to GE-EPI with regular "thick" slices. tSNR measurements proved the comparable signal robustness of VAST in comparison to regular GE-EPI with thin slices. A novel acquisition strategy for functional 2D GE-EPI at ultrahigh magnetic field is presented to reduce susceptibility-induced signal voids and keep TR sufficiently short for whole-brain coverage.

  3. Susceptibility of murine norovirus and hepatitis A virus to electron beam irradiation in oysters and quantifying the reduction in potential infection risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praveen, Chandni; Dancho, Brooke A; Kingsley, David H; Calci, Kevin R; Meade, Gloria K; Mena, Kristina D; Pillai, Suresh D

    2013-06-01

    Consumption of raw oysters is an exposure route for human norovirus (NoV) and hepatitis A virus (HAV). Therefore, efficient postharvest oyster treatment technology is needed to reduce public health risks. This study evaluated the inactivation of HAV and the NoV research surrogate, murine norovirus-1 (MNV-1), in oysters (Crassostrea virginica) by electron beam (E-beam) irradiation. The reduction of potential infection risks was quantified for E-beam irradiation technology employed on raw oysters at various virus contamination levels. The E-beam dose required to reduce the MNV and HAV titer by 90% (D(10) value) in whole oysters was 4.05 (standard deviations [SD], ±0.63) and 4.83 (SD, ±0.08) kGy, respectively. Microbial risk assessment suggests that if a typical serving of 12 raw oysters was contaminated with 10(5) PFU, a 5-kGy treatment would achieve a 12% reduction (from 4.49 out of 10 persons to 3.95 out of 10 persons) in NoV infection and a 16% reduction (from 9.21 out of 10 persons to 7.76 out of 10 persons) in HAV infections. If the serving size contained only 10(2) PFU of viruses, a 5-kGy treatment would achieve a 26% reduction (2.74 out of 10 persons to 2.03 out of 10 persons) of NoV and 91% reduction (2.1 out of 10 persons to 1.93 out of 100 persons) of HAV infection risks. This study shows that although E-beam processing cannot completely eliminate the risk of viral illness, infection risks can be reduced.

  4. Susceptibility to Entamoeba histolytica intestinal infection is related to reduction in natural killer T-lymphocytes in C57BL/6 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Fabrício M S; Horta, Bernardo C; Prata, Luana O; Santiago, Andrezza F; Alves, Andréa C; Faria, Ana M C; Gomes, Maria A; Caliari, Marcelo V

    2012-04-27

    Entamoeba histolytica is a protozoan that causes amoebiasis. Recent studies demonstrated that natural killer T lymphocytes (NKT) are critical for preventing the development of amoebic liver abscess. In spite of that, there are only a handful of studies in the area. Herein, we explored the role of NKT cells in E. histolytica infection using C57BL/6 wild-type and CD1(-/-) mice. Animals were inoculated with E. histolytica and sacrificed 48 hours later to collect caecum samples that were used for quantitative analyses of lesions, trophozoites, NK1.1(+) T lymphocytes and expression of the mucus protein MUC-2 by immunohistochemistry technique. Quantitative analyses confirmed that the frequency of NK1.1(+) T cells was significantly lower in samples from C57BL/6 CD1(-/-) mice as compared to their wild type (WT) counterparts. The extension of necrotic mucosa was larger and the number of trophozoites higher in Entamoeba (Eh)-infected CD1(-/-) mice when compared with Eh-infected WT mice. In mice from both groups, non-infected (CTRL) and Eh-infected CD1(-/-), there was a reduction in the thickness of the caecal mucosa and in the MUC-2-stained area in comparison with CTRL- and Eh-WT mice. Our results showed that NKT lymphocytes contribute to resistance against Entamoeba histolytica infection and to the control of inflammation in the colitis induced by infection. The presence of a normal epithelial layer containing appropriate levels of mucus had also a protective role against infection.

  5. Susceptibility to Entamoeba histolytica intestinal infection is related to reduction in natural killer T-lymphocytes in C57BL/6 mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrício M.S. Oliveira

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Entamoeba histolytica is a protozoan that causes amoebiasis. Recent studies demonstrated that natural killer T lymphocytes (NKT are critical for preventing the development of amoebic liver abscess. In spite of that, there are only a handful of studies in the area. Herein, we explored the role of NKT cells in E. histolytica infection using C57BL/6 wild-type and CD1-/- mice. Animals were inoculated with E. histolytica and sacrificed 48 hours later to collect caecum samples that were used for quantitative analyses of lesions, trophozoites, NK1.1+ T lymphocytes and expression of the mucus protein MUC-2 by immunohistochemistry technique. Quantitative analyses confirmed that the frequency of NK1.1+ T cells was significantly lower in samples from C57BL/6 CD1-/- mice as compared to their wild type (WT counterparts. The extension of necrotic mucosa was larger and the number of trophozoites higher in Entamoeba (Eh-infected CD1-/- mice when compared with Eh-infected WT mice. In mice from both groups, noninfected (CTRL and Eh-infected CD1-/-, there was a reduction in the thickness of the caecal mucosa and in the MUC-2-stained area in comparison with CTRL- and Eh-WT mice. Our results showed that NKT lymphocytes contribute to resistance against Entamoeba histolytica infection and to the control of inflammation in the colitis induced by infection. The presence of a normal epithelial layer containing appropriate levels of mucus had also a protective role against infection.

  6. Microbiological screening of Irish patients with autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy reveals persistence of Candida albicans strains, gradual reduction in susceptibility to azoles, and incidences of clinical signs of oral candidiasis without culture evidence.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McManus, Brenda A

    2011-05-01

    Patients with autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) are prone to chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, which is often treated with azoles. The purpose of this study was to characterize the oral Candida populations from 16 Irish APECED patients, who comprise approximately half the total number identified in Ireland, and to examine the effect of intermittent antifungal therapy on the azole susceptibility patterns of Candida isolates. Patients attended between one and four clinical evaluations over a 5-year period, providing oral rinses and\\/or oral swab samples each time. Candida was recovered from 14\\/16 patients, and Candida albicans was the only Candida species identified. Interestingly, clinical diagnosis of candidiasis did not correlate with microbiological evidence of Candida infection at 7\\/22 (32%) clinical assessments. Multilocus sequence typing analysis of C. albicans isolates recovered from the same patients on separate occasions identified the same sequence type each time. Fluconazole resistance was detected in isolates from one patient, and isolates exhibiting a progressive reduction in itraconazole and\\/or fluconazole susceptibility were identified in a further 3\\/16 patients, in each case correlating with the upregulation of CDR- and MDR-encoded efflux pumps. Mutations were also identified in the ERG11 and the TAC1 genes of isolates from these four patients; some of these mutations have previously been associated with azole resistance. The findings suggest that alternative Candida treatment options, other than azoles such as chlorhexidine, should be considered in APECED patients and that clinical diagnosis of oral candidiasis should be confirmed by culture prior to the commencement of anti-Candida therapy.

  7. Damage control resuscitation is associated with a reduction in resuscitation volumes and improvement in survival in 390 damage control laparotomy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, Bryan A; Reddy, Neeti; Hatch, Quinton M; LeFebvre, Eric; Wade, Charles E; Kozar, Rosemary A; Gill, Brijesh S; Albarado, Rondel; McNutt, Michelle K; Holcomb, John B

    2011-10-01

    To determine whether implementation of damage control resuscitation (DCR) in patients undergoing damage control laparotomy (DCL) translates into improved survival. DCR aims at preventing coagulopathy through permissive hypotension, limiting crystalloids and delivering higher ratios of plasma and platelets. Previous work has focused only on the impact of delivering higher ratios (1:1:1). A retrospective cohort study was performed on all DCL patients admitted between January 2004 and August 2010. Patients were divided into pre-DCR implementation and DCR groups and were excluded if they died before completion of the initial laparotomy. The lethal triad was defined as immediate postoperative temperature less than 95°F, international normalized ratio more than 1.5, or a pH less than 7.30. A total of 390 patients underwent DCL. Of these, 282 were pre-DCR and 108 were DCR. Groups were similar in demographics, injury severity, admission vitals, and laboratory values. DCR patients received less crystalloids (median: 14 L vs 5 L), red blood cells (13 U vs 7 U), plasma (11 U vs 8 U), and platelets (6 U vs 0 U) in 24 hours, all P lethal triad upon intensive care unit arrival (80% vs 46%, P < 0.001). 24-hour and 30-day survival was higher with DCR (88% vs 97%, P = 0.006 and 76% vs 86%, P = 0.03). Multivariate analysis controlling for age, injury severity, and emergency department variables, demonstrated DCR was associated with a significant increase in 30-day survival (OR: 2.5, 95% CI: 1.10-5.58, P = 0.028). In patients undergoing DCL, implementation of DCR reduces crystalloid and blood product administration. More importantly, DCR is associated with an improvement in 30-day survival.

  8. High local recurrence risk is not associated with large survival reduction after postmastectomy radiotherapy in high-risk breast cancer: a subgroup analysis of DBCG 82 b

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyndi, Marianne; Overgaard, Marie; Nielsen, Hanne M

    2009-01-01

    randomly assigned to not receive radiotherapy, three prognostic subgroups of LR risk were found. "The good" defined by at least four out of five favorable criteria (3 positive nodes, tumor size 2cm, Grade 1 malignancy, estrogen or progesterone receptor positive, HER2 negative), "the Poor" defined...... radiotherapy in the DBCG82 b&c trials. Tissue microarrays had been constructed and sections stained for estrogen, progesterone and HER2 receptors. Median potential follow-up time was 17 years. Endpoints were LR as isolated first event, breast cancer mortality and overall mortality. RESULTS: Among patients...... by at least two out of three un-favorable criteria (>3 positive nodes, tumor size >5cm, Grade 3 malignancy) and finally "the Intermediate" the group in between. The smallest absolute reduction in 5-year LR probability (11%) after radiotherapy was seen for the good prognosis group. A similar absolute reduction...

  9. Impact of Elimination or Reduction of Dietary Animal Proteins on Cancer Progression and Survival: Protocol of an Online Pilot Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catany Ritter, Anna; Egger, Annarita Sabrina; Machacek, Jennifer; Aspalter, Rosa

    2016-07-29

    Current evidence suggests that the incidence of cancer is low in vegan populations, and experimental studies have revealed a significant role of dietary proteins in cancer development and progression. However, little data currently exists regarding the effect of a plant-based diet on the progression of diagnosed cancer. The main objective of this study is to determine if a reduction or total elimination of animal protein from the diet can positively influence the outcome of an existing cancer and, in addition to standard oncological therapies, increase remission rates. The primary aim of this online study is to test the effect on remission rates in cancer patients (primary outcome) with distinct self-selected dietary patterns (omnivore, lacto-ovo-vegetarian, vegan), and allow for an estimation of the effect size. Secondary outcomes are tumor behavior, relapse-free interval, therapies, therapy tolerability and side-effects, comorbidities, medication, quality of life, acceptance, and feasibility of the selected diet. Safety concerns exist for vegan diets (especially in cancer patients) and the study will carefully monitor for deterioration of health, tumor progression, or malnutrition. Furthermore, the study will evaluate the online portal as a study platform (technical and safety aspects, and sequence of displayed questionnaires) as well as the validity of self-reported and online-generated data. The study was performed between April, 2015 and June, 2016, and a preliminary evaluation of safety aspects was undertaken after June, 2016. Primary and secondary outcomes will be evaluated when the final patients complete the study in December, 2016. This study will reveal information about the effects of dietary patterns on cancer disease and progression. The methodology of the study addresses several aspects and limitations of nutrition studies in cancer patients, such as precision of nutrition data, acceptance criteria, online methodology, and safety aspects

  10. Antiproliferative activity of vitexin-2-O-xyloside and avenanthramides on CaCo-2 and HepG2 cancer cells occurs through apoptosis induction and reduction of pro-survival mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarpa, Emanuele Salvatore; Antonini, Elena; Palma, Francesco; Mari, Michele; Ninfali, Paolino

    2017-03-10

    CaCo-2 colon cancer cells and HepG2 liver cancer cells represent two malignant cell lines, which show a high resistance to apoptosis induced by the conventional anticancer drugs. Vitexin-2-O-xyloside (XVX) and avenanthramides (AVNs) are naturally occurring dietary agents from Beta vulgaris var. cicla L. and Avena sativa L., respectively. The aim of this work was to evaluate the antiproliferative effects and the reduction of the pro-survival mechanisms exerted by XVX and AVNs, used individually and in combination, in CaCo-2 and HepG2 cancer cells. XVX and AVNs were isolated by liquid chromatography and characterized by HPLC-PDA-MS. The XVX and AVN antiproliferative effects were evaluated through sulforhodamine B method, while their pro-apoptotic effects through caspase activity assays. RTqPCR was used to investigate the modulation of the pro-survival factors baculoviral inhibitor of apoptosis repeat-containing 5 (BIRC5), hypoxia inducible factor 1 A (HIF1A), and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA). Cellular antioxidant activity (CAA) was investigated by means of DCFH-DA assay, whereas chemical antioxidant capacity was evaluated by the ORAC method. XVX and AVNs, both individually and in combination, inhibited the proliferation of CaCo-2 and HepG2 cancer cells, through activation of caspases 9, 8, and 3. XVX and AVNs downregulated the pro-survival genes BIRC5, HIF1A, and VEGFA. The CAA assay showed that AVNs exhibited strong antioxidant activity inside both CaCo-2 and HepG2 cells. The antiproliferative activity of the XVX + AVNs mixture represents an innovative treatment, which is effective against two types of cancer cells characterized by high resistance to the conventional anticancer drugs.

  11. Rapid reduction in blood flow to the rat ventral prostate gland after castration: preliminary evidence that androgens influence prostate size by regulating blood flow to the prostate gland and prostatic endothelial cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabsigh, A; Chang, D T; Heitjan, D F; Kiss, A; Olsson, C A; Puchner, P J; Buttyan, R

    1998-08-01

    Androgenic steroids regulate the development and size of the mammalian prostate gland. The mechanism(s) for this growth control might involve a direct effect on prostate cell proliferation and survival as well as more complex effects on the tissue environment supporting nourishment and oxygenation. In this study, we evaluated an animal model of androgen action on the prostate, the rat ventral prostate gland, to determine whether acute androgen withdrawal, by means of castration, might alter the primary blood flow to the prostate gland and for the effects of castration on prostatic endothelial cell viability. Groups of rats studied included intact control males, males that had been surgically castrated, or males that received a sham-surgical castration. Relative blood flow (RBF) to the rat ventral prostate glands and rat bladders were measured at 18 and 24 hr after castration or sham castration using a fluorescent microsphere infusion technique. Thin sections from fixed and embedded rat ventral prostate glands obtained from unoperated or 12-hr castrated rats were analyzed by the TUNEL immunostaining technique to microscopically identify and quantify apoptotic epithelial, stromal, and endothelial cells. RBF to the rat ventral prostate was reduced by 38%, at 18 hr after castration when compared with intact or sham-operated rats and by 45% at 24 hr after castration (P=0.038 unoperated/0.025 sham operated). In contrast, RBF to the bladder was not significantly different between any of the groups in the 24-hr castrate experiment. TUNEL staining analysis of ventral prostate tissues obtained from 12-hr castrated rats showed only rare TUNEL-positive epithelial cells similar to the control tissue but significantly increased TUNEL labeling for endothelial and other ventral prostate stromal cells. Castration resulted in a rapid and significant reduction of blood flow to the mature rat ventral prostate gland that was not seen in the bladder. This reduction precedes the

  12. Extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli contributes to the survival of cefotaxime-susceptible E. coli under high concentrations of cefotaxime by acquisition of increased AmpC expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Tatsuya; Kawahara, Ryuji; Kumeda, Yuko; Yamamoto, Yoshimasa

    2018-01-18

    Extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli (ESBL-E) are becoming increasingly widespread in Vietnam. Antibiotics are detected in many Vietnamese foods; however, the effect of ESBL-E and antibiotic consumption on intestinal bacteria has not been studied sufficiently. Here, we investigated the effect of oral administration of ESBL-E (TB19) and cefotaxime on luminescence-emitting cefotaxime-sensitive E. coli (X14). Mice were given water containing TB19 and then received three injections of 1.0 × 108 CFU of X14 harboring a luciferase gene. The mice were administered 100 μg of cefotaxime and luminescent bacteria were monitored over 24 h, following which luminescent bacteria were isolated from mouse feces. Luminescence continued to be detected in mice administered TB19 24 h after cefotaxime ingestion. Fecal analysis revealed two types of luminescent colonies, cefoxitin-resistant E. coli (X14-R) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Pulse-field gel electrophoresis confirmed that X14-R was a clonal strain of X14, suggesting that X14 survived using ESBLs originating from TB19 and acquired cefoxitin resistance due to cefotaxime consumption. Moreover, in vitro analysis of X14 indicated that expression of the ampC gene was upregulated by cefotaxime. Overall, ESBL-E and cefotaxime promoted the expansion of cefoxitin-resistant E. coli in the absence of plasmid-mediated gene transfer. © FEMS 2018. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Survival Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Rupert G

    2011-01-01

    A concise summary of the statistical methods used in the analysis of survival data with censoring. Emphasizes recently developed nonparametric techniques. Outlines methods in detail and illustrates them with actual data. Discusses the theory behind each method. Includes numerous worked problems and numerical exercises.

  14. Modelling survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashauer, Roman; Albert, Carlo; Augustine, Starrlight

    2016-01-01

    well GUTS, calibrated with short-term survival data of Gammarus pulex exposed to four pesticides, can forecast effects of longer-term pulsed exposures. Thirdly, we tested the ability of GUTS to estimate 14-day median effect concentrations of malathion for a range of species and use these estimates...

  15. Susceptibility to malignant hyperthermia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snoeck, Marcus Matheus Johannes

    2004-01-01

    In this thesis the author studied the diagnostic procedures for susceptibility to malignant hyperthermia (MH), with special emphasis upon refining the biological diagnostic test and improving protocols and guidelines for investigation of MH susceptibility. MH is a pharmacogenetic disease of skeletal

  16. Antimycotics susceptibility testing of dermatophytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arsić-Arsenijević Valentina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Dermatophytes are moulds that produce infections of the skin, hair and nails of humans and animals. The most common forms among these infections are onychomycosis and tinea pedis affecting 20% of world population. These infections are usually chronic. The treatment of dermatophytoses tends to be prolonged partly because available treatments are not very effective. Antifungal drug consumption and public health expenditure are high worldwide, as well as in Serbia. For adequate therapy, it is necessary to prove infection by isolation of dermatophytes and to test the antifungal susceptibility of isolates. Susceptibility testing is important for the resistance monitoring, epidemiological research and to compare in vitro activities of new antifungal agents. The diffusion and dilution methods of susceptibility tests are used, and technical issues of importance for the proper performance and interpretation of test results are published in the document E.DEF 9.1 (EUCAST and M38-A2 (CLSI. The aim of our paper is to promptly inform the public about technical achievements in this area, as well as the new organization of laboratory for medical mycology in our country. The formation of laboratory networks coordinated by the National Reference Laboratory for the cause of mycosis need to enable interlaboratory studies and further standardization of methods for antifungal susceptibility testing of dermatophytes, reproducibility of tests and clinical correlation monitoring (MIK values and clinical outcome of dermatophytosis. The importance of the new organization is expected efficient improvement in the dermatophytosis therapy at home, better quality of patient's life and the reduction of the cost of treatment.

  17. Innovations’ Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Tabas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Innovations currently represent a tool of maintaining the going concern of a business entity and its competitiveness. However, effects of innovations are not infinite and if an innovation should constantly preserve a life of business entity, it has to be a continual chain of innovations, i.e. continual process. Effective live of a single innovation is limited while the limitation is derived especially from industry. The paper provides the results of research on innovations effects in the financial performance of small and medium-sized enterprises in the Czech Republic. Objective of this paper is to determine the length and intensity of the effects of technical innovations in company’s financial performance. The economic effect of innovations has been measured at application of company’s gross production power while the Deviation Analysis has been applied for three years’ time series. Subsequently the Survival Analysis has been applied. The analyses are elaborated for three statistical samples of SMEs constructed in accordance to the industry. The results obtained show significant differences in innovations’ survival within these three samples of enterprises then. The results are quite specific for the industries, and are confronted and discussed with the results of authors’ former research on the issue.

  18. Pathways to Understanding Ovarian Cancer, Epidemiology, Genetic Susceptibility, and Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    for age, matching factors, OC use, parity , tubal ligation, and family history of breast or ovarian cancer Endometriosis was not available in NHS...ligation and parity may be more strongly associated with tumors of ovarian origin, while family history of ovarian cancer and possibly past smoking...and older from eastern Massachusetts and New Hampshire between 1992 and 2008. Cases were incident cases of ovarian cancer identified through hospital

  19. DO AUTOCHTHONOUS BACTERIA AFFECT GIARDIA CYST SURVIVAL IN NATURAL WATERS?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardia lamblia survives in and is transmitted to susceptible human and animal populations via water, where it is present in an environmentally resistant cyst form. Previous research has highlighted the importance of water temperature in cyst survival, and has also suggested the ...

  20. Nutrition affects insect susceptibility to Bt toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deans, Carrie A.; Behmer, Spencer T.; Tessnow, Ashley E.; Tamez-Guerra, Patricia; Pusztai-Carey, Marianne; Sword, Gregory A.

    2017-01-01

    Pesticide resistance represents a major challenge to global food production. The spread of resistance alleles is the primary explanation for observations of reduced pesticide efficacy over time, but the potential for gene-by-environment interactions (plasticity) to mediate susceptibility has largely been overlooked. Here we show that nutrition is an environmental factor that affects susceptibility to Bt toxins. Protein and carbohydrates are two key macronutrients for insect herbivores, and the polyphagous pest Helicoverpa zea self-selects and performs best on diets that are protein-biased relative to carbohydrates. Despite this, most Bt bioassays employ carbohydrate-biased rearing diets. This study explored the effect of diet protein-carbohydrate content on H. zea susceptibility to Cry1Ac, a common Bt endotoxin. We detected a 100-fold increase in LC50 for larvae on optimal versus carbohydrate-biased diets, and significant diet-mediated variation in survival and performance when challenged with Cry1Ac. Our results suggest that Bt resistance bioassays that use ecologically- and physiologically-mismatched diets over-estimate susceptibility and under-estimate resistance.

  1. Genetic susceptibility of periodontitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laine, M.L.; Crielaard, W.; Loos, B.G.

    2012-01-01

    In this systematic review, we explore and summarize the peer-reviewed literature on putative genetic risk factors for susceptibility to aggressive and chronic periodontitis. A comprehensive literature search on the PubMed database was performed using the keywords ‘periodontitis’ or ‘periodontal

  2. Fourie susceptible.pmd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Adipala Ekwamu

    a number of cultivars exhibited field resistance to halo blight and bacterial brown spot, all cultivars were more or less susceptible to .... Cerillos. Alubia. I. 91. 57. Kranskop. Red speckled sugar. II. 97. 63. OPS-RS1. Red speckled sugar. II. 96. 63. OPS-RS2. Red speckled sugar. I. 100. 61. OPS-RS3. Red speckled sugar. II. 97.

  3. Genetic susceptibility to pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Alison P

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in both men and women in the United States. However, it has the poorest prognosis of any major tumor type, with a 5-yr survival rate of approximately 5%. Cigarette smoking, increased body mass index, heavy alcohol consumption, and a diagnosis of diabetes mellitus have all been demonstrated to increase risk of pancreatic cancer. A family history of pancreatic cancer has also been associated with increased risk suggesting inherited genetic factors also play an important role, with approximately 5-10% of pancreatic cancer patients reporting family history of pancreatic cancer. While the genetic basis for the majority of the familial clustering of pancreatic cancer remains unclear, several important pancreatic cancer genes have been identified. These consist of high penetrance genes including BRCA2 or PALB2, to more common genetic variation associated with a modest increase risk of pancreatic cancer such as genetic variation at the ABO blood group locus. Recent advances in genotyping and genetic sequencing have accelerated the rate at which novel pancreatic cancer susceptibility genes have been identified with several genes identified within the past few years. This review addresses our current understanding of the familial aggregation of pancreatic cancer, established pancreatic cancer susceptablity genes and how this knowledge informs risk assessment and screening for high-risk families. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Genetic Susceptibility to Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Alison P.

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in both men and women in the United States. However, it has the poorest prognosis of any major tumor type, with a 5-yr survival rate of approximately 5%. Cigarette smoking, increased body mass index, heavy alcohol consumption, and a diagnosis of diabetes mellitus have all been demonstrated to increase risk of pancreatic cancer. A family history of pancreatic cancer has also been associated with increased risk suggesting inherited genetic factors also play an important role, with approximately 5–10% of pancreatic cancer patients reporting family history of pancreatic cancer. While the genetic basis for the majority of the familial clustering of pancreatic cancer remains unclear, several important pancreatic cancer genes have been identified. These consist of high penetrance genes including BRCA2 or PALB2, to more common genetic variation associated with a modest increase risk of pancreatic cancer such as genetic variation at the ABO blood group locus. Recent advances in genotyping and genetic sequencing have accelerated the rate at which novel pancreatic cancer susceptibility genes have been identified with several genes identified within the past few years. This review addresses our current understanding of the familial aggregation of pancreatic cancer, established pancreatic cancer susceptablity genes and how this knowledge informs risk assessment and screening for high-risk families. PMID:22162228

  5. L-carnitine reduces susceptibility to bupivacaine-induced cardiotoxicity: an experimental study in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Gail K; Pehora, Carolyne; Crawford, Mark W

    2017-03-01

    The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of acute administration of L-carnitine 100 mg·kg -1 iv on susceptibility to bupivacaine-induced cardiotoxicity in rats. In the first of two experiments, L-carnitine 100 mg·kg -1 iv (n = 10) or saline iv (n = 10) was administered to anesthetized and mechanically ventilated Sprague-Dawley rats following which an infusion of bupivacaine 2.0 mg·kg -1 ·min -1 iv was given until asystole occurred. The primary outcome was the probability of survival. Secondary outcomes included times to asystole, first dysrhythmia, and to 50% reductions in heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP). To determine whether the same dose of L-carnitine is effective in treating established bupivacaine cardiotoxicity, we also conducted a second experiment in which bupivacaine 20 mg·kg -1 iv was infused over 20 sec. Animals (n = 10 per group) received one of four iv treatments: 30% lipid emulsion 4.0 mL·kg -1 , L-carnitine 100 mg·kg -1 , 30% lipid emulsion plus L-carnitine, or saline. The primary outcome was the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) during resuscitation. In the first study, L-carnitine 100 mg·kg -1 increased the probability of survival during bupivacaine infusion (hazard ratio, 12.0; 95% confidence interval, 3.5 to 41.5; P L-carnitine-treated animals, the times to asystole, first dysrhythmia, and to 50% reductions in HR and MAP increased by 33% (P L-carnitine alone groups achieved ROSC when compared with the lipid emulsion groups (P L-carnitine 100 mg·kg -1 decreases susceptibility to bupivacaine cardiotoxicity, but is ineffective during resuscitation from bupivacaine-induced cardiac arrest.

  6. Genetic Susceptibility to Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanja Kovacic

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a complex multifocal arterial disease involving interactions of multiple genetic and environmental factors. Advances in techniques of molecular genetics have revealed that genetic ground significantly influences susceptibility to atherosclerotic vascular diseases. Besides further investigations of monogenetic diseases, candidate genes, genetic polymorphisms, and susceptibility loci associated with atherosclerotic diseases have been identified in recent years, and their number is rapidly increasing. This paper discusses main genetic investigations fields associated with human atherosclerotic vascular diseases. The paper concludes with a discussion of the directions and implications of future genetic research in arteriosclerosis with an emphasis on prospective prediction from an early age of individuals who are predisposed to develop premature atherosclerosis as well as to facilitate the discovery of novel drug targets.

  7. Marijuana Usage and Hypnotic Susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzini, Louis R.; McDonald, Roy D.

    1973-01-01

    Anonymous self-reported drug usage data and hypnotic susceptibility scores were obtained from 282 college students. Frequent marijuana users (more than 10 times) showed greater susceptibility to hypnosis than nonusers. (Author)

  8. Psychology and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, D P; Ruth, T E; Wagner, L M

    1993-11-06

    We examined the deaths of 28,169 adult Chinese-Americans, and 412,632 randomly selected, matched controls coded "white" on the death certificate. Chinese-Americans, but not whites, die significantly earlier than normal (1.3-4.9 yr) if they have a combination of disease and birthyear which Chinese astrology and medicine consider ill-fated. The more strongly a group is attached to Chinese traditions, the more years of life are lost. Our results hold for nearly all major causes of death studied. The reduction in survival cannot be completely explained by a change in the behaviour of the Chinese patient, doctor, or death-registrar, but seems to result at least partly from psychosomatic processes.

  9. Phase processing for quantitative susceptibility mapping of regions with large susceptibility and lack of signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortier, Véronique; Levesque, Ives R

    2017-11-11

    Phase processing impacts the accuracy of quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM). Techniques for phase unwrapping and background removal have been proposed and demonstrated mostly in brain. In this work, phase processing was evaluated in the context of large susceptibility variations (Δχ) and negligible signal, in particular for susceptibility estimation using the iterative phase replacement (IPR) algorithm. Continuous Laplacian, region-growing, and quality-guided unwrapping were evaluated. For background removal, Laplacian boundary value (LBV), projection onto dipole fields (PDF), sophisticated harmonic artifact reduction for phase data (SHARP), variable-kernel sophisticated harmonic artifact reduction for phase data (V-SHARP), regularization enabled sophisticated harmonic artifact reduction for phase data (RESHARP), and 3D quadratic polynomial field removal were studied. Each algorithm was quantitatively evaluated in simulation and qualitatively in vivo. Additionally, IPR-QSM maps were produced to evaluate the impact of phase processing on the susceptibility in the context of large Δχ with negligible signal. Quality-guided unwrapping was the most accurate technique, whereas continuous Laplacian performed poorly in this context. All background removal algorithms tested resulted in important phase inaccuracies, suggesting that techniques used for brain do not translate well to situations where large Δχ and no or low signal are expected. LBV produced the smallest errors, followed closely by PDF. Results suggest that quality-guided unwrapping should be preferred, with PDF or LBV for background removal, for QSM in regions with large Δχ and negligible signal. This reduces the susceptibility inaccuracy introduced by phase processing. Accurate background removal remains an open question. Magn Reson Med, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  10. Prospective Study of Serial Imaging Comparing Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Fluorothymidine PET During Radical Chemoradiation for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Reduction of Detectable Proliferation Associated With Worse Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everitt, Sarah; Ball, David; Hicks, Rodney J; Callahan, Jason; Plumridge, Nikki; Trinh, Jenny; Herschtal, Alan; Kron, Tomas; Mac Manus, Michael

    2017-11-15

    To investigate the associations between interim tumor responses on (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) and (18)F-fluorothymidine ((18)F-FLT) PET and patient outcomes, especially progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS), in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Patients with FDG-PET/computed tomography stage I-III NSCLC were prescribed concurrent chemotherapy and radiation therapy (60 Gy in 30 fractions). Scans were acquired at baseline (FDG-PET/computed tomography [FDGBL] for radiation therapy planning and FLT-PET [FLTBL]), week 2 (FDGwk2 and FLTwk2), and week 4 (FDGwk4 and FLTwk4) of chemoradiation therapy. Tumor responses were categorized as complete or partial responses or stable or progressive disease (SD, PD) using European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer criteria. Associations between response, OS, and PFS were analyzed with univariate Cox regressions and plotted using Kaplan-Meier curves. Between 2009 and 2013, 60 patients were recruited. Thirty-seven (62%) were male, and the median age was 66 years (range, 31-86 years). Two-year OS and PFS were 0.51 and 0.26, respectively. Unexpectedly, SD on FLTwk2 compared with complete response/partial response was associated with longer OS (hazard ratio [95% confidence interval] 2.01 [0.87-4.65], P=.082) and PFS (2.01 [0.92-4.36], P=.061). Weeks 2 and 4 FDG PET/CT were not significantly associated with survival. Study scans provided additional information to FDGBL in 21 patients (35%). Distant metastases detected in 3 patients on FLTBL and in 2 patients on FDG/FLTwk2 changed treatment intent from curative to palliative. Locoregional progression during radiation therapy was observed in 5 (8%) patients, prompting larger radiation therapy fields. Stable uptake of (18)F-FLT at week 2 was paradoxically associated with longer OS and PFS. This suggests that suppression of tumor cell proliferation may protect against radiation-induced tumor cell

  11. Lactobacillus species: taxonomic complexity and controversial susceptibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Ellie J C; Tyrrell, Kerin L; Citron, Diane M

    2015-05-15

    The genus Lactobacillus is a taxonomically complex and is composed of over 170 species that cannot be easily differentiated phenotypically and often require molecular identification. Although they are part of the normal human gastrointestinal and vaginal flora, they can also be occasional human pathogens. They are extensively used in a variety of commercial products including probiotics. Their antimicrobial susceptibilities are poorly defined in part because of their taxonomic complexity and are compounded by the different methods recommended by Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute and International Dairy Foundation. Their use as probiotics for prevention of Clostridium difficile infection is prevalent among consumers worldwide but raises the question of will the use of any concurrent antibiotic effect their ability to survive. Lactobacillus species are generally acid resistant and are able to survive ingestion. They are generally resistant to metronidazole, aminoglycosides and ciprofloxacin with L. acidophilus being susceptible to penicillin and vancomycin, whereas L. rhamnosus and L. casei are resistant to metronidazole and vancomycin. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Adaptive Memory: Survival Processing Increases Both True and False Memory in Adults and Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otgaar, Henry; Smeets, Tom

    2010-01-01

    Research has shown that processing information in a survival context can enhance the information's memorability. The current study examined whether survival processing can also decrease the susceptibility to false memories and whether the survival advantage can be found in children. In Experiment 1, adults rated semantically related words in a…

  13. Magnetic susceptibilities of minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblum, Sam; Brownfield, I.K.

    2000-01-01

    Magnetic separation of minerals is a topic that is seldom reported in the literature for two reasons. First, separation data generally are byproducts of other projects; and second, this study requires a large amount of patience and is unusually tedious. Indeed, we suspect that most minerals probably are never investigated for this property. These data are timesaving for mineralogists who concentrate mono-mineralic fractions for chemical analysis, age dating, and for other purposes. The data can certainly be used in the ore-beneficiation industries. In some instances, magnetic-susceptibility data may help in mineral identification, where other information is insufficient. In past studies of magnetic separation of minerals, (Gaudin and Spedden, 1943; Tille and Kirkpatrick, 1956; Rosenblum, 1958; Rubinstein and others, 1958; Flinter, 1959; Hess, 1959; Baker, 1962; Meric and Peyre, 1963; Rojas and others, 1965; and Duchesne, 1966), the emphasis has been on the ferromagnetic and paramagnetic ranges of extraction. For readers interested in the history of magnetic separation of minerals, Krumbein and Pettijohn (1938, p. 344-346) indicated nine references back to 1848. The primary purpose of this paper is to report the magnetic-susceptibility data on as many minerals as possible, similar to tables of hardness, specific gravity, refractive indices, and other basic physical properties of minerals. A secondary purpose is to demonstrate that the total and best extraction ranges are influenced by the chemistry of the minerals. The following notes are offered to help avoid problems in separating a desired mineral concentrate from mixtures of mineral grains.

  14. Alcohol increases hypnotic susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semmens-Wheeler, Rebecca; Dienes, Zoltán; Duka, Theodora

    2013-09-01

    One approach to hypnosis suggests that for hypnotic experience to occur frontal lobe activity must be attenuated. For example, cold control theory posits that a lack of awareness of intentions is responsible for the experience of involuntariness and/or the subjective reality of hypnotic suggestions. The mid-dorso-lateral prefrontal cortex and the ACC are candidate regions for such awareness. Alcohol impairs frontal lobe executive function. This study examined whether alcohol affects hypnotisability. We administered 0.8 mg/kg of alcohol or a placebo to 32 medium susceptible participants. They were subsequently hypnotised and given hypnotic suggestions. All participants believed they had received some alcohol. Participants in the alcohol condition were more susceptible to hypnotic suggestions than participants in the placebo condition. Impaired frontal lobe activity facilitates hypnotic responding, which supports theories postulating that attenuation of executive function facilitates hypnotic response, and contradicts theories postulating that hypnotic response involves enhanced inhibitory, attentional or other executive function. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Graphene susceptibility in Holstein model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mousavi, Hamze, E-mail: hamze.mousavi@gmail.co [Department of Physics, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nano Science and Nano Technology Research Center, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-06-15

    We study the effects of the electron-phonon interaction on the temperature dependence of the orbital magnetic susceptibility of monolayer graphene. We use the linear response theory and Green's function formalism within the Holstein Hamiltonian model. The results show that the effects of the electron-phonon interaction on the susceptibility of graphene sheet have different behaviors in two temperature regions. In the low temperature region, susceptibility increases when the electron-phonon coupling strength increases. On the other hand, the susceptibility reduces with increasing the electron-phonon coupling strength in the high temperature region. - Highlights: Effect of electron-phonon interaction on the susceptibility of graphene is studied. Linear response theory and Green's function technique in Holstein model are used. Effect of electron-phonon on susceptibility has different behaviors in two temperature regions.

  16. Topological susceptibility from slabs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bietenholz, Wolfgang [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, A.P. 70-543, Distrito Federal, C.P. 04510 (Mexico); Forcrand, Philippe de [Institute for Theoretical Physics, ETH Zürich,CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland); CERN, Physics Department, TH Unit, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Gerber, Urs [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, A.P. 70-543, Distrito Federal, C.P. 04510 (Mexico); Instituto de Física y Matemáticas, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo,Edificio C-3, Apdo. Postal 2-82, Morelia, Michoacán, C.P. 58040 (Mexico)

    2015-12-14

    In quantum field theories with topological sectors, a non-perturbative quantity of interest is the topological susceptibility χ{sub t}. In principle it seems straightforward to measure χ{sub t} by means of Monte Carlo simulations. However, for local update algorithms and fine lattice spacings, this tends to be difficult, since the Monte Carlo history rarely changes the topological sector. Here we test a method to measure χ{sub t} even if data from only one sector are available. It is based on the topological charges in sub-volumes, which we denote as slabs. Assuming a Gaussian distribution of these charges, this method enables the evaluation of χ{sub t}, as we demonstrate with numerical results for non-linear σ-models.

  17. Topological Susceptibility from Slabs

    CERN Document Server

    Bietenholz, Wolfgang; Gerber, Urs

    2015-01-01

    In quantum field theories with topological sectors, a non-perturbative quantity of interest is the topological susceptibility chi_t. In principle it seems straightforward to measure chi_t by means of Monte Carlo simulations. However, for local update algorithms and fine lattice spacings, this tends to be difficult, since the Monte Carlo history rarely changes the topological sector. Here we test a method to measure chi_t even if data from only one sector are available. It is based on the topological charges in sub-volumes, which we denote as slabs. Assuming a Gaussian distribution of these charges, this method enables the evaluation of chi_t, as we demonstrate with numerical results for non-linear sigma-models.

  18. Microwave susceptibility experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McConaghy, C.

    1984-05-29

    In certain experimental environments, systems can be affected or damaged by microwave pulses. I have conducted tests at LLNL to understand the phenomenology of microwave susceptibility of system components and subsystem components. To date, my experiments have concentrated on bipolar transistors, similar to what might be used in discrete analog circuits, and on CMOS RAM chips, which might be used in a computer memory system. I observed a decrease in failure energies for both the transistor and the integrated curcuit as I shortened the microwave pulse width. An S band (2.86 GHz) transmit/receive (T/R) tube has also been tested both at S band and at X band (8.16 GHz). The S band pulse had limitations in rise-time from zero power, which had an effect on the amount of power that could be transmitted through the T/R tube, as much as 0.7% of the incident power passed through the tube. All tests were conducted in closed-waveguide or coax test-fixtures, in contrast to the anechoic chambers utilized by other experimenters. I have used both S band and X band Klystron generators. For very high power (greater than 1 MW), I used an additional pulse-compression cavity at S band. Other subsystem components such as an X band mixer and an X band T/R tube will be tested in the future. 8 references.

  19. [Antimicrobial susceptibility cumulative reports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canut-Blasco, Andrés; Calvo, Jorge; Rodríguez-Díaz, Juan Carlos; Martínez-Martínez, Luis

    2016-10-01

    Cumulative reports on antimicrobial susceptibility tests data are important for selecting empirical treatments, as an educational tool in programs on antimicrobial use, and for establishing breakpoints defining clinical categories. These reports should be based on data validated by clinical microbiologists using diagnostic samples (not surveillance samples). In order to avoid a bias derived from including several isolates obtained from the same patient, it is recommended that, for a defined period, only the first isolate is counted. A minimal number of isolates per species should be presented: a figure of >=30 isolates is statistically acceptable. The report is usually presented in a table format where, for each cell, information on clinically relevant microorganisms-antimicrobial agents is presented. Depending on particular needs, multiple tables showing data related to patients, samples, services or special pathogens can be prepared. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  20. Conjunctivitis Caused by Neisseria gonorrhoeae Isolates with Reduced Cephalosporin Susceptibility and Multidrug Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagawa, Yutaka; Maruyama, Yosuke; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Sakane, Yuri; Miyamoto, Hitoshi; Ohashi, Yuichi

    2013-01-01

    We report two cases of conjunctivitis caused by Neisseria gonorrhoeae with reduced cephalosporin susceptibility. Patients showed no response to cefmenoxime eye drops and intravenous ceftriaxone administration. The patients' condition improved after the addition of oral minocycline. The isolates contained the mosaic penA for reduction of β-lactam susceptibility. PMID:24025911

  1. [Antimicrobial susceptibility in Chile 2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifuentes-D, Marcela; Silva, Francisco; García, Patricia; Bello, Helia; Briceño, Isabel; Calvo-A, Mario; Labarca, Jaime

    2014-04-01

    Bacteria antimicrobial resistance is an uncontrolled public health problem that progressively increases its magnitude and complexity. The Grupo Colaborativo de Resistencia, formed by a join of experts that represent 39 Chilean health institutions has been concerned with bacteria antimicrobial susceptibility in our country since 2008. In this document we present in vitro bacterial susceptibility accumulated during year 2012 belonging to 28 national health institutions that represent about 36% of hospital discharges in Chile. We consider of major importance to report periodically bacteria susceptibility so to keep the medical community updated to achieve target the empirical antimicrobial therapies and the control measures and prevention of the dissemination of multiresistant strains.

  2. Susceptibilities of the dermatophytes Trichophyton mentagrophytes and T. rubrum microconidia to photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy with novel phenothiazinium photosensitizers and red light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Gabriela B; Ferreira, Liana K S; Wainwright, Mark; Braga, Gilberto U L

    2012-11-05

    Photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) is a promising alternative to conventional chemotherapy that can be used to treat localized mycosis. The development of PACT depends on identifying effective and selective PS for the different pathogenic species. The in vitro susceptibilities of Trichophyton mentagrophytes and Trichophyton rubrum microconidia to PACT with methylene blue (MB), toluidine blue O (TBO), new methylene blue N (NMBN), and the novel pentacyclic phenothiazinium photosensitizer S137 were investigated. The efficacy of each PS was determined based on its minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC). Additionally, we evaluated the effect of PACT with NMBN and S137 on the survival of the microconidia of both species. S137 showed the lowest MIC. MIC for S137 was 2.5 μM both for T. mentagrophytes and T. rubrum, when a light dose of 5 J cm(-2) was used. PACT with NMBN (10 μM and 20 J cm(-2)) resulted in a reduction of 4 logs in the survival of the T. rubrum and no survivor of T. mentagrophytes was observed. PACT with S137 at 1 μM and 20 J cm(-2) resulted in a reduction of approximately 3 logs in the survival of both species. When a S137 concentration of 10 μM was used, no survivor was observed for both species at all light doses (5, 10 and 20 J cm(-2)). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. pso.ATION AND ANTIMICROBIAL SUSCEPTIBILITY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    isolates vere made using standard methods, Antibiotic susceptibility tests against commonly prescribed ... Acute otitis media is rapid with short .... sensitivity tests. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests: The antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of major Gram positive and negative bacterial isolates obtained from clinical specimens.

  4. Nitrate reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziewinski, Jacek J.; Marczak, Stanislaw

    2000-01-01

    Nitrates are reduced to nitrogen gas by contacting the nitrates with a metal to reduce the nitrates to nitrites which are then contacted with an amide to produce nitrogen and carbon dioxide or acid anions which can be released to the atmosphere. Minor amounts of metal catalysts can be useful in the reduction of the nitrates to nitrites. Metal salts which are formed can be treated electrochemically to recover the metals.

  5. Hypnotic susceptibility and dream characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamore, N; Barrett, D

    1989-11-01

    This study examined the relationship of hypnotic susceptibility to a variety of dream characteristics and types of dream content. A Dream Questionnaire was constructed synthesizing Gibson's dream inventory and Hilgard's theoretical conceptions of hypnosis. Employing the Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility and the Field Inventory for evaluating hypnotic response, several dream dimensions correlated significantly with hypnotizability. For subjects as a whole, the strongest correlates were the frequency of dreams which they believed to be precognitive and out-of-body dreams. Ability to dream on a chosen topic also correlated significantly with hypnotic susceptibility for both genders. For females only, there was a negative correlation of hypnotic susceptibility to flying dreams. Absorption correlated positively with dream recall, ability to dream on a chosen topic, reports of conflict resolution in dreams, creative ideas occurring in dreams, amount of color in dreams, pleasantness of dreams, bizarreness of dreams, flying dreams and precognitive dreams.

  6. Effects of acetochlor (herbicide) on the survival and avoidance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-07-06

    Jul 6, 2011 ... This study was designed to evaluate the potential effects of acetochlor (herbicide) on the survival and avoidance behaviour of lycosid spiders example Lycosa terrestris. During the topical toxicity experiment, P. birmanica was found to be more susceptible to acetochlor than L. terrestris. Although, there was ...

  7. Ancestral susceptibility to colorectal cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Huhn, S.; Pardini, Barbara; Naccarati, Alessio; Vodička, Pavel (ed.); Hemminki, K.; Försti, A.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 2 (2012), s. 197-204 ISSN 0267-8357 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/07/1430; GA ČR GAP304/10/1286 Grant - others:EU FP7(XE) HEALTH-F4-2007-200767 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : cancer susceptibility * molecular epidemiology * genetic susceptibility Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.500, year: 2012

  8. Multinationals and plant survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandick, Roger

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper is twofold: first, to investigate how different ownership structures affect plant survival, and second, to analyze how the presence of foreign multinational enterprises (MNEs) affects domestic plants’ survival. Using a unique and detailed data set on the Swedish manufacturing...... sector, I am able to separate plants into those owned by foreign MNEs, domestic MNEs, exporting non-MNEs, and purely domestic firms. In line with previous findings, the result, when conditioned on other factors affecting survival, shows that foreign MNE plants have lower survival rates than non......-MNE plants. However, separating the non-MNEs into exporters and non-exporters, the result shows that foreign MNE plants have higher survival rates than non-exporting non-MNEs, while the survival rates of foreign MNE plants and exporting non-MNE plants do not seem to differ. Moreover, the simple non...

  9. The Effect of Size and Ecology on Extinction Susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, C.; Yuan, A.; Heim, N.; Payne, J.

    2015-12-01

    Although life on Earth first emerged as prokaryotic organisms, it eventually evolved into billions of different species. However, extinctions on Earth, especially the five mass extinctions, have decimated species. So what leads to a species survival or demise during a mass extinction? Are certain species more susceptible to extinctions based on their size and ecology? For this project, we focused on the data of marine animals. To examine the impact of size and ecology on a species's likelihood of survival, we compared the sizes and ecologies of the survivors and victims of the five mass extinctions. The ecology, or life mode, of a genus consists of the combination of tiering, motility, and feeding mechanism. Tiering refers to the animal's typical location in the water column and sediments, motility refers to its ability to move, and feeding mechanism describes the way the organism eats; together, they describe the animal's behavior. We analyzed the effect of ecology on survival using logistic regression, which compares life mode to the success or failure of a genus during each mass extinction interval. For organism size, we found the extinct organisms' mean size (both volume and length) and compared it with the average size of survivors on a graph. Our results show that while surviving genera of mass extinctions tended to be slightly larger than those that went extinct, there was no significant difference. Even though the Permian (Changhsingian) and Triassic (Rhaetian) extinctions had larger surviving species, likewise the difference was small. Ecology had a more obvious impact on the likelihood of survival; fast-moving, predatory pelagic organisms were the most likely to go extinct, while sedentary, infaunal suspension feeders had the greatest chances of survival. Overall, ecology played a greater role than size in determining the survival of a species. With this information, we can use ecology to predict which species would survive future extinctions.

  10. Structural design optimization with survivability dependent constraints application: Primary wing box of a multi-role fighter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolvin, Douglas J.

    1992-01-01

    The superior survivability of a multirole fighter is dependent upon balanced integration of technologies for reduced vulnerability and susceptability. The objective is to develop a methodology for structural design optimization with survivability dependent constraints. The design criteria for optimization will be survivability in a tactical laser environment. The following analyses are studied to establish a dependent design relationship between structural weight and survivability: (1) develop a physically linked global design model of survivability variables; and (2) apply conventional constraints to quantify survivability dependent design. It was not possible to develop an exact approach which would include all aspects of survivability dependent design, therefore guidelines are offered for solving similar problems.

  11. Hyperglycemia Increases Susceptibility to Ischemic Necrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Lévigne

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic patients are at risk for spontaneous foot ulcers, chronic wounds, infections, and tissue necrosis. Current theories suggest that the development and progression of diabetic foot ulcers are mainly caused by arteriosclerosis and peripheral neuropathy. Tissue necrosis plays a primordial role in the progression of diabetic foot ulcers but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of hyperglycemia per se on the susceptibility of ischemic tissue to necrosis, using a critical ischemic hind limb animal model. We inflicted the same degree of ischemia in both euglycemic and streptozotocin-induced hyperglycemic rats by resecting the external iliac, the femoral, and the saphenous arteries. Postoperative laser Doppler flowmetry of the ischemic feet showed the same degree of reduction in skin perfusion in both hyperglycemic and euglycemic animals. Nevertheless, we found a significantly higher rate of limb necrosis in hyperglycemic rats compared to euglycemic rats (71% versus 29%, resp.. In this study, we revealed that hyperglycemia per se increases the susceptibility to limb necrosis in ischemic conditions. Our results may help to better understand the physiopathology of progressive diabetic wounds and underline the importance of strict glycemic control in patients with critical limb ischemia.

  12. Susceptibility Genes in Thyroid Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiyuki Ban

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD are complex diseases which are caused by an interaction between susceptibility genes and environmental triggers. Genetic susceptibility in combination with external factors (e.g. dietary iodine is believed to initiate the autoimmune response to thyroid antigens. Abundant epidemiological data, including family and twin studies, point to a strong genetic influence on the development of AITD. Various techniques have been employed to identify the genes contributing to the etiology of AITD, including candidate gene analysis and whole genome screening. These studies have enabled the identification of several loci (genetic regions that are linked with AITD, and in some of these loci, putative AITD susceptibility genes have been identified. Some of these genes/loci are unique to Graves' disease (GD and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT and some are common to both the diseases, indicating that there is a shared genetic susceptibility to GD and HT. The putative GD and HT susceptibility genes include both immune modifying genes (e.g. HLA, CTLA-4 and thyroid specific genes (e.g. TSHR, Tg. Most likely, these loci interact and their interactions may influence disease phenotype and severity.

  13. Rich Reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niebuhr, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Managing and, ideally, explaining phonetic variation has ever since been a key issue in the speech sciences. In this context, the major contribution of Lindblom's H&H theory was to replace the futile search for invariance by an explainable variance based on the tug-of-war metaphor. Recent empirical...... evidence on articulatory prosodies and the involvement of reduction in conveying communication functions both suggest the next steps along the line of argument opened up by Lindblom. Specifically, we need to supplement Lindblom's explanatory framework and revise the speaker-listener conflict that lies...... at the heart of the tug-of-war metaphor. The author's suggestion would be to "offshore" the tug-of-war metaphor and replace it by the ocean metaphor of Bolinger (1964), with the ups and downs at the surface of the ocean representing the speaker's variation along the hypo-hyper scale and wavelength...

  14. The Bmi-1 helix–turn and ring finger domains are required for Bmi-1 antagonism of (–) epigallocatechin-3-gallate suppression of skin cancer cell survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Sivaprakasam; Scharadin, Tiffany M.; Han, Bingshe; Xu, Wen; Eckert, Richard L.

    2016-01-01

    The Bmi-1 Polycomb group (PcG) protein is an important epigenetic regulator of chromatin status. Elevated Bmi-1 expression is observed in skin cancer and contributes to cancer cell survival. (–) Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), an important green tea-derived cancer prevention agent, reduces Bmi-1 level resulting in reduced skin cancer cell survival. This is associated with increased p21Cip1 and p27Kip1 expression, reduced cyclin, and cyclin dependent kinase expression, and increased cleavage of apoptotic markers. These EGCG-dependent changes are attenuated by vector-mediated maintenance of Bmi-1 expression. In the present study, we identify Bmi-1 functional domains that are required for this response. Bmi-1 expression reverses the EGCG-dependent reduction in SCC-13 cell survival, but Bmi-1 mutants lacking the helix–turn–helix–turn–helix–turn (Bmi-1ΔHT) or ring finger (Bmi-1ΔRF) domains do not reverse the EGCG impact. The reduction in Ring1B ubiquitin ligase activity, observed in the presence of mutant Bmi-1, is associated with reduced ability of these mutants to interact with and activate Ring1B ubiquitin ligase, the major ligase responsible for the ubiquitination of histone H2A during chromatin condensation. This results in less chromatin condensation leading to increased tumor suppressor gene expression and reduced cell survival; thereby making the cells more susceptible to the anti-survival action of EGCG. We further show that these mutants act in a dominant-negative manner to inhibit the action of endogenous Bmi-1. Our results suggest that the HT and RF domains are required for Bmi-1 ability to maintain skin cancer cell survival in response to cancer preventive agents. PMID:25843776

  15. Inherited susceptibility and radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Little, J.B. [Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States)

    1997-03-01

    There is continuing concern that some people in the general population may have genetic makeups that place them at particularly high risk for radiation-induced cancer. The existence of such a susceptible subpopulation would have obvious implications for the estimation of risks of radiation exposure. Although it has been long known that familial aggregations of cancer do sometimes occur, recent evidence suggests that a general genetic predisposition to cancer does not exist; most cancers occur sporadically. On the other hand, nearly 10% of the known Mendelian genetic disorders are associated with cancer. A number of these involve a familial predisposition to cancer, and some are characterized by an enhanced susceptibility to the induction of cancer by various physical and chemical carcinogens, including ionizing radiation. Such increased susceptibility will depend on several factors including the frequency of the susceptibility gene in the population and its penetrance, the strength of the predisposition, and the degree to which the cancer incidence in susceptible individuals may be increased by the carcinogen. It is now known that these cancer-predisposing genes may be responsible not only for rare familial cancer syndromes, but also for a proportion of the common cancers. Although the currently known disorders can account for only a small fraction of all cancers, they serve as models for genetic predisposition to carcinogen-induced cancer in the general population. In the present report, the author describes current knowledge of those specific disorders that are associated with an enhanced predisposition to radiation-induced cancer, and discusses how this knowledge may bear on the susceptibility to radiation-induced cancer in the general population and estimates of the risk of radiation exposure.

