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Sample records for surveys toxicity assays

  1. Assessing sediment contamination using six toxicity assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen G. BURTON Jr.

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available An evaluation of sediment toxicity at Lake Orta, Italy was conducted to compare a toxicity test battery of 6 assays and to evaluate the extent of sediment contamination at various sediment depths. Lake Orta received excessive loadings of copper and ammonia during the 1900’s until a large remediation effort was conducted in 1989-90 using lime addition. Since that time, the lake has shown signs of a steady recovery of biological communities. The study results showed acute toxicity still exists in sediments at a depth of 5 cm and greater. Assays that detected the highest levels of toxicity were two whole sediment exposures (7 d using Hyalella azteca and Ceriodaphnia dubia. The MicrotoxR assay using pore water was the third most sensitive assay. The Thamnotox, Rototox, Microtox solid phase, and Seed Germination-Root Elongation (pore and solid phase assays showed occasional to no toxicity. Based on similarity of responses and assay sensitivity, the two most useful assays were the C. dubia (or H. azteca and Microtox pore water. These assays were effective at describing sediment toxicity in a weight-of-evidence approach.

  2. Benzodiazepine Synthesis and Rapid Toxicity Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, James T.; Boriraj, Grit

    2010-01-01

    A second-year organic chemistry laboratory experiment to introduce students to general concepts of medicinal chemistry is described. Within a single three-hour time window, students experience the synthesis of a biologically active small molecule and the assaying of its biological toxicity. Benzodiazepine rings are commonly found in antidepressant…

  3. Screening of fullerene toxicity by hemolysis assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tramer, Federica; Da Ros, Tatiana; Passamonti, Sabina

    2012-01-01

    Fullerene is a compound formed during carbon burst that has been produced synthetically starting from the 1990s. The spherical shape and the characteristic carbon bonds of this allotrope (C(60)) have made it a suitable molecule for many applications. During the last decade, the low aqueous solubility of this molecule has been improved by chemical functionalization allowing the use of fullerene derivatives in biological fluids. The characterization of the toxicity potential of fullerenes is therefore of growing interest for any biomedical application. Intravenous injection is one of the possible routes of their administrations and therefore red blood cells are among the first targets of fullerene cytotoxicity. Human red blood cells are easily available and separated from plasma. Membrane disruption by toxic compounds is easily detected in red blood cells as release of hemoglobin in the cell medium, which can be assayed spectrophotometrically at λ = 415 nm. Due to the high molar extinction coefficient of hemoglobin, the assay can be performed on a small amount of both red blood cells and the test compounds, which might be available only in small quantities. So, the hemolysis assay is a simple screening test, whose results can guide further investigations on cytotoxicity in more complex experimental models.

  4. Determination of leachate toxicity through acute toxicity using Daphnia pulex and anaerobic toxicity assays

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    Patricia Torres Lozada

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The municipal solid waste (MSW of large cities, in particular in developing countries, is mainly disposed of in landfills (LFs, whose inadequate management generates the emission of greenhouse gases and the production of leachates with high concentrations of organic and inorganic matter and occasionally heavy metals. In this study, the toxicity of the leachates from an intermediate-age municipal landfill was evaluated by ecotoxicity and anaerobic digestion tests. The acute toxicity assays with Daphnia pulex presented a toxic unit (TU value of 49.5%, which indicates that these leachates should not be directly discharged into water sources or percolate into the soil because they would affect the ecosystems served by these waters. According to statistical analyses, the leachate toxicity is mainly associated with the inorganic fraction, with chlorides, calcium hardness and calcium having the greatest influence on the toxicity. The anaerobic toxicity assays showed that in the exposure stage, the methanogenic activity exceeded that of the control, which suggests that the anaerobic bacteria easily adapted to the leachate. Therefore, this treatment could be an alternative to mitigate the toxicity of the studied leachates. The inhibition presented in the recovery stage, represented by a reduction of the methanogenic activity, could arise because the amount of supplied substrate was not enough to fulfill the carbon and nutrient requirements of the bacterial population present.

  5. Determination of leachate toxicity through acute toxicity using Daphnia pulex and Anaerobic Toxicity Assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Torres Lozada

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The municipal solid waste (MSW of large cities, in particular in developing countries, is mainly disposed of in landfills (LFs, whose inadequate management generates the emission of greenhouse gases and the production of leachates with high concentrations of organic and inorganic matter and occasionally heavy metals. In this study, the toxicity of the leachates from an intermediate-age municipal landfill was evaluated by ecotoxicity and anaerobic digestion tests. The acute toxicity assays with Daphnia pulex presented a toxic unit (TU value of 49.5%, which indicates that these leachates should not be directly discharged into water sources or percolate into the soil because they would affect the ecosystems served by these waters. According to statistical analyses, the leachate toxicity is mainly associated with the inorganic fraction, with chlorides, calcium hardness and calcium having the greatest influence on the toxicity. The anaerobic toxicity assays showed that in the exposure stage, the methanogenic activity exceeded that of the control, which suggests that the anaerobic bacteria easily adapted to the leachate. Therefore, this treatment could be an alternative to mitigate the toxicity of the studied leachates. The inhibition presented in the recovery stage, represented by a reduction of the methanogenic activity, could arise because the amount of supplied substrate was not enough to fulfill the carbon and nutrient requirements of the bacterial population present.

  6. Toxicity Assays in Nanodrops Combining Bioassay and Morphometric Endpoints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reboud, Julien; Papine, Alexandre; Angulo, Jesus; Pointu, Hervé; Diaz-Latoud, Chantal; Lajaunie, Christian; Chatelain, François; Arrigo, André-Patrick; Schaack, Béatrice

    2007-01-01

    Background Improved chemical hazard management such as REACH policy objective as well as drug ADMETOX prediction, while limiting the extent of animal testing, requires the development of increasingly high throughput as well as highly pertinent in vitro toxicity assays. Methodology This report describes a new in vitro method for toxicity testing, combining cell-based assays in nanodrop Cell-on-Chip format with the use of a genetically engineered stress sensitive hepatic cell line. We tested the behavior of a stress inducible fluorescent HepG2 model in which Heat Shock Protein promoters controlled Enhanced-Green Fluorescent Protein expression upon exposure to Cadmium Chloride (CdCl2), Sodium Arsenate (NaAsO2) and Paraquat. In agreement with previous studies based on a micro-well format, we could observe a chemical-specific response, identified through differences in dynamics and amplitude. We especially determined IC50 values for CdCl2 and NaAsO2, in agreement with published data. Individual cell identification via image-based screening allowed us to perform multiparametric analyses. Conclusions Using pre/sub lethal cell stress instead of cell mortality, we highlighted the high significance and the superior sensitivity of both stress promoter activation reporting and cell morphology parameters in measuring the cell response to a toxicant. These results demonstrate the first generation of high-throughput and high-content assays, capable of assessing chemical hazards in vitro within the REACH policy framework. PMID:17235363

  7. Toxicity assays in nanodrops combining bioassay and morphometric endpoints.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Lemaire

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Improved chemical hazard management such as REACH policy objective as well as drug ADMETOX prediction, while limiting the extent of animal testing, requires the development of increasingly high throughput as well as highly pertinent in vitro toxicity assays. METHODOLOGY: This report describes a new in vitro method for toxicity testing, combining cell-based assays in nanodrop Cell-on-Chip format with the use of a genetically engineered stress sensitive hepatic cell line. We tested the behavior of a stress inducible fluorescent HepG2 model in which Heat Shock Protein promoters controlled Enhanced-Green Fluorescent Protein expression upon exposure to Cadmium Chloride (CdCl2, Sodium Arsenate (NaAsO2 and Paraquat. In agreement with previous studies based on a micro-well format, we could observe a chemical-specific response, identified through differences in dynamics and amplitude. We especially determined IC50 values for CdCl2 and NaAsO2, in agreement with published data. Individual cell identification via image-based screening allowed us to perform multiparametric analyses. CONCLUSIONS: Using pre/sub lethal cell stress instead of cell mortality, we highlighted the high significance and the superior sensitivity of both stress promoter activation reporting and cell morphology parameters in measuring the cell response to a toxicant. These results demonstrate the first generation of high-throughput and high-content assays, capable of assessing chemical hazards in vitro within the REACH policy framework.

  8. Validating potential toxicity assays to assess petroleum hydrocarbon toxicity in polar soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Alexis Nadine; Snape, Ian; Siciliano, Steven Douglas

    2012-02-01

    Potential microbial activities are commonly used to assess soil toxicity of petroleum hydrocarbons (PHC) and are assumed to be a surrogate for microbial activity within the soil ecosystem. However, this assumption needs to be evaluated for frozen soil, in which microbial activity is limited by liquid water (θ(liquid)). Influence of θ(liquid) on in situ toxicity was evaluated and compared to the toxicity endpoints of potential microbial activities using soil from an aged diesel fuel spill at Casey Station, East Antarctica. To determine in situ toxicity, gross mineralization and nitrification rates were determined by the stable isotope dilution technique. Petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soil (0-8,000 mg kg(-1)), packed at bulk densities of 1.4, 1.7, and 2.0 g cm(-3) to manipulate liquid water content, was incubated at -5°C for one, two, and three months. Although θ(liquid) did not have a significant effect on gross mineralization or nitrification, gross nitrification was sensitive to PHC contamination, with toxicity decreasing over time. In contrast, gross mineralization was not sensitive to PHC contamination. Toxic response of gross nitrification was comparable to potential nitrification activity (PNA) with similar EC25 (effective concentration causing a 25% effect in the test population) values determined by both measurement endpoints (400 mg kg(-1) for gross nitrification compared to 200 mg kg(-1) for PNA), indicating that potential microbial activity assays are good surrogates for in situ toxicity of PHC contamination in polar regions. Copyright © 2011 SETAC.

  9. USING THE MEDAKA EMBRYO ASSAY TO INVESTIGATE DEVELOPMENTAL ETHANOL TOXICITY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethanol (EtOH) is a well-known developmental toxicant that produces a range of abnormal phenotypes. While the toxic potential of developmental EtOH exposure is well characterized, the effect of the timing of exposure on the extent of toxicity remains unknown. Fish models such as ...

  10. Use of toxicity assays for evaluating the effectiveness of groundwater remediation with Fenton’s reagent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusk, Kresten Ole; Bennedsen, Lars Rønn; Christophersen, Mette

    evaluates in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) using modified Fenton’s reagent (H2O2 + chelated Fe2+) as a groundwater remedy. Three injections were performed over a period to test treatment efficacy. Performance monitoring samples were collected from two depths both prior to and during treatment, and analyzed...... treatment with Fenton’s reagent the toxicity had increased and now needed 7100 times dilution to reduce toxicity to the LC10 probably due to mobilization of metals. It is concluded that toxicity assay is a useful tool for evaluating samples from contaminated sites and that toxicity assays and chemical...

  11. Use of toxicity assays for evaluating the effectiveness of groundwater remediation with Fenton’s reagent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusk, Kresten Ole; Bennedsen, Lars; Christophersen, Mette

    2011-01-01

    evaluates in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) using modified Fenton’s reagent (H2O2 + chelated Fe2+) as a groundwater remedy. Three injections were performed over a period to test treatment efficacy. Performance monitoring samples were collected from two depths both prior to and during treatment, and analyzed...... treatment with Fenton’s reagent the toxicity had increased and now needed 7100 times dilution to reduce toxicity to the LC10 probably due to mobilization of metals. It is concluded that toxicity assay is a useful tool for evaluating samples from contaminated sites and that toxicity assays and chemical...

  12. Plasmonic Interrogation of Biomimetic Systems for Enhanced Toxicity Assays

    OpenAIRE

    Hinman, Samuel S

    2017-01-01

    In light of their escalating exposure to possible environmental toxicants, there are many biological systems that need to be evaluated in a resource and time efficient manner. Understanding how toxicants behave in relation to their physicochemical properties and within complex biological media is especially important toward developing a stronger scientific foundation of these systems so that adequate regulatory decisions may be made. While there are many emerging methods available for the det...

  13. Toxicity assessment of reference and natural freshwater sediments with the luminotox assay

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dellamatrice, PM

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available to exist between LuminoTox-Solid Phase Assay (Lum-SPA) and Microtox Solid Phase Assay (Mic-SPA) indicating that both tests display a similar toxicity response pattern for CRM sediments having differing contaminant profiles. The sediment elutriate Lum...

  14. Modeling Zebrafish Developmental Toxicity using a Concurrent In vitro Assay Battery (SOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    We describe the development of computational models that predict activity in a repeat-dose zebrafish embryo developmental toxicity assay using a combination of physico-chemical parameters and in vitro (human) assay measurements. The data set covered 986 chemicals including pestic...

  15. Effects of solvents and dosing procedure on chemical toxicity in cell-based in vitro assays.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanneberger, K.; Rico Rico, A.; Kramer, N.I.; Busser, F.J.M.; Hermens, J.L.M.; Schirmer, K.

    2010-01-01

    Due to the implementation of new legislation, such as REACh, a dramatic increase of animal use for toxicity testing is expected and the search for alternatives is timely. Cell-based in vitro assays are promising alternatives. However, the behavior of chemicals in these assays is still poorly

  16. In vitro assay for compounds toxic to rumen protozoa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, A.J.; Cumming, G.J.; Graham, C.A. (ICI Australia Operations Pty. Ltd, Merrindale Research Station. Croydon, Victoria, Australia); Leng, R.A. (New England Univ., Armidale (Australia). Dept. of Biochemistry and Nutrition)

    1982-01-01

    The viability of protozoa in whole rumen fluid was assessed by measuring the incorporation of Me-/sup 14/C-choline in vitro. The use of the technique as an assay for testing antiprotozoal agents was evaluated with a variety of surfactant detergents which have previously been shown to have antiprotozoal activity in vivo. A good correlation was obtained between the potency of these compounds in vitro and in vivo.

  17. Predictive value of in vitro assays depends on the mechanism of toxicity of metal oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Wan-Seob; Duffin, Rodger; Bradley, Mark; Megson, Ian L; MacNee, William; Lee, Jong Kwon; Jeong, Jayoung; Donaldson, Ken

    2013-10-25

    Hazard identification for risk assessment of nanoparticles (NPs) is mainly composed of in vitro cell-based assays and in vivo animal experimentation. The rapidly increasing number and functionalizations of NPs makes in vivo toxicity tests undesirable on both ethical and financial grounds, creating an urgent need for development of in vitro cell-based assays that accurately predict in vivo toxicity and facilitate safe nanotechnology. In this study, we used 9 different NPs (CeO2, TiO2, carbon black, SiO2, NiO, Co3O4, Cr2O3, CuO, and ZnO). As an in vivo toxicity endpoint, the acute lung inflammogenicity in a rat instillation model was compared with the in vitro toxicity endpoints comprising cytotoxicity, pro-inflammatory cytokine expression, or haemolytic potential. For in vitro assays, 8 different cell-based assays were used including epithelial cells, monocytic/macrophage cells, human erythrocytes, and combined culture. ZnO and CuO NPs acting via soluble toxic ions showed positive results in most of assays and were consistent with the lung inflammation data. When compared in in vitro assays at the same surface area dose (30 cm2/mL), NPs that were low solubility and therefore acting via surface reactivity had no convincing activity, except for CeO2 NP. Cytotoxicity in differentiated peripheral blood mononuclear cells was the most accurate showing 89% accuracy and 11% false negativity in predicting acute lung inflammogenicity. However, the haemolysis assay showed 100% consistency with the lung inflammation if any dose, having statistical significance was considered positivity. Other cell-based in vitro assays showed a poorer correlation with in vivo inflammogenicity. Based on the toxicity mechanisms of NPs, two different approaches can be applied for prediction of in vivo lung inflammogenicity. Most in vitro assays were good at detecting NPs that act via soluble ions (i.e., ZnO and CuO NP). However, in vitro assays were limited in detecting NPs acting via surface

  18. Comparison of Acute Toxicity of Algal Metabolites Using Bioluminescence Inhibition Assay

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    Hansa Jeswani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Microalgae are reported to degrade hazardous compounds. However, algae, especially cyanobacteria are known to produce secondary metabolites which may be toxic to flora, fauna and human beings. The aim of this study was selection of an appropriate algal culture for biological treatment of biomass gasification wastewater based on acute toxicity considerations. The three algae that were selected were Spirulina sp., Scenedesmus abundans and a fresh water algal consortium. Acute toxicity of the metabolites produced by these algal cultures was tested at the end of log phase using the standard bioluminescence inhibition assay based on Vibrio fischeri NRRLB 11174. Scenedesmus abundans and a fresh water algal consortium dominated by cyanobacteria such as Phormidium, Chroococcus and Oscillatoria did not release much toxic metabolites at the end of log phase and caused only about 20% inhibition in bioluminescence. In comparison, Spirulina sp. released toxic metabolites and caused 50% bioluminescence inhibition at 3/5 times dilution of the culture supernatant (EC50.

  19. Evaluation of N-methylpyrrolidone and its oxidative products toxicity utilizing the Microtox assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, H.L. [Susquehanna River Basin Commission, Harrisburg, PA (United States); Striebig, B.A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1999-06-01

    N-Methylpyrrolidone (NMP) is a cyclic nitrogen-containing organic chemical used to replace more volatile and toxic organic solvents in paint coating and cleaning applications. The Marine Corps Multi-Commodity Maintenance Center was concerned that the high NMP and organic levels in process water would upset treatment processes at the Industrial Process Water Plant (IWP). The NMP contaminated process water was oxidized by a semicontinuous advanced oxidation reactor to reduce the organic concentration. The oxidative byproducts of NMP were identified by GC/MS and tested for their toxicity. A toxicity test, utilizing the Microtox toxicity assay, revealed that methylsuccinimide was the most toxic identifiable product of NMP oxidation. The toxicity of the process water was reduced as methylsuccinimide and was further oxidized to succinimide and other amine products. The results indicate that NMP contaminated process water should be oxidized past the N-methylsuccinimide compound prior to standard industrial process water treatment procedures, so as to reduce toxicity concerns associated with NMP contaminated process water.

  20. A rapid mitochondrial toxicity assay utilizing rapidly changing cell energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanuki, Yosuke; Araki, Tetsuro; Nakazono, Osamu; Tsurui, Kazuyuki

    2017-01-01

    Drug-induced liver injury is a major cause of safety-related drug-marketing withdrawals. Several drugs have been reported to disrupt mitochondrial function, resulting in hepatotoxicity. The development of a simple and effective in vitro assay to identify the potential for mitochondrial toxicity is thus desired to minimize the risk of causing hepatotoxicity and subsequent drug withdrawal. An in vitro test method called the "glucose-galactose" assay is often used in drug development but requires prior-culture of cells over several passages for mitochondrial adaptation, thereby restricting use of the assay. Here, we report a rapid version of this method with the same predictability as the original method. We found that replacing the glucose in the medium with galactose resulted in HepG2 cells immediately shifting their energy metabolism from glycolysis to oxidative phosphorylation due to drastic energy starvation; in addition, the intracellular concentration of ATP was reduced by mitotoxicants when glucose in the medium was replaced with galactose. Using our proposed rapid method, mitochondrial dysfunction in HepG2 cells can be evaluated by drug exposure for one hour without a pre-culture step. This rapid assay for mitochondrial toxicity may be more suitable for high-throughput screening than the original method at an early stage of drug development.

  1. Impedimetric toxicity assay in microfluidics using free and liposome-encapsulated anticancer drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caviglia, Claudia; Zor, Kinga; Montini, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we have developed a microfluidic cytotoxicity assay for a cell culture and detection platform, which enables both fluid handling and electrochemical/optical detection. The cytotoxic effect of anticancer drugs doxorubicin (DOX), oxaliplatin (OX) as well as OX-loaded liposomes......, developed for targeted drug delivery, was evaluated using real-time impedance monitoring. The time-dependent effect of DOX on HeLa cells was monitored and found to have a delayed onset of cytotoxicity in microfluidics compared with static culture conditions based on data obtained in our previous study....... The result of a fluorescent microscopic annexin V/propidium iodide assay, performed in microfluidics, confirmed the outcome of the real-time impedance assay. In addition, the response of HeLa cells to OX-induced cytotoxicity proved to be slower than toxicity induced by DOX. A difference in the time...

  2. In vitro red blood cell assay for oxidant toxicity of petroleum oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couillard, C.M.; Leighton, F.A. (Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon (Canada))

    1993-05-01

    Petroleum oil has caused hemolytic anemia in birds and mammals. In birds, an oxidant damage on circulating red cells has been identified as the primary toxic effect of ingested petroleum oils. An in vitro red blood cell assay was developed to discriminate among the oxidant activities of different petroleum oils. The assay used rabbit red blood cells with a rat liver enzyme system and formation of methemoglobin was measured as an indicator of oxidant damage to the red cells. The assay was applied to five different petroleum oils and to naphthalene, a petroleum hydrocarbon known to cause hemolytic anemia. Different petroleum oils differed in their capacity to induce methemoglobin formation. Methemoglobin levels varied from 2.9% with Arabian light crude oil to 6.2% with South Louisiana crude oil. Naphthalene induced formation of up to 37% methemoglobin. Naphthalene and the five petroleum oils generated methemoglobin only in the presence of liver enzymes.

  3. Paper-disc method: An efficient assay for evaluating metal toxicity to soil algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Sun-Hwa; An, Youn-Joo

    2016-09-01

    The probabilistic ecological risk assessment using terrestrial toxicity data has been mainly based on microfauna or mesofauna. Soil algae, which are food source for microfauna and mesofauna, may be alternatively used for assessing soil toxicity. However, there are no internationally recommended guidelines for soil algal bioassays, and the collection of algae from the test soils has some limitations. In this study, we suggested the paper-disc method as an easy-to-use alternative. This method has been widely used for testing the antibacterial toxicity of various chemicals in agar media by measuring the diameter of the inhibition zone around the disc. We adapted the paper-disc method for screening the toxicity of copper (Cu) and nickel (Ni) to the soil alga Chlorococcum infusionum using various evaluation endpoints, such as growth zone, chlorophyll fluorescence, and photosynthetic activity. Chlorophyll fluorescence and photosynthetic activity decreased with the increasing concentrations of Cu(+2) or Ni(+2) contaminated soils. Algal growth zone was analyzed visually and showed similar results to those of chlorophyll fluorescence. The direct ethanol extraction method and indirect culture medium extraction method were similarly effective; however, the former was easier to perform, while the latter might facilitate the analysis of additional endpoints in future studies. Overall, the results suggested that the paper-disc method was not only a user-friendly assay for screening soil toxicity, but also effective due to its association with indirect soil quality indicators. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Toxicity assessment of water at different stages of treatment using Microtox assay

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    Pogorzelec Marta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Number of potentially toxic hydrophobic organic contaminants e.g. polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls and dioxins having entered aquatic environment, including potential sources of drinking water. Unfortunately, not all micropollutants can be removed during water treatment processes. What is more, disinfectants can react with some organic compounds already present in the water, and form disinfection by-products which also can be toxic. The aim of this study was to assess toxicity of water at different stages of water treatment and to verify usefulness semipermeable membrane devices in monitoring of drinking water. For this purpose, semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs were deployed in a surface water treatment plant. To determine the effect of water treatment on the presence of toxic micropollutants, study was conducted for a period of 5 months. Three sampling places were chosen: raw water input, stream of water just before disinfection and treated water output. After sampling dialysis in organic solvent was carried out and extracts were then analyzed with the Microtox acute toxicity test. The study has indicated the utility as well as some limitations of combining SPMDs with bioluminescence assay in the monitoring of biological effects of bioavailable hydrophobic pollutants in drinking water.

  5. Sediment toxicity in the Duluth-Superior Harbor: Use of Microtox{reg_sign} and Mutatox{reg_sign} as screening assays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schubauer-Berigan, M.; Hubbard, C. [Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, St. Paul, MN (United States); Schubauer-Berigan, J. [Univ. of South Carolina, Georgetown, SC (United States). Baruch Marine Inst.; Tesser, G. [Univ. of Minnesota, Duluth, MN (United States). Natural Resources Research Inst.

    1995-12-31

    Sediment toxicity tests were conducted in the Duluth-Superior Harbor at 40 sites as part of an integrated sediment assessment during the fall of 1993. Two rapid assays conducted with Photobacterium phosphoreum (Microtox{reg_sign} and Mutatox{reg_sign}) were compared with three standard US EPA sediment toxicity tests: Hyalella azteca (acute tests) and Chironomus tentans (acute and sub-lethal tests). The response in the two microbial assays was also evaluated for sensitivity to various contaminants analyzed simultaneously in the Duluth-Superior Harbor sediments. Microtox{reg_sign} and Mutatox{reg_sign} were found to be sensitive to approximately one-third and one-half the sediments, respectively; Chironomus tentans was sensitive to 15% of the sediments (either acutely or sub-lethally), while Hyalella azteca was not sensitive to any of the sediments. In almost all cases, Microtox{reg_sign} and Mutatox{reg_sign} correctly identified samples that were toxic to the chironomid, making it useful as a screening tool for toxicity, to reduce the number of sites to be tested with the benthic organisms. The subsequent application of Microtox{reg_sign} as a screen for sediment toxicity in an EMAP survey in the St. Louis River (MN) estuary will be discussed. Correlation of Microtox{reg_sign} and Mutatox{reg_sign} toxicity to environmental contaminants found in the sediments will be presented.

  6. Acute toxicity assessment of explosive-contaminated soil extracting solution by luminescent bacteria assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenjie; Jiang, Zhenming; Zhao, Quanlin; Zhang, Zhenzhong; Su, Hongping; Gao, Xuewen; Ye, Zhengfang

    2016-11-01

    Explosive-contaminated soil is harmful to people's health and the local ecosystem. The acute toxicity of its extracting solution was tested by bacterial luminescence assay using three kinds of luminescent bacteria to characterize the toxicity of the soil. An orthogonal test L 16 (45) was designed to optimize the soil extracting conditions. The optimum extracting conditions were obtained when the ultrasonic extraction time, ultrasonic extraction temperature, and the extraction repeat times were 6 h, 40 °C, and three, respectively. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) results showed that the main components of the contaminated soil's extracting solution were 2,4-dinitrotoluene-3-sulfonate (2,4-DNT-3-SO3-); 2,4-dinitrotoluene-5-sulfonate (2,4-DNT-5-SO3-); and 2,6-dinitrotoluene (2,6-DNT). Compared with Photobacterium phosphoreum and Vibrio fischeri, Vibrio qinghaiensis sp. Nov. is more suitable for assessing the soil extracting solution's acute toxicity. Soil washing can remove most of the contaminants toxic to luminescent bacterium Vibrio qinghaiensis sp. Nov., suggesting that it may be a potential effective remediation method for explosive-contaminated soil.

  7. Toxicity evaluation of ZnO nanostructures on L929 fibroblast cell line using MTS assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakhori, Siti Khadijah Mohd; Mahmud, Shahrom; Ann, Ling Chuo [Nano-optoelectronics Research and Technology Laboratory (NOR.), School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800, USM, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia); Mohamed, Azman Seeni; Saifuddin, Siti Nazmin [Integrative Medicine Cluster, Advanced Medical and Dental Institute, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Bandar Putra Bertam, 13200 Kepala Batas, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia); Masudi, Sam’an Malik; Mohamad, Dasmawati [Craniofacial Science Laboratory, School of Dentistry, Health Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 16150 Kubang Kerian, Kelantan (Malaysia)

    2015-04-24

    ZnO has wide applications in medical and dentistry apart from being used as optoelectronic devices such as solar cells, photodetectors, sensors and light emitting diodes (LEDs). Therefore, the toxicity evaluation is important to know the toxicity level on normal cell line. The toxicity of two grades ZnO nanostructures, ZnO-4 and ZnO-8 have been carried out using cytotoxicity test of MTS assay on L929 rat fibroblast cell line. Prior to that, ZnO-4 and ZnO-8 were characterized for its morphology, structure and optical properties using FESEM, X-ray diffraction, and Photoluminescence respectively. The two groups revealed difference in morphology and exhibit slightly shifted of near band edge emission of Photoluminescence other than having a similar calculated crystallite size of nanostructures. The viability of cells after 72h were obtained and the statistical significance value was calculated using SPSS v20. The p value is more than 0.05 between untreated and treated cell with ZnO. This insignificant value of p>0.05 can be summarized as a non-toxic level of ZnO-4 and ZnO-8 on the L929 cell line.

  8. Toxicity evaluation of ZnO nanostructures on L929 fibroblast cell line using MTS assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhori, Siti Khadijah Mohd; Mahmud, Shahrom; Ann, Ling Chuo; Mohamed, Azman Seeni; Saifuddin, Siti Nazmin; Masudi, Sam'an Malik; Mohamad, Dasmawati

    2015-04-01

    ZnO has wide applications in medical and dentistry apart from being used as optoelectronic devices such as solar cells, photodetectors, sensors and light emitting diodes (LEDs). Therefore, the toxicity evaluation is important to know the toxicity level on normal cell line. The toxicity of two grades ZnO nanostructures, ZnO-4 and ZnO-8 have been carried out using cytotoxicity test of MTS assay on L929 rat fibroblast cell line. Prior to that, ZnO-4 and ZnO-8 were characterized for its morphology, structure and optical properties using FESEM, X-ray diffraction, and Photoluminescence respectively. The two groups revealed difference in morphology and exhibit slightly shifted of near band edge emission of Photoluminescence other than having a similar calculated crystallite size of nanostructures. The viability of cells after 72h were obtained and the statistical significance value was calculated using SPSS v20. The p value is more than 0.05 between untreated and treated cell with ZnO. This insignificant value of p>0.05 can be summarized as a non-toxic level of ZnO-4 and ZnO-8 on the L929 cell line.

  9. Bioluminescent enzyme inhibition-based assay to predict the potential toxicity of carbon nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esimbekova, Elena N; Nemtseva, Elena V; Bezrukikh, Anna E; Jukova, Galina V; Lisitsa, Albert E; Lonshakova-Mukina, Viktoriya I; Rimatskaya, Nadezhda V; Sutormin, Oleg S; Kratasyuk, Valentina A

    2017-12-01

    A bioluminescent enzyme inhibition-based assay was applied to predict the potential toxicity of carbon nanomaterials (CNM) presented by single- and multi-walled nanotubes (SWCNT and MWCNT) and aqueous solutions of hydrated fullerene С60 (C60HyFn). This assay specifically detects the influence of substances on parameters of the soluble or immobilised coupled enzyme system of luminescent bacteria: NAD(P)Н:FMN-oxidoreductase+luciferase (Red+Luc). A protocol based on the optical properties of CNM for correcting the results of the bioluminescent assay was also developed. It was shown that the inhibitory activity of CNM on Red+Luc decreased in the following order: MWCNT>SWCNT>C60HyFn. The soluble enzyme system Red+Luc had high sensitivity to MWCNT and SWCNT, with values of the inhibition parameter IC50 equal to 0.012 and 0.16mg/L, respectively. The immobilised enzyme system was more vulnerable to C60HyFn than its soluble form, with an IC50 equal to 1.4mg/L. Due to its technical simplicity, rapid response time and high sensitivity, this bioluminescent method has the potential to be developed as a general enzyme inhibition-based assay for a wide variety of nanomaterials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Fluorescence-based assay as a new screening tool for toxic chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moczko, Ewa; Mirkes, Evgeny M.; Cáceres, César; Gorban, Alexander N.; Piletsky, Sergey

    2016-09-01

    Our study involves development of fluorescent cell-based diagnostic assay as a new approach in high-throughput screening method. This highly sensitive optical assay operates similarly to e-noses and e-tongues which combine semi-specific sensors and multivariate data analysis for monitoring biochemical processes. The optical assay consists of a mixture of environmental-sensitive fluorescent dyes and human skin cells that generate fluorescence spectra patterns distinctive for particular physico-chemical and physiological conditions. Using chemometric techniques the optical signal is processed providing qualitative information about analytical characteristics of the samples. This integrated approach has been successfully applied (with sensitivity of 93% and specificity of 97%) in assessing whether particular chemical agents are irritating or not for human skin. It has several advantages compared with traditional biochemical or biological assays and can impact the new way of high-throughput screening and understanding cell activity. It also can provide reliable and reproducible method for assessing a risk of exposing people to different harmful substances, identification active compounds in toxicity screening and safety assessment of drugs, cosmetic or their specific ingredients.

  11. Determination of toxicity assays, trophic state index, and physicochemical parameters on Piracicaba River and Itapeva Stream

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa de Assunção Rodrigues

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic activity has a great impact on aquatic environments, causing changes in biodiversity and the environment. In an attempt to determine pollution levels, we established physicochemical parameters, a trophic state index and toxicity assays. The Piracicaba River is an important water body that receives xenobiotic waste from industry, domestic activities and agriculture. These pollutants are released directly into the river or by streams like Itapeva Stream, which discharges into the river. The goals of this work were to analyze the toxicity factor for Daphnia magna (TFD, trophic state index (TSI, pH, conductivity, temperature and dissolved oxygen in the Piracicaba River and in the Itapeva Stream from one monthly collection in the months of May, June and August 2011. In the Piracicaba River was not found toxicity, while in May, June and August the TFD was 1, 8 and 1, respectively. The TSI varied from mesotrophic to eutrophic in the river and in the stream from ultraoligotrophic to mesotrophic. The medium of conductivity for the Itapeva Stream was 479.5 µS.cm-1 and for the Piracicaba River was 219.8 µS.cm-1. The dissolved oxygen in the Piracicaba River varied from 6.89 to11.36 mg.L-1 and in the Itapeva Stream from 0.92 to 6.31 mg.L-1. Based upon the results, both hydric bodies were eutrophic, and the Itapeva Stream was classified as unsuitable for maintaining aquatic life.

  12. Evaluation of male germ cell toxicity in rats: correlation between sperm head morphology and sperm comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, P P; Kushwaha, S; Tripathi, D N; Jena, G B

    2010-12-21

    The present study was aimed to investigate the germ cell toxicity of doxorubicin and find out the possible correlation between sperm head morphological evaluation and sperm comet assay, which are used to assess male germ cell toxicity. The correlation between these two assays was validated using a potent germ cell toxicant, doxorubicin, in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Doxorubicin was administered intra-peritionally at the doses of 1.25, 2.5 and 5mg/kg weekly once for a period of 5 weeks and all the animals were sacrificed after 1 week of receiving the last dose. The germ cell toxicity of doxorubicin was assessed using oxidative stress parameters, sperm head morphology, sperm comet assay, halo assay and histology in testes as the end point of evaluation. A significant increase in the % abnormality in sperm head was found in the animals treated with 2.5 and 5mg/kg/week doxorubicin. Doxorubicin treatment significantly increased the DNA damage of sperm in a dose-dependent manner as observed by sperm comet assay parameters. A strong positive correlation was observed between the sperm head morphological evaluation and the sperm comet assay. Therefore, it can be concluded that the damage in genetic material of sperm may result into abnormalities in the sperm head morphology. The sperm head morphological evaluation is considered to be essential for the assessment of male germ cell toxicity by several regulatory bodies like the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) and the International Conference on Harmonization (ICH). However, acceptance of the sperm comet assay by regulatory authorities as a standard genotoxicity test for assessing male germ cell toxicity still requires further validation of the assay. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Prediction of Chemical Carcinogenicity in Rodents from in vitro Genetic Toxicity Assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennant, Raymond W.; Margolin, Barry H.; Shelby, Michael D.; Zeiger, Errol; Haseman, Joseph K.; Spalding, Judson; Caspary, William; Resnick, Michael; Stasiewicz, Stanley; Anderson, Beth; Minor, Robert

    1987-05-01

    Four widely used in vitro assays for genetic toxicity were evaluated for their ability to predict the carcinogenicity of selected chemicals in rodents. These assays were mutagenesis in Salmonella and mouse lymphoma cells and chromosome aberrations and sister chromatid exchanges in Chinese hamster ovary cells. Seventy-three chemicals recently tested in 2-year carcinogenicity studies conducted by the National Cancer Institute and the National Toxicology Program were used in this evaluation. Test results from the four in vitro assays did not show significant differences in individual concordance with the rodent carcinogenicity results; the concordance of each assay was approximately 60 percent. Within the limits of this study there was no evidence of complementarity among the four assays, and no battery of tests constructed from these assays improved substantially on the overall performance of the Salmonella assay. The in vitro assays which represented a range of three cell types and four end points did show substantial agreement among themselves, indicating that chemicals positive in one in vitro assay tended to be positive in the other in vitro assays. To help put this project into its proper context, we emphasize certain features of the study: 1) Standard protocols were used to mimic the major use of STTs worldwide--screening for mutagens and carcinogens; no attempt was made to optimize protocols for specific chemicals. 2) The 73 NTP chemicals and their 60% incidence of carcinogenicity are probably not representative of the universe of chemicals but rather reflect the recent chemical selection process for the NTP carcinogenicity assay. 3) The small, diverse group of chemicals precludes a meaningful evaluation of the predictive utility of chemical structure information. 4) The NTP is currently testing these same 73 chemicals in two in vivo STTs for chromosomal effects. 5) Complete data for an additional group of 30 to 40 NTP chemicals will be gathered on

  14. Bioluminescent Vibrio fischeri Assays in the Assessment of Seasonal and Spatial Patterns in Toxicity of Contaminated River Sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarque, Sergio; Masner, Petr; Klánová, Jana; Prokeš, Roman; Bláha, Ludek

    2016-01-01

    Several bacteria-based assays, notably Vibrio fischeri luminescence assays, are often used as environmental monitoring tool for toxicity in sediments that may serve as both sinks and secondary source of contamination in aquatic ecosystems. In this study, we used 30-s kinetic bioassays based on V. fischeri to evaluate the toxicity associated to sediments from five localities with different contamination inputs (Morava River and its tributary Drevnice River in the south-eastern part of the Czech Republic). Toxicity assessed as half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) over the course of a year-long sampling was compared in bottom sediments and freshly trapped particulate material. Standard approach based on testing of aqueous elutriates was compared with toxicity of whole sediments (contact suspension toxicity). Bottom sediments showed lower toxicity compared to freshly trapped suspended materials in all cases. On the other hand, standardized elutriates induced generally weaker effects than suspended sediments likely due to losses during the extraction process. Toxicity generally increased during winter reaching maximum peaks in early spring months in all five sites. Total organic carbon (TOC) was found to be highly correlated with toxic effects. Toxicity from sites with direct industrial and agricultural water inputs also correlated with concentrations of metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Single time point sampling followed by the extraction and testing of elutriates, do not truly reflect the spatial and temporal variability in natural sediments and may lead to underestimation of ecotoxic risks.

  15. Bioluminescent Vibrio fischeri assays in the assessment of seasonal and spatial patterns in toxicity of contaminated river sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Jarque

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Several bacteria-based assays, notably Vibrio fischeri luminescence assays, are often used as environmental monitoring tool for toxicity in sediments that may serve as both sinks and secondary source of contamination in aquatic ecosystems. In this study, we used 30-s kinetic bioassays based on V. fischeri to evaluate the toxicity associated to sediments from five localities with different contamination inputs (Morava River and its tributary Drevnice River in the south-eastern part of the Czech Republic. Toxicity assessed as half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 over the course of a year-long sampling was compared in bottom sediments and freshly trapped particulate material. Standard approach based on testing of aqueous elutriates was compared with toxicity of whole sediments (contact suspension toxicity. Bottom sediments showed lower toxicity compared to freshly trapped suspended materials in all cases. On the other hand, standardized elutriates induced generally weaker effects than suspended sediments likely due to losses during the extraction process. Toxicity generally increased during winter reaching maximum peaks in early spring months in all five sites. Total organic carbon (TOC was found to be highly correlated with toxic effects. Toxicity from sites with direct industrial and agricultural water inputs also correlated with concentrations of metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs. Single time point sampling followed by the extraction and testing of elutriates, do not truly reflect the spatial and temporal variability in natural sediments and may lead to underestimation of ecotoxic risks.

  16. Chronic toxicity, genotoxic assay, and phytochemical analysis of four traditional medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda Sortibrán, América; Téllez, María Guadalupe Ordaz; Ocotero, Verónica Muñoz; Carballo-Ontiveros, Marco Antonio; García, Angélica Méndez; Valdés, Rocio Jimena Jiménez; Gutiérrez, Elizabeth Romero; Rodríguez-Arnaiz, Rosario

    2011-09-01

    Four medicinal plants--Tecoma stans, Ligusticum porteri, Monarda austromontana, and Poliomintha longiflora, which are distributed in tropical and subtropical countries of the American continent--are widely used in folk medicine to treat diseases such as diarrhea and dysentery. In addition, T. stans and P. longiflora are extensively used as hypoglycemic agents, and M. austromontana and P. longiflora are used as condiments. The plants were collected, identified, dried, and pulverized. Solvent extraction was prepared by maceration of the plant samples, and the phytochemical composition of the extracts was determined by using standard analysis procedures. Phytochemical analysis showed the presence of triterpenoids/steroids, flavonoids, and phenols/tannins and, in L. porteri, traces of alkaloids. After the elimination of solvents in vacuo, the extracts were administrated to Drosophila larvae to test their toxicity and genotoxicity. Third instar larvae were chronically fed with the phytoextracts. The extract from L. porteri was toxic, whereas those from T. stans, P. longiflora, and M. austromontana were not. Genotoxic activities of the 4 plants were investigated by using the wing-spot assay of D. melanogaster. Mitomycin C was used as a positive control. No statistically significant increase was observed between treated sample series and a concurrent negative (water) or solvent control sample series.

  17. A spheroid toxicity assay using magnetic 3D bioprinting and real-time mobile device-based imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Hubert; Gage, Jacob A; Shen, Tsaiwei; Haisler, William L; Neeley, Shane K; Shiao, Sue; Chen, Jianbo; Desai, Pujan K; Liao, Angela; Hebel, Chris; Raphael, Robert M; Becker, Jeanne L; Souza, Glauco R

    2015-09-14

    An ongoing challenge in biomedical research is the search for simple, yet robust assays using 3D cell cultures for toxicity screening. This study addresses that challenge with a novel spheroid assay, wherein spheroids, formed by magnetic 3D bioprinting, contract immediately as cells rearrange and compact the spheroid in relation to viability and cytoskeletal organization. Thus, spheroid size can be used as a simple metric for toxicity. The goal of this study was to validate spheroid contraction as a cytotoxic endpoint using 3T3 fibroblasts in response to 5 toxic compounds (all-trans retinoic acid, dexamethasone, doxorubicin, 5'-fluorouracil, forskolin), sodium dodecyl sulfate (+control), and penicillin-G (-control). Real-time imaging was performed with a mobile device to increase throughput and efficiency. All compounds but penicillin-G significantly slowed contraction in a dose-dependent manner (Z' = 0.88). Cells in 3D were more resistant to toxicity than cells in 2D, whose toxicity was measured by the MTT assay. Fluorescent staining and gene expression profiling of spheroids confirmed these findings. The results of this study validate spheroid contraction within this assay as an easy, biologically relevant endpoint for high-throughput compound screening in representative 3D environments.

  18. Assessment of a simple, non-toxic Alamar blue cell survival assay to monitor tomato cell viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byth, H A; Mchunu, B I; Dubery, I A; Bornman, L

    2001-01-01

    The Alamar Blue (AB) assay, which incorporates a medox indicator that changes colour or fluorescence in response to metabolic activity, is commonly used to assess quantitatively the viability and/or proliferation of mammalian cells and micro-organisms. In this study the AB assay was adapted for the determination of the viability of plant cells. Cell suspension cultures of tomato, Lycopersicon esculentum, L., with differing viabilities, served as the experimental model for a comparison of the AB assay with the conventional 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) viability assay. The AB assay showed a sigmoidal relationship between cell viability and AB reduction (as quantified by spectrofluorometry or spectrophotometry), which was similar to that obtained using the TTC assay. Both assays detected a significant reduction in cell viability after 48 h exposure to virulent Ralstonia solanacearum (biovar III), while the TTC assay, in addition, revealed cell proliferation in control cells from 24 to 72 h. The TTC assay detected cell proliferation over a wider range of cell densities, while the AB assay was more rapid and versatile whilst being non-toxic and thus allowing subsequent cell analysis.

  19. Assay for the developmental toxicity of safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L. to zebrafish embryos/larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Xia

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Safflower exhibits developmental toxicity for zebrafish embryos/larvae. The developing heart was speculated as the target organ of toxicity. Oxidative stress and increased apoptosis have roles in the developmental toxicity of safflower. This article provides a novel method to research the teratogenicity and possible mechanisms of toxicity of traditional Chinese medicines that are prohibited or contraindicated in pregnant women.

  20. Paired image- and FACS-based toxicity assays for high content screening of spheroid-type tumor cell cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trumpi, Kari; Egan, David A.; Vellinga, Thomas T.; Borel Rinkes, Inne H M; Kranenburg, Onno

    2015-01-01

    Novel spheroid-type tumor cell cultures directly isolated from patients' tumors preserve tumor characteristics better than traditionally grown cell lines. However, such cultures are not generally used for high-throughput toxicity drug screens. In addition, the assays that are commonly used to assess

  1. 20161106 - Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Based Assay Predicts Developmental Toxicity Potential of ToxCast Chemicals (ACT meeting)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worldwide initiatives to screen for toxicity potential among the thousands of chemicals currently in use require inexpensive and high-throughput in vitro models to meet their goals. The devTOX quickPredict platform is an in vitro human pluripotent stem cell-based assay used to as...

  2. Comparative Analysis of Predictive Models for Liver Toxicity Using ToxCast Assays and Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships (MCBIOS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comparative Analysis of Predictive Models for Liver Toxicity Using ToxCast Assays and Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships Jie Liu1,2, Richard Judson1, Matthew T. Martin1, Huixiao Hong3, Imran Shah1 1National Center for Computational Toxicology (NCCT), US EPA, RTP, NC...

  3. Unique Nanoparticle Optical Properties Confound Fluorescent Based Assays Widely Employed in Their In Vitro Toxicity Screening and Ranking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are novel materials having at least one dimension less than 100 nm and display unique physicochemical properties due to their nanoscale size. An emphasis has been placed on developing high throughput screening (HTS) assays to characterize and rank the toxiciti...

  4. Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Based Assay Predicts Developmental Toxicity Potential of ToxCast Chemicals (ACT meeting)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worldwide initiatives to screen for toxicity potential among the thousands of chemicals currently in use require inexpensive and high-throughput in vitro models to meet their goals. The devTOX quickPredict platform is an in vitro human pluripotent stem cell-based assay used to as...

  5. Evaluation of different toxicity assays applied to proliferating cells and to stratified epithelium in relation to permeability enhancement with glycocholate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eirheim, Heidi Ugelstad; Bundgaard, Christoffer; Nielsen, Hanne Mørck

    2004-01-01

    exposed to different GC concentrations for 4 h. The MTS/PMS assay and neutral red (NR) retention were performed along with quantitation of ATP, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and extracellular protein. The toxicity was calculated as the IC50 value relative to the control. Increase in 3H-mannitol permeability...

  6. Application of the rat liver lysosome assay to determining the reduction of toxic gliadin content during breadmaking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell, Hugh J; Stelmasiak, Teodor; Small, Darryl M; Buddrick, Oliver

    2016-02-01

    Enriched caricain was able to detoxify a major proportion of the gliadin in wholemeal wheat dough by allowing it to react for 5h at 37 °C during the fermentation stage. A reduction of 82% in toxicity, as determined by the rat-liver lysosome assay, was achieved using 0.03% enzyme on weight of dough. Without enzyme, only 26% reduction occurred. The difference in reduction of toxicity achieved is statistically significant (p < 0.01). The results are very similar to those obtained in our previous work using an immuno assay and the same enzyme preparation. They confirm the value of caricain as a means of reducing the toxicity of gliadin and open the way for enzyme therapy as an adjunct to the gluten free diet. This approach should lead to better control over the elimination of dietary gluten intake in conditions such as coeliac disease and dermatitis herpetiformis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Toxicity estimation of treated coke plant wastewater using the luminescent bacteria assay and the algal growth inhibition test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, S.; Siersdorfer, C.; Kaltwasser, H.; Geiger, M. [University of Saarland, Saarbruecken (Germany)

    1995-08-01

    Among several bioassays, the Scendesmus subspicatus chlorophyll fluorescence test and the Photobacterium phosphoreum bioluminescence assay were selected to examine their applicability for toxicity evaluation of changes in coke plant effluent quality. In addition to the ecotoxicological parameters, a chemical analysis of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), ammonia-N and nitrate-N was performed. It was demonstrated that the toxicity values obtained from the bioassays give a first indication on potential hazard and successful treatment. Decreasing toxicity values went along with decreasing DOC or ammonia-N values, but the sensitivity toward DOC reduction was higher. Sensitivity toward pure compounds was assessed by comparing the EC{sub 50} values of the luminescent bacteria assay with the corresponding EC{sub 50} values of the algal bioassay. The data showed a poor correlation between the two bioassays.

  8. UV and arsenate toxicity: a specific and sensitive yeast bioluminescence assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhrat, Anya; Eltzov, Evgeni; Finkelstein, Yishay; Marks, Robert S; Raveh, Dina

    2011-06-01

    We describe a Saccharomyces cerevisiae bioluminescence assay for UV and arsenate in which bacterial luciferase genes are regulated by the promoter of the yeast gene, UFO1. UFO1 encodes the F-box subunit of the Skp1–Cdc53–F-box protein ubiquitin ligase complex and is induced by DNA damage and by arsenate. We engineered the UFO1 promoter into an existing yeast bioreporter that employs human genes for detection of steroid hormone-disrupting compounds in water bodies. Our analysis indicates that use of an endogenous yeast promoter in different mutant backgrounds allows discrimination between different environmental signals. The UFO1-engineered yeast give a robust bioluminescence response to UVB and can be used for evaluating UV protective sunscreens. They are also effective in detecting extremely low concentrations of arsenate, particularly in pdr5Δ mutants that lack a mechanism to extrude toxic chemicals; however, they do not respond to cadmium or mercury. Combined use of endogenous yeast promoter elements and mutants of stress response pathways may facilitate development of high-specificity yeast bioreporters able to discriminate between closely related chemicals present together in the environment.

  9. Quantification of fullerenes by LC/ESI-MS and its application to in vivo toxicity assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacson, Carl W; Usenko, Crystal Y; Tanguay, Robert L; Field, Jennifer A

    2007-12-01

    With production and use of carbon nanoparticles increasing, it is imperative that the toxicity of these materials be determined; yet such testing requires specific and selective analytical methodologies that do not yet exist. Quantitative liquid-liquid extraction was coupled with liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for the quantitative determination of fullerenes from C60 to C98. Isotopically enriched, 13C60, was used as an internal standard. The method was applied to determine the loss of C60 from exposure water solution and uptake of C60 by embryonic zebrafish. The average recovery of C60 from zebrafish embryo extracts and 1% DMSO in aqueous-exposure solutions was 90 and 93%, respectively, and precision, as indicated by the relative standard deviation, was 2 and 7%, respectively. The method quantification limit was 0.40 microg/L and the detection limit was 0.02 microg/L. During the toxicological assay, loss of C60 due to sorption to test vials resulted in the reduction of exposure-solution concentrations over 6 h to less than 50% of the initial concentration. Time-course experiments indicated embryo uptake increased over course of the 12-h exposure. A lethal concentration that caused 50% mortality was determined to be 130 microg/L and was associated with a zebrafish embryo concentration, LD50, of 0.079 microg/g of embryo.

  10. Tier-1 assays for assessing the toxicity of insecticidal proteins produced by genetically engineered plants to non-target arthropods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yun-He; Romeis, Jörg; Wu, Kong-Ming; Peng, Yu-Fa

    2014-04-01

    In assessing an insect-resistant genetically engineered (IRGE) crop before its commercialization, researchers normally use so-called "Tier-1 assays" as the initial step to determine the effects of the crop on non-target organisms. In these tests, the insecticidal proteins (IPs) produced by the IRGEs are added to the diets of test organisms in the laboratory. Test organisms in such assays can be directly exposed to much higher concentrations of the test IPs than they would encounter in the field. The results of Tier-1 assays are thus more conservative than those generated in studies in which the organisms are exposed to the IPs by feeding on IRGE plant tissue or in the case of predators or parasites, by feeding on invertebrate prey or hosts that have fed on IRGE plant tissue. In this report, we consider three important factors that must be considered in Tier-1 assays: (i) methods for delivery of the IP to the test organisms; (ii) the need for and selection of compounds used as positive controls; and (iii) methods for monitoring the concentration, stability and bioactivity of the IP during the assay. We also analyze the existing data from Tier-1 assays regarding the toxicity of Bt Cry proteins to non-target arthropod species. The data indicate that the widely used Bt proteins have no direct toxicity to non-target organisms. © 2013 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  11. Predictive value of in vitro assays depends on the mechanism of toxicity of metal oxide nanoparticles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cho, Wan-Seob; Duffin, Rodger; Bradley, Mark; Megson, Ian L; MacNee, William; Lee, Jong Kwon; Jeong, Jayoung; Donaldson, Ken

    2013-01-01

    ...). As an in vivo toxicity endpoint, the acute lung inflammogenicity in a rat instillation model was compared with the in vitro toxicity endpoints comprising cytotoxicity, pro-inflammatory cytokine...

  12. Automated high-content assay for compounds selectively toxic to Trypanosoma cruzi in a myoblastic cell line.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Alonso-Padilla

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, represents a very important public health problem in Latin America where it is endemic. Although mostly asymptomatic at its initial stage, after the disease becomes chronic, about a third of the infected patients progress to a potentially fatal outcome due to severe damage of heart and gut tissues. There is an urgent need for new drugs against Chagas disease since there are only two drugs available, benznidazole and nifurtimox, and both show toxic side effects and variable efficacy against the chronic stage of the disease.Genetically engineered parasitic strains are used for high throughput screening (HTS of large chemical collections in the search for new anti-parasitic compounds. These assays, although successful, are limited to reporter transgenic parasites and do not cover the wide T. cruzi genetic background. With the aim to contribute to the early drug discovery process against Chagas disease we have developed an automated image-based 384-well plate HTS assay for T. cruzi amastigote replication in a rat myoblast host cell line. An image analysis script was designed to inform on three outputs: total number of host cells, ratio of T. cruzi amastigotes per cell and percentage of infected cells, which respectively provides one host cell toxicity and two T. cruzi toxicity readouts. The assay was statistically robust (Z´ values >0.6 and was validated against a series of known anti-trypanosomatid drugs.We have established a highly reproducible, high content HTS assay for screening of chemical compounds against T. cruzi infection of myoblasts that is amenable for use with any T. cruzi strain capable of in vitro infection. Our visual assay informs on both anti-parasitic and host cell toxicity readouts in a single experiment, allowing the direct identification of compounds selectively targeted to the parasite.

  13. Abatement of toxicity of effluents containing Cr(VI) by heterogeneous photocatalysis. Toxicity assessment by AMPHITOX assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojman, Jonatan Y; Meichtry, J Martín; Litter, Marta I; Pérez Coll, Cristina S

    2015-12-01

    Toxicity of a Cr(VI) solution before and after treatment by TiO2 heterogeneous photocatalysis (HP) was performed with AMPHITOX bioassay. Changes in toxicity on Rhinella arenarum larvae for 10-d were monitored after exposure to an untreated Cr(VI) solution and to the same solution after HP treatment. The HP treatment of a 41.60 mg L(-1) Cr(VI) solution reduced to 37.5% the concentration of the metal ion. A 10-fold reduction in toxicity at acute exposure (72 h) and 150-fold reduction in toxicity after 240 h was found. Further, the LOEC value increased from 0.001% for the untreated solution to 0.153% after HP treatment. Moreover, the safe concentration in untreated solution corresponded to 0.0001% sample, and it was 0.01% after the treatment, i.e., 100 times higher. A saving of water of about 100,000 L per L of effluent would be possible through dilution to allow safer concentrations for discharge; the saving would reach the highest value (1,000,000 L per L) at 240 h. Sub-lethal effects were completely absent in larvae exposed to the treated solution. The AMPHITOX test allowed to detect chronic effects at low Cr concentrations, i.e. at environmentally relevant levels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Pulmonary toxicity of nanomaterials: a critical comparison of published in vitro assays and in vivo inhalation or instillation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landsiedel, Robert; Sauer, Ursula G; Ma-Hock, Lan; Schnekenburger, Jürgen; Wiemann, Martin

    2014-11-01

    To date, guidance on how to incorporate in vitro assays into integrated approaches for testing and assessment of nanomaterials is unavailable. In addressing this shortage, this review compares data from in vitro studies to results from in vivo inhalation or intratracheal instillation studies. Globular nanomaterials (ion-shedding silver and zinc oxide, poorly soluble titanium dioxide and cerium dioxide, and partly soluble amorphous silicon dioxide) and nanomaterials with higher aspect ratios (multiwalled carbon nanotubes) were assessed focusing on the Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) reference nanomaterials for these substances. If in vitro assays are performed with dosages that reflect effective in vivo dosages, the mechanisms of nanomaterial toxicity can be assessed. In early tiers of integrated approaches for testing and assessment, knowledge on mechanisms of toxicity serves to group nanomaterials thereby reducing the need for animal testing.

  15. Sacha Inchi (Plukenetia volubilis L. powder: acute toxicity, 90 days oral toxicity study and micronucleus assay in rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idania Rodeiro

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Context: Sacha Inchi has been consumed for years by indigenous peoples. Meanwhile, its toxicological potential has not been sufficiently studied. Aims: To assess the acute, sub-chronic toxicity and genotoxicity evaluation of Sacha Inchi powder obtained from Plukenetia volubilis L. Methods: A dose of 2000 mg/kg was orally administered to rats and mice and toxicity symptoms for 14 days were observed. In repeated dose study, the product was orally administered to Sprague Dawley rats of both sexes. Animals received 50, 250 and 500 mg/kg/day of the product for 90 days. At the end, animals were sacrificed and samples were done for hematological and biochemical analysis, organ weighs and histopathological examination. Genotoxicity potential of Sacha Inchi powder was evaluated through micronucleus test in mice. Negative controls received the vehicle (carboxymethyl cellulose, 0.5% used. Results: No morbidity or mortality at 2000 mg/kg of the product were found. Sacha Inchi powder oral administration during 90 days to rats did not lead to death, body weight gain, food consumption, or adverse events. No significant changes on hematological or biochemical parameters, organ weights or histopathological findings were observed. Induction of micronucleus formation attributable to the product was not found in mice. Conclusions: No toxicity effects after oral acute exposure of Sacha Inchi power to rats and mice were observed. Neither toxicity attributable to oral doses of the product up to 500 mg/kg during 90 days to rats were found. Results suggested Sacha Inchi powder does not have genotoxicity potential under our experimental conditions.

  16. A quantitative toxicogenomics assay reveals the evolution and nature of toxicity during the transformation of environmental pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Na; Yuan, Songhu; Lan, Jiaqi; Gao, Ce; Alshawabkeh, Akram N; Gu, April Z

    2014-01-01

    The incomplete mineralization of contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) during the advanced oxidation processes can generate transformation products that exhibit toxicity comparable to or greater than that of the original contaminant. In this study, we demonstrated the application of a novel, fast, and cost-effective quantitative toxicogenomics-based approach for the evaluation of the evolution and nature of toxicity along the electro-Fenton oxidative degradation of three representative CECs whose oxidative degradation pathways have been relatively well studied, bisphenol A, triclosan, and ibuprofen. The evolution of toxicity as a result of the transformation of parent chemicals and production of intermediates during the course of degradation are monitored, and the quantitative toxicogenomics assay results revealed the dynamic toxicity changes and mechanisms, as well as their association with identified intermediates during the electro-Fenton oxidation process of the selected CECs. Although for the three CECs, a majority (>75%) of the parent compounds disappeared at the 15 min reaction time, the nearly complete elimination of toxicity required a minimal 30 min reaction time, and they seem to correspond to the disappearance of identified aromatic intermediates. Bisphenol A led to a wide range of stress responses, and some identified transformation products containing phenolic or quinone group, such as 1,4-benzoquinone and hydroquinone, likely contributed to the transit toxicity exhibited as DNA stress (genotoxicity) and membrane stress during the degradation. Triclosan is known to cause severe oxidative stress, and although the oxidative damage potential decreased concomitantly with the disappearance of triclosan after a 15 min reaction, the sustained toxicity associated with both membrane and protein stress was likely attributed at least partially to the production of 2,4-dichlorophenol that is known to cause the production of abnormal proteins and affect the cell

  17. Differential toxicity of Disperse Red 1 and Disperse Red 13 in the Ames test, HepG2 cytotoxicity assay, and Daphnia acute toxicity test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraz, E R A; Umbuzeiro, G A; de-Almeida, G; Caloto-Oliveira, A; Chequer, F M D; Zanoni, M V B; Dorta, D J; Oliveira, D P

    2011-10-01

    Azo dyes are of environmental concern due to their degradation products, widespread use, and low-removal rate during conventional treatment. Their toxic properties are related to the nature and position of the substituents with respect to the aromatic rings and amino nitrogen atom. The dyes Disperse Red 1 and Disperse Red 13 were tested for Salmonella mutagenicity, cell viability by annexin V, and propidium iodide in HepG2 and by aquatic toxicity assays using daphnids. Both dyes tested positive in the Salmonella assay, and the suggestion was made that these compounds induce mainly frame-shift mutations and that the enzymes nitroreductase and O-acetyltransferase play an important role in the observed effect. In addition, it was shown that the presence of the chlorine substituent in Disperse Red 13 decreased the mutagenicity about 14 times when compared with Disperse Red 1, which shows the same structure as Disperse Red 13, but without the chlorine substituent. The presence of this substituent did not cause cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells, but toxicity to the water flea Daphnia similis increased in the presence of the chlorine substituent. These data suggest that the insertion of a chlorine substituent could be an alternative in the design of dyes with low-mutagenic potency, although the ecotoxicity should be carefully evaluated. Copyright © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Troubleshooting the dichlorofluorescein assay to avoid artifacts in measurement of toxicant-stimulated cellular production of reactive oxidant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetz, Lauren M; Kamau, Patricia W; Cheng, Adrienne A; Meeker, John D; Loch-Caruso, Rita

    2013-01-01

    The dichlorofluorescein (DCF) assay is a popular method for measuring cellular reactive oxidant species (ROS). Although caveats have been reported with the DCF assay and other compounds, the potential for artifactual results due to cell-free interactions between the DCF compound and toxicants has hardly been explored. We evaluated the utility of the DCF assay for measuring ROS generation by the toxicants mono-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP), and tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA). DCF fluorescence was measured spectrofluorometrically after a 1-h incubation of toxicants with 6-carboxy-2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (carboxy-H2DCFDA). MEHP was incubated with carboxy-H2DCFDA in cell-free solutions of Hank's buffered salt solution (HBSS), or in Royal Park Memorial Institute (RPMI) medium with or without fetal bovine serum. TBBPA was incubated with carboxy-H2DCFDA in cell-free HBSS and with human trophoblast cells (HTR8/SVneo cells). MEHP did not increase fluorescence in solutions of carboxy-H2DCFDA in HBSS or RPMI medium without serum. However, MEHP (90 and 180μM) increased DCF fluorescence in cell-free RPMI medium containing serum. Furthermore, serum-free and cell-free HBSS containing 25μM TBBPA exhibited concentration-dependent increased fluorescence with 5-100μM carboxy-H2DCFDA (ptoxicant-stimulated cellular production of ROS. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Toxicity testing of heavy-metal-polluted soils with algae Selenastrum capricornutum: a soil suspension assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aruoja, Villem; Kurvet, Imbi; Dubourguier, Henri-Charles; Kahru, Anne

    2004-08-01

    A small-scale Selenastrum capricornutum (Rhapidocelis subcapitata) growth inhibition assay was applied to the toxicity testing of suspensions of heavy-metal-polluted soils. The OECD 201 standard test procedure was followed, and algal biomass was measured by the fluorescence of extracted chlorophyll. The soils, which contained up to (per kilogram) 1390 mg of Zn, 20 mg of Cd, and 1050 mg of Pb were sampled around lead and zinc smelters in northern France. The water extractability of the metals in suspensions (1 part soil/99 parts water w/v) was not proportional to the pollution level, as extractability was lower for soil samples that were more polluted. Thus, the same amount of metals could be leached out of soils of different levels of pollution, showing that total concentrations of heavy metals in soil (currently used for risk assessment purposes) are poor predictors of the real environmental risk via the soil-water path. Despite high concentrations of water-extracted zinc (0.6-1.4 mg/L of Zn in the test), exceeding by approximately 10-fold the EC(50) value for S. capricornutum (0.1 mg Zn/L), 72-h algal growth in the soil extracts was comparable or better than growth in the standard control OECD mineral medium. The soil suspension stimulated the growth of algae up to eightfold greater than growth using the OECD control medium. Growth stimulation of algae was observed even when soil suspensions contained up to 12.5 mg Zn/L and could not be explained by supplementary nitrogen, phosphorous, and carbonate leached from the soil. However, if the growth of algae in suspensions of clean and polluted soils was compared, a dose-dependent inhibitory effect of metals on algal growth was demonstrated. Thus, as soil contains nutrients/supplements that mask the adverse effect of heavy metals, a clean soil that has properties similar to the polluted soils should be used instead of mineral salt solution as a control for analysis of the ecotoxicity of soils. Copyright 2004 Wiley

  20. Non-toxic goiter and post-operative hypothyroidism: a survey among Russian endocrinologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V V Fadeyev

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The article represents results of a survey among Russian endocrinologists concerning treatment of non-toxic goiter, post-operative hypothyroidism and safety of iodine preparations.

  1. Toxicity testing of human assisted reproduction devices using the mouse embryo assay.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Punt-Van der Zalm, J.P.; Hendriks, J.C.M.; Westphal, J.R.; Kremer, J.A.M.; Teerenstra, S.; Wetzels, A.M.M.

    2009-01-01

    Systems to assess the toxicity of materials used in human assisted reproduction currently lack efficiency and/or sufficient discriminatory power. The development of 1-cell CBA/B6 F1 hybrid mouse embryos to blastocysts, expressed as blastocyst rate (BR), is used to measure toxicity. The embryos were

  2. Acute toxicity evaluation of explosive wastewater by bacterial bioluminescence assays using a freshwater luminescent bacterium, Vibrio qinghaiensis sp. Nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zhengfang; Zhao, Quanlin; Zhang, Mohe; Gao, Yuchen

    2011-02-28

    The compositions of explosive wastewater generated from TNT (2,4,6-trinitrotoluene) purification stage were characterized by using UV-vis spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), high performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC) and gas chromatograph/mass spectroscopy (GC/MS). The acute toxicity was evaluated by bacterium bioluminescence assay using a freshwater luminescent bacterium (Vibrio qinghaiensis sp. Nov.) and a marine luminescent bacterium (Photobacterium phosphoreum). The results showed that the wastewater's biodegradability was poor due to the high amount of chemical oxygen demand (COD). The main organic components were dinitrotoluene sulfonates (DNTS) with small amount of TNT, dinitrotoluene (DNT), mononitrotoluene (MNT) and other derivatives of nitrobenzene. It was highly toxic to luminescent bacteria P. phosphoreum and V. qinghaiensis sp. Nov. After reaction time of 15 min, the relative concentration of toxic pollutants (expressed as reciprocal of dilution ratio of wastewater) at 50% of luminescence inhibition ratio was 5.32×10(-4) for P. phosphoreu, while that was 4.34×10(-4) for V. qinghaiensis. V. qinghaiensis is more sensitive and suitable for evaluating the wastewater's acute toxicity than P. phosphoreum. After adsorption by resin, the acute toxicity can be greatly reduced, which is helpful for further treatment by biological methods. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Building a Tiered Approach to In Vitro Predictive Toxicity Screening: A Focus on Assays with In Vivo Relevance

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKim, James M

    2010-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges facing the pharmaceutical industry today is the failure of promising new drug candidates due to unanticipated adverse effects discovered during preclinical animal safety studies and clinical trials. Late stage attrition increases the time required to bring a new drug to market, inflates development costs, and represents a major source of inefficiency in the drug discovery/development process. It is generally recognized that early evaluation of new drug candidates is necessary to improve the process. Building in vitro data sets that can accurately predict adverse effects in vivo would allow compounds with high risk profiles to be deprioritized, while those that possess the requisite drug attributes and a lower risk profile are brought forward. In vitro cytotoxicity assays have been used for decades as a tool to understand hypotheses driven questions regarding mechanisms of toxicity. However, when used in a prospective manner, they have not been highly predictive of in vivo toxicity. Therefore, the issue may not be how to collect in vitro toxicity data, but rather how to translate in vitro toxicity data into meaningful in vivo effects. This review will focus on the development of an in vitro toxicity screening strategy that is based on a tiered approach to data collection combined with data interpretation. PMID:20053163

  4. Survey of toxicity and carcinogenity of mineral deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furst, A.; Harding-Barlow, I.

    1981-11-03

    The toxicities and biogeochemical cycles of arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead and nickel are reviewed in some detail, and other trace elements briefly mentioned. These heavy metals are used as a framework within which the problem of low-level radioactive waste disposal can be compared. (ACR)

  5. Evaluation of acute toxicity and teratogenic effects of plant growth regulators by Daphnia magna embryo assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai-Sung; Lu, Chi-Yuan; Chang, Shih-Hsien

    2011-06-15

    This study selected common plant growth regulators (Atonik, Cytokinin, Ethephon, Gibberellic acid and Paclobutrazol) to investigate their biological toxicity to the waters of the important biological indicator Daphnia magna. The methods used in this study included traditional neonate acute toxicity test, new Daphnia embryo toxicity test, and teratogenic embryo test. The study concluded that the acute toxicity of the five PGRs to Daphnia neonate had EC(50) value range of 1.9-130.5 mg l(-1), while acute toxicity of PGRs on Daphnia embryo had EC(50) value range of 0.2-125 mg l(-1); the Daphnia embryos' LOEC values (0.05-48 mg l(-1)) for the five PGRs were lower than embryo EC(50) values. The toxic ratios of 48 h EC(50) (neonate)/48 h LOEC (embryo) for 5 PGRs were 19-512 times. The study found that teratogenic effects of Paclobutrazol and Cytokinin induced in embryo were higher than those of most other PGRs. Microscopic observation of the teratogenic effects showed that all 5 PGRs induced malformations of the second antenna, rostrum, Malpighian tube, sensory bristles, and tail spine as well as function loss and death. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Based Developmental Toxicity Assays for Chemical Safety Screening and Systems Biology Data Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinde, Vaibhav; Klima, Stefanie; Sureshkumar, Perumal Srinivasan; Meganathan, Kesavan; Jagtap, Smita; Rempel, Eugen; Rahnenführer, Jörg; Hengstler, Jan Georg; Waldmann, Tanja; Hescheler, Jürgen; Leist, Marcel; Sachinidis, Agapios

    2015-06-17

    Efficient protocols to differentiate human pluripotent stem cells to various tissues in combination with -omics technologies opened up new horizons for in vitro toxicity testing of potential drugs. To provide a solid scientific basis for such assays, it will be important to gain quantitative information on the time course of development and on the underlying regulatory mechanisms by systems biology approaches. Two assays have therefore been tuned here for these requirements. In the UKK test system, human embryonic stem cells (hESC) (or other pluripotent cells) are left to spontaneously differentiate for 14 days in embryoid bodies, to allow generation of cells of all three germ layers. This system recapitulates key steps of early human embryonic development, and it can predict human-specific early embryonic toxicity/teratogenicity, if cells are exposed to chemicals during differentiation. The UKN1 test system is based on hESC differentiating to a population of neuroectodermal progenitor (NEP) cells for 6 days. This system recapitulates early neural development and predicts early developmental neurotoxicity and epigenetic changes triggered by chemicals. Both systems, in combination with transcriptome microarray studies, are suitable for identifying toxicity biomarkers. Moreover, they may be used in combination to generate input data for systems biology analysis. These test systems have advantages over the traditional toxicological studies requiring large amounts of animals. The test systems may contribute to a reduction of the costs for drug development and chemical safety evaluation. Their combination sheds light especially on compounds that may influence neurodevelopment specifically.

  7. Design of a high-throughput human neural crest cell migration assay to indicate potential developmental toxicants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyffeler, Johanna; Karreman, Christiaan; Leisner, Heidrun; Kim, Yong Jun; Lee, Gabsang; Waldmann, Tanja; Leist, Marcel

    2017-01-01

    Migration of neural crest cells (NCCs) is one of the pivotal processes of human fetal development. Malformations arise if NCC migration and differentiation are impaired genetically or by toxicants. In the currently available test systems for migration inhibition of NCC (MINC), the manual generation of a cell-free space results in extreme operator dependencies, and limits throughput. Here a new test format was established. The assay avoids scratching by plating cells around a commercially available circular stopper. Removal of the stopper barrier after cell attachment initiates migration. This microwell-based circular migration zone NCC function assay (cMINC) was further optimized for toxicological testing of human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC)-derived NCCs. The challenge of obtaining data on viability and migration by automated image processing was addressed by developing a freeware. Data on cell proliferation were obtained by labelling replicating cells, and by careful assessment of cell viability for each experimental sample. The role of cell proliferation as an experimental confounder was tested experimentally by performing the cMINC in the presence of the proliferation-inhibiting drug cytosine arabinoside (AraC), and by a careful evaluation of mitotic events over time. Data from these studies led to an adaptation of the test protocol, so that toxicant exposure was limited to 24 h. Under these conditions, a prediction model was developed that allows classification of toxicants as either inactive, leading to unspecific cytotoxicity, or specifically inhibiting NC migration at non-cytotoxic concentrations.

  8. An in situ postexposure feeding assay with Carcinus maenas for estuarine sediment-overlying water toxicity evaluations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreira, Susana M. [Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas de Abel Salazar (ICBAS), Departamento de Estudos de Populacoes, Largo Abel Salazar 2, 4099-003 Porto (Portugal); Centro Interdisciplinar de Investigacao Marinha e Ambiental, Laboratorio de Ecotoxicologia, Rua dos Bragas 289, 4050-123 Porto (Portugal); Moreira-Santos, Matilde [Instituto do Ambiente e Vida, Departamento de Zoologia da Universidade de Coimbra, Largo Marques de Pombal, 3004-517 Coimbra (Portugal); Guilhermino, Lucia [Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas de Abel Salazar (ICBAS), Departamento de Estudos de Populacoes, Largo Abel Salazar 2, 4099-003 Porto (Portugal); Centro Interdisciplinar de Investigacao Marinha e Ambiental, Laboratorio de Ecotoxicologia, Rua dos Bragas 289, 4050-123 Porto (Portugal); Ribeiro, Rui [Instituto do Ambiente e Vida, Departamento de Zoologia da Universidade de Coimbra, Largo Marques de Pombal, 3004-517 Coimbra (Portugal)]. E-mail: rui.ribeiro@zoo.uc.pt

    2006-01-15

    This study developed and evaluated a short-term sublethal in situ toxicity assay for estuarine sediment-overlying waters, with the crab Carcinus maenas (L.) based on postexposure feeding. It consisted of a 48-h in situ exposure period followed by a short postexposure feeding period (30 min). A precise method for quantifying feeding, using the Polychaeta Hediste (Nereis) diversicolor Mueller as food source, was first developed. The sensitivity of the postexposure feeding response was verified by comparing it to that of lethality, upon cadmium exposure. The influence of environmental conditions prevailing during exposure (salinity, temperature, substrate, light regime, and food availability) on postexposure feeding was also addressed. The potential of this in situ assay was then investigated by deploying organisms at ten sites, located in reference and contaminated Portuguese estuaries. Organism recovery ranged between 90% and 100% and a significant postexposure feeding depression (16.3-72.7%) was observed at all contaminated sites relatively to references. - A new sub-lethal toxicity assay is presented for marine invertebrates.

  9. Toxicity screening of produced water extracts in a zebrafish embryo assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, G; Norrgren, L; Hylland, K; Tollefsen, K E

    2014-01-01

    Produced water is the largest effluent discharge from oil and gas/condensate production facilities in the North Sea. There is concern that contaminants originating from the reservoir and chemicals used in the production process may affect marine organisms. Developmental toxicity of extractable organic compounds in produced water effluents from oil and gas/condensate production platforms in the Norwegian sector of the North Sea was assessed in a temporal and spatial manner using zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos. Large-scale solid-phase extraction (SPE) and on-column fractionation of water-soluble fraction (WSF) and an oil/particulate fraction was used in a rapid screening bioassay for embryotoxicity. Exposure to produced water extracts increased rate of mortality and reduced pigmentation and heart rate, as well as delaying time to hatch. The oil/particulate fraction was 10-fold less toxic than WSF, indicating that toxicity was predominantly produced by moderately polar and bioavailable compounds. Large spatial and temporal variation in produced water toxicity was observed, displaying considerable variability in the reservoir, oil well, and effluent composition over time. The noted toxicity did not correlate well with either reported produced water composition or parameters such as total hydrocarbons, thus challenging chemical measurements as a reliable source of information for predicting complex effects. Although embryotoxicity was observed following exposure to the extracts, dilution and transformation of produced water in the recipient are expected to rapidly reduce the concentrations of compounds in the effluents to levels below the thresholds of observed effects.

  10. Hazard and risk assessment of human exposure to toxic metals using in vitro digestion assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hani A. Alhadrami

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Clean-up targets for toxic metals require that the site be “fit for purpose”. This means that targets are set with respect to defined receptors that reflect intended land-use. In this study, the likely threat of human exposure to toxic metals has been evaluated by simulating the human digestion process in vitro. The effects of key attributes (i.e. sample fraction size, pH, Kd and total metal concentrations on the bioavailability of Cu and Ni were also investigated. Total metal concentration was the key explanatory factor for Cu and Ni bioavailability. A comparative ranking of metal concentrations in the context of tolerable daily intakes for Cu and Ni confirmed that the pH has the greatest impact on metals bioavailability. Rapid screening of key attributes and total toxic metal doses can reveal the relative hazard imposed on human, and this approach should be considered when defining threshold values for human protection.

  11. The MTT assay as tool to evaluate and compare excipient toxicity in vitro on respiratory epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherliess, Regina

    2011-06-15

    There are not many excipients already approved in drug products for the use in the respiratory tract. In this study, a rapid in vitro screening procedure to assess and compare acute toxicity of soluble excipient substances on respiratory epithelial cells utilising the Calu-3 cell line is presented. The test substances are either dissolved in HBSS+HEPES buffer or are directly applied to the cellular surface. After 4h incubation, the substances are removed and the cell viability is assessed using an MTT assay. The tested excipients include polysorbate 20 and 80, lactose and povidone 30 as well as glycerol and propylene glycol as examples of excipients already being used in formulations for application in the respiratory tract. These substances are sorted according to their toxic effect and new excipients not yet used in the respiratory tract like HPMC can be classified in this scheme. With this, besides information from systemic toxicity tests, a first valuation of the acute toxic effect of the substance on respiratory epithelial cells is gained. This can aid in the choice of new excipients being necessary for modern respiratory formulations comprising new active compounds as biomolecules or new delivery strategies such as sustained or prolonged delivery. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Predictive value of cell assays for developmental toxicity and embryotoxicity of conazole fungicides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Karin Dreisig; Taxvig, Camilla; Kjærstad, Mia Birkhøj

    2013-01-01

    This paper evaluates in vivo predictability of a battery of in vitro tests covering developmental toxicity and embryotoxicity of five widely used conazole fungicides. The conazoles were investigated in the embryonic stem cell test, and data were compared to in vivo embryotoxicity data. The same...

  13. Evaluation of toxicity equivalent calculations for use with data from in vitro aromatase inhibition assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    With growing investment in alternatives to traditional animal toxicity tests, the next generation of risk assessment must interpret new streams of data to identify hazards and protect humans and wildlife populations. If the effects of a chemical can be characterized by a battery...

  14. Development of a Facile and High-Throughput Bioluminescence Assay Using Vibrio fischeri to Determine the Chronic Toxicity of Contaminated Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasuhoglu, Deniz; Westlund, Paul; Isazadeh, Siavash; Neamatallah, Sarah; Yargeau, Viviane

    2017-02-01

    Chronic toxicity testing using the luminescent bacterium, Vibrio fischeri, has recently been demonstrated to be a suitable bioassay for water quality monitoring. The toxicity evaluation is typically based on determining the EC50 at specific time points which may lead to overlooking the dynamic nature of luminescence response and limits information regarding the possible mechanisms of action of target compounds. This study investigated various approaches (standard, integral, and luminescence rate inhibition) to evaluate the chronic toxicity of three target compounds (atrazine, trimethoprim, and acetamiprid) using a 96-well plate based method. The chronic toxicity assay and the methods used for EC50 calculation provided in this work resulted in a high-throughput method of chronic toxicity testing and indicated lower EC50 than the values provided by the standard short term methods, indicating higher toxicity. This study emphasizes the need for additional chronic toxicity testing to further evaluate the toxicity of compounds or unknown samples.

  15. [Endonuclease modified comet assay for oxidative DNA damage induced by detection of genetic toxicants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian; Li, Hongli; Zhai, Qingfeng; Qiu, Yugang; Niu, Yong; Dai, Yufei; Zheng, Yuxin; Duan, Huawei

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the use of the lesion-specific endonucleases-modified comet assay for analysis of DNA oxidation in cell lines. DNA breaks and oxidative damage were evaluated by normal alkaline and formamidopyrimidine-DNA-glycosylase (FPG) modified comet assays. Cytotoxicity were assessed by MTT method. The human bronchial epithelial cell (16HBE) were treated with benzo (a) pyrene (B(a)P), methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), colchicine (COL) and vincristine (VCR) respectively, and the dose is 20 µmol/L, 25 mg/ml, 5 mg/L and 0.5 mg/L for 24 h, respectively. Oxidative damage was also detected by levels of reactive oxygen species in treated cells. Four genotoxicants give higher cytotoxicity and no significant changes on parameters of comet assay treated by enzyme buffer. Cell survival rate were (59.69 ± 2.60) %, (54.33 ± 2.81) %, (53.11 ± 4.00) %, (51.43 ± 3.92) % in four groups, respectively. There was the direct DNA damage induced by test genotoxicants presented by tail length, Olive tail moment (TM) and tail DNA (%) in the comet assay. The presence of FPG in the assays increased DNA migration in treated groups when compared to those without it, and the difference was statistically significant which indicated that the clastogen and aneugen could induce oxidative damage in DNA strand. In the three parameters, the Olive TM was changed most obviously after genotoxicants treatment. In the contrast group, the Olive TM of B(a) P,MMS, COL,VCR in the contrast groups were 22.99 ± 17.33, 31.65 ± 18.86, 19.86 ± 9.56 and 17.02 ± 9.39, respectively, after dealing with the FPG, the Olive TM were 34.50 ± 17.29, 43.80 ± 10.06, 33.10 ± 12.38, 28.60 ± 10.53, increased by 58.94%, 38.48%, 66.86% and 68.21%, respectively (t value was 3.91, 3.89, 6.66 and 3.87, respectively, and all P comet assay appears more specific for detecting oxidative DNA damage induced by genotoxicants exposure, and the application of comet assay will be expanded. The endonuclease

  16. Toxicity of selected plant volatiles in microbial and mammalian short-term assays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stammati, A.; Bonsi, P.; Zucco, F.; Moezelaar, R.; Alakomi, H.L.; Wright, von A.

    1999-01-01

    In this study, several short-term microbial and mammalian in vitro assays were used to evaluate cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of four plant volatiles showing antifungal activity: cinnamaldehyde, carvacrol, thymol and S(+)-carvone. All inhibited viability and proliferation of Hep-2 cells in a

  17. Bioluminescence inhibition assays for toxicity screening of wood extractives and biocides in paper mill process waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigol, Anna; Latorre, Anna; Lacorte, Sílvia; Barceló, Damià

    2004-02-01

    The risk associated with wood extractives, biocides, and other additives in pulp and paper mill effluents was evaluated by performing a characterization of process waters and effluents in terms of toxicity and chemical analysis. The individual toxicity of 10 resin acids, two unsaturated fatty acids, and three biocides was estimated by measuring the bioluminescence inhibition with a ToxAlert 100 system. Median effective concentration values (EC50) of 4.3 to 17.9, 1.2 to 1.5, and 0.022 to 0.50 mg/L were obtained, respectively. Mixtures of these three families of compounds showed antagonistic effects. Chemical analysis of process waters was performed by liquid chromatography- and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Biocides such as 2-(thiocyanomethylthio)-benzotiazole (TCMTB) (EC50 = 0.022 mg/L) and 2,2-dibromo-3-nitrilpropionamide (DBNPA) (EC50 = 0.50 mg/L) were the most toxic compounds tested and were detected at concentrations of 16 and 59 microg/L, respectively, in a closed-circuit recycling paper mill. Process waters from kraft pulp mills, printing paper mills, and packing board paper mills showed the highest concentration of resin acids (up to 400 microg/L) and accounted for inhibition percentages up to 100%. Detergent degradation products such as nonylphenol (NP) and octylphenol (OP) and the plasticizer bisphenol A (BPA) were also detected in the waters at levels of 0.6 to 10.6, 0.3 to 1.4, and 0.7 to 187 microg/L, respectively. However, once these waters were biologically treated, the concentration of detected organic compounds diminished and the toxicity decreased in most cases to values of inhibition lower than 20%.

  18. Interlaboratory study of precision: Hyalella azteca and Chironomus tentans freshwater sediment toxicity assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, G.A.; Norberg-King, T. J.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Benoit, D.A.; Ankley, G.T.; Winger, P.V.; Kubitz, J.; Lazorchak, J.M.; Smith, M.E.; Greer, E.; Dwyer, F.J.; Call, D.J.; Day, K.E.; Kennedy, P.; Stinson, M.

    1996-01-01

    Standard 10-d whole-sediment toxicity test methods have recently been developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for the amphipod Hyalella azteca and the midge Chironomus tentans. An interlaboratory evaluation of method precision was performed using a group of seven to 10 laboratories, representing government, academia, and environmental consulting firms. The test methods followed the EPA protocols for 4-d water-only reference toxicant (KCl) testing (static exposure) and for 10-d whole-sediment testing. Test sediments included control sediment, two copper-containing sediments, and a sediment contaminated primarily with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Reference toxicant tests resulted in H. azteca and C. tentans median lethal concentration (LC50) values with coefficents of variation (CVs) of 15.8 and 19.6%, respectively. Whole sediments which were moderately contaminated provided the best estimates of precision using CVs. Hyalella azteca and C. tentans tests in moderately contaminated sediments exhibited LC50 CVs of 38.9 and 13.5%, respectively. The CV for C. tentans growth was 31.9%. Only 3% (1 of 28) of samples exceeded acceptable interlaboratory precision limits for the H. azteca survival tests. No samples exceeded the intralaboratory precision limit for H. azteca or C. tentans survival tests. However, intralaboratory variability limits for C. tentans growth were exceeded by 80 and 100% of the laboratories for a moderately toxic and control sample, respectively. Interlaboratory variability limits for C. tentans survival were not exceeded by any laboratory. The results showed these test methods to have relatively low variance and acceptable levels of precision in interlaboratory comparisons.

  19. [Photobacterium phosphoreum assay on the toxicity of soil contaminated by heavy metals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, B; Li, P; Wang, J; Yang, G; Zhang, H

    2001-06-01

    The toxicity of soil artificially contaminated by heavy metals was assessed with Photobacterium phosphoreum. The results showed that the duration of optimum balance was 24 hours, and that of optimum extraction was 2 hours. Two leaching methods were compared, and data showed that optimum leaching solvent was hydrocarbon chloride with a concentration of 0.1 mol.L-1 HCL. Dose-response curve indicated that the content of heavy metals was positively related with the toxicity of soil. The general detection limit given by EC50 of soil contaminated by single heavy metal were Cd 26.12 mg.kg-1, Cu 291.48 mg.kg-1, Zn 72.46 mg.kg-1 and Pb 2174.93 mg.kg-1. This study also indicated the toxicity of complex heavy metals pollution in soil was stronger than that of individual element. The research could provide a theoretic base for the remediation of soil contaminated by heavy metals.

  20. Relative developmental toxicity potencies of retinoids in the embryonic stem cell test compared with their relative potencies in in vivo and two other in vitro assays for developmental toxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louisse, J.; Gönen, S.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Verwei, M.

    2011-01-01

    The present study determines the relative developmental toxicity potencies of retinoids in the embryonic stem (ES)-D3 cell differentiation assay of the embryonic stem cell test, and compares the outcomes with their relative potencies in in vivo and two other in vitro assays for developmental

  1. Can Artemia Hatching Assay Be a (Sensitive) Alternative Tool to Acute Toxicity Test?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotini, A; Manfra, L; Canepa, S; Tornambè, A; Migliore, L

    2015-12-01

    Artemia sp. is extensively used in ecotoxicity testing, despite criticisms inherent to both acute and long-term tests. Alternative endpoints and procedures should be considered to support the use of this biological model. The hatching process comprises several developmental steps and the cyst hatchability seems acceptable as endpoint criterion. In this study, we assessed the reliability of the hatching assay on A. franciscana by comparing with acute and long-term mortality tests, using two chemicals: Diethylene Glycol (DEG), Sodium Dodecyl Sulphate (SDS). Both DEG and SDS tests demonstrated a dose dependent hatching inhibition. The hatching test resulted more sensitive than acute mortality test and less sensitive than the long-term one. Results demonstrate the reliability and high sensitivity of this hatching assay on a short time lag and support its useful application in first-tier risk assessment procedures.

  2. Label-free detection of protein molecules secreted from an organ-on-a-chip model for drug toxicity assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Andres W.; Zhang, Yu S.; Aleman, Julio; Alerasool, Parissa; Dokmeci, Mehmet R.; Khademhosseini, Ali; Ye, Jing Yong

    2016-03-01

    Clinical attrition is about 30% from failure of drug candidates due to toxic side effects, increasing the drug development costs significantly and slowing down the drug discovery process. This partly originates from the fact that the animal models do not accurately represent human physiology. Hence there is a clear unmet need for developing drug toxicity assays using human-based models that are complementary to traditional animal models before starting expensive clinical trials. Organ-on-a-chip techniques developed in recent years have generated a variety of human organ models mimicking different human physiological conditions. However, it is extremely challenging to monitor the transient and long-term response of the organ models to drug treatments during drug toxicity tests. First, when an organ-on-a-chip model interacts with drugs, a certain amount of protein molecules may be released into the medium due to certain drug effects, but the amount of the protein molecules is limited, since the organ tissue grown inside microfluidic bioreactors have minimum volume. Second, traditional fluorescence techniques cannot be utilized for real-time monitoring of the concentration of the protein molecules, because the protein molecules are continuously secreted from the tissue and it is practically impossible to achieve fluorescence labeling in the dynamically changing environment. Therefore, direct measurements of the secreted protein molecules with a label-free approach is strongly desired for organs-on-a-chip applications. In this paper, we report the development of a photonic crystal-based biosensor for label-free assays of secreted protein molecules from a liver-on-a-chip model. Ultrahigh detection sensitivity and specificity have been demonstrated.

  3. Evaluation of alamar blue reduction for the in vitro assay of hepatocyte toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaughter, M R; Bugelski, P J; O'Brien, P J

    1999-01-01

    Alamar Blue (AB) reduction is a promising new in vitro assay which is simple to conduct and amenable to repeated measurements and high-throughput screening; however, evaluation with hepatocytes has not been reported. Accordingly, we compared AB reduction with established markers of hepatocyte viability and cell density. Primary rat hepatocytes were allowed to adhere to collagen-coated 96-well plates, then exposed for 16 hours to culture medium, 0.7% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) in medium, 500 mum CCl(4), 500 mum eugenol or 15 or 150 mum of a novel substituted indoline (the latter three in medium with 0.7% DMSO; medium also contained hydrocortisone during exposure period). Using a spectrophotometric plate reader, AB reduction was compared with lactate dehydrogenase release (LDH) release, neutral red (NR) uptake, total protein (TP) and cell seed density. AB reduction showed a linear relationship and good correlation with NR uptake, LDH release, TP and cell density. AB assay precision varied with cell density, but was similar to other assays in cytotoxicity screening. Good correlation with cell density indicates AB to have the potential for assessment of hepatocyte proliferation. From the results reported here, we recommend further evaluation and optimization of a protocol for application of AB reduction as a test for cytotoxicity and proliferation in primary hepatocyte cultures.

  4. High Specificity of a Quantitative PCR Assay Targeting a Saxitoxin Gene for Monitoring Toxic Algae Associated with Paralytic Shellfish Toxins in the Yellow Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yan; Yu, Ren-Cheng; Murray, Shauna A; Chen, Jian-Hua; Kang, Zhen-Jun; Zhang, Qing-Chun; Kong, Fan-Zhou; Zhou, Ming-Jiang

    2015-10-01

    The identification of core genes involved in the biosynthesis of saxitoxin (STX) offers a great opportunity to detect toxic algae associated with paralytic shellfish toxins (PST). In the Yellow Sea (YS) in China, both toxic and nontoxic Alexandrium species are present, which makes it a difficult issue to specifically monitor PST-producing toxic algae. In this study, a quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay targeting sxtA4, a domain in the sxt gene cluster that encodes a unique enzyme involved in STX biosynthesis, was applied to analyze samples collected from the YS in spring of 2012. The abundance of two toxic species within the Alexandrium tamarense species complex, i.e., A. fundyense and A. pacificum, was also determined with TaqMan-based qPCR assays, and PSTs in net-concentrated phytoplankton samples were analyzed with high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with a fluorescence detector. It was found that the distribution of the sxtA4 gene in the YS was consistent with the toxic algae and PSTs, and the quantitation results of sxtA4 correlated well with the abundance of the two toxic species (r=0.857). These results suggested that the two toxic species were major PST producers during the sampling season and that sxtA-based qPCR is a promising method to detect toxic algae associated with PSTs in the YS. The correlation between PST levels and sxtA-based qPCR results, however, was less significant (r=0.552), implying that sxtA-based qPCR is not accurate enough to reflect the toxicity of PST-producing toxic algae. The combination of an sxtA-based qPCR assay and chemical means might be a promising method for monitoring toxic algal blooms. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Toxicity screening of soils from different mine areas—A contribution to track the sensitivity and variability of Arthrobacter globiformis assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques, Catarina R., E-mail: crmarques@ua.pt [Departamento de Biologia and CESAM (Centro de Estudos do Ambiente e do Mar), Universidade de Aveiro, Campus Universitário de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Caetano, Ana L. [Departamento de Biologia and CESAM (Centro de Estudos do Ambiente e do Mar), Universidade de Aveiro, Campus Universitário de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Haller, Andreas [ECT Oekotoxikologie GmbH, Böttgerstraße 2–14, D-65439 Flörsheim a. M. (Germany); Gonçalves, Fernando [Departamento de Biologia and CESAM (Centro de Estudos do Ambiente e do Mar), Universidade de Aveiro, Campus Universitário de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Pereira, Ruth [Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, s/n, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Interdisciplinary Centre of Marine and Environmental Research (CIIMAR/CIMAR), Universidade do Porto, Rua dos Bragas 289, P 4050-123 Porto (Portugal); Römbke, Jörg [ECT Oekotoxikologie GmbH, Böttgerstraße 2–14, D-65439 Flörsheim a. M. (Germany)

    2014-06-01

    Highlights: • The assay gave rapid and feasible discrimination of toxic soils to A. globiformis. • Sensitive and low variability response to soils from different regions. • Soil properties may interfere with metal toxicity and fluorescence measurements. • Proposal of a toxicity threshold for the contact assay regarding soils. • A. globiformis assay should be included in the Tier I of risk assessment frameworks. - Abstract: This study used the Arthrobacter globiformis solid-contact test for assessing the quality of soils collected in areas subjected to past and present mine activities in Europe (uranium mine, Portugal) and North Africa (phosphogypsum pile, Tunisia; iron mine, Morocco). As to discriminate the influence of soils natural variability from the effect of contaminants, toxicity thresholds were derived for this test, based on the dataset of each study area. Furthermore, the test sensitivity and variability was also evaluated. As a result, soils that inhibited A. globiformis dehydrogenase activity above 45% or 50% relatively to the control, were considered to be toxic. Despite the soil metal content determined, the properties of soils seemed to influence dehydrogenase activity. Overall, the contact test provided a coherent outcome comparing to other more time-consuming and effort-demanding ecotoxicological assays. Our results strengthened the feasibility and ecological relevance of this assay, which variability was quite reduced hence suggesting its potential integration within the test battery of tier 1 of soil risk assessment schemes.

  6. Development of screening assays for nanoparticle toxicity assessment in human blood: preliminary studies with charged Au nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Sara A; Thompson, John W; Haynes, Christy L

    2012-09-01

    As nanoparticles have found increased use in both consumer and medical applications, corresponding increases in possible exposure to humans necessitate studies examining the impacts of these nanomaterials in biological systems. This article examines the effects of approximately 30-nm-diameter gold nanoparticles, with positively and negatively charged surface coatings in human blood. Here, we study the exposure effects, with up to 72 h of exposure to 5, 15, 25 and 50 µg/ml nanoparticles on hemolysis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and platelet aggregation in subsets of cells from human blood. Assessing viability with hemolysis, results show significant changes in a concentration-dependent fashion. Rates of ROS generation were investigated using the dichlorofluorscein diacetate-based assay as ROS generation is a commonly suspected mechanism of nanoparticle toxicity; herein, ROS was not a significant factor. Optical monitoring of platelet aggregation revealed that none of the examined nanoparticles induced aggregation upon short-term exposure.

  7. Contact toxicity of metals in sewage sludge: Evaluation of alternatives to sodium chloride in the Microtox[reg sign] assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson-Ekvall, C.E.A.; Morrison, G.M. (Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Sanitary Engineering)

    1995-01-01

    The presence of chloride ions in the Microtox[reg sign] test can cause problems when testing metal toxicity, both due to extraction of metals from solid samples and formation of chloro complexes of metals in the liquid phase. To investigate alternatives to NaCl in the Microtox test, the toxicity of Cu, Cd, Pb, and Zn to Photobacterium phosphoreum was tested in 28 osmotic surrogates for NaCl. It was found that Na[sup +] must be present to keep the blank luminescence stable for 30 min. The results point to NaClO[sub 4] as the most satisfactory surrogate solution as it has an inert behavior and does not form complexes with any metal of environmental interest. Raw, digested, and reference sewage sludges were tested in the osmotic surrogates. The EC50 values for sludges were lower in solutions of NaNO[sub 3], Na[sub 2]SO[sub 4], and NaClO[sub 4], and higher in sucrose, mannitol, and KCl, compared to NaCl. NaClO[sub 4] can be recommended as an osmotic surrogate for sewage sludge testing. Another problem with the Microtox assay is the lack of pH control in the cuvette. Copper toxicity tests were carried out in Tris buffer and KH[sub 2]PO[sub 4] at two different concentrations and at pH 7 and 8. The results show that 1 mM phosphate buffer, pH 7.0, can be recommended for solid samples. However, owing to formation of KClO[sub 4] a buffer containing potassium is not recommended in combination with NaClO[sub 4].

  8. Developmental Toxicity Assay for Food Additive Tartrazine Using Zebrafish ( Danio rerio) Embryo Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Vani; Katti, Pancharatna

    Tartrazine (TTZ) is an azo dye used as a colorant in food products, drugs, and cosmetics. The present study evaluates the impacts of TTZ on embryonic development of zebrafish ( Danio rerio). Laboratory-raised D. rerio embryos (n = 20/concentration) were exposed to graded dilutions of TTZ (0, 0.1, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 75, and 100 mM) from gastrulation stage (5.25 hours postfertilization [hpf]) until hatching and developmental trajectory was traced up to day 7. The no observed effect concentration (NOEC), median lethal concentration (LC50), median effective concentration (EC50), and teratogenic index (TI) were calculated. Exposure of embryos to < 10 mM TTZ had no effects; 20 to 30 mM TTZ caused tail bending, cardiac and yolk sac edema in 50% of larvae; in 30 to 50 mM TTZ-exposed embryos the heart rates declined along with the above mentioned deformities, causing mortality within 96 to 144 hpf; development ceased completely at 75 to 100 mM concentration. The NOEC and LC50 were recorded at 5 and 29.4 mM dose, respectively. The EC50 values for heart rate, cardiac edema, tail bending, and hatching success were at 59.60, 53.81, 98.28, and 58.97 mM with TI quotient 0.49, 0.54, 0.29, and 0.49, respectively. We conclude that TTZ is not embryo toxic/teratogenic for zebrafish embryos up to a dose level of 10 mM concentration.

  9. Analytic Validation of Immunohistochemistry Assays: New Benchmark Data From a Survey of 1085 Laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Lauren N; Volmar, Keith E; Nowak, Jan A; Fatheree, Lisa A; Souers, Rhona J; Fitzgibbons, Patrick L; Goldsmith, Jeffrey D; Astles, J Rex; Nakhleh, Raouf E

    2017-09-01

    - A cooperative agreement between the College of American Pathologists (CAP) and the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention was undertaken to measure laboratories' awareness and implementation of an evidence-based laboratory practice guideline (LPG) on immunohistochemical (IHC) validation practices published in 2014. - To establish new benchmark data on IHC laboratory practices. - A 2015 survey on IHC assay validation practices was sent to laboratories subscribed to specific CAP proficiency testing programs and to additional nonsubscribing laboratories that perform IHC testing. Specific questions were designed to capture laboratory practices not addressed in a 2010 survey. - The analysis was based on responses from 1085 laboratories that perform IHC staining. Ninety-six percent (809 of 844) always documented validation of IHC assays. Sixty percent (648 of 1078) had separate procedures for predictive and nonpredictive markers, 42.7% (220 of 515) had procedures for laboratory-developed tests, 50% (349 of 697) had procedures for testing cytologic specimens, and 46.2% (363 of 785) had procedures for testing decalcified specimens. Minimum case numbers were specified by 85.9% (720 of 838) of laboratories for nonpredictive markers and 76% (584 of 768) for predictive markers. Median concordance requirements were 95% for both types. For initial validation, 75.4% (538 of 714) of laboratories adopted the 20-case minimum for nonpredictive markers and 45.9% (266 of 579) adopted the 40-case minimum for predictive markers as outlined in the 2014 LPG. The most common method for validation was correlation with morphology and expected results. Laboratories also reported which assay changes necessitated revalidation and their minimum case requirements. - Benchmark data on current IHC validation practices and procedures may help laboratories understand the issues and influence further refinement of LPG recommendations.

  10. Extended evaluation on the ES-D3 cell differentiation assay combined with the BeWo transport model, to predict relative developmental toxicity of triazole compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hequn; Flick, Burkhard; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M; Louisse, Jochem; Schneider, Steffen; van Ravenzwaay, Bennard

    2016-05-01

    The mouse embryonic stem D3 (ES-D3) cell differentiation assay is based on the morphometric measurement of cardiomyocyte differentiation and is a promising tool to detect developmental toxicity of compounds. The BeWo transport model, consisting of BeWo b30 cells grown on transwell inserts and mimicking the placental barrier, is useful to determine relative placental transport velocities of compounds. We have previously demonstrated the usefulness of the ES-D3 cell differentiation assay in combination with the in vitro BeWo transport model to predict the relative in vivo developmental toxicity potencies of a set of reference azole compounds. To further evaluate this combined in vitro toxicokinetic and toxicodynamic approach, we combined ES-D3 cell differentiation data of six novel triazoles with relative transport rates obtained from the BeWo model and compared the obtained ranking to the developmental toxicity ranking as derived from in vivo data. The data show that the combined in vitro approach provided a correct prediction for in vivo developmental toxicity, whereas the ES-D3 cell differentiation assay as stand-alone did not. In conclusion, we have validated the combined in vitro approach for developmental toxicity, which we have previously developed with a set of reference azoles, for a set of six novel triazoles. We suggest that this combined model, which takes both toxicodynamic and toxicokinetic aspects into account, should be further validated for other chemical classes of developmental toxicants.

  11. Methods of acute biological assays in guinea-pigs for the study of toxicity and innocuity of drugs and chemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gui Mi Ko

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, 602 samples were tested by the following assays performed at the animal facilities (Cedeme of the Federal University of São Paulo (UNIFESP: 385 for dermal irritability, 90 for ocular irritability (discontinued in 1995, 31 for systemic toxicity by injection, 26 for oral acute toxicity, 15 for toxicity by intracutaneous injection, 15 for skin sensitization, 15 for toxicity of serum and vaccines for human use, 14 for toxicity by intramuscular implantation, 7 for pyrogens, 2 for acute dermal toxicity, and 2 for irritation of mucous membrane. The following agents were tested: cosmetics and related substances (42.0%, chemicals used in industry (32.9%, plastics, rubber, and other polymers (15.9%, agrotoxics (4.0%, medicines (2.7%, and vaccines (2.5%. In the present description, emphasis was given to tests of dermal irritability and sensitization. This work was conducted entirely in animal facilities, according to our general belief that animal facilities at universities, while considering ethic principles and sanitary, genetic, nutritional, and pathophysiological controls, also require laboratories specialized in areas such as transgenics, cryopreservation, ambiental physiology, functional genomics, alternative models, and mainly activities and research on methods in toxicology, as focused in this study.Descrevemos os testes usados em ensaios biológicos de curta duração para estudo de toxicidade e inocuidade de cosméticos, fármacos e outras substâncias químicas, feitos no Biotério Central/Cedeme da Unifesp, de 1986 a 2000. Testamos 602 amostras nos seguintes ensaios: 385 de irritação cutânea, 90 de irritação ocular (até 1995, 31 de toxicidade sistêmica por injeção, 26 de toxicidade oral aguda, 15 de toxicidade por aplicação intracutânea, 15 de sensibilização da pele, 15 de toxicidade de soros e vacinas de uso humano, 14 de toxicidade por implantação intramuscular, 7 de pirogênio, 2 de toxicidade dérmica aguda e

  12. Toxicity and physical properties of atrazine and its degradation products: A literature survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pugh, K.C.

    1994-10-01

    The Tennessee Valley Authority`s Environmental Research Center has been developing a means of detoxifying atrazine waste waters using TiO{sub 2} photocatalysis. The toxicity and physical properties of atrazine and its degradation products will probably be required information in obtaining permits from the United States Environmental Protection Agency for the demonstration of any photocatalytic treatment of atrazine waste waters. The following report is a literature survey of the toxicological and physical properties of atrazine and its degradation products.

  13. Introducing Environmental Toxicology in Instructional Labs: The Use of a Modified Amphibian Developmental Toxicity Assay to Support Inquiry-Based Student Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauterer, Roger; Rayburn, James R.

    2012-01-01

    Introducing students to the process of scientific inquiry is a major goal of high school and college labs. Environmental toxins are of great concern and public interest. Modifications of a vertebrate developmental toxicity assay using the frog Xenopus laevis can support student-initiated toxicology experiments that are relevant to humans. Teams of…

  14. Use of the ES-D3 cell differentiation assay, combined with the BeWo transport model, to predict relative in vivo developmental toxicity of antifungal compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hequn; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M; Louisse, Jochem; Blok, Martine; Wang, Xinyi; Snijders, Linda; van Ravenzwaay, Bennard

    2015-03-01

    We investigated the applicability of the ES-D3 cell differentiation assay combined with the in vitro BeWo transport model to predict the relative in vivo developmental toxicity potencies. To this purpose, the in vitro developmental toxicity of five antifungal compounds was investigated by characterizing their inhibitory effect on the differentiation of ES-D3 cells into cardiomyocytes. The BeWo transport model, consisting of BeWo b30 cells grown on transwell inserts and mimicking the placental barrier, was used to determine the relative placental transport velocity. The ES-D3 cell differentiation data were first compared to benchmark doses (BMDs) for in vivo developmental toxicity as derived from data reported in the literature. Correlation between the benchmark concentration for 50% effect (BMCd50) values, obtained in the ES-D3 cell differentiation assay, with in vivo BMD10 values showed a reasonable correlation (R(2)=0.57). When the ES-D3 cell differentiation data were combined with the relative transport rates obtained from the BeWo model, the correlation with the in vivo data increased (R(2)=0.95). In conclusion, we show that the ES-D3 cell differentiation assay is able to better predict the in vivo developmental toxicity ranking of antifungal compounds when combined with the BeWo transport model, than as a stand-alone assay. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The Role of Feature Selection and Statistical Weighting in Predicting In Vivo Toxicity Using In Vitro Assay and QSAR Data (SOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our study assesses the value of both in vitro assay and quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) data in predicting in vivo toxicity using numerous statistical models and approaches to process the data. Our models are built on datasets of (i) 586 chemicals for which bo...

  16. Solubilization and bio-conjugation of quantum dots and bacterial toxicity assays by growth curve and plate count.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soonhyang; Chibli, Hicham; Nadeau, Jay

    2012-07-11

    previous study, we showed that coupling of antibiotics to CdTe can increase toxicity to bacteria but decrease toxicity to mammalian cells, due to decreased production of reactive oxygen species from the conjugates. Although it is unlikely that cadmium-containing compounds will be approved for use in humans, such preparations could be used for disinfection of surfaces or sterilization of water. In this protocol, we give a straightforward approach to solubilizing CdTe QDs with mercaptopropionic acid (MPA). The QDs are ready to use within an hour. We then demonstrate coupling to an antimicrobial agent. The second part of the protocol demonstrates a 96-well bacterial inhibition assay using the conjugated and unconjugated QDs. The optical density is read over many hours, permitting the effects of QD addition and light exposure to be evaluated immediately as well as after a recovery period. We also illustrate a colony count for quantifying bacterial survival.

  17. General baseline toxicity QSAR for nonpolar, polar and ionisable chemicals and their mixtures in the bioluminescence inhibition assay with Aliivibrio fischeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escher, Beate I; Baumer, Andreas; Bittermann, Kai; Henneberger, Luise; König, Maria; Kühnert, Christin; Klüver, Nils

    2017-03-22

    The Microtox assay, a bioluminescence inhibition assay with the marine bacterium Aliivibrio fischeri, is one of the most popular bioassays for assessing the cytotoxicity of organic chemicals, mixtures and environmental samples. Most environmental chemicals act as baseline toxicants in this short-term screening assay, which is typically run with only 30 min of exposure duration. Numerous Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships (QSARs) exist for the Microtox assay for nonpolar and polar narcosis. However, typical water pollutants, which have highly diverse structures covering a wide range of hydrophobicity and speciation from neutral to anionic and cationic, are often outside the applicability domain of these QSARs. To include all types of environmentally relevant organic pollutants we developed a general baseline toxicity QSAR using liposome-water distribution ratios as descriptors. Previous limitations in availability of experimental liposome-water partition constants were overcome by reliable prediction models based on polyparameter linear free energy relationships for neutral chemicals and the COSMOmic model for charged chemicals. With this QSAR and targeted mixture experiments we could demonstrate that ionisable chemicals fall in the applicability domain. Most investigated water pollutants acted as baseline toxicants in this bioassay, with the few outliers identified as uncouplers or reactive toxicants. The main limitation of the Microtox assay is that chemicals with a high melting point and/or high hydrophobicity were outside of the applicability domain because of their low water solubility. We quantitatively derived a solubility cut-off but also demonstrated with mixture experiments that chemicals inactive on their own can contribute to mixture toxicity, which is highly relevant for complex environmental mixtures, where these chemicals may be present at concentrations below the solubility cut-off.

  18. Investigation of olive mill wastewater (OMW) ozonation efficiency with the use of a battery of selected ecotoxicity and human toxicity assays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siorou, Sofia [Section of Animal Biology, Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences, University of Patras, GR-26500 Patras (Greece); Vgenis, Theodoros T.; Dareioti, Margarita A. [Laboratory of Biochemical Engineering and Environmental Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Patras, 1 Karatheodori Str., University Campus, GR-26500 Patras (Greece); Vidali, Maria-Sophia; Efthimiou, Ioanna [Department of Environmental and Natural Resources Management, University of Patras, 2 Seferi Str., GR-30100 Agrinio (Greece); Kornaros, Michael [Laboratory of Biochemical Engineering and Environmental Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Patras, 1 Karatheodori Str., University Campus, GR-26500 Patras (Greece); Vlastos, Dimitris [Department of Environmental and Natural Resources Management, University of Patras, 2 Seferi Str., GR-30100 Agrinio (Greece); Dailianis, Stefanos, E-mail: sdailianis@upatras.gr [Section of Animal Biology, Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences, University of Patras, GR-26500 Patras (Greece)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Raw- and ozonated-olive mill wastewater (OMW) toxic effects were investigated. • A battery of biological assays and toxic endpoints were used. • Ozonation for up to 300 min attenuates OMW toxicity, following phenols’ reduction. • Further OMW ozonation (>300 min) could enhance OMW toxicity. • OMW ozonation efficacy depends on OMW-derived intermediates and high NO{sub 3}{sup −}–N levels. - Abstract: The effects of olive mill wastewater (OMW) on a battery of biological assays, before and during the ozonation process, were investigated in order to assess ozone’s efficiency in removing phenolic compounds from OMW and decreasing the concomitant OMW toxicity. Specifically, ozonated-OMW held for 0, 60, 120, 300, 420, 540 min in a glass bubble reactor, showed a drastic reduction of OMW total phenols (almost 50%) after 300 min of ozonation with a concomitant decrease of OMW toxicity. In particular, the acute toxicity test primarily performed in the fairy shrimp Thamnocephalus platyurus (Thamnotoxkit F™ screening toxicity test) showed a significant attenuation of OMW-induced toxic effects, after ozonation for a period of 120 and in a lesser extent 300 min, while further treatment resulted in a significant enhancement of ozonated-OMW toxic effects. Furthermore, ozonated-OMW-treated mussel hemocytes showed a significant attenuation of the ability of OMW to cause cytotoxic (obtained by the use of NRRT assay) effects already after an ozonation period of 120 and to a lesser extent 300 min. In accordance with the latter, OMW-mediated oxidative (enhanced levels of superoxide anions and lipid peroxidation by-products) and genotoxic (induction of DNA damage) effects were diminished after OMW ozonation for the aforementioned periods of time. The latter was also revealed by the use of cytokinesis block micronucleus (CBMN) assay in human lymphocytes exposed to different concentrations of both raw- and ozonated-OMW for 60, 120 and 300 min. Those findings

  19. Practices in management of cancer treatment-related cardiovascular toxicity: A cardio-oncology survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovenaux, Ludovic; Cautela, Jennifer; Resseguier, Noemie; Pibarot, Michele; Taouqi, Myriam; Orabona, Morgane; Pinto, Johan; Peyrol, Michael; Barraud, Jeremie; Laine, Marc; Bonello, Laurent; Paganelli, Franck; Barlesi, Fabrice; Thuny, Franck

    2017-08-15

    Cardiovascular toxicity has become a challenging issue during cancer therapy. Nonetheless, there is a lack of consensual guidelines for their management. We aimed to determine the current practices of oncologists regarding cardiovascular toxicity related to anthracyclines, trastuzumab and angiogenic inhibitors and to gather their opinions on the development of cardio-oncology programs. A cross-sectional declarative study was submitted to French oncologists in the form of an individual, structured questionnaire. A total of 303 oncologists responded to the survey. Ninety-nine percent of oncologists prescribed cardiotoxic therapies, including anthracyclines (83%), trastuzumab (51%) and other angiogenic inhibitors (64%). The method adopted for managing cardiovascular toxicity was based on guidelines from expert oncology societies for only 35% of oncologists. None was aware of recommendations from expert cardiology societies. Prescription of pre-, peri- and post-therapy cardiovascular assessment was inconsistent and significantly less frequent for all classes of angiogenic inhibitors than for anthracyclines and trastuzumab (Pcardio-oncology programs development. Practices of oncologists are disparate in the field of cardiovascular toxicity. This finding underlines the complexity of managing many different situations and the need for distribution of formal guidelines from oncology and cardiology expert societies. The development of personalized cardio-oncology programs seems essential. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Assessment by Ames test and comet assay of toxicity potential of polymer used to develop field-capable rapid-detection device to analyze environmental samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, Amanda; Bishop, Michelle; Bhattacharyya, Dhiman; Gleason, Karen; Torosian, Stephen

    2015-08-01

    There is need for devices that decrease detection time of food-borne pathogens from days to real-time. In this study, a rapid-detection device is being developed and assessed for potential cytotoxicity. The device is comprised of melt-spun polypropylene coupons coated via oxidative chemical vapor deposition (oCVD) with 3,4-Ethylenedioxythiophene (EDOT), for conductivity and 3-Thiopheneethanol (3TE), allowing antibody attachment. The Ames test and comet assay have been used in this study to examine the toxicity potentials of EDOT, 3TE, and polymerized EDOT-co-3TE. For this study, Salmonella typhimurium strain TA1535 was used to assess the mutagenic potential of EDOT, 3TE and the copolymer. The average mutagenic potential of EDOT, 3TE and copolymer was calculated to be 0.86, 0.56, and 0.92, respectively. For mutagenic potential, on a scale from 0 to 1, close to 1 indicates low potential for toxicity, whereas a value of 0 indicates a high potential for toxicity. The comet assay is a single-cell gel electrophoresis technique that is widely used for this purpose. This assay measures toxicity based on the area or intensity of the comet-like shape that DNA fragments produce when DNA damage has occurred. Three cell lines were assessed; FRhK-4, BHK-21, and Vero cells. After averaging the results of all three strains, the tail intensity of the copolymer was 8.8 % and tail moment was 3.0, and is most similar to the untreated control, with average tail intensity of 5.7 % and tail moment of 1.7. The assays conducted in this study provide evidence that the copolymer is non-toxic to humans.

  1. Investigation of olive mill wastewater (OMW) ozonation efficiency with the use of a battery of selected ecotoxicity and human toxicity assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siorou, Sofia; Vgenis, Theodoros T; Dareioti, Margarita A; Vidali, Maria-Sophia; Efthimiou, Ioanna; Kornaros, Michael; Vlastos, Dimitris; Dailianis, Stefanos

    2015-07-01

    The effects of olive mill wastewater (OMW) on a battery of biological assays, before and during the ozonation process, were investigated in order to assess ozone's efficiency in removing phenolic compounds from OMW and decreasing the concomitant OMW toxicity. Specifically, ozonated-OMW held for 0, 60, 120, 300, 420, 540min in a glass bubble reactor, showed a drastic reduction of OMW total phenols (almost 50%) after 300min of ozonation with a concomitant decrease of OMW toxicity. In particular, the acute toxicity test primarily performed in the fairy shrimp Thamnocephalus platyurus (Thamnotoxkit F™ screening toxicity test) showed a significant attenuation of OMW-induced toxic effects, after ozonation for a period of 120 and in a lesser extent 300min, while further treatment resulted in a significant enhancement of ozonated-OMW toxic effects. Furthermore, ozonated-OMW-treated mussel hemocytes showed a significant attenuation of the ability of OMW to cause cytotoxic (obtained by the use of NRRT assay) effects already after an ozonation period of 120 and to a lesser extent 300min. In accordance with the latter, OMW-mediated oxidative (enhanced levels of superoxide anions and lipid peroxidation by-products) and genotoxic (induction of DNA damage) effects were diminished after OMW ozonation for the aforementioned periods of time. The latter was also revealed by the use of cytokinesis block micronucleus (CBMN) assay in human lymphocytes exposed to different concentrations of both raw- and ozonated-OMW for 60, 120 and 300min. Those findings revealed for a first time the existence of a critical time point during the OMW ozonation process that could be fundamentally used for evaluating OMW ozonation as a pretreatment method of OMW. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Reference genes for qPCR assays in toxic metal and salinity stress in two flatworm model organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plusquin, Michelle; DeGheselle, Olivier; Cuypers, Ann; Geerdens, Ellen; Van Roten, Andromeda; Artois, Tom; Smeets, Karen

    2012-03-01

    The flatworm species Schmidtea mediterranea and Macrostomum lignano have become new and innovative model organisms in stem cell, regeneration and tissue homeostasis research. Because of their unique stem cell system, (lab) technical advantages and their phylogenetic position within the Metazoa, they are also ideal candidate model organisms for toxicity assays. As stress and biomarker screenings are often performed at the transcriptional level, the aim of this study was to establish a set of reference genes for qPCR experiments for these two model organisms in different stress situations. We examined the transcriptional stability of nine potential reference genes (actb, tubb, ck2, cox4, cys, rpl13, gapdh, gm2ap, plscr1) to assess those that are most stable during altered stress conditions (exposure to carcinogenic metals and salinity stress). The gene expression stability was evaluated by means of geNorm and NormFinder algorithms. Sets of best reference genes in these analyses varied between different stress situations, although gm2ap and actb were stably transcribed during all tested combinations. In order to demonstrate the impact of bad normalisation, the stress-specific gene hsp90 was normalised to different sets of reference genes. In contrast to the normalisation according to GeNorm and NormFinder, normalisation of hsp90 in Macrostomum lignano during cadmium stress did not show a significant difference when normalised to only gapdh. On the other hand an increase of variability was noticed when normalised to all nine tested reference genes together. Testing appropriate reference genes is therefore strongly advisable in every new experimental condition.

  3. Glycohemoglobin assays evaluated in a large-scale quality-control survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillery, P; Labbé, D; Dumont, G; Vassault, A

    1995-11-01

    We report the results of a national quality-control survey on glycohemoglobin (GHb), monitored in France by the Société Française de Biologie Clinique on behalf of the authority of the "Agence du Médicament." A sample of lyophilized hemolysate was sent to 3109 laboratories. Results were obtained from 2770 laboratories. HbA1C, HbA1, and total GHb were measured by 50%, 24%, and 26% of the participants, respectively. Of these measurements, 79% of the HbA1C results and 76% of the total GHb results, but only 48% of the HbA1 results, were within the +/- 20% limits of the indicated target values. Mean values for the hemolysate ranged from 8% to 11% for HbA1C, from 7% to 12% for HbA1, and from 11% to 13% for total GHb. The interlaboratory CVs ranged from 3% to 20%, according to method used. So, methods used for GHb assay, which are based on various principles, exhibit very different analytical performances. Nonetheless, this large-scale study indicates that some techniques can support transferability of results from laboratory to laboratory.

  4. Rapid aquatic toxicity assay using incorporation of tritiated-thymidine into sea urchin, Arbacia punctulata, embryo: evaluation of toxicant exposure procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nacci, D.E.; Jackim, E.

    1985-01-01

    Toxicity of substances in seawater was measured using growth inhibition of embryonic sea urchins during a short period after fertilization. Growth of Arbacia punctulata embryos was monitored by incorporation of tritium-labeled thymidine. The paper presents a comparison of toxicant exposure procedures using the Arbacia embryo thymidine incorporation test. Toxicant exposure began before, at the time of, or after fertilization and continued for 4 h following fertilization. In addition to the eight organic chemicals tested for comparison to acute toxicity values for other species, several chemicals with embryotoxic potentials (tumor promoters and teratogens) were tested to determine differential sensitivities of exposed life-stages: unfertilized egg, fertilization, and early embryo. EC50 values for any one substance were not significantly changed by exposure modification. Toxicity values for exposures that included fertilization as well as early embryo growth were at least as sensitive as post-fertilization exposure values for all compounds tested except one. Because of technical ease and potential sensitivity, toxicant exposure that includes fertilization as well as early embryo growth (but not unfertilized egg exposure) is recommended for future testing.

  5. High-Content Assay Multiplexing for Vascular Toxicity Screening in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Endothelial Cells and Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Yasuhiro; Klaren, William D; Lebakken, Connie S; Grimm, Fabian A; Rusyn, Ivan

    Endothelial cells (ECs) play a major role in blood vessel formation and function. While there is longstanding evidence for the potential of chemical exposures to adversely affect EC function and vascular development, the hazard potential of chemicals with respect to vascular effects is not routinely evaluated in safety assessments. Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived ECs promise to provide a physiologically relevant, organotypic culture model that is amenable for high-throughput (HT) EC toxicant screening and may represent a viable alternative to traditional in vitro models, including human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). To evaluate the utility of iPSC-ECs for multidimensional HT toxicity profiling of chemicals, both iPSC-ECs and HUVECs were exposed to selected positive (angiogenesis inhibitors, cytotoxic agents) and negative compounds in concentration response for either 16 or 24 h in a 384-well plate format. Furthermore, chemical effects on vascularization were quantified using EC angiogenesis on biological (Geltrex™) and synthetic (SP-105 angiogenesis hydrogel) extracellular matrices. Cellular toxicity was assessed using high-content live cell imaging and the CellTiter-Glo® assay. Assay performance indicated good to excellent assay sensitivity and reproducibility for both cell types investigated. Both iPSC-derived ECs and HUVECs formed tube-like structures on Geltrex™ and hydrogel, an effect that was inhibited by angiogenesis inhibitors and cytotoxic agents in a concentration-dependent manner. The quality of HT assays in HUVECs was generally higher than that in iPSC-ECs. Altogether, this study demonstrates the capability of ECs for comprehensive assessment of the biological effects of chemicals on vasculature in a HT compatible format.

  6. ToxCast Profiling in a Human Stem Cell Assay for Developmental Toxicity (CompTox CoP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standard practice for assessing disruptions in embryogenesis involves testing pregnant animals of two species, typically rats and rabbits, exposed during major organogenesis and evaluated just prior to term. Under this design the major manifestations of developmental toxicity are...

  7. A Quantitative Toxicogenomics Assay Reveals the Evolution and Nature of Toxicity during the Transformation of Environmental Pollutants

    OpenAIRE

    Gou, Na; Yuan, Songhu; Lan, Jiaqi; Gao, Ce; Alshawabkeh, Akram N.; Gu, April Z.

    2014-01-01

    The incomplete mineralization of contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) during the advanced oxidation processes can generate transformation products that exhibit toxicity comparable to or greater than that of the original contaminant. In this study, we demonstrated the application of a novel, fast, and cost-effective quantitative toxicogenomics-based approach for the evaluation of the evolution and nature of toxicity along the electro-Fenton oxidative degradation of three representative CECs...

  8. C. elegans-on-a-chip for in situ and in vivo Ag nanoparticles? uptake and toxicity assay

    OpenAIRE

    Jin Ho Kim; Seung Hwan (Mark) Lee; Yun Jeong Cha; Sung Jin Hong; Sang Kug Chung; Tai Hyun Park; Shin Sik Choi

    2017-01-01

    Nanomaterials are extensively used in consumer products and medical applications, but little is known about their environmental and biological toxicities. Moreover, the toxicity analysis requires sophisticated instruments and labor-intensive experiments. Here we report a microfluidic chip incorporated with the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans that rapidly displays the changes in body growth and gene expression specifically responsive to the silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). C. elegans were culture...

  9. Burn unit care of Stevens Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis: A survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Hong-Gam; Saeed, Hajirah; Mantagos, Iason S; Mitchell, Caroline M; Goverman, Jeremy; Chodosh, James

    2016-06-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN) is a systemic disease that can be associated with debilitating acute and chronic complications across multiple organ systems. As patients with acute SJS/TEN are often treated in a burn intensive care unit (BICU), we surveyed burn centers across the United States to determine their approach to the care of these patients. The goal of our study was to identify best practices and possible variations in the care of patients with acute SJS/TEN. We demonstrate that the method of diagnosis, use of systemic therapies, and involvement of subspecialists varied significantly between burn centers. Beyond supportive care provided to every patient, our data highlights a lack of standardization in the acute care of patients with SJS/TEN. A comprehensive guideline for the care of patients with acute SJS/TEN is indicated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  10. Integrated survey on toxic effects of lindane on neotropical fish: Corydoras paleatus and Jenynsia multidentata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pesce, Silvia F. [Universidad Nacional de Cordoba-CONICET, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Dto. Bioquimica Clinica-CIBICI, Medina Allende esq., Haya de La Torre, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina); Cazenave, Jimena [Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas Fisicas y Naturales, Catedra Diversidad Animal II, Av. Velez Sarsfield 299, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina); Monferran, Magdalena V. [Universidad Nacional de Cordoba-CONICET, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Dto. Bioquimica Clinica-CIBICI, Medina Allende esq., Haya de La Torre, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina); Frede, Silvia [Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Dto. Bioquimica Clinica-CIBICI, Hospital Nacional de Clinicas, Santa Rosa 1564, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina); Wunderlin, Daniel A. [Universidad Nacional de Cordoba-CONICET, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Dto. Bioquimica Clinica-CIBICI, Medina Allende esq., Haya de La Torre, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina)], E-mail: dwunder@fcq.unc.edu.ar

    2008-12-15

    We report the effect of lindane on fish experimentally exposed to lindane. Sublethal toxicity was assessed through (a) changes in histopathology; (b) the activity of GST in different organs; and (c) bioaccumulation in exposed fish. We present a survey on toxic effects of lindane at these three levels, proposing a sequence of dose-dependent effects. Physiological damage was reversible at lowest doses, but severe at the highest, including damage consistent with fibrosis in liver and karyolitic nucleus in brain of both studied species. Exposure of Jenynsia multidentata above 6 {mu}g L{sup -1} caused activation a GST in liver and gills, followed by inhibition at 75 {mu}g L{sup -1}. Interestingly, the bioaccumulation rate was suddenly increased when GST was inhibited. Corydoras paleatus exposed to 6.0 {mu}g L{sup -1} lindane did not present significant changes in GST activity; however, enzymatic inhibition was observed above 25 {mu}g L{sup -1}. The bioaccumulation rate in C. paleatus remained constant throughout the experiments. All in all, these results evidence that C. paleatus is more sensitive to lindane than J. multidentata. - We observed an inverse correlation between GST activity and bioaccumulation in exposed fish, showing a severe increase of bioaccumulation and damages upon inhibition of GST.

  11. Amendment in phosphorus levels moderate the chromium toxicity in Raphanus sativus L. as assayed by antioxidant enzymes activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayantan, D; Shardendu

    2013-09-01

    Chromium (Z=24), a d-block element, is a potent carcinogen, whereas phosphorus is an essential and limiting nutrient for the plant growth and development. This study undertakes the role of phosphorus in moderating the chromium toxicity in Raphanus sativus L., as both of them compete with each other during the uptake process. Two-factor complete randomized experiment (5 chromium × 5 phosphorus concentrations) was conducted for twenty eight days in green house. The individuals of R. sativus were grown in pots supplied with all essential nutrients. The toxic effects of chromium and the moderation of toxicity due to phosphorus amendment were determined as accumulation of chromium, nitrogen, phosphorus in root tissues and their effects were also examined in the changes in biomass, chlorophyll and antioxidant enzyme levels. Cr and N accumulation were almost doubled at the highest concentration of Cr supply, without any P amendment, whereas at the highest P concentration (125 mM), the accumulation was reduced to almost half. A significant reduction in toxic effects of Cr was determined as there was three-fold increase in total chlorophyll and biomass at the highest P amendment. Antioxidant enzymes like superoxide dismutase, catalase, peroxidase and lipid peroxidation were analyzed at various levels of Cr each amended with five levels of P. It was observed that at highest level of P amendment, the reduction percentage in toxicity was 33, 44, 39 and 44, correspondingly. Conclusively, the phosphorus amendment moderates the toxicity caused by the supplied chromium in R. sativus. This finding can be utilized to develop a novel technology for the amelioration of chromium stressed fields. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A fluorescence-based hydrolytic enzyme activity assay for quantifying toxic effects of Roundup® to Daphnia magna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørsted, Michael; Roslev, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Daphnia magna is a widely used model organism for aquatic toxicity testing. In the present study, we investigated the hydrolytic enzyme activity of D. magna after exposure to toxicant stress. In vivo enzyme activity was quantified using 15 fluorogenic enzyme probes based on 4-methylumbelliferyl...... showed that hydrolytic enzyme activity was quantifiable as a combination of whole body fluorescence of D. magna, and fluorescence of the surrounding water. Exposure of D. magna to lethal and sublethal concentrations of Roundup® resulted in loss of whole body enzyme activity, and release of cell...

  13. Experimental Assays to Assess the Efficacy of Vinegar and Other Topical First-Aid Approaches on Cubozoan (Alatina alata Tentacle Firing and Venom Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel A. Yanagihara

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the medical urgency presented by cubozoan envenomations, ineffective and contradictory first-aid management recommendations persist. A critical barrier to progress has been the lack of readily available and reproducible envenomation assays that (1 recapitulate live-tentacle stings; (2 allow quantitation and imaging of cnidae discharge; (3 allow primary quantitation of venom toxicity; and (4 employ rigorous controls. We report the implementation of an integrated array of three experimental approaches designed to meet the above-stated criteria. Mechanistically overlapping, yet distinct, the three approaches comprised (1 direct application of test solutions on live tentacles (termed tentacle solution assay, or TSA with single image- and video-microscopy; (2 spontaneous stinging assay using freshly excised tentacles overlaid on substrate of live human red blood cells suspended in agarose (tentacle blood agarose assays, or TBAA; and (3 a “skin” covered adaptation of TBAA (tentacle skin blood agarose assay, or TSBAA. We report the use and results of these assays to evaluate the efficacy of topical first-aid approaches to inhibit tentacle firing and venom activity. TSA results included the potent stimulation of massive cnidae discharge by alcohols but only moderate induction by urine, freshwater, and “cola” (carbonated soft drink. Although vinegar, the 40-year field standard of first aid for the removal of adherent tentacles, completely inhibited cnidae firing in TSA and TSBAA ex vivo models, the most striking inhibition of both tentacle firing and subsequent venom-induced hemolysis was observed using newly-developed proprietary formulations (Sting No More™ containing copper gluconate, magnesium sulfate, and urea.

  14. Experimental Assays to Assess the Efficacy of Vinegar and Other Topical First-Aid Approaches on Cubozoan (Alatina alata) Tentacle Firing and Venom Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagihara, Angel A; Wilcox, Christie; King, Rebecca; Hurwitz, Kikiana; Castelfranco, Ann M

    2016-01-11

    Despite the medical urgency presented by cubozoan envenomations, ineffective and contradictory first-aid management recommendations persist. A critical barrier to progress has been the lack of readily available and reproducible envenomation assays that (1) recapitulate live-tentacle stings; (2) allow quantitation and imaging of cnidae discharge; (3) allow primary quantitation of venom toxicity; and (4) employ rigorous controls. We report the implementation of an integrated array of three experimental approaches designed to meet the above-stated criteria. Mechanistically overlapping, yet distinct, the three approaches comprised (1) direct application of test solutions on live tentacles (termed tentacle solution assay, or TSA) with single image- and video-microscopy; (2) spontaneous stinging assay using freshly excised tentacles overlaid on substrate of live human red blood cells suspended in agarose (tentacle blood agarose assays, or TBAA); and (3) a "skin" covered adaptation of TBAA (tentacle skin blood agarose assay, or TSBAA). We report the use and results of these assays to evaluate the efficacy of topical first-aid approaches to inhibit tentacle firing and venom activity. TSA results included the potent stimulation of massive cnidae discharge by alcohols but only moderate induction by urine, freshwater, and "cola" (carbonated soft drink). Although vinegar, the 40-year field standard of first aid for the removal of adherent tentacles, completely inhibited cnidae firing in TSA and TSBAA ex vivo models, the most striking inhibition of both tentacle firing and subsequent venom-induced hemolysis was observed using newly-developed proprietary formulations (Sting No More™) containing copper gluconate, magnesium sulfate, and urea.

  15. Analysis of the ecotoxicity data submitted within the framework of the REACH Regulation. Part 3. Experimental sediment toxicity assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesnaitis, Romanas; Sobanska, Marta A; Versonnen, Bram; Sobanski, Tomasz; Bonnomet, Vincent; Tarazona, Jose V; De Coen, Wim

    2014-03-15

    For the first REACH registration deadline, companies have submitted registrations with relevant hazard and exposure information for substances at the highest tonnage level (above 1000 tonnes per year). At this tonnage level, information on the long-term toxicity of a substance to sediment organisms is required. There are a number of available test guidelines developed and accepted by various national/international organisations, which can be used to investigate long-term toxicity to sediment organisms. However instead of testing, registrants may also use other options to address toxicity to sediment organisms, e.g. weight of evidence approach, grouping of substances and read-across approaches, as well as substance-tailored exposure-driven testing. The current analysis of the data provided in ECHA database focuses on the test methods applied and the test organisms used in the experimental studies to assess long-term toxicity to sediment organisms. The main guidelines used for the testing of substances registered under REACH are the OECD guidelines and OSPAR Protocols on Methods for the Testing of Chemicals used in the Offshore Oil Industry: "Part A: A Sediment Bioassay using an Amphipod Corophium sp." explaining why one of the mostly used test organisms is the marine amphipod Corophium sp. In total, testing results with at least 40 species from seven phyla are provided in the database. However, it can be concluded that the ECHA database does not contain a high enough number of available experimental data on toxicity to sediment organisms for it to be used extensively by the scientific community (e.g. for development of non-testing methods to predict hazards to sediment organisms). © 2013.

  16. Lateral flow (immuno) assay : its strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats. A literature survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Posthuma-Trumpie, Geertruida A.; Korf, Jakob; van Amerongen, Aart

    Lateral flow (immuno) assays are currently used for qualitative, semiquantitative and to some extent quantitative monitoring in resource-poor or non-laboratory environments. Applications include tests on pathogens, drugs, hormones and metabolites in biomedical, phytosanitary, veterinary, feed/food

  17. Lateral flow (immuno)assay: its strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats. A literature survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Posthuma-Trumpie, G.A.; Korf, J.; Amerongen, van A.

    2009-01-01

    Lateral flow (immuno)assays are currently used for qualitative, semiquantitative and to some extent quantitative monitoring in resource-poor or non-laboratory environments. Applications include tests on pathogens, drugs, hormones and metabolites in biomedical, phytosanitary, veterinary, feed/food

  18. Genetic toxicity evaluation of 1,1,1,2,3,3,3- heptatfluoropropane. Volume 1. Results of salmonella typhimurium histidine reversion assay (ames assay). Final report, March-December 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, A.D.

    1995-01-01

    Under subcontract to ManTech Environmental Technology, Incorporated, Uenesys Research, Incorporated tested 1,1,12,3,3,3- heptafluoropropane (HFC-227ea) using Billups-Rothenberg exposure chambers for the exposure chamber modification of the Salmonella typhimurium histidine (his) reversion mutagenesis system (the Ames test), a microbial assay that measures his his+ reversion induced by chemicals that cause base changes or frameshift mutations i the genome of this organism. Testing was conducted using five Salmonella strains, with and without metabolic activation. HFC-227ea was tested in a preliminary test and in a mutagenesis assay. HFC-227ea was tested to toxic levels in the mutagenesis assay, but a sufficient number of nontoxic concentrations were tested to determine if HFC-227ea were capable of inducing a dose-related mutagenic response, and the positive control responses were consistent with historical data from the laboratory, and no evidence of a mutagenic response was obtained in any strain without or with activation. Therefore, HFC-227ea was negative in the Salmonella typhimurium histidine reversion mutagenesis test in the presence and absence of metabolic activation.

  19. Unique Nanoparticle Properties Confound Fluorescent Based Assays Widely Employed in Their In Vitro Toxicity Testing and Ranking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanomaterials are a diverse collection of novel materials that exhibit at least one dimension less than 100 nm and display unique chemical and physical properties due to their nanoscale size. An emphasis has been put on developing high throughput screening (HTS) assays to charac...

  20. Assessment of Individual and Combined Toxicities of Four Non-Essential Metals (As, Cd, Hg and Pb in the Microtox Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul B. Tchounwou

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Although most researches with non-essential metals (NEMs have been done with single or individual metals, in reality, organisms are often exposed to multiple contaminants at the same time through the air, food and water. In this study, we tested the toxicity of four NEMs, As, Cd, Pb, and Hg, individually and as a composite mixture using the microtox bioassay. This assay uses the reduction of bioluminescence of the bacterium Vibrio fischeri as a measure of toxicity. The concentrations of each chemical in the mixture were based on multiples of their maximum contaminant levels (MCLs set by the U.S. EPA. The highest concentration of exposure was 20 times the MCL, which translated into 200, 100, 40 and 300 ppb for As, Cd, Hg and Pb, respectively. The ratio for the mixture from these concentrations was 10:5:2:15 for As, Cd, Hg and Pb, respectively. Among the individual metals tested, the ranking of toxicity was Hg>Pb>Cd>As based on the EC50 values of 109, 455, 508 and 768 ppb for Hg, Pb, Cd and As, respectively. The EC50 for the composite mixture was 495% MCL which translated into nominal concentrations of 49, 25, 10 and 74 ppb for As, Cd, Hg, and Pb, respectively. Overall, the EC50 value of each NEM within the mixture was lower than the EC50 of the individual chemical; an evidence of synergism for the mixture. The individual toxic units (TU were 0.06, 0.05, 0.09, and 0.16 for As, Cd Hg, and Pb, respectively and the summed toxic unit (TU was 0.37 (less than 1. This study provides needed scientific data necessary for carrying out complete risk assessment of As, Cd, Hg, and Pb mixtures of some priority compounds.

  1. A cell impedance-based real-time in vitro assay to assess the toxicity of amphotericin B formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menotti, Jean; Alanio, Alexandre; Sturny-Leclère, Aude; Vitry, Sandrine; Sauvage, Félix; Barratt, Gillian; Bretagne, Stéphane

    2017-11-01

    Aerosolized liposomal amphotericin B (L-AmB) has been investigated as prophylaxis against invasive aspergillosis. However, the clinical results are controversial and some trials suggest that toxicity could be a limitation for wider use. Our aim was to assess the dynamics of cell toxicity induced in a human alveolar epithelial cell line (A549) after exposure to L-AmB (50 to 400μg/ml) or amphotericin B deoxycholate (D-AmB; 50 to 200μg/ml) by monitoring real-time A549 cell viability using an impedance-based technology. Results were expressed as cell index values integrating cell adhesion, proliferation, and survival. In parallel, the gene expression of proinflammatory cytokines was quantified at 6 and 24h after drug addition by real-time RT-PCR on cell lysates. No sustained reduction of cell indexes was observed with L-AmB or empty liposomes, even at 400μg/ml. Only the highest concentration tested of L-AmB (400μg/ml) yielded transient significant 6-fold and 4-fold induction of TNF-α and IL-8 mRNAs, respectively. In contrast, D-AmB induced a decrease in cell indexes and only the 50μg/ml concentration of D-AmB was followed by cell recovery, higher concentrations leading to cell death. Significant 4-fold, 7-fold and 3-fold inductions of TNF-α, IL-8 and IL-33 mRNAs were also observed at 6h with 50μg/ml of D-AmB. In conclusion, continuous cell impedance measurement showed no toxicity on overall cellular behavior although a slight proinflammatory cytokine expression is possible after L-AmB challenge. Real-time kinetics of cell impedance is an interesting tool for initial screening of cell toxicity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Toxicity of the Alternaria metabolites alternariol, alternariol methyl ether, altenuene, and tenuazonic acid in the chicken embryo assay.

    OpenAIRE

    Griffin, G F; Chu, F S

    1983-01-01

    The effects in the chicken embryo assay of four Alternaria metabolites (alternariol [AOH], alternariol methyl ether [AME], altenuene [ALT], and tenuazonic acid [TA]) were investigated. Administered to 7-day-old chicken embryos by yolk sac injection, AOH, AME, and ALT caused no mortality or teratogenic effect at doses up to 1,000, 500, and 1,000 micrograms per egg, respectively. TA exhibited a calculated 50% lethal dose of 548 micrograms per egg, with no teratogenic effect observed at either l...

  3. Application of cell-based assays for toxicity characterization of complex wastewater matrices: Possible applications in wastewater recycle and reuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Preeti; Naoghare, Pravin K; Gandhi, Deepa; Devi, S Saravana; Krishnamurthi, Kannan; Bafana, Amit; Kashyap, Sanjay M; Chakrabarti, Tapan

    2017-08-01

    Exposure to pre-concentrated inlet or outlet STP wastewater extracts at different concentrations (0.001% to 1%) induced dose-dependent toxicity in MCF-7 cells, whereas drinking water extracts did not induce cytotoxicity in cells treated. GC-MS analysis revealed the occurrence of xenobiotic compounds (Benzene, Phthalate, etc.) in inlet/outlet wastewater extracts. Cells exposed to inlet/outlet extract showed elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS: inlet: 186.58%, precycling processes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparison of serum and red blood cell folate microbiologic assays for national population surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Christine M; Zhang, Mindy; Lacher, David A; Molloy, Anne M; Tamura, Tsunenobu; Yetley, Elizabeth A; Picciano, Mary-Frances; Johnson, Clifford L

    2011-07-01

    Three laboratories participated with their laboratory-specific microbiologic growth assays (MA) in the NHANES 2007-2008 to assess whether the distributions of serum (n = 2645) and RBC folate (n = 2613) for the same one-third sample of participants were comparable among laboratories. Laboratory (L) 2 produced the highest and L1 the lowest serum and RBC folate geometric means (nmol/L) in the NHANES sample (serum: L1, 39.5; L2, 59.2; L3, 47.7; and RBC: L1, 1120; L2, 1380; L3, 1380). Each laboratory produced different reference intervals for the central 95% of the population. Pearson correlation coefficients were highest between L3 and L1 (serum, r = 0.95; RBC, r = 0.92) and lowest between L2 and L1 (serum, r = 0.81; RBC, r = 0.65). Notable procedural differences among the laboratories were the Lactobacillus rhamnosus microorganism (L1 and L3: chloramphenicol resistant, L2: wild type) and the calibrator [L1: [6S]5-methyltetrahydrofolate (5-methylTHF), L2: [6R,S] 5-formyltetrahydrofolate ([6R,S] 5-formylTHF), L3: folic acid (FA)]. Compared with 5-methylTHF as calibrator, the folate results were 22-32% higher with FA as calibrator and 8% higher with 5-formylTHF as calibrator, regardless of the matrix (n = 30 serum, n = 28 RBC). The use of different calibrators explained most of the differences in results between L3 and L1 but not between L2 and L1. The use of the wild-type L. rhamnosus by L2 appeared to be the main reason for the differences in results between L2 and the other 2 laboratories. These findings indicate how assay variations influence MA folate results and how those variations can affect population data. To ensure data comparability, better assay harmonization is needed.

  5. C. elegans-on-a-chip for in situ and in vivo Ag nanoparticles’ uptake and toxicity assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Ho; Lee, Seung Hwan; Cha, Yun Jeong; Hong, Sung Jin; Chung, Sang Kug; Park, Tai Hyun; Choi, Shin Sik

    2017-01-01

    Nanomaterials are extensively used in consumer products and medical applications, but little is known about their environmental and biological toxicities. Moreover, the toxicity analysis requires sophisticated instruments and labor-intensive experiments. Here we report a microfluidic chip incorporated with the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans that rapidly displays the changes in body growth and gene expression specifically responsive to the silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). C. elegans were cultured in microfluidic chambers in the presence or absence of AgNPs and were consequently transferred to wedge-shaped channels, which immobilized the animals, allowing the evaluation of parameters such as length, moving distance, and fluorescence from the reporter gene. The AgNPs reduced the length of C. elegans body, which was easily identified in the channel of chip. In addition, the decrease of body width enabled the worm to advance the longer distance compared to the animal without nanoparticles in a wedge-shaped channel. The transgenic marker DNA, mtl-2::gfp was highly expressed upon the uptake of AgNPs, resulting in green fluorescence emission. The comparative investigation using gold nanoparticles and heavy-metal ions indicated that these parameters are specific to AgNPs. These results demonstrate that C. elegans-on-a-chip has a great potential as a rapid and specific nanoparticle detection or nanotoxicity assessment system.

  6. Developmental toxicity testing in the 21st century: the sword of Damocles shattered by embryonic stem cell assays?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, Andrea; Oelgeschläger, Michael; Liebsch, Manfred; Pirow, Ralph; Riebeling, Christian; Tralau, Tewes; Luch, Andreas

    2011-11-01

    Modern society faces an inherent dilemma. In our globalized society, we are spoilt for choice by an ever-increasing number of products, many of which are made of new materials and compound mixtures. At the same time, as consumers we got accustomed to the idea of a life minimized for risk, including our own exposure to chemicals from the environment or to compounds present in and released from everyday products. Chemical safety testing bridges these obviously diverging interests, and the corresponding legislation has hence been tremendously extended (e.g., introduction of the European legislation REACH in 2007). However, the underlying regulatory toxicology still relies mainly on animal testing, which is relatively slow, expensive, and ethically arguable. Meanwhile, recent years have seen a surge in efforts to develop alternative testing systems and strategies. Expectations are particularly high for the applicability of stem cells as test systems especially for developmental toxicity testing in vitro. For the first time in history, test systems can be based on differentiating cells and tissue progenitors in culture, thus bringing the 'vision of toxicity testing in the 21st century' a step closer.

  7. Toxicity of the Alternaria metabolites alternariol, alternariol methyl ether, altenuene, and tenuazonic acid in the chicken embryo assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, G F; Chu, F S

    1983-12-01

    The effects in the chicken embryo assay of four Alternaria metabolites (alternariol [AOH], alternariol methyl ether [AME], altenuene [ALT], and tenuazonic acid [TA]) were investigated. Administered to 7-day-old chicken embryos by yolk sac injection, AOH, AME, and ALT caused no mortality or teratogenic effect at doses up to 1,000, 500, and 1,000 micrograms per egg, respectively. TA exhibited a calculated 50% lethal dose of 548 micrograms per egg, with no teratogenic effect observed at either lethal or sublethal doses.

  8. An epidemiological survey on the determination of Taenia saginata cysticercosis in Iran, using a PCR assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinzadeh, S; Setayesh, A; Shekarforoush, S S; Fariman, S H

    2013-04-27

    Bovine cysticercosis caused by Taenia saginata is a zoonotic disease affirming routine inspection measures for the postmortem detection of cysticerci (cysts) in beef destined for human consumption. Detection is based on gross examination of traditional carcase predilection sites; although there is evidence to suggest that examination of other sites may offer improvements in sensitivity. In the current study, a biomolecular-based assay was employed to confirm and differentiate T saginata cysticercosis from other comparable parasitic infection in cattle carcases. Out of 7371 cattle carcases routinely inspected, 72 (0.97 per cent) were initially detected, from which 57 (79.16 per cent), 11(15.27 per cent) and 4 (5.55 per cent) were recorded in masseter muscle, heart and diaphragm, respectively. The PCR assay was also conducted to confirm different stages of the cysts, being able to detect the cyst, and to discriminate its various degenerative stages with other parasitic structures. The technique was proposed as a reliable tool to differentiate the cysticerci and, thus, could be used in further epidemiological studies as there was no difference in view of negative PCR results in lesions found by routine inspection.

  9. [Preliminary survey to detect toxic substances in domestic potable water, Bogotá and Soacha, 2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Elizabeth; Villarreal, María Elsa; Cárdenas, Omayda; Cristancho, Carlos Armando; Murillo, Carmenza; Salgado, Manuel Alberto; Nava, Gerardo

    2015-08-01

    Significant alterations may be found in the water of Bogotá´s water supply system after its purification, specifically during its distribution and storage in home reservoirs, which makes it necessary to study the final quality of the domiciliary water consumed by users. To conduct a preliminary study of toxic chemical substances in the water supplied by Bogotá´s water supply system in samples obtained from residential reservoirs and faucets. Descriptive study made in 26 homes located in Bogotá and Soacha. Two samplings were done during different seasons, each including a survey and the collection of water samples from domiciliary storage tanks and faucets. Samples were analyzed for basic physicochemical parameters, a screening test for organic and inorganic substances and the determination of heavy metals and residues of organophosphate pesticides and/or carbamates. Values obtained for conductivity, color and nitrates were acceptable, pH and turbidity were slightly high while residual chlorine levels were low; aluminum traces were found in 94% of the samples; 8% of the samples analyzed during the dry season showed organic compounds, compared to 66.7% during the rainy season, and just one positive result was obtained for inorganic compounds. Consequently, a medium risk level was observed in 11.5% of homes, low risk in 61.5% and no risk in 27.0%. The evidence showed deterioration of the domiciliary water by organic substances present in the reservoirs as well as in the water supply piping, probably caused by the formation of biofilms or organic polymers. Aluminum levels close to the top permissible limit can be explained by the presence of residual coagulants used during water treatment.

  10. Safety evaluation of Chlorella sorokiniana strain CK-22 based on an in vitro cytotoxicity assay and a 13-week subchronic toxicity trial in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himuro, Sayaka; Ueno, Sugi; Noguchi, Naoto; Uchikawa, Takuya; Kanno, Toshihiro; Yasutake, Akira

    2017-08-01

    The genus Chlorella contains unicellular green algae that have been used as food supplements. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the safety of the Chlorella sorokiniana strain CK-22 using powdered preparation (CK-22P) both by in vitro and in vivo assays. These included an experiment for cytotoxicity using Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts (V79 cells) and a 13-week repeated-dose oral toxicity trial using Wistar rats. The cytotoxicity was evaluated by MTT assay of a hot water extract (Hw-Ex) and 80% ethanol extract (Et-Ex) of CK-22P, and no effect on cell viability was observed. The 50% viability inhibitory effect (IC50) value for Hw-Ex and Et-Ex were estimated as greater than 73 and 17 μg/ml, respectively. In the subchronic toxicity test, pelleted rodent diet containing 0%, 2.5%, 5% or 10% CK-22P was given to Wistar rats (ten animals/sex/groups) for 13 weeks. During the experimental period, no CK-22P treatment-induced differences in general condition, body weight gain, food and water consumption, ophthalmology, urinalysis, hematology, clinical chemistry, gross pathology, organ weights, histopathology, or animal death were observed. The no-observed-adverse-effect levels (NOAEL) were estimated to be 5.94 g/kg body-weight/day for males and 6.41 g/kg body-weight/day for females. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Improvement of heavy metal stress and toxicity assays by coupling a transgenic reporter in a mutant nematode strain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, K.-W. [Department of Biology, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Chan, Shirley K.W. [Atmospheric, Marine and Coastal Environment Program, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Chow, King L. [Department of Biology, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China) and Atmospheric, Marine and Coastal Environment Program, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)]. E-mail: bokchow@ust.hk

    2005-09-30

    Previous studies have demonstrated that wild type Caenorhabditis elegans displays high sensitivity to heavy metals in a lethality test at a level comparable to that of other bioindicator organisms. Taking advantage of the genetics of this model organism, we have tested a number of mutant strains for enhanced sensitivity in heavy metal induced lethality and stress response. These mutants are defective in genes controlling dauer formation, longevity or response to reactive oxygen species (ROS). Among the tested mutants, a double mutant daf-16 unc-75 strain was identified to have superior sensitivity. It has a 6-, 3- and 2-fold increase in sensitivity to cadmium, copper and zinc, respectively, as compared with that of wild type animals. When a fluorescent reporter transgene was coupled with this double mutant for stress detection, a 10-fold enhancement of sensitivity to cadmium over the wild type strain was observed. These transgenic animals, superior to most of the model organisms currently used in bioassays for environmental pollutants, offer a fast and economic approach to reveal the bioavailability of toxic substance in field samples. This study also demonstrates that combination of genetic mutations and transgenesis is a viable approach to identify sensitive indicator animals for environmental monitoring.

  12. Toxicity assays applied for evaluation of ionizing radiation and zeolites adsorption as treatment technologies for coloured effluent; Aplicacao de ensaios de toxicidade na avaliacao da eficiencia da radiacao ionizante e da adsorcao em zeolitas para o tratamento de efluentes coloridos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higa, Marcela Cantelli

    2008-07-01

    Textile industry is one raising commercial activity in Brazil. This activity has been generating important environmental interferences such as colour and bad biological effects into aquatic environment. Liquid textile effluents are toxic to lived organisms and may present low biological degradability. Although foreseen at federal regulation, the effluent quality is not controlled by toxicity assays in the country. These assays are carried out to determine the potential effects of chemical substances and effluents to cause negative effects to the exposed organisms. The present work aimed whole toxicity evaluation as well as the applicability of two different treatment techniques: ionizing radiation and zeolite adsorption. The efficacy of them were evaluated using eco toxicity bases and real effluents. Two different industries from Sao Paulo State contributed to this project supplying their real effluents. The samples were collected at a Textile Industry and at a Chemical Industry (dying producer) and after the measurement of whole toxicity the samples were submitted to treatments. Toxicity assays were carried out for Daphnia similis and for Vibrio fischeri. Sample irradiations were performed at an Electron Beam Accelerator at CTR/IPEN. Zeolites treatment is an P and D activity from CQMA/IPEN which contributed to this Project. Zeolites v/ere prepared from fly ash previously being used as an adsorber material. Both treatments (electron irradiation and zeolite adsorption) resulted on important toxicity and colour reduction. Concerning irradiation the effluents from chemical industry required higher radiation doses than that from textile activity. The radiation dose to be suggested is 40 kGy (toxicity reduction > 60%) for the chemical effluents and 0.5 kGy for the textile effluents (toxicity reduction > 90%). When zeolite adsorption was evaluated the Z1M6 resulted in 85%o v/hole toxicity reduction and ZC6 resulted in very low efficiency for the effluents of chemical

  13. Bioassay Screening of the Essential Oil and Various Extracts of Nigella sativa L. Seeds Using Brine Shrimp Toxicity Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Sharififar

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Since cytotoxicity screening is the first step necessary for any new drug development, this study was designed to find out and compare the cytotoxicity effects of the essential oil and various extracts of Nigella sativa L. seeds using Brine Shrimp Lethality (BSL assay. Materials and Methods: Essential oils and various extracts of N. sativa were assessed by two methods of disk and solution of BSL. Data analysis was carried out using SPSS statistical package version 17.0 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, 250 USA. Data were processed in probit-analysis program to estimate LC50 values. Results: All of the tested fractions demonstrated more cytotoxicity in the solution method. Petroleum ether and chloroform extract of N. sativa showed the most cytotoxicity with LC50 values 7 and 21 μg/ml respectively; while aqueous and ethanolic had no significant cytotoxicity. Moreover, the GC/MS analysis of the essential oil of N. sativa showed the p-cymene (48.1%, α-thujone (14.38% and dihydro carveol (9.11% as the main compounds. Conclusion: These results suggest some limitation for using this spice in diet. Furthermore, this plant could be considered as a source of cytotoxic compounds which should be studied in details.

  14. The comet assay in Environmental Risk Assessment of marine pollutants: applications, assets and handicaps of surveying genotoxicity in non-model organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Marta; Costa, Pedro M

    2015-01-01

    Determining the genotoxic effects of pollutants has long been a priority in Environmental Risk Assessment (ERA) for coastal ecosystems, especially of complex areas such as estuaries and other confined waterbodies. The acknowledged link between DNA damage, mutagenicity and carcinogenicity to the exposure to certain toxicants has been responsible to the growing interest in determining the genotoxic effects of xenobiotics to wildlife as a measure of environmental risk. The comet assay, although widely employed in in vivo and in vitro toxicology, still holds many constraints in ERA, in large part owing to difficulties in obtaining conclusive cause-effect relationships from complex environments. Nevertheless, these challenges do not hinder the attempts to apply the alkaline comet assay on sentinel organisms, wild or subjected to bioassays in or ex situ (from fish to molluscs) as well to standardise protocols and establish general guidelines to the interpretation of findings. Fish have been regarded as an appealing subject due to the ease of performing the comet assay in whole blood. However, the application of the comet assay is becoming increasingly common in invertebrates (e.g. in molluscan haemocytes and solid tissues such as gills). Virtually all sorts of results have been obtained from the application of the comet assay in ERA (null, positive and inconclusive). However, it has become clear that interpreting DNA damage data from wild organisms is particularly challenging due to their ability to adapt to continuous environmental stressors, including toxicants. Also, the comet assay in non-model organisms for the purpose of ERA implies different constraints, assumptions and interpretation of findings, compared with the in vitro procedures from which most guidelines have been derived. This paper critically reviews the application of the comet assay in ERA, focusing on target organisms and tissues; protocol developments, case studies plus data handling and

  15. Mapping the Distribution of Cysts from the Toxic Dinoflagellate Cochlodinium polykrikoides in Bloom-Prone Estuaries by a Novel Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattenrath-Lehmann, Theresa K; Zhen, Yu; Wallace, Ryan B; Tang, Ying-Zhong; Gobler, Christopher J

    2015-12-04

    Cochlodinium polykrikoides is a cosmopolitan dinoflagellate that is notorious for causing fish-killing harmful algal blooms (HABs) across North America and Asia. While recent laboratory and ecosystem studies have definitively demonstrated that Cochlodinium forms resting cysts that may play a key role in the dynamics of its HABs, uncertainties regarding cyst morphology and detection have prohibited even a rudimentary understanding of the distribution of C. polykrikoides cysts in coastal ecosystems. Here, we report on the development of a fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) assay using oligonucleotide probes specific for the large subunit (LSU) ribosomal DNA (rDNA) of C. polykrikoides. The LSU rDNA-targeted FISH assay was used with epifluorescence microscopy and was iteratively refined to maximize the fluorescent reaction with C. polykrikoides and minimize cross-reactivity. The final LSU rDNA-targeted FISH assay was found to quantitatively recover cysts made by North American isolates of C. polykrikoides but not cysts formed by other common cyst-forming dinoflagellates. The method was then applied to identify and map C. polykrikoides cysts across bloom-prone estuaries. Annual cyst and vegetative cell surveys revealed that elevated densities of C. polykrikoides cysts (>100 cm(-3)) during the spring of a given year were spatially consistent with regions of dense blooms the prior summer. The identity of cysts in sediments was confirmed via independent amplification of C. polykrikoides rDNA. This study mapped C. polykrikoides cysts in a natural marine setting and indicates that the excystment of cysts formed by this harmful alga may play a key role in the development of HABs of this species. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Development of a seaweed derived platelet activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) inhibitory hydrolysate, synthesis of inhibitory peptides and assessment of their toxicity using the Zebrafish larvae assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Ciarán; Gallagher, Eimear; O'Connor, Paula; Prieto, José; Mora-Soler, Leticia; Grealy, Maura; Hayes, Maria

    2013-12-01

    The vascular inflammatory role of platelet activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) is thought to be due to the formation of lysophosphatidyl choline and oxidized non-esterified fatty acids. This enzyme is considered a promising therapeutic target for the prevention of atherosclerosis and there is a need to expand the available chemical templates of PAF-AH inhibitors. This study demonstrated how natural PAF-AH inhibitory peptides were isolated and characterized from the red macroalga Palmaria palmata. The dried powdered alga was hydrolyzed using the food grade enzyme papain, and the resultant peptide containing fraction generated using RP-HPLC. Several oligopeptides were identified as potential PAF-AH inhibitors following bio-guided fractionation, and the amino acid sequences of these oligopeptides were confirmed by Q-TOF-MS and microwave-assisted solid phase de novo synthesis. The most promising PAF-AH inhibitory peptide had the amino acid sequence NIGK and a PAF-AH IC50 value of 2.32 mM. This peptide may constitute a valid drug template for PAF-AH inhibitors. Furthermore the P. palmata hydrolysate was nontoxic when assayed using the Zebrafish toxicity model at a concentration of 1mg/ml. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Using an RNAi Signature Assay To Guide the Design of Three-Drug-Conjugated Nanoparticles with Validated Mechanisms, In Vivo Efficacy, and Low Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Jonathan C; Bruno, Peter M; Nguyen, Hung V-T; Liao, Longyan; Liu, Jenny; Hemann, Michael T; Johnson, Jeremiah A

    2016-09-28

    Single-nanoparticle (NP) combination chemotherapeutics are quickly emerging as attractive alternatives to traditional chemotherapy due to their ability to increase drug solubility, reduce off-target toxicity, enhance blood circulation lifetime, and increase the amount of drug delivered to tumors. In the case of NP-bound drugs, that is, NP-prodrugs, the current standard of practice is to assume that the subcellular mechanism of action for each drug released from the NP mirrors that of the unbound, free-drug. Here, we use an RNAi signature assay for the first time to examine the mechanism of action of multidrug-conjugated NP prodrugs relative to their small molecule prodrugs and native drug mechanisms of action. Additionally, the effective additive contribution of three different drugs in a single-NP platform is characterized. The results indicate that some platinum(IV) cisplatin prodrugs, although cytotoxic, may not have the expected mechanism of action for cisplatin. This insight was utilized to develop a novel platinum(IV) oxaliplatin prodrug and incorporate it into a three-drug-conjugated NP, where each drug's mechanism of action is preserved, to treat tumor-bearing mice with otherwise lethal levels of chemotherapy.

  18. Risk of tuberculosis among air passengers estimated by interferon gamma release assay: survey of contact investigations, Japan, 2012 to 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Masaki; Kato, Seiya

    2017-03-23

    Although the World Health Organization recommends contact investigations around air travel-associated sputum smear-positive tuberculosis (TB) patients, evidence suggests that the information thus obtained may have overestimated the risk of TB infection because it involved some contacts born in countries with high TB burden who were likely to have been infected with TB in the past, or because tuberculin skin tests were used, which are less specific than the interferon gamma release assay (IGRA) particularly in areas where Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination coverage is high. We conducted a questionnaire survey on air travel-associated TB contact investigations in local health offices of Japan from 2012 to 2015, focusing on IGRA positivity. Among 651 air travel-associated TB contacts, average positivity was 3.8% (95% confidence interval (CI): 2.5-5.6) with a statistically significant increasing trend with older age (p < 0.0094). Positivity among 0-34 year-old contacts was 1.0% (95% CI: 0.12-3.5%), suggesting their risk of TB infection is as small as among Japanese young adults with low risk of TB infection (positivity: 0.85-0.90%). Limiting the contact investigation to fewer passengers (within two seats surrounding the index case, rather than two rows) seems reasonable in the case of aircraft with many seats per row. This article is copyright of The Authors, 2017.

  19. A human induced pluripotent stem cell-based in vitro assay predicts developmental toxicity through a retinoic acid receptor-mediated pathway for a series of related retinoid analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Jessica A; Smith, Alan M; Egnash, Laura A; Colwell, Michael R; Donley, Elizabeth L R; Kirchner, Fred R; Burrier, Robert E

    2017-07-23

    The relative developmental toxicity potency of a series of retinoid analogues was evaluated using a human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell assay that measures changes in the biomarkers ornithine and cystine. Analogue potency was predicted, based on the assay endpoint of the ornithine/cystine (o/c) ratio, to be all-trans-retinoic acid>TTNPB>13-cis-retinoic acid≈9-cis-retinoic acid>acitretin>etretinate>retinol. These rankings correlate with in vivo data and demonstrate successful application of the assay to rank a series of related toxic and non-toxic compounds. The retinoic acid receptor α (RARα)-selective antagonist Ro 41-5253 inhibited the cystine perturbation caused by all-trans-retinoic acid, TTNPB, 13-cis-retinoic acid, 9-cis-retinoic acid, and acitretin. Ornithine was altered independent of RARα in all retinoids except acitretin. These results suggest a role for an RARα-mediated mechanism in retinoid-induced developmental toxicity through altered cystine metabolism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [First French national survey on lifestyle and toxic factors in infertile couples].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, S; Devouche, E

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of our study is to assess, prior to any treatment for infertility, the environment and quality of life of candidate couples for medically assisted procreation (MAP) and the toxic factors which may be related to their difficulty in conceiving. A screening questionnaire aimed at 796 patients (348 couples) has been collected by 43 assisted reproductive techniques (ART) centers in France. Stress factors, anxiety, toxic and environmental factors have been recorded and analysed. Women were on average younger than men (34.9 y ± 5.3 vs. 37.5 y ± 7.5), with a normal BMI, and 78% of them had no children. Sexual relations are regular: 2.14 per week. However, 1 in 8 women reports having sexual problems as opposed to 2 in 100 men (P cannabis use were significantly higher in the men (32% vs. 20% and 6,4% vs. 1,2%). Alcohol consumption is more common in men (32 vs. 23%, P fertility and which should be corrected before any MAP treatment is attempted in order to optimise the results in ART and to increase natural fertility. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Review on the acute Daphnia magna toxicity test – Evaluation of the sensitivity and the precision of assays performed with organisms from laboratory cultures or hatched from dormant eggs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Persoone

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available One of the most internationally used bioassays for toxicity screening of chemicals and for toxicity monitoring of effluents and contaminated waters is the acute toxicity test with daphnid crustaceans, and in particular that performed with Daphnia magna.Standard methods have been developed for this assay that were gradually endorsed by national and international organisations dealing with toxicity testing procedures, in view of its application within a regulatory framework. As for all toxicity tests, the organisms used for the acute D. magna assay have to be obtained from live stocks which are cultured in the laboratory on live food (micro-algae.Unsurprisingly the various standard protocols of this particular assay differ – at least to a certain extent – with regard to the test organism culturing conditions. In addition, some technical aspects of the toxicity test such as the effect criterion (mortality of immobility, the exposure time, the type of dilution water, etc., also vary from one standard to another.Although this particular assay is currently used in many countries, the technical and biological problems inherent in year-round culturing and availability of the biological material and the culturing/maintenance costs of live stocks restrict its application to a limited number of highly specialised laboratories.This fundamental bottleneck in toxicity testing triggered investigations which brought forward the concept of “microbiotests” or “small-scale” toxicity tests. “Culture/maintenance free” aquatic microbiotests with species of different phylogenetic groups were developed in the early 1990s at the Laboratory for Environmental Toxicology and Aquatic Ecology at the Ghent University in Belgium.These assays which were given the generic name “Toxkits”, are unique in that they employ dormant stages (“cryptobiotic eggs” of the test species, which can be stored for long periods of time and “hatched” at the time of

  2. Survey of Nonprescription Medication and Antibiotic Use in Patients with Stevens-Johnson Syndrome, Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis, and Overlap Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine J. Sullivan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS, toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN, and overlap syndrome (SJS-TEN are rare, serious skin and mucosa break-down conditions frequently associated with antibiotic use. The role of nonprescription medications alone, or in combination with antibiotics in triggering SJS/TEN, is largely unknown. This study summarized data collected from patient surveys about nonprescription and antibiotic use prior to a SJS/TEN diagnosis. The survey was administered online to members of the U.S. SJS Foundation who had been diagnosed with SJS/TEN or were the parent of a child who had been diagnosed with SJS/TEN. Respondents were asked about nonprescription medications taken within the year before diagnosis, and the approximate point in time before diagnosis that they had taken them. They were also asked about specific prescription medications, including antibiotics, that they took before diagnosis. An estimated 4500 patients received an invitation to complete the survey. 251 patients completed it, resulting in a response rate of 5.6%. The mean age of respondents was 43 years (SD (standard deviation = 17.3 and 70% were female. 32.3% of respondents indicated that a prescription antibiotic triggered their reaction. 14.1% indicated a nonprescription medication had triggered their SJS/TEN, and 18.1% said a nonprescription medication may have triggered their SJS/TEN. 85.5% of respondents said they took a nonprescription medication within three months of their SJS/TEN diagnosis. Of those respondents who reported that an antibiotic triggered their SJS/TEN, 35.2% reported taking a nonprescription medication within the three months prior to their diagnosis. This survey captured valuable information about nonprescription and antibiotic use in SJS/TEN patients. It is important for future studies to estimate the impact of antibiotics on SJS/TEN, and account for nonprescription medication use in that relationship.

  3. Survey of Nonprescription Medication and Antibiotic Use in Patients with Stevens-Johnson Syndrome, Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis, and Overlap Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Katherine J; Jeffres, Meghan N; Dellavalle, Robert P; Valuck, Robert; Anderson, Heather D

    2018-02-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS), toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN), and overlap syndrome (SJS-TEN) are rare, serious skin and mucosa break-down conditions frequently associated with antibiotic use. The role of nonprescription medications alone, or in combination with antibiotics in triggering SJS/TEN, is largely unknown. This study summarized data collected from patient surveys about nonprescription and antibiotic use prior to a SJS/TEN diagnosis. The survey was administered online to members of the U.S. SJS Foundation who had been diagnosed with SJS/TEN or were the parent of a child who had been diagnosed with SJS/TEN. Respondents were asked about nonprescription medications taken within the year before diagnosis, and the approximate point in time before diagnosis that they had taken them. They were also asked about specific prescription medications, including antibiotics, that they took before diagnosis. An estimated 4500 patients received an invitation to complete the survey. 251 patients completed it, resulting in a response rate of 5.6%. The mean age of respondents was 43 years (SD (standard deviation) = 17.3) and 70% were female. 32.3% of respondents indicated that a prescription antibiotic triggered their reaction. 14.1% indicated a nonprescription medication had triggered their SJS/TEN, and 18.1% said a nonprescription medication may have triggered their SJS/TEN. 85.5% of respondents said they took a nonprescription medication within three months of their SJS/TEN diagnosis. Of those respondents who reported that an antibiotic triggered their SJS/TEN, 35.2% reported taking a nonprescription medication within the three months prior to their diagnosis. This survey captured valuable information about nonprescription and antibiotic use in SJS/TEN patients. It is important for future studies to estimate the impact of antibiotics on SJS/TEN, and account for nonprescription medication use in that relationship.

  4. A comprehensive study of the toxicity of natural multi-contaminated sediments: New insights brought by the use of a combined approach using the medaka embryo-larval assay and physico-chemical analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barjhoux, Iris; Clérandeau, Christelle; Menach, Karyn Le; Anschutz, Pierre; Gonzalez, Patrice; Budzinski, Hélène; Morin, Bénédicte; Baudrimont, Magalie; Cachot, Jérôme

    2017-08-01

    Sediment compartment is a long term sink for pollutants and a secondary source of contamination for aquatic species. The abiotic factors controlling the bioavailability and thus the toxicity of complex mixtures of pollutants accumulated in sediments are poorly documented. To highlight the different factors influencing sediment toxicity, we identified and analyzed the physico-chemical properties, micro-pollutant contents, and toxicity level of six contrasted sediments in the Lot-Garonne continuum. Sediment toxicity was evaluated using the recently described Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) embryo-larval assay with direct exposure to whole sediment (MELAc). Multiple toxicity endpoints including embryotoxicity, developmental defects and DNA damage were analyzed in exposed embryos. Chemical analyses revealed significant variations in the nature and contamination profile of sediments, mainly impacted by metallic trace elements and, unexpectedly, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Exposure to sediments induced different toxic impacts on medaka early life stages when compared with the reference site. Principal component analysis showed that the toxic responses following exposure to sediments from the Lot River and its tributary were associated with micro-pollutant contamination: biometric measurements, hatching success, genotoxicity, craniofacial deformities and yolk sac malabsorption were specifically correlated to metallic and organic contaminants. Conversely, the main biological responses following exposure to the Garonne River sediments were more likely related to their physico-chemical properties than to their contamination level. Time to hatch, cardiovascular injuries and spinal deformities were correlated to organic matter content, fine particles and dissolved oxygen levels. These results emphasize the necessity of combining physico-chemical analysis of sediment with toxicity assessment to accurately evaluate the environmental risks associated with sediment

  5. Comparison of in situ and in vitro baiting assays for Phytophthora ramorum survey of waterways in the southeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven Oak; Jaesoon Hwang; Steven Jeffers

    2013-01-01

    In situ baiting with whole, intact leaves of Rhododendron spp. has been employed since 2006 by the National Phytophthora ramorum Early Detection survey of forests (national survey). Using this method, P. ramorum was detected for the first time in national survey waterways draining 12 infested ornamental...

  6. Review on the acute Daphnia magna toxicity test – Evaluation of the sensitivity and the precision of assays performed with organisms from laboratory cultures or hatched from dormant eggs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Persoone G.

    2009-08-01

    “Culture/maintenance free” aquatic microbiotests with species of different phylogenetic groups were developed in the early 1990s at the Laboratory for Environmental Toxicology and Aquatic Ecology at the Ghent University in Belgium. These assays which were given the generic name “Toxkits”, are unique in that they employ dormant stages (“cryptobiotic eggs” of the test species, which can be stored for long periods of time and “hatched” at the time of performance of the assays. One of these microbiotests is the Daphtoxkit F magna, which is currently used in many laboratories worldwide for research as well as for toxicity monitoring purposes. The microbiotest technology has several advantages in comparison to the “traditional” tests based on laboratory cultures, especially its independence of the stock culturing burden. However, the acceptance (or possible non-acceptance of performing assays with test organisms obtained from “dormant eggs” should be clearly dictated by the “sensitivity” and “precision” criteria of the former assays in comparison to the latter. The first part of this review therefore thoroughly reviews the scientific literature and of data obtained from various laboratories for assays performed with either D. magna test organisms obtained from lab cultures or hatched from dormant eggs. Attention has focused on data of quality control tests performed on reference chemicals, and in particular on potassium dichromate (K2Cr2O7 for which an acceptability range of 0.6–2.1 mg·L–1 has been set in ISO standard 6341 for the 24 h EC50 of the acute D. magna assay. Mean EC50s, standard deviations and variation coefficients were calculated from the collected data, all of which are presented in tables and figures and discussed in detail. The major conclusions drawn from the analysis of the large number of quality control (QC data on the acute D. magna toxicity test are that : (1 Virtually all results from assays performed with

  7. Severe bullous hypersensitivity reactions after exposure to carbamazepine in a Han-Chinese child with a positive HLA-B*1502 and negative in vitro toxicity assays: evidence for different pathophysiological mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elzagallaai, Abdelbaset A; Garcia-Bournissen, Facundo; Finkelstein, Yaron; Bend, John R; Rieder, Michael J; Koren, Gideon

    2011-01-01

    Drug hypersensitivity syndrome (DHS) can present in several clinical forms ranging from simple maculopapular skin rash to severe bullous reactions and multi-system dysfunction. Genetic analysis of DHS patients has revealed a striking association between carbamazepine (CBZ)-induced severe bullous reactions, such as Steven-Johnson Syndrome, and toxic epidermal necrolysis in individuals from Southeast Asia who carry a specific HLA allele (HLA-B*1502). This ethnic-specific relationship with a disease phenotype has raised the question of the commonality of the pathogenesis mechanisms of these diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the genetic and metabolic bases of DHS development to help predict patient susceptibility. A case of carbamazepine-induced Steven-Johnson Syndrome reaction in a HLA-B*1502 positive child of Han Chinese origin, a carbamazepine-induced DHS case in a Caucasian patient and 3 healthy controls were investigated. We performed two types of in vitro toxicity assay, the lymphocyte toxicity assay (LTA) and the novel in vitro platelet toxicity assay (iPTA) on cells taken from the Chinese child 3 and 9 months after recovery from the reaction and from two healthy volunteers. We also tested the Caucasian patient, who developed CBZ-induced DHS, 3 months after the reaction. Both LTA and iPTA tests were negative 3 and 9 months after the reaction on samples from the Chinese child whereas the tests were positive in the Caucasian patient. These results strongly suggest more than one mechanistic pathway for different CBZ-induced hypersensitivity reactions in patients with different ethnic backgrounds.

  8. Ethnobotanical survey of plants with toxic active constituents, grown in the municipality of Cuité, Paraíba, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diégina Araújo FERNANDES

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Incidents involving plants have been a major problem for public health over the years and represent the fourth leading cause of poisoning in Brazil, leading to death many people, especially children. This study aimed to carry out an ethnobotanical survey of plants with toxic active constituents, grown in the municipality of Cuité, Paraíba, correlating the popular and scientific knowledge. This study conducted an exploratory and descriptive field research by applying semi-structured questionnaires to city dwellers who maintained frequent contact with plants. The identification of 19 toxic species and 18 potentially poisonous species was possible. Prevalent plants in homes were ornamental. Most respondents were senior women who carried out this practice over ten years, and this interest in cultivation had come through relatives. The survey showed that most interviewees unaware the toxic potential of cited plants, which indicates the need to carry out educational and preventive work among the population.

  9. 90-Day Inhalation Toxicity Study of Bio-Derived Gevo Alcohol-to-Jet (ATJ) Synthetic Paraffinic Kerosene (SPK) in Rats with Neurotoxicity Testing and Genotoxicity Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-31

    turned and briefly held on its back,  hind leg splay: response to being dropped approximately 30 cm (12 inches). Hind legs were painted to mark the...approximately 30 cm (12 inches). Hind legs are painted to mark the location of the hind legs upon landing. This test is not done if the animal is judged...2007. Assessing toxicity of fine and nanoparticles : Comparing in vitro measurements to in vivo pulmonary toxicity profiles. Toxicol. Sci. 97:163– 180

  10. A real-time PCR assay for bat SARS-like coronavirus detection and its application to Italian greater horseshoe bat faecal sample surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balboni, Andrea; Gallina, Laura; Palladini, Alessandra; Prosperi, Santino; Battilani, Mara

    2012-01-01

    Bats are source of coronaviruses closely related to the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) virus. Numerous studies have been carried out to identify new bat viruses related to SARS-coronavirus (bat-SARS-like CoVs) using a reverse-transcribed-polymerase chain reaction assay. However, a qualitative PCR could underestimate the prevalence of infection, affecting the epidemiological evaluation of bats in viral ecology. In this work an SYBR Green-real time PCR assay was developed for diagnosing infection with SARS-related coronaviruses from bat guano and was applied as screening tool in a survey carried out on 45 greater horseshoe bats (Rhinolophus ferrumequinum) sampled in Italy in 2009. The assay showed high sensitivity and reproducibility. Its application on bats screening resulted in a prevalence of 42%. This method could be suitable as screening tool in epidemiological surveys about the presence of bat-SARS-like CoVs, consequently to obtain a more realistic scenario of the viral prevalence in the population.

  11. A Real-Time PCR Assay for Bat SARS-Like Coronavirus Detection and Its Application to Italian Greater Horseshoe Bat Faecal Sample Surveys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Balboni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bats are source of coronaviruses closely related to the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS virus. Numerous studies have been carried out to identify new bat viruses related to SARS-coronavirus (bat-SARS-like CoVs using a reverse-transcribed-polymerase chain reaction assay. However, a qualitative PCR could underestimate the prevalence of infection, affecting the epidemiological evaluation of bats in viral ecology. In this work an SYBR Green-real time PCR assay was developed for diagnosing infection with SARS-related coronaviruses from bat guano and was applied as screening tool in a survey carried out on 45 greater horseshoe bats (Rhinolophus ferrumequinum sampled in Italy in 2009. The assay showed high sensitivity and reproducibility. Its application on bats screening resulted in a prevalence of 42%. This method could be suitable as screening tool in epidemiological surveys about the presence of bat-SARS-like CoVs, consequently to obtain a more realistic scenario of the viral prevalence in the population.

  12. Illicit Distribution of Prescription Drugs: Report of Inadvertent Chloroquine Toxicity and a Market Survey of Businesses Serving Ethnic Minority Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grazier, Michael R; Armenian, Patil; Vohra, Rais

    2014-08-01

    To report a case of life-threatening cinchonism from illicit purchase of chloroquine and survey local ethnic markets to determine what medications are sold without a prescription. A 44-year-old Hmong woman presented with abdominal pain and vomiting 30 minutes after ingesting 20 presumed acetaminophen pills in a self-harm gesture. Initial vital signs were normal, and an electrocardiogram (ECG) showed normal sinus rhythm, QRS = 130 ms, and QTc = 455 ms. Her systolic blood pressure dropped to 84 mm Hg, which was unchanged after 3 L normal saline, but improved after 150 mEq NaHCO 3 . A repeat ECG showed QRS = 114 ms and QTc = 588 ms. Serum labs were significant for K 2.8 mmol/L and Mg 1.8 mg/dL; 2.5 hours later, the family brought in the medication, which was 250 mg tablets of chloroquine phosphate. K and Mg were repleted, and she was admitted to the intensive care unit with complete recovery. Serum chloroquine level 9 hours after ingestion was 530 ng/mL (therapeutic = 20-400 ng/mL). We identified local ethnic markets through patient and hospital employee referrals and Internet searches. In our survey, 3 of 4 ethnic markets sold prescription medications: 35 were identified, of which 5 are discontinued by the FDA (diphenidol, phenacetin, metamizole, phenylbutazone, and sibutramine). A variety of prescription medications, including 5 discontinued by the FDA, were available in markets serving our community's ethnic minorities. Health care workers should be aware of this public health risk, which can result in serious toxicity, as described in this case of chloroquine overdose. © The Author(s) 2014.

  13. Has Toxicity Testing Moved into the 21st Century? A Survey and Analysis of Perceptions in the Field of Toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaunbrecher, Virginia; Beryt, Elizabeth; Parodi, Daniela; Telesca, Donatello; Doherty, Joseph; Malloy, Timothy; Allard, Patrick

    2017-08-30

    Ten years ago, leaders in the field of toxicology called for a transformation of the discipline and a shift from primarily relying on traditional animal testing to incorporating advances in biotechnology and predictive methodologies into alternative testing strategies (ATS). Governmental agencies and academic and industry partners initiated programs to support such a transformation, but a decade later, the outcomes of these efforts are not well understood. We aimed to assess the use of ATS and the perceived barriers and drivers to their adoption by toxicologists and by others working in, or closely linked with, the field of toxicology. We surveyed 1,381 toxicologists and experts in associated fields regarding the viability and use of ATS and the perceived barriers and drivers of ATS for a range of applications. We performed ranking, hierarchical clustering, and correlation analyses of the survey data. Many respondents indicated that they were already using ATS, or believed that ATS were already viable approaches, for toxicological assessment of one or more end points in their primary area of interest or concern (26-86%, depending on the specific ATS/application pair). However, the proportions of respondents reporting use of ATS in the previous 12 mo were smaller (4.5-41%). Concern about regulatory acceptance was the most commonly cited factor inhibiting the adoption of ATS, and a variety of technical concerns were also cited as significant barriers to ATS viability. The factors most often cited as playing a significant role (currently or in the future) in driving the adoption of ATS were the need for expedited toxicology information, the need for reduced toxicity testing costs, demand by regulatory agencies, and ethical or moral concerns. Our findings indicate that the transformation of the field of toxicology is partly implemented, but significant barriers to acceptance and adoption remain. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1435.

  14. Optimizing conditions of a cell-free toxic filtrate stem cutting assay to evaluate soybean genotype responses to Fusarium species that cause sudden death syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cell-free toxic culture filtrates from Fusarium virguliforme, the causal fungus of soybean sudden death syndrome (SDS), cause foliar symptoms on soybean stem-cuttings similar to those obtained from root inoculations in whole plants and those observed in production fields. The objectives of this stud...

  15. On-chip constructive cell-network study (II): on-chip quasi-in vivo cardiac toxicity assay for ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation measurement using ring-shaped closed circuit microelectrode with lined-up cardiomyocyte cell network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Fumimasa; Kaneko, Tomoyuki; Hattori, Akihiro; Yasuda, Kenji

    2011-09-19

    Conventional in vitro approach using human ether-a-go-go related gene (hERG) assay has been considered worldwide as the first screening assay for cardiac repolarization safety. However, it does not always oredict the potential QT prolongation risk or pro-arrhythmic risk correctly. For adaptable preclinical strategiesto evaluate global cardiac safety, an on-chip quasi-in vivo cardiac toxicity assay for lethal arrhythmia (ventricular tachyarrhythmia) measurement using ring-shaped closed circuit microelectrode chip has been developed. The ventricular electrocardiogram (ECG)-like field potential data, which includes both the repolarization and the conductance abnormality, was acquired from the self-convolutied extracellular field potentials (FPs) of a lined-up cardiomyocyte network on a circle-shaped microelectrode in an agarose microchamber. When Astemisol applied to the closed-loop cardiomyocyte network, self-convoluted FP profile of normal beating changed into an early afterdepolarization (EAD) like waveform, and then showed ventricular tachyarrhythmias and ventricular fibrilations (VT/Vf). QT-prolongation-like self-convoluted FP duration prolongation and its fluctuation increase was also observed according to the increase of Astemizole concentration. The results indicate that the convoluted FPs of the quasi-in vivo cell network assay includes both of the repolarization data and the conductance abnormality of cardiomyocyte networks has the strong potential to prediction lethal arrhythmia.

  16. On-chip constructive cell-network study (II: on-chip quasi-in vivo cardiac toxicity assay for ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation measurement using ring-shaped closed circuit microelectrode with lined-up cardiomyocyte cell network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuda Kenji

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Backgrounds Conventional in vitro approach using human ether-a-go-go related gene (hERG assay has been considered worldwide as the first screening assay for cardiac repolarization safety. However, it does not always oredict the potential QT prolongation risk or pro-arrhythmic risk correctly. For adaptable preclinical strategiesto evaluate global cardiac safety, an on-chip quasi-in vivo cardiac toxicity assay for lethal arrhythmia (ventricular tachyarrhythmia measurement using ring-shaped closed circuit microelectrode chip has been developed. Results The ventricular electrocardiogram (ECG-like field potential data, which includes both the repolarization and the conductance abnormality, was acquired from the self-convolutied extracellular field potentials (FPs of a lined-up cardiomyocyte network on a circle-shaped microelectrode in an agarose microchamber. When Astemisol applied to the closed-loop cardiomyocyte network, self-convoluted FP profile of normal beating changed into an early afterdepolarization (EAD like waveform, and then showed ventricular tachyarrhythmias and ventricular fibrilations (VT/Vf. QT-prolongation-like self-convoluted FP duration prolongation and its fluctuation increase was also observed according to the increase of Astemizole concentration. Conclusions The results indicate that the convoluted FPs of the quasi-in vivo cell network assay includes both of the repolarization data and the conductance abnormality of cardiomyocyte networks has the strong potential to prediction lethal arrhythmia.

  17. Probit analysis of comparative assays on toxicities of lead chloride and lead acetate to in vitro cultured human umbilical cord blood lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patnaik, Rajashree; Padhy, Rabindra N

    2015-03-01

    This work describes that cytotoxicity of lead chloride and lead acetate to in vitro cultured lymphocytes from human umbilical cord blood, using four monitoring methods namely, trypan blue staining, acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining, 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl] 2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and neutral red uptake assays; lead genotoxicity to lymphocytes was monitored by comet assay. The MIC value in each method was invariably 300 mg/L for PbCl2. Lethal concentration25 (LC25) values were almost in an agreeable range: 691.83 to 831.76 mg/L; LC50 values in each method were almost in the range: 1174.9 to 1348.9 mg/L; LC100 values were in the range: 3000 to 3300 mg/L, for lead chloride. Similarly, The MIC value in each method were invariably 150 mg/L; LC25 values were almost in the range: 295.12 to 371.53 mg/L; LC50 values were in the range: 501.18 to 588.84 mg/L; LC100 value was 1500 mg/L in all assays, for lead acetate. The comet assay also indicated that the LC100 values were 3300 mg/L lead chloride and 1500 mg/L lead acetate. Thus, both cytotoxicity and genotoxicity were recorded at 3300 mg/L lead chloride and 1500 mg/L lead acetate with lymphocytes.

  18. Using an RNAi Signature Assay To Guide the Design of Three-Drug-Conjugated Nanoparticles with Validated Mechanisms, In Vivo Efficacy, and Low Toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Barnes, Jonathan C.; Bruno, Peter M.; Nguyen, Hung V.-T.; Liao, Longyan; Liu, Jenny; Hemann, Michael T.; Johnson, Jeremiah A.

    2016-01-01

    Single-nanoparticle (NP) combination chemotherapeutics are quickly emerging as attractive alternatives to traditional chemotherapy due to their ability to increase drug solubility, reduce off-target toxicity, enhance blood circulation lifetime, and increase the amount of drug delivered to tumors. In the case of NP-bound drugs, that is, NP-prodrugs, the current standard of practice is to assume that the subcellular mechanism of action for each drug released from the NP mirrors that of the unbo...

  19. Pharmacological assay of Cordia verbenacea V: oral and topical anti-inflammatory activity, analgesic effect and fetus toxicity of a crude leaf extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sertié, J A A; Woisky, R G; Wiezel, G; Rodrigues, M

    2005-05-01

    Cordia verbenacea D.C. (Borraginaceae) is a perennial bush plant that grows widely along the southeastern coast of Brazil. Its leaves have been used in folk medicine for their anti-ulcer, anti-inflammatory and cicatrizing activities. We have already described the anti-inflammatory properties of C. verbenacea and its low toxicity in different acute animal models. In the present study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory activity in sub-chronic animal models of a crude leaf lyophilized extract when administered by oral route or topically applied, and concomitantly, its analgesic potency and toxicity to the fetus. Topical administration of the extract inhibited nystatin-induced edema proportionally to the doses used, and this effect at a dose of 4.56 mg/kg body wt. was similar to that observed with 6.0 mg/kg body wt. of naproxen. In miconazole-induced edema, the leaf extract at a dose of 1.24 mg/kg body wt., orally administered, has a very similar effect as compared to nimezulide (2.5 mg/kg body wt.) and dexamethasone (0.2 mg/kg body wt.). At an oral dose of 2.48 mg/kg body wt. the extract showed a very low analgesic effect, and total absence of fetus toxicity at doses of less than 7.44 mg/kg body wt.

  20. Use of plant toxicity assays to evaluate a mobile solvent extraction system for remediation of soil from a hazardous waste site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, J.R.; Chang, L.; Meckes, M. [Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH (United States)] [and others

    1995-11-01

    Soil from a site heavily contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls and several other organic and inorganic compounds was treated with a full-scale, mobile solvent extraction system, which is being evaluated by the USEPA`s Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program. The present study employed several plant bioassays to examine the genotoxicity and acute toxicity of the soil before and after the treatment. The toxicity endpoints were mitotic alterations in root tip cells of Allium cepa (common onion), micronuclei in pollen mother cells of Tradescantia, and seed germination and root elongation in oats and lettuce. Bulbs or inflorescences of Allium and Tradescantia, respectively, were exposed to aqueous extracts (20% w/v) of the soils at three concentrations (undiluted, 1/2, or 1/4). Oat and lettuce seeds were exposed to the soils mixed with sand at concentrations from 25 to 100% (w/w). The results were as follows: (1) no evidence of genotoxicity for either the untreated or treated soils in Tradescantia; (2) dose-related increases in chromosomal aberrations for both soils in Allium; (3) inhibition of seed germination for lettuce but not oats for both soils; (4) inhibition of root elongation for both lettuce and oats for the treated soil. The toxicity and genotoxicity remaining after treatment appears to be due to residual solvent introduced during the solvent extraction treatment process, or to inorganic contaminants not removed by the treatment.

  1. C{sub 60} fullerene: A powerful antioxidant or a damaging agent? The importance of an in-depth material characterization prior to toxicity assays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spohn, P.; Hirsch, C.; Hasler, F.; Bruinink, A.; Krug, H.F. [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research, Laboratory for Materials-Biology Interactions, Lerchenfeldstrasse 5, CH-9014 St. Gallen (Switzerland); Wick, P. [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research, Laboratory for Materials-Biology Interactions, Lerchenfeldstrasse 5, CH-9014 St. Gallen (Switzerland)], E-mail: peter.wick@empa.ch

    2009-04-15

    Since the discovery of fullerenes in 1985, these carbon nanospheres have attracted attention regarding their physico/chemical properties. Despite little knowledge about their impact on the environment and human health, the production of fullerenes has already reached an industrial scale. However, the toxicity of C{sub 60} is still controversially discussed. The aim of this study was to clarify the biological effects of tetrahydrofuran (THF) suspended C{sub 60} fullerene in comparison to water stirred C{sub 60} fullerene suspensions. Beyond that, we analyzed the effects on the Crustacea Daphnia magna an indicator for ecotoxicological effects and the human lung epithelial cell line A549 as a simplified model for the respiratory tract. We could demonstrate that water-soluble side products which were formed in THF nC{sub 60} suspension were responsible for the observed acute toxic effects, whereas fullerenes themselves had no negative effect regardless of the preparative route on either A549 cell in vitro or D. magna in vivo. - THF suspended nC{sub 60} did not show any toxic effect to Daphnia and lung cells when side products were eliminated by additional washing steps.

  2. A survey of the effects of Raha® and Berberin medicine in toxic and sub toxic doses compare with Clonidine medicine on reducing symptoms of morphine withdrawal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad.J Khoshnood

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Opiate withdrawal refers to the wide range of symptoms that occur after stopping or dramatically reducing opiate drugs after heavy and prolonged use. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of Raha and Berberin medicine in toxic and sub toxic doses compare with Clonidine medicine on reducing symptoms of morphine withdrawal in Syrian mice.Materials and Method: 140 Syrian mice (weight range 70-90 gr were divided randomly into 2 groups; first group; n1=35(receiving drug =21, control=14 & second group; n2=105 (receiving drug=91, control=14. Animals were treated by injected increasing doses of morphine sulfate for physical dependence. Then withdrawal syndrome was induced by administration of Naloxone. In order to evaluate the effect of Raha Berberin and Clonidine on morphine withdrawal syndrome in Syrian mice and also amount of total alkaloids and Berberin value in the Raha® were measured.Result: Total of average of alkaloid and Berberin value was 120, 5.72 mg, respectively in 5 ml of the Raha®. The rate of alcohol in Raha® was shown by using the USP procedure which was 19.34 percent. Toxic doses of Raha® and Berberin were 4, 40 mg/kg, respectively. Results indicated that, Raha increases significantly the percent of occurrence of ptosis and immobility were compared with control group (distilled water receiver (p=0.016. The occurrence rate of sniffing, grooming and rearing behavior in Raha and Berberin treated groups compared with control group, within 15min period, was not found statistically significant (p=0.089.Conclusion: Based on our study both Raha® and Berberin in any dilution had no effect on reducing signs of opioid withdrawal syndrome. According to the lack of its effect in mice, further studies should be undertaken for prescription of this drug in human

  3. Sediment quality assessment and Toxicity Identification Evaluation studies in Lavaca Bay, Texas -- An estuarine Superfund site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, R.S.; Biedenbach, J. [National Biological Service, Corpus Christi, TX (United States). Texas Gulf Coast Field Station; Hooten, R.; May, L.; Teas, T. [Texas A and M Univ., Corpus Christi, TX (United States). Center for Coastal Studies

    1995-12-31

    A sediment quality assessment survey was conducted in the Lavaca Bay system which has been designated a Superfund site because of elevated concentrations of mercury and other contaminants (e.g., PAHs) in the sediments. Twenty-four stations were sampled in the initial survey. Sediment pore water was extracted pneumatically and the toxicity of the pore water determined using the sea urchin fertilization and embryological development assays. Based on the results of the toxicity tests, aliquots of the toxic sediments were analyzed for metals, PAHs, and pesticides. Based on these results, several of the most toxic sites were resampled and a preliminary Toxicity Identification Evaluation (TIE) was performed with the pore water using the sea urchin fertilization test. Preliminary results indicated that the toxic components were removed by adsorption on a C-18 column but were not affected by EDTA additions and, therefore, the primary toxicants are hydrophobic in nature.

  4. Detection limits of quantitative and digital PCR assays and their influence in presence-absence surveys of environmental DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Margaret; Dorazio, Robert M.; Butterfield, John S.; Meigs-Friend, Gaia; Nico, Leo; Ferrante, Jason A.

    2017-01-01

    A set of universal guidelines is needed to determine the limit of detection (LOD) in PCR-based analyses of low concentration DNA. In particular, environmental DNA (eDNA) studies require sensitive and reliable methods to detect rare and cryptic species through shed genetic material in environmental samples. Current strategies for assessing detection limits of eDNA are either too stringent or subjective, possibly resulting in biased estimates of species’ presence. Here, a conservative LOD analysis grounded in analytical chemistry is proposed to correct for overestimated DNA concentrations predominantly caused by the concentration plateau, a nonlinear relationship between expected and measured DNA concentrations. We have used statistical criteria to establish formal mathematical models for both quantitative and droplet digital PCR. To assess the method, a new Grass Carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) TaqMan assay was developed and tested on both PCR platforms using eDNA in water samples. The LOD adjustment reduced Grass Carp occupancy and detection estimates while increasing uncertainty – indicating that caution needs to be applied to eDNA data without LOD correction. Compared to quantitative PCR, digital PCR had higher occurrence estimates due to increased sensitivity and dilution of inhibitors at low concentrations. Without accurate LOD correction, species occurrence and detection probabilities based on eDNA estimates are prone to a source of bias that cannot be reduced by an increase in sample size or PCR replicates. Other applications also could benefit from a standardized LOD such as GMO food analysis, and forensic and clinical diagnostics.

  5. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the epidemiological survey of Dermatophilus congolensis infection in camels (Camelus dromedarius).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitao, C G

    1993-06-01

    The breeding of camels (Camelus dromedarius) is especially important in arid and semi-arid areas of Africa, where drought and famine frequently occur. A number of diseases which impair camel production have recently been described, including dermatophilosis (caused by Dermatophilus congolensis). However, it is not possible to determine the prevalence of infection from clinical cases alone. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay has therefore been developed to determine the epidemiological prevalence of D. congolensis infection in sera of camels. Whole-cell antigen was used on microplates and the test serum was added. Horseradish peroxidase-conjugated sheep antibodies against heavy and light chains of camel immunoglobulin (Ig)G were then added, followed by substrate. The test was used to trace the antibody profile of twelve experimentally-infected camels. Peak antibody levels in serum occurred within twenty-one days following infection. It is planned to use this test to determine the epidemiological prevalence of D. congolensis infection in camels reared in a pastoral area of Kenya.

  6. Screening survey of deoxynivalenol in beer from the European market by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulou-Bouraoui, A; Vrabcheva, T; Valzacchi, S; Stroka, J; Anklam, E

    2004-06-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) was analysed in 313 beer samples collected from the European retail market using a commercially available immunoassay kit (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, ELISA). The incidence rate was about 87%, while most samples (73%) had contamination levels lower than 20 ng m(-1). The contamination ranged between 4.0 and 56.7 ng ml(-1), with an average of 13.5 ng ml(-1). A statistically significant correlation between alcohol levels and DON contamination was found, as well as a significant difference between bottom, top and spontaneous fermenting beers. Twenty-seven beer samples were compared using a second ELISA kit and a good correlation was obtained between the two kits (r = 0.93). Although when compared with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry the ELISA tended to overestimate the results, a good correlation (r=0.94) between the two methods was observed. Monitoring of DON in beer is important considering that DON production is dependent on the weather and that it can contribute significantly to the tolerable daily intake of DON, especially for frequent beer consumers.

  7. The diagnostic performance of a single GeneXpert MTB/RIF assay in an intensified tuberculosis case finding survey among HIV-infected prisoners in Malaysia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haider Abdulrazzaq Abed Al-Darraji

    Full Text Available Delays in tuberculosis (TB diagnosis, particularly in prisons, is associated with detrimental outcomes. The new GeneXpert MTB/RIF assay (Xpert offers accurate and rapid diagnosis of active TB, but its performance in improving case detection in high-transmission congregate settings has yet to be evaluated. We assessed the diagnostic accuracy of a single Xpert assay in an intensified case finding survey among HIV-infected prisoners in Malaysia.HIV-infected prisoners at a single site provided two early-morning sputum specimens to be examined using fluorescence smear microscopy, BACTEC MGIT 960 liquid culture and a single Xpert. The sensitivity, specificity, negative and positive predictive values of Xpert were calculated relative to gold-standard results using MGIT 960 liquid culture. Relevant clinical and demographic data were used to examine correlates of active TB disease.The majority of enrolled subjects with complete data (N=125 were men (90.4%, age <40 years (61.6% and had injected drugs (75.2%. Median CD4 lymphocyte count was 337 cells/µL (IQR 149-492; only 19 (15.2% were receiving antiretroviral therapy. Of 15 culture-positive TB cases, single Xpert assay accurately detected only eight previously undiagnosed TB cases, resulting in a sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of 53.3% (95% CI 30.12-75.2%, 100% (95% CI 96.6-100%, 100% (95% CI 67.56-100% and 94.0% (95% CI 88.2-97.1%, respectively. Only 1 of 15 (6.7% active TB cases was smear-positive. The prevalence (12% of undiagnosed active pulmonary TB (15 of 125 prisoners was high and associated with longer duration of drug use (AOR 1.14, 95% CI 1.03-1.26, for each year of drug use.Single Xpert assay improved TB case detection and outperformed AFB smear microscopy, but yielded low screening sensitivity. Further examination of the impact of HIV infection on the diagnostic performance of the new assay alongside other screening methods in correctional

  8. Detection limits of quantitative and digital PCR assays and their influence in presence-absence surveys of environmental DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Margaret E; Dorazio, Robert M; Butterfield, John S S; Meigs-Friend, Gaia; Nico, Leo G; Ferrante, Jason A

    2017-03-01

    A set of universal guidelines is needed to determine the limit of detection (LOD) in PCR-based analyses of low-concentration DNA. In particular, environmental DNA (eDNA) studies require sensitive and reliable methods to detect rare and cryptic species through shed genetic material in environmental samples. Current strategies for assessing detection limits of eDNA are either too stringent or subjective, possibly resulting in biased estimates of species' presence. Here, a conservative LOD analysis grounded in analytical chemistry is proposed to correct for overestimated DNA concentrations predominantly caused by the concentration plateau, a nonlinear relationship between expected and measured DNA concentrations. We have used statistical criteria to establish formal mathematical models for both quantitative and droplet digital PCR. To assess the method, a new Grass Carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) TaqMan assay was developed and tested on both PCR platforms using eDNA in water samples. The LOD adjustment reduced Grass Carp occupancy and detection estimates while increasing uncertainty-indicating that caution needs to be applied to eDNA data without LOD correction. Compared to quantitative PCR, digital PCR had higher occurrence estimates due to increased sensitivity and dilution of inhibitors at low concentrations. Without accurate LOD correction, species occurrence and detection probabilities based on eDNA estimates are prone to a source of bias that cannot be reduced by an increase in sample size or PCR replicates. Other applications also could benefit from a standardized LOD such as GMO food analysis and forensic and clinical diagnostics. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  9. Marine chemistry, fish / shell-fish surveys, benthic organisms, and marine toxic substances and pollutants data from current meter and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico from 1993-01-26 to 1994-06-13 (NODC Accession 9500088)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine chemistry, fish / shell-fish surveys, benthic organisms, and marine toxic substances and pollutants data were collected using current meter and other...

  10. Gas Chromatography, GC/Mass Analysis and Bioactivity of Essential Oil from Aerial Parts of Ferulago trifida: Antimicrobial, Antioxidant, AChE Inhibitory, General Toxicity, MTT assay and Larvicidal Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Tavakoli

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: We aimed to investigate different biological properties of aerial parts essential oil of Ferulago trifida Boiss and larvicidal activity of its volatile oils from all parts of plant.Methods: Essential oil was prepared by steam distillation and analyzed by Gas chromatography and GC/Mass. Anti­oxidant, antimicrobial, cytotoxic effects and AChE inhibitory of the oil were investigated using DPPH, disk diffusion method, MTT assay and Ellman methods. Larvicidal activity of F. trifida essential oil against malaria vector Anoph­eles stephensi was carried out according to the method described by WHO.Results: In GC and GC/MS analysis, 58 compounds were identified in the aerial parts essential oil, of which E-ver­benol (9.66%, isobutyl acetate (25.73% and E-β-caryophyllene (8.68% were main compounds. The oil showed (IC50= 111.2µg/ml in DPPH and IC50= 21.5 mg/ml in the investigation of AChE inhibitory. Furthermore, the oil demonstrated toxicity with (LD50= 1.1µg/ml in brine shrimp lethality test and with (IC50= 22.0, 25.0 and 42.55 µg/ml on three cancerous cell lines (MCF-7, A-549 and HT-29 respectively. LC50 of stem, root, aerial parts, fruits, and flowers essential oils against larvae of An. stephensi were equal with 10.46, 22.27, 20.50, 31.93 and 79.87ppm respectively. In antimicrobial activities, essential oil was effective on all specimens except Escherichia coli, Asper­gillus niger and Candida albicans.Conclusion: The essential oil showed moderate antioxidant activity, strong antimicrobial properties and good toxic effect in brine shrimp test and MTT assay on three cancerous cell lines.

  11. Gas Chromatography, GC/Mass Analysis and Bioactivity of Essential Oil from Aerial Parts of Ferulago trifida: Antimicrobial, Antioxidant, AChE Inhibitory, General Toxicity, MTT Assay and Larvicidal Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Saeed; Vatandoost, Hassan; Zeidabadinezhad, Reza; Hajiaghaee, Reza; Hadjiakhoondi, Abbas; Abai, Mohammad Reza; Yassa, Narguess

    2017-09-01

    We aimed to investigate different biological properties of aerial parts essential oil of Ferulago trifida Boiss and larvicidal activity of its volatile oils from all parts of plant. Essential oil was prepared by steam distillation and analyzed by Gas chromatography and GC/Mass. Antioxidant, antimicrobial, cytotoxic effects and AChE inhibitory of the oil were investigated using DPPH, disk diffusion method, MTT assay and Ellman methods. Larvicidal activity of F. trifida essential oil against malaria vector Anopheles stephensi was carried out according to the method described by WHO. In GC and GC/MS analysis, 58 compounds were identified in the aerial parts essential oil, of which E-verbenol (9.66%), isobutyl acetate (25.73%) and E-β-caryophyllene (8.68%) were main compounds. The oil showed (IC50= 111.2μg/ml) in DPPH and IC50= 21.5 mg/ml in the investigation of AChE inhibitory. Furthermore, the oil demonstrated toxicity with (LD50= 1.1μg/ml) in brine shrimp lethality test and with (IC50= 22.0, 25.0 and 42.55 μg/ml) on three cancerous cell lines (MCF-7, A-549 and HT-29) respectively. LC50 of stem, root, aerial parts, fruits, and flowers essential oils against larvae of An. stephensi were equal with 10.46, 22.27, 20.50, 31.93 and 79.87ppm respectively. In antimicrobial activities, essential oil was effective on all specimens except Escherichia coli, Aspergillus niger and Candida albicans. The essential oil showed moderate antioxidant activity, strong antimicrobial properties and good toxic effect in brine shrimp test and MTT assay on three cancerous cell lines.

  12. Toxicity of Exhaust Gases and Particles from IC-Engines -- International Activities Survey (EngToxIn)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czerwinski, J. [University for Applied Sciences, Biel-Bienne (Switzerland)

    2011-09-15

    Exhaust gases from engines, as well as from other combustion -- and industrial processes contain different gaseous, semi volatile and solid compounds which are toxic. Some of these compounds are not regarded by the respective legislations; some new substances may appear, due to the progressing technical developments and new systems of exhaust gas aftertreatment. The toxical effects of exhaust gases as whole aerosols (i.e. all gaseous components together with particle matter and nanoparticles) can be investigated in a global way, by exposing the living cells, or cell cultures to the aerosol, which means a simultaneous superposition of all toxic effects from all active components. On several places researchers showed, that this method offers more objective results of validation of toxicity, than other methods used up to date. It also enables a relatively quick insight in the toxic effects with consideration of all superimposed influences of the aerosol. This new methodology can be applied for all kinds of emission sources. It bears potentials of giving new contributions to the present state of knowledge in this domain and can in some cases lead to a change of paradigma. The present report gives short information about the activities concerning the research on toxicity of exhaust gases from IC-engines in different countries. It also gives some ideas about research of information sources. It can be stated that there are worldwide a lot of activities concerning health effects. They have different objectives, different approaches and methodologies and rarely the results can be directly compared to each other. Nevertheless there also are some common lines and with appropriate efforts there are possible ways to establish the harmonised biological test procedures.

  13. Development of an in vitro model assay system for the evaluation of the effects of toxic chemicals on human airways. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, J.L.; Filbert, M.G.

    1994-03-01

    The ability of the anticholinesterase agent soman to contract human bronchi was examined. Soman (1-2 uM) had variable effects on human bronchi that had not been stimulated with an electric field stimulator (EFS). In bronchi continuously stimulated by EFS (0.5 Hz, 1 ms, 12 V), soman produced contractions in all tissues examined (12 preparations from 9 humans). In tissues stimulated by EFS, the beta-adrenoreceptor agonist isoproterenol produced relaxations that were greater in magnitude than the contractions produced by soman. The duration of the isoproterenol induced relaxations was variable. Of 12 preparations studied, 3 showed no reversal of the relaxation within 120 min, 6 showed a slow reversal with a reversal time of 106 + or - 6 min and 3 showed rapid reversal with a 50% reversal time of 14 min. In the latter group the duration of the relaxation produced by isoproterenol was doubled (28 + or - 2 min) by the M2 muscarinic receptor antagonist AFDX 116 (10 uM). These results show that the isolated human bronchus is a useful model for studying the effects of toxic chemical agents such as soman on the airways. The data obtained with isoproterenol suggest that beta-2 agonists may be useful adjuncts for treating the effects of anticholinesterase agents.

  14. Microbial reporter gene assay as a diagnostic and early warning tool for the detection and characterization of toxic pollution in surface waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hug, Christine; Zhang, Xiaowei; Guan, Miao; Krauss, Martin; Bloch, Robert; Schulze, Tobias; Reinecke, Tim; Hollert, Henner; Brack, Werner

    2015-11-01

    Surface water samples constantly receive a vast mixture of micropollutants mainly originating from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). High-throughput live cell arrays provide a promising method for the characterization of the effects of chemicals and the associated molecular mechanisms. In the present study, this test system was evaluated for the first time for the characterization of a set of typical surface water extracts receiving effluent from WWTPs. The extracts containing complex mixtures of micropollutants were analyzed for the expression of 90 stress responsive genes in the Escherichia coli reporter gene assay. The most affected pathways and the genes most sensitive to surface water samples suggested prominent stress-responsive pathways for wastewater-impacted surface water, such as oxidative stress, DNA damage, and drug resistance. Samples strongly affecting particular pathways were identified by statistical analysis of gene expression. Transcription data were correlated with contamination data from chemical screening and percentages of wastewater in the samples. Samples with particular effects and outstanding chemical composition were analyzed. For these samples, hypotheses on the alteration of the transcription of genes involved in drug resistance and DNA repair attributable to the presence of pharmaceuticals were drawn. © 2015 SETAC.

  15. Relative embryotoxic potency of p-substituted phenols in the embryonic stem cell test (EST) and comparison to their toxic potency in vivo and in the whole embryo culture (WEC) assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strikwold, Marije; Woutersen, Ruud A; Spenkelink, Bert; Punt, Ans; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M

    2012-09-03

    The applicability of the embryonic stem cell test (EST) as an alternative for in vivo embryotoxicity testing was evaluated for a series of five p-substituted phenols. To this purpose, the potency ranking for this class of compounds derived from the inhibition of cardiomyocyte differentiation in the EST was compared to in vivo embryotoxic potency data obtained from literature and to the potency ranking defined in the in vitro whole embryo culture (WEC) assay. From the results obtained it appears that the EST was able to identify the embryotoxic potential for p-substituted phenols, providing an identical potency ranking compared to the WEC assay. However, the EST was not able to predict an accurate ranking for the phenols compared to their potency observed in vivo. Only phenol, the least potent compound within this series, was correctly ranked. Furthermore, p-mercaptophenol was correctly identified as a relative potent congener of the phenols tested, but its ranking was distorted by p-heptyloxyphenol, of which the toxicity was overestimated in the EST. It is concluded that when attempting to explain the observed disparity in potency rankings between in vitro and in vivo embryotoxicity, the in vitro models should be combined with a kinetic model describing in vivo absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion processes of the compounds. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Arsenic (III, V), indium (III), and gallium (III) toxicity to zebrafish embryos using a high-throughput multi-endpoint in vivo developmental and behavioral assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares, Christopher I; Field, Jim A; Simonich, Michael; Tanguay, Robert L; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes

    2016-04-01

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs), indium gallium arsenide (InGaAs) and other III/V materials are finding increasing application in microelectronic components. The rising demand for III/V-based products is leading to increasing generation of effluents containing ionic species of gallium, indium, and arsenic. The ecotoxicological hazard potential of these streams is unknown. While the toxicology of arsenic is comprehensive, much less is known about the effects of In(III) and Ga(III). The embryonic zebrafish was evaluated for mortality, developmental abnormalities, and photomotor response (PMR) behavior changes associated with exposure to As(III), As(V), Ga(III), and In(III). The As(III) lowest observable effect level (LOEL) for mortality was 500 μM at 24 and 120 h post fertilization (hpf). As(V) exposure was associated with significant mortality at 63 μM. The Ga(III)-citrate LOEL was 113 μM at 24 and 120 hpf. There was no association of significant mortality over the tested range of In(III)-citrate (56-900 μM) or sodium citrate (213-3400 μM) exposures. Only As(V) resulted in significant developmental abnormalities with LOEL of 500 μM. Removal of the chorion prior to As(III) and As(V) exposure was associated with increased incidence of mortality and developmental abnormality suggesting that the chorion may normally attenuate mass uptake of these metals by the embryo. Finally, As(III), As(V), and In(III) caused PMR hypoactivity (49-69% of control PMR) at 900-1000 μM. Overall, our results represent the first characterization of multidimensional toxicity effects of III/V ions in zebrafish embryos helping to fill a significant knowledge gap, particularly in Ga(III) and In(III) toxicology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Validation of a novel real-time PCR assay for detection of HLA-B*15:02 allele for prevention of carbamazepine - Induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome/Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis in individuals of Asian ancestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Dinh Van; Vidal, Christopher; Chu, Hieu Chi; Do, Nga Thi Quynh; Tran, Tu Thi Linh; Le, Huong Thi Minh; Fulton, Richard B; Li, Jamma; Fernando, Suran L

    2016-12-01

    Screening for the HLA-B*15:02 allele has been recommended to prevent carbamazepine (CBZ) - induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis (TEN) in individuals with Asian ancestry. We aimed, therefore, to develop and validate a robust and inexpensive method for detection of the HLA-B*15:02 allele. Real-time PCR using TaqMan® probes followed by SYBR® Green was used to detect the HLA-B*15:02 allele prior to treatment with CBZ therapy. A total of 121 samples were tested. The assay has a sensitivity of 100% (95% CI: 76.84-100.0%), a specificity of 100% (95% CI: 96.61-100%), a positive predictive value of 100% (95% CI: 76.84-100%) and a negative predictive value of 100.0% (95% CI: 96.61-100.0%), respectively. There was 100% agreement between our results and genotyping using Luminex SSO/SBT/SSP. The lowest limit of detection of the TaqMan® probe is 0.05ng/μl and the SYBR® Green is 0.5ng/μl of DNA. The unit cost of using the TaqMan® probe followed by SYBR® Green is only $4.7 USD. We developed a novel assay for the detection of the HLA-B*15:02 allele, which is robust, inexpensive and suitable for screening individuals of Asian ancestry in the prevention of CBZ-induced SJS/TEN. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Survey of ABC transporter and metallothionein genes expressions in tall fescue inoculated with Funneliformis intraradices under Nickel toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massomeh Rafiei-Demneh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In plants, there are complex network of transport, chelation, and sequestration processes that functions in maintaining concentrations of essential metal ions in different cellular compartments, thus minimizing the damage caused by entry of non-essential metal ions into the cytosol. In the presence of toxic ones, arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM fungi are able to alleviate metal toxicity in the plant. In this study the effect of an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi Funneliformis intraradices on growth, Nickel tolerance, and ABC transporter and metallothionein expression in leaves and roots of tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea plants cultivated in Ni polluted soil were evaluated. The fungi infected (M+ and uninfected (M- fescue plants were cultivated in soil under different Ni concentrations (0, 30, 90 and 180 ppm for 3 months. Results demonstrated the positive effect of fungi colonization on the increase in growth and reduction in Ni uptake (90 and 180 ppm and Ni translocation from roots to shoot of tall fescue under Ni stress. The results also demonstrated that the level of ABC transporterand metallothionein transcripts accumulation in roots was considerably higher for both M- and M+ plants compared to the control. Also, M+ plants showed less ABC and MET expression compared to the M- plants. These results demonstrated the importance of mycorrhizal colonization of F. intraradices in reduction of Ni transport from root to shoot of tall fescue which alleviates Ni-induced stress.

  19. Enzyme assays

    OpenAIRE

    Bisswanger, Hans

    2014-01-01

    The essential requirements for enzyme assays are described and frequently occurring errors and pitfalls as well as their avoidance are discussed. The main factors, which must be considered for assaying enzymes, are temperature, pH, ionic strength and the proper concentrations of the essential components like substrates and enzymes. Standardization of these parameters would be desirable, but the diversity of the features of different enzymes prevents unification of assay conditions. Neverthele...

  20. A survey of arsenic, manganese, boron, thorium, and other toxic metals in the groundwater of a West Bengal, India neighbourhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacquart, Thomas; Bradshaw, Kelly; Frisbie, Seth; Mitchell, Erika; Springston, George; Defelice, Jeffrey; Dustin, Hannah; Sarkar, Bibudhendra

    2012-07-01

    Around 150 million people are at risk from arsenic-contaminated groundwater in India and Bangladesh. Multiple metal analysis in Bangladesh has found other toxic elements above the World Health Organization (WHO) health-based drinking water guidelines which significantly increases the number of people at risk due to drinking groundwater. In this study, drinking water samples from the Bongaon area (North 24 Parganas district, West Bengal, India) were analyzed for multiple metal contamination in order to evaluate groundwater quality on the neighbourhood scale. Each sample was analyzed for arsenic (As), boron (B), barium (Ba), chromium (Cr), manganese (Mn), molybdenum (Mo), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), and uranium (U). Arsenic was found above the WHO health-based drinking water guideline in 50% of these tubewells. Mn and B were found at significant concentrations in 19% and 6% of these tubewells, respectively. The maps of As, Mn, and B concentrations suggest that approximately 75% of this area has no safe tubewells. The concentrations of As, Mn, B, and many other toxic elements are independent of each other. The concentrations of Pb and U were not found above WHO health-based drinking water guidelines but they were statistically related to each other (p-value = 0.001). An analysis of selected isotopes in the Uranium, Actinium, and Thorium Radioactive Decay Series revealed the presence of thorium (Th) in 31% of these tubewells. This discovery of Th, which does not have a WHO health-based drinking water guideline, is a potential public health challenge. In sum, the widespread presence and independent distribution of other metals besides As must be taken into consideration for drinking water remediation strategies involving well switching or home-scale water treatment.

  1. A Questionnaire Study to Assess the Value of the Vulnerable Elders Survey, G8, and Predictors of Toxicity as Screening Tools for Frailty and Toxicity in Geriatric Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hentschel, Leopold; Rentsch, Anke; Lenz, Felicitas; Hornemann, Beate; Schmitt, Jochen; Baumann, Michael; Ehninger, Gerhard; Schuler, Markus

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify an appropriate screening instrument for the identification of frail elderly patients in a tertiary cancer center. In order to improve cancer care for older patients, the use of a geriatric assessment (GA) has been proposed to identify frail patients or those who are at a higher risk for chemotherapy-related toxicities. In busy clinical routine, an appropriate screening instrument could be used to spare time- and resource-consuming application of GA. We administered the Vulnerable Elders Survey (VES-13), G8 questionnaire, and Predictors of Toxicity (POT) as well as a GA at the first visit of 84 consecutive patients at a single Comprehensive Cancer Center. Analysis for patients' characteristics as well as sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive value (npv) was conducted. The median age of the patients was 73 years (range 63-93 years), 61.9% were male, most (63%) suffered from gastrointestinal tumors, 39.3% had a multiple cancer diagnosis, and 53.6% had metastasis. 30 (35.7%) individuals were classified as 'frail' by the GA. Sensitivity of G8 was 38.3%, and the npv was 63.8%. Sensitivity for VES-13 was 57.1%, and npv was 76.3%. Sensitivity of POT was 72.7%, and the npv was 80.6%. For the first time, the VES-13, G8, and POT are compared in a sample of older German patients. The POT seems to be a sufficient screening tool to identify frail patients in a tertiary referral cancer center and helps to save time and resources compared with a complete GA. © 2016 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  2. Ethnobotanical survey and toxicity evaluation of medicinal plants used for fungal remedy in the Southern Highlands of Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbunde, Mourice Victor Nyangabo; Innocent, Ester; Mabiki, Faith; Andersson, Pher G.

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aim: Some of the antifungal drugs used in the current treatments regime are responding to antimicrobial resistance. In rural areas of Southern Tanzania, indigenous people use antifungal drugs alone or together with medicinal plants to curb the effects of antibiotic resistance. This study documented ethnobotanical information of medicinal plants used for managing fungal infections in the Southern Highlands of Tanzania and further assess their safety. Materials and Methods: Ethnobotanical survey was conducted in Makete and Mufindi districts between July 2014 and December 2015 using semi-structured questionnaires followed by two focus group discussions to verify respondents’ information. Cytotoxicity study was conducted on extracts of collected plants using brine shrimp lethality test and analyzed by MS Excel 2013 program. Results: During this survey about 46 plant species belonging to 28 families of angiosperms were reported to be traditionally useful in managing fungal and other health conditions. Among these, Terminalia sericea, Aloe nutii, Aloe lateritia, Zanthoxylum chalybeum, Zanthoxylum deremense, and Kigelia africana were frequently mentioned to be used for managing fungal infections. The preparation of these herbals was mostly by boiling plant parts especially the leaves and roots. Cytotoxicity study revealed that most of the plants tested were nontoxic with LC50 > 100 which implies that most compounds from these plants are safe for therapeutic use. The dichloromethane extract of Croton macrostachyus recorded the highest with LC50 value 12.94 µg/ml. The ethnobotanical survey correlated well with documented literature from elsewhere about the bioactivity of most plants. Conclusions: The ethnobotanical survey has revealed that traditional healers are rich of knowledge to build on for therapeutic studies. Most of the plants are safe for use; and thus can be considered for further studies on drug discovery. PMID:28163965

  3. Biological assays for aquatic toxicity testing

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Slabbert, JL

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available and management purposes of effluents. If receiving water is used for drinking water purposes, the Ames Salmonella mutagenicity and toad embryo teratogenicity tests should be included in the battery of tests. Some of the rapid microbiotests, the petrozoan oxygen...

  4. Correlation between non-toxic goitre and benign mastopathia. The result of a survey in 477 middle-aged women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borup Christensen, S

    1987-01-01

    A survey of thyroid and breast diseases was performed in 477 women representative of a middle-aged female population in Malmö, Sweden. Fifty-four women (11.3%) were found to have palpable goitre; 45 of these were unaware of their disorder. All goitres were considered to be benign. One woman with goitre had a mild thyrotoxicosis; the goitres in the other 53 women were atoxic. Seventy-six women (16.0%) had been subjected to surgical breast biopsy 1-25 years before the present survey (median 9 years). The histological diagnoses were: cancer 1, fibroadenoma 8, cystic disease 48, fibrosis 9, and miscellaneous 10. A correlation between atoxic goitre and histologically verified benign breast disease was found (p less than 0.05). The correlation was explained solely by an association between goitre and fibrosis of the breast (p less than 0.001). This study shows a correlation between fibrosis of the breast and atoxic goitre in middle-aged women. The correlation is considered to be a true one, and a possible explanation is briefly discussed.

  5. Cell Proliferation and Cytotoxicity Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adan, Aysun; Kiraz, Yağmur; Baran, Yusuf

    Cell viability is defined as the number of healthy cells in a sample and proliferation of cells is a vital indicator for understanding the mechanisms in action of certain genes, proteins and pathways involved cell survival or death after exposing to toxic agents. Generally, methods used to determine viability are also common for the detection of cell proliferation. Cell cytotoxicity and proliferation assays are generally used for drug screening to detect whether the test molecules have effects on cell proliferation or display direct cytotoxic effects. Regardless of the type of cell-based assay being used, it is important to know how many viable cells are remaining at the end of the experiment. There are a variety of assay methods based on various cell functions such as enzyme activity, cell membrane permeability, cell adherence, ATP production, co-enzyme production, and nucleotide uptake activity. These methods could be basically classified into different categories: (I) dye exclusion methods such as trypan blue dye exclusion assay, (II) methods based on metabolic activity, (III) ATP assay, (IV) sulforhodamine B assay, (V) protease viability marker assay, (VI) clonogenic cell survival assay, (VII) DNA synthesis cell proliferation assays and (V) raman micro-spectroscopy. In order to choose the optimal viability assay, the cell type, applied culture conditions, and the specific questions being asked should be considered in detail. This particular review aims to provide an overview of common cell proliferation and cytotoxicity assays together with their own advantages and disadvantages, their methodologies, comparisons and intended purposes.

  6. Assessing Nanoparticle Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Sara A.; Maurer-Jones, Melissa A.; Thompson, John W.; Lin, Yu-Shen; Haynes, Christy L.

    2012-07-01

    Nanoparticle toxicology, an emergent field, works toward establishing the hazard of nanoparticles, and therefore their potential risk, in light of the increased use and likelihood of exposure. Analytical chemists can provide an essential tool kit for the advancement of this field by exploiting expertise in sample complexity and preparation as well as method and technology development. Herein, we discuss experimental considerations for performing in vitro nanoparticle toxicity studies, with a focus on nanoparticle characterization, relevant model cell systems, and toxicity assay choices. Additionally, we present three case studies (of silver, titanium dioxide, and carbon nanotube toxicity) to highlight the important toxicological considerations of these commonly used nanoparticles.

  7. SURVEY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    SURVEY er en udbredt metode og benyttes inden for bl.a. samfundsvidenskab, humaniora, psykologi og sundhedsforskning. Også uden for forskningsverdenen er der mange organisationer som f.eks. konsulentfirmaer og offentlige institutioner samt marketingsafdelinger i private virksomheder, der arbejder...

  8. Use of a real time PCR assay for detection of the ctxA gene of Vibrio cholerae in an environmental survey of Mobile Bay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackstone, George M; Nordstrom, Jessica L; Bowen, Michael D; Meyer, Richard F; Imbro, Paula; DePaola, Angelo

    2007-02-01

    Toxigenic Vibrio cholerae, the etiological agent of cholera, is a natural inhabitant of the marine environment and causes severe diarrheal disease affecting thousands of people each year in developing countries. It is the subject of extensive testing of shrimp produced and exported from these countries. We report the development of a real time PCR (qPCR) assay to detect the gene encoding cholera toxin, ctxA, found in toxigenic V. cholerae strains. This assay was tested against DNA isolated from soil samples collected from diverse locations in the US, a panel of eukaryotic DNA from various sources, and prokaryotic DNA from closely related and unrelated bacterial sources. Only Vibrio strains known to contain ctxA generated a fluorescent signal with the 5' nuclease probe targeting the ctxA gene, thus confirming the specificity of the assay. In addition, the assay was quantitative in pure culture across a six-log dynamic range down to <10 CFU per reaction. To test the robustness of this assay, oysters, aquatic sediments, and seawaters from Mobile Bay, AL, were analyzed by qPCR and traditional culture methods. The assay was applied to overnight alkaline peptone water enrichments of these matrices after boiling the enrichments for 10 min. Toxigenic V. cholerae strains were not detected by either qPCR or conventional methods in the 16 environmental samples examined. A novel exogenous internal amplification control developed by us to prevent false negatives identified the samples that were inhibitory to the PCR. This assay, with the incorporated internal control, provides a highly specific, sensitive, and rapid detection method for the detection of toxigenic strains of V. cholerae.

  9. Toxic Metal Concentrations in Cigarettes Obtained from U.S. Smokers in 2009: Results from the International Tobacco Control (ITC United States Survey Cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalie V. Caruso

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Smoking-related diseases can be attributed to the inhalation of many different toxins, including heavy metals, which have a host of detrimental health effects. The current study reports the levels of arsenic (As, cadmium (Cd, chromium (Cr, nickel (Ni, and lead (Pb in cigarettes obtained from adult smokers participating in the 2009 wave of the ITC United States Survey (N = 320. The mean As, Cd, Cr, Ni, and Pb levels were 0.17, 0.86, 2.35, 2.21, and 0.44 µg/g, respectively. There were some differences in metal concentrations of cigarette brands produced by different manufacturers, suggesting differences in the source of tobaccos used by different companies. For Ni, there were significant pairwise differences between Philip Morris U.S. (PMUSA and R.J. Reynolds (RJR brands (PMUSA higher; p < 0.001, PMUSA and other manufacturer (OM brands (PMUSA higher; p < 0.001, and RJR and OM brands (RJR higher; p = 0.006. For Cr, RJR brands had higher levels than did OM brands (p = 0.02. Levels of As, Cd, and Pb did not differ significantly across manufacturer groups (p > 0.10. Because of the variety of toxic heavy metals in cigarette tobacco, and their numerous negative health effects, metal content in cigarette tobacco should be reduced.

  10. Graphistrength© C100 MultiWalled Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNT): thirteen-week inhalation toxicity study in rats with 13- and 52-week recovery periods combined with comet and micronucleus assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Régnier, Jean-François; Pothmann-Krings, Daniela; Simar, Sophie; Dony, Eva; Le Net, Jean-Loïc; Beausoleil, Julien

    2017-06-01

    Graphistrength© C100 provides superior electrical and mechanical properties for various applications and is one of the industrial MWCNT referenced in the OECD sponsorship program for the safety testing of nanomaterials. Graphistrength© C100 is formed of MWCNT (ca. 12 walls, outer mean diameter ca. 12 nm, length ca. 1 µm) agglomerated in particles with a granulometry centered on 400 µm. A general feature of MWCNT after inhalation or intratracheal exposures is the induction of an inflammatory reaction in the lungs sometimes associated with local genotoxic effects. Most of the in vitro and in vivo genotoxicity data available on Graphistrength© C100 are negative. However, a weak DNA damage activity in the in vitro and in vivo FPG-modified Comet assays and a weak clastogenic effect in the in vitro micronucleus test were reported. After investigating different parameters for the aerosol generation, male and female Wistar rats were exposed by nose-only inhalation (6h/day, 5d/week) to target concentrations of 0.05, 0.25 and 5.0 mg/m3 air of a respirable aerosol (MMAD human 8-oxoguanine DNA N-glycosylase 1 (hOGG1)-modified comet assay (OECD TG 489). Concentration-related deposition of black particles (MWCNT) was observed in lungs. At all sacrifice periods, an inflammatory lung reaction was observed in rats exposed to 5.0 mg/m3 associated with changes in the differential white blood cells counts. The lung inflammation was characterized by changes in the cytological, biochemical and cytokine parameters of the BALF, an increase of the lung weight, an interstitial inflammation mainly around the alveolar ducts at the bronchiole-alveolar junction and a cell hypertrophy/hyperplasia in the terminal and respiratory bronchioles. The slight changes in BALF parameters observed at 0.25 mg/m3 recovered after the 13-week treatment-free period and were not associated with any of the histological changes observed in lungs at 5.0 mg/m3. Signs of lung clearance of the MWCNT were observed

  11. Molecular survey of Dirofilaria immitis and Dirofilaria repens by new real-time TaqMan® PCR assay in dogs and mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) in Corsica (France).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, Djamel; Bittar, Fadi; Barré-Cardi, Hélène; Sow, Doudou; Dahmani, Mustapha; Mediannikov, Oleg; Raoult, Didier; Davoust, Bernard; Parola, Philippe

    2017-02-15

    Dirofilaria immitis and D. repens are filarioid nematodes of animals and humans, transmitted by the bite of infected mosquitoes. Domestic and wild canids are a major natural host and reservoir for these parasites. In this study, we designed a duplex real-time PCR protocol targeting the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene, detecting both D. immitis and D. repens using two primer pairs and two Dirofilaria-specific hydrolysable probes. The sensitivity and specificity of the primers and probes were tested in both experimental and naturally infected samples. The detection limits of this assay were evaluated using plasmid DNA from D. immitis and D. repens. No cross-reaction was observed when testing this system against DNA from other filarial nematodes. The detection limit of the real-time PCR system was one copy per reaction mixture containing 5μl of template DNA. Field application of the new duplex real-time assay was conducted in Corsica. The prevalence rate of D. immitis was 21.3% (20/94) in dogs. In a locality where most dogs with Dirofilaria spp. infection were found, D. immitis and D. repens were detected in 5% (20/389) and 1.5% (6/389) of the Aedes albopictus population, respectively. These results suggest that this sensitive assay is a powerful tool for monitoring dirofilariosis in endemic or high risk areas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Reporter Gene Assays in Ecotoxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elad, Tal; Belkin, Shimshon

    The need for simple and rapid means for evaluating the potential toxic effects of environmental samples has prompted the development of reporter gene assays, based on tester cells (bioreporters) genetically engineered to report on sample toxicity by producing a readily quantifiable signal. Bacteria are especially suitable to serve as bioreporters owing to their fast responses, low cost, convenient preservation, ease of handling, and amenability to genetic manipulations. Various bacterial bioreporters have been introduced for general toxicity and genotoxicity assessment, and the monitoring of endocrine disrupting and dioxin-like compounds has been mostly covered by similarly engineered eukaryotic cells. Some reporter gene assays have been validated, standardized, and accredited, and many others are under constant development. Efforts are aimed at broadening detection spectra, lowering detection thresholds, and combining toxicity identification capabilities with characterization of the toxic effects. Taking advantage of bacterial robustness, attempts are also being made to incorporate bacterial bioreporters into field instrumentation for online continuous monitoring or on-site spot checks. However, key hurdles concerning test validation, cell preservation, and regulatory issues related to the use of genetically modified organisms still remain to be overcome.

  13. Toxic Elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hajeb, Parvaneh; Shakibazadeh, Shahram; Sloth, Jens Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    Food is considered the main source of toxic element (arsenic, cadmium, lead, and mercury) exposure to humans, and they can cause major public health effects. In this chapter, we discuss the most important sources for toxic element in food and the foodstuffs which are significant contributors...... to human exposure. The occurrence of each element in food classes from different regions is presented. Some of the current toxicological risk assessments on toxic elements, the human health effect of each toxic element, and their contents in the food legislations are presented. An overview of analytical...... techniques and challenges for determination of toxic elements in food is also given....

  14. Evaluation of circulating cathodic antigen (CCA) urine-cassette assay as a survey tool for Schistosoma mansoni in different transmission settings within Bugiri District, Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adriko, M; Standley, C J; Tinkitina, B; Tukahebwa, E M; Fenwick, A; Fleming, F M; Sousa-Figueiredo, J C; Stothard, J R; Kabatereine, N B

    2014-08-01

    Diagnosis of schistosomiasis at the point-of-care (POC) is a growing topic in neglected tropical disease research. There is a need for diagnostic tests which are affordable, sensitive, specific, user-friendly, rapid, equipment-free and delivered to those who need it, and POC is an important tool for disease mapping and guiding mass deworming. The aim of present study was to evaluate the relative diagnostic performance of two urine-circulating cathodic antigen (CCA) cassette assays, one commercially available and the other in experimental production, against results obtained using the standard Kato-Katz faecal smear method (six thick smears from three consecutive days), as a 'gold-standard', for Schistosoma mansoni infection in different transmission settings in Uganda. Our study was conducted among 500 school children randomly selected across 5 schools within Bugiri district, adjacent to Lake Victoria in Uganda. Considering results from the 469 pupils who provided three stool samples for the six Kato-Katz smears, 293 (76%) children had no infection, 109 (23%) were in the light intensity category, while 42 (9%) and 25 (5%) were in the moderate and heavy intensity categories respectively. Following performance analysis of CCA tests in terms of sensitivity, specificity, negative and positive predictive values, overall performance of the commercially available CCA test was more informative than single Kato-Katz faecal smear microscopy, the current operational field standard for disease mapping. The current CCA assay is therefore a satisfactory method for surveillance of S. mansoni in an area where disease endemicity is declining due to control interventions. With the recent resolution on schistosomiasis elimination by the 65th World Health Assembly, the urine POC CCA test is an attractive tool to augment and perhaps replace the Kato-Katz sampling within ongoing control programmes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Nicotine and Toxicant Exposure Among US Smokeless Tobacco Users: Results from 1999-2012 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostron, Brian L.; Chang, Cindy M.; van Bemmel, Dana M.; Xia, Yang; Blount, Benjamin C.

    2016-01-01

    Background It has been suggested that smokeless tobacco users have high levels of exposure to nicotine and some toxic substances as measured by biomarker concentrations, but studies with nationally representative data have been limited. Methods We analyzed biomarkers of tobacco exposure for 23,684 adult participants from the National Health and Nutrition and Examination Survey (NHANES) from 1999-2012. The biomarkers analyzed were serum cotinine, urinary 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol (NNAL), blood lead, blood cadmium, blood mercury, urinary arsenic, and urinary N-acetyl-S-(2-cyanoethyl)-L-cysteine (CYMA). We calculated geometric mean concentrations for each biomarker by tobacco use category (exclusive smokeless tobacco use, exclusive cigarette smoking, dual cigarette and smokeless tobacco use, and non-cigarette and smokeless tobacco use) and geometric mean ratios adjusting for demographic factors. Results Exclusive smokeless tobacco users had higher geometric mean concentrations of cotinine (178.9 ng/mL, 95% CI = 145.5, 220.0) and NNAL (583.0 pg/mg creatinine, 95% CI = 445.2, 763.5) than exclusive cigarette smokers, (130.6 ng/mL, 95% CI = 122.3, 139.6 and 217.6 pg/mg creatinine, 95% CI = 193.0, 245.2, respectively). Smokeless tobacco users also had higher concentrations of blood lead compared with non-tobacco users (adjusted geometric mean ratio = 1.30, 95% CI = 1.21, 1.38). Differences in concentrations of cadmium, mercury, and CYMA between smokeless tobacco users and non-tobacco users were not observed. Based on limited sample sizes, NNAL concentrations for smokeless tobacco users appear to have declined from 2007-2008 (geometric mean = 1013.7 pg/mg creatinine, 95% CI = 738.9, 1390.8) to 2011-2012 (geometric mean = 325.7 pg/mg creatinine, 95% CI = 159.6, 664.9). Conclusions Smokeless tobacco users have higher observed levels of exposure to nicotine and carcinogenic tobacco-specific nitrosamines, as measured by cotinine and NNAL biomarker

  16. Antimony toxicity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sundar, Shyam; Chakravarty, Jaya

    2010-01-01

    Antimony toxicity occurs either due to occupational exposure or during therapy. Occupational exposure may cause respiratory irritation, pneumoconiosis, antimony spots on the skin and gastrointestinal symptoms...

  17. Toxicity of Exhaust Gases and Particles from IC-Engines – International Activities Survey (EngToxIn). 2nd Information Report for IEA Implementing Agreement AMF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czerwinski, J. [University for Applied Sciences, Biel-Bienne (Switzerland)

    2012-10-15

    Exhaust gases from engines, as well as from other technical combustion processes contain gaseous, semi volatile and solid compounds which are toxic. Some of these compounds are not yet limited by the respective legislations; but may need to be based on ongoing health research findings and some new substances did appear recently, due to the progressing technical developments providing new systems of exhaust gas aftertreatment. A new approach described here is that the toxic effects of exhaust gases as an aerosol containing gaseous components as well as particulate matter and nanoparticles can be investigated in a global way, by exposing the living cells, or cell cultures to the aerosol, which means a simultaneous superposition of all toxic effects from all active components. At several research sites it has been showed, that this method offers more objective results of validation of toxicity, than other methods used until now. It also enables a relatively quick insight in the toxic effects with consideration of all superimposed influences of the aerosol. This new methodology can be applied for all kinds of emission sources. It also bears the potential of giving new contributions to the present state of knowledge in this domain and can in some cases lead to a change of paradigma. The present report gives information about activities concerning the research on toxicity of exhaust gases from IC-engines in different countries. It also gives some ideas about the available information sources. The general situation and the basic information have not changed much so the chapters 1 and 2 are repeated from the last year report, [1] with only a few modifications. We observe fast increasing research activities concerning health effects worldwide. They have different objectives, different approaches and methodologies and sometimes the results can be directly compared to each other. There are mostly common lines and with appropriate efforts there might be possible ways to

  18. The prevalence of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection based on an interferon-γ release assay: a cross-sectional survey among urban adults in Mwanza, Tanzania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas V Jensen

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: One third of the world's population is estimated to be latently infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (LTBI. Surveys of LTBI are rarely performed in resource poor TB high endemic countries like Tanzania although low-income countries harbor the largest burden of the worlds LTBI. The primary objective was to estimate the prevalence of LTBI in household contacts of pulmonary TB cases and a group of apparently healthy neighborhood controls in an urban setting of such a country. Secondly we assessed potential impact of LTBI on inflammation by quantitating circulating levels of an acute phase reactant: alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (AGP in neighborhood controls. METHODS: The study was nested within the framework of two nutrition studies among TB patients in Mwanza, Tanzania. Household contacts- and neighborhood controls were invited to participate. The study involved a questionnaire, BMI determination and blood samples to measure AGP, HIV testing and a Quantiferon Gold In tube (QFN-IT test to detect signs of LTBI. RESULTS: 245 household contacts and 192 neighborhood controls had available QFN-IT data. Among household contacts, the proportion of QFT-IT positive was 59% compared to 41% in the neighborhood controls (p = 0.001. In a linear regression model adjusted for sex, age, CD4 and HIV, a QFT-IT positive test was associated with a 10% higher level of alpha-1-acid glycoprotein(AGP (10(B 1.10, 95% CI 1.01; 1.20, p = 0.03, compared to individuals with a QFT-IT negative test. CONCLUSION: LTBI is highly prevalent among apparently healthy urban Tanzanians even without known exposure to TB in the household. LTBI was found to be associated with elevated levels of AGP. The implications of this observation merit further studies.

  19. Canine angiostrongylosis in Sweden: a nationwide seroepidemiological survey by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and a summary of five-year diagnostic activity (2011-2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandi, Giulio; Lind, Eva Osterman; Schaper, Roland; Ågren, Erik; Schnyder, Manuela

    2017-12-19

    For the first time in Sweden, Angiostrongylus vasorum was detected on the island of Sydkoster in foxes and dogs in 2003. After sporadic detection of the parasite in foxes in southern Sweden, the first positive canine faecal sample on the mainland was found in 2011. Since then a total of 2882 faecal samples have been analysed with the Baermann test at the National Veterinary Institute (SVA) during the years 2011-2015; 20 of them being positive. Contemporaneously, of over 525 fox necropsies, only three were found to be infected. To gather a more accurate knowledge of A. vasorum occurrence in Sweden, a large scale seroepidemiological survey was performed and totally 3885 serum samples from dogs were tested for both the presence of circulating antigens and of specific antibodies to A. vasorum. In total, 0.10% (n = 4, 95% Confidence Intervals, CI 0.03-0.26%) of the dogs were positive for both antigen and antibodies, whereas 0.51% (n = 20, CI 0.31-0.79%) of the tested dogs were only antigen positive and 0.88% (n = 34, CI 0.61-1.22%) only positive for specific antibodies. Seropositive animals, as well as the majority of A. vasorum-positive faecal samples tested during the same period, were spread over central and southern Sweden. Annual prevalence of positive faecal dog samples and of necropsied A. vasorum positive foxes (coming from southern Sweden) varied from 0.3 to 0.9% (overall: 0.7%, CI 0.4-1.1%) and 0.0 to 1.4% (overall: 0.3%, CI 0.1-0.9%), respectively. The findings confirmed that A. vasorum has become established in various geographical areas of central and southern Sweden. Veterinarians and dog owners should be aware of the potential risks of infection in large areas of the country, since canine angiostrongylosis may be a fatal disease if left untreated.

  20. Testing strategies for embryo-fetal toxicity of human pharmaceuticals. Animal models vs. in vitro approaches: a workshop report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Laan, Jan Willem; Chapin, Robert E; Haenen, Bert; Jacobs, Abigail C; Piersma, Aldert

    2012-06-01

    Reproductive toxicity testing is characterized by high animal use. For registration of pharmaceutical compounds, developmental toxicity studies are usually conducted in both rat and rabbits. Efforts have been underway for a long time to design alternatives to animal use. Implementation has lagged, partly because of uncertainties about the applicability domain of the alternatives. The reproductive cycle is complex and not all mechanisms of development can be mimicked in vitro. Therefore, efforts are underway to characterize the available alternative tests with regard to the mechanism of action they include. One alternative test is the mouse embryonic stem cell test (EST), which has been studied since the late 1990s. It is a genuine 3R "alternative" assay as it is essentially animal-free. A meeting was held to review the state-of-the-art of various in vitro models for prediction of developmental toxicity. Although the predictivity of individual assays is improving, a battery of several assays is likely to have even higher predictivity, which is necessary for regulatory acceptance. The workshop concluded that an important first step is a thorough survey of the existing rat and rabbit studies, to fully characterize the frequency of responses and the types of effects seen. At the same time, it is important to continue the optimization of in vitro assays. As more experience accumulates, the optimal conditions, assay structure, and applicability of the alternative assays are expected to emerge. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The future of toxicity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Melvin E; Al-Zoughool, Mustafa; Croteau, Maxine; Westphal, Margit; Krewski, Daniel

    2010-02-01

    In 2007, the U.S. National Research Council (NRC) released a report, "Toxicity Testing in the 21st Century: A Vision and a Strategy," that proposes a paradigm shift for toxicity testing of environmental agents. The vision is based on the notion that exposure to environmental agents leads to adverse health outcomes through the perturbation of toxicity pathways that are operative in humans. Implementation of the NRC vision will involve a fundamental change in the assessment of toxicity of environmental agents, moving away from adverse health outcomes observed in experimental animals to the identification of critical perturbations of toxicity pathways. Pathway perturbations will be identified using in vitro assays and quantified for dose response using methods in computational toxicology and other recent scientific advances in basic biology. Implementation of the NRC vision will require a major research effort, not unlike that required to successfully map the human genome, extending over 10 to 20 years, involving the broad scientific community to map important toxicity pathways operative in humans. This article provides an overview of the scientific tools and technologies that will form the core of the NRC vision for toxicity testing. Of particular importance will be the development of rapidly performed in vitro screening assays using human cells and cell lines or human tissue surrogates to efficiently identify environmental agents producing critical pathway perturbations. In addition to the overview of the NRC vision, this study documents the reaction by a number of stakeholder groups since 2007, including the scientific, risk assessment, regulatory, and animal welfare communities.

  2. Comparative study of the assay of Artemia salina L. and the estimate of the medium lethal dose (LD50 value) in mice, to determine oral acute toxicity of plant extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logarto Parra, A; Silva Yhebra, R; Guerra Sardiñas, I; Iglesias Buela, L

    2001-09-01

    Artemia salina L. (Artemiidae), the brine shrimp larva, is an invertebrate used in the alternative test to determine toxicity of chemical and natural products. In this study the Medium Lethal Concentrations (LC50 value) of 20 plant extracts, Aloe vera (L.) Burm. F. (Aloeaceae), Artemisia absinthium L. (Asteraceae); Citrus aurantium L. (Rutaceae); Cymbopogon citratus (DC. Ex Nees) Stapf (Poaceae); Datura stramonium L. (Solanaceae); Justicia pectoralis Jacq. (Acanthaceae); Musa x paradisiaca L. (Musaceae); Ocimum basilicum L.; O. gratissimum L.; O. tenuiflorum L. (Lamiaceae); Pimenta dioica (L.) Merr. (Myrtaceae); Piper auritum Kunth (Piperaceae); Plantago major L. (Plantaginaceae); Plectranthus amboinicus (Lour.) Spreng. (Lamiaceae); Ruta graveolens L. (Rutaceae); Senna alata (L.) Roxb. (Fabaceae); Stachytarpheta jamaicensis (L.) Vahl (Verbenaceae); and Thuja occidentalis L. (Cupressaceae), were determined using Artemia salina L. (Artemiidae), with the objective of relating the results to the LD50 values reported in mice (tested at three concentrations: 10, 100, and 1000 microg/mL, for each extract). We found good correlation between the in vivo and the in vitro tests (r = 0.85 p < 0.05), and this method is a useful tool for predicting oral acute toxicity in plant extracts.

  3. Antimony Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundar, Shyam; Chakravarty, Jaya

    2010-01-01

    Antimony toxicity occurs either due to occupational exposure or during therapy. Occupational exposure may cause respiratory irritation, pneumoconiosis, antimony spots on the skin and gastrointestinal symptoms. In addition antimony trioxide is possibly carcinogenic to humans. Improvements in working conditions have remarkably decreased the incidence of antimony toxicity in the workplace. As a therapeutic, antimony has been mostly used for the treatment of leishmaniasis and schistosomiasis. The major toxic side-effects of antimonials as a result of therapy are cardiotoxicity (~9% of patients) and pancreatitis, which is seen commonly in HIV and visceral leishmaniasis co-infections. Quality control of each batch of drugs produced and regular monitoring for toxicity is required when antimonials are used therapeutically. PMID:21318007

  4. Recovery of anaerobic digestion after exposure to toxicants. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, J.; Parkin, G.F.; Speece, R.E.

    1979-12-01

    The concept that methane fermentation cannot tolerate chronic or slug doses of toxicants has almost totally precluded methane fermentation as a viable contender for the treatment of industrial wastewaters. This study assayed a wide variety of toxicants, heavy metals, inorganic salts, organic chemicals, solvents, and antibiotics which are used in industrial processes and, therefore, appear in the industrial wastewaters therefrom. Toxicity was related to the reduction in methane production of a control containing no toxicant. The response of methane fermentation after exposure to a toxicant was assayed with unacclimated cultures as well as cultures which had been acclimated to increasing concentrations of the toxicant over long periods of time. The reversible nature of the toxicants was assayed by adding slug doses to plug flow anaerobic filters and recording gas production prior to, during, and after toxicant addition.

  5. In vivo toxicity study of Lantana camara

    OpenAIRE

    Badakhshan Mahdi Pour; Sreenivasan Sasidharan

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the toxicity of methanol extract of various parts (Root, Stem, Leaf, Flower and Fruit) of Lantana camara (L. Camara) in Artemia salina. Methods: The methanol extracts of L. camara were tested for in vivo brine shrimp lethality assay. Results: All the tested extract exhibited very low toxicity on brine shrimp larva. The results showed that the root extract was the most toxic part of L. camara and may have potential as anticancer agent. Conclusions: Methanolic...

  6. Pharmaceuticals, hormones, personal-care products, and other organic wastewater contaminants in water resources: Recent research activities of the U.S. Geological Survey's toxic substances hydrology program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Focazio, Michael J.; Kolpin, Dana W.; Buxton, Herbert T.

    2003-01-01

    Recent decades have brought increasing concerns for potential contamination of water resources that could inadvertently result during production, use, and disposal of the numerous chemicals offering improvements in industry, agriculture, medical treatment, and even common household products. Increasing knowledge of the environmental occurrence or toxicological behavior of these contaminants from various studies in Europe, United States, and elsewhere has resulted in increased concern for potential adverse environmental and human health effects (Daughton and Ternes, 1999). Ecologists and public health experts often have incomplete understandings of the toxicological significance of many of these contaminants, particularly long-term, low-level exposure and when they occur in mixtures with other contaminants (Daughton and Ternes, 1999; Kümmerer, 2001). In addition, these ‘emerging contaminants’ are not typically monitored or assessed in ambient water resources. The need to understand the processes controlling the transport and fate of these contaminants in the environment, and the lack of knowledge of the significance of long-term exposures have increased the need to study environmental occurrence down to trace (nanogram per liter) levels. Furthermore, the possibility that mixtures of environmental contaminants may interact synergistically or antagonistically has increased the need to characterize the types of mixtures that are found in our waters. The U.S. Geological Survey’s Toxic Substances Hydrology Program (Toxics Program) is developing information and tools on emerging water-quality issues that will be used to design and improve water-quality monitoring and assessment programs of the USGS and others, and for proactive decision-making by industry, regulators, the research community, and the public (http://toxics.usgs.gov/regional/emc.html). This research on emerging water-quality issues includes a combination of laboratory work to develop new analytical

  7. Impact of globalization under the ICH guidelines on the conduct of reproductive toxicity studies--report on current status in Japan, Europe and the U.S. by questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mineshima, Hiroshi; Endo, Yoshihiko; Ogasawara, Hiroyuki; Nishigaki, Keiji; Numa, Toshiaki; Hirano, Fumiya; Matsuzawa, Toshiaki

    2004-08-01

    We surveyed interpretation of the ICH guidelines concerning reproductive toxicology. Valid responses were obtained from Japan (JPN), Europe (EUR) and the U.S. The results obtained were compared to those at the time of a previous survey targeted at JPN facilities in 1995-1996 as well as compared among all three regions. Compared to the previous survey in Japan, the number of facilities performing toxicokinetics (TK) in rats has slightly increased. This result was considered to represent changes of attitude toward TK in reproductive toxicity studies. Differences in interpretation of the guidelines between JPN, EUR and the US were widely seen. Clear differences were noted in sperm examinations, postnatal tests, fetal examinations, some examinations for F1 animals after culling and TK. Researchers in the West seemed to be interpreting the ICH guidelines more flexibly from the scientific point of view. JPN researchers appeared to interpret the guidelines, including notes, as rigid requirements. Most of the parts which produced different interpretations were the notes in the guidelines. The force of mention in the notes should be defined in the future. In addition, there were doubts about some parts, including notes, which had been found to have become unsuitable for the implementation of studies because of scientific progress or from long experience in using the guidelines. Therefore, updates of the guidelines may be needed in the future as well as the remedy of interpretation by JPN researchers. In JPN, the number of reproductive toxicity studies has decreased. The scanty experience in JPN therefore raises apprehension of appropriate selection and stagnating development of methodology, and might hinder the maintenance of the guidelines. In the future, the cooperation of CROs as well as global collaboration will be essential not only to scientific developments of reproductive toxicology but also updates of the guidelines.

  8. [Toxic megacolon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppkes, M; Ganslmayer, M; Strauß, R; Neurath, M F

    2015-10-01

    Toxic megacolon constitutes a feared, life-threatening complication of severe intestinal inflammation and is a challenge for interdisciplinary medical care. Specific aspects of conservative treatment based on current scientific evidence derived from guidelines, qualified reviews, and scientific studies are presented, which provide a rational approach and maximize therapeutic success. This work is based on a selective literature review and the authors' experience of many years in gastroenterology and intensive care. Toxic megacolon requires a rapid interdisciplinary assessment. Depending on the underlying etiology, an individual treatment concept needs to be developed. If an infectious or inflammatory cause is probable, a conservative approach can reduce perioperative morbidity and mortality. A step-wise approach with controlled reevaluations of the response to therapy after 72 h and 7 days avoids uncontrolled delay of surgical options further ensuring patient safety. Despite a decreasing incidence of toxic megacolon, it remains an interdisciplinary therapeutic challenge.

  9. A preliminary survey of marine contamination from mining-related activities on Marinduque Island, Philippines: porewater toxicity and chemistry results from a field trip, October 14-19, 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, R. Scott; Nipper, Marion; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.

    2001-01-01

    measurement of porewater concentrations of several heavy metals associated with copper mining activities. Pore waters for toxicological and chemical analyses were collected at several stations on the coast of Marinduque, near the mouths of the Boac and Mogpog rivers, and near the causeways formed by mine tailings disposal. Porewater samples were also collected at the Tres Reyes Marine Reserve, so that these non-contaminated samples could serve as a reference for test performance. Sea urchin embryological development and fertilization were only significantly impaired by two porewater samples, suggesting the presence of contaminants in toxic amounts at those stations. The toxic samples were collected near the up current side of the Calancan (Marcopper) mine tailings causeway (stations 2 and 3 – see figure 10). The pore water from station 2 also had the highest levels of heavy metals, particularly cadmium, cobalt, copper, nickel, lead and zinc (Table 5). The concentrations of cobalt, nickel and zinc were also elevated 2 at station 3. Copper concentrations were also elevated at the two river mouth stations (8 and 9) and near the CMI tailings causeway (station 7). Visual observations also indicated biological degradation due to heavy siltation and smothered coral at a gradient off the Calancan causeway, suggesting that siltation might also be causing a physical impact. This preliminary survey suggests that effects related to past mining activities are still evident and warrant a more comprehensive study to assess their severity and areal extent.

  10. Comportamento de Biomphalaria glabrata (Say, 1818 como critério de toxicidade em ensaios biológicos com moluscicidas Behavior of Biomphalaria glabrata (Say, 1818 as a parameter of toxicity in biological assays with molluscicides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otávio S. Pieri

    1981-06-01

    parameters in toxicity determinations of molluscicides was assessed through the development of a method based on W.H.O. standard procedures of bioassying molluscicides and involving behavioural records by time-lapse cinematogrphy. B. glabrata adults (5 7/8 ± 1/8 whorls were subjected to different sublethal doses of copper sulfate during 24 hours and then transferred to deionized distilled water for recovery; from those records it was possible to compute: (a frequency of climbs to surface, (b frequency of crawlings out of water and (c proportion of snails on the upper, middle and botton thirds of the test containers. The Litchfield-Wilcoxon test was employed in determining a reference value (called "concentration of behavioural effect of 50%" of CBE50 in relation to each parameter. The indices thus obtained - (a 0,010, (b 0,006 and (c 0,029 ppm of copper - showed the freasibility of systematic uses of behavioural criteria of toxicity and also proved capable of detecting toxic effects of the product under concentrations much lower than those obtained from conventional lethality determinations. The data also showed an effect/log dose lienar relationship for all the parameters considered and revealed changes in snail activity as a consequence of the daily light cycle. Although the clarification of the ethological aspects involved in the control of schistosome hsot snails depends on the analysis of the relationships between the snail and its natural habitat, laboratory studies, carried out with accurate measuremente of the parameters related to protective modes of behaviour, can be of great value as well.

  11. Human Toxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jolliet, Olivier; Fantke, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This chapter reviews the human toxicological impacts of chemicals and how to assess these impacts in life cycle impact assessment (LCIA), in order to identify key processes and pollutants. The complete cause-effect pathway – from emissions of toxic substances up to damages on human health...... on characterisation factors means that results should by default be reported and interpreted in log scales when comparing scenarios or substance contribution! We conclude by outlining future trends in human toxicity modelling for LCIA, with promising developments for (a) better estimates of degradation halflives, (b......) the inclusion of ionization of chemicals in human exposure including bioaccumulation, (c) metal speciation, (d) spatialised models to differentiate the variability associated with spatialisation from the uncertainty, and (e) the assessment of chemical exposure via consumer products and occupational settings...

  12. Studying toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkus, A.; LeBlanc, L.; Kim, C.; Van Beneden, R.; Mayer, G.

    2006-01-01

    With funding from the George Mitchell Center for the Environment at the University of Maine, a team of scientists used a simple laboratory-based sediment resuspension design, and two well-established aquatic toxicology models, fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) and zebrafish (Danio rerio), to evaluate if resuspension of Penobscot river sediment significantly elevates the toxicity of river water and to provide preliminary information on the types of chemicals likely to desorb during resuspension. The group collected sediments from two sites with known chemical contamination downstream of the Great Works and Veazie dams. The sediments were examined to determine the dynamics of PAH desorption and degradation under different resuspension frequencies. The scientists used clarified water from resuspension experiments for toxicity tests with the water-flea Ceriodaphnia dubia, and other aquatic test organisms to infer toxicity from sediments from northern California rivers. Data from the study will help ascertain whether metals and/or xenoestrogens are present in the desorption water and give insight into possible avenues of sediment remediation.

  13. Toxic shock syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome; Toxic shock-like syndrome; TSLS ... Toxic shock syndrome is caused by a toxin produced by some types of staphylococcus bacteria. A similar problem, called toxic shock- ...

  14. Chromosome aberration assays in Allium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant, W.F.

    1982-01-01

    The common onion (Allium cepa) is an excellent plant for the assay of chromosome aberrations after chemical treatment. Other species of Allium (A. cepa var. proliferum, A. carinatum, A. fistulosum and A. sativum) have also been used but to a much lesser extent. Protocols have been given for using root tips from either bulbs or seeds of Allium cepa to study the cytological end-points, such as chromosome breaks and exchanges, which follow the testing of chemicals in somatic cells. It is considered that both mitotic and meiotic end-points should be used to a greater extent in assaying the cytogenetic effects of a chemical. From a literature survey, 148 chemicals are tabulated that have been assayed in 164 Allium tests for their clastogenic effect. Of the 164 assays which have been carried out, 75 are reported as giving a positive reaction, 49 positive and with a dose response, 1 positive and temperature-related, 9 borderline positive, and 30 negative; 76% of the chemicals gave a definite positive response. It is proposed that the Allium test be included among those tests routinely used for assessing chromosomal damage induced by chemicals.

  15. Movement and fate of creosote waste in ground water, Pensacola, Florida; U.S. Geological Survey toxic waste--ground-water contamination program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattraw, H. C.; Franks, B.J.

    1984-01-01

    In 1983, the U.S. Geological Survey, Office of Hazardous Waste Hydrology, selected the former American Creosote Works site near Pensacola, Florida as a national research demonstration area. Seventy-nine years (1902-81) of seepage from unlined discharge impoundments had released creosote, diesel fuel, and pentachlorophenol (since 1950) wastes into the ground-water system. A cluster of from 2 to 5 wells constructed at different depths at 9 sites yielded water which revealed contamination 600 feet downgradient and to a depth of 100 feet below land surface near the site. The best cross-sectional representation of the contaminant plume was obtained from samples collected and analyzed for oxidation-reduction sensitive inorganic chemical constituents. Energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence detected recently formed iron carbonate in soil samples from highly reducing ground-water zones. Approximately eighty specific organic contaminants were isolated from ground-water samples by gas-chromotography/mass spectrometry. Column studies indicate the dimethyl phenols are not sorbed or degraded by the sand-and-gravel aquifer materials. Five of nineteen individual phenolic and related compounds are biodegradable based on anaerobic digestor experiments with ACW site bacterial populations. The potential impacts in the nearby Pensacola Bay biotic community are being evaluated. (USGS)

  16. The comet assay in nanotoxicology research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Hanna L

    2010-09-01

    Nanoscale particles can have impressive and useful characteristics, but the same properties may be problematic for human health. From this perspective it is critical to assess the ability of nanoparticles to cause DNA damage. This review focuses on the use of the comet assay in nanotoxicology research. In the alkaline version of the assay, DNA strand breaks and alkali-labile sites are detected and oxidatively damaged DNA can be analyzed using the enzyme formamidopyrimidine glycosylase. The article reviews studies that have used the comet assay to investigate the toxicity of manufactured nanoparticles. It is shown that at least 46 cellular in vitro studies and several in vivo studies have used the comet assay and that the majority of the nanoparticles tested cause DNA strand breaks or oxidative DNA lesions. This is not surprising considering the sensitivity of the method and the reactivity of many nanomaterials. Interactions between the particles and the assay cannot be totally excluded and need further consideration. It is concluded that studies including several particle types, to enable the assessment of their relative potency, are valuable as are studies focusing both on comet assay end points and mutagenicity. Finally, the article discusses the potential future use of the comet assay in human biomonitoring studies, which could provide valuable information for hazard identification of nanoparticles.

  17. Microbead agglutination based assays

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2013-01-21

    We report a simple and rapid room temperature assay for point-of-care (POC) testing that is based on specific agglutination. Agglutination tests are based on aggregation of microbeads in the presence of a specific analyte thus enabling the macroscopic observation. Such tests are most often used to explore antibody-antigen reactions. Agglutination has been used for protein assays using a biotin/streptavidin system as well as a hybridization based assay. The agglutination systems are prone to selftermination of the linking analyte, prone to active site saturation and loss of agglomeration at high analyte concentrations. We investigated the molecular target/ligand interaction, explaining the common agglutination problems related to analyte self-termination, linkage of the analyte to the same bead instead of different microbeads. We classified the agglutination process into three kinds of assays: a two- component assay, a three-component assay and a stepped three- component assay. Although we compared these three kinds of assays for recognizing DNA and protein molecules, the assay can be used for virtually any molecule, including ions and metabolites. In total, the optimized assay permits detecting analytes with high sensitivity in a short time, 5 min, at room temperature. Such a system is appropriate for POC testing.

  18. Evaluation of organ weights for rodent and non-rodent toxicity studies: a review of regulatory guidelines and a survey of current practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Bindhu; Yano, Barry; Sellers, Rani S; Perry, Rick; Morton, Daniel; Roome, Nigel; Johnson, Julie K; Schafer, Ken; Pitsch, Sue

    2007-08-01

    The Society of Toxicologic Pathology convened a working group to evaluate current practices regarding organ weights in toxicology studies. A survey was distributed to pharmaceutical, veterinary, chemical, food/nutritional and consumer product companies in Europe, North America, and Japan. Responses were compiled to identify organs routinely weighed for various study types in rodent and non-rodent species, compare methods of organ weighing, provide perspectives on the value of organ weights and identify the scientist(s) responsible for organ weight data interpretation. Data were evaluated as a whole as well as by industry type and geographic location. Regulatory guidance documents describing organ weighing practices are generally available, however, they differ somewhat dependent on industry type and regulatory agency. While questionnaire respondents unanimously stated that organ weights were a good screening tool to identify treatment-related effects, opinions varied as to which organ weights are most valuable. The liver, kidneys, and testes were commonly weighed and most often considered useful by most respondents. Other organs that break were commonly weighed included brain, adrenal glands, ovaries, thyroid glands, uterus, heart, and spleen. Lungs, lymph nodes, and other sex organs were weighed infrequently in routine studies, but were often weighed in specialized studies such as inhalation, immunotoxicity, and reproduction studies. Organ-to-body weight ratios were commonly calculated and were considered more useful when body weights were affected. Organ to brain weight ratios were calculated by most North American companies, but rarely according to respondents representing veterinary product or European companies. Statistical analyses were generally performed by most respondents. Pathologists performed interpretation of organ weight data for the majority of the industries.

  19. [Toxic methemoglobinemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, P; Neuhaus, H

    2011-04-01

    A 19 year-old female patient suffered from severe hypoxemia after an ambulant surgery for splayfeet. Local anesthesia had been performed with prilocain and bupivacain. Methemoglobinemia was suspected and treated with ascorbine acid and methylene blue. The patient was then admitted to hospital. The patient was well orientated and awake. She complained of a mild headache and general illness. There was marked central cyanosis. A blood sample was dark-red to brownish. The periphere oxygen saturation was 85%. A cardiac ultrasound and a chest X ray were without pathological findings. Initial arterial blood gas analysis showed a concentration of methemoglobin of 24%. On intensive care clinical and laboratory findings quickly resolved and methemoglobin concentration normalized after one day. The patient had no symptoms anymore and was discharged the next day. In treatment-resistent hypoxemia after local anesthesia toxic methemoglobinaemia should be suspected. Therapy of choice is immediate administration of methylene blue. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Absolute nuclear material assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Manoj K [Pleasanton, CA; Snyderman, Neal J [Berkeley, CA; Rowland, Mark S [Alamo, CA

    2012-05-15

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  1. Absolute nuclear material assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Manoj K [Pleasanton, CA; Snyderman, Neal J [Berkeley, CA; Rowland, Mark S [Alamo, CA

    2010-07-13

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  2. The importance of including toxicity assays when screening plant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-10-19

    Oct 19, 2009 ... with different structural features, along with new strate- gies in malaria control and the recognition and .... poration of [3H]-hypoxanthine into DNA was measured by liquid scintillation counting. The results were expressed as a ... 13C and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra were recorded on a ...

  3. The C. elegans model in toxicity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Piper Reid

    2017-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans is a small nematode that can be maintained at low cost and handled using standard in vitro techniques. Unlike toxicity testing using cell cultures, C. elegans toxicity assays provide data from a whole animal with intact and metabolically active digestive, reproductive, endocrine, sensory and neuromuscular systems. Toxicity ranking screens in C. elegans have repeatedly been shown to be as predictive of rat LD50 ranking as mouse LD50 ranking. Additionally, many instances of conservation of mode of toxic action have been noted between C. elegans and mammals. These consistent correlations make the case for inclusion of C. elegans assays in early safety testing and as one component in tiered or integrated toxicity testing strategies, but do not indicate that nematodes alone can replace data from mammals for hazard evaluation. As with cell cultures, good C. elegans culture practice (GCeCP) is essential for reliable results. This article reviews C. elegans use in various toxicity assays, the C. elegans model's strengths and limitations for use in predictive toxicology, and GCeCP. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Journal of Applied Toxicology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Journal of Applied Toxicology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. The Comet Assay: Tails of the (Unexpected. Use of the comet assay in pharmaceutical development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bas-jan Van Der Leede

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In genotoxicity testing of pharmaceuticals the rodent alkaline comet assay is being increasingly used as a second in vivo assay in addition to the in vivo micronucleus assay to mitigate in vitro positive results as recommended by regulatory guidance. In this presentation we want to give insight into the circumstances in vivo comet assay is deployed in a Genetic Toxicology Department of a pharmaceutical company. As the in vivo comet assay is a salvage assay, it means that some events have occurred in an in vitro assay and that the compound (or metabolite responsible for this signal is potentially deselected for further development. More than often the decision to perform an in vivo comet assay is at a very early stage in development and the first time that the compound will be tested in vivo at high/toxic dose levels. As almost no toxicokinetic data and tissue distribution data are available a careful design with maximizes the chances for successful mitigation is necessary. Decisions on acute or repeated dosing need to be made and arrangements for combining the in vivo comet assay with the in vivo micronucleus assay are to be considered. Often synthesis methods need to be scaled up fast to provide the required amount of compound and information on suitable formulations needs to be in place. As exposure data is crucial for interpretation of results, analytical methods need to be brought in place rapidly. An experienced multi skilled and communicative team needs to be available to deploy successfully this kind of assays at an early stage of development. We will present a few scenarios on study conduct and demonstrate how this assay can make a difference for the further development of a new drug.

  5. Optimal growth of Dunaliella primolecta in axenic conditions to assay herbicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santín-Montanyá, I; Sandín-España, P; García Baudín, J M; Coll-Morales, J

    2007-01-01

    To develop an assay for herbicides in marine environments using microalgae, we have optimized the specie, cell culture media and physical conditions to obtain maximal cellular densities in a 96 well micro format to allow mass assays. We first surveyed several species of 7 unicellular eukaryotic algae genera (Dunaliella, Tetraselmis, Chlorella, Ellipsoidon, Isochrysis, Nannochloropsis, and Phaeodactylum) for vigorous in vitro axenic growth. Once the genus Dunaliella was selected, Dunaliella primolecta was preferred among 9 species (bioculata, minuta, parva, peircei, polymorpha, primolecta, quartolecta, salina and tertiolecta) because it showed the highest growth rates. The components (oligo elements, sugars, amino acids and vitamins) and conditions (light, CO(2), temperature) of the culture media were further optimized to obtain the highest cellular densities (up to 60x10(6)cellsml(-1)) and the shortest cell cycle duration ( approximately 12h) for D. primolecta. Then the toxicity of four representative herbicides, alloxydim, and sethoxydim (inhibitors of acetyl-coA carboxilase), metamitron (inhibitor of photosynthesis) and clopyralid (inhibitor of respiration), were assayed on the optimal culture conditions for D. primolecta during 96h. The results showed that D. primolecta was susceptible to those herbicides in the following order: metamitron > sethoxydim > alloxydim. In contrast, clopyralid did not have any effects. Therefore, D. primolecta microcultures can be used to assay a large number of samples for the presence of herbicides under a saline environment.

  6. Screening of toxic potential of graphene family nanomaterials using in vitro and alternative in vivo toxicity testing systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Nivedita; Yang, Ji Su; Park, Kwangsik; Oh, Seung Min; Park, Jeonggue; Choi, Jinhee

    2015-01-01

    The widely promising applications of graphene nanomaterials raise considerable concerns regarding their environmental and human health risk assessment. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the toxicity profiling of graphene family nananomaterials (GFNs) in alternative in vitro and in vivo toxicity testing models. The GFNs used in this study are graphene nanoplatelets ([GNPs]-pristine, carboxylate [COOH] and amide [NH2]) and graphene oxides (single layer [SLGO] and few layers [FLGO]). The human bronchial epithelial cells (Beas2B cells) as in vitro system and the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as in vivo system were used to profile the toxicity response of GFNs. Cytotoxicity assays, colony formation assay for cellular toxicity and reproduction potentiality in C. elegans were used as end points to evaluate the GFNs' toxicity. In general, GNPs exhibited higher toxicity than GOs in Beas2B cells, and among the GNPs the order of toxicity was pristine>NH2>COOH. Although the order of toxicity of the GNPs was maintained in C. elegans reproductive toxicity, but GOs were found to be more toxic in the worms than GNPs. In both systems, SLGO exhibited profoundly greater dose dependency than FLGO. The possible reason of their differential toxicity lay in their distinctive physicochemical characteristics and agglomeration behavior in the exposure media. The present study revealed that the toxicity of GFNs is dependent on the graphene nanomaterial's physical forms, surface functionalizations, number of layers, dose, time of exposure and obviously, on the alternative model systems used for toxicity assessment.

  7. Screening of toxic potential of graphene family nanomaterials using and alternative toxicity testing systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nivedita Chatterjee

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The widely promising applications of graphene nanomaterials raise considerable concerns regarding their environmental and human health risk assessment. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the toxicity profiling of graphene family nananomaterials (GFNs in alternative in vitro and in vivo toxicity testing models. Methods The GFNs used in this study are graphene nanoplatelets ([GNPs]–pristine, carboxylate [COOH] and amide [NH2] and graphene oxides (single layer [SLGO] and few layers [FLGO]. The human bronchial epithelial cells (Beas2B cells as in vitro system and the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as in vivo system were used to profile the toxicity response of GFNs. Cytotoxicity assays, colony formation assay for cellular toxicity and reproduction potentiality in C. elegans were used as end points to evaluate the GFNs’ toxicity. Results In general, GNPs exhibited higher toxicity than GOs in Beas2B cells, and among the GNPs the order of toxicity was pristine>NH2>COOH. Although the order of toxicity of the GNPs was maintained in C. elegans reproductive toxicity, but GOs were found to be more toxic in the worms than GNPs. In both systems, SLGO exhibited profoundly greater dose dependency than FLGO. The possible reason of their differential toxicity lay in their distinctive physicochemical characteristics and agglomeration behavior in the exposure media. Conclusions The present study revealed that the toxicity of GFNs is dependent on the graphene nanomaterial’s physical forms, surface functionalizations, number of layers, dose, time of exposure and obviously, on the alternative model systems used for toxicity assessment.

  8. In vivo toxicity study of Lantana camara.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pour, Badakhshan Mahdi; Sasidharan, Sreenivasan

    2011-06-01

    To investigate the toxicity of methanol extract of various parts (Root, Stem, Leaf, Flower and Fruit) of Lantana camara (L. Camara) in Artemia salina. The methanol extracts of L. camara were tested for in vivo brine shrimp lethality assay. All the tested extract exhibited very low toxicity on brine shrimp larva. The results showed that the root extract was the most toxic part of L. camara and may have potential as anticancer agent. Methanolic extract of L. camara is relatively safe on short-term exposure.

  9. The application of sulforhodamine B as a colorimetric endpoint in a cytotoxicity assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricker, S P

    1994-08-01

    Sulforhodamine B (SRB), an aminoxanthene dye, has been used as an assay for total cell protein, initially developed as an endpoint assay for in vitro screening of antitumour agents. In this paper it was investigated as a possible endpoint for a cytotoxicity assay using CHO cells. It is a robust assay with a stable colorimetric endpoint, capable of semi-automation using microtitre equipment. At optimum concentrations (0.05-0.1% SRB) the assay is linear with respect to cell number over a range of 5 x 10(3) to 10(5) cells. In comparative studies with the neutral red assay the SRB assay was more sensitive, and in cytotoxicity assays with test compounds gave comparable dose-response curves. The cytotoxicity of five divalent metal chlorides was assessed using the SRB assay. The order of toxicity was Cd > Hg > Zn > Mn > Mg, that is similar to the expected in vivo ranking. 16 compounds with reported oral LD(50) (rat) ranging from 25,800 mg/kg (glucose) to 1 mg/kg (mercuric chloride) were tested in the assay. The relative toxicities of the compounds in the in vitro SRB assay were similar to the relative in vivo toxicities. The exceptions could be explained by the chemistry of the compounds and could be attributed to pharmacokinetic properties or mechanism of action. This assay can therefore be used to rank chemically similar compounds but is unsuitable as a precise predictor of in vivo toxicity.

  10. Toxicity evaluation of PAH mixtures using Microtox

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompkins, J.; Guthrie, E.; Pfaender, F. [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are produced from both natural and anthropogenic combustion processes. PAHs are known to be toxic and carcinogenic, are prevalent at many hazardous waste sites, and pose a potential risk to both ecological and human health. To date, few researchers have assessed the toxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) mixtures. The toxicity of chrysene, anthracene, pyrene, phenanthrene, fluoranthrene, acenaphthene, fluorene, and naphthalene were evaluated using Microtox, and acute toxicity assay that uses bioluminescent bacteria, Photobacterium phosphoreum, to measure toxicity. In this study, the toxicities of 2, 3, and 4 ring PAHs were determined for individual compounds. Synergistic or additive effects of PAH mixtures was assessed by comparing the toxicity of mixtures with that of pure compounds. Each PAH or mixture was evaluated at their respective water solubility concentrations, For individual PAHs tested, the toxicity of PAHs is inversely related to water solubility. Mixtures of two and three PAHs with disparate water solubilities resulted in synergistic interactions. Antagonistic interactions, a decrease in toxicity, were observed for mixtures of similar water solubilities.

  11. Bacterial and enzymatic bioassays for toxicity testing in the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitton, G; Koopman, B

    1992-01-01

    Microbioassays using bacteria or enzymes are increasingly applied to measure chemical toxicity in the environment. Attractive features of these assays may include low cost, rapid response to toxicants, high sample throughput, modest laboratory equipment and space requirements, low sample volume, portability, and reproducible responses. Enzymatic tests rely on measurement of either enzyme activity or enzyme biosynthesis. Dehydrogenases are the enzymes most used in toxicity testing. Assay of dehydrogenase activity is conveniently carried out using oxidoreduction dyes such as tetrazolium salts. Other enzyme activity tests utilize ATPases, esterases, phosphatases, urease, luciferase, beta-galactosidase, protease, amylase, or beta-glucosidase. Recently, the inhibition of enzyme (beta-galactosidase, tryptophanase, alpha-glucosidase) biosynthesis has been explored as a basis for toxicity testing. Enzyme biosynthesis was found to be generally more sensitive to organic chemicals than enzyme activity. Bacterial toxicity tests are based on bioluminescence, motility, growth, viability, ATP, oxygen uptake, nitrification, or heat production. An important aspect of bacterial tests is the permeability of cells to environmental toxicants, particularly organic chemicals of hydrophobic nature. Physical, chemical, and genetic alterations of the outer membrane of E. coli have been found to affect test sensitivity to organic toxicants. Several microbioassays are now commercially available. The names of the assays and their basis are: Microtox (bioluminescence), Polytox (respiration), ECHA Biocide Monitor (dehydrogenase activity), Toxi-Chromotest (enzyme biosynthesis), and MetPAD (enzyme activity). An important feature common to these tests is the provision of standardized cultures of bacteria in freeze-dried form. Two of the more recent applications of microbioassays are in sediment toxicity testing and toxicity reduction evaluation. Sediment pore water may be assayed directly or

  12. Sample size calculations for a split-cluster, beta-binomial design in the assessment of toxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, J.C.M.; Teerenstra, S.; Punt-Van der Zalm, J.P.; Wetzels, A.M.M.; Westphal, J.R.; Borm, G.F.

    2005-01-01

    Mouse embryo assays are recommended to test materials used for in vitro fertilization for toxicity. In such assays, a number of embryos is divided in a control group, which is exposed to a neutral medium, and a test group, which is exposed to a potentially toxic medium. Inferences on toxicity are

  13. Distributed Structure Searchable Toxicity

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Distributed Structure Searchable Toxicity (DSSTox) online resource provides high quality chemical structures and annotations in association with toxicity data....

  14. Nanomaterial Toxicity Screening in Developing Zebrafish Embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    To assess nanomaterial vertebrate toxicity, a high-content screening assay was created using developing zebrafish, Danio rerio. This included a diverse group of nanomaterials (n=42 total) ranging from metallic (Ag, Au) and metal oxide (CeO2, CuO, TiO2, ZnO) nanoparticles, to non...

  15. Lateral flow assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koczula, Katarzyna M; Gallotta, Andrea

    2016-06-30

    Lateral flow assays (LFAs) are the technology behind low-cost, simple, rapid and portable detection devices popular in biomedicine, agriculture, food and environmental sciences. This review presents an overview of the principle of the method and the critical components of the assay, focusing on lateral flow immunoassays. This type of assay has recently attracted considerable interest because of its potential to provide instantaneous diagnosis directly to patients. The range and interpretation of results and parameters used for evaluation of the assay will also be discussed. The main advantages and disadvantages of LFAs will be summarized and relevant future improvements to testing devices and strategies will be proposed. Finally, the major recent advances and future diagnostic applications in the LFA field will be explored. © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  16. Lateral flow assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koczula, Katarzyna M.

    2016-01-01

    Lateral flow assays (LFAs) are the technology behind low-cost, simple, rapid and portable detection devices popular in biomedicine, agriculture, food and environmental sciences. This review presents an overview of the principle of the method and the critical components of the assay, focusing on lateral flow immunoassays. This type of assay has recently attracted considerable interest because of its potential to provide instantaneous diagnosis directly to patients. The range and interpretation of results and parameters used for evaluation of the assay will also be discussed. The main advantages and disadvantages of LFAs will be summarized and relevant future improvements to testing devices and strategies will be proposed. Finally, the major recent advances and future diagnostic applications in the LFA field will be explored. PMID:27365041

  17. Tube-Forming Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ryan M; Meah, Christopher J; Heath, Victoria L; Styles, Iain B; Bicknell, Roy

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis involves the generation of new blood vessels from the existing vasculature and is dependent on many growth factors and signaling events. In vivo angiogenesis is dynamic and complex, meaning assays are commonly utilized to explore specific targets for research into this area. Tube-forming assays offer an excellent overview of the molecular processes in angiogenesis. The Matrigel tube forming assay is a simple-to-implement but powerful tool for identifying biomolecules involved in angiogenesis. A detailed experimental protocol on the implementation of the assay is described in conjunction with an in-depth review of methods that can be applied to the analysis of the tube formation. In addition, an ImageJ plug-in is presented which allows automatic quantification of tube images reducing analysis times while removing user bias and subjectivity.

  18. Modelling the comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArt, Darragh G; McKerr, George; Howard, C Vyvyan; Saetzler, Kurt; Wasson, Gillian R

    2009-08-01

    The single-cell gel electrophoresis technique or comet assay is widely regarded as a quick and reliable method of analysing DNA damage in individual cells. It has a proven track record from the fields of biomonitoring to nutritional studies. The assay operates by subjecting cells that are fixed in agarose to high salt and detergent lysis, thus removing all the cellular content except the DNA. By relaxing the DNA in an alkaline buffer, strands containing breaks are released from supercoiling. Upon electrophoresis, these strands are pulled out into the agarose, forming a tail which, when stained with a fluorescent dye, can be analysed by fluorescence microscopy. The intensity of this tail reflects the amount of DNA damage sustained. Despite being such an established and widely used assay, there are still many aspects of the comet assay which are not fully understood. The present review looks at how the comet assay is being used, and highlights some of its limitations. The protocol itself varies among laboratories, so results from similar studies may vary. Given such discrepancies, it would be attractive to break the assay into components to generate a mathematical model to investigate specific parameters.

  19. Sediment toxicity in Boston Harbor: Magnitude, extent, and relationships with chemical toxicants. Technical memo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, E.R.; Sloane, G.M.; Carr, R.S.; Scott, K.J.; Thursby, G.B.

    1996-06-01

    A survey of the toxicity of sediments throughout Boston Harbor and vicinity was conducted by NOAA`s National Status and Trends (NS&T) Program. The objectives of the survey were to determine the magnitude and spatial extent of toxicity and the relationship between measures of toxicity and the concentrations of chemical toxicants in the sediments. Multiple toxicity tests were performed including: an amphipod survival test performed with whole sediments, a microbial bioluminescence test performed with organic solvent extracts of the sediments, and sea urchin fertilization and embryological development tests performed with the pore waters extracted from the sediments. Chemical analyses were performed on selected samples for trace metals, polynuclear aromatic hydrcarbons, chlorinated pesticides, PCBs, and butyltins.

  20. Rover waste assay system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akers, D.W.; Stoots, C.M.; Kraft, N.C.; Marts, D.J. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1997-11-01

    The Rover Waste Assay System (RWAS) is a nondestructive assay system designed for the rapid assay of highly-enriched {sup 235}U contaminated piping, tank sections, and debris from the Rover nuclear rocket fuel processing facility at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. A scanning system translates a NaI(Tl) detector/collimator system over the structural components where both relative and calibrated measurements for {sup 137}Cs are made. Uranium-235 concentrations are in operation and is sufficiently automated that most functions are performed by the computer system. These functions include system calibration, problem identification, collimator control, data analysis, and reporting. Calibration of the system was done through a combination of measurements on calibration standards and benchmarked modeling. A description of the system is presented along with the methods and uncertainties associated with the calibration and analysis of the system for components from the Rover facility. 4 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Lateral flow strip assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Robin R [Danville, CA; Benett, William J [Livermore, CA; Coleman, Matthew A [Oakland, CA; Pearson, Francesca S [Livermore, CA; Nasarabadi, Shanavaz L [Livermore, CA

    2011-03-08

    A lateral flow strip assay apparatus comprising a housing; a lateral flow strip in the housing, the lateral flow strip having a receiving portion; a sample collection unit; and a reagent reservoir. Saliva and/or buccal cells are collected from an individual using the sample collection unit. The sample collection unit is immersed in the reagent reservoir. The tip of the lateral flow strip is immersed in the reservoir and the reagent/sample mixture wicks up into the lateral flow strip to perform the assay.

  2. (MTT) dye reduction assay.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    to inhibit proliferation of HeLa cells was determined using the 3443- dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) dye reduction assay. Extracts from roots of Agathisanthemum bojeri, Synaptolepis kirkii and Zanha africana and the leaf extract of Physalis peruviana at a concentration of 10 pg/ml inhibited cell ...

  3. Hyaluronic Acid Assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Itenov, Theis S; Kirkby, Nikolai S; Bestle, Morten H

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUD: Hyaluronic acid (HA) is proposed as a marker of functional liver capacity. The aim of the present study was to compare a new turbidimetric assay for measuring HA with the current standard method. METHODS: HA was measured by a particle-enhanced turbidimetric immunoassay (PETIA) and enzyme...

  4. Proteomics: from hypothesis to quantitative assay on a single platform. Guidelines for developing MRM assays using ion trap mass spectrometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bomie; Higgs, Richard E

    2008-09-01

    High-throughput HPLC-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) is routinely used to profile biological samples for potential protein markers of disease, drug efficacy and toxicity. The discovery technology has advanced to the point where translating hypotheses from proteomic profiling studies into clinical use is the bottleneck to realizing the full potential of these approaches. The first step in this translation is the development and analytical validation of a higher throughput assay with improved sensitivity and selectivity relative to typical profiling assays. Multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) assays are an attractive approach for this stage of biomarker development given their improved sensitivity and specificity, the speed at which the assays can be developed and the quantitative nature of the assay. While the profiling assays are performed with ion trap mass spectrometers, MRM assays are traditionally developed in quadrupole-based mass spectrometers. Development of MRM assays from the same instrument used in the profiling analysis enables a seamless and rapid transition from hypothesis generation to validation. This report provides guidelines for rapidly developing an MRM assay using the same mass spectrometry platform used for profiling experiments (typically ion traps) and reviews methodological and analytical validation considerations. The analytical validation guidelines presented are drawn from existing practices on immunological assays and are applicable to any mass spectrometry platform technology.

  5. Photoinduced toxicity of engineered nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Philip Scott

    Engineered nanomaterials including metal, metal oxide and carbon based nanomaterials are extensively used in a wide variety of applications to the extent that their presence in the environment is expected to increase dramatically over the next century. These nanomaterials may be photodegraded by solar radiation and thereby release metal ions into the environment that can produce cytotoxic and genotoxic effects. Photoinduced toxicity experiments are performed exposing human lung epithelial carcinoma cells [H1650] to engineered semiconductor nanoparticles such as CdSe quantum dots and ZnO nanoparticles after exposure to 3, 6, and 9 hours of solar simulated radiation. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of the metal ions are evaluated using ZnSO4 and CdCl2 solutions for the MTT assay and Comet assay respectively. The objective of the dissertation is to obtain quantitative information about the environmental transformation of engineered nanomaterials and their mechanism of toxicity. This information is critical for addressing the environmental health and safety risks of engineered nanomaterials to workers, consumers and the environment.

  6. Lucigenin chemiluminescence assay as an adjunctive tool for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A simple, fast, precise and biologically relevant toxicity assay for screening cytotoxicity of minerals would have distinct advantages due to its cost benefits and relative savings in time. Furthermore, a bioassay to differentiate acute and chronic in vivo pulmonary reactions could have potential value as predictors of fibrogenicity ...

  7. Lucigenin chemiluminescence assay as an adjunctive tool for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    *Pathology and Physiology Research Branch, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health,. Morgantown, WV 26505, USA. †Corresponding author (Fax, 304-293-5449; Email, kvandyke@hsc.wvu.edu). A simple, fast, precise and biologically relevant toxicity assay for screening cytotoxicity of minerals would have.

  8. Toxicity and antinociceptive effects of Hamelia patens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Josabad Alonso-Castro

    Full Text Available Abstract Many medicinal herbs are used in folk medicine without taking into account their toxicity. Hamelia patens Jacq. (Rubiaceae, a Mexican endemic species, is used for the empirical treatment of pain. The aim of this work was to evaluate the toxicity and antinociceptive effects of ethanolic extracts of H. patens leaves. The toxicity of H. patens leaves (500–5000 mg/kg was evaluated in acute (14 days and subacute (28 days assays. In the subacute assay, a blood analysis (both hematology and chemistry was carried out. The antinociceptive effects of H. patens leaves (50–200 mg/kg were evaluated using thermal-induced nociception (hot plate and the chemical-induced nociceptive tests (acid acetic and formalin. In the acute toxicity test, the LD50 estimated for H. patens leaves was 2964 mg/kg i.p. and >5000 mg/kg p.o., whereas in the subacute test HPE did not affect hematological or biochemical parameters. In chemical-induced nociception models, H. patens (100 and 200 mg/kg p.o. showed antinociceptive effects with similar activity than 100 mg/kg naproxen. In the hot plate test, HPE at 100 mg/kg (17% and 200 mg/kg (25% showed moderate antinociceptive effects. HPE could be a good source of antinociceptive agents because of its good activity and low toxicity.

  9. Toxic hemolytic anemias.

    OpenAIRE

    ZEMANOVÁ, Vendula

    2014-01-01

    This thesis deals with toxic hemolytic anemias which are often unheeded. There are described laboratory signs of hemolytic anemias, their dividing into the various groups and it focuses mainly to toxic and drug-related hemolytic anemias and their causations.

  10. Global assays of fibrinolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilich, A; Bokarev, I; Key, N S

    2017-10-01

    Fibrinolysis is an important and integral part of the hemostatic system. Acting as a balance to blood coagulation, the fibrinolytic system protects the body from unwanted thrombus formation and occlusion of blood vessels. As long as blood coagulation and fibrinolysis remain in equilibrium, response to injury, such as vessel damage, is appropriately regulated. However, alterations in this balance may lead to thrombosis or bleeding. A variety of methods have been proposed to assess fibrinolytic activity in blood or its components, but due to the complexity of the system, the design of a "gold standard" assay that reflects overall fibrinolysis has remained an elusive goal. In this review, we describe the most commonly used methods that have been described, such as thromboelastography (TEG and ROTEM), global fibrinolytic capacity in plasma and whole blood, plasma turbidity methods, simultaneous thrombin and plasmin generation assays, euglobulin clot lysis time and fibrin plate methods. All of these assays have strengths and limitations. We suggest that some methods may be preferable for detecting hypofibrinolytic conditions, whereas others may be better for detecting hyperfibrinolytic states. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Allergy and "toxic mold syndrome".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmondson, David A; Nordness, Mark E; Zacharisen, Michael C; Kurup, Viswanath P; Fink, Jordan N

    2005-02-01

    "Toxic mold syndrome" is a controversial diagnosis associated with exposure to mold-contaminated environments. Molds are known to induce asthma and allergic rhinitis through IgE-mediated mechanisms, to cause hypersensitivity pneumonitis through other immune mechanisms, and to cause life-threatening primary and secondary infections in immunocompromised patients. Mold metabolites may be irritants and may be involved in "sick building syndrome." Patients with environmental mold exposure have presented with atypical constitutional and systemic symptoms, associating those symptoms with the contaminated environment. To characterize the clinical features and possible etiology of symptoms in patients with chief complaints related to mold exposure. Review of patients presenting to an allergy and asthma center with the chief complaint of toxic mold exposure. Symptoms were recorded, and physical examinations, skin prick/puncture tests, and intracutaneous tests were performed. A total of 65 individuals aged 1 1/2 to 52 years were studied. Symptoms included rhinitis (62%), cough (52%), headache (34%), respiratory symptoms (34%), central nervous system symptoms (25%), and fatigue (23%). Physical examination revealed pale nasal mucosa, pharyngeal "cobblestoning," and rhinorrhea. Fifty-three percent (33/62) of the patients had skin reactions to molds. Mold-exposed patients can present with a variety of IgE- and non-IgE-mediated symptoms. Mycotoxins, irritation by spores, or metabolites may be culprits in non-IgE presentations; environmental assays have not been perfected. Symptoms attributable to the toxic effects of molds and not attributable to IgE or other immune mechanisms need further evaluation as to pathogenesis. Allergic, rather than toxic, responses seemed to be the major cause of symptoms in the studied group.

  12. Paraprotein interference with turbidimetric gentamicin assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimeski, Goce; Bassett, Kendra; Brown, Nigel

    2015-01-01

    Gentamicin due to its low level of resistance and rapid bactericidal activity is commonly used to treat gram-negative bacteria. However, due to its toxic effects it needs to be monitored. To date, no interference has been reported with gentamicin assays. A patient with leg cellulitis and sepsis received a single dose of gentamicin and a sample was sent for gentamicin analysis. The sample showed high blank absorbance readings on Beckman DxC800 and DC800 analysers with various dilutions. A second sample was received and analysed on a Roche Cobas system to obtain a result. A third sample was received 107 hours later with the same results and this sample was then analysed neat and post ethanol precipitation on all the turbidimetric assays available on the DxC800 analyser. The high blank absorbance was observed upon addition of the reactive reagents due to protein precipitation. Although not obvious from the patient protein results, it was shown the presence of high IgM paraprotein, 18.9 g/L (reference range 0.4-2.3 g/L) was the cause of precipitation, giving high blank readings. Of all the other turbidimetric assays, only vancomicin and valproate showed similar high blank absorbance readings. To be able to provide more rapid results it was shown ethanol could be used as a precipitant of proteins in both calibrators and patient samples with acceptable recovery. IgM paraprotein was identified as the cause of interference with the gentamicin, vancomicin and valproate assays. Protein interference in these assays can be overcome by precipitation with ethanol.

  13. Radon assay for SNO+

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rumleskie, Janet [Laurentian University, Greater Sudbury, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-12-31

    The SNO+ experiment will study neutrinos while located 6,800 feet below the surface of the earth at SNOLAB. Though shielded from surface backgrounds, emanation of radon radioisotopes from the surrounding rock leads to back-grounds. The characteristic decay of radon and its daughters allows for an alpha detection technique to count the amount of Rn-222 atoms collected. Traps can collect Rn-222 from various positions and materials, including an assay skid that will collect Rn-222 from the organic liquid scintillator used to detect interactions within SNO+.

  14. Marine and estuarine porewater toxicity testing -- species and end point comparisons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, R.S.; Chapman, D.C.; Biedenbach, J.M.; Robertson, L. [NBS, Corpus Christi, TX (United States). NFCR Field Research Station

    1994-12-31

    As part of their continuing development and evaluation of the porewater toxicity test approach for assessing the quality of marine and estuarine sediments, a variety of studies involving species and endpoint comparisons as well as validation studies have recently been conducted. The results from numerous extensive sediment quality assessment surveys have demonstrated that porewater toxicity tests are considerably more sensitive than the standard solid-phase tests and invariably exhibit a higher degree of concordance with sediment quality assessment guidelines than the standard tests. Species that have been evaluated for use in testing marine and estuarine pore water include a life-cycle test with the polychaete Dinophilus gyrociliatus, survival and hatching success with embryo-larval stages of red drum Sciaaenops ocellatus, survival of nauplii stages of the harpacticoid copepod Longipedia sp., and three different assays (fertilization, embryological development, and cytogenetic) with the sea urchin Arbacia punctulata. The different species and end points have been compared using sediment pore water from a variety of contaminated sites. Although the results of tests with the different species and end points were often comparable, in general, the sea urchin embryological development assay appears to be the most sensitive porewater test evaluated thus far in their laboratory.

  15. Chlorophyll concentration assays

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    heaven

    2012-05-10

    May 10, 2012 ... In compliance to the recent surveys on algal species and their potentials to produce biologically active compounds, seven algal species belonging to cyanobacteria such as Spirulina platensis, Nostoc linckia, Phormidium autumnale, Tolypothrix distorta and Microcystis aeruginosa and green algae such.

  16. Eugenol Toxicity in Human Dental Pulp Fibroblasts of Primary Teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar-García, Maria; Rodríguez-Contreras, Karen; Ruiz-Rodríguez, Socorro; Pierdant-Pérez, Mauricio; Cerda-Cristerna, Bernardino; Pozos-Guillén, Amaury

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the eugenol concentrations at which toxicity occurs in human dental pulp fibroblasts of primary teeth. Samples of primary dental pulp tissue were taken. Tissue samples were seeded by means of explant technique and used in the 4(th)-5th pass. Single Cell Gel Electrophoresis (Comet), phenazine MeThoSulfate (MTS), LIVE/DEAD Cell Viability/Toxicity and trypan blue assays for evaluation of the cytotoxicity of increasing concentrations of eugenol (0.06 to 810 μM) were performed. The results of toxicity tests showed toxic effects on dental pulp fibroblasts, even at very low concentrations of eugenol (0.06 μM). Very low concentrations of eugenol produce high toxicity in human dental pulp fibroblasts. All of the concentrations of eugenol that we evaluated produced high toxicity in human dental pulp fibroblasts of primary teeth.

  17. Assessment of precision and concordance of quantitative mitochondrial DNA assays: a collaborative international quality assurance study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hammond, Emma L.; Sayer, David; Nolan, David; Walker, Ulrich A.; Ronde, Anthony de; Montaner, Julio S. G.; Cote, Helene C. F.; Gahan, Michelle E.; Cherry, Catherine L.; Wesselingh, Steven L.; Reiss, Peter; Mallal, Simon

    2003-01-01

    Background: A number of international research groups have developed DNA quantitation assays in order to investigate the role of mitochondrial DNA depletion in anti-retroviral therapy-induced toxicities. Objectives: A collaborative study was undertaken to evaluate intra-assay precision and between

  18. 78 FR 19499 - Request for Information: The National Toxicology Program Requests Information On Assays and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    ... cell- based assays or alternative (non-rodent) animal models, that might be used to prioritize compounds for in vivo neurotoxicity testing. DATES: The deadline for receipt of information is May 1, 2013... cellular toxicity pathways in biochemical- or cell-based assays or alternative animal models that assess...

  19. Evaluation of DNA damage induced by environmental exposure to mercury in Liza aurata using the comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Carla Sofia Alves; Guilherme, Sofia Isabel Antunes Gomes; Barroso, Carlos Miguel Miguez; Verschaeve, Luc; Pacheco, Mário Guilherme Garcês; Mendo, Sónia Alexandra Leite Velho

    2010-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is one of the major aquatic contaminants even though emissions have been reduced over the years. Despite the relative abundance of investigations carried out on Hg toxicity, there is a scarcity of studies on its DNA damaging effects in fish under realistic exposure conditions. This study assessed the Hg genotoxicity in Golden grey mullets (Liza aurata) at Laranjo basin, a particularly contaminated area of Ria de Aveiro (Portugal) well known for its Hg contamination gradient. (1) Fish were seasonally caught at Laranjo basin and at a reference site (S. Jacinto), and (2) animals from the reference site were transplanted and caged (at bottom and surface), for 3 days, in two different locations within Laranjo basin. Using the comet assay, blood was analyzed for genetic damage and apoptotic cell frequency. The seasonal survey showed greater DNA damage in the Hg-contaminated area for all sampling seasons excluding winter. The temporal variation pattern of DNA lesions was: summer approximately autumn > winter > spring. Fish caged at Laranjo also exhibited greater DNA damage than those caged at the reference site, highlighting the importance of gill uptake on the toxicity of this metal. No increased susceptibility to apoptosis was detected in either wild or caged fish, indicating that mercury damages DNA of blood cells by a nonapoptotic mechanism. Both L. aurata and the comet assay proved to be sensitive and suitable for genotoxicity biomonitoring in mercury-contaminated coastal systems.

  20. Toxicity of individual naphthenic acids to Vibrio fischeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, David; Scarlett, Alan G; West, Charles E; Rowland, Steven J

    2011-11-15

    Numerous studies have suggested that the toxicity of organic compounds containing at least one carboxylic acid group and broadly classified as "naphthenic acids", is of environmental concern. For example, the acute toxicity of the more than 1 billion m(3) of oil sands process-affected water and the hormonal activity of some offshore produced waters has been attributed to the acids. However, experimental evidence for the toxicity of the individual acids causing these effects has not been very forthcoming. Instead, most data have been gathered from assays of incompletely characterized extracts of the water, which may contain other toxic constituents. An alternative approach is to assay the individual identified toxicants. Since numerous petroleum-derived naphthenic acids and some in oil sands process water, have recently been identified, we were able to measure the toxicity of some individual acids to the bioluminescent bacterium, Vibrio fischeri. Thirty-five pure individual acids were either synthesized or purchased for this purpose. We also used the US EPA ECOSAR computer model to predict the toxicity of each acid to the water flea, Daphnia magna. Both are well-accepted toxicological screening end points. The results show how toxic some of the naphthenic acids really are (e.g., V. fischeri Effective Concentrations for 50% response (EC(50)) 0.004 to 0.7 mM) and reveal the influence of hydrophobicity and aqueous solubility on the toxicities. Comparison with measured toxicities of other known, but more minor, constituents of oil sands process water, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and alkylphenols, helps place these toxicities into a wider context. Given the reported toxicological effects of naphthenic acids to other organisms (e.g., fish, plants), the toxicities of the acids to further end points should now be determined.

  1. Gold nanoparticle antibody conjugates for use in competitive lateral flow assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailes, Julian; Mayoss, Samantha; Teale, Phil; Soloviev, Mikhail

    2012-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are widely used in a variety of biomedical diagnostic assays and for imaging. Their popularity stems from key properties such as their low toxicity and high extinction coefficients, as well as straightforward synthesis methods that allow GNPs to be produced quickly and inexpensively. Here we describe the use of GNPs for visual detection in a lateral flow assay using benzodiazepine affinity assay to illustrate the methods.

  2. ATSDR Marines Health Survey

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-08-30

    This podcast gives an overview of the health survey ATSDR is conducting of more than 300,000 people who lived or worked at Camp Lejeune or Camp Pendleton in the 1970s and 1980s.  Created: 8/30/2011 by Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR).   Date Released: 8/30/2011.

  3. FLUIDICS DEVICE FOR ASSAY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    The present invention relates to a device for use in performing assays on standard laboratory solid supports whereon chemical entities are attached. The invention furthermore relates to the use of such a device and a kit comprising such a device. The device according to the present invention...... is adapted to receive one or more replaceable solid support(s) (40) onto which chemical entities (41) are attached, said device comprising a base (1, 60, 80, 300, 400, 10, 70, 140, 20, 90, 120, 150, 30, 100), one or more inlet(s) (5), one or more outlet(s) (6). The base and the solid support (40) defines......, when operatively connected, one or more chambers (21) comprising the chemical entities (41), the inlet(s) (5) and outlet(s) (6) and chambers (21) being in fluid connection. The device further comprise means for providing differing chemical conditions in each chamber (21)....

  4. Females and Toxic Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-14

    than uplifting followers. Toxic leadership plummets productivity and applies brakes to organizational growth , causing progress to screech to a halt...uplifting followers. Toxic leadership plummets productivity and applies brakes to organizational growth , causing progress to screech to a halt.”5...FEMALES AND TOXIC LEADERSHIP A thesis presented to the Faculty of the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College in

  5. Survival assays using Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hae-Eun H; Jung, Yoonji; Lee, Seung-Jae V

    2017-02-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans is an important model organism with many useful features, including rapid development and aging, easy cultivation, and genetic tractability. Survival assays using C. elegans are powerful methods for studying physiological processes. In this review, we describe diverse types of C. elegans survival assays and discuss the aims, uses, and advantages of specific assays. C. elegans survival assays have played key roles in identifying novel genetic factors that regulate many aspects of animal physiology, such as aging and lifespan, stress response, and immunity against pathogens. Because many genetic factors discovered using C. elegans are evolutionarily conserved, survival assays can provide insights into mechanisms underlying physiological processes in mammals, including humans.

  6. CHEMICAL TOXICITY OF URANIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sermin Cam

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Uranium, occurs naturally in the earth’s crust, is an alpha emitter radioactive element from the actinide group. For this reason, U-235 and U-238, are uranium isotopes with long half lives, have got radiological toxicity. But, for natural-isotopic-composition uranium (NatU, there is greater risk from chemical toxicity than radiological toxicity. When uranium is get into the body with anyway, also its chemical toxicity must be thought. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2007; 6(3.000: 215-220

  7. Genotoxicity evaluation of water soil leachates by Ames test, comet assay, and preliminary Tradescantia micronucleus assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lah, B; Vidic, T; Glasencnik, E; Cepeljnik, T; Gorjanc, G; Marinsek-Logar, Romana

    2008-04-01

    Combining genotoxicity/mutagenicity tests and physico-chemical methodologies can be useful for determining the potential genotoxic contaminants in soil samples. The aim of our study was to evaluate the genotoxicity of soil by applying an integrated physico-chemical-biological approach. Soil samples were collected at six sampling points in a Slovenian industrial and agricultural region where contamination by heavy metals and sulphur dioxide (SO(2)) are primarily caused by a nearby power plant. The in vitro alkaline version of the comet assay on water soil leachates was performed with Caco-2 and HepG2 cells. A parallel genotoxicity evaluation of the samples was performed by Ames test using Salmonella typhimurium and the Tradescantia micronucleus test. Pedological analyses, heavy metal content determination, and different physico-chemical analyses, were also performed utilizing standard methodology. Water leachates of soil samples were prepared according to standard methods. Since only a battery of biotests with prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms or cells can accurately estimate the effects of (geno)toxicants in soil samples and water soil leachates, a combination of three bioassays, with cells or organisms belonging to different trophic levels, was used. Genotoxicity of all six water soil leachates was proven by the comet assay on both human cell lines, however no positive results were detected by bacterial assay, Ames test. The Tradescantia micronucleus assay showed increase in micronuclei formation for three samples. According to these results we can assume that the comet assay was the most sensitive assay, followed by the micronucleus test. The Ames test does not appear to be sensitive enough for water soil leachates genotoxicity evaluations where heavy metal contamination is anticipated.

  8. Toxicity of sediments surrounding the Gunpowder Neck Superfund Site at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Final report, August 1992-December 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haley, M.V.; Anthony, J.S.; Chester, N.A.; Kurnas, C.W.

    1995-07-01

    From the late 1940s through the 1960s, the standard practice for disposing of toxic chemicals at Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD, was open burning. This disposal site has since been placed on the National Priority List (NPt) by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. In the spring 1992, sediment samples were taken from waterways that surround that disposal area. Chemical analysis and sediment toxicity assays (Ampelisca abdita) were conducted. Toxicity comparison, with sediment leachate from an Adapted Toxicity Characteristic teaching Procedure (ATCLP), were made using Daphnia magna and a fluorescent bacterium Photobacterium phosphoreum in MICROTOX assays. Amphipods showed a wide range of mortality in mud as well as coarser sediments indicating substrate preference is not critical to the outcome of the assay. Toxicity results from the leachates showed the sediments were not toxic to daphnia and MICROTOX assays.

  9. Performance indexes of a dot-enzime-linked immunosorbent assay (dot-ELISA and an ezyme-linked immunosorbent assay (IgG-ELISA for field surveys of new world leishmaniasis Índices de desempenho do dot-ELISA e do IgG-ELISA, em inquéritos soroepidemiológicos da leishmaniose do Novo Mundo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Carolina S. Guimarães

    1991-10-01

    Full Text Available Diagnostic performance indexes of sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and efficiency were determined for dot-ELISA and IgG-ELISA tests in 340 leishmaniasis sera. Sensitivity of the dot-ELISA was significantly lower than IgG-ELISA's; the two tests had indexes of specificity and positive predictive value of the same magnitude. Seventy-eight sera gave a negative dot-ELISA test result and a positive IgG-ELISA test result. When sera were classified according to different criteria as how to interpret this diversity, the kappa statistic did not corroborate the classification indicating that the two tests display a substantial strength of agreement. The results presented indicate that performance indexes accrued in a survey where variables arc well known may be extrapolated to other population studies if the disease presents itself as highly prevalent (due to a selection bias or not and may be expected to discriminate a disease status among test positives.Índices de desempenho diagnóstico de sensibilidade, especificidade, valor preditivo positivo e eficiência foram determinados nas reações de dot-ELISA e IgG-ELISA em 340 soros de leishmaniose mucocutânea. A sensibilidade do dot-ELISA foi significativamente mais baixa que a da IgG-ELISA e os dois testes tiveram índices de especificidade e de valor de predição positivo da mesma magnitude. Setenta e oito soros tinham resultado negativo à reação de dot-ELISA e resultado positivo ao IgG-ELISA. Quando os soros foram examinados de acordo com diferentes critérios de análise, quanto a esta discrepância a estatística kappa não corroborou esta hipótese indicando que os dois testes concordavam substancialmente. Os resultados apresentados indicam que os índices de desempenho diagnóstico obtidos em trabalhos de campo onde haja boa caracterização das variáveis podem ser extrapolados a outros estudos populacionais desde que a doença se mostre de alta prevalência (devido a um vi

  10. Evaluation of soil toxicity at Joliet Army Ammunition Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simini, M.; Amos, J.C. [Geo-Centers, Inc., Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD (United States). Gunpowder Branch; Wentsel, R.S.; Checkai, R.T.; Phillips, C.T.; Chester, N.A. [Army ERDEC, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD (United States); Major, M.A. [Army CHPPM, Frederick, MD (United States)

    1995-04-01

    Environmental toxicity testing and chemical analyses of soil were performed as part of an ecological risk assessment at the Joliet Army Ammunition Plant (JAAP), Joliet, Illinois. Soils were collected from an area where munitions were loaded, assembled, and packed (area L7, group 1), and from an area where waste explosives were burned on unprotected soil (area L2). Control samples were collected from an adjacent field. Soil toxicity was determined using early seedling growth and vigor tests, earthworm survival and growth tests, and Microtox{reg_sign} assays. Relative toxicity of soils was determined within each area based on statistical significant (p = 0.05) of plant and earthworm growth and survival, and the effective concentration at which luminescence of the bacterium Photobacterium phosphoreum was reduced by 50% (EC50) in the Microtox assay. Samples were designated as having high, moderate, or no significant toxicity. Soil that had significant toxicity according to at least one test, and representative samples showing no toxicity, were analyzed for munitions via HPLC. Chemical residues found in soils were 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT); 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene (TNB); 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT); 2,6-dinitrotoluene; 2-amino-4,6-DNT; 4-amino-2,6-DNT; 1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX); and octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX). All soils with no significant toxicity were void of these chemicals. However, some soils void of munitions still showed toxicity that may have been caused by elevated levels of heavy metals. Linear regressions of toxicity test results vs. chemical concentrations showed that TNT and TNB accounted for most off the soil toxicity. Lowest-observable-effect concentrations (LOEC) of TNT were determined from these data. This study presents a simple, relatively inexpensive methodology for assessing toxicity of soils containing TNT, RDX, and other contaminants related to munitions production.

  11. Toward in vitro biomarkers for developmental toxicity and their extrapolation to the in vivo situation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louisse, Jochem; Verwei, Miriam; Woutersen, Ruud A; Blaauboer, Bas J; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M

    2012-01-01

    Reliable in vitro and in silico assays as alternatives for in vivo developmental toxicity studies are urgently needed, for the replacement, reduction and refinement (3Rs) of animal use in toxicological research. Therefore, relevant biomarkers for in vivo developmental toxicity in in vitro assays are needed. The present review gives an overview of alternative assays, as described in literature, for in vivo developmental toxicity, including the effects (readouts) assessed in these assays. The authors discuss how these data may be used to obtain relevant biomarkers for in vivo developmental toxicity, and how in vitro effect data can be translated to the in vivo situation using physiologically based kinetic (PBK) modeling. Relevance of readouts in in vitro developmental toxicity assays as predictive biomarkers for in vivo developmental toxicity should be evaluated by comparing the obtained in vitro effect concentrations with in vivo internal concentrations at dose levels causing developmental toxicity. Extrapolation of the in vitro effect concentrations to in vivo dose levels using PBK modeling (i.e., reverse dosimetry) is promising in its use to derive points of departure for risk assessment, enabling the use of in vitro toxicity data in the safety assessment of compounds.

  12. Toxic proteins in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Liuyi; Van Damme, Els J M

    2015-09-01

    Plants have evolved to synthesize a variety of noxious compounds to cope with unfavorable circumstances, among which a large group of toxic proteins that play a critical role in plant defense against predators and microbes. Up to now, a wide range of harmful proteins have been discovered in different plants, including lectins, ribosome-inactivating proteins, protease inhibitors, ureases, arcelins, antimicrobial peptides and pore-forming toxins. To fulfill their role in plant defense, these proteins exhibit various degrees of toxicity towards animals, insects, bacteria or fungi. Numerous studies have been carried out to investigate the toxic effects and mode of action of these plant proteins in order to explore their possible applications. Indeed, because of their biological activities, toxic plant proteins are also considered as potentially useful tools in crop protection and in biomedical applications, such as cancer treatment. Genes encoding toxic plant proteins have been introduced into crop genomes using genetic engineering technology in order to increase the plant's resistance against pathogens and diseases. Despite the availability of ample information on toxic plant proteins, very few publications have attempted to summarize the research progress made during the last decades. This review focuses on the diversity of toxic plant proteins in view of their toxicity as well as their mode of action. Furthermore, an outlook towards the biological role(s) of these proteins and their potential applications is discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Assay for calcium channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glossmann, H.; Ferry, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    This chapter focuses on biochemical assays for Ca/sup 2 +/-selective channels in electrically excitable membranes which are blocked in electrophysiological and pharmacological experiments by verapamil, 1,4-dihydropyridines, diltiazen (and various other drugs), as well as inorganic di- or trivalent cations. The strategy employed is to use radiolabeled 1,4-dihydropyridine derivatives which block calcium channels with ED/sub 50/ values in the nanomolar range. Although tritiated d-cis-diltiazem and verapamil can be used to label calcium channels, the 1,4-dihydropyridines offer numerous advantages. The various sections cover tissue specificity of channel labeling, the complex interactions of divalent cations with the (/sup 3/H)nimodipine-labeled calcium channels, and the allosteric regulation of (/sup 3/H)nimodipine binding by the optically pure enantiomers of phenylalkylamine and benzothiazepine calcium channel blockers. A comparison of the properties of different tritiated 1,4-dihydropyridine radioligands and the iodinated channel probe (/sup 125/I)iodipine is given.

  14. Mechanisms of Phosphine Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisa S. Nath

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Fumigation with phosphine gas is by far the most widely used treatment for the protection of stored grain against insect pests. The development of high-level resistance in insects now threatens its continued use. As there is no suitable chemical to replace phosphine, it is essential to understand the mechanisms of phosphine toxicity to increase the effectiveness of resistance management. Because phosphine is such a simple molecule (PH3, the chemistry of phosphorus is central to its toxicity. The elements above and below phosphorus in the periodic table are nitrogen (N and arsenic (As, which also produce toxic hydrides, namely, NH3 and AsH3. The three hydrides cause related symptoms and similar changes to cellular and organismal physiology, including disruption of the sympathetic nervous system, suppressed energy metabolism and toxic changes to the redox state of the cell. We propose that these three effects are interdependent contributors to phosphine toxicity.

  15. Comparative Toxicity of Gasoline and Diesel Engine Emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JeanClare Seagrave; Joe L. Mauderly; Barbara Zielinska; John Sagebiel; Kevin Whitney; Doughlas R. Lawson; Michael Gurevich

    2000-06-19

    Better information on the comparative toxicity of airborne emissions from different types of engines is needed to guide the development of heavy vehicle engine, fuel, lubricant, and exhaust after-treatment technologies, and to place the health hazards of current heavy vehicle emissions in their proper perspective. To help fill this information gap, samples of vehicle exhaust particles and semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOC) were collected and analyzed. The biological activity of the combined particle-SVOC samples is being tested using standardized toxicity assays. This report provides an update on the design of experiments to test the relative toxicity of engine emissions from various sources.

  16. Acute toxicity and genotoxicity of fermented traditional medicine oyaksungi-san

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwayong Park

    2017-06-01

    Conclusion: As a whole, no acute toxicity or genotoxicity were observed in all the assays examined. Therefore, fermented OY is considered to be a safe material that can be used for development of complementary and alternative medicine using bioconversion.

  17. Sediment toxicity data from the NOAA National Status and Trends Program, March 1991 to July 1996 (NODC Accession 9800146)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — As part of its bioeffects assessment program. NOAA has begun a series of surveys of the toxicity and other biological effects of toxicants in selected bays and...

  18. Pediatric Toxic Shock Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Yee

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Audience: This scenario was developed to educate emergency medicine residents on the diagnosis and management of a pediatric patient with toxic shock syndrome. The case is also appropriate for teaching of medical students and advanced practice providers, as well as a review of the principles of crisis resource management, teamwork, and communication. Introduction: Toxic shock syndrome is a low-frequency, high-acuity scenario requiring timely identification and aggressive management. If patients suffering from this condition are managed incorrectly, they may progress into multi-organ dysfunction and potentially death. Toxic shock syndrome has been associated with Streptococcus and Staphylococcus aureus (Staph. Approximately half of Staph cases are associated with menstruation, which was first described in the 1970s-1980s and was associated with the use of absorbent tampons.1 Group A Streptococcus may cause complications such as necrotizing fasciitis and gangrenous myositis.2 Pediatric patients may present critically ill from toxic shock syndrome. Providers need to perform a thorough history and physical exam to discern the source of infection. Management requires aggressive care with antibiotics and IV fluids. Objectives: By the end of this simulation session, the learner will be able to: 1 Recognize toxic shock syndrome. 2 Review the importance of a thorough physical exam. 3 Discuss management of toxic shock syndrome, including supportive care and the difference in antibiotic choices for streptococcal and staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome. 4 Appropriately disposition a patient suffering from toxic shock syndrome. 5 Communicate effectively with team members and nursing staff during a resuscitation of a critically ill patient. Method: This session was conducted using high-fidelity simulation, followed by a debriefing session and lecture on toxic shock syndrome.

  19. Electronic Cigarette Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, J Drew; Michaels, David; Orellana-Barrios, Menfil; Nugent, Kenneth

    2017-04-01

    Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) are often advertised as a healthier product when compared with traditional cigarettes. Currently, there are limited data to support this and only a threat of federal regulation from the US Food and Drug Administration. Calls to poison control centers about e-cigarette toxicity, especially in children, and case reports of toxic exposures have increased over the past 3 years. This research letter reports the frequency of hazardous exposures to e-cigarettes and characterizes the reported adverse health effects associated with e-cigarette toxicity.

  20. Liquid Nicotine Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Won; Baum, Carl R

    2015-07-01

    E-cigarettes, also known as electronic nicotine delivery systems and electronic cigarettes, are advertised as a healthier alternative product to tobacco cigarettes despite limited data on the consequences of e-cigarette use. Currently, there are no US Food and Drug Administration or other federal regulations of e-cigarettes, and calls to poison control centers regarding liquid nicotine toxicity, especially in children, are on the rise. This article presents the background and mechanism of action of e-cigarettes as well as up-to-date details of the toxicity of liquid nicotine. We also present management strategies in the setting of liquid nicotine toxicity.

  1. Sulforhodamine B colorimetric assay for cytotoxicity screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vichai, Vanicha; Kirtikara, Kanyawim

    2006-01-01

    The sulforhodamine B (SRB) assay is used for cell density determination, based on the measurement of cellular protein content. The method described here has been optimized for the toxicity screening of compounds to adherent cells in a 96-well format. After an incubation period, cell monolayers are fixed with 10% (wt/vol) trichloroacetic acid and stained for 30 min, after which the excess dye is removed by washing repeatedly with 1% (vol/vol) acetic acid. The protein-bound dye is dissolved in 10 mM Tris base solution for OD determination at 510 nm using a microplate reader. The results are linear over a 20-fold range of cell numbers and the sensitivity is comparable to those of fluorometric methods. The method not only allows a large number of samples to be tested within a few days, but also requires only simple equipment and inexpensive reagents. The SRB assay is therefore an efficient and highly cost-effective method for screening.

  2. Sulforhodamine B assay and chemosensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Wieland

    2005-01-01

    The sulforhodamine B (SRB) assay was developed by Skehan and colleagues to measure drug-induced cytotoxicity and cell proliferation for large-scale drug-screening applications. Its principle is based on the ability of the protein dye sulforhodamine B to bind electrostatically and pH dependent on protein basic amino acid residues of trichloroacetic acid-fixed cells. Under mild acidic conditions it binds to and under mild basic conditions it can be extracted from cells and solubilized for measurement. Results of the SRB assay were linear with cell number and cellular protein measured at cellular densities ranging from 1 to 200% of confluence. Its sensitivity is comparable with that of several fluorescence assays and superior to that of Lowry or Bradford. The signal-to-noise ratio is favorable and the resolution is 1000-2000 cells/well. It performed similarly compared to other cytotoxicity assays such as MTT or clonogenic assay. The SRB assay possesses a colorimetric end point and is nondestructive and indefinitely stable. These practical advances make the SRB assay an appropriate and sensitive assay to measure drug-induced cytotoxicity even at large-scale application.

  3. Toxics Release Inventory (TRI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) is a dataset compiled by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). It contains information on the release and waste...

  4. Toxicity Reference Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Toxicity Reference Database (ToxRefDB) contains approximately 30 years and $2 billion worth of animal studies. ToxRefDB allows scientists and the interested...

  5. Local anaesthetic toxicity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    treatment strategies. Introduction ... depression and central nervous system and cardiovascular toxicity increased .... requiring analgesic therapy beyond that of surgery. ..... Progress in Biophysics and Molecular Biology 2006;91:1 –82. 32.

  6. [Toxicity of hydroxyquinoline derivatives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashov, D; Simeonov, S P; Drumev, D; Peĭnikova, Ts; Dzhurov, A

    1980-01-01

    We studied a 90 day toxicity in dogs of the compound broxyquinoline + broxaldine--5:1 (enteroquin), applied orally and daily in doses of 0.1 and 0.2/kg t/24 h. We established the toxic manifestations during the period after the 15th day of the treatment: leukopenia, neutropenia and lymphocytosis (by 0.2 kg t/24 h). After the second and fifth day we observed a decrease of appetite, depression of the CNS, paralyses, arrhythmia, progressing loss in weight, proteinorrhea (more pronounced with those receiving 0.2/kg t (24 h); lethal consequence with some part of the animals 25% (ba 0.1/kg t) and 50% (by 0.2 kg t). We found out pathohistologically necrobiotic changes in the medulla oblongata and the kidneys, toxic distrophy of the liver, blood-vessel injuries. The toxic changes observed can be interpreted in connection with the presence of a species specific reaction.

  7. Digital Assays Part II: Digital Protein and Cell Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Amar S

    2017-08-01

    A digital assay is one in which the sample is partitioned into many containers such that each partition contains a discrete number of biological entities (0, 1, 2, 3, . . .). A powerful technique in the biologist's toolkit, digital assays bring a new level of precision in quantifying nucleic acids, measuring proteins and their enzymatic activity, and probing single-cell genotype and phenotype. Where part I of this review focused on the fundamentals of partitioning and digital PCR, part II turns its attention to digital protein and cell assays. Digital enzyme assays measure the kinetics of single proteins with enzymatic activity. Digital enzyme-linked immunoassays (ELISAs) quantify antigenic proteins with 2 to 3 log lower detection limit than conventional ELISA, making them well suited for low-abundance biomarkers. Digital cell assays probe single-cell genotype and phenotype, including gene expression, intracellular and surface proteins, metabolic activity, cytotoxicity, and transcriptomes (scRNA-seq). These methods exploit partitioning to 1) isolate single cells or proteins, 2) detect their activity via enzymatic amplification, and 3) tag them individually by coencapsulating them with molecular barcodes. When scaled, digital assays reveal stochastic differences between proteins or cells within a population, a key to understanding biological heterogeneity. This review is intended to give a broad perspective to scientists interested in adopting digital assays into their workflows.

  8. Disagreement between Human Papillomavirus Assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebolj, Matejka; Preisler, Sarah; Ejegod, Ditte Møller

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to determine the disagreement in primary cervical screening between four human papillomavirus assays: Hybrid Capture 2, cobas, CLART, and APTIMA. Material from 5,064 SurePath samples of women participating in routine cervical screening in Copenhagen, Denmark, was tested with the four...... of considerable disagreement between human papillomavirus assays. This suggested that the extent of disagreement in primary screening is neither population- nor storage media-specific, leaving assay design differences as the most probable cause. The substantially different selection of women testing positive...... on the various human papillomavirus assays represents an unexpected challenge for the choice of an assay in primary cervical screening, and for follow up of in particular HPV positive/cytology normal women....

  9. Past, Present and Emerging Toxicity Issues for Jet Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    dermal sensitizer. In this assay, 25 μL JP-8 was applied to the ear flaps of female CBA/ Ca mice for three consecutive days; allergic response was...Witschi, H., 1981. Acute toxicity of selected crude and refined shale oil- and petroleum-derived substances. Ch. 11. In: Griest, W.H., Guerin , M.R

  10. Investigation of monocrotophos toxic effects on human lymphocytes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Investigation of monocrotophos toxic effects on human lymphocytes at cytogenetic level. ... The analysis revealed that more satellite associations, breaks and gaps were found which were statistically significant (P < 0.05) when compared to controls. Comet assay was used to assess the possibility of monocrotophos ...

  11. Degradation and toxicity reduction of phenol by ultrasound waves ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of parameters such as pH, kinetic constants and initial phenol concentration on the sonochemical degradation of phenol and toxicity assay were studied. The experimental results showed that lower pH and lower concentration of phenol favor the phenol degradation. But the rates of phenol degradation under ...

  12. Hyperpolarized NMR Probes for Biological Assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Meier

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade, the development of nuclear spin polarization enhanced (hyperpolarized molecular probes has opened up new opportunities for studying the inner workings of living cells in real time. The hyperpolarized probes are produced ex situ, introduced into biological systems and detected with high sensitivity and contrast against background signals using high resolution NMR spectroscopy. A variety of natural, derivatized and designed hyperpolarized probes has emerged for diverse biological studies including assays of intracellular reaction progression, pathway kinetics, probe uptake and export, pH, redox state, reactive oxygen species, ion concentrations, drug efficacy or oncogenic signaling. These probes are readily used directly under natural conditions in biofluids and are often directly developed and optimized for cellular assays, thus leaving little doubt about their specificity and utility under biologically relevant conditions. Hyperpolarized molecular probes for biological NMR spectroscopy enable the unbiased detection of complex processes by virtue of the high spectral resolution, structural specificity and quantifiability of NMR signals. Here, we provide a survey of strategies used for the selection, design and use of hyperpolarized NMR probes in biological assays, and describe current limitations and developments.

  13. Recurrent amiodarone pulmonary toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chendrasekhar, A; Barke, R A; Druck, P

    1996-01-01

    Amiodarone, a widely used antiarrhythmic drug, is associated with pulmonary toxicity, with an estimated mortality of 1% to 33%. Standard treatment for amiodarone pulmonary toxicity (APT) has been discontinuance of the drug and steroid therapy. We report a case of APT that recurred after withdrawal of steroids and failed to respond to reinstatement of steroid therapy. Recurrent APT is a rare clinical entity that has been reported only twice in recent literature.

  14. [Toxic alcohol poisonings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulicki, Paweł; Głogowski, Tomasz

    Accidental or intentional poisonings with ethylene glycol or methanol constitute a serious toxicological problem in many countries. Both alcohols are quickly metabolized by alcohol dehydrogenase to toxic metabolites responsible for high anion gap severe metabolic acidosis and profound neurological, cardiopulmonary, renal disturbances and death. In the early period, the competing inhibition the alcohol dehydrogenase with ethanol or fomepizol may successfully prevent the formation of the toxic metabolites. Once severe acidosis develops an emergency hemodialysis is required.

  15. Toward in vitro biomarkers for developmental toxicity and their extrapolation to the in vivo situation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louisse, J.; Verwei, M.; Woutersen, R.A.; Blaauboer, B.J.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Reliable in vitro and in silico assays as alternatives for in vivo developmental toxicity studies are urgently needed, for the replacement, reduction and refinement (3Rs) of animal use in toxicological research. Therefore, relevant biomarkers for in vivo developmental toxicity in in

  16. Acute toxicity and bio-accumulation of mercury and copper in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The acute toxicity of Mercury and Copper on C. africanus and T. fuscatus and the bio-accumulation potentials of the metals were investigated in laboratory experiments employing standard bio–assay techniques. On the basis of LC50 values, both metals had similar magnitudes of toxicity against C. africanus. However ...

  17. In vitro developmental toxicity test detects inhibition of stem cell differentiation by silica nanoparticles.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Park, M.V.; Annema, W.; Salvati, A.; Lesniak, A.; Elsaesser, A.; Barnes, C.; McKerr, G.; Howard, C.; Lynch, I.; Dawson, K.; Piersma, A.H.; de Jong, W.H.

    2009-01-01

    While research into the potential toxic properties of nanomaterials is now increasing, the area of developmental toxicity has remained relatively uninvestigated. The embryonic stem cell test is an in vitro screening assay used to investigate the embryotoxic potential of chemicals by determining

  18. Cellular toxicity and bioaccumulationof silver nanoparticles in the marine polychaete, Nereis diversicolor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    cong, Yi; Banta, Gary Thomas; Selck, Henriette

    In this study, the toxicities of commercial silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs, 20 and 80 nm) were compared with the toxicities of Ag+ ions in the marine sediment-dwelling polychaete, Nereis diversicolor, after 10 d of sediment exposure, using lysosomal membrane stability (neutral red assay), DNA damage...

  19. Hydrolysis of Toxic Natural Glucosides Catalyzed by Cyclodextrin Dicyanohydrins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, Jeannette; Nielsen, Erik Holm; Bols, Mikael

    2008-01-01

    The hydrolysis of toxic 7-hydroxycoumarin glucosides and other aryl and alkyl glucosides, catalyzed by modified a- and ß-cyclodextrin dicyanohydrins, was investigated using different UV, redox, or HPAEC detection assays. The catalyzed reactions all followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics, and an impre......The hydrolysis of toxic 7-hydroxycoumarin glucosides and other aryl and alkyl glucosides, catalyzed by modified a- and ß-cyclodextrin dicyanohydrins, was investigated using different UV, redox, or HPAEC detection assays. The catalyzed reactions all followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics...... degree of catalysis was also found for the toxic hydroxycoumarin esculin. A novel synthesized diaminomethyl ß-cyclodextrin showed a weak catalysis of p-nitrophenyl ß-D-glucopyranoside hydrolysis....

  20. Using single-species toxicity tests, community-level responses, and toxicity identification evaluations to investigate effluent impacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maltby, L.; Clayton, S.A.; Yu, H.; McLoughlin, N.; Wood, R.M.; Yin, D.

    2000-01-01

    Whole effluent toxicity (WET) tests are increasingly used to monitor compliance of consented discharges, but few studies have related toxicity measured using WET tests to receiving water impacts. Here the authors adopt a four-stage procedure to investigate the toxicity and biological impact of a point source discharge and to identify the major toxicants. In stage 1, standard WET tests were employed to determine the toxicity of the effluent. This was then followed by an assessment of receiving water toxicity using in situ deployment of indigenous (Gammarus pulex) and standard (Daphnia magna) test species. The third stage involved the use of biological survey techniques to assess the impact of the discharge on the structure and functioning of the benthic macroinvertebrate community. In stage 4, toxicity identification evaluations (TIE) were used to identify toxic components in the effluent. Receiving-water toxicity and ecological impact detected downstream of the discharge were consistent with the results of WET tests performed on the effluent. Downstream of the discharge, there was a reduction in D. magna survival, in G. pulex survival and feeding rate, in detritus processing, and in biotic indices based on macroinvertebrate community structure. The TIE studies suggested that chlorine was the principal toxicant in the effluent.

  1. In Vitro Toxicity Assessment Technique for Volatile ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is tasked with evaluating the human health, environmental, and wildlife effects of over 80,000 chemicals registered for use in the environment and commerce. The challenge is that sparse chemical data exists; traditional toxicity testing methods are slow, costly, involve animal studies, and cannot keep up with a chemical registry that typically grows by at least 1000 chemicals every year. In recent years, High Throughput Screening (HTS) has been used in order to prioritize chemicals for traditional toxicity screening or to complement traditional toxicity studies. HTS is an in vitro approach of rapidly assaying a large number of chemicals for biochemical activity using robotics and automation. However, no method currently exists for screening volatile chemicals such as air pollutants in a HTS fashion. Additionally, significant uncertainty regarding in vitro to in in vivo extrapolation (IVIVE) remains. An approach to bridge the IVIVE gap and the current lack of ability to screen volatile chemicals in a HTS fashion is by using a probe molecule (PrM) technique. The proposed technique uses chemicals with empirical human pharmacokinetic data as PrMs to study toxicity of molecules with no known data for gas-phase analysis. We are currently studying the xenobiotic-metabolizing enzyme CYP2A6 using transfected BEAS-2B bronchial epithelial cell line. The CYP2A6 pathway activity is studied by the formation of cotinine from nicot

  2. Development and Evaluation of Reproductive and Developmental Toxicity Tests for Assessing the Hazards of Environmental Contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-08-01

    place the 35 number on the dorsal surface. Five groups of 5 males were assigned to treatment groups, randomized by block design using body weights as...extracts frogs or embryos. Methods of ^^"^^t the soil for 60 to 90 days. Methods (SCFE) via earthworms or other food and^recrexposur contaminated and of...Spills 4 2. The Need for Reproductive Toxicity Testing 3. Reproductive Toxicity Assay Design 4. The Need for Developmental Toxicity Testing 5

  3. Elemental copper nanoparticle toxicity to anaerobic ammonium oxidation and the influence of ethylene diamine-tetra acetic acid (EDTA) on copper toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Estrella, Jorge; Li, Guangbin; Neely, Sarah E; Puyol, Daniel; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A

    2017-10-01

    Soluble ions released by elemental copper nanoparticles (Cu(0) NP) are toxic to key microorganisms of wastewater treatment processes. However, their toxicity to anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) has not yet been studied. Chelating agents occurring in wastewater may decrease copper ions (Cu(2+)) concentration and consequently, decrease copper toxicity. This study evaluated Cu(0) NP and CuCl2 toxicity to anammox and the influence of ethylene diamine-tetra acetic acid (EDTA) on copper toxicity. Bioassays were supplemented with Cu(0) NP or CuCl2 with and without EDTA. Anammox activities were used to calculate inhibition constants (Ki). Results showed that Cu(0) NP are toxic to anammox. Ki constants with respect to added copper were 1.8- and 2.81-fold larger (less toxic) in EDTA-containing assays for Cu(0) NP and CuCl2, respectively, compared to EDTA-free assays. Additionally, Ki constants calculated in EDTA-free assays with respect the measured dissolved copper concentration were 0.023 mM Cu(0) NP and 0.014 mM CuCl2. The similarity of these Ki constants indicates that Cu(0) NP toxicity to anammox is caused by the release of Cu(2+). Finally, severe toxicity caused by 0.315 mM and Cu(0) NP 0.118 mM CuCl2 was attenuated by 88-100% when 0.14 mM EDTA was supplied. Toxicity attenuation likely occurred because EDTA complexed Cu(2+) ions, thus, decreasing their bioavailability. Overall, this study indicates that Cu(0) NP and CuCl2 are toxic to anammox, and furthermore, that EDTA attenuates Cu(0) NP and CuCl2 toxicity to anammox by complexing Cu(2+) ions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. DeepTox: Toxicity Prediction using Deep Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas eMayr

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The Tox21 Data Challenge has been the largest effort of the scientific community to compare computational methods for toxicity prediction. This challenge comprised 12,000 environmental chemicals and drugs which were measured for 12 different toxic effects by specifically designed assays. We participated in this challenge to assess the performance of Deep Learning in computational toxicity prediction. Deep Learning has already revolutionized image processing, speech recognition, and language understanding but has not yet been applied to computational toxicity. Deep Learning is founded on novel algorithms and architectures for artificial neural networks together with the recent availability of very fast computers and massive datasets. It discovers multiple levels of distributed representations of the input, with higher levels representing more abstract concepts. We hypothesized that the construction of a hierarchy of chemical features gives Deep Learning the edge over other toxicity prediction methods. Furthermore, Deep Learning naturally enables multi-task learning, that is, learning of all toxic effects in one neural network and thereby learning of highly informative chemical features.In order to utilize Deep Learning for toxicity prediction, we have developed the DeepTox pipeline. First, DeepTox normalizes the chemical representations of the compounds. Then it computes a large number of chemical descriptors that are used as input to machine learning methods. In its next step, DeepTox trains models, evaluates them, and combines the best of them to ensembles. Finally, DeepTox predicts the toxicity of new compounds. In the Tox21 Data Challenge, DeepTox had the highest performance of all computational methods winning the grand challenge, the nuclear receptor panel, the stress response panel, and six single assays (teams ``Bioinf@JKU''. We found that Deep Learning excelled in toxicity prediction and outperformed many other computational approaches

  5. Vectorization by nanoparticles decreases the overall toxicity of airborne pollutants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolphe Carpentier

    Full Text Available Atmospheric pollution is mainly composed of volatile pollutants and particulate matter that strongly interact. However, their specific roles in the induction of cellular toxicity, in particular the impact of the vectorization of atmospheric pollutants by ultrafine particles, remains to be fully elucidated. For this purpose, non-toxic poly-lactic co-glycolic acid (PLGA nanoparticles were synthesized and three pollutants (benzo(apyrene, naphthalene and di-ethyl-hexyl-phthalate were adsorbed on the surface of the nanoparticles in order to evaluate the toxicity (cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and ROS induction of these complexes to a human airway epithelial cell line. The adsorption of the pollutants onto the nanoparticles was confirmed by HPLC analysis. Interestingly, the cytotoxicity assays (MTT, LDH and CellTox Green clearly demonstrated that the vectorization by nanoparticles decreases the toxicity of the adsorbed pollutants. Genotoxicity was assessed by the micronucleus test and the comet assay and showed no increase in primary DNA damage or in chromosomal aberrations of nanoparticle vectorized pollutants. Neither cytotoxicity nor genotoxicity was correlated with ROS induction. To conclude, our results indicate that the vectorization of pollutants by nanoparticles does not potentiate the toxicity of the pollutants studied and that, on the contrary, adsorption onto nanoparticles could protect cells against pollutants' toxicity.

  6. Vectorization by nanoparticles decreases the overall toxicity of airborne pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpentier, Rodolphe; Platel, Anne; Maiz-Gregores, Helena; Nesslany, Fabrice; Betbeder, Didier

    2017-01-01

    Atmospheric pollution is mainly composed of volatile pollutants and particulate matter that strongly interact. However, their specific roles in the induction of cellular toxicity, in particular the impact of the vectorization of atmospheric pollutants by ultrafine particles, remains to be fully elucidated. For this purpose, non-toxic poly-lactic co-glycolic acid (PLGA) nanoparticles were synthesized and three pollutants (benzo(a)pyrene, naphthalene and di-ethyl-hexyl-phthalate) were adsorbed on the surface of the nanoparticles in order to evaluate the toxicity (cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and ROS induction) of these complexes to a human airway epithelial cell line. The adsorption of the pollutants onto the nanoparticles was confirmed by HPLC analysis. Interestingly, the cytotoxicity assays (MTT, LDH and CellTox Green) clearly demonstrated that the vectorization by nanoparticles decreases the toxicity of the adsorbed pollutants. Genotoxicity was assessed by the micronucleus test and the comet assay and showed no increase in primary DNA damage or in chromosomal aberrations of nanoparticle vectorized pollutants. Neither cytotoxicity nor genotoxicity was correlated with ROS induction. To conclude, our results indicate that the vectorization of pollutants by nanoparticles does not potentiate the toxicity of the pollutants studied and that, on the contrary, adsorption onto nanoparticles could protect cells against pollutants' toxicity.

  7. ToxiFly: Can Fruit Flies be Used to Identify Toxicity Pathways for Airborne Chemicals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Current high-throughput and alternative screening assays for chemical toxicity are unable to test volatile organic compounds (VOCs), thus limiting their scope. Further, the data generated by these assays require mechanistic information to link effects at molecular targets to adve...

  8. Toxicоlogical evaluation of the plant products using Brine Shrimp (Artemia salina L. model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Меntor R. Hamidi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Many natural products could serve as the starting point in the development of modern medicines because of their numerous biological and pharmacological activities. However, some of them are known to carry toxicological properties as well. In order to achieve a safe treatment with plant products, numerous research studies have recently been focused on both pharmacology and toxicity of medicinal plants. Moreover, these studies employed efforts for alternative biological assays. Brine Shrimp Lethality Assay is the most convenient system for monitoring biological activities of various plant species. This method is very useful for preliminary assessment of toxicity of the plant extracts. Rapidness, simplicity and low requirements are several advantages of this assay. However, several conditions need to be completed, especially in the means of standardized experimental conditions (temperature, pH of the medium, salinity, aeration and light. The toxicity of herbal extracts using this assay has been determined in a concentration range of 10, 100 and 1000 µg/ml of the examined herbal extract. Most toxicity studies which use the Brine Shrimp Lethality Assay determine the toxicity after 24 hours of exposure to the tested sample. The median lethal concentration (LC50 of the test samples is obtained by a plot of percentage of the dead shrimps against the logarithm of the sample concentration. LC50 values are estimated using a probit regression analysis and compared with either Meyer’s or Clarkson’s toxicity criteria. Furthermore, the positive correlation between Meyer’s toxicity scale for Artemia salina and Gosselin, Smith and Hodge’s toxicity scale for higher animal models confirmed that the Brine Shrimp Lethality Assay is an excellent predictive tool for the toxic potential of plant extracts in humans.

  9. [Toxicity of puffer fish fins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Shunichi; Ichimaru, Shunichi; Arakawa, Osamu; Takatani, Tomohiro; Noguchi, Tamao; Ishizaki, Shoichiro; Nagashima, Yuji

    2007-10-01

    Puffer fish is prized as a Japanese traditional food and its fin is also used in the cuisine. However, whether the fin is edible or not is determined for convenience from the toxicity of skin, since little information is available about the toxicity of puffer fish fins. In the present study, we examined the toxicity of fins and skin of three toxic species, Takifugu vermicularis, T. snyderi, and T. porphyreus. The toxicity of T. vermicularis fins (puffer fish with toxic skin also have toxic fins.

  10. Biological assays in microfabricated structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Daniel M.; Fare, Thomas L.; Dong, Qianping; Fan, Z. Hugh; Davis, Timothy J.; Kumar, Rajan

    1999-04-01

    Microfluidic control in microfabricated glass channels enables miniaturized, fast, and multianalyte assays. We are applying this technology in several areas, including real- time environmental monitoring for airborne biological agents. Two complementary approaches are being used in parallel. the first is assaying for the presence of nucleotide sequences that are markers for specific hazardous, engineered bacteria. The second is an assay that monitors the functionality of an in vitro biochemical pathway, in which the pathway that is chosen is sensitive to the presence of the class of toxins to be detected. The first approach is discussed here. The detected signal from the nucleic-acid-based assay is from fluorescently labeled probes that hybridize to bead-bound amplified DNA sequences. Detection approaches and their benefits will be discussed.

  11. Development of a new integrative toxicity index based on an improvement of the sea urchin embryo toxicity test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morroni, L; Pinsino, A; Pellegrini, D; Regoli, F; Matranga, V

    2016-01-01

    The sea urchin embryo toxicity test is classically used to assess the noxious effects of contaminated marine waters and sediments. In Italian guidelines on quality of dredged sediments, the standard toxicity criteria used for this assay are based on a single endpoint at 48 hours of development, corresponding to the pluteus stage. Different typologies of abnormalities, including those which occur at earlier stages, are not categorized, thus preventing the evaluation of the actual teratogenic hazards. A new integrative toxicity index has been developed in this study based on the analysis of two developmental stages, at 24 and 48h post-fertilization, and the differentiation between development delays and germ layers impairments: the new toxicity index is calculated by integrating the frequency of abnormal embryos with the severity of such abnormalities. When tested on dredged sediments, the evaluation of increasing levels of toxicity affecting embryonic outcomes enhanced the capability to discriminate different samples, appearing particularly relevant to validate the sea urchin embryo toxicity assay, and supporting its utility in practical applications such as the sediments classification in harbor areas. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Microtiter dish biofilm formation assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Toole, George A

    2011-01-30

    Biofilms are communities of microbes attached to surfaces, which can be found in medical, industrial and natural settings. In fact, life in a biofilm probably represents the predominate mode of growth for microbes in most environments. Mature biofilms have a few distinct characteristics. Biofilm microbes are typically surrounded by an extracellular matrix that provides structure and protection to the community. Microbes growing in a biofilm also have a characteristic architecture generally comprised of macrocolonies (containing thousands of cells) surrounded by fluid-filled channels. Biofilm-grown microbes are also notorious for their resistance to a range of antimicrobial agents including clinically relevant antibiotics. The microtiter dish assay is an important tool for the study of the early stages in biofilm formation, and has been applied primarily for the study of bacterial biofilms, although this assay has also been used to study fungal biofilm formation. Because this assay uses static, batch-growth conditions, it does not allow for the formation of the mature biofilms typically associated with flow cell systems. However, the assay has been effective at identifying many factors required for initiation of biofilm formation (i.e, flagella, pili, adhesins, enzymes involved in cyclic-di-GMP binding and metabolism) and well as genes involved in extracellular polysaccharide production. Furthermore, published work indicates that biofilms grown in microtiter dishes do develop some properties of mature biofilms, such a antibiotic tolerance and resistance to immune system effectors. This simple microtiter dish assay allows for the formation of a biofilm on the wall and/or bottom of a microtiter dish. The high throughput nature of the assay makes it useful for genetic screens, as well as testing biofilm formation by multiple strains under various growth conditions. Variants of this assay have been used to assess early biofilm formation for a wide variety of microbes

  13. Clonogenic assays measure leukemia stem cell killing not detectable by chromium release and flow cytometric cytotoxicity assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Brent A; Wang, Xing-Hua; Keating, Armand

    2010-11-01

    NK-92, a permanent natural killer (NK) cell line, shows cytotoxicity against a variety of tumors and has been tested in a phase I trial. We tested the toxicity of NK-92 and chemotherapy drugs against the stem cell capacity of the acute leukemia cell line, KG1. While the chromium-release assay is the most common method for assessing cytotoxicity of immune effectors, and flow cytometry is increasingly used, the relationship of either assay to clonogenic readouts remains unknown. KG1 was assessed for stem cell frequency by serial dilution, single-cell sorting and colony growth in methylcellulose. KG1 was sorted into CD34(+) CD38(+) and CD34(+) CD38⁻ populations and recultured in liquid medium or methylcellulose to determine the proliferative capacity of each fraction. Cytotoxicity of NK-92, daunorubicin and cytarabine against KG1 was measured using the chromium-release assay, flow cytometry and clonogenic assays. The culture-initiating cell frequency of whole KG1 was between 1 in 100 to 1000 by serial dilution and single-cell sorting. Although a rare (1-3%) CD34(+) CD38⁻ population could be demonstrated in KG1, both fractions had equivalent proliferative capacity. The cumulative flow cytotoxicity assay was more sensitive than the chromium-release assay in detecting target cell killing. At a 10:1 ratio NK-92 eliminated the clonogenic capacity of KG1, which was not predicted by the chromium-release assay. Clonogenic assays provide a more sensitive means of assessing the effect of a cytotoxic agent against putative cancer stem cells within cell lines, provided that they grow well in liquid culture medium or methylcellulose.

  14. Comet Assay: A Method to Evaluate Genotoxicity of Nano-Drug Delivery System

    OpenAIRE

    Morteza Eskandani; Somayeh Vandghanooni

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Drug delivery systems could induce cellular toxicity as side effect of nanomaterials. The mechanism of toxicity usually involves DNA damage. The comet assay or single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) is a sensitive method for detecting strand damages in the DNA of a cell with applications in genotoxicity testing and molecular epidemiology as well as fundamental research in DNA damage and repair. Methods: In the current study, we reviewed recent drug delivery researches related to...

  15. Acute Toxicity of Vildagliptin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Peter; Martin, Lori; Keselica, Michael; Gunson, Diane; Skuba, Elizabeth; Lapadula, Dan; Hayes, Michael; Bentley, Phil; Busch, Steve

    2017-01-01

    This article describes acute toxicity data in cynomolgus monkeys following oral treatment with vildagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor. Acute toxicity symptoms in cynomolgus monkeys include edema formation of the extremities, tails, and face associated with skeletal muscle necrosis, and elevations of lactate dehydrogenase, creatine kinase, alanine transaminase, and aspartate aminotransferase activities in the serum; hypothermia; hypotension; tachycardia; moribundity; and death in a few isolated instances. In surviving animals, symptoms were reversible even if treatment was continued. Cynomolgus monkeys from Mauritius appear more sensitive than monkeys of Asian origin. The underlying mechanism(s) of these symptoms in cynomolgus monkeys is currently not well understood, although a vascular mechanism including initial vasoconstriction and subsequent vascular leakage in distal extremities may play a role. The monkey data are reviewed and discussed in the context of other preclinical and clinical data, and it is concluded that acute toxicity following vildagliptin treatment is a monkey-specific phenomenon without relevance for humans.

  16. Discriminating modes of toxic action in mice using toxicity in BALB/c mouse fibroblast (3T3) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tao; Yan, Lichen; Zheng, Shanshan; Wang, Yue; Wang, Xiaohong; Fan, Lingyun; Li, Chao; Zhao, Yuanhui; Martyniuk, Christopher J

    2017-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether toxicity in mouse fibroblast cells (3T3 cells) could predict toxicity in mice. Synthesized data on toxicity was subjected to regression analysis and it was observed that relationship of toxicities between mice and 3T3 cells was not strong (R2 = 0.41). Inclusion of molecular descriptors (e.g. ionization, pKa) improved the regression to R2 = 0.56, indicating that this relationship is influenced by kinetic processes of chemicals or specific toxic mechanisms associated to the compounds. However, to determine if we were able to discriminate modes of action (MOAs) in mice using the toxicities generated from 3T3 cells, compounds were first classified into "baseline" and "reactive" guided by the toxic ratio (TR) for each compound in mice. Sequence, binomial and recursive partitioning analyses provided strong predictions of MOAs in mice based upon toxicities in 3T3 cells. The correct classification of MOAs based on these methods was 86%. Nearly all the baseline compounds predicted from toxicities in 3T3 cells were identified as baseline compounds from the TR in mice. The incorrect assignment of MOAs for some compounds is hypothesized to be due to experimental uncertainty that exists in toxicity assays for both mice and 3T3 cells. Conversely, lack of assignment can also arise because some reactive compounds have MOAs that are different in mice compared to 3T3 cells. The methods developed here are novel and contribute to efforts to reduce animal numbers in toxicity tests that are used to evaluate risks associated with organic pollutants in the environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A simple and novel modification of comet assay for determination of bacteriophage mediated bacterial cell lysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairnar, Krishna; Sanmukh, Swapnil; Chandekar, Rajshree; Paunikar, Waman

    2014-07-01

    The comet assay is the widely used method for in vitro toxicity testing which is also an alternative to the use of animal models for in vivo testing. Since, its inception in 1984 by Ostling and Johansson, it is being modified frequently for a wide range of application. In spite of its wide applicability, unfortunately there is no report of its application in bacteriophages research. In this study, a novel application of comet assay for the detection of bacteriophage mediated bacterial cell lysis was described. The conventional methods in bacteriophage research for studying bacterial lysis by bacteriophages are plaque assay method. It is time consuming, laborious and costly. The lytic activity of bacteriophage devours the bacterial cell which results in the release of bacterial genomic material that gets detected by ethidium bromide staining method by the comet assay protocol. The objective of this study was to compare efficacy of comet assay with different assay used to study phage mediated bacterial lysis. The assay was performed on culture isolates (N=80 studies), modified comet assay appear to have relatively higher sensitivity and specificity than other assay. The results of the study showed that the application of comet assay can be an economical, time saving and less laborious alternative to conventional plaque assay for the detection of bacteriophage mediated bacterial cell lysis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The toxicity of refrigerants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calm, J.M.

    1996-07-01

    This paper presents toxicity data and exposure limits for refrigerants. The data address both acute (short-term, single exposure) and chronic (long-term, repeated exposure) effects, with emphasis on the former. The refrigerants covered include those in common use for the last decade, those used as components in alternatives, and selected candidates for future replacements. The paper also reviews the toxicity indicators used in both safety standards and building, mechanical, and fire codes. It then outlines current classification methods for refrigerant safety and relates them to standard and code usage.

  19. Toxicity test of xanthone from mangosteen on zebrafish embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noordin, Muhammad Akram Mohd; Noor, Mahanem Mat; Kamaruddin, Wan Mohd Aizat Wan; Lazim, Azwan Mat; Fazry, Shazrul

    2016-11-01

    Xanthone is a chemical compound identified in mangosteen pericarp. A previous study showed that xanthone has anti-proliferating effect on cancer cells. In this study we investigate the toxicity level of xanthone in zebrafish embryo to for future reference on other animal model. We employed Fish Embryo Toxicity (FET) assay to determine the toxicity level of different concentrations of xanthone. Embryos were observed at 24, 48 and 72 hours post fertilization (hpf) under microscope at 4× magnification. The extract showed toxicity effect on embryo at concentrations of 250, 125 and 62.5 µg/mL. Concentrations at 15.63, 7.81 and 3.91 µg / mL of xanthone did not harm the embryos and showed 100% of survival.

  20. Correlation between the genotoxicity endpoints measured by two different genotoxicity assays: comet assay and CBMN assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Ladeira

    2015-06-01

    The results concerning of positive findings by micronuclei and non significant ones by comet assay, are corroborated by Deng et al. (2005 study performed in workers occupationally exposed to methotrexate, also a cytostatic drug. According to Cavallo et al. (2009, the comet assay seems to be more suitable for the prompt evaluation of the genotoxic effects, for instance, of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons mixtures containing volatile substances, whereas the micronucleus test seems more appropriate to evaluate the effects of exposure to antineoplastic agents. However, there are studies that observed an increase in both the comet assay and the micronucleus test in nurses handling antineoplastic drugs, although statistical significance was only seen in the comet assay, quite the opposite of our results (Maluf & Erdtmann, 2000; Laffon et al. 2005.

  1. Alkaline comet assay in liver and stomach, and micronucleus assay in bone marrow, from rats treated with 2-acetylaminofluorene, azidothymidine, cisplatin, or isobutyraldehyde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraynak, A R; Barnum, J E; Cunningham, C L; Ng, A; Ykoruk, B A; Bennet, B; Stoffregen, D; Merschman, M; Freeland, E; Galloway, S M

    2015-07-01

    As part of the Japanese Center for the Validation of Alternative Methods (JaCVAM) initiative international validation study of the in vivo rat alkaline comet assay (comet assay), we examined the ability of the assay to determine the genotoxicity of 2-acetylaminofluorene (AAF), azidothymidine (AZT), cisplatin (CPN), and isobutyraldehyde (IBA) in liver and glandular stomach of male Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats were given oral doses of test compound or control once daily for three days. High dose levels were approximately maximum tolerated doses and were based on preliminary range-finding studies. Tissues were harvested 3h after the final dose (48h after the initial dose). A bone marrow micronucleus assay (MN) was also conducted on the rats treated with AZT, CPN, and IBA. Acute toxic effects of treatment were determined primarily through histomorphologic analysis of liver and stomach but also by body weight and serum liver enzyme changes. The comet assay was conducted on fresh tissue preparations but frozen samples from two studies were also assayed. Statistically significant dose-related differences in comet % DNA in tail were found in liver and stomach for the genotoxin AZT and in liver for the genotoxin CPN, but not in liver or stomach for the non-genotoxin IBA. Statistically significant differences in % DNA in tail were measured in liver for the low and mid dose of the genotoxin AAF, but not the high dose. The comet assays of frozen liver suspensions from CPN- and AAF-treated rats yielded comparable results to the assays of fresh preparations. There were no indications of significant toxicity induced by any treatment. The micronucleus assay was positive for CPN and AZT and negative for IBA. In conclusion, the in vivo comet assay is capable of detecting genotoxic effects of a variety of chemicals and may fill an important role in the genotoxicity test battery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Recommended Immunological Assays to Screen for Ricin-Containing Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Simon

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Ricin, a toxin from the plant Ricinus communis, is one of the most toxic biological agents known. Due to its availability, toxicity, ease of production and absence of curative treatments, ricin has been classified by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC as category B biological weapon and it is scheduled as a List 1 compound in the Chemical Weapons Convention. An international proficiency test (PT was conducted to evaluate detection and quantification capabilities of 17 expert laboratories. In this exercise one goal was to analyse the laboratories’ capacity to detect and differentiate ricin and the less toxic, but highly homologuous protein R. communis agglutinin (RCA120. Six analytical strategies are presented in this paper based on immunological assays (four immunoenzymatic assays and two immunochromatographic tests. Using these immunological methods “dangerous” samples containing ricin and/or RCA120 were successfully identified. Based on different antibodies used the detection and quantification of ricin and RCA120 was successful. The ricin PT highlighted the performance of different immunological approaches that are exemplarily recommended for highly sensitive and precise quantification of ricin.

  3. Recommendations for safety testing with the in vivo comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Marie Z

    2012-08-30

    While the in vivo comet assay increases its role in regulatory safety testing, deliberations about the interpretation of comet data continue. Concerns can arise regarding comet assay publications with limited data from non-blind testing of positive control compounds and using protocols (e.g. dose concentrations, sample times, and tissues) known to give an expected effect. There may be a tendency towards bias when the validation or interpretation of comet assay data is based on results generated by widely accepted but non-validated assays. The greatest advantages of the comet assay are its sensitivity and its ability to detect genotoxicity in tissues and at sample times that could not previously be evaluated. Guidelines for its use and interpretation in safety testing should take these factors into account. Guidelines should be derived from objective review of data generated by blind testing of unknown compounds dosed at non-toxic concentrations and evaluated in a true safety-testing environment, where the experimental design and conclusions must be defensible. However, positive in vivo comet findings with such compounds are rarely submitted to regulatory agencies and this data is typically unavailable for publication due to its proprietary nature. To enhance the development of guidelines for safety testing with the comet assay, and with the permission of several sponsors, this paper presents and discusses relevant data from multiple GLP comet studies conducted blind, with unknown pharmaceuticals and consumer products. Based on these data and the lessons we have learned through the course of conducting these studies, I suggest significant adjustments to the current conventions, and I provide recommendations for interpreting in vivo comet assay results in situations where risk must be evaluated in the absence of carcinogenicity or clinical data. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Nanomaterials and Retinal Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    The neuroretina should be considered as a potential site of nanomaterial toxicity. Engineered nanomaterials may reach the retina through three potential routes of exposure including; intra­ vitreal injection of therapeutics; blood-borne delivery in the retinal vasculature an...

  5. Respiratory Toxicity Biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    The advancement in high throughput genomic, proteomic and metabolomic techniques have accelerated pace of lung biomarker discovery. A recent growth in the discovery of new lung toxicity/disease biomarkers have led to significant advances in our understanding of pathological proce...

  6. ANTIRETROVIRAl TOXICITY IN CHILDREN

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    vertical transmission prophylaxis (VrP), and the other is treatment for symptomatic HIV infection. Fig. 7. Disease profile ofHN-positivechildren in the Italian. Collaborative Multicentric Study. Antiretroviral (ARV) toxicity is an important issue that must be fully appreciated by prescribing doctors. While the benefits of therapy are ...

  7. Monosodium Glutamate Toxicity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    on the brain, it is used as a major taste enhancer in most eateries and cafeteria in Nigeria. However, information is scanty on the potential of Sida acuta leaf ethanolic extract. (SALEE) to mitigate MSG-induced effect on the brain. This study aimed to investigate the possible toxic effect of MSG, a natural constituent of many ...

  8. Serum Mucin Antigen (CASA as a Marker of Amiodarone-Induced Pulmonary Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter L. Devine

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Amiodarone is used to treat life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias. Amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity (APT can be difficult to diagnose. APT may result in increased mucus production and mucin expression. Thus, serum mucin-1 was evaluated as a marker for amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity. Concentrations of mucin-1 in peripheral blood were determined using cancer-associated serum antigen (CASA assay in patients taking amiodarone. Eight of ten patients who developed major amiodarone toxicity had high serum CASA levels. Patients with toxicity had a significantly higher mean rank CASA concentration compared with those without major toxicity. CASA shows potential as a marker for amiodarone-induced toxicity, particularly pulmonary toxicity.

  9. Serum Mucin Antigen (CASA) as a Marker of Amiodarone-Induced Pulmonary Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devine, Peter L.; Siebert, Wendy J.; Morton, Sharon L.; Scells, Betty; Quin, Rachel J.; Heddle, William F.; Zimmerman, Paul V.; Donohoe, Peter J.

    1998-01-01

    Amiodarone is used to treat life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias. Amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity (APT) can be difficult to diagnose. APT may result in increased mucus production and mucin expression. Thus, serum mucin-1 was evaluated as a marker for amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity. Concentrations of mucin-1 in peripheral blood were determined using cancer-associated serum antigen (CASA) assay in patients taking amiodarone. Eight of ten patients who developed major amiodarone toxicity had high serum CASA levels. Patients with toxicity had a significantly higher mean rank CASA concentration compared with those without major toxicity. CASA shows potential as a marker for amiodarone-induced toxicity, particularly pulmonary toxicity. PMID:10427477

  10. [Toxicity study of realgar].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Aihua; Li, Chunying; Wang, Jinhua; Xue, Baoyun; Li, Hua; Yang, Bing; Wang, Jingyu; Xie, Qing; Nilsen, Odd Georg

    2011-07-01

    To investigate the toxicity of realgar and provide the scientific basis for safety use of realgar in clinic. Acute toxicity was tested by single oral administration. Chronic toxicity of realgar was tested at different dose levels (5, 10, 20, 80, 160 mg x kg(-1) x d(-1)) which correspond to 1/2, 1, 2, 8, 16 times of human dose levels. The rats were treated with the test substances through oral administration once daily for successively 90 days. Urinary qualitative test, blood routine examination, serum chemistry measurement, and histomorphologic observation were conducted at day 30, 60 and 90. Toxic changes related to the treatment of realgar and no-observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) was evaluated. With the content of 90% total arsenic and 1.696 mg x g(-1) soluble asenic, LD50 of Realgar with oral administration was 20.5 g x kg(-1) (corresponding to 34.8 mg x kg(-1) soluble arsenic), equivalent to 12 812 times of clinical daily dose for an adult. Realgar can cause kidney toxicity or/and liver toxicity after administration for over 30, 60 or 90 days respectively. The kidney was more sensitive to realgar than liver. Based on repeated dose toxicity study, NOAELs were 160 mg x kg(-1) x d(-1) for 30 day's administration, 20 mg x kg(-1) x d(-1) for 60 day's administration, 10 mg x kg(-1) x d(-1) mg x kg(-1) x d(-1) for 90 day's administration respectively. Thus, for safety use of realgar, it is recommended that the daily doses of realgar (with soluble arsenic realgar can cause kidney and liver pathological change, so the doses and administration duration should be limited. The suggestion is as follows: realgar which contains soluble arsenic < or = 1.7 mg x g(-1) should be used less than 2 weeks at daily dose 160 mg, less than 4 weeks at the dose of 20 mg and less than 6 weeks at the dose of 10 mg.

  11. Toxic dinoflagellates (Dinophyceae) from Rarotonga, Cook Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Lesley L; Smith, Kirsty F; Munday, Rex; Selwood, Andy I; McNabb, Paul S; Holland, Patrick T; Bottein, Marie-Yasmine

    2010-10-01

    Dinoflagellate species isolated from the green calcareous seaweed, Halimeda sp. J.V. Lamouroux, growing in Rarotongan lagoons, included Gambierdiscus australes Faust & Chinain, Coolia monotis Meunier, Amphidinium carterae Hulburth, Prorocentrum lima (Ehrenberg) Dodge, P. cf. maculosum Faust and species in the genus Ostreopsis Schmidt. Isolates were identified to species level by scanning electron microscopy and/or DNA sequence analysis. Culture extracts of G. australes isolate CAWD149 gave a response of 0.04 pg P-CTX-1 equiv. per cell by an N2A cytotoxicity assay (equivalent to ca 0.4 pg CTX-3C cell(-1)). However, ciguatoxins were not detected by LC-MS/MS. Partitioned fractions of the cell extracts potentially containing maitotoxin were found to be very toxic to mice after intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection. A. carterae was also of interest as extracts of mass cultures caused respiratory paralysis in mice at high doses, both by i.p. injection and by oral administration. The Rarotongan isolate fell into a different clade to New Zealand A. carterae isolates, based on DNA sequence analysis, and also had a different toxin profile. As A. carterae co-occurred with G. australes, it may contribute to human poisonings attributed to CTX and warrants further investigation. A crude extract of C. monotis was of low toxicity to mice by i.p. injection, and an extract of Ostreopsis sp. was negative in the palytoxin haemolysis neutralisation assay. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Potential protective effect of L-cysteine against the toxicity of acrylamide and furan in exposed Xenopus laevis embryos: an interaction study

    Science.gov (United States)

    The embryo toxicities of two food-processing-induced toxic compounds, acrylamide and furan, with and without added L-cysteine were examined individually and in mixtures using the frog embryo teratogenesis assay-Xenopus (FETAX). The following measures of developmental toxicity were used (a) 96-h LC5...

  13. Comparative metal oxide nanoparticle toxicity using embryonic zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah C. Wehmas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Engineered metal oxide nanoparticles (MO NPs are finding increasing utility in the medical field as anticancer agents. Before validation of in vivo anticancer efficacy can occur, a better understanding of whole-animal toxicity is required. We compared the toxicity of seven widely used semiconductor MO NPs made from zinc oxide (ZnO, titanium dioxide, cerium dioxide and tin dioxide prepared in pure water and in synthetic seawater using a five-day embryonic zebrafish assay. We hypothesized that the toxicity of these engineered MO NPs would depend on physicochemical properties. Significant agglomeration of MO NPs in aqueous solutions is common making it challenging to associate NP characteristics such as size and charge with toxicity. However, data from our agglomerated MO NPs suggests that the elemental composition and dissolution potential are major drivers of toxicity. Only ZnO caused significant adverse effects of all MO particles tested, and only when prepared in pure water (point estimate median lethal concentration = 3.5–9.1 mg/L. This toxicity was life stage dependent. The 24 h toxicity increased greatly (∼22.7 fold when zebrafish exposures started at the larval life stage compared to the 24 h toxicity following embryonic exposure. Investigation into whether dissolution could account for ZnO toxicity revealed high levels of zinc ion (40–89% of total sample were generated. Exposure to zinc ion equivalents revealed dissolved Zn2+ may be a major contributor to ZnO toxicity.

  14. Chloramination of wastewater effluent: Toxicity and formation of disinfection byproducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roux, Julien; Plewa, Michael J; Wagner, Elizabeth D; Nihemaiti, Maolida; Dad, Azra; Croué, Jean-Philippe

    2017-08-01

    The reclamation and disinfection of waters impacted by human activities (e.g., wastewater effluent discharges) are of growing interest for various applications but has been associated with the formation of toxic nitrogenous disinfection byproducts (N-DBPs). Monochloramine used as an alternative disinfectant to chlorine can be an additional source of nitrogen in the formation of N-DBPs. Individual toxicity assays have been performed on many DBPs, but few studies have been conducted with complex mixtures such as wastewater effluents. In this work, we compared the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of wastewater effluent organic matter (EfOM) before and after chloramination. The toxicity of chloraminated EfOM was significantly higher than the toxicity of raw EfOM, and the more hydrophobic fraction (HPO) isolated on XAD-8 resin was more toxic than the fraction isolated on XAD-4 resin. More DBPs were also isolated on the XAD-8 resin. N-DBPs (i.e., haloacetonitriles or haloacetamides) were responsible for the majority of the cytotoxicity estimated from DBP concentrations measured in the XAD-8 and XAD-4 fractions (99.4% and 78.5%, respectively). Measured DBPs accounted for minor proportions of total brominated and chlorinated products, which means that many unknown halogenated compounds were formed and can be responsible for a significant part of the toxicity. Other non-halogenated byproducts (e.g., nitrosamines) may contribute to the toxicity of chloraminated effluents as well. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Activity Assays for Rhomboid Proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arutyunova, E; Strisovsky, K; Lemieux, M J

    2017-01-01

    Rhomboids are ubiquitous intramembrane serine proteases that are involved in various signaling pathways. This fascinating class of proteases harbors an active site buried within the lipid milieu. High-resolution structures of the Escherichia coli rhomboid GlpG with various inhibitors revealed the catalytic mechanism for rhomboid-mediated proteolysis; however, a quantitative characterization was lacking. Assessing an enzyme's catalytic parameters is important for understanding the details of its proteolytic reaction and regulatory mechanisms. To assay rhomboid protease activity, many challenges exist such as the lipid environment and lack of known substrates. Here, we summarize various enzymatic assays developed over the last decade to study rhomboid protease activity. We present detailed protocols for gel-shift and FRET-based assays, and calculation of KM and Vmax to measure catalytic parameters, using detergent solubilized rhomboids with TatA, the only known substrate for bacterial rhomboids, and the model substrate fluorescently labeled casein. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. COMPARISONS OF ELISA AND WESTERN BLOT ASSAYS FOR DETECTION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM ANTIBODY

    Science.gov (United States)

    A seroprevalence survey was conducted using ELISA and Western blot (WB) assays for antibody to three Cryptosporidium antigens on 380 blood donors in Jackson County, Oregon. The purpose was to determine if either assay could detect serological evidence of an outbreak which occurre...

  17. Ricin Toxicity: Clinical and Molecular Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Moshiri

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Seeds of the castor bean plant Ricinuscommunis L (CB contain ricin toxin (RT, one of the most poisonous naturally-occurring substances known. Ricin toxin, a water-soluble glycoprotein that does not partition into the oil extract, is a ribosome-inactivating toxin composed of two chains, labeled A and B. Severity of the toxicity varies depending on the route of exposure to the toxin. Inhalational is the most toxic route, followed by oral ingestion. Orally-ingested RT accumulates in the liver and spleen but other cells are also affected. The main clinical manifestations are also related to the administration route. Oral ingestion of CB or RT results in abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea, and various types of gastrointestinal bleeding that leading to volume depletion, hypovolemic shock, and renal failure. Inhalation of the toxin presents with non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema, diffuse necrotizing pneumonia, interstitial and alveolar inflammation, and edema. Local injection of RT induces indurations at the injection site, swelling of regional lymph nodes, hypotension, and death. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA has been developed to detect RT in animal tissues and fluids. Ricinine, an alkaloid of CB, can be detected in rat urine within 48 h of RT exposure. Supportive care is the basic treatment and standard biowarfare decontamination protocols are used for RT intoxication. Dexamethasone and difluoromethylornithine might be effective treatments. This review examines the clinical and molecular aspects of ricin toxicity.

  18. Animal Toxicity of Phytopathogenic Fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Main, C. E.; Hamilton, P. B.

    1972-01-01

    Twelve genera of phytopathogenic fungi comprising 27 species previously reported to produce phytotoxins were tested concurrently for animal and plant toxicity. There appeared to be no direct relationship between plant and animal toxicity. PMID:5059620

  19. Allegheny County Toxics Release Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — The Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) data provides information about toxic substances released into the environment or managed through recycling, energy recovery, and...

  20. Evaluation of the Gravataí River sediment quality (Rio Grande do Sul- Brazil using Daphnia magna (Straus, 1820 as the test-organism for toxicity assays Avaliação da qualidade dos sedimentos do rio Gravataí (Rio Grande do Sul - Brasil a partir de testes de toxicidade utilizando Daphnia magna (Straus, 1820 como organismo-teste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiane Lucheta

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM: Persistent pollutants released to riverbeds return to the trophic system, damaging living organisms thereof. Ecotoxicological assays express the effect of environmental interactions with organisms found there. Assays were performed with microcrustacean Daphnia magna (Straus, 1820 in sediment samples, from the headwaters to the mouth, in order to evaluate the Gravataí River quality; METHODS: Bottom sediment was used to evaluate the responses of cladocerans to environmental changes in 15 samples collected between Jan./06 and May/09. The microcrustaceans were submitted to stress for 21 days from birth (2-26 hours old. Duncan Test, percentage survival, reproduction and Spearman Correlation were used to evaluate the quality of the sites; RESULTS: Duncan Test showed a significant difference (p OBJETIVO: Poluentes persistentes lançados no leito dos rios retornam ao sistema trófico danificando os organismos que o integram. Os ensaios ecotoxicológicos expressam o efeito das interações ambientais com os organismos ali presentes. Visando avaliar a qualidade do rio Gravataí foram realizados ensaios com o microcrustáceo Daphnia magna (Straus, 1820, em amostras do sedimento, da nascente até a foz; MÉTODOS: Sedimento de fundo foi utilizado na avaliação das respostas dos cladóceros às alterações ambientais de 15 amostras coletadas entre Jan./06 e Maio/09. Os microcrustáceos foram colocados em situação de estresse durante 21 dias desde o início de suas vidas (2-26 horas. O Teste de Duncan, percentual de sobrevivência, reprodução e Correlação de Spearman foram utilizados para avaliar a qualidade dos locais; RESULTADOS: O Teste de Duncan mostrou diferença significativa (p < 0,05 na reprodução em 14 das 15 amostragens, sendo a ação crônica mais constante (88% que a aguda (23%. Somente em algumas ocasiões foram observadas alterações na sobrevivência e na reprodução relacionadas à estação climática ou regime de chuvas. Os

  1. Kombucha--toxicity alert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Kombucha mushroom, also known as Manchurian mushroom, is a mail-order product touted to lower blood pressure and raise T-cell counts. No controlled trials have been conducted to test these claims. Aspergillus, a mold that may grow on the Kombucha mushroom, attacks the brain and may be fatal to persons with weakened immune systems. Reported toxicity reactions have included stomach problems and yeast infections. Taking Kombucha in combination with other drugs may affect the drugs potency.

  2. Toxicity of Depleted Uranium

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-02-01

    cancer in dogs and humans1 and mice and humans.2 The information for inert metal toxicity in humans is foreign-body carcinogenesis data related to...high dose of Thorotrast® (> 0.4 Bq/g) developed fibrosarcomas from perivascular leakage of some injections.19 Plutonium fragments have been injected...into the footpads of dogs to simulate the plutonium-contaminated wounds of plutonium machinists.2" The plutonium was translocated to the local lymph

  3. Toxic Substances Control Act

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-05-15

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Toxic Substances Control Act and those regulations that implement the statute and appear to be most relevant to DOE activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Questions concerning this Reference Book may be directed to Mark Petts, EH-231 (202/586-2609).

  4. Toxicity of nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi, Shahriar; Behzadi, Shahed; Laurent, Sophie; Forrest, M Laird; Stroeve, Pieter; Mahmoudi, Morteza

    2012-03-21

    Nanoscience has matured significantly during the last decade as it has transitioned from bench top science to applied technology. Presently, nanomaterials are used in a wide variety of commercial products such as electronic components, sports equipment, sun creams and biomedical applications. There are few studies of the long-term consequences of nanoparticles on human health, but governmental agencies, including the United States National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and Japan's Ministry of Health, have recently raised the question of whether seemingly innocuous materials such as carbon-based nanotubes should be treated with the same caution afforded known carcinogens such as asbestos. Since nanomaterials are increasing a part of everyday consumer products, manufacturing processes, and medical products, it is imperative that both workers and end-users be protected from inhalation of potentially toxic NPs. It also suggests that NPs may need to be sequestered into products so that the NPs are not released into the atmosphere during the product's life or during recycling. Further, non-inhalation routes of NP absorption, including dermal and medical injectables, must be studied in order to understand possible toxic effects. Fewer studies to date have addressed whether the body can eventually eliminate nanomaterials to prevent particle build-up in tissues or organs. This critical review discusses the biophysicochemical properties of various nanomaterials with emphasis on currently available toxicology data and methodologies for evaluating nanoparticle toxicity (286 references).

  5. Amiodarone Pulmonary Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman Wolkove

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Amiodarone is an antiarrhythmic agent commonly used to treat supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias. This drug is an iodine-containing compound that tends to accumulate in several organs, including the lungs. It has been associated with a variety of adverse events. Of these events, the most serious is amiodarone pulmonary toxicity. Although the incidence of this complication has decreased with the use of lower doses of amiodarone, it can occur with any dose. Because amiodarone is widely used, all clinicians should be vigilant of this possibility. Pulmonary toxicity usually manifests as an acute or subacute pneumonitis, typically with diffuse infiltrates on chest x-ray and high-resolution computed tomography. Other, more localized, forms of pulmonary toxicity may occur, including pleural disease, migratory infiltrates, and single or multiple nodules. With early detection, the prognosis is good. Most patients diagnosed promptly respond well to the withdrawal of amiodarone and the administration of corticosteroids, which are usually given for four to 12 months. It is important that physicians be familiar with amiodarone treatment guidelines and follow published recommendations for the monitoring of pulmonary as well as extrapulmonary adverse effects.

  6. Amiodarone pulmonary toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolkove, Norman; Baltzan, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Amiodarone is an antiarrhythmic agent commonly used to treat supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias. This drug is an iodine-containing compound that tends to accumulate in several organs, including the lungs. It has been associated with a variety of adverse events. Of these events, the most serious is amiodarone pulmonary toxicity. Although the incidence of this complication has decreased with the use of lower doses of amiodarone, it can occur with any dose. Because amiodarone is widely used, all clinicians should be vigilant of this possibility. Pulmonary toxicity usually manifests as an acute or subacute pneumonitis, typically with diffuse infiltrates on chest x-ray and high-resolution computed tomography. Other, more localized, forms of pulmonary toxicity may occur, including pleural disease, migratory infiltrates, and single or multiple nodules. With early detection, the prognosis is good. Most patients diagnosed promptly respond well to the withdrawal of amiodarone and the administration of corticosteroids, which are usually given for four to 12 months. It is important that physicians be familiar with amiodarone treatment guidelines and follow published recommendations for the monitoring of pulmonary as well as extrapulmonary adverse effects. PMID:19399307

  7. ToxCast Workflow: High-throughput screening assay data processing, analysis and management (SOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    US EPA’s ToxCast program is generating data in high-throughput screening (HTS) and high-content screening (HCS) assays for thousands of environmental chemicals, for use in developing predictive toxicity models. Currently the ToxCast screening program includes over 1800 unique c...

  8. Sediment toxicity test results for the Urban Waters Study 2010, Bellingham Bay, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedenbach, James M.

    2011-01-01

    The Washington Department of Ecology annually determines the quality of recently deposited sediments in Puget Sound as a part of Ecology's Urban Waters Initiative. The annual sediment quality studies use the Sediment Quality Triad (SQT) approach, thus relying on measures of chemical contamination, toxicity, and benthic in-faunal effects (Chapman, 1990). Since 2002, the studies followed a rotating sampling scheme, each year sampling a different region of the greater Puget Sound Basin. During the annual studies, samples are collected in locations selected with a stratified-random design, patterned after the designs previously used in baseline surveys completed during 1997-1999 (Long and others, 2003; Wilson and Partridge, 2007). Sediment samples were collected by personnel from the Washington Department of Ecology, in June of 2010 and shipped to the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) laboratory in Corpus Christi, Texas (not shown), where the tests were performed. Sediment pore water was extracted with a pneumatic apparatus and was stored frozen. Just before testing, water-quality measurements were made and salinity adjusted, if necessary. Tests were performed on a dilution series of each sample consisting of 100-, 50-, and 25-percent pore-water concentrations. The specific objectives of this study were to: * Extract sediment pore water from a total of 30 sediment samples from the Bellingham Bay, Washington area within a day of receipt of the samples. * Measure water-quality parameters (salinity, dissolved oxygen, pH, sulfide, and ammonia) of thawed pore-water samples before testing and adjust salinity, temperature and dissolved oxygen, if necessary, to obtain optimal ranges for the test species. * Conduct the fertilization toxicity test with pore water using sea urchin (Stronylocentrotus purpuratus) (S. purpuratus) gametes. * Perform quality control assays with reference pore water, dilution blanks and a positive control dilution series with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS

  9. Acute toxicity of anionic and non-ionic surfactants to aquatic organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechuga, M; Fernández-Serrano, M; Jurado, E; Núñez-Olea, J; Ríos, F

    2016-03-01

    The environmental risk of surfactants requires toxicity measurements. As different test organisms have different sensitivity to the toxics, it is necessary to establish the most appropriate organism to classify the surfactant as very toxic, toxic, harmful or safe, in order to establish the maximum permissible concentrations in aquatic ecosystems. We have determined the toxicity values of various anionic surfactants ether carboxylic derivatives using four test organisms: the freshwater crustacean Daphnia magna, the luminescent bacterium Vibrio fischeri, the microalgae Selenastrum capricornutum (freshwater algae) and Phaeodactylum tricornutum (seawater algae). In addition, in order to compare and classify the different families of surfactants, we have included a compilation of toxicity data of surfactants collected from literature. The results indicated that V. fischeri was more sensitive to the toxic effects of the surfactants than was D. magna or the microalgae, which was the least sensitive. This result shows that the most suitable toxicity assay for surfactants may be the one using V. fischeri. The toxicity data revealed considerable variation in toxicity responses with the structure of the surfactants regardless of the species tested. The toxicity data have been related to the structure of the surfactants, giving a mathematical relationship that helps to predict the toxic potential of a surfactant from its structure. Model-predicted toxicity agreed well with toxicity values reported in the literature for several surfactants previously studied. Predictive models of toxicity is a handy tool for providing a risk assessment that can be useful to establish the toxicity range for each surfactant and the different test organisms in order to select efficient surfactants with a lower impact on the aquatic environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Comet Assay on Daphnia magna in eco-genotoxicity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegri, Valerio; Gorbi, Gessica; Buschini, Annamaria

    2014-10-01

    Detection of potentially hazardous compounds in water bodies is a priority in environmental risk assessment. For the evaluation and monitoring of water quality, a series of methodologies may be applied. Among them, the worldwide used toxicity tests with organisms of the genus Daphnia is one of the most powerful. In recent years, some attempts were made to utilize Daphnia magna in genotoxicity testing as many of the new environmental contaminants are described as DNA-damaging agents in aquatic organisms. The aim of this research was to develop a highly standardized protocol of the Comet Assay adapted for D. magna, especially regarding the isolation of cells derived from the same tissue (haemolymph) from newborn organisms exposed in vivo. Several methods for haemolymph extraction and different Comet Assay parameters were compared. Electrophoretic conditions were adapted in order to obtain minimum DNA migration in cells derived from untreated organisms and, at the same time, maximum sensitivity in specimens treated with known genotoxicants (CdCl2 and H2O2). Additional tests were performed to investigate if life-history traits of the cladoceran (such as the age of adult organisms that provide newborns, the clutch size of origin, the number of generations reared in standard conditions) and the water composition as well, might influence the response of the assay. This study confirms the potential application of the Comet Assay in D. magna for assessing genotoxic loads in aqueous solution. The newly developed protocol could integrate the acute toxicity bioassay, thus expanding the possibility of using this model species in freshwater monitoring (waters, sediment and soil elutriates) and is in line with the spirit of the EU Water Framework Directive in reducing the number of bioassays that involve medium-sized species. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Behavioral assays in environmental toxicology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, B.

    1979-01-01

    Environmental toxicology is too permeated by questions about how the whole organism functions to abandon intact animals as test systems. Behavior does not participate as a single entity or discipline. It ranges across the total spectrum of functional toxicity, from tenuous subjective complaints to subtle sensory and motor disturbances demanding advanced instrumentation for their evaluation. Three facets of behavioral toxicology that illustrate its breadth of interests and potential contributions are discussed.

  12. Modern toxic antipersonnel projectiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillard, Yvan; Regenstreif, Philippe; Fanton, Laurent

    2014-12-01

    In the spring of 1944, Kurt von Gottberg, the SS police chief in Minsk, was shot and injured by 2 Soviet agents. Although he was only slightly injured, he died 6 hours later. The bullets were hollow and contained a crystalline white powder. They were 4-g bullets, semi-jacketed in cupronickel, containing 28 mg of aconitine. They were later known as akonitinnitratgeschosse. The Sipo (the Nazi security police) then ordered a trial with a 9-mm Parabellum cartridge containing Ditran, an anticholinergic drug with hallucinogenic properties causing intense mental confusion. In later years, QNB was used and given the NATO code BZ (3-quinuclidinyl-benzylate). It was proven that Saddam Hussein had this weapon (agent 15) manufactured and used it against the Kurds. Serbian forces used the same type of weapon in the Bosnian conflict, particularly in Srebrenica.The authors go on to list the Cold War toxic weapons developed by the KGB and the Warsaw pact countries for the discreet elimination of dissidents and proindependence leaders who had taken refuge in the West. These weapons include PSZh-13 launchers, the Troika electronic sequential pistol, and the ingenious 4-S110T captive piston system designed by the engineer Stechkin. Disguised as a cigarette case, it could fire a silent charge of potassium cyanide. This rogues gallery also includes the umbrella rigged to inject a pellet of ricin (or another phytalbumin of similar toxicity, such as abrin or crotin) that was used to assassinate the Bulgarian writer and journalist Georgi Markov on September 7, 1978, in London.During the autopsy, the discovery of a bullet burst into 4 or 5 parts has to make at once suspecting the use of a toxic substance. Toxicological analysis has to look for first and foremost aconitine, cyanide, suxamethonium, Ditran, BZ, or one of the toxic phytalbumins. The use of such complex weapons has to make suspect a powerful organization: army, secret service, terrorism. The existence of the Russian UDAR spray

  13. Earthworm dispersal assay for rapidly evaluating soil quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Shin Woong; Kim, Dokyung; Moon, Jongmin; Chae, Yooeun; Kwak, Jin Il; Park, Younsu; Jeong, Seung-Woo; An, Youn-Joo

    2017-10-01

    Earthworms enhance soil functioning and are therefore key species in the soil. Their presence is generally a positive sign for a terrestrial ecosystem, because these species serve as important biomarkers in soil quality evaluations. We describe a novel bioassay, the "dispersal assay," that is a simple and rapid technique for field-based soil quality evaluations. It is based on the premise that earthworms prefer optimal soils if given the choice. Thus, assay tubes containing a reference soil were inserted in target sites, and earthworms were placed into these tubes. According to their soil preference, the earthworms dispersed into the surrounding soil, remained in the initial soil within the tubes, avoided both by crawling up the tube, or died. Furthermore, sensitivity responses to metal concentrations, electrical conductivity, and soil pH were observed in field tests. Although the dispersal assay did not completely match traditional toxicity endpoints such as earthworm survival, we found that it can serve as an in situ screening test for assessing soil quality. Overall, our dispersal assay was relatively rapid (within 24 h), had low levels of variation, and showed high correlations between earthworm behavior and soil physicochemical properties. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:2766-2772. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  14. Repeated-dose liver micronucleus assay: an investigation with 2-nitropropane, a hepatocarcinogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Satoru; Araki, Tetsuro; Nakajima, Mikio; Kusuoka, Osamu; Uchida, Keisuke; Sato, Norihiro; Tanabe, Yoko; Takahashi, Kaori; Wako, Yumi; Kawasako, Kazufumi; Tsurui, Kazuyuki

    2015-03-01

    The utility of the repeated-dose liver micronucleus (RDLMN) assay in the detection of a genotoxic hepatocarcinogen was evaluated. In this paper, a rat hepatocarcinogen, 2-nitropropane (2-NP), was administered orally to young adult rats for 14 and 28 days without a partial hepatectomy or a mitogen, and the micronucleus induction in liver was examined using a simple method to isolate hepatocytes. In addition, a bone marrow micronucleus assay was conducted concomitantly. The frequency of micronucleated hepatocytes induced by 2-NP increased significantly in both the 14- and 28-day repeated-dose studies, while the bone marrow micronucleus assays were negative in each study. These results indicate that the RDLMN assay is useful for detecting a genotoxic hepatocarcinogen that is negative in bone marrow micronucleus assays and is a suitable in vivo genotoxicity test method for integration into a repeated-dose general toxicity study. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The comet assay in testing the potential genotoxicity of nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amaya Azqueta

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the last two decades the production and use of nanomaterials (NMs has impressively increased. Their small size, given a mass equal to that of the corresponding bulk material, implies an increase in the surface area and consequently in the number of atoms that can be reactive. They possess different physical, chemical and biological properties compared to bulk materials of the same composition, which makes them very interesting and valuable for many different applications in technology, energy, construction, electronics, agriculture, optics, paints, textiles, food, cosmetics, medicine... Toxicological assessment of NMs is crucial; the same properties that make them interesting also make them potentially harmful for health and the environment. However, the term NM covers many different kinds of particle , and so there is no simple, standard approach to assessing their toxicity. NMs can enter the cell, interact with cell components and even penetrate the nucleus and interfere with the genetic material. Among the different branches of toxicology, genotoxicity is a main area of concern since it is closely related with the carcinogenic potential of compounds. The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD has published internationally agreed in vitro and in vivo validated test methods to evaluate different genotoxic endpoints of chemicals, including chromosome and gene mutations, and DNA breaks. However not all the assays are suitable to study the genotoxic potential of NMs as has been shown by the OECD Working Party on Manufactured Nanomaterials (WPMN. Moreover, alterations to DNA bases, which are precursors to mutations and of great importance in elucidating the mechanism of action of NMs, are not covered by the OECD guidelines. The in vivo standard comet assay (which measures DNA breaks and alkali-labile sites was included in the OECD assays battery in September 2014 while the in vitro standard comet assay is currently under

  16. Bio-testing integral toxicity of corrosion inhibitors, biocides and oil hydrocarbons in oil-and gas-processing industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chugunov, V.A.; Kholodenko, V.P.; Irkhina, I.A.; Fomchenkov, V.M.; Novikov, I.A. [State Research Center for Applied Microbiology, Obolensk, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2004-07-01

    In recent years bioassays have been widely used for assessing levels of contamination of the environment. This is due to the fact that test-organisms provide a general response to toxicants present in samples. Based on microorganisms as test objects, it is possible to develop cheap, sensitive and rapid assays to identify environmental xenobiotics and toxicants. The objective of the research was to develop different microbiological assays for assessing integral toxicity of water environments polluted with corrosion inhibitors, biocides and hydrocarbons in oil- and gas-processing industry. Bio-luminescent, electro-orientational, osmo-optic and microorganism reducing activity assays were used for express evaluation of integral toxicity. They are found to determine promptly integral toxicity of water environments containing various pollutants (oil, oil products, corrosion inhibitors, biocides). Results conclude that the assays may be used for analyzing integral toxicity of water polluted with hydrocarbons, as well as for monitoring of water changes as a result of biodegradation of pollutants by microorganisms and their associations. Using a kit of different assays, it is also possible to evaluate ecological safety of biocides, corrosion inhibitors, and their compositions. Bioassays used as a kit are more effective than each assay individually, allowing one to get complete characterization of a reaction of bacterial test organisms to different environments. (authors)

  17. A combined in vitro approach to improve the prediction of mitochondrial toxicants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eakins, Julie; Bauch, Caroline; Woodhouse, Heather; Park, Benjamin; Bevan, Samantha; Dilworth, Clive; Walker, Paul

    2016-08-01

    Drug induced mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in organ toxicity and the withdrawal of drugs or black box warnings limiting their use. The development of highly specific and sensitive in vitro assays in early drug development would assist in detecting compounds which affect mitochondrial function. Here we report the combination of two in vitro assays for the detection of drug induced mitochondrial toxicity. The first assay measures cytotoxicity after 24h incubation of test compound in either glucose or galactose conditioned media (Glu/Gal assay). Compounds with a greater than 3-fold toxicity in galactose media compared to glucose media imply mitochondrial toxicity. The second assay measures mitochondrial respiration, glycolysis and a reserve capacity with mechanistic responses observed within one hour following exposure to test compound. In order to assess these assays a total of 72 known drugs and chemicals were used. Dose-response data was normalised to 100× Cmax giving a specificity, sensitivity and accuracy of 100%, 81% and 92% respectively for this combined approach. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Cytokine release assays: current practices and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finco, D; Grimaldi, C; Fort, M; Walker, M; Kiessling, A; Wolf, B; Salcedo, T; Faggioni, R; Schneider, A; Ibraghimov, A; Scesney, S; Serna, D; Prell, R; Stebbings, R; Narayanan, P K

    2014-04-01

    As a result of the CD28 superagonist biotherapeutic monoclonal antibody (TGN 1412) "cytokine storm" incident, cytokine release assays (CRA) have become hazard identification and prospective risk assessment tools for screening novel biotherapeutics directed against targets having a potential risk for eliciting adverse pro-inflammatory clinical infusion reactions. Different laboratories may have different strategies, assay formats, and approaches to the reporting, interpretation, and use of data for either decision making or risk assessment. Additionally, many independent contract research organizations (CROs), academic and government laboratories are involved in some aspect of CRA work. As a result, while some pharmaceutical companies are providing CRA data as part of the regulatory submissions when necessary, technical and regulatory practices are still evolving to provide data predictive of cytokine release in humans and that are relevant to safety. This manuscript provides an overview of different approaches employed by the pharmaceutical industry and CROs, for the use and application of CRA based upon a survey and post survey follow up conducted by ILSI-Health and Environmental Sciences Institute (HESI) Immunotoxicology Committee CRA Working Group. Also discussed is ongoing research in the academic sector, the regulatory environment, current limitations of the assays, and future directions and recommendations for cytokine release assays. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Development of cell culture techniques for assessment of the toxicity of plant products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, B J

    1996-02-01

    Plant products consumed by humans contain a wide variety of both beneficial and toxic compounds. Studies have been undertaken to explore the utility of cell culture techniques in testing plant products for toxicity and antitoxicity. Preliminary results are reported on the cytotoxic effects of aqueous and methanol extracts of a range of conventional and herb teas and a variety of vegetables. The teas were tested in primary cultures of rat hepatocytes, using lactate dehydrogenase release and inhibition of protein synthesis as endpoints of cytotoxicity. Toxicity was detected in aqueous preparations but not in methanol extracts. Korean green tea and a conventional black tea were more toxic than herb teas such as comfrey and ragwort, which are thought to contain hepatotoxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids. Extracts of five vegetables were tested using the same assays and also the MTT assay in hepatocytes and the Kenacid blue assay in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Toxicity to hepatocytes was low but most extracts were more toxic to CHO cells. The toxicity of cabbage was reduced by cooking and that of potato was increased by greening, which increases the levels of glycoalkaloids and other toxins in the tubers. The results suggest a number of ways in which cell culture tests may be useful for detecting and assessing the effects of toxins and antitoxins in plant products.

  20. Comparative toxicity of 24 manufactured nanoparticles in human alveolar epithelial and macrophage cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boczkowski Jorge

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A critical issue with nanomaterials is the clear understanding of their potential toxicity. We evaluated the toxic effect of 24 nanoparticles of similar equivalent spherical diameter and various elemental compositions on 2 human pulmonary cell lines: A549 and THP-1. A secondary aim was to elaborate a generic experimental set-up that would allow the rapid screening of cytotoxic effect of nanoparticles. We therefore compared 2 cytotoxicity assays (MTT and Neutral Red and analyzed 2 time points (3 and 24 hours for each cell type and nanoparticle. When possible, TC50 (Toxic Concentration 50 i.e. nanoparticle concentration inducing 50% cell mortality was calculated. Results The use of MTT assay on THP-1 cells exposed for 24 hours appears to be the most sensitive experimental design to assess the cytotoxic effect of one nanoparticle. With this experimental set-up, Copper- and Zinc-based nanoparticles appear to be the most toxic. Titania, Alumina, Ceria and Zirconia-based nanoparticles show moderate toxicity, and no toxicity was observed for Tungsten Carbide. No correlation between cytotoxicity and equivalent spherical diameter or specific surface area was found. Conclusion Our study clearly highlights the difference of sensitivity between cell types and cytotoxicity assays that has to be carefully taken into account when assessing nanoparticles toxicity.

  1. Comet Assay in Cancer Chemoprevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Raffaela; Ferraiuolo, Maria; Morgano, Gian Paolo; Muti, Paola; Strano, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    The comet assay can be useful in monitoring DNA damage in single cells caused by exposure to genotoxic agents, such as those causing air, water, and soil pollution (e.g., pesticides, dioxins, electromagnetic fields) and chemo- and radiotherapy in cancer patients, or in the assessment of genoprotective effects of chemopreventive molecules. Therefore, it has particular importance in the fields of pharmacology and toxicology, and in both environmental and human biomonitoring. It allows the detection of single strand breaks as well as double-strand breaks and can be used in both normal and cancer cells. Here we describe the alkali method for comet assay, which allows to detect both single- and double-strand DNA breaks.

  2. USING STRUCTURAL EFFECTS ON THE ORGANIZATION OF THE CYTOSKELETON OF RAINBOW TROUT HEPATOCYTES TO SORT PATHWAYS OF REACTIVE TOXICITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinones have been shown to be more acutely toxic to aquatic organisms than chemicals that are not capable of either direct interaction with cellular nucleophiles or potentially metabolized free radicals. For the development of accurate QSAR models, in vitro toxicity assays are n...

  3. Functional toxicology: tools to advance the future of toxicity testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaytán, Brandon D.; Vulpe, Chris D.

    2014-01-01

    The increased presence of chemical contaminants in the environment is an undeniable concern to human health and ecosystems. Historically, by relying heavily upon costly and laborious animal-based toxicity assays, the field of toxicology has often neglected examinations of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of toxicity for the majority of compounds—information that, if available, would strengthen risk assessment analyses. Functional toxicology, where cells or organisms with gene deletions or depleted proteins are used to assess genetic requirements for chemical tolerance, can advance the field of toxicity testing by contributing data regarding chemical mechanisms of toxicity. Functional toxicology can be accomplished using available genetic tools in yeasts, other fungi and bacteria, and eukaryotes of increased complexity, including zebrafish, fruit flies, rodents, and human cell lines. Underscored is the value of using less complex systems such as yeasts to direct further studies in more complex systems such as human cell lines. Functional techniques can yield (1) novel insights into chemical toxicity; (2) pathways and mechanisms deserving of further study; and (3) candidate human toxicant susceptibility or resistance genes. PMID:24847352

  4. Toxicity of benzotriazole and benzotriazole derivatives to three aquatic species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillard, D A; Cornell, J S; Dufresne, D L; Hernandez, M T

    2001-02-01

    Benzotriazole and its derivatives comprise an important class of corrosion inhibitors, typically used as trace additives in industrial chemical mixtures such as coolants, deicers, surface coatings, cutting fluids, and hydraulic fluids. Recent studies have shown that benzotriazole derivatives are a major component of aircraft deicing fluids (ADFs) responsible for toxicity to bacteria (Microtox). Our current research compared the toxicity of benzotriazole (BT), two methylbenzotriazole (MeBT) isomers, and butylbenzotriazole (BBT). Acute toxicity assays were used to model the response of three common test organisms: Microtox bacteria (Vibrio fischeri), fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) and water flea (Ceriodaphnia dubia). The response of all the three organisms varied over two orders of magnitude among all compounds. Vibrio fischeri was more sensitive than either C. dubia or P. promelas to all the test materials, while C. dubia was less sensitive than P. promelas. The response of test organisms to unmethylated benzotriazole and 4-methylbenzotriazole was similar, whereas 5-methylbenzotriazole was more toxic than either of these two compounds. BBT was the most toxic benzotriazole derivative tested, inducing acute toxicity at a concentration of < or = 3.3 mg/l to all organisms.

  5. Verapamil toxicity dysregulates the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechtel, Laura K; Haverstick, Doris M; Holstege, Christopher P

    2008-04-01

    Recent animal research and clinical case reports suggest benefit from high-dose insulin therapy (HDIT) for the treatment of calcium channel blocker (CCB) toxicity. One molecular signaling pathway, the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway, that contributes to CCB toxicity and the efficacy of HDIT, was examined for a role in this phenomenon. A differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocyte model system was utilized to characterize metabolic and molecular signaling events dysregulated in response to acute CCB toxicity. Glucose uptake assays were performed in the presence of representatives of three classes of CCB drugs, and the ability of HDIT to reverse observed inhibition was assessed. Western blot analyses were utilized to probe which insulin-dependent signaling pathway was inhibited by CCB toxicity. Representative compounds from the dihydropyridine and phenylalkylamine classes of CCBs were more effective at inhibiting glucose uptake in differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes than a representative from the benzothiazepine class. Phosphorylation at serine 473 of the Akt protein (P-Akt), a protein representing a common pathway for insulin receptors (IR), insulinlike growth factor receptors (IGFR), and hybrid receptors formed by IR and IGFR subunits, was abolished in the presence of toxic doses of the phenylalkylamine CCB verapamil. Phosphorylation at serine 473 of Akt was rescued in the presence high concentrations of insulin. These data suggest that dysregulation of the insulin-dependent PI3K pathway is partially responsible for insulin resistance and the hyperglycemic state observed in response to acute CCB toxicity.

  6. Functional toxicology: tools to advance the future of toxicity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaytán, Brandon D; Vulpe, Chris D

    2014-01-01

    The increased presence of chemical contaminants in the environment is an undeniable concern to human health and ecosystems. Historically, by relying heavily upon costly and laborious animal-based toxicity assays, the field of toxicology has often neglected examinations of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of toxicity for the majority of compounds-information that, if available, would strengthen risk assessment analyses. Functional toxicology, where cells or organisms with gene deletions or depleted proteins are used to assess genetic requirements for chemical tolerance, can advance the field of toxicity testing by contributing data regarding chemical mechanisms of toxicity. Functional toxicology can be accomplished using available genetic tools in yeasts, other fungi and bacteria, and eukaryotes of increased complexity, including zebrafish, fruit flies, rodents, and human cell lines. Underscored is the value of using less complex systems such as yeasts to direct further studies in more complex systems such as human cell lines. Functional techniques can yield (1) novel insights into chemical toxicity; (2) pathways and mechanisms deserving of further study; and (3) candidate human toxicant susceptibility or resistance genes.

  7. Functional toxicology: tools to advance the future of toxicity testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon David Gaytán

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The increased presence of chemical contaminants in the environment is an undeniable concern to human health and ecosystems. Historically, by relying heavily upon costly and laborious animal-based toxicity assays, the field of toxicology has often neglected examinations of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of toxicity for the majority of compounds – information that, if available, would strengthen risk assessment analyses. Functional toxicology, where cells or organisms with gene deletions or depleted proteins are used to assess genetic requirements for chemical tolerance, can advance the field of toxicity testing by contributing data regarding chemical mechanisms of toxicity. Functional toxicology can be accomplished using available genetic tools in yeasts, other fungi and bacteria, and eukaryotes of increased complexity, including zebrafish, fruit flies, rodents, and human cell lines. Underscored is the value of using less complex systems such as yeasts to direct further studies in more complex systems such as human cell lines. Functional techniques can yield (1 novel insights into chemical toxicity; (2 pathways and mechanisms deserving of further study; and (3 candidate human toxicant susceptibility or resistance genes.

  8. Degradation and toxicity reduction of phenol by ultrasound waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Maleki

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The effects of parameters such as pH, kinetic constants and initial phenol concentration on the sonochemical degradation of phenol and toxicity assay were studied. The experimental results showed that lower pH and lower concentration of phenol favor the phenol degradation. But the rates of phenol degradation under sonication have always been quite low. It is found that the rate of ultrasonic degradation of phenol for initial concentration of 1 mg/L is 0.018 min-1 but later it reduces with increasing of phenol initial concentration substantially and the experimental data fitted well with pseudo first-order reaction rate equation. Bioassay tests showed that phenol was toxic to Daphnia magna and so resulted in quite low LC50 values. Comparison of toxicity units (TU between phenol and effluent toxicity showed that the TU value for effluent was 1.21 times lower than that obtained for phenol solely. Thus, the toxicity of metabolites formed during the degradation of phenol is lower than the toxicity of phenol itself.

  9. Protein binding assay for hyaluronate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacy, B.E.; Underhill, C.B.

    1986-11-01

    A relatively quick and simple assay for hyaluronate was developed using the specific binding protein, hyaluronectin. The hyaluronectin was obtained by homogenizing the brains of Sprague-Dawley rats, and then centrifuging the homogenate. The resulting supernatant was used as a source of crude hyaluronectin. In the binding assay, the hyaluronectin was mixed with (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate, followed by an equal volume of saturated (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, which precipitated the hyaluronectin and any (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate associated with it, but left free (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate in solution. The mixture was then centrifuged, and the amount of bound (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate in the precipitate was determined. Using this assay, the authors found that hyaluronectin specifically bound hyaluronate, since other glycosaminoglycans failed to compete for the binding protein. In addition, the interaction between hyaluronectin and hyaluronate was of relatively high affinity, and the size of the hyaluronate did not appear to substantially alter the amount of binding. To determine the amount of hyaluronate in an unknown sample, they used a competition assay in which the binding of a set amount of (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate was blocked by the addition of unlabeled hyaluronate. By comparing the degree of competition of the unknown samples with that of known amounts of hyaluronate, it was possible to determine the amount of hyaluronate in the unknowns. They have found that this method is sensitive to 1 ..mu..g or less of hyaluronate, and is unaffected by the presence of proteins.

  10. Is LSD toxic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, David E; Grob, Charles S

    2018-02-01

    LSD (lysergic acid diethylamide) was discovered almost 75 years ago, and has been the object of episodic controversy since then. While initially explored as an adjunctive psychiatric treatment, its recreational use by the general public has persisted and on occasion has been associated with adverse outcomes, particularly when the drug is taken under suboptimal conditions. LSD's potential to cause psychological disturbance (bad trips) has been long understood, and has rarely been associated with accidental deaths and suicide. From a physiological perspective, however, LSD is known to be non-toxic and medically safe when taken at standard dosages (50-200μg). The scientific literature, along with recent media reports, have unfortunately implicated "LSD toxicity" in five cases of sudden death. On close examination, however, two of these fatalities were associated with ingestion of massive overdoses, two were evidently in individuals with psychological agitation after taking standard doses of LSD who were then placed in maximal physical restraint positions (hogtied) by police, following which they suffered fatal cardiovascular collapse, and one case of extreme hyperthermia leading to death that was likely caused by a drug substituted for LSD with strong effects on central nervous system temperature regulation (e.g. 25i-NBOMe). Given the renewed interest in the therapeutic potential of LSD and other psychedelic drugs, it is important that an accurate understanding be established of the true causes of such fatalities that had been erroneously attributed to LSD toxicity, including massive overdoses, excessive physical restraints, and psychoactive drugs other than LSD. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Toxic metals and autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Sarmishtha; Sarkar, Shuvasree; Bhattacharya, Shelley

    2014-11-17

    The earth's resources are finite, and it can no longer be considered a source of inexhaustible bounty for the human population. However, this realization has not been able to contain the human desire for rapid industrialization. The collateral to overusing environmental resources is the high-level contamination of undesirable toxic metals, leading to bioaccumulation and cellular damage. Cytopathological features of biological systems represent a key variable in several diseases. A review of the literature revealed that autophagy (PCDII), a high-capacity process, may consist of selective elimination of vital organelles and/or proteins that intiate mechanisms of cytoprotection and homeostasis in different biological systems under normal physiological and stress conditions. However, the biological system does survive under various environmental stressors. Currently, there is no consensus that specifies a particular response as being a dependable biomarker of toxicology. Autophagy has been recorded as the initial response of a cell to a toxic metal in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Various signaling pathways are triggered through cellular proteins and/or protein kinases that can lead to autophagy, apoptosis (or necroptosis), and necrosis. Although the role of autophagy in tumorigenesis is associated with promoting tumor cell survival and/or acting as a tumor suppressive mechanism, PCDII in metal-induced toxicity has not been extensively studied. The aim of this review is to analyze the comparative cytotoxicity of metals/metalloids and nanoparticles (As, Cd, Cr, Hg, Fe, and metal-NP) in cells enduring autophagy. It is noted that metals/metalloids and nanoparticles prefer ATG8/LC3 as a potent inducer of autophagy in several cell lines or animal cells. MAP kinases, death protein kinases, PI3K, AKT, mTOR, and AMP kinase have been found to be the major components of autophagy induction or inhibition in the context of cellular responses to metals/metalloids and

  12. Quantitative analysis of the toxicity of human amniotic fluid to cultured rat spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewek, M J; Bruner, J P; Whetsell, W O; Tulipan, N

    1997-10-01

    It has been proposed that the myelodysplastic components of a myelomeningocele are secondarily damaged as the result of exposure to amniotic fluid, the so-called 'two-hit' hypothesis. The critical time at which this secondary insult might occur has not been clearly defined. The present study addresses this issue by quantitatively assessing the toxic effects of human amniotic fluid of various gestational ages upon organotypic cultures of rat spinal cord. Using an assay for lactate dehydrogenase efflux to evaluate toxicity in such spinal cord cultures, we found that the amniotic fluid became toxic at approximately 34 weeks' gestation. This toxic effect of amniotic fluid appears to emerge rather suddenly. Accordingly, it seems reasonable to suggest that prevention of exposure of vulnerable spinal cord tissue to this toxicity by surgical closure of a myelomeningocele defect prior to the emergence of toxicity in amniotic fluid may prevent injury to vulnerable myelodysplastic spinal cord tissue.

  13. Nanoparticle toxicity and cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prevenslik, T, E-mail: nanoqed@gmail.com [QED Radiations, Discovery Bay, Hong Kong (Hong Kong)

    2011-07-06

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have provided significant advancements in cancer treatment. But as in any technology, there is a darkside. Experiments have shown NPs in body fluids pose a health risk by causing DNA damage that in of itself may lead to cancer. To avoid the dilemma that NPs are toxic to both cancer cells and DNA alike, the mechanism of NP toxicity must be understood so that the safe use of NPs may go forward. Reactive oxidative species (ROS) of peroxide and hydroxyl radicals damage the DNA by chemical reaction, but require NPs provide energies of about 5 eV not possible by surface effects. Only electromagnetic (EM) radiations beyond ultraviolet (UV) levels may explain the toxicity of NPs. Indeed, experiments show DNA damage from <100 nm NPs mimic the same reaction pathways of conventional sources of ionizing radiation, Hence, it is reasonable to hypothesize that NPs produce their own source of UV radiation, albeit at low intensity. Ionizing radiation from NPs at UV levels is consistent with the theory of QED induced EM radiation. QED stands for quantum electrodynamics. By this theory, fine < 100 nm NPs absorb low frequency thermal energy in the far infrared (FIR) from collisions with the water molecules in body fluids. Since quantum mechanics (QM) precludes NPs from having specific heat, absorbed EM collision energy cannot be conserved by an increase in temperature. But total internal reflection (TIR) momentarily confines the absorbed EM energy within the NP. Conservation proceeds by the creation of QED photons by frequency up-conversion of the absorbed EM energy to the TIR confinement frequency, typically beyond the UV. Subsequently, the QED photons upon scattering from atoms within the NP avoid TIR confinement and leak UV to the surroundings, thereby explaining the remarkable toxicity of NPs. But QED radiation need not be limited to natural or man-made NPs. Extensions suggest UV radiation is produced from biological NPs within the body, e.g., enzyme induced

  14. Neurological oxygen toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmery, Scott; Sykes, Oliver

    2012-10-01

    SCUBA diving has several risks associated with it from breathing air under pressure--nitrogen narcosis, barotrauma and decompression sickness (the bends). Trimix SCUBA diving involves regulating mixtures of nitrogen, oxygen and helium in an attempt to overcome the risks of narcosis and decompression sickness during deep dives, but introduces other potential hazards such as hypoxia and oxygen toxicity convulsions. This study reports on a seizure during the ascent phase, its potential causes and management and discusses the hazards posed to the diver and his rescuer by an emergency ascent to the surface.

  15. Predicting toxic heavy metal movements in upper Sanyati catchment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study assessed toxic heavy metal concentrations in the upper Sanyati catchment in the Midlands Province in Zimbabwe and predicted their movements and potential impacts on ground water quality. Topographic surveying was used to determine borehole locations, elevations, hydraulic conductivity and water yields.

  16. High throughput comet assay to study genotoxicity of nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naouale El Yamani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The unique physicochemical properties of engineered nanomaterials (NMs have accelerated their use in diverse industrial and domestic products. Although their presence in consumer products represents a major concern for public health safety, their potential impact on human health is poorly understood. There is therefore an urgent need to clarify the toxic effects of NMs and to elucidate the mechanisms involved. In view of the large number of NMs currently being used, high throughput (HTP screening technologies are clearly needed for efficient assessment of toxicity. The comet assay is the most used method in nanogenotoxicity studies and has great potential for increasing throughput as it is fast, versatile and robust; simple technical modifications of the assay make it possible to test many compounds (NMs in a single experiment. The standard gel of 70-100 μL contains thousands of cells, of which only a tiny fraction are actually scored. Reducing the gel to a volume of 5 μL, with just a few hundred cells, allows twelve gels to be set on a standard slide, or 96 as a standard 8x12 array. For the 12 gel format, standard slides precoated with agarose are placed on a metal template and gels are set on the positions marked on the template. The HTP comet assay, incorporating digestion of DNA with formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (FPG to detect oxidised purines, has recently been applied to study the potential induction of genotoxicity by NMs via reactive oxygen. In the NanoTEST project we investigated the genotoxic potential of several well-characterized metal and polymeric nanoparticles with the comet assay. All in vitro studies were harmonized; i.e. NMs were from the same batch, and identical dispersion protocols, exposure time, concentration range, culture conditions, and time-courses were used. As a kidney model, Cos-1 fibroblast-like kidney cells were treated with different concentrations of iron oxide NMs, and cells embedded in minigels (12

  17. Spatial and temporal variations in toxicity in a marsh receiving urban runoff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katznelson, R.; Jewell, W.T.; Anderson, S.L.

    1993-06-01

    This project is composed of two sections. The first section describes dry weather toxicity surveys to evaluate the distribution of toxicity in the waters of San Francisco Bay and adjacent wetland habitat, and the second is a series of wet weather toxicity studies with emphasis on a marsh receiving urban runoff. The dry weather studies are reported in the appendices, while the wet weather work comprises the main report.

  18. Comparisons of sediment toxicity with predictions based on chemical guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Connor, T.P.; Daskalakis, K.D. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Silver Spring, MD (United States). National Status and Trends Program; Hyland, J.L. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Charleston, SC (United States); Paul, J.F. [Environmental Protection Agency, Narragansett, RI (United States). Atlantic Ecology Div.; Summers, J.K. [Environmental Protection Agency, Gulf Breeze, FL (United States). Gulf Ecology Div.

    1998-03-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program-Estuaries and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Bioeffects Surveys provide large data sets with which to test proposed relationships between sediment chemistry and toxicity. The authors conclude that guidelines based on bulk chemistry can provide useful triggers for further analysis but should not be used alone as indicators of toxicity. The sediment quality criteria for nonionic organic compounds proposed by the EPA are exceeded in so few samples that they may be of limited practical value. Toxicity was present in many cases when acid-volatile sulfide (AVS) concentrations exceeded the sum of concentrations of sulfide-insoluble metals. However, there is no way to test whether that toxicity was due to those trace elements. The AVS criterion is much more sensitive to AVS concentration than to trace metal contamination.

  19. Acylcarnitine Profiles in Acetaminophen Toxicity in the Mouse: Comparison to Toxicity, Metabolism and Hepatocyte Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack Hinson

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available High doses of acetaminophen (APAP result in hepatotoxicity that involves metabolic activation of the parent compound, covalent binding of the reactive intermediate N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI to liver proteins, and depletion of hepatic glutathione. Impaired fatty acid β-oxidation has been implicated in previous studies of APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. To better understand relationships between toxicity and fatty acid β-oxidation in the liver in APAP toxicity, metabolomic assays for long chain acylcarnitines were examined in relationship to established markers of liver toxicity, oxidative metabolism, and liver regeneration in a time course study in mice. Male B6C3F1 mice were treated with APAP (200 mg/kg IP or saline and sacrificed at 1, 2, 4, 8, 24 or 48 h after APAP. At 1 h, hepatic glutathione was depleted and APAP protein adducts were markedly increased. Alanine aminotransferase (ALT levels were elevated at 4 and 8 h, while proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA expression, indicative of hepatocyte regeneration, was apparent at 24 h and 48 h. Elevations of palmitoyl, oleoyl and myristoyl carnitine were apparent by 2–4 h, concurrent with the onset of Oil Red O staining in liver sections. By 8 h, acylcarnitine levels were below baseline levels and remained low at 24 and 48 h. A partial least squares (PLS model suggested a direct association of acylcarnitine accumulation in serum to APAP protein adduct and hepatic glutathione levels in mice. Overall, the kinetics of serum acylcarnitines in APAP toxicity in mice followed a biphasic pattern involving early elevation after the metabolism phases of toxicity and later depletion of acylcarnitines.

  20. Resveratrol Sensitizes Selectively Thyroid Cancer Cell to 131-Iodine Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Jalal Hosseinimehr

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. In this study, the radiosensitizing effect of resveratrol as a natural product was investigated on cell toxicity induced by 131I in thyroid cancer cell. Methods. Human thyroid cancer cell and human nonmalignant fibroblast cell (HFFF2 were treated with 131I and/or resveratrol at different concentrations for 48 h. The cell proliferation was measured by determination of the percent of the survival cells using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay. Results. Findings of this study show that resveratrol enhanced the cell death induced by 131I on thyroid cancer cell. Also, resveratrol exhibited a protective effect on normal cells against 131I toxicity. Conclusion. This result indicates a promising effect of resveratrol on improvement of cellular toxicity during iodine therapy.

  1. Comparative toxicity of silver nanoparticles on oxidative stress and DNA damage in the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jeong-Min; Eom, Hyun-Jeong; Yang, Xinyu; Meyer, Joel N; Choi, Jinhee

    2014-08-01

    This study examined the effects of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) surface coating and size on the organismal and molecular toxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans. The toxicity of bare AgNPs and 8 and 38 nm PVP-coated AgNPs (PVP8-AgNPs, PVP38-AgNPs) were compared. The toxicity of AgNO3 was also tested because ion dissolution and particle-specific effects are often important characteristics determining Ag nanotoxicity. Comparative toxicity across AgNO3 and the three different types of AgNPs was first evaluated using a C. elegans mortality test by a direct comparison of the LC50 values. Subsequently, mutant screening followed by oxidative stress, mitochondrial toxicity and DNA damage assays were carried out at equitoxic (LC10 and LC50) concentrations to further assess the toxicity mechanism of AgNO3 and AgNPs. AgNO3 and bare AgNPs had similar toxicities, whereas PVP coating reduced the toxicity of the AgNPs significantly. Of the PVP-AgNPs, the smaller NPs were more toxic. Different groups of mutants responded differently to AgNO3 and AgNPs, which indicates that their toxicity mechanism might be different. AgNO3 and bare AgNPs induced mitochondrial membrane damage. None of the silver materials tested caused detectable polymerase-inhibiting DNA lesions in either the nucleus or mitochondria as measured by a quantitative PCR assay, but AgNO3, bare AgNPs and PVP8-AgNPs induced oxidative DNA damage. These results show that coatings on the AgNPs surface and the particle size make a clear contribution to the toxicity of the AgNPs, and oxidative stress-related mitochondrial and DNA damage appear to be potential mechanisms of toxicity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Toxic effects exerted on methanogenic, nitrifying and denitrifying bacteria by chemicals used in a milk analysis laboratory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lopez-Fiuza, J.; Buys, B.; Mosquera-Corral, A.; Omil, F.; Mendez, R.

    2002-01-01

    The toxic effects caused by the chemicals contained in wastewaters generated by laboratories involved in raw milk analyses were assessed using batch assays. These assays were carried out separately with methanogenic, ammonium-oxidizing, nitrite-oxidizing and denitrifying bacteria. Since sodium azide

  3. Molecular toxicity of nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Xue-Ling; Yang, Sheng-Tao; Xing, Gengmei

    2014-10-01

    With the rapid developments in the fields of nanoscience and nanotechnlogy, more and more nanomaterials and their based consumer products have been used into our daily life. The safety concerns of nanomaterials have been well recognized by the scientific community and the public. Molecular mechanism of interactions between nanomaterials and biosystems is the most essential topic and final core of the biosafety. In the last two decades, nanotoxicology developed very fast and toxicity phenomena of nanomaterials have been reported. To achieve better understanding and detoxication of nanomaterials, thorough studies of nanotoxicity at molecular level are important. The interactions between nanomaterials and biomolecules have been widely investigated as the first step toward the molecular nanotoxicology. The consequences of such interactions have been discussed in the literature. Besides this, the chemical mechanism of nanotoxicology is gaining more attention, which would lead to a better design of nontoxic nanomaterials. In this review, we focus on the molecular nanotoxicology and explore the toxicity of nanomaterials at molecular level. The molecular level studies of nanotoxicology are summarized and the published nanotoxicological data are revisited.

  4. Toxicity of nonylphenol diethoxylate in lab-scale anaerobic digesters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozkurt, Hande; Sanin, F. Dilek

    2014-01-01

    Nonylphenol compounds have high commercial, industrial and domestic uses owing to their surface active properties. In addition to their toxic, carcinogenic and persistent characteristics; they have drawn the attention of scientists lately due to their endocrine disrupting properties. Their widesp......Nonylphenol compounds have high commercial, industrial and domestic uses owing to their surface active properties. In addition to their toxic, carcinogenic and persistent characteristics; they have drawn the attention of scientists lately due to their endocrine disrupting properties....... Their widespread use and disposal cause them to enter wastewater treatment systems at high concentrations. Since they are highly persistent and hydrophobic, they accumulate mostly on sludge.In this study using Anaerobic Toxicity Assay (ATA) tests, the toxicity of a model nonylphenol compound, nonylphenol...... the fate, the target compounds were extracted from water and sludge and analyzed using GC/MS. The sludge samples used for assembling the reactors were found to contain NP and NP1EO but no NP2EO. After the assay was completed, all the NP2EO spiked into the live reactors was found to disappear. The increase...

  5. Toxicity Appraisal of Untreated Dyeing Industry Wastewater Based on Chemical Characterization and Short Term Bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Muhammad Furqan; Ashraf, Muhammad; Javeed, Aqeel; Anjum, Aftab Ahmad; Sharif, Ali; Saleem, Ammara; Akhtar, Bushra; Khan, Abdul Muqeet; Altaf, Imran

    2016-04-01

    Characterizing wastewaters only on a chemical basis may be insufficient owing to their complex nature. The purpose of this study was to assess toxicity of textile dyeing wastewater based on analytical techniques and short term toxicity based bioassays. In this study, screening of the fractionated wastewater through GC-MS showed the presence of phenols, phthalic acid derivatives and chlorpyrifos. Metal analysis revealed that chromium, arsenic and mercury were present in amounts higher than the wastewater discharge limits. Textile dyeing wastewater was found to be highly mutagenic in the Ames test. DNA damage in sheep lymphocytes decreased linearly with an increase in the dilution of wastewater. MTT assay showed that 8.3 percent v/v wastewater decreased cell survival percentage to 50 %. It can be concluded from this study that short term toxicity tests such as Ames test, in vitro comet assay, and cytotoxicity assays may serve as useful indicators of wastewater pollution along with their organic and inorganic chemical characterizations.

  6. Wnt Ligands Differentially Regulate Toxicity and Translocation of Graphene Oxide through Different Mechanisms in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Lingtong; Ren, Mingxia; Qu, Man; Zhang, Hanyu; Wang, Dayong

    2016-12-01

    In this study, we investigated the possible involvement of Wnt signals in the control of graphene oxide (GO) toxicity using the in vivo assay system of Caenorhabditis elegans. In nematodes, the Wnt ligands, CWN-1, CWN-2, and LIN-44, were found to be involved in the control of GO toxicity. Mutation of cwn-1 or lin-44 gene induced a resistant property to GO toxicity and resulted in the decreased accumulation of GO in the body of nematodes, whereas mutation of cwn-2 gene induces a susceptible property to GO toxicity and an enhanced accumulation of GO in the body of nematodes. Genetic interaction assays demonstrated that mutation of cwn-1 or lin-44 was able to suppress the susceptibility to GO toxicity shown in the cwn-2 mutants. Loss-of-function mutations in all three of these Wnt ligand genes resulted in the resistance of nematodes to GO toxicity. Moreover, the Wnt ligands might differentially regulate the toxicity and translocation of GO through different mechanisms. These findings could be important in understanding the function of Wnt signals in the regulation of toxicity from environmental nanomaterials.

  7. "Suntelligence" Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the American Academy of Dermatology's "Suntelligence" sun-smart survey. Please answer the following questions to measure your ... how you incorporate it into your life. The survey will take 5 to 7 minutes to complete. ...

  8. Biological control of toxic cyanobacteria

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ndlela, L

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available • If successful, the biocontrol agent may produce conformational changes to the cyanobacterial toxins or reduced eco-toxicity effects • The laboratory study may give insight into the factors inhibiting the natural balance of predatory bacteria... studies have been done on the eco-toxicity resulting from biocontrol as well as the changes to cyanotoxins, if any. Research Plan The study will be conducted at whole cell level and with specific metabolites and toxins, with eco-toxicity studied...

  9. Resveratrol radiomodifier effect on Danio rerio embriolarval assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damasceno, Kelme C.; Mamede, Fernanda C.S.; Cavalcante, Adriana K.; Rogero, Sizue O.; Rogero, José R. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Ferreira, Monica L., E-mail: kelmecardoso@gmail.com, E-mail: monica.lopesferreira@butantan.gov.br [Instituto Butantan, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The ionizing radiation can cause fatal damages to cells by the direct interaction with DNA and RNA or a series of toxic reactions occasioning chemical and biological changes. There are compounds with radioprotective potential, like resveratrol. For use these compounds it is necessary to know their toxicity and interaction with the organism. Resveratrol is a substance found in peanuts, grapes and wine and its production occurs in plants as a response to physical, chemical and biological stress. Some studies have indicated that it has many health benefits. Danio rerio (zebrafish) is a vertebrate animal and has become the model of several studies related to human diseases, due to its genomes similarity of 70 %, rapid embryonic development and the transparency of the eggs, which make it possible to observe the effects during the test period. The aim of the present study was to verify the resveratrol radiomodifier effect on zebrafish during the embryolarval development by modified Fish Embryo Acute Toxicity (FET) based on OECD236 and the obtained lethal concentration of resveratrol (LC50) was 66.9 mg.L{sup -1}. Before, to understand the effects of radiation, was carried out the gamma radiation lethal dose (LD50) assay and the LD50 was 25 Gy. With these results the project will continue later to finish the study of the radiomodifier effect of resveratrol in the presence of gamma radiation. (author)

  10. Tapentadol toxicity in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borys, Douglas; Stanton, Matthew; Gummin, David; Drott, Tracy

    2015-02-01

    Tapentadol (Nucynta) is indicated for the treatment of moderate to severe pain in adults. Tapentadol's mechanism of action consists of acting as an agonist on the μ-opioid receptor and by inhibiting the reuptake of norepinephrine. There are no published reports on the toxicity of tapentadol in pediatric patients. The goals of this study are to describe the incidence, medical outcomes, clinical effects, and treatment secondary to tapentadol exposure. This retrospective observational study used data from the National Poison Data System. Inclusion criteria were exposure to tapentadol from November 1, 2008 to December 31, 2013; age 0 to 17 years; single ingestion; and followed to a known outcome. There were 104 patients who met the inclusion criteria. Eighty patients were aged ≤ 6, 2-year-olds the most common age group (60.6%). There were 52 male and 52 female patients. Of the 104 patients, 93 had unintentional exposures. No deaths were reported. Sixty-two of the patients had no effect, 34 had minor effects, 6 had moderate and 2 had major effects. Thirty patients reported drowsiness and lethargy. Other effects reported included nausea, vomiting, miosis, tachycardia, respiratory depression, dizziness/vertigo, coma, dyspnea, pallor, vomiting, edema, hives/welts, slurred speech, pruritus, and hallucinations/delusions. Fifty-three patients were reported to have no medical intervention. This is the first study examining the toxic effects of tapentadol in a pediatric population. Although a majority of the patients in this review developed no effect from their exposure, two had life-threatening events. The most common effects reported were opioidlike. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  11. Lead toxicity: Current concerns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goyer, R.A. (Univ. of Western Ontario, London (Canada))

    1993-04-01

    Over the 20-year period since the first issue of Environmental Health Perspectives was published, there has been considerable progress in the understanding of the potential toxicity of exposure to lead. Many of these advances have been reviewed in published symposia, conferences, and review papers in EHP. This brief review identifies major advances as well as a number of current concerns that present opportunities for prevention and intervention strategies. The major scientific advance has been the demonstration that blood lead (PbB) levels of 10-15 micrograms/dL in newborn and very young infants result in cognitive and behavioral deficits. Further support for this observation is being obtained by prospective or longitudinal studies presently in progress. The mechanism(s) for the central nervous system effects of lead is unclear but involve lead interactions within calcium-mediated intracellular messenger systems and neurotransmission. Effects of low-level lead exposure on blood pressure, particularly in adult men, may be related to the effect of lead on calcium-mediated control of vascular smooth muscle contraction and on the renin-angiotensin system. Reproductive effects of lead have long been suspected, but low-level effects have not been well studied. Whether lead is a carcinogen or its association with renal adenocarcinoma is a consequence of cystic nephropathy is uncertain. Major risk factors for lead toxicity in children in the United States include nutrition, particularly deficiencies of essential metals, calcium, iron, and zinc, and housing and socioeconomic status. A goal for the year 2000 is to reduce prevalence of blood lead levels exceeding 15 micrograms/dL. 97 refs.

  12. Antioxidants and the Comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cemeli, Eduardo; Baumgartner, Adolf; Anderson, Diana

    2009-01-01

    It is widely accepted that antioxidants, either endogenous or from the diet, play a key role in preserving health. They are able to quench radical species generated in situations of oxidative stress, either triggered by pathologies or xenobiotics, and they protect the integrity of DNA from genotoxicants. Nevertheless, there are still many compounds with unclear or unidentified prooxidant/antioxidant activities. This is of concern since there is an increase in the number of compounds synthesized or extracted from vegetables to which humans might be exposed. Despite the well-established protective effects of fruit and vegetables, the antioxidant(s) responsible have not all been clearly identified. There might also be alternative mechanisms contributing to the protective effects for which a comprehensive description is lacking. In the last two decades, the Comet assay has been extensively used for the investigation of the effects of antioxidants and many reports can be found in the literature. The Comet assay, a relatively fast, simple, and sensitive technique for the analysis of DNA damage in all cell types, has been applied for the screening of chemicals, biomonitoring and intervention studies. In the present review, several of the most well-known antioxidants are considered. These include: catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, selenium, iron chelators, melatonin, melanin, vitamins (A, B, C and E), carotenes, flavonoids, isoflavones, tea polyphenols, wine polyphenols and synthetic antioxidants. Investigations showing beneficial as well as non-beneficial properties of the antioxidants selected, either at the in vitro, ex vivo or in vivo level are discussed.

  13. SNO+ Scintillator Purification and Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, R.; Chen, M.; Chkvorets, O.; Hallman, D.; Vázquez-Jáuregui, E.

    2011-04-01

    We describe the R&D on the scintillator purification and assay methods and technology for the SNO+ neutrino and double-beta decay experiment. The SNO+ experiment is a replacement of the SNO heavy water with liquid scintillator comprised of 2 g/L PPO in linear alkylbenzene (LAB). During filling the LAB will be transported underground by rail car and purified by multi-stage distillation and steam stripping at a flow rate of 19 LPM. While the detector is operational the scintillator can be recirculated at 150 LPM (full detector volume in 4 days) to provide repurification as necessary by either water extraction (for Ra, K, Bi) or by functional metal scavenger columns (for Pb, Ra, Bi, Ac, Th) followed by steam stripping to remove noble gases and oxygen (Rn, O2, Kr, Ar). The metal scavenger columns also provide a method for scintillator assay for ex-situ measurement of the U and Th chain radioactivity. We have developed "natural" radioactive spikes of Pb and Ra in LAB and use these for purification testing. Lastly, we present the planned operating modes and purification strategies and the plant specifications and design.

  14. Children's Ability to Recognise Toxic and Non-Toxic Fruits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fancovicova, Jana; Prokop, Pavol

    2011-01-01

    Children's ability to identify common plants is a necessary prerequisite for learning botany. However, recent work has shown that children lack positive attitudes toward plants and are unable to identify them. We examined children's (aged 10-17) ability to discriminate between common toxic and non-toxic plants and their mature fruits presented in…

  15. A Nationwide Register-Based Survey of Baclofen Toxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiel, Louise Bendix; Hoegberg, Lotte Christine Groth; Jansen, Tejs

    2015-01-01

    was conducted with ICD-10 codes for poisoning, self-harm and suicide, and coupled with the baclofen ATC code. All enquiries about baclofen to the Danish Poison Information Centre (DPIC) in the same period were evaluated. Demographic and clinical data were extracted, and the poisonings were classified according...

  16. Acute toxicity tests and meta-analysis identify gaps in tropical ecotoxicology for amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghose, Sonia L; Donnelly, Maureen A; Kerby, Jacob; Whitfield, Steven M

    2014-09-01

    Amphibian populations are declining worldwide, particularly in tropical regions where amphibian diversity is highest. Pollutants, including agricultural pesticides, have been identified as a potential contributor to decline, yet toxicological studies of tropical amphibians are very rare. The present study assesses toxic effects on amphibians of 10 commonly used commercial pesticides in tropical agriculture using 2 approaches. First, the authors conducted 8-d toxicity assays with formulations of each pesticide using individually reared red-eyed tree frog (Agalychnis callidryas) tadpoles. Second, they conducted a review of available data for the lethal concentration to kill 50% of test animals from the US Environmental Protection Agency's ECOTOX database to allow comparison with their findings. Lethal concentration estimates from the assays ranged over several orders of magnitude. The nematicides terbufos and ethoprophos and the fungicide chlorothalonil were very highly toxic, with evident effects within an order of magnitude of environmental concentrations. Acute toxicity assays and meta-analysis show that nematicides and fungicides are generally more toxic than herbicides yet receive far less research attention than less toxic herbicides. Given that the tropics have a high diversity of amphibians, the findings emphasize the need for research into the effects of commonly used pesticides in tropical countries and should help guide future ecotoxicological research in tropical regions. © 2014 SETAC.

  17. Biomarker evaluation of skeletal muscle toxicity following clofibrate administration in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodié, Karen; Buck, Wayne R; Pieh, Julia; Liguori, Michael J; Popp, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    The use of sensitive biomarkers to monitor skeletal muscle toxicity in preclinical toxicity studies is important for the risk assessment in humans during the development of a novel compound. Skeletal muscle toxicity in Sprague Dawley Rats was induced with clofibrate at different dose levels for 7 days to compare standard clinical pathology assays with novel skeletal muscle and cardiac muscle biomarkers, gene expression and histopathological changes. The standard clinical pathology assays aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and creatine kinase (CK) enzyme activity were compared to novel biomarkers fatty acid binding protein 3 (Fabp3), myosin light chain 3 (Myl3), muscular isoform of CK immunoreactivity (three isoforms CKBB, CKMM, CKMB), parvalbumin (Prv), skeletal troponin I (sTnI), cardiac troponin T (cTnT), cardiac troponin I (cTnI), CKMM, and myoglobin (Myo). The biomarker elevations were correlated to histopathological findings detected in several muscles and gene expression changes. Clofibrate predominantly induced skeletal muscle toxicity of type I fibers of low magnitude. Useful biomarkers for skeletal muscle toxicity were AST, Fabp3, Myl3, (CKMB) and sTnI. Measurements of CK enzyme activity by a standard clinical assay were not useful for monitoring clofibrate-induced skeletal muscle toxicity in the rat at the doses used in this study. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  18. Toxicity of benthic dinoflagellates on grazing, behavior and survival of the brine shrimp Artemia salina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Raquel A. F.; Fernandes, Tainá; dos Santos, Luciano Neves; Nascimento, Silvia M.

    2017-01-01

    Harmful algae may differently affect their primary grazers, causing sub-lethal effects and/or leading to their death. The present study aim to compare the effects of three toxic benthic dinoflagellates on clearance and grazing rates, behavioral changes, and survival of Artemia salina. Feeding assays consisted in 1-h incubations of brine shrimps with the toxic Prorocentrum lima, Gambierdiscus excentricus and Ostreopsis cf. ovata and the non-toxic Tetraselmis sp. Brine shrimps fed unselectively on all toxic and non-toxic algal preys, without significant differences in clearance and ingestion rates. Acute toxicity assays were performed with dinoflagellate cells in two growth phases during 7-h to assess differences in cell toxicity to A. salina. Additionally, exposure to cell-free medium was performed to evaluate its effects on A. salina survival. The behavior of brine shrimps significantly changed during exposure to the toxic dinoflagellates, becoming immobile at the bottom by the end of the trials. Dinoflagellates significantly affected A. salina survival with 100% mortality after 7-h exposure to cells in exponential phase (all treatments) and to P. lima in stationary phase. Mortality rates of brine shrimps exposed to O. cf. ovata and G. excentricus in stationary phase were 91% and 75%, respectively. However, incubations of the brine shrimps with cell-free medium did not affect A. salina survivorship. Significant differences in toxic effects between cell growth phases were only found in the survival rates of A. salina exposed to G. excentricus. Acute exposure to benthic toxic dinoflagellates induced harmful effects on behavior and survival of A. salina. Negative effects related to the toxicity of benthic dinoflagellates are thus expected on their primary grazers making them more vulnerable to predation and vectors of toxins through the marine food webs. PMID:28388672

  19. Toxicity of benthic dinoflagellates on grazing, behavior and survival of the brine shrimp Artemia salina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel A F Neves

    Full Text Available Harmful algae may differently affect their primary grazers, causing sub-lethal effects and/or leading to their death. The present study aim to compare the effects of three toxic benthic dinoflagellates on clearance and grazing rates, behavioral changes, and survival of Artemia salina. Feeding assays consisted in 1-h incubations of brine shrimps with the toxic Prorocentrum lima, Gambierdiscus excentricus and Ostreopsis cf. ovata and the non-toxic Tetraselmis sp. Brine shrimps fed unselectively on all toxic and non-toxic algal preys, without significant differences in clearance and ingestion rates. Acute toxicity assays were performed with dinoflagellate cells in two growth phases during 7-h to assess differences in cell toxicity to A. salina. Additionally, exposure to cell-free medium was performed to evaluate its effects on A. salina survival. The behavior of brine shrimps significantly changed during exposure to the toxic dinoflagellates, becoming immobile at the bottom by the end of the trials. Dinoflagellates significantly affected A. salina survival with 100% mortality after 7-h exposure to cells in exponential phase (all treatments and to P. lima in stationary phase. Mortality rates of brine shrimps exposed to O. cf. ovata and G. excentricus in stationary phase were 91% and 75%, respectively. However, incubations of the brine shrimps with cell-free medium did not affect A. salina survivorship. Significant differences in toxic effects between cell growth phases were only found in the survival rates of A. salina exposed to G. excentricus. Acute exposure to benthic toxic dinoflagellates induced harmful effects on behavior and survival of A. salina. Negative effects related to the toxicity of benthic dinoflagellates are thus expected on their primary grazers making them more vulnerable to predation and vectors of toxins through the marine food webs.

  20. Flow cytometric assay for analysis of cytotoxic effects of potential drugs on human peripheral blood leukocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieschke, Kathleen; Mittag, Anja; Golab, Karolina; Bocsi, Jozsef; Pierzchalski, Arkadiusz; Kamysz, Wojciech; Tarnok, Attila

    2014-03-01

    Toxicity test of new chemicals belongs to the first steps in the drug screening, using different cultured cell lines. However, primary human cells represent the human organism better than cultured tumor derived cell lines. We developed a very gentle toxicity assay for isolation and incubation of human peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) and tested it using different bioactive oligopeptides (OP). Effects of different PBL isolation methods (red blood cell lysis; Histopaque isolation among others), different incubation tubes (e.g. FACS tubes), anticoagulants and blood sources on PBL viability were tested using propidium iodide-exclusion as viability measure (incubation time: 60 min, 36°C) and flow cytometry. Toxicity concentration and time-depended effects (10-60 min, 36 °C, 0-100 μg /ml of OP) on human PBL were analyzed. Erythrocyte lysis by hypotonic shock (dH2O) was the fastest PBL isolation method with highest viability (>85%) compared to NH4Cl-Lysis (49%). Density gradient centrifugation led to neutrophil granulocyte cell loss. Heparin anticoagulation resulted in higher viability than EDTA. Conical 1.5 mL and 2 mL micro-reaction tubes (both polypropylene (PP)) had the highest viability (99% and 97%) compared to other tubes, i.e. three types of 5.0 mL round-bottom tubes PP (opaque-60%), PP (blue-62%), Polystyrene (PS-64%). Viability of PBL did not differ between venous and capillary blood. A gentle reproducible preparation and analytical toxicity-assay for human PBL was developed and evaluated. Using our assay toxicity, time-course, dose-dependence and aggregate formation by OP could be clearly differentiated and quantified. This novel assay enables for rapid and cost effective multiparametric toxicological screening and pharmacological testing on primary human PBL and can be adapted to high-throughput-screening.°z

  1. Reliability of plant root comet assay in comparison with human leukocyte comet assay for assessment environmental genotoxic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Gabriela Barreto Dos; Andrade-Vieira, Larissa Fonseca; Moraes, Isabella de Campos; César, Pedro Henrique Souza; Marcussi, Silvana; Davide, Lisete Chamma

    2017-08-01

    Comet assay is an efficient test to detect genotoxic compounds based on observation of DNA damage. The aim of this work was to compare the results obtained from the comet assay in two different type of cells extracted from the root tips from Lactuca sativa L. and human blood. For this, Spent Pot Liner (SPL), and its components (aluminum and fluoride) were applied as toxic agents. SPL is a solid waste generated in industry from the aluminum mining and processing with known toxicity. Three concentrations of all tested solutions were applied and the damages observed were compared to negative and positive controls. It was observed an increase in the frequency of DNA damage for human leukocytes and plant cells, in all treatments. On human leukocytes, SPL induced the highest percentage of damage, with an average of 87.68%. For root tips cells of L. sativa the highest percentage of damage was detected for aluminum (93.89%). Considering the arbitrary units (AU), the average of nuclei with high levels of DNA fragmentation was significant for both cells type evaluated. The tested cells demonstrated equal effectiveness for detection of the genotoxicity induced by the SPL and its chemical components, aluminum and fluoride. Further, using a unique method, the comet assay, we proved that cells from root tips of Lactuca sativa represent a reliable model to detect DNA damage induced by genotoxic pollutants is in agreement of those observed in human leukocytes as model. So far, plant cells may be suggested as important system to assess the toxicological risk of environmental agents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Identifying the cause of toxicity in an algal whole effluent toxicity study - an unanticipated toxicant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naddy, Rami B; Tapp, Kelly; Rehner, Anita B; Pillard, David A; Schrage, Laura

    2011-10-01

    Toxicity was observed in whole effluent toxicity (WET) studies with the freshwater alga, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, in three consecutive monthly studies, (NOEC=50-75%). Toxicity was not observed to Ceriodaphnia dubia or the fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas in concurrent studies. Selected toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) tests were conducted in a tiered approach to eliminate possible toxicants and progressively identify the causative agent. Filtration following alkaline adjustment (pH 10 or 11) was effective in eliminating significant growth effects and also reduced phosphate concentration. The TIE studies confirmed that the observed effluent toxicity was caused by excess ortho-phosphate in the effluent not by overstimulation or related to unfavorable N:P ratios; but due to direct toxicity. The 96-h 25% inhibition concentration (IC25) of ortho-phosphate to P. subcapitata was 3.4 mg L⁻¹ while the maximum acceptable toxicant concentration was 4.8 mg L⁻¹. This study illustrates the value of multi-species testing and also provides an example of an effective TIE using algae identifying an unanticipated toxicant. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Determination of Metabolic Viability and Cell Mass Using a Tandem Resazurin/Sulforhodamine B Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Filomena S G; Starostina, Irina G; Ivanova, Vilena V; Rizvanov, Albert A; Oliveira, Paulo J; Pereira, Susana P

    2016-05-04

    The identification of rapid, reliable, and highly reproducible biological assays that can be standardized and routinely used in preclinical tests constitutes a promising approach to reducing drug discovery costs and time. This unit details a tandem, rapid, and reliable cell viability method for preliminary screening of chemical compounds. This assay measures metabolic activity and cell mass in the same cell sample using a dual resazurin/sulforhodamine B assay, eliminating the variation associated with cell seeding and excessive manipulations in assays that test different cell samples across plates. The procedure also reduces the amount of cells, test compound, and reagents required, as well as the time expended in conventional tests, thus resulting in a more confident prediction of toxic thresholds for the tested compounds. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  4. Catalytic Ozonation of Phenolic Wastewater: Identification and Toxicity of Intermediates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Farzadkia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A new strategy in catalytic ozonation removal method for degradation and detoxification of phenol from industrial wastewater was investigated. Magnetic carbon nanocomposite, as a novel catalyst, was synthesized and then used in the catalytic ozonation process (COP and the effects of operational conditions such as initial pH, reaction time, and initial concentration of phenol on the degradation efficiency and the toxicity assay have been investigated. The results showed that the highest catalytic potential was achieved at optimal neutral pH and the removal efficiency of phenol and COD is 98.5% and 69.8%, respectively. First-order modeling demonstrated that the reactions were dependent on the initial concentration of phenol, with kinetic constants varying from 0.038 min−1  ([phenol]o = 1500 mg/L to 1.273 min−1 ([phenol]o = 50 mg/L. Bioassay analysis showed that phenol was highly toxic to Daphnia magna (LC50 96 h=5.6 mg/L. Comparison of toxicity units (TU of row wastewater (36.01 and the treated effluent showed that TU value, after slightly increasing in the first steps of ozonation for construction of more toxic intermediates, severely reduced at the end of reaction (2.23. Thus, COP was able to effectively remove the toxicity of intermediates which were formed during the chemical oxidation of phenolic wastewaters.

  5. In vivo transgenic mutation assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thybaud, Véronique; Dean, Stephen; Nohmi, Takehiko; de Boer, Johan; Douglas, George R; Glickman, Barry W; Gorelick, Nancy J; Heddle, John A; Heflich, Robert H; Lambert, Iain; Martus, Hans-Jörg; Mirsalis, Jon C; Suzuki, Takayoshi; Yajima, Nobuhiro

    2003-10-07

    Transgenic rodent gene-mutation models provide relatively quick and statistically reliable assays for gene mutations in the DNA from any tissue. This report summarizes those issues that have been agreed upon at a previous IWGT meeting [Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 35 (2000) 253], and discusses in depth those issues for which no consensus was reached before. It was previously agreed that for regulatory applications, assays should be based upon neutral genes, be generally available in several laboratories, and be readily transferable. For phage-based assays, five to ten animals per group should be analyzed, assuming a spontaneous mutant frequency (MF) of approximately 3x10(-5) mutants/locus and 125,000-300,000 plaque or colony forming units (pfu or cfu) per tissue per animal. A full set of data should be generated for a vehicle control and two dose groups. Concurrent positive control animals are only necessary during validation, but positive control DNA must be included in each plating. Tissues should be processed and analyzed in a blocked design, where samples from negative control, positive control and each treatment group are processed together. The total number of pfus or cfus and the MF for each tissue and animal are reported. Statistical tests should consider the animal as the experimental unit. Nonparametric statistical tests are recommended. A positive result is a statistically significant dose-response and/or statistically significant increase in any dose group compared to concurrent negative controls using an appropriate statistical model. A negative result is a statistically non-significant change, with all mean MFs within two standard deviations of the control. During the current workshop, a general protocol was agreed in which animals are treated daily for 28 consecutive days and tissues sampled 3 days after the final treatment. This recommendation could be modified by reducing or increasing the number of treatments or the length of the treatment period, when

  6. Externalization of the Toxic Introject

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Michael

    1975-01-01

    The therapist encounters patients who have incorporated toxic introjects. Therapy helps them to provide room for incorporation of a healthy object by externalizing the toxic introject. This technique is illustrated with several cases and comparison is made between the use of this technique in the treatment of adults and children. (Author)

  7. Toxic Leadership in Educational Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, James E.

    2014-01-01

    While research on the traits and skills of effective leaders is plentiful, only recently has the phenomenon of toxic leadership begun to be investigated. This research report focuses on toxic leadership in educational organizations--its prevalence, as well as the characteristics and early indicators. Using mixed methods, the study found four…

  8. One Health and Toxic Cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    One Health and toxic cyanobacteria Blooms of toxic freshwater blue-green algae or cyanobacteria (HABs) have been in the news after HABs associated with human and animal health problems have been reported in Florida, California and Utah during 2016. HABs occur in warm, slow moving...

  9. The toxicity of X material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferry, J.L.

    1943-12-31

    This report addresses toxicity (largely chemical) of Manhattan Project materials from the point of worker protection. Known chemical toxicities of X material (uranium), nitrous fumes, fluorine, vanadium, magnesium, and lime are described followed by safe exposure levels, symptoms of exposure, and treatment recommendations. The report closes with an overview of general policy in a question and answer format.

  10. Polish Toxic Currency Options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldemar Gontarski

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Toxic currency options are defined on the basis of the opposition to the nature (essence of an option contract, which is justified in terms of norms founded on the general law clause of characteristics (nature of a relation (which represents an independent premise for imposing restrictions on the freedom of contracts. So-understood toxic currency options are unlawful. Indeed they contravene iuris cogentis regulations. These include for instance option contracts, which are concluded with a bank, if the bank has not informed about option risk before concluding the contract; or the barrier options, which focus only on the protection of banks interests. Therefore, such options may appear to be invalid. Therefore, performing contracts for toxic currency options may be qualified as a criminal mismanagement. For the sake of security, the manager should then take into consideration filing a claim for stating invalidity (which can be made in a court verdict. At the same time, if the supervisory board member in a commercial company, who can also be a subject to mismanagement offences, commits an omission involving lack of reaction (for example, if he/she fails to notify of the suspected offence committed by the management board members acting to the companys detriment when the management board makes the company conclude option contracts which are charged with absolute invalidity the supervisory board member so acting may be considered to act to the companys detriment. In the most recent Polish jurisprudence and judicature the standard of a good host is treated to be the last resort for determining whether the managers powers resulting from criminal regulations were performed. The manager of the exporter should not, as a rule, issue any options. Issuing options always means assuming an obligation. In the case of currency put options it is an absolute obligation to purchase a given amount in euro at exchange rate set in advance. On the other hand issuing

  11. VARIATIONS IN REPRODUCTIVE TOXICANT IDENTIFICATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, F

    2008-05-13

    Reproductive toxicants are a very important class of compounds. They present unique hazards to those of child bearing ages, perform their 'dirty work' using a wide variety of mechanisms on a number of different organs, and are regulatorily important. Because of all of this, properly identifying reproductive toxicants is important, but fraught with difficulty. In this paper we will describe types or reproductive toxicants, their importance, and both mistakes and good practices that people who are not experts in reproductive toxicology may use in their attempts to identify them. Additionally, this paper will focus on chemical reproductive toxicants and will not address biological agents that could affect reproductive toxicity although many principles outlined here could be applied to that endeavor.

  12. Predictive Assay For Cancer Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suess, A; Nguyen, C; Sorensen, K; Montgomery, J; Souza, B; Kulp, K; Dugan, L; Christian, A

    2005-09-19

    Early detection of cancer is a key element in successful treatment of the disease. Understanding the particular type of cancer involved, its origins and probable course, is also important. PhIP (2-amino-1-methyl-6 phenylimidazo [4,5-b]pyridine), a heterocyclic amine produced during the cooking of meat at elevated temperatures, has been shown to induce mammary cancer in female, Sprague-Dawley rats. Tumors induced by PhIP have been shown to contain discreet cytogenetic signature patterns of gains and losses using comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). To determine if a protein signature exists for these tumors, we are analyzing expression levels of the protein products of the above-mentioned tumors in combination with a new bulk protein subtractive assay. This assay produces a panel of antibodies against proteins that are either on or off in the tumor. Hybridization of the antibody panel onto a 2-D gel of tumor or control protein will allow for identification of a distinct protein signature in the tumor. Analysis of several gene databases has identified a number of rat homologs of human cancer genes located in these regions of gain and loss. These genes include the oncogenes c-MYK, ERBB2/NEU, THRA and tumor suppressor genes EGR1 and HDAC3. The listed genes have been shown to be estrogen-responsive, suggesting a possible link between delivery of bio-activated PhIP to the cell nucleus via estrogen receptors and gene-specific PhIP-induced DNA damage, leading to cell transformation. All three tumors showed similar silver staining patterns compared to each other, while they all were different than the control tissue. Subsequent screening of these genes against those from tumors know to be caused by other agents may produce a protein signature unique to PhIP, which can be used as a diagnostic to augment optical and radiation-based detection schemes.

  13. Predictive assay for cancer targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suess, Amanda; Nguyen, Christine; Sorensen, Karen; Montgomery, Jennifer; Souza, Brian; Kulp, Kris; Dugan, Larry; Christian, Allen

    2005-11-01

    Early detection of cancer is a key element in successful treatment of the disease. Understanding the particular type of cancer involved, its origins and probable course, is also important. PhIP (2-amino-1- methyl-6 phenylimidazo [4,5-b]pyridine), a heterocyclic amine produced during the cooking of meat at elevated temperatures, has been shown to induce mammary cancer in female, Sprague-Dawley rats. Tumors induced by PhIP have been shown to contain discreet cytogenetic signature patterns of gains and losses using comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). To determine if a protein signature exists for these tumors, we are analyzing expression levels of the protein products of the above-mentioned tumors in combination with a new bulk protein subtractive assay. This assay produces a panel of antibodies against proteins that are either on or off in the tumor. Hybridization of the antibody panel onto a 2-D gel of tumor or control protein will allow for identification of a distinct protein signature in the tumor. Analysis of several gene databases has identified a number of rat homologs of human cancer genes located in these regions of gain and loss. These genes include the oncogenes