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Sample records for surveys written feedback

  1. Written Corrective Feedback in Second Language Acquisition and Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitchener, John; Ferris, Dana R.

    2011-01-01

    What should language and writing teachers do about giving students written corrective feedback? This book surveys theory, research, and practice on the important and sometimes controversial issue of written corrective feedback, also known as "error/grammar correction," and its impact on second language acquisition and second language writing…

  2. The challenge of giving written thesis feedback to nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuvesson, Hanna; Borglin, Gunilla

    2014-11-01

    Providing effective written feedback on nursing student's assignments can be a challenging task for any assessor. Additionally, as the student groups tend to become larger, written feedback is likely to gain an overall more prominent position than verbal feedback. Lack of formal training or regular discussion in the teaching faculty about the skill set needed to provide written feedback could negatively affect the students' learning abilities. In this brief paper, we discuss written feedback practices, whilst using the Bachelor of Science in Nursing thesis as an example. Our aim is to highlight the importance of an informed understanding of the impact written feedback can have on students. Creating awareness about this can facilitate the development of more strategic and successful written feedback strategies. We end by offering examples of some relatively simple strategies for improving this practice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Feedback on Feedback: Eliciting Learners' Responses to Written Feedback through Student-Generated Screencasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Toro, María; Furnborough, Concha

    2014-01-01

    Despite the potential benefits of assignment feedback, learners often fail to use it effectively. This study examines the ways in which adult distance learners engage with written feedback on one of their assignments. Participants were 10 undergraduates studying Spanish at the Open University, UK. Their responses to feedback were elicited by means…

  4. Comparison of audio vs. written feedback on clinical assignments of nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgault, Annette M; Mundy, Cynthia; Joshua, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    This pilot study explored using audio recordings as method of feedback for weekly clinical assignments of nursing students. Feedback that provides students with insight into their performance is an essential component of nursing education. Audio methods have been used to communicate feedback on written assignments in other disciplines, but this method has not been reported in the nursing literature. A survey and VARK questionnaire were completed by eight nursing students. Each student had randomly received written and audio feedback during an eight-week period. There were no differences between written and audio methods. Students perceived audio as the most personal, easy to understand, and positive method. Only one student expressed a preference for written feedback.There was no difference in instructor time. Audio feedback is an innovative method of feedback for clinical assignments of 'Net Generation' nursing students.

  5. Written Teacher Feedback: Aspects of Quality, Benefits and Challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmeier, Monika; Grob, Regula; Nielsen, Jan Alexis

    2018-01-01

    Written feedback provided by the teacher to his or her students is an important aspect of formative assessment. After a theoretical introduction to teacher prerequisites for giving feedback and to the quality of written feedback in general, results from an implementation of feedback methods......, it will be discussed which means of support for teachers seem necessary in order to foster the implementation of written teacher feedback as part of formative assessment in inquiry-based science education....... in classrooms will be described for the cases of Germany, Switzerland and Denmark. The focus will be on the inquiry method ‘investigation in science’ that requires from students such competences as planning and/or conducting experiments. This study examines the quality of written teacher feedback which...

  6. INDIRECT WRITTEN CORRECTIVE FEEDBACK, REVISION, AND LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Poorebrahim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Corrective feedback, the necessity of providing it, and how it should be provided has been one of the hot topics in the area of ELT. Amid continuing controversies over whether providing feedback helps L2 learners improve their writing accuracy, many research studies have been undertaken to compare the relative effectiveness of different types of feedback. However, the difference between two types of indirect corrective feedback, namely indication and indication plus location, have not been properly examined yet. Motivated to narrow this gap, this study is designed to compare two groups of Iranian learners, each revising their papers based on one of the aforementioned options. For data analysis, a series of independent samples t tests were employed. The results revealed that the difference between the two groups in their reduction of errors from the original draft to the revision of each task followed a growing trend and became significant. Nonetheless, the difference in accuracy of new pieces of writing fell short of significance. Finally, it was found that error reduction in revision stage cannot be considered as learning. The results of the study, discussed in relation to that of others, implicate that the purpose for which feedback is provided is essential in determining the type of feedback; more explicit feedback is better for revising purposes while more implicit feedback is good for learning purposes.

  7. Written Comments as a Form of Feedback

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    Bruno, Ines; Santos, Leonor

    2010-01-01

    The characteristics of written comments on assignments as well as the process of writing them were studied. Interviews to three case-study middle school students, observation of lessons and content analysis of their assignments show that features that promote learning are: comments located next to what needs revision must be reviewed; use of…

  8. Written Corrective Feedback in Second Language Acquisition and Writing Studies

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    Ferris, Dana R.

    2012-01-01

    Written corrective feedback, referred to hereafter as "written CF" and also known as "grammar correction" or "error correction", has been a controversial topic in second language studies over the past fifteen years. Inspired by John Truscott's thought-provoking 1996 essay in "Language Learning", many different researchers have undertaken new…

  9. Quantity and quality of written feedback, action plans, and student ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Mini-clinical-evaluation exercise (mini-CEX) assessment forms that have been modified with the addition of specific spaces on separate sheets are expected to improve the quantity and quality of written feedback and the action plan for further learning which is agreed upon, and to encourage written reflection.

  10. Dynamic Written Corrective Feedback in Developmental Multilingual Writing Classes

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    Kurzer, Kendon

    2018-01-01

    This study investigated the role of dynamic written corrective feedback (DWCF; Evans, Hartshorn, McCollum, & Wolfersberger, 2010; Hartshorn & Evans, 2015; Hartshorn et al., 2010), a mode of providing specific, targeted, and individualized grammar feedback in developmental English as a second language (ESL) writing classes (pre-first year…

  11. Student Views of Technology-Mediated Written Corrective Feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Hanne Wacher

    2017-01-01

    Danish schools are generally technology-rich, but one area where technology use seems to have been taken over sparingly is the area of written corrective feedback (WCF). The present article reports on one part of an intervention study investigating 1) the potential changes in teacher beliefs...... and practices concerning the specific – and time-consuming – language-teacher activity of providing WCF and 2) potential changes in student attitudes when technology is used to mediate the feedback. At the core of the study is an eight-month intervention which was carried out with three teachers of English...... as a foreign language and their lower-secondary classes, requiring the teachers to make use of a specific program supportive of effective written corrective feedback in their provision of feedback to their students. The article will report on results pertaining to student attitudes to the changes brought about...

  12. THE EFFECT OF INDIRECT WRITTEN CORRECTIVE FEEDBACK ON STUDENTS’ WRITING ACCURACY

    OpenAIRE

    Fastha Bagus Shirotha

    2016-01-01

    Written corrective feedback has proven to be a key tool to improve students writing. Many previous researchers have proven so. Teacher gets to decide their very own written corrective feedback. There are many types of written corrective feedback that can be used in the classroom. They are direct written corrective feedback, indirect, and metalinguistic. The paper presents the effect of using indirect written corrective feedback to improve students’ writing accuracy. The paper is intended to f...

  13. Graduate Students' Needs and Preferences for Written Feedback on Academic Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manjet Kaur Mehar

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research is to examine graduate students' needs and preferences for written feedback on academic writing from their lecturers and thesis supervisors. Quantitative method via survey questionnaire was used to collect data from 21 respondents. The data collection involved Master and Doctorate students at a tertiary level institution…

  14. Responding Effectively to Composition Students: Comparing Student Perceptions of Written and Audio Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilbro, J.; Iluzada, C.; Clark, D. E.

    2013-01-01

    The authors compared student perceptions of audio and written feedback in order to assess what types of students may benefit from receiving audio feedback on their essays rather than written feedback. Many instructors previously have reported the advantages they see in audio feedback, but little quantitative research has been done on how the…

  15. Which characteristics of written feedback are perceived as stimulating students' reflective competence : an exploratory study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, Hanke; Schonrock-Adema, Johanna; Snoek, Jos W.; van der Molen, Thys; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke

    2013-01-01

    Background: Teacher feedback on student reflective writing is recommended to improve learners' reflective competence. To be able to improve teacher feedback on reflective writing, it is essential to gain insight into which characteristics of written feedback stimulate students' reflection processes.

  16. Students' Perceptions of Written Feedback in Teacher Education: Ideally Feedback is a Continuing Two-Way Communication that Encourages Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowden, Tony; Pittaway, Sharon; Yost, Helen; McCarthy, Robyn

    2013-01-01

    A small but growing body of research has investigated students' perceptions of written feedback in higher education but little attention has been brought to bear on students' emotional responses to feedback. This paper investigates students' perceptions of written feedback with particular emphasis on their emotional responses within a teacher…

  17. Interplay among Technical, Socio-Emotional and Personal Factors in Written Feedback Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Ivan

    2018-01-01

    The centrality of written feedback is clearly seen from the proliferation of research in the context of higher education. As an increasingly expanding field in research, the majority of written feedback studies have been interested in investigating the technical aspect of how feedback should be given in order to promote student learning. More…

  18. Designing student peer assessment in higher education: Analysis of written and oral peer feedback

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, I.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/288125797; Admiraal, W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/120226340; Pilot, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/068350880

    2006-01-01

    Designing student peer assessment in higher education: analysis of written and oral peer feedback Relating it to design features, the present article describes the nature of written and oral peer feedback as it occurred in seven writing courses, each with a different PA design. Results indicate that

  19. Correcting Students' Written Grammatical Errors: The Effects of Negotiated versus Nonnegotiated Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassaji, Hossein

    2011-01-01

    A substantial number of studies have examined the effects of grammar correction on second language (L2) written errors. However, most of the existing research has involved unidirectional written feedback. This classroom-based study examined the effects of oral negotiation in addressing L2 written errors. Data were collected in two intermediate…

  20. Investigating Expectations and Experiences of Audio and Written Assignment Feedback in First-Year Undergraduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawcett, Hannah; Oldfield, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Previous research suggests that audio feedback may be an important mechanism for facilitating effective and timely assignment feedback. The present study examined expectations and experiences of audio and written feedback provided through "turnitin for iPad®" from students within the same cohort and assignment. The results showed that…

  1. Students' and teachers' views of written feedback at undergraduate level: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agius, Natalie M; Wilkinson, Ann

    2014-04-01

    To explore undergraduate students' expectations and teachers' views of written feedback. Narrative literature review. Seven electronic databases were searched for primary research published in English with additional manual searches and reference tracking. Systematic approach to search strategy, selection and appraisal of papers, data extraction and synthesis following Hawker et al.'s (2002) guidelines. 21 studies met the inclusion criteria. Four student themes were identified concerning written feedback: quality, quantity and location of feedback, feed-forward and timeliness. Teachers reported that time pressures, institutional policies, and administrative issues affect feedback provision. Rigorous research is needed to gain a better understanding of students' expectations of written feedback. Strategies need to be adopted to meet students' expectations and educate students to take an active role and reflect on the feedback received. © 2013.

  2. The basis for cosmic ray feedback: Written on the wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zweibel, Ellen G.

    2017-05-01

    Star formation and supermassive black hole growth in galaxies appear to be self-limiting. The mechanisms for self-regulation are known as feedback. Cosmic rays, the relativistic particle component of interstellar and intergalactic plasma, are among the agents of feedback. Because cosmic rays are virtually collisionless in the plasma environments of interest, their interaction with the ambient medium is primarily mediated by large scale magnetic fields and kinetic scale plasma waves. Because kinetic scales are much smaller than global scales, this interaction is most conveniently described by fluid models. In this paper, I discuss the kinetic theory and the classical theory of cosmic ray hydrodynamics (CCRH) which follows from assuming cosmic rays interact only with self-excited waves. I generalize CCRH to generalized cosmic ray hydrodynamics, which accommodates interactions with extrinsic turbulence, present examples of cosmic ray feedback, and assess where progress is needed.

  3. Written Corrective Feedback and Peer Review in the BYOD Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Error correction in the English as a Foreign Language (EFL) writing curriculum is a practice both teachers and students agree is important for writing proficiency development (Ferris, 2004; Van Beuningen, De Jong, & Kuiken, 2012; Vyatkina, 2010, 2011). Research suggests student dependency on teacher corrective feedback yields few long-term…

  4. Teachers' Accounts of Their Perceptions and Practices of Providing Written Feedback to Nursing Students on Their Assignments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Sajid; Gul, Raisa; Lakhani, Arusa; Rizvi, Nusrat Fatima

    2014-01-01

    Written feedback can facilitate students' learning in several ways. However, the teachers' practices of written feedback may be affected by various factors. This study aimed to explore the nurse teachers' accounts of their perceptions and practices of providing written feedback. A descriptive exploratory design was employed in the study. A…

  5. Measuring the Effect of Written Feedback on Writing

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    Demaree, Dedra

    2007-11-01

    Members of the Physics and English departments at The Ohio State University (OSU) and Rochester Institute of Technology are involved in an ongoing study addressing issues related to writing activities in the physics classroom. Students in the physics 103 and 104 course sequence at OSU "The World of Energy" view weekly videos then turn in summaries as part of their homework grade. These summaries are given one point if turned in; they are not graded for the quality of their content. In winter quarter, 2006, some students were given substantial feedback on these summaries with comments aimed to improve their writing. Feedback-induced improvement in their video summaries is demonstrated in this paper.

  6. Relations between scripted online peer feedback processes and quality of written argumentative essay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noroozi, Omid; Biemans, Harm; Mulder, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Teachers often complain about the quality of students' written essays in higher education. This study explores the relations between scripted online peer feedback processes and quality of written argumentative essay as they occur in an authentic learning situation with direct practical relevance.

  7. The Relationship between Teacher's Written Feedback and Student's' Writing Performance: Sociocultural Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijami, Maryam; Pandian, Ambigapathy; Singh, Manjet Kaur Mehar

    2016-01-01

    Feedback plays a fundamental role in writing development. The present study seeks to investigate the impact of teacher's written feedback on the writing performance of Iranian undergraduates. The subjects were 400 students majoring in the fields of English language translation and English language literature in four universities, namely Shahaid…

  8. Written Teacher Feedback: Student Perceptions, Teacher Perceptions, and Actual Teacher Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Li

    2016-01-01

    This study sets out to investigate a teacher's and her students' perceptions of written teacher feedback in a college English as a foreign language (EFL) writing class in China. Essays, questionnaires, and interviews were employed to identify the types of feedback given by the teacher, the perceptions and preferences of students and the…

  9. Correcting students’ written grammatical errors: The effects of negotiated versus nonnegotiated feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Nassaji

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available A substantial number of studies have examined the effects of grammar correction on second language (L2 written errors. However, most of the existing research has involved unidirectional written feedback. This classroom-based study examined the effects of oral negotiation in addressing L2 written errors. Data were collected in two intermediate adult English as a second language classes. Three types of feedback were compared: nonnegotiated direct reformulation, feedback with limited negotiation (i.e., prompt + reformulation and feedback with negotiation. The linguistic targets chosen were the two most common grammatical errors in English: articles and prepositions. The effects of feedback were measured by means of learner-specific error identification/correction tasks administered three days, and again ten days, after the treatment. The results showed an overall advantage for feedback that involved negotiation. However, a comparison of data per error types showed that the differential effects of feedback types were mainly apparent for article errors rather than preposition errors. These results suggest that while negotiated feedback may play an important role in addressing L2 written errors, the degree of its effects may differ for different linguistic targets.

  10. A Written, Reflective and Dialogic Strategy for Assessment Feedback That Can Enhance Student/Teacher Relationships

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    Crimmins, Gail; Nash, Gregory; Oprescu, Florin; Liebergreen, Marama; Turley, Janet; Bond, Richard; Dayton, Jeanne

    2016-01-01

    In response to the shortcomings of current assessment feedback practice, this paper presents the results of a study designed to examine students' and teachers' experience of engaging in a written, reflective and dialogic feedback (WRDF) strategy. The strategy was designed to enhance the learning experience of students undertaking a large…

  11. The Focus of Supervisor Written Feedback to Thesis/Dissertation Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitchener, John; Basturkmen, Helen; East, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Written feedback on drafts of a thesis or dissertation is arguably the most important source of input on what is required or expected of thesis-writing students by the academic community. Despite its importance, relatively little is known about what type of information supervisors focus on when giving feedback. This article presents the findings…

  12. The Focus of Supervisor Written Feedback to Thesis/Dissertation Students

    OpenAIRE

    John Bitchener; Helen Basturkmen; Martin East

    2010-01-01

    Written feedback on drafts of a thesis or dissertation is arguably the most important source of input on what is required or expected of thesis-writing students by the academic community. Despite its importance, relatively little is known about what type of information supervisors focus on when giving feedback. This article presents the findings of an exploratory, descriptive study that investigated what supervisors said they focused on when giving feedback. A total of 35 supervisors across t...

  13. Written corrective feedback in secondary education: learners' and teachers' preferences and perceptions

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez Buffa, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    Treball Final de Màster Universitari en Ensenyament i Adquisició de la Llengua Anglesa en Contextos Multilingües (Pla de 2013). Codi: SAY031. Curs: 2015/2016 The role of corrective feedback (CF, henceforth) in second language acquisition (SLA, henceforth), more specifically written corrective feedback (WCF, henceforth), has been highly studied in the last couple of decades (Truscott, 1996; 1999; Ferris, 1999; Ashwell, 2000; Chandler, 2003; Russell & Spada, 2006; Sheen, 2010; 2...

  14. Investigating the relationship between quality, format and delivery of feedback for written assignments in higher education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sopina, Liza Elizaveta; McNeill, Rob

    2015-01-01

    Feedback can have a great impact on student learning. However, in order for it to be effective, feedback needs to be of high quality. Electronic marking has been one of the latest adaptations of technology in teaching and offers a new format of delivering feedback. There is little research...... investigating the impact the format of feedback has on quality of feedback and subsequently on student learning. This study sets out to investigate the impact paper-based and electronic methods of assignment submission and return have on students’ and markers’ perceived quality of feedback. Students and markers...... on an undergraduate course were asked to complete an anonymous online survey investigating their perceptions of quality, format and timeliness of feedback delivered electronically and on paper. The results showed that marking and providing feedback electronically was an acceptable method for markers, reporting...

  15. Can the Effectiveness of Different Forms of Feedback Be Measured? Retention and Student Preference for Written and Verbal Feedback in Level 4 Bioscience Students

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    Buckley, Phil

    2012-01-01

    Feedback is an important part of the learning process. However, the relative effectiveness of feedback in any given situation is poorly understood. Student retention of different forms of feedback is also largely unexplored. This case study examined the relative student perception and retention of both verbal and written feedback, using 68 level 4…

  16. The role of written corrective feedback in enhancing the linguistic accuracy of Iranian Japanese learners’ writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Ahmadi Shirazi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is an attempt to investigate the effect of direct and indirect feedback on the writing performance of Iranian learners of Japanese as a foreign language. During one academic semester, three indirect feedback types including underlining, coding and translation were used as well as direct type of feedback in order to see which one makes a difference in the written essays of students. The study targeted the impact of these feedback types on the correct usage of prepositions, adjective and noun phrases. Sixty students participated in the study. They were divided into control and experimental group; both were asked to write expository essays each session during a 10-week period; the experimental group were given feedback, either direct or indirect, every other session. Independent samples t- test showed that there is a significant difference between groups with the experimental group having a higher mean of accuracy in the use of three linguistic categories. Having time series design, we conducted repeated measure ANOVA which showed that just direct feedback enhanced the linguistic aspect of written essays of students with indirect feedback having little or no role to play in writing practice.

  17. Factors affecting written distance-learning feedback: the tutor’s perspective

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    Christine Calfoglou

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Launching the distance-learning student-tutor interaction process, tutors of the first module of the M.Ed in English course at the HOU lay the foundations of academic student autonomy by means of providing – inter alia -- the appropriate written feedback on written assignments. In doing so, they need to gauge the content and form of their written comments systematically with regard to both output- and student-, that is human factor-related issues (cf. Goldstein, 2004, the latter being particularly relevant to the distance-learning context. In this article we discuss tutor policy as well as tutor perceptions (cf. Lee, 2004, 2009 among others regarding written feedback on students’ academic assignments in terms of aspects of deviance treated and the relative gravity of ‘global’ and ‘local’ errors (e.g. Ferris, 2002, the directness of the correction, the punitive or facilitative nature of the comments provided as well as the relative balance of student strengths and weaknesses on the tutor’s comment agenda (cf. Hyland & Hyland, 2006. The role of the tutor as an assessor and/or counsellor is explored and the importance of striking a delicate balance between the two, especially in a context where face-to-face feedback opportunities are severely restricted, is underscored. We suggest that distance-learning feedback practices may need to be at least partially individualized to maximize student response and meet the goal of ‘informed autonomy’.

  18. The Effect of Teachers' Written Corrective Feedback (WCF) Types on Intermediate EFL Learners' Writing Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghajanloo, Khadijeh; Mobini, Fariba; Khosravi, Robab

    2016-01-01

    Written Corrective Feedback (WCF) is a controversial topic among theorists and researchers in L2 studies. Ellis, Sheen, Murakami, and Takashima (2008) identify two dominant dichotomies in this regard, that is focused vs. unfocused WCF and direct vs. indirect WCF. This study considered both dichotomies in a matrix format, resulted in the…

  19. A Model for Doctoral Students' Perceptions and Attitudes toward Written Feedback for Academic Writing

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    Can, Gulfidan; Walker, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate social science doctoral students' perceptions and attitudes toward written feedback about their academic writing and towards those who provide it. The study culminates in an explanatory model to describe the relationships between students' perceptions and attitudes, their revision decisions, and other…

  20. Shortcomings of the written survey questionnaire for discovering ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this article I describe my reflections on using a written survey questionnaire to investigate, on a large-scale, students' perceptions of studying Xhosa as a first language in high schools. I describe the aims of the project, how the questionnaire was designed, and the problems I encountered with the analysis of the data.

  1. Teaching And Learning Writing Using Teacher’s Written Feedback And Conference

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    Iisrohli Irawati

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to find out whether there is a significant difference in terms of writing skills improvements between the 8th grade students of SMP N 1 Prambanan Sleman who are given teacher’s written feedback and conference and those who are not in the academic year of 2011/2012. This study involved 71 students from two groups, Class VIII B (35 students as the experimental group and Class VIII A (36 students as the control group. The experimental group was given teacher’s written feedback and conference in the writing learning process, whereas the control group was given peer’s feedback. The data were obtained by using two essay writing tests. They were administered to the two groups as the pre-test and post-test. The pre-test was given to both groups before the treatment was given and the post-test was given after the treatment finished. The data of the pre-test and post-test of both groups were analyzed by means of descriptive and inferential statistics. After the data were tested and found to be homogeneous and normal, the hypothesis was tested using the analysis of covariance (ANCOVA. The results show that there is a significant difference in the writing ability between the students who are given teacher’s written feedback and conference and those who were not. It can be seen in the result of the hypothesis testing using ANCOVA. The significant value of 0.001 is less than the significance level of 0.05 (0.001 < 0.05, which means that the data of this study are considered to have a significant difference. Therefore, the hypothesis of this study is accepted. It means that the technique of giving teacher’s written feedback and conference significantly improves the students’ writing ability in the English teaching and learning process in SMP N 1 Prambanan Sleman.

  2. A Comparative Study of EFL Teachers' and Intermediate High School Students' Perceptions of Written Corrective Feedback on Grammatical Errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jodaie, Mina; Farrokhi, Farahman; Zoghi, Masoud

    2011-01-01

    This study was an attempt to compare EFL teachers' and intermediate high school students' perceptions of written corrective feedback on grammatical errors and also to specify their reasons for choosing comprehensive or selective feedback and some feedback strategies over some others. To collect the required data, the student version of…

  3. Iranian EFL Learners’ Reaction to Teacher’s Written Corrective Feedback

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    Abdolvahed Zarifi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Providing different types of corrective feedback on learners’ writing is a common practice in writing classes. Applied linguists have also invested huge attempt in investigating the impact that coorective feedback might have on developing different language skills among EFL/ESL writers. Despite the breadth of empirical research on the issue, literature has witnessed very few studies addressing the writer thought processes in dealing with the corrective feedback they recieve from their instructors. Therefore, the present qualitative study, which explores the way Iranian EFL learners respond to teacher corrective feedback, is an answer to this research need. The study included a sample of ten female high school students who were purposively selected and investigated for the cognitive process they assumed in responding to teacher written corrective feedback and their preferences for CF in writing tasks. Findings of the study have revealed that EFL learners go through a long and sophisticated thought process, reviewing, evaluating and finally accepting or ‘submiting to’ teacher corrective feedback.

  4. The Focus of Supervisor Written Feedback to Thesis/Dissertation Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Bitchener

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Written feedback on drafts of a thesis or dissertation is arguably the most important source of input on what is required or expected of thesis-writing students by the academic community. Despite its importance, relatively little is known about what type of information supervisors focus on when giving feedback. This article presents the findings of an exploratory, descriptive study that investigated what supervisors said they focused on when giving feedback. A total of 35 supervisors across three disciplines (Humanities, Sciences/ Mathematics, Commerce at six New Zealand universities participated in the study. Data were sought from self –report data (written questionnaires and interviews and samples of feedback given on thesis drafts. The study found that a wide range of beliefs concerning feedback are held by supervisors, that there is little difference in the type of feedback provided by supervisors in the different disciplines and that similar feedback tends to be given to both L1 and L2 students.Aunque los comentarios escritos que se añaden como feedback a los borradores de una tesis o tesina pueden considerarse una de las fuentes de información más importantes sobre lo que se requiere o se espera por parte de la comunidad académica con relación a la expresión escrita utilizada por los estudiantes, se sabe relativamente poco sobre el tipo de información en la que los directores centran su atención a la hora de hacer dichos comentarios. Este artículo presenta los resultados de un estudio exploratorio y descriptivo que investigó los aspectos a los que los directores afirmaron prestar atención al proporcionar comentarios escritos. Un total de 35 directores de tres disciplinas diferentes (Humanidades, Ciencias/Matemáticas, Comercio pertenecientes a seis universidades de Nueva Zelanda participaron en el estudio. Los datos se obtuvieron a partir de la información proporcionada por los propios participantes (cuestionarios escritos y

  5. THE EFFECT OF WRITTEN CORRECTIVE FEEDBACK ON HIGHER EDUCATION STUDENTS’ WRITING ACCURACY

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    Yustina Priska Kisnanto

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract With the higher demand of accuracy on students’ writing in university level, the present study examines the effect of direct and indirect written corrective feedback (WCF on students’ L2 writing accuracy. The study was conducted in a six-week period with 43 Indonesian university student participants majoring IT. The results of the pre- and post-writing tests showed that 1 the writing accuracy improvement of the students receiving direct WCF was statistically significant while the writing accuracy improvement of the students given the indirect WCF treatment was not; 2 the accuracy improvement in the untreatable error rate of the direct WCF group was the most significant compared to all types of error in both WFC student groups. The study concludes that considering the students’ current English proficiency level and learning setting with limited English exposure, written corrective feedback, especially the direct one, helps the university students improve their writing accuracy. Keywords: corrective feedback, L2 writing, higher education

  6. An Experiment in the Relationship of Types of Written Feedback to the Development of Second-Language Writing Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepner, Christine Goring

    1991-01-01

    Comparison of the effects of error- versus message-oriented written feedback on second-language students' essays found that error corrections and rule reminders did not significantly improve students' written accuracy or enhance the ideational quality of their writing, whereas message-related comments promoted writing proficiency. (63 references)…

  7. The Effect of Written Corrective Feedback on the Accuracy of Output Task and Learning of Target Form

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    Mohammad Reza Hasannejad

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of error feedback on the accuracy of output task types such as editing task, text reconstruction task, picture cued writing task, and dictogloss task, has not been clearly explored. Following arguments concerning that the combination of both corrective feedback and output makes it difficult to determine whether their effects were in combination or alone, the purpose of the present study is to document the role of teachers’ feedback in improving the accuracy of linguistic form in output tasks and in acquiring target form. To this end, this study compared three groups of Iranian intermediate learners (N= 93, one with direct grammar feedback, the other one with indirect grammar feedback and the last one with no grammar feedback. In terms of the target form uptake from first to subsequent text reconstruction tasks, the analysis of the data obtained within ten treatment sessions indicated that the participants, who received written corrective feedback compared to those who did not, progressed significantly from the first to the subsequent output tasks. In terms of learning, the learners who had the opportunities for receiving feedback performed significantly better than those in non- feedback condition on the production and recognition post- tests although explicit feedback rather than implicit feedback led to greater learning of target form on the production test, but no significant differences were found in relative efficacy of the two written corrective feedback types as far as the result of the recognition test was concerned.

  8. The impact of computer-based feedback on students’ written work

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    Khaled El Ebyary

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A pesar de que la investigación sobre escritura en segundas lenguas sugiere que los comentarios de los profesores pueden tener una influencia positiva sobre el trabajo escrito de los estudiantes, el proporcionar con regularidad tales comentarios puede ser problemático, especialmente en clases muy numerosas. Sin embargo, existen en el mercado una serie de programas informáticos que garantizan poder proporcionar tanto evaluaciones integrales de carácter automático como comentarios informatizados sobre trabajos escritos y que, por lo tanto, tienen cierto potencial para tratar este problema. Criterion es una de estas herramientas y, como tal, proporciona información automatizada a nivel de palabra, oración, párrafo y texto. En el presente trabajo analizamos el valor práctico que ofrece en la producción de comentarios para la escritura en L2 y, a este respecto, recogimos datos cuantitativos y cualitativos de 31 instructores y 616 profesores en formación de inglés como lengua extranjera de origen egipcio por medio de cuestionarios previos, entrevistas y discusiones en grupo. 24 de los profesores recibieron comentarios informatizados producidos por medio de Criterion sobre dos borradores de redacciones realizadas acerca de 4 temas diferentes. La información registrada en el software indica un efecto positivo sobre la calidad de los segundos borradores realizados por los estudiantes, así como de escritos posteriores. Asimismo, tanto los cuestionarios administrados después de la aplicación, como las entrevistas y las discusiones en grupo revelan un efecto positivo sobre la actitud de los estudiantes hacia los comentarios de los profesorWhile research in second language writing suggests that instructor feedback can have a positive influence on students’ written work, the provision of such feedback on a regular basis can be problematic, especially with larger student numbers. A number of computer programs that claim to provide both

  9. The Effect of Teachers’ Written Corrective Feedback (WCF Types on Intermediate EFL Learners’ Writing Performance

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    Khadijeh Aghajanloo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Written Corrective Feedback (WCF is a controversial topic among theorists and researchers in L2 studies. Ellis, Sheen, Murakami, and Takashima (2008 identify two dominant dichotomies in this regard, that is focused vs. unfocused WCF and direct vs. indirect WCF. This study considered both dichotomies in a matrix format, resulted in the recognition of four types of operationally defined WCF, and aimed at: (1 investigating the effects of four types of WCF (i.e., focused direct CF, unfocused direct CF, focused indirect CF, and unfocused indirect CF on intermediate EFL learners’ writing performance; (2 finding out the most effective type of WCF for intermediate EFL learners’ writing performance; (3 determining learners’ attitudes toward the effectiveness of using WCF and the types which they had received. After conducting Nelson English Language Test (Test 300 D, out of 140 male and female Iranian EFL learners, 120 of them were selected as intermediate learners, aging from 14-18. The subjects were then assigned randomly to four homogeneous groups (each group including 30 participants. The pre-test and post-test both included a writing test which assessed learners’ writing performance, and then their scores were analyzed by using analytic marking scale. The results indicated that, learners outperformed in all of the four groups, validating WCF as an effective technique which can be used in EFL classes. A clear implication of the study is that WCF types (specially unfocused direct CF should be emphasized as an essential tool for developing writing ability of intermediate EFL learners. Keywords: Written Corrective Feedback (WCF, Focused CF, Unfocused CF, Direct CF, Indirect CF, Writing Performance, Intermediate EFL Learners

  10. Combining Explicit- Implicit with Focus on Form - Focus on FormS Feedback in EFL Learners' Written Task Accuracy

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    Asghar Salimi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A number of studies has investigated whether definite types of written corrective feedback combinations of different types are more beneficial  than others. It seems that teaching writing and giving feedback to students’ written task accuracy is an important task for teachers, so this study tried to investigate the effects of different types of feedback (implicit focus on form, explicit focus on form and explicit focus on forms on EFL learners’ writing. For this purpose, 45 learners of a total number of 90 low intermediate learners studying at Meraj high school in Ardabil were chosen based on their placement test. Initially to make sure that subjects were homogenous, all of them took the Nelson placement test. Results of the test indicated that all of the participation was homogenous. The 45 learners thus were  divided into three groups and each of the groups were received feedback through one of the three forms of  above mentioned At the end of the treatment, the participants in three groups were given a writing posttest. T-Tests and One-way ANOVA were used to test the hypotheses. The results of t-tests showed all types of feedback were effective in improving written accuracy and result of Anova (post hoc showed that there were significant differences between groups and explicit focus on form outperformed than other types of feedback.

  11. The Quality of Written Peer Feedback on Undergraduates' Draft Answers to an Assignment, and the Use Made of the Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Mirabelle

    2015-01-01

    The research described here investigated the quality and characteristics of peer feedback given on a draft piece of writing in the context of an undergraduate summative assignment. It also investigated whether the recipients made use of the feedback, with the aim of discovering whether some types of feedback were used in preference to others. The…

  12. Direct and Indirect Written Corrective Feedback in the Context of Genre-based Instruction on Job Application Letter Writing

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    Mostafa Mirzaii

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite the fact that a considerable proportion of today’s writing programs operate according to the principles of genre-based instruction, research has not adequately dealt with the teaching of various genres (e.g., job application letters. Nor has research, to date, attempted to address the issue of written corrective feedback in conjunction with genre-based instruction. This study, therefore, aimed to investigate the impact of written corrective feedback in the context of genre-based instruction on job application letters. To this end, 120 Iranian advanced-level EFL learners at Kish Institute of Science and Technology participated in the present study. After administering the TOEFL test, 80 students scoring within ±1 SD of the mean score were randomly assigned to one of two experimental groups?namely, Direct Feedback Group or Indirect Feedback Group. Having sat a writing pretest, the participants received genre-based instruction on how to compose job application letters. Meanwhile, they were supplied with direct or indirect feedback on their writing. Following this instruction, a writing posttest was administered, the results of which showed that direct corrective feedback was more effective than indirect corrective feedback in the context of genre-based instruction on letters of job application.

  13. The Effects of Direct and Indirect Speech Acts on Native English and ESL Speakers' Perception of Teacher Written Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Wendy; Hansen Bricker, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    This study explores how second language (L2) learners perceive indirect (hedging or indirect speech acts) and direct written teacher feedback. Though research suggests that indirect speech acts may be more difficult to interpret than direct speech acts ([Champagne, 2001] and [Holtgraves, 1999]), using indirect speech acts is often encouraged in…

  14. The Effectiveness of Synchronous and Asynchronous Written Corrective Feedback on Grammatical Accuracy in a Computer-Mediated Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shintani, Natsuko; Aubrey, Scott

    2016-01-01

    This study extends research on written corrective feedback (CF) by investigating how timing of CF affects grammar acquisition. Specifically, it examined the relative effects of synchronous and asynchronous CF on the accurate use of the hypothetical conditional structure. Participants were 68 intermediate-level students of English at a university…

  15. Direct Written Corrective Feedback, Learner Differences, and the Acquisition of Second Language Article Use for Generic and Specific Plural Reference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanou, Charis; Revesz, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on a classroom-based study that investigated the effectiveness of direct written corrective feedback in relation to learner differences in grammatical sensitivity and knowledge of metalanguage. The study employed a pretest-posttest-delayed posttest design with two treatment sessions. Eighty-nine Greek English as a foreign…

  16. The Effect of Written Corrective Feedback on Omani Students’ Accuracy in the Use of English Prepositions

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    Ahmed Ali Saleh Al Ajmi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A quasi-experimental study was conducted to examin the effectiveness of providing written corrective feedback (WCF to Arab speakers of English on ten uses of English prepositions. Arab speakers commonly find it difficult to correctly use English propositions, mainly due to the differences between the two languages (e.g. Ortega, 2009. Examples of prepositions misuse are “married from,” “die from,” and “kind with.” The WCF implementation lasted for seven weeks.  The students’ being in intact classes made random assignments to different groups difficult. The data were derived from three tests: pre-test, immediate post-test and delayed post-test as well as an open-ended questionnaire. The experimental group (n= 25 received WCF on their writing, oral meta-linguistic tutorials, and a treatment task for their pre-test. For both the immediate post-test and the delayed post-test, they only received WCF on their writings. The control group (n= 25 only received general comments, like “good organization of the story events.” The statistical results of the independent samples t-test show the experimental group outperforming the control group on the target features. The analysis of the questionnaire data also shows the benefits of WCF for improving preposition use. The results also have pedagogical implications with regard to WCF. Keywords: WCF, writing, prepositions, students’ views, Arabic, EFL

  17. The Use of Models as a Form of Written Feedback to Secondary School Pupils of English

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    Noelia Martínez Esteban

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este estudio es investigar la relación entre atención, escritura y feedback durante la redacción individual y colaborativa de textos en inglés como lengua extranjera. Los participantes eran alumnos españoles de enseñanza secundaria con nivel de competencia intermedio-bajo que completaron una tarea de redacción en tres etapas: escritura de una narración a partir de unos dibujos (Etapa 1, comparación de los textos escritos con dos modelos escritos por hablantes nativos (etapa 2 y revisión posterior de los textos originales (etapa 3. Los resultados indican que los estudiantes repararon en errores principalmente de tipo léxico durante la escritura de la narración, pero que sólo pudieron encontrar unas pocas soluciones a esos problemas en los modelos proporcionados. Sin embargo, la comparación con los modelos les permitió, especialmente a los que trabajaban en colaboración, percatarse de un amplio número de elementos relacionados con el contenido de los dibujos y los medios lingüísticos utilizados para expresar tales contenidos, así como incorporar un número razonable de estos elementos en las revisiones posteriores. De acuerdo con estos resultados, se sugieren diversas implicaciones para la docencia y la investigación.The present study investigated how noticing is related to composing and subsequent feedback processing in individual and collaborative EFL writing. Participants were Spanish secondary school pupils at a lowintermediate proficiency level who completed a three-stage writing task that included writing a picture-based story (Stage 1, comparing their written texts with two native-speaker models (Stage 2, and attempting subsequent revisions (Stage 3. The results indicate that the students noticed mainly lexical problems at the writing stage but could only find a few solutions to those problems in the models provided. However, the comparison with the models allowed them, especially those who wrote

  18. The Effect of Coded and Uncoded Written Corrective Feedback on the Accuracy of Learners Writing in Pre-intermediate Level

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    Asghar Salimi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available To date, conflict exists in the literature on whether or not and how teachers should react to EFL learners' written grammar errors. Coded versus uncoded corrective feedback has been one of the rarely explored areas of investigation in SLA. To shed light on the factors that may explain such conflicting results, this study investigated the effect of coded and un-coded written corrective feedback with regard to possible improvements in the accuracy in writing of pre-intermediate EFL learners. It, further, sought whether such an effect would last in the long run. In the course of 14 weeks, learners’ errors in 2 groups (i.e., coded and uncoded were reacted. A paired-samples t-test was run to analyze the obtained data. Analysis of the written pieces in the immediate post-test and delayed post test revealed that coded corrective feedback, compared to the uncoded group, had a significantly more positive influence on learners' accuracy improvement both in the short and in the long run. The findings imply that teachers should weigh the learners' abilities and interlanguage, proficiency level, and type of error before applying different feedback types. Moreover, the implications are discussed in terms of effective guidelines for teaching writing in EFL contexts.

  19. Exploring Doctoral Students' Perceptions of Language Use in Supervisory Written Feedback Practices--Because "Feedback Is Hard to Have"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stracke, Elke; Kumar, Vijay

    2016-01-01

    The mastery of academic writing is essential in doctoral writing. Supervisory feedback provides opportunities for students to improve their writing. It is a communicative tool that can be categorised based on fundamental functions of speech: referential, directive, and expressive. This study provides some understanding of the impact that language…

  20. THE IMPORTANCE OF TEACHER’S WRITTEN FEEDBACK ON THE STUDENTS’ WRITING IN TEACHING LEARNING PROCESS

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    Afifah Raihany

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Teacher’s feedback to the student’s writing is vital for improving both teaching and learning process. It enables the teachers to find out to what extent they have been successful in their teaching and what they need to do to make their teaching more effective. Feedback also influences learning in that it provides an opportunity for learners mainly EFL learners to know what they need to do in order to improve. Unfortunately, the teachers’ responses to the student’ writing is sometimes neglected. In other words, they may pay little attention to the students’ views or opinions about forms/ types of teachers’ feedback they receive. Thus, the teachers do not know the students’ problems in responding to the teachers’ feedback and they do not know the students’ views of what forms and types of response the students prefer or even the teachers do not know much how to react in order to help the students process feedback successfully.

  1. The Effects of Focused And Unfocused Written Corrective Feedback on The Grammatical Accuracy of Beginner EFL Learners

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    Fateme Saeb

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The study reported in this paper aimed at investigating the efficacy of written corrective feedback (CF in improving beginner EFL learners’ grammatical accuracy. It also compared the effects of focused and unfocused written CF on the learners’ grammatical accuracy.  Seventy-nine beginner EFL students formed a control group (n= 29 and two experimental groups (focused= 25, unfocused= 25. The use of the third person singular ‘s’ morpheme for verbs was selected as the target structure to be treated through the provision of the written CF. The focused group received corrections concerning the use of the ‘s’ morpheme while the unfocused group received corrections for their all types of errors. The results indicated a significant improvement in accuracy for the two experimental groups from pretest to posttest. Also, the difference between the focused and unfocused groups in the posttest was not significant. These results suggested that providing written CF was effective for improving learners’ grammatical accuracy and that focused and unfocused written CF were not of differential effect in this regard.

  2. The effect of written corrective feedback on grammatical accuracy of EFL students: An improvement over previous unfocused designs

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    Mobin Khanlarzadeh

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of written corrective feedback (WCF in the improvement of language learners' grammatical accuracy has been a topic of interest in SLA studies for the past couple of decades. The present study reports the findings of a three-month study investigating the effect of direct unfocused WCF on the grammatical accuracy of elementary students in an EFL context. The researchers selected two intact classes totaling 33 students, and assigned each to a direct feedback group (n = 16 and a control group (n = 17. The students produced eight pieces of writing (a pretest, three writing tasks along with their revisions, and a posttest from which their grammatical accuracy was obtained. The results indicated that while the experimental group significantly outperformed the control group in the revision of the three writing tasks, no significant difference was found when the two groups produced a new piece of writing after a one-month interval. The study concludes that accuracy improvement caused by unfocused WCF during the revision process does not extend to EFL learners' future writing when no feedback is available, at least at the elementary level.

  3. Evaluating the impact of feedback on elementary aged students' fluency growth in written expression: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truckenmiller, Adrea J; Eckert, Tanya L; Codding, Robin S; Petscher, Yaacov

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this randomized controlled trial was to evaluate elementary-aged students' writing fluency growth in response to (a) instructional practices, (b) sex differences, and (c) student's initial level of writing fluency. Third-grade students (n=133) in three urban elementary schools were randomly assigned to either an individualized performance feedback condition (n=46), a practice-only condition (i.e., weekly writing practice; n=39), or an instructional control condition (n=48) for 8weeks. Findings included support for use of performance feedback as an instructional component in general education classrooms (Hedges' g=0.66), whereas simple practice with curriculum-based measurement in written expression did not produce growth significantly greater than standard instructional practices. The hypothesis that girls write significantly more than boys was supported. However, girls and boys did not differ in their rate of growth. Finally, students' initial risk status in writing fluency did not differentially predict growth in writing fluency over the course of the study. Implications for incorporating feedback as a basic component of intervention in writing are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Society for the Study of School Psychology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluating the Impact of Feedback on Elementary Aged Students’ Fluency Growth in Written Expression: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truckenmiller, Adrea J.; Eckert, Tanya L.; Codding, Robin S.; Petscher, Yaacov

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this randomized controlled trial was to evaluate elementary-aged students’ writing fluency growth in response to (a) instructional practices, (b) sex differences, and (c) student’s initial level of writing fluency. Third-grade students (n=133) in three urban elementary schools were randomly assigned to either an individualized performance feedback condition (n=46), a practice-only condition (i.e., weekly writing practice; n = 39), or an instructional control condition (n = 48) for 8 weeks. Findings included support for use of performance feedback as an instructional component in general education classrooms (Hedges’ g = 0.66), whereas simple practice with curriculum-based measurement in written expression did not produce growth significantly greater than standard instructional practices. The hypothesis that girls write significantly more than boys was supported. However, girls and boys did not differ in their rate of growth. Finally, students’ initial risk status in writing fluency did not differentially predict growth in writing fluency over the course of the study. Implications for incorporating feedback as a basic component of intervention in writing are discussed. PMID:25432270

  5. Quality of written narrative feedback and reflection in a modified mini-clinical evaluation exercise: an observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pelgrim, E.A.M.; Kramer, A.W.M.; Mokkink, H.G.A.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Research has shown that narrative feedback, (self) reflections and a plan to undertake and evaluate improvements are key factors for effective feedback on clinical performance. We investigated the quantity of narrative comments comprising feedback (by trainers),

  6. Attitudes towards chiropractic: an analysis of written comments from a survey of north american orthopaedic surgeons

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    Busse Jason W

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is increasing interest by chiropractors in North America regarding integration into mainstream healthcare; however, there is limited information about attitudes towards the profession among conventional healthcare providers, including orthopaedic surgeons. Methods We administered a 43-item cross-sectional survey to 1000 Canadian and American orthopaedic surgeons that inquired about demographic variables and their attitudes towards chiropractic. Our survey included an option for respondants to include written comments, and our present analysis is restricted to these comments. Two reviewers, independantly and in duplicate, coded all written comments using thematic analysis. Results 487 surgeons completed the survey (response rate 49%, and 174 provided written comments. Our analysis revealed 8 themes and 24 sub-themes represented in surgeons' comments. Reported themes were: variability amongst chiropractors (n = 55; concerns with chiropractic treatment (n = 54; areas where chiropractic is perceived as effective (n = 43; unethical behavior (n = 43; patient interaction (n = 36; the scientific basis of chiropractic (n = 26; personal experiences with chiropractic (n = 21; and chiropractic training (n = 18. Common sub-themes endorsed by surgeon's were diversity within the chiropractic profession as a barrier to increased interprofessional collaboration, endorsement for chiropractic treatment of musculoskeletal complaints, criticism for treatment of non-musculoskeletal complaints, and concern over whether chiropractic care was evidence-based. Conclusions Our analysis identified a number of issues that will have to be considered by the chiropractic profession as part of its efforts to further integrate chiropractic into mainstream healthcare.

  7. Investigating the Practice of Providing Written Corrective Feedback Types by ESL Teachers at the Upper Secondary Level in High Performance Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmud, Norasyikin

    2016-01-01

    The past few decades has seen the rapid development of WCF (written corrective feedback) study. The present study examined the practice of providing WCF by teachers. The aim of this study was to determine the types of WCF used by English teachers. The study is an explanatory sequential mixed-methods design using open-ended and close-ended survey…

  8. Written online situational feedback via mobile phone to support self-management of chronic widespread pain: a usability study of a web-based intervention.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kristjánsdóttir, O.B.; Fors, E.A.; Eide, E.; Finset, A.; Dulmen, S. van; Wigers, S.H.; Eide, H.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This pretrial study aimed to develop and test the usability of a four-week Internet intervention delivered by a Web-enabled mobile phone to support self-management of chronic widespread pain. METHODS: The intervention included daily online entries and individualized written feedback,

  9. Visualizing the qualitative: making sense of written comments from an evaluative satisfaction survey

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    Keith V. Bletzer

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Satisfaction surveys are common in the field of health education, as a means of assisting organizations to improve the appropriateness of training materials and the effectiveness of facilitation-presentation. Data can be qualitative of which analysis often become specialized. This technical article aims to reveal whether qualitative survey results can be visualized by presenting them as a Word Cloud. Methods: Qualitative materials in the form of written comments on an agency-specific satisfaction survey were coded and quantified. The resulting quantitative data were used to convert comments into “input terms” to generate Word Clouds to increase comprehension and accessibility through visualization of the written responses. Results: A three-tier display incorporated a Word Cloud at the top, followed by the corresponding frequency table, and a textual summary of the qualitative data represented by the Word Cloud imagery. This mixed format adheres to recognition that people vary in what format is most effective for assimilating new information. Conclusion: The combination of visual representation through Word Clouds complemented by quantified qualitative materials is one means of increasing comprehensibility for a range of stakeholders, who might not be familiar with numerical tables or statistical analyses.

  10. The Differential Effect of Two Types of Direct Written Corrective Feedback on Noticing and Uptake: Reformulation vs. Error Correction

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    Rosa M. Manchón

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Framed in a cognitively-oriented strand of research on corrective feedback (CF in SLA, the controlled three- stage (composition/comparison-noticing/revision study reported in this paper investigated the effects of two forms of direct CF (error correction and reformulation on noticing and uptake, as evidenced in the written output produced by a group of 8 secondary school EFL learners. Noticing was operationalized as the amount of corrections noticed in the comparison stage of the writing task, whereas uptake was operationally defined as the type and amount of accurate revisions incorporated in the participants’ revised versions of their original texts. Results support previous research findings on the positive effects of written CF on noticing and uptake, with a clear advantage of error correction over reformulation as far as uptake was concerned. Data also point to the existence of individual differences in the way EFL learners process and make use of CF in their writing. These findings are discussed from the perspective of the light they shed on the learning potential of CF in instructed SLA, and suggestions for future research are put forward.Enmarcado en la investigación de orden cognitivo sobre la corrección (“corrective feedback”, en este trabajo se investigó la incidencia de dos tipos de corrección escrita (corrección de errores y reformulación en los procesos de detección (noticing e incorporación (“uptake”. Ocho alumnos de inglés de Educción Secundaria participaron en un experimento que constó de tres etapas: redacción, comparación-detección y revisión. La detección se definió operacionalmente en términos del número de correcciones registradas por los alumnos durante la etapa de detección-comparación, mientras que la operacionalización del proceso de incorporación fue el tipo y cantidad de revisiones llevadas a cabo en la última etapa del experimento. Nuestros resultados confirman los hallazgos de la

  11. 77 FR 34062 - Announcement of the U.S. Geological Survey Science Strategy Planning Feedback Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR U.S. Geological Survey Announcement of the U.S. Geological Survey Science Strategy Planning Feedback Process AGENCY: U.S. Geological Survey, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Feedback Process. ] SUMMARY: The U.S...

  12. Providing written information increases patient satisfaction: a web-based questionnaire survey of Japanese cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Hitomi; Katsumata, Noriyuki; Takahashi, Miyako

    2017-07-01

    The Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the United States recommends that all cancer survivors be provided with a survivorship care plan (SCP), which includes a patient treatment summary and a follow-up care plan. However, SCPs have not been widely adopted in Japan. To provide basic data necessary for implementing SCPs in Japan, we aimed to investigate the forms of clinical and survivorship-related information that Japanese cancer survivors receive from their healthcare providers, and to examine whether written information increases their satisfaction. We performed a cross-sectional online survey of cancer survivors who underwent acute cancer treatment and had at least one follow-up with a physician in the past year. Cancer survivors provided the elements and forms (verbally and/or written) of information they received, as well as the degree of satisfaction with the information provided. Responses were obtained from 545 cancer survivors. Information elements such as surgical procedure (98.3%), surgical outcome (98.1%), and names of administered chemotherapy agents (97.8%) were commonly provided, whereas mental care resources and providers (29.7%), effects on marital relationship and sexual health (35.7%), and effects on fertility (43.4%) were less common. A large proportion of cancer survivors received verbal information only. For 18 of 20 elements, except for effects on fertility and duration of hormonal therapy, satisfaction was significantly higher when both forms of information were provided (P information can better meet the needs of Japanese cancer survivors.

  13. Survey on multisensory feedback virtual reality dental training systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, D; Li, T; Zhang, Y; Hou, J

    2016-11-01

    Compared with traditional dental training methods, virtual reality training systems integrated with multisensory feedback possess potentials advantages. However, there exist many technical challenges in developing a satisfactory simulator. In this manuscript, we systematically survey several current dental training systems to identify the gaps between the capabilities of these systems and the clinical training requirements. After briefly summarising the components, functions and unique features of each system, we discuss the technical challenges behind these systems including the software, hardware and user evaluation methods. Finally, the clinical requirements of an ideal dental training system are proposed. Future research/development areas are identified based on an analysis of the gaps between current systems and clinical training requirements. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Comparison of two reading feedback strategies in improving the oral and written language performance of children with language-learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Linda K

    2003-02-01

    Twelve school-age children with language-learning disabilities (LLD) participated in a study comparing the effects of two reading feedback strategies for improving their oral and written language performance. Children were matched for age, disability, gender, and general reading performance. Participants were assigned to one of three study groups, Treatment 1 (T1), Treatment 2 (T2), or Control (C). Children were pre- and posttested on standardized tests of reading and oral vocabulary. T1 and T2 participated in 6 weeks of reading intervention. T1 used traditional decoding-based feedback strategies, and T2 used meaning-based feedback strategies, termed Communicative Reading Strategies (CRS). Significant differences across groups were found for reading comprehension, oral reading, and expressive vocabulary measures. Pairwise comparisons indicated that T2 performed significantly better than T1 and C on reading comprehension at posttest. Though not reaching levels of significance, T2 made greater gains than T1 and C on oral reading and expressive vocabulary measures. Results are discussed with implications for using CRS (T2) with school-age poor readers.

  15. 77 FR 6785 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Feedback Survey for Annual Tsunami Warning...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-09

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Feedback... (or via the Internet at [email protected] .) FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Requests for additional... Service's (NWS) Tsunami Warning System, this survey is needed to gather specific feedback information...

  16. Survey of Digital Feedback Systems in High Current Storage Rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teytelman, Dmitry

    2003-06-06

    In the last decade demand for brightness in synchrotron light sources and luminosity in circular colliders led to construction of multiple high current storage rings. Many of these new machines require feedback systems to achieve design stored beam currents. In the same time frame the rapid advances in the technology of digital signal processing allowed the implementation of these complex feedback systems. In this paper I concentrate on three applications of feedback to storage rings: orbit control in light sources, coupled-bunch instability control, and low-level RF control. Each of these applications is challenging in areas of processing bandwidth, algorithm complexity, and control of time-varying beam and system dynamics. I will review existing implementations as well as comment on promising future directions.

  17. Consulting the Delphi: A New Idea for Collecting Student Feedback through the Two Survey Method (TSM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finelli, Cynthia J.; Wright, Mary C.; Pinder-Grover, Tershia

    2010-01-01

    The Two Survey Method (TSM) is a new time-efficient tool for gathering formative student feedback. Based on the Delphi technique, the TSM uses iterative surveys to develop student consensus about key strengths and suggestions for instruction. Evaluation data indicate that both faculty and students are satisfied with the method's efficiency and the…

  18. Adaptation of the Patient Feedback Survey at a Community Treatment Setting

    OpenAIRE

    Kolodziej, Monika E.; Muchowski, Patrice M.; Hamdi, Nayla R.; Morrissette, Paula; Psy.D.,; McGowan, Alicen J.; Weiss, Roger D.

    2011-01-01

    The Patient Feedback Survey is a performance improvement measure designed to assess the quality of outpatient substance abuse treatment. We modified and administered this measure to 500 individuals at a multi-site treatment provider. Although the feedback scores were high in general, analyses of variance showed score variability in relation to type and length of treatment. Moreover, respondents who reported any use of marijuana, cravings for substances, or mutual-support group attendance (i.e...

  19. Adaptation of the patient feedback survey at a community treatment setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolodziej, Monika E; Muchowski, Patrice M; Hamdi, Nayla R; Morrissette, Paula; McGowan, Alicen J; Weiss, Roger D

    2012-01-01

    The Patient Feedback Survey is a performance improvement measure designed to assess the quality of outpatient substance abuse treatment. We modified and administered this measure to 500 individuals at a multisite treatment provider. Although the feedback scores were high in general, analyses of variance showed score variability in relation to type and length of treatment. Moreover, respondents who reported any use of marijuana, cravings for substances, or mutual-support group attendance (ie, Alcoholics Anonymous or Narcotics Anonymous) had lower feedback scores than respondents without these experiences. We highlight the importance of investigating treatment evaluations in the context of other recovery experiences.  Copyright © American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  20. Written online situational feedback via mobile phone to support self-management of chronic widespread pain: a usability study of a Web-based intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eide Erlend

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This pretrial study aimed to develop and test the usability of a four-week Internet intervention delivered by a Web-enabled mobile phone to support self-management of chronic widespread pain. Methods The intervention included daily online entries and individualized written feedback, grounded in a mindfulness-based cognitive behavioral approach. The participants registered activities, emotions and pain cognitions three times daily using the mobile device. The therapist had immediate access to this information through a secure Web site. The situational information was used to formulate and send a personalized text message to the participant with the aim of stimulating effective self-management of the current situation. Six women participated and evaluated the experience. Results The intervention was rated as supportive, meaningful and user-friendly by the majority of the women. The response rate to the daily registration entries was high and technical problems were few. Conclusion The results indicate a feasible intervention. Web-applications are fast becoming standard features of mobile phones and interventions of this kind can therefore be more available than before. Trial registration number ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01236209

  1. Written online situational feedback via mobile phone to support self-management of chronic widespread pain: a usability study of a Web-based intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristjánsdóttir, Ólöf Birna; Fors, Egil A; Eide, Erlend; Finset, Arnstein; van Dulmen, Sandra; Wigers, Sigrid Hørven; Eide, Hilde

    2011-02-25

    This pretrial study aimed to develop and test the usability of a four-week Internet intervention delivered by a Web-enabled mobile phone to support self-management of chronic widespread pain. The intervention included daily online entries and individualized written feedback, grounded in a mindfulness-based cognitive behavioral approach. The participants registered activities, emotions and pain cognitions three times daily using the mobile device. The therapist had immediate access to this information through a secure Web site. The situational information was used to formulate and send a personalized text message to the participant with the aim of stimulating effective self-management of the current situation. Six women participated and evaluated the experience. The intervention was rated as supportive, meaningful and user-friendly by the majority of the women. The response rate to the daily registration entries was high and technical problems were few. The results indicate a feasible intervention. Web-applications are fast becoming standard features of mobile phones and interventions of this kind can therefore be more available than before. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01236209.

  2. Audio Feedback to Physiotherapy Students for Viva Voce: How Effective Is "The Living Voice"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, Wendy; Hollingworth, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Assessment and feedback remains one of the categories that students are least satisfied with within the United Kingdom National Student Survey. The Student Charter promotes the use of various formats of feedback to enhance student learning. This study evaluates the use of audio MP3 as an alternative feedback mechanism to written feedback for…

  3. The significance of assignment feedback: from consumption to construction

    OpenAIRE

    Blair, Alasdair; Curtis, Steven; Goodwin, Mark; Shields, Sam

    2012-01-01

    Research undertaken on student feedback has pointed to the difficulties that students have in understanding written feedback. However, little attention has been given to understanding student views on verbal feedback. This article aims to fill this gap by reporting on the findings of verbal feedback practices among 114 History, Politics and International Relations students obtained from a questionnaire survey. These findings were supported by five in-depth semi-structured in...

  4. Audio Feedback -- Better Feedback?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelkel, Susanne; Mello, Luciane V.

    2014-01-01

    National Student Survey (NSS) results show that many students are dissatisfied with the amount and quality of feedback they get for their work. This study reports on two case studies in which we tried to address these issues by introducing audio feedback to one undergraduate (UG) and one postgraduate (PG) class, respectively. In case study one…

  5. Effect on survey response rate of hand written versus printed signature on a covering letter: randomised controlled trial [ISRCTN67566265

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayers Sarah

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is important that response rates to postal surveys are as high as possible to ensure that the results are representative and to maximise statistical power. Previous research has suggested that any personalisation of approach helps to improve the response rate. This experiment tested whether personalising questionnaires by hand signing the covering letter improved the response rate compared with a non-personalised group where the investigator's signature on the covering letter was scanned into the document and printed. Methods Randomised controlled trial. Questionnaires about surgical techniques of caesarean section were mailed to 3,799 Members and Fellows of the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists resident in the UK. Individuals were randomly allocated to receive a covering letter with either a computer printed signature or a hand written signature. Two reminders were sent to non-respondents. The outcome measures were the proportion of questionnaires returned and their time to return. Results The response rate was 79.1% (1506/1905 in the hand-signed group and 78.4% (1484/1894 in the scanned and printed signature group. There was no detectable difference between the groups in response rate or time taken to respond. Conclusion No advantage was detected to hand signing the covering letter accompanying a postal questionnaire to health professionals.

  6. ‘Health and happiness is more important than weight’: a qualitative investigation of the views of parents receiving written feedback on their child's weight as part of the National Child Measurement Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrad, H; Falconer, C; Cooke, L; Saxena, S; Kessel, A S; Viner, R; Kinra, S; Wardle, J; Croker, H

    2015-01-01

    Background The present study aimed to explore parental perceptions of overweight children and associated health risks after receiving National Child Measurement Programme (NCMP) weight feedback. Methods Fifty-two parents of overweight and obese children aged 4–5 years and 10–11 years enrolled in the NCMP programme in England in 2010–2011 participated in qualitative, semi-structured interviews about their perceptions of their child's weight and health risk after receiving weight feedback. Interviews were audio tape recorded and were conducted either by telephone (n = 9) or in the respondents’ homes (n = 41). Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using interpretative thematic analysis. Results Parents who received NCMP written feedback informing them that their child was overweight disregarded the results because they viewed ‘health and happiness as being more important than weight’. The feedback was viewed as less credible because it did not consider the individual child's lifestyle. ‘Broad definitions of healthy’ were described that did not include weight, such as reference to the child having good emotional and physical health and a healthy diet. Parents attributed weight to ‘inherited/acquired factors’ such as genetics or puppy fat, or did not regard their child's ‘appearance’ as reflecting being overweight. ‘Cultural influence’ also meant that being overweight was not viewed negatively by some non-white parents. Conclusions After receiving written weight feedback, parents use methods other than actual weight when evaluating their child's weight status and health risks. Parents’ conceptions of health and weight should be considered when communicating with parents, with the aim of bridging the gap between parental recognition of being overweight and subsequent behaviour change. PMID:26295077

  7. Do 360-degree feedback survey results relate to patient satisfaction measures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hageman, Michiel G J S; Ring, David C; Gregory, Paul J; Rubash, Harry E; Harmon, Larry

    2015-05-01

    There is evidence that feedback from 360-degree surveys-combined with coaching-can improve physician team performance and quality of patient care. The Physicians Universal Leadership-Teamwork Skills Education (PULSE) 360 is one such survey tool that is used to assess work colleagues' and coworkers' perceptions of a physician's leadership, teamwork, and clinical practice style. The Clinician & Group-Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and System (CG-CAHPS), developed by the US Department of Health and Human Services to serve as the benchmark for quality health care, is a survey tool for patients to provide feedback that is based on their recent experiences with staff and clinicians and soon will be tied to Medicare-based compensation of participating physicians. Prior research has indicated that patients and coworkers often agree in their assessment of physicians' behavioral patterns. The goal of the current study was to determine whether 360-degree, also called multisource, feedback provided by coworkers could predict patient satisfaction/experience ratings. A significant relationship between these two forms of feedback could enable physicians to take a more proactive approach to reinforce their strengths and identify any improvement opportunities in their patient interactions by reviewing feedback from team members. An automated 360-degree software process may be a faster, simpler, and less resource-intensive approach than telephoning and interviewing patients for survey responses, and it potentially could facilitate a more rapid credentialing or quality improvement process leading to greater fiscal and professional development gains for physicians. Our primary research question was to determine if PULSE 360 coworkers' ratings correlate with CG-CAHPS patients' ratings of overall satisfaction, recommendation of the physician, surgeon respect, and clarity of the surgeon's explanation. Our secondary research questions were to determine whether CG-CAHPS scores

  8. Leadership development in a professional medical society using 360-degree survey feedback to assess emotional intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Paul J; Robbins, Benjamin; Schwaitzberg, Steven D; Harmon, Larry

    2016-12-30

    The current research evaluated the potential utility of a 360-degree survey feedback program for measuring leadership quality in potential committee leaders of a professional medical association (PMA). Emotional intelligence as measured by the extent to which self-other agreement existed in the 360-degree survey ratings was explored as a key predictor of leadership quality in the potential leaders. A non-experimental correlational survey design was implemented to assess the variation in leadership quality scores across the sample of potential leaders. A total of 63 of 86 (76%) of those invited to participate did so. All potential leaders received feedback from PMA Leadership, PMA Colleagues, and PMA Staff and were asked to complete self-ratings regarding their behavior. Analyses of variance revealed a consistent pattern of results as Under-Estimators and Accurate Estimators-Favorable were rated significantly higher than Over-Estimators in several leadership behaviors. Emotional intelligence as conceptualized in this study was positively related to overall performance ratings of potential leaders. The ever-increasing roles and potential responsibilities for PMAs suggest that these organizations should consider multisource performance reviews as these potential future PMA executives rise through their organizations to assume leadership positions with profound potential impact on healthcare. The current findings support the notion that potential leaders who demonstrated a humble pattern or an accurate pattern of self-rating scored significantly higher in their leadership, teamwork, and interpersonal/communication skills than those with an aggrandizing self-rating.

  9. A Pharmaceutical Bioethics Consultation Service: Six-Year Descriptive Characteristics and Results of a Feedback Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Campen, Luann E; Allen, Albert J; Watson, Susan B; Therasse, Donald G

    2015-04-03

    Background: Bioethics consultations are conducted in varied settings, including hospitals, universities, and other research institutions, but there is sparse information about bioethics consultations conducted in corporate settings such as pharmaceutical companies. The purpose of this article is to describe a bioethics consultation service at a pharmaceutical company, to report characteristics of consultations completed by the service over a 6-year period, and to share results of a consultation feedback survey. Methods: Data on the descriptive characteristics of bioethics consultations were collected from 2008 to 2013 and analyzed in Excel 2007. Categorical data were analyzed via the pivot table function, and time-based variables were analyzed via formulas. The feedback survey was administered to consultation requesters from 2009 to 2012 and also analyzed in Excel 2007. Results: Over the 6-year period, 189 bioethics consultations were conducted. The number of consultations increased from five per year in 2008 to approximately one per week in 2013. During this time, the format of the consultation service was changed from a committee-only approach to a tiered approach (tailored to the needs of the case). The five most frequent topics were informed consent, early termination of a clinical trial, benefits and risks, human biological samples, and patient rights. The feedback survey results suggest the consultation service is well regarded overall and viewed as approachable, helpful, and responsive. Conclusions: Pharmaceutical bioethics consultation is a unique category of bioethics consultation that primarily focuses on pharmaceutical research and development but also touches on aspects of clinical ethics, business ethics, and organizational ethics. Results indicate there is a demand for a tiered bioethics consultation service within this pharmaceutical company and that advice was valued. This company's experience indicates that a bioethics consultation service raises

  10. Constructing a survey over time: Audio-visual feedback and theatre sketches in rural Mali

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Véronique Hertrich

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge dissemination is an emerging issue in population studies, both in terms of ethics and data quality. The challenge is especially important in long term follow-up surveys and it requires methodological imagination when the population is illiterate. The paper presents the dissemination project developed in a demographic surveillance system implemented in rural Mali over the last 20 years. After basic experience of document transfer, the feedback strategy was developed through audiovisual shows and theatre sketches. The advantages and drawbacks of these media are discussed, in terms of scientific communication and the construction of dialogue with the target population.

  11. TCT-82 Evaluation of Current Practices in Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement: The WRITTEN (WoRldwIde TAVR ExperieNce) Survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nombela-Franco, Luis; Cerrato, Enrico; Nazif, Tamim

    2016-01-01

    the main areas of consensus and divergence between centers. Methods An online questionnaire was distributed in centers performing TAVR irrespective of the number of procedures and valve type. The questionnaire was divided in 3 main blocks: pre-procedural evaluation, procedural practices and post......-procedural management. Regional experts were recruited to distribute the survey in each country or region. Results The survey was completed by 250 TAVR centers (with a cumulative experience of nearly 70,000 procedures) from 38 different countries. Heart team meetings were regularly scheduled in most (>95%) centers...... in patients with atrial fibrillation requiring anticoagulation therapy (anticoagulation alone, anticoagulation+aspirin, anticoagulation+clopidogrel, and triple therapy in 28%, 37%, 26% and 4% of centers, respectively). Conclusion The WRITTEN survey provided extensive data on current TAVR-related practice...

  12. A nationwide survey of public healthcare providers’ impressions of family medicine specialists in Malaysia: a qualitative analysis of written comments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Ai-Theng; Ismail, Mastura; Hamzah, Zuhra; A-Rashid, Mohd-Radzniwan; Md-Yasin, Mazapuspavina; Ali, Norsiah; Mohd-Salleh, Noridah; Bashah, Baizury

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine impressions of public healthcare providers/professionals (PHCPs) who are working closely with family medicine specialists (FMSs) at public health clinics. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting This study is part of a larger national study on the perception of Malaysian public healthcare professionals on FMSs (PERMFAMS). Participants PHCPs from three categories of health facility: hospitals, health clinics and health offices. Main outcome measures Qualitative analyses of written comments of respondents’ general impression of FMSs. Results The participants’ response rate was 58.0% (780/1345), with almost equal proportions from each public healthcare facility. A total of 23 categories for each of the 648 impression comments were identified. The six emerging themes were: (1) importance of FMSs; (2) roles of FMSs; (3) clinical performance of FMSs; (4) attributes of FMSs; (5) FMS practice challenges; (6) misconception of FMS roles. Overall, FMS practice was perceived to be safe and able to provide effective treatments in a challenging medical discipline that was in line with the current standards of medical care and ethical and professional values. The areas of concern were in clinical performance expressed by PHCPs from some hospitals and the lack of personal attributes and professionalism among FMSs mentioned by PHCPs from health clinics and offices. Conclusions FMSs were perceived to be capable of providing effective treatment and were considered to be important primary care physicians. There were a few negative impressions in some areas of FMS practice, which demanded attention by the FMSs themselves and the relevant authorities in order to improve efficiency and safeguard the fraternity's reputation. PMID:26743703

  13. A nationwide survey of public healthcare providers' impressions of family medicine specialists in Malaysia: a qualitative analysis of written comments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Boon-How; Cheong, Ai-Theng; Ismail, Mastura; Hamzah, Zuhra; A-Rashid, Mohd-Radzniwan; Md-Yasin, Mazapuspavina; Ali, Norsiah; Mohd-Salleh, Noridah; Bashah, Baizury

    2016-01-07

    To examine impressions of public healthcare providers/professionals (PHCPs) who are working closely with family medicine specialists (FMSs) at public health clinics. Cross-sectional study. This study is part of a larger national study on the perception of Malaysian public healthcare professionals on FMSs (PERMFAMS). PHCPs from three categories of health facility: hospitals, health clinics and health offices. Qualitative analyses of written comments of respondents' general impression of FMSs. The participants' response rate was 58.0% (780/1345), with almost equal proportions from each public healthcare facility. A total of 23 categories for each of the 648 impression comments were identified. The six emerging themes were: (1) importance of FMSs; (2) roles of FMSs; (3) clinical performance of FMSs; (4) attributes of FMSs; (5) FMS practice challenges; (6) misconception of FMS roles. Overall, FMS practice was perceived to be safe and able to provide effective treatments in a challenging medical discipline that was in line with the current standards of medical care and ethical and professional values. The areas of concern were in clinical performance expressed by PHCPs from some hospitals and the lack of personal attributes and professionalism among FMSs mentioned by PHCPs from health clinics and offices. FMSs were perceived to be capable of providing effective treatment and were considered to be important primary care physicians. There were a few negative impressions in some areas of FMS practice, which demanded attention by the FMSs themselves and the relevant authorities in order to improve efficiency and safeguard the fraternity's reputation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  14. Useful but Different: Resident Physician Perceptions of Interprofessional Feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesel, Travis P; O'Brien, Bridget C; Henry, Duncan M; van Schaik, Sandrijn M

    2016-01-01

    Phenomenon: Based on recently formulated interprofessional core competencies, physicians are expected to incorporate feedback from other healthcare professionals. Based on social identity theory, physicians likely differentiate between feedback from members of their own profession and others. The current study examined residents' experiences with, and perceptions of, interprofessional feedback. In 2013, Anesthesia, Obstetrics-Gynecology, Pediatrics, and Psychiatry residents completed a survey including questions about frequency of feedback from different professionals and its perceived value (5-point scale). The authors performed an analysis of variance to examine interactions between residency program and profession of feedback provider. They conducted follow-up interviews with a subset of residents to explore reasons for residents' survey ratings. Fifty-two percent (131/254) of residents completed the survey, and 15 participated in interviews. Eighty percent of residents reported receiving written feedback from physicians, 26% from nurses, and less than 10% from other professions. There was a significant interaction between residency program and feedback provider profession, F(21, 847) = 3.82, p feedback provider profession, F(7, 847) = 73.7, p feedback from attending physicians higher than feedback from others, and anesthesia residents rated feedback from other professionals significantly lower than other residents. Ten major themes arose from qualitative data analysis, which revealed an overall positive attitude toward interprofessional feedback and clarified reasons behind residents' perceptions and identified barriers. Insights: Residents in our study reported limited exposure to interprofessional feedback and valued such feedback less than intraprofessional feedback. However, our data suggest opportunities exist for effective utilization of interprofessional feedback.

  15. The results of a survey highlighting issues with feedback on medical training in the United Kingdom and how a Smartphone App could provide a solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Thomas G; Hood, Gill; Farrell, Tom

    2015-11-06

    Feedback drives learning in medical education. Healthcare Supervision Logbook (HSL) is a Smartphone App developed at Sheffield Teaching Hospitals for providing feedback on medical training, from both a trainee's and a supervisor's perspective. In order to establish a mandate for the role of HSL in clinical practice, a large survey was carried out. Two surveys (one for doctors undertaking specialty training and a second for consultants supervising their training) were designed. The survey for doctors-in-training was distributed to all specialty trainees in the South and West localities of the Health Education Yorkshire and the Humber UK region. The survey for supervisors was distributed to all consultants involved in educational and clinical supervision of specialty trainees at Sheffield Teaching Hospitals. The results confirm that specialty trainees provide feedback on their training infrequently-66 % do so only annually. 96 % of the specialty trainees owned a Smartphone and 45 % said that they would be willing to use a Smartphone App to provide daily feedback on the clinical and educational supervision they receive. Consultant supervisors do not receive regular feedback on the educational and clinical supervision they provide to trainees-56 % said they never received such feedback and 33 % said it was only on an annual basis. 86 % of consultants surveyed owned a Smartphone and 41 % said they would be willing to use a Smartphone App to provide feedback on the performance of trainees they were supervising. Feedback on medical training is recorded by specialty trainees infrequently and consultants providing educational and clinical supervision often do not receive any feedback on their performance in this area. HSL is a simple, quick and efficient way to collect and collate feedback on medical training to improve this situation. Good support and education needs to be provided when implementing this new technology.

  16. Approaches to Treating Student Written Errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Thu H.

    2013-01-01

    Second language writing teachers face numerous challenges when providing feedback on student writing. There may be so many problems in the writing that is almost impossible for them to focus on or they may constantly seek a better method of giving feedback on student written errors. This paper attempts to provide second language writing teachers…

  17. Force Modeling, Identification, and Feedback Control of Robot-Assisted Needle Insertion: A Survey of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chongjun; Xie, Yu; Liu, Shuang; Sun, Dong

    2018-02-12

    Robot-assisted surgery is of growing interest in the surgical and engineering communities. The use of robots allows surgery to be performed with precision using smaller instruments and incisions, resulting in shorter healing times. However, using current technology, an operator cannot directly feel the operation because the surgeon-instrument and instrument-tissue interaction force feedbacks are lost during needle insertion. Advancements in force feedback and control not only help reduce tissue deformation and needle deflection but also provide the surgeon with better control over the surgical instruments. The goal of this review is to summarize the key components surrounding the force feedback and control during robot-assisted needle insertion. The literature search was conducted during the middle months of 2017 using mainstream academic search engines with a combination of keywords relevant to the field. In total, 166 articles with valuable contents were analyzed and grouped into five related topics. This survey systemically summarizes the state-of-the-art force control technologies for robot-assisted needle insertion, such as force modeling, measurement, the factors that influence the interaction force, parameter identification, and force control algorithms. All studies show force control is still at its initial stage. The influence factors, needle deflection or planning remain open for investigation in future.

  18. Force Modeling, Identification, and Feedback Control of Robot-Assisted Needle Insertion: A Survey of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chongjun Yang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Robot-assisted surgery is of growing interest in the surgical and engineering communities. The use of robots allows surgery to be performed with precision using smaller instruments and incisions, resulting in shorter healing times. However, using current technology, an operator cannot directly feel the operation because the surgeon-instrument and instrument-tissue interaction force feedbacks are lost during needle insertion. Advancements in force feedback and control not only help reduce tissue deformation and needle deflection but also provide the surgeon with better control over the surgical instruments. The goal of this review is to summarize the key components surrounding the force feedback and control during robot-assisted needle insertion. The literature search was conducted during the middle months of 2017 using mainstream academic search engines with a combination of keywords relevant to the field. In total, 166 articles with valuable contents were analyzed and grouped into five related topics. This survey systemically summarizes the state-of-the-art force control technologies for robot-assisted needle insertion, such as force modeling, measurement, the factors that influence the interaction force, parameter identification, and force control algorithms. All studies show force control is still at its initial stage. The influence factors, needle deflection or planning remain open for investigation in future.

  19. Nutritional disorders in the proposed 11th revision of the International Classification of Diseases: feedback from a survey of stakeholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Onis, Mercedes; Zeitlhuber, Julia; Martínez-Costa, Cecilia

    2016-12-01

    To receive stakeholders' feedback on the new structure of the Nutritional Disorders section of the International Classification of Diseases, 11th Revision (ICD-11). A twenty-five-item survey questionnaire on the ICD-11 Nutritional Disorders section was developed and sent out via email. The international online survey investigated participants' current use of the ICD and their opinion of the new structure being proposed for ICD-11. The LimeSurvey® software was used to conduct the survey. Summary statistical analyses were performed using the survey tool. Worldwide. Individuals subscribed to the mailing list of the WHO Department of Nutrition for Health and Development. Seventy-two participants currently using the ICD, mainly nutritionists, public health professionals and medical doctors, completed the questionnaire (response rate 16 %). Most participants (n 69) reported the proposed new structure will be a useful improvement over ICD-10 and 78 % (n 56) considered that all nutritional disorders encountered in their work were represented. Overall, participants expressed satisfaction with the comprehensiveness, clarity and life cycle approach. Areas identified for improvement before ICD-11 is finalized included adding some missing disorders, more clarity on the transition to new terminology, links to other classifications and actions to address the disorders. The Nutritional Disorders section being proposed for ICD-11 offers significant improvements compared with ICD-10. The new taxonomy and inclusion of currently missing entities is expected to enhance the classification and health-care professionals' accurate coding of the full range of nutritional disorders throughout the life cycle.

  20. Gathering Feedback from Early-Career Faculty: Speaking with and Surveying Agricultural Faculty Members about Research Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah C. Williams

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In spring 2013, the Life Sciences Data Services Librarian at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign gave a data management presentation to early-career, agricultural faculty members participating in a selective program designed to help them succeed in the tenure process. After the presentation, the participants were invited to complete an online survey that included questions on how well informed and prepared they feel about funding agencies’ data requirements, what data challenges they face, and how the library can help with new or improved services in this area. The presentation discussion and survey responses suggested value in offering data training specifically for agricultural graduate students and research assistants and compiling examples of data management plans from successful grant proposals. Despite the small number of participants, the feedback provides an interesting glimpse into data management from the perspective of early-career faculty.

  1. Interpreting Feedback: A Discourse Analysis of Teacher Feedback and Student Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, J. T.; Anguiano, Carlos J.

    2016-01-01

    Feedback has typically been studied as a means of improving academic performance. Few studies inquire into the processes by which feedback shapes student identity. The authors carry out a discourse analysis of written comments to explore how feedback is discursively constructed by both teachers and students. Analysis of written feedback,…

  2. Volunteer feedback and perceptions after participation in a phase I, first-in-human Ebola vaccine trial: An anonymous survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie-Anne Dayer

    Full Text Available The continued participation of volunteers in clinical trials is crucial to advances in healthcare. Few data are available regarding the satisfaction and impressions of healthy volunteers after participation in phase I trials, many of which lead to unexpected adverse events. We report feedback from over 100 adult volunteers who took part in a first-in-human trial conducted in a high-income country testing an experimental Ebola vaccine causing significant reactogenicity, as well as unexpected arthritis in one fifth of participants. The anonymous, internet-based satisfaction survey was sent by email to all participants upon their completion of this one-year trial; it asked 24 questions concerning volunteers' motivations, impressions of the trial experience, and overall satisfaction. Answers were summarized using descriptive statistics. Of the 115 trial participants, 103 (90% filled out the survey. Fifty-five respondents (53% were male. Thirty-five respondents (34% were healthcare workers, many of whom would deploy to Ebola-affected countries. All respondents cited scientific advancement as their chief motivation for participation, while 100/103 (97% and 61/103 (59% reported additional "humanitarian reasons" and potential protection from Ebolavirus, respectively. Although investigators had documented adverse events in 97% of trial participants, only 74 of 103 respondents (72% recalled experiencing an adverse event. All reported an overall positive experience, and 93/103 (90% a willingness to participate in future trials. Given the high level of satisfaction, no significant associations could be detected between trial experiences and satisfaction, even among respondents reporting adverse events lasting weeks or months. Despite considerable reactogenicity and unexpected vaccine-related arthritis, all survey respondents reported overall satisfaction. While this trial's context was unique, the positive feedback is likely due at least in part to the

  3. Error treatment in students' written assignments in Discourse Analysis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... is generally no consensus on how lecturers should treat students' errors in written assignments, observations in this study enabled the researcher to provide certain strategies that lecturers can adopt. Key words: Error treatment; error handling; corrective feedback, positive cognitive feedback; negative cognitive feedback; ...

  4. The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: SCUBA-2 observations of radiative feedback in NGC1333

    OpenAIRE

    Hatchell, J.; Wilson, T; Drabek, E.; Curtis, E; Richer, J; Nutter, D.; Di Francesco, J.; consortium, D. Ward-Thompson on behalf of the JCMT GBS

    2012-01-01

    We present observations of NGC1333 from SCUBA-2 on JCMT, observed as a JCMT Gould Belt Survey pilot project during the shared risk campaign when the first of four arrays was installed at each of 450 and 850 microns. Temperature maps are derived from 450 micron and 850 micron ratios under the assumption of constant dust opacity spectral index beta=1.8. Temperatures indicate that the dust in the northern (IRAS 6/8) region of NGC1333 is hot, 20-40 K, due to heating by the B star SVS3, other youn...

  5. Interpreting feedback: a discourse analysis of teacher feedback and student identity

    OpenAIRE

    Torres, JT; Anguiano, Carlos J.

    2016-01-01

    Feedback has typically been studied as a means of improving academic performance. Few studies inquire into the processes by which feedback shapes student identity. The authors carry out a discourse analysis of written comments to explore how feedback is discursively constructed by both teachers and students. Analysis of written feedback, think-aloud protocols, and semi-structured interviews work to arrive at an understanding of how feedback is interpreted by both teachers and students, paying...

  6. Chandra survey of nearby highly inclined disk galaxies - IV. New insights into the working of stellar feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q. Daniel; Li, Jiangtao; Jiang, Xiaochuan; Fang, Taotao

    2016-04-01

    Galaxy evolution is regulated by the interplay between galactic discs and their surrounding medium. We study this interplay by examining how the galactic coronal emission efficiency of stellar feedback depends on the (surface and specific) star formation rates (SFRs) and other parameters for a sample of 52 Chandra-observed nearby highly inclined disc galaxies. We first measure the star-forming galactic disc sizes, as well as the SFRs of these galaxies, using data from the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer, and then show that (1) the specific 0.5-2 keV luminosity of the coronal emission correlates with the specific SFR in a sub-linear fashion: on average, LX/LK∝(SFR/M*)Γ with Γ = 0.29 ± 0.12; (2) the efficiency of the emission LX/SFR decreases with increasing surface SFR (ISFR; Γ = -0.44 ± 0.12); and (3) the characteristic temperature of the X-ray-emitting plasma weakly correlates with ISFR (Γ = 0.08 ± 0.04). These results, somewhat surprising and anti-intuitive, suggest that (i) the linear correlation between LX and SFR, as commonly presented, is largely due to the correlation of these two parameters with galaxy mass; (ii) much of the mechanical energy from stellar feedback likely drives global outflows with little X-ray cooling and with a mass-loading efficiency decreasing fast with increasing ISFR (Γ ≲ -0.5); (iii) these outflows heat and inflate the medium around the galactic disks of massive galaxies, reducing its radiative cooling rate, whereas for relatively low-mass galaxies, the energy in the outflows is probably dissipated in regions far away from the galactic discs.

  7. ICT and Feedback Practices in the Lower-Secondary Foreign Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjaergaard, Hanne Wacher

    2017-01-01

    A central part of language teachers' work consists in providing written corrective feedback for their students using well-known pen-and-paper practices, and they are often unsure of the return on their investment of time in this task. This article will describe the results of a survey among close to 300 Danish teachers of lower-secondary EFL aimed…

  8. Students' Feedback Preferences: How Do Students React to Timely and Automatically Generated Assessment Feedback?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayerlein, Leopold

    2014-01-01

    This study assesses whether or not undergraduate and postgraduate accounting students at an Australian university differentiate between timely feedback and extremely timely feedback, and whether or not the replacement of manually written formal assessment feedback with automatically generated feedback influences students' perception of feedback…

  9. Providing rapid feedback to residents on their teaching skills: an educational strategy for contemporary trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz-Sidlow, Rachel J; Baer, Tamar G; Gershel, Jeffrey C

    2016-03-20

    The objective of this study was to assess the attitudes of contemporary residents toward receiving rapid feedback on their teaching skills from their medical student learners. Participants consisted of 20 residents in their second post-graduate training year. These residents facilitated 44 teaching sessions with medical students within our Resident-as-Teacher program. Structured, written feedback from students was returned to the resident within 3 days following each session. Residents completed a short survey about the utility of the feedback, whether they would make a change to future teaching sessions based on the feedback, and what specifically they might change. The survey utilized a 4-point scale ("Not helpful/likely=1" to "Very helpful/likely=4"), and allowed for one free-text response. Free-text responses were hand-coded and underwent qualitative analysis to identify themes. There were 182 student feedback encounters resulting from 44 teaching sessions. The survey response rate was 73% (32/44). Ninety-four percent of residents rated the rapid feedback as "very helpful," and 91% would "very likely" make a change to subsequent sessions based on student feedback. Residents' proposed changes included modifications to session content and/or their personal teaching style. Residents found that rapid feedback received from medical student learners was highly valuable to them in their roles as teachers. A rapid feedback strategy may facilitate an optimal educational environment for contemporary trainees.

  10. Achievement and motivation in the middle school science classroom: The effects of formative assessment feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Evera, William C.

    2004-11-01

    Formative assessment feedback is increasingly viewed as essential to learning. Yet, existing studies on feedback have focused heavily on knowledge of results (KR) feedback rather than information-rich formative assessment feedback that is more commonly used to encourage and guide learning. This study was designed to investigate the effects of information-rich formative assessment feedback on performance and motivation of middle school science students. Using a within subjects crossover design, treatment students received written formative assessment feedback on all homework and class-work assignments. Control students received completion scores for their work but no feedback. Dependent measures included two multiple-choice unit tests and a multipart motivation survey which assessed self-efficacy, goal orientation, affective responses, and preferences regarding feedback. Results indicated effects sizes of .7 for low achievers and .4 for middle level achievers on the performance measure as a result of the feedback intervention. These students also experienced a significant increase in self-efficacy. High achievers experienced reduced performance following the feedback intervention with an effect size of -.7. Survey analysis revealed no improvement in motivation-related variables for high achievers.

  11. Effectiveness of Feedback in First Year Physics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bearden, Ian; Voigt, Karen A; Mathiasen, Helle

    How can we provide better and more effective feedback to our students? How can we encourage students to use feedback effectively? We will present results of a study of first year physics students addressing these questions and comparing the effectiveness of written and screencast feedback....

  12. A nationwide survey on the expectation of public healthcare providers on family medicine specialists in Malaysia-a qualitative analysis of 623 written comments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Boon-How; Cheong, Ai-Theng; Ismail, Mastura; Hamzah, Zuhra; A-Rashid, Mohd-Radzniwan; Md-Yasin, Mazapuspavina; Ali, Norsiah

    2014-06-11

    To examine the expectation of public healthcare providers/professionals (PHCPs) who are working closely with family medicine specialists (FMSs) at public health clinics. Cross-sectional study. This study is part of a larger national study on the perception of the Malaysian public healthcare professionals on FMSs. PHCPs from three categories of health facilities, namely hospitals, health clinics and health offices. Qualitative analysis of written comments of respondents' expectation of FMSs. The participants' response rate was 58% (780/1345) with an almost equal proportion from each public healthcare facility. We identified 21 subthemes for the 623 expectation comments. The six emerging themes are (1) need for more FMSs, (2) clinical roles and functions of FMSs, (3) administrative roles of FMSs, (4) contribution to community and public health, (5) attributes improvement and (6) research and audits. FMSs were expected to give attention to clinical duty. Delivering this responsibility with competence included having the latest medical knowledge in their own and others' medical disciplines, practising evidence-based medicine in prehospital and posthospital care, better supervision of staff and doctors under their care, fostering effective teamwork, communicating more often with hospital specialists and making appropriate referral. Expectations ranged from definite and strong for more FMSs at the health clinics to low expectation for FMSs' involvement in research; to mal-expectation on FMSs' involvement in community and public health programmes. There were some remarkable differences in expectations on FMSs from the three different PHCPs. These ranged from being clinically competent and administratively available for patients and staff at the health clinics, to mal-expectations on FMSs to engage in public health affairs. Relevant parties, including FMSs themselves, could take appropriate self-improvement initiatives to enhance public practice of family medicine and

  13. A nationwide survey on the expectation of public healthcare providers on family medicine specialists in Malaysia—a qualitative analysis of 623 written comments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Boon-How; Cheong, Ai-Theng; Ismail, Mastura; Hamzah, Zuhra; A-Rashid, Mohd-Radzniwan; Md-Yasin, Mazapuspavina; Ali, Norsiah

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the expectation of public healthcare providers/professionals (PHCPs) who are working closely with family medicine specialists (FMSs) at public health clinics. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting This study is part of a larger national study on the perception of the Malaysian public healthcare professionals on FMSs. Participants PHCPs from three categories of health facilities, namely hospitals, health clinics and health offices. Main outcome measures Qualitative analysis of written comments of respondents’ expectation of FMSs. Results The participants’ response rate was 58% (780/1345) with an almost equal proportion from each public healthcare facility. We identified 21 subthemes for the 623 expectation comments. The six emerging themes are (1) need for more FMSs, (2) clinical roles and functions of FMSs, (3) administrative roles of FMSs, (4) contribution to community and public health, (5) attributes improvement and (6) research and audits. FMSs were expected to give attention to clinical duty. Delivering this responsibility with competence included having the latest medical knowledge in their own and others’ medical disciplines, practising evidence-based medicine in prehospital and posthospital care, better supervision of staff and doctors under their care, fostering effective teamwork, communicating more often with hospital specialists and making appropriate referral. Expectations ranged from definite and strong for more FMSs at the health clinics to low expectation for FMSs’ involvement in research; to mal-expectation on FMSs’ involvement in community and public health programmes. Conclusions There were some remarkable differences in expectations on FMSs from the three different PHCPs. These ranged from being clinically competent and administratively available for patients and staff at the health clinics, to mal-expectations on FMSs to engage in public health affairs. Relevant parties, including FMSs themselves, could take

  14. [A case management programme for women with breast cancer: results of a written survey of participating medical and non-medical networking-partners].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büscher, C; Thorenz, A; Grochocka, A; Koch, U; Watzke, B

    2011-12-01

    Breast cancer patients are as a rule in need of a multiple sequential in-patient, day-patient and out-patient permanent treatment. The required care demands a trans-sectoral networking of all multi-professional persons involved in diagnostics, therapies, rehabilitation and aftercare. A method to develop the integration of treatment processes, as well as thereby resulting in increased effectiveness and efficiency, can constitute the concept of case management. A prerequisite for an effective implementation of case management and thus the starting point of the present survey is a well-functioning network encompassing optimal cooperation. Within the framework of the evaluation of the case management-based integrated care model "mammaNetz" for women with mamma carcinoma as a whole and against the background of the potential for innovation and improvement of case management on the one hand as well as the existence of only few empirical data otherwise, the present survey of members of a trans-sectoral network of the service centre was accomplished. Medical and non-medical networking partners of the service centre (N=168) were questioned by regular mail about different aspects of the cooperation. Identical items in both surveys were compared. The return rate for the medical networking partners is about 59% (n=35), whereby only medical network partners in private practice participated in the survey. For the non-medical networking partners about 60% (n=66) participated. Medical networking partners assess the cooperation with the service centre in reference to the exchange of information slightly more positively (66%) than the non-medical networking partners (59%). Medical networking partners are in significantly more frequent contact with the service centre and see in the cooperation significantly more advantages for their own office/facility (each with p=0.001) than non-medical networking partners. Overall the results suggest that medical as well as non-medical networking

  15. Evaluating a web-based health risk assessment with tailored feedback: what does an expert focus group yield compared to a web-based end-user survey?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vosbergen, Sandra; Mahieu, Guy R; Laan, Eva K; Kraaijenhagen, Roderik A; Jaspers, Monique Wm; Peek, Niels

    2014-01-02

    Increasingly, Web-based health applications are developed for the prevention and management of chronic diseases. However, their reach and utilization is often disappointing. Qualitative evaluations post-implementation can be used to inform the optimization process and ultimately enhance their adoption. In current practice, such evaluations are mainly performed with end-user surveys. However, a review approach by experts in a focus group may be easier to administer and might provide similar results. The aim of this study was to assess whether industrial design engineers in a focus group would address the same issues as end users in a Web-based survey when evaluating a commercial Web-based health risk assessment (HRA) with tailored feedback. Seven Dutch companies used the HRA as part of their corporate health management strategy. Employees using the HRA (N=2289) and 10 independent industrial designers were invited to participate in the study. The HRA consisted of four components: (1) an electronic health questionnaire, (2) biometric measurements, (3) laboratory evaluation, and (4) individually tailored feedback generated by decision support software. After participating in the HRA as end users, both end users and designers evaluated the program. End users completed an evaluation questionnaire that included a free-text field. Designers participated in a focus group discussion. Constructs from user satisfaction and technology acceptance theories were used to categorize and compare the remarks from both evaluations. We assessed and qualitatively analyzed 294 remarks of 189 end users and 337 remarks of 6 industrial designers, pertaining to 295 issues in total. Of those, 137 issues were addressed in the end-user survey and 148 issues in the designer focus group. Only 7.3% (10/137) of the issues addressed in the survey were also addressed in the focus group. End users made more remarks about the usefulness of the HRA and prior expectations that were not met. Designers made

  16. Identification and analysis of knee-ankle-foot orthosis design requirements based on a feedback survey of orthosis users in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bapat, Ganesh M; Sujatha, S

    2017-12-21

    The world is advancing towards a technological revolution in various fields, yet the assistive devices available for people with disability, especially in developing countries, are in the most primitive stage. For many years, lower limb orthotics has been a neglected area of research and there is an urgent need to address the problems faced by lower limb orthosis users to enable them to lead an independent life. This work is a first step in this direction and aims to identify and analyse the needs of knee-ankle-foot orthosis (KAFO) users in India. A structured feedback survey of 29 KAFO users was conducted at three rehabilitation centres located in South India. A feedback questionnaire and a novel outcome measure tool (trigger cards) were used as means to assess user satisfaction about their existing KAFOs. The results of the survey were analysed to obtain quantitative and qualitative outcomes. The survey identifies various biomechanical and functional issues associated with lower limb orthosis design. The results of the survey imply that there is an urgent need to solve issues, especially related to locked orthotic knee joint design. Additionally, it sheds light on the lifestyle and socio-economic issues of KAFO users that are likely prevalent in many other low- and middle-income countries. The outcomes of this survey can motivate and guide researchers to design improved orthotic solutions to meet the needs of lower limb orthosis users all over the world. Implications for Rehabilitation  • This is a first of its kind survey that brings forth the needs of lower limb orthosis users in India, and is an important step towards rehabilitation and empowerment of people with lower limb disability.  • The pilot survey helps to identify critical areas for design improvements in a knee-ankle-foot orthosis.  • The outcomes of this survey can help researchers to design functionally improved assistive devices that better meet the needs of users than currently

  17. Reconsidering written language

    CERN Document Server

    Sarma, Gopal

    2013-01-01

    In a previous essay, I argued that European schools of thought on memory and memorization were critical in enabling widespread adoption of the scientific method. Here, as a way of understanding the peculiar relationship the memory arts had to 17th century philosophy and intellectual culture, I propose a historical thought experiment, and examine whether these developments might have occurred several thousand years earlier when the adoption of written language accelerated. I suggest that strong cultural norms discouraging the use of written language may have precipitated a scientific revolution at a much earlier stage in human history. I close by arguing for the value of counter-factual scientific histories in attempting to separate scientific principles from the particular historical circumstances in which they arose.

  18. Types of Feedback in Competency-Based Predoctoral Orthodontics: Effects on Students' Attitudes and Confidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipp, Mitchell J; Cho, Kiyoung; Kim, Han Suk

    2017-05-01

    Feedback can exert a powerful influence on learning and achievement although its effect varies. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of three types of feedback on dental students' attitudes and confidence in a competency-based course in predoctoral orthodontics at New York University College of Dentistry. In 2013-14, all 253 third-year students in a course using test-enhanced instructional methods received written feedback on formative assessments. The type of feedback varied across three groups: pass/fail grades (PF) N=77, emoticons (EM) N=90, or written comments (WC) N=86. At the end of the course, students completed surveys that included four statements addressing their attitudes toward course instruction and confidence in their abilities. The survey response rate ranged from 75% to 100% among groups. The lowest response rate (75%) was in the PF group. In attitudes toward course instruction and confidence in their abilities, the WC group trended to more positive responses than the other groups, while the PF group trended to negative responses. On two of the four statements, the trend for the WC group was significant (95% CI). In both statements concerning attitudes toward instruction, the PF group trended to negative responses that were significant (95% CI). These results support the effectiveness of descriptive written comments over pass/fail grades or emoticons in improving dental students' confidence in their abilities and their attitudes toward instruction.

  19. Software Development and Feedback from Usability Evaluations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høegh, Rune Thaarup

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the strengths and weaknesses of written, multimedia and oral feedback from usability evaluations to developers. The strengths and weaknesses are related to how well the feedback supports the developers in addressing usability problems in a software system. The study...... concludes that using the traditional written usability report, as the only form of feedback from usability evaluations is associated with problems related to the report not supporting the process of addressing the usability problems. The report is criticized for representing an overwhelming amount...... of information, while still not offering the required information to address usability problems. Other forms of feedback, such as oral or multimedia feedback helps the developer in understanding the usability problems better, but are on the other hand less cost-effective than a written description....

  20. The Effects of Writing Anxiety and Motivation on EFL College Students' Self-Evaluative Judgments of Corrective Feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Jui-Jung; Tseng, Wen-Ta; Wang, Chaochang

    2017-04-01

    Feedback is regarded as a way to foster students' motivation and to ensure linguistic accuracy. However, mixed findings are reported in the research on written corrective feedback because of its multifaceted nature and its correlations with learners' individual differences. It is necessary, therefore, to conduct further research on corrective feedback from the student's perspective and to examine how individual differences in terms of factors such as writing anxiety and motivation predict learners' self-evaluative judgments of both teacher-corrected and peer-corrected feedback. For this study, 158 Taiwanese college sophomores participated in a survey that comprised three questionnaires. Results demonstrated that intrinsic motivation and different types of writing anxiety predicted English as foreign language learners' evaluative judgments of teacher and peer feedback. The findings have implications for English-writing instruction.

  1. Error Patterns in Written Russian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosengrant, Sandra F.

    1987-01-01

    Evaluation of the Russian oral and written proficiency of third-year university students (N=9) suggested a clear relationship between the students' initial oral proficiency ratings and the grammatical accuracy of their written compositions; the lower a student's oral proficiency rating, the greater the average number of written mistakes, and vice…

  2. Engaging Feedback: Meaning, Identity and Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Paul; Gill, Wendy

    2010-01-01

    This paper uses a methodology that synthesises an Academic Literacies approach and Critical Discourse Analysis to explore student experiences of feedback on written assessments in two higher education institutions. The qualitative analysis of student interviews is oriented around three topics: (1) the socially situated meaning of feedback; (2)…

  3. English Learners Perception on Lecturers’ Corrective Feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Titien Fatmawaty Mohammad

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The importance of written corrective feedback (CF has been an issue of substantial debate in the literature and this controversial issue has led to a development in latest studies to draw on foreign language acquisition (FLA research as a way to further comprehend the complexities of this issue particularly how students and teachers perceive the effectiveness of written corrective feedback. This research has largely focused on students’ perception on Lecturers’ corrective feedback, perceives the usefulness of different types of corrective feedback and the reasons they have for their preferences. Qualitative data was collected from 40 EFL students in 6th semester, by means of written questionnaires, interview and observation. Four feedback strategies were employed in this research and ranked each statement by using five-point Likert scale. Findings showed that almost all students 81.43 % want correction or feedback from lecturers for the mistakes on their writing. For the type of written corrective feedback, students prefer lecturers mark their mistakes and give comment on their work with the percentage as follows: 93% students found that giving clues or comment about how to fix errors can improve their writing ability, 76.69% of the students found that error identification is the most useful type of feedback, and 57.50% of students have a positive opinion for the provision of correction which is accompanied by comment. Those percentages of students perspective is supported by students’ explanation in an open ended question of questionnaire. Pedagogical implications of the study are also discussed.

  4. Gemini NIFS survey of feeding and feedback processes in nearby active galaxies - II. The sample and surface mass density profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riffel, R. A.; Storchi-Bergmann, T.; Riffel, R.; Davies, R.; Bianchin, M.; Diniz, M. R.; Schönell, A. J.; Burtscher, L.; Crenshaw, M.; Fischer, T. C.; Dahmer-Hahn, L. G.; Dametto, N. Z.; Rosario, D.

    2018-02-01

    We present and characterize a sample of 20 nearby Seyfert galaxies selected for having BAT 14-195 keV luminosities LX ≥ 1041.5 erg s-1, redshift z ≤ 0.015, being accessible for observations with the Gemini Near-Infrared Field Spectrograph (NIFS) and showing extended [O III]λ5007 emission. Our goal is to study Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) feeding and feedback processes from near-infrared integral-field spectra, which include both ionized (H II) and hot molecular (H2) emission. This sample is complemented by other nine Seyfert galaxies previously observed with NIFS. We show that the host galaxy properties (absolute magnitudes MB, MH, central stellar velocity dispersion and axial ratio) show a similar distribution to those of the 69 BAT AGN. For the 20 galaxies already observed, we present surface mass density (Σ) profiles for H II and H2 in their inner ˜500 pc, showing that H II emission presents a steeper radial gradient than H2. This can be attributed to the different excitation mechanisms: ionization by AGN radiation for H II and heating by X-rays for H2. The mean surface mass densities are in the range (0.2 ≤ ΣH II ≤ 35.9) M⊙ pc-2, and (0.2 ≤ ΣH2 ≤ 13.9)× 10-3 M⊙ pc-2, while the ratios between the H II and H2 masses range between ˜200 and 8000. The sample presented here will be used in future papers to map AGN gas excitation and kinematics, providing a census of the mass inflow and outflow rates and power as well as their relation with the AGN luminosity.

  5. A Reflection on "The Language Learning Potential" of Written CF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitchener, John

    2012-01-01

    For more than 30 years, different opinions about whether written corrective feedback (CF) is a worthwhile pedagogical practice for L2 learning and acquisition have been voiced. Despite the arguments for and against its potential to help L2 learners acquire the target language and the inconclusive findings across studies that have sought answers to…

  6. Formativ Feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldahl, Kirsten Kofod

    Denne bog undersøger, hvordan lærere kan anvende feedback til at forbedre undervisningen i klasselokalet. I denne sammenhæng har John Hattie, professor ved Melbourne Universitet, udviklet en model for feedback, hvilken er baseret på synteser af meta-analyser. I 2009 udgav han bogen "Visible...

  7. Perceived Insider Status and Feedback Reactions: A Dual Path of Feedback Motivation Attribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao; Liao, JianQiao; Wu, Weijiong; Zhang, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Many studies have evaluated how the characteristics of feedback receiver, feedback deliverer and feedback information influence psychological feedback reactions of the feedback receiver while largely neglecting that feedback intervention is a kind of social interaction process. To address this issue, this study proposes that employees' perceived insider status (PIS), as a kind of employee-organization relationship, could also influence employees' reactions to supervisory feedback. In particular, this study investigates the influence of PIS focusing on affective and cognitive feedback reactions, namely feedback satisfaction and feedback utility. Surveys were conducted in a machinery manufacturing company in the Guangdong province of China. Samples were collected from 192 employees. Data analysis demonstrated that PIS and feedback utility possessed a U-shaped relationship, whereas PIS and feedback satisfaction exhibited positively linear relationships. The analysis identified two kinds of mediating mechanisms related to feedback satisfaction and feedback utility. Internal feedback motivation attribution partially mediated the relationship between PIS and feedback satisfaction but failed to do the same with respect to the relationship between PIS and feedback utility. In contrast, external feedback motivation attribution partially mediated the relationship between PIS and feedback utility while failing to mediate the relationship between PIS and feedback satisfaction. Theoretical contributions and practical implications of the findings are discussed at the end of the paper.

  8. Perceived Insider Status and Feedback Reactions: A Dual Path of Feedback Motivation Attribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weijiong Wu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Many studies have evaluated how the characteristics of feedback receiver, feedback deliverer and feedback information influence psychological feedback reactions of the feedback receiver while largely neglecting that feedback intervention is a kind of social interaction process. To address this issue, this study proposes that employees’ perceived insider status (PIS, as a kind of employee-organization relationship, could also influence employees’ reactions to supervisory feedback. In particular, this study investigates the influence of PIS focusing on affective and cognitive feedback reactions, namely feedback satisfaction and feedback utility. Surveys were conducted in a machinery manufacturing company in the Guangdong province of China. Samples were collected from 192 employees. Data analysis demonstrated that PIS and feedback utility possessed a U-shaped relationship, whereas PIS and feedback satisfaction exhibited positively linear relationships. The analysis identified two kinds of mediating mechanisms related to feedback satisfaction and feedback utility. Internal feedback motivation attribution partially mediated the relationship between PIS and feedback satisfaction but failed to do the same with respect to the relationship between PIS and feedback utility. In contrast, external feedback motivation attribution partially mediated the relationship between PIS and feedback utility while failing to mediate the relationship between PIS and feedback satisfaction. Theoretical contributions and practical implications of the findings are discussed at the end of the paper.

  9. Perceived Insider Status and Feedback Reactions: A Dual Path of Feedback Motivation Attribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao; Liao, JianQiao; Wu, Weijiong; Zhang, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Many studies have evaluated how the characteristics of feedback receiver, feedback deliverer and feedback information influence psychological feedback reactions of the feedback receiver while largely neglecting that feedback intervention is a kind of social interaction process. To address this issue, this study proposes that employees’ perceived insider status (PIS), as a kind of employee-organization relationship, could also influence employees’ reactions to supervisory feedback. In particular, this study investigates the influence of PIS focusing on affective and cognitive feedback reactions, namely feedback satisfaction and feedback utility. Surveys were conducted in a machinery manufacturing company in the Guangdong province of China. Samples were collected from 192 employees. Data analysis demonstrated that PIS and feedback utility possessed a U-shaped relationship, whereas PIS and feedback satisfaction exhibited positively linear relationships. The analysis identified two kinds of mediating mechanisms related to feedback satisfaction and feedback utility. Internal feedback motivation attribution partially mediated the relationship between PIS and feedback satisfaction but failed to do the same with respect to the relationship between PIS and feedback utility. In contrast, external feedback motivation attribution partially mediated the relationship between PIS and feedback utility while failing to mediate the relationship between PIS and feedback satisfaction. Theoretical contributions and practical implications of the findings are discussed at the end of the paper. PMID:28507527

  10. Master's Thesis Projects: Student Perceptions of Supervisor Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kleijn, Renske A. M.; Mainhard, M. Tim; Meijer, Paulien C.; Brekelmans, Mieke; Pilot, Albert

    2013-01-01

    A growing body of research has investigated student perceptions of written feedback in higher education coursework, but few studies have considered feedback perceptions in one-on-one and face-to-face contexts such as master's thesis projects. In this article, student perceptions of feedback are explored in the context of the supervision of…

  11. Does Grading Undermine Feedback? the Influence of Grades on the Effectiveness of Corrective Feedback on L2 Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dlaska, Andrea; Krekeler, Christian

    2017-01-01

    It has been questioned whether students notice, act upon and, ultimately, learn from feedback if feedback about a task is received in conjunction with grades. If grades undermine feedback, it could be argued that it is a waste of teachers' time to add comments to students' written work if the students also receive grades. With reference to SLA…

  12. Assessment of clinical feedback given to medical students via an electronic feedback system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaughness, Gabrielle; Georgoff, Patrick E; Sandhu, Gurjit; Leininger, Lisa; Nikolian, Vahagn C; Reddy, Rishindra; Hughes, David T

    2017-10-01

    The feedback medical students receive during clinical rotations, traditionally verbal and not formally captured, plays a critical role in student development. This study evaluates written daily feedback given to students through a novel web-based feedback system. A Minute Feedback System was used to collect feedback given to medical students during their surgery clerkship from May 2015-April 2016. Using qualitative content analysis, feedback comments were categorized as: encouraging, corrective, specific, and nonspecific. Effective feedback was a combination of specific and either corrective or encouraging feedback; ineffective feedback contained only nonspecific comments; mediocre feedback contained elements of both effective and ineffective comments. 3191 feedback requests were sent by medical students and 2029 faculty/resident feedback responses were received. The overall response rate was 62%. Nonspecific feedback comprised 80% of faculty, 83% of senior resident, and 78% of junior resident comments. Specific feedback was given by only 35% of faculty, 17% of senior residents, and 26% of junior residents. Faculty provided Effective feedback in only 16% of comments, senior residents 8%, and junior residents 17%. Mediocre feedback comprised 13% of faculty, 9% of senior resident, and 7% of junior resident comments. Ineffective feedback comprised 67% of all feedback: 60% of faculty, 72% of senior resident, and 68% of junior resident feedback. The majority of resident and faculty feedback to medical students using an electronic, email-based application during their surgery clerkship was nonspecific and encouraging and therefore of limited effectiveness. This presents an opportunity for resident/faculty development and education regarding optimal feedback techniques. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Three nested randomized controlled trials of peer-only or multiple stakeholder group feedback within Delphi surveys during core outcome and information set development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookes, Sara T; Macefield, Rhiannon C; Williamson, Paula R; McNair, Angus G; Potter, Shelley; Blencowe, Natalie S; Strong, Sean; Blazeby, Jane M

    2016-08-17

    Methods for developing a core outcome or information set require involvement of key stakeholders to prioritise many items and achieve agreement as to the core set. The Delphi technique requires participants to rate the importance of items in sequential questionnaires (or rounds) with feedback provided in each subsequent round such that participants are able to consider the views of others. This study examines the impact of receiving feedback from different stakeholder groups, on the subsequent rating of items and the level of agreement between stakeholders. Randomized controlled trials were nested within the development of three core sets each including a Delphi process with two rounds of questionnaires, completed by patients and health professionals. Participants rated items from 1 (not essential) to 9 (absolutely essential). For round 2, participants were randomized to receive feedback from their peer stakeholder group only (peer) or both stakeholder groups separately (multiple). Decisions as to which items to retain following each round were determined by pre-specified criteria. Whilst type of feedback did not impact on the percentage of items for which a participant subsequently changed their rating, or the magnitude of change, it did impact on items retained at the end of round 2. Each core set contained discordant items retained by one feedback group but not the other (3-22 % discordant items). Consensus between patients and professionals in items to retain was greater amongst those receiving multiple group feedback in each core set (65-82 % agreement for peer-only feedback versus 74-94 % for multiple feedback). In addition, differences in round 2 scores were smaller between stakeholder groups receiving multiple feedback than between those receiving peer group feedback only. Variability in item scores across stakeholders was reduced following any feedback but this reduction was consistently greater amongst the multiple feedback group. In the development of

  14. Teacher's Attitude into Different Approach to Providing Feedback to Students in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaqmaqchee, Zina Adil

    2015-01-01

    Feedback within higher education has an effective role in teaching staffs mode. The treatise on teachers' methods of feedback is represented to demonstrate how the novel feedback can help the academic staffs to provide an effective feedback for students in their assignments and written draft. The study investigates the academic staff's methods of…

  15. Making sense of teacher-feedback to high school students in science classes: Science instruction and student learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahl, Jarvis Van Netta Calvin

    When we perceive the world as whole and begin to explore how things are interrelated, we confer a sense of meaning and order to what we are studying. When we include the learner as an active participant in what is being learned, we have the basis for an educational practice that accentuates meaning. The connectedness between meaning and learning will become more apparent...connectedness is natural...it is everywhere and in everything. We have only to look for it. As our perceptions change, so will our practice. (Caine, Caine, and Cromwell, 1994) What can we learn about our teaching practices when we ask high school students their perceptions about teacher-feedback to them regarding their learning science? This research study uses students' written stories of what teacher-feedback in high school science classes means to them. Students provide vivid descriptions of how they use science teacher-feedback to create new meaning or how they do not use or receive science teacher-feedback. There were three essential questions in the study, one qualitative and two quantitative. These questions were: what types of teacher-feedback do high school students receive from their science teachers; how do students use the teacher-feedback they receive; and what teacher-feedback do students identify as most useful to them? This research study used a qualitative-quantitative approach for gathering and analyzing data. The design of the procedure was a blend of the qualitative research question to access initial data to be used with a modified quantitative approach in a followup of the remaining two research questions which were focused on a student survey for a practical application of the research. The following six emergent dichotomous types of teacher-feedback were found in the study: supportive and non supportive teacher-feedback; short term and long term teacher-feedback; academic and non academic teacher-feedback; teacher-initiated and student-initiated contact with the teacher

  16. 2008CoreFieldDescriptions: PDF converted hand-written descriptions of 20 cores from offshore Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands for cores collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in 2008.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In 2008, as a collaborative effort between Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and the U.S. Geological Survey, 20 giant gravity cores were collected from areas...

  17. The Feedback Tango: An Integrative Review and Analysis of the Content of the Teacher-Learner Feedback Exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bing-You, Robert; Varaklis, Kalli; Hayes, Victoria; Trowbridge, Robert; Kemp, Heather; McKelvy, Dina

    2017-10-03

    To conduct an integrative review and analysis of the literature on the content of feedback to learners in medical education. Following completion of a scoping review in 2016, the authors analyzed a subset of articles published through 2015 describing the analysis of feedback exchange content in various contexts: audiotapes, clinical examination, feedback cards, multisource feedback, videotapes, and written feedback. Two reviewers extracted data from these articles and identified common themes. Of the 51 included articles, about half (49%) were published since 2011. Most involved medical students (43%) or residents (43%). A leniency bias was noted in many (37%), as there was frequently reluctance to provide constructive feedback. More than one-quarter (29%) indicated the feedback was low in quality (e.g., too general, limited amount, no action plans). Some (16%) indicated faculty dominated conversations, did not use feedback forms appropriately, or provided inadequate feedback, even after training. Multiple feedback tools were used, with some articles (14%) describing varying degrees of use, completion, or legibility. Some articles (14%) noted the impact of the gender of the feedback provider or learner. The findings reveal that the exchange of feedback is troubled by low-quality feedback, leniency bias, faculty deficient in feedback competencies, challenges with multiple feedback tools, and gender impacts. Using the tango dance form as a metaphor for this dynamic partnership, the authors recommend ways to improve feedback for teachers and learners willing to partner with each other and engage in the complexities of the feedback exchange.

  18. Modern Written Arabic, Volume II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naja, A. Nashat; Snow, James A.

    This second volume of Modern Written Arabic builds on the previous volume and is the second step designed to teach members of the Foreign Service to read the modern Arabic press. The student will gain recognitional mastery of an extensive set of vocabulary items and will be more intensively exposed to wider and more complex morphological and…

  19. Students' perceptions on feedback module in pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Varsha J; Malhotra, Supriya D; Rana, Devang A

    2016-01-01

    Feedback is an integral part of formative assessment though underutilized in medical education. The objective of this study was to review our feedback module through students' perceptions. We have developed a feedback module which is practiced by us for last 10 years for term ending examination that gives collective feedback to the whole class, followed by individual student-teacher interactions. Students were also exposed to 6-7 multiple choice questions (MCQs) based assessment during the course of pharmacology. Immediately after each MCQ test the answer keys is displayed along with an explanation. Two classes of students were requested to give their perceptions about the feedback by responding on Likert scale for the statements in the questionnaire. All the 206 students who volunteered for the study were enrolled in the study. Mann-Whitney test was used to calculate the difference in perceptions. Of 278 students of two classes, 206 responded (74%). Students' agreement varied from 93% to 98% for 5 items in the questionnaire for the feedback after term ending examinations. Perception of students attending one or more than one feedback session did not differ significantly. For MCQs, tests agreement was 91% to 98% for the 4 items. There was no significant difference between two classes in their perceptions regarding feedback practices (P feedback module. In the medical colleges with a large number of students, this module is feasible for feedback in formative assessment in the form of written tests.

  20. Minimal Poems Written in 1979 Minimal Poems Written in 1979

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Sirangelo Maggio

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The reading of M. van der Slice's Minimal Poems Written in 1979 (the work, actually, has no title reminded me of a book I have seen a long time ago. called Truth, which had not even a single word printed inside. In either case we have a sample of how often excentricities can prove efficient means of artistic creativity, in this new literary trend known as Minimalism. The reading of M. van der Slice's Minimal Poems Written in 1979 (the work, actually, has no title reminded me of a book I have seen a long time ago. called Truth, which had not even a single word printed inside. In either case we have a sample of how often excentricities can prove efficient means of artistic creativity, in this new literary trend known as Minimalism.

  1. Collecting Feedback on the Quality of Distance Education: A Follow-Up Survey of China Central Radio and TV University Graduates and Their Employers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dailin, Liu; Fengyan, Chang; Shuangxu, Yin; Fenglong, Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Timely collection of feedback on the quality of teaching from graduates and their employers is of great significance in distance education, and can help enhance the quality of teaching and improve management and all-round learner support. However, since the graduates left university some years ago, are now widely dispersed and consequently may…

  2. [Written language and intellectual disability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrando-Lucas, M T; Banús-Gómez, P; Hoz-Rosales, A G

    2005-01-15

    Following the diagnosis of intellectual disability, a prognosis can be offered concerning the degree of autonomy the child will be able to achieve based on prior experience, but which depends on the aetiology of the disability. It is still difficult to give a prospective answer regarding the capacity to reach an operative level of written language. The goal of being able to offer an experience-based prognosis involves prior analysis of how learning dysfunctions are approached in the disabled population. Although we have an increasingly deeper understanding of the neurocognitive foundations of specific learning difficulties and the careful neuropsychological management of children with disorders affecting the acquisition of written language with a typical intellectual level, those with intellectual disability continue to be treated using a simplistic approach in which their intelligence quotient is still taken as the most relevant feature. Little attention is paid to neuropsychological aspects, the pedagogical and social environment or comorbid aspects that may affect the acquisition of the function. Yet, these are aspects that are submitted to thorough evaluation in children who are not disabled. The current concept of intellectual disability has gone beyond the definition based on the intelligence quotient. The wide variability in the reading function in children with intellectual disability cannot be explained only according to a psychometric assessment. A more complete neuropsychological approach, as carried out in the population with no disability, will enable us to detect cognitive, pedagogical, social and pathological dysfunctions that interfere with the acquisition of written language.

  3. Written Materials for the IYA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierro Gossman, Julieta

    2008-05-01

    In the poster presentation I shall describe the written materials we have edited for the IYA. The first is a book written for general public about Galileo's life and research. The rest are a series of articles for teachers so that they include hands-on astronomy activities in their classroom including a star party. All these materials are written in Spanish, that is a language spoken is large areas of the world. I believe science is better understood in the mother tong so that many of these materials will be also useful for countries where Spanish is a second language. References Hector Dominguez y Julieta Fierro Galileo y el telescopio, 400 anios de ciencia Uribe y Ferrari Editores, 2007 ISBN 970 756 238-2 Hector Dominguez y Julieta Fierro Newton, la luz y el movimiento de los cuerpos Uribe y Ferrari Editores, 2007 ISBN 970 756 238 2 Hector Dominguez y Julieta Fierro, Galileo para Maestros I Correo del Maestro, Núm. 133, p. 15-26, Anio 12, Junio 2007. Hector Dominguez y Julieta Fierro, Galileo para Maestros II Correo del Maestro, Num. 134, p. 17-26, Anio 12, 2007. Hector Dominguez y Julieta Fierro, Galileo para Maestros III Correo del Maestro, Num. 135, p. 10-18, Anio 12, 2007. Hector Dominguez y Julieta Fierro Experimentos sobre la caida de los cuerpos El Correo del Maestro, anio 12 Numero 142, p. 5-18, 2008.

  4. Real World Evidence: A Quantitative and Qualitative Glance at Participant Feedback from a Free-Response Survey Investigating Experiences of a Structured Exercise Intervention for Men with Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Fox

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To explore patient experiences of a structured exercise intervention for men with prostate cancer (PCa. Sample. 41 men with either localised or advanced PCa who had been referred for a structured exercise programme by their physician and then subsequently consented to a telephone survey. Method. Participants underwent a 10-week supervised exercise programme within a large cancer centre hospital consisting of 8 sessions. They then completed a short multiple choice telephone survey, elaborating on their responses where appropriate. Views expressed by participants were analysed using an affinity diagram and common themes were identified. Results. Feedback from our telephone surveys was consistently positive and suggests that the structured exercise intervention provides exercise confidence, motivation to exercise, and social support and promotes positive health behaviour change in the context of exercise. Individual differences arose amongst participants in their perceived utility of the intervention, with 73.3% expressing a preference for structured exercise classes and 19.5% expressing a preference for exercising independently. Conclusion. Design of a structured exercise intervention for patients with PCa should embrace the positive aspects outlined here but consider patients’ individual differences. Ongoing feedback from patients should be utilised alongside traditional study designs to inform intervention design in this area.

  5. Transactional Space: Feedback, Critical Thinking, and Learning Dance Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinleye, Adesola; Payne, Rose

    2016-01-01

    This article explores attitudes about feedback and critical thinking in dance technique classes. The authors discuss an expansion of their teaching practices to include feedback as bidirectional (transactional) and a part of developing critical thinking skills in student dancers. The article was written after the authors undertook research…

  6. Receptivity to Learner-Driven Feedback in EAP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, Clare

    2017-01-01

    There is still debate surrounding what constitutes the most effective feedback on EFL learners' writing, particularly in English for Academic Purposes (EAP) settings. Unanswered questions are found in the literature on topics such as the best formats for feedback, the role of technology, authors' authority over written texts, and ways of helping…

  7. Using Turnitin to Provide Feedback on L2 Writers' Texts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostka, Ilka; Maliborska, Veronika

    2016-01-01

    Second language (L2) writing instructors have varying tools at their disposal for providing feedback on students' writing, including ones that enable them to provide written and audio feedback in electronic form. One tool that has been underexplored is Turnitin, a widely used software program that matches electronic text to a wide range of…

  8. Feedback effects on students' writing motivation, process, and performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijnhouwer, H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304836230

    2010-01-01

    Many students’ writing capacities remain insufficient during college years (Kellogg & Whiteford, 2009). Teachers try to improve students’ writing skills by providing them with feedback on their texts. Remarkably, research on the effects of feedback provided on written products is scarce (Graham &

  9. Calidad de servicio y calidad de vida: El "survey feedback" como estrategia de cambio organizacional. Análisis teórico-conceptual y resultados empíricos. Serie: Colección Feaps

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez-Tur, Vicente; Peiró, José María; Moliner, Carolina; Potocnik, Kristina

    2011-01-01

    Fue en el 2005 cuando FEAPS y el Instituto de Investigación en Psicología de los Recursos Humanos, Desarrollo Organizacional y Calidad de Vida Laboral, de la Universidad de Valencia (IDOCAL), empezaron a cooperar a través de un proyecto de investigación que tenía varios objetivos. Por una parte, se pretendía transferir y utilizar en los centros participantes la metodología de cambio organizacional survey feedback (retroalimentación a través de encuestas). Por otra, se querían medir y poner en...

  10. Feedback options in nonlinear numerical finance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hugger, Jens; Mashayekhi, Sima

    2012-01-01

    Feedback options are options where information about the trading of the underlying asset is fed back into the pricing model. This results in nonlinear pricing models. A survey of the literature about feedback options in finance is presented. The pricing model for the full feedback option on an in......Feedback options are options where information about the trading of the underlying asset is fed back into the pricing model. This results in nonlinear pricing models. A survey of the literature about feedback options in finance is presented. The pricing model for the full feedback option...... on an infinite slab is presented and boundary values on a bounded domain are derived. This bounded, nonlinear, 2 dimensional initial-boundary value problem is solved numerically using a number of standard finite difference schemes and the methods incorporated in the symbolic software Maple™....

  11. Promoting Strong Written Communication Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, M.

    2015-12-01

    The reason that an improvement in the quality of technical writing is still needed in the classroom is due to the fact that universities are facing challenging problems not only on the technological front but also on the socio-economic front. The universities are actively responding to the changes that are taking place in the global consumer marketplace. Obviously, there are numerous benefits of promoting strong written communication skills. They can be summarized into the following six categories. First, and perhaps the most important: The University achieves learner satisfaction. The learner has documented verbally, that the necessary knowledge has been successfully acquired. This results in learner loyalty that in turn will attract more qualified learners.Second, quality communication lowers the cost per pupil, consequently resulting in increased productivity backed by a stronger economic structure and forecast. Third, quality communications help to improve the cash flow and cash reserves of the university. Fourth, having high quality communication enables the university to justify the need for high costs of tuition and fees. Fifth, better quality in written communication skills result in attracting top-quality learners. This will lead to happier and satisfied learners, not to mention greater prosperity for the university as a whole. Sixth, quality written communication skills result in reduced complaints, thus meaning fewer hours spent on answering or correcting the situation. The University faculty and staff are thus able to devote more time on scholarly activities, meaningful research and productive community service. References Boyer, Ernest L. (1990). Scholarship reconsidered: Priorities of the Professorate.Princeton, NJ: Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. Hawkins, P., & Winter, J. (1997). Mastering change: Learning the lessons of the enterprise.London: Department for Education and Employment. Buzzel, Robert D., and Bradley T. Gale. (1987

  12. Feedback: Breakfast of Champions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justman, Jeffrey J.

    Feedback is an important skill that people need to learn in life. Feedback is crucial in a public speaking class to improve speaking skills. Providing and receiving feedback is what champions feed on to be successful, thus feedback is called the "Breakfast of Champions." Feedback builds speakers' confidence. Providing in-depth feedback…

  13. 46 CFR 201.17 - Written appearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Written appearance. 201.17 Section 201.17 Shipping... PROCEDURE Appearance and Practice Before the Administration (Rule 2) § 201.17 Written appearance. Persons who appear at any hearing shall deliver a written notation of appearance to the reporter, stating for...

  14. 22 CFR 1002.4 - Written requests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Written requests. 1002.4 Section 1002.4 Foreign Relations INTER-AMERICAN FOUNDATION AVAILABILITY OF RECORDS § 1002.4 Written requests. In order to facilitate the processing of written requests, every petitioner should: (a) Address his request to: General...

  15. How we give personalised audio feedback after summative OSCEs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Christopher J; Molyneux, Adrian J; Blackwell, Sara; Wass, Valerie J

    2015-04-01

    Students often receive little feedback after summative objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs) to enable them to improve their performance. Electronic audio feedback has shown promise in other educational areas. We investigated the feasibility of electronic audio feedback in OSCEs. An electronic OSCE system was designed, comprising (1) an application for iPads allowing examiners to mark in the key consultation skill domains, provide "tick-box" feedback identifying strengths and difficulties, and record voice feedback; (2) a feedback website giving students the opportunity to view/listen in multiple ways to the feedback. Acceptability of the audio feedback was investigated, using focus groups with students and questionnaires with both examiners and students. 87 (95%) students accessed the examiners' audio comments; 83 (90%) found the comments useful and 63 (68%) reported changing the way they perform a skill as a result of the audio feedback. They valued its highly personalised, relevant nature and found it much more useful than written feedback. Eighty-nine per cent of examiners gave audio feedback to all students on their stations. Although many found the method easy, lack of time was a factor. Electronic audio feedback provides timely, personalised feedback to students after a summative OSCE provided enough time is allocated to the process.

  16. ICT and Feedback Practices in the Lower-Secondary Foreign Language Classroom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Hanne Wacher

    2017-01-01

    A central part of language teachers’ work consists in providing written corrective feedback for their students using wellknown pen-and-paper practices, and they are often unsure of the return on their investment of time in this task. This article will describe the results of a survey among close ....... The article also presents and discusses some of the advantages that may result from increasing the adequate uses of ICT in this aspect of (foreign) language teaching.......A central part of language teachers’ work consists in providing written corrective feedback for their students using wellknown pen-and-paper practices, and they are often unsure of the return on their investment of time in this task. This article will describe the results of a survey among close...... to 300 Danish teachers of lower-secondary EFL aimed at uncovering their practices, not least the role of ICT in their work. The results indicate that they use ICT much less in this part of their work than in others, depriving both teachers and students of the benefits that technology can provide...

  17. ICT and Feedback Practices in the Lower-Secondary Foreign Language Classroom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Hanne Wacher

    2016-01-01

    A central part of language teachers’ work consists in providing written corrective feedback for their students using well-known pen-and-paper practices, and they are often unsure of the return on their investment of time in this task. This article will describe the results of a survey among close....... The article also presents and discusses some of the advantages that may result from increasing the adequate uses of ICT in this aspect of (foreign) language teaching.......A central part of language teachers’ work consists in providing written corrective feedback for their students using well-known pen-and-paper practices, and they are often unsure of the return on their investment of time in this task. This article will describe the results of a survey among close...... to 300 Danish teachers of lower-secondary EFL aimed at uncovering their practices, not least the role of ICT in their work. The results indicate that they use ICT much less in this part of their work than in others, depriving both teachers and students of the benefits that technology can provide...

  18. Using GoPro to Give Video-Assisted Operative Feedback for Surgery Residents: A Feasibility and Utility Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Maureen D; Abelson, Jonathan S; O'Mahoney, Paul; Bagautdinov, Iskander; Yeo, Heather; Watkins, Anthony C

    2017-08-21

    As an adjunct to simulation-based teaching, laparoscopic video-based surgical coaching has been an effective tool to augment surgical education. However, the wide use of video review in open surgery has been limited primarily due to technological and logistical challenges. The aims of our study were to (1) evaluate perceptions of general surgery (GS) residents on video-assisted operative instruction and (2) conduct a pilot study using a head-mounted GoPro in conjunction with the operative performance rating system to assess feasibility of providing video review to enhance operative feedback during open procedures. GS residents were anonymously surveyed to evaluate their perceptions of oral and written operative feedback and use of video-based operative resources. We then conducted a pilot study of 10 GS residents to assess the utility and feasibility of using a GoPro to record resident performance of an arteriovenous fistula creation with an attending surgeon. Categorical variables were analyzed using the chi-square test. Academic, tertiary medical center. GS residents and faculty. A total of 59 GS residents were anonymously surveyed (response rate = 65.5%). A total of 40% (n = 24) of residents reported that structured evaluations rarely or never provided meaningful feedback. When feedback was received, 55% (n = 32) residents reported that it was only rarely or sometimes in regard to their operative skills. There was no significant difference in surveyed responses among junior postgraduate year (PGY 1-2), senior (PGY 3-4), or chief residents (PGY-5). A total of 80% (n = 8) of residents found the use of GoPro video review very or extremely useful for education; they also deemed video review more useful for operative feedback than written or communicative feedback. An overwhelming majority (90%, n = 9) felt that video review would lead to improved technical skills, wanted to review the video with the attending surgeon for further feedback, and desired expansion of

  19. Skriftlig feedback i engelskundervisningen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Hanne Wacher

    2017-01-01

    The article describes useful feedback strategies in language teaching and describes the feedback practices of lower-seconday teachers in Denmark. The article is aimed at language teahcers in secondary schools.......The article describes useful feedback strategies in language teaching and describes the feedback practices of lower-seconday teachers in Denmark. The article is aimed at language teahcers in secondary schools....

  20. Computer-Assisted Learning for the Hearing Impaired: An Interactive Written Language Enviroment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, R. D.; Rostron, A. B.

    1983-01-01

    To help hearing-impaired children develop their linguistic competence, a computer system that can process sentences and give feedback about their acceptability was developed. Suggestions are made of ways to use the system as an environment for interactive written communication. (Author/CL)

  1. Facilitating the Feedback Process on a Clinical Clerkship Using a Smartphone Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Aditya; Generalla, Jenilee; Thompson, Britta; Haidet, Paul

    2017-04-18

    This pilot study evaluated the effects of a smartphone-triggered method of feedback delivery on students' perceptions of the feedback process. An interactive electronic feedback form was made available to students through a smartphone app. Students were asked to evaluate various aspects of the feedback process. Responses from a previous year served as control. In the first three quarters of academic year 2014-2015 (pre-implementation), only 65% of responders reported receiving oral feedback and 40% reported receiving written feedback. During the pilot phase (transition), these increased to 80% for both forms. Following full implementation in academic year 2015-2016 (post-implementation), 97% reported receiving oral feedback, and 92% reported receiving written feedback. A statistically significant difference was noted pre- to post-implementation for both oral and written feedback (p performance; 69% indicated the feedback method as better compared to other methods. Students acknowledged the facilitation of conversation with supervisors and the convenience of receiving feedback, as well as the promptness with which feedback was provided. The use of a drop-down menu was thought to limit the scope of conversation. These data point to the effectiveness of this method to cue supervisors to provide feedback to students.

  2. [A workshop to improve written communication skills of medical students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitran, Marcela; Zúñiga, Denisse; Flotts, Paulina; Padilla, Oslando; Moreno, Rodrigo

    2009-05-01

    Despite being among the best academically prepared of the country, many medical students have difficulties to communicate in writing. In 2005, the School of Medicine at the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile introduced a writing workshop in the undergraduate curriculum, to enhance the students' writing skills. To describe the workshop and its impact on the writing skills of 3 cohorts of students. This 30-h workshop used a participative methodology with emphasis on deliberate practice and feedback. Students worked in small groups with a faculty member specially trained in writing. The qualities of the essays written before and after the workshop were compared. Essays were rated by a professional team that used an analytic rubric to measure formal aspects of text writing as well as more complex thinking processes. There was a significant improvement in the quality of the texts written after the workshop; the main changes occurred in argumentation, and in paragraph and text structure. This improvement was inversely proportional to the initial level of performance, and independent of gender. A writing workshop based on deliberate practice and personalized feedback is effective to enhance the writing proficiency of medical students. Due to its design, this workshop could be useful for students of other careers and universities.

  3. Defining quality student feedback in distance learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, B

    1997-07-01

    The quality of student feedback is of critical importance in distance learning. Students studying such courses may be geographically far removed from tutors, and limited contact opportunities necessitate a sharp and accurate focus upon aspects of study which link theory, research, clinical practice and written assessment closely together. An understanding of quality feedback begins with an appreciation of the role of distance learning course tutors and the education models which can usefully guide them. Quality also relies upon a close evaluation of support to students as courses are planned, launched and then monitored through course boards or their equivalent.

  4. Midwifery competence: Content in midwifery students' daily written reflections on clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekelin, Maria; Kvist, Linda J; Persson, Eva K

    2016-01-01

    to examine the content in midwifery students' written daily reflections and in their supervisors' written feedback during clinical practice at birth units. a total of 388 reflections written by a cohort of 18 midwifery students and written feedback provided by their supervisors have been analysed using content analysis. one main category, transition to midwifery competence emerged and was interpreted as a process of development in midwifery skills over time. This main category encompasses five categories: evaluations, own actions, communication, own emotions and insights comprising fourteen subcategories. As the education programme progressed there was evidence of development from fragmented reflections about care and learning to holistic reflections on learning. Comments from the clinical supervisors contained acknowledgement of the students' reflections or comments with a didactic content. daily written reflections on practice may be a useful pedagogical tool as reflective writing helps students to be active in transition to midwifery competence. Professional development may be facilitated by insights generated by reflection. Amount and content of feedback varied between supervisors which can result in a discrepancy in pedagogical value for individual students. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. [Information transmission to the community pharmacist after a patient's discharge from the hospital: setting up of a written medication discharge form, prospective evaluation of its impact, and survey of the information needs of the pharmacists].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claeys, C; Dufrasne, M; De Vriese, C; Nève, J; Tulkens, P M; Spinewine, A

    2015-03-01

    Discharge from the hospital is a period at risk for the continuity of patient's medication (seamless pharmaceutical care). The community pharmacist is often the first health care professional seen by the patient after hospital discharge. The clinical pharmacist has potentially a key role in establishing an efficient information transfer from the hospital to the community pharmacy. (1) To develop and, (2) to evaluate the impact of a structured discharge medication form prepared at hospital discharge by the clinical pharmacist and containing information items related to the medication regimen for the community pharmacist, and (3) to survey the information needs of the Belgian community pharmacists to ensure continuity of care after hospitalization. (1) A structured discharge medication form has been developed based on a Literature review and on opinions expressed by community and clinical pharmacists, members of the Belgian Pharmaceutical Union (Association Pharmaceutique Belge) and an ethical committee. (2) A prospective study has been conducted with patients from geriatrics and orthopaedics wards of the University Hospital Dinant-Godinne returning home after hospital discharge with the discharge medication form to be given to their commuiity pharmacist; its use, the reasons for non-use, the perceived impact and the satisfaction of the community pharmacist have been assessed. (3) An on-line survey addressed to all Belgian community pharmacists evaluated their information needs. (1) The final version of the discharge medication form included key information items concerning the hospital, the patient, the discharge treatment (including the type of modifications made as compared to medications taken before admission), and on medication management at home. Some items were excluded because of Lack of perceived utility by pharmacists, confidentiality issues, and respect of patient's freedom of choice. (2) From the 71 medication forms given to patients, 48 were received by

  6. Comprehensive feedback on trainee surgeons’ non-technical skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieckmann, Peter; Beier-Holgersen, Randi; Rosenberg, Jacob; Oestergaard, Doris

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to explore the content of conversations, feedback style, and perceived usefulness of feedback to trainee surgeons when conversations were stimulated by a tool for assessing surgeons’ non-technical skills. Methods Trainee surgeons and their supervisors used the Non-Technical Skills for Surgeons in Denmark tool to stimulate feedback conversations. Audio recordings of post-operation feedback conversations were collected. Trainees and supervisors provided questionnaire responses on the usefulness and comprehensiveness of the feedback. The feedback conversations were qualitatively analyzed for content and feedback style. Usefulness was investigated using a scale from 1 to 5 and written comments were qualitatively analyzed. Results Six trainees and six supervisors participated in eight feedback conversations. Eighty questionnaires (response rate 83 percent) were collected from 13 trainees and 12 supervisors. Conversations lasted median eight (2-15) minutes. Supervisors used the elements and categories in the tool to structure the content of the conversations. Supervisors tended to talk about the trainees’ actions and their own frames rather than attempting to understand the trainees’ perceptions. Supervisors and trainees welcomed the feedback opportunity and agreed that the conversations were useful and comprehensive. Conclusions The content of the feedback conversations reflected the contents of the tool and the feedback was considered useful and comprehensive. However, supervisors talked primarily about their own frames, so in order for the feedback to reach its full potential, supervisors may benefit from training techniques to stimulate a deeper reflection among trainees. PMID:25602262

  7. SURVEY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    SURVEY er en udbredt metode og benyttes inden for bl.a. samfundsvidenskab, humaniora, psykologi og sundhedsforskning. Også uden for forskningsverdenen er der mange organisationer som f.eks. konsulentfirmaer og offentlige institutioner samt marketingsafdelinger i private virksomheder, der arbejder...

  8. Online Instructor's Use of Audio Feedback to Increase Social Presence and Student Satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Trumpy

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the impact of written group feedback, versus audio feedback, based upon four student satisfaction measures in the online classroom environment. Undergraduate students in the control group were provided both individual written feedback and group written feedback, while undergraduate students in the experimental treatment group were provided both individual written feedback and audio group feedback. Using a one-tailed t-test, the four student satisfaction measures were analyzed and one was found to be significant for students’ perception that the instructor seemed genuinely concerned with whether students learned. The authors believe the study, when combined with their previous research, has significant impact on understanding strategies for improving instructor effectiveness with online students. Furthermore, the authors believe this area of student satisfaction resides primarily in positive perceptions of instructors’ engagement and “social presence.” In addition, the authors believe the provision of audio feedback (either individual or group to be more time efficient, while allowing for increased instructor creativity. Finally, the use of audio feedback may be perceived as more accessible or practical by the student, rather than written feedback alone.

  9. Online assessment: what influences students to engage with feedback?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Alan

    2014-07-01

    The intention of giving written feedback is to close the gap between the standard achieved and the standard desired, but students do not always read it. Web-based marking tools are increasingly being used in assessment practices to deliver the feedback. What motivates students to read the feedback provided, especially since the advent of these online marking tools, is poorly understood. This research looked at the factors likely to influence a medical student's engagement with written feedback delivered through an online marking tool (grademark by Turnitin). What motivates students to read the feedback provided Third-year medical students on a UK undergraduate medical course submitted an assignment online. A questionnaire was distributed to a cohort of them following the release of their results and feedback, allowing quantitative and qualitative data collection. Software recorded whether they opened their feedback. Previous examination performance figures were also collated. Online feedback is accessible and acceptable to the majority of students. Personal demographics, computer literacy, previous course performance, or personal motivational drivers did not predict those who did or did not read it. Some students reported seeing little value in feedback because of their previous negative experiences. A minority found feedback hurtful, and were likely to show avoidance behaviours. This research found that feedback provided through an online marking tool overcame many of the problems associated with handwritten feedback, but alone was not enough to ensure universal engagement. Feedback dialogues are proposed as a method to overcome negative student experiences, enhance tutor performance and encourage future student engagement. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Effective Instructor Feedback: Perceptions of Online Graduate Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beverley Getzlaf

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This descriptive study explored online graduate students' perceptions of effective instructor feedback. The objectives of the study were to determine the students’ perceptions of the content of effective instructor feedback (“what should be included in effective feedback?” and the process of effective instructor feedback (“how should effective feedback be provided?”. The participants were students completing health-related graduate courses offered exclusively online. Data were collected via a survey that included open ended questions inviting participants to share their perspectives regarding effective online instructor feedback. Thematic analysis revealed five major themes: student involvement/individualization, gentle guidance, being positively constructive, timeliness and future orientation. We conclude that effective instructor feedback has positive outcomes for the students. Future studies are warranted to investigate strategies to make feedback a mutual process between instructor and student that supports an effective feedback cycle.

  11. Pharmacy students' views of faculty feedback on academic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Maurice; Hanna, Lezley-Anne; Quinn, Siobhan

    2012-02-10

    To investigate students' views on and satisfaction with faculty feedback on their academic performance. A 41-item survey instrument was developed based on a literature review relating to effective feedback. All pharmacy undergraduate students were invited via e-mail to complete the self-administered electronic questionnaire relating to their views on feedback, including faculty feedback received to date regarding their academic performance. A response rate of 61% (343/561) was obtained. Only 32.3% of students (107/331) agreed that they were satisfied with the feedback they received; dissatisfaction with examination feedback was particularly high. The provision of faculty feedback was perceived to be variable in terms of quality and quantity. There are some inconsistencies relating to provision of feedback within the MPharm degree program at Queen's University Belfast. Further work is needed to close the gap between student expectations and the faculty's delivery of feedback on academic performance.

  12. Does source matter? Nurses' and Physicians' perceptions of interprofessional feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schaik, Sandrijn M; O'Sullivan, Patricia S; Eva, Kevin W; Irby, David M; Regehr, Glenn

    2016-02-01

    Receptiveness to interprofessional feedback, which is important for optimal collaboration, may be influenced by 'in-group or out-group' categorisation, as suggested by social identity theory. We used an experimental design to explore how nurses and resident physicians perceive feedback from people within and outside their own professional group. Paediatric residents and nurses participated in a simulation-based team exercise. Two nurses and two physicians wrote anonymous performance feedback for each participant. Participants each received a survey containing these feedback comments with prompts to rate (i) the usefulness (ii) the positivity and (iii) their agreement with each comment. Half of the participants received feedback labelled with the feedback provider's profession (two comments correctly labelled and two incorrectly labelled). Half received unlabelled feedback and were asked to guess the provider's profession. For each group, we performed separate three-way anovas on usefulness, positivity and agreement ratings to examine interactions between the recipient's profession, actual provider profession and perceived provider profession. Forty-five out of 50 participants completed the survey. There were no significant interactions between profession of the recipient and the actual profession of the feedback provider for any of the 3 variables. Among participants who guessed the source of the feedback, we found significant interactions between the profession of the feedback recipient and the guessed source of the feedback for both usefulness (F1,48 = 25.6; p feedback they guessed to be from nurses were higher than ratings of feedback they guessed to be from physicians, and vice versa. Among participants who received labelled feedback, we noted a similar interaction between the profession of the feedback recipient and labelled source of feedback for usefulness ratings (F1,92 = 4.72; p feedback to the in-group than to the out-group. This finding has potential

  13. Students’ expectations of feedback given on draft writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zach Simpson

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Academic writing is the primary means of assessing university students and feedback (oral or written responses on writing can contribute significantly to student learning and success (Ferris, 2003; Hyland & Hyland, 2006. This study explores students’ expectations of feedback on draft writing. The research design was two-pronged. The initial quantitative aspect employed a questionnaire which students completed after receiving feedback from Writing Centre consultants who aim to give developmental feedback. A subsequent phase involved focus groups with volunteer students. This mixed methods design allowed for greater depth of understanding as the qualitative findings extended the quantitative results. The study concludes that students expect feedback to be understandable, encouraging and to focus on both positive and negative aspects of their writing. Importantly, students expect feedback to ‘unpack’ the conventions of academic literacy while still encouraging independence and originality.

  14. Refining Prescription Warning Labels Using Patient Feedback: A Qualitative Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olayinka O Shiyanbola

    Full Text Available The complexity of written medication information hinders patients' understanding and leads to patient misuse of prescribed medications. Incorporating patient feedback in designing prescription warning labels (PWLs is crucial in enhancing patient comprehension of medication warning instructions. This qualitative study explored patient feedback on five newly designed PWLs. In-depth semi-structured face-to-face interviews were conducted with 21 patients, who were 18 years and older, spoke English, and took a prescription medication. These patients were shown different variations of the five most commonly used PWLs-Take with Food, Do not Drink Alcohol, Take with a Full glass of Water, Do not Chew or Break, and Protect from Sunlight. The 60-minute interviews explored feedback on patient comprehension of the PWL instructions and their suggestions for improving the clarity of the PWLs. At the end of the interview, patient self-reported socio-demographic information was collected with a 3-minute survey and a brief health literacy assessment was completed using the Newest Vital Sign. Twenty-one patients completed the interviews. Most patients were female (n = 15, 71.4% with ages ranging from 23 to 66 years old (mean: 47.6 ± 13.3. The mean health literacy score was 2.4 on a scale of 0-6. Qualitative content analysis based on the text, pictures, and placement of the PWLs on the pill bottle showed preferences for including 'WARNING' on the PWL to create alertness, inclusion of a picture together with the text, yellow color highlighting behind the text, and placement of the PWL on the front of the pill bottle. Although patients had positive opinions of the redesigned PWLs, patients wanted further improvements to the content and design of the PWLs for enhanced clarity and understandability.

  15. Segmentation of Written Words in French

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetail, Fabienne; Content, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Syllabification of spoken words has been largely used to define syllabic properties of written words, such as the number of syllables or syllabic boundaries. By contrast, some authors proposed that the functional structure of written words stems from visuo-orthographic features rather than from the transposition of phonological structure into the…

  16. 28 CFR 55.19 - Written materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Written materials. 55.19 Section 55.19... RIGHTS ACT REGARDING LANGUAGE MINORITY GROUPS Minority Language Materials and Assistance § 55.19 Written materials. (a) Types of materials. It is the obligation of the jurisdiction to decide what materials must be...

  17. Feedback to nurse managers about staff nurses' perceptions of their jobs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, M A; Lytle, K S; Swearengen, P

    1997-12-01

    This article describes a survey feedback intervention in which staff nurses were surveyed about various job characteristics, job satisfaction, and intent to remain in the organization. Nurse managers received the feedback through graphs and a workshop. A year later the same survey was conducted, and the results were compared with preintervention data. Of the 13 units surveyed, six showed significant improvement in one area and one showed significant improvement in 11. Nurse managers considered the survey feedback helpful, but the feedback alone was not sufficient for achieving broad changes in 1 year. However, the feedback is a useful component of continuous quality improvement efforts.

  18. Rateless feedback codes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jesper Hemming; Koike-Akino, Toshiaki; Orlik, Philip

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a concept called rateless feedback coding. We redesign the existing LT and Raptor codes, by introducing new degree distributions for the case when a few feedback opportunities are available. We show that incorporating feedback to LT codes can significantly decrease both...... the coding overhead and the encoding/decoding complexity. Moreover, we show that, at the price of a slight increase in the coding overhead, linear complexity is achieved with Raptor feedback coding....

  19. Innovative curriculum for second-year Harvard-MIT medical students: practicing communication skills with volunteer patients giving immediate feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Nadaa B; Pelletier, Stephen R; Shields, Helen M

    2017-01-01

    Medical students are expected to develop excellent communication skills. The purpose of our study was to create an innovative communication skills exercise using real volunteer patients and physician co-teachers for students to practice communication skills while receiving immediate feedback. This is a mixed methods study where second-year medical students participated in the communication skills exercise with real patients and physician co-teachers giving immediate feedback. Clinical scenarios reflected the patients' actual experiences. Students acted out roles as physicians. Physicians co-taught with the patients and gave immediate feedback to students. Students completed an anonymous written survey at the end of the exercise. Qualitative and quantitative responses were recorded. Student feedback from the 2014 surveys was used to modify the teaching designs to increase active role play opportunities by having only two students in each group and doubling the number of stations with real patients. Students rated the overall exercise and the utility of patient volunteers in learning how to communicate on a Likert scale of 1-5, where in this medical school traditionally 1 is excellent and 5 is poor. In 2014, the exercises were rated with a mean score of 1.47 (SD 0.621). In 2015, the exercises were rated with a mean score of 1.03 (SD 0.62). In 2016, the exercises were rated with a mean score of 1.27 (SD 0.52). ANOVA analysis ( p =0.002) and Bonferroni corrections indicate a statistically significant difference between combined mean scores of the exercise in 2014 and 2015 ( p =0.001). No difference was shown between 2014 and 2016 or 2015 and 2016. Medical students rated practicing communication skills with real patient volunteers and physician co-teachers giving immediate feedback in their preclinical years very highly. Student feedback indicated that they preferred active roles and increased opportunities to practice their communication skills.

  20. Developing Sustainable Feedback Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carless, David; Salter, Diane; Yang, Min; Lam, Joy

    2011-01-01

    Feedback is central to the development of student learning, but within the constraints of modularized learning in higher education it is increasingly difficult to handle effectively. This article makes a case for sustainable feedback as a contribution to the reconceptualization of feedback processes. The data derive from the Student Assessment and…

  1. Improving medical students' written communication skills: design and evaluation of an educational curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melvin, L; Connolly, K; Pitre, L; Dore, K L; Wasi, P

    2015-06-01

    Written and verbal communication skills are important skills for all physicians. While verbal skills are taught and assessed in medical school, medical students report limited instruction in written communication skills. This study examined the impact of a curriculum delivered during a 6-week clinical rotation in Internal Medicine on the objective assessment of medical students' written communication skills. The curriculum consisted of two educational programmes: a medical student communication tutorial and a resident feedback workshop. The study was conducted from March 2012 to January 2013 at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. The study featured three arms: (1) control, (2) medical student communication tutorial alone and (3) student tutorial and resident feedback workshop. Data were collected on 126 students during 6-week Internal Medicine clerkship rotations. Students' written consultation notes were collected prior to the educational programmes and at 6 weeks. Blinded faculty assessors used an independently validated Assessment Checklist to evaluate consultation notes. Consultation note scores improved from week 1 to week 6 across all study arms. However, the change was statistically significant only in arm 3, featuring both the medical student tutorial and the resident feedback workshop, with mean scores improving from 4.75 (SD=1.496) to 5.56 (SD=0.984) out of 7. The mean difference between week 1 and week 6 was significantly different (0.806, p=0.002, 95% CI 0.306 to 1.058). The combination of a resident feedback workshop with medical student written communication tutorial improves objective evaluations of consultation note scores over student tutorial alone. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  2. Feedback Cheerleader, Mean-Spirited Feedback Estudio Critico Discursivo De Ideologias Sobre El Feedback Escrito En Un Departamento Universitario De Espanol En Estados Unidos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez-Mujica, Maria Eugenia

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this research is to investigate ideologies that monitor and control styles of written feedback as well as discursive resources used in the expression of those ideologies. Using socio-cognitive analysis, a development of critical discourse studies, I have analyzed 44 sessions of chat on the Internet, 78 journal notes, 31 emails and 12…

  3. Written educational materials for families of chronically ill children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahat, Ganga; Scoloveno, Mary Ann; Donnelly, Cassandra Barnette

    2007-09-01

    To provide information on evaluation of written educational materials and to illustrate the evaluation of Sickle Cell Disease: A Family Guide (SCDFG) used for children with sickle cell disease (SCD) and their families. A large Valerie Fund Children's Center developed the SCDFG in collaboration with the New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services, Special Child Health and Early Intervention Services. Two university faculty members and one pediatric nurse practitioner (NP) working in the clinic conducted an evaluation of the effectiveness and usefulness of the SCDFG. Forty-eight caregivers of children with SCD who were using the SCDFG were asked to complete a survey developed by the investigators. The survey was completed during a clinic visit. The SCDFG met the standards for content, organization, layout, linguistics, visuals, readability, and comprehension. Overall, the caregivers were knowledgeable about the cause, signs and symptoms, and what to do during a sickle crisis. More than half the participants reported that they felt confident in managing their child's problems related to SCD. Confidence of the caregivers was positively correlated with their perception that the information in the SCDFG was helpful and easy to understand. NPs need to evaluate written educational materials that are used as part of a multifaceted approach to the care of children with chronic illnesses. A planned systematic evaluation provides the NP with information about the efficacy and usefulness of the written educational materials. These materials may help empower children and caregivers to manage their long-term illnesses.

  4. Feedback and efficient behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casal, Sandro; DellaValle, Nives; Mittone, Luigi; Soraperra, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    Feedback is an effective tool for promoting efficient behavior: it enhances individuals' awareness of choice consequences in complex settings. Our study aims to isolate the mechanisms underlying the effects of feedback on achieving efficient behavior in a controlled environment. We design a laboratory experiment in which individuals are not aware of the consequences of different alternatives and, thus, cannot easily identify the efficient ones. We introduce feedback as a mechanism to enhance the awareness of consequences and to stimulate exploration and search for efficient alternatives. We assess the efficacy of three different types of intervention: provision of social information, manipulation of the frequency, and framing of feedback. We find that feedback is most effective when it is framed in terms of losses, that it reduces efficiency when it includes information about inefficient peers' behavior, and that a lower frequency of feedback does not disrupt efficiency. By quantifying the effect of different types of feedback, our study suggests useful insights for policymakers.

  5. Feedback and Incentives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Tor Viking; Poulsen, Anders; Villeval, Marie Claire

    2009-01-01

    use two pay schemes, a piece rate and a tournament. We find that overall feedback does not improve performance. In contrast to the piece-rate pay scheme there is some evidence of positive peer effects in tournaments since the underdogs almost never quit the competition even when lagging significantly......This paper experimentally investigates the impact of different pay schemes and relative performance feedback policies on employee effort. We explore three feedback rules: no feedback on relative performance, feedback given halfway through the production period, and continuously updated feedback. We...... behind, and front runners do not slack off. But in both pay schemes relative performance feedback reduces the quality of the low performers' work; we refer to this as a "negative quality peer effect"....

  6. Situated Formative Feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukassen, Niels Bech; Wahl, Christian; Sorensen, Elsebeth Korsgaard

    This study addresses the conceptual challenge of providing students with good quality feedback to enhance student learning in an online community of practice (COP). The aim of the study is to identify feedback mechanisms in a virtual learning environment (VLE) and to create a full formative...... feedback episode (FFE) through an online dialogue. The paper argues that dialogue is crucial for student learning and that feedback is not only something the teacher gives to the student. Viewing good quality feedback as social, situated, formative, emphasis is put on the establishment of dialogue. We...... refer to this type of feedback as, Situated Formative Feedback (SFF). As a basis for exploring, identifying and discussing relevant aspects of SFF the paper analyses qualitative data from a Moodle dialogue. Data are embedded in the qualitative analytic program Nvivo and are analysed with a system...

  7. A quest for helpful feedback to programming coursework

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Shun Ha Sylvia; Beaumont, Anthony J.

    2012-01-01

    The 2011 National Student Survey (NSS) revealed that 40% of full-time students in England did not think that the feedback on their work has been helpful, even though 66% of these students agreed that the feedback was detailed and 62% of them agreed that the feedback has been prompt. Detailed feedback that is not considered helpful by students means a waste of tutors' time while students continue to struggle with their learning. What do students consider as helpful feedback? What are the quali...

  8. 45 CFR 1179.6 - Written decision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES SALARY OFFSET § 1179.6 Written decision. (a) The hearing... will include: a statement of the facts presented to demonstrate the nature and origin of the alleged...

  9. Accurate modelling of UV written waveguide components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svalgaard, Mikael

    BPM simulation results of UV written waveguide components that are indistinguishable from measurements can be achieved on the basis of trajectory scan data and an equivalent step index profile that is very easy to measure.......BPM simulation results of UV written waveguide components that are indistinguishable from measurements can be achieved on the basis of trajectory scan data and an equivalent step index profile that is very easy to measure....

  10. Accurate modeling of UV written waveguide components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svalgaard, Mikael

    BPM simulation results of UV written waveguide components that are indistinguishable from measurements can be achieved on the basis of trajectory scan data and an equivalent step index profile that is very easy to measure.......BPM simulation results of UV written waveguide components that are indistinguishable from measurements can be achieved on the basis of trajectory scan data and an equivalent step index profile that is very easy to measure....

  11. Determinants of feedback retention in soccer players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Januário Nuno

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed soccer players’ retention of coaches’ feedback during training sessions. We intended to determine if the retention of information was influenced by the athletes’ personal characteristic (age, gender and the sports level, the quantity of information included in coach’s feedback (the number of ideas and redundancy, athletes’ perception of the relevance of the feedback information and athletes’ motivation as well as the attention level. The study that was conducted over the course of 18 sessions of soccer practice, involved 12 coaches (8 males, 4 females and 342 athletes (246 males, 96 females, aged between 10 and 18 years old. All coach and athlete interventions were transposed to a written protocol and submitted to content analysis. Descriptive statistics and multiple linear regression were calculated. The results showed that a substantial part of the information was not retained by the athletes; in 65.5% of cases, athletes experienced difficulty in completely reproducing the ideas of the coaches and, on average, the value of feedback retention was 57.0%. Six variables with a statistically significant value were found: gender, the athletes’ sports level, redundancy, the number of transmitted ideas, athletes’ perception of the relevance of the feedback information and the athletes’ motivation level.

  12. Follower-Centered Perspective on Feedback: Effects of Feedback Seeking on Identification and Feedback Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Gong, Zhenxing; Li, Miaomiao; Qi, Yaoyuan; Zhang, Na

    2017-01-01

    In the formation mechanism of the feedback environment, the existing research pays attention to external feedback sources and regards individuals as objects passively accepting feedback. Thus, the external source fails to realize the individuals’ need for feedback, and the feedback environment cannot provide them with useful information, leading to a feedback vacuum. The aim of this study is to examine the effect of feedback-seeking by different strategies on the supervisor-feedback environme...

  13. Quantifying Feedback – Insights Into Peer Assessment Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wind, David Kofoed; Jensen, Ulf Aslak

    2017-01-01

    The act of producing content - for example in forms of written reports - is one of the most used methods for teaching and learning all the way from primary school to university. It is a learning tool which helps students relate their theories to practice. Getting relevant and helpful feedback...... on this work is important to ensure a good learning experience for the students. Providing this feedback is often a time-consuming job for the teacher. An effective way to learn is to teach others, and similarly give feedback on work done by others. One way to approach a combined solution to the above...... of more than 10,000 students. The students have together made more than 100,000 peer-evaluations of work by other students, and these evaluations together contain more than 10,000,000 words of text feedback. A key problem when using peer assessment is to ensure high quality feedback between peers...

  14. Hold on to This!: Strategies for Teacher Feedback in Online Dance Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risner, Doug

    2014-01-01

    Drawn from current research on web-based learning, this practical article presents applied research and informed applications for online dance educators engaged in undergraduate and graduate dance education course work. With a focus on written assessment feedback, the author provides a review of recent literature, an overview of written feedback…

  15. Written Forms of Self-Expression: Changes from 1985 to 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Jacqueline; Linstrum, Karen S.

    2017-01-01

    This study sought to compare the results of a 1985 study by Roscoe, Krug, and Schmidt, who surveyed high school students and their use of written forms of self-expression, with university undergraduates and graduate students in 2016. This study also sought to develop an updated survey instrument for use in obtaining information concerning a…

  16. Missing: Electronic Feedback in Egyptian EFL Essay Writing Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seliem, Soheir; Ahmed, Abdelhamid

    2009-01-01

    EFL essay writing is considered one of the most important academic courses in the teacher education programmes that should help develop students' skills to write cohesively and coherently. Teachers' feedback plays a crucial role in improving and enhancing the quality of students' written essays. The aim of the current study was to shed light on…

  17. RF feedback for KEKB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezura, Eizi; Yoshimoto, Shin-ichi; Akai, Kazunori [National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1996-08-01

    This paper describes the present status of the RF feedback development for the KEK B-Factory (KEKB). A preliminary experiment concerning the RF feedback using a parallel comb-filter was performed through a choke-mode cavity and a klystron. The RF feedback has been tested using the beam of the TRISTAN Main Ring, and has proved to be effective in damping the beam instability. (author)

  18. Neural cryptography with feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruttor, Andreas; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Shacham, Lanir; Kanter, Ido

    2004-04-01

    Neural cryptography is based on a competition between attractive and repulsive stochastic forces. A feedback mechanism is added to neural cryptography which increases the repulsive forces. Using numerical simulations and an analytic approach, the probability of a successful attack is calculated for different model parameters. Scaling laws are derived which show that feedback improves the security of the system. In addition, a network with feedback generates a pseudorandom bit sequence which can be used to encrypt and decrypt a secret message.

  19. Neural cryptography with feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruttor, Andreas; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Shacham, Lanir; Kanter, Ido

    2004-04-01

    Neural cryptography is based on a competition between attractive and repulsive stochastic forces. A feedback mechanism is added to neural cryptography which increases the repulsive forces. Using numerical simulations and an analytic approach, the probability of a successful attack is calculated for different model parameters. Scaling laws are derived which show that feedback improves the security of the system. In addition, a network with feedback generates a pseudorandom bit sequence which can be used to encrypt and decrypt a secret message.

  20. Feedback in surgical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Boghdady, Michael; Alijani, Afshin

    2017-04-01

    The positive effect of feedback has long been recognized in surgical education. Surgical educators convey feedback to improve the performance of the surgical trainees. We aimed to review the scientific classification and application of feedback in surgical education, and to propose possible future directions for research. A literature search was performed using Pubmed, OVID, CINAHL, Web of science, EMBASE, ERIC database and Google Scholar. The following search terms were used: 'feedback', 'feedback in medical education', 'feedback in medical training' and 'feedback in surgery'. The search was limited to articles in English. From 1157 citations, 12 books and 43 articles met the inclusion criteria and were selected for this review. Feedback comes in a variety of types and is an essential tool for learning and developing performance in surgical education. Different methods of feedback application are evolving and future work needs to concentrate on the value of each method as well as the role of new technologies in surgical education. Copyright © 2016 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Strategies for effective feedback

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kritek, Patricia A

    2015-01-01

    Provision of regular feedback to trainees on clinical performance by supervising providers is increasingly recognized as an essential component of undergraduate and graduate health sciences education...

  2. Feedback stabilization initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    Much progress has been made in attaining high confinement regimes in magnetic confinement devices. These operating modes tend to be transient, however, due to the onset of MHD instabilities, and their stabilization is critical for improved performance at steady state. This report describes the Feedback Stabilization Initiative (FSI), a broad-based, multi-institutional effort to develop and implement methods for raising the achievable plasma betas through active MHD feedback stabilization. A key element in this proposed effort is the Feedback Stabilization Experiment (FSX), a medium-sized, national facility that would be specifically dedicated to demonstrating beta improvement in reactor relevant plasmas by using a variety of MHD feedback stabilization schemes.

  3. Policy Feedback System (PFS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Policy Feedback System (PFS) is a web application developed by the Office of Disability Policy Management Information (ODPMI) team that gathers empirical data...

  4. Feedback Loop Gains and Feedback Behavior (1996)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampmann, Christian Erik

    2012-01-01

    Linking feedback loops and system behavior is part of the foundation of system dynamics, yet the lack of formal tools has so far prevented a systematic application of the concept, except for very simple systems. Having such tools at their disposal would be a great help to analysts in understanding...... large, complicated simulation models. The paper applies tools from graph theory formally linking individual feedback loop strengths to the system eigenvalues. The significance of a link or a loop gain and an eigenvalue can be expressed in the eigenvalue elasticity, i.e., the relative change...... of an eigenvalue resulting from a relative change in the gain. The elasticities of individual links and loops may be found through simple matrix operations on the linearized system. Even though the number of feedback loops can grow rapidly with system size, reaching astronomical proportions even for modest systems...

  5. The Content Feedback Practices of Applied Linguistics Doctoral Supervisors in New Zealand and Australian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitchener, John

    2016-01-01

    The focus of this article is on the written feedback that supervisors say they often give their second language (L2) doctoral students. Little is known about the focus of this feedback and about what supervisors consider as priorities in the early draft writing of dissertation chapters. Given the potentially different priorities and foci of…

  6. Treatment Integrity Enhancement via Performance Feedback Conceptualized as an Exercise in Social Influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erchul, William P.

    2013-01-01

    This commentary is in response to the article "Effects of Verbal and Written Performance Feedback on Treatment Adherence" (Kaufman, Codding, Markus, Tryon, & Kyse, this issue). The overall recommendation to those who study treatment integrity using performance feedback methods is to incorporate theories and research on social…

  7. Written Language Shift among Norwegian Youth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil ÖZERK

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In Norway there are two written Norwegian languages, Bokmål and Nynorsk. Of these two written languages Bokmål is being used by the majority of the people, and Bokmål has the highest prestige in the society. This article is about the shift of written language from Nynorsk to Bokmål among young people in a traditional Nynorsk district in the country. Drawing on empirical data we conclude that many adolescents are experiencing written language shift. We discuss various reasons for this phenomenon in the linguistic landscape of Norway. In our discussions we emphasize the importance of the school with regard to language maintenance and language revitalization. We call for a new language policy in the educational system that can prevent language shift. Having several dialects and two officially written forms of Norwegian in the country, creates a special linguistic landscape in Norway. Despite the fact that the Norwegian language situation is in several ways unique, it’s done very little research on how the existing policy works in practice. Our research reveals that the existing language policy and practice in the school system is not powerful enough to prevent language shift and language decay among the youngsters. The school system functions like a fabric for language shift.

  8. ICT and Feedback Practices in the Lower-Secondary Foreign Language Classroom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Hanne Wacher

    2017-01-01

    to 300 Danish teachers of lower-secondary EFL aimed at uncovering their practices, not least the role of ICT in their work. The results indicate that they use ICT much less in this part of their work than in others, depriving both teachers and students of the benefits that technology can provide......A central part of language teachers’ work consists in providing written corrective feedback for their students using wellknown pen-and-paper practices, and they are often unsure of the return on their investment of time in this task. This article will describe the results of a survey among close....... The article also presents and discusses some of the advantages that may result from increasing the adequate uses of ICT in this aspect of (foreign) language teaching....

  9. ICT and Feedback Practices in the Lower-Secondary Foreign Language Classroom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Hanne Wacher

    2016-01-01

    to 300 Danish teachers of lower-secondary EFL aimed at uncovering their practices, not least the role of ICT in their work. The results indicate that they use ICT much less in this part of their work than in others, depriving both teachers and students of the benefits that technology can provide......A central part of language teachers’ work consists in providing written corrective feedback for their students using well-known pen-and-paper practices, and they are often unsure of the return on their investment of time in this task. This article will describe the results of a survey among close....... The article also presents and discusses some of the advantages that may result from increasing the adequate uses of ICT in this aspect of (foreign) language teaching....

  10. Feedback in Language Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamel, Vivian

    In this paper, two theoretical approaches to language teaching, the audio-lingual and the cognitive code methods, are examined with respect to how they deal with feedback in the classroom situation. Audio-lingual theorists either ignore completely the need for feedback in the classroom or deal with it only in terms of its reinforcing attributes.…

  11. Fault Tolerant Feedback Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoustrup, Jakob; Niemann, H.

    2001-01-01

    An architecture for fault tolerant feedback controllers based on the Youla parameterization is suggested. It is shown that the Youla parameterization will give a residual vector directly in connection with the fault diagnosis part of the fault tolerant feedback controller. It turns out that there...

  12. Feedback og interpersonel kommunikation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dindler, Camilla

    2016-01-01

    Som interpersonel kommunikationsform handler feedback om at observere, mærke og italesætte det, som handler om relationen mellem samtaleparterne mere end om samtaleemnet. Her er fokus på, hvad der siges og hvordan der kommunikeres sammen. Feedback er her ikke en korrigerende tilbagemelding til...

  13. Developing 360 degree feedback system for KINS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, In Soo; Cheon, B. M.; Kim, T. H.; Ryu, J. H. [Chungman National Univ., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-12-15

    This project aims to investigate the feasibility of a 360 degree feedback systems for KINS and to design guiding rules and structures in implementing that systems. Literature survey, environmental analysis and questionnaire survey were made to ensure that 360 degree feedback is the right tool to improve performance in KINS. That review leads to conclusion that more readiness and careful feasibility review are needed before implementation of 360 degree feedback in KINS. Further the project suggests some guiding rules that can be helpful for successful implementation of that system in KINS. Those include : start with development, experiment with one department, tie it to a clear organization's goal, train everyone involve, make sure to try that system in an atmosphere of trust.

  14. Feedback i matematik

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sortkær, Bent

    2017-01-01

    Feedback bliver i litteraturen igen og igen fremhævet som et af de mest effektive midler til at fremme elevers præstationer i skolen (Hartberg, Dobson, & Gran, 2012; Hattie & Timperley, 2007; Wiliam, 2015). Dette på trods af, at flere forskere påpeger, at feedback ikke altid er læringsfremmende...... (Hattie & Gan, 2011), og nogle endda viser, at feedback kan have en negativ virkning i forhold til præstationer (Kluger & DeNisi, 1996). Artiklen vil undersøge disse tilsyneladende modstridende resultater ved at stille spørgsmålet: Under hvilke forudsætninger virker feedback i matematik læringsfremmende......? Dette gøres ved at dykke ned i forskningslitteraturen omhandlende feedback ud fra en række temaer for på den måde at besvare ovenstående spørgsmål....

  15. Feedback som tredjeordensiagttagelse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ane Qvortrup

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Feedback tilskrives stor betydning for læring, men trods intensiv forskning på området synes det svært at fange, hvori feedbacks særlige potentiale består. I forsøgene på at gøre dette knyttes an til en række faktorer eller parametre, der fremhæves som centrale. En af disse faktorer er tid, hvor der kredses om forskellen mellem umiddelbar og forsinket feedback samt om fordele og ulemper ved hver af de to. I denne artikel knyttes der an til en forståelse af feedback som tredjeordensiagttagelse, og der sættes herfra fokus på, hvordan man i en praktisk undervisningssituation kan imødekomme tidsfaktoren knyttet til feedback. Med udgangspunkt i et undervisningsforløb på bachelorniveau, hvor der er arbejdet systematisk med feedback understøttet af Wikis, belyses det, hvordan et sådant arbejde synes at have potentiale for understøttelse af såvel læring som undervisning. En sådan teoretisk reflekteret belysning kan udgøre et refleksionsprogram for fremtidig planlægning af og løbende refleksion over undervisning.     The article investigates the effect of feedback on learning. Feedback has been shown to be one of the most powerful influences on achievement in education. But, in spite of much research on the matter, there is no agreement on how the special potential of feedback can be described, and consequently no agreement on what is good and bad feedback. This article sets out to rectify this omission by seeking a new theoretical framework that is sensitive to the complexity of the impact of feedback. The author propose a system theoretical frame and through its use identifies significant didactical issues. Although feedback is described as an internal, system-relative construction, when seen through a system theoretical lens different teaching environments create diverse conditions for feedback constructions. The final section of the paper explores this idea in relation to wikis.

  16. Feedback Valence Affects Auditory Perceptual Learning Independently of Feedback Probability

    OpenAIRE

    Amitay, Sygal; Moore, David R.; Molloy, Katharine; Halliday, Lorna F.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that negative feedback is more effective in driving learning than positive feedback. We investigated the effect on learning of providing varying amounts of negative and positive feedback while listeners attempted to discriminate between three identical tones; an impossible task that nevertheless produces robust learning. Four feedback conditions were compared during training: 90% positive feedback or 10% negative feedback informed the participants that they wer...

  17. Writing Helpful Feedback: The Influence of Feedback Type on Students' Perceptions and Writing Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyssa Taylor

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Written feedback on students’ assignments is a common method that instructors and teaching assistants use to inform students about their performance or guide revisions. Despite its frequency of use, written feedback often lacks sufficient detail to be beneficial to students, and additional empirical research should examine its effectiveness as a teaching tool. The current study examined the effectiveness of two different types of feedback, developed and undeveloped, in terms of its influence on students’ subsequent writing performance and students’ perceptions of the feedback. Results demonstrated that the type of feedback significantly affected students’ perceptions, with developed feedback related to higher ratings of fairness and helpfulness; however, this feedback did not have a significant positive effect on students’ written performance.Les commentaires écrits sur les travaux sont une méthode courante utilisée par les enseignants et les aides-enseignants pour renseigner les étudiants sur leurs performances ou pour orienter les révisions. Malgré leur fréquence, il arrive souvent que les commentaires écrits ne soient pas assez détaillés pour être profitables aux étudiants. De plus amples recherches empiriques devraient se pencher sur l’efficacité de cet outil d'enseignement. La présente étude porte sur l'efficacité de différents types de commentaires élaborés et sous-élaborés; sur leur influence sur la performance écrite subséquente des étudiants et sur la perception de ces derniers à propos des commentaires. Les résultats démontrent que le type de commentaires influe significativement sur la perception des étudiants, les commentaires élaborés entraînant des évaluations supérieures en ce qui a trait à l’impartialité et à l'utilité; cependant, ces commentaires n'ont pas d'effets positifs importants sur la performance écrite des étudiants.

  18. Debriefing in Moodle: Written Feedback on Trust and Knowledge Sharing in a Social Dilemma Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oertig, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a new approach to debriefing that uses the discussion forum feature of the Moodle open source course management system to debrief a simulation game with undergraduate business students. The simulation game allowed the students to experience the fragility of trust when sharing knowledge in a global virtual project team. I…

  19. Limited effect of screening for depression with written feedback in outpatients with diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pouwer, F; Tack, C J; Geelhoed-Duijvestijn, P H L M

    2011-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The aim of this study was to test the effectiveness of a screening procedure for depression (SCR) vs care as usual (CAU) in outpatients with diabetes. The primary outcome measured was depression score and the secondary outcomes were mental healthcare consumption, diabetes-distres...

  20. Providing Written Feedback on Students' Mathematical Arguments: Proof Validations of Prospective Secondary Mathematics Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleiler, Sarah K.; Thompson, Denisse R.; Krajcevski, Milé

    2014-01-01

    Mathematics teachers play a unique role as experts who provide opportunities for students to engage in the practices of the mathematics community. Proof is a tool essential to the practice of mathematics, and therefore, if teachers are to provide adequate opportunities for students to engage with this tool, they must be able to validate student…

  1. On written expression of primary school pupils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevanović Jelena

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Normative rules of standard Serbian language are acquired during primary and secondary education through curriculum demands of Serbian language instruction, which takes place in three fields: grammar, orthography and culture of expression. Topic of interest in this paper is the quality of written expression of 6th and 7th grade pupils, in the context of all three fields specified to be mastered by the curriculum of Serbian language. Research comprised 148 primary school pupils from Belgrade. Linguistic analysis of spontaneously created written text was performed, in the conditions where it was not explicitly demanded form the pupil to write correctly. The results indicate that the majority of pupils make spelling and grammatical errors, meeting the condition for the basic level of mastering the knowledge in Serbian language according to the standards specified for the end of compulsory education. In addition to this, a considerable majority of pupils has a satisfactory level of culture of written expression. Pupils more often make spelling than grammatical errors. Seventh grade pupils are better than sixth grade pupils with respect to adhering to grammar rules and according to culture of written expression, while the mark in Serbian language and general school achievement of pupils correlate only with the degree of adhering to the orthographic rules. It was concluded that not only individual programs of support for pupils who make more errors are necessary, but also launching national projects for the development of linguistic competence of the young in Serbia.

  2. Word Frequencies in Written and Spoken English

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    R.B. Ruthven

    Word Frequencies in. Written and Spoken English. 2001, xv + 304 pp. ISBN: 0 582 32007 0. Har- low: Pearson Education. Price: £45.99. Geoffrey Leech ... ther discusses problems of data collection, transcription and spelling conven- tions. Each frequency list appears with a frequency score of tokens per million words.

  3. Test Anxiety in Written and Oral Examinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparfeldt, Jorn R.; Rost, Detlef H.; Baumeister, Ulrike M.; Christ, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    The distinction of different test anxiety reactions (e.g., worry, emotionality) is well established. Recently, additional relevance has been given to school-subject-specific test anxiety factors. The present study explored a further aspect concerning the structure of test anxiety experiences, specifically oral versus written examination modes. A…

  4. Written mathematical traditions in Ancient Mesopotamia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høyrup, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Writing, as well as various mathematical techniques, were created in proto-literate Uruk in order to serve accounting, and Mesopotamian mathematics as we know it was always expressed in writing. In so far, mathematics generically regarded was always part of the generic written tradition....

  5. Written Assignments in the Introductory Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madigan, R. J.; And Others

    In an attempt to contribute to the development of students' writing skills while helping them master basic psychology, a writing component was designed for a medium sized introductory psychology course. Its purpose was to aid in the mastery of course material and to contribute to the development of students' skill in written expression. In the…

  6. 22 CFR 1502.4 - Written requests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...: Director, Administration and Finance Division, African Development Foundation, 1724 Massachusetts Avenue... Relations AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION AVAILABILITY OF RECORDS § 1502.4 Written requests. In order to... of the Foundation. Blanket requests or requests for “the entire file of” or “all matters relating to...

  7. Classifying Written Texts Through Rhythmic Features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balint, Mihaela; Dascalu, Mihai; Trausan-Matu, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Rhythm analysis of written texts focuses on literary analysis and it mainly considers poetry. In this paper we investigate the relevance of rhythmic features for categorizing texts in prosaic form pertaining to different genres. Our contribution is threefold. First, we define a set of rhythmic

  8. Cue Reliance in L2 Written Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiechmann, Daniel; Kerz, Elma

    2014-01-01

    Second language learners reach expert levels in relative cue weighting only gradually. On the basis of ensemble machine learning models fit to naturalistic written productions of German advanced learners of English and expert writers, we set out to reverse engineer differences in the weighting of multiple cues in a clause linearization problem. We…

  9. Increasing advertising power via written scent references

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fenko, Anna; Breulmann, Svenja; Bialkova, Svetlana; Bialkova, Svetlana

    2014-01-01

    Olfactory cues in advertisements can evoke positive consumer emotions and product attitudes, yet including real scent in advertising is not always feasible. This study aimed at investigating whether written scent references could produce effects similar to real scents. Participants in online

  10. Cloze Procedure and Written Language in Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manschreck, Theo C.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Examines the relationship between relevant clinical symptoms and the predictability of language utterances in schizophrenia. Specifically, investigates the sensitivity of the Cloze procedure to various modes of language response, attempting to detect differences between language samples written by schizophrenics and controls. Analyzes experimental…

  11. Mobilising the "F" in CFSP: written evidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blockmans, S.

    2015-01-01

    Written evidence for the House of Lords, EU External Affairs Sub-Committee, 11 Nov 2015. The June 2015 European Council tasked the High Representative Federica Mogherini with preparing, in close cooperation with Member States, an EU global strategy on foreign and security policy, to be submitted to

  12. Word Frequencies in Written and Spoken English

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    R.B. Ruthven

    The words are ranked without any distinction between speech and writing. Chapter 2 looks at word frequency across speech and writing. In chapter 3, the focus is on the spoken part of the BNC corpus with comparison between the conversa- tional and task-oriented subcorpora. The written data of the corpus is the sub-.

  13. 42 CFR 8.33 - Written decision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS CERTIFICATION OF OPIOID TREATMENT PROGRAMS Procedures for Review of Suspension or Proposed Revocation of OTP Certification, and of Adverse Action Regarding Withdrawal of Approval of an Accreditation Body § 8.33 Written decision. (a...

  14. Do Written Asthma Action Plans Improve Outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelso, John M

    2016-03-01

    With appropriate management, children with asthma should expect few symptoms, no limits on activity, rare exacerbations, and normal lung function. Appropriate education of parents and other caregivers of children with asthma has clearly been shown to help achieve these goals. Although recommended in asthma guidelines, providing written asthma action plans does not improve outcomes beyond asthma education alone.

  15. 40 CFR 57.403 - Written consent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... NONFERROUS SMELTER ORDERS Supplementary Control System Requirements § 57.403 Written consent. (a) The consent... violation of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for sulfur dioxide in the smelter's designated... of, and obtain data from ambient air quality monitors operated by the company under the requirements...

  16. Exploring Oral Traditions through the Written Text.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metting, Fred

    1995-01-01

    Argues that, by reading literature that incorporates folklore and oral traditions, students learn to recognize and appreciate how oral traditions have influenced all cultures. Argues that a study of contemporary American written literature which incorporates elements of the oral tradition introduces students to old and deep wisdom and to a diverse…

  17. Feedback and efficient behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro Casal

    Full Text Available Feedback is an effective tool for promoting efficient behavior: it enhances individuals' awareness of choice consequences in complex settings. Our study aims to isolate the mechanisms underlying the effects of feedback on achieving efficient behavior in a controlled environment. We design a laboratory experiment in which individuals are not aware of the consequences of different alternatives and, thus, cannot easily identify the efficient ones. We introduce feedback as a mechanism to enhance the awareness of consequences and to stimulate exploration and search for efficient alternatives. We assess the efficacy of three different types of intervention: provision of social information, manipulation of the frequency, and framing of feedback. We find that feedback is most effective when it is framed in terms of losses, that it reduces efficiency when it includes information about inefficient peers' behavior, and that a lower frequency of feedback does not disrupt efficiency. By quantifying the effect of different types of feedback, our study suggests useful insights for policymakers.

  18. Feedback and Incentives:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Tor Viking; Poulsen, Anders; Villeval, Marie-Claire

    This paper experimentally investigates the impact of different pay and relative performance information policies on employee effort. We explore three information policies: No feedback about relative performance, feedback given halfway through the production period, and continuously updated feedba...... of positive peer effects since the underdogs almost never quit the competition even when lagging significantly behind, and frontrunners do not slack off. Moreover, in both pay schemes information feedback reduces the quality of the low performers' work.......This paper experimentally investigates the impact of different pay and relative performance information policies on employee effort. We explore three information policies: No feedback about relative performance, feedback given halfway through the production period, and continuously updated feedback....... The pay schemes are a piece rate payment scheme and a winner-takes-all tournament. We find that, regardless of the pay scheme used, feedback does not improve performance. There are no significant peer effects in the piece-rate pay scheme. In contrast, in the tournament scheme we find some evidence...

  19. Strategies for effective feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritek, Patricia A

    2015-04-01

    Provision of regular feedback to trainees on clinical performance by supervising providers is increasingly recognized as an essential component of undergraduate and graduate health sciences education; however, many individuals have not been formally trained in this pedagogical skill. At the bedside or in the clinic, effective performance feedback can be accomplished by following four key steps. Begin by setting expectations that incorporate the trainee's personal goals and external objectives. Delineate how and when you will provide feedback to the learner. Next, directly observe the trainee's performance. This can be challenging while engaged on a busy clinical service, but a focus on discrete activities or interactions (e.g., family meeting, intravascular volume assessment using bedside ultrasound, or obtaining informed consent) is helpful. The third step is to plan and prioritize the feedback session. Feedback is most effective when given in a timely fashion and delivered in a safe environment. Limit the issues addressed because learners often disengage if confronted with too many deficiencies. Finally, when delivering feedback, begin by listening to the trainee's self-evaluation and then take a balanced approach. Describe in detail what the trainee does well and discuss opportunities for improvement with emphasis on specific, modifiable behaviors. The feedback loop is completed with a plan for follow-up reassessment. Through the use of these relatively simple practices, both the trainee and teacher can have a more productive learning experience.

  20. Feedback - fra et elevperspektiv

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Benedikte Vilslev; Pedersen, Bent Sortkær

    Feedback bliver i litteraturen igen og igen fremhævet som et af de mest effektive midler til at fremme elevers præstationer i skolen (Hattie og Timperley, 2007). Andre studier er dog inde på at feedback ikke altid er læringsfremmende og nogle viser endda at feedback kan have en negativ virkning i...... forhold til præstationer (Kluger & DeNisi, 1996). I forsøget på at forklare hvordan og hvorfor feedback virker (forskelligt), er der undersøgt flere dimensioner og forhold omkring feedback (se bl.a. Black og Wiliam, 1998; Hattie og Timperley, 2007; Shute, 2008). Dog er der få studier der undersøger...... hvordan feedback opleves fra et elevperspektiv (Ruiz-Primo og Li, 2013). Samtidig er der i feedbacklitteraturen en mangel på kvalitative studier, der kommer tæt på fænomenet feedback, som det viser sig i klasserummet (Ruiz-Primo og Li, 2013) i naturlige omgivelser (Black og Wiliam, 1998), og hvordan...

  1. Fear of feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Jay M; Strober, Myra H

    2003-04-01

    Nobody likes performance reviews. Subordinates are terrified they'll hear nothing but criticism. Bosses think their direct reports will respond to even the mildest criticism with anger or tears. The result? Everyone keeps quiet. That's unfortunate, because most people need help figuring out how to improve their performance and advance their careers. This fear of feedback doesn't come into play just during annual reviews. At least half the executives with whom the authors have worked never ask for feedback. Many expect the worst: heated arguments, even threats of dismissal. So rather than seek feedback, people try to guess what their bosses are thinking. Fears and assumptions about feedback often manifest themselves in psychologically maladaptive behaviors such as procrastination, denial, brooding, jealousy, and self-sabotage. But there's hope, say the authors. Those who learn adaptive techniques can free themselves from destructive responses. They'll be able to deal with feedback better if they acknowledge negative emotions, reframe fear and criticism constructively, develop realistic goals, create support systems, and reward themselves for achievements along the way. Once you've begun to alter your maladaptive behaviors, you can begin seeking regular feedback from your boss. The authors take you through four steps for doing just that: self-assessment, external assessment, absorbing the feedback, and taking action toward change. Organizations profit when employees ask for feedback and deal well with criticism. Once people begin to know how they are doing relative to management's priorities, their work becomes better aligned with organizational goals. What's more, they begin to transform a feedback-averse environment into a more honest and open one, in turn improving performance throughout the organization.

  2. Depression screening with patient-targeted feedback in cardiology: DEPSCREEN-INFO randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löwe, Bernd; Blankenberg, Stefan; Wegscheider, Karl; König, Hans-Helmut; Walter, Dirk; Murray, Alexandra M; Gierk, Benjamin; Kohlmann, Sebastian

    2017-02-01

    International guidelines advocate depression screening in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) and other chronic illnesses, but evidence is lacking. To test the differential efficacy of written patient-targeted feedback v. no written patient feedback after depression screening. Patients with CHD or hypertension from three cardiology settings were randomised and screened for depression (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01879111). Compared with the control group, where only cardiologists received written feedback, in the intervention group both cardiologists and patients received written feedback regarding depression status. Depression severity was measured 1 month (primary outcome) and 6 months after screening. The control group (n = 220) and the patient-feedback group (n = 155) did not differ in depression severity 1 month after screening. Six months after screening, the patient-feedback group showed significantly greater improvements in depression severity and was twice as likely to seek information about depression compared with the control group. Patient-targeted feedback in addition to screening has a significant but small effect on depression severity after 6 months and may encourage patients to take an active role in the self-management of depression. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2017.

  3. Evaluative expression in deaf children's written narratives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Beijsterveldt, Liesbeth Maria; van Hell, Janet G

    2009-01-01

    Deaf children vary in the use of and proficiency in signed language. The majority of studies on writing skills of children who are deaf did not assess deaf children's proficiency in signed language and/or grouped together deaf children with varying sign language skills. Adopting a bimodal bilingual perspective, we examined evaluative expression, an important narrative tool in both oral/written languages and signed languages, in narratives written in Dutch by deaf children who are proficient in Sign Language of the Netherlands (SLN) and deaf children who are low-proficient in SLN, and hearing monolingual and bilingual children. We hypothesized that deaf children who are proficient in signed language use their knowledge of evaluative expression in signed language to enrich their narratives in written Dutch, and more so than deaf children who are low-proficient in signed language and hearing monolingual and bilingual children. We examined the use of eight different evaluative devices in narratives written by deaf proficiently and low-proficiently signing children, and hearing monolingual and bilingual children. Narratives were also examined for morpho-syntactic errors and use of complex sentences. The results show that proficiently signing deaf children's narratives contain more evaluative devices that enrich the referential structure of the narrative than narratives of low-proficiently signing deaf children, and hearing bilingual and monolingual children. We propose that proficiently signing deaf children use their knowledge of SLN to convey evaluation in their written narratives, and thus have an advantage in enriching their narratives. This study also shows that in order to gain insight into deaf people's writing, it is important to take variations in sign language proficiency into account.

  4. Written Communication Skills for Scientists and Engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, M.

    2016-12-01

    Lord Chancellor, Francis Bacon of England said: Reading maketh a full man; conference a ready man; and writing an exact man. Even after his death, Francis Bacon remained extremely influential through his works, especially as philosophical advocate and practitioner of the scientific method during the scientific revolution. Written communication skills are extremely important for scientists and engineers because it helps them to achieve their goals effectively and meet stipulated deadlines according to a pre-established schedule. Richard Arum and Josipa Roksa claim that American students are learning very little during their first two years of college (Arum and Roksa, 2011). Written communication involves expressing yourself clearly, using language with precision; constructing a logical argument; taking notes; editing and summarizing; and writing reports. There are three main elements to written communication. First and foremost is the structure because this in principle outlines clearly the way the entire content is laid out. Second, the style which primarily indicates the way it is written and how communication is made effective and vibrant. Third, the content which should document in complete detail, what you are writing about. Some researchers indicate that colleges and universities are failing to prepare the students to meet the demanding challenges of the present day workforce and are struggling to maintain an international status (Johnson, K. 2013). In this presentation, the author provides some guidelines to help students improve their written communication skills. References: Johnson, Kristine (2013) "Why Students Don't Write: Educating in the Era of Credentialing: Academically Adrift: Limited Learning on College Campuses," Conversations on Jesuit Higher Education: Vol. 43, Article 9. Available at: http://epublications.marquette.edu/conversations/vol43/iss1/9 Arum, Richard and Roksa, Josipa (2011) Academically Adrift: Limited Learning on College Campuses

  5. Feedback Valence Affects Auditory Perceptual Learning Independently of Feedback Probability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amitay, Sygal; Moore, David R.; Molloy, Katharine; Halliday, Lorna F.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that negative feedback is more effective in driving learning than positive feedback. We investigated the effect on learning of providing varying amounts of negative and positive feedback while listeners attempted to discriminate between three identical tones; an impossible task that nevertheless produces robust learning. Four feedback conditions were compared during training: 90% positive feedback or 10% negative feedback informed the participants that they were doing equally well, while 10% positive or 90% negative feedback informed them they were doing equally badly. In all conditions the feedback was random in relation to the listeners’ responses (because the task was to discriminate three identical tones), yet both the valence (negative vs. positive) and the probability of feedback (10% vs. 90%) affected learning. Feedback that informed listeners they were doing badly resulted in better post-training performance than feedback that informed them they were doing well, independent of valence. In addition, positive feedback during training resulted in better post-training performance than negative feedback, but only positive feedback indicating listeners were doing badly on the task resulted in learning. As we have previously speculated, feedback that better reflected the difficulty of the task was more effective in driving learning than feedback that suggested performance was better than it should have been given perceived task difficulty. But contrary to expectations, positive feedback was more effective than negative feedback in driving learning. Feedback thus had two separable effects on learning: feedback valence affected motivation on a subjectively difficult task, and learning occurred only when feedback probability reflected the subjective difficulty. To optimize learning, training programs need to take into consideration both feedback valence and probability. PMID:25946173

  6. Feedback in analog circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Ochoa, Agustin

    2016-01-01

    This book describes a consistent and direct methodology to the analysis and design of analog circuits with particular application to circuits containing feedback. The analysis and design of circuits containing feedback is generally presented by either following a series of examples where each circuit is simplified through the use of insight or experience (someone else’s), or a complete nodal-matrix analysis generating lots of algebra. Neither of these approaches leads to gaining insight into the design process easily. The author develops a systematic approach to circuit analysis, the Driving Point Impedance and Signal Flow Graphs (DPI/SFG) method that does not require a-priori insight to the circuit being considered and results in factored analysis supporting the design function. This approach enables designers to account fully for loading and the bi-directional nature of elements both in the feedback path and in the amplifier itself, properties many times assumed negligible and ignored. Feedback circuits a...

  7. NAIP 2015 Imagery Feedback

    Data.gov (United States)

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — The NAIP 2015 Imagery Feedback web application allows users to make comments and observations about the quality of the 2015 National Agriculture Imagery Program...

  8. On written expression of primary school pupils

    OpenAIRE

    Stevanović Jelena; Maksić Slavica; Tenjović Lazar

    2009-01-01

    Normative rules of standard Serbian language are acquired during primary and secondary education through curriculum demands of Serbian language instruction, which takes place in three fields: grammar, orthography and culture of expression. Topic of interest in this paper is the quality of written expression of 6th and 7th grade pupils, in the context of all three fields specified to be mastered by the curriculum of Serbian language. Research comprised 148 primary school pupils from Belgrade. ...

  9. The Effect of Direct and Indirect Corrective Feedback on Students’ Spelling Errors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasan Baleghizadeh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The study presented here is an attempt to examine the role of indirect feedback in promoting junior high school students' spelling accuracy in English. It compares the effect of direct feedback with indirect feedback on students' written work dictated by their teacher from their textbooks. Two classes were selected from the Zanjanrood District in Iran. Forty-four male students in two groups, one from School A (the direct feedback group and the other from School B (the indirect feedback group were treated differently regarding their spelling errors for six weeks. The results obtained revealed that indirect feedback is a more effective tool than direct feedback in rectifying students' spelling errors.

  10. Developing essential professional skills: a framework for teaching and learning about feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Penny; Ferguson-Smith, Anne C; Johnson, Martin H

    2005-01-01

    Background The ability to give and receive feedback effectively is a key skill for doctors, aids learning between all levels of the medical hierarchy, and provides a basis for reflective practice and life-long learning. How best to teach this skill? Discussion We suggest that a single "teaching the skill of feedback" session provides superficial and ineffective learning in a medical culture that often uses feedback skills poorly or discourages feedback. Our experience suggests that both the skill and the underlying attitude informing its application must be addressed, and is best done so longitudinally and reiteratively using different forms of feedback delivery. These feedback learning opportunities include written and oral, peer to peer and cross-hierarchy, public and private, thereby addressing different cognitive processes and attitudinal difficulties. Summary We conclude by asking whether it is possible to build a consensus approach to a framework for teaching and learning feedback skills? PMID:15804360

  11. Developing essential professional skills: a framework for teaching and learning about feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferguson-Smith Anne C

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability to give and receive feedback effectively is a key skill for doctors, aids learning between all levels of the medical hierarchy, and provides a basis for reflective practice and life-long learning. How best to teach this skill? Discussion We suggest that a single "teaching the skill of feedback" session provides superficial and ineffective learning in a medical culture that often uses feedback skills poorly or discourages feedback. Our experience suggests that both the skill and the underlying attitude informing its application must be addressed, and is best done so longitudinally and reiteratively using different forms of feedback delivery. These feedback learning opportunities include written and oral, peer to peer and cross-hierarchy, public and private, thereby addressing different cognitive processes and attitudinal difficulties. Summary We conclude by asking whether it is possible to build a consensus approach to a framework for teaching and learning feedback skills?

  12. Written narrative practices in elementary school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano-Soares, Soraia; Soares, Aparecido José Couto; Cárnio, Maria Silvia

    2010-01-01

    Promotion of a written narratives production program in the third grade of an Elementary School. To analyze two written narrative practice proposals in order to verify which resources are more efficient in benefitting the textual productions of third grade Elementary School students. Sixty students were selected from two third grade groups of a public Elementary School in São Paulo (Brazil). For the analysis, students were divided into two groups (Group A and Group B). Fourteen children's storybooks were used. In Group A, the story was orally told by the researchers in a colloquial manner, keeping the narrator role and the original structure proposed by the author. In Group B, the story was fully read. The book was projected onto a screen and read aloud so the students could follow the reading and observe the corresponding illustrations. Voice changing resources in the characters' dialogues were used. In the overall comparison, statistically significant results were found for moment (initial and final assessments) and for interaction between groups. It was observed that both groups presented substantial development from initial to final assessment. The Written Narratives Promotion Program based on the shared reading of children's storybooks constituted a more effective strategy than telling the stories using a single reader.

  13. Physician Perceptions of Performance Feedback in a Quality Improvement Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eden, Aimee R; Hansen, Elizabeth; Hagen, Michael D; Peterson, Lars E

    2017-10-01

    Physician performance and peer comparison feedback can affect physician care quality and patient outcomes. This study aimed to understand family physician perspectives of the value of performance feedback in quality improvement (QI) activities. This study analyzed American Board of Family Medicine open-ended survey data collected between 2004 and 2014 from physicians who completed a QI module that provided pre- and post-QI project individual performance data and peer comparisons. Physicians made 3480 comments in response to a question about this performance feedback, which were generally positive in nature (86%). Main themes that emerged were importance of accurate feedback data, enhanced detail in the content of feedback, and ability to customize peer comparison groups to compare performance to peers with similar patient populations or practice characteristics. Meaningful and tailored performance feedback may be an important tool for physicians to improve their care quality and should be considered an integral part of QI project design.

  14. Innovative curriculum for second-year Harvard-MIT medical students: practicing communication skills with volunteer patients giving immediate feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali NB

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Nadaa B Ali,1 Stephen R Pelletier,2 Helen M Shields1 1Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, 2Center for Evaluation, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA Purpose: Medical students are expected to develop excellent communication skills. The purpose of our study was to create an innovative communication skills exercise using real volunteer patients and physician co-teachers for students to practice communication skills while receiving immediate feedback.Method: This is a mixed methods study where second-year medical students participated in the communication skills exercise with real patients and physician co-teachers giving immediate feedback. Clinical scenarios reflected the patients’ actual experiences. Students acted out roles as physicians. Physicians co-taught with the patients and gave immediate feedback to students. Students completed an anonymous written survey at the end of the exercise. Qualitative and quantitative responses were recorded. Student feedback from the 2014 surveys was used to modify the teaching designs to increase active role play opportunities by having only two students in each group and doubling the number of stations with real patients.Results: Students rated the overall exercise and the utility of patient volunteers in learning how to communicate on a Likert scale of 1–5, where in this medical school traditionally 1 is excellent and 5 is poor. In 2014, the exercises were rated with a mean score of 1.47 (SD 0.621. In 2015, the exercises were rated with a mean score of 1.03 (SD 0.62. In 2016, the exercises were rated with a mean score of 1.27 (SD 0.52. ANOVA analysis (p=0.002 and Bonferroni corrections indicate a statistically significant difference between combined mean scores of the exercise in 2014 and 2015 (p=0.001. No difference was shown between 2014 and 2016 or 2015 and 2016.Conclusions: Medical students rated practicing communication skills with real patient volunteers and physician co

  15. Physician performance feedback in a Canadian academic center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvin, Dennis; Worthington, James; McGuire, Shaun; Burgetz, Stephanie; Forster, Alan J; Patey, Andrea; Gerin-Lajoie, Caroline; Turnbull, Jeffrey; Roth, Virginia

    2017-10-02

    Purpose This paper aims at the implementation and early evaluation of a comprehensive, formative annual physician performance feedback process in a large academic health-care organization. Design/methodology/approach A mixed methods approach was used to introduce a formative feedback process to provide physicians with comprehensive feedback on performance and to support professional development. This initiative responded to organization-wide engagement surveys through which physicians identified effective performance feedback as a priority. In 2013, physicians primarily affiliated with the organization participated in a performance feedback process, and physician satisfaction and participant perceptions were explored through participant survey responses and physician leader focus groups. Training was required for physician leaders prior to conducting performance feedback discussions. Findings This process was completed by 98 per cent of eligible physicians, and 30 per cent completed an evaluation survey. While physicians endorsed the concept of a formative feedback process, process improvement opportunities were identified. Qualitative analysis revealed the following process improvement themes: simplify the tool, ensure leaders follow process, eliminate redundancies in data collection (through academic or licensing requirements) and provide objective quality metrics. Following physician leader training on performance feedback, 98 per cent of leaders who completed an evaluation questionnaire agreed or strongly agreed that the performance feedback process was useful and that training objectives were met. Originality/value This paper introduces a physician performance feedback model, leadership training approach and first-year implementation outcomes. The results of this study will be useful to health administrators and physician leaders interested in implementing physician performance feedback or improving physician engagement.

  16. Encouraging residents to seek feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delva, Dianne; Sargeant, Joan; Miller, Stephen; Holland, Joanna; Alexiadis Brown, Peggy; Leblanc, Constance; Lightfoot, Kathryn; Mann, Karen

    2013-12-01

    To explore resident and faculty perceptions of the feedback process, especially residents' feedback-seeking activities. We conducted focus groups of faculty and residents exploring experiences in giving and receiving feedback, feedback-seeking, and suggestions to support feedback-seeking. Using qualitative methods and an iterative process, all authors analyzed the transcribed audiotapes to identify and confirm themes. Emerging themes fit a framework situating resident feedback-seeking as dependent on four central factors: (1) learning/workplace culture, (2) relationships, (3) purpose/quality of feedback, (4) emotional responses to feedback. Residents and faculty agreed on many supports and barriers to feedback-seeking. Strengthening the workplace/learning culture through longitudinal experiences, use of feedback forms and explicit expectations for residents to seek feedback, coupled with providing a sense of safety and adequate time for observation and providing feedback were suggested. Tensions between faculty and resident perceptions regarding feedback-seeking related to fear of being found deficient, the emotional costs related to corrective feedback and perceptions that completing clinical work is more valued than learning. Resident feedback-seeking is influenced by multiple factors requiring attention to both faculty and learner roles. Further study of specific influences and strategies to mitigate the tensions will inform how best to support residents in seeking feedback.

  17. The Multifaceted Use of a Written Artifact in Student Supervision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunilla Jansson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the use of a written artifact, an assessment form encompassing a checklist with health care terms, in supervised nurse student-patient interactions during assessment interviews in a Swedish hospital ward. The students were doing their clinical practice and were in their first year of a three-year nursing degree. Even though the students are not in charge of the situation, they are expected to perform a professional task for which they lack adequate skills. As demonstrated, the use of the assessment form provided a useful way for the participants to manage specific tasks in an apprenticeship context, such as regulating affect display, demonstrating uptake of the patient's concerns and staging the interview as an exercise. For this article, three excerpts have been selected from history-taking sequences, when the patient's previous illness history is created. The analysis illustrates the affordances provided by the assessment form to handle perspective shifts, when the patient departs from a general pattern of unelaborated answers and offers a window into his/her concerns. Importantly, however, the students' feedback talk with the nurse preceptor offers evidence that the artifact also constrains their forms of action in the practice of gathering assessment data. The article argues for ward-level practices that socialize students into reflective ways of using the artifact.

  18. ASD Customer Satisfaction Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — ASD implemented a customer satisfaction survey for our products and services. This feedback will provide a better understanding of how ASD products and services can...

  19. Understanding Classroom Feedback Practices: A Study of New Zealand Student Experiences, Perceptions, and Emotional Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Lois R.; Brown, Gavin T.; Harnett, Jennifer A.

    2014-01-01

    While feedback is a key factor for improving student learning, little is known about how students understand and experience feedback within the classroom. This study analysed 193 New Zealand primary and secondary students' survey responses alongside drawings of their understandings and experiences of feedback to examine how they experience,…

  20. Global climate feedbacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manowitz, B.

    1990-10-01

    The important physical, chemical, and biological events that affect global climate change occur on a mesoscale -- requiring high spatial resolution for their analysis. The Department of Energy has formulated two major initiatives under the US Global Change Program: ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurements), and CHAMMP (Computer Hardware Advanced Mathematics and Model Physics). ARM is designed to use ground and air-craft based observations to document profiles of atmospheric composition, clouds, and radiative fluxes. With research and models of important physical processes, ARM will delineate the relationships between trace gases, aerosol and cloud structure, and radiative transfer in the atmosphere, and will improve the parameterization of global circulation models. The present GCMs do not model important feedbacks, including those from clouds, oceans, and land processes. The purpose of this workshop is to identify such potential feedbacks, to evaluate the uncertainties in the feedback processes (and, if possible, to parameterize the feedback processes so that they can be treated in a GCM), and to recommend research programs that will reduce the uncertainties in important feedback processes. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases.

  1. The impact of problem-solving feedback on team-based learning case responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Melissa S; Conway, Susan E; Davis-Maxwell, Tamra S; Webb, Ryan

    2013-11-12

    To determine the amount and type of feedback needed to improve pharmacy students' problem-solving skills using team-based learning (TBL) and a problem-solving rubric. A problem-solving rubric was developed to assess the ability of pharmacy students' to prioritize, organize, and defend the best and alternative options on TBL cases The study involved 3 groups of pharmacy students: second-year students in a cardiology class who received no feedback (control group), third-year students in an endocrinology class who received written feedback only, and third-year students in an endocrinology class who received written and verbal feedback. Students worked in groups on all TBL cases except the first and last one (beginning and end of course), which students completed independently as it served as a pretest and posttest. Significant improvements were seen in the ability of the third-year students who received verbal and written feedback to prioritize the information presented in the case and in their total score on the problem-solving rubric. Providing pharmacy students with written and verbal explanations may help them improve their problem-solving skills overall. During verbal feedback, faculty members can provide more examples of how to improve and can field questions if needed.

  2. Supervisors' On-Script Feedback Comments on Drafts of Dissertations: Socialising Students into the Academic Discourse Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basturkmen, Helen; East, Martin; Bitchener, John

    2014-01-01

    Supervising masters and doctoral dissertations is a key function of teaching in higher education and giving written feedback on draft sections is an essential component of this function. However, the specific types of response that supervisors give to their dissertation students' written work have received limited research interest to date. The…

  3. An autoethnographic exploration of the use of goal oriented feedback to enhance brief clinical teaching encounters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Laura; Bourgeois-Law, Gisele; Ajjawi, Rola; Regehr, Glenn

    2017-03-01

    Supervision in the outpatient context is increasingly in the form of single day interactions between students and preceptors. This creates difficulties for effective feedback, which often depends on a strong relationship of trust between preceptor and student. Building on feedback theories focusing on the relational and dialogic aspects of feedback, this study explored the use of goal-oriented feedback in brief encounters with learners. This study used autoethnography to explore one preceptor's feedback interactions over an eight-month period both in the ambulatory setting and on the wards. Data included written narrative reflections on feedback interactions with twenty-three learners informed by discussions with colleagues and repeated reading of feedback literature. Thematic and narrative analyses of data were performed iteratively. Data analysis emphasized four recurrent themes. (1) Goal discussions were most effective when initiated early and integrated throughout the learning experience. (2) Both learner and preceptor goals were multiple and varied, and feedback needed to reflect this complexity. (3) Negotiation or co-construction of goals was important when considering the focus of feedback discussions in order to create safer, more effective interactions. (4) Goal oriented interactions offer potential benefits to the learner and preceptor. Goal oriented feedback promotes dialogue as it requires both preceptor and learner to acknowledge and negotiate learning goals throughout their interaction. In doing so, feedback becomes an explicit component of the preceptor-learner relationship. This enhances feedback interactions even in relatively brief encounters, and may begin an early educational alliance that can be elaborated with longer interactions.

  4. Written and Computer-Mediated Accounting Communication Skills: An Employer Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christopher G.

    2011-01-01

    Communication skills are a fundamental personal competency for a successful career in accounting. What is not so obvious is the specific written communication skill set employers look for and the extent those skills are computer mediated. Using survey research, this article explores the particular skills employers desire and their satisfaction…

  5. Audio and Written Comments in an Online Undergraduate Composition Class: Student and Instructor Approaches and Preferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanaugh, Andrew; Song, Liyan

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated students' and instructors' approaches and preferences to audio and written comments in an online undergraduate composition class. A mixed-method design was employed utilizing both a survey instrument and interviews for data collection. Forty-nine students and five instructors participated. Students gave more positive…

  6. A Study of Students’ and Teachers’ Preferences and Attitudes towards Correction of Classroom Written Errors in Iranian EFL Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Hajian

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Written error correction may be the most widely used method for responding to student writing. Although there are various studies investigating error correction, there are little researches considering teachers’ and students’ preferences towards written error correction. The present study investigates students’ and teachers’ preferences and attitudes towards correction of classroom written errors in Iranian EFL context by using questionnaire. In this study, 80 students and 12 teachers were asked to answer the questionnaire. Then data were collected and analyzed by descriptive method. The findings from teachers and students show positive attitudes towards written error correction. Although the results of this study demonstrate teachers and students have some common preferences related to written error correction, there are some important discrepancies. For example; students prefer all error be corrected, but teachers prefer selecting some. However, students prefer teachers’ correction rather than peer or self-correction. This study considers a number of difficulties regarding students and teachers in written error correction processes with some suggestions. This study shows many teachers might believe written error correction takes a lot of time and effort to give comments. This study indicates many students does not have any problems in rewriting their paper after getting feedback. It might be one main positive point to improve their writing and it might give them self-confidence.

  7. Varied reasoning schema in students' written solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Weliweriya, Nandana; Sayre, Eleanor C; Zollman, Dean

    2016-01-01

    The Mathematization project investigates students' use of mathematical tools across the undergraduate physics curriculum. As a part of this project, we look at intermediate mechanics students' written homework solutions to understand how they use those tools in approaching traditional mechanics problems. We use a modified version of the ACER framework to analyze students' solutions and to identify patterns of mathematical skills used on traditional problems. We apply techniques borrowed from network analysis and the Resources Framework to build a "fingerprint" of students' mathematical tool use. In this paper, we present preliminary findings on patterns that we identified in students' problem solving.

  8. Modeling statistical properties of written text.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Angeles Serrano

    Full Text Available Written text is one of the fundamental manifestations of human language, and the study of its universal regularities can give clues about how our brains process information and how we, as a society, organize and share it. Among these regularities, only Zipf's law has been explored in depth. Other basic properties, such as the existence of bursts of rare words in specific documents, have only been studied independently of each other and mainly by descriptive models. As a consequence, there is a lack of understanding of linguistic processes as complex emergent phenomena. Beyond Zipf's law for word frequencies, here we focus on burstiness, Heaps' law describing the sublinear growth of vocabulary size with the length of a document, and the topicality of document collections, which encode correlations within and across documents absent in random null models. We introduce and validate a generative model that explains the simultaneous emergence of all these patterns from simple rules. As a result, we find a connection between the bursty nature of rare words and the topical organization of texts and identify dynamic word ranking and memory across documents as key mechanisms explaining the non trivial organization of written text. Our research can have broad implications and practical applications in computer science, cognitive science and linguistics.

  9. Transitions of Care: The Presence of Written Interfacility Transfer Guidelines and Agreements for Pediatric Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genovesi, Andrea Lynn; Olson, Lenora M; Telford, Russell; Fendya, Diana; Schenk, Ellen; Morrison-Quinata, Theresa; Edgerton, Elizabeth A

    2017-07-11

    Every year, emergency medical services agencies transport approximately 150,000 pediatric patients between hospitals. During these transitions of care, patient safety may be affected and contribute to adverse events when important clinical information is missing, incomplete, or inaccurate. Written interfacility transfer policies are one way to standardize procedures and facilitate communication between the hospitals leading to improved patient safety and satisfaction for children and families. We assessed the presence and components of written interfacility transfer guidelines and agreements for pediatric patients via a survey sent to US hospital emergency department (ED) nurse managers during 2010 and 2013. Although there was an increase in the presence of written interfacility transfer guidelines and agreements, a third of hospitals did not have either by 2013, and only 50% had guidelines with all recommended pediatric components. Hospitals with medium and low ED pediatric patient volumes were less likely to have written guidelines or agreements compared with hospitals with high volume. Hospitals with advanced pediatric resources, such as a pediatric emergency care coordinator or EDs designated approved for pediatrics, were more likely to have guidelines or agreements than less resourced hospitals. Although there was improvement over time, opportunities exist for increasing the presence of written interfacility transfer guidelines as well as agreements for pediatric patients. Further studies are needed to demonstrate whether improved delivery of patient care is associated with the presence of written interfacility transfer guidelines and agreements and to identify other elements in the process to ensure optimal pediatric patient care.

  10. Plant–soil feedbacks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cortois, Roeland; Schröder-Georgi, Thomas; Weigelt, Alexandra; Putten, van der Wim H.; Deyn, De Gerlinde B.

    2016-01-01

    Plant–soil feedback (PSF), plant trait and functional group concepts advanced our understanding of plant community dynamics, but how they are interlinked is poorly known. To test how plant functional groups (FGs: graminoids, small herbs, tall herbs, legumes) and plant traits relate to PSF, we

  11. Giving Students Feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowman, Joseph

    1987-01-01

    Some of the special challenges associated with evaluation and grading in the large class are discussed. Suggestions for evaluation methods include seeking clarity, reducing the stress of test administration, giving feedback, guarding against errors in record keeping, and returning exams efficiently and with respect. (MLW)

  12. Feedback i undervisningen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Preben Olund

    2015-01-01

    undervisningsdifferentiering, feedback på læreprocesser, formativ og summativ evaluering, observationer og analyse af undervisning samt lærernes teamsamarbejde herom. Praktikken udgør et særligt læringsrum i læreruddannelsen. Samspillet mellem studerende, praktiklærere og undervisere giver den studerende en unik mulighed...

  13. The Endogenous Feedback Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Augustenborg, Claudia Carrara

    2010-01-01

    proposals, it will first be considered the extents of their reciprocal compatibility, tentatively shaping an integrated, theoretical profile of consciousness. A new theory, the Endogenous Feedback Network (EFN) will consequently be introduced which, beside being able to accommodate the main tenets...

  14. Portfolio, refleksion og feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jens Jørgen; Qvortrup, Ane; Christensen, Inger-Marie F.

    2017-01-01

    Denne leder definerer indledningsvist begrebet portfolio og gør rede for anvendelsesmuligheder i en uddannelseskontekst. Dernæst behandles portfoliometodens kvalitet og effekt for læring og undervisning og de centrale begreber refleksion, progression og feedback præsenteres og diskuteres. Herefter...

  15. Feedback-giving behaviour in performance evaluations during clinical clerkships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bok, Harold G J; Jaarsma, Debbie A D C; Spruijt, Annemarie; Van Beukelen, Peter; Van Der Vleuten, Cees P M; Teunissen, Pim W

    2016-01-01

    Narrative feedback documented in performance evaluations by the teacher, i.e. the clinical supervisor, is generally accepted to be essential for workplace learning. Many studies have examined factors of influence on the usage of mini-clinical evaluation exercise (mini-CEX) instruments and provision of feedback, but little is known about how these factors influence teachers' feedback-giving behaviour. In this study, we investigated teachers' use of mini-CEX in performance evaluations to provide narrative feedback in undergraduate clinical training. We designed an exploratory qualitative study using an interpretive approach. Focusing on the usage of mini-CEX instruments in clinical training, we conducted semi-structured interviews to explore teachers' perceptions. Between February and June 2013, we conducted interviews with 14 clinicians participated as teachers during undergraduate clinical clerkships. Informed by concepts from the literature, we coded interview transcripts and iteratively reduced and displayed data using template analysis. We identified three main themes of interrelated factors that influenced teachers' practice with regard to mini-CEX instruments: teacher-related factors; teacher-student interaction-related factors, and teacher-context interaction-related factors. Four issues (direct observation, relationship between teacher and student, verbal versus written feedback, formative versus summative purposes) that are pertinent to workplace-based performance evaluations were presented to clarify how different factors interact with each other and influence teachers' feedback-giving behaviour. Embedding performance observation in clinical practice and establishing trustworthy teacher-student relationships in more longitudinal clinical clerkships were considered important in creating a learning environment that supports and facilitates the feedback exchange. Teachers' feedback-giving behaviour within the clinical context results from the interaction

  16. Online feedback op schriftelijk werk: betere feedback in minder tijd.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, B.A.M.; van der Hulst, M.E.

    2015-01-01

    Feedback is a powerful teaching technic to raise students’ performance, provided that the feedback is informative on how to improve, is given in a timely manner and students have the opportunity to act upon it. Therefore, many institutions want their students to receive feedback on their performance

  17. Norbert Elias. A sociology of written culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa Borges Leão

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with Norbert Elias’ historical sociology. In the first place, it asserts the civilizing process theory is pretty much based on objects from the written culture produced by European Courts in the 17th and 18th centuries: the articles of the Encyclopédie, the memoirs of writers and manuals of civility. In this approach I consider that separating the construction of sociological models from the corpus of specific documents from the Ancien Regime results in a dichotomic appropriation of the knowledge process, which is far away from Elias’ perspective. Finally, this paper analyzes Norbert Elias’ contributions to contemporary historiographic thinking, as well as the concepts of mentality, private life and the notion of childhood in Philippe Ariès.

  18. Using Peer Feedback to Improve Students' Scientific Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasker, Tammy Q.; Herrenkohl, Leslie Rupert

    2016-02-01

    This article examines a 7th grade teacher's pedagogical practices to support her students to provide peer feedback to one another using technology during scientific inquiry. This research is part of a larger study in which teachers in California and Washington and their classes engaged in inquiry projects using a Web-based system called Web of Inquiry. Videotapes of classroom lessons and artifacts such as student work were collected as part of the corpus of data. In the case examined, Ms. E supports her students to collectively define "meaningful feedback," thereby improving the quality of feedback that was provided in the future. This is especially timely, given the attention in Next Generation Science Standards to cross-cutting concepts and practices that require students discuss and debate ideas with each other in order to improve their understanding and their written inquiry reports (NGSS, 2013).

  19. 43 CFR 4.1139 - Written interrogatories to parties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Written interrogatories to parties. 4.1139... Written interrogatories to parties. (a) Any party may serve upon any other party written interrogatories to be answered in writing by the party served, or if the party served is a public or private...

  20. 28 CFR 55.12 - Language used for written material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... written form. Some languages, for example, Japanese, have more than one written form. A jurisdiction... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Language used for written material. 55.12... OF THE VOTING RIGHTS ACT REGARDING LANGUAGE MINORITY GROUPS Determining the Exact Language § 55.12...

  1. Using Morphological Awareness Instruction to Improve Written Language Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apel, Kenn; Werfel, Krystal

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Written English is a morphophonemic language. Researchers have documented that a conscious awareness of the morphological structure of English morphology is predictive of students' written language skills and that morphological awareness instruction leads to improvements in morphological awareness and in other written language…

  2. Written Expression: Assessment and Remediation for Learning Disabled Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Ann M.

    1982-01-01

    The educational evaluation and remediation of written language disorders in learning disabled students are considered. It is suggested that a written language assessment should involve a thorough educational history and a complete psychoeducational evaluation. Attention is directed to written language assessment and remediation for handwriting,…

  3. Politeness strategies in the job application letter: Implications of Intercultural Rhetoric for designing writing feedback

    OpenAIRE

    Dressen-Hammouda, Dacia

    2013-01-01

    International audience; This paper makes the case that writing feedback on grammar error alone is ineffective. Designing more effective writing feedback requires drawing on a broader understanding of the writer's cultural context and present situation. The current study explores this context by using an Intercultural Rhetoric approach to examine job application letters written in English by a group of French-speaking undergraduates. A mixed research design was used to investigate the effectiv...

  4. Feedback: Focusing Attention on Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Margaret; Handley, Karen; Millar, Jill

    2011-01-01

    Within many higher education systems there is a search for means to increase levels of student satisfaction with assessment feedback. This article suggests that the search is under way in the wrong place by concentrating on feedback as a product rather than looking more widely to feedback as a long-term dialogic process in which all parties are…

  5. Det ved vi om Feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Vibeke; Bærenholdt, Jørgen

    Præsentation af forskningsviden om feedback i forskellige personkonstellationer i undervisningen: Feedback fra lærer til elev, fra elever til lærer, fra elev til elev og elevens eget arbejde med feedback til sig selv. De præsenterede forskningsresultater er udvalgt dels inden for en kognitivistisk...

  6. A Journey towards Sustainable Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutch, Allyson; Young, Charlotte; Davey, Tamzyn; Fitzgerald, Lisa

    2018-01-01

    Meeting students' expectations associated with the provision of feedback is a perennial challenge for tertiary education. Efforts to provide comprehensive, timely feedback within our own first year undergraduate public health courses have not always met students' expectations. In response, we sought to develop peer feedback activities to support…

  7. How to Give Professional Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookhart, Susan M.; Moss, Connie M.

    2015-01-01

    Professional learning "should be a joy," the authors write, "not an affliction." Feedback experts Brookhart and Moss show how professional feedback can best motivate educators to learn. Professional conversations should be dialogs between the teacher and the principal, and feedback should feed teacher professional learning…

  8. Polarization feedback laser stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esherick, P.; Owyoung, A.

    1987-09-28

    A system for locking two Nd:YAG laser oscillators includes an optical path for feeding the output of one laser into the other with different polarizations. Elliptical polarization is incorporated into the optical path so that the change in polarization that occurs when the frequencies coincide may be detected to provide a feedback signal to control one laser relative to the other. 4 figs.

  9. Regenerative feedback resonant circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A. Mark; Kelly, James F.; McCloy, John S.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2014-09-02

    A regenerative feedback resonant circuit for measuring a transient response in a loop is disclosed. The circuit includes an amplifier for generating a signal in the loop. The circuit further includes a resonator having a resonant cavity and a material located within the cavity. The signal sent into the resonator produces a resonant frequency. A variation of the resonant frequency due to perturbations in electromagnetic properties of the material is measured.

  10. Positive feedback promotes oscillations in negative feedback loops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananthasubramaniam, Bharath; Herzel, Hanspeter

    2014-01-01

    A simple three-component negative feedback loop is a recurring motif in biochemical oscillators. This motif oscillates as it has the three necessary ingredients for oscillations: a three-step delay, negative feedback, and nonlinearity in the loop. However, to oscillate, this motif under the common Goodwin formulation requires a high degree of cooperativity (a measure of nonlinearity) in the feedback that is biologically "unlikely." Moreover, this recurring negative feedback motif is commonly observed augmented by positive feedback interactions. Here we show that these positive feedback interactions promote oscillation at lower degrees of cooperativity, and we can thus unify several common kinetic mechanisms that facilitate oscillations, such as self-activation and Michaelis-Menten degradation. The positive feedback loops are most beneficial when acting on the shortest lived component, where they function by balancing the lifetimes of the different components. The benefits of multiple positive feedback interactions are cumulative for a majority of situations considered, when benefits are measured by the reduction in the cooperativity required to oscillate. These positive feedback motifs also allow oscillations with longer periods than that determined by the lifetimes of the components alone. We can therefore conjecture that these positive feedback loops have evolved to facilitate oscillations at lower, kinetically achievable, degrees of cooperativity. Finally, we discuss the implications of our conclusions on the mammalian molecular clock, a system modeled extensively based on the three-component negative feedback loop.

  11. The Effect of Direct and Indirect Corrective Feedback on Students' Spelling Errors (El efecto de la retroalimentación directa e indirecta sobre los errores de ortografía de los estudiantes)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baleghizadeh, Sasan; Dadashi, Mehdi

    2011-01-01

    The study presented here is an attempt to examine the role of indirect feedback in promoting junior high school students' spelling accuracy in English. It compares the effect of direct feedback with indirect feedback on students' written work dictated by their teacher from their textbooks. Two classes were selected from the Zanjanrood District in…

  12. Public preferences on written informed consent for low-risk pragmatic clinical trials in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal-Ré, Rafael; Carcas, Antonio J; Carné, Xavier; Wendler, David

    2017-09-01

    Pragmatic randomized clinical trials (pRCTs) collect data that have the potential to improve medical care significantly. However, these trials may be undermined by the requirement to obtain written informed consent, which can decrease accrual and increase selection bias. Recent data suggest that the majority of the US public endorses written consent for low-risk pRCTs. The present study was designed to assess whether this view is specific to the US. The study took the form of a cross-sectional, probability-based survey, with a 2 × 2 factorial design, assessing support for written informed consent vs. verbal consent or general notification for two low-risk pRCTs in hypertension, one comparing two drugs with similar risk/benefit profiles and the other comparing the same drug being taken in the morning or at night. The primary outcome measures were respondents' personal preference and hypothetical recommendation to a research ethics committee regarding the use of written informed consent vs. the alternatives. A total of 2008 adults sampled from a probability-based online panel responded to the web-based survey conducted in May 2016 (response rate: 61%). Overall, 77% of respondents endorsed written consent. In both scenarios, the alternative of general notification received significantly more support (28.7-37.1%) than the alternative of verbal consent (12.7-14.0%) (P = 0.001). Forty per cent of respondents preferred and/or recommended general notification rather than written consent. The results suggested that, rather than attempting to waive written consent, current pRCTs should focus on developing ways to implement written consent that provide sufficient information without undermining recruitment or increasing selection bias. The finding that around 40% of respondents endorsed general notification over written consent raises the possibility that, with educational efforts, the majority of Spaniards might accept general notification for low-risk pRCTs. © 2017 The

  13. Recommendations for reducing ambiguity in written procedures.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matzen, Laura E.

    2009-11-01

    Previous studies in the nuclear weapons complex have shown that ambiguous work instructions (WIs) and operating procedures (OPs) can lead to human error, which is a major cause for concern. This report outlines some of the sources of ambiguity in written English and describes three recommendations for reducing ambiguity in WIs and OPs. The recommendations are based on commonly used research techniques in the fields of linguistics and cognitive psychology. The first recommendation is to gather empirical data that can be used to improve the recommended word lists that are provided to technical writers. The second recommendation is to have a review in which new WIs and OPs and checked for ambiguities and clarity. The third recommendation is to use self-paced reading time studies to identify any remaining ambiguities before the new WIs and OPs are put into use. If these three steps are followed for new WIs and OPs, the likelihood of human errors related to ambiguity could be greatly reduced.

  14. Feedback på arbejdspladser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holdt Christensen, Peter

    Feedback på arbejdspladser er vigtig. Men feedback er også et populært begreb mange taler med om uden dog at vide sig helt sikker på hvad det er. Formålet med denne bog er at bidrage til en bedre forståelse af hvad feedback er, hvordan det fungerer og dermed hvordan arbejdspladser bedst muligt bør...... understøtte feedback. Med udgangspunkt i forskningen identificeres centrale udfordringer ved feedback, bl.a. hvorfor det kan være svært at give præcis feedback, hvordan forholdet mellem lederen og den ansatte påvirker den feedback der gives, og hvad der kendetegner en feedback kultur. Bogen er skrevet til...... undervisere og studerende på videregående uddannelser samt praktikere der ønsker en systematisk og forskningsbaseret forståelse af feedback på arbejdspladser. Bogen er således ikke en kogebog til bedre feedback, men en analyse og diskussion af hvad forskningen ved om feedback, og bidrager med inspiration og...

  15. Written debriefing: Evaluating the impact of the addition of a written component when debriefing simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Shelly J

    2015-11-01

    Debriefing, the reflective period following a simulation, is said to be where the bulk of simulation learning takes place. Many expert opinions regarding debriefing exist, but evidence-based best practices have yet to be identified. Written debriefing is one of these practices; experts state learning can be extended through the addition of a written component to the debriefing process, but no evidence exists to support this. This study compares three debriefing types: discussion alone, and discussion followed by journaling or blogging. Undergraduate nursing students participating in a simulation were randomized as a simulation group to one of these three debriefing types. Following completion of debriefing activities, students completed a Debriefing Experience Scale, a tool designed to evaluate the student experience during debriefing. Data obtained from completed scales were analyzed with ANOVA followed by Fisher LSD post hoc testing. The results showed the students preferred their experience with discussion debriefing over discussion debriefing with a written component added. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Active Galactic Nuclei Feedback and Galactic Outflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ai-Lei

    Feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) is thought to regulate the growth of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) and galaxies. The most direct evidence of AGN feedback is probably galactic outflows. This thesis addresses the link between SMBHs and their host galaxies from four different observational perspectives. First, I study the local correlation between black hole mass and the galactic halo potential (the MBH - Vc relation) based on Very Large Array (VLA) HI observations of galaxy rotation curves. Although there is a correlation, it is no tighter than the well-studied MBH - sigma* relation between the black hole mass and the potential of the galactic bulge, indicating that physical processes, such as feedback, could link the evolution of the black hole to the baryons in the bulge. In what follows, I thus search for galactic outflows as direct evidence of AGN feedback. Second, I use the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) to observe a luminous obscured AGN that hosts an ionized galactic outflow and find a compact but massive molecular outflow that can potentially quench the star formation in 10. 6 years.The third study extends the sample of known ionized outflows with new Magellan long-slit observations of 12 luminous obscured AGN. I find that most luminous obscured AGN (Lbol > 1046 ergs s-1) host ionized outflows on 10 kpc scales, and the size of the outflow correlates strongly with the luminosity of the AGN. Lastly, to capitalize on the power of modern photometric surveys, I experiment with a new broadband imaging technique to study the morphology of AGN emission line regions and outflows. With images from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), this method successfully constructs images of the [OIII]lambda5007 emission line and reveals hundreds of extended emission-line systems. When applied to current and future surveys, such as the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), this technique could open a new parameter space for the study of AGN outflows. In

  17. Univé customer survey: Pay-As-You-Drive (PAYD) insurance : Report PAYD-2. Feedback from Pay-As-You-Drive insurance, both outside and inside the car

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lewis Evans, Ben; den Heijer, Anne; Dijksterhuis, Chris; de Waard, Dick; Brookhuis, Karel; Tucha, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    On the 10th of January 2013 over 3500 Univé clients were contacted and asked to fill in an online survey via Qualtrics, a survey website company licenced by the University of Groningen, about the future of car insurance at Univé. These customers could be classified under three main headings; car

  18. Driver feedback mobile APP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soriguera Marti, F.; Miralles Miquel, E.

    2016-07-01

    This paper faces the human factor in driving and its consequences for road safety. It presents the concepts behind the development of a smartphone app capable of evaluating drivers’ performance. The app provides feedback to the driver in terms of a grade (between 0 and 10) depending on the aggressiveness and risks taken while driving. These are computed from the cumulative probability distribution function of the jerks (i.e. the time derivative of acceleration), which are measured using the smartphones’ accelerometer. Different driving contexts (e.g. urban, freeway, congestion, etc.) are identified applying cluster analysis to the measurements, and treated independently. Using regression analysis, the aggressiveness indicator is related to the drivers' safety records and to the probability of having an accident, through the standard DBQ - Driving Behavior Questionnaire. Results from a very limited pilot test show a strong correlation between the 99th percentile of the jerk measurements and the DBQ results. A linear model is fitted. This allows quantifying the safe driving behavior only from smartphone measurements. Finally, this indicator is translated into a normalized grade and feedback to the driver. This feedback will challenge the driver to train and to improve his performance. The phone will be blocked while driving and will incorporate mechanisms to prevent bad practices, like competition in aggressive driving. The app is intended to contribute to the improvement of road safety, one of the major public health problems, by tackling the human factor which is the trigger of the vast majority of traffic accidents. Making explicit and quantifying risky behaviors is the first step towards a safer driving. (Author)

  19. Competency assessment form to improve feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauer, Karen E; Nishimura, Holly; Dubon, Diego; Teherani, Arianne; Boscardin, Christy

    2017-10-18

    In-training evaluation reports are a commonly used assessment method for clinical learners that can characterise the development of competence in essential domains of practice. Strategies to increase the usefulness and specificity of written narrative comments about learner performance in these reports are needed to guide their learning. Soliciting narrative comments by competency domain from supervising doctors on in-training evaluation reports could improve the quality of written feedback to students. This is a pre-post study examining narrative comments derived from assessments of core clerkship students by faculty members and resident supervisors in seven clerkships using two assessment forms in academic years 2013/14 (pre; two comments fields - summative, constructive) and 2014/15 (post; seven comments fields - six competency domains, constructive comments). Using a purposive sample of 60 students based on overall clerkship performance, we conducted content analysis of written comments to compare comment quality based on word count, competencies addressed and reinforcing or constructive content. Differences between the two forms across these three components of quality were compared using Student's t-tests. The revised form elicited more narrative comments in all seven clerkships, with more competencies addressed. The revised form led to a decrease in the proportion of constructive comments about the students' performances. In-training evaluation reports are a commonly used assessment method for clinical learners DISCUSSION: Structural changes to a medical student assessment form to elicit narrative comments by competency improved some measures of the quality of narrative comments provided by faculty members and residents. Additional study is needed to determine how learners use this information to improve their clinical practice. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  20. Cascaded processing in written compound word production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond eBertram

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study we investigated the intricate interplay between central linguistic processing and peripheral motor processes during typewriting. Participants had to typewrite two-constituent (noun-noun Finnish compounds in response to picture presentation while their typing behavior was registered. As dependent measures we used writing onset time to assess what processes were completed before writing and inter-key intervals to assess what processes were going on during writing. It was found that writing onset time was determined by whole word frequency rather than constituent frequencies, indicating that compound words are retrieved as whole orthographic units before writing is initiated. In addition, we found that the length of the first syllable also affects writing onset time, indicating that the first syllable is fully prepared before writing commences. The inter-key interval results showed that linguistic planning is not fully ready before writing, but cascades into the motor execution phase. More specifically, inter-key intervals were largest at syllable and morpheme boundaries, supporting the view that additional linguistic planning takes place at these boundaries. Bigram and trigram frequency also affected inter-key intervals with shorter intervals corresponding to higher frequencies. This can be explained by stronger memory traces for frequently co-occurring letter sequences in the motor memory for typewriting. These frequency effects were even larger in the second than in the first constituent, indicating that low-level motor memory starts to become more important during the course of writing compound words. We discuss our results in the light of current models of morphological processing and written word production.

  1. Students want feedback and educators need dialogue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esbjerg, Lars; Rask, Morten

    2015-01-01

    wanting: a survey found that only a third of students at Business and Social Science (BSS), Aarhus University (AU), think they get sufficient feedback on their work , while educators bemoan the impossibility of activating and engaging students in the substantive, theoretical and methodological discussions...... in class-room settings that are considered central for effective learning. In other words, we have a situation where students want to talk to their teachers and teachers also want to engage in dialogue, but they seem to get nowhere. Based on qualitative and quantitative data from both students......We discuss what we call “the interaction paradox” in Danish management education. On the one hand, the fact that students want more feedback and educators want to foster dialogue with their students should bode well for interaction in educational settings. On the other hand, both groups are left...

  2. Developing, evaluating and validating a scoring rubric for written case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyr, Peggy R; Smith, Kahsi A; Broyles, India L; Holt, Christina T

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate Family Medicine Clerkship students' writing skills using an anchored scoring rubric. In this study, we report on the assessment of a current scoring rubric (SR) used to grade written case description papers (CDP) for medical students, describe the development of a revised SR with examination of scoring consistency among faculty raters, and report on feedback from students regarding SR revisions and written CDP. Five faculty members scored a total of eighty-three written CDP using both the Original SR (OSR) and the Revised SR1 (RSR1) during the 2009-2010 academic years. Overall increased faculty inter-rater reliability was obtained using the RSR1. Additionally, this subset analysis revealed that the five faculty using the Revised SR2 (RSR2) had a high measure of inter-rater reliability on their scoring of this subset of papers (as measured by intra-class correlation (ICC) with ICC = 0.93, p = 0.001. Findings from this research have implications for medical education, by highlighting the importance of the assessment and development of reliable evaluation tools for medical student writing projects.

  3. Haptic Feedback Compared with Visual Feedback for BCI

    OpenAIRE

    Kauhanen, L.; Palomäki, T; Jylänki, P.; Aloise, F; Nuttin, Marnix; Millán, José del R.

    2006-01-01

    Feedback plays an important role when learning to use a Brain-Computer Interface (BCI). Here we compare visual and haptic feedback in a short experiment. By imagining left and right hand movements, six subjects tried to control a BCI with the help of either visual or haptic feedback every 1s. Alpha band EEG signals from C3 and C4 were classified. The classifier was updated after each prediction using correct class information. Thus feedback could be given throughout the experiment. Subjects g...

  4. How to Accelerate Learning in Entrepreneurship Education through Explicit Feedback Strategies?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Færgemann, Helle Meibom

    study of an actual entrepreneurship course with an approach to entrepreneurship as a method (as described by Sarasvathy & Venkataraman 2011), I would like to explore: How to accelerate learning in entrepreneurship education through explicit feedback strategies? Approach: This paper initially explores...... feedback and lower the need for time consuming written feedback from the educator. In order to systematically explore and develop feedback strategies in “through” entrepreneurship courses the model by Hattie & Timperley (2007) was tested out and found useful, but not sufficient. The definition of some...... of the elements needs to be broadened and/or supplemented with new elements. These elements should take into account affective learning, social learning and learning from experience in uncertain situations. Value/originality: Some recommendations with regards to effective and explicit feedback strategies...

  5. Students’ and tutors’ perceptions of feedback on academic essays in an open and distance learning context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack Matlou Chokwe

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Feedback is the most important aspect of the learning and teaching process. Through feedback, tutors/lecturers provide an important intervention in teaching as students would always like to know where they did right or wrong in their written assessed work. Without feedback, learning is not complete. This article reports on the results of a major study on academic writing of first year English Second Language university students in open and distance learning context. The study probed both students’ perceptions and tutors’ practices in the provision of giving feedback. Marked students’ assignments were evaluated using document analysis method and interviews were held with students and tutors. The findings show that feedback provided to students is not always sufficient and therefore denying students’ opportunities to learn effectively as they would not know their weak and strong points.

  6. Improving Written Language Performance of Adolescents with Asperger Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Delano, Monica E

    2007-01-01

    The effects of a multicomponent intervention involving self-regulated strategy development delivered via video self-modeling on the written language performance of 3 students with Asperger syndrome were examined. During intervention sessions, each student watched a video of himself performing strategies for increasing the number of words written and the number of functional essay elements. He then wrote a persuasive essay. The number of words written and number of functional essay elements in...

  7. [Guide for the publication of written materials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Campos, M G

    1987-01-01

    Tips for writing and editing population education or other materials and descriptions of the process of printing a text and of available types of print media are provided. Written materials should be brief and concise, and should avoid bombarding the reader with too many figures or references. Ideas of others must always be acknowledged. Adjectives and metaphors should be used in moderation. The first person and obscure words should both be avoided. Acronyms and abbreviations should be defined at their 1st use. Ideas should be presented in a logical sequence. Illustrations and tables may facilitate comprehension, but only if they are clearly presented and printed. Materials should be adapted to their audiences. In a country with the cultural, racial, and social diversity of Peru, it is impossible to refer to a general audience. Population communication which wishes to influence people must be based on a clear knowledge of the level of information, habits, linguistic practices, and other traits of the intended audience. Once the audience has been characterized, the objectives of the publication should be clearly defined. The technical characteristics of the publication are then selected. The format should be a standard size so that all the available paper can be used. The number of pages is often determined by the funds available although ideally it should be decided in accordance with the information to be presented. The color, type of lettering and spacing, paper, number of copies to be printed, and frequency of appearance are influenced by budgetary considerations, but the letter size and spacing should be generous enough to allow easy reading. The layout, style, and sections of the work must then be determined. A bulletin for example could have an editorial, a central article, reportage, an in-depth interview, correspondence, book reviews, and other regular features. The contents should be carefully checked for accuracy and grammaticality, and each step of

  8. GIVING AND RECEIVING CONSTRUCTIVE FEEDBACK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ірина Олійник

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The article scrutinizes the notion of feedback applicable in classrooms where team teaching is provided. The experience of giving and receiving feedback has been a good practice in cooperation between a U.S. Peace Corps volunteer and a Ukrainian counterpart. Giving and receiving feedback is an effective means of classroom observation that provides better insight into the process of teaching a foreign language. The article discusses the stages of feedback and explicates the notion of sharing experience between two teachers working simultaneously in the same classroom. The guidelines for giving and receiving feedback have been provided as well as the most commonly used vocabulary items have been listed. It has been proved that mutual feedback leads to improving teaching methods and using various teaching styles and techniques.

  9. Emotional feedback for mobile devices

    CERN Document Server

    Seebode, Julia

    2015-01-01

    This book investigates the functional adequacy as well as the affective impression made by feedback messages on mobile devices. It presents an easily adoptable experimental setup to examine context effects on various feedback messages, and applies it to auditory, tactile and auditory-tactile feedback messages. This approach provides insights into the relationship between the affective impression and functional applicability of these messages as well as an understanding of the influence of unimodal components on the perception of multimodal feedback messages. The developed paradigm can also be extended to investigate other aspects of context and used to investigate feedback messages in modalities other than those presented. The book uses questionnaires implemented on a Smartphone, which can easily be adopted for field studies to broaden the scope even wider. Finally, the book offers guidelines for the design of system feedback.

  10. Single-frequency thulium-doped distributed-feedback fibre laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agger, Søren; Povlsen, Jørn Hedegaard; Varming, Poul

    2004-01-01

    We have successfully demonstrated a single-frequency distributed-feedback (DFB) thulium-doped silica fiber laser emitting at a wavelength of 1735 nm. The laser cavity is less than 5 cm long and is formed by intracore UV-written Bragg gratings with a phase shift. The laser is pumped at 790 nm from...

  11. Iranian EFL Learners' Grammatical Knowledge: Effect of Direct and Metalinguistic Corrective Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadi, Zahra Kheradmand; Saadat, Mahboobeh

    2015-01-01

    The present study was conducted to compare the impact of direct and metalinguistic written corrective feedback on Iranian EFL learners' grammatical knowledge. The participants were a convenient sample of students in two intact writing classes. The instruction provided in both groups was similar; however, the students in one group received direct…

  12. Effects of longitudinal small-group learning on delivery and receipt of communication skills feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Calvin L; Masters, Dylan E; Chang, Anna; Kruidering, Marieke; Hauer, Karen E

    2013-11-01

    Although feedback is a critical component of learning, recent data suggest that learners may discount feedback they receive. The emotional threat inherent in feedback can contribute to its ineffectiveness, particularly for sensitive topics like communication skills. Longitudinal relationships among peers may increase their sense of safety and soften the perceived threat of feedback to allow students to give, receive and potentially more effectively incorporate feedback. We studied the effects of prior shared learning experiences among medical students in the delivery and receipt of feedback on clinical (communication) skills. During a formative clinical skills examination, we divided Year 3 students at a US medical school into two subgroups comprising, respectively, small-group classmates from a 2-year longitudinal pre-clerkship clinical skills course (with prior peer-learning relationships), and peers with no prior shared small-group coursework. Students in both subgroups observed peers in a simulated clinical case and then provided feedback, which was videotaped, transcribed and coded. Feedback recipients also completed a survey on their perceptions of the feedback. Students valued the feedback they received and intended to enact it, regardless of whether they had prior peer-learning relationships. Coding of feedback revealed high specificity. Feedback providers who had prior peer-learning relationships with recipients provided more specific corrective feedback on communication skills than those with no such relationships (p = 0.014); there was no significant difference between subgroups in the provision of reinforcing feedback on communication skills. Year 3 medical student peers can deliver specific feedback on clinical skills; prior peer-learning relationships in pre-clerkship clinical skills courses enrich the provision of specific corrective feedback about communication skills. Feedback between peers with pre-existing peer-learning relationships represents

  13. Technical analysis of the Slosson Written Expression Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erford, Bradley T; Hofler, Donald B

    2004-06-01

    The Slosson Written Expression Test was designed to assess students ages 8-17 years at risk for difficulties in written expression. Scores from three independent samples were used to evaluate the test's reliability and validity for measuring students' written expression. Test-retest reliability of the SWET subscales ranged from .80 to .94 (n = 151), and .95 for the Written Expression Total Standard Scores. The median alternate-form reliability for students' Written Expression Total Standard Scores was .81 across the three forms. Scores on the Slosson test yielded concurrent validity coefficients (n = 143) of .60 with scores from the Woodcock-Johnson: Tests of Achievement-Third Edition Broad Written Language Domain and .49 with scores on the Test of Written Language-Third Edition Spontaneous Writing Quotient. Exploratory factor analytic procedures suggested the Slosson test is comprised of two dimensions, Writing Mechanics and Writing Maturity (47.1% and 20.1% variance accounted for, respectively). In general, the Slosson Written Expression Test presents with sufficient technical characteristics to be considered a useful written expression screening test.

  14. Designing feedback: multimodality and specificity

    OpenAIRE

    Ludden, Geke Dina Simone; Sugiyama, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    Now that many of us carry around devices that are equipped with sensors (e.g., smartphones with accelerometers) we can use these sensors to measure behavior. The data thus captured can be used to give someone feedback about this behavior. These feedback mechanisms are often used in so called smart coaches, a growing group of product-service systems within the domain of persuasive technology. Despite decades of research on persuasive systems, challenges remain for designers of feedback systems...

  15. Seasonal contributions to climate feedbacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colman, R. [Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre, GPO Box 1289K, Melbourne, VIC (Australia)

    2003-05-01

    Heading Abstract. This study addresses the question: how do the contributions to feedbacks in a climate model vary over the seasonal cycle? To answer this the feedbacks are evaluated from an equilibrium doubled CO{sub 2} experiment performed using the Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre (BMRC) General Circulation Model. Monthly means of the top-of-atmosphere radiative perturbations (which together comprise the annual climate feedbacks) are extracted to produce a mean annual cycle. It is found that the radiative contributions to the total longwave (LW) feedback are fairly constant throughout the year. Those to the total shortwave (SW) feedback, on the other hand, vary by a factor of three, from a maximum in July to a minimum in November. Of the LW feedbacks, contributions to the lapse rate shows greatest seasonal variation, while those to water vapour and cloud feedbacks vary by relatively small amounts throughout the year. Contributions to the lapse rate feedback as a function of surface type and latitude reveal conflicting positive and negative radiative perturbations, which vary most strongly at high latitudes. Of the SW feedbacks, contributions to both albedo and cloud show large seasonal variations. Radiative perturbations contributing to albedo feedback vary in strength with snow and sea-ice retreat which occurs at different latitudes and in different months. They are shown to be highly sensitive to the amount of incident solar radiation in a given month. SW radiative perturbations due to cloud changes vary in sign between opposite seasons. Contributions to the seasonal variations of the cloud component feedbacks, which make up the total cloud feedback, are also examined. In the LW, the feedback is dominated by the total cloud water term. Radiative perturbations due to this component show relatively little variation throughout the year. In the SW, the main source of seasonal variation occurs for contributions to the cloud amount feedback: radiative

  16. Fast feedback for linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendrickson, L.; Adolphsen, C.; Allison, S.; Gromme, T.; Grossberg, P.; Himel, T.; Krauter, K.; MacKenzie, R.; Minty, M.; Sass, R. [and others

    1995-05-01

    A fast feedback system provides beam stabilization for the SLC. As the SLC is in some sense a prototype for future linear colliders, this system may be a prototype for future feedbacks. The SLC provides a good base of experience for feedback requirements and capabilities as well as a testing ground for performance characteristics. The feedback system controls a wide variety of machine parameters throughout the SLC and associated experiments, including regulation of beam position, angle, energy, intensity and timing parameters. The design and applications of the system are described, in addition to results of recent performance studies.

  17. Hvad siger forskningen om feedback?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holdt Christensen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Feedback skal serveres ligesom en gammeldags sandwich. Først lidt brød, så det lidt sejere kød og til sidst igen til lidt brød”. Sådan nogenlunde lyder en pragmatisk løsning på udfordringerne ved at give feedback. Når medarbejdere skal have negativ feedback, skal denne altså pakkes ind, så feedb...... feedbacken indledes med let fordøjeligt positiv feedback, derefter kommer den negative – og noget sværere fordøjelige – feedback, og til sidst afrundes feedbacken med en god udgangsreplik, nemlig den positive feedback.......”Feedback skal serveres ligesom en gammeldags sandwich. Først lidt brød, så det lidt sejere kød og til sidst igen til lidt brød”. Sådan nogenlunde lyder en pragmatisk løsning på udfordringerne ved at give feedback. Når medarbejdere skal have negativ feedback, skal denne altså pakkes ind, så...

  18. Offering effective feedback to trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskander, Morkos

    2015-01-01

    Effective feedback on performance is an integral part of clinical training. It allows the trainee to critically reflect on their development, as well as enable the teacher to chart progress and detect areas for development. In order to provide effective feedback, we need to take into account the performance itself, but also the setting where feedback is offered, and the expected outcomes of the encounter. As ever, negative feedback remains more difficult to give and receive, and as such requires a greater degree of delicacy to produce a positive result.

  19. Feedback strategies for wireless communication

    CERN Document Server

    Ozbek, Berna

    2014-01-01

    This book explores the different strategies regarding the feedback information for wireless communication systems. The text analyzes the impact of quantization and correlation of channel state information (CSI) on the system performance. The authors show the effect of the reduced and limited feedback information and gives an overview about the feedback strategies in the standards. This volume presents theoretical analysis as well as practical algorithms for the required feedback information at the base stations to perform adaptive resource allocation efficiently and mitigate interference coming from other cells.

  20. The effect of instruction type and dyadic or individual emulation on the quality of higher-order peer feedback in EFL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Steendam, E.; Rijlaarsdam, G.; Sercu, L.; van den Bergh, H.

    2010-01-01

    Studies in peer feedback on written texts show that instruction in revision is necessary for the effectiveness of global feedback. Participants in the study were 247 university freshmen, native speakers of Dutch, who took the same Business English course, and were instructed a revision strategy

  1. Tobacco smoking policies in Australian alcohol and other drug treatment services, agreement between staff awareness and the written policy document.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelton, Eliza; Bonevski, Billie; Tzelepis, Flora; Shakeshaft, Anthony; Guillaumier, Ashleigh; Dunlop, Adrian; McCrabb, Sam; Palazzi, Kerrin

    2017-01-17

    Comprehensive smoke-free policy in the alcohol and other drug (AOD) setting provides an opportunity to reduce tobacco related harms among clients and staff. This study aimed to examine within AOD services: staff awareness of their service's smoking policy compared to the written policy document and staff and service factors associated with accurate awareness of a total ban and perceived enforcement of a total ban. An audit of written tobacco smoking policy documents and an online cross-sectional survey of staff from 31 Australian AOD services. In addition, a contact at each service was interviewed to gather service-related data. Overall, 506 staff participated in the survey (response rate: 57%). Nearly half (46%) perceived their service had a total ban with 54% indicating that this policy was always enforced. Over one-third (37%) reported a partial ban with 48% indicating that this policy was always enforced. The audit of written policies revealed that 19 (61%) services had total bans, 11 (36%) had partial bans and 1 (3%) did not have a written smoking policy. Agreement between staff policy awareness and their service's written policy was moderate (Kappa 0.48) for a total ban and fair (Kappa 0.38) for a partial ban. Age (1 year increase) of staff was associated with higher odds of correctly identifying a total ban at their service. Tobacco smoking within Australian AOD services is mostly regulated by a written policy document. Staff policy awareness was modest and perceived policy enforcement was poor.

  2. The effects of self-controlled video feedback on the learning of the basketball set shot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Adam Aiken

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Allowing learners to control some aspect of instructional support (e.g., augmented feedback appears to facilitate motor skill acquisition. No studies, however, have examined self-controlled (SC video feedback without the provision of additional attentional cueing. The purpose of this study was to extend previous SC research using video feedback about movement form for the basketball set shot without explicitly directing attention to specific aspects of the movement. The SC group requested video feedback of their performance following any trial during the acquisition phase. The yoked (YK group received feedback according to a schedule created by a SC counterpart. During acquisition participants were also allowed to view written instructional cues at any time. Results revealed that the SC group had significantly higher form scores during the transfer phase and utilized the instructional cues more frequently during acquisition. Post-training questionnaire responses indicated no preference for requesting or receiving feedback following good trials as reported by Chiviacowsky and Wulf (2002, 2005. The nature of the task was such that participants could have assigned both positive and negative evaluations to different aspects of the movement during the same trial. Thus, the lack of preferences along with the similarity in scores for feedback and no-feedback trials may simply have reflected this complexity. Importantly, however, the results indicated that SC video feedback conferred a learning benefit without the provision of explicit additional attentional cueing.

  3. The effects of self-controlled video feedback on the learning of the basketball set shot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, Christopher Adam; Fairbrother, Jeffrey T; Post, Phillip Guy

    2012-01-01

    Allowing learners to control some aspect of instructional support (e.g., augmented feedback) appears to facilitate motor skill acquisition. No studies, however, have examined self-controlled (SC) video feedback without the provision of additional attentional cueing. The purpose of this study was to extend previous SC research using video feedback about movement form for the basketball set shot without explicitly directing attention to specific aspects of the movement. The SC group requested video feedback of their performance following any trial during the acquisition phase. The yoked group received feedback according to a schedule created by a SC counterpart. During acquisition participants were also allowed to view written instructional cues at any time. Results revealed that the SC group had significantly higher form scores during the transfer phase and utilized the instructional cues more frequently during acquisition. Post-training questionnaire responses indicated no preference for requesting or receiving feedback following good trials as reported by Chiviacowsky and Wulf (2002, 2005). The nature of the task was such that participants could have assigned both positive and negative evaluations to different aspects of the movement during the same trial. Thus, the lack of preferences along with the similarity in scores for feedback and no-feedback trials may simply have reflected this complexity. Importantly, however, the results indicated that SC video feedback conferred a learning benefit without the provision of explicit additional attentional cueing.

  4. KEKB bunch feedback systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobiyama, M.; Kikutani, E. [National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1996-08-01

    Design and the present status of the bunch by bunch feedback systems for KEKB rings are shown. The detection of the bunch oscillation are made with the phase detection for longitudinal plane, the AM/PM method for transverse plane. Two GHz component of the bunch signal which is extracted with an analog FIR filter is used for the detection. Hardware two-tap FIR filter systems to shift the phase of the oscillation by 90deg will be used for the longitudinal signal processing. The same system will be used with no filtering but with only digital delay for transverse system. The candidate for the kicker and the required maximum power are also estimated. (author)

  5. FEEDBACK AND LOGISTICS CONTROLLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehesne Berek Szilvia

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The following things led to that the feedback, the supervision and improvement of the processes have become more pronounced: continuous rise in the importance of logistics; increase in complexity of its content; its activity becoming more complex. These activities are necessary for the optimum information supply. The intensification of market competition requires the corporations to possess exact and up-to-date information about their activities. Complexity of the logistics system presumes a parallel application of an effective feedback, supervision and management system simultaneously with the given logistics system. The indispensability of logistics is also proved by the fact that it can be found sporadically (in the form of logistics departments or in a complex way in case of each organization. The logistical approach means a huge support in the management since it contains the complexity, the handling as a unit in order to ensure a harmony of the different corporate departments and part activities. In addition to the professional application of a logistics system, there is an opportunity to coordinate the relations inside an organization as well as between the organizations and to handle them as a unit. The sine qua non of the success of logistical processes is a harmony of the devices applied. The controlling system is a device for feeding back the processes of a corporate system. By means of the checkpoints intercalated into the processes, the logistics controlling provides information for the leadership which contributes even more to the complex approach of logistics system. By dint of the logistics controlling, the monitoring and coordination of every logistical part activity become possible with the help of information supply ensured by the logistics controlling. The logistics controlling reviews, assesses and coordinates; these activities have an effect on the cost and income management. Its reason is to be searched in the built

  6. Feedback matters current feedback practices in the EFL classroom

    CERN Document Server

    Reitbauer, Margit; Mercer, Sarah; Schumm-Fauster, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    This varied collection of papers is concerned with feedback in the language learning context. With its blend of theoretical overviews, action research-based empirical studies and practical implications, this will be a valuable resource for all academics and practitioners concerned with generating feedback that matters.

  7. What higher education students do with teacher feedback: Feedback ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Writing pedagogy research has constantly maintained that feedback is 'an essential component of virtually every model of the writing process' (Hall, 1990: 43) as it motivates writers to improve their next draft. Feedback during the writing process improves not only student attitude to writing but writing performance if students ...

  8. Neuropsychological Correlates of Written Expression in College Students with ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semrud-Clikeman, Margaret; Harder, Lana

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To examine written expression and the executive function skills (working memory, verbal fluency, and planning and organization) involved in written expression in college-aged students with ADHD. Method: Two groups of undergraduate students, aged 19 to 28 years, (ADHD, n = 31; control, n = 27) are evaluated on selected measures of…

  9. 38 CFR 21.84 - Individualized written rehabilitation plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... rehabilitation plan. 21.84 Section 21.84 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment Under 38 U.S.C. Chapter 31 Individualized Written Rehabilitation Plan § 21.84 Individualized written rehabilitation plan...

  10. 29 CFR 1401.32 - Logging of written requests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Logging of written requests. 1401.32 Section 1401.32 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) FEDERAL MEDIATION AND CONCILIATION SERVICE PUBLIC INFORMATION Production or Disclosure of Information § 1401.32 Logging of written requests. (a) All requests for records...

  11. Are Poor Chinese Text Comprehenders Also Poor in Written Composition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Connie Qun; Ye, Feifei; Meng, Wanjin; Leong, Che Kan

    2013-01-01

    We studied the performance in three genres of Chinese written composition (narration, exposition, and argumentation) of 158 grade 4, 5, and 6 poor Chinese text comprehenders compared with 156 good Chinese text comprehenders. We examined text comprehension and written composition relationship. Verbal working memory (verbal span working memory and…

  12. The Written Communication Skills That Matter Most for Accountants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Tracey J.; Simons, Kathleen A.

    2016-01-01

    Given the importance of effective written communication skills to the discipline of accounting, faculty must emphasize these skills in their classroom in order to adequately prepare students for successful careers in the field. Since 2000, only two studies in the accounting literature have examined which written communication skills are needed by…

  13. 18 CFR 385.507 - Prepared written testimony (Rule 507).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROCEDURAL RULES RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Hearings § 385... time for the preparation of such written testimony. (b) Time for filing. Any prepared written testimony... warranted by any other showing of good cause; and (ii) Would not be unduly prejudicial to any participant...

  14. 19 CFR 148.111 - Written declaration for unaccompanied articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Written declaration for unaccompanied articles... of the United States § 148.111 Written declaration for unaccompanied articles. The baggage... covers articles which do not accompany him and: (a) The articles are entitled to free entry under the $1...

  15. 33 CFR 146.35 - Written report of casualty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Written report of casualty. 146.35 Section 146.35 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... postmarked within 5 days of the casualty, the written report required by paragraph (a) of this section serves...

  16. 5 CFR 179.306 - Written agreement for repayment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Written agreement for repayment. 179.306 Section 179.306 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS CLAIMS COLLECTION STANDARDS Administrative Offset § 179.306 Written agreement for repayment. A debtor who admits...

  17. Observational Signatures Of Agn Feedback Across Cosmic Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylezalek, Dominika

    2017-06-01

    While many compelling models of AGN feedback exist, there is no clear data-driven picture of how winds are launched, how they propagate through the galaxy and what impact they have on the galactic gas. Recent work suggests that AGN luminosity plays an important role. The following described projects focus on understanding the power, reach and impact of feedback processes exerted by AGN of different power. I first describe recent efforts in our group of relating feedback signatures in powerful quasars to the specific star formation rate in their host galaxies, where our results are consistent with the AGN having a `negative' impact through feedback on the galaxies' star formation history. Feedback signatures seem to be best observable in gas-rich galaxies where the coupling of the AGN-driven wind to the gas is strongest, in agreement with recent simulations. But how and where does this quenching happen? Is it accomplished through the mechanical action of jets or through nuclear winds driven by radiation pressure? Finally, I show that AGN signatures and AGN-driven winds can be easily hidden and not be apparent in the integrated spectrum of a galaxy hosting a low/intermediate-luminosity AGN. Using data from the new SDSS-IV MaNGA survey, we have developed a new AGN selection algorithm tailored to IFU data and we are uncovering a much more nuanced picture of AGN activity allowing us to discover AGN signatures at large distances from the galaxy center. This implies that large IFU surveys, such as the SDSS-IV MaNGA survey, might uncover many previously unknown AGN and feedback signatures related to them. Outflows and feedback from low- and intermediate-luminosity AGN might have been underestimated in the past but can potentially significantly contribute to the AGN/host-galaxy self-regulation.

  18. Feedback on household electricity consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønhøj, Alice; Thøgersen, John

    2011-01-01

    consumption, we evaluate the effects of giving households detailed feedback about their electricity consumption on a small liquid crystal display (LCD) screen. Twenty Danish households participated in the study over a 5-month period. A new feedback system was developed in a user-involved innovation process...

  19. Student Interpretations of Diagnostic Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doe, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic assessment is increasingly being recognized as a potentially beneficial tool for teaching and learning (Jang, 2012). There have been calls in the research literature for students to receive diagnostic feedback and for researchers to investigate how such feedback is used by students. Therefore, this study examined how students…

  20. Teacher Feedback during Active Learning:

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. Linda Keuvelaar - van den Bergh

    2013-01-01

    Feedback is one of the most powerful tools teachers can use to enhance student learning. In 2006, the Dutch Inspectorate of Education concluded from classroom observations that it is difficult for Dutch teachers to give their students good feedback in order to stimulate students' learning process

  1. Videoer om feedback i undervisningen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hanne Nexø

    2017-01-01

    I denne video bliver du introduceret til en måde at praktisere og rammesætte klyngevejledning på i bachelorundervisning. Klyngefeedbackformen til de studerende er valgt, da de studerende lærer meget af både at give og om modtage feedback fra medstuderende. Fokus på feedback ligger derfor primært i...

  2. Designing feedback: multimodality and specificity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ludden, Geke Dina Simone; Sugiyama, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    Now that many of us carry around devices that are equipped with sensors (e.g., smartphones with accelerometers) we can use these sensors to measure behavior. The data thus captured can be used to give someone feedback about this behavior. These feedback mechanisms are often used in so called smart

  3. Feedback, Incentives and Peer Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Tor Viking; Poulsen, Anders; Villeval, Marie Claire

    . The pay schemes are a piece rate payment scheme and a winner takes-all tournament. We find that the principal should not provide any information on relative  performance, regardless of the pay scheme used, since feedback does not improve performance. Indeed, we do not find evidence of positive peer...... effects in the piece-rate pay scheme. In both pay schemes, interim feedback generates negative quality peer effects on the less able performers. We find however evidence of positive peer effects in the tournament scheme since the underdogs almost never quit the competition even when lagging significantly......This paper experimentally investigates the impact of different pay and relative performance information policies on employee effort. We explore three information policies: No feedback, feedback given halfway through the production period, and continuously updated feedback about relative performance...

  4. Multi-bunch Feedback Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Lonza, M.

    2014-12-19

    Coupled-bunch instabilities excited by the interaction of the particle beam with its surroundings can seriously limit the performance of circular particle accelerators. These instabilities can be cured by the use of active feedback systems based on sensors capable of detecting the unwanted beam motion and actuators that apply the feedback correction to the beam. Advances in electronic technology now allow the implementation of feedback loops using programmable digital systems. Besides important advantages in terms of flexibility and reproducibility, digital systems open the way to the use of novel diagnostic tools and additional features. We first introduce coupled-bunch instabilities, analysing the equation of motion of charged particles and the different modes of oscillation of a multi-bunch beam, showing how they can be observed and measured. Different types of feedback systems will then be presented as examples of real implementations that belong to the history of multi-bunch feedback systems. The main co...

  5. Oral but not written test anxiety is related to social anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurin-Barantke, Lisa; Hoyer, Jürgen; Fehm, Lydia; Knappe, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    AIM To examine the associations of test anxiety (TA) in written vs oral exam situations with social anxiety (SA). METHODS A convenience sample of 204 students was recruited at the Technische Universität Dresden (TU Dresden, Germany) and contacted via e-mail asking to complete a cross-sectional online survey based on established questionnaires. The study protocol was approved by the ethics committee of the TU Dresden. Full data of n = 96 students were available for dependent t-tests and correlation analyses on the associations of SA and TA respectively with trigger events, cognitions, safety behaviors, physical symptoms and depersonalization. Analyses were run using SPSS. RESULTS Levels of TA were higher for fear in oral exams than for fear in written exams (M = 48.1, SD = 11.5 vs M = 43.7, SD = 10.1 P 0.05; Pearson’s r = 0.223, P > 0.05). Compared to written TA, trigger events were more often reported for oral TA (18.2% vs 30.3%, P = 0.007); which was also accompanied more often by test-anxious cognitions (7.9% vs 8.5%, P = 0.001), safety behavior (8.9% vs 10.3%, P < 0.001) and physical symptoms (for all, P < 0.001). CONCLUSION Written, but not oral TA emerged being unrelated to SA and may rather not be considered as a typical facet of SA disorder. PMID:27679775

  6. Speech-language therapy for adolescents with written-language difficulties: The South African context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danel Erasmus

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate whether privately practising speech-language therapists in South Africa are fulfilling their role of identification, assessment and intervention for adolescents with written-language and reading difficulties. Further needs concerning training with regard to this population group were also determined.Method: A survey study was conducted, using a self-administered questionnaire. Twenty-two currently practising speech-language therapists who are registered members of the South African Speech-Language-Hearing Association (SASLHA participated in the study.Results: The respondents indicated that they are aware of their role regarding adolescents with written-language difficulties. However, they feel that South-African speech-language therapists are not fulfilling this role. Existing assessment tools and interventions for written-language difficulties are described as inadequate, and culturally and age inappropriate. Yet, the majority of the respondents feel that they are adequately equipped to work with adolescents with written-language difficulties, based on their own experience, self-study and secondary training. The respondents feel that training regarding effective collaboration with teachers is necessary to establish specific roles, and to promote speech-language therapy for adolescents among teachers.Conclusion: Further research is needed in developing appropriate assessment and intervention tools as well as improvement of training at an undergraduate level.

  7. Feedback control of sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafaely, Boaz

    This thesis is concerned with the development an application of feedback control techniques for active sound control. Both fixed and adaptive controllers are considered. The controller design problem for active sound control is formulated as a constrained optimisation problem with an H2 performance objective, of minimising the variance of the control error, and H2 and H∞ design constraints involving control power output, disturbance enhancement, and robust stability. An Internal Model Controller with an FIR control filter is assumed. Conventional H2 design methods for feedback controllers are studied first. Although such controllers can satisfy the design constraints by employing effort terms in the quadratic cost function, they do not achieve the best possible performance, and when adapted using LMS-based algorithms, they suffer from instabilities if the plant response varies significantly. Improved H2/H∞ design methods for fixed and adaptive controllers are then developed, which achieve the best H2 performance under the design constraints, offer an improved stability when made adaptive, and in general outperform the conventional H2 controllers. The H2/H∞ design problems employ convex programming to ensure a unique solution. The Sequential Quadratic Programming methods is used for the off-line design of fixed controllers, and penalty and barrier function methods, together with frequency domain LMS-based algorithms are employed in the H2/H∞ adaptive controllers. The controllers studied and developed here were applied to three active sound control systems: a noise-reducing headset, an active headrest, and a sound radiating panel. The emphasis was put on developing control strategies that improve system performance. First, a high performance controller for the noise-reducing headset was implemented in real-time, which combines analogue and adaptive digital controllers, and can thus reject disturbances which has both broad-band and periodic components. Then

  8. Understanding Feedback: A Learning Theory Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurlings, Marieke; Vermeulen, Marjan; Bastiaens, Theo; Stijnen, Sjef

    2013-01-01

    This article aims to review literature on feedback to teachers. Because research has hardly focused on feedback among teachers, the review's scope also includes feedback in classrooms. The review proposes that the effectiveness of feedback and feedback processes depend on the learning theory adhered to. Findings show that regardless of the…

  9. Understanding feedback: A learning theory perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thurlings, Marieke; Vermeulen, Marjan; Bastiaens, Theo; Stijnen, Sjef

    2018-01-01

    This article aims to review literature on feedback to teachers. Because research has hardly focused on feedback among teachers, the review’s scope also includes feedback in class- rooms. The review proposes that the effectiveness of feedback and feedback processes depend on the learning theory

  10. Closing the open public data feedback loop: the ENGAGE platform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alexopoulos, C; Zuiderwijk-van Eijk, AMG; Charalabidis, Y; Loukis, E

    2014-01-01

    One essential element of open data ecosystems concerns their development through feedback loops, discussions and dynamic supplier and user interactions. However, these elements appear barely to be part of existing open data practices. We conducted a survey which showed that most professional open

  11. Role of morphologic feedback in surf zone sandbar response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plant, N.G.; Freilich, M.H.; Holman, R.A.

    2001-01-01

    Several aspects of feedback mechanisms associated with surf zone sandbar response have been characterized using bathymetric surveys, sampled approximately monthly over a 16-year period at the Army Corps of Engineers' Field Research Facility (North Carolina). The measured bathymetry was alongshore

  12. Evaluating Classroom Time through Systematic Analysis and Student Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achen, Rebecca M.; Lumpkin, Angela

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this action research was to examine the use of class time through classroom observation and student feedback. Students', the teacher's, and whole class activities during class were categorized every two minutes. Students also were given pre- and post-course surveys to assess perceptions on lecture time, impact of learning…

  13. Enhancing Healthcare Provider Feedback and Personal Health Literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaltoft, Mette Kjer; Nielsen, Jesper Bo; Salkeld, Glenn

    2015-01-01

    In this protocol for a pilot study we seek to establish the feasibility of using a web-based survey to simultaneously supply healthcare organisations and agencies with feedback on a key aspect of the care experience they provide and increase the generic health decision literacy of the individuals...

  14. Resident Perceptions of Giving and Receiving Peer-to-Peer Feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Cruz, Maria Syl D; Kopec, Michael T; Wimsatt, Leslie A

    2015-06-01

    Peer feedback is increasingly being used by residency programs to provide an added dimension to the assessment process. Studies show that peer feedback is useful, uniquely informative, and reliable compared to other types of assessments. Potential barriers to implementation include insufficient training/preparation, negative consequences for working relationships, and a perceived lack of benefit. We explored the perceptions of residents involved in peer-to-peer feedback, focusing on factors that influence accuracy, usefulness, and application of the information. Family medicine residents at the University of Michigan who were piloting an online peer assessment tool completed a brief survey to offer researchers insight into the peer feedback process. Focus groups were conducted to explore residents' perceptions that are most likely to affect giving and receiving peer feedback. Survey responses were provided by 28 of 30 residents (93%). Responses showed that peer feedback provided useful (89%, 25 of 28) and unique (89%, 24 of 27) information, yet only 59% (16 of 27) reported that it benefited their training. Focus group participants included 21 of 29 eligible residents (72%). Approaches to improve residents' ability to give and accept feedback included preparatory training, clearly defined goals, standardization, fewer and more qualitatively oriented encounters, 1-on-1 delivery, immediacy of timing, and cultivation of a feedback culture. Residents perceived feedback as important and offered actionable suggestions to enhance accuracy, usefulness, and application of the information shared. The findings can be used to inform residency programs that are interested in creating a meaningful peer feedback process.

  15. PEER-FEEDBACK AND ONLINE INTERACTION: A CASE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Isabel Espitia

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of information and communication technologies (ICTs in the English as a Foreign Language (EFL classroom has led to different practices and types of interaction. Online interaction allows teachers and students to use the target language beyond the classroom and provides students with more time to be exposed to and use the language. This case study aimed at understanding how a group of twelve students at Universidad de la Sabana, who participated in online forums as part of the requirements of a blended EFL course, interacted online to provide peer-feedback on written compositions. It also analyzed how online interaction was undertaken when using online forums. Findings suggest that participants raised awareness about the relevance of editing to avoid possible language problems by reviewing their peers' products and that the implementation of online peer feedback as an assessment strategy reveals students' beliefs towards language assessment.

  16. Adult Beginner Distance Language Learner Perceptions and Use of Assignment Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furnborough, Concha; Truman, Mike

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative study examines perceptions and use of assignment feedback among adult beginner modern foreign language learners on higher education distance learning courses. A survey of responses to feedback on assignments by 43 Open University students on beginner language courses in Spanish, French, and German indicated that respondents can be…

  17. Enhancing the Assessment Experience: Improving Student Perceptions, Engagement and Understanding Using Online Video Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, John; Turner, Will

    2016-01-01

    Individualised video screencasts with accompanying narration were used to provide assessment feedback to a large number (n = 299) of first-year Bachelor of Education students at Edith Cowan University in Western Australia. An anonymous online survey revealed that nearly three times as many respondents (61%) preferred video feedback to written…

  18. Student Feedback Systems in Higher Education: A Focused Literature Review and Environmental Scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderman, Lyn; Towers, Stephen; Bannah, Sylvia

    2012-01-01

    In recent times, higher education institutions have paid increasing attention to the views of students to obtain feedback on their experience of learning and teaching through internal surveys. This article reviews research in the field and reports on practices in other Australian universities. Findings demonstrate that while student feedback is…

  19. How Student Written Communication Skills Benefit during Participation in an Industry-Sponsored Civil Engineering Capstone Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, Ryan; Cross, Brad; Zhou, Jianpeng; Verbais, Chad

    2017-01-01

    Because many engineering programs use capstone design courses and value strong communication abilities, authors sought to identify how student written communication skills changed because of industry-sponsored capstone design projects. A student exit survey was collected at the end of the capstone design course during faculty-led projects and…

  20. Image-based feedback and analysis system for digital microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Philippe Q N; Husser, Mathieu C; Ahmadi, Fatemeh; Sinha, Hugo; Shih, Steve C C

    2017-10-11

    Digital microfluidics (DMF) is a technology that provides a means of manipulating nL-μL volumes of liquids on an array of electrodes. By applying an electric potential to an electrode, these discrete droplets can be controlled in parallel which can be transported, mixed, reacted, and analyzed. Typically, an automation system is interfaced with a DMF device that uses a standard set of basic instructions written by the user to execute droplet operations. Here, we present the first feedback method for DMF that relies on imaging techniques that will allow online detection of droplets without the need to reactivate all destination electrodes. Our system consists of integrating open-source electronics with a CMOS camera and a zoom lens for acquisition of the images that will be used to detect droplets on the device. We also created an algorithm that uses a Hough transform to detect a variety of droplet sizes and to detect singular droplet dispensing and movement failures on the device. As a first test, we applied this feedback system to test droplet movement for a variety of liquids used in cell-based assays and to optimize different feedback actuation schemes to improve droplet movement fidelity. We also applied our system to a colorimetric enzymatic assay to show that our system is capable of biological analysis. Overall, we believe that using our approach of integrating imaging and feedback for DMF can provide a platform for automating biological assays with analysis.

  1. Styrket feedback gennem studerendes selvevaluering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Bo

    2016-01-01

    Studerende er ofte utilfredse med såvel kvaliteten som kvantiteten af feedback på skriftligt arbejde. Ligeledes kan det som underviser være svært at afgive feedback, der tager udgangspunkt i de studerendes respektive læringssituationer, hvis man ikke har andet afsæt end opgavetekster. Denne artikel...... beskriver derfor to eksperimenter med brug af selvevaluering som kvalificerende mellemled i ekstern feedback på skriveøvelser. Eksperimenternes formål er at styrke den formative læring ved skriftligt arbejde. I det første eksperiment bestod feedbacken af underviser-feedback, mens det andet eksperiment...... indebar peer-feedback og fælles feedback. I begge tilfælde blev selvevalueringen foretaget med udgangspunkt i en kriteriebaseret retteguide. Eksperimenterne medførte, at den eksterne feedback blev målrettet og kvalificeret i forhold til den enkelte studerende, mens selve skriveprocessen mod forventning...

  2. Optimal allocation of reviewers for peer feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wind, David Kofoed; Jensen, Ulf Aslak; Jørgensen, Rasmus Malthe

    2017-01-01

    feedback. In this paper we present a novel way to intelligently allocate reviewers for peer feedback. We train a statistical model to infer the quality of feedback based on a dataset of feedback quality evaluations. This dataset contains more than 20,000 reviews where the receiver of the feedback has......Peer feedback is the act of letting students give feedback to each other on submitted work. There are multiple reasons to use peer feedback, including students getting more feedback, time saving for teachers and increased learning by letting students reflect on work by others. In order for peer...... indicated the quality of the feedback. Using this model together with historical data we calculate the feedback-giving skill of each student and uses that as input to an allocation algorithm that assigns submissions to reviewers, in order to optimize the feedback quality for all students. We test...

  3. Gamification and Smart, Competence-Centered Feedback: Promising Experiences in the Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Kickmeier-Rust

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Gamification appears being a promising approach to utilize the strong motivational potential of “gaming” in classroom without suffering from shortcomings such as low efficiency, weak pedagogy, or maybe most importantly the high costs. In the context of a European project we developed a rather light weight tool for learning and practicing multiplications. The target age group of the tool is 6 to 8 years. To benefit from the motivational potential of games we used a “gamification” approach. Accordingly we designed and developed a game-like, attractive user interface and integrated aspects of competition. The system is capable of providing students formative, competence-oriented feedback in real-time. Tailored to the age group this feedback is presented in form of a ninja character. For an experimental comparison of the effects of different feedback modes, we realized the conditions (i no feedback, (ii written only right/wrong feedback, (iii audio right/wrong feedback, and (iv competence-based, smart formative feedback. We applied and evaluated the tool in Austrian classrooms and found some evidence for the motivational aspect of the gamification elements, in particular the scoring. We also found strong positive effects of an individualized and meaningful feedback about achievements and progress.

  4. Factors shaping e-feedback utilization following electronic Objective Structured Clinical Examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashby, Samantha E; Snodgrass, Suzanne H; Rivett, Darren A; Russell, Trevor

    2016-09-01

    The development of student-practitioners' practical clinical skills is essential in health professional education. Objective Structured Clinical Examinations are central to the assessment of students performing clinical procedures on simulated patients (actors). While feedback is considered core to learning providing timely, individualised student OSCE feedback is difficult. This study explored the perceptions of students about the multiple factors which shape the utility of e-feedback following an electronic Objective Structured Clinical Examinations, which utilized iPad and specialised software. The e-feedback was trialled in four courses within occupational therapy and physiotherapy pre-professional programs with a cohort of 204 students. Evaluation of student perceptions about feedback was collected using two surveys and eight focus groups. This data showed three factors shaped perceptions of the utility of e- Objective Structured Clinical Examinations feedback: 1) timely accessibility within one day of the assessment, 2) feedback demonstrating examiners' academic literacy and 3) feedback orientated to ways of improving future performance of clinical skills. The study found training in the provision of feedback using IPads and software is needed for examiners to ensure e-feedback meets students' needs for specific, future-oriented e-feedback and institutional requirements for justification of grades. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  5. Meeting the Demands of the Workplace: Science Students and Written Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, F. Elizabeth; Emerson, Lisa; Mackay, Bruce

    2005-12-01

    Over the last 15 years, surveys in a range of English-speaking countries, from North America and the United Kingdom, to New Zealand and Australia, have consistently shown that employers rank oral and written communication skills as highly as or more highly than any technical or quantitative skills. However, in New Zealand there has been very little research into determining exactly what is meant by the "written communication skills" employers state they desire. A further issue in this research to date has been a lack of differentiation between employers—no study has specifically targeted the requirements of employers of science graduates. This article reports the findings of ongoing research into the expectations of science students and of employers of science graduates, and centers around several key questions: What do New Zealand employers of science graduates specifically want in terms of their new hires' writing skills?

  6. Improving written language performance of adolescents with Asperger syndrome

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Delano, Monica E

    2007-01-01

    The effects of a multicomponent intervention involving self-regulated strategy development delivered via video self-modeling on the written language performance of 3 students with Asperger syndrome were examined...

  7. 7 CFR 46.49 - Written notifications and complaints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... under Section 6(c); (2) Any written notice of intent to preserve the benefits of the trust established... with notice of the status of the investigation, including whether the Secretary intends to issue a...

  8. CURRICULUM LEADERSIHP: STRATEGIES FOR LINKING THE WRITTEN AND DELIVERED CURRICULIM

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lena Damovska

    2014-01-01

    ...) without neglecting the written curriculum(the theory), and vice versa, all the while analyzing strategies that will link both curricula and implement these conclusions in their further teaching...

  9. Nonlinear light propagation in fs laser-written waveguide arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szameit A.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We report on recent achievements in the field of nonlinear light propagation in fs laser-written waveguide lattices. Particular emphasis is thereby given on discrete solitons in such systems.

  10. Investigating Difficulties in Elementary School Students' Written Expression

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Teresa Benítez Velasquez

    2011-01-01

      This article presents the results of a qualitative action research study about the possible causes of the difculties in the written expression offth grade students of a bilingual school in Barranquilla...

  11. Measuring Galactic Feedback with the Origins Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armus, Lee; Bolatto, Alberto; Pope, Alexandra; Bradford, Charles Matt; Origins Space Telescope Science and Technology Definition Team

    2018-01-01

    Since a significant fraction of star formation and black hole growth occurs behind dust, our understanding of how and why galaxies evolve will remain incomplete until deep, wide area spectroscopic surveys in the FIRcan be carried out from space. The Origins Space Telescope (OST), a mission concept being studied for presentation to the 2020 Decadal Survey, represents an enormous leap over any existing infrared mission, and will uniquely measure black hole growth and star formation in dusty galaxies over more than 95% of cosmic history. Energetic feedback from AGN, young stars, and supernovae can regulate galaxy growth over a wide range in mass and be important for the enrichment of the interstellar and circumgalactic medium, yet the existence and type of feedback as a function of redshift, luminosity, and environment is poorly constrained. With wide wavelength coverage (5-600 microns), a large primary mirror actively cooled to ~4K, and a capable suite of imagers and spectrometers, OST will be an extremely sensitive probe of the effects of feedback on the multi-phase ISM in galaxies, through measurement of key feedback tracers such as OH and H2O absorption lines, fine structure emission lines, and PAH dust features. With OST we can directly observe the role of feedback in quenching galaxies, derive the wind kinetic energy and mass outflow rates, and correlate these with key galaxy properties (AGN or starburst power, environment, mass, age). In this poster we will explain how blind and targeted surveys with OST will have an enormous impact on our understanding of the duty cycle and basic physical properties of feedback in AGN and starburst galaxies over the last 12 Gyr.

  12. Medical students' perception of objective structured clinical examination: a feedback for process improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir, Abdulrasheed A; Yusuf, Ayodeji S; Abdur-Rahman, Lukman O; Babalola, Olasunkanmi M; Adeyeye, Ademola A; Popoola, Ademola A; Adeniran, James O

    2014-01-01

    Medical educators have always been desirous of the best methods for formative and summative evaluation of trainees. The Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) is an approach for student assessment in which aspects of clinical competence are evaluated in a comprehensive, consistent, and structured manner with close attention to the objectivity of the process. Though popular in most medical schools globally, its use in Nigeria medical schools appears limited. This study was conceived to explore students' perception about the acceptability of OSCE process and to provide feedback to be used to improve the assessment technique. A cross-sectional survey was conducted on final-year medical students, who participated in the final MBBS surgery examination in June 2011. A 19-item self-administered structured questionnaire was employed to obtain relevant data on demographics of respondents and questions evaluating the OSCE stations in terms of the quality of instructions and organization, learning opportunities, authenticity and transparency of the process, and usefulness of the OSCE as an assessment instrument compared with other formats. Students' responses were based on a 5-point Likert scales ranging from strongly disagree to strongly agree. The data were analyzed using SPSS, version 15 (SPSS, Inc, Chicago, IL). The study took place at the University of Ilorin, College of Health Science. A total of 187 final-year medical students were enrolled in to the survey. Of 187 eligible students, 151 completed the self-administered questionnaire representing 80.7% response rate. A total of 61 (40.4%) students felt that it was easy to understand written instructions at the OSCE stations. In total, 106 (70.2%) students felt that the time allocated to each station was adequate. A total of 89 (58.9%) students agreed that the OSCE accurately measured their knowledge and skill, and 85 (56.3%) reported that OSCE enhanced their communication skill. Of the respondents, 80 (53

  13. Full Static Output Feedback Equivalence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aristotle G. Yannakoudakis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a constructive solution to the problem of full output feedback equivalence, of linear, minimal, time-invariant systems. The equivalence relation on the set of systems is transformed to another on the set of invertible block Bezout/Hankel matrices using the isotropy subgroups of the full state feedback group and the full output injection group. The transformation achieving equivalence is calculated solving linear systems of equations. We give a polynomial version of the results proving that two systems are full output feedback equivalent, if and only if they have the same family of generalized Bezoutians. We present a new set of output feedback invariant polynomials that generalize the breakaway polynomial of scalar systems.

  14. NAIP 2015 Imagery Feedback Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — The NAIP 2015 Imagery Feedback map allows users to make comments and observations about the quality of the 2015 National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP)...

  15. NAIP 2017 Imagery Feedback Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — The NAIP 2017 Imagery Feedback map allows users to make comments and observations about the quality of the 2017 National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP)...

  16. UV-written Integrated Optical 1xN Splitters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olivero, Massimo; Svalgaard, Mikael

    2006-01-01

    The first demonstration of UV-written, silica-on-silicon integrated optical 1×N power splitters with up to 32 outputs ports is presented. The fabricated components exhibit 450 nm bandwidth, low excess loss and good channel uniformity.......The first demonstration of UV-written, silica-on-silicon integrated optical 1×N power splitters with up to 32 outputs ports is presented. The fabricated components exhibit 450 nm bandwidth, low excess loss and good channel uniformity....

  17. High index ring resonator coupled to UV-written waveguide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Winnie Edith; Philipp, Hugh Taylor; Svalgaard, Mikael

    2002-01-01

    High index silicon rich nitride (SHN) ring resonators were coupled to straight UV-written waveguides. Resonance peaks with a free spectral range of 2 nm and a spectral width (fwhm) of 0.2 nm were observed......High index silicon rich nitride (SHN) ring resonators were coupled to straight UV-written waveguides. Resonance peaks with a free spectral range of 2 nm and a spectral width (fwhm) of 0.2 nm were observed...

  18. Feedback trap using optical force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Yonggun; Pak, Hyuk Kyu

    Recently, the feedback trap using electrophoretic force (ABEL trap) has been used in the experimental study of non-equilibrium thermodynamics such as Landauer's erasure principle. This trap can trap and manipulate a small particle in solution by canceling the Brownian fluctuations. Here, we propose a simple way to control a bead using optical force with feedback and show the dynamics of a single particle in the virtual potential.

  19. Mass production of individual feedback

    OpenAIRE

    Heaney, David

    2006-01-01

    Learning to program is intrinsically difficult. In addition there is a trend towards increased student diversity and larger class sizes. Student diversity increases the need for individual attention for each student, while increased class sizes decreases the amount of time a lecturer has to provide this attention. This thesis investigates an approach to help provide each student with detailed individual feedback. This feedback is important where individual attention is lacking. We used tw...

  20. Recognition of boundary feedback systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Michael

    1989-01-01

    A system that has been the object of intense research is outlined. In view of that and recent progress of the theory of pseudodifferential boundary operator calculus, the author describes some features that could prove to be interesting in connection with the problems of boundary feedback...... stabilizability. It is shown that it is possible to use the calculus to consider more general feedback systems in a variational setup....

  1. Written Cultural Heritage in the Context of Adopted Legal Regulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Kodrič-Dačić

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTPurpose: Libraries collect written cultural heritage which is not only the most valuable part of their collections but also a part of library materials which is, due to digitalization projects in the last decade, becoming more and more interesting to librarians and library users. The main goal of the study is a theoretical research of library materials acknowledged as Slovenian heritage. By defining the basic terms it highlights the attributes which are immanent to library materials, derived from the context of their origin or later destiny. Slovenian library legislation concerning protection of written cultural heritage is also critically analysed.Methodology/approach: Comparative analyses of European and Slovenian legislation concerning librarianship and written cultural heritage. Research limitation: Research was mainly limited to professional literature and resources dealing with written cultural heritage. Originality/practical implications: Results of the research serve as formal criteria for definition of library materials as written heritage and suggest how to improve legislation in the field of protection of written heritage in libraries. 

  2. Planning Data Management Education Initiatives: Process, Feedback, and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Eaker

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Educating researchers in sound data management skills is a hot topic in today’s data intensive research world. Librarians across the country and the world are taking the lead in offering this training to their campus research communities. In Fall, 2013, the Data Curation Librarian at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, held a one-day “Data Management Basics” Workshop geared towards graduate students in engineering and science disciplines based on the New England Collaborative Data Management Curriculum. Students were asked to complete a pre-workshop survey and a series of seven post-module surveys throughout the day. This article discusses the results of the survey feedback, the planning process, and elaborates on important variables in planning data management training initiatives, such as disciplinary adjustments and time constraints. The article concludes with a discussion of the author’s future plans for providing training initiatives based on the feedback he received.

  3. Improving written and verbal communication skills for international medical graduates: a linguistic and medical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Duncan; Smalldridge, Ann

    2011-01-01

    Adapting to UK communication styles can be difficult for International Medical Graduates (IMGs). Reache Northwest provides education, training and support for internationally trained refugee and asylum seeking health professionals who are looking to return to work in the UK. A Safe and Effective Communication Skills course was designed by a team of language teachers and clinicians to provide IMGs with an understanding of the written, verbal and summarisation skills required in the UK work environment. A series of language exercises adapted to clinical situations was developed. These increased in complexity to the practical application of language skills in clinical settings using simulated patients. The combination of language and clinical tutors meant that feedback could be given from a language teacher's perspective, the clinical perspective and the cultural context. The combination of language and clinical tutors meant that analysis of communication difficulties could be made from different perspectives and detailed, specific feedback could be given to each student in these areas. Using a combined linguistic and clinical approach can provide solutions to clinical communication problems that may otherwise be missed. This strategy could be extended to cover communication areas in other contexts.

  4. Membership Survey Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis M Bowie

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In an effort to gather feedback from Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS members, the Executive sent out a survey to the membership and received replies from approximately one-third of the membership. This was an attempt to look at the role of the CTS and what the members wanted from the CTS.

  5. Are we closing the gap in faculty development needs for feedback training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, John D; Holak, Elena J; Tran, H Nicole; Muret-Wagstaff, Sharon; Jones, Stephanie B; Brzezinski, Marek

    2013-11-01

    To determine needs, adequacy, types of resources, and challenges in teaching faculty how to provide feedback to residents. Survey instrument. Academic medical center. Of the 115 anesthesia residency program directors surveyed, 69 responses were received (60% response rate). Percentages of respondents who indicated categories of need, adequacy, and types of resources for teaching faculty to give feedback to residents were recorded, as were narrative descriptions of challenges confronted by respondents. While the percentage of programs with faculty development resources has increased from 20.2% in 1999 to 48% today, an overwhelming majority of program directors (90%) feel that faculty require more training in providing feedback to residents. The majority of program directors also want more resources to train their faculty in providing feedback. While the perceived gap in providing training for faculty in giving feedback to anesthesia residents has narrowed, program director responses suggest a substantial unmet need remains. Innovative new approaches are in order. © 2013.

  6. Feedback traps for virtual potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrilov, Momčilo; Bechhoefer, John

    2017-03-01

    Feedback traps are tools for trapping and manipulating single charged objects, such as molecules in solution. An alternative to optical tweezers and other single-molecule techniques, they use feedback to counteract the Brownian motion of a molecule of interest. The trap first acquires information about a molecule's position and then applies an electric feedback force to move the molecule. Since electric forces are stronger than optical forces at small scales, feedback traps are the best way to trap single molecules without `touching' them (e.g. by putting them in a small box or attaching them to a tether). Feedback traps can do more than trap molecules: they can also subject a target object to forces that are calculated to be the gradient of a desired potential function U(x). If the feedback loop is fast enough, it creates a virtual potential whose dynamics will be very close to those of a particle in an actual potential U(x). But because the dynamics are entirely a result of the feedback loop-absent the feedback, there is only an object diffusing in a fluid-we are free to specify and then manipulate in time an arbitrary potential U(x,t). Here, we review recent applications of feedback traps to studies on the fundamental connections between information and thermodynamics, a topic where feedback plays an even more fundamental role. We discuss how recursive maximum-likelihood techniques allow continuous calibration, to compensate for drifts in experiments that last for days. We consider ways to estimate work and heat, using them to measure fluctuating energies to a precision of ±0.03 kT over these long experiments. Finally, we compare work and heat measurements of the costs of information erasure, the Landauer limit of kT ln 2 per bit of information erased. We argue that, when you want to know the average heat transferred to a bath in a long protocol, you should measure instead the average work and then infer the heat using the first law of thermodynamics. This

  7. Limited effect of screening for depression with written feedback in outpatients with diabetes mellitus: a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pouwer, F.; Tack, C.J.J.; Geelhoed-Duijvestijn, P.H.; Bazelmans, E.; Beekman, A.T.; Heine, R.J.; Snoek, F.J.

    2011-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The aim of this study was to test the effectiveness of a screening procedure for depression (SCR) vs care as usual (CAU) in outpatients with diabetes. The primary outcome measured was depression score and the secondary outcomes were mental healthcare consumption, diabetes-distress

  8. Pulsed feedback defers cellular differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe H Levine

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental signals induce diverse cellular differentiation programs. In certain systems, cells defer differentiation for extended time periods after the signal appears, proliferating through multiple rounds of cell division before committing to a new fate. How can cells set a deferral time much longer than the cell cycle? Here we study Bacillus subtilis cells that respond to sudden nutrient limitation with multiple rounds of growth and division before differentiating into spores. A well-characterized genetic circuit controls the concentration and phosphorylation of the master regulator Spo0A, which rises to a critical concentration to initiate sporulation. However, it remains unclear how this circuit enables cells to defer sporulation for multiple cell cycles. Using quantitative time-lapse fluorescence microscopy of Spo0A dynamics in individual cells, we observed pulses of Spo0A phosphorylation at a characteristic cell cycle phase. Pulse amplitudes grew systematically and cell-autonomously over multiple cell cycles leading up to sporulation. This pulse growth required a key positive feedback loop involving the sporulation kinases, without which the deferral of sporulation became ultrasensitive to kinase expression. Thus, deferral is controlled by a pulsed positive feedback loop in which kinase expression is activated by pulses of Spo0A phosphorylation. This pulsed positive feedback architecture provides a more robust mechanism for setting deferral times than constitutive kinase expression. Finally, using mathematical modeling, we show how pulsing and time delays together enable "polyphasic" positive feedback, in which different parts of a feedback loop are active at different times. Polyphasic feedback can enable more accurate tuning of long deferral times. Together, these results suggest that Bacillus subtilis uses a pulsed positive feedback loop to implement a "timer" that operates over timescales much longer than a cell cycle.

  9. Feedback i den laegelige postgraduate uddannelse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rubak, Sune; Ipsen, Merete; Sørensen, Jette

    2008-01-01

    . Feedback is essential in medical education and has great implications for the educational climate. It has been shown that a common language regarding the principles of feedback has a sustained effect on quality and frequency of feedback. Further research is needed on feedback and educational climate...

  10. Feedback Revolution: What Gets in the Way?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Icy

    2011-01-01

    Feedback in writing has in recent years attracted the attention of an increasing number of writing researchers. While much feedback research focuses on the act of feedback per se, little attention has been paid to the issue of teacher readiness to implement change in feedback. Using data gathered from Hong Kong secondary teachers attending a…

  11. Feedback as Real-Time Constructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiding, Tina Bering; Qvortrup, Ane

    2014-01-01

    This article offers a re-description of feedback and the significance of time in feedback constructions based on systems theory. It describes feedback as internal, real-time constructions in a learning system. From this perspective, feedback is neither immediate nor delayed, but occurs in the very moment it takes place. This article argues for a…

  12. Sustainable feedback: students’ and tutors’ perceptions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geitz, Gerry; Joosten-ten Brinke, Desirée; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2018-01-01

    Feedback has been shown to substantially influence students’ learning. However, not everything characterized as feedback is effective. Sustainable feedback places students in an active role in which they generate and use feedback from peers, self or others and aims at developing lifelong learning

  13. How does culture affect experiential training feedback in exported Canadian health professional curricula?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbur, Kerry; Mousa Bacha, Rasha; Abdelaziz, Somaia

    2017-03-17

    To explore feedback processes of Western-based health professional student training curricula conducted in an Arab clinical teaching setting. This qualitative study employed document analysis of in-training evaluation reports (ITERs) used by Canadian nursing, pharmacy, respiratory therapy, paramedic, dental hygiene, and pharmacy technician programs established in Qatar. Six experiential training program coordinators were interviewed between February and May 2016 to explore how national cultural differences are perceived to affect feedback processes between students and clinical supervisors. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and coded according to a priori cultural themes. Document analysis found all programs' ITERs outlined competency items for students to achieve. Clinical supervisors choose a response option corresponding to their judgment of student performance and may provide additional written feedback in spaces provided. Only one program required formal face-to-face feedback exchange between students and clinical supervisors. Experiential training program coordinators identified that no ITER was expressly culturally adapted, although in some instances, modifications were made for differences in scopes of practice between Canada and Qatar.  Power distance was recognized by all coordinators who also identified both student and supervisor reluctance to document potentially negative feedback in ITERs. Instances of collectivism were described as more lenient student assessment by clinical supervisors of the same cultural background. Uncertainty avoidance did not appear to impact feedback processes. Our findings suggest that differences in specific cultural dimensions between Qatar and Canada have implications on the feedback process in experiential training which may be addressed through simple measures to accommodate communication preferences.

  14. Feedback on Trait or Action Impacts on Caudate and Paracingulum Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelgren, Alva; Bengtsson, Sara L

    2015-01-01

    There is a general conception that positive associations to one’s trait, e.g. ‘I’m clever’, are beneficial for cognitive performance. Scientific evidence shows that this is a simplification. In this functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study we used written trial-based trait feedback ‘you are clever’, or task feedback ‘your choice was correct’, on each correct response of a rule-switching task, to investigate how the character of positive self-associations influences performance outcome. Twenty participants took part in this crossover design study. We found that trait feedback was less beneficial for motivation and performance improvement, and resulting in enhanced neural activation on more difficult bivalent rule trials. This indicates that the task was treated as more complex in this condition. For example, ‘you are clever’ feedback led to enhanced activation in anterior caudate nucleus, an area known to process uncertainty. We further observed that activation in anterior paracingulate cortex was sensitive to whether self-reflection was imposed by external feedback or generated from internal processes, where the latter activation correlated positively with performance when following after task feedback. Our results illustrate how feedback can evoke self-reflections that either help or hinder motivation and performance, most likely by impacting on processes of uncertainty. The results support social psychological models stipulating that trait focus take resources away from task focus. PMID:26102501

  15. Written language skills in children with specific language impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Gareth J; Larkin, Rebecca F; Blaggan, Samarita

    2013-01-01

    Young children are often required to carry out writing tasks in an educational context. However, little is known about the patterns of writing skills that children with specific language impairment (CwSLI) have relative to their typically developing peers. To assess the written language skills of CwSLI and compare these with typically developing peers. It also aimed to assess the relative contributions of reading and spelling skills to written language skills. Forty-five children took part in the study: 15 were CwSLI, 15 were a chronological age match and 15 were a spelling age match. The children took part in a range of tasks that assessed writing, reading and spelling abilities. In their written language and compared with typical age-matched peers, CwSLI used a significantly less diverse range of words, had lower quality written compositions overall, and lower levels of organization, unity and coherence. They also had a higher proportion of spelling errors. Overall, writing skills were strongly associated with reading skills. The findings demonstrate the challenges CwSLI have in producing good-quality written text and that these challenges are likely to be related to the linguistic skills profile shown by these children. © 2013 Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists.

  16. AGN feedback in dwarf galaxies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashyan, Gohar; Silk, Joseph; Mamon, Gary A.; Dubois, Yohan; Hartwig, Tilman

    2018-02-01

    Dwarf galaxy anomalies, such as their abundance and cusp-core problems, remain a prime challenge in our understanding of galaxy formation. The inclusion of baryonic physics could potentially solve these issues, but the efficiency of stellar feedback is still controversial. We analytically explore the possibility of feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in dwarf galaxies and compare AGN and supernova (SN) feedback. We assume the presence of an intermediate-mass black hole within low-mass galaxies and standard scaling relations between the relevant physical quantities. We model the propagation and properties of the outflow and explore the critical condition for global gas ejection. Performing the same calculation for SNe, we compare the ability of AGNs and SNe to drive gas out of galaxies. We find that a critical halo mass exists below which AGN feedback can remove gas from the host halo and that the critical halo mass for an AGN is greater than the equivalent for SNe in a significant part of the parameter space, suggesting that an AGN could provide an alternative and more successful source of negative feedback than SNe, even in the most massive dwarf galaxies.

  17. Speech-language therapy for adolescents with written-language difficulties: The South African context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danel Erasmus

    2013-11-01

    Method: A survey study was conducted, using a self-administered questionnaire. Twenty-two currently practising speech-language therapists who are registered members of the South African Speech-Language-Hearing Association (SASLHA participated in the study. Results: The respondents indicated that they are aware of their role regarding adolescents with written-language difficulties. However, they feel that South-African speech-language therapists are not fulfilling this role. Existing assessment tools and interventions for written-language difficulties are described as inadequate, and culturally and age inappropriate. Yet, the majority of the respondents feel that they are adequately equipped to work with adolescents with written-language difficulties, based on their own experience, self-study and secondary training. The respondents feel that training regarding effective collaboration with teachers is necessary to establish specific roles, and to promote speech-language therapy for adolescents among teachers. Conclusion: Further research is needed in developing appropriate assessment and intervention tools as well as improvement of training at an undergraduate level.

  18. The impact of online therapeutic feedback on outcome measures in Internet-CBTI for adolescents with insomnia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruin, E.J.; Meijer, A.M.

    Background Guided Internet cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBTI) offers an effective treatment for adolescents, but little is known about the active ingredients of therapeutic feedback on outcomes. Objective This study aims to identify which factors can be distinguished in written

  19. Analyzing graduate student trends in written paper evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giddens, Jean Foret; Lobo, Marie

    2008-10-01

    Writing is valued as an essential skill in nursing education. However, the evaluation of written scholarly work is challenging. Limited nursing literature addressing issues or strategies associated with evaluation exists. The purpose of this study was to describe and evaluate differences that exist in the evaluation of a standardized written paper. The study included a sample of 47 graduate nursing students enrolled in a nursing education course. Participants were asked to grade a mock paper as part of a course assignment; their work was retained for data analysis. Wide variability in scoring and comments on the paper were noted; significantly lower scores were assigned by participants who had experience teaching in academic settings. The majority of written comments made by participants were related to grammar and American Psychological Association formatting or citation problems. Further research is needed to better understand paper evaluation practices of nursing faculty.

  20. Driving feedback : psychological factors influencing the effectiveness of feedback

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dogan, Ebru

    2013-01-01

    Automobilisten rijden niet altijd veilig en duurzaam. Het geven van feedback wordt over het algemeen beschouwd als een kansrijke strategie om automobilisten bewust te maken van de gevolgen van hun gedrag, en om hun gedrag te veranderen. Er is tot nu toe echter weinig bekend over welke factoren de

  1. Linear feedback controls the essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Haidekker, Mark A

    2013-01-01

    The design of control systems is at the very core of engineering. Feedback controls are ubiquitous, ranging from simple room thermostats to airplane engine control. Helping to make sense of this wide-ranging field, this book provides a new approach by keeping a tight focus on the essentials with a limited, yet consistent set of examples. Analysis and design methods are explained in terms of theory and practice. The book covers classical, linear feedback controls, and linear approximations are used when needed. In parallel, the book covers time-discrete (digital) control systems and juxtapos

  2. Cafemodellen: Anerkendende feedback i projektgrupper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lene Tortzen Bager

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Kan feedback på meningsfuld måde varetages af de studerende selv? Kan de studerende lære at anvende feedbackformer, der kvalificerer dem til at indgå i fagligt lærende fællesskaber? I artiklen beskrives erfaringer med at lade studerende give hinanden feedback gennem cafemodellen i forbindelse med projektarbejde. Den pædagogiske hensigt hermed er, at de studerende får erfaring med en anerkendende tilgang, med at anvende dialogens lytte- og tale-positioner aktivt samt med at konstituere sin rolle som studerende i et lærende fællesskab

  3. Written emotional expression: effect sizes, outcome types, and moderating variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, J M

    1998-02-01

    A research synthesis was conducted to examine the relationship between a written emotional expression task and subsequent health. This writing task was found to lead to significantly improved health outcomes in healthy participants. Health was enhanced in 4 outcome types--reported physical health, psychological well-being, physiological functioning, and general functioning--but health behaviors were not influenced. Writing also increased immediate (pre- to postwriting) distress, which was unrelated to health outcomes. The relation between written emotional expression and health was moderated by a number of variables, including the use of college students as participants, gender, duration of the manipulation, publication status of the study, and specific writing content instructions.

  4. Thermal stability of directly UV-written waveguides and devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulstad, K.; Svalgaard, Mikael

    1998-01-01

    Accelerated aging experiments of directly UV-written straight waveguides, s-bends and directional couplers have been made. The results show that these structures are nearly unaffected by thousands of thermal cycles between +22°C and +80°C......Accelerated aging experiments of directly UV-written straight waveguides, s-bends and directional couplers have been made. The results show that these structures are nearly unaffected by thousands of thermal cycles between +22°C and +80°C...

  5. Champion lineman scores unprecedented 100 on written test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon

    2011-01-15

    The 27th annual international lineman's rodeo saw a lineman from Duke Energy Distribution named World Champion Apprentice. He was also the first competitor to score 100 % in the written test and finished first in the apprentice category in the investor owned utility (IOU) division. The apprentice division is made up of linemen within their first four years of trade. Events include a hurt man rescue, pole climb, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), mystery event and a written test. The rodeo began in 1984, and this year more than 650 men competed.

  6. Förderung von schriftsprachlichen Kompetenzen im Fremd- bzw. Zweitsprachenunterricht: Zum Verhältnis von Motivation und schriftlichem Feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Busse

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Die Entwicklung schriftsprachlicher Fähigkeiten ist ein wesentlicher Bestandteil des Sprachenunterrichts. Wie beim Erwerb anderer Kompetenzen spielen Lernmotivation und Feedback hierbei eine wichtige Rolle. Der vorliegende Artikel behandelt das Wechselspiel zwischen Motivation und Feedback und gibt eine Übersicht über empirische Studien, die die motivationale Wirkung verschiedener Arten von schriftlichem Feedback untersuchen. Arbeiten zum Einfluss individueller Unterschiede und existierender Motivationsprofile auf die Wahrnehmung und Rezeption von Feedback werden dabei ebenso thematisiert wie Studien, die sich mit Feedbackpräferenzen beschäftigen. Abschließend werden auf der Grundlage des Forschungsstands Implikationen für die Praxis herausgearbeitet.   Developing writing skills is an essential component of language education. As in the case of acquiring other competencies, learning motivation and feedback play an important role in this respect. The present article explores the interplay between motivation and feedback and provides an overview of empirical studies which explore the motivational effect of different kinds of written feedback. The influence of individual differences and existing motivational profiles on perception and reception of feedback will be discussed, in addition to studies which deal with feedback preferences. The article concludes by discussing practical implications deriving from the literature review.

  7. The Comparative Effects of Comprehensible Input, Output and Corrective Feedback on the Receptive Acquisition of L2 Vocabulary Items

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Nowbakht

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the comparative effects of comprehensible input, output and corrective feedback on the receptive acquisition of L2 vocabulary items were investigated. Two groups of beginning EFL learners participated in the study. The control group received comprehensible input only, while the experimental group received input and was required to produce written output. They also received corrective feedback on their lexical errors if any. This could result in the production of modified output. The results of the study indicated that (a the group which produced output and received feedback (if necessary outperformed the group which only received input in the post-test, (b within the experimental group, feedback played a greater role in learners’ better performance than output, (c also a positive correlation between the amount of feedback an individual learner received, and his overall performance in the post-test; and also between the amount of feedback given for a specific word and the correct responses given to its related item in the post-test was found.  The findings of this study provide evidence for the role of output production along with receiving corrective feedback in enhancing L2 processing by drawing further L2 learners’ attention to their output which in turn may result in improving their receptive acquisition of L2 words. Furthermore, as the results suggested, feedback made a more contribution to L2 development than output. Keywords: comprehensible input, output, interaction, corrective feedback, modified output, receptive vocabulary acquisition

  8. Telephony user survey

    CERN Multimedia

    IT Department

    2016-01-01

    Let us know your needs to better plan the transition to a new CERN telephony system.   CERN is planning to upgrade its telephony network and replace the system with a new and modern VoIP infrastructure. We strive to make this transition as beneficial and smooth as possible for you. Please let us know more about your current working environment, expectations and suggestions by responding to this survey: https://cern.ch/tel-survey. The more answers we get, the better the new system will serve everyone in the future. The survey will take you about five minutes to complete; we are counting on your feedback!

  9. Navigating User Feedback Channels to Chart an Evidence Based Course for Library Redesign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Derek Halling

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives – The objective of this project was to redesign library spaces based on the user feedback obtained from a broad complement of feedback channels. The over-arching goal of this project was to develop an evidence based approach to the redesign of library spaces.Methods – Data from user-initiated and library-initiated feedback channels were collected and analyzed to determine priorities for library space changes. Online/onsite suggestions, a library onsite census survey, the LibQUAL+® survey, a whiteboard, ballot voting, and text voting were all used to gather input. A student advisory group was used as a sounding board for planned space changes before a final decision was made.Results – Data produced by different feedback channels varied both in the number of suggestions generated as well as the changes requested. Composite data from all feedback channels resulted in a total of 687 suggestions identifying 17 different types of space changes. An onsite whiteboard, the LibQUAL+® survey, and library census proved the most prolific in producing suggestions.Conclusion – Priorities for space changes were best determined through a composite of suggestions received from all feedback channels. The number of suggestions and requests received that were initiated by users was so small that it had to be supplemented with library-initiated feedback requests. The use of multiple feedback channels enhanced the number, variety, and scope of the suggestions that were received. Similar requests received through multiple feedback channels emphasized their importance to users. Focused follow-up feedback channels were effective in clarifying user suggestions for specific changes.

  10. The effect of oral interactive feedback on the accuracy and complexity of EFL learners’ writing performance: Uptake and retention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roya Akbarzadeh

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The role of teacher-student interaction and collaboration in solving linguistic problems has recently been in the center of SLA research. Accordingly, this study investigated the effect of Oral Interactive Feedback (OIF on the accuracy and complexity of Iranian intermediate EFL learners’ writing. After ensuring the homogeneity using Preliminary English Test (PET, the researchers randomly assigned 50 sophomores into OIF group and Explicit Feedback (EF group, with 25 students in each of them. The participants in the OIF group received oral interactive feedback, including elicitation and metalinguistic clues, on their written errors, while those in the EF group received oral explicit correction on their written errors. Data collection was based on immediate revisions of compositions and a post-test. Using ANCOVA, the researchers found that the OIF group outperformed the EF group in terms of both accuracy and complexity in both revised compositions and post-test. The findings from the study may encourage language teachers’ further use

  11. The effect of positive and negative verbal feedback on surgical skills performance and motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannappan, Aarthy; Yip, Dana T; Lodhia, Nayna A; Morton, John; Lau, James N

    2012-01-01

    There is considerable effort and time invested in providing feedback to medical students and residents during their time in training. However, little effort has been made to measure the effects of positive and negative verbal feedback on skills performance and motivation to learn and practice. To probe these questions, first-year medical students (n = 25) were recruited to perform a peg transfer task on Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery box trainers. Time to completion and number of errors were recorded. The students were then randomized to receive either positive or negative verbal feedback from an expert in the field of laparoscopic surgery. After this delivery of feedback, the students repeated the peg transfer task. Differences in performance pre- and post-feedback and also between the groups who received positive feedback (PF) vs negative feedback (NF) were analyzed. A survey was then completed by all the participants. Baseline task times were similar between groups (PF 209.3 seconds; NF 203 seconds, p = 0.58). The PF group averaged 1.83 first-time errors while the NF group 1 (p = 0.84). Post-feedback task times were significantly decreased for both groups (PF 159.75 seconds, p = 0.05; NF 132.08 seconds, p = 0.002). While the NF group demonstrated a greater improvement in mean time than the PF group, this was not statistically significant. Both groups also made fewer errors (PF 0.33 errors, p = 0.04; NF 0.38 errors, p = 0.23). When surveyed about their responses to standardized feedback scenarios, the students stated that both positive and negative verbal feedback could be potent stimulants for improved performance and motivation. Further research is required to better understand the effects of feedback on learner motivation and the interpersonal dynamic between mentors and their trainees. Copyright © 2012 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. What Parents Want: Does Provider Knowledge of Written Parental Expectations Improve Satisfaction in the Emergency Department?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoltowski, Kathleen S W; Mistry, Rakesh D; Brousseau, David C; Whitfill, Travis; Aronson, Paul L

    2016-01-01

    Satisfaction is an important measure of care quality. Interventions to improve satisfaction in the pediatric emergency department (ED) are limited, especially for patients with nonurgent conditions. Our objective was to determine if clinician knowledge of written parental expectations improves parental satisfaction for nonurgent ED visits. This randomized controlled trial was conducted in a tertiary-care pediatric ED. Parents of children presenting for nonurgent visits (Emergency Severity Index level 4 or 5) were randomized into 3 groups: 1) the intervention group completed an expectation survey on arrival, which was reviewed by the clinician, 2) the control group completed the expectation survey, which was not reviewed, and 3) the baseline group did not complete an expectation survey. At ED disposition, all groups completed a 3-item satisfaction survey, scored using 5-point Likert scales (1 = very poor, 5 = very good). The primary outcome was rating of "overall care." Secondary outcomes included likelihood of recommending the ED and staff sensitivity to concerns. Proportions were compared by chi-square test. A total of 304 subjects were enrolled. The proportion of parents rating 5 of 5 for overall care did not differ among the baseline, control, and intervention groups (74.8% vs 73.2% vs 69.2%, P = .56). The proportion of parents rating 5 of 5 also did not differ for likelihood of recommending the ED (77.7% vs 72.2% vs 70.2%, P = .45) or staff sensitivity to concerns (78.6% vs 78.4% vs 78.8%, P = .71). For nonurgent pediatric ED visits, clinician knowledge of written parental expectations does not improve parental satisfaction. Copyright © 2016 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. LFSC - Linac Feedback Simulation Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, Valentin; /Fermilab

    2008-05-01

    The computer program LFSC (Feedback Simulation Code>) is a numerical tool for simulation beam based feedback in high performance linacs. The code LFSC is based on the earlier version developed by a collective of authors at SLAC (L.Hendrickson, R. McEwen, T. Himel, H. Shoaee, S. Shah, P. Emma, P. Schultz) during 1990-2005. That code was successively used in simulation of SLC, TESLA, CLIC and NLC projects. It can simulate as pulse-to-pulse feedback on timescale corresponding to 5-100 Hz, as slower feedbacks, operating in the 0.1-1 Hz range in the Main Linac and Beam Delivery System. The code LFSC is running under Matlab for MS Windows operating system. It contains about 30,000 lines of source code in more than 260 subroutines. The code uses the LIAR ('Linear Accelerator Research code') for particle tracking under ground motion and technical noise perturbations. It uses the Guinea Pig code to simulate the luminosity performance. A set of input files includes the lattice description (XSIF format), and plane text files with numerical parameters, wake fields, ground motion data etc. The Matlab environment provides a flexible system for graphical output.

  14. Feedback: How to Teach How.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krovar, Susan K.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    To give definitive feedback, physical education teachers must be able to teach basic kinesiological and mechanical principles of movement and how they apply to specific sports skills. The article includes a chart with common kinesiological and mechanical principles applied to particular movements. Appropriate teaching cues are noted. (SM)

  15. Fishualization: a group feedback display

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schavemaker, J.G.M.; Boertjes, E.M.; Koldijk, S.J.; Wiertz, L.; Verberne, S.; Sappelli, M.; Kaptein, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    In this contribution1 we present a novel psychological intervention that maps human computer activity to a group feedback device on the basis of a combination of various types of unobtrusive, low-level sensors. The goal is to enable employees to gain insights into their working habits, to reduce

  16. Cardiac concomitants of feedback processing.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crone, E.A.; van der Veen, F.M.; van der Molen, M.W.; Somsen, R.J.; van Beek, B.; Jennings, J.R.

    2003-01-01

    This study examined the heart rate changes associated with positive and negative performance feedback in a probabilistic learning task derived from Holroyd and Coles (2002). In this task, 21 20-29 yr old college students were presented with six stimuli and asked to respond by pressing a left versus

  17. Tubuloglomerular feedback in Dahl rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsen, F M; Leyssac, P P; Holstein-Rathlou, N H

    1998-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated a loss of autoregulation in Dahl salt-sensitive (Dahl-S) rats rendered hypertensive on a high-salt diet. To determine whether this was due to a decreased activity of either the myogenic or the tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF) response, we tested the TGF response...

  18. Environmental Feedback and Spatial Conditioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Isak Worre; Poulsen, Esben Skouboe

    2010-01-01

    with structural integrity, where thermal energy flow through the prototype, to be understood as a membrane, can be controlled and the visual transparancy altered. The work shows performance based feedback systems and physical prototype models driven by information streaming, screening and application....

  19. A Comparison of Biology Majors' Written Arguments across the Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schen, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    Argumentation in science is the process of coordinating theory and evidence to justify conclusions. This practice is at the heart of scientific journal writing and communication, but little is known regarding the argument quality of college science majors, the future scientists. Studies on written arguments at the college level have focused…

  20. THE PHONOLOGICAL BASIS OF MISSPELLINGS IN THE WRITTEN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Misspellings have been a common error in the written English of non-native speakers. Though even native speakers of English mis-spell words in English, this study focused only on ... has phonological segments that are influenced by the phonological structure of Kikuyu. Key words: Error Analysis, Phonology, Orthography ...

  1. Early History of Written Oromo Language up to 1900 | Tolessa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this paper is to make known historical development of written Afaan Oromo to 1900. The study draws upon primary and secondary sources. The primary data are drawn from oral and archival sources. Books and articles in Afaan Oromo and in other languages about Afaan Oromo were consulted. Many of ...

  2. Airline Transport Pilot-Airplane (Air Carrier) Written Test Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC. Flight Standards Service.

    Presented is information useful to applicants who are preparing for the Airline Transport Pilot-Airplane (Air Carrier) Written Test. The guide describes the basic aeronautical knowledge and associated requirements for certification, as well as information on source material, instructions for taking the official test, and questions that are…

  3. Commercial Pilot Airplane Written Test Guide. Revised Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC. Flight Standards Service.

    This guide is intended to help applicants prepare for the Commercial Airplane Pilot Written Test. The guide outlines the aeronautical knowledge requirements for a commercial pilot, informs the applicant of source material that can be used to acquire their knowledge, and includes test items and illustrations representative of those used in the…

  4. Integrating Technology Tools for Students Struggling with Written Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedora, Pledger

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory study was designed to assess the experience of preservice teachers when integrating written language technology and their likelihood of applying that technology in their future classrooms. Results suggest that after experiencing technology integration, preservice teachers are more likely to use it in their future teaching.

  5. 19 CFR 123.72 - Written agreement requirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Written agreement requirement. 123.72 Section 123.72 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY CUSTOMS RELATIONS WITH CANADA AND MEXICO Land Border Carrier Initiative Program § 123.72...

  6. Processing of Written Irony: An Eye Movement Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaakinen, Johanna K.; Olkoniemi, Henri; Kinnari, Taina; Hyönä, Jukka

    2014-01-01

    We examined processing of written irony by recording readers' eye movements while they read target phrases embedded either in ironic or non-ironic story context. After reading each story, participants responded to a text memory question and an inference question tapping into the understanding of the meaning of the target phrase. The results of…

  7. The On-Line Processing of Written Irony

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filik, Ruth; Moxey, Linda M.

    2010-01-01

    We report an eye-tracking study in which we investigate the on-line processing of written irony. Specifically, participants' eye movements were recorded while they read sentences which were either intended ironically, or non-ironically, and subsequent text which contained pronominal reference to the ironic (or non-ironic) phrase. Results showed…

  8. Characterization of UV written waveguides with luminescence microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svalgaard, Mikael; Harpøth, Anders; Rosbirk, Tue

    2005-01-01

    Luminescence microscopy is used to measure the refractive index profile and molecular defect distribution of UV written waveguides with a spatial resolution of ~0.4 mm and high signal-to-noise ratio. The measurements reveal comlex waveguide formation dynamics with significant topological changes...

  9. Effects of Jigsaw III Technique on Achievement in Written Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Abdullah

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to compare the Jigsaw III technique (of cooperative learning) with the instructional teacher-centered teaching method in six graders in terms of the effect of written expression on their academic success. The universe of the study consists of 71 sixth-grade students studying during 2009-2010 academic term in a…

  10. Learners' right to freedom of written expression | Van Vollenhoven ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An important aspect of education about the rights and duties that underpin citizenship is to learn both the use of, and the appropriate limits upon, freedom of expression essential to a functioning democracy. In this article we look at problems that may arise in connection with written expression by learners in schools, ...

  11. 36 CFR 1120.24 - Misdirected written requests; oral requests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Misdirected written requests; oral requests. 1120.24 Section 1120.24 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD PUBLIC AVAILABILITY OF INFORMATION Information Available Upon Request...

  12. Written Rhetorical Syntheses: Processes and Products. Technical Report No. 17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantz, Margaret J.

    When students write syntheses in response to a rhetorical task, does the rhetorical nature of the task exert some special influence on the students' composing processes? How do these processes differ? Three case studies, quantitative analyses of papers written by seventeen undergraduates, and a tentative model of a synthesizing process address…

  13. Proctoring Oral and Written Performance in a Motivation Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, K. Anthony; Gottula, Penelope

    A comparison of oral interviewing and written proctoring procedures is described. Students were required to present units orally or in writing from unit study guides. Final exam scores were positively correlated with the number of oral interviews one student interviewer gave to another student, and negatively correlated with the number of…

  14. A Comparison between Written and Spoken Narratives in Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrns, Ingrid; Wengelin, Asa; Broberg, Malin; Hartelius, Lena

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore how a personal narrative told by a group of eight persons with aphasia differed between written and spoken language, and to compare this with findings from 10 participants in a reference group. The stories were analysed through holistic assessments made by 60 participants without experience of aphasia…

  15. Cracking the code: residents' interpretations of written assessment comments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ginsburg, S.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der; Eva, K.W.; Lingard, L.

    2017-01-01

    CONTEXT: Interest is growing in the use of qualitative data for assessment. Written comments on residents' in-training evaluation reports (ITERs) can be reliably rank-ordered by faculty attendings, who are adept at interpreting these narratives. However, if residents do not interpret assessment

  16. Timed written picture naming in 14 European languages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrance, Mark; Nottbusch, Guido; Alves, Rui A; Arfé, Barbara; Chanquoy, Lucile; Chukharev-Hudilainen, Evgeny; Dimakos, Ioannis; Fidalgo, Raquel; Hyönä, Jukka; Jóhannesson, Ómar I; Madjarov, George; Pauly, Dennis N; Uppstad, Per Henning; van Waes, Luuk; Vernon, Michael; Wengelin, Åsa

    2017-05-24

    We describe the Multilanguage Written Picture Naming Dataset. This gives trial-level data and time and agreement norms for written naming of the 260 pictures of everyday objects that compose the colorized Snodgrass and Vanderwart picture set (Rossion & Pourtois in Perception, 33, 217-236, 2004). Adult participants gave keyboarded responses in their first language under controlled experimental conditions (N = 1,274, with subsamples responding in Bulgarian, Dutch, English, Finnish, French, German, Greek, Icelandic, Italian, Norwegian, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, and Swedish). We measured the time to initiate a response (RT) and interkeypress intervals, and calculated measures of name and spelling agreement. There was a tendency across all languages for quicker RTs to pictures with higher familiarity, image agreement, and name frequency, and with higher name agreement. Effects of spelling agreement and effects on output rates after writing onset were present in some, but not all, languages. Written naming therefore shows name retrieval effects that are similar to those found in speech, but our findings suggest the need for cross-language comparisons as we seek to understand the orthographic retrieval and/or assembly processes that are specific to written output.

  17. Written Formative Assessment and Silence in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee Hang, Desmond Mene; Bell, Beverley

    2015-01-01

    In this commentary, we build on Xinying Yin and Gayle Buck's discussion by exploring the cultural practices which are integral to formative assessment, when it is viewed as a sociocultural practice. First we discuss the role of assessment and in particular oral and written formative assessments in both western and Samoan cultures, building on the…

  18. Written Language Skills in Children with Specific Language Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Gareth J.; Larkin, Rebecca F.; Blaggan, Samarita

    2013-01-01

    Background: Young children are often required to carry out writing tasks in an educational context. However, little is known about the patterns of writing skills that children with specific language impairment (CwSLI) have relative to their typically developing peers. Aims: To assess the written language skills of CwSLI and compare these with…

  19. Connecting Oral and Written Language Through Applied Writing Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brice, Roanne G.

    2004-01-01

    Written language requires prior knowledge of many foundation language skills. Students with language learning disabilities find it difficult to integrate language skills into academic writing assignments. Exceptional educators can teach foundation writing skills through certain underlying components of language, that is, phonology, morphology,…

  20. Written Narrative Characteristics in Adults with Language Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suddarth, Rachael; Plante, Elena; Vance, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Adults with language-based disabilities are known to have deficits in oral language; however, less is known about their written language skills. Two studies were designed to characterize the writing of adults with language-based disabilities. Method: In Study 1, 60 adults, 30 with language impairment and 30 with typical language,…

  1. Learner Creativity and Performance in Written Narrative Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pishghadam, Reza; Mehr, Fatemh Javdan

    2011-01-01

    This study aims at examining the relationship between learner creativity and performance in written narrative tasks in the context of Iranian EFL students. To this end, a sample of 222 EFL students from four universities in Mashhad (Iran) participated in this study. Our study involved measuring the participants' creativity using creativity test…

  2. 37 CFR 2.124 - Depositions upon written questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Depositions upon written questions. 2.124 Section 2.124 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE RULES OF PRACTICE IN TRADEMARK CASES Procedure in Inter Partes Proceedings § 2.124...

  3. Verbal irony: Differences in usage across written genres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgers, C.F.; van Mulken, M.J.P.; Schellens, P.J.M.C.

    2012-01-01

    According to Gibbs and Colston, one of the biggest challenges for irony research is the uncovering of the various ways in which irony is used in discourse. This article takes up a genre-based approach to deal with this research challenge. In a content analysis of ironic utterances from six written

  4. 16 CFR 701.3 - Written warranty terms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... consumer product actually costing the consumer more than $15.00 shall clearly and conspicuously disclose in... MAGNUSON-MOSS WARRANTY ACT DISCLOSURE OF WRITTEN CONSUMER PRODUCT WARRANTY TERMS AND CONDITIONS § 701.3... identification of products, or parts, or characteristics, or components or properties covered by and where...

  5. Written Language Comprehension in Younger and Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Joyce L.; Rogers, Wendy A.; Qualls, Constance D.

    1998-01-01

    This study examined effects of text genre and repeated reading on written language comprehension in younger (mean age 21) and older (mean age 72) healthy adults. Although reading time was significantly faster for younger adults, there were appreciable influences of text genre and repeated reading on measures of text processing and comprehension in…

  6. Written Cohesion in Children with and without Language Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutsoftas, Anthony D.; Petersen, Victoria

    2017-01-01

    Background: Cohesion refers to the linguistic elements of discourse that contribute to its continuity and is an important element to consider as part of written language intervention, especially in children with language learning disabilities (LLD). There is substantial evidence that children with LLD perform more poorly than typically developing…

  7. Fidelity of Implementation: Bringing Written Curriculum Materials into the Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Superfine, Alison Castro; Marshall, Anne Marie; Kelso, Cathy

    2015-01-01

    Fidelity of curriculum implementation (FOI) is an important area of research because of the critical role it plays in understanding how and why curriculum materials work and how they can be improved. This analysis explores written features within the Math Trailblazers curriculum that may influence the ways teachers implement mathematics curriculum…

  8. Distribution of Articles in Written Composition among Malaysian ESL Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim, Mia Emily Abdul; Rahim, Emma Marini Abdul; Ning, Chia Han

    2013-01-01

    The study aimed to investigate the distribution patterns of the English grammar articles (a, an, and the) as well as the distributions of their colligation patterns in written compositions of English among Malaysian ESL learners. This paper reports the results of a corpus-based study on articles used by these learners. The method used in this…

  9. Comparing Written Competency in Core French and French Immersion Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappin-Fortin, Kerry

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have compared the written competency of French immersion students and their core French peers, and research on these learners at a postsecondary level is even scarcer. My corpus consists of writing samples from 255 students from both backgrounds beginning a university course in French language. The writing proficiency of core French…

  10. Short message service (SMS) language and written language skills ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SMS language is English language slang, used as a means of mobile phone text messaging. This practice may impact on the written language skills of learners at school. The main aim of this study was to determine the perspectives of Grade 8 and 9 English (as Home Language) educators in Gauteng regarding the ...

  11. 31 CFR 10.37 - Requirements for other written advice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... give written advice (including electronic communications) concerning one or more Federal tax issues if... or should know, or, in evaluating a Federal tax issue, takes into account the possibility that a tax return will not be audited, that an issue will not be raised on audit, or that an issue will be resolved...

  12. 42 CFR 456.180 - Individual written plan of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Individual written plan of care. 456.180 Section 456.180 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Utilization Control: Mental Hospitals...

  13. Providing Feedback: Practical Skills and Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkany, David; Deitte, Lori

    2017-06-01

    Feedback is an essential component of education. It is designed to influence, reinforce, and change behaviors, concepts, and attitudes in learners. Although providing constructive feedback can be challenging, it is a learnable skill. The negative consequences of destructive feedback or lack of feedback all together are far-reaching. This article summarizes the components of constructive feedback and provides readers with tangible skills to enhance their ability to give effective feedback to learners and peers. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Preface: Multiscale feedbacks in ecogeomorphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheaton, Joseph M.; Gibbins, Chris; Wainwright, John; Larsen, Laurel G.; McElroy, Brandon

    2011-01-01

    Geomorphic systems are known to exhibit nonlinear responses to physical–biological feedbacks (Thornes, 1985; Baas, 2002; Reinhardt et al., 2010). These responses make understanding and/or predicting system response to change highly challenging. With growing concerns over ecosystem health, a pressing need exists for research that tries to elucidate these feedbacks (Jerolmack, 2008; Darby, 2010; National Research Council, 2010). A session was convened at the Fall 2008 meeting of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) to provide an outlet for some of this truly interdisciplinary and original research, which is central to understanding geomorphic and ecological dynamics. The session attracted over 39 contributions, which were divided into two well-attended oral sessions and a very busy poster session. This special issue presents new research from the AGU session, which highlights clear physical–biological feedbacks. The aim is to bring together contrasting perspectives on biological and geomorphic feedbacks in a diversity of physiographic settings, ranging from wetlands and estuaries, through rivers, to uplands. These papers highlight biological and physical feedbacks which involve the modulation or amplification of geomorphic processes. These papers will be of interest to a core geomorphology audience, and should also draw attention from the fields of ecohydraulics, hydroecology, ecohydrology, ecomorphology, biogeochemistry and biogeography, and biogeomorphology as well as the more traditional fields of hydrology, ecology and biology. In this preface to the special issue, we a) review past contributions to the emerging field of ecogeomorphology and related disciplines, b) provide some context for how this topical special issue came to fruition, and c) summarize the contributions to this special issue.

  15. The Effects of Feedback Types on Learners’ Recognition of Lexical Collocations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Ali Zarei

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effects of three types of feedback on Iranian EFL learners’ recognition of lexical collocations. 78 pre-intermediate students from among 90 were selected to participate in this study. A KET (Key English Test was used in order to homogenize them. A teacher-made pre-test including all 150 target lexical collocations was used to make sure that the students did not know the target lexical collocations beforehand. Then the participants were divided into three experimental groups. All groups received the same instruction during 10 sessions of treatment. However, they received different types of feedback. Each session, the teacher gave a handout including 15 English sentences to each student. There was one lexical collocation in each sentence which was written in parentheses. Students were asked to write 15 collocations within twenty minutes and then submit the paper to the teacher. Then the teacher underlined the errors and gave them back to the students. Students in group A received direct feedback from the teacher. Students in group B received indirect feedback and the last group received peer feedback on their collocational errors. At the end of the treatment, 30 multiple-choice items were used to test students’ recognition of lexical collocations. The result of One-Way ANOVA procedure revealed that the group that received indirect feedback had the best performance, followed closely by the group that received peer feedback. Students in direct feedback group had the lowest performance. The findings suggest that different types of feedback have different effects on EFL learners’ recognition of lexical collocations.

  16. An Extended Validity Argument for Assessing Feedback Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rougas, Steven; Clyne, Brian; Cianciolo, Anna T; Chan, Teresa M; Sherbino, Jonathan; Yarris, Lalena M

    2015-01-01

    NEGEA 2015 CONFERENCE ABSTRACT (EDITED): Measuring an Organization's Culture of Feedback: Can It Be Done? Steven Rougas and Brian Clyne. CONSTRUCT: This study sought to develop a construct for measuring formative feedback culture in an academic emergency medicine department. Four archetypes (Market, Adhocracy, Clan, Hierarchy) reflecting an organization's values with respect to focus (internal vs. external) and process (flexibility vs. stability and control) were used to characterize one department's receptiveness to formative feedback. The prevalence of residents' identification with certain archetypes served as an indicator of the department's organizational feedback culture. New regulations have forced academic institutions to implement wide-ranging changes to accommodate competency-based milestones and their assessment. These changes challenge residencies that use formative feedback from faculty as a major source of data for determining training advancement. Though various approaches have been taken to improve formative feedback to residents, there currently exists no tool to objectively measure the organizational culture that surrounds this process. Assessing organizational culture, commonly used in the business sector to represent organizational health, may help residency directors gauge their program's success in fostering formative feedback. The Organizational Culture Assessment Instrument (OCAI) is widely used, extensively validated, applicable to survey research, and theoretically based and may be modifiable to assess formative feedback culture in the emergency department. Using a modified Delphi technique and several iterations of focus groups amongst educators at one institution, four of the original six OCAI domains (which each contain 4 possible responses) were modified to create a 16-item Formative Feedback Culture Tool (FFCT) that was administered to 26 residents (response rate = 55%) at a single academic emergency medicine department. The mean

  17. Student Voice: Using Qualitative Feedback from Students to Enhance Their University Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebennikov, Leonid; Shah, Mahsood

    2013-01-01

    Many performance indicators in Australian higher education are based on the quantitative data from student feedback surveys, while the qualitative data usually generated by these surveys receive relatively limited attention. This paper argues that these data, if collected and analysed in a systematic way, can be used as an effective and robust…

  18. Students Reflecting on Test Performance and Feedback: An On-Line Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyfe, Georgina; Fyfe, Sue; Meyer, Jan; Ziman, Mel; Sanders, Kathy; Hill, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Undergraduate students accessing on-line tests in Human Biology in three Western Australian universities were asked to complete an on-line post-test reflective survey about their perceptions of their test performance in light of automated feedback. The survey allowed pre-determined choices and comment text boxes relating to students' perceptions…

  19. Using Fairy Tales, Written in Spanish, Which Are Parallels to Fairy Tales Written in English, for Enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saenz, Mary D.

    The study shows that there are Spanish fairy tales which are parallels to some well-known fairy tales written in English. These fairy tales are not merely translations of the English, but have certain character and plot similarities that allow them to be compared. This study compares eight fairy tales--the English tale is discussed first, then the…

  20. Development of a written assessment for a national interprofessional cardiotocography education program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thellesen, Line; Bergholt, Thomas; Hedegaard, Morten; Colov, Nina Palmgren; Christensen, Karl Bang; Andersen, Kristine Sylvan; Sorensen, Jette Led

    2017-05-18

    To reduce the incidence of hypoxic brain injuries among newborns a national cardiotocography (CTG) education program was implemented in Denmark. A multiple-choice question test was integrated as part of the program. The aim of this article was to describe and discuss the test development process and to introduce a feasible method for written test development in general. The test development was based on the unitary approach to validity. The process involved national consensus on learning objectives, standardized item writing, pilot testing, sensitivity analyses, standard setting and evaluation of psychometric properties using Item Response Theory models. Test responses and feedback from midwives, specialists and residents in obstetrics and gynecology, and medical and midwifery students were used in the process (proofreaders n = 6, pilot test participants n = 118, CTG course participants n = 1679). The final test included 30 items and the passing score was established at 25 correct answers. All items fitted a loglinear Rasch model and the test was able to discriminate levels of competence. Seven items revealed differential item functioning in relation to profession and geographical regions, which means the test is not suitable for measuring differences between midwives and physicians or differences across regions. In the setting of pilot testing Cronbach's alpha equaled 0.79, whereas Cronbach's alpha equaled 0.63 in the setting of the CTG education program. This indicates a need for more items and items with a higher degree of difficulty in the test, and illuminates the importance of context when discussing validity. Test development is a complex and time-consuming process. The unitary approach to validity was a useful and applicable tool for development of a CTG written assessment. The process and findings supported our proposed interpretation of the assessment as measuring CTG knowledge and interpretive skills. However, for the test to function as a

  1. Digital Detection and feedback Fluxgate Magnetometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piil-Henriksen, J.; Merayo, José M.G.; Nielsen, Otto V

    1996-01-01

    A new full Earth's field dynamic feedback fluxgate magnetometer is described. It is based entirely on digital signal processing and digital feedback control, thereby replacing the classical second harmonic tuned analogue electronics by processor algorithms. Discrete mathematical cross...

  2. Feedback as real-time constructions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering; Qvortrup, Ane

    2014-01-01

    This article offers a re-description of feedback and the significance of time in feedback constructions based on systems theory. It describes feedback as internal, real-time constructions in a learning system. From this perspective, feedback is neither immediate nor delayed, but occurs in the very...... instant it takes place. This article argues for a clear distinction between the timing of communicative events, such as responses that are provided as help for feedback constructions, and the feedback construction itself as an event in a psychic system. Although feedback is described as an internal......, system-relative construction, different teaching environments offer diverse conditions for feedback constructions. The final section of this article explores this idea with the help of examples from both synchronous oral interaction and asynchronous text-based interaction mediated by digital media....

  3. Feedback as real-time constructions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering; Qvortrup, Ane

    2014-01-01

    The article offers a re-description of feedback and the significance of time in feedback constructions based on systems theory. It describes feedback as internal, real-time constructions in a learning system. From this perspective, feedback is neither immediate nor delayed, but occurs in the very...... instant it takes place. This article argues for a clear distinction between the timing of communicative events, such as responses that are provided as help for feedback constructions, and the feedback construction itself as an event in a psychic system. Although feedback is described as an internal......, system-relative construction, different teaching environments offer diverse conditions for feedback constructions. The final section of this article explores this idea with the help of examples from both synchronous, oral interaction and asynchronous, text-based interaction mediated by digital media....

  4. Two Collaborative Feedback Models in EFL Writing Instruction: Do They Make a Difference?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Rabiee

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Research in L1 writing has found numerous benefits of employing collaborative learning in the classroom. The research findings on group work provide clear evidence that engaging learners in group activities increases opportunities for students to engage in the negotiation of meaning, which further leads to better acquisition. The present study, implementing two different collaborative feedback models, based on various sources and modes of feedback, examines the effect of each on the students’ writing quality. Sixty Iranian students, majoring in English Translation, were assigned into three homogeneous groups based on their obtained scores on Oxford Placement Test (OPT and sample paragraph writing. They covered five topics in a sequence of ten written texts − before and after receiving feedback − over a 15-week semester. The results revealed that students incorporated both the teacher’s and peers’ oral/written comments in the process of draft editing, and that they benefited from the two collaborative feedback models almost equally. The interview results also confirmed co-operative learning as an effective teaching strategy that could be used to enhance achievement and socialization among students and to improve attitudes towards learning and working in groups, especially in EFL settings.

  5. Online Peer Feedback Between Colombian and New Zealand FL Beginners: A Comparison and Lessons Learned

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constanza Tolosa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on an exploratory study comparing the performance as online tutors of two groups of beginner eleven-year-old students of English in Colombia and Spanish in New Zealand. The native speaker students of the foreign language the others were learning corrected paragraphs written by their peers. The feedback provided by each group of tutors was analyzed for (1 language corrected, (2 input on errors, and (3 types of feedback provided. We found that both Colombian and New Zealand tutors willingly provided corrections to their peers and used other feedback strategies to foster attention to linguistic form. The Colombian tutors identified a higher number of errors, but the New Zealanders provided more detailed comments. We draw lessons from the exploration.

  6. Reinforcement Learning: A Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Kaelbling, L. P.; Littman, M. L.; Moore, A. W.

    1996-01-01

    This paper surveys the field of reinforcement learning from a computer-science perspective. It is written to be accessible to researchers familiar with machine learning. Both the historical basis of the field and a broad selection of current work are summarized. Reinforcement learning is the problem faced by an agent that learns behavior through trial-and-error interactions with a dynamic environment. The work described here has a resemblance to work in psychology, but differs considerably in...

  7. Electroencephalogy (EEG) Feedback in Decision-Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-26

    Electroencephalogy ( EEG ) Feedback In Decision- Making The goal of this project is to investigate whether Electroencephalogy ( EEG ) can provide useful...feedback when training rapid decision-making. More specifically, EEG will allow us to provide online feedback about the neural decision processes...Electroencephalogy ( EEG ) Feedback In Decision-Making Report Title The goal of this project is to investigate whether Electroencephalogy ( EEG ) can provide useful

  8. Effects of different kinds of robot feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Kerstin; Lohan, K. S.; Nehaniv, C.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate to what extent tutors' behavior is influenced by different kinds of robot feedback. In particular, we study the effects of online robot feedback in which the robot responds either contingently to the tutor's social behavior or by tracking the objects presented. Also,...... time. Display of learning outcomes, in contrast, only serves as feedback on robot capabilities when it is coupled with online social feedback. © Springer International Publishing 2013....

  9. PEER FEEDBACK ON FACEBOOK: The Use of Social Networking Websites to Develop Writing Ability of Undergraduate Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saovapa WICHADEE

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The current study explores how integrating a social networking website called Facebook with peer feedback in groups supports student learning, investigates the nature of feedback students received on their writing, and examines their attitudes towards the use of Facebook for peer feedback. The study involves 30 undergraduate students who participated in giving and receiving feedback on Facebook with an aim to develop their writing competence over the fundamental English course of one-semester study. Data were collected from the first and final drafts of writing assignments, written peer comments, a questionnaire and an interview. While the document analysis was the main data collection method, a questionnaire and an interview provided crucial information. The results revealed that the nature of students’ feedback focused on content more than grammatical errors. However, quantitative analyses of the peer comments and revisions to the drafts show that feedback given on Facebook had an effect on improving revised drafts. There was statistically significant improvement in the revised drafts which was linked to peer feedback. Finally, the analysis of interviews indicated positive attitude on the use of Facebook for peer feedback in the English class.

  10. The Art of Giving Online Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibold, Nancyruth; Schwarz, Laura Marie

    2015-01-01

    The cultivation of providing online feedback that is positive, effective, and enhances the learning experience is a valuable educator skill. Acquisition of the art of providing feedback is through education, practice, and faculty development. This article provides information about the best practices for delivering online feedback to learners. An…

  11. Synergistic relationships between Analytical Chemistry and written standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valcárcel, Miguel, E-mail: qa1vacam@uco.es; Lucena, Rafael

    2013-07-25

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Analytical Chemistry is influenced by international written standards. •Different relationships can be established between them. •Synergies can be generated when these standards are conveniently managed. -- Abstract: This paper describes the mutual impact of Analytical Chemistry and several international written standards (norms and guides) related to knowledge management (CEN-CWA 14924:2004), social responsibility (ISO 26000:2010), management of occupational health and safety (OHSAS 18001/2), environmental management (ISO 14001:2004), quality management systems (ISO 9001:2008) and requirements of the competence of testing and calibration laboratories (ISO 17025:2004). The intensity of this impact, based on a two-way influence, is quite different depending on the standard considered. In any case, a new and fruitful approach to Analytical Chemistry based on these relationships can be derived.

  12. The Effect of Overt Prepositional Input on Students’ Written Accuracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareth Morgan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available I believe that there should be a focus on problematic language issues such as prepositions in the language classroom in order to provide continuous exposure to such features. Consequently I provided my students with supplementary activities on prepositions, and also promoted learner autonomy by highlighting urls which deal with collocation. Analysis of the students written output shows the input to have been successful in focussing students’ attention on this problematic language aspect. While a pre-input writing task generated 83 prepositional errors, at the rate of 1 in every 48 words, longer post-input tasks only generated 76 prepositional errors at the rate of 1 in every 215 words. Consequently, I plan to continue providing students with input on this often neglected language feature, in order to increase students’ written accuracy.

  13. Oral and written instruction of oral hygiene: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnacke, Daniela; Beldoch, Magdalena; Bohn, Gertrude-Heidi; Seghaoui, Ouarda; Hegel, Nicole; Deinzer, Renate

    2012-10-01

    This randomized, evaluator-masked, controlled study evaluates the effectiveness of oral in contrast to written instruction of oral hygiene. Eighty-three students without clinical signs of periodontitis were randomly assigned to either a control group or one of three experimental conditions: 1) written instruction, 2) standardized oral instruction, or 3) individualized oral instruction. Plaque and bleeding indices were assessed to analyze intervention effects on oral health and oral hygiene skills. Measurements took place at baseline and 4 weeks after intervention. Groups differed significantly with respect to gingival bleeding and were tentatively significant with respect to oral hygiene skills. Participants who had received oral individualized instructions showed the best results. A gradient of effectiveness of the instruction methods was observed with most favorable results for the individualized instruction.

  14. Rf Feedback free electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brau, Charles A.; Swenson, Donald A.; Boyd, Jr., Thomas J.

    1981-01-01

    A free electron laser system and electron beam system for a free electron laser which use rf feedback to enhance efficiency. Rf energy is extracted from an electron beam by decelerating cavities and returned to accelerating cavities using rf returns such as rf waveguides, rf feedthroughs, etc. This rf energy is added to rf klystron energy to lower the required input energy and thereby enhance energy efficiency of the system.

  15. Stellar Feedback from Galactic Bulges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shikui; Wang, D. Q.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate that feedback from galactic bulges can play an essential role in the halo gas dynamics and the evolution of their host galaxies by conducting a series of 1-D and 3-D simulations. In our 1-D models we approximately divide the the bulge stellar feedback into two phases: 1) a starbusrt-induced blastwave from the formation of bulge built up through frequent major mergers at high redshift and 2) a gradual feedback in forms of stellar wind and Type Ia SNe from low mass stars. Our simulations show that the combination of the two-phase feedback can heat the surrounding gas beyond the virial radius and stop further gas accretion, which naturally produces a baryon deficit around MW-like galaxies and explains the lack of large-scale X-ray halos, consistent with observations. The hot gas dynamics depends sensitively on the environment and bulge formation history. This dependency may account for the large dispersion in the X-ray luminosities of the galaxies with similar L_B. In the 3-D simulations, we examine the spatial, thermal, and chemical substructures and their effects on X-ray measurements. The sporadic SN explosion creates wealth of filamentary and shell-like structures in the hot gas and produces a broad lognormal-like emission-measure distribution, which enhances the X-ray emission at a low and high temperatures. The luminosity at 0.3-2.0 keV band is nearly tripled due to the gas structures. We find that the SN Ia ejecta are not well-mixed with the ambient medium within the bulge scale, and the X-ray emission is primarily from shocked stellar wind materials which in general has low metallicity.

  16. Probabilistic models for feedback systems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grace, Matthew D.; Boggs, Paul T.

    2011-02-01

    In previous work, we developed a Bayesian-based methodology to analyze the reliability of hierarchical systems. The output of the procedure is a statistical distribution of the reliability, thus allowing many questions to be answered. The principal advantage of the approach is that along with an estimate of the reliability, we also can provide statements of confidence in the results. The model is quite general in that it allows general representations of all of the distributions involved, it incorporates prior knowledge into the models, it allows errors in the 'engineered' nodes of a system to be determined by the data, and leads to the ability to determine optimal testing strategies. In this report, we provide the preliminary steps necessary to extend this approach to systems with feedback. Feedback is an essential component of 'complexity' and provides interesting challenges in modeling the time-dependent action of a feedback loop. We provide a mechanism for doing this and analyze a simple case. We then consider some extensions to more interesting examples with local control affecting the entire system. Finally, a discussion of the status of the research is also included.

  17. Augmented feedback in autistic disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salome Geertsema

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Children with autistic disorder (AD display atypical eye contact and struggle with the social imitation of eye contact. Impaired social imitation may be indicative of disruptions in motor learning processes. The application of specific motor learning principles, such as external feedback, may suggest which variables will result in positive change in eye contact. The study aimed to determine the effects of knowledge of performance (KP and knowledge of results (KR as types of feedback on the frequency and duration of elicited and spontaneous eye contact in children with AD. A two-phase multiple-probe, multi-treatment (cross-over, singleparticipant design with a withdrawal component was used. Mixed treatment effects were obtained. Overall effects suggest that KR results in the greatest positive change over a short period of time regarding frequency and duration for both elicited and spontaneous eye contact. This type of feedback seems to be the most effective for spontaneous eye contact. The provision of KP, after elicited and spontaneous eye contact, produced positive effects for duration only. The current Phase 1 evidence suggests that KR (which is goal-directed with fewer additional instructions may be more beneficial to children with AD. These findings are in accordance with the limb motor learning literature and may therefore support preliminary evidence for disrupted motor learning during eye contact imitation in children with AD.

  18. Written communication and teaching of the czech language for foreigners

    OpenAIRE

    Toufarová, Dagmar

    2015-01-01

    In her thesis the author looks at written communication in teaching Czech for foreigners. The theoretical part gives an account of theoretical foundations, such as synchronic and diachronic approaches to the language situation (worldwide, in Europe and especially in the Czech Republic) and language education, including introduction to communicative methods. Furthermore, the author describes individual component parts of the language education (means of expression and communication skills), wi...

  19. STRATEGIES OF EXPRESSING WRITTEN APOLOGIES IN THE ONLINE NEWSPAPERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cipto Wardoyo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Expressing apology is a universal activity although people have different strategies or ways to express the apology based on the culture, situation, and context. An apology has played a vital role in verbal politeness; it is certainly impolite when someone does not express an apology when he or she has commited an offence to the others. Apologies in the Pragmatic study is classified under speech act theory. An apology based on Searle (1969 is classified as expressive speech acts because it expresses speaker’s physiological attitude. An apology expresses speaker’s sorrow and regret because he/she has offended hearers or readers.  This paper tries to discuss strategies of editors in expressing written apologies in the online newspaper. The objective of this paper is to explain what the strategies of written apologies are in the online newspaper. This study uses qualitative method; the writer chooses descriptive interpretative technique for analyzing data. There are four written apologies in the online neswpapers as data sources in this paper, the data are taken from The Jakarta Post, The Daily Express, The Sun, and Brisbane Times. The writer tries to describe and analyzes utterances in the data sources based on Olshtain & Cohen theory (1986. There are five main strategies in expressing apologies according to Olshtain & Cohen (1986; they are Illocutionary Force Indicating Device (IFID, expression responsibility, explanation/justification, offer repairs, and promise forbearance. The writer found that all of the written apologies used combination strategies, they used IFID by using performative verb: apologize and be sorry then followed by expression resposbility, explanation, offer repairs, and promise forbearance. Keywords: apologies, speech acts, politeness, pragmatics

  20. The robot programming language interpreter written in the Logo language

    OpenAIRE

    K. Foit

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: of this paper is to elaborate a simple system used to visualize the trajectory of the robot manipulator, using the interpreter written in the Logo programming language. The interpreter should be able to run on the older PC class hardware with limited RAM and CPU computing power.Design/methodology/approach: Compared to the other programming languages, the Logo is a convenient tool for use in the field of robotics, due to simple syntax, derived from LISP, direct support for mapping the...

  1. Polish Phoneme Statistics Obtained On Large Set Of Written Texts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartosz Ziółko

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The phonetical statistics were collected from several Polish corpora. The paper is a summaryof the data which are phoneme n-grams and some phenomena in the statistics. Triphonestatistics apply context-dependent speech units which have an important role in speech recognitionsystems and were never calculated for a large set of Polish written texts. The standardphonetic alphabet for Polish, SAMPA, and methods of providing phonetic transcriptions are described.

  2. Processes involved in the recognition of written words

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia DEFIOR

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Written word recognition is a sine qua non of reading. The acquisition and development of word recognition requires the synergistic working of multiple factors and processes. In this study, developmental and expert models of reading that explain the mechanisms underlying the acquisition and expert performance on this important skill are examined. Likewise, reading brain development and the implied cognitive processes are also addressed, as a mean for a better understanding of reading typical development as well as reading disabilities.

  3. Processes involved in the recognition of written words

    OpenAIRE

    Sylvia DEFIOR

    2015-01-01

    Written word recognition is a sine qua non of reading. The acquisition and development of word recognition requires the synergistic working of multiple factors and processes. In this study, developmental and expert models of reading that explain the mechanisms underlying the acquisition and expert performance on this important skill are examined. Likewise, reading brain development and the implied cognitive processes are also addressed, as a mean for a better understanding of reading typical ...

  4. Aviation Medical Examiner 2012 Feedback Survey: Content Analysis of Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Adjust capability - change to function currently supported - change to existing interface feature (e.g., button, text box, menu ) Reliability...airman to find/download info (1)] - larger font /print (1) make bulletin easier to read online AMCS (7) - simplify (3) [in general (1), steps to...print (1), reduce burden of quarterly user verification (1)] - more user friendly (2) - larger font /print (2) [larger (1), MID and ID# on printout (1

  5. Immediate Surgical Skills Feedback in the Operating Room Using “SurF” Cards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, AnnaMarie; Hansen, Darci; Schuler, Kevin; Galvin, Shelley L.; Wolfe, Honor

    2014-01-01

    Background Ensuring residents develop operative skills requires application of the principles of guided learning, deliberate practice, and directed feedback. Objective We sought to create and implement a tool to promote procedural “key” step review and immediate feedback on surgical skills, and examined faculty and resident satisfaction with surgical skills feedback. Methods We created surgical skills feedback (SurF) cards for 8 gynecologic procedures. Faculty/fellows and residents completed prestudy surveys querying frequency of preoperative key step review and satisfaction with surgical skill feedback, a SurF card each time 1 of 8 procedures was performed, and poststudy surveys to evaluate for changes. Results Prestudy surveys were completed by 31 faculty/fellows and 20 residents, with 55% (17 of 31) of the faculty/fellows and 5% (1 of 20) of the residents reporting key step review before surgery. All reported low satisfaction rates with feedback frequency, quality, and timeliness. After implementation of SurF cards, preoperative key step review occurred in 78% (82 of 105) of the procedures. Twenty-one faculty/fellows (68%) and 16 residents (80%) completed our poststudy survey. Faculty/fellows reported statistically similar key step review (n  =  15 [71%], P  =  .23), while residents reported that key step review had significantly improved (n  =  6 [38%], P  =  .01). Resident satisfaction with feedback frequency (5% to 50%, P  =  .002) and quality (15% to 50%, P  =  .02) increased significantly. Conclusions The SurF cards we developed facilitated procedural key step review, were associated with significantly improved resident satisfaction with surgical feedback, and could prove helpful with outcomes assessments, such as Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education–required documentation of Milestone attainment. PMID:25512804

  6. Immediate Surgical Skills Feedback in the Operating Room Using "SurF" Cards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, AnnaMarie; Hansen, Darci; Schuler, Kevin; Galvin, Shelley L; Wolfe, Honor

    2014-12-01

    Ensuring residents develop operative skills requires application of the principles of guided learning, deliberate practice, and directed feedback. We sought to create and implement a tool to promote procedural "key" step review and immediate feedback on surgical skills, and examined faculty and resident satisfaction with surgical skills feedback. We created surgical skills feedback (SurF) cards for 8 gynecologic procedures. Faculty/fellows and residents completed prestudy surveys querying frequency of preoperative key step review and satisfaction with surgical skill feedback, a SurF card each time 1 of 8 procedures was performed, and poststudy surveys to evaluate for changes. Prestudy surveys were completed by 31 faculty/fellows and 20 residents, with 55% (17 of 31) of the faculty/fellows and 5% (1 of 20) of the residents reporting key step review before surgery. All reported low satisfaction rates with feedback frequency, quality, and timeliness. After implementation of SurF cards, preoperative key step review occurred in 78% (82 of 105) of the procedures. Twenty-one faculty/fellows (68%) and 16 residents (80%) completed our poststudy survey. Faculty/fellows reported statistically similar key step review (n  =  15 [71%], P  =  .23), while residents reported that key step review had significantly improved (n  =  6 [38%], P  =  .01). Resident satisfaction with feedback frequency (5% to 50%, P  =  .002) and quality (15% to 50%, P  =  .02) increased significantly. The SurF cards we developed facilitated procedural key step review, were associated with significantly improved resident satisfaction with surgical feedback, and could prove helpful with outcomes assessments, such as Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-required documentation of Milestone attainment.

  7. Evaluating the dimensionality of first grade written composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Suk; Al Otaiba, Stephanie; Folsom, Jessica S.; Greulich, Luana; Puranik, Cynthia

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We examined dimensions of written composition using multiple evaluative approaches such as an adapted 6+1 trait scoring, syntactic complexity measures, and productivity measures. We further examined unique relations of oral language and literacy skills to the identified dimensions of written composition. Method A large sample of first grade students (N = 527) was assessed on their language, reading, spelling, letter writing automaticity, and writing in the spring. Data were analyzed using a latent variable approach including confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling. Results The seven traits in the 6+1 trait system were best described as two constructs: substantive quality, and spelling and writing conventions. When the other evaluation procedures such as productivity and syntactic complexity indicators were included, four dimensions emerged: substantive quality, productivity, syntactic complexity, and spelling and writing conventions. Language and literacy predictors were differentially related to each dimension in written composition. Conclusions These four dimensions may be a useful guideline for evaluating developing beginning writer’s compositions. PMID:24687472

  8. Effects of written emotional expression: the role of positive expectancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langens, Thomas A; Schüler, Julia

    2007-03-01

    Writing in an emotional way about stressful or traumatic experiences has beneficial effects on emotional well-being and physical health. Yet the mechanisms that underlie these effects still need to be explored. Integrating research on the effects of positive expectancies, the authors suggest that positive effects of written emotional expression may, in part, depend on expectancies induced by writing about emotional experiences. Two studies were conducted to test this hypothesis. In both studies, participants wrote about either an upsetting event or trivial issues. After the writing period, participants rated their expectancies that the writing intervention would improve (or impair) their emotional well-being over time. Study 1 assessed the emotional impact of an upsetting event, whereas Study 2 assessed subjective reports of physical symptoms. In both studies, outcome variables were collected both before and 6 weeks after the writing intervention. The results showed that (a) writing about upsetting experiences induced higher positive expectancies than writing about trivial issues and (b) expectancies associated with written emotional expression were related to a reduction in the emotional impact of an upsetting event (Study 1) and to a reduction in physical symptoms (Study 2). There may be 2 alternative ways to render written emotional expression effective in reducing negative emotions: (a) by rendering an emotional experience more meaningful and (b) by inducing positive affect regulation expectancies. (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved

  9. Prosodic Parallelism—Comparing Spoken and Written Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiese, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The Prosodic Parallelism hypothesis claims adjacent prosodic categories to prefer identical branching of internal adjacent constituents. According to Wiese and Speyer (2015), this preference implies feet contained in the same phonological phrase to display either binary or unary branching, but not different types of branching. The seemingly free schwa-zero alternations at the end of some words in German make it possible to test this hypothesis. The hypothesis was successfully tested by conducting a corpus study which used large-scale bodies of written German. As some open questions remain, and as it is unclear whether Prosodic Parallelism is valid for the spoken modality as well, the present study extends this inquiry to spoken German. As in the previous study, the results of a corpus analysis recruiting a variety of linguistic constructions are presented. The Prosodic Parallelism hypothesis can be demonstrated to be valid for spoken German as well as for written German. The paper thus contributes to the question whether prosodic preferences are similar between the spoken and written modes of a language. Some consequences of the results for the production of language are discussed. PMID:27807425

  10. Prosodic Parallelism-Comparing Spoken and Written Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiese, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The Prosodic Parallelism hypothesis claims adjacent prosodic categories to prefer identical branching of internal adjacent constituents. According to Wiese and Speyer (2015), this preference implies feet contained in the same phonological phrase to display either binary or unary branching, but not different types of branching. The seemingly free schwa-zero alternations at the end of some words in German make it possible to test this hypothesis. The hypothesis was successfully tested by conducting a corpus study which used large-scale bodies of written German. As some open questions remain, and as it is unclear whether Prosodic Parallelism is valid for the spoken modality as well, the present study extends this inquiry to spoken German. As in the previous study, the results of a corpus analysis recruiting a variety of linguistic constructions are presented. The Prosodic Parallelism hypothesis can be demonstrated to be valid for spoken German as well as for written German. The paper thus contributes to the question whether prosodic preferences are similar between the spoken and written modes of a language. Some consequences of the results for the production of language are discussed.

  11. Prosodic Parallelism – comparing spoken and written language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Wiese

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The Prosodic Parallelism hypothesis claims adjacent prosodic categories to prefer identical branching of internal adjacent constituents. According to Wiese and Speyer (2015, this preference implies feet contained in the same phonological phrase to display either binary or unary branching, but not different types of branching. The seemingly free schwa-zero alternations at the end of some words in German make it possible to test this hypothesis. The hypothesis was successfully tested by conducting a corpus study which used large-scale bodies of written German. As some open questions remain, and as it is unclear whether Prosodic Parallelism is valid for the spoken modality as well, the present study extends this inquiry to spoken German. As in the previous study, the results of a corpus analysis recruiting a variety of linguistic constructions are presented. The Prosodic Parallelism hypothesis can be demonstrated to be valid for spoken German as well as for written German. The paper thus contributes to the question whether prosodic preferences are similar between the spoken and written modes of a language. Some consequences of the results for the production of language are discussed.

  12. Enhancing the Benefits of Written Emotional Disclosure through Response Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konig, Andrea; Eonta, Alison; Dyal, Stephanie R.; Vrana, Scott R.

    2014-01-01

    Writing about a personal stressful event has been found to have psychological and physical health benefits, especially when physiological response increases during writing. Response training was developed to amplify appropriate physiological reactivity in imagery exposure. The present study examined whether response training enhances the benefits of written emotional disclosure. Participants were assigned to either a written emotional disclosure condition (n = 113) or a neutral writing condition (n = 133). Participants in each condition wrote for 20 minutes on three occasions and received response training (n = 79), stimulus training (n = 84) or no training (n = 83). Heart rate and skin conductance were recorded throughout a 10-minute baseline, 20-minute writing, and a 10-minute recovery period. Self-reported emotion was assessed in each session. One month after completing the sessions, participants completed follow-up assessments of psychological and physical health outcomes. Emotional disclosure elicited greater physiological reactivity and self-reported emotion than neutral writing. Response training amplified physiological reactivity to emotional disclosure. Greater heart rate during emotional disclosure was associated with the greatest reductions in event-related distress, depression, and physical illness symptoms at follow-up, especially among response trained participants. Results support an exposure explanation of emotional disclosure effects and are the first to demonstrate that response training facilitates emotional processing and may be a beneficial adjunct to written emotional disclosure. PMID:24680230

  13. Enhancing the benefits of written emotional disclosure through response training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konig, Andrea; Eonta, Alison; Dyal, Stephanie R; Vrana, Scott R

    2014-05-01

    Writing about a personal stressful event has been found to have psychological and physical health benefits, especially when physiological response increases during writing. Response training was developed to amplify appropriate physiological reactivity in imagery exposure. The present study examined whether response training enhances the benefits of written emotional disclosure. Participants were assigned to either a written emotional disclosure condition (n=113) or a neutral writing condition (n=133). Participants in each condition wrote for 20 minutes on 3 occasions and received response training (n=79), stimulus training (n=84) or no training (n=83). Heart rate and skin conductance were recorded throughout a 10-minute baseline, 20-minute writing, and a 10-minute recovery period. Self-reported emotion was assessed in each session. One month after completing the sessions, participants completed follow-up assessments of psychological and physical health outcomes. Emotional disclosure elicited greater physiological reactivity and self-reported emotion than neutral writing. Response training amplified physiological reactivity to emotional disclosure. Greater heart rate during emotional disclosure was associated with the greatest reductions in event-related distress, depression, and physical illness symptoms at follow-up, especially among response trained participants. Results support an exposure explanation of emotional disclosure effects and are the first to demonstrate that response training facilitates emotional processing and may be a beneficial adjunct to written emotional disclosure. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Development of the Teacher Feedback Observation Scheme: evaluating the quality of feedback in peer groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thurlings, Marieke; Vermeulen, Marjan; Kreijns, Karel; Bastiaens, Theo; Stijnen, Sjef

    2018-01-01

    Research suggests that feedback is an essential element in learning. This study focuses on feedback that teachers provide in reciprocal peer groups to improve their performance in the classroom. The Teacher Feedback Observation Scheme (TFOS) was developed to identify feedback patterns, which

  15. Comparison of Written and Oral Examinations in a Baccalaureate Medical-Surgical Nursing Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushton, Patricia; Eggett, Dennis

    2003-01-01

    Of four groups of medical-surgical nurses, 55 took one final and three midterm written exams, 150 took one each (written), 45 took an oral final, 92 took both written and oral, and 47 took a written test with licensure questions and an oral final. Oral exams resulted in higher scores, more effective study habits, and increased application. (SK)

  16. The effect of force feedback on student reasoning about gravity, mass, force and motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussell, Linda

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether force feedback within a computer simulation had an effect on reasoning by fifth grade students about gravity, mass, force, and motion, concepts which can be difficult for learners to grasp. Few studies have been done on cognitive learning and haptic feedback, particularly with young learners, but there is an extensive base of literature on children's conceptions of science and a number of studies focus specifically on children's conceptions of force and motion. This case study used a computer-based paddleball simulation with guided inquiry as the primary stimulus. Within the simulation, the learner could adjust the mass of the ball and the gravitational force. The experimental group used the simulation with visual and force feedback; the control group used the simulation with visual feedback but without force feedback. The proposition was that there would be differences in reasoning between the experimental and control groups, with force feedback being helpful with concepts that are more obvious when felt. Participants were 34 fifth-grade students from three schools. Students completed a modal (visual, auditory, and haptic) learning preference assessment and a pretest. The sessions, including participant experimentation and interviews, were audio recorded and observed. The interviews were followed by a written posttest. These data were analyzed to determine whether there were differences based on treatment, learning style, demographics, prior gaming experience, force feedback experience, or prior knowledge. Work with the simulation, regardless of group, was found to increase students' understanding of key concepts. The experimental group appeared to benefit from the supplementary help that force feedback provided. Those in the experimental group scored higher on the posttest than those in the control group. The greatest difference between mean group scores was on a question concerning the effects of increased

  17. Feedback suppression in digital hearing instruments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Guilin

    In this dissertation, the feedback whistling problem with digital hearing instruments is investigated. The work focuses on the properties of the feedback path, the modelling of the feedback path and the feedback suppression techniques. The properties and modelling of the feedback path are first...... canceller with filtered-X adaptation by injecting nearly inaudible noise. The second approach uses a linear predicative coding based vocoder to synthesize the hearing-aid output in order to decorrelate the hearing-aid output signal and the desired input signal. In the end, a discussion about the use...

  18. 360-degree feedback for medical trainees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Ellen; Holm, Kirsten; Sørensen, Jette Led

    2015-01-01

    In 360-degree feedback medical colleagues and collaborators give a trainee feedback by answering a questionnaire on behaviour of the trainee. The questionnaire may contain questions answered on a scale or/and they may contain open questions. The result from 360-degree feedback is used for formative...... feedback and assessment. In order to secure reliability 8-15 respondents are needed. It is a matter of discussion whether the respondents should be chosen by the trainee or by a third part, and if respondents should be anonymous. The process includes a feedback session with a trained supervisor....

  19. Developing Validity Evidence for the Written Pediatric History and Physical Exam Evaluation Rubric.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Marta A; Phillipi, Carrie A; Buchanan, Paula M; Lewin, Linda O

    The written history and physical examination (H&P) is an underutilized source of medical trainee assessment. The authors describe development and validity evidence for the Pediatric History and Physical Exam Evaluation (P-HAPEE) rubric: a novel tool for evaluating written H&Ps. Using an iterative process, the authors drafted, revised, and implemented the 10-item rubric at 3 academic institutions in 2014. Eighteen attending physicians and 5 senior residents each scored 10 third-year medical student H&Ps. Inter-rater reliability (IRR) was determined using intraclass correlation coefficients. Cronbach α was used to report consistency and Spearman rank-order correlations to determine relationships between rubric items. Raters provided a global assessment, recorded time to review and score each H&P, and completed a rubric utility survey. Overall intraclass correlation was 0.85, indicating adequate IRR. Global assessment IRR was 0.89. IRR for low- and high-quality H&Ps was significantly greater than for medium-quality ones but did not differ on the basis of rater category (attending physician vs. senior resident), note format (electronic health record vs nonelectronic), or student diagnostic accuracy. Cronbach α was 0.93. The highest correlation between an individual item and total score was for assessments was 0.84; the highest interitem correlation was between assessment and differential diagnosis (0.78). Mean time to review and score an H&P was 16.3 minutes; residents took significantly longer than attending physicians. All raters described rubric utility as "good" or "very good" and endorsed continued use. The P-HAPEE rubric offers a novel, practical, reliable, and valid method for supervising physicians to assess pediatric written H&Ps. Copyright © 2016 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Healthcare professionals' views on feedback of a patient safety culture assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwijnenberg, Nicolien C; Hendriks, Michelle; Hoogervorst-Schilp, Janneke; Wagner, Cordula

    2016-06-17

    By assessing patient safety culture, healthcare providers can identify areas for improvement in patient safety culture. To achieve this, these assessment outcomes have to be relevant and presented clearly. The aim of our study was to explore healthcare professionals' views on the feedback of a patient safety culture assessment. Twenty four hospitals participated in a patient safety culture assessment in 2012. Hospital departments received feedback in a report and on a website. In a survey, we evaluated healthcare professionals' views on this feedback and the effect of additional information about patient safety culture improvement strategies on the appraisal of the feedback. 20 hospitals participated in part I (evaluation of the report), 13 hospitals participated in part II (evaluation of the website). Healthcare professionals (e.g. members of staff and department heads/managers) rated the feedback in the report and on the website positively (average mean on different aspects = 7.2 on a scale from 1 to 10). Interpreting results was sometimes difficult, and information was sometimes lacking, like specific recommendations and improvement strategies. The provision of additional general information on patient safety culture improvement strategies resulted only in a higher appraisal of the attractiveness (lay-out) of the report and the understandability of the feedback report. The majority (84 %) of the healthcare professionals agreed or partly agreed that the feedback on patient safety culture stimulated actions to improve patient safety culture. However, a quarter also stated that although the feedback report provided insight into the patient safety culture, they did not know how to improve patient safety culture in their hospital. Healthcare professionals seem to be positive about the feedback on patient safety culture and its effect on stimulating patient safety culture improvement. To optimally tune feedback on patient safety culture towards healthcare