  16. pitting corrosion susceptibility pitting corrosion susceptibility of aisi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    Abstract. The susceptibility of austenitic (AISI 301) stainless steel to pitting corrosion was evaluated in sodium chloride. (NaCl) solutions ... AISI 301 steel suffers from pitting corrosion in all the investigated solutions. AISI 301 steel suffers from ..... [1] Ijeomah, M.N.C. Elements of Corrosion and Protection. Theory, Auto Century ...

  17. A landslide susceptibility map of Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broeckx, Jente; Vanmaercke, Matthias; Duchateau, Rica; Poesen, Jean

    2017-04-01

    Studies on landslide risks and fatalities indicate that landslides are a global threat to humans, infrastructure and the environment, certainly in Africa. Nonetheless our understanding of the spatial patterns of landslides and rockfalls on this continent is very limited. Also in global landslide susceptibility maps, Africa is mostly underrepresented in the inventories used to construct these maps. As a result, predicted landslide susceptibilities remain subject to very large uncertainties. This research aims to produce a first continent-wide landslide susceptibility map for Africa, calibrated with a well-distributed landslide dataset. As a first step, we compiled all available landslide inventories for Africa. This data was supplemented by additional landslide mapping with Google Earth in underrepresented regions. This way, we compiled 60 landslide inventories from the literature (ca. 11000 landslides) and an additional 6500 landslides through mapping in Google Earth (including 1500 rockfalls). Various environmental variables such as slope, lithology, soil characteristics, land use, precipitation and seismic activity, were investigated for their significance in explaining the observed spatial patterns of landslides. To account for potential mapping biases in our dataset, we used Monte Carlo simulations that selected different subsets of mapped landslides, tested the significance of the considered environmental variables and evaluated the performance of the fitted multiple logistic regression model against another subset of mapped landslides. Based on these analyses, we constructed two landslide susceptibility maps for Africa: one for all landslide types and one excluding rockfalls. In both maps, topography, lithology and seismic activity were the most significant variables. The latter factor may be surprising, given the overall limited degree of seismicity in Africa. However, its significance indicates that frequent seismic events may serve as in important

  18. Magnetic Susceptability Measurements in Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jason; Mallory, Kendall; Seim, Ryan

    2000-04-01

    A new undergraduate research facility in magnetic susceptability measurements on superconductors is being developed at the University of Northern Colorado. Initial data measurements of the magnetic susceptability of various superconductors will be presented. These measurements were obtained with a liquid helium/nitrogen dewar that was reassembled for use in this project. The cryostat consists of two separate dewars, the first of which contains liquid nitrogen, the second, liquid helium. The liquid nitrogen dewar is used to keep the helium bath from evaporating off too quickly. Data on the evaporation rates of the two liquids will also be presented.

  19. Exceptional Reductions

    CERN Document Server

    Marrani, Alessio; Riccioni, Fabio

    2011-01-01

    Starting from basic identities of the group E8, we perform progressive reductions, namely decompositions with respect to the maximal and symmetric embeddings of E7xSU(2) and then of E6xU(1). This procedure provides a systematic approach to the basic identities involving invariant primitive tensor structures of various irreprs. of finite-dimensional exceptional Lie groups. We derive novel identities for E7 and E6, highlighting the E8 origin of some well known ones. In order to elucidate the connections of this formalism to four-dimensional Maxwell-Einstein supergravity theories based on symmetric scalar manifolds (and related to irreducible Euclidean Jordan algebras, the unique exception being the triality-symmetric N = 2 stu model), we then derive a fundamental identity involving the unique rank-4 symmetric invariant tensor of the 0-brane charge symplectic irrepr. of U-duality groups, with potential applications in the quantization of the charge orbits of supergravity theories, as well as in the study of mult...

  20. BIRC3 single nucleotide polymorphism associate with asthma susceptibility and the abundance of eosinophils and neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roscioli, Eugene; Hamon, Rhys; Ruffin, Richard E; Grant, Janet; Hodge, Sandra; Zalewski, Peter; Lester, Susan

    2017-03-01

    Aberrant apoptosis is a disease susceptibility mechanism relevant for asthma, whereby fragility of the airway epithelium and enhanced survival of inflammatory cells, contributes to its pathogenesis and prolongation. Cellular Inhibitor of Apoptosis Proteins (cIAP) suppress apoptosis, and participate in the immune response. In this study, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in the BIRC2 (codes cIAP1) and BIRC3 (cIAP2) genes were evaluated for an association with asthma. Caucasian asthmatic (n = 203) and control (n = 198) subjects were selected from participants in the North West Adelaide Health Study. SNPs (n = 9) spanning the consecutively positioned BIRC2 and BIRC3 genes, were selected using a haplotype tagging approach. Alleles and haplotype associations were analysed by logistic regression, assuming an additive genetic model, and adjusted for gender and atopy. The frequency of the minor allele for the BIRC3 SNP rs3460 was significantly lower in asthmatics compared to the control cases (P = 0.046). BIRC3 SNPs rs7928663 and rs7127583 associated with a reduction in eosinophil and neutrophil abundance when assessed across the study population (multivariate P values = 0.002, and 0.005, respectively). Further, the frequency of a haplotype tagged by rs3460, rs7928663 and rs7127583 was reduced in the asthma sub group (P = 0.05), while the presence of the major allele for rs7928663 associated with an increased load of circulating eosinophils and neutrophils (multivariate P value = 0.001). Polymorphisms in the BIRC3 gene, but not BIRC2, are associated with a protective effect with regards to asthma susceptibility, and a reduced load of inflammatory cells.

  1. Topological susceptibility from the overlap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Del Debbio, Luigi; Pica, Claudio

    2003-01-01

    The chiral symmetry at finite lattice spacing of Ginsparg-Wilson fermionic actions constrains the renormalization of the lattice operators; in particular, the topological susceptibility does not require any renormalization, when using a fermionic estimator to define the topological charge. Theref...

  2. Network ties and survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Acheampong, George; Narteh, Bedman; Rand, John

    2017-01-01

    Poultry farming has been touted as one of the major ways by which poverty can be reduced in low-income economies like Ghana. Yet, anecdotally there is a high failure rate among these poultry farms. This current study seeks to understand the relationship between network ties and survival chances...... of small commercial poultry farms (SCPFs). We utilize data from a 2-year network survey of SCPFs in rural Ghana. The survival of these poultry farms are modelled using a lagged probit model of farms that persisted from 2014 into 2015. We find that network ties are important to the survival chances...... but this probability reduces as the number of industry ties increases but moderation with dynamic capability of the firm reverses this trend. Our findings show that not all network ties aid survival and therefore small commercial poultry farmers need to be circumspect in the network ties they cultivate and develop....

  3. Aircraft Survivability: Rotorcraft Survivability. Summer 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    protect those who serve to protect us?” The answer is a mixed bag. I am fortunate to have joined a group of dedicated men and women who represent this...and Service subject matter experts on rotorcraft safety and survivability to complete the study and report the results to the Joint Chiefs of...Operations and Support CDD TEMP DT DT/OT LUT IOT &E BLRIP TEMP TEMP LRIP Acquisition & LFT Strategies B C LFT&E Review Requirements Approve TEMPs

  4. Growth, survival, proliferation and pathogenesis of Listeria monocytogenes under low oxygen or anaerobic conditions: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lungu, B; Ricke, S C; Johnson, M G

    2009-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram positive facultative anaerobe that causes listeriosis, a disease that mainly affects the immune-compromised, the elderly, infants and pregnant women. In the susceptible immune challenged population, listeriosis is very severe and has a fatality rate of up to 30%. Control of L. monocytogenes is difficult due to its: 1) widespread presence in the environment, 2) intrinsic physiological resistance, 3) ability to adapt to external stresses and 4) ability to grow at a wide range of temperatures. L. monocytogenes encounters anaerobic conditions in the external environment as well as during pathogenesis. Although L. monocytogenes is a facultative anaerobe, the differential effects of O(2) and oxidation-reduction potential on the multiplication of L. monocytogenes have not been established. In addition, most laboratory studies to determine the growth, survival and persistence of this pathogen in foods as well as in the environment have emphasized the response of this pathogen under aerobic conditions. Consequently, this has led to a limited understanding of the metabolic and physiological responses of L. monocytogenes in low oxygen environments. Therefore, the objective of our review was to highlight the progress that has been made in L. monocytogenes research with emphasis on the role of low oxygen and/or anaerobiosis in the growth, survival and proliferation of this pathogen in the environment as well as during pathogenesis.

  5. Effect of Fascioloides magna (Digenea) on fecundity, shell height, and survival rate of Pseudosuccinea columella (Lymnaeidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankrác, Jan; Novobilský, Adam; Rondelaud, Daniel; Leontovyč, Roman; Syrovátka, Vít; Rajský, Dušan; Horák, Petr; Kašný, Martin

    2016-08-01

    Infection with Fascioloides magna (Digenea) causes serious damage to liver tissue in definitive hosts represented by ruminants, especially cervids. The distribution of F. magna includes the indigenous areas in North America, and the areas to which F. magna was introduced-Central Europe, Southeast Europe, and Italy. The North American intermediate host of F. magna, the freshwater snail Pseudosuccinea columella (Lymnaeidae), is an invasive species recorded in South America, the Caribbean, Africa, Australia, and west and Southeast Europe. In Europe, Galba truncatula is the snail serving for transmission, but P. columella has potential to become here a new intermediate host of F. magna. Little is known about interactions between F. magna and P. columella. In this study, the susceptibility of P. columella (Oregon, USA) to the infection by a single miracidium of the Czech strain of F. magna and the influence of F. magna on snail fecundity, shell height, and survival were evaluated. The data show that the Oregon strain of P. columella is a highly suitable host for the Czech strain of F. magna, with the infection rate of 74 %. In addition, a negative effect on survival rate of infected snails was recorded only in the late phase of infection. The infection was accompanied by a major reduction in egg mass production and by a decrease in the number of eggs per egg mass. The shell height of infected snails did not significantly differ from that in unexposed controls.

  6. Landslide Susceptibility Assessment Using Spatial Multi-Criteria Evaluation Model in Rwanda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Baptiste Nsengiyumva

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Landslides susceptibility assessment has to be conducted to identify prone areas and guide risk management. Landslides in Rwanda are very deadly disasters. The current research aimed to conduct landslide susceptibility assessment by applying Spatial Multi-Criteria Evaluation Model with eight layers of causal factors including: slope, distance to roads, lithology, precipitation, soil texture, soil depth, altitude and land cover. In total, 980 past landslide locations were mapped. The relationship between landslide factors and inventory map was calculated using the Spatial Multi-Criteria Evaluation. The results revealed that susceptibility is spatially distributed countrywide with 42.3% of the region classified from moderate to very high susceptibility, and this is inhabited by 49.3% of the total population. In addition, Provinces with high to very high susceptibility are West, North and South (40.4%, 22.8% and 21.5%, respectively. Subsequently, the Eastern Province becomes the peak under low susceptibility category (87.8% with no very high susceptibility (0%. Based on these findings, the employed model produced accurate and reliable outcome in terms of susceptibility, since 49.5% of past landslides fell within the very high susceptibility category, which confirms the model’s performance. The outcomes of this study will be useful for future initiatives related to landslide risk reduction and management.

  7. Nivolumab Doubles Survival for Patients with HNSCC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    In patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma refractory to platinum-based chemotherapy, those treated with nivolumab had a 30% reduction in the risk of death compared with those assigned to receive one of three single-agent chemotherapies, according to a recent phase III trial. In addition, 1-year survival among nivolumab recipients was double that of those who received a chemotherapeutic, the current standard of care. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  8. Simulated field maps for susceptibility artefact correction in interventional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochan, Martin; Daga, Pankaj; Burgos, Ninon; White, Mark; Cardoso, M Jorge; Mancini, Laura; Winston, Gavin P; McEvoy, Andrew W; Thornton, John; Yousry, Tarek; Duncan, John S; Stoyanov, Danail; Ourselin, Sébastien

    2015-09-01

    Intraoperative MRI (iMRI) is a powerful modality for acquiring images of the brain to facilitate precise image-guided neurosurgery. Diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) provides critical information about location, orientation and structure of nerve fibre tracts, but suffers from the "susceptibility artefact" stemming from magnetic field perturbations due to the step change in magnetic susceptibility at air-tissue boundaries in the head. An existing approach to correcting the artefact is to acquire a field map by means of an additional MRI scan. However, to recover true field maps from the acquired field maps near air-tissue boundaries is challenging, and acquired field maps are unavailable in historical MRI data sets. This paper reports a detailed account of our method to simulate field maps from structural MRI scans that was first presented at IPCAI 2014 and provides a thorough experimental and analysis section to quantitatively validate our technique. We perform automatic air-tissue segmentation of intraoperative MRI scans, feed the segmentation into a field map simulation step and apply the acquired and the simulated field maps to correct DW-MRI data sets. We report results for 12 patient data sets acquired during anterior temporal lobe resection surgery for the surgical management of focal epilepsy. We find a close agreement between acquired and simulated field maps and observe a statistically significant reduction in the susceptibility artefact in DW-MRI data sets corrected using simulated field maps in the vicinity of the resection. The artefact reduction obtained using acquired field maps remains better than that using the simulated field maps in all evaluated regions of the brain. The proposed simulated field maps facilitate susceptibility artefact reduction near the resection. Accurate air-tissue segmentation is key to achieving accurate simulation. The proposed simulation approach is adaptable to different iMRI and neurosurgical applications.

  9. Reducing Susceptibility to Courtesy Stigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachleda, Catherine L; El Menzhi, Leila

    2017-04-19

    In light of the chronic shortage of health professionals willing to care for HIV/AIDS patients, and rising epidemics in many Muslim countries, this qualitative study examined susceptibility and resistance to courtesy stigma as experienced by nurses, doctors, and social workers in Morocco. Forty-nine in-depth interviews provided rich insights into the process of courtesy stigma and how it is managed, within the context of interactions with Islam, interactions within the workplace (patients, other health professionals), and interactions outside the workplace (the general public, friends, and family). Theoretically, the findings extend understanding of courtesy stigma and the dirty work literature. The findings also offer practical suggestions for the development of culturally appropriate strategies to reduce susceptibility to courtesy stigmatization. This study represents the first to explore courtesy stigma as a process experienced by health professionals providing HIV/AIDS care in an Islamic country.

  10. Starvation-Survival in Haloarchaea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, Yaicha D.; Lowenstein, Tim K.; Timofeeff, Michael N.

    2015-01-01

    experienced size reductions and shape transitions from rods to cocci. In the short-term, these trends more closely resembled the response of these organisms to starvation conditions than to nutrient-rich media. Results from this experiment reproduced the physical state of cells (small cocci) in ancient halite where prokaryotes co-exist with single-celled algae. We conclude that glycerol is not the limiting factor in the survival of haloarchaea for thousands of years in fluid inclusions in halite. PMID:26569313

  11. Starvation-Survival in Haloarchaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaicha D. Winters

    2015-11-01

    and DV582A-1 experienced size reductions and shape transitions from rods to cocci. In the short-term, these trends more closely resembled the response of these organisms to starvation conditions than to nutrient-rich media. Results from this experiment reproduced the physical state of cells (small cocci in ancient halite where prokaryotes co-exist with single-celled algae. We conclude that glycerol is not the limiting factor in the survival of haloarchaea for thousands of years in fluid inclusions in halite.

  12. Multiple neoplasms, single primaries, and patient survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amer MH

    2014-03-01

    clinical behavior with longer survival rates, possibly related to genetic predisposition. Keywords: genetic susceptibility, incidence study, hereditary, multiple primary neoplasms, survival analysis, prognosis

  13. Vaccine effects on heterogeneity in susceptibility and implications for population health management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langwig, Kate E.; Wargo, Andrew R.; Jones, Darbi R.; Viss, Jessie R.; Rutan, Barbara J.; Egan, Nicholas A.; Sá-Guimarães, Pedro; Min Sun Kim,; Kurath, Gael; Gomes, M. Gabriela M.; Lipsitch, Marc; Bansal, Shweta; Pettigrew, Melinda M.

    2017-01-01

    Heterogeneity in host susceptibility is a key determinant of infectious disease dynamics but is rarely accounted for in assessment of disease control measures. Understanding how susceptibility is distributed in populations, and how control measures change this distribution, is integral to predicting the course of epidemics with and without interventions. Using multiple experimental and modeling approaches, we show that rainbow trout have relatively homogeneous susceptibility to infection with infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus and that vaccination increases heterogeneity in susceptibility in a nearly all-or-nothing fashion. In a simple transmission model with an R0 of 2, the highly heterogeneous vaccine protection would cause a 35 percentage-point reduction in outbreak size over an intervention inducing homogenous protection at the same mean level. More broadly, these findings provide validation of methodology that can help to reduce biases in predictions of vaccine impact in natural settings and provide insight into how vaccination shapes population susceptibility.

  14. Antibiotic susceptibility of Atopobium vaginae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verschraegen Gerda

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have indicated that a recently described anaerobic bacterium, Atopobium vaginae is associated with bacterial vaginosis (BV. Thus far the four isolates of this fastidious micro-organism were found to be highly resistant to metronidazole and susceptible for clindamycin, two antibiotics preferred for the treatment of BV. Methods Nine strains of Atopobium vaginae, four strains of Gardnerella vaginalis, two strains of Lactobacillus iners and one strain each of Bifidobacterium breve, B. longum, L. crispatus, L. gasseri and L. jensenii were tested against 15 antimicrobial agents using the Etest. Results All nine strains of A. vaginae were highly resistant to nalidixic acid and colistin while being inhibited by low concentrations of clindamycin (range: G. vaginalis strains were also susceptible for clindamycin ( 256 μg/ml but susceptible to clindamycin (0.023 – 0.125 μg/ml. Conclusion Clindamycin has higher activity against G. vaginalis and A. vaginae than metronidazole, but not all A. vaginae isolates are metronidazole resistant, as seemed to be a straightforward conclusion from previous studies on a more limited number of strains.

  15. Differential biocide susceptibility of the multiple genotypes of Mycobacterium immunogenum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaraju, Suresh B; Khan, Izhar U H; Yadav, Jagjit S

    2008-03-01

    The non-tuberculous mycobacterium Mycobacterium immunogenum colonizes industrial metalworking fluids (MWFs) presumably due to its relative resistance to the currently practiced biocides and has been implicated in occupational respiratory hazards, particularly hypersensitivity pneumonitis. With an aim to understand its inherent biocide susceptibility profile and survival potential in MWF, five different genotypes of this organism, including a reference genotype (700506) and four novel test genotypes (MJY-3, MJY-4, MJY-10 and MJY-12) isolated in our recent study from diverse MWF operations were evaluated. For this, two commercial biocide formulations, Grotan (Hexahydro-1,3,5-tris(2-hydroxyethyl)-s-triazine) and Kathon (5-chloro-2-methyl-4-isothiazolin-3-one) currently practiced for the control of microorganisms, including mycobacteria, in MWF operations were tested. Effect of the fluid matrix on the biocide susceptibility was investigated for the synthetic (S) and semi-synthetic (SS) MWF matrices. In general, the minimum inhibitory concentration values were higher for the HCHO-releasing biocide Grotan than the isothiazolone biocide Kathon. All genotypes (except the reference genotype) showed lower susceptibility in SS as compared to S fluid matrix for Grotan. However, in case of Kathon, a greater susceptibility was observed in SS fluid for majority of the test genotypes (MJY-3, 4 and 10). The test genotypes were more resistant than the reference genotype to either biocide in both fluid types. Furthermore, the individual genotypes showed differential biocidal susceptibility, with MJY-10 being the most resistant. These observations emphasize the importance of using the resistant genotypes of M. immunogenum as the test strains for formulation or development and evaluation of existing and novel biocides, for industrial applications.

  16. Proof-Carrying Survivability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-15

    pp.289-302 ( Impact factor : 2.09). 2. Julic, J. and Zuo, Y. (2012). “An RFID Survivability Impact Model in the Military Domain”, Proc. of 18 th...Availability, Reliability and Security, 40(4), pp. 406-418 ( Impact factor : 2.016). 10. Zuo, Y. (2010). “A Holistic Approach for Specification of Security... Impact factor : 1.596). 20. Zuo, Y., Pimple, M. and Lande, S. (2009). “A Framework for RFID Survivability Requirement Analysis and Specification”, Proc

  17. Measurements of temperature dependence of 'localized susceptibility'

    CERN Document Server

    Shiozawa, H; Ishii, H; Takayama, Y; Obu, K; Muro, T; Saitoh, Y; Matsuda, T D; Sugawara, H; Sato, H

    2003-01-01

    The magnetic susceptibility of some rare-earth compounds is estimated by measuring magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) of rare-earth 3d-4f absorption spectra. The temperature dependence of the magnetic susceptibility obtained by the MCD measurement is remarkably different from the bulk susceptibility in most samples, which is attributed to the strong site selectivity of the core MCD measurement.

  18. Smoking tobacco in Costa Rica: susceptibility, consumption and dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Fonseca-Chaves

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To identify factors associated with susceptibility, tobacco use and addiction in young people from 13 to 15 years of age, to determine conditions of risk and identify possible correlates to the development of public policies on smoking in Costa Rica. Materials and methods. Information available from the four rounds of the Global Youth Tobacco Survey (GYTS Costa Rica was used. It was based on a sample size of 11 540 youngsters from public and private schools. Indicators of interest and logistic regression models for smoking, susceptibility and addiction were estimated. Results. The prevalence of current consumption shows a significant decrease over the 14 years of the study (17.3% in 1999 and 5.0% in 2013 and, to a lesser intensity, in the index of smoking susceptibility (19.3% in 1999 and 12.4% in 2013. The proportion of young people with addiction has shown a significant increase in the same period. Conclusions. The conditions that explained the significant reduction in smoking prevalence and less susceptibility must be maintained and deepened to achieve full compliance of the MPower measures.

  19. Factors affecting post-capture survivability of lobster Homarus americanus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basti, David; Bricknell, Ian; Hoyt, Ken; Chang, Ernest S; Halteman, William; Bouchard, Deborah

    2010-06-11

    Technological advances in gear and fishing practices have driven the global expansion of the American lobster live seafood market. These changes have had a positive effect on the lobster industry by increasing capture efficiency. However, it is unknown what effect these improved methods will have on the post-capture fitness and survival of lobsters. This project utilized a repeated measures design to compare the physiological changes that occur in lobsters over time as the result of differences in depth, hauling rate, and storage methodology. The results indicate that lobsters destined for long distance transport or temporary storage in pounds undergo physiological disturbance as part of the capture process. These changes are significant over time for total hemocyte counts, crustacean hyperglycemic hormone, L-lactate, ammonia, and glucose. Repeated measures multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) for glucose indicates a significant interaction between depth and storage methodology over time for non-survivors. A Gram-negative bacterium, Photobacterium indicum, was identified in pure culture from hemolymph samples of 100% of weak lobsters. Histopathology revealed the presence of Gram-negative bacteria throughout the tissues with evidence of antemortem edema and necrosis suggestive of septicemia. On the basis of these findings, we recommend to the lobster industry that if a reduction in depth and hauling rate is not economically feasible, fishermen should take particular care in handling lobsters and provide them with a recovery period in recirculating seawater prior to land transport. The ecological role of P. indicum is not fully defined at this time. However, it may be an emerging opportunistic pathogen of stressed lobsters. Judicious preemptive antibiotic therapy may be necessary to reduce mortality in susceptible lobsters destined for high-density holding facilities.

  20. Survivability via Control Objectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CAMPBELL,PHILIP L.

    2000-08-11

    Control objectives open an additional front in the survivability battle. A given set of control objectives is valuable if it represents good practices, it is complete (it covers all the necessary areas), and it is auditable. CobiT and BS 7799 are two examples of control objective sets.

  1. Artists’ Survival Rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Trine; Jensen, Søren

    2017-01-01

    The literature of cultural economics generally finds that an artistic education has no significant impact on artists’ income and careers in the arts. In our research, we have readdressed this question by looking at the artists’ survival in the arts occupations. The results show that an artistic...... education has a significant impact on artists’ careers in the arts and we find important industry differences....

  2. Education for Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldrich, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This article provides a brief overview of current approaches to education and concludes that none of these is sufficient to meet the challenges that now face the human race. It argues instead for a new concept of education for survival. (Contains 1 note.)

  3. Flexible survival regression modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortese, Giuliana; Scheike, Thomas H; Martinussen, Torben

    2009-01-01

    Regression analysis of survival data, and more generally event history data, is typically based on Cox's regression model. We here review some recent methodology, focusing on the limitations of Cox's regression model. The key limitation is that the model is not well suited to represent time-varyi...

  4. Seeds to survive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, S.P.C.

    2002-01-01

    Seeds are important for man, either as propagation material of crops or directly for the production of foods, fodder and drinks. The natural function of seeds is dispersal of its genes to successive generations. Survival mechanisms seed have evolved sometimes interfere with those preferred by

  5. Survival After Retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Clark; Youngblood, Stuart A.

    1986-01-01

    Examined survival rates after retirement in a large corporation. A regression analysis was performed to control for age, sex, job status, and type of work differences that may influence longevity. Short-term suvivors seemed to undergo a different adjustment process than long-term survivors. (Author/ABL)

  6. Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of Burkholderia pseudomallei among melioidosis cases in Kedah, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Muhammad R A; Vijayalakshmi, Natesan; Pani, Subhada Prasad; Peng, Ng P; Mehenderkar, Ranjith; Voralu, Kirtanaa; Michael, Edwin

    2014-05-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis is an important cause of morbidity and mortality particularly among diabetics. We evaluated 228 isolates of B. pseudomallei for antimicrobial sensitivity during 2005-2010 using the disc diffusion technique, of which 144 were obtained from blood culture. More than 90% of the strains were susceptible to cefoperazone, ceftazidime, chloramphenicol and imipenem. Eighty-two percent of the isolates were susceptible to tetracycline and amoxicillin/clavulanate. The susceptibilities to ciprofloxacin was 78% and to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxezole was 47%. The susceptibilities to aminoglycoside antibiotics were low (21% to gentamicin and 6% to amikacin). The susceptibilities were similar between isolates from females and males, bacteremic and abacteremic cases, diabetics and non-diabetics, pneumonia and non-pneumonia cases and between those who died and those who survived. Our findings show antibiotic susceptibility patterns are not a major factor in determining outcomes of B. pseudomallei infection. Monitoring the drug susceptibilities among B. pseudomallei isolates needs to be conducted regularly to guide empiric therapy for melioidosis, as it causes high mortality, especially among diabetic cases.

  7. Dielectric and diamagnetic susceptibilities near percolative superconductor-insulator transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Yen Lee; Karki, Pragalv

    2017-10-25

    Coarse-grained superconductor-insulator composites exhibit a superconductor-insulator transition governed by classical percolation, which should be describable by networks of inductors and capacitors. We study several classes of random inductor-capacitor networks on square lattices. We present a unifying framework for defining electric and magnetic response functions, and we extend the Frank-Lobb bond-propagation algorithm to compute these quantities by network reduction. We confirm that the superfluid stiffness scales approximately as [Formula: see text] as the superconducting bond fraction p approaches the percolation threshold p c . We find that the diamagnetic susceptibility scales as [Formula: see text] below percolation, and as [Formula: see text] above percolation. For models lacking self-capacitances, the electric susceptibility scales as [Formula: see text]. Including a self-capacitance on each node changes the critical behavior to approximately [Formula: see text].

  8. Ureolytic Biomineralization Reduces Proteus mirabilis Biofilm Susceptibility to Ciprofloxacin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaobao; Lu, Nanxi; Brady, Hannah R; Packman, Aaron I

    2016-05-01

    Ureolytic biomineralization induced by urease-producing bacteria, particularly Proteus mirabilis, is responsible for the formation of urinary tract calculi and the encrustation of indwelling urinary catheters. Such microbial biofilms are challenging to eradicate and contribute to the persistence of catheter-associated urinary tract infections, but the mechanisms responsible for this recalcitrance remain obscure. In this study, we characterized the susceptibility of wild-type (ure+) and urease-negative (ure-) P. mirabilis biofilms to killing by ciprofloxacin. Ure+ biofilms produced fine biomineral precipitates that were homogeneously distributed within the biofilm biomass in artificial urine, while ure- biofilms did not produce biomineral deposits under identical growth conditions. Following exposure to ciprofloxacin, ure+ biofilms showed greater survival (less killing) than ure- biofilms, indicating that biomineralization protected biofilm-resident cells against the antimicrobial. To evaluate the mechanism responsible for this recalcitrance, we observed and quantified the transport of Cy5-conjugated ciprofloxacin into the biofilm by video confocal microscopy. These observations revealed that the reduced susceptibility of ure+ biofilms resulted from hindered delivery of ciprofloxacin into biomineralized regions of the biofilm. Further, biomineralization enhanced retention of viable cells on the surface following antimicrobial exposure. These findings together show that ureolytic biomineralization induced by P. mirabilis metabolism strongly regulates antimicrobial susceptibility by reducing internal solute transport and increasing biofilm stability. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Spanish field isolates of Brachyspira hyodysenteriae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, A; Carvajal, A; García-Feliz, C; Osorio, J; Rubio, P

    2009-08-01

    This study is the first conducted in Spain to evaluate antimicrobial susceptibility of field isolates of Brachyspira hyodysenteriae. One hundred and eight isolates of the bacterium, recovered from different Spanish swine farms between 2000 and 2007, were investigated. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of erythromycin, tylosin, tiamulin, valnemulin, clindamycin and lincomycin were determined using a broth microdilution technique. Most of the isolates showed poor susceptibility to erythromycin (MIC(90)>256 microg/ml), tylosin (MIC(90)>256 microg/ml), clindamycin (MIC(90)>4 microg/ml) and lincomycin (MIC(90)=128 microg/ml). Reduced susceptibility to tiamulin and valnemulin was observed with a MIC>2 microg/ml in 17.6% and 7.41% of the B. hyodysenteriae isolates, respectively. Moreover, a survival analysis permitted the detection of an increasing trend in the MIC values for almost all the antimicrobials used in the treatment of swine dysentery when comparing recent isolates (from 2006 to 2007) with those recovered in earlier years (between 2000 and 2004).

  10. Surviving Sepsis Campaign

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rhodes, Andrew; Evans, Laura E; Alhazzani, Waleed

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide an update to "Surviving Sepsis Campaign Guidelines for Management of Sepsis and Septic Shock: 2012". DESIGN: A consensus committee of 55 international experts representing 25 international organizations was convened. Nominal groups were assembled at key international meetings......, and to formulate recommendations as strong or weak, or best practice statement when applicable. RESULTS: The Surviving Sepsis Guideline panel provided 93 statements on early management and resuscitation of patients with sepsis or septic shock. Overall, 32 were strong recommendations, 39 were weak recommendations...... of care have relatively weak support, evidence-based recommendations regarding the acute management of sepsis and septic shock are the foundation of improved outcomes for these critically ill patients with high mortality....

  11. Surviving Sepsis Campaign

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rhodes, Andrew; Evans, Laura E; Alhazzani, Waleed

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide an update to "Surviving Sepsis Campaign Guidelines for Management of Sepsis and Septic Shock: 2012." DESIGN: A consensus committee of 55 international experts representing 25 international organizations was convened. Nominal groups were assembled at key international meetings......, and to formulate recommendations as strong or weak, or best practice statement when applicable. RESULTS: The Surviving Sepsis Guideline panel provided 93 statements on early management and resuscitation of patients with sepsis or septic shock. Overall, 32 were strong recommendations, 39 were weak recommendations...... of care have relatively weak support, evidence-based recommendations regarding the acute management of sepsis and septic shock are the foundation of improved outcomes for these critically ill patients with high mortality....

  12. Genetic Susceptibility to Pancreatic Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Klein, Alison P

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in both men and women in the United States. However, it has the poorest prognosis of any major tumor type, with a 5-yr survival rate of approximately 5%. Cigarette smoking, increased body mass index, heavy alcohol consumption, and a diagnosis of diabetes mellitus have all been demonstrated to increase risk of pancreatic cancer. A family history of pancreatic cancer has also been associated with increased risk suggesting inherited g...

  13. Cracking the survival code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Füllgrabe, Jens; Heldring, Nina; Hermanson, Ola; Joseph, Bertrand

    2014-01-01

    Modifications of histones, the chief protein components of the chromatin, have emerged as critical regulators of life and death. While the “apoptotic histone code” came to light a few years ago, accumulating evidence indicates that autophagy, a cell survival pathway, is also heavily regulated by histone-modifying proteins. In this review we describe the emerging “autophagic histone code” and the role of histone modifications in the cellular life vs. death decision. PMID:24429873

  14. Artillery Survivability Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    experiment mode also enables users to set their own design of experiment by manipulating an editable CSV file. The second one is a real-time mode that...renders a 3D virtual environment of a restricted battlefield where the survivability movements of an artillery company are visualized . This mode...provides detailed visualization of the simulation and enables future experimental uses of the simulation as a training tool. 14. SUBJECT TERMS

  15. Survival analysis models and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Xian

    2012-01-01

    Survival analysis concerns sequential occurrences of events governed by probabilistic laws.  Recent decades have witnessed many applications of survival analysis in various disciplines. This book introduces both classic survival models and theories along with newly developed techniques. Readers will learn how to perform analysis of survival data by following numerous empirical illustrations in SAS. Survival Analysis: Models and Applications: Presents basic techniques before leading onto some of the most advanced topics in survival analysis.Assumes only a minimal knowledge of SAS whilst enablin

  16. Redução das internações por condições sensíveis à atenção primária no Brasil entre 1998-2009 Reducción de las internaciones por condiciones susceptibles a atención primaria en Brasil entre 1998-2009 Reduction of ambulatory care sensitive conditions in Brazil between 1998 and 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Fernando Boing

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Descrever a tendência de hospitalizações por condições sensíveis à atenção primária entre 1998 e 2009 no Brasil. MÉTODOS: Estudo ecológico de séries temporais com dados secundários referentes às internações hospitalares por condições sensíveis à atenção primária no Sistema Único de Saúde. Os dados foram obtidos do Sistema de Informações Hospitalares. As taxas de internações por 10.000 habitantes foram padronizadas por faixa etária e sexo, considerando a população brasileira masculina recenseada em 2000 como padrão. A análise de tendência da série histórica foi realizada por regressão linear generalizada pelo método de Prais-Winsten. RESULTADOS: Houve redução média anual de internações por condições sensíveis à atenção primária de 3,7% entre homens (IC95% -2,3;-5,1 e mulheres (IC95% -2,5;-5,6 entre 1998 e 2009. A tendência variou em cada unidade federativa, porém em nenhuma houve aumento das internações. No sexo masculino e feminino as maiores reduções foram observadas nas internações por úlceras gastrintestinais (-11,7% ao ano e -12,1%, respectivamente, condições evitáveis (-8,8% e -8,9% e doenças das vias aéreas inferiores (-8,0% e -8,1%. Angina (homens, infecção no rim e trato urinário (homens e mulheres e condições relacionadas ao pré-natal e parto (mulheres apresentaram aumento nas internações. Os três grupos de doenças que mais ocasionaram internações foram gastrenterites infecciosas e complicações, internações por insuficiência cardíaca e asma. CONCLUSÕES: Houve redução substancial nas internações por condições sensíveis à atenção primária no Brasil entre 1998 e 2009, porém algumas doenças apresentaram estabilidade ou acréscimo, exigindo atenção do setor saúde.OBJETIVO: Describir la tendencia de hospitalizaciones por condiciones susceptibles a atención primaria entre 1998 y 2009 en Brasil. MÉTODOS: Estudio ecológico de series

  17. Reduced Slc6a15 in Nucleus Accumbens D2-Neurons Underlies Stress Susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Ramesh; Francis, T Chase; Nam, Hyungwoo; Riggs, Lace M; Engeln, Michel; Rudzinskas, Sarah; Konkalmatt, Prasad; Russo, Scott J; Turecki, Gustavo; Iniguez, Sergio D; Lobo, Mary Kay

    2017-07-05

    Previous research demonstrates that Slc6a15, a neutral amino acid transporter, is associated with depression susceptibility. However, no study examined Slc6a15 in the ventral striatum [nucleus accumbens (NAc)] in depression. Given our previous characterization of Slc6a15 as a striatal dopamine receptor 2 (D2)-neuron-enriched gene, we examined the role of Slc6a15 in NAc D2-neurons in mediating susceptibility to stress in male mice. First, we showed that Slc6a15 mRNA was reduced in NAc of mice susceptible to chronic social defeat stress (CSDS), a paradigm that produces behavioral and molecular adaptations that resemble clinical depression. Consistent with our preclinical data, we observed Slc6a15 mRNA reduction in NAc of individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD). The Slc6a15 reduction in NAc occurred selectively in D2-neurons. Next, we used Cre-inducible viruses combined with D2-Cre mice to reduce or overexpress Slc6a15 in NAc D2-neurons. Slc6a15 reduction in D2-neurons caused enhanced susceptibility to a subthreshold social defeat stress (SSDS) as observed by reduced social interaction, while a reduction in social interaction following CSDS was not observed when Slc6a15 expression in D2-neurons was restored. Finally, since both D2-medium spiny neurons (MSNs) and D2-expressing choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) interneurons express Slc6a15, we examined Slc6a15 protein in these interneurons after CSDS. Slc6a15 protein was unaltered in ChAT interneurons. Consistent with this, reducing Slc5a15 selectively in NAc D2-MSNs, using A2A-Cre mice that express Cre selectively in D2-MSNs, caused enhanced susceptibility to SSDS. Collectively, our data demonstrate that reduced Slc6a15 in NAc occurs in MDD individuals and that Slc6a15 reduction in NAc D2-neurons underlies stress susceptibility. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Our study demonstrates a role for reduced Slc6a15, a neutral amino acid transporter, in nucleus accumbens (NAc) in depression and stress susceptibility. The

  18. Directions of the US Geological Survey Landslide Hazards Reduction Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczorek, G.F.

    1993-01-01

    The US Geological Survey (USGS) Landslide Hazards Reduction Program includes studies of landslide process and prediction, landslide susceptibility and risk mapping, landslide recurrence and slope evolution, and research application and technology transfer. Studies of landslide processes have been recently conducted in Virginia, Utah, California, Alaska, and Hawaii, Landslide susceptibility maps provide a very important tool for landslide hazard reduction. The effects of engineering-geologic characteristics of rocks, seismic activity, short and long-term climatic change on landslide recurrence are under study. Detailed measurement of movement and deformation has begun on some active landslides. -from Author

  19. Applied survival analysis using R

    CERN Document Server

    Moore, Dirk F

    2016-01-01

    Applied Survival Analysis Using R covers the main principles of survival analysis, gives examples of how it is applied, and teaches how to put those principles to use to analyze data using R as a vehicle. Survival data, where the primary outcome is time to a specific event, arise in many areas of biomedical research, including clinical trials, epidemiological studies, and studies of animals. Many survival methods are extensions of techniques used in linear regression and categorical data, while other aspects of this field are unique to survival data. This text employs numerous actual examples to illustrate survival curve estimation, comparison of survivals of different groups, proper accounting for censoring and truncation, model variable selection, and residual analysis. Because explaining survival analysis requires more advanced mathematics than many other statistical topics, this book is organized with basic concepts and most frequently used procedures covered in earlier chapters, with more advanced topics...

  20. Genetic susceptibility to environmental toxicants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2001-01-01

    The toxicological challenges to the chemical industry have in recent years been greatly affected by the rapid innovation and development of analytical, molecular and genetic technologies. ECETOC recognises the importance of developing the technical and intellectual skill bases in academia...... and industrial based laboratories to meet the rapid development of the science base of toxicology. As the technology to determine genetic susceptibility develops, so scientist will be able to describe altered gene expression provoked by chemicals long before they are able to offer valid interpretations...... of their meaning. A potential for inadvertently raising concerns over the effect of chemicals in experimental animals or man, or even the intentional misrepresentation of results to suggest chemicals are “playing” with our genes is enormous. History has shown that some individuals and groups in society are willing...

  1. Accuracy of magnetic resonance based susceptibility measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdevig, Hannah E.; Russek, Stephen E.; Carnicka, Slavka; Stupic, Karl F.; Keenan, Kathryn E.

    2017-05-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is increasingly used to map the magnetic susceptibility of tissue to identify cerebral microbleeds associated with traumatic brain injury and pathological iron deposits associated with neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease. Accurate measurements of susceptibility are important for determining oxygen and iron content in blood vessels and brain tissue for use in noninvasive clinical diagnosis and treatment assessments. Induced magnetic fields with amplitude on the order of 100 nT, can be detected using MRI phase images. The induced field distributions can then be inverted to obtain quantitative susceptibility maps. The focus of this research was to determine the accuracy of MRI-based susceptibility measurements using simple phantom geometries and to compare the susceptibility measurements with magnetometry measurements where SI-traceable standards are available. The susceptibilities of paramagnetic salt solutions in cylindrical containers were measured as a function of orientation relative to the static MRI field. The observed induced fields as a function of orientation of the cylinder were in good agreement with simple models. The MRI susceptibility measurements were compared with SQUID magnetometry using NIST-traceable standards. MRI can accurately measure relative magnetic susceptibilities while SQUID magnetometry measures absolute magnetic susceptibility. Given the accuracy of moment measurements of tissue mimicking samples, and the need to look at small differences in tissue properties, the use of existing NIST standard reference materials to calibrate MRI reference structures is problematic and better reference materials are required.

  2. Proteochemometric modeling of HIV protease susceptibility

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lapins, Maris; Eklund, Martin; Spjuth, Ola; Prusis, Peteris; Wikberg, Jarl E S

    2008-01-01

    .... Therefore, we used proteochemometrics to model the susceptibility of HIV to protease inhibitors in current use, utilizing descriptions of the physico-chemical properties of mutated HIV proteases...

  3. Survival after blood transfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads; Ahlgren, Martin; Rostgaard, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    of transfusion recipients in Denmark and Sweden followed for up to 20 years after their first blood transfusion. Main outcome measure was all-cause mortality. RESULTS: A total of 1,118,261 transfusion recipients were identified, of whom 62.0 percent were aged 65 years or older at the time of their first...... the SMR remained significantly 1.3-fold increased. CONCLUSION: The survival and relative mortality patterns among blood transfusion recipients were characterized with unprecedented detail and precision. Our results are relevant to assessments of the consequences of possible transfusion-transmitted disease...... as well as for cost-benefit estimation of new blood safety interventions....

  4. Nuclear War Survival Skills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kearny, C.H.

    2002-06-24

    The purpose of this book is to provide Americans with information and instructions that will significantly increase their chances of surviving a possible nuclear attack. It brings together field-tested instructions that, if followed by a large fraction of Americans during a crisis that preceded an attack, could save millions of lives. The author is convinced that the vulnerability of our country to nuclear threat or attack must be reduced and that the wide dissemination of the information contained in this book would help achieve that objective of our overall defense strategy.

  5. Design of survivable networks

    CERN Document Server

    Stoer, Mechthild

    1992-01-01

    The problem of designing a cost-efficient network that survives the failure of one or more nodes or edges of the network is critical to modern telecommunications engineering. The method developed in this book is designed to solve such problems to optimality. In particular, a cutting plane approach is described, based on polyhedral combinatorics, that is ableto solve real-world problems of this type in short computation time. These results are of interest for practitioners in the area of communication network design. The book is addressed especially to the combinatorial optimization community, but also to those who want to learn polyhedral methods. In addition, interesting new research problemsare formulated.

  6. Beliefs about the causes of success in sports and susceptibility for doping use in adolescent athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkoukis, Vassilis; Lazuras, Lambros; Tsorbatzoudis, Haralambos

    2014-01-01

    The present study set out to assess the impact of attributional beliefs about success on the susceptibility for doping use in adolescent athletes. The sample consisted of 309 adolescent athletes participating in both team and individual sports. Participants completed a battery of questionnaires including Beliefs about the Causes of Success in Sport Questionnaire (BACSSQ), current and past doping use, and measures of attitudes, norms, situational temptation and social desirability. Variance reduction rate analysis revealed that social desirability did not act as a confounder in the relationship between doping susceptibility and its predictors. With regard to beliefs about the causes of success dimensions, only deception emerged as a significant predictor of doping use susceptibility over and above the effects of well-established social-cognitive predictors of doping intentions and use. These findings imply that beliefs about the causes of success in youth sports may comprise another dimension of risk factors for doping susceptibility and use.

  7. Macrophage Susceptibility to Emactuzumab (RG7155) Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradel, Leon P; Ooi, Chia-Huey; Romagnoli, Solange; Cannarile, Michael A; Sade, Hadassah; Rüttinger, Dominik; Ries, Carola H

    2016-12-01

    Blockade of colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF-1R) enables the therapeutic targeting of tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) in cancer patients. Various CSF-1R inhibitors, mAbs, and tyrosine kinase inhibitors are currently evaluated in early clinical trials. Presence of an alternative survival signal, such as GM-CSF, rescues human monocyte-derived macrophages from CSF-1R inhibitor-induced apoptosis. In this study, we sought to identify additional factors that mediate resistance to CSF-1R-blocking antibody RG7155 (emactuzumab). We investigated the impact of hypoxia, macrophage-polarizing cytokines IL4 and IL10, and genetic alterations within the CSF1R locus and mitochondrial DNA. Among all investigated factors, only IL4 completely rescued viability of RG7155-treated macrophages in vitro This RG7155-resistant population was characterized by a substantially increased mannose receptor-1 (CD206) expression. Analysis of CD206 and the hemoglobin scavenger receptor CD163 expression on normal tissue allowed for discrimination of distinct macrophage populations according to localization and frequency. In emactuzumab-treated cancer patients, we found a significant reduction of CSF-1R, CD204, and CD163 mRNA levels in contrast to a less pronounced decrease of CD206 expression by transcriptome analysis of tumor biopsies. However, we detected in normal skin tissue, which shows lower IL4 mRNA expression compared with melanoma tissue, significant reduction of CD206(+) dermal macrophages in RG7155-treated skin biopsies. These results suggest that in cancers where the cytokines IL4 and GM-CSF are sufficiently expressed to induce very high CD206 expression on macrophages, CSF-1R inhibition may not deplete CD206(hi) TAM. This observation can help to identify those patients most likely to benefit from CSF-1R-targeting agents. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(12); 3077-86. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  8. Multifractal magnetic susceptibility distribution models of hydrothermally altered rocks in the Needle Creek Igneous Center of the Absaroka Mountains, Wyoming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. Gettings

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic susceptibility was measured for 700 samples of drill core from thirteen drill holes in the porphyry copper-molybdenum deposit of the Stinkingwater mining district in the Absaroka Mountains, Wyoming. The magnetic susceptibility measurements, chemical analyses, and alteration class provided a database for study of magnetic susceptibility in these altered rocks. The distribution of the magnetic susceptibilities for all samples is multi-modal, with overlapping peaked distributions for samples in the propylitic and phyllic alteration class, a tail of higher susceptibilities for potassic alteration, and an approximately uniform distribution over a narrow range at the highest susceptibilities for unaltered rocks. Samples from all alteration and mineralization classes show susceptibilities across a wide range of values. Samples with secondary (supergene alteration due to oxidation or enrichment show lower susceptibilities than primary (hypogene alteration rock. Observed magnetic susceptibility variations and the monolithological character of the host rock suggest that the variations are due to varying degrees of alteration of blocks of rock between fractures that conducted hydrothermal fluids. Alteration of rock from the fractures inward progressively reduces the bulk magnetic susceptibility of the rock. The model introduced in this paper consists of a simulation of the fracture pattern and a simulation of the alteration of the rock between fractures. A multifractal model generated from multiplicative cascades with unequal ratios produces distributions statistically similar to the observed distributions. The reduction in susceptibility in the altered rocks was modelled as a diffusion process operating on the fracture distribution support. The average magnetic susceptibility was then computed for each block. For the purpose of comparing the model results with observation, the simulated magnetic susceptibilities were then averaged over the same

  9. Reduction in language testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimova, Slobodanka; Jensen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    /video recorded speech samples and written reports produced by two experienced raters after testing. Our findings suggest that reduction or reduction-like pronunciation features are found in tested L2 speech, but whenever raters identify and comment on such reductions, they tend to assess reductions negatively...

  10. Search for new breast cancer susceptibility genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oldenburg, Rogier Abel

    2008-01-01

    This thesis describes the search for new high-risk breast cancer susceptibility genes by linkage analysis. To date 20-25% of familial breast cancer is explained by mutations in the high-risk BRCA1 and BRCA2 breast cancer susceptibility genes. For the remaining families the genetic etiology is

  11. Mapping markers linked to porcine salmonellosis susceptibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galina-Pantoja, L.; Siggens, K.; Schriek, van M.G.M.; Heuven, H.C.M.

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this study was to identify pig chromosomal regions associated with susceptibility to salmonellosis. Genomic DNA from pig reference populations with differences in susceptibility to Salmonella enterica serovar Choleraesuis as quantified by spleen and liver bacterial colonization at day 7

  12. Crystal morphology change by magnetic susceptibility force

    OpenAIRE

    Katsuki, Aiko; Aibara, Shigeo; Tanimoto, Yoshifumi

    2006-01-01

    We found a change in morphology when lysozyme crystals were grown in a magnetic field. The phenomenon was caused by the magnetic force derived from the magnetic susceptibility gradient. We propose that this force should be called the “magnetic susceptibility force".

  13. A link between ectoparasite infection and susceptibility to bacterial disease in rainbow trout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandilla, M; Valtonen, E T; Suomalainen, L-R; Aphalo, P J; Hakalahti, T

    2006-08-01

    Rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, were infected concomitantly with Argulus coregoni and Flavobacterium columnare and their survival was compared with that of fish infected with either the parasite or the bacterium alone. The mortality of fish challenged with A. coregoni was negligible while infection with F. columnare alone led to significantly lower survival. However, compared with single infections, the mortality was significantly higher and the onset of disease condition was earlier among fish, which were concomitantly infected by A. coregoni and F. columnare. This data presents, for the first time, experimental support for the hypothesis that an ectoparasite infection increases susceptibility of fish to a bacterial pathogen.

  14. OBESITY IN CANCER SURVIVAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, Niyati; Chandran, Urmila; Bandera, Elisa V.

    2013-01-01

    Although obesity is a well known risk factor for several cancers, its role on cancer survival is poorly understood. We conducted a systematic literature review to assess the current evidence evaluating the impact of body adiposity on the prognosis of the three most common obesity-related cancers: prostate, colorectal, and breast. We included 33 studies of breast cancer, six studies of prostate cancer, and eight studies of colorectal cancer. We note that the evidence over-represents breast cancer survivorship research and is sparse for prostate and colorectal cancers. Overall, most studies support a relationship between body adiposity and site-specific mortality or cancer progression. However, most of the research was not specifically designed to study these outcomes and, therefore, several methodological issues should be considered before integrating their results to draw conclusions. Further research is urgently warranted to assess the long-term impact of obesity among the growing population of cancer survivors. PMID:22540252

  15. Surviving relatives after suicide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørrelykke, Helle; Cohrt, Pernille

    suicide in Denmark. This means that at least 400 people undergo the trauma it is when one of their near relatives commits suicide. We also know that the loss from suicide involves a lot of conflicting feelings - like anger, shame, guilt and loss and that the lack of therapy/treatment of these difficult...... and conflicting feelings may result in pathological expansion of grief characterized by extremely reduced quality of life involving severe psychical and social consequences. Suicide a subject of taboo In the 1980s WHO drafted a health policy document (‘Health for all year 2000’) with 38 targets for attaining......We would like to focus on the surviving relatives after suicides, because it is generally accepted that it is especially difficult to recover after the loss from suicide and because we know as a fact that one suicide affects five persons on average. Every year approximately 700 people commit...

  16. Obesity in cancer survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, Niyati; Chandran, Urmila; Bandera, Elisa V

    2012-08-21

    Although obesity is a well-known risk factor for several cancers, its role on cancer survival is poorly understood. We conducted a systematic literature review to assess the current evidence evaluating the impact of body adiposity on the prognosis of the three most common obesity-related cancers: prostate, colorectal, and breast. We included 33 studies of breast cancer, six studies of prostate cancer, and eight studies of colo-rectal cancer. We note that the evidence overrepresents breast cancer survivorship research and is sparse for prostate and colorectal cancers. Overall, most studies support a relationship between body adiposity and site-specific mortality or cancer progression. However, most of the research was not specifically designed to study these outcomes and, therefore, several methodological issues should be considered before integrating their results to draw conclusions. Further research is urgently warranted to assess the long-term impact of obesity among the growing population of cancer survivors.

  17. Candida survival strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polke, Melanie; Hube, Bernhard; Jacobsen, Ilse D

    2015-01-01

    Only few Candida species, e.g., Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida dubliniensis, and Candida parapsilosis, are successful colonizers of a human host. Under certain circumstances these species can cause infections ranging from superficial to life-threatening disseminated candidiasis. The success of C. albicans, the most prevalent and best studied Candida species, as both commensal and human pathogen depends on its genetic, biochemical, and morphological flexibility which facilitates adaptation to a wide range of host niches. In addition, formation of biofilms provides additional protection from adverse environmental conditions. Furthermore, in many host niches Candida cells coexist with members of the human microbiome. The resulting fungal-bacterial interactions have a major influence on the success of C. albicans as commensal and also influence disease development and outcome. In this chapter, we review the current knowledge of important survival strategies of Candida spp., focusing on fundamental fitness and virulence traits of C. albicans. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Single-step quantitative susceptibility mapping with variational penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatnuntawech, Itthi; McDaniel, Patrick; Cauley, Stephen F; Gagoski, Borjan A; Langkammer, Christian; Martin, Adrian; Grant, P Ellen; Wald, Lawrence L; Setsompop, Kawin; Adalsteinsson, Elfar; Bilgic, Berkin

    2017-04-01

    Quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) estimates the underlying tissue magnetic susceptibility from the gradient echo (GRE) phase signal through background phase removal and dipole inversion steps. Each of these steps typically requires the solution of an ill-posed inverse problem and thus necessitates additional regularization. Recently developed single-step QSM algorithms directly relate the unprocessed GRE phase to the unknown susceptibility distribution, thereby requiring the solution of a single inverse problem. In this work, we show that such a holistic approach provides susceptibility estimation with artifact mitigation and develop efficient algorithms that involve simple analytical solutions for all of the optimization steps. Our methods employ total variation (TV) and total generalized variation (TGV) to jointly perform the background removal and dipole inversion in a single step. Using multiple spherical mean value (SMV) kernels of varying radii permits high-fidelity background removal whilst retaining the phase information in the cortex. Using numerical simulations, we demonstrate that the proposed single-step methods reduce the reconstruction error by up to 66% relative to the multi-step methods that involve SMV background filtering with the same number of SMV kernels, followed by TV- or TGV-regularized dipole inversion. In vivo single-step experiments demonstrate a dramatic reduction in dipole streaking artifacts and improved homogeneity of image contrast. These acquisitions employ the rapid three-dimensional echo planar imaging (3D EPI) and Wave-CAIPI (controlled aliasing in parallel imaging) trajectories for signal-to-noise ratio-efficient whole-brain imaging. Herein, we also demonstrate the multi-echo capability of the Wave-CAIPI sequence for the first time, and introduce an automated, phase-sensitive coil sensitivity estimation scheme based on a 4-s calibration acquisition. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley

  19. Fidelity susceptibility in the quantum Rabi model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Bo-Bo; Lv, Xiao-Chen

    2018-01-01

    Quantum criticality usually occurs in many-body systems. Recently it was shown that the quantum Rabi model, which describes a two-level atom coupled to a single model cavity field, presents quantum phase transitions from a normal phase to a superradiate phase when the ratio between the frequency of the two-level atom and the frequency of the cavity field extends to infinity. In this work, we study quantum phase transitions in the quantum Rabi model from the fidelity susceptibility perspective. We found that the fidelity susceptibility and the generalized adiabatic susceptibility present universal finite-size scaling behaviors near the quantum critical point of the Rabi model if the ratio between frequency of the two-level atom and frequency of the cavity field is finite. From the finite-size scaling analysis of the fidelity susceptibility, we found that the adiabatic dimension of the fidelity susceptibility and the generalized adiabatic susceptibility of fourth order in the Rabi model are 4 /3 and 2, respectively. Meanwhile, the correlation length critical exponent and the dynamical critical exponent in the quantum critical point of the Rabi model are found to be 3 /2 and 1 /3 , respectively. Since the fidelity susceptibility and the generalized adiabatic susceptibility are the moments of the quantum noise spectrum which are directly measurable by experiments in linear response regime, the scaling behavior of the fidelity susceptibility in the Rabi model could be tested experimentally. The simple structure of the quantum Rabi model paves the way for experimentally observing the universal scaling behavior of the fidelity susceptibility at a quantum phase transition.

  20. Prolonged pre-incubation increases the susceptibility of Galleria mellonella larvae to bacterial and fungal infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Niall; Surlis, Carla; Maher, Amie; Gallagher, Clair; Carolan, James C; Clynes, Martin; Kavanagh, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Galleria mellonella larvae are widely used for assessing the virulence of microbial pathogens and for measuring the in vivo activity of antimicrobial agents and produce results comparable to those that can be obtained using mammals. The aim of the work described here was to ascertain the effect of pre-incubation at 15°C for 1, 3, 6 or 10 weeks on the susceptibility of larvae to infection with Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus. Larvae infected with C. albicans after 1 week pre-incubation at 15°C showed 73.3 ± 3.3% survival at 24 hours post-infection while those infected after 10 weeks pre-incubation showed 30 ± 3.3% survival (P mellonella larvae are a useful in vivo model system but the duration of the pre-incubation stage significantly affects their susceptibility to microbial pathogens possibly as a result of altered metabolism. PMID:25785635

  1. Susceptibility of KSHV-Infected PEL Cell Lines to the Human Complement System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Seung-Min; Jeon, Hyungtaek; Lee, Suhyuk; Lee, Myung-Shin

    2016-03-01

    Pleural effusion lymphoma (PEL) is a rare B-cell lymphoma that has a very poor prognosis with a median survival time of around 6 months. PEL is caused by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus, and is often co-infected with the Epstein Barr virus. The complement system is fundamental in the innate immune system against pathogen invasion and tumor development. In the present study, we investigated the activation of the complement system in PEL cells using human serum complements. Interestingly, two widely used PEL cell lines, BCP-1 and BCBL-1, showed different susceptibility to the complement system, which may be due to CD46 expression on their cell membranes. Complement activation did not induce apoptosis but supported cell survival considerably. Our results demonstrated the susceptibility of PEL to the complement system and its underlying mechanisms, which would provide insight into understanding the pathogenesis of PEL.

  2. Comparative analyses of longevity and senescence reveal variable survival benefits of living in zoos across mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tidière, Morgane; Gaillard, Jean-Michel; Berger, Vérane; Müller, Dennis W H; Bingaman Lackey, Laurie; Gimenez, Olivier; Clauss, Marcus; Lemaître, Jean-François

    2016-11-07

    While it is commonly believed that animals live longer in zoos than in the wild, this assumption has rarely been tested. We compared four survival metrics (longevity, baseline mortality, onset of senescence and rate of senescence) between both sexes of free-ranging and zoo populations of more than 50 mammal species. We found that mammals from zoo populations generally lived longer than their wild counterparts (84% of species). The effect was most notable in species with a faster pace of life (i.e. a short life span, high reproductive rate and high mortality in the wild) because zoos evidently offer protection against a number of relevant conditions like predation, intraspecific competition and diseases. Species with a slower pace of life (i.e. a long life span, low reproduction rate and low mortality in the wild) benefit less from captivity in terms of longevity; in such species, there is probably less potential for a reduction in mortality. These findings provide a first general explanation about the different magnitude of zoo environment benefits among mammalian species, and thereby highlight the effort that is needed to improve captive conditions for slow-living species that are particularly susceptible to extinction in the wild.

  3. Hypoxia inducible factor signaling modulates susceptibility to mycobacterial infection via a nitric oxide dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elks, Philip M; Brizee, Sabrina; van der Vaart, Michiel; Walmsley, Sarah R; van Eeden, Fredericus J; Renshaw, Stephen A; Meijer, Annemarie H

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a current major world-health problem, exacerbated by the causative pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), becoming increasingly resistant to conventional antibiotic treatment. Mtb is able to counteract the bactericidal mechanisms of leukocytes to survive intracellularly and develop a niche permissive for proliferation and dissemination. Understanding of the pathogenesis of mycobacterial infections such as tuberculosis (TB) remains limited, especially for early infection and for reactivation of latent infection. Signaling via hypoxia inducible factor α (HIF-α) transcription factors has previously been implicated in leukocyte activation and host defence. We have previously shown that hypoxic signaling via stabilization of Hif-1α prolongs the functionality of leukocytes in the innate immune response to injury. We sought to manipulate Hif-α signaling in a well-established Mycobacterium marinum (Mm) zebrafish model of TB to investigate effects on the host's ability to combat mycobacterial infection. Stabilization of host Hif-1α, both pharmacologically and genetically, at early stages of Mm infection was able to reduce the bacterial burden of infected larvae. Increasing Hif-1α signaling enhanced levels of reactive nitrogen species (RNS) in neutrophils prior to infection and was able to reduce larval mycobacterial burden. Conversely, decreasing Hif-2α signaling enhanced RNS levels and reduced bacterial burden, demonstrating that Hif-1α and Hif-2α have opposing effects on host susceptibility to mycobacterial infection. The antimicrobial effect of Hif-1α stabilization, and Hif-2α reduction, were demonstrated to be dependent on inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) signaling at early stages of infection. Our findings indicate that induction of leukocyte iNOS by stabilizing Hif-1α, or reducing Hif-2α, aids the host during early stages of Mm infection. Stabilization of Hif-1α therefore represents a potential target for therapeutic

  4. Hypoxia inducible factor signaling modulates susceptibility to mycobacterial infection via a nitric oxide dependent mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip M Elks

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis is a current major world-health problem, exacerbated by the causative pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb, becoming increasingly resistant to conventional antibiotic treatment. Mtb is able to counteract the bactericidal mechanisms of leukocytes to survive intracellularly and develop a niche permissive for proliferation and dissemination. Understanding of the pathogenesis of mycobacterial infections such as tuberculosis (TB remains limited, especially for early infection and for reactivation of latent infection. Signaling via hypoxia inducible factor α (HIF-α transcription factors has previously been implicated in leukocyte activation and host defence. We have previously shown that hypoxic signaling via stabilization of Hif-1α prolongs the functionality of leukocytes in the innate immune response to injury. We sought to manipulate Hif-α signaling in a well-established Mycobacterium marinum (Mm zebrafish model of TB to investigate effects on the host's ability to combat mycobacterial infection. Stabilization of host Hif-1α, both pharmacologically and genetically, at early stages of Mm infection was able to reduce the bacterial burden of infected larvae. Increasing Hif-1α signaling enhanced levels of reactive nitrogen species (RNS in neutrophils prior to infection and was able to reduce larval mycobacterial burden. Conversely, decreasing Hif-2α signaling enhanced RNS levels and reduced bacterial burden, demonstrating that Hif-1α and Hif-2α have opposing effects on host susceptibility to mycobacterial infection. The antimicrobial effect of Hif-1α stabilization, and Hif-2α reduction, were demonstrated to be dependent on inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS signaling at early stages of infection. Our findings indicate that induction of leukocyte iNOS by stabilizing Hif-1α, or reducing Hif-2α, aids the host during early stages of Mm infection. Stabilization of Hif-1α therefore represents a potential target for

  5. Clinical prediction of 5-year survival in systemic sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fransen, Julie Munk; Popa-Diaconu, D; Hesselstrand, R

    2011-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is associated with a significant reduction in life expectancy. A simple prognostic model to predict 5-year survival in SSc was developed in 1999 in 280 patients, but it has not been validated in other patients. The predictions of a prognostic model are usually less accura...

  6. Radiative Susceptibility of Cloudy Atmospheres to Droplet Number Perturbations: 2. Global analysis from MODIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Platnick, Steven

    2008-01-01

    Global distributions of albedo susceptibility for areas covered by liquid clouds are presented for 4 months in 2005. The susceptibility estimates are based on expanded definitions presented in a companion paper and include relative cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC) changes, perturbations in cloud droplet asymmetry parameter and single-scattering albedo, atmospheric/surface effects, and incorporation of the full solar spectrum. The cloud properties (optical thickness and effective radius) used as input in the susceptibility calculations come from MODIS Terra and Aqua Collection 5 gridded data. Geographical distributions of susceptibility corresponding to absolute ( absolute cloud susceptibility ) and relative ( relative cloud susceptibility ) CDNC changes are markedly different indicating that the detailed nature of the cloud microphysical perturbation is important for determining the radiative forcing associated with the first indirect aerosol effect. However, both types of susceptibility exhibit common characteristics such as significant reductions when perturbations in single-scattering properties are omitted, significant increases when atmospheric absorption and surface albedo effects are ignored, and the tendency to decrease with latitude, to be higher over ocean than over land, and to be statistically similar between the morning and afternoon MODIS overpasses. The satellite-based susceptibility analysis helps elucidate the role of present-day cloud and land surface properties in indirect aerosol forcing responses. Our realistic yet moderate CDNC perturbations yield forcings on the order of 1-2 W/sq m for cloud optical property distributions and land surface spectral albedos observed by MODIS. Since susceptibilities can potentially be computed from model fields, these results have practical application in assessing the reasonableness of model-generated estimates of the aerosol indirect radiative forcing.

  7. Susceptibility to hypoxia and breathing control changes after short-term cold exposures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyudmila T. Kovtun

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background . Hypoxia is the reduction of oxygen availability due to external or internal causes. There is large individual variability of response to hypoxia. Objective . The aim of this study was to define individual and typological features in susceptibility to hypoxia, its interrelation with hypoxic and hypercapnic ventilatory responses (HVR and HCVR, respectively and their changes after cold acclimation. Design . Twenty-four healthy men were tested. HVR and HCVR were measured by the rebreathing method during hypoxic and hypercapnic tests, respectively. These tests were carried out in thermoneutral conditions before and after cold exposures (nude, at 13°C, 2 h daily, for 10 days. Susceptibility to hypoxia (sSaO2 was determined as haemoglobin saturation slope during hypoxic test. Results . It was found that HVR and HCVR significantly increased and susceptibility to hypoxia (sSaO2 tended to decrease after cold acclimation. According to sSaO2 results before cold exposures, the group was divided into 3: Group 1 – with high susceptibility to hypoxia, Group 2 – medium and Group 3 – low susceptibility. Analysis of variances (MANOVA shows the key role of susceptibility to hypoxia and cold exposures and their interrelation. Posterior analysis (Fisher LSD showed significant difference in susceptibility to hypoxia between the groups prior to cold acclimation, while HVR and HCVR did not differ between the groups. After cold acclimation, susceptibility to hypoxia was not significantly different between the groups, while HCVR significantly increased in Groups 1 and 3, HVR significantly increased in Group 3 and HCVR, HVR did not change in Group 2. Conclusions . Short-term cold exposures caused an increase in functional reserves and improved oxygen supply of tissues in Group 1. Cold exposure hypoxia has caused energy loss in Group 3. Group 2 showed the most appropriate energy conservation reaction mode to cold exposures. No relation was found between

  8. Susceptibility to hypoxia and breathing control changes after short-term cold exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovtun, Lyudmila T; Voevoda, Mikhail I

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxia is the reduction of oxygen availability due to external or internal causes. There is large individual variability of response to hypoxia. The aim of this study was to define individual and typological features in susceptibility to hypoxia, its interrelation with hypoxic and hypercapnic ventilatory responses (HVR and HCVR, respectively) and their changes after cold acclimation. Twenty-four healthy men were tested. HVR and HCVR were measured by the rebreathing method during hypoxic and hypercapnic tests, respectively. These tests were carried out in thermoneutral conditions before and after cold exposures (nude, at 13°C, 2 h daily, for 10 days). Susceptibility to hypoxia (sSaO2) was determined as haemoglobin saturation slope during hypoxic test. It was found that HVR and HCVR significantly increased and susceptibility to hypoxia (sSaO2) tended to decrease after cold acclimation. According to sSaO2 results before cold exposures, the group was divided into 3: Group 1--with high susceptibility to hypoxia, Group 2--medium and Group 3--low susceptibility. Analysis of variances (MANOVA) shows the key role of susceptibility to hypoxia and cold exposures and their interrelation. Posterior analysis (Fisher LSD) showed significant difference in susceptibility to hypoxia between the groups prior to cold acclimation, while HVR and HCVR did not differ between the groups. After cold acclimation, susceptibility to hypoxia was not significantly different between the groups, while HCVR significantly increased in Groups 1 and 3, HVR significantly increased in Group 3 and HCVR, HVR did not change in Group 2. Short-term cold exposures caused an increase in functional reserves and improved oxygen supply of tissues in Group 1. Cold exposure hypoxia has caused energy loss in Group 3. Group 2 showed the most appropriate energy conservation reaction mode to cold exposures. No relation was found between the thermoregulation and the susceptibility to hypoxia.

  9. Growth and survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Listeria monocytogenes in egg products held at different temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, S E; Chou, C C

    2000-07-01

    Growth and survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Listeria monocytogenes in steamed eggs and scrambled eggs held at different temperatures (5, 18, 22, 37, 55, and 60 degrees C) were investigated in the present study. Among the holding temperatures tested, both pathogens multiplied best at 37 degrees C followed by 22, 18, and 5 degrees C. In general, E. coli O157:H7 grew better in the egg products than L. monocytogenes did at all the storage temperatures tested except at 5 degrees C. E. coli O157:H7 did not grow in steamed eggs and scrambled eggs held at 5 degrees C. L. monocytogenes showed a slight population increase of approximately 0.6 to 0.9 log CFU/g in these egg products at the end of the 36-h storage period at 5 degrees C. The population of both pathogens detected in the egg products was affected by the initial population, holding temperature, and length of the holding period. It was also noted that L. monocytogenes was more susceptible than E. coli O157:H7 in steamed eggs held at 60 degrees C. After holding at 60 degrees C for 1 h, no detectable viable cells of L. monocytogenes with a population reduction of 5.4 log CFU/g was observed in steamed eggs, whereas a lower population reduction of only approximately 0.5 log CFU/ml was noted for E. coli O157:H7.

  10. Investigation of Exomic Variants Associated with Overall Survival in Ovarian Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winham, Stacey J; Pirie, Ailith; Chen, Yian Ann

    2016-01-01

    Background: While numerous susceptibility loci for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) have been identified, few associations have been reported with overall survival. In the absence of common prognostic genetic markers, we hypothesize that rare coding variants may be associated with overall EOC surv...

  11. Association of MTOR and AKT Gene Polymorphisms with Susceptibility and Survival of Gastric Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Piao

    Full Text Available The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K/protein kinase B (PKB, AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR signaling pathway plays a critical role in angiogenesis and cell growth, proliferation, metabolism, migration, differentiation, and apoptosis. Genetic diversity in key factors of this pathway may influence protein function and signal transduction, contributing to disease initiation and progression. Studies suggest that MTOR rs1064261 and AKT rs1130233 polymorphisms are associated with risk and/or prognosis of multiple cancer types. However, this relationship with gastric cancer (GC remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of MTOR and AKT polymorphisms in the risk and prognosis of GC.The Sequenom MassARRAY platform was used to genotype 1842 individuals for MTOR rs1064261 T→C and AKT rs1130233 G→A polymorphisms. ELISA was used to detect Helicobacter pylori antibodies in serum. Immunohistochemical analysis was used to detect total and phosphorylated MTOR and AKT proteins.The MTOR rs1064261 (TC+CC genotype and the AKT rs1130233 (GA+AA genotype were associated with increased risk of GC in men (P = 0.049, P = 0.030. In H. pylori-negative individuals, the AKT rs1130233 GA and (GA+AA genotypes were related to increased risk of atrophic gastritis (AG; P = 0.012, P = 0.024. Notably, the AKT rs1130233 (GA+AA genotype demonstrated significant interactions with H. pylori in disease progression from healthy controls (CON to AG (P = 0.013 and from AG to GC (P = 0.049. Additionally, for individuals with the AKT rs1130233 variant, those in the H. pylori-positive group had higher levels of phosphorylated AKT (p-AKT expression. The AKT rs1130233 genotype was found to be associated with clinicopathological parameters including lymph node metastasis and alcohol drinking (P<0.05.MTOR rs1064261and AKT rs1130233 polymorphisms were associated with increased GC risk in males and increased AG risk in H. pylori-negative individuals. A significant interaction existed between the AKT rs1130233 genotype and H. pylori infection in CON→AG→GC disease progression. The AKT rs1130233 genotype influenced p-AKT protein expression in H. pylori-infected individuals.

  12. Neural Crest Migration and Survival Are Susceptible to Morpholino-Induced Artifacts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena F Boer

    Full Text Available The neural crest (NC is a stem cell-like embryonic population that is essential for generating and patterning the vertebrate body, including the craniofacial skeleton and peripheral nervous system. Defects in NC development underlie many birth defects and contribute to formation of some of the most malignant cancers in humans, such as melanoma and neuroblastoma. For these reasons, significant research efforts have been expended to identify genes that control NC development, as it is expected to lead to a deeper understanding of the genetic mechanisms controlling vertebrate development and identify new treatments for NC-derived diseases and cancers. However, a number of inconsistencies regarding gene function during NC development have emerged from comparative analyses of gene function between mammalian and non-mammalian systems (chick, frog, zebrafish. This poses a significant barrier to identification of single genes and/or redundant pathways to target in NC diseases. Here, we determine whether technical differences, namely morpholino-based approaches used in non-mammalian systems, could contribute to these discrepancies, by examining the extent to which NC phenotypes in fascin1a (fscn1a morphant embryos are similar to or different from fscn1a null mutants in zebrafish. Analysis of fscn1a morphants showed that they mimicked early NC phenotypes observed in fscn1a null mutants; however, these embryos also displayed NC migration and derivative phenotypes not observed in null mutants, including accumulation of p53-independent cell death. These data demonstrate that morpholinos can cause seemingly specific NC migration and derivative phenotypes, and thus have likely contributed to the inconsistencies surrounding NC gene function between species. We suggest that comparison of genetic mutants between different species is the most rigorous method for identifying conserved genetic mechanisms controlling NC development and is critical to identify new treatments for NC diseases.

  13. Harm reduction-the cannabis paradox

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melamede Robert

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This article examines harm reduction from a novel perspective. Its central thesis is that harm reduction is not only a social concept, but also a biological one. More specifically, evolution does not make moral distinctions in the selection process, but utilizes a cannabis-based approach to harm reduction in order to promote survival of the fittest. Evidence will be provided from peer-reviewed scientific literature that supports the hypothesis that humans, and all animals, make and use internally produced cannabis-like products (endocannabinoids as part of the evolutionary harm reduction program. More specifically, endocannabinoids homeostatically regulate all body systems (cardiovascular, digestive, endocrine, excretory, immune, nervous, musculo-skeletal, reproductive. Therefore, the health of each individual is dependant on this system working appropriately.

  14. Does colour polymorphism enhance survival of prey populations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wennersten, Lena; Forsman, Anders

    2009-06-22

    That colour polymorphism may protect prey populations from predation is an old but rarely tested hypothesis. We examine whether colour polymorphic populations of prey exposed to avian predators in an ecologically valid visual context were exposed to increased extinction risk compared with monomorphic populations. We made 2976 artificial pastry prey, resembling Lepidoptera larvae, in four different colours and presented them in 124 monomorphic and 124 tetramorphic populations on tree trunks and branches such that they would be exposed to predation by free-living birds, and monitored their 'survival'. Among monomorphic populations, there was a significant effect of prey coloration on survival, confirming that coloration influenced susceptibility to visually oriented predators. Survival of polymorphic populations was inferior to that of monomorphic green populations, but did not differ significantly from monomorphic brown, yellow or red populations. Differences in survival within polymorphic populations paralleled those seen among monomorphic populations; the red morph most frequently went extinct first and the green morph most frequently survived the longest. Our findings do not support the traditional protective polymorphism hypothesis and are in conflict with those of earlier studies. As a possible explanation to our findings, we offer a competing 'giveaway cue' hypothesis: that polymorphic populations may include one morph that attracts the attention of predators and that polymorphic populations therefore may suffer increased predation compared with some monomorphic populations.

  15. Neuronal survival induced by neurotrophins requires calmodulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egea, Joaquim; Espinet, Carme; Soler, Rosa M.; Dolcet, Xavier; Yuste, Víctor J.; Encinas, Mario; Iglesias, Montserrat; Rocamora, Nativitat; Comella, Joan X.

    2001-01-01

    It has been reported that phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) and its downstream target, protein kinase B (PKB), play a central role in the signaling of cell survival triggered by neurotrophins (NTs). In this report, we have analyzed the involvement of Ca2+ and calmodulin (CaM) in the activation of the PKB induced by NTs. We have found that reduction of intracellular Ca2+ concentration or functional blockade of CaM abolished NGF-induced activation of PKB in PC12 cells. Similar results were obtained in cultures of chicken spinal cord motoneurons treated with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Moreover, CaM inhibition prevented the cell survival triggered by NGF or BDNF. This effect was counteracted by the transient expression of constitutive active forms of the PKB, indicating that CaM regulates NT-induced cell survival through the activation of the PKB. We have investigated the mechanisms whereby CaM regulates the activation of the PKB, and we have found that CaM was necessary for the proper generation and/or accumulation of the products of the PI 3-kinase in intact cells. PMID:11489918

  16. Anisotropy of the magnetic susceptibility of gallium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankey, T.

    1960-01-01

    The bulk magnetic susceptibilities of single gallium crystals and polycrystalline gallium spheres were measured at 25??C. The following anisotropic diamagnetic susceptibilities were found: a axis (-0.119??0. 001)??10-6 emu/g, b axis (-0.416??0.002)??10 -6 emu/g, and c axis (-0.229??0.001) emu/g. The susceptibility of the polycrystalline spheres, assumed to be the average value for the bulk susceptibility of gallium, was (-0.257??0.003)??10-6 emu/g at 25??C, and (-0.299??0.003)??10-6 emu/g at -196??C. The susceptibility of liquid gallium was (0.0031??0.001) ??10-6 emu/g at 30??C and 100??C. Rotational diagrams of the susceptibilities in the three orthogonal planes of the unit cell were not sinusoidal. The anisotropy in the single crystals was presumably caused by the partial overlap of Brillouin zone boundaries by the Fermi-energy surface. The large change in susceptibility associated with the change in state was attributed to the absence of effective mass influence in the liquid state. ?? 1960 The American Institute of Physics.

  17. Reduced artemisinin susceptibility of Plasmodium falciparum ring stages in western Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkowski, Benoit; Khim, Nimol; Chim, Pheaktra; Kim, Saorin; Ke, Sopheakvatey; Kloeung, Nimol; Chy, Sophy; Duong, Socheat; Leang, Rithea; Ringwald, Pascal; Dondorp, Arjen M; Tripura, Rupam; Benoit-Vical, Françoise; Berry, Antoine; Gorgette, Olivier; Ariey, Frédéric; Barale, Jean-Christophe; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile; Menard, Didier

    2013-02-01

    The declining efficacy of artemisinin derivatives against Plasmodium falciparum in western Cambodia is a major concern. The knowledge gap in the understanding of the mechanisms involved hampers designing monitoring tools. Here, we culture-adapted 20 isolates from Pailin and Ratanakiri (areas of artemisinin resistance and susceptibility in western and eastern Cambodia, respectively) and studied their in vitro response to dihydroartemisinin. No significant difference between the two sets of isolates was observed in the classical isotopic test. However, a 6-h pulse exposure to 700 nM dihydroartemisinin (ring-stage survival assay -RSA]) revealed a clear-cut geographic dichotomy. The survival rate of exposed ring-stage parasites (ring stages) was 17-fold higher in isolates from Pailin (median, 13.5%) than in those from Ratanakiri (median, 0.8%), while exposed mature stages were equally and highly susceptible (0.6% and 0.7%, respectively). Ring stages survived drug exposure by cell cycle arrest and resumed growth upon drug withdrawal. The reduced susceptibility to artemisinin in Pailin appears to be associated with an altered in vitro phenotype of ring stages from Pailin in the RSA.

  18. Susceptibility of Acanthamoeba to multipurpose lens-cleaning solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Aguiar, Ana Paula Costa; de Oliveira Silveira, Caroline; Todero Winck, Mari Aline; Rott, Marilise Brittes

    2013-09-01

    The present study investigated the susceptibility of Acanthamoeba spp. trophozoites to two multipurpose systems for cleaning and maintenance of contact lenses. Three strains of trophozoites from the ATCC (A. castellani T4, A. castellani Neff, and A. polyphaga) and two Acanthamoeba isolates obtained from swimming pools (PT5 and PO1) were placed in monoxenic culture. To test their survival in cleaning solutions for contact lenses, the trophozoites were exposed for 4 and 24 h to two multipurpose solutions (A and B), and were then inoculated into a new monoxenic culture. Amoebic growth on the plates was observed after 72 h of incubation. Trophozoites from all three ATCC strains and one isolate from a swimming pool (PO1) grew in all plates after 4 h of exposure to solutions A and B. After 24 h, the ATCC strains and the PO1 isolate showed growth in most of the plates treated. Only the PT5 isolate showed susceptibility to both solutions over the time intervals tested. The two solutions were not completely effective against most strains and isolates over the time intervals tested. These results are important, since species of Acanthamoeba are widely distributed in the environment and are potential agents of eye pathologies.

  19. Advanced amperometric respiration assay for antimicrobial susceptibility testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chotinantakul, Kamonnaree; Suginta, Wipa; Schulte, Albert

    2014-10-21

    A ferricyanide-based electrochemical cell respiration assay was adapted for use in broad-spectrum antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST). Total bacterial respiration was converted into faradaic current by electro-oxidation of ferrocyanide, produced when ferricyanide is reduced by bacterial electron-transport. For Escherichia coli (E. coli), the signal was linear with 5-13 × 10(8) colony-forming units in measuring buffer. For AST, test cells were treated with drugs before ferricyanide addition; cell counts from the amperometric assay provided a measure of drug-induced cell death. Initial trials with six antimicrobial agents produced incorrect susceptibility classifications for drugs that were electroactive at the potential used to detect ferrocyanide or which affected cellular respiration rates. We therefore changed the procedure from drug-treatment and assay in the same buffer to sequential drug exposure in treatment buffer, centrifugal separation of surviving cells, cell resuspension, incubation in the presence of ferricyanide and finally ferrocyanide amperometry in drug-free buffer. Data analysis with E. coli led to an activity classification that agreed with cell culture-based ASTs, obtained by a quicker, more convenient procedure. The potential of this approach was confirmed by trials with the highly virulent bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei, a particularly antimicrobial-resistant pathogen that is the cause of lethal melioidosis in tropical climates and is currently of concern as a potential bioterrorism agent.

  20. Radiation-sensitive genetically susceptible pediatric sub-populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleinerman, Ruth A. [National Cancer Institute, NIH, DHHS, Radiation Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Rockville, MD (United States)

    2009-02-15

    Major advances in pediatric cancer treatment have resulted in substantial improvements in survival. However, concern has emerged about the late effects of cancer therapy, especially radiation-related second cancers. Studies of childhood cancer patients with inherited cancer syndromes can provide insights into the interaction between radiation and genetic susceptibility to multiple cancers. Children with retinoblastoma (Rb), neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS), and nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) are at substantial risk of developing radiation-related second and third cancers. A radiation dose-response for bone and soft-tissue sarcomas has been observed in hereditary Rb patients, with many of these cancers occurring in the radiation field. Studies of NF1 patients irradiated for optic pathway gliomas have reported increased risks of developing another cancer associated with radiotherapy. High relative risks for second and third cancers were observed for a cohort of 200 LFS family members, especially children, possibly related to radiotherapy. Children with NBCCS are very sensitive to radiation and develop multiple basal cell cancers in irradiated areas. Clinicians following these patients should be aware of their increased genetic susceptibility to multiple primary malignancies enhanced by sensitivity to ionizing radiation. (orig.)

  1. Survival assays using Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hae-Eun H; Jung, Yoonji; Lee, Seung-Jae V

    2017-02-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans is an important model organism with many useful features, including rapid development and aging, easy cultivation, and genetic tractability. Survival assays using C. elegans are powerful methods for studying physiological processes. In this review, we describe diverse types of C. elegans survival assays and discuss the aims, uses, and advantages of specific assays. C. elegans survival assays have played key roles in identifying novel genetic factors that regulate many aspects of animal physiology, such as aging and lifespan, stress response, and immunity against pathogens. Because many genetic factors discovered using C. elegans are evolutionarily conserved, survival assays can provide insights into mechanisms underlying physiological processes in mammals, including humans.

  2. Survival of Listeria monocytogenes with different antibiotic resistance patterns to food-associated stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komora, Norton; Bruschi, Carolina; Magalhães, Rui; Ferreira, Vânia; Teixeira, Paula

    2017-03-20

    The ongoing rise of antibiotic resistant microbial pathogens has become one of the major public health threats worldwide. Despite all the effort and actions taken so far, a proliferation of antibiotic resistant (AR) and multi-antibiotic resistant (MAR) strains is still observed, including in foodborne pathogens. This trend has been also noted recently for isolates of Listeria monocytogenes, a species that, although remaining largely sensitive to clinically relevant antimicrobials, has been reported to develop increased tolerance to antibiotics, particularly in isolates recovered from the food-chain. In this study we compared the ability of MAR (n=8), AR (n=18) and antibiotic susceptible (AS, n=11) L. monocytogenes strains from food and clinical origin to survive to different environmental stress conditions, including temperature (58°C), acidic stress (1% v/v lactic acid, pH3.5), and osmotic stress (37% w/v NaCl). The presence of antibiotic active efflux among MAR and AR strains, and its role on L. monocytogenes tolerance to different antimicrobial compounds was also investigated, namely; hydrogen peroxide; organic acids (acetic, citric and lactic); nisin; benzalkonium chloride (BC); and, sodium nitrite. While no significant differences were observed in the survival of the 37 strains exposed to high temperature (58°C), overall the mean logarithmic reduction of clinical strains was statistically lower after acid and salt exposure than that observed for strains of food origin; but both food and clinical strains resistant to two or three antibiotics were significantly less susceptible to acid (lactic acid 1% v/v) and osmotic stresses (37% w/v NaCl) when compared to AS strains. Using the EtBr-agar Cartwheel method, it was possible to detect efflux pumps in three of the 26 MAR and AR isolates, including one control strain; the active efflux in theses isolates was proven to be associated with fluoroquinolone resistance, and possible extrusion of BC and hydrogen peroxide

  3. Red cell survival time in chronic renal failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rath, R.N.; Das, R.K.; Panda, R.K.; Mahakur, A.C.; Patnaik, S.R. (M.K.C.G. Medical College, Berhampur (India))

    1979-10-01

    The red cell survival time was estimated in 50 cases of chronic renal failure and 20 healthy subjects, using radioactive chromium /sup 51/Cr. The mean value of red cell survival half time (T1/2/sup 51/Cr) was determined to be 25.9 +- 1.1 days in control subjects. The red cell survival half time (17.9 +- 4.67 days) was found to be significantly decreased in cases of chronic renal failure, when compared to the control group. An inverse relationship was observed between T1/2/sup 51/Cr value and blood urea, serum creatinine, the magnitude of hypertension, and duration of illness, whereas, creatinine clearance showed a direct relationship. There was no increased splenic uptake of radioactive chromium, indicating that haemolysis occurred elsewhere in the circulation other than spleen. The possible mechanism for the reduction of red cell survival time and the effect of uraemic environment on it has been discussed.

  4. Absolute method of measuring magnetic susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, A.; Senftle, F.E.

    1959-01-01

    An absolute method of standardization and measurement of the magnetic susceptibility of small samples is presented which can be applied to most techniques based on the Faraday method. The fact that the susceptibility is a function of the area under the curve of sample displacement versus distance of the magnet from the sample, offers a simple method of measuring the susceptibility without recourse to a standard sample. Typical results on a few substances are compared with reported values, and an error of less than 2% can be achieved. ?? 1959 The American Institute of Physics.

  5. Surviving a Suicide Attempt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Al-Harrasi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Suicide is a global phenomenon in all regions of the world affecting people of all age groups. It has detrimental consequences on patients, their families, and the community as a whole. There have been numerous risk factors described for suicide including mental illness, stressful life situations, loss of social support, and general despair. The association of suicide with Islam has not been extensively studied. The common impression from clinical practice is that being a practicing Muslim reduces the risk of suicide. Another factor associated with suicide is starting a patient on antidepressants. However, this has been questioned recently. This report describes a middle-aged man with depression and multiple social stressors who survived a serious suicide attempt. The discussion will focus on the factors that lead him to want to end his life and the impact of the assumed protective factors such as religious belief and family support on this act of self-harm. Such patients can be on the edge when there is an imbalance between risk factors (such as depression, insomnia, and psychosocial stressors and protective factors (like religious affiliation and family support. All physicians are advised to assess the suicide risk thoroughly in patients with depression regardless of any presumed protective factor.

  6. Surviving a Suicide Attempt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Harrasi, Ahmed; Al Maqbali, Mandhar; Al-Sinawi, Hamed

    2016-09-01

    Suicide is a global phenomenon in all regions of the world affecting people of all age groups. It has detrimental consequences on patients, their families, and the community as a whole. There have been numerous risk factors described for suicide including mental illness, stressful life situations, loss of social support, and general despair. The association of suicide with Islam has not been extensively studied. The common impression from clinical practice is that being a practicing Muslim reduces the risk of suicide. Another factor associated with suicide is starting a patient on antidepressants. However, this has been questioned recently. This report describes a middle-aged man with depression and multiple social stressors who survived a serious suicide attempt. The discussion will focus on the factors that lead him to want to end his life and the impact of the assumed protective factors such as religious belief and family support on this act of self-harm. Such patients can be on the edge when there is an imbalance between risk factors (such as depression, insomnia, and psychosocial stressors) and protective factors (like religious affiliation and family support). All physicians are advised to assess the suicide risk thoroughly in patients with depression regardless of any presumed protective factor.

  7. Will the olympics survive?.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosla, T.

    1977-01-01

    The United States of America dominated 58 events in athletics, field and swimming, which between them accounted for 35 per cent of all events in the Munich Olympiad. 1972; these events favour taller individuals. But, in 25 per cent of other events (1) cycling, (2) fencing, (3) gymnastics, (4) judo, (5) weightlifting and (6) Graeco Roman wrestling the U.S.A. did not win a single medal. The failure of the U.S.A. to maintain her lead in Munich was largely due to weaknesses in these other events in many of which the potential medallists can be derived from the lower half of the height distribution (events 3 to 6). These weaknesses are Russia's strength and they continued to remain unstrengthened at Montreal. Also, the domination held by the U.S.A. in swimming was seriously challenged by East Germany. The present trends indicate that the U.S.A.'s ranking is likely to slip further to the third position in Moscow 1980. Factors inhibiting the survival of the Olympics are pointed. PMID:861436

  8. Unique TTC repeat base pair loss mutation in cases of pure neural leprosy: A survival strategy of Mycobacterium leprae?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek De

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Genomic reduction helps obligate intracellular microbes to survive difficult host niches. Adaptation of Mycobacterium leprae in cases of pure neural leprosy (PNL in the intracellular niche of peripheral nerves can be associated with some gene loss. Recently, a stable but variable number of tandem repefzats (TTC have been reported in strains of M. leprae. FolP and rpoB genes are the two common mutation sites which deal with the susceptibility of the bacteria to drugs. Aim: We attempted to find if genomic reduction of M. leprae in context of these TTC repeats or mutations in folP1 and rpoB can be the reason for the restriction of M. leprae in the nerves in PNL. Materials and Methods: DNA extracts taken from fine needle aspiration of affected nerves of 24 PNL cases were studied for tandem repeats with 21TTC primer in multiplex-PCR. Mutations were also studied by PCR Amplification of SRDR (Sulphone Resistance Determining Region of the folP1 and multiple primer PCR amplification refractory mutation system (MARS of the rpoB. Results: Of the 24 PNL, only 1 patient showed mutation in the rpoB gene and none in the folp1 gene. Studying the mutation in TTC region of the M. leprae gene we found that all the cases have a loss of a few bases in the sequence. Conclusion: We can conclude that there is consistent loss in the bases in the TTC region in all cases of pure neural Hansen and we postulate that it may be an adaptive response of the bacteria to survive host niche resulting in its restriction to peripheral nerves.

  9. Screening probiotic strains for safety: Evaluation of virulence and antimicrobial susceptibility of enterococci from healthy Chinese infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fen; Jiang, Meiling; Wan, Cuixiang; Chen, Xiaoyan; Chen, Xiaoyong; Tao, Xueying; Shah, Nagendra P; Wei, Hua

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety of enterococci isolated from Chinese infants and screen out potential probiotic candidates. One hundred eight strains were isolated from feces of 34 healthy infants, and 38 strains of Enterococcus spp. were categorized as follows: E. faecalis (22), E. faecium (10), E. hirae (3), E. durans (2), and E. casseliflavus (1). Of these, 72.7% of E. faecalis came from infants delivered by cesarean and 62.5% of E. faecium from infants delivered vaginally. For safety evaluation of strains, we determined presence of virulence genes; production of hemolysin, gelatinase, and biofilm; and antimicrobial susceptibility of enterococci. Six out of 14 virulence genes were detected with a distribution of gelE (26.3%), cylA (39.4%), esp (15.8%), efaA (63.2%), asa1 (50.0%), and ace (50.0%). In phenotype analysis, 36.8% of the strains exhibited positive hemolytic activity and 17.5% were positive for production of gelatinase. Results of antimicrobial susceptibility showed that different percentages of the strains were resistant to ciprofloxacin (5.2%), vancomycin (7.8%), rifampicin (10.5%), erythromycin (52.6%), and gentamycin (52.6%); remarkably, none of the strains were resistant to ampicillin or chloramphenicol. In total, 10 strains, including 6 E. faecium, which are free of virulence determinants and sensitive to common antimicrobial agents (e.g., ampicillin and vancomycin), were further assessed for their probiotic properties. All strains survived well in simulated gastric fluid and intestinal tract, with maximum reductions of 0.600 and 0.887 log cfu/mL, respectively. Six strains of E. faecium could resist 0.3 to 1.0% bile salt, of which E. faecium WEFA23 presented the highest growth (75.06%) at 1.0% bile salt. All strains showed bile salt hydrolase activity on glycodeoxycholic acid, but only 3 of E. faecium showed activity on taurodeoxycholic acid. These results deliver useful information on the safety of enterococci in infants in

  10. Modern Reduction Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Andersson, Pher G

    2008-01-01

    With its comprehensive overview of modern reduction methods, this book features high quality contributions allowing readers to find reliable solutions quickly and easily. The monograph treats the reduction of carbonyles, alkenes, imines and alkynes, as well as reductive aminations and cross and heck couplings, before finishing off with sections on kinetic resolutions and hydrogenolysis. An indispensable lab companion for every chemist.

  11. Early life triclocarban exposure during lactation affects neonate rat survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Rebekah C M; Menn, Fu-Min; Healy, Laura; Fecteau, Kellie A; Hu, Pan; Bae, Jiyoung; Gee, Nancy A; Lasley, Bill L; Zhao, Ling; Chen, Jiangang

    2015-01-01

    Triclocarban (3,4,4'-trichlorocarbanilide; TCC), an antimicrobial used in bar soaps, affects endocrine function in vitro and in vivo. This study investigates whether TCC exposure during early life affects the trajectory of fetal and/or neonatal development. Sprague Dawley rats were provided control, 0.2% weight/weight (w/w), or 0.5% w/w TCC-supplemented chow through a series of 3 experiments that limited exposure to critical growth periods: gestation, gestation and lactation, or lactation only (cross-fostering) to determine the susceptible windows of exposure for developmental consequences. Reduced offspring survival occurred when offspring were exposed to TCC at concentrations of 0.2% w/w and 0.5% w/w during lactation, in which only 13% of offspring raised by 0.2% w/w TCC dams survived beyond weaning and no offspring raised by 0.5% w/w TCC dams survived to this period. In utero exposure status had no effect on survival, as all pups nursed by control dams survived regardless of their in utero exposure status. Microscopic evaluation of dam mammary tissue revealed involution to be a secondary outcome of TCC exposure rather than a primary effect of compound administration. The average concentration of TCC in the milk was almost 4 times that of the corresponding maternal serum levels. The results demonstrate that gestational TCC exposure does not affect the ability of dams to carry offspring to term but TCC exposure during lactation has adverse consequences on the survival of offspring although the mechanism of reduced survival is currently unknown. This information highlights the importance of evaluating the safety of TCC application in personal care products and the impacts during early life exposure. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. Early Life Triclocarban Exposure During Lactation Affects Neonate Rat Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Rebekah C. M.; Menn, Fu-Min; Healy, Laura; Fecteau, Kellie A.; Hu, Pan; Bae, Jiyoung; Gee, Nancy A.; Lasley, Bill L.; Zhao, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Triclocarban (3,4,4′-trichlorocarbanilide; TCC), an antimicrobial used in bar soaps, affects endocrine function in vitro and in vivo. This study investigates whether TCC exposure during early life affects the trajectory of fetal and/or neonatal development. Sprague Dawley rats were provided control, 0.2% weight/weight (w/w), or 0.5% w/w TCC-supplemented chow through a series of 3 experiments that limited exposure to critical growth periods: gestation, gestation and lactation, or lactation only (cross-fostering) to determine the susceptible windows of exposure for developmental consequences. Reduced offspring survival occurred when offspring were exposed to TCC at concentrations of 0.2% w/w and 0.5% w/w during lactation, in which only 13% of offspring raised by 0.2% w/w TCC dams survived beyond weaning and no offspring raised by 0.5% w/w TCC dams survived to this period. In utero exposure status had no effect on survival, as all pups nursed by control dams survived regardless of their in utero exposure status. Microscopic evaluation of dam mammary tissue revealed involution to be a secondary outcome of TCC exposure rather than a primary effect of compound administration. The average concentration of TCC in the milk was almost 4 times that of the corresponding maternal serum levels. The results demonstrate that gestational TCC exposure does not affect the ability of dams to carry offspring to term but TCC exposure during lactation has adverse consequences on the survival of offspring although the mechanism of reduced survival is currently unknown. This information highlights the importance of evaluating the safety of TCC application in personal care products and the impacts during early life exposure. PMID:24803507

  13. Diverse microbial species survive high ammonia concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Laura C.; Cockell, Charles S.; Summers, Stephen

    2012-04-01

    Planetary protection regulations are in place to control the contamination of planets and moons with terrestrial micro-organisms in order to avoid jeopardizing future scientific investigations relating to the search for life. One environmental chemical factor of relevance in extraterrestrial environments, specifically in the moons of the outer solar system, is ammonia (NH3). Ammonia is known to be highly toxic to micro-organisms and may disrupt proton motive force, interfere with cellular redox reactions or cause an increase of cell pH. To test the survival potential of terrestrial micro-organisms exposed to such cold, ammonia-rich environments, and to judge whether current planetary protection regulations are sufficient, soil samples were exposed to concentrations of NH3 from 5 to 35% (v/v) at -80°C and room temperature for periods up to 11 months. Following exposure to 35% NH3, diverse spore-forming taxa survived, including representatives of the Firmicutes (Bacillus, Sporosarcina, Viridibacillus, Paenibacillus, Staphylococcus and Brevibacillus) and Actinobacteria (Streptomyces). Non-spore forming organisms also survived, including Proteobacteria (Pseudomonas) and Actinobacteria (Arthrobacter) that are known to have environmentally resistant resting states. Clostridium spp. were isolated from the exposed soil under anaerobic culture. High NH3 was shown to cause a reduction in viability of spores over time, but spore morphology was not visibly altered. In addition to its implications for planetary protection, these data show that a large number of bacteria, potentially including spore-forming pathogens, but also environmentally resistant non-spore-formers, can survive high ammonia concentrations.

  14. VARIATION OF STRIKE INCENTIVES IN DEEP REDUCTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G.H. CANAVAN

    2001-08-01

    This note studies the sensitivity of strike incentives to deep offensive force reductions using exchange, cost, and game theoretic decision models derived and discussed in companion reports. As forces fall, weapon allocations shift from military to high value targets, with the shift being half complete at about 1,000 weapons. By 500 weapons, the first and second strikes are almost totally on high value. The dominant cost for striking first is that of damage to one's high value, which is near total absent other constraints, and hence proportional to preferences for survival of high value. Changes in military costs are largely offsetting, so total first strike costs change little. The resulting costs at decision nodes are well above the costs of inaction, so the preferred course is inaction for all offensive reductions studied. As the dominant cost for striking first is proportional to the preference for survival of high value. There is a wide gap between the first strike cost and that of inaction for the parameters studied here. These conclusions should be insensitive to significant reductions in the preference for survival of high value, which is the most sensitive parameter.

  15. Differential susceptibility of interneurons expressing neuropeptide Y or parvalbumin in the aged hippocampus to acute seizure activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramkumar Kuruba

    Full Text Available Acute seizure (AS activity in old age has an increased predisposition for evolving into temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE. Furthermore, spontaneous seizures and cognitive dysfunction after AS activity are often intense in the aged population than in young adults. This could be due to an increased vulnerability of inhibitory interneurons in the aged hippocampus to AS activity. We investigated this issue by comparing the survival of hippocampal GABA-ergic interneurons that contain the neuropeptide Y (NPY or the calcium binding protein parvalbumin (PV between young adult (5-months old and aged (22-months old F344 rats at 12 days after three-hours of AS activity. Graded intraperitoneal injections of the kainic acid (KA induced AS activity and a diazepam injection at 3 hours after the onset terminated AS-activity. Measurement of interneuron numbers in different hippocampal subfields revealed that NPY+ interneurons were relatively resistant to AS activity in the aged hippocampus in comparison to the young adult hippocampus. Whereas, PV+ interneurons were highly susceptible to AS activity in both age groups. However, as aging alone substantially depleted these populations, the aged hippocampus after three-hours of AS activity exhibited 48% reductions in NPY+ interneurons and 70% reductions in PV+ interneurons, in comparison to the young hippocampus after similar AS activity. Thus, AS activity-induced TLE in old age is associated with far fewer hippocampal NPY+ and PV+ interneuron numbers than AS-induced TLE in the young adult age. This discrepancy likely underlies the severe spontaneous seizures and cognitive dysfunction observed in the aged people after AS activity.

  16. Prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility of Extended Spectrum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lactamase (ESBL) producing gram-negative uropathogens in Sokoto, Nigeria. ... Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was determined using the modified Kirby Bauer method. Confirmation of ESBL phenotype was performed by Double-Disc Synergy Test ...

  17. antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of extended spectrum

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    JAMILU

    ABSTRACT. The emergence of resistant strains of urogenital extended spectrum beta-lactamase producing ... antimicrobial susceptibility test using CLSI recommended, WHO modified Kirby Bauer disc diffusion method. ... Keywords: Extended Spectrum Beta-lactamases, Prevalence, Gram-negative urogenital isolates,.

  18. antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of salmonella species in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Empirical treatment for enteric fevers should, therefore, be discouraged while quinolones, cefepime, carbapenem, azithromycin and third generation cephalosporins be given preference. KEY WORDS: Susceptibility, Antimicrobial, Salmonella species, Enteric fever. INTRODUCTION. In the 21st century, enteric fever in the.

  19. Human genetic susceptibility to Candida infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plantinga, T.S.; Johnson, M.D.; Scott, W.K.; Joosten, L.A.B.; Meer, J.W. van der; Perfect, J.R.; Kullberg, B.J.; Netea, M.G.

    2012-01-01

    Infections with Candida spp. have different manifestations in humans, ranging from mucosal to bloodstream and deep-seated disseminated infections. Immunocompromised patients have increased susceptibility to these types of infections, due to reduced capacity to elicit effective innate or adaptive

  20. Real-Time Optical Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredborg, Marlene; Andersen, Klaus R; Jørgensen, Erik

    2013-01-01

    Rapid antibiotic susceptibility testing is in highly demand in health-care fields as antimicrobial resistant bacterial strains emerge and spread. Here we describe an optical screening system (oCelloScope), which based on time-lapse imaging of 96 bacteria-antibiotic combinations at a time, introdu......Rapid antibiotic susceptibility testing is in highly demand in health-care fields as antimicrobial resistant bacterial strains emerge and spread. Here we describe an optical screening system (oCelloScope), which based on time-lapse imaging of 96 bacteria-antibiotic combinations at a time......, introduces real-time detection of bacterial growth and antimicrobial susceptibility, with imaging material to support the automatically generated graphs. Automated antibiotic susceptibility tests of a monoculture showed statistically significant antibiotic effect within 6 minutes and within 30 minutes...

  1. Landslide susceptibility map: from research to application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorucci, Federica; Reichenbach, Paola; Ardizzone, Francesca; Rossi, Mauro; Felicioni, Giulia; Antonini, Guendalina

    2014-05-01

    Susceptibility map is an important and essential tool in environmental planning, to evaluate landslide hazard and risk and for a correct and responsible management of the territory. Landslide susceptibility is the likelihood of a landslide occurring in an area on the basis of local terrain conditions. Can be expressed as the probability that any given region will be affected by landslides, i.e. an estimate of "where" landslides are likely to occur. In this work we present two examples of landslide susceptibility map prepared for the Umbria Region and for the Perugia Municipality. These two maps were realized following official request from the Regional and Municipal government to the Research Institute for the Hydrogeological Protection (CNR-IRPI). The susceptibility map prepared for the Umbria Region represents the development of previous agreements focused to prepare: i) a landslide inventory map that was included in the Urban Territorial Planning (PUT) and ii) a series of maps for the Regional Plan for Multi-risk Prevention. The activities carried out for the Umbria Region were focused to define and apply methods and techniques for landslide susceptibility zonation. Susceptibility maps were prepared exploiting a multivariate statistical model (linear discriminant analysis) for the five Civil Protection Alert Zones defined in the regional territory. The five resulting maps were tested and validated using the spatial distribution of recent landslide events that occurred in the region. The susceptibility map for the Perugia Municipality was prepared to be integrated as one of the cartographic product in the Municipal development plan (PRG - Piano Regolatore Generale) as required by the existing legislation. At strategic level, one of the main objectives of the PRG, is to establish a framework of knowledge and legal aspects for the management of geo-hydrological risk. At national level most of the susceptibility maps prepared for the PRG, were and still are obtained

  2. Survival After Relapse of Medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koschmann, Carl; Bloom, Karina; Upadhyaya, Santhosh; Geyer, J Russell; Leary, Sarah E S

    2016-05-01

    Survival after recurrence of medulloblastoma has not been reported in an unselected cohort of patients in the contemporary era. We reviewed 55 patients diagnosed with medulloblastoma between 2000 and 2010, and treated at Seattle Children's Hospital to evaluate patterns of relapse treatment and survival. Fourteen of 47 patients (30%) over the age of 3 experienced recurrent or progressive medulloblastoma after standard therapy. The median time from diagnosis to recurrence was 18.0 months (range, 3.6 to 62.6 mo), and site of recurrence was metastatic in 86%. The median survival after relapse was 10.3 months (range, 1.3 to 80.5 mo); 3-year survival after relapse was 18%. There were trend associations between longer survival and having received additional chemotherapy (median survival 12.8 vs. 1.3 mo, P=0.16) and radiation therapy (15.4 vs. 5.9 mo, P=0.20). Isolated local relapse was significantly associated with shorter survival (1.3 vs. 12.8 mo, P=0.009). Recurrence of medulloblastoma is more likely to be metastatic than reported in previous eras. Within the limits of our small sample, our data suggest a potential survival benefit from retreatment with cytotoxic chemotherapy and radiation even in heavily pretreated patients. This report serves as a baseline against which to evaluate novel therapy combinations.

  3. The effects of inbreeding on disease susceptibility: Gyrodactylus turnbulli infection of guppies, Poecilia reticulata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallbone, Willow; van Oosterhout, Cock; Cable, Jo

    2016-08-01

    Inbreeding can threaten population persistence by reducing disease resistance through the accelerated loss of gene diversity (i.e. heterozygosity). Such inbreeding depression can affect many different fitness-related traits, including survival, reproductive success, and parasite susceptibility. Empirically quantifying the effects of inbreeding on parasite resistance is therefore important for ex-situ conservation of vertebrates. The present study evaluates the disease susceptibility of individuals bred under three different breeding regimes (inbred, crossed with full siblings; control, randomly crossed mating; and fully outbred). Specifically, we examined the relationship between inbreeding coefficient (F-coefficient) and susceptibility to Gyrodactylus turnbulli infection in a live bearing vertebrate, the guppy Poecilia reticulata. Host-breeding regime significantly affected the trajectories of parasite population growth on individual fish. Inbred fish showed significantly higher mean parasite intensity than fish from the control and outbred breeding regimes, and in addition, inbred fish were slower in purging their gyrodactylid infections. We discuss the role of inbreeding on the various arms of the immune system, and argue that the increased disease susceptibility of inbred individuals could contribute to the extinction vortex. This is one of the first studies to quantify the effects of inbreeding and breeding regime on disease susceptibility in a captive bred vertebrate of wild origin, and it highlights the risks faced by small (captive-bred) populations when exposed to their native parasites. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Survival of Salmonella enterica in poultry feed is strain dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andino, Ana; Pendleton, Sean; Zhang, Nan; Chen, Wei; Critzer, Faith; Hanning, Irene

    2014-02-01

    Feed components have low water activity, making bacterial survival difficult. The mechanisms of Salmonella survival in feed and subsequent colonization of poultry are unknown. The purpose of this research was to compare the ability of Salmonella serovars and strains to survive in broiler feed and to evaluate molecular mechanisms associated with survival and colonization by measuring the expression of genes associated with colonization (hilA, invA) and survival via fatty acid synthesis (cfa, fabA, fabB, fabD). Feed was inoculated with 1 of 15 strains of Salmonella enterica consisting of 11 serovars (Typhimurium, Enteriditis, Kentucky, Seftenburg, Heidelberg, Mbandanka, Newport, Bairely, Javiana, Montevideo, and Infantis). To inoculate feed, cultures were suspended in PBS and survival was evaluated by plating samples onto XLT4 agar plates at specific time points (0 h, 4 h, 8 h, 24 h, 4 d, and 7 d). To evaluate gene expression, RNA was extracted from the samples at the specific time points (0, 4, 8, and 24 h) and gene expression measured with real-time PCR. The largest reduction in Salmonella occurred at the first and third sampling time points (4 h and 4 d) with the average reductions being 1.9 and 1.6 log cfu per g, respectively. For the remaining time points (8 h, 24 h, and 7 d), the average reduction was less than 1 log cfu per g (0.6, 0.4, and 0.6, respectively). Most strains upregulated cfa (cyclopropane fatty acid synthesis) within 8 h, which would modify the fluidity of the cell wall to aid in survival. There was a weak negative correlation between survival and virulence gene expression indicating downregulation to focus energy on other gene expression efforts such as survival-related genes. These data indicate the ability of strains to survive over time in poultry feed was strain dependent and that upregulation of cyclopropane fatty acid synthesis and downregulation of virulence genes were associated with a response to desiccation stress.

  5. Reduction of a Ship's Magnetic Field Signatures

    CERN Document Server

    Holmes, John

    2008-01-01

    Decreasing the magnetic field signature of a naval vessel will reduce its susceptibility to detonating naval influence mines and the probability of a submarine being detected by underwater barriers and maritime patrol aircraft. Both passive and active techniques for reducing the magnetic signatures produced by a vessel's ferromagnetism, roll-induced eddy currents, corrosion-related sources, and stray fields are presented. Mathematical models of simple hull shapes are used to predict the levels of signature reduction that might be achieved through the use of alternate construction materials. Al

  6. Susceptibility of the Plum Curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar, to Entomopathogenic Nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro-Ilan, David I; Mizell, Russell F; Campbell, James F

    2002-09-01

    The plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar, is a major pest of pome and stone fruit. Our objective was to determine virulence and reproductive potential of six commercially available nematode species in C. nenuphar larvae and adults. Nematodes tested were Heterorhabditis bacteriophora (Hb strain), H. marelatus (Point Reyes strains), H. megidis (UK211 strain), Steinernema riobrave (355 strain), S. carpocapsae (All strain), and S. feltiae (SN strain). Survival of C. nenuphar larvae treated with S. feltiae and S. riobrave, and survival of adults treated with S. carpocapsae and S. riobrave, was reduced relative to non-treated insects. Other nematode treatments were not different from the control. Conotrachelus nenuphar larvae were more susceptible to S. feltiae infection than were adults, but for other nematode species there was no significant insect-stage effect. Reproduction in C. nenuphar was greatest for H. marelatus, which produced approximately 10,000 nematodes in larvae and 5,500 in adults. Other nematodes produced approximately 1,000 to 3,700 infective juveniles per C. nenuphar with no significant differences among nematode species or insect stages. We conclude that S. carpocapsae or S. riobrave appears to have the most potential for controlling adults, whereas S. feltiae or S. riobrave appears to have the most potential for larval control.

  7. Association Between a Germline OCA2 Polymorphism at Chromosome 15q13.1 and Estrogen Receptor-Negative Breast Cancer Survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azzato, E.M.; Tyrer, J.; Fasching, P.A.

    2010-01-01

    Traditional prognostic factors for survival and treatment response of patients with breast cancer do not fully account for observed survival variation. We used available genotype data from a previously conducted two-stage, breast cancer susceptibility genome-wide association study (ie, Studies of...

  8. Maternal environment shapes the life history and susceptibility to malaria of Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Lena M; Koella, Jacob C

    2011-12-21

    It is becoming generally recognized that an individual's phenotype can be shaped not only by its own genotype and environmental experience, but also by its mother's environment and condition. Maternal environmental factors can influence mosquitoes' population dynamics and susceptibility to malaria, and therefore directly and indirectly the epidemiology of malaria. In a full factorial experiment, the effects of two environmental stressors - food availability and infection with the microsporidian parasite Vavraia culicis - of female mosquitoes (Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto) on their offspring's development, survival and susceptibility to malaria were studied. The offspring of A. gambiae s.s. mothers infected with V. culicis developed into adults more slowly than those of uninfected mothers. This effect was exacerbated when mothers were reared on low food. Maternal food availability had no effect on the survival of their offspring up to emergence, and microsporidian infection decreased survival only slightly. Low food availability for mothers increased and V. culicis-infection of mothers decreased the likelihood that the offspring fed on malaria-infected blood harboured malaria parasites (but neither maternal treatment influenced their survival up to dissection). Resource availability and infection with V. culicis of A. gambiae s.s. mosquitoes not only acted as direct environmental stimuli for changes in the success of one generation, but could also lead to maternal effects. Maternal V. culicis infection could make offspring more resistant and less likely to transmit malaria, thus enhancing the efficacy of the microsporidian for the biological control of malaria.

  9. Maternal environment shapes the life history and susceptibility to malaria of Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenz Lena M

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is becoming generally recognized that an individual's phenotype can be shaped not only by its own genotype and environmental experience, but also by its mother's environment and condition. Maternal environmental factors can influence mosquitoes' population dynamics and susceptibility to malaria, and therefore directly and indirectly the epidemiology of malaria. Methods In a full factorial experiment, the effects of two environmental stressors - food availability and infection with the microsporidian parasite Vavraia culicis - of female mosquitoes (Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto on their offspring's development, survival and susceptibility to malaria were studied. Results The offspring of A. gambiae s.s. mothers infected with V. culicis developed into adults more slowly than those of uninfected mothers. This effect was exacerbated when mothers were reared on low food. Maternal food availability had no effect on the survival of their offspring up to emergence, and microsporidian infection decreased survival only slightly. Low food availability for mothers increased and V. culicis-infection of mothers decreased the likelihood that the offspring fed on malaria-infected blood harboured malaria parasites (but neither maternal treatment influenced their survival up to dissection. Conclusions Resource availability and infection with V. culicis of A. gambiae s.s. mosquitoes not only acted as direct environmental stimuli for changes in the success of one generation, but could also lead to maternal effects. Maternal V. culicis infection could make offspring more resistant and less likely to transmit malaria, thus enhancing the efficacy of the microsporidian for the biological control of malaria.

  10. Diagnostic Value of Direct Antibiotic Susceptibility Test for Faster BacterialSusceptibility Reporting in Bacteremia

    OpenAIRE

    Rebriarina Hapsari; Vincentia Rizke Ciptaningtyas; Masfiyah Masfiyah

    2012-01-01

    Background: Rapid and accurate information on susceptibility of bacteria causing bacteraemia is very helpful in sepsis management. Blood culture is the gold standard for bacteraemia diagnosis. Standard antibiotic susceptibility testing needs at least three days for completion while direct method can give the result a day earlier. The aim of this study was to investigate the diagnostic value of direct antibiotic susceptibility testing in blood culture. Methods: Bloods from positive BACTEC b...

  11. Susceptibility to peer pressure as an explanatory variable for the differential effectiveness of an alcohol misuse prevention program in elementary schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dielman, T E; Kloska, D D; Leech, S L; Schulenberg, J E; Shope, J T

    1992-08-01

    A school-based alcohol misuse prevention program had differential effects on students' susceptibility to peer pressure, depending on prior experience with alcohol. These effects paralleled those on alcohol use and misuse, indicating program effects on use and misuse were mediated by reductions in the rate of increase on susceptibility to peer pressure. Experimental group students with prior unsupervised use of alcohol showed a significantly greater reduction than their controls in the rate of increase in susceptibility to peer pressure, alcohol use, and alcohol misuse. This difference was not found among students without prior unsupervised use of alcohol.

  12. Herbicide tolerance and seed survival of grain amaranth (Amaranthus sp.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kudsk, Per; Taberner, Andreu; de Troiani, Rosa M.

    2012-01-01

    Amaranth is receiving increasing attention as an alternative crop to small grain cereals. From a weed control point of view cultivation of amaranth poses two problems. Firstly, amaranth grows slowly after emergence and hence is very susceptible to competition by weeds and secondly, seed losses...... crop damage applied at the 4-6 leaf stage compared to the 2-4 leaf stage while clopyralid was selective at both growth stages. The seed survival studies revealed differences between the countries with higher viability in Spain (up to 18%) than in Argentina and Denmark (up to 6%). Our results showed...... at harvest are significant due to an uneven maturing and volunteer amaranth plants could potentially become a weed problem in following crops. Nonetheless, no studies are available on the tolerance of amaranth to herbicides or the survival of seeds in the soil. In this study we examined 1) the tolerance...

  13. Norwegian honey bees surviving Varroa destructor mite infestations by means of natural selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa A.Y. Oddie

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Managed, feral and wild populations of European honey bee subspecies, Apis mellifera, are currently facing severe colony losses globally. There is consensus that the ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor, that switched hosts from the Eastern honey bee Apis cerana to the Western honey bee A. mellifera, is a key factor driving these losses. For >20 years, breeding efforts have not produced European honey bee colonies that can survive infestations without the need for mite control. However, at least three populations of European honey bees have developed this ability by means of natural selection and have been surviving for >10 years without mite treatments. Reduced mite reproductive success has been suggested as a key factor explaining this natural survival. Here, we report a managed A. mellifera population in Norway, that has been naturally surviving consistent V. destructor infestations for >17 years. Methods Surviving colonies and local susceptible controls were evaluated for mite infestation levels, mite reproductive success and two potential mechanisms explaining colony survival: grooming of adult worker bees and Varroa Sensitive Hygiene (VSH: adult workers specifically detecting and removing mite-infested brood. Results Mite infestation levels were significantly lower in surviving colonies and mite reproductive success was reduced by 30% when compared to the controls. No significant differences were found between surviving and control colonies for either grooming or VSH. Discussion Our data confirm that reduced mite reproductive success seems to be a key factor for natural survival of infested A. mellifera colonies. However, neither grooming nor VSH seem to explain colony survival. Instead, other behaviors of the adult bees seem to be sufficient to hinder mite reproductive success, because brood for this experiment was taken from susceptible donor colonies only. To mitigate the global impact of V. destructor, we suggest learning

  14. Marketing child survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, J P

    1984-01-01

    Growth monitoring charts, packets of oral rehydration salts (ORS), and vaccines, are inexpensive, life-saving, growth-protecting technologies which can enable parents to protect their children against the worst effects of poverty. Similarly, a matrix of current and easily understandable information about pregnancy, breast feeding, weaning, feeding during and immediately after illness, child spacing, and preparing and using home-made oral rehydration solutions, also could empower parents to protect the lives and the health of their children. The question arises as to how can these technologies and this information be put at the disposal of millions of families in the low-income world. The initial task of the Child Survival and Development Revolution is the communication of what is now possible, yet little is known about how to communicate information whose principal value is to the poor. There are 2 large-scale precedents: the Green Revolution, which in many instances succeeded in putting into the hands of thousands of small and large farmers the techniques and the knowledge which enabled them to double and treble the yields from their lands; and the campaign to put the knowledge and the means of family planning at the disposal of many millions of people. There are 2 lessons to be learned from these precedents: they have shown that the way to promote a people's technology and to put information at the disposal of the majority is by mobilizing all possible resources and working through all possible channels both to create the demand and to meet it; and neither the Green Revolution nor the family planning movement rally took off until they were viewed as political and economic priorities and given the full support of the nation's political leadership. Nowhere are these 2 lessons more clearly illustrated than in present-day Indonesia. Because the campaign for family planning was given high personal and political priority by the President, and because 85% of all family

  15. Early survival factor deprivation in the olfactory epithelium enhances activity-dependent survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrien eFrançois

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The neuronal olfactory epithelium undergoes permanent renewal because of environmental aggression. This renewal is partly regulated by factors modulating the level of neuronal apoptosis. Among them, we had previously characterized endothelin as neuroprotective. In this study, we explored the effect of cell survival factor deprivation in the olfactory epithelium by intranasal delivery of endothelin receptors antagonists to rat pups. This treatment induced an overall increase of apoptosis in the olfactory epithelium. The responses to odorants recorded by electroolfactogram were decreased in treated animal, a result consistent with a loss of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs. However, the treated animal performed better in an olfactory orientation test based on maternal odor compared to non-treated littermates. This improved performance could be due to activity-dependent neuronal survival of OSNs in the context of increased apoptosis level. In order to demonstrate it, we odorized pups with octanal, a known ligand for the rI7 olfactory receptor (Olr226. We quantified the number of OSN expressing rI7 by RT-qPCR and whole mount in situ hybridization. While this number was reduced by the survival factor removal treatment, this reduction was abolished by the presence of its ligand. This improved survival was optimal for low concentration of odorant and was specific for rI7-expressing OSNs. Meanwhile, the number of rI7-expressing OSNs was not affected by the odorization in non-treated littermates; showing that the activity-dependant survival of OSNs did not affect the OSN population during the 10 days of odorization in control conditions. Overall, our study shows that when apoptosis is promoted in the olfactory mucosa, the activity-dependent neuronal plasticity allows faster tuning of the olfactory sensory neuron population towards detection of environmental odorants.

  16. Early survival factor deprivation in the olfactory epithelium enhances activity-driven survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    François, Adrien; Laziz, Iman; Rimbaud, Stéphanie; Grebert, Denise; Durieux, Didier; Pajot-Augy, Edith; Meunier, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    The neuronal olfactory epithelium undergoes permanent renewal because of environmental aggression. This renewal is partly regulated by factors modulating the level of neuronal apoptosis. Among them, we had previously characterized endothelin as neuroprotective. In this study, we explored the effect of cell survival factor deprivation in the olfactory epithelium by intranasal delivery of endothelin receptors antagonists to rat pups. This treatment induced an overall increase of apoptosis in the olfactory epithelium. The responses to odorants recorded by electroolfactogram were decreased in treated animal, a result consistent with a loss of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). However, the treated animal performed better in an olfactory orientation test based on maternal odor compared to non-treated littermates. This improved performance could be due to activity-dependent neuronal survival of OSNs in the context of increased apoptosis level. In order to demonstrate it, we odorized pups with octanal, a known ligand for the rI7 olfactory receptor (Olr226). We quantified the number of OSN expressing rI7 by RT-qPCR and whole mount in situ hybridization. While this number was reduced by the survival factor removal treatment, this reduction was abolished by the presence of its ligand. This improved survival was optimal for low concentration of odorant and was specific for rI7-expressing OSNs. Meanwhile, the number of rI7-expressing OSNs was not affected by the odorization in non-treated littermates; showing that the activity-dependant survival of OSNs did not affect the OSN population during the 10 days of odorization in control conditions. Overall, our study shows that when apoptosis is promoted in the olfactory mucosa, the activity-dependent neuronal plasticity allows faster tuning of the olfactory sensory neuron population toward detection of environmental odorants. PMID:24399931

  17. On model reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Saggaf, Ubaid M.; Franklin, Gene F.

    1986-01-01

    Three model reduction methods are described. These are the discrete balanced realizations of Mullis and Roberts (1976) where a characterization of the reduction error is given and a previously unknown L(infinity) norm bound on the reduction error, is obtained. Another method is a new model reduction technique for discrete time systems which has the advantage that the reduced order model is balanced and has an L(infinity) norm bound on the reduction error. The last method derived is a frequency weighting technique for continuous and discrete systems where it is possible to specify the approximation accuracy with frequency and also, for this method, an L(infinity) norm on the weighted reduction error is obtained.

  18. Global Activities and Plant Survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandick, Roger

    2014-01-01

    This chapter provides an extensive review of the empirical evidence found for Sweden concerning plant survival. The result reveals that foreign MNE plants and exporting non-MNE plants have the lowest exit rates, followed by purely domestic-oriented plants, and that domestic MNE plants have...... the highest exit rates. Moreover, the exit rates of globally engaged plants seem to be unaffected by increased foreign presence, whereas there appears to be a negative impact on the survival rates of non-exporting non-MNE plants. Finally, the result reveals that the survival ratio of plants of acquired...... exporters, but not other types of plants, improves post acquisition....

  19. Cardiovascular disease incidence and survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byberg, Stine; Agyemang, Charles; Zwisler, Ann Dorthe

    2016-01-01

    Studies on cardiovascular disease (CVD) incidence and survival show varying results between different ethnic groups. Our aim was to add a new dimension by exploring the role of migrant status in combination with ethnic background on incidence of-and survival from-CVD and more specifically acute...... of some types of cardiovascular disease compared to Danish-born. Family-reunified migrants on the other hand had lower rates of CVD. All migrants had better survival than Danish-born indicating that migrants may not always be disadvantaged in health....

  20. Quantum State Reduction

    OpenAIRE

    Brody, DC; Hughston, LP

    2016-01-01

    We propose an energy-driven stochastic master equation for the density matrix as a dynamical model for quantum state reduction. In contrast, most previous studies of state reduction have considered stochastic extensions of the Schr¨odinger equation, and have introduced the density matrix as the expectation of the random pure projection operator associated with the evolving state vector. After working out properties of the reduction process we construct a general solution to the energy- driven...

  1. Drag reduction in nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushnell, D. M.; Moore, K. J.

    1991-01-01

    Recent studies on the drag-reducing shapes, structures, and behaviors of swimming and flying animals are reviewed, with an emphasis on potential analogs in vehicle design. Consideration is given to form drag reduction (turbulent flow, vortex generation, mass transfer, and adaptations for body-intersection regions), skin-friction drag reduction (polymers, surfactants, and bubbles as surface 'additives'), reduction of the drag due to lift, drag-reduction studies on porpoises, and drag-reducing animal behavior (e.g., leaping out of the water by porpoises). The need for further research is stressed.

  2. Finding optimal exact reducts

    KAUST Repository

    AbouEisha, Hassan M.

    2014-01-01

    The problem of attribute reduction is an important problem related to feature selection and knowledge discovery. The problem of finding reducts with minimum cardinality is NP-hard. This paper suggests a new algorithm for finding exact reducts with minimum cardinality. This algorithm transforms the initial table to a decision table of a special kind, apply a set of simplification steps to this table, and use a dynamic programming algorithm to finish the construction of an optimal reduct. I present results of computer experiments for a collection of decision tables from UCIML Repository. For many of the experimented tables, the simplification steps solved the problem.

  3. Comparative susceptibility of two Neotropical predators, Eriopis connexa and Chrysoperla externa, to acetamiprid and pyriproxyfen: Short and long-term effects after egg exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimoldi, Federico; Fogel, Marilina N; Ronco, Alicia E; Schneider, Marcela I

    2017-12-01

    Compatibility assessments between selective insecticides and the natural enemies of pests are essential for integrated-pest-management programs. Chrysoperla externa and Eriopis connexa are two principal Neotropical predators of agricultural pests whose conservation in agroecosystems requires a toxicity evaluation of pesticides to minimize the impact on those beneficial insects on the environment. The objective of this work was to evaluate the toxicity of the insecticides pyriproxyfen and acetamiprid on C. externa and E. connexa eggs exposed to the maximum recommended field concentrations of each along with three successive dilutions. The survival and the immature developmental time were assessed daily until adulthood and the mean survival time calculated over a 10-day period. The cumulative survival of E. connexa was reduced at all concentrations of both insecticides, while that of C. externa was significantly decreased by ≥50 mg L -1 of acetamiprid and ≥37.6 mg L -1 of pyriproxyfen. In both species, the reductions occurred principally on the eggs and first larval instar. Survival curves, in general, differed from those of the controls, with the mean survival time of E. connexa being significantly shorter in insecticides treatments than that of the controls. Certain concentrations of each of the insecticide lengthened the egg and first-larval-instar developmental periods of E. connexa and C. externa, respectively. Also, pyriproxyfen reduced the first-larval-instar period and lengthened the fourth of E. connexa. Acetamiprid was more toxic to E. connexa than to C. externa at the two highest concentrations. Conversely, at those same concentrations of pyriproxyfen, the relative toxicity to the two species was reversed. The present work represents the first investigation on the comparative susceptibility of two relevant Neotropical biological control agents to acetamiprid and pyriproxyfen. Also, it highlights the necessity of assessing long

  4. Survival of vancomycin-intermediate Staphylococcus aureus on hospital surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarpellon, M N; Gales, A C; Sasaki, A L; Selhorst, G J; Menegucci, T C; Cardoso, C L; Garcia, L B; Tognim, M C B

    2015-08-01

    Contaminated surfaces play an important role in the transmission of certain pathogens that are responsible for healthcare-associated infections. Although previous studies have shown that meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) can survive on dry surfaces at room temperature, no published data regarding vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA) are available to date. To compare the survival time on different types of surfaces, cell-surface hydrophobicity, adherence to abiotic surfaces and biofilm formation of meticillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA), MRSA and VISA. Survival of the S. aureus strains was tested on latex, cotton fabric, vinyl flooring and formica. Cell-surface hydrophobicity was determined using the hydrocarbon interaction affinity method. Adhesion to abiotic surfaces was tested on granite, latex (gloves), glass, vinyl flooring and formica. Biofilm formation was evaluated at 6, 12, 24 and 48 h. All of the samples survived on the vinyl flooring and formica for at least 40 days. VISA survived on both surfaces for more than 45 days. All of the strains were highly hydrophobic. VISA adhered to latex, vinyl flooring and formica. Biofilm formation increased for all of the tested strains within 6-24 h. VISA present high survival, adherence and cell-surface hydrophobicity. Therefore, as the treatment of patients with VISA is a significant challenge for clinicians, greater care with cleaning and disinfection of different types of surfaces in healthcare facilities is recommended because these may become important reservoirs of multi-resistant pathogens. Copyright © 2015 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Female American Kestrel survives double amputation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skipper, Ben R.; Boal, Clint W.

    2011-01-01

    Free-ranging raptors are susceptible to a variety of injuries, many of which are sustained while pursuing and/or capturing live prey. Injuries hindering an individual’s ability to capture prey, such as partial blindness, damage to the bill, and foot or leg injuries, are debilitating and potentially life-threatening. However, there are ample observations in the literature of free-ranging raptors with eye (Bedrosian and St.Pierre 2007), bill (Strobel and Haralson-Strobel 2009) and foot and leg injuries (Blodget et al. 1990, Murza et al. 2000, Dwyer 2006, Bedrosian and St.Pierre 2007), suggesting that some individuals are able to compensate for their injuries if only partial functionality is lost (e.g., loss of only one eye). Reports of injuries resulting in the complete loss of functionality (e.g., loss of both eyes) are rare as individuals suffering such severe trauma presumably do not survive long. Here we report the capture on a bal-chatri trap of an American Kestrel (Falco sparverius; hereafter kestrel) with previous amputation of both legs

  6. Susceptibility of Campylobacter jejuni and Yersinia enterocolitica to UV radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, R.C.; Lund, V.; Carlson, D.A.

    1987-02-01

    Two enteric pathogens, Campylobacter jejuni and Yersinia enterocolitica serogroup O:3, together with Escherichia coli, were investigated for susceptibility to UV radiation at 254 nm. The UV dose required for a 3-log reduction (99.9% inactivation) of C. jejuni, Y. enterocolitica, and E. coli was 1.8, 2.7, and 5.0 mWs/cm2, respectively. Using E. coli as the basis for comparison, it appears that C. jejuni and Y. enterocolitica serogroup O:3 are more sensitive to UV than many of the pathogens associated with waterborne disease outbreaks and can be easily inactivated in most commercially available UV reactors. No association was found between the sensitivity of Y. enterocolitica to UV and the presence of a 40- to 50-megadalton virulence plasmid.

  7. A hemocyte gene expression signature correlated with predictive capacity of oysters to survive Vibrio infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Rafael

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The complex balance between environmental and host factors is an important determinant of susceptibility to infection. Disturbances of this equilibrium may result in multifactorial diseases as illustrated by the summer mortality syndrome, a worldwide and complex phenomenon that affects the oysters, Crassostrea gigas. The summer mortality syndrome reveals a physiological intolerance making this oyster species susceptible to diseases. Exploration of genetic basis governing the oyster resistance or susceptibility to infections is thus a major goal for understanding field mortality events. In this context, we used high-throughput genomic approaches to identify genetic traits that may characterize inherent survival capacities in C. gigas. Results Using digital gene expression (DGE, we analyzed the transcriptomes of hemocytes (immunocompetent cells of oysters able or not able to survive infections by Vibrio species shown to be involved in summer mortalities. Hemocytes were nonlethally collected from oysters before Vibrio experimental infection, and two DGE libraries were generated from individuals that survived or did not survive. Exploration of DGE data and microfluidic qPCR analyses at individual level showed an extraordinary polymorphism in gene expressions, but also a set of hemocyte-expressed genes whose basal mRNA levels discriminate oyster capacity to survive infections by the pathogenic V. splendidus LGP32. Finally, we identified a signature of 14 genes that predicted oyster survival capacity. Their expressions are likely driven by distinct transcriptional regulation processes associated or not associated to gene copy number variation (CNV. Conclusions We provide here for the first time in oyster a gene expression survival signature that represents a useful tool for understanding mortality events and for assessing genetic traits of interest for disease resistance selection programs.

  8. Adolescent neurobiological susceptibility to social context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta A. Schriber

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Adolescence has been characterized as a period of heightened sensitivity to social contexts. However, adolescents vary in how their social contexts affect them. According to neurobiological susceptibility models, endogenous, biological factors confer some individuals, relative to others, with greater susceptibility to environmental influences, whereby more susceptible individuals fare the best or worst of all individuals, depending on the environment encountered (e.g., high vs. low parental warmth. Until recently, research guided by these theoretical frameworks has not incorporated direct measures of brain structure or function to index this sensitivity. Drawing on prevailing models of adolescent neurodevelopment and a growing number of neuroimaging studies on the interrelations among social contexts, the brain, and developmental outcomes, we review research that supports the idea of adolescent neurobiological susceptibility to social context for understanding why and how adolescents differ in development and well-being. We propose that adolescent development is shaped by brain-based individual differences in sensitivity to social contexts – be they positive or negative – such as those created through relationships with parents/caregivers and peers. Ultimately, we recommend that future research measure brain function and structure to operationalize susceptibility factors that moderate the influence of social contexts on developmental outcomes.

  9. Adolescent Neurobiological Susceptibility to Social Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schriber, Roberta A.; Guyer, Amanda E.

    2016-01-01

    Adolescence has been characterized as a period of heightened sensitivity to social contexts. However, adolescents vary in how their social contexts affect them. According to neurobiological susceptibility models, endogenous, biological factors confer some individuals, relative to others, with greater susceptibility to environmental influences, whereby more susceptible individuals fare the best or worst of all individuals, depending on the environment they encounter (e.g., high vs. low parental warmth). Until recently, research guided by these theoretical frameworks has not incorporated direct measures of brain structure or function to index this sensitivity. Drawing on prevailing models of adolescent neurodevelopment and a growing number of neuroimaging studies on the interrelations among social contexts, the brain, and developmental outcomes, we review research that supports the idea of adolescent neurobiological susceptibility to social context for understanding why and how adolescents differ in development and well-being. We propose that adolescent development is shaped in part by brain-based individual differences in sensitivity to social contexts – be they positive or negative – such as those created through relationships with parents/caregivers and peers. As such, we recommend that future research measure brain function and structure to operationalize susceptibility factors that moderate the influence of social contexts on developmental outcomes. PMID:26773514

  10. Norovirus surrogate survival on spinach during preharvest growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirneisen, Kirsten A; Kniel, Kalmia E

    2013-04-01

    Produce can become contaminated with human viral pathogens in the field through soil, feces, or water used for irrigation; through application of manure, biosolids, pesticides, and fertilizers; and through dust, insects, and animals. The objective of this study was to assess the survival and stability of human noroviruses and norovirus surrogates (Murine norovirus [MNV] and Tulane virus [TV]) on foliar surfaces of spinach plants in preharvest growth conditions. Spinach plants were housed in a biocontrol chamber at optimal conditions for up to 7 days and infectivity was determined by plaque assay. Virus inoculation location had the largest impact on virus survival as viruses present on adaxial leaf surfaces had lower decimal reduction time (D values) than viruses present on abaxial leaf surfaces. Under certain conditions, spinach type impacted virus survival, with greater D values observed from survival on semi-savoy spinach leaves. Additional UVA and UVB exposure to mimic sunlight affected virus survival on adaxial surfaces for both semi-savoy and smooth spinach plants for both viruses. Human GII norovirus inoculated onto semi-savoy spinach had an average D value that was not statistically significant from MNV and TV, suggesting that these surrogates may have similar survival on spinach leaves compared with human noroviruses. An understanding of the behavior of enteric viruses on spinach leaves can be used to enhance growers' guidelines and for risk assessment with certain growing conditions.

  11. [Physical activity and cancer survival].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romieu, Isabelle; Touillaud, Marina; Ferrari, Pietro; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Antoun, Sami; Berthouze-Aranda, Sophie; Bachmann, Patrick; Duclos, Martine; Ninot, Grégory; Romieu, Gilles; Sénesse, Pierre; Behrendt, Jan; Balosso, Jacques; Pavic, Michel; Kerbrat, Pierre; Serin, Daniel; Trédan, Olivier; Fervers, Béatrice

    2012-10-01

    Physical activity has been shown in large cohort studies to positively impact survival in cancer survivors. Existing randomized controlled trials showed a beneficial effect of physical activity on physical fitness, quality of life, anxiety and self-esteem; however, the small sample size, the short follow-up and the lack of standardization of physical activity intervention across studies impaired definite conclusion in terms of survival. Physical activity reduces adiposity and circulating estrogen levels and increases insulin sensitivity among other effects. A workshop was conducted at the International Agency for Research on Cancer in April 2011 to discuss the role of physical activity on cancer survival and the methodology to develop multicentre randomized intervention trials, including the type of physical activity to implement and its association with nutritional recommendations. The authors discuss the beneficial effect of physical activity on cancer survival with a main focus on breast cancer and report the conclusions from this workshop.

  12. The susceptibility of circulating human influenza viruses to tizoxanide, the active metabolite of nitazoxanide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilmanis, Danielle; van Baalen, Carel; Oh, Ding Yuan; Rossignol, Jean-Francois; Hurt, Aeron C

    2017-11-01

    Nitazoxanide is a thiazolide compound that was originally developed as an anti-parasitic agent, but has recently been repurposed for the treatment of influenza virus infections. Thought to exert its anti-influenza activity via the inhibition of hemagglutinin maturation and intracellular trafficking in infected cells, the effectiveness of nitazoxanide in treating patients with non-complicated influenza is currently being assessed in phase III clinical trials. Here, we describe the susceptibility of 210 seasonal influenza viruses to tizoxanide, the active circulating metabolite of nitazoxanide. An optimised cell culture-based focus reduction assay was used to determine the susceptibility of A(H1N1)pdm09, A(H3N2), and influenza B viruses circulating in the southern hemisphere from the period March 2014 to August 2016. Tizoxanide showed potent in vitro antiviral activity against all influenza viruses tested, including neuraminidase inhibitor-resistant viruses, allowing the establishment of a baseline level of susceptibility for each subtype. Median EC 50 values (±IQR) of 0.48 μM (0.33-0.71), 0.62 μM (0.56-0.75), 0.66 μM (0.62-0.69), and 0.60 μM (0.51-0.67) were obtained for A(H1N1)pdm09, A(H3N2), B(Victoria lineage), and B(Yamagata lineage) influenza viruses respectively. There was no significant difference in the median baseline tizoxanide susceptibility for each influenza subtype tested. This is the first report on the susceptibility of circulating viruses to tizoxanide. The focus reduction assay format described is sensitive, robust, and less laborious than traditional cell based antiviral assays, making it highly suitable for the surveillance of tizoxanide susceptibility in circulating seasonal influenza viruses. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Susceptible-infected-susceptible epidemics on the complete graph and the star graph : Exact analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cator, E.A.; Van Mieghem, P.

    2013-01-01

    Since mean-field approximations for susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) epidemics do not always predict the correct scaling of the epidemic threshold of the SIS metastable regime, we propose two novel approaches: (a) an ?-SIS generalized model and (b) a modified SIS model that prevents the

  14. Operational slack and venture survival

    OpenAIRE

    Azadegan, Arash; Patel, Pankaj; Parida, Vinit

    2013-01-01

    Slack can act as a double-edged sword. While it can buffer against environmental threats to help ensure business continuity, slack canalso be costly and reduce profitability. In this study, we focus on operational slack, the form related to the firm’s production processes. We investigate the role of operational slack on firm survival during its venture stage, when its survival is significantly challenged by environmental threats. Specifically, we explore how change in three types of environme...

  15. Mechanisms of plant survival and mortality during drought: why do some plants survive while others succumb to drought?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, Nate G.; Pockman, William T.; Allen, Craig D.; Breshears, David D.; Cobb, Neil; Kolb, Thomas; Plaut, Jennifer; Sperry, John; West, Adam; Williams, David G.; Yepez, Enrico A.

    2008-01-01

    Severe droughts have been associated with regional-scale forest mortality worldwide. Climate change is expected to exacerbate regional mortality events; however, prediction remains difficult because the physiological mechanisms underlying drought survival and mortality are poorly understood. We developed a hydraulically based theory considering carbon balance and insect resistance that allowed development and examination of hypotheses regarding survival and mortality. Multiple mechanisms may cause mortality during drought. A common mechanism for plants with isohydric regulation of water status results from avoidance of drought-induced hydraulic failure via stomatal closure, resulting in carbon starvation and a cascade of downstream effects such as reduced resistance to biotic agents. Mortality by hydraulic failure per se may occur for isohydric seedlings or trees near their maximum height. Although anisohydric plants are relatively drought-tolerant, they are predisposed to hydraulic failure because they operate with narrower hydraulic safety margins during drought. Elevated temperatures should exacerbate carbon starvation and hydraulic failure. Biotic agents may amplify and be amplified by drought-induced plant stress. Wet multidecadal climate oscillations may increase plant susceptibility to drought-induced mortality by stimulating shifts in hydraulic architecture, effectively predisposing plants to water stress. Climate warming and increased frequency of extreme events will probably cause increased regional mortality episodes. Isohydric and anisohydric water potential regulation may partition species between survival and mortality, and, as such, incorporating this hydraulic framework may be effective for modeling plant survival and mortality under future climate conditions.

  16. Biodiesel from Specified Risk Material Tallow: An Appraisal of TSE Risks and their Reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baribeau, A.; Bradley, R.; Brown, P.; Goodwin, J.; Kihm, U.; Lotero, E.; O' Connor, D.; Schuppers, M.; Taylor, D.

    2007-03-15

    This document presents a systematic survey of current knowledge about the risk to human and animal health posed by the processing of tissues from animals potentially infected with transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE, or 'prion disease') into biodiesel. It is organised into an introductory background section on TSE, followed by chapters treating the sequential stages of biodiesel production. The principal conclusions are: Animal tissue sources. The choice of geographic origin, based on published scientific evaluations of the risk of TSE to be present in a given country, can largely reduce or even eliminate the entry of contaminated tissue into the biodiesel feedstock. Further safeguards can be provided by selection of animal species not susceptible to TSE, and of tissues without any detectable infectivity even in susceptible species. None of these measures, however, would be applied to the biodiesel projects under consideration, which have the specific aim of using animals and tissues (including specified risk material, or SRM) considered to have sufficient potential risk to be unacceptable for use in food, feed, fertilisers, or pharmaceuticals (including biologicals and medical devices) and therefore are designated for other approved uses, or destruction. Tissue rendering to produce tallow. Experiments to test the survival of TSE infectivity in the products of rendering failed to detect any infectivity in the crude tallow fraction, even following processing methods that allowed survival of infectivity in the co-produced meat and bone meal fraction. It is therefore extremely unlikely that pure tallow originating from diseased animals would be infectious; however, lower grade tallow might contain infectious impurities. A requirement that tallow derived from SRM for use in biodiesel contain no detectable protein would reduce this possibility. Transesterification of tallow to biodiesel. Several steps in the manufacturing process have at least the

  17. Strategies for poverty reduction

    OpenAIRE

    Øyen, Else

    2003-01-01

    SIU konferanse Solstrand 6.-7. October 2003 Higher education has a value of its own. When linked to the issue of poverty reduction it is necessary to ask another set of questions, including the crutial one whether higher education in general is the best tool for poverty reduction.

  18. Intelligent Data Reduction (IDARE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, D. Michael; Ford, Donnie R.

    1990-01-01

    A description of the Intelligent Data Reduction (IDARE) expert system and an IDARE user's manual are given. IDARE is a data reduction system with the addition of a user profile infrastructure. The system was tested on a nickel-cadmium battery testbed. Information is given on installing, loading, maintaining the IDARE system.

  19. Dirac reduction revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Marciniak, Krzysztof; Blaszak, Maciej

    2003-01-01

    The procedure of Dirac reduction of Poisson operators on submanifolds is discussed within a particularly useful special realization of the general Marsden-Ratiu reduction procedure. The Dirac classification of constraints on 'first-class' constraints and 'second-class' constraints is reexamined.

  20. Susceptibility of adult female Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae to the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae is modified following blood feeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuels Richard I

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mosquito Aedes aegypti, vector of dengue fever, is a target for control by entomopathogenic fungi. Recent studies by our group have shown the susceptibility of adult A. aegypti to fungal infection by Metarhizium anisopliae. This fungus is currently being tested under field conditions. However, it is unknown whether blood-fed A. aegypti females are equally susceptible to infection by entomopathogenic fungi as sucrose fed females. Insect populations will be composed of females in a range of nutritional states. The fungus should be equally efficient at reducing survival of insects that rest on fungus impregnated surfaces following a blood meal as those coming into contact with fungi before host feeding. This could be an important factor when considering the behavior of A. aegypti females that can blood feed on multiple hosts over a short time period. Methods Female A. aegypti of the Rockefeller strain and a wild strain were infected with two isolates of the entomopathogenic fungus M. anisopliae (LPP 133 and ESALQ 818 using an indirect contact bioassay at different times following blood feeding. Survival rates were monitored on a daily basis and one-way analysis of variance combined with Duncan's post-hoc test or Log-rank survival curve analysis were used for statistical comparisons of susceptibility to infection. Results Blood feeding rapidly reduced susceptibility to infection, determined by the difference in survival rates and survival curves, when females were exposed to either of the two M. anisopliae isolates. Following a time lag which probably coincided with digestion of the blood meal (96-120 h post-feeding, host susceptibility to infection returned to pre-blood fed (sucrose fed levels. Conclusions Reduced susceptibility of A. aegypti to fungi following a blood meal is of concern. Furthermore, engorged females seeking out intra-domicile resting places post-blood feeding, would be predicted to rest for prolonged

  1. Excess algal symbionts increase the susceptibility of reef corals to bleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunning, Ross; Baker, Andrew C.

    2013-03-01

    Rising ocean temperatures associated with global climate change are causing mass coral bleaching and mortality worldwide. Understanding the genetic and environmental factors that mitigate coral bleaching susceptibility may aid local management efforts to help coral reefs survive climate change. Although bleaching susceptibility depends partly on the genetic identity of a coral's algal symbionts, the effect of symbiont density, and the factors controlling it, remain poorly understood. By applying a new metric of symbiont density to study the coral Pocillopora damicornis during seasonal warming and acute bleaching, we show that symbiont cell ratio density is a function of both symbiont type and environmental conditions, and that corals with high densities are more susceptible to bleaching. Higher vulnerability of corals with more symbionts establishes a quantitative mechanistic link between symbiont density and the molecular basis for coral bleaching, and indicates that high densities do not buffer corals from thermal stress, as has been previously suggested. These results indicate that environmental conditions that increase symbiont densities, such as nutrient pollution, will exacerbate climate-change-induced coral bleaching, providing a mechanistic explanation for why local management to reduce these stressors will help coral reefs survive future warming.

  2. Susceptibility of fruit from diverse apple and crabapple germplasm to attack from apple maggot (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Clayton T; Reissig, W Harvey; Forsline, Phillip L

    2008-02-01

    Apple maggot, Rhagoletis pomonella (Walsh) (Diptera: Tephritidae), is a pest of major concern to apple, Malus x domestica (Borkh.) production in eastern North America. Host plant resistance to apple maggot among apple germplasm has been previously evaluated among a small number of exotic Malus accessions and domestic hybrid selections. However, a large number of exotic accessions housed in USDA collections have never been evaluated for their susceptibility to apple pests. Additionally, previous reports of resistance need to be confirmed under both field conditions and with more rigorous laboratory evaluations. Thus, studies were conducted to evaluate the susceptibility of a number of Malus accessions housed at the USDA Plant Genetic Resources Unit "core" collection. Contrary to earlier published reports, these results suggest that some selections previously described as "resistant" are in fact susceptible to both oviposition damage and larval feeding damage by apple maggot. One domestic, disease-resistant apple accession, 'E36-7' is resistant to survival of apple maggot larvae except when the fruit is nearly ripe in late fall. This is the first report of an apple cultivar that is confirmed to be resistant to larval feeding of apple maggot. Although adults can successfully oviposit on all accessions examined, larval survival was zero in a number of small-fruited crabapple accessions classified as resistant in previous studies and also in two accessions, Malus tschonoskii (Maxim) C. K. Schneid. and M. spectabilis (Aiton) Borkh., that have not been previously evaluated.

  3. Fidelity susceptibility as holographic PV-criticality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Momeni, Davood, E-mail: davoodmomeni78@gmail.com [Eurasian International Center for Theoretical Physics and Department of General & Theoretical Physics, Eurasian National University, Astana 010008 (Kazakhstan); Faizal, Mir, E-mail: mirfaizalmir@googlemail.com [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, Alberta T1K 3M4 (Canada); Irving K. Barber School of Arts and Sciences, University of British Columbia – Okanagan, 3333 University Way, Kelowna, British Columbia V1V 1V7 (Canada); Myrzakulov, Kairat, E-mail: kairatmyrzakul@gmail.com [Eurasian International Center for Theoretical Physics and Department of General & Theoretical Physics, Eurasian National University, Astana 010008 (Kazakhstan); Myrzakulov, Ratbay, E-mail: rmyrzakulov@gmail.com [Eurasian International Center for Theoretical Physics and Department of General & Theoretical Physics, Eurasian National University, Astana 010008 (Kazakhstan)

    2017-02-10

    It is well known that entropy can be used to holographically establish a connection among geometry, thermodynamics and information theory. In this paper, we will use complexity to holographically establish a connection among geometry, thermodynamics and information theory. Thus, we will analyze the relation among holographic complexity, fidelity susceptibility, and thermodynamics in extended phase space. We will demonstrate that fidelity susceptibility (which is the informational complexity dual to a maximum volume in AdS) can be related to the thermodynamical volume (which is conjugate to the cosmological constant in the extended thermodynamic phase space). Thus, this letter establishes a relation among geometry, thermodynamics, and information theory, using complexity.

  4. Middle Prut plain's erosion susceptibility evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tudor CASTRAVEȚ

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The given article is dedicated to Middle Prut Plain’s erosion susceptibility evaluation  using factorial analysis and methodology of principal component analysis implemented byGeographical Informational System GRASS. Susceptibility evaluation is executed in a qualitative mode, and the results have preliminary character, for further quantitative andmore precise study. This type of natural hazards analysis offers information on probable localization and severity of erosion phenomena, as well as their manifestation probabilityin a given place.

  5. The Aging Kidney: Increased Susceptibility to Nephrotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinhui Wang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Three decades have passed since a series of studies indicated that the aging kidney was characterized by increased susceptibility to nephrotoxic injury. Data from these experimental models is strengthened by clinical data demonstrating that the aging population has an increased incidence and severity of acute kidney injury (AKI. Since then a number of studies have focused on age-dependent alterations in pathways that predispose the kidney to acute insult. This review will focus on the mechanisms that are altered by aging in the kidney that may increase susceptibility to injury, including hemodynamics, oxidative stress, apoptosis, autophagy, inflammation and decreased repair.

  6. Plant Survival and Mortality during Drought Can be Mediated by Co-occurring Species' Physiological and Morphological Traits: Results from a Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, X.; Mackay, D. S.

    2015-12-01

    Interactions among co-occurring species are mediated by plant physiology, morphology and environment. Without proper mechanisms to account for these factors, it remains difficult to predict plant mortality/survival under changing climate. A plant ecophysiological model, TREES, was extended to incorporate co-occurring species' belowground interaction for water. We used it to examine the interaction between two commonly co-occurring species during drought experiment, pine (Pinus edulis) and juniper (Juniperus monosperma), with contrasting physiological traits (vulnerability to cavitation and leaf water potential regulation). TREES was parameterized and validated using field-measured plant physiological traits. The root architecture (depth, profile, and root area to leaf area ratio) of juniper was adjusted to see how root morphology could affect the survival/mortality of its neighboring pine under both ambient and drought conditions. Drought suppressed plant water and carbon uptake, as well increased the average percentage loss of conductivity (PLC). Pine had 59% reduction in water uptake, 48% reduction in carbon uptake, and 38% increase in PLC, while juniper had 56% reduction in water uptake, 50% reduction in carbon and 29% increase in PLC, suggesting different vulnerability to drought as mediated by plant physiological traits. Variations in juniper root architecture further mediated drought stress on pine, from negative to positive. Different juniper root architecture caused variations in response of pine over drought (water uptake reduction ranged 0% ~63%, carbon uptake reduction ranged 0% ~ 70%, and PLC increase ranged 2% ~ 91%). Deeper or more uniformly distributed roots of juniper could effectively mitigate stress experienced by pine. In addition, the total water and carbon uptake tended to increase as the ratio of root area to leaf area increased while PLC showed non-monotonic response, suggesting the potential trade-off between maximizing resource uptake and

  7. Correlations of EZH2 and SMDY3 Gene Polymorphisms with Breast Cancer Susceptibility and Prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shao-Jun; Liu, Yan-Mei; Zhang, Yue-Lang; Chen, Ming-Wei; Cao, Wei

    2017-10-31

    To investigate the correlation of EZH2 and SMYD3 gene polymorphisms with breast cancer susceptibility and prognosis. A total of 712 patients with breast cancer and 783 healthy individuals were selected. Normal breast epithelial cells MCF-10A and breast cancer cells MCF-7, MDA-MB-231, T47D and Bcap-37 were cultured. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method was applied for genotyping. Reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting were used to EZH2 and SMYD3 expression in breast cancer tissues and cells. The risk factors and prognostic factors for breast cancer were estimated. The C allele of EZH2 rs12670401 (odds ratio (OR) = 1.255, 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 1.085~1.452), T allele of EZH2 rs6464926 (OR = 1.240, 95% CI: 1.071~1.435) and 3 allele of SMYD3 VNTR (OR = 1.305, 95% CI: 1.097~1.552) could increase susceptibility to breast cancer. Combined genotypes of EZH2 rs12670401 (TC + CC) and EZH2 rs6464926 (CT + TT) were associated with breast cancer susceptibility. Breast cancer tissues had higher EZH2 and SMYD3 expression. EZH2 rs12670401, EZH2 rs6464926, age of menarche and menopausal status were associated with breast cancer susceptibility. Patients with TT genotype of EZH2 rs12670401 or with CC genotype of EZH2 rs6464926 had higher overall survival. EZH2 rs12670401, EZH2 rs6464926 and clinical staging were independent prognostic factors for breast cancer. SMYD3 VNTR polymorphism exhibited no association with susceptibility and prognosis. EZH2 rs12670401 and rs6464926 polymorphisms, EZH2 and SMYD3 expression, clinical staging, lymph node metastasis, HER2 status and metastasis may be correlated with breast cancer susceptibility and prognosis. ©2017 The Author(s).

  8. Evaluation of the diffusivity and susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement of API 5L X80 steel welded joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Araújo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study of susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement of API 5L X80 steel welded joints by SMAW and GTAW processes. By varying the consumables used and the use of the same interpass temperature three different welded joints were obtained. Tests of hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility were performed according to ASTM G129-2006 with an aqueous solution (Solution A - TM0177/2005 NACE sodium thiosulfate (Na2S2O3 replacing the bubbling of H2S. From the elongation values was observed that the joint obtained in all welding conditions showed susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement, which was determined by the elongation ratio. The joints that showed higher levels of hardness showed higher susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement. The joints obtained with higher welding speeds for the same amount of heat input presented a reduction in the rate of hydrogen embrittlement. All joints tested in solution showed fracture surfaces with quasi cleavage zones.

  9. Survival of foodborne pathogens on inshell walnuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blessington, Tyann; Theofel, Christopher G; Mitcham, Elizabeth J; Harris, Linda J

    2013-09-16

    The survival of Salmonella enterica Enteritidis PT 30 or five-strain cocktails of S. enterica, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Listeria monocytogenes was evaluated on inshell walnuts during storage. Inshell walnuts were separately inoculated with an aqueous preparation of the pathogens at levels of 10 to 4 log CFU/nut, dried for 24 h, and then stored at either 4 °C or ambient conditions (23-25 °C, 25-35% relative humidity) for 3 weeks to more than 1 year. During the initial 24-h drying period, bacterial levels declined by 0.7 to 2.4 log CFU/nut. After the inoculum dried, further declines of approximately 0.1 log CFU/nut per month of Salmonella Enteritidis PT 30 levels were observed on inshell walnuts stored at 4 °C; at ambient conditions the rates of decline ranged from 0.55 to 2.5 log CFU/nut per month. Rates of decline were generally greater during the first few weeks of storage, particularly at lower inoculum levels. The survival of the five-strain cocktails inoculated at very low levels (under 400 CFU/nut) was determined during storage at ambient conditions. The pathogens could be recovered by either enumeration or enrichment from most samples throughout the 3-month storage period; reductions in bacterial levels from the beginning to end of storage were 0.7, 0.2, and 2.3 log CFU/nut for Salmonella, E. coli O157:H7, and L. monocytogenes, respectively. For 6% of all nut samples (14 of 234 samples), pathogens were isolated from the second but not first 24-h enrichment, suggesting that bacterial cells were viable but not easily culturable. Salmonella-inoculated walnuts were exposed for 2 min to water or a 3% solution of sodium hypochlorite (to mimic commercial brightening) either 24 h or 7 days after inoculation; treated nuts were dried for 24h and held at ambient conditions. Salmonella levels were reduced by less than 0.5 log or 2.4 to 2.6 log CFU/nut on water- or chlorine- treated walnuts, respectively, regardless of postinoculation treatment time. Additional

  10. Reduction in Susceptibility of MOS Devices to Radiation- and Electrically-Induced Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    primarily because the number of neutral atoms in the beam can only be estimated; but beam current measures ions only. Figure 14 shows four NBTI curves...Figure 13, indicated that a beam energy of 5.2 keV would put the center of the He ion distribution in the center of the oxide. Figure 13. TRIM ...15  Figure 10. NBTI “Stress” Curve With 0 Gate Voltage Applied, Reflecting the

  11. Multifactor dimensionality reduction reveals a three-locus epistatic interaction associated with susceptibility to pulmonary tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Collins, Ryan L; Hu, Ting; Wejse, Christian

    2013-01-01

    for this problem. The goal of the present study was to apply MDR to mining high-order epistatic interactions in a population-based genetic study of tuberculosis (TB). Results The study used a previously published data set consisting of 19 candidate single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 321 pulmonary TB cases...

  12. Fluconazole Susceptibility in Cryptococcus gattii Is Dependent on the ABC Transporter Pdr11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mai Lee; Uhrig, John; Vu, Kiem; Singapuri, Anil; Dennis, Michael; Gelli, Angie; Thompson, George R

    2015-12-07

    Cryptococcus gattii isolates from the Pacific Northwest have exhibited higher fluconazole MICs than isolates from other sites. The mechanism of fluconazole resistance in C. gattii is unknown. We sought to determine the role of the efflux pumps Mdr1 and Pdr11 in fluconazole susceptibility. Using biolistic transformation of the parent isolate, we created a strain lacking Mdr1 (mdr1Δ) and another strain lacking Pdr11 (pdr11Δ). Phenotypic virulence factors were assessed by standard methods (capsule size, melanin production, growth at 30 and 37 °C). Survival was assessed in an intranasal murine model of cryptococcosis. Antifungal MICs were determined by the M27-A3 methodology. No differences in key virulence phenotypic components were identified. Fluconazole susceptibility was unchanged in the Mdr1 knockout or reconstituted isolates. However, fluconazole MICs decreased from 32 μg/ml for the wild-type isolate to fluconazole susceptibility in C. gattii. Genomic and expression differences between resistant and susceptible C. gattii clinical isolates should be assessed further in order to identify other potential mechanisms of resistance. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Genetics of Asthma Susceptibility and Severity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slager, Rebecca E.; Hawkins, Gregory A.; Li, Xingnan; Postma, Dirkje S.; Meyers, Deborah A.; Bleecker, Eugene R.

    This article summarizes major findings in genome-wide studies of asthma susceptibility and severity. Two large meta-analyses identified four chromosomal regions which were consistently associated with development of asthma. Genes that are associated with asthma subphenotypes such as lung function,

  14. Climate change and corn susceptibility to mycotoxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maize is an essential part of the world’s grain supply, but climate change has the potential to increase maize susceptibility to mycotoxigenic fungal pathogens and reduce food security and safety. While rising atmospheric [CO2] is a driving force of climate change, our understanding of how elevated ...

  15. Why do Individuals Differ in Viral Susceptibility?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluijs, van L.; Pijlman, G.P.; Kammenga, J.E.

    2017-01-01

    Viral susceptibility and disease progression is determined by host genetic variation that underlies individual differences. Genetic polymorphisms that affect the phenotype upon infection have been well-studied for only a few viruses, such as HIV-1 and Hepatitis C virus. However, even for

  16. antimicrobial susceptibility and plasmids from escherichia coli

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2001-10-02

    Oct 2, 2001 ... 78 No. IO October 200]. ANTIMICROBIAL SUSCEPTIBILITY AND PLASMIDS FROM ESCHERICHIA COLI ISOLATED FROM RATS. FM. Gakuya, BVM, MSc, Field Veterinarian, Kenya Wildlife Services, M.N. Kyule, BVM, ... Request for reprints to: Dr FM. ... profile index (API) 20E strips (Bio Merieux, Marcy~l?

  17. Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of Salmonella typhi and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to determine antimicrobial susceptibility testing patterns of Candida Albicans and Salmonella typhi isolates. Fifteen isolates of each microorganism were collected from three hospitals located in Dar es Salaam region within a 3-month period in the year 2005. Candida Albicans and Salmonella typhi ...

  18. Incidence and antibiotic susceptibility pattern of Staphylococcus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Incidence and antibiotic susceptibility pattern of Staphylococcus aureus amongst patients with urinary tract infection (UTI) in UBTH Benin City, Nigeria. ... (4.4%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (2.0%) and Candida albican (1.0%). No growth was recorded in 46.6% of cultures. The occurrence of S. aureus was found to be ...

  19. Short Communication Antibiotic Susceptibility Pattern and Beta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The multiple drug resistance as evident in high MICs of the antibiotics tested could probably be due to abuse/misuse of antibiotics resulting in recurrence of furuncles in the patients. Keywords: Antibiotic susceptibility, β-lactamase, Recurrent furunculosis, Staphylococcus aureus. Received 08 August 2011/ Accepted 30 ...

  20. Prevalence and susceptibility pattern of methicillinresistant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Also, recent reports describe methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) carriage in persons in the community. The study investigated its prevalence in urine of healthy women and its susceptibility pattern to other antibiotics. Urine samples collected from healthy women volunteers in Zaria were cultured and screened for S.

  1. Landslide susceptibility analysis using Probabilistic Certainty Factor ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper reports the use of a GIS based Probabilistic Certainty Factor method to assess the geo-environmental factors that contribute to landslide susceptibility in Tevankarai Ar sub-watershed,. Kodaikkanal. Landslide occurrences are a common phenomenon in the Tevankarai Ar sub-watershed,. Kodaikkanal owing to ...

  2. Estimation of bonding nature using diamagnetic susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomiyasu, Keisuke; Sato, Toyoto; Orimo, Shin-ichi

    2015-05-21

    A chemical bond includes both covalent and ionic characteristics. We develop an experimental method to estimate the degree of each contribution based on magnetic susceptibility measurements, in which Pascal's scheme for Larmor diamagnetism is combined with electronegativity. The applicability to metal hydrides is also shown.

  3. acetyltransferases: Influence on Lung Cancer Susceptibility

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lung cancer remains a major health challenge in the world. It is the commonest cause of cancer mortality in men, it has been suggested that genetic susceptibility may contribute to the major risk factor, with increasing prevalence of smoking. Lung cancer has reached epidemic proportions in India. Recently indoor air ...

  4. Susceptibility Pattern of Nasopharyngeal Isolates of Streptococcus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aims: To determine the rate of nasopharyngeal colonization of Streptococcus pneumoniae among nursery school children in Enugu urban and to determine their antibiotic susceptibility pattern particularly the penicillin resistant strains. Methods: Specimens were collected from the nasopharynx of 385 apparently healthy ...

  5. Susceptibility of pathogenic and nonpathogenic Naegleria ssp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whiteman, L.Y.

    1988-01-01

    The susceptibility of four species of Naegleria amoebae to complement-mediated lysis was determined. The amoebicidal activity of normal human serum (NHS) and normal guinea pig serum (NGPS) for Naegleria amoebae was measured by an in vitro cytotoxicity assay. Release of radioactivity from amoebae labeled with {sup 3}H-uridine and visual observation with a compound microscope were used as indices of lysis. Susceptibility or resistance to complement-mediated lysis in vitro correlated with the in vivo pathogenic potential. Nonpathogenic Naegleria amoebae were lysed at a faster rate and at higher cell concentrations than were pathogenic amoebae. Electrophoretic analysis of NHS incubated with pathogenic or nonpathogenic Naegleria spp. demonstrated that amoebae activate the complement cascade resulting in the production of C3 and C5 complement cleavage products. Treatment with papain or trypsin for 1 h, but not with sialidase, increase the susceptibility of highly pathogenic, mouse-passaged N. fowleri to lysis. Treatment with actinomycin D, cycloheximide or various protease inhibitors for 4 h did not increase susceptibility to lysis. Neither a repair process involving de novo protein synthesis nor a complement-inactivating protease appear to account for the increase resistance of N. fowleri amoebae to complement-mediated lysis. A binding study with {sup 125}I radiolabeled C9 indicated that the terminal complement component does not remain stably bound to the membrane of pathogenic amoebae.

  6. Surveillance and insecticide susceptibility status of Culicine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vector control programs in Nigeria are mostly targeted towards reducing the burden of malaria with less emphasis placed on other debilitating vector borne diseases such as dengue, yellow fever and filariasis. This study assessed the indoor resting densities and insecticide susceptibility status of Culex and Aedes ...

  7. Epidemiological and antibiotic susceptibility profiles of infectious ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-09-28

    Sep 28, 2011 ... isolation rates among different age groups, educational status, gender, water drank, use of chlorine, toilet use, exposure at home to .... with intermediate susceptibility to ciprofloxacin in the majority of .... Antibiotic and bacterial strain specific distribution of resistance in bacteria isolated from patients attending.

  8. Bacteriological Quality and antimicrobial susceptibility of some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bacteriological Quality and antimicrobial susceptibility of some isolates of Well Water used for Drinking in Jimma Town, Southwest Ethiopia. ... resistance against most of the antibiotics tested. In general, the well water samples analyzed in this study were found in unacceptable condition in terms of bacteriological quality.

  9. Susceptibility to methamphetamine dependence associated with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Khyber Saify

    2015-09-26

    Sep 26, 2015 ... Susceptibility to methamphetamine dependence associated with high transcriptional activity alleles of VNTR polymorphism in the promoter region of monoamine oxidase A (MAOA). Khyber Saify, Mostafa Saadat*. Department of Biology, College of Sciences, Shiraz University, Shiraz 71454, Iran. Received ...

  10. Susceptibility of Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine anti-fungal susceptibility of Cryptococcus neoformans and. Cryptococcus gattii from environmental and clinical sources in Nairobi, Kenya. Design: Prospective study. Setting: Kenya Medical Research Institute, Mycology laboratory, Nairobi, Kenya. Subjects: A total of 123 isolates were tested for their ...

  11. Susceptibility of Some Bacterial Contaminants Recovered from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: Nine bacterial isolates recovered from various brands of commercially available cosmetics marketed in Jordan were tested for their susceptibility pattern against two paraben esters and two formaldehyde donors in addition to nine commonly used antibiotics. The biocidal effect for three preservatives was tested at ...

  12. Antimicrobial susceptibility of organisms causing community ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Demographic and clinical data were recorded and mid-stream urine (MSU) specimens were cultured. UTI pathogens were Gram-stained and identified to species level. Etest-based antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed for amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, cefixime, cefuroxime, ciprofloxacin, fosfomycin, levofloxacin, ...

  13. Antibiotic Susceptibility Pattern of Extended Spectrum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the antibiotic susceptibility pattern of various bacterial pathogens including extended spectrum betalactamase (ESBL) producers in Kano, Nigeria. Method: A total of 604 consecutive clinical samples obtained from Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital. (AKTH), Kano between January and July 2010 were ...

  14. Antimicrobial susceptibility of staphylococci species from cow ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of antibiotic susceptibility of Staphylococcus species isolated from foremilk samples. Setting: Milk was collected from five farms within a 70 km radius of Gaborone, Botswana. Subjects: Two hundred and twenty five staphylococci isolates from foremilk samples. Main outcome measures: ...

  15. Prevalence and antibiotic susceptibility pattern of methicillin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a multidrug resistant bacterium that threatens the continued effectiveness of antibiotics worldwide. The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of MRSA and its antibiotic susceptibility pattern in patients with burns and bedsore. This was a cross- sectional ...

  16. Assessment of antibiotic susceptibilities, genotypic characteristics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was designed to evaluate the antibiotic susceptibilities, genotypic characteristics and biofilm formation abilities of antibiotic-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus KACC 13236 (SAS), multiple antibiotic-resistant S. aureus CCARM 3080 (SAR), antibiotic-sensitive Salmonella Typhimurium KCCM 40253 (STS) and ...

  17. Isolation, identifications and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A cross-sectional study was conducted from November 2013 to April 2014 to isolate coagulase positive Staphylococcus (CPS) from subclinical mastitic (SCM) lactating cows, to establishing prevalence, to identify risk factors and to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of CPS isolates in and around Haramaya.

  18. Antimicrobial susceptibility in community-acquired bacterial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Bacterial isolates were obtained from adults suspected to have community-acquired pneumonia and who sought treatment at two city council clinics in Nairobi, Kenya. Susceptibility to antimicrobial agents was performed using a microdilution broth method, according to the criteria set ...

  19. Antibiotic Susceptibility of Potentially Probiotic Vaginal Lactobacilli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Ocaña

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study the antimicrobial susceptibility of six vaginal probiotic lactobacilli. Methods. The disc diffusion method in Müeller Hinton, LAPTg and MRS agars by the NCCLS (National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards procedure was performed. Due to the absence of a Lactobacillus reference strains, the results were compared to those of Staphylococcus aureus ATCC29213. Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC with 21 different antibiotics in LAPTg agar and broth was also determined. Results. LAPTg and MRS agars are suitable media to study antimicrobial susceptibility of lactobacilli. However, the NCCLS procedure needs to be standardized for this genus. The MICs have shown that all Lactobacillus strains grew at concentrations above 10 μg/mL of chloramphenicol, aztreonam, norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, streptomycin and kanamycin. Four lactobacilli were sensitive to 1 μg/mL vancomycin and all of them were resistant to 1000 μg/mL of metronidazole. Sensitivity to other antibiotics depended on each particular strain. Conclusions. The NCCLS method needs to be standardized in an appropriate medium to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility of Lactobacillus. Vaginal probiotic lactobacilli do not display uniform susceptibility to antibiotics. Resistance to high concentrations of metronidazole suggests that lactobacilli could be simultaneously used with a bacterial vaginosis treatment to restore the vaginal normal flora.

  20. Antibiotic Susceptibility of Potentially Probiotic Vaginal Lactobacilli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocaña, Virginia; Silva, Clara; Nader-Macías, María Elena

    2006-01-01

    Objective. To study the antimicrobial susceptibility of six vaginal probiotic lactobacilli. Methods. The disc diffusion method in Müeller Hinton, LAPTg and MRS agars by the NCCLS (National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards) procedure was performed. Due to the absence of a Lactobacillus reference strains, the results were compared to those of Staphylococcus aureus ATCC29213. Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) with 21 different antibiotics in LAPTg agar and broth was also determined. Results. LAPTg and MRS agars are suitable media to study antimicrobial susceptibility of lactobacilli. However, the NCCLS procedure needs to be standardized for this genus. The MICs have shown that all Lactobacillus strains grew at concentrations above 10 μg/mL of chloramphenicol, aztreonam, norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, streptomycin and kanamycin. Four lactobacilli were sensitive to 1 μg/mL vancomycin and all of them were resistant to 1000 μg/mL of metronidazole. Sensitivity to other antibiotics depended on each particular strain. Conclusions. The NCCLS method needs to be standardized in an appropriate medium to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility of Lactobacillus. Vaginal probiotic lactobacilli do not display uniform susceptibility to antibiotics. Resistance to high concentrations of metronidazole suggests that lactobacilli could be simultaneously used with a bacterial vaginosis treatment to restore the vaginal normal flora. PMID:17485797

  1. Sparse methods for Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgic, Berkin; Chatnuntawech, Itthi; Langkammer, Christian; Setsompop, Kawin

    2015-09-01

    Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping (QSM) aims to estimate the tissue susceptibility distribution that gives rise to subtle changes in the main magnetic field, which are captured by the image phase in a gradient echo (GRE) experiment. The underlying susceptibility distribution is related to the acquired tissue phase through an ill-posed linear system. To facilitate its inversion, spatial regularization that imposes sparsity or smoothness assumptions can be employed. This paper focuses on efficient algorithms for regularized QSM reconstruction. Fast solvers that enforce sparsity under Total Variation (TV) and Total Generalized Variation (TGV) constraints are developed using Alternating Direction Method of Multipliers (ADMM). Through variable splitting that permits closed-form iterations, the computation efficiency of these solvers are dramatically improved. An alternative approach to improve the conditioning of the ill-posed inversion is to acquire multiple GRE volumes at different head orientations relative to the main magnetic field. The phase information from such multi-orientation acquisition can be combined to yield exquisite susceptibility maps and obviate the need for regularized reconstruction, albeit at the cost of increased data acquisition time.

  2. Compensatory and Susceptive Responses of Cowpea Genotypes...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    turing genotypes of cowpea. Control of aphid's infestation in early maturing cowpea genotypes should not be delayed up to two weeks after infestation (28 days after planting) to avoid yield loss. Aphid infestation period for studies in susceptive response in medium to late matur- ing genotypes should go beyond 28 days after.

  3. Mapping markers linked to porcine salmonellosis susceptibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galina-Pantoja, L.; Siggens, K.; Schriek, M.G.; Heuven, H.C.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314417818

    2009-01-01

    Anim Genet. 2009 Jun 3. [Epub ahead of print] Mapping markers linked to porcine salmonellosis susceptibility. Galina-Pantoja L, Siggens K, van Schriek MG, Heuven HC. PIC/Genus, 100 Bluegrass Commons Blvd, Hendersonville, TN 37075, USA. The goal of this study was to identify pig chromosomal regions

  4. Caspofungin Etest susceptibility testing of Candida species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendrup, Maiken Cavling; Pfaller, Michael A; Schønheyder, Henrik Carl

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of caspofungin Etest and the recently revised CLSI breakpoints. A total of 497 blood isolates, of which 496 were wild-type isolates, were included. A total of 65/496 susceptible isolates (13.1%) were misclassified as intermediate (I) or re...

  5. Species identification and antifungal susceptibility pattern of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dalia Saad ElFeky

    2015-10-23

    Oct 23, 2015 ... Species identification and antifungal susceptibility pattern of Candida isolates in cases of vulvovaginal candidiasis. Dalia Saad ElFeky a,. *, Noha Mahmoud Gohar a. , Eman Ahmad El-Seidi a. ,. Mona Mahmoud Ezzat a. , Somaia Hassan AboElew b a Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, ...

  6. The current susceptibility pattern of methicillin resistant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from in-patients and out-patients at the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital (UPTH) was studied. Fifty, S. aureus organisms were isolated from routine clinical specimens such as high vaginal, wound, urethral and ear ...

  7. Prevalence And Antimicrobial Susceptibility Pattern Of Methicillin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an important nosocomial pathogen. We report the prevalence and antibiotic susceptibility pattern of MRSA in Amravati, Maharashtra state (India). A total of 150 healthcare-associated (HA) sources (doctors mobiles phone and wound/pus swabs), and 160 ...

  8. Distribution and antibiotic susceptibility pattern of methicillin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The rise of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection has become a serious health issue. The emergence of mutidrug – resistant MRSA strains compounds chemotherapy and has raised public health concern. In this preliminary study, the distribution and antimicrobial susceptibility profile of ...

  9. Prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of Staphylococcus aureus from cow's milk, nasal and environmental swabs in selected dairy farms in Morogoro, ... 28.4% (n=27) of all isolates were resistant to Oxacillin and/or Cefoxitin, and therefore classified as Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

  10. Antimicrobial susceptibility and minimal inhibitory concentration of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antibiotic susceptibility profile of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from different animal species with septic ocular surface disease. Sixteen strains of P. aeruginosa were isolated from different species of animals (dog, cat, horse, penguin and brown bear) with ocular surface ...

  11. Isolation, characterization and antibiotic susceptibility pattern of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The swab sticks were inoculated into brain-heart infusion broth, transported to the laboratory and then inoculated on mannitol salt agar. Isolates with the characteristic colonial morphology of S. aureus were then identified microscopically and characterized biochemically. The susceptibility of S. aureus isolates to seven ...

  12. Antibiotic Susceptibility Pattern of Extended Spectrum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antibiotics susceptibility tests including, ESBL screening and confirmation, were carried out by disc diffusion technique using Clinical Laboratory Standard Institute (CLSI) criteria. Results: Ten different types of bacteria genera were observed from nine different clinical samples. E. coli was the most frequently isolated bacteria ...

  13. Antimicrobial susceptibility profile of selected bacteraemic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antimicrobial susceptibility tests were performed by 12 participating laboratories according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) guidelines. Extended-spectrum 13-lactamase (ESBL) production was determined in selected species of Enterobacteriaceae irrespective of source. Results. The overall ...

  14. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Corynebacterium group D2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaría, M; Ponte, C; Wilhelmi, I; Soriano, F

    1985-01-01

    The in vitro susceptibility of 30 Corynebacterium group D2 strains to nine antimicrobial agents was determined. Vancomycin and norfloxacin were the most active agents tested. All strains were resistant to ampicillin and cephalothin, all except one were resistant to gentamicin, and the activity of erythromycin, novobiocin, tetracycline, and rifampin varied. PMID:4083869

  15. Helicobacter pylori : Prevalence and antibiotic susceptibility among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    E-test strips for metronidazole, amoxicillin and clarithromycin were used for susceptibility testing. Results. The prevalence of H. pylori infection in children was 73.3%, and 54.8% in adults. All the H. pylori investigated in this study were largely sensitive to clarithromycin (100%, minimum inhibiting concentration (MIC) <2 ìg/ml) ...

  16. The differential susceptibility to media effects model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valkenburg, P.M.; Peter, J.

    2013-01-01

    In this theoretical article, we introduce the Differential Susceptibility to Media Effects Model (DSMM), a new, integrative model to improve our understanding of media effects. The DSMM organizes, integrates, and extends the insights developed in earlier microlevel media-effects theories. It

  17. Enumeration, Isolation and Antibiotic Susceptibility Profile of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was carried out between February and March, 2012, to enumerate, isolate and identify bacteria associated with mobile cell phones in a University environment. This was with a view to determining the bacterial load and their susceptibility pattern to some commonly-used antibiotics. Samples were collected from ...

  18. Real-Time Optical Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Klaus R.; Jørgensen, Erik; Droce, Aida; Olesen, Tom; Jensen, Bent B.; Rosenvinge, Flemming S.; Sondergaard, Teis E.

    2013-01-01

    Rapid antibiotic susceptibility testing is in high demand in health care fields as antimicrobial-resistant bacterial strains emerge and spread. Here, we describe an optical screening system (oCelloScope) which, based on time-lapse imaging of 96 bacteria-antibiotic combinations at a time, introduces real-time detection of bacterial growth and antimicrobial susceptibility with imaging material to support the automatically generated graphs. Automated antibiotic susceptibility tests of a monoculture showed statistically significant antibiotic effects within 6 min and within 30 min in complex samples from pigs suffering from catheter-associated urinary tract infections. The oCelloScope system provides a fast high-throughput screening method for detecting bacterial susceptibility that might entail an earlier diagnosis and introduction of appropriate targeted therapy and thus combat the threat from multidrug-resistant pathogenic bacteria. The oCelloScope system can be employed for a broad range of applications within bacteriology and might present new vistas as a point-of-care instrument in clinical and veterinary settings. PMID:23596243

  19. Clinical assessment of wounds and antimicrobial susceptibility ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was conducted at two veterinary surgeries to investigate the common aerobic bacteria associated with dog bite wounds in dogs, and to determine their antimicrobial susceptibilities. From each wound, two swabs were collected for bacterial culture and cytology. A total of 50 wounds from 50 dogs were examined, with ...

  20. Isolation, identifications and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A cross-sectional study was conducted from November 2013 to April 2014 to isolate coagulase positive Staphylococcus (CPS) from subclinical mastitic (SCM) lactating cows, to establishing prevalence, to identify risk factors and to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of CPS isolates in and around Haramaya ...

  1. Relative susceptibility of banana cultivars to Xanthomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    short time making the disease one of the most dreaded in banana. The disease affects almost all varieties of commonly grown banana cultivars. Some knowledge of the relative susceptibility of banana cultivars would be extremely useful and could be a basis for management strategies for BXW. Ten banana cultivars were ...

  2. Biofilm production and antibiotic susceptibility profiles of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Staphylococcus aureus is a common pathogen associated with nosocomial as well as community acquired infections. Despite multiple reports on the severity and recurrent nature of S. aureus infection, the pathogenesis as well as antibiotic susceptibility profiles of S. aureus infecting HIV and AIDS patients has not been well ...

  3. Individual Differences in Susceptibility to Inattentional Blindness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seegmiller, Janelle K.; Watson, Jason M.; Strayer, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Inattentional blindness refers to the finding that people do not always see what appears in their gaze. Though inattentional blindness affects large percentages of people, it is unclear if there are individual differences in susceptibility. The present study addressed whether individual differences in attentional control, as reflected by…

  4. Original Paper Multicenter study on antibiotic susceptibility ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sampling was performed by fingerprinting on culture media and ... Further investigations and previous works alleged drug use and basic hygiene as crucial in .... Susceptibility testing. This was carried out on 24 h bacterial pure culture. Prior to the test, bacterial isolates were streaked on fresh agar and incubated at 37.

  5. Sequence Alignment to Predict Across Species Susceptibility ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conservation of a molecular target across species can be used as a line-of-evidence to predict the likelihood of chemical susceptibility. The web-based Sequence Alignment to Predict Across Species Susceptibility (SeqAPASS) tool was developed to simplify, streamline, and quantitatively assess protein sequence/structural similarity across taxonomic groups as a means to predict relative intrinsic susceptibility. The intent of the tool is to allow for evaluation of any potential protein target, so it is amenable to variable degrees of protein characterization, depending on available information about the chemical/protein interaction and the molecular target itself. To allow for flexibility in the analysis, a layered strategy was adopted for the tool. The first level of the SeqAPASS analysis compares primary amino acid sequences to a query sequence, calculating a metric for sequence similarity (including detection of candidate orthologs), the second level evaluates sequence similarity within selected domains (e.g., ligand-binding domain, DNA binding domain), and the third level of analysis compares individual amino acid residue positions identified as being of importance for protein conformation and/or ligand binding upon chemical perturbation. Each level of the SeqAPASS analysis provides increasing evidence to apply toward rapid, screening-level assessments of probable cross species susceptibility. Such analyses can support prioritization of chemicals for further ev

  6. antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of extended spectrum

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    JAMILU

    Microbiology Department of Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital (AKTH), Kano. The isolates were tested against third generation cephalosporins using Clinical Laboratory Standard Institute (CLSI) recommended, WHO modified Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. Isolates with reduced susceptibility to cefpodoxime, cefpotaxime ...

  7. Ethernet susceptibility to electric fast transients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leersum, B.J.A.M.; Buesink, Frederik Johannes Karel; Bergsma, J.G.; Leferink, Frank Bernardus Johannes

    2013-01-01

    The effect of Electric Fast Transients (EFT) phenomena in an Ethernet interface set-up is investigated in order to get more insight in coupling and interference mechanisms, robustness and susceptibility levels of a typical Ethernet installation on board of a naval vessel. It is shown that already a

  8. White bass Morone chrysops is less susceptible than its hybrid to experimental infection with Flavobacterium columnare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, S Adam; Farmer, Bradley D; Beck, Benjamin H

    2014-04-23

    Hybrid striped bass (HSB) and white bass (WB) were evaluated for their susceptibility to Flavobacterium columnare, the causative agent of columnaris disease, in 3 fundamental studies. In the first experiment, we determined whether columnaris disease could be developed by experimental challenge in HSB. This challenge consisted of 3 levels of F. columnare (10, 30, and 60 ml volumes) determined to be 2.25 × 10(7), 6.75 × 10(7), and 1.35 × 10(8) CFU ml(-1), respectively. Each treatment group exhibited significantly different survival rates: 0, 3.3, and 13.3% in the 60, 30, and 10 ml groups, respectively. In Expt 2, using the 30 ml dose, both HSB and WB had a 0% survival rate, with WB taking significantly longer to reach 100% mortality. In Expt 3, using the 10 ml dose, no HSB survived, whereas 33% of WB survived (p mortality observed in HSB; in contrast, WB gills showed noticeably less damage. From these series of experiments, it is clear that HSB are more sensitive to F. columnare, having lower survival and more extensive histological damage compared to WB following challenge.

  9. Understanding the susceptibility to HIV of female and male students case study of LAMS school in Benin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kissezounnon, M.S.

    2008-01-01

    This research project aims to understand the factors that influence susceptibility to HIV for female and male students in LAMS (Lycee Agricole Meidji o Sekou in Benin), in order to contribute to the reduction of the phenomenon. The results of questionnaires, group discussions and interviews show the

  10. The mediational pathway among parenting styles, attachment styles and self-regulation with addiction susceptibility of adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Zeinali

    2011-01-01

    Conclusions: The findings of present study suggest the authoritative and permissive parenting styles as the most efficient styles and authoritarian and neglectful parenting styles as the most inefficient styles in terms of addiction susceptibility. Accordingly, efficient parenting style training to parents should be the main goal of drug demand reduction program.

  11. Influences of Cry1Ac broccoli on larval survival and oviposition of diamondback moth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Dengxia; Cui, Shusong; Yang, Limei; Fang, Zhiyuan; Liu, Yumei; Zhuang, Mu; Zhang, Yangyong

    2015-01-01

    Larval survival and oviposition behavior of three genotypes of diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella L. (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae), (homozygous Cry1Ac-susceptibile, Cry1Ac-resistant, and their F1 hybrids), on transgenic Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) broccoli expressing different levels of Cry1Ac protein were evaluated in laboratory. These Bt broccoli lines were designated as relative low, medium, and high, respectively, according to the Cry1Ac content. Untransformed brocccoli plants were used as control. Larval survival of diamondback moth on non-Bt leaves was not significantly different among the three genotypes. The Cry1Ac-resistant larvae could survive on the low level of Bt broccoli plants, while Cry1Ac-susceptible and F1 larvae could not survive on them. The three genotypes of P. xylostella larvae could not survive on medium and high levels of Bt broccoli. In oviposition choice tests, there was no significant difference in the number of eggs laid by the three P. xylostella genotypes among different Bt broccoli plants. The development of Cry1Ac-susceptible and Cry1Ac-resistant P. xylostella on intact Bt plants was also tested in greenhouse. All susceptible P. xylostella larvae died on all Bt plants, while resistant larvae could survive on broccoli, which expresses low Cry1Ac protein under greenhouse conditions. The results of the greenhouse trials were similar to that of laboratory tests. This study indicated that high dose of Bt toxins in broccoli cultivars or germplasm lines is required for effective resistance management. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Entomological Society of America.

  12. Work Truck Idling Reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2017-03-01

    Hybrid utility trucks, with auxiliary power sources for on-board equipment, significantly reduce unnecessary idling resulting in fuel costs savings, less engine wear, and reduction in noise and emissions.

  13. Waste Reduction Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    To help solid waste planners and organizations track/report GHG emissions reductions from various waste management practices. To assist in calculating GHG emissions of baseline and alternative waste management practices and provide the history of WARM.

  14. Breast Reduction Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to achieve a breast size proportionate to your body. Breast reduction surgery might also help improve your self-image and self-confidence and your ability to participate in physical activities. ...

  15. Medical Errors Reduction Initiative

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mutter, Michael L

    2005-01-01

    The Valley Hospital of Ridgewood, New Jersey, is proposing to extend a limited but highly successful specimen management and medication administration medical errors reduction initiative on a hospital-wide basis...

  16. Bronchoscopic Lung Volume Reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armin Ernst

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of lung volume reduction surgery in clinical practice is limited by high postoperative morbidity and stringent selection criteria. This has been the impetus for the development of bronchoscopic approaches to lung volume reduction. A range of different techniques such as endobronchial blockers, airway bypass, endobronchial valves, thermal vapor ablation, biological sealants, and airway implants have been employed on both homogeneous as well as heterogeneous emphysema. The currently available data on efficacy of bronchoscopic lung volume reduction are not conclusive and subjective benefit in dyspnoea scores is a more frequent finding than improvements on spirometry or exercise tolerance. Safety data are more promising with rare procedure-related mortality, few serious complications, and short hospital length of stay. The field of bronchoscopic lung volume reduction continues to evolve as ongoing prospective randomized trials build on earlier feasibility data to clarify the true efficacy of such techniques.

  17. Survival Processing Eliminates Collaborative Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reysen, Matthew B; Bliss, Heather; Baker, Melissa A

    2017-04-11

    The present experiments examined the effect of processing words for their survival value, relevance to moving, and pleasantness on participants' free recall scores in both nominal groups (non-redundant pooled individual scores) and collaborative dyads. Overall, participants recalled more words in the survival processing conditions than in the moving and pleasantness processing conditions. Furthermore, nominal groups in both the pleasantness condition (Experiment 1) and the moving and pleasantness conditions (Experiment 2) recalled more words than collaborative groups, thereby replicating the oft-observed effect of collaborative inhibition. However, processing words for their survival value appeared to eliminate the deleterious effects of collaborative remembering in both Experiments 1 and 2. These results are discussed in the context of the retrieval strategy disruption hypothesis and the effects of both expertise and collaborative skill on group remembering.

  18. Susceptibility of Permafrost Soil Organic Carbon under Warming Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Z.; Wullschleger, S. D.; Liang, L.; Graham, D. E.; Gu, B.

    2015-12-01

    Degradation of soil organic carbon (SOC) that has been stored in permafrost is a key concern under warming climate because it could provide a positive feedback. Studies and conceptual models suggest that SOC degradation is largely controlled by the decomposability of SOC, but it is unclear exactly what portions of SOC are susceptible to rapid breakdown and what mechanisms may be involved in SOC degradation. Using a suite of analytical techniques, we examined the dynamic consumption and production of labile SOC compounds, including sugars, alcohols, and small molecular weight organic acids in incubation experiments (up to 240 days at either -2 or 8 °C) with a tundra soil under anoxic conditions, where SOC respiration and iron(III) reduction were monitored. We observe that sugars and alcohols are main components in SOC accounting for initial rapid release of CO2 and CH4 through anaerobic fermentation, whereas the fermentation products such as acetate and formate are subsequently utilized as primary substrates for methanogenesis. Iron(III) reduction is correlated to acetate production and methanogenesis, suggesting its important roles as an electron acceptor in tundra SOC respiration. These observations corroborate strongly with the glucose addition during incubation, in which rapid CO2 and CH4 production is observed concurrently with rapid production and consumption of organics such as acetate. Thus, the biogeochemical processes we document here are pertinent to understanding the accelerated SOC decomposition with temperature and could provide basis for model predicting feedbacks to climate warming in the Arctic.

  19. Unveiling time in dose-response models to infer host susceptibility to pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delphine Pessoa

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The biological effects of interventions to control infectious diseases typically depend on the intensity of pathogen challenge. As much as the levels of natural pathogen circulation vary over time and geographical location, the development of invariant efficacy measures is of major importance, even if only indirectly inferrable. Here a method is introduced to assess host susceptibility to pathogens, and applied to a detailed dataset generated by challenging groups of insect hosts (Drosophila melanogaster with a range of pathogen (Drosophila C Virus doses and recording survival over time. The experiment was replicated for flies carrying the Wolbachia symbiont, which is known to reduce host susceptibility to viral infections. The entire dataset is fitted by a novel quantitative framework that significantly extends classical methods for microbial risk assessment and provides accurate distributions of symbiont-induced protection. More generally, our data-driven modeling procedure provides novel insights for study design and analyses to assess interventions.

  20. Survival in Women with NSCLC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katcoff, Hannah; Wenzlaff, Angela S.; Schwartz, Ann G.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Although lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in women, few studies have investigated the hormonal influence on survival after a lung cancer diagnosis and results have been inconsistent. We evaluated the role of reproductive and hormonal factors in predicting overall survival in women with non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods Population-based lung cancer cases diagnosed between November 1, 2001 and October 31, 2005 were identified through the Metropolitan Detroit Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Registry. Interview and follow-up data were collected for 485 women. Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to determine hazard ratios (HRs) for death after an NSCLC diagnosis associated with reproductive and hormonal variables. Results Use of hormone therapy (HT) was associated with improved survival (HR, 0.69; 95% confidence interval, 0.54–0.89), adjusting for stage, surgery, radiation, education level, pack-years of smoking, age at diagnosis, race, and a multiplicative interaction between stage and radiation. No other reproductive or hormonal factor was associated with survival after an NSCLC diagnosis. Increased duration of HT use before the lung cancer diagnosis (132 months or longer) was associated with improved survival (HR, 0.54; 95% confidence interval, 0.37–0.78), and this finding remained significant in women taking either estrogen alone or progesterone plus estrogen, never smokers, and smokers. Conclusion These findings suggest that HT use, in particular use of estrogen plus progesterone, and long-term HT use are associated with improved survival of NSCLC. PMID:24496005

  1. Survival of Sami cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leena Soininen

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The incidence of cancer among the indigenous Sami people of Northern Finland is lower than among the Finnish general population. The survival of Sami cancer patients is not known, and therefore it is the object of this study. Study design. The cohort consisted of 2,091 Sami and 4,161 non-Sami who lived on 31 December 1978 in the two Sami municipalities of Inari and Utsjoki, which are located in Northern Finland and are 300–500 km away from the nearest central hospital. The survival experience of Sami and non-Sami cancer patients diagnosed in this cohort during 1979–2009 was compared with that of the Finnish patients outside the cohort. Methods. The Sami and non-Sami cancer patients were matched to other Finnish cancer patients for gender, age and year of diagnosis and for the site of cancer. An additional matching was done for the stage at diagnosis. Cancer-specific survival analyses were made using the Kaplan–Meier method and Cox regression modelling. Results. There were 204 Sami and 391 non-Sami cancer cases in the cohort, 20,181 matched controls without matching with stage, and 7,874 stage-matched controls. In the cancer-specific analysis without stage variable, the hazard ratio for Sami was 1.05 (95% confidence interval 0.85–1.30 and for non-Sami 1.02 (0.86–1.20, indicating no difference between the survival of those groups and other patients in Finland. Likewise, when the same was done by also matching the stage, there was no difference in cancer survival. Conclusion. Long distances to medical care or Sami ethnicity have no influence on the cancer patient survival in Northern Finland.

  2. Survival following spinal cord infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New, P W; McFarlane, C L

    2013-06-01

    Retrospective open cohort. To calculate the survival of patients with spinal cord infarction and to compare the cause of death in patients with different mechanisms of ischaemic injury. Spinal Rehabilitation Unit, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. Consecutive admissions between 1 January 1995 and 31 December 2008 with recent onset of spinal cord infarction. Linkage to the Registry of Births, Deaths and Marriages (Victoria) was used to determine survival following discharge from in-patient rehabilitation and cause of death. A total of 44 patients were admitted (males=26, 59%), with a median age of 72 years (interquartile range (IQR) 62-79). One patient died during their in-patient rehabilitation programme. In all, 14 patients (n=14/44; 33%) died during the follow-up period. The median survival after diagnosis was 56 months (IQR 28-85) and after discharge from in-patient rehabilitation was 46 months (IQR 25-74). The 1- and 5-year mortality rates were 7.0% (n=3/43; 95% confidence interval (CI)=2.4-18.6%) and 20.9% (n=9/43; 95% CI=11.4-35.2%). There was no statistically significant difference in survival between patients with the different aetiologies of spinal cord infarction (other vs idiopathic: χ(2)=0.6, P=0.7; other vs vascular: χ(2)=1.9, P=0.3). There was no relationship between survival and gender (χ(2)=0.2, P=0.6), age (χ(2)=3.0, P=0.08), level of injury (χ(2)=0.0, P=1) or American Spinal Cord Society Impairment Scale grade of spinal cord injury (χ(2)=0.02, P=0.9). Patients with spinal cord infarction appear to have a fair survival after discharge from in-patient rehabilitation, not withstanding the occurrence of risk factors of vascular disease in many patients.

  3. Genetic aspects of piglet survival

    OpenAIRE

    Knol, E.F.

    2001-01-01

    Piglet mortality is high. In the USA nearly 20% of the piglets do not survive between late gestation and weaning; 7% of the piglets die during farrowing and some 13% are lost during lactation. These statistics from the USA are no exception to the norm. Selection for increased piglet survival, if possible, could have an important economic impact.

    Litters and sows

    Data on some 33.000 litters and some 400.000 piglets from a commercial breeding progr...

  4. Frailty Models in Survival Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Wienke, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    The concept of frailty offers a convenient way to introduce unobserved heterogeneity and associations into models for survival data. In its simplest form, frailty is an unobserved random proportionality factor that modifies the hazard function of an individual or a group of related individuals. "Frailty Models in Survival Analysis" presents a comprehensive overview of the fundamental approaches in the area of frailty models. The book extensively explores how univariate frailty models can represent unobserved heterogeneity. It also emphasizes correlated frailty models as extensions of

  5. Pathological and immunological responses associated with differential survival of Chinook salmon following Renibacterium salmoninarum challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, David C.; Elliott, Diane G.; Wargo, Andrew; Park, Linda K.; Purcell, Maureen K.

    2010-01-01

    Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha are highly susceptible to Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease (BKD). Previously we demonstrated that introduced Chinook salmon from Lake Michigan, Wisconsin (WI), USA, have higher survival following R. salmoninarum challenge relative to the progenitor stock from Green River, Washington, USA. In the present study, we investigated the pathological and immunological responses that are associated with differential survival in the 2 Chinook salmon stocks following intra-peritoneal R. salmoninarum challenge of 2 different cohort years (2003 and 2005). Histological evaluation revealed delayed appearance of severe granulomatous lesions in the kidney and lower overall prevalence of membranous glomerulopathy in the higher surviving WI stock. The higher survival WI stock had a lower bacterial load at 28 d post-infection, as measured by reverse-transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). However, at all other time points, bacterial load levels were similar despite higher mortality in the more susceptible Green River stock, suggesting the possibility that the stocks may differ in their tolerance to infection by the bacterium. Interferon-γ, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), Mx-1, and transferrin gene expression were up-regulated in both stocks following challenge. A trend of higher iNOS gene expression at later time points (≥28 d post-infection) was observed in the lower surviving Green River stock, suggesting the possibility that higher iNOS expression may contribute to greater pathology in that stock.

  6. Diagnostic Value of Direct Antibiotic Susceptibility Test for Faster BacterialSusceptibility Reporting in Bacteremia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebriarina Hapsari

    2012-12-01

    Methods: Bloods from positive BACTEC bottles which met inclusion and exclusion criteria were put into sterile tubes and centrifuged. The pellets were then used to make 0.5 McFarland bacterial suspensions and directly used for antibiotic susceptibility testing. Interpretations of direct method were compared to standard method to count sensitivity, specificity, sensitive predictive value, resistant predictive value, accuracy, and kappa value. Results: From 58 samples (containing 22 gram negative, 36 gram positive bacteria, there were 309 total antibiotic susceptibility tests. Direct method showed sensitivity, specificity, sensitive predictive value, resistant predictive value, accuracy, and kappa value of 89.3%, 92.9%, 93.8%, 87.8%, 86.4%, and 0.82, respectively. Conclusion: Direct antibiotic susceptibility testing has a good agreement with the standard method so it can aid faster antibiotic susceptibility reporting in bacteraemia (Sains Medika, 4(2:174-181.

  7. HIV-1 Disease Progression and Survival in an Adult Population in Zimbabwe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zinyama-Gutsire, Rutendo B L; Chasela, Charles; Kallestrup, Per

    2015-01-01

    HIV infection remains a major global health burden since its discovery in 1983. Sub-Saharan Africa is the region hardest hit by the HIV/AIDS pandemic where 63% of the 33 million infected people live. While there is marked person-to-person variability in susceptibility, progression, and survival...... to HIV progression and mortality. We therefore cannot recommend at this time the use of plasma MBL levels or MBL2 genetic variants as a prognostic marker in HIV infection, disease progression, and survival in this adult population in Africa....... with HIV infection, there is a paucity of predictive diagnostics associated with these clinical endpoints. In this regard, the deficiency in plasma Mannose Binding Lectin (MBL) is a common opsonic defect reported to increase susceptibility infections, including HIV. To the best of our knowledge, we report...

  8. School Leadership: Handbook for Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Stuart C., Ed.; And Others

    Based on the assumption that the survival of the nation's schools and their leaders depends on these leaders having real influence over the quality of schooling, this volume draws from the work of many authorities to look at leadership from three perspectives: the person, the structure, and the skills. Chapters focusing on the person who holds the…

  9. Long-term haemodialysis survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heaf, James; Nielsen, Arne Høj; Hansen, Henrik Post

    2012-01-01

    Haemodialysis (HD) treatment for end-stage renal disease bears a poor prognosis. We present a case of a patient who, apart from two transplant periods lasting 8 months in all, was treated with conventional in-centre HD three times a week and who survived for 41 years. Patients should be aware tha...

  10. Characteristics of Patients Who Survived

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verlaan, Jorrit-Jan; Choi, David; Versteeg, Anne; Albert, Todd; Arts, Mark; Balabaud, Laurent; Bunger, Cody; Buchowski, Jacob Maciej; Chung, Chung Kee; Coppes, Maarten Hubert; Crockard, Hugh Alan; Depreitere, Bart; Fehlings, Michael George; Harrop, James; Kawahara, Norio; Kim, Eun Sang; Lee, Chong-Suh; Leung, Yee; Liu, Zhongjun; Martin-Benlloch, Antonio; Massicotte, Eric Maurice; Mazel, Christian; Meyer, Bernhard; Peul, Wilco; Quraishi, Nasir A.; Tokuhashi, Yasuaki; Tomita, Katsuro; Ulbricht, Christian; Wang, Michael; Oner, F. Cumhur

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Survival after metastatic cancer has improved at the cost of increased presentation with metastatic spinal disease. For patients with pathologic spinal fractures and/or spinal cord compression, surgical intervention may relieve pain and improve quality of life. Surgery is generally

  11. Genetic aspects of piglet survival

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knol, E.F.

    2001-01-01

    Piglet mortality is high. In the USA nearly 20% of the piglets do not survive between late gestation and weaning; 7% of the piglets die during farrowing and some 13% are lost during lactation. These statistics from the USA are no exception to the norm. Selection for increased piglet

  12. Cool echidnas survive the fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowack, Julia; Cooper, Christine Elizabeth; Geiser, Fritz

    2016-01-01

    Fires have occurred throughout history, including those associated with the meteoroid impact at the Cretaceous–Palaeogene (K–Pg) boundary that eliminated many vertebrate species. To evaluate the recent hypothesis that the survival of the K–Pg fires by ancestral mammals was dependent on their ability to use energy-conserving torpor, we studied body temperature fluctuations and activity of an egg-laying mammal, the echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus), often considered to be a ‘living fossil’, before, during and after a prescribed burn. All but one study animal survived the fire in the prescribed burn area and echidnas remained inactive during the day(s) following the fire and substantially reduced body temperature during bouts of torpor. For weeks after the fire, all individuals remained in their original territories and compensated for changes in their habitat with a decrease in mean body temperature and activity. Our data suggest that heterothermy enables mammals to outlast the conditions during and after a fire by reducing energy expenditure, permitting periods of extended inactivity. Therefore, torpor facilitates survival in a fire-scorched landscape and consequently may have been of functional significance for mammalian survival at the K–Pg boundary. PMID:27075255

  13. Modelling survival and connectivity of

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Molen, J.; van Beek, J.; Augustine, S.; Vansteenbrugge, L.; van Walraven, L.; van Langenberg, V.; van der Veer, H.W.; Hostens, K.; Pitois, S.; Robbens, J.

    2015-01-01

    Three different models were applied to study the reproduction, survival and dispersal of Mnemiopsis leidyi in the Scheldt estuaries and the southern North Sea: a high-resolution particle tracking model with passive particles, a low-resolution particle tracking model with a reproduction model

  14. Survivability of SCADA Control Loop

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Camacho, José; de Boer, Pieter-Tjerk; Remke, Anne Katharina Ingrid

    2009-01-01

    The endorsement of information technologies for critical infrastructures control introduces new threats in their security and surveillance. Along with certain level of protection against attacks, it is desirable for critical processes to survive even if they succeed. A stochastic Petri Nets-based

  15. Life and reliability modeling of bevel gear reductions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, M.; Brikmanis, C. K.; Lewicki, D. G.; Coy, J. J.

    1985-01-01

    A reliability model is presented for bevel gear reductions with either a single input pinion or dual input pinions of equal size. The dual pinions may or may not have the same power applied for the analysis. The gears may be straddle mounted or supported in a bearing quill. The reliability model is based on the Weibull distribution. The reduction's basic dynamic capacity is defined as the output torque which may be applied for one million output rotations of the bevel gear with a 90 percent probability of reduction survival.

  16. Freezing tolerance versus freezing susceptibility in the land snail Helix aspersa (Gastropoda: Helicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansart, A; Vernon, P; Daguzan, J

    2001-01-01

    Freezing hardiness in ectotherms has often been separated into two categories, freezing tolerance and freezing susceptibility. But more complex classifications have also been proposed. Helix aspersa hibernates in Brittany during winter. It has a high temperature of crystallisation (between -1.2( and -7.4 degrees C) and survives only few hours at freezing temperatures. Helix aspersa is a large snail, which needs a long time to freeze and can bear some ice formation in its tissues up to 60% of its total body water. It may be provisionally considered as a partially freezing tolerant species.

  17. Avascular necrosis of bone in childhood cancer patients: a possible role of genetic susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geczova, L; Soltysova, A; Gecz, J; Sufliarska, S; Horakova, J; Mladosievicova, B

    2015-01-01

    With the increasing number of paediatric cancer patients and with their prolonged survival, the evidence of a number of serious complications induced by anticancer therapy is rising. Osteonecrosis (ON) of bone is one of these treatment-related effects with a multifactorial pathogenesis. In the past few years, several polymorphisms of candidate genes with possible role in development of this disorder were studied.We summarized potential risk factors leading to increased susceptibility to osteonecrosis of bone development in cancer patients during childhood and to present current knowledge in the field of genetic aspects of this condition (Ref. 86).

  18. On the Survival of Overwintering Bovine Gastrointestinal Nematode Larvae During the Subsequent Grazing Season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, H. J.; Archibald, R. McG.

    1969-01-01

    Large numbers of overwintering Nematodirus helvetianus were shown to survive on Maritime marshland pastures throughout the ensuing grazing season, while the numbers of Ostertagia ostertagi and Cooperia oncophora declined rapidly after the first few weeks. It was concluded that pastures carrying heavy overwintering residual infections, particularly of N. helvetianus, may be unsafe for susceptible cattle at any time during the following grazing season. ImagesFig. 1. PMID:4237295

  19. Murine models susceptibility to distinct Trypanosoma cruzi I genotypes infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, Cielo M; Montilla, Marleny; Vanegas, Ricardo; Castillo, Maria; Parra, Edgar; Ramírez, Juan David

    2017-04-01

    Chagas disease is a complex zoonosis that affects around 8 million people worldwide. This pathology is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, a kinetoplastid parasite that shows tremendous genetic diversity evinced in six distinct Discrete Typing Units (TcI-TcVI) including a recent genotype named as TcBat and associated with anthropogenic bats. TcI presents a broad geographical distribution and has been associated with chronic cardiomyopathy. Recent phylogenetic studies suggest the existence of two genotypes (Domestic (TcIDom) and sylvatic TcI) within TcI. The understanding of the course of the infection in different mouse models by these two genotypes is not yet known. Therefore, we infected 126 animals (ICR-CD1, National Institute of Health (NIH) and Balb/c) with two TcIDom strains and one sylvatic strain for a follow-up period of 60 days. We quantified the parasitaemia, immune response and histopathology observing that the maximum day of parasitaemia was achieved at day 21 post-infection. Domestic strains showed higher parasitaemia than the sylvatic strain in the three mouse models; however in the survival curves Balb/c mice were less susceptible to infection compared with NIH and ICR-CD1. Our results suggest that the genetic background plays a fundamental role in the natural history of the infection and the sympatric TcI genotypes have relevant implications in disease pathogenesis.

  20. Host glycosaminoglycan confers susceptibility to bacterial infection in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Miriam J; Wong, Sandra L; Nybakken, Kent; Carey, Vincent J; Madoff, Lawrence C

    2009-02-01

    Many pathogens engage host cell surface glycosaminoglycans, but redundancy in pathogen adhesins and host glycosaminoglycan-anchoring proteins (heparan sulfate proteoglycans) has limited the understanding of the importance of glycosaminoglycan binding during infection. The alpha C protein of group B streptococcus, a virulence determinant for this neonatal human pathogen, binds to host glycosaminoglycan and mediates the entry of bacteria into human cells. We studied alpha C protein-glycosaminoglycan binding in Drosophila melanogaster, whose glycosaminoglycan repertoire resembles that of humans but whose genome includes only three characterized membrane heparan sulfate proteoglycan genes. The knockdown of glycosaminoglycan polymerases or of heparan sulfate proteoglycans reduced the cellular binding of alpha C protein. The interruption of alpha C protein-glycosaminoglycan binding was associated with longer host survival and a lower bacterial burden. These data indicate that the glycosaminoglycan-alpha C protein interaction involves multiple heparan sulfate proteoglycans and impairs bacterial killing. Host glycosaminoglycans, anchored by multiple proteoglycans, thereby determine susceptibility to infection. Because there is homology between Drosophila and human glycosaminoglycan/proteoglycan structures and many pathogens express glycosaminoglycan-binding structures, our data suggest that interfering with glycosaminoglycan binding may protect against infections in humans.

  1. Alteration in the gut microbiota provokes susceptibility to tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nargis Khan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe microbiota that resides in the gastrointestinal tract provides essential health benefits to the host. In particular, they regulate immune homeostasis. Recently, several evidences indicate that alteration in the gut microbial community can cause infectious and non-infectious diseases. Tuberculosis (TB is the most devastating disease, inflicting mortality and morbidity. It remains unexplored, whether changes in the gut microbiota can provoke or prevent TB. In the current study, we have demonstrated the antibiotics driven changes in the gut microbial composition and their impact on the survival of Mtb in the lungs, liver and spleen of infected mice, compared to those with intact microbiota. Interestingly, dysbiosis of microbes showed significant increase in the bacterial burden in lungs and dissemination of Mtb to spleen and liver. Further, elevation in the number of Tregs and decline in the pool of IFN-γ and TNF-α releasing CD4 T cells was noticed. Interestingly, fecal transplantation in the gut microbiota disrupted animals exhibited improved Th1 immunity and lesser Tregs population. Importantly, these animals displayed reduced severity to Mtb infection. This study for the first time demonstrated the novel role of gut microbes in the susceptibility to TB and its prevention by microbial implants. In future, microbial therapies may help in treating patients suffering from TB.

  2. Impact of revised cefepime CLSI breakpoints on Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae susceptibility and potential impact if applied to Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Yukihiro; Sutherland, Christina A; Nicolau, David P

    2015-05-01

    The CLSI reduced the cefepime Enterobacteriaceae susceptibility breakpoint and introduced the susceptible-dose-dependent (S-DD) category. In this study, MICs were determined for a Gram-negative collection to assess the impact of this change. For Enterobacteriaceae, this resulted in <2% reduction in susceptibility, with 1% being S-DD. If applied to Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the % susceptibility (%S) dropped from 77% to 43%, with 34% being S-DD. The new breakpoints did little to the Enterobacteriaceae %S, but for P. aeruginosa, a profound reduction was seen in %S. The recognition of a S-DD response to cefepime should alert clinicians to the possible need for higher doses. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Effect of salinity on Rhizobium growth and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleton, P W; El Swaify, S A; Bohlool, B B

    1982-10-01

    This study examines the effect of salinity on the growth and survival of Rhizobium spp. in culture media and soil. Eleven isolates from saline and nonsaline environments were compared. The growth (mean doubling time) of all strains and species tested decreased when the electrical conductivity of the culture medium (yeast extract-mannitol) was raised from 1.2 mS cm to 6.7 mS cm (15% seawater equivalent) or to 13.1 mS cm (28% seawater equivalent). Three of eleven strains failed to grow at 13.1 mS cm. Although growth was affected by salinity, four strains selected from the growth rate study could survive in extremely high concentrations of salt. Two strains with growth rates sensitive to salt and two strains with growth rates relatively unaffected by salt were inoculated into solutions with electrical conductivities of up to 43.0 mS cm (92% seawater equivalent). Not only did all four strains survive the initial osmotic shock (at 5 h after inoculation), but it was not until 27 days after inoculation that the sensitive strains exhibited a significant reduction in viable numbers. The salt-tolerant strains survived for more than 65 days with no reduction in viable counts. The interaction between soil moisture tension and soil salinity in relation to Rhizobium survival in gamma-irradiated soil was also examined. Six treatment combinations were used, ranging from -0.1 bars and 0.2 mS cm to -15 bars and 12 mS cm. Sensitive strains declined from 10 to 10 organisms per g of soil after 84 days of incubation at -15 bars and 12 mS cm. Tolerant strains survived for the same period with no loss in viable numbers. The results of these experiments indicate that many strains of Rhizobium can grow and survive at salt concentrations which are inhibitory to most agricultural legumes. The emphasis of research concerning the effects of salinity on symbiotic nitrogen fixation should, therefore, be directed to aspects of the symbiosis other than the survival of the Rhizobium spp.

  4. Rapid Ganciclovir Susceptibility Assay Using Flow Cytometry for Human Cytomegalovirus Clinical Isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSharry, James J.; Lurain, Nell S.; Drusano, George L.; Landay, Alan L.; Notka, Mostafa; O’Gorman, Maurice R. G.; Weinberg, Adriana; Shapiro, Howard M.; Reichelderfer, Patricia S.; Crumpacker, Clyde S.

    1998-01-01

    Rapid, quantitative, and objective determination of the susceptibilities of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) clinical isolates to ganciclovir has been assessed by an assay that uses a fluorochrome-labeled monoclonal antibody to an HCMV immediate-early antigen and flow cytometry. Analysis of the ganciclovir susceptibilities of 25 phenotypically characterized clinical isolates by flow cytometry demonstrated that the 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) of ganciclovir for 19 of the isolates were between 1.14 and 6.66 μM, with a mean of 4.32 μM (±1.93) (sensitive; IC50 less than 7 μM), the IC50s for 2 isolates were 8.48 and 9.79 μM (partially resistant), and the IC50s for 4 isolates were greater than 96 μM (resistant). Comparative analysis of the drug susceptibilities of these clinical isolates by the plaque reduction assay gave IC50s of less than 6 μM, with a mean of 2.88 μM (±1.40) for the 19 drug-sensitive isolates, IC50s of 6 to 8 μM for the partially resistant isolates, and IC50s of greater than 12 μM for the four resistant clinical isolates. Comparison of the IC50s for the drug-susceptible and partially resistant clinical isolates obtained by the flow cytometry assay with the IC50s obtained by the plaque reduction assay showed an acceptable correlation (r2 = 0.473; P = 0.001), suggesting that the flow cytometry assay could substitute for the more labor-intensive, subjective, and time-consuming plaque reduction assay. PMID:9736557

  5. Novel susceptibility loci for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, Christiane

    2015-12-01

    Late-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD), a highly prevalent neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive deterioration in cognition, function and behavior terminating in incapacity and death, is a clinically and pathologically heterogeneous disease with a substantial heritable component. During the past 5 years, the technological developments in next-generation high-throughput genome technologies have led to the identification of more than 20 novel susceptibility loci for AD, and have implicated specific pathways in the disease, in particular intracellular trafficking/endocytosis, inflammation and immune response and lipid metabolism. These observations have significantly advanced our understanding of underlying pathogenic mechanisms and potential therapeutic targets. This review article summarizes these recent advances in AD genomics and discusses the value of identified susceptibility loci for diagnosis and prognosis of AD.

  6. Entanglement susceptibility: area laws and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanardi, Paolo; Campos Venuti, Lorenzo

    2013-04-01

    Generic quantum states in the Hilbert space of a many-body system are nearly maximally entangled whereas low-energy physical states are not; the so-called area laws for quantum entanglement are widespread. In this paper we introduce the novel concept of entanglement susceptibility by expanding the 2-Rényi entropy in the boundary couplings. We show how this concept leads to the emergence of area laws for bi-partite quantum entanglement in systems ruled by local gapped Hamiltonians. Entanglement susceptibility also captures quantitatively which violations one should expect when the system becomes gapless. We also discuss an exact series expansion of the 2-Rényi entanglement entropy in terms of connected correlation functions of a boundary term. This is obtained by identifying Rényi entropy with ground state fidelity in a doubled and twisted theory.

  7. Individual differences in susceptibility to inattentional blindness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seegmiller, Janelle K; Watson, Jason M; Strayer, David L

    2011-05-01

    Inattentional blindness refers to the finding that people do not always see what appears in their gaze. Though inattentional blindness affects large percentages of people, it is unclear if there are individual differences in susceptibility. The present study addressed whether individual differences in attentional control, as reflected by variability in working memory capacity, modulate susceptibility to inattentional blindness. Participants watched a classic inattentional blindness video (Simons & Chabris, 1999) and were instructed to count passes among basketball players, wherein 58% noticed the unexpected: a person wearing a gorilla suit. When participants were accurate with their pass counts, individuals with higher working memory capacity were more likely to report seeing the gorilla (67%) than those with lesser working memory capacity (36%). These results suggest that variability in attentional control is a potential mechanism underlying the apparent modulation of inattentional blindness across individuals.

  8. [Rapid antibiotic susceptibility test in Clinical Microbiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    March Rosselló, Gabriel Alberto; Bratos Pérez, Miguel Ángel

    2016-01-01

    The most widely used antibiotic susceptibility testing methods in Clinical Microbiology are based on the phenotypic detection of antibiotic resistance by measuring bacterial growth in the presence of the antibiotic being tested. These conventional methods take typically 24hours to obtain results. A review is presented here of recently developed techniques for the rapid determination of antibiotic susceptibility. Data obtained with different methods such as molecular techniques, flow cytometry, chemiluminescence, mass spectrometry, commercial methods used in routine work, colorimetric methods, nephelometry, microarrays, microfluids, and methods based on cell disruption and sequencing, are analyzed and discussed in detail. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  9. Trained Immunity and Susceptibility to HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derrick, Steven C

    2017-01-01

    In this issue of Clinical and Vaccine Immunology, K. Jensen et al. (Clin Vaccine Immunol 24:e00360-16, 2017, https://doi.org/10.1128/CVI.00360-16) describe a dual-purpose attenuated Mycobacterium tuberculosis-simian immunodeficiency virus vaccine (AMTB-SIV). Interestingly, immunized infant macaques required fewer oral exposures to SIV to become infected relative to nonimmunized animals. The authors hypothesized that augmented susceptibility to SIV was due to activation of CD4+ T cells through trained immunity. This commentary explores the possible relationship between trained immunity, enhanced CD4 T cell responses, and increased susceptibility to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  10. Magnetization and magnetic susceptibility of kunzite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartkowska, J.A. E-mail: jobart@polsl.katowice.pl; Cisowski, J.; Voiron, J.; Heimann, J.; Czaja, M.; Mazurak, Z

    2000-11-01

    We have studied the high-field magnetization up to 14.5 T and magnetic susceptibility in the temperature range 1.6-400 K of three different samples of natural kunzite crystals, being a variety of spodumene (LiAlSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}) and containing transition metal ions. It appears that the total magnetization and susceptibility consist of the paramagnetic contribution following from the temperature-dependent Brillouin-type behavior of magnetic ions and temperature-independent diamagnetic contribution of the spodumene matrix which we have found as being equal to -3.5x10{sup -7} emu/g. We have identified the Mn{sup 2+} ions as the dominant ones in the kunzites studied and we have determined the molar concentration of these ions as lying in the range 0.2-0.4%.

  11. Nationwide investigation of the pyrethroid susceptibility of mosquito larvae collected from used tires in Vietnam.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitoshi Kawada

    Full Text Available Pyrethroid resistance is envisioned to be a major problem for the vector control program since, at present, there are no suitable chemical substitutes for pyrethroids. Cross-resistance to knockdown agents, which are mainly used in mosquito coils and related products as spatial repellents, is the most serious concern. Since cross-resistance is a global phenomenon, we have started to monitor the distribution of mosquito resistance to pyrethroids. The first pilot study was carried out in Vietnam. We periodically drove along the national road from the north end to the Mekong Delta in Vietnam and collected mosquito larvae from used tires. Simplified susceptibility tests were performed using the fourth instar larvae of Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus, and Culex quinquefasciatus. Compared with the other species, Ae. aegypti demonstrated the most prominent reduction in susceptibility. For Ae. aegypti, significant increases in the susceptibility indices with a decrease in the latitude of collection points were observed, indicating that the susceptibility of Ae. aegypti against d-allethrin was lower in the southern part, including mountainous areas, as compared to that in the northern part of Vietnam. There was a significant correlation between the susceptibility indices in Ae. aegypti and the sum of annual pyrethroid use for malaria control (1998-2002. This might explain that the use of pyrethroids as residual treatment inside houses and pyrethroid-impregnated bed nets for malaria control is attributable to low pyrethroid susceptibility in Ae. aegypti. Such insecticide treatment appeared to have been intensively administered in the interior and along the periphery of human habitation areas where, incidentally, the breeding and resting sites of Ae. aegypti are located. This might account for the strong selection pressure toward Ae. aegypti and not Ae. albopictus.

  12. Resistance rather than tolerance explains survival of savannah honeybees (Apis mellifera scutellata) to infestation by the parasitic mite Varroa destructor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Ursula; Dietemann, Vincent; Human, Hannelie; Crewe, Robin M; Pirk, Christian W W

    2016-03-01

    Varroa destructor is considered the most damaging parasite affecting honeybees (Apis mellifera L.). However, some honeybee populations such as the savannah honeybee (Apis mellifera scutellata) can survive mite infestation without treatment. It is unclear if survival is due to resistance mechanisms decreasing parasite reproduction or to tolerance mechanisms decreasing the detrimental effects of mites on the host. This study investigates both aspects by quantifying the reproductive output of V. destructor and its physiological costs at the individual host level. Costs measured were not consistently lower when compared with susceptible honeybee populations, indicating a lack of tolerance. In contrast, reproduction of V. destructor mites was distinctly lower than in susceptible populations. There was higher proportion of infertile individuals and the reproductive success of fertile mites was lower than measured to date, even in surviving populations. Our results suggest that survival of savannah honeybees is based on resistance rather than tolerance to this parasite. We identified traits that may be useful for breeding programmes aimed at increasing the survival of susceptible populations. African honeybees may have benefited from a lack of human interference, allowing natural selection to shape a population of honeybees that is more resistant to Varroa mite infestation.

  13. Harm Reduction Behind Bars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma R. Miller

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to identify how strategies to reduce the risk of hepatitis C virus (HCV in prisons could be implemented in a way that is acceptable to those with the responsibility for implementing them. Prison officer and nurse perceptions of HCV and attitudes toward a range of harm reduction interventions, including clean needle and bleach provision, were explored. In the context of highly prevalent feelings of resentment, most of the proposed strategies were perceived by all staff as a threat for officers and a privilege for prisoners. Addressing the underlying concerns of prison staff is essential in achieving a fully collaborative harm reduction effort. Ongoing resistance to proposed harm reduction strategies underscores the relevance of these findings for prison settings in Australia and elsewhere.

  14. In vitro susceptibility testing of Dientamoeba fragilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, N; Marriott, D; Harkness, J; Ellis, J T; Stark, D

    2012-01-01

    Dientamoeba fragilis is a commonly encountered trichomonad which has been implicated as a cause of gastrointestinal disease in humans. Despite the frequency of reports recording infections with this parasite, little research has been undertaken in terms of antimicrobial susceptibility. The aim of this study was to evaluate the susceptibility of D. fragilis to several commonly used antiparasitic agents: diloxanide furoate, furazolidone, iodoquinol, metronidazole, nitazoxanide, ornidazole, paromomycin, secnidazole, ronidazole, tetracycline, and tinidazole. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed on four clinical strains of D. fragilis, designated A, E, M, and V, respectively. Molecular testing followed, and all strains were determined to be genotype 1. The activities of antiprotozoal compounds at concentrations ranging from 2 μg/ml to 500 μg/ml were determined via cell counts of D. fragilis trophozoites grown in dixenic culture. Minimum lethal concentrations (MLCs) were as follows: ornidazole, 8 to 16 μg/ml; ronidazole, 8 to 16 μg/ml; tinidazole, 31 μg/ml; metronidazole, 31 μg/ml; secnidazole, 31 to 63 μg/ml; nitazoxanide, 63 μg/ml; tetracycline, 250 μg/ml; furazolidone, 250 to 500 μg/ml; iodoquinol, 500 μg/ml; paromomycin, 500 μg/ml; and diloxanide furoate, >500 μg/ml. This is the first study to report the profiles of susceptibility to a wide range of commonly used treatments for clinical isolates of D. fragilis. Our study indicated 5-nitroimidazole derivatives to be the most active compounds in vitro against D. fragilis.

  15. THE SUSCEPTIBILITY OF MICE TO BACTERIAL ENDOTOXINS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaedler, Russell W.; Dubos, Rene J.

    1961-01-01

    Albino mice (Rockefeller NCS strain) raised and maintained free of ordinary bacterial pathogens, as well as of intestinal Escherichia coli and of Proteus bacilli, were found to be highly resistant to the lethal effect of bacterial endotoxins. When newborn mice of this NCS colony were nursed by foster mothers from another colony raised under ordinary conditions (SS colony from which the NCS colony was derived), they acquired the intestinal flora of the latter animals and became susceptible to the lethal effects of endotoxins. NCS adult mice could be rendered susceptible to the lethal effect of endotoxins by vaccination with heat killed Gram-negative bacilli. The susceptibility thus induced exhibited a certain degree of specificity for the bacterial strain used in vaccination. Although untreated NCS mice were resistant to the lethal effect of endotoxins, they proved exquisitively susceptible to the infection-enhancing effect of these materials. For example, 1 µg. or less of endotoxin was found sufficient to help establish a rapidly fatal septicemia with Staphylococcus aureus. Small amounts of endotoxin (1 µg. or less), administered alone, caused a marked but transient loss of weight. Vaccination with heat-killed Gram-negative bacilli or with killed BCG increased the resistance of NCS mice to the infection-enhancing effect of small amounts of endotoxin. This protective effect exhibited a certain degree of specificity for the bacterial strain from which the toxin used in the infection-enhancing test was derived. These various findings can be explained by assuming that the pathological effects of endotoxins involve at least two unrelated mechanisms; (a) a primary toxicity illustrated in this study by the loss of weight and enhancement of infection resulting from the injection of small doses of toxin; (b) an immunological reaction with lethal consequences which became manifest only in animals sensitized to the endotoxin by prior exposure to Gram-negative bacilli. PMID

  16. Polymyxins: Antimicrobial susceptibility concerns and therapeutic options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Balaji

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing prevalence of multidrug-resistant nosocomial pathogens such as Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae poses a great challenge to the treating physicians. The paucity of newer effective antimicrobials has led to renewed interest in the polymyxin group of drugs, as a last resort for treatment of gram-negative bacterial infections. There is a dearth of information on the pharmacological properties of colistin, leading to difficulties in selecting the right dose, dosing interval, and route of administration for treatment, especially in critically-ill patients. The increasing use of colistin over the last few years necessitates the need for accurate and reliable in vitro susceptibility testing methods. Development of heteroresistant strains as a result of colistin monotherapy is also a growing concern. There is a compelling need from the clinicians to provide options for probable and possible colistin combination therapy for multidrug-resistant bacterial infections in the ICU setting. Newer combination drug synergy determination tests are being developed and reported. There are no standardized recommendations from antimicrobial susceptibility testing reference agencies for the testing and interpretation of these drug combinations. Comparison and analysis of these reported methodologies may help to understand and assist the microbiologist to choose the best method that produces accurate results at the earliest. This will help clinicians to select the appropriate combination therapy. In this era of multidrug resistance it is important for the microbiology laboratory to be prepared, by default, to provide timely synergistic susceptibility results in addition to routine susceptibility, if warranted. Not as a favour or at request, but as a responsibility.

  17. Nasopharyngeal carriage and susceptibility patterns of Streptococcu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Résistance à la Pénicilline streptocoque pneumonie soulève la question croissante dans le domaine de la pédiatrie, aux pays sous développés en particulier. A l'extérieur de l'Afrique du Sud, on a connue peu de choses en ce qui concerné S. pneumonie et ses susceptibilities on Afrique sous Sahara. L'objet de cette étude ...

  18. Identification of Potential Biomarkers for Antimony Susceptibility ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Identification of Potential Biomarkers for Antimony Susceptibility/Resistance in L. donovani Rentala Madhubala School of Life Sciences Jawaharlal Nehru University New Delhi, India · Slide 2 · Slide 3 · Slide 4 · Slide 5 · Slide 6 · Slide 7 · Slide 8 · Slide 9 · Slide 10 · Slide 11 · Slide 12 · Slide 13 · Slide 14 · Slide 15 · Slide 16.

  19. Treatment and survival of patients harboring histological variants of glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Alicia; Nuño, Miriam; Walia, Sartaaj; Mukherjee, Debraj; Black, Keith L; Patil, Chirag G

    2014-10-01

    It is unclear whether the survival difference observed between glioblastoma (GBM), giant cell glioblastoma (gcGBM), and gliosarcoma (GSM) patients is due to differences in tumor histology, patient demographics, and/or treatment regimens. The USA National Cancer Database was utilized to evaluate patients diagnosed with GBM, gcGBM, and GSM between 1998 and 2011. Kaplan-Meier survival estimates and Cox proportional hazards models were utilized to estimate overall survival. A cohort of 69,935 patients was analyzed; 67,509 (96.5%) of these patients had GBM, 592 (0.9%) gcGBM, and 1834 (2.6%) GSM. The median age for GBM and GSM patients was 61 versus 56 years for gcGBM (p<0.0001). Higher extent of resection (p<0.0001) and radiation (p=0.001) were observed in gcGBM patients compared to other histologies. Multivariate analysis showed that gcGBM patients had a 20% reduction in the hazards of mortality (hazard ratio [HR] 0.80, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.69-0.93) compared to GBM, while GSM patients trended towards higher hazards of mortality (HR 1.04, 95% CI 0.96-1.12) than the GBM cohort. Previous studies have suggested a disparity in the survival of patients with GBM tumors and their histological variants. Using a large cohort of patients treated at hospitals nationwide, this study found a 20% reduction in the hazards of mortality in gcGBM patients compared to GBM. Similarly, gcGBM patients had a 24% reduction in the hazards of mortality compared to the GSM cohort. GSM patients had a 3% increase in the hazards of mortality compared to GBM. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Bordetella avium and Bordetella bronchiseptica isolates.

    OpenAIRE

    Mortensen, J E; Brumbach, A; Shryock, T R

    1989-01-01

    Two veterinary pathogens, Bordetella bronchiseptica and Bordetella avium, were tested for their antimicrobial susceptibilities. Of the 20 antimicrobial agents tested, both species were consistently resistant to penicillin and cefuroxime but susceptible to mezlocillin, piperacillin, gentamicin, amikacin, and cefoperazone.

  1. Adolescent Susceptibility to Peer Influence in Sexual Situations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Widman, Laura; Choukas-Bradley, Sophia; Helms, Sarah W; Prinstein, Mitchell J

    2016-01-01

    ...; however, not all youth are equally susceptible to these peer influence effects. Understanding individual differences in susceptibility to peer influence is critical to identifying adolescents at risk for negative health outcomes...

  2. Drug susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to fluoroquinolones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, I S; Larsen, A R; Sandven, P

    2003-01-01

    In the first attempt to establish a quality assurance programme for susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to fluoroquinolones, 20 strains with different fluoroquinolone susceptibility patterns were distributed by the Supranational Reference Laboratory in Stockholm to the other...

  3. Characterization and quantification of path dependency in landslide susceptibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samia, Jalal; Temme, Arnaud; Bregt, Arnold; Wallinga, Jakob; Guzzetti, Fausto; Ardizzone, Francesca; Rossi, Mauro

    2017-01-01

    Landslides cause major environmental damage, economic losses and casualties. Although susceptibility to landsliding is usually considered an exclusively location-specific phenomenon, indications exist that landslide history co-determines susceptibility to future landslides. In this contribution,

  4. Polaritons and retarded interactions in nonlinear optical susceptibilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoester, Jasper; Mukamel, Shaul

    1989-01-01

    The role of retarded intermolecular interactions (polariton effects) in the nonlinear optical susceptibilities of condensed phases is studied. A systematic method for calculating these susceptibilities is developed, based on the derivation of reduced equations of motion which couple the electronic

  5. Diamagnetic bulk susceptibility data of C4H8S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, M.; Gupta, R.

    This document is part of Subvolume B `Diamagnetic Susceptibility of Organic Compounds, Oils, Paraffins and Polyethylenes' of Volume 27 `Diamagnetic Susceptibility and Anisotropy' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group II Molecules and Radicals.

  6. Genetic architecture of intrinsic antibiotic susceptibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hany S Girgis

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic exposure rapidly selects for more resistant bacterial strains, and both a drug's chemical structure and a bacterium's cellular network affect the types of mutations acquired.To better characterize the genetic determinants of antibiotic susceptibility, we exposed a transposon-mutagenized library of Escherichia coli to each of 17 antibiotics that encompass a wide range of drug classes and mechanisms of action. Propagating the library for multiple generations with drug concentrations that moderately inhibited the growth of the isogenic parental strain caused the abundance of strains with even minor fitness advantages or disadvantages to change measurably and reproducibly. Using a microarray-based genetic footprinting strategy, we then determined the quantitative contribution of each gene to E. coli's intrinsic antibiotic susceptibility. We found both loci whose removal increased general antibiotic tolerance as well as pathways whose down-regulation increased tolerance to specific drugs and drug classes. The beneficial mutations identified span multiple pathways, and we identified pairs of mutations that individually provide only minor decreases in antibiotic susceptibility but that combine to provide higher tolerance.Our results illustrate that a wide-range of mutations can modulate the activity of many cellular resistance processes and demonstrate that E. coli has a large mutational target size for increasing antibiotic tolerance. Furthermore, the work suggests that clinical levels of antibiotic resistance might develop through the sequential accumulation of chromosomal mutations of small individual effect.

  7. Genetic heterogeneity in breast cancer susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, T I

    1996-01-01

    Approximately 20% of breast cancer patients have a family history of the disease, and in one-fourth of these cases breast cancer appears to be inherited as an autosomally dominant trait. Five genes and gene regions involved in breast cancer susceptibility have been uncovered. Germ-line mutations in the recently cloned BRCA1 gene at 17q21 is considered to be responsible for the disease in a majority of the breast-ovarian cancer families and in 40-45% of the site-specific breast cancer families, but appears not to be involved in families with both male and female breast cancer cases. The BRCA2 locus at 13q12-q13 appears to be involved in 40-45% of the site-specific breast cancer families, and in most of the families with affected males. The gene located in this region, however, does not seem to confer susceptibility to ovarian cancer. The TP53 gene is involved in breast cancer development in the Li-Fraumeni syndrome and Li-Fraumeni syndrom-like families, whereas germ-line mutations in the androgen receptor (AR) gene is present in a subset of male breast cancers. Furthermore, females who are obligate carriers of ataxia telangiectasia (AT) have a 4-12 times relative risk of developing breast cancer as compared with the general female population, indicating that germ-line mutations in AT also confer susceptibility to breast cancer.

  8. Ergothioneine Maintains Redox and Bioenergetic Homeostasis Essential for Drug Susceptibility and Virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikram Saini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms by which Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb maintains metabolic equilibrium to survive during infection and upon exposure to antimycobacterial drugs are poorly characterized. Ergothioneine (EGT and mycothiol (MSH are the major redox buffers present in Mtb, but the contribution of EGT to Mtb redox homeostasis and virulence remains unknown. We report that Mtb WhiB3, a 4Fe-4S redox sensor protein, regulates EGT production and maintains bioenergetic homeostasis. We show that central carbon metabolism and lipid precursors regulate EGT production and that EGT modulates drug sensitivity. Notably, EGT and MSH are both essential for redox and bioenergetic homeostasis. Transcriptomic analyses of EGT and MSH mutants indicate overlapping but distinct functions of EGT and MSH. Last, we show that EGT is critical for Mtb survival in both macrophages and mice. This study has uncovered a dynamic balance between Mtb redox and bioenergetic homeostasis, which critically influences Mtb drug susceptibility and pathogenicity.

  9. Ergothioneine maintains redox and bioenergetic homeostasis essential for drug susceptibility and virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Vikram; Cumming, Bridgette M.; Guidry, Loni; Lamprecht, Dirk; Adamson, John H.; Reddy, Vineel P.; Chinta, Krishna C.; Mazorodzo, James; Glasgow, Joel N.; Richard-Greenblatt, Melissa; Gomez-Velasco, Anaximandro; Bach, Horacio; Av-Gay, Yossef; Eoh, Hyungjin; Rhee, Kyu; Steyn, Adrie J.C.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY The mechanisms by which Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) maintains metabolic equilibrium to survive during infection and upon exposure to antimycobacterial drugs are poorly characterized. Ergothioneine (EGT) and mycothiol (MSH) are the major redox buffers present in Mtb, but the contribution of EGT to Mtb redox homeostasis and virulence remains unknown. We report that Mtb WhiB3, a 4Fe-4S redox sensor protein, regulates EGT production and maintains bioenergetic homeostasis. We show that central carbon metabolism and lipid precursors regulate EGT production and that EGT modulates drug sensitivity. Notably, EGT and MSH are both essential for redox and bioenergetic homeostasis. Transcriptomic analyses of EGT and MSH mutants indicate overlapping, but distinct functions of EGT and MSH. Lastly, we show that EGT is critical for Mtb survival in both macrophages and mice. This study has uncovered a dynamic balance between Mtb redox and bioenergetic homeostasis, which critically influences Mtb drug susceptibility and pathogenicity. PMID:26774486

  10. Bronchoscopic lung volume reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Polkey

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Surgical lung volume reduction can improve exercise performance and forced expiratory volume in one second in patients with emphysema. However, the procedure is associated with a 5% mortality rate and a nonresponse rate of 25%. Accordingly, interest has focused on alternative ways of reducing lung volume. Two principle approaches are used: collapse of the diseased area using blockers placed endobronchially and the creation of extrapulmonary pathways. Preliminary data from the former approach suggest that it can be successful and that the magnitude of success is related to reduction in dynamic hyperinflation.

  11. REDUCTIONS WITHOUT REGRET: SUMMARY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swegle, J.; Tincher, D.

    2013-09-16

    This paper briefly summarizes the series in which we consider the possibilities for losing, or compromising, key capabilities of the U.S. nuclear force in the face of modernization and reductions. The first of the three papers takes an historical perspective, considering capabilities that were eliminated in past force reductions. The second paper is our attempt to define the needed capabilities looking forward in the context of the current framework for force modernization and the current picture of the evolving challenges of deterrence and assurance. The third paper then provides an example for each of our undesirable outcomes: the creation of roach motels, box canyons, and wrong turns.

  12. Coyote removal, understory cover, and survival of white-tailed deer neonates: Coyote Control and Fawn Survival

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilgo, John C. [USDA Forest Service; Southern Research Station, New Ellenton, SC (United States); Vukovich, Mark [USDA Forest Service; Southern Research Station, New Ellenton, SC (United States); Ray, H. Scott [USDA Forest Service, Savannah River; New Ellenton, SC (United States); Shaw, Christopher E. [USDA Forest Service; Southern Research Station, New Ellenton, SC (United States); Ruth, Charles [South Carolina Dept. of Natural Resources, Columbia, SC (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Predation by coyotes (Canis latrans) on white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) neonates has led to reduced recruitment in many deer populations in southeastern North America. This low recruitment combined with liberal antlerless deer harvest has resulted in declines in some deer populations, and consequently, increased interest in coyote population control. We investigated whether neonate survival increased after coyote removal, whether coyote predation on neonates was additive to other mortality sources, and whether understory vegetation density affected neonate survival. We monitored neonate survival for 4 years prior to (2006–2009) and 3 years during (2010–2012) intensive coyote removal on 3 32-km2 units on the United States Department of Energy’s Savannah River Site, South Carolina. We removed 474 coyotes (1.63 coyotes/km2 per unit per year), reducing coyote abundance by 78% from pre-removal levels. The best model (wi = 0.927) describing survival probability among 216 radio-collared neonates included a within-year quadratic time trend variable, date of birth, removal treatment, and a varying removal year effect. Under this model, survival differed between pre-treatment and removal periods and it differed among years during the removal period, being >100% greater than pre-treatment survival (0.228) during the first removal year (0.513), similar to pre-treatment survival during the second removal year (0.202), and intermediate during the third removal year (0.431). Despite an initial increase, the overall effect of coyote removal on neonate survival was modest. Mortality rate attributable to coyote predation was lowest during the first removal year (0.357) when survival was greatest, but the mortality rate from all other causes did not differ between the pretreatment period and any year during removals, indicating that coyote predation acted as an additive source of mortality. Survival probability was not related to

  13. Using Loop Heat Pipes to Minimize Survival Heater Power for NASA's Evolutionary Xenon Thruster Power Processing Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Michael K.

    2017-01-01

    A thermal design concept of using propylene loop heat pipes to minimize survival heater power for NASA's Evolutionary Xenon Thruster power processing units is presented. It reduces the survival heater power from 183 W to 35 W per power processing unit. The reduction is 81%.

  14. Penicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus: susceptibility testing, resistance rates and outcome of infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagstrand Aldman, Malin; Skovby, Annette; I Påhlman, Lisa

    2017-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (SA) is an important human pathogen that causes both superficial and invasive infections. Penicillin is now rarely used in the treatment of SA infections due to widespread resistance and a concern about the accuracy of existing methods for penicillin susceptibility testing. The aims of the present study were to determine the frequency of penicillin-susceptible SA isolates from blood and wound cultures in Lund, Sweden, and to evaluate methods for penicillin testing in SA. We also wanted to investigate if penicillin-susceptible isolates are associated with higher mortality. Hundred blood culture isolates collected 2008/2009, 140 blood culture isolates from 2014/2015, and 141 superficial wound culture strains from 2015 were examined. Penicillin susceptibility was tested with disk diffusion according to EUCAST guidelines, and results were confirmed with a cloverleaf assay and PCR amplification of the BlaZ gene. Patient data for all bacteraemia cases were extracted from medical records. The disk diffusion method with assessment of both zone size and zone edge appearance had high accuracy in our study. About 57% of bacteraemia isolates from 2008/2009 were sensitive to penicillin compared to 29% in 2014/2015 (p penicillin susceptible. There was no difference in co-morbidity or mortality rates between patients with penicillin resistant and penicillin sensitive SA bacteraemia. Disk-diffusion is a simple and reliable method to detect penicillin resistance in SA, and susceptibility rates are significant. Penicillin has many theoretical advantages and should be considered in the treatment of SA bacteraemia when susceptible.

  15. Definition of a magnetic susceptibility of conglomerates with magnetite particles. Particularities of defining single particle susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandulyak, A. A.; Sandulyak, A. V.; Ershova, V.; Pamme, N.; Ngmasom, B.; Iles, A.

    2017-11-01

    Data of a magnetic susceptibility of ferro-and the ferrimagnetic particles of many technogenic, natural, special media are especially demanded for the solution of various tasks connected with purposeful magnetic impact on these particles. One of productive approaches to definition of a magnetic susceptibility χ of these particles consists in receiving experimental data of a susceptibility of disperse samples with a disperse phase of these particles. The paper expounds and analyses the results of experiments on defining (by Faraday method in a magnetic field with intensity H = 90-730 kA/m) the magnetic susceptibility of disperse samples (conglomerates) with a given volume ratio γ of magnetite particles (γ = 0.0065-0.25). The corresponding families of concentration and field dependences are provided alongside with discussing the applicability of linear and exponential functions to describe these dependences. We consider the possibility of defining single particles susceptibility χ (with simultaneous obtaining field dependence of this susceptibility) by the commonly used relation χ = /γ both at relatively small (preferable for accuracy reasons) values γ - to γ = 0.02…0.025, as well as at increased values γ - up to γ = 0.25. The data χ are provided depending on H and correlating with known data at H defined here value of constant-multiplier (0.8), it provides the grounds for obtaining valid data χ, employing the results of measuring for conglomerates with not obligatory small values of γ. It is demonstrated that being obtained by data χ, the calculated field dependence of the particle matter magnetic susceptibility χm (for the case when the particles are traditionally likened to balls with the characteristic for them demagnetising factor equalling 1/3) complies with the anticipated inverse function χm ∼ 1/H in the studied area H (where magnetization M expressed as M = χH reaches saturation M = Const).

  16. Etiology and antibiotic susceptibility pattern of community-acquired ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Streptomycin showed the highest susceptibility to bacteria isolates while the least susceptibility was observed with augmentin. Rational use of antibiotics with regular antibiotics susceptibility surveillance studies is recommended to maintain high antibiotic therapeutic profile. Keywords: Community-acquired urinary tract ...

  17. Susceptibility Status of Anopheles gambiae s.l. (Diptera: Culicidae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    komla

    susceptible 'Kisumu' strain, both Korle-Bu and Airport populations were highly resistant to DDT and gave resistance levels which were over nine-fold for permethrin and over 2.5-fold for deltamethrin. Both wild and susceptible populations showed full susceptibility to malathion. The S and M forms of A. gambiae s.s. were ...

  18. Susceptibility status of Anopheles gambiae s.l. (Diptera: Culicidae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    susceptible 'Kisumu' strain, both Korle-Bu and Airport populations were highly resistant to DDT and gave resistance levels which were over nine-fold for permethrin and over 2.5-fold for deltamethrin. Both wild and susceptible populations showed full susceptibility to malathion. The S and M forms of A. gambiae s.s. were ...

  19. Quark number density and susceptibility calculation under one loop ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Somorendro Singh

    2017-05-30

    May 30, 2017 ... Abstract. We calculate quark number density and susceptibility under one-loop correction in the mean- field potential. The calculation shows continuous increase in the number density and susceptibility up to the temperature T = 0.4 GeV. Then the values of number density and susceptibility approach the ...

  20. Aquifer susceptibility in Virginia, 1998-2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelms, David L.; Harlow, George E.; Plummer, L. Niel; Busenberg, Eurybiades

    2003-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Virginia Department of Health, sampled water from 171 wells and springs across the Commonwealth of Virginia between 1998 and 2000 as part of the Virginia Aquifer Susceptibility study. Most of the sites sampled are public water supplies that are part of the comprehensive Source Water Assessment Program for the Commonwealth. The fundamental premise of the study was that the identification of young waters (less than 50 years) by multiple environmental tracers could be used as a guide for classifying aquifers in terms of susceptibility to contamination from near-surface sources. Environmental tracers, including chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), tritium (3H), and tritium/helium-3 (3H/3He), and carbon isotopes (14C and d13C) were used to determine the age of water discharging from wells and springs. Concentrations of CFCs greater than 5 picograms per kilogram and 3H concentrations greater than 0.6 tritium unit were used as thresholds to indicate that parts of the aquifer sampled have a component of young water and are, therefore, susceptible to near-surface contamination. Concentrations of CFCs exceeded the susceptibility threshold in 22 percent of the wells and in one spring sampled in the Coastal Plain regional aquifer systems. About 74 percent of the samples from wells with the top of the first water zone less than 100 feet below land surface exceeded the threshold values, and water supplies developed in the upper 100 feet of the Coastal Plain are considered to be susceptible to contamination from near-surface sources. The maximum depth to the top of the screened interval for wells that contained CFCs was less than 150 feet. Wells completed in the deep confined aquifers in the Coastal Plain generally contain water older than 1,000 years, as indicated by carbon-14 dating, and are not considered to be susceptible to contamination under natural conditions. All of the water samples from wells

  1. (MTT) dye reduction assay.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    to inhibit proliferation of HeLa cells was determined using the 3443- dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) dye reduction assay. Extracts from roots of Agathisanthemum bojeri, Synaptolepis kirkii and Zanha africana and the leaf extract of Physalis peruviana at a concentration of 10 pg/ml inhibited cell ...

  2. Method I : Planar reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broer, H.; Hoveijn, I.; Lunter, G.; Vegter, G.

    2003-01-01

    We apply the planar reduction method to a general two degree of freedom system with optional symmetry, near equilibrium and close to resonance. As a leading example the spring-pendulum close to 1:2 resonance is used. The resulting planar model is computed explicitly, and the bifurcation curves

  3. Retrofiting survivability of military vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canavan, Gregory H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    of 0.5. Over the range from 0.5 to 4.5 cm the shock KE is attenuated by a factor of {approx}70, while its momentum is changed little. The shock and particle velocity falls by a factor of 200 while the mass increases by a factor of 730. In the limit of very porous media u {approx} 1/M, so KE {approx} 1/M, which falls by a factor of {approx}600, while momentum Mu does not change at all. Figure 2 shows the KE, Mu, u, and M for a material with a porosity of 1.05, for which the KE changes little. In the limit of media of very low porosity, u {approx} 1/{radical}M, so KE is constant while Mu {approx} {radical}M, which increases by a factor of 15. Thus, if the goal is to reduce the peak pressure from strong explosions below, very porous materials, which strongly reduce pressure but do not increase momentum, are preferred to non-porous materials, which amplify momentum but do not decrease pressure. These predictions are in qualitative accord with the results of experiments at Los Alamos in which projectiles from high velocity, large caliber cannons were stopped by one to two sandbags. The studies were performed primarily to determine the effectiveness of sand in stopping fragments of various sizes, but could be extended to study sand's effectiveness in attenuating blast pressure. It would also be useful to test the above predictions on the effectiveness of media with higher porosity. Water barriers have been discussed but not deployed in previous retrofit survivability studies for overseas embassies. They would detect the flash from the mine detonation below, trigger a thin layer of explosive above a layer of water, and drive water droplets into the approaching blast wave. The blast loses energy in evaporating the droplets and loses momentum in slowing them. Under favorable conditions that could attenuate the pressure in the blast enough to prevent the penetration or disruption of the vehicle. However, such barriers would depend on prompt and reliable detonation

  4. Individual social capital and survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejlskov, Linda; Mortensen, Rikke N; Overgaard, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The concept of social capital has received increasing attention as a determinant of population survival, but its significance is uncertain. We examined the importance of social capital on survival in a population study while focusing on gender differences. METHODS: We used data from...... a Danish regional health survey with a five-year follow-up period, 2007-2012 (n = 9288, 53.5% men, 46.5% women). We investigated the association between social capital and all-cause mortality, performing separate analyses on a composite measure as well as four specific dimensions of social capital while...... controlling for covariates. Analyses were performed with Cox proportional hazard models by which hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated. RESULTS: For women, higher levels of social capital were associated with lower all-cause mortality regardless of age, socioeconomic status, health...

  5. Campylobacter virulence and survival factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, Declan J

    2015-06-01

    Despite over 30 years of research, campylobacteriosis is the most prevalent foodborne bacterial infection in many countries including in the European Union and the United States of America. However, relatively little is known about the virulence factors in Campylobacter or how an apparently fragile organism can survive in the food chain, often with enhanced pathogenicity. This review collates information on the virulence and survival determinants including motility, chemotaxis, adhesion, invasion, multidrug resistance, bile resistance and stress response factors. It discusses their function in transition through the food processing environment and human infection. In doing so it provides a fundamental understanding of Campylobacter, critical for improved diagnosis, surveillance and control. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Does Intelligence Provide Survival Value?

    OpenAIRE

    Cairns, John

    2009-01-01

    Intelligence is defined as a general mental capacity to reason, plan, solve problems, think abstractly, comprehend ideas, and learn. Intelligence can also be defined as the ability to acquire and apply information gathered from the environment to modify its behavior. It is this intelligence that has allowed the genus Homo to survive for 2 million years. However, recently the global financial meltdown and the deleterious effects of climate change raise the question of whether intelligence has ...

  7. Survival on Land and Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    1943-01-01

    flower, leaf steams, and young leaves may be eaten cooked as greens provided you cook them in several changes of water to remove the bitter taste and...and become a weed almost throughout the tropics. Its bladdery pods contain a single retl tomato-like fruit that is edible. Raspberries, blackberries ...plant that 108 SURVIVAL OK LAND AND SEA is about one foot In height and has blue flowers and inflated leaf stems. The young leaves, leafy stalks

  8. Columbia Crew Survival Investigation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    NASA commissioned the Columbia Accident Investigation Board (CAIB) to conduct a thorough review of both the technical and the organizational causes of the loss of the Space Shuttle Columbia and her crew on February 1, 2003. The accident investigation that followed determined that a large piece of insulating foam from Columbia s external tank (ET) had come off during ascent and struck the leading edge of the left wing, causing critical damage. The damage was undetected during the mission. The CAIB's findings and recommendations were published in 2003 and are available on the web at http://caib.nasa.gov/. NASA responded to the CAIB findings and recommendations with the Space Shuttle Return to Flight Implementation Plan. Significant enhancements were made to NASA's organizational structure, technical rigor, and understanding of the flight environment. The ET was redesigned to reduce foam shedding and eliminate critical debris. In 2005, NASA succeeded in returning the space shuttle to flight. In 2010, the space shuttle will complete its mission of assembling the International Space Station and will be retired to make way for the next generation of human space flight vehicles: the Constellation Program. The Space Shuttle Program recognized the importance of capturing the lessons learned from the loss of Columbia and her crew to benefit future human exploration, particularly future vehicle design. The program commissioned the Spacecraft Crew Survival Integrated Investigation Team (SCSIIT). The SCSIIT was asked to perform a comprehensive analysis of the accident, focusing on factors and events affecting crew survival, and to develop recommendations for improving crew survival for all future human space flight vehicles. To do this, the SCSIIT investigated all elements of crew survival, including the design features, equipment, training, and procedures intended to protect the crew. This report documents the SCSIIT findings, conclusions, and recommendations.

  9. Statistical analysis of survival data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, J; Breslow, N

    1984-01-01

    A general review of the statistical techniques that the authors feel are most important in the analysis of survival data is presented. The emphasis is on the study of the duration of time between any two events as applied to people and on the nonparametric and semiparametric models most often used in these settings. The unifying concept is the hazard function, variously known as the risk, the force of mortality, or the force of transition.

  10. Gene–gene interaction analysis for the survival phenotype based on the Cox model

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Seungyeoun; Kwon, Min-Seok; Oh, Jung Mi; Park, Taesung

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: For the past few decades, many statistical methods in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been developed to identify SNP–SNP interactions for case-control studies. However, there has been less work for prospective cohort studies, involving the survival time. Recently, Gui et al. (2011) proposed a novel method, called Surv-MDR, for detecting gene–gene interactions associated with survival time. Surv-MDR is an extension of the multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) metho...

  11. Extreme ocean acidification reduces the susceptibility of eastern oyster shells to a polydorid parasite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, J C; Bourque, D; McLaughlin, J; Stephenson, M; Comeau, L A

    2017-11-01

    Ocean acidification poses a threat to marine organisms. While the physiological and behavioural effects of ocean acidification have received much attention, the effects of acidification on the susceptibility of farmed shellfish to parasitic infections are poorly understood. Here we describe the effects of moderate (pH 7.5) and extreme (pH 7.0) ocean acidification on the susceptibility of Crassostrea virginica shells to infection by a parasitic polydorid, Polydora websteri. Under laboratory conditions, shells were exposed to three pH treatments (7.0, 7.5 and 8.0) for 3- and 5-week periods. Treated shells were subsequently transferred to an oyster aquaculture site (which had recently reported an outbreak of P. websteri) for 50 days to test for effects of pH and exposure time on P. websteri recruitment to oyster shells. Results indicated that pH and exposure time did not affect the length, width or weight of the shells. Interestingly, P. websteri counts were significantly lower under extreme (pH 7.0; ~50% reduction), but not moderate (pH 7.5; ~20% reduction) acidification levels; exposure time had no effect. This study suggests that extreme levels - but not current and projected near-future levels - of acidification (∆pH ~1 unit) can reduce the susceptibility of eastern oyster shells to P. websteri infections. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. LATERAL SURVIVAL: AN OT ACCOUNT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moira Yip

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available When laterals are the targets of phonological processes, laterality may or may not survive. In a fixed feature geometry, [lateral] should be lost if its superordinate node is eliminated by either the spreading of a neighbouring node, or by coda neutralization. So if [lateral] is under Coronal (Blevins 1994, it should be lost under Place assimilation, and if [lateral] is under Sonorant Voicing (Rice & Avery 1991 it should be lost by rules that spread voicing. Yet in some languages lateral survives such spreading intact. Facts like these argue against a universal attachment of [lateral] under either Coronal or Sonorant Voicing, and in favour of an account in terms of markedness constraints on feature-co-occurrence (Padgett 2000. The core of an OT account is that IFIDENTLAT is ranked above whatever causes neutralization, such as SHARE-F or *CODAF. laterality will survive. If these rankings are reversed, we derive languages in which laterality is lost. The other significant factor is markedness. High-ranked feature co-occurrence constraints like *LATDORSAL can block spreading from affecting laterals at all.

  13. Association of dynamic susceptibility contrast enhanced MR Perfusion parameters with prognosis in elderly patients with glioblastomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jabehdar Maralani, Pejman [University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, Toronto, ON (Canada); Melhem, Elias R.; Herskovits, Edward H. [University of Maryland Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Wang, Sumei; Voluck, Matthew R.; Learned, Kim O.; Mohan, Suyash [Perelman School of Medicine at University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Kim, Sang Joon [University of Ulsan Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); O' Rourke, Donald M. [Perelman School of Medicine at University of Pennsylvania, Department of Surgery, Division of Neurosurgery, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-09-15

    We aimed to evaluate the prognostic value of dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) MR perfusion in elderly patients with glioblastomas (GBM). Thirty five patients aged ≥65 and 35 aged <65 years old, (referred to as elderly and younger, respectively) were included in this retrospective study. The median relative cerebral volume (rCBV) from the enhancing region (rCBV{sub ER-Med}) and immediate peritumoral region (rCBV{sub IPR-Med}) and maximum rCBV from the enhancing region of the tumor (rCBV{sub ER-Max}) were compared and correlated with survival data. Analysis was repeated after rCBVs were dichotomized into high and low values and after excluding elderly patients who did not receive postoperative chemoradiation (34.3 %). Kaplan-Meyer survival curves and parametric and semi-parametric regression tests were used for analysis. All rCBV parameters were higher in elderly compared to younger patients (p < 0.05). After adjustment for age, none were independently associated with shorter survival (p > 0.05). After rCBV dichotomization into high and low values, high rCBV in elderly was independently associated with shorter survival compared to low rCBV in elderly, or any rCBV in younger patients (p < 0.05). rCBV can be an imaging biomarker to identify a subgroup of GBM patients in the elderly with worse prognosis compared to others. (orig.)

  14. Survival of Macrobrachium amazonicum embryos submitted to cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Arthur Vinícius Lourenço; Martins, Moisés Fernandes; Martins de Sousa, Míriam Luzia Nogueira; Soares Filho, Aldeney Andrade; Sampaio, Célia Maria de Souza

    2017-06-01

    Cooling techniques have several applications for reproduction in aquaculture. However, few studies have sought to create protocols for cooling and cryopreservation of Macrobrachium amazonicum embryos. Thus, the objective of this work was to verify the survival of M. amazonicum embryos and the correlation between embryonic volume and mortality of M. amazonicum embryos after cooling. Embryo pools were collected from three females and divided into two treatment groups: dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) 3% and ethylene glycol (EG) 0.5%, both of them associated with 2 M sucrose. Positive and negative control groups consisted of seawater 10%. Aliquots of 10 µg of embryos were placed in Falcon® tubes containing a cryoprotectant solution and submitted directly to the test temperature of 2°C for 2 and 6 h of cooling. Further analysis of survival and embryonic volume were performed under a stereoscopic microscope. Data were subjected to analysis of variance (ANOVA), and means were compared using the Tukey test at 5%. The highest embryonic survival rate was observed after the shortest storage time for both the DMSO 3% and the 0.5% EG groups, with survival rates of 84.8 ± 3.9 and 79.7 ± 2.8%, respectively. There was a reduction in survival after 24 h, with the DMSO 3% group presenting a survival rate of 71.7 ± 6.6%, and the EG 0.5% group, 66 ± 6.9%. Survival showed a statistically significant difference when compared with the positive controls after 2 h and 24 h of cooling, with 99 ± 0.5% and 95.8 ± 1.5% survival rates, respectively. There was no significant statistical difference in the embryonic volume, but it was possible to observe a change in the appearance of the embryos, from a translucent coloration to an opaque white or brownish coloration, after 24 h in incubators. Thus, it can be concluded that survival is inversely proportional to storage time and that, although there was no change in the embryonic volume after cooling, a change in the appearance of embryos could

  15. Flow Cytometric Determination of Ganciclovir Susceptibilities of Human Cytomegalovirus Clinical Isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSharry, James M.; Lurain, Nell S.; Drusano, George L.; Landay, Alan; Manischewitz, Jody; Nokta, Mostafa; O’Gorman, Maurice; Shapiro, Howard M.; Weinberg, Adriana; Reichelderfer, Patricia; Crumpacker, Clyde

    1998-01-01

    A flow cytometric assay has been developed for the measurement of susceptibilities to ganciclovir of laboratory strains and clinical isolates of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). The assay uses fluorochrome-labeled monoclonal antibodies to HCMV immediate-early and late antigens to identify HCMV-infected cells and flow cytometry to detect and quantitate the number of antigen-positive cells. By this assay, the 50 and 90% inhibitory concentrations (IC50 and IC90, respectively) of ganciclovir for the AD169 strain of HCMV were 1.7 and 9.2 μM, respectively, and the IC50 for the ganciclovir-resistant D6/3/1 derivative of the AD169 strain was greater than 12 μM. The ganciclovir susceptibilities of 17 HCMV clinical isolates were also determined by flow cytometric analysis of the effect of ganciclovir on late-antigen synthesis in HCMV-infected cells. The average IC50 of ganciclovir for drug-sensitive HCMV clinical isolates was 3.79 μM (±2.60). The plaque-reduction assay for these clinical isolates yielded an average IC50 of 2.80 μM (±1.46). Comparison of the results of the flow cytometry assays with those obtained from the plaque-reduction assays demonstrated acceptable bias and precision. Flow cytometric and plaque-reduction analysis of cells infected with ganciclovir-resistant clinical isolates failed to show a reduction in the percentage of late-antigen-positive cells or PFU, even at 96 μM ganciclovir. The flow cytometric assay for determining ganciclovir susceptibility of HCMV is quantitative, and objective, and potentially automatable, and its results are reproducible among laboratories. PMID:9542916

  16. Symbiotic Dinoflagellate Functional Diversity Mediates Coral Survival under Ecological Crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suggett, David J; Warner, Mark E; Leggat, William

    2017-10-01

    Coral reefs have entered an era of 'ecological crisis' as climate change drives catastrophic reef loss worldwide. Coral growth and stress susceptibility are regulated by their endosymbiotic dinoflagellates (genus Symbiodinium). The phylogenetic diversity of Symbiodinium frequently corresponds to patterns of coral health and survival, but knowledge of functional diversity is ultimately necessary to reconcile broader ecological success over space and time. We explore here functional traits underpinning the complex biology of Symbiodinium that spans free-living algae to coral endosymbionts. In doing so we propose a mechanistic framework integrating the primary traits of resource acquisition and utilisation as a means to explain Symbiodinium functional diversity and to resolve the role of Symbiodinium in driving the stability of coral reefs under an uncertain future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Two-Component Systems Involved in Susceptibility to Nisin A in Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawada-Matsuo, Miki; Tatsuno, Ichiro; Arii, Kaoru; Zendo, Takeshi; Oogai, Yuichi; Noguchi, Kazuyuki; Hasegawa, Tadao; Sonomoto, Kenji; Komatsuzawa, Hitoshi

    2016-10-01

    Two-component systems (TCSs) are regulatory systems in bacteria that play important roles in sensing and adapting to the environment. In this study, we systematically evaluated the roles of TCSs in the susceptibility of the group A Streptococcus (GAS; Streptococcus pyogenes) SF370 strain to several types of lantibiotics. Using individual TCS deletion mutants, we found that the deletion of srtRK (spy_1081-spy_1082) in SF370 increased the susceptibility to nisin A, which is produced by Lactococcus lactis ATCC 11454, but susceptibility to other types of lantibiotics (nukacin ISK-1, produced by Staphylococcus warneri, and staphylococcin C55, produced by Staphylococcus aureus) was not altered in the TCS mutants tested. The expression of srtFEG (spy_1085 to spy_1087), which is located downstream of srtRK and is homologous to ABC transporters, was increased in response to nisin A. However, srtEFG expression was not induced by nisin A in the srtRK mutant. The inactivation of srtFEG increased the susceptibility to nisin A. These results suggest that SrtRK controls SrtFEG expression to alter the susceptibility to nisin A. Further experiments showed that SrtRK is required for coexistence with L. lactis ATCC 11454, which produces nisin A. Our results elucidate the important roles of S. pyogenes TCSs in the interactions between different bacterial species, including bacteriocin-producing bacteria. In this study, we focused on the association of TCSs with susceptibility to bacteriocins in S. pyogenes SF370, which has no ability to produce bacteriocins, and reported two major new findings. We demonstrated that the SrtRK TCS is related to susceptibility to nisin A by controlling the ABC transporter SrtFEG. We also showed that S. pyogenes SrtRK is important for survival when the bacteria are cocultured with nisin A-producing Lactococcus lactis This report highlights the roles of TCSs in the colocalization of bacteriocin-producing bacteria and non-bacteriocin-producing bacteria. Our

  18. [Examination of urogenital tract microorganism infection and antibiotic susceptibility test].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen-wen; Yan, Zu-wei; Dai, Gan

    2003-06-01

    To isolate bacteria, mycoplasma and chlamydia from the urogenital tract, and to determine their antibiotic susceptibility. Bacteria, mycoplasma and chlamydia were isolated from the urogenital tract secretion by artifical culture, and their antibiotic susceptibility was detected by disk diffusion. The common microorganisms were S. epidermidis and corynebacberium, and the minority microorganisms were G- bacteria or E. coli. Bacteria were susceptible to amikacin, cephazolin V, rifampin, gentamycin, and docycyclin. S. epidermidis and corynebacterium are important pathogens of the urogenital tract infection. Disk susceptibility test can be used to screen the susceptible antibiotic.

  19. Variation in susceptibility pattern of fish to Argulus siamensis: Do immune responses of host play a role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Banya; Moussa, Cisse; Mohapatra, Amruta; Mohanty, Jyotirmaya; Jayasankar, Pallipuram; Sahoo, Pramoda Kumar

    2016-05-15

    Branchiuran ectoparasites of the genus Argulus can have extensive damaging effects on cultured fish. There exist no systematic studies that evaluate susceptibility or resistance of various carp species to Argulus sp. and the underlying mechanisms. The present study aimed at identifying the most susceptible and resistant cultured species, studying settlement and survival of parasite on these species, and finally unravelling the variations of immune response in both resistant and susceptible species. Fish from eight species (Labeo rohita, Cirrhinus mrigala, Catla catla, Hypophthalmichthys molitrix, Cyprinus carpio, Ctenopharyngodon idella, Carassius auratus, Labeo fimbriatus) were individually challenged with metanauplii of A. siamensis (100 metanauplii/fish) before rearing them in single tank in triplicate for 45 days. Based on the observed parasite load on each species, L. rohita was found to be the most susceptible and C. idella the resistant species. The settlement and survival of the parasite on L. rohita and C. idella was compared at 24, 48, 72 and 96h post experimental infection. Survival was significantly low at 72h onwards in C. idella indicating it is an unsuitable/poorly preferred host for A. siamensis. The inflammatory responses which are known to be related to susceptibility were analysed. Individuals of both the species were exposed to A. siamensis (100 parasites/fish), and after 24h and 3 d, skin samples directly from the attachment site and non-attachment sites were assessed for transcriptomic profiles of selected innate defence genes. Artificial skin abrasion permitted comparisons between abrasion associated injury and louse-associated injury. The inflammatory responses varied significantly between both species indicating their role in determining susceptibility of a host to A. siamensis. The expression of major histocompatibility class II and matrix metalloproteinase 2 was significantly higher in C. idella compared to L. rohita and therefore

  20. Efficacy, safety and drug survival of conventional agents in pediatric psoriasis: A multicenter, cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergun, Tulin; Seckin Gencosmanoglu, Dilek; Alpsoy, Erkan; Bulbul-Baskan, Emel; Saricam, Merve Hatun; Salman, Andac; Onsun, Nahide; Sarioz, Abdullah

    2017-06-01

    The data on long-term efficacy, safety and drug survival rates of conventional systemic therapeutics in pediatric psoriasis is lacking. The primary aim of this study is to investigate acitretin, methotrexate, cyclosporin efficacy, safety and drug survival rates in pediatric patients as well as predictors of drug survival. This is a multicenter study including 289 pediatric cases being treated with acitretin, methotrexate and cyclosporin in four academic referral centers. Efficacy, adverse events, reasons for discontinuation, 1, 2- and 3-year drug survival rates, and determinants of drug survival were analyzed. A 75% reduction of Psoriasis Area and Severity Index score or better response rate was obtained in 47.5%, 34.1% and 40% of the patients who were treated with acitretin, methotrexate and cyclosporin, respectively. One-year drug survival rates for acitretin, methotrexate and cyclosporin were 36.3%, 21.1% and 15.1%, respectively. The most significant determinant of drug survival, which diminished over time, was treatment response whereas arthritis, body mass index and sex had no influence. Although all three medications are effective and relatively safe in children, drug survival rates are low due to safety concerns at this age group. Effective disease control through their rational use can be expected to improve survival rates. © 2016 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  1. Antibiotic susceptibility of Listeria monocytogenes in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Mónica; Martínez, Claudia; Aguerre, Lorena; Rocca, María Florencia; Cipolla, Lucía; Callejo, Raquel

    2016-02-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is the causative agent of listeriosis, a food-borne disease that mainly affects pregnant women, the elderly, and immunocompromised patients. The primary treatment of choice of listeriosis is the combination of ampicillin or penicillin G, with an aminoglycoside, classically gentamicin. The second-choice therapy for patients allergic to β-lactams is the combination of trimethoprim with a sulfonamide (such as co-trimoxazole). The aim of this study was to analyze the antimicrobial susceptibility profile of strains isolated from human infections and food during the last two decades in Argentina. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 8 antimicrobial agents was determined for a set of 250 strains of L. monocytogenes isolated in Argentina during the period 1992-2012. Food-borne and human isolates were included in this study. The antibiotics tested were ampicillin, chloramphenicol, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, erythromycin, gentamicin, penicillin G, tetracycline and rifampicin. Breakpoints for penicillin G, ampicillin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole were those given in the CLSI for L. monocytogenes. CLSI criteria for staphylococci were applied to the other antimicrobial agents tested. Strains were serotyped by PCR, and confirmed by an agglutination method. Strains recovered from human listeriosis patients showed a prevalence of serotype 4b (71%), with the remaining 29% corresponding to serotype 1/2b. Serotypes among food isolates were distributed as 62% serotype 1/2b and 38% serotype 4b. All antimicrobial agents showed good activity. The strains of L. monocytogenes isolated in Argentina over a period of 20 years remain susceptible to antimicrobial agents, and that susceptibility pattern has not changed during this period. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  2. Magnetic susceptibility as a biosignature in stromatolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petryshyn, Victoria A.; Corsetti, Frank A.; Frantz, Carie M.; Lund, Steve P.; Berelson, William M.

    2016-03-01

    Microbialites have long been a focus of study in geobiology because they are macroscopic sedimentary records of the activities of microscopic organisms. However, abiotic processes can result in microbialite-like morphologies. Developing robust tools for substantiating the biogenicity of putative microbialites remains an important challenge. Here, we report a new potential biosignature based on the detrital magnetic mineral component present in nearly all sedimentary rocks. Detrital grains falling onto a hard, abiogenic, chemically precipitated structure would be expected to roll off surfaces at high incline angles. Thus, the distribution of grains in an abiogenic microbialite should exhibit a dependence on the dip angle along laminae. In contrast, a microbialite formed by the active trapping and binding of detrital grains by microorganisms could exhibit a distribution of detrital grains significantly less dependent on the dip angle of the laminae. However, given that most ancient stromatolites are micritic (composed of carbonate mud), tracking detrital grains vs. precipitated carbonate is not straightforward. Recent advances in our ability to measure miniscule magnetic fields open up the possibility to map magnetic susceptibility as a tracer of detrital grains in stromatolites. In abiogenic carbonate precipitation experiments, magnetic susceptibility fell to zero when the growth surface was inclined above 30° (the angle at which grains rolled off). In cyanobacterial mat experiments, even vertically inclined mats held magnetic material. The results indicate that cyanobacterial mats trap and bind small grains more readily than abiogenic carbonate precipitates alone. A variety of stromatolites of known and unknown biogenicity were then analyzed. Tested stromatolites span many different ages (Eocene to Holocene) and depositional environments (hot springs, lakes), and compositional forms (micritic, sparry crusts, etc.). The results were consistent with the laboratory

  3. Injury reduction at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffing, Bill; /Fermilab

    2005-06-01

    In a recent DOE Program Review, Fermilab's director presented results of the laboratory's effort to reduce the injury rate over the last decade. The results, shown in the figure below, reveal a consistent and dramatic downward trend in OSHA recordable injuries at Fermilab. The High Energy Physics Program Office has asked Fermilab to report in detail on how the laboratory has achieved the reduction. In fact, the reduction in the injury rate reflects a change in safety culture at Fermilab, which has evolved slowly over this period, due to a series of events, both planned and unplanned. This paper attempts to describe those significant events and analyze how each of them has shaped the safety culture that, in turn, has reduced the rate of injury at Fermilab to its current value.

  4. Singular Reduction and Quantization

    CERN Document Server

    Meinrenken, E; Meinrenken, Eckhard; Sjamaar, Reyer

    1997-01-01

    Consider a compact prequantizable symplectic manifold M on which a compact Lie group G acts in a Hamiltonian fashion. The ``quantization commutes with reduction'' theorem asserts that the G-invariant part of the equivariant index of M is equal to the Riemann-Roch number of the symplectic quotient of M, provided the quotient is nonsingular. We extend this result to singular symplectic quotients, using partial desingularizations of the symplectic quotient to define its Riemann-Roch number. By similar methods we also compute multiplicities for the equivariant index of the dual of a prequantum bundle, and furthermore show that the arithmetic genus of a Hamiltonian G-manifold is invariant under symplectic reduction.

  5. Interpretive criteria and quality control limits for ceftibuten disk susceptibility tests. Collaborative Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, A L; Jones, R N

    1990-01-01

    In vitro studies were undertaken to evaluate susceptibility tests with 30-micrograms ceftibuten disks. The following interpretive criteria were proposed: less than or equal to 17 mm for resistance (MIC, greater than or equal to 32 micrograms/ml) and greater than or equal to 21 mm for susceptibility (MIC, less than or equal to 8.0 micrograms/ml). A multilaboratory quality control study led to the conclusion that Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 should provide zones 29 to 35 mm in diameter. PMID:2182675

  6. Macroeconomic susceptibility, inflation, and aggregate supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Raymond J.

    2017-03-01

    We unify aggregate-supply dynamics as a time-dependent susceptibility-mediated relationship between inflation and aggregate economic output. In addition to representing well various observations of inflation-output dynamics this parsimonious formalism provides a straightforward derivation of popular representations of aggregate-supply dynamics and a natural basis for economic-agent expectations as an element of inflation formation. Our formalism also illuminates questions of causality and time-correlation that challenge central banks for whom aggregate-supply dynamics is a key constraint in their goal of achieving macroeconomic stability.

  7. ANTIBIOTIC SUSCEPTIBILITY OF POTENTIALLY PROBIOTIC LACTOBACILLUS STRAINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junhua Han

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Susceptibility of 29 Lactobacilli to 13 antibiotics was assayed by paper disc diffusion method. Plasmids and gastrointestinal tolerance were detected. The relationship between plasmids andantibiotic resistance was discussed. The results showed that all of the strains were resistant to bacitracin, polymyxin B, kanamycin, and nalidixic acid. Many strains were relatively sensitive tochloramphenicol and tetracycline. Six strains contained plasmids and showed good gastrointestinal tolerance. β-lactam resistance gene blr was found in the plasmid of L. plantarum CICC 23180by PCR. The study will be helpful to promote the safety evaluation and development of potentially probiotic lactic acid bacteria.

  8. Genetic Susceptibility to Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Stevens, Kristen N.; Vachon, Celine M.; Couch, Fergus J.

    2013-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancers (TNBC), defined by the absence of estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 expression, account for 12-24% of all breast cancers. TNBC is associated with early recurrence of disease and poor outcome. Germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 breast cancer susceptibility genes have been associated with up to 15% of TNBC, and TNBC accounts for 70% of breast tumors arising in BRCA1 mutation carriers and 16-23% of breast ...

  9. Tobacco use increases susceptibility to bacterial infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demuth Donald R

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Active smokers and those exposed to secondhand smoke are at increased risk of bacterial infection. Tobacco smoke exposure increases susceptibility to respiratory tract infections, including tuberculosis, pneumonia and Legionnaires disease; bacterial vaginosis and sexually transmitted diseases, such as chlamydia and gonorrhoea; Helicobacter pylori infection; periodontitis; meningitis; otitis media; and post-surgical and nosocomial infections. Tobacco smoke compromises the anti-bacterial function of leukocytes, including neutrophils, monocytes, T cells and B cells, providing a mechanistic explanation for increased infection risk. Further epidemiological, clinical and mechanistic research into this important area is warranted.

  10. Operator fidelity susceptibility, decoherence, and quantum criticality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiao-Ming; Sun, Zhe; Wang, Xiaoguang; Zanardi, Paolo

    2008-09-01

    The extension of the notion of quantum fidelity from the state-space to the operator level can be used to study environment-induced decoherence. The state-dependent operator fidelity susceptibility (OFS), the leading-order term for slightly different operator parameters, is shown to have a nontrivial behavior when the environment is at critical points. Two different contributions to the OFS are identified which have distinct physical origins and temporal dependence. Exact results are obtained for the finite-temperature decoherence caused by a bath described by the Ising model in a transverse field.

  11. Susceptibility weighted imaging of the neonatal brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meoded, A.; Poretti, A. [Division of Pediatric Radiology and Division of Neuroradiology, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Northington, F.J. [Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Tekes, A.; Intrapiromkul, J. [Division of Pediatric Radiology and Division of Neuroradiology, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Huisman, T.A.G.M., E-mail: thuisma1@jhmi.edu [Division of Pediatric Radiology and Division of Neuroradiology, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2012-08-15

    Susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) is a well-established magnetic resonance technique, which is highly sensitive for blood, iron, and calcium depositions in the brain and has been implemented in the routine clinical use in both children and neonates. SWI in neonates might provide valuable additional diagnostic and prognostic information for a wide spectrum of neonatal neurological disorders. To date, there are few articles available on the application of SWI in neonatal neurological disorders. The purpose of this article is to illustrate and describe the characteristic SWI findings in various typical neonatal neurological disorders.

  12. Harm Reduction Behind Bars

    OpenAIRE

    Emma R. Miller; Jan M. Moore; Peng Bi

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to identify how strategies to reduce the risk of hepatitis C virus (HCV) in prisons could be implemented in a way that is acceptable to those with the responsibility for implementing them. Prison officer and nurse perceptions of HCV and attitudes toward a range of harm reduction interventions, including clean needle and bleach provision, were explored. In the context of highly prevalent feelings of resentment,...

  13. Reductive desulfurization of dibenzyldisulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, K W

    1992-07-01

    Dibenzyldisulfide was reductively degraded by a methanogenic mixed culture derived from a sewage digestor. Toluene was produced with benzyl mercaptan as an intermediate in sulfur-limited medium. Toluene production was strictly associated with biological activity; however, the reducing agent for the culture medium, Ti(III), was partially responsible for production of benzyl mercaptan. Sulfide was not detected. Additions of sodium sulfide did not inhibit toluene production. Additions of 2-bromoethane sulfonic acid prevented methanogenesis but did not adversely affect toluene yields.

  14. Drag reduction strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, D. Christopher

    1994-12-01

    previously a description was given of an active control scheme using wall transpiration that leads to a 15% reduction in surface skin friction beneath a turbulent boundary layer, according to direct numerical simulation. In this research brief further details of that scheme and its variants are given together with some suggestions as to how sensor/actuator arrays could be configured to reduce surface drag. The research which is summarized here was performed during the first half of 1994. This research is motivated by the need to understand better how the dynamics of near-wall turbulent flow can be modified so that skin friction is reduced. The reduction of turbulent skin friction is highly desirable in many engineering applications. Experiments and direct numerical simulations have led to an increased understanding of the cycle of turbulence production and transport in the boundary layer and raised awareness of the possibility of disrupting the process with a subsequent reduction in turbulent skin friction. The implementation of active feedback control in a computational setting is a viable approach for the investigation of the modifications to the flow physics that can be achieved. Bewley et al. and Hill describe how ideas from optimal control theory are employed to give 'sub-optimal' drag reduction schemes. The objectives of the work reported here is to investigate in greater detail the assumptions implicit within such schemes and their limitations. It is also our objective to describe how an array of sensors and actuators could be arranged and interconnected to form a 'smart' surface which has low skin friction.

  15. Efficient emissions reduction

    OpenAIRE

    Roussillon, Beatrice; Schweinzer, Paul

    2010-01-01

    We propose a simple mechanism capable of achieving international agreement on the reduction of harmful emissions to their efficient level. It employs a contest creating incentives among participating nations to simultaneously exert efficient productive and efficient abatement efforts. Participation in the most stylised formulation of the scheme is voluntary and individually rational. All rules are mutually agreeable and are unanimously adopted if proposed. The scheme balances its budget and r...

  16. Carotenoids and amphibians: effects on life history and susceptibility to the infectious pathogen, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cothran, Rickey D; Gervasi, Stephanie S; Murray, Cindy; French, Beverly J; Bradley, Paul W; Urbina, Jenny; Blaustein, Andrew R; Relyea, Rick A

    2015-01-01

    Carotenoids are considered beneficial nutrients because they provide increased immune capacity. Although carotenoid research has been conducted in many vertebrates, little research has been done in amphibians, a group that is experiencing global population declines from numerous causes, including disease. We raised two amphibian species through metamorphosis on three carotenoid diets to quantify the effects on life-history traits and post-metamorphic susceptibility to a fungal pathogen (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis; Bd). Increased carotenoids had no effect on survival to metamorphosis in gray treefrogs (Hyla versicolor) but caused lower survival to metamorphosis in wood frogs [Lithobates sylvaticus (Rana sylvatica)]. Increased carotenoids caused both species to experience slower development and growth. When exposed to Bd after metamorphosis, wood frogs experienced high mortality, and the carotenoid diets had no mitigating effects. Gray treefrogs were less susceptible to Bd, which prevented an assessment of whether carotenoids could mitigate the effects of Bd. Moreover, carotenoids had no effect on pathogen load. As one of only a few studies examining the effects of carotenoids on amphibians and the first to examine potential interactions with Bd, our results suggest that carotenoids do not always serve amphibians in the many positive ways that have become the paradigm in other vertebrates.

  17. Antifungal susceptibility of Candida species isolated from patients with candidemia in southern Taiwan, 2007-2012: impact of new antifungal breakpoints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Chun; Kuo, Shu-Fang; Chen, Fang-Ju; Lee, Chen-Hsiang

    2017-02-01

    The Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute (CLSI) revised the clinical breakpoints (CBPs) for the azoles and echinocandins against Candida species in 2012. We aimed to report the epidemiology of candidemia and antifungal susceptibility of Candida species and evaluate the impact of new CBPs on antifungal susceptibility in our region. All blood isolates of Candida species were obtained from 2007 to 2012. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of fluconazole, voriconazole, echinocandins and flucytosine against Candida isolates were determined by Sensititre YeastOne system. Differences in susceptibility rates between the CBPs of previous and revised versions of CLSI were examined. Of 709 Candida isolates, the fluconazole-susceptible rate was 96.5% in Candida albicans, 85.8% in Candida tropicalis and 92.1% in Candida parapsilosis by the revised CBPs. Compared with the susceptibility results by previous CBPs, the marked reductions in susceptibility of C. albicans, C. tropicalis and C. parapsilosis to fluconazole, that of C. tropicalis and C. parapsilosis to voriconazole, that of C. tropicalis and Candida glabrata to anidulafungin and that of C. tropicalis, C. glabrata and Candida krusei to caspofungin by revised CBPs were found. In conclusion, Candida albicans and C. parapsilosis remain highly susceptible to fluconazole. The non-susceptible rates of Candida species to azoles and echinocandins increase with interpretation by the revised CBPs. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  18. Oxygen Reduction on Platinum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nesselberger, Markus

    This thesis investigates the electro reduction of oxygen on platinum nanoparticles, which serve as catalyst in low temperature fuel cells. Kinetic studies on model catalysts as well as commercially used systems are presented in order to investigate the particle size effect, the particle proximity...... adsorption on Pt does not block the ORR directly. Instead, the onset of oxide formation with the concomitant conversion of the anion adsorbate layer is the decisive blocking mechanism....... effect and anion adsorption on the performance of Pt based electrocatalysts. The anion adsorption is additionally studied by in situ electrochemical infrared spectroscopy during the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). For this purpose an in situ FTIR setup in attenuated total refection (ATR) configuration....... The influence of the ion adsorption strength, which is observed in the “particle size studies” on the oxygen reduction rate on Pt/C catalysts, is further investigated under similar reaction conditions by infrared spectroscopy. The designed in situ electrochemical ATR-FTIR setup features a high level...

  19. Survival of enterococci during hospital laundry processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, K E; Holliday, M G; Jones, A L; Robson, I; Perry, J D

    2002-02-01

    Much remains to be elucidated about the epidemiology of nosocomial enterococcal infections. Enterococci are, however, known to be relatively thermotolerant, and several studies have shown that under laboratory conditions many strains are able to survive the time/temperature combinations of the UK Department of Health recommendations for the decontamination of used linen (HSG(95)18). We therefore wished to investigate the efficacy of decontamination of enterococci from hospital linen in working hospital laundries. The thermotolerance of 40 strains of Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium was first determined. Reduction by a factor of greater than 10(5) was achieved in only two of 40 strains after 3 min at 71 degrees C or 10 min at 65 degrees C, the time/temperature combinations specified by the Department of Health for the disinfection of used linen. During experimental challenge of 10 working hospital laundries, however, we demonstrated successful decontamination of laundry artificially contaminated with enterococci. This was shown to take place during the washing stage. Our study suggests that, despite the relative thermotolerance of enterococci, the time/temperature combinations specified in HSG(95)18 should be adequate for their decontamination in hospital laundries. Copyright 2002 The Hospital Infection Society.

  20. Stage at diagnosis and ovarian cancer survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maringe, Camille; Walters, Sarah; Butler, John

    2012-01-01

    We investigate what role stage at diagnosis bears in international differences in ovarian cancer survival.......We investigate what role stage at diagnosis bears in international differences in ovarian cancer survival....

  1. In vitro susceptibility of the Streptococcus milleri group to antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartie, K L; Devine, D A; Wilson, M J; Lewis, M A O

    2008-07-01

    To determine the susceptibility of strains of the Streptococcus milleri group (SMG) to commercially available antimicrobial peptides. Thirty strains of SMG from a range of sources were assessed for their susceptibility to 10 antimicrobial peptides of either human, animal or insect origin, using a double layer diffusion assay. The majority of the test strains were sensitive to the amidated peptides, mastoparan (100%; n = 30), magainin 2 amide (95%; n = 21) and indolicin (91%; n = 23). Some strains were susceptible to cecropin B (30%; n = 30) and histatin (10%; n = 30), whilst no activity was observed for the defensins HNP-1 and HNP-2, histatin 8, cecropin P1 and magainin 2. The majority of strains were resistant to the human derived peptides. The ability to resist such peptides may be a factor in the colonisation of the oral cavity and the survival and initiation of infection in the pulp and root canal environment. Interestingly, the present study indicated that amidated and alpha helical peptides exhibit antimicrobial activity against SMG. Structural modification of these peptides may allow a targeted approach for the development of these substances as preventative or therapeutic agents.

  2. Baseline susceptibilities of B- and Q-biotype Bemisia tabaci to anthranilic diamides in Arizona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianchun; Degain, Benjamin A; Harpold, Virginia S; Marçon, Paula G; Nichols, Robert L; Fournier, Alfred J; Naranjo, Steven E; Palumbo, John C; Ellsworth, Peter C

    2012-01-01

    Development of pyriproxyfen and neonicotinoid resistance in the B-biotype whitefly and recent introduction of the Q biotype have the potential to threaten current whitefly management programs in Arizona. The possibility of integrating the novel anthranilic diamides chlorantraniliprole and cyantraniliprole into the current program to tackle these threats largely depends on whether these compounds have cross-resistance with pyriproxyfen and neonicotinoids in whiteflies. To address this question, the authors bioassayed a susceptible B-biotype strain, a pyriproxyfen-resistant B-biotype strain, four multiply resistant Q-biotype strains and 16 B-biotype field populations from Arizona with a systemic uptake bioassay developed in the present study. The magnitude of variations in LC(50) and LC(99) among the B-biotype populations or the Q-biotype strains was less than fivefold and tenfold, respectively, for both chlorantraniliprole and cyantraniliprole. The Q-biotype strains were relatively more tolerant than the B-biotype populations. No correlations were observed between the LC(50) (or LC(99)) values of the two diamides against the B- and Q-biotype populations tested and their survival rates at a discriminating dose of pyriproxyfen or imidacloprid. These results indicate the absence of cross-resistance between the two anthranilic diamides and the currently used neonicotinoids and pyriproxyfen. Future variation in susceptibility of field populations to chlorantraniliprole and cyantraniliprole could be documented according to the baseline susceptibility range of the populations tested in this study. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Attribute Reduction and Information Granularity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-hong Wang

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available In the view of granularity, this paper analyzes the influence of three attribute reducts on an information system, finding that the possible reduct and m - decision reduct will make the granule view coarser, while discernible reduct will not change the granule view. In addition, we investigate the combination of reducts from two partial information systems in parallel or in incremental data mining and urge that the union of partial possible reducts can be regarded as a possible reduct for union of partial information systems.

  4. Toward a theory of international new venture survivability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turcan, Romeo V.

    2011-01-01

    technique was employed. The method of constructing typologies by reduction was employed to advance the typology of hype defined as the overall sentiment of the environmental context, within which the firm is embedded, about the future. Grounded in data, there emerged a middle-range theory of international......In this longitudinal study, we explore in-depth how entrepreneurs acquire legitimacy for their new ventures in an attempt to internationalise and survive before and after the dot.com bubble. We adopted a longitudinal multiple-case study methodology for the purpose of theory building. Five firms...... new venture survivability that postulates that the closer the new venture is to the hype, the higher the likelihood of failure. Several implications to the theory of new venture legitimacy could be singled out. The paper makes an attempt to understand the nature of a legitimacy threshold. The data...

  5. Factors affecting griseofulvin susceptibility testing of Trichophyton rubrum in microcultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granade, T C; Artis, W M

    1982-01-01

    A microculture broth assay system for griseofulvin susceptibility testing of Trichophyton rubrum was further characterized. The effects of mass and number of colony-forming units of a fragmented mycelial inoculum, 5- or 8-day incubation periods, 25 or 32 degrees C incubation temperatures, and the solvents used to dissolve griseofulvin on the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of griseofulvin were determined. An inoculum density with an absorbance of 0.600 at 450 nm ensured successful inoculation of all microcultures. Reduction of the inoculum mass to an absorbance of 0.200 lowered the number of colony-forming units in the inoculum by 60 to 80%. This decreased the efficiency of inoculation but did not alter the resulting MIC. There was no correlation between MIC and the number of colony-forming units used to initiate growth. Neither incubation temperature nor the length of incubation affected the MIC. The use of either acetone or ethanol to solubilize griseofulvin likewise had no effect on the MIC. The mean reproducibility of the MICs determined with the microculture method was 96%. Images PMID:7161372

  6. Health effects of air pollution on length of respiratory cancer survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaohui; Ha, Sandie; Kan, Haidong; Hu, Hui; Curbow, Barbara A; Lissaker, Claudia T K

    2013-09-03

    Air pollution has been extensively and consistently linked with mortality. However, no study has investigated the health effects of air pollution on length of survival among diagnosed respiratory cancer patients. In this study, we conducted a population-based study to investigate if air pollution exposure has adverse effects on survival time of respiratory cancer cases in Los Angeles (LA), CA and Honolulu, HI. We selected all White respiratory cancer patients in the two study areas from the 1992-2008 Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results cancer data. Death from respiratory cancer and length of survival were the main outcomes. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis shows that all respiratory cancer cases exposed to high air pollution referring to the individuals from LA had a significantly shorter survival time than the low pollution exposure group referring to those from Honolulu without adjusting for other covariates (p pollution may have deleterious effects on the length of survival among White respiratory cancer patients. This study calls for attention to preventive effort from air pollution for this susceptible population in standard cancer patient care. The findings from this study warrant further investigation.

  7. Survival of adult martens in Northern Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas P. McCann; Patrick A. Zollner; Jonathan H. Gilbert

    2010-01-01

    Low adult marten (Martes americana) survival may be one factor limiting their population growth >30 yr after their reintroduction in Wisconsin, USA. We estimated annual adult marten survival at 0.81 in northern Wisconsin, with lower survival during winter (0.87) than summer-fall (1.00). Fisher (Martes pennanti) and raptor kills...

  8. Long-term survival after perforated diverticulitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Vermeulen (Jan); M.P. Gosselink (Martijn Pieter); W.C.J. Hop (Wim); E. van der Harst (Erwin); B.E. Hansen (Bettina); G.H.H. Mannaerts (Guido); P-P. Coene (Peter Paul); W.F. Weidema (Wibo); J.F. Lange (Johan)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAim: Short-term survival after emergency surgery for perforated diverticulitis is poor. Less is known about long-term survival. The aims of this study were to evaluate long-term survival after discharge from hospital and to identify factors associated with prognosis. Method: All patients

  9. Clustered survival data with left-truncation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Frank; Martinussen, Torben; Scheike, Thomas H.

    2015-01-01

    Left-truncation occurs frequently in survival studies, and it is well known how to deal with this for univariate survival times. However, there are few results on how to estimate dependence parameters and regression effects in semiparametric models for clustered survival data with delayed entry...

  10. 46 CFR 133.105 - Survival craft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Survival craft. 133.105 Section 133.105 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS LIFESAVING SYSTEMS Requirements for All OSVs § 133.105 Survival craft. (a) Each survival craft must be approved and equipped as...

  11. 46 CFR 199.201 - Survival craft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Survival craft. 199.201 Section 199.201 Shipping COAST... SYSTEMS FOR CERTAIN INSPECTED VESSELS Additional Requirements for Passenger Vessels § 199.201 Survival craft. (a) Each survival craft must be approved and equipped as follows: (1) Each lifeboat must be...

  12. 46 CFR 199.261 - Survival craft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Survival craft. 199.261 Section 199.261 Shipping COAST... SYSTEMS FOR CERTAIN INSPECTED VESSELS Additional Requirements for Cargo Vessels § 199.261 Survival craft. (a) Each survival craft must be approved and equipped as follows: (1) Each lifeboat must be a totally...

  13. 46 CFR 28.120 - Survival craft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Survival craft. 28.120 Section 28.120 Shipping COAST... VESSELS Requirements for All Vessels § 28.120 Survival craft. (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (b) through (h) of this section and 28.305, each vessel must carry the survival craft specified in Table 28...

  14. 46 CFR 174.320 - Damage survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Damage survival. 174.320 Section 174.320 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO... survival. A hopper dredge survives assumed damage if it meets the following conditions: (a) The maximum...

  15. Surviving the crash: T-cell homeostasis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TOSHIBA

    Spatial and temporal elements. – Cellular sites for the integration of cell death and survival cues. – Spatial regulation of Notch activity for cell survival. Page 4. Cell survival is determined by the availability and uptake of nutrients live dead. Activated T-cells. T-cells. Page 5. dead wildtype. Bax active -6A7. Nucleus – H33342.

  16. Surviving Impact in Experiments and on Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, P. H.

    2012-12-01

    speed objects hitting the Moon. As a result, some processes observed in laboratory experiments can guide further computer simulations and benchmarking. For example, vapor expansion scours away downrange surface materials while low-angle, hypervelocity projectile fragments melt and mix with the target downrange, thereby creating distinct compositions. At large scales on the Moon, the reduction in cratering efficiency exposes early-time processes and becomes even more obvious for oblique impacts where the these processes are mapped across the surface. Impacts on the edge of an adjacent basin or crater (e.g., King Crater on the Moon) expose the surviving impactor component in the downrange melt, rather than proposing a near-surface mafic intrusion. At basin scales, the disrupted inner ring and downrange extension create the appearance of a double impact (e.g., Orientale, Crisium and Moscoviense basins). Large basins formed also may preserve signatures of melt-mixed impactor components within the basin along the inner ring uprange, e.g., Mg-rich spinels within the inner ring of Moscoviense.

  17. Organisms causing pyoderma and their susceptibility patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R G Baslas

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available Five hundred and seventy cases of pyoderma were studied clinically and bacteriologically. Of these, 58.8% cases were of primary pyoderma, and the rest were secondary pyoderma. Primary pyoderma consituted impetigo contagiosa (21.4%, bullous impetigo (3.3%, ecthyma (4.4%, superficial folliculitis (12.3%, chronic folliculitis of legs (8.8%; forunculosis (3.7% carbuncle (1.8%, folliculitis decalvans (0.4%, sycosis barbae (0.4% and abscess (2.5%. Secondary pyderma cases were infected scabies (23.9%, infected wound (1.1%, infectious eczematoid dermatitis (12.6%, intertrigo (0.4% and miscellaneous (3.3%. In 85 samples, no organism was isolated. Out of 485 samples, 75.9% grew a single organism and the rest (24.1% gave multiple organisms. Among the 603 strains collected, 73.6% were staphylococcus aureus, 25.0% were beta-haemolytic streptococcus and 0.7% each were alpha-haemolytic streptococcus and Gram negative bacilli. Eighty eight per cent strains of Staphylococcus aureous were susceptible to cephaloridine and 27.4% to ampicillin while 97.4% beta haemolytic streptococcus were susceptible to cephaloridine and 23.2% to pencillin.

  18. Measuring Nematic Susceptibilities from the Elastoresistivity Tensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristov, A. T.; Shapiro, M. C.; Hlobil, Patrick; Maharaj, Akash; Chu, Jiun-Haw; Fisher, Ian

    The elastoresistivity tensor mijkl relates changes in resistivity to the strain on a material. As a fourth-rank tensor, it contains considerably more information about the material than the simpler (second-rank) resistivity tensor; in particular, certain elastoresistivity coefficients can be related to thermodynamic susceptibilities and serve as a direct probe of symmetry breaking at a phase transition. The aim of this talk is twofold. First, we enumerate how symmetry both constrains the structure of the elastoresistivity tensor into an easy-to-understand form and connects tensor elements to thermodynamic susceptibilities. In the process, we generalize previous studies of elastoresistivity to include the effects of magnetic field. Second, we describe an approach to measuring quantities in the elastoresistivity tensor with a novel transverse measurement, which is immune to relative strain offsets. These techniques are then applied to BaFe2As2 in a proof of principle measurement. This work is supported by the Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division, under Contract DE-AC02-76SF00515.

  19. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Brachyspira hyodysenteriae in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchgässner, C; Schmitt, S; Borgström, A; Wittenbrink, M M

    2016-06-01

    Brachyspira (B.) hyodysenteriae is the causative agent of swine dysentery (SD), a severe mucohaemorrhagic diarrheal disease in pigs worldwide. So far, the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of B. hyodysenteriae in Switzerland have not been investigated. Therefore, a panel of 30 porcine B. hyodysenteriae isolates were tested against 6 antimicrobial agents by using the VetMIC Brachy panel, a broth microdilution test. Tiamulin and valnemulin showed high antimicrobial activity inhibiting all isolates at low concentrations. The susceptibility testing of doxycycline revealed values from ≤0.25 μg/ ml (47%) to 2 μg/ml (10%). The MIC values of lincomycin ranged between ≤0.5 μg/ml (30%) and 32 μg/ml (43%). For tylosin, 57% of the isolates could not be inhibited at the highest concentration of ≥128 μg/ml. The MIC values for tylvalosin were between ≤0.25 μg/ml (10%) and 8 μg/ml (20%). These findings reveal Switzerland's favourable situation compared to other European countries. Above all, tiamulin and valnemulin are still effective antimicrobial agents and can be further used for the treatment of SD.

  20. Antibiotic Susceptibility Patterns of Vibrio cholerae isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S D Shrestha

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Cholera is one of the most common diarrhoeal diseases in Nepal. Etiological agent of cholera is Vibrio cholerae which removes essential body fluids, salts and vital nutrients, which are necessary for life causing dehydration and malnutrition. Emerging antimicrobial resistant is common. The aim of the present study was to determine the antibiotic susceptibility pattern of cholera patients in Nepal. METHODS: All the laboratory works were conducted in the bacteriology section of National Public Health Laboratory, Teku from March to September 2005. During this period a total of 340 stool samples from diarrhoeal patients were collected and processed according to the standard laboratory methods. Each patient suffering from diarrhoea was directly interviewed for his or her clinical history during sample collection. RESULTS: A total of 340 stool samples were processed and studied from both sex including all ages of patients. Among the processed sample 53 Vibrio cholerae cases were found. All isolated Vibrio cholerae O1 were El Tor, Inaba. All isolated (100% Vibrio cholerae O1 were sensitive to Ampicillin, Ciprofloxacin, Erythromycin and Tetracycline whereas all were resistant to Nalidixic acid and Cotrimoxazole. Only 15.1% cases were sensitive to Furazolidone whereas 84.9% were resistant. CONCLUSION: All V. cholerae strains isolated in this study were found resistant to Multi Drug Resistant (resistant to at least two antibiotics of different group. Ampicillin, Ciprofloxacin, Erythromycin and Tetracycline were found still more potent antibiotics against Vibrio cholerae isolated during the study. Keywords: antibiotics, susceptibility, Vibrio cholera.

  1. Universal locality of quantum thermal susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Palma, Giacomo; De Pasquale, Antonella; Giovannetti, Vittorio

    2017-05-01

    The ultimate precision of any measurement of the temperature of a quantum system is the inverse of the local quantum thermal susceptibility [A. De Pasquale et al., Nat. Commun. 7, 12782 (2016), 10.1038/ncomms12782] of the subsystem with which the thermometer interacts. If this subsystem can be described with the canonical ensemble, such quantity reduces to the variance of the local Hamiltonian, which is proportional to the heat capacity of the subsystem. However, the canonical ensemble might not apply in the presence of interactions between the subsystem and the rest of the system. In this work, we address this problem in the framework of locally interacting quantum systems. We prove that the local quantum thermal susceptibility of any subsystem is close to the variance of its local Hamiltonian, provided the volume-to-surface ratio of the subsystem is much larger than the correlation length. This result greatly simplifies the determination of the ultimate precision of any local estimate of the temperature and rigorously determines the regime where interactions can affect this precision.

  2. FLOOD SUSCEPTIBILITY ASSESSMENT IN THE NIRAJ BASIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SANDA ROŞCA

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Flood susceptibility assessment in the Niraj basin. In the context of global warming and the increasing frequency of extreme weather events, it becomes evident that we have to face natural hazards, such as floods. In the area of Niraj basin this phenomenon is specific both in the spring, because of the snow melting and of the precipitations which come along with the season, and then in the summer because of the torrential precipitations but rarely in autumn and winter. The aim of this paper is to determinate the susceptibility of the zone and obtain a map which will take into consideration the possibility of a flooding. Defining vulnerability can help us understand this type of natural disasters and find the best ways to reduce it. For this purpose we use thematic layers, morphological characteristics (slope and depth fragmentation, hydrological characteristics, geology, pedology (permeability and soil texture, landuse, precipitation data, and human interventions because in this way we have the possibility to use data mining for this purpose. Data mining will allow us to extract new information based on the existing sets of data.The final result will be a thematic map that highlights the areas which are exposed to the flood. Therefore, this map can be used as a support decision for local government or business purposes.

  3. Microfluidics for Antibiotic Susceptibility and Toxicity Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Dai

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The recent emergence of antimicrobial resistance has become a major concern for worldwide policy makers as very few new antibiotics have been developed in the last twenty-five years. To prevent the death of millions of people worldwide, there is an urgent need for a cheap, fast and accurate set of tools and techniques that can help to discover and develop new antimicrobial drugs. In the past decade, microfluidic platforms have emerged as potential systems for conducting pharmacological studies. Recent studies have demonstrated that microfluidic platforms can perform rapid antibiotic susceptibility tests to evaluate antimicrobial drugs’ efficacy. In addition, the development of cell-on-a-chip and organ-on-a-chip platforms have enabled the early drug testing, providing more accurate insights into conventional cell cultures on the drug pharmacokinetics and toxicity, at the early and cheaper stage of drug development, i.e., prior to animal and human testing. In this review, we focus on the recent developments of microfluidic platforms for rapid antibiotics susceptibility testing, investigating bacterial persistence and non-growing but metabolically active (NGMA bacteria, evaluating antibiotic effectiveness on biofilms and combinatorial effect of antibiotics, as well as microfluidic platforms that can be used for in vitro antibiotic toxicity testing.

  4. Acute exposure of mice to high-dose ultrafine carbon black decreases susceptibility to pneumococcal pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon Stephen

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epidemiological studies suggest that inhalation of carbonaceous particulate matter from biomass combustion increases susceptibility to bacterial pneumonia. In vitro studies report that phagocytosis of carbon black by alveolar macrophages (AM impairs killing of Streptococcus pneumoniae. We have previously reported high levels of black carbon in AM from biomass smoke-exposed children and adults. We therefore aimed to use a mouse model to test the hypothesis that high levels of carbon loading of AM in vivo increases susceptibility to pneumococcal pneumonia. Methods Female outbred mice were treated with either intranasal phosphate buffered saline (PBS or ultrafine carbon black (UF-CB in PBS; 500 μg on day 1 and day 4, and then infected with S. pneumoniae strain D39 on day 5. Survival was assessed over 72 h. The effect of UF-CB on AM carbon loading, airway inflammation, and a urinary marker of pulmonary oxidative stress was assessed in uninfected animals. Results Instillation of UF-CB in mice resulted a pattern of AM carbon loading similar to that of biomass-smoke exposed humans. In uninfected animals, UF-CB treated animals had increased urinary 8-oxodG (P = 0.055, and an increased airway neutrophil differential count (P . pneumoniae, whereas morbidity and mortality after infection was reduced in UF-CB treated animals (median survival 48 h vs. 30 h, P . pneumoniae colony forming unit counts, and lower airway levels of keratinocyte-derived chemokine/growth-related oncogene (KC/GRO, and interferon gamma. Conclusion Acute high level loading of AM with ultrafine carbon black particles per se does not increase the susceptibility of mice to pneumococcal infection in vivo.

  5. Multiscale/multiresolution landslides susceptibility mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grozavu, Adrian; Cătălin Stanga, Iulian; Valeriu Patriche, Cristian; Toader Juravle, Doru

    2014-05-01

    Within the European strategies, landslides are considered an important threatening that requires detailed studies to identify areas where these processes could occur in the future and to design scientific and technical plans for landslide risk mitigation. In this idea, assessing and mapping the landslide susceptibility is an important preliminary step. Generally, landslide susceptibility at small scale (for large regions) can be assessed through qualitative approach (expert judgements), based on a few variables, while studies at medium and large scale requires quantitative approach (e.g. multivariate statistics), a larger set of variables and, necessarily, the landslide inventory. Obviously, the results vary more or less from a scale to another, depending on the available input data, but also on the applied methodology. Since it is almost impossible to have a complete landslide inventory on large regions (e.g. at continental level), it is very important to verify the compatibility and the validity of results obtained at different scales, identifying the differences and fixing the inherent errors. This paper aims at assessing and mapping the landslide susceptibility at regional level through a multiscale-multiresolution approach from small scale and low resolution to large scale and high resolution of data and results, comparing the compatibility of results. While the first ones could be used for studies at european and national level, the later ones allows results validation, including through fields surveys. The test area, namely the Barlad Plateau (more than 9000 sq.km) is located in Eastern Romania, covering a region where both the natural environment and the human factor create a causal context that favor these processes. The landslide predictors were initially derived from various databases available at pan-european level and progressively completed and/or enhanced together with scale and the resolution: the topography (from SRTM at 90 meters to digital

  6. Susceptibility to a metal under global warming is shaped by thermal adaptation along a latitudinal gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinh Van, Khuong; Janssens, Lizanne; Debecker, Sara; De Jonge, Maarten; Lambret, Philippe; Nilsson-Örtman, Viktor; Bervoets, Lieven; Stoks, Robby

    2013-09-01

    Global warming and contamination represent two major threats to biodiversity that have the potential to interact synergistically. There is the potential for gradual local thermal adaptation and dispersal to higher latitudes to mitigate the susceptibility of organisms to contaminants and global warming at high latitudes. Here, we applied a space-for-time substitution approach to study the thermal dependence of the susceptibility of Ischnura elegans damselfly larvae to zinc in a common garden warming experiment (20 and 24 °C) with replicated populations from three latitudes spanning >1500 km in Europe. We observed a striking latitude-specific effect of temperature on the zinc-induced mortality pattern; local thermal adaptation along the latitudinal gradient made Swedish, but not French, damselfly larvae more susceptible to zinc at 24 °C. Latitude- and temperature-specific differences in zinc susceptibility may be related to the amount of energy available to defend against and repair damage since Swedish larvae showed a much stronger zinc-induced reduction of food intake at 24 °C. The pattern of local thermal adaptation indicates that the predicted temperature increase of 4 °C by 2100 will strongly magnify the impact of a contaminant such as zinc at higher latitudes unless there is thermal evolution and/or migration of lower latitude genotypes. Our results underscore the critical importance of studying the susceptibility to contaminants under realistic warming scenarios taking into account local thermal adaptation across natural temperature gradients. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Drug susceptibility prediction against a panel of drugs using kernelized Bayesian multitask learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gönen, Mehmet; Margolin, Adam A

    2014-09-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and cancer require personalized therapies owing to their inherent heterogeneous nature. For both diseases, large-scale pharmacogenomic screens of molecularly characterized samples have been generated with the hope of identifying genetic predictors of drug susceptibility. Thus, computational algorithms capable of inferring robust predictors of drug responses from genomic information are of great practical importance. Most of the existing computational studies that consider drug susceptibility prediction against a panel of drugs formulate a separate learning problem for each drug, which cannot make use of commonalities between subsets of drugs. In this study, we propose to solve the problem of drug susceptibility prediction against a panel of drugs in a multitask learning framework by formulating a novel Bayesian algorithm that combines kernel-based non-linear dimensionality reduction and binary classification (or regression). The main novelty of our method is the joint Bayesian formulation of projecting data points into a shared subspace and learning predictive models for all drugs in this subspace, which helps us to eliminate off-target effects and drug-specific experimental noise. Another novelty of our method is the ability of handling missing phenotype values owing to experimental conditions and quality control reasons. We demonstrate the performance of our algorithm via cross-validation experiments on two benchmark drug susceptibility datasets of HIV and cancer. Our method obtains statistically significantly better predictive performance on most of the drugs compared with baseline single-task algorithms that learn drug-specific models. These results show that predicting drug susceptibility against a panel of drugs simultaneously within a multitask learning framework improves overall predictive performance over single-task learning approaches. Our Matlab implementations for binary classification and regression are available at

  8. Comparison of susceptibility patterns using commercially available susceptibility testing methods performed on prevalent Candida spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cretella, David; Barber, Katie E; King, S Travis; Stover, Kayla R

    2016-12-01

    The rising rates of invasive fungal infections caused by non-albicans Candida and the increasing emergence of antifungal resistance complicate the management of invasive candidiasis. Accurate and timely antifungal susceptibility testing is critical to targeting antifungal therapy. The purpose of this study was to compare commercially available susceptibility testing methods using prospectively collected Candida isolates. Susceptibility testing was performed on 74 Candida isolates collected from July 2014 to March 2015 using broth microdilution according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute method, Etest, Vitek 2 (YS-05) and Sensititre. Essential agreement and categorical agreement (CA) were assessed using the reference method. Of the 34 total blood isolates collected, Candida albicans comprised only 38 % (13) of the Candida spp. with Candidaglabrata being nearly as prevalent (29 %, 10). CA using Etest was 86 % for fluconazole, 72 % for caspofungin, 98 % for micafungin and 97 % for anidulafungin. Vitek 2 CA was 90 % for fluconazole and 98 % for caspofungin. Sensititre CA was 93 % for fluconazole, 98 % for caspofungin, 98 % for micafungin and 100 % for anidulafungin. Although our study tested a small population of Candida isolates, our results were variable by method. When implementing antifungal susceptibility testing, clinicians should be aware of the strengths and limitations of each testing method.

  9. Susceptibility of Porphyromonas gingivalis in biofilms to amoxicillin, doxycycline and metronidazole

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, T.

    2002-01-01

    Biofilm, Porphyromonas gingivalis, susceptibility testing, amoxicillin, doxycycline, metronidazole......Biofilm, Porphyromonas gingivalis, susceptibility testing, amoxicillin, doxycycline, metronidazole...

  10. Survival strategies in arctic ungulates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. J. C. Tyler

    1990-09-01

    Full Text Available Arctic ungulates usually neither freeze nor starve to death despite the rigours of winter. Physiological adaptations enable them to survive and reproduce despite long periods of intense cold and potential undernutrition. Heat conservation is achieved by excellent insulation combined with nasal heat exchange. Seasonal variation in fasting metabolic rate has been reported in several temperate and sub-arctic species of ungulates and seems to occur in muskoxen. Surprisingly, there is no evidence for this in reindeer. Both reindeer and caribou normally maintain low levels of locomotor activity in winter. Light foot loads are important for reducing energy expenditure while walking over snow. The significance and control of selective cooling of the brain during hard exercise (e.g. escape from predators is discussed. Like other cervids, reindeer and caribou display a pronounced seasonal cycle of appetite and growth which seems to have an intrinsic basis. This has two consequences. First, the animals evidently survive perfectly well despite enduring negative energy balance for long periods. Second, loss of weight in winter is not necessarily evidence of undernutrition. The main role of fat reserves, especially in males, may be to enhance reproductive success. The principal role of fat reserves in winter appears to be to provide a supplement to, rather than a substitute for, poor quality winter forage. Fat also provides an insurance against death during periods of acute starvation.

  11. Candida and candidaemia. Susceptibility and epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendrup, Maiken Cavling

    2013-11-01

    In our part of the world invasive fungal infections include invasive yeast infections with Candida as the absolutely dominating pathogen and invasive mould infections with Aspergillus as the main organism. Yeasts are part of our normal micro-flora and invasive infections arise only when barrier leakage or impaired immune function occurs. On the contrary, moulds are ubiquitous in the nature and environment and their conidia inhaled at a daily basis. Hence invasive mould infections typically arise from the airways whereas invasive yeast infections typically enter the bloodstream causing fungaemia. Candida is by far the most common fungal blood stream pathogen; hence this genus has been the main focus of this thesis. As neither the Danish epidemiology nor the susceptibility of fungal pathogens was well described when we initiated our studies we initially wanted to be able to include animal models in our work. Therefore, a comprehensive animal study was undertaken comparing the virulence in a haematogenous mouse model of eight different Candida species including the five most common ones in human infections (C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. krusei, C. parapsilosis and C. tropicalis and in addition three rarer species C. guilliermondii, C. lusitaniae and C. kefyr). We found remarkable differences in the virulence among these species and were able to group the species according to decreasing virulence in three groups I: C. albicans and C. tropicalis, II: C. glabrata, C. lusitaniae and C. kefyr, and III: C. krusei, C. parapsilosis and C. guilliermondii. Apart from being necessary for our subsequent animal experiments exploring in vivo antifungal susceptibility, these findings also helped us understand at least part of the reason for the differences in the epidemiology and the pitfalls associated with the establishment of genus rather than species specific breakpoints. In example, it was less surprising that C. albicans has been the dominant pathogen and associated with a

  12. UCAC3: Astrometric Reductions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    2010). Double star fits of blended images are based on the same Lorentz image profile model, however three more free parame- ters are used for the two...single width of the profiles for both components of a double star and a single background level parameter is used in this fit. The x, y data files also...provided with the DVD release. The UCAC3 is based on a complete re-reduction of the pixel data aiming at more completeness with the inclusion of double

  13. Transportation network reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav PALÚCH

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Network reduction problem is formulated as follows: We are given a transportation network T, a set of important origin – destination relations R and a number q greater than 1. The goal is to find a subnetwork S of the given network T such that all shortest paths between all origin – destination pairs from R using only subnetwork S are not longer than q-multiple of the corresponding distance in original network T. A mathematical model and an exact algorithm of just mentioned task is presented.

  14. Foreign Ownership and Long-term Survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronborg, Dorte; Thomsen, Steen

    2006-01-01

    Does foreign ownership enhance or decrease a firm's chances of survival? Over the 100 year period 1895-2001 this paper compares the survival of foreign subsidiaries in Denmark to a control sample matched by industry and firm size. We find that foreign-owned companies have higher survival...... probability. On average exit risk for domestic companies is 2.3 times higher than for foreign companies. First movers like Siemens, Philips, Kodak, Ford, GM or Goodyear have been active in the country for almost a century. Relative foreign survival increases with company age. However, the foreign survival...

  15. Survival costs of chick rearing in black-legged kittiwakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golet, Gregory H.; Irons, David B.; Estes, James A.

    1998-01-01

    1. We tested for costs of chick rearing in the black-legged kittiwake Rissa tridactyla (Linnaeus) by removing entire clutches from 149 of 405 randomly selected nests, in which one or both mates was colour-banded. After the manipulation, we monitored adult nest attendance and body condition at unmanipulated and manipulated nests, and measured the survival and fecundity of these adults the following year.2. Late in the chick-rearing period, adults from unmanipulated nests (i.e. with chicks) went on significantly longer foraging trips, and were significantly lighter for their size, than adults from manipulated nests (i.e. without chicks).3. Adults from unmanipulated nests also survived to the following nesting season at a significantly lower rate than those from the manipulated nests (0·898 vs. 0·953), suggesting that attempting to raise chicks can reduce life expectancy by 55%.4. There was a tendency for adults from nests that were unmanipulated in year one to have lower reproductive success in year two, primarily because of reduced fledging success, and a higher incidence of non-breeding.5. These findings suggest that mass loss in kittiwakes during chick rearing may not be adaptive. Raising chicks can lead to reproductive costs, and the causal mechanism appears to be a reduction in body condition.6. We compare our results with previous brood (or clutch) size manipulation experiments that have measured adult body condition, survival and/or future fecundity. Although the empirical evidence suggests that long-lived species are more likely to experience survival costs than short-lived species, we believe the opposite may be true. We suggest that shifting the experimental protocol of cost of reproduction studies from brood enlargements (an approach taken in most prior studies) to brood reductions will provide more accurate quantifications of naturally occurring costs.7. The cost of reproduction is one mechanism proposed to explain the reduced survival rates reported

  16. Exsanguination protocol improves survival after major hepatic trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaydfudim, Victor; Dutton, William D; Feurer, Irene D; Au, Brigham K; Pinson, C Wright; Cotton, Bryan A

    2010-01-01

    Hepatic injury remains an important cause of exsanguination after major trauma. Recent studies have noted a dramatic reduction in mortality amongst severely injured patients when trauma exsanguinations protocols (TEP) are employed. We hypothesised that utilisation of our institution's TEP at the initiation of hospital resuscitation would improve survival in patients with significant hepatic trauma. All patients who (1) sustained intra-abdominal haemorrhage with Grades III-V hepatic injury and (2) underwent immediate operative intervention between February 2004 and January 2008 were included in the study. TEP was instituted in February 2006, and all subsequent patients who met inclusion criteria and were treated with TEP constituted the study group. Patients who met inclusion criteria, were treated before introduction of TEP, and received at least 10 units packed red blood cells in the first 24h constituted pre-TEP comparison group. Univariate and multivariate analyses evaluated the effects of TEP on the study population. Seventy-five patients were included in the study: 39 in the pre-TEP cohort (31% 30-day survival) and 36 in the TEP cohort (53% 30-day survival). There were no differences in demographics, extent of hepatic injury, or operative approach between the patient groups (all p > or = 0.27). Injury Severity Scores were significantly higher in the TEP group (41+/-18 vs. 28+/-15, p<0.01). TEP patients received more plasma and platelets during operative intervention and significantly less crystalloid (all p<0.01). Occurrence of cardiac dysfunction and abdominal compartment syndrome was significantly lower in TEP patients who survived 24-h post-injury (both p < or = 0.04). After adjusting for the significant negative effects of Grade V injury and involvement of major hepatic vasculature (both p < or = 0.02), TEP significantly improved 30-day survival: OR=0.22, 95% CI: 0.06-0.81, p=0.02. TEP allows for an effective use of plasma and platelets during intra

  17. How long do centenarians survive?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Modig, Karin; Andersson, Tomas; Vaupel, James

    2017-01-01

    of advanced age. CONCLUSION: Mortality among centenarians is not changing despite improvements at younger ages. An extension of the maximum life span and a sizeable extension of life expectancy both require reductions in mortality above the age of 100 years. This article is protected by copyright. All rights......OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to explore the pattern of mortality above the age of 100 years. In particular, we aimed to examine whether Scandinavian data support the theory that mortality reaches a plateau at particularly old ages. Whether the maximum length of life increases with time...... length of life. Whether maximum age changed over time was analysed taking into account increases in cohort size. RESULTS: The results confirm that there has not been any improvement in mortality among centenarians in the past 30 years and that the current rise in life expectancy is driven by reductions...

  18. Effects of disruption of heat shock genes on susceptibility of Escherichia coli to fluoroquinolones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morioka Mizue

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is well known that expression of certain bacterial genes responds rapidly to such stimuli as exposure to toxic chemicals and physical agents. It is generally believed that the proteins encoded in these genes are important for successful survival of the organism under the hostile conditions. Analogously, the proteins induced in bacterial cells exposed to antibiotics are believed to affect the organisms' susceptibility to these agents. Results We demonstrated that Escherichia coli cells exposed to levofloxacin (LVFX, a fluoroquinolone (FQ, induce the syntheses of heat shock proteins and RecA. To examine whether the heat shock proteins affect the bactericidal action of FQs, we constructed E. coli strains with mutations in various heat shock genes and tested their susceptibility to FQs. Mutations in dnaK, groEL, and lon increased this susceptibility; the lon mutant exhibited the greatest effects. The increased susceptibility of the lon mutant was corroborated by experiments in which the gene encoding the cell division inhibitor, SulA, was subsequently disrupted. SulA is induced by the SOS response and degraded by the Lon protease. The findings suggest that the hypersusceptibility of the lon mutant to FQs could be due to abnormally high levels of SulA protein resulting from the depletion of Lon and the continuous induction of the SOS response in the presence of FQs. Conclusion The present results show that the bactericidal action of FQs is moderately affected by the DnaK and GroEL chaperones and strongly affected by the Lon protease. FQs have contributed successfully to the treatment of various bacterial infections, but their widespread use and often misuse, coupled with emerging resistance, have gradually compromised their utility. Our results suggest that agents capable of inhibiting the Lon protease have potential for combination therapy with FQs.

  19. Preliminary Evaluation of a Semisolid Agar Antifungal Susceptibility Test for Yeasts and Molds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provine, Harriet; Hadley, Susan

    2000-01-01

    This report presents a semisolid agar antifungal susceptibility (SAAS) method for the rapid susceptibility screening of yeasts and molds. The reproducibility and accuracy of the SAAS method were assessed by comparing the MICs of amphotericin B and fluconazole obtained for 10 candidate quality control (QC) American Type Culture Collection yeast strains in ≥15 replicates with those found by six independent laboratories using the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS) M27-P broth macrodilution method (M. A. Pfaller et al., J. Clin. Microbiol. 33:1104–1107, 1995). Overall, 96% of MICs for both drugs fell within 1 log2 dilution of the modal MIC for each strain. The MICs for amphotericin B showed 99% agreement with the NCCLS proposed QC ranges within 1 log2 dilution. Likewise, the MICs for fluconazole at ≥75% growth reduction showed 99% agreement for seven strains. Three strains, Candida albicans ATCC 24333 and ATCC 76615 and Candida tropicalis ATCC 750, showed a less sharp fluconazole endpoint at ≥75% growth reduction, but at >50% growth reduction, the agreement was 98% within 1 log2 dilution of the proposed range. The MIC agreement within the proposed range for the suggested QC strains Candida parapsilosis ATCC 22019 and Candida krusei ATCC 6258 was 100% for fluconazole and 100% within 1 log2 dilution of the proposed range for amphotericin B. The SAAS method demonstrated the susceptibility or resistance of 25 clinical isolates of filamentous fungi such as Aspergillus fumigatus to amphotericin B, itraconazole, and fluconazole, usually within 48 h. Although the results are preliminary, this SAAS method is promising as a rapid and cost-effective screen and is worthy of concerted investigation. PMID:10655341

  20. Background field removal using a region adaptive kernel for quantitative susceptibility mapping of human brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jinsheng; Bao, Lijun; Li, Xu; van Zijl, Peter C. M.; Chen, Zhong

    2017-08-01

    Background field removal is an important MR phase preprocessing step for quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM). It separates the local field induced by tissue magnetic susceptibility sources from the background field generated by sources outside a region of interest, e.g. brain, such as air-tissue interface. In the vicinity of air-tissue boundary, e.g. skull and paranasal sinuses, where large susceptibility variations exist, present background field removal methods are usually insufficient and these regions often need to be excluded by brain mask erosion at the expense of losing information of local field and thus susceptibility measures in these regions. In this paper, we propose an extension to the variable-kernel sophisticated harmonic artifact reduction for phase data (V-SHARP) background field removal method using a region adaptive kernel (R-SHARP), in which a scalable spherical Gaussian kernel (SGK) is employed with its kernel radius and weights adjustable according to an energy ;functional; reflecting the magnitude of field variation. Such an energy functional is defined in terms of a contour and two fitting functions incorporating regularization terms, from which a curve evolution model in level set formation is derived for energy minimization. We utilize it to detect regions of with a large field gradient caused by strong susceptibility variation. In such regions, the SGK will have a small radius and high weight at the sphere center in a manner adaptive to the voxel energy of the field perturbation. Using the proposed method, the background field generated from external sources can be effectively removed to get a more accurate estimation of the local field and thus of the QSM dipole inversion to map local tissue susceptibility sources. Numerical simulation, phantom and in vivo human brain data demonstrate improved performance of R-SHARP compared to V-SHARP and RESHARP (regularization enabled SHARP) methods, even when the whole paranasal sinus regions

  1. The landslide susceptibility map of Italy at 1:1 Million scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigila, A.; Catani, F.; Casagli, N.; Crosta, G.; Esposito, C.; Frattini, P.; Iadanza, C.; Lagomarsino, D.; Lari, S.; Scarascia Mugnozza, G.; Segoni, S.; Spizzichino, D.; Tofani, V.

    2012-04-01

    a significant number of statistical units. These tests also demonstrated that large grid-cells (100x100 m, 500x500 m) are suitable terrain units for the scale of the analysis. Considering the results of the tests, the Bayesian Tree Random Forest model was selected to produce the 1:1,000,000 susceptibility map of Italy. Landslide susceptibility map of Italy at 1:1,000,000 scale can be an important support for the implementation of pan-European landslide susceptibility map and a useful tools for the EU policies and measures finalized to the landslide risk reduction and mitigation.

  2. [What place for lung volume reduction surgery for emphysema?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Wolf, J; Bonnette, P; Sage, É; Hamid, A

    2017-02-01

    Lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) has been part of the management for the treatment of selected emphysematous patients for two decades. In a large randomized American trial (NETT), lung volume reduction surgery was shown to improve overall survival at 5 years as well as exercise capacity and health-related quality of life, especially in cases of upper-lobe-predominant emphysema and low exercise capacity. Inclusion criteria were pretreatment FEV1≤45 %, TLC≥100 %, RV≥150 %, room air resting PaCO2≤60mmHg and PaO2≥45mmHg. Patients with FEV1≤20 % and either a DLCOlung volume reduction surgery is performed infrequently, competing with lung transplantation and new endoscopic volume reduction techniques. Copyright © 2016 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Microbial reduction of iodate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Councell, T.B.; Landa, E.R.; Lovley, D.R.

    1997-01-01

    The different oxidation species of iodine have markedly different sorption properties. Hence, changes in iodine redox states can greatly affect the mobility of iodine in the environment. Although a major microbial role has been suggested in the past to account for these redox changes, little has been done to elucidate the responsible microorganisms or the mechanisms involved. In the work presented here, direct microbial reduction of iodate was demonstrated with anaerobic cell suspensions of the sulfate reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio desulfuricans which reduced 96% of an initial 100 ??M iodate to iodide at pH 7 in 30 mM NaHCO3 buffer, whereas anaerobic cell suspensions of the dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens were unable to reduce iodate in 30 mM NaHCO3 buffer (pH 7). Both D. desulfuricans and S. putrefaciens were able to reduce iodate at pH 7 in 10 mM HEPES buffer. Both soluble ferrous iron and sulfide, as well as iron monosulfide (FeS) were shown to abiologically reduce iodate to iodide. These results indicate that ferric iron and/or sulfate reducing bacteria are capable of mediating both direct, enzymatic, as well as abiotic reduction of iodate in natural anaerobic environments. These microbially mediated reactions may be important factors in the fate and transport of 129I in natural systems.

  4. Planning for reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaines Das, Rose; Fry, Derek; Preziosi, Richard; Hudson, Michelle

    2009-02-01

    Reduction is one of the Three Rs which can be readily achieved in practice. This can be done by careful consideration of the experimental strategy and the implementation of good experimental design. Moreover, strategic planning leads to 'best' scientific practice and can have a positive impact on both refinement and replacement. The FRAME Reduction Steering Committee has developed a flow chart for an overall strategy for planning and conducting biomedical research. This, and important planning considerations for each of the steps proposed, are discussed. The strategy involves taking an initial overview and undertaking related background research, then planning a sequence of experiments expected to give satisfactory results with the least animal use and minimal severity, choosing an efficient design for each experiment in the sequence, reviewing the results of one experiment before progressing to the next, and conducting an overall analysis at the end of the programme. This approach should minimise animal use and maximise the quality of the resultant scientific output. Copyright (c) 2009 FRAME.

  5. Islam and harm reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamarulzaman, A; Saifuddeen, S M

    2010-03-01

    Although drugs are haram and therefore prohibited in Islam, illicit drug use is widespread in many Islamic countries throughout the world. In the last several years increased prevalence of this problem has been observed in many of these countries which has in turn led to increasing injecting drug use driven HIV/AIDS epidemic across the Islamic world. Whilst some countries have recently responded to the threat through the implementation of harm reduction programmes, many others have been slow to respond. In Islam, The Quran and the Prophetic traditions or the Sunnah are the central sources of references for the laws and principles that guide the Muslims' way of life and by which policies and guidelines for responses including that of contemporary social and health problems can be derived. The preservation and protection of the dignity of man, and steering mankind away from harm and destruction are central to the teachings of Islam. When viewed through the Islamic principles of the preservation and protection of the faith, life, intellect, progeny and wealth, harm reduction programmes are permissible and in fact provide a practical solution to a problem that could result in far greater damage to the society at large if left unaddressed. Copyright (c) 2009. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Transmission of Multidrug-Resistant and Drug-Susceptible Tuberculosis within Households: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis Grandjean

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The "fitness" of an infectious pathogen is defined as the ability of the pathogen to survive, reproduce, be transmitted, and cause disease. The fitness of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDRTB relative to drug-susceptible tuberculosis is cited as one of the most important determinants of MDRTB spread and epidemic size. To estimate the relative fitness of drug-resistant tuberculosis cases, we compared the incidence of tuberculosis disease among the household contacts of MDRTB index patients to that among the contacts of drug-susceptible index patients.This 3-y (2010-2013 prospective cohort household follow-up study in South Lima and Callao, Peru, measured the incidence of tuberculosis disease among 1,055 household contacts of 213 MDRTB index cases and 2,362 household contacts of 487 drug-susceptible index cases. A total of 35/1,055 (3.3% household contacts of 213 MDRTB index cases developed tuberculosis disease, while 114/2,362 (4.8% household contacts of 487 drug-susceptible index patients developed tuberculosis disease. The total follow-up time for drug-susceptible tuberculosis contacts was 2,620 person-years, while the total follow-up time for MDRTB contacts was 1,425 person-years. Using multivariate Cox regression to adjust for confounding variables including contact HIV status, contact age, socio-economic status, and index case sputum smear grade, the hazard ratio for tuberculosis disease among MDRTB household contacts was found to be half that for drug-susceptible contacts (hazard ratio 0.56, 95% CI 0.34-0.90, p = 0.017. The inference of transmission in this study was limited by the lack of genotyping data for household contacts. Capturing incident disease only among household contacts may also limit the extrapolation of these findings to the community setting.The low relative fitness of MDRTB estimated by this study improves the chances of controlling drug-resistant tuberculosis. However, fitter multidrug-resistant strains that emerge

  7. Fire Severity Controlled Susceptibility to a 1940s Spruce Beetle Outbreak in Colorado, USA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik Kulakowski

    Full Text Available The frequency, magnitude, and size of forest disturbances are increasing globally. Much recent research has focused on how the occurrence of one disturbance may affect susceptibility to subsequent disturbances. While much has been learned about such linked disturbances, the strength of the interactions is likely to be contingent on the severity of disturbances as well as climatic conditions, both of which can affect disturbance intensity and tree resistance to disturbances. Subalpine forests in western Colorado were affected by extensive and severe wildfires in the late 19th century and an extensive and severe outbreak of spruce beetle (Dendroctonus rufipennis in the 1940s. Previous research found that most, but not all, of the stands that burned and established following the late 19th century fires were not susceptible to the 1940s outbreak as beetles preferentially attack larger trees and stands in advanced stages of development. However, previous research also left open the possibility that some stands that burned and established following the 19th century fires may have been attacked during the 1940s outbreak. Understanding how strongly stand structure, as shaped by disturbances of varying severity, affected susceptibility to past outbreaks is important to provide a baseline for assessing the degree to which recent climate change may be relaxing the preferences of beetles for larger trees and for stands in latter stages of structural development and thereby changing the nature of linked disturbances. Here, dendroecological methods were used to study disturbance history and tree age of stands in the White River National Forest in Western Colorado that were identified in historical documents or remotely-sensed images as having burned in the 19th century and having been attacked by spruce beetle in the 1940s. Dendroecological reconstructions indicate that in young post-fire stands only old remnant trees that survived the otherwise stand

  8. Diffractive optics for reduction of hot cracking in pulsed mode Nd:YAG laser welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Claus; Olesen, Søren; Roos, Sven-Olov

    2001-01-01

    In order to reduce the susceptibility to hot cracking in pulsed mode laser welding of austenitic stainless steel, an optical system for reduction of the cooling rate is sought developed. Based on intensive numerical simulations, an optical system producing three focused spots is made. In a number...

  9. Electrochemical surface derivation of glassy carbon by the reduction of triaryl- and alkyldiphenylsulfonium salts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vase, K.H.; Holm, A.H.; Norrman, Kion

    2008-01-01

    The range of materials susceptible to electrochemically assisted grafting onto carbon materials has been expanded to include a new group of compounds. This new approach is based on the reduction of symmetrical or unsymmetrical triarylsulfonium salts and alkyldiphenylsulfonium salts. Our findings...

  10. Inflationary susceptibilities, duality and large-scale magnetic fields generation

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    We investigate what can be said about the interaction of scalar fields with Abelian gauge fields during a quasi-de Sitter phase of expansion and under the assumption that the electric and the magnetic susceptibilities do not coincide. The duality symmetry, transforming the magnetic susceptibility into the inverse of the electric susceptibility, exchanges the magnetic and electric power spectra. The mismatch between the two susceptibilities determines an effective refractive index affecting the evolution of the canonical fields. The constraints imposed by the duration of the inflationary phase and by the magnetogenesis requirements pin down the rate of variation of the susceptibilities that is consistent with the observations of the magnetic field strength over astrophysical and cosmological scales but avoids back-reaction problems. The parameter space of this magnetogenesis scenario is wider than in the case when the susceptibilities are equal, as it happens when the inflaton or some other spectator field is ...

  11. Effect of Calcination and Reduction Temperatures on the Reduction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of calcination and reduction temperatures on the reducibility, dispersion and Fischer-Tropsch activity of 10 wt% cobalt supported on titania catalyst modified by 0.1 wt% boron has been studied. The percentage reduction and ... The reduction temperature did not affect the product selectivity. South African Journal of ...

  12. Orientational Glasses: NMR and Electric Susceptibility Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Sullivan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We review the results of a wide range of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMRmeasurements of the local order parameters and the molecular dynamics of solid ortho-para hydrogen mixtures and solid nitrogen-argon mixtures that form novel molecular orientational glass states at low temperatures. From the NMR measurements, the distribution of the order parameters can be deduced and, in terms of simple models, used to analyze the thermodynamic measurements of the heat capacities of these systems. In addition, studies of the dielectric susceptibilities of the nitrogen-argon mixtures are reviewed in terms of replica symmetry breaking analogous to that observed for spin glass states. It is shown that this wide set of experimental results is consistent with orientation or quadrupolar glass ordering of the orientational degrees of freedom.

  13. Susceptibility of cell lines to avian viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simoni Isabela Cristina

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The susceptibility of the five cell lines - IB-RS-2, RK-13, Vero, BHK-21, CER - to reovirus S1133 and infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV vaccine GBV-8 strain was studied to better define satisfactory and sensitive cell culture systems. Cultures were compared for presence of CPE, virus titers and detection of viral RNA. CPE and viral RNA were detected in CER and BHK-21 cells after reovirus inoculation and in RK-13 cell line after IBDV inoculation and with high virus titers. Virus replication by production of low virus titers occurred in IB-RS-2 and Vero cells with reovirus and in BHK-21 cell line with IBDV.

  14. TREATMENT EFFICIENCY OF DRUG SUSCEPTIBLE PULMONARY TUBERCULOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Pavlova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the study of comparative efficiency of fenazid (isonicotinoilhydrazine-О,N’ ferrous dihydrate sulphate (II and isoniazid in drug susceptible pulmonary tuberculosis patients.The high treatment efficiency namely significant improvement and improvement was observed in the patients of Group 1 – 84.1% which could be compared to the standard treatment regimen (85-7% in Group 2. The total number of adverse reactions in the main group was confidently lower – 18.6% against 33.9%, p < 0.05. Hepatotoxic reactions with 2-3 fold increase of alaninetransferase level was registered significantly less (9.3% in Group 1 compared to the Group treated with isoniazid.

  15. Evaluation of SLE Susceptibility Genes in Malaysians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molineros, Julio E; Chua, Kek Heng; Sun, Celi; Lian, Lay Hoong; Motghare, Prasenjeet; Kim-Howard, Xana; Nath, Swapan K

    2014-01-01

    Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) is a clinically heterogeneous autoimmune disease with strong genetic and environmental components. Our objective was to replicate 25 recently identified SLE susceptibility genes in two distinct populations (Chinese (CH) and Malays (MA)) from Malaysia. We genotyped 347 SLE cases and 356 controls (CH and MA) using the ImmunoChip array and performed an admixture corrected case-control association analysis. Associated genes were grouped into five immune-related pathways. While CH were largely homogenous, MA had three ancestry components (average 82.3% Asian, 14.5% European, and 3.2% African). Ancestry proportions were significantly different between cases and controls in MA. We identified 22 genes with at least one associated SNP (P SLE genes are also associated in the major ethnicities of Malaysia. However, these novel SNPs showed stronger association in these Asian populations than with the SNPs reported in previous studies.

  16. Are there stress resistant and susceptible myocardia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, V A

    1988-11-01

    The satisfactory analysis of the Na/K ATPase, its pumping component and the mechanism of action of the inhibitor digitalis remains elusive; yet the controversial inotropic effect of digitalis in the clinical setting has been known for over a century. There are also conflicting reports of the effect of urea and uremia on the cardiovascular system, and the evidence as it exists, suggests that urea may have two effects on the intact heart, by virtue of its extent of action on hydrogen bonding of water molecules, determined by which type of muscle constitutes the myocardium. If different types of myocardium do exist, they could well respond differently to inotropic agents. Evidence suggests that two types of myocardia, relatively stress resistant or susceptible may exist, analagous to known skeletal muscle differences.

  17. FGF receptor genes and breast cancer susceptibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agarwal, D; Pineda, S; Michailidou, K

    2014-01-01

    Background:Breast cancer is one of the most common malignancies in women. Genome-wide association studies have identified FGFR2 as a breast cancer susceptibility gene. Common variation in other fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptors might also modify risk. We tested this hypothesis by studying...... genotyped single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and imputed SNPs in FGFR1, FGFR3, FGFR4 and FGFRL1 in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium.Methods:Data were combined from 49 studies, including 53 835 cases and 50 156 controls, of which 89 050 (46 450 cases and 42 600 controls) were of European ancestry......, 12 893 (6269 cases and 6624 controls) of Asian and 2048 (1116 cases and 932 controls) of African ancestry. Associations with risk of breast cancer, overall and by disease sub-type, were assessed using unconditional logistic regression.Results:Little evidence of association with breast cancer risk...

  18. Susceptibility of Genital Mycoplasmas to Antimicrobial Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Peter; Klein, Jerome O.; Kass, Edward H.

    1970-01-01

    The susceptibility of 11 T-strains, 12 strains of Mycoplasma hominis, and a single strain of M. fermentans to 15 antimicrobial agents was determined by study of inhibition of metabolic activity in a broth dilution system. All three species were inhibited by tetracycline, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, gentamicin, and kanamycin, and were relatively resistant to cephalothin, cephaloridine, polymyxin, vancomycin, and ampicillin. Three antimicrobial agents had significant differential effects on these species. Erythromycin was more active against T-strains than against M. hominis or M. fermentans. Lincomycin, clindamycin, and nitrofurantoin had greater activity against M. hominis and M. fermentans than against T-strains. The activity of the drugs tested was generally uniform over a wide range of inocula. The effect of pH and the difference between minimal inhibiting and minimal mycoplasmacidal concentrations of the drugs tested were consistent with expectations based on the effects of these drugs on bacteria. PMID:4313312

  19. Automated sliding susceptibility mapping of rock slopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Günther

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a suite of extensions for ARCVIEW GIS™ (ESRI that allows to map the spatial distribution of first-order mechanical slope-properties in hard rock terrain, e.g. for large slope areas like water reservoir slopes. Besides digital elevation data, this expert-system includes regional continuous grid-based data on geological structures that might act as potential sliding or cutoff planes for rockslides. The system allows rapid automated mapping of geometrical and kinematical slope properties in hard rock, providing the basis for spatially distributed deterministic sliding-susceptibility evaluations on a pixel base. Changing hydrostatic slope conditions and rock mechanical parameters can be implemented and used for simple predictive static stability calculations. Application is demonstrated for a study area in the Harz Mts., Germany.

  20. [Oxidative stress and susceptibility of periodontal disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mei-fang; Huang, Yi-jing; Zhang, Hai-feng; Tang, Wen; Zhou, Jie

    2013-10-01

    To investigate the relationship between dietary antioxidant status and susceptibility of periodontal disease in humans. Fifty patients with moderate-to-sever periodontal disease and 50 subjects without periodontal disease were enrolled in this study. Food frequency questionnaire and 72-hour diet recall were conducted to study the dietary pattern and antioxidant nutrients intake in patients and healthy subjects. Nutritional status including vitamins, mineral substance, and antioxidant enzymes in these 2 groups were analyzed in serum and saliva samples by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). SPSS 19.0 software package was used for paired t test. Compared with the control group, the chronic periodontal group had lower levels of potatoes, aquatic product, milk, soy, fresh vegetables, fruit and vitamin supplements intake(Pperiodontal disease group than that in the control group (Pperiodontal group than in the control group (Pperiodontal disease. The antioxidant nutrients may help to protect paradentium. Supported by Research Fund from Shanghai Municipal Health Bureau (20114103).

  1. Sociability and susceptibility to the common cold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Sheldon; Doyle, William J; Turner, Ronald; Alper, Cuneyt M; Skoner, David P

    2003-09-01

    There is considerable evidence that social relationships can influence health, but only limited evidence on the health effects of the personality characteristics that are thought to mold people's social lives. We asked whether sociability predicts resistance to infectious disease and whether this relationship is attributable to the quality and quantity of social interactions and relationships. Three hundred thirty-four volunteers completed questionnaires assessing their sociability, social networks, and social supports, and six evening interviews assessing daily interactions. They were subsequently exposed to a virus that causes a common cold and monitored to see who developed verifiable illness. Increased sociability was associated in a linear fashion with a decreased probability of developing a cold. Although sociability was associated with more and higher-quality social interactions, it predicted disease susceptibility independently of these variables. The association between sociability and disease was also independent of baseline immunity (virus-specific antibody), demographics, emotional styles, stress hormones, and health practices.

  2. Shear-flow susceptibility near the low-density transition in TJ-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carralero, D.; Calvo, I.; da Graça, S.; Carreras, B. A.; Estrada, T.; Pedrosa, M. A.; Hidalgo, C.

    2012-06-01

    The emergence of the plasma edge shear-flow layer has been recently shown to be consistent with second-order transition model coupling shear amplification by Reynolds stress and turbulence reduction by shear. A fundamental feature of second-order transitions in equilibrium thermodynamics is the divergence of the susceptibility near the critical point. In this paper, an experimental investigation is carried out to find out whether an analogous phenomenon takes place in the transition leading to the formation of the shear-flow layer in the TJ-II stellarator.

  3. Mapping soil magnetic susceptibility and mineralogy in Ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menshov, Oleksandr; Pereira, Paulo; Kruglov, Oleksandr; Sukhorada, Anatoliy

    2017-04-01

    Soil suatainable planning is fundamental for agricultural areas. Soil mapping and modeling are increasingly used in agricultural areas in the entire world (Brevik et al., 2016). They are beneficial to land managers, to reduce soil degradation, increase soil productivity and their restoration. Magnetic susceptibility (MS) methods are low cost and accurate for the developing maps of agricultural areas.. The objective of this work is to identify the minerals responsible for MS increase in soils from the two study areas in Poltava and Kharkiv region. The thermomagnetic analyses were conducted using the KLY-4 with an oven apparatus. The hysteresis parameters were measured with the Rotating Magnetometer at the Geophysical Centre Dourbes, Belgium. The results showed that all of samples from Kharkiv area and the majortity of the samples collected in Poltava area represent the pseudo single domain (PSD) zone particles in Day plot. According to Hanesch et al. (2006), the transformation of goethite, ferrihydrite or hematite to a stronger ferrimagnetic phase like magnetite or maghemite is common in strongly magnetic soils with high values of organic carbon content. In our case of thermomagnetic study, the first peak on the heating curve near 260 ˚C indicates the presence of ferrihydrite which gradually transforms into maghemite (Jordanova et al., 2013). A further decrease in the MS identified on the heating curve may be related to the transformation of the maghemite to hematite. A second MS peak on the heating curve near 530 ˚C and the ultimate loss of magnetic susceptibility near 580 ˚C were caused by the reduction of hematite to magnetite. The shape of the thermomagnetic curves suggests the presence of single domain (SD) particles at room temperature and their transformation to a superparamagnetic (SP) state under heating. Magnetic mineralogical analyses suggest the presence of highly magnetic minerals like magnetite and maghemite as well as slightly magnetic goethite

  4. Standardization of hyphal growth inhibition rate as a means of evaluating Microsporum spp. in vitro susceptibility to terbinafine, griseofulvin, and ciclopiroxolamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biancalana, Fernanda Simas Corrêa; Lyra, Luzia; Moretti, Maria Luiza; Kamei, Katsuhiko; Schreiber, Angélica Zaninelli

    2011-10-01

    Reference methods for antifungal susceptibility tests recommend the use of conidia as inoculum. However, some isolates produce few conidia, while the invasive form of filamentous fungi in general is hyphae making susceptibility tests infeaseble. These facts suggest that other than conidia broth dilution method is required for susceptibility tests. The aim of this study was to clarify if the hyphal growth inhibition rate could be used as a method of determining the antifungal susceptibility of genus Microsporum. For this reason, a method which traces hyphal tips automatically and measures their growth rate was standardized for Microsporum spp. Control growth curves and test growth curves obtained by real-time observation of the hyphae groups responses to different concentrations of terbinafine, griseofulvin, and ciclopiroxolamine were used to compare with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) obtained by conidia broth microdilution method. A visible reduction in the growth inhibition rate was observed when hyphal activity was evaluated using the third or fourth serial two-fold dilution below the MIC determined by broth microdilution for terbinafine and ciclopiroxolamine. For griseofulvin, this reduction occurred after the fifth dilution below the MIC. This study highlights the importance of the inoculum type used to determine the in vitro susceptibility of Microsporum strains. We conclude that measurement of hyphal growth inhibition, despite being time consuming, could be a suitable method for evaluating antifungal susceptibility, particularly for fungi as Microsporum spp. that produce a small (or not at all) number of conidia.

  5. Susceptibility of laboratory rodents to Trichinella papuae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadaow, Lakkhana; Intapan, Pewpan M; Boonmars, Thidarut; Morakote, Nimit; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2013-12-01

    Members of the genus Trichinella are small nematodes that can infect a wide range of animal hosts. However, their infectivity varies depending on the parasite and host species combination. In this study, we examined the susceptibility of 4 species of laboratory rodents, i.e., mice, rats, hamsters, and gerbils to Trichinella papuae, an emerging non-encapsulated Trichinella species. Trichinella spiralis and Trichinella pseudospiralis were also included in this study for comparison. Fifteen animals of each rodent species were infected orally with 100 muscle larvae of each Trichinella species. Intestinal worm burden was determined at day 6 and 10 post-inoculation (PI). The numbers of muscle larvae were examined at day 45 PI. The reproductive capacity index (RCI) of the 3 Trichinella species in different rodent hosts was determined. By day 6 PI, 33.2-69.6% of the inoculated larvae of the 3 Trichinella species became adult worms in the small intestines of the host animals. However, in rats, more than 96% of adult worms of all 3 Trichinella species were expelled from the gut by day 10 PI. In gerbils, only 4.8-18.1% of adult worms were expelled by day 10 PI. In accordance with the intestinal worm burden and the persistence of adults, the RCI was the highest in gerbils with values of 241.5±41.0 for T. papuae, 432.6±48 for T. pseudospiralis, and 528.6±20.6 for T. spiralis. Hamsters ranked second and mice ranked third in susceptibility in terms of the RCI, Rats yielded the lowest parasite RCI for all 3 Trichinella species. Gerbils may be an alternative laboratory animal for isolation and maintenance of Trichinella spp.

  6. On magnetic and vortical susceptibilities of the Cooper condensate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorsky, A.; Popov, F.

    2017-11-01

    We discuss the susceptibility of the Cooper condensate in the s-wave 2 + 1 superconductor in the external magnetic field and in the rotating frame. The extended holographic model involving the charged rank-two field is considered and it is argued that the susceptibility does not vanish. We interpret non-vanishing susceptibilities as the admixture of the p-wave triplet component in the Cooper condensate in the external field.

  7. Susceptibilities and Spin Gaps of Weakly Coupled Spin Ladders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larochelle, S.

    2004-05-11

    We calculate the uniform and staggered susceptibilities of two-chain spin-1/2 Heisenberg ladders using Monte-Carlo simulations. We show that the gap extracted from the uniform susceptibility and the saturation value of the staggered susceptibility are independent of the sign of the interchain coupling J{perpendicular} in the asymptotic limit |J{perpendicular}|/J {yields} 0. Furthermore, we examine the existence of logarithmic corrections to the linear scaling of the gap with |J{perpendicular}|.

  8. Dynamical spin dependent susceptibility of graphene like structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradian, Rostam; Rezania, Hamed; Marvi, Saeed

    2018-02-01

    Spin dependent susceptibility of gapped graphene is calculated using Hubbard model. We found that by increasing the electron density, energy gap and repulsive coulomb interaction the imaginary part of the susceptibility peaks will be shifted towards higher frequencies and by increasing the magnetization the imaginary part of the susceptibility peaks will be shifted towards lower frequencies. It means that plasmonic frequency depends on electrons band filling, electronic coulomb repulsion, magnetization and graphene initial energy gap.

  9. The electricity sector susceptibility of European countries to climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Daniel R.; Olonscheck, Mady; Walther, Carsten; Kropp, Jürgen P.

    2014-05-01

    Due to the close relationship between electricity consumption, production and temperature, the electricity systems of countries are particularly susceptible to climate change. Based on a number of quantitative influencing factors, we provide a relative index for 21 European countries. This allows relevant stakeholders to identify the main influencing factors that determine the electricity system susceptibility of their country. The index was determined using 14 influencing factors that include those that increase or decrease susceptibility. This includes information on monthly mean temperature, electricity consumption, import, export and production by energy source for the period 2000-2011. Moreover, we consider the results of nine global climate models regarding future temperature changes as well as data on air conditioner prevalence by country. A quantitative relative ranked index describing the susceptibility of each country's electricity system is provided. In both Luxembourg and Greece, which top the list, the inability to meet electricity demand with inland production as well as a heavy reliance on combustible fuel electricity production explain part of the high relative susceptibility. Summer electricity consumption (another influencing factor) is expected to increase in Greece where current relatively warm temperatures, in the context of the countries included in this study, are expected to increase in the future. Comparatively, Norway was the least susceptible country based on our index. Norway is expected to benefit from rising projected temperatures, which will decrease winter electricity consumption and limit susceptibility. Furthermore, Norway's current electricity production exceeds consumption demand and is largely based on hydro, which also decreases susceptibility. The findings of this study enable policy makers, scientists and energy managers to examine the most important influencing factors that increase susceptibility and focus their adaptation

  10. Migratory status is not related to the susceptibility to HPAIV H5N1 in an insectivorous passerine species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donata Kalthoff

    Full Text Available Migratory birds have evolved elaborate physiological adaptations to travelling, the implications for their susceptibility to avian influenza are however unknown. Three groups of stonechats (Saxicola torquata from (I strongly migrating, (II weakly migrating and (III non-migrating populations were experimentally infected with HPAIV H5N1. The different bird groups of this insectivorous passerine species were infected in autumn, when the migrating populations clearly exhibit migratory restlessness. Following infection, all animals succumbed to the disease from 3 through 7 days post inoculation. Viral shedding, antigen distribution in tissues, and survival time did not differ between the three populations. However, notably, endothelial tropism of the HPAIV infection was exclusively seen in the group of resident birds. In conclusion, our data document for the first time the high susceptibility of an insectivorous passerine species to H5N1 infection, and the epidemiological role of these passerine birds is probably limited due to their high sensitivity to HPAIV H5N1 infection. Despite pronounced inherited differences in migratory status, the groups were generally indistinguishable in their susceptibility, survival time, clinical symptoms and viral shedding. Nevertheless, the migratory status partly influenced pathogenesis in the way of viral tropism.

  11. Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Cancer Survival: The Contribution of Tumor, Sociodemographic, Institutional, and Neighborhood Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Libby; Canchola, Alison J; Spiegel, David; Ladabaum, Uri; Haile, Robert; Gomez, Scarlett Lin

    2018-01-01

    Purpose Racial/ethnic disparities in cancer survival in the United States are well documented, but the underlying causes are not well understood. We quantified the contribution of tumor, treatment, hospital, sociodemographic, and neighborhood factors to racial/ethnic survival disparities in California. Materials and Methods California Cancer Registry data were used to estimate population-based cancer-specific survival for patients diagnosed with breast, prostate, colorectal, or lung cancer between 2000 and 2013 for each racial/ethnic group (non-Hispanic black, Hispanic, Asian American and Pacific Islander, and separately each for Chinese, Japanese, and Filipino) compared with non-Hispanic whites. The percentage contribution of factors to overall racial/ethnic survival disparities was estimated from a sequence of multivariable Cox proportional hazards models. Results In baseline models, black patients had the lowest survival for all cancer sites, and Asian American and Pacific Islander patients had the highest, compared with whites. Mediation analyses suggested that stage at diagnosis had the greatest influence on overall racial/ethnic survival disparities accounting for 24% of disparities in breast cancer, 24% in prostate cancer, and 16% to 30% in colorectal cancer. Neighborhood socioeconomic status was an important factor in all cancers, but only for black and Hispanic patients. The influence of marital status on racial/ethnic disparities was stronger in men than in women. Adjustment for all covariables explained approximately half of the overall survival disparities in breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer, but it explained only 15% to 40% of disparities in lung cancer. Conclusion Overall reductions in racial/ethnic survival disparities were driven largely by reductions for black compared with white patients. Stage at diagnosis had the largest effect on racial/ethnic survival disparities, but earlier detection would not entirely eliminate them. The influences

  12. Survival paths through the forest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Ulla Brasch

    when the information is high-dimensional e.g. when there are many thousands of genes or markers. In these situations machine learning methods such as the random forest can still be applied and provide reasonable prediction accuracy. The main focus in this talk is the performance of random forest...... in particular when the response is three-dimensional. In a diagnostic study of inflammatory bowel disease three classes of patients have to be diagnosed based on microarray gene-expression data. The performance of random forest is compared on a probability scale and on a classification scale to elastic net....... In survival analysis with competing risks I present an extension of random forest using time-dependent pseudo-values to build event risk prediction models. This approach is evaluated with data from Copenhagen stroke study. Further, I will explain how to use the R-package "pec" to evaluate random forests using...

  13. Survival of captive-reared Hispaniolan Parrots released in Parque Nacional del Este, Dominican Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collazo, J.A.; White, T.H.; Vilella, F.J.; Guerrero, S.A.

    2003-01-01

    We report first-year survival rates of 49 captive-reared Hispaniolan Parrots (Amazona ventralis) released in Parque Nacional del Este, Dominican Republic. Our goal was to learn about factors affecting postrelease survival. Specifically, we tested if survival was related to movements and whether modifying prerelease protocols influenced survival rates. We also estimated survival in the aftermath of Hurricane Georges (22 September 1998). Twenty-four parrots, fitted with radio-transmitters, were released between 14 September and 12 December 1997. Twenty-five more were released between 29 June and 16 September 1998. First-year survival rates were 30% in 1997 and 29% in 1998. Survival probability was related to bird mobility. In contrast to birds released in 1997, none of the 25 parrots released in 1998 suffered early postrelease mortality (i.e., 3-5 days after release). Two adjustments to prerelease protocols (increased exercise and reduced blood sampling) made in 1998 may have contributed to differences in mobility and survival between years. The reduction of early postrelease mortality in 1998 was encouraging, as was the prospect for higher first-year survival (e.g., 30% to 65%). Only one death was attributed to the immediate impact of the hurricane. Loss of foraging resources was likely a major contributor to ensuing mortality. Birds increased their mobility, presumably in search of food. Survival rates dropped 23% in only eight weeks posthurricane. This study underscores the value of standardized prerelease protocols, and of estimating survival and testing for factors that might influence it. Inferences from such tests will provide the best basis to make adjustments to a release program.

  14. MRI survival guide; MRT Basiskurs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardoza, J. [Alta Imaging Medical Group and Magnetic Imaging Affiliates, Berkeley, CA (United States); Herfkens, R.J. [eds.] [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Medical Center

    1999-07-01

    The book is a German translation of an American textbook with the original title ''MRI Survival Guide'' and is intended to serve as an introductory guide for beginners or a reference book for quick information. Readers will find information on the fundamentals of the technology and methodology of MRI as well as all details of relevance to practice in a precise and easy-to-grasp arrangement, covering all anatomic areas of interest, illustrations and descriptions of characteristic signs of pathologic processes, high-quality and unusually large-sized diagnostic pictures, a modern didactic concept for quick orientiation, including surveys, tables, and reproductions for visualisation of contents. (orig./CB) [German] Praktisch jeder Mediziner wird im Laufe seiner Berufstaetigkeit mit der MRT konfrontiert - unabhaengig davon ob in der Radiologie, Orthopaedie, Gynaekologie, Chirurgie, Neurologie oder sonstigen Fachrichtung. Das Buch ist eine Uebersetzung eines amerikanischen Lehrbuches mit dem Originaltitel ''MRI Survival Guide'' und will eine wesentliche Erleichterung als 'Ueberlebenshandbuch fuer die MRT' bieten: - Darstellung aller relevanten Grundlagen zu Technik, verschiedenen Sequenzen und Methodik der MRT - knapp und mit maximalem Praxisbezug - Beruecksichtigung aller moeglichen Untersuchungsregionen und strukturierte Orientierung daran (Gehirn, Wirbelsaeule, Kopf/Nacken, Brustkorb, Bauch, Becken, Muskel-Skelett-Bereich) - Illustration und Beschreibung der charakteristischen Erscheinungsmerkmale aller haeufigen pathologischen Prozesse im MRT, inklusive direkt umsetzbarer differentialdiagnostischer Abgrenzungskriterien - hochwertiges und aussergewoehnlich gross dimensioniertes Bildmaterial - modernes, didaktisches Konzept fuer die rasche Orientierung mit vielen Uebersichten, Tabellen und Abbildungen zur Visualisierung der Inhalte, Praxistips und Aufzeigen von Fehlermoeglichkeiten - zum Einstieg, zur Rekapitulation

  15. Evaluation of Insecticides Susceptibility and Malaria Vector Potential of Anopheles annularis s.l. and Anopheles vagus in Assam, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhiman, Sunil; Yadav, Kavita; Rabha, Bipul; Goswami, Diganta; Hazarika, S; Tyagi, Varun

    2016-01-01

    During the recent past, development of DDT resistance and reduction to pyrethroid susceptibility among the malaria vectors has posed a serious challenge in many Southeast Asian countries including India. Current study presents the insecticide susceptibility and knock-down data of field collected Anopheles annularis sensu lato and An. vagus mosquito species from endemic areas of Assam in northeast India. Anopheles annularis s.l. and An. vagus adult females were collected from four randomly selected sentinel sites in Orang primary health centre (OPHC) and Balipara primary health centre (BPHC) areas, and used for testing susceptibility to DDT, malathion, deltamethrin and lambda-cyhalothrin. After insecticide susceptibility tests, mosquitoes were subjected to VectorTest™ assay kits to detect the presence of malaria sporozoite in the mosquitoes. An. annularis s.l. was completely susceptible to deltamethrin, lambda-cyhalothrin and malathion in both the study areas. An. vagus was highly susceptible to deltamethrin in both the areas, but exhibited reduced susceptibility to lambda-cyhalothrin in BPHC. Both the species were resistant to DDT and showed very high KDT50 and KDT99 values for DDT. Probit model used to calculate the KDT50 and KDT99 values did not display normal distribution of percent knock-down with time for malathion in both the mosquito species in OPHC (p<0.05) and An. vagus in BPHC (χ2 = 25.3; p = 0.0), and also for deltamethrin to An. vagus in BPHC area (χ2 = 15.4; p = 0.004). Minimum infection rate (MIR) of Plasmodium sporozoite for An. vagus was 0.56 in OPHC and 0.13 in BPHC, while for An. annularis MIR was found to be 0.22 in OPHC. Resistance management strategies should be identified to delay the expansion of resistance. Testing of field caught Anopheles vectors from different endemic areas for the presence of malaria sporozoite may be useful to ensure their role in malaria transmission.

  16. Evaluation of Insecticides Susceptibility and Malaria Vector Potential of Anopheles annularis s.l. and Anopheles vagus in Assam, India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Dhiman

    Full Text Available During the recent past, development of DDT resistance and reduction to pyrethroid susceptibility among the malaria vectors has posed a serious challenge in many Southeast Asian countries including India. Current study presents the insecticide susceptibility and knock-down data of field collected Anopheles annularis sensu lato and An. vagus mosquito species from endemic areas of Assam in northeast India. Anopheles annularis s.l. and An. vagus adult females were collected from four randomly selected sentinel sites in Orang primary health centre (OPHC and Balipara primary health centre (BPHC areas, and used for testing susceptibility to DDT, malathion, deltamethrin and lambda-cyhalothrin. After insecticide susceptibility tests, mosquitoes were subjected to VectorTest™ assay kits to detect the presence of malaria sporozoite in the mosquitoes. An. annularis s.l. was completely susceptible to deltamethrin, lambda-cyhalothrin and malathion in both the study areas. An. vagus was highly susceptible to deltamethrin in both the areas, but exhibited reduced susceptibility to lambda-cyhalothrin in BPHC. Both the species were resistant to DDT and showed very high KDT50 and KDT99 values for DDT. Probit model used to calculate the KDT50 and KDT99 values did not display normal distribution of percent knock-down with time for malathion in both the mosquito species in OPHC (p<0.05 and An. vagus in BPHC (χ2 = 25.3; p = 0.0, and also for deltamethrin to An. vagus in BPHC area (χ2 = 15.4; p = 0.004. Minimum infection rate (MIR of Plasmodium sporozoite for An. vagus was 0.56 in OPHC and 0.13 in BPHC, while for An. annularis MIR was found to be 0.22 in OPHC. Resistance management strategies should be identified to delay the expansion of resistance. Testing of field caught Anopheles vectors from different endemic areas for the presence of malaria sporozoite may be useful to ensure their role in malaria transmission.

  17. The mediational pathway among parenting styles, attachment styles and self-regulation with addiction susceptibility of adolescents*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeinali, Ali; Sharifi, Hassanpasha; Enayati, Mirsalahadine; Asgari, Parviz; Pasha, Gohlamreza

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of present study was to create and test a model that illustrates variables that influence the development of addiction susceptibility and determine how different styles of parenting may indirectly influence the addiction susceptibility of children through the mediators of attachment style and self-regulation. METHODS: Using random cluster sampling, 508 adolescent high school boys and girls aged 14-19 years were enrolled. Data were analyzed using structural equations modeling (path analysis). RESULTS: The results showed that authoritative and permissive parenting styles were associated with secure attachment whereas authoritarian and neglectful parenting styles were associated with insecure attachment. Insecure attachment was associated with a low level of self-regulation whereas secure attachment was associated with a high level of self-regulation. We found that a low level of self-regulation increased the adolescent's addiction susceptibility whereas a high level of self-regulation decreased their addiction susceptibility. CONCLUSIONS: The findings of present study suggest the authoritative and permissive parenting styles as the most efficient styles and authoritarian and neglectful parenting styles as the most inefficient styles in terms of addiction susceptibility. Accordingly, efficient parenting style training to parents should be the main goal of drug demand reduction program. PMID:22973379

  18. Thyroid status affects membranes susceptibility to free radicals and oxidative balance in skeletal muscle of Muscovy ducklings (Cairina moschata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Benjamin; Romestaing, Caroline; Bodennec, Jacques; Dumet, Adeline; Fongy, Anaïs; Duchamp, Claude; Roussel, Damien

    2014-10-01

    Thyroid hormones (TH) are major contributor to oxidative stress in mammals because they (1) stimulate reactive oxygen species generation (ROS), (2) impair antioxidant defenses, and (3) increase the susceptibility to free radicals of most tissues. Unlike mammals, THs seem to diminish mitochondrial ROS while they have limited effect on the antioxidant machinery in birds. However, how THs modify the susceptibility to ROS has never been explored in an avian model, and very little is known about their effect on oxidative balance in birds. Therefore, the objective of our study was to examine the effect of chronic pharmacological hypo- and hyperthyroidism on (i) the susceptibility of mitochondrial membranes to ROS; and (ii) the level of oxidative stress assessed by measuring oxidative damage to lipids, nucleic acids and proteins in the gastrocnemius muscle of ducklings. We show that hypothyroidism had no effect on the susceptibility of mitochondrial membranes to free radicals. Hypothyroid ducklings had lower oxidized lipids (-31%) and DNA (-25%) but a similar level of protein carbonylation relative to controls. Conversely, mitochondrial membranes of hyperthyroid ducklings exhibited higher unsaturation (+12%) and peroxidation (+31%) indexes than in controls indicating a greater susceptibility to free radicals. However, hyperthyroid ducklings exhibited more oxidative damages on proteins (+67%) only, whereas lipid damages remained unchanged, and there was a slight reduction (-15%) in damages to DNA compared to euthyroid controls. Our results indicate that birds and mammals present fundamental differences in their oxidative stress response to thyroid status. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. The mediational pathway among parenting styles, attachment styles and self-regulation with addiction susceptibility of adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeinali, Ali; Sharifi, Hassanpasha; Enayati, Mirsalahadine; Asgari, Parviz; Pasha, Gohlamreza

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of present study was to create and test a model that illustrates variables that influence the development of addiction susceptibility and determine how different styles of parenting may indirectly influence the addiction susceptibility of children through the mediators of attachment style and self-regulation. Using random cluster sampling, 508 adolescent high school boys and girls aged 14-19 years were enrolled. Data were analyzed using structural equations modeling (path analysis). The results showed that authoritative and permissive parenting styles were associated with secure attachment whereas authoritarian and neglectful parenting styles were associated with insecure attachment. Insecure attachment was associated with a low level of self-regulation whereas secure attachment was associated with a high level of self-regulation. We found that a low level of self-regulation increased the adolescent's addiction susceptibility whereas a high level of self-regulation decreased their addiction susceptibility. The findings of present study suggest the authoritative and permissive parenting styles as the most efficient styles and authoritarian and neglectful parenting styles as the most inefficient styles in terms of addiction susceptibility. Accordingly, efficient parenting style training to parents should be the main goal of drug demand reduction program.

  20. The role of genetic breast cancer susceptibility variants as prognostic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasching, Peter A; Pharoah, Paul D P; Cox, Angela; Nevanlinna, Heli; Bojesen, Stig E; Karn, Thomas; Broeks, Annegien; van Leeuwen, Flora E; van't Veer, Laura J; Udo, Renate; Dunning, Alison M; Greco, Dario; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Shah, Mitul; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Flyger, Henrik; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Apicella, Carmel; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Sherman, Mark; Lissowska, Jolanta; Seynaeve, Caroline; Huijts, Petra E A; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; Ziogas, Argyrios; Ekici, Arif B; Rauh, Claudia; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Andrulis, Irene L; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Mulligan, Anna-Marie; Glendon, Gord; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Liu, Jianjun; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Eilber, Ursula; Nickels, Stefan; Dörk, Thilo; Schiekel, Maria; Bremer, Michael; Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won; Giles, Graham G; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Hooning, Maartje J; Martens, John W M; Jager, Agnes; Kriege, Mieke; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Couch, Fergus J; Stevens, Kristen N; Olson, Janet E; Kosel, Matthew; Cross, Simon S; Balasubramanian, Sabapathy P; Reed, Malcolm W R; Miron, Alexander; John, Esther M; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kauppila, Saila; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Lambrechts, Diether; Dieudonne, Anne-Sophie; Hatse, Sigrid; van Limbergen, Erik; Benitez, Javier; Milne, Roger L; Zamora, M Pilar; Pérez, José Ignacio Arias; Bonanni, Bernardo; Peissel, Bernard; Loris, Bernard; Peterlongo, Paolo; Rajaraman, Preetha; Schonfeld, Sara J; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Devilee, Peter; Beckmann, Matthias W; Slamon, Dennis J; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Figueroa, Jonine D; Humphreys, Manjeet K; Easton, Douglas F; Schmidt, Marjanka K

    2012-09-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies identified 11 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with breast cancer (BC) risk. We investigated these and 62 other SNPs for their prognostic relevance. Confirmed BC risk SNPs rs17468277 (CASP8), rs1982073 (TGFB1), rs2981582 (FGFR2), rs13281615 (8q24), rs3817198 (LSP1), rs889312 (MAP3K1), rs3803662 (TOX3), rs13387042 (2q35), rs4973768 (SLC4A7), rs6504950 (COX11) and rs10941679 (5p12) were genotyped for 25 853 BC patients with the available follow-up; 62 other SNPs, which have been suggested as BC risk SNPs by a GWAS or as candidate SNPs from individual studies, were genotyped for replication purposes in subsets of these patients. Cox proportional hazard models were used to test the association of these SNPs with overall survival (OS) and BC-specific survival (BCS). For the confirmed loci, we performed an accessory analysis of publicly available gene expression data and the prognosis in a different patient group. One of the 11 SNPs, rs3803662 (TOX3) and none of the 62 candidate/GWAS SNPs were associated with OS and/or BCS at P<0.01. The genotypic-specific survival for rs3803662 suggested a recessive mode of action [hazard ratio (HR) of rare homozygous carriers=1.21; 95% CI: 1.09-1.35, P=0.0002 and HR=1.29; 95% CI: 1.12-1.47, P=0.0003 for OS and BCS, respectively]. This association was seen similarly in all analyzed tumor subgroups defined by nodal status, tumor size, grade and estrogen receptor. Breast tumor expression of these genes was not associated with prognosis. With the exception of rs3803662 (TOX3), there was no evidence that any of the SNPs associated with BC susceptibility were associated with the BC survival. Survival may be influenced by a distinct set of germline variants from those influencing susceptibility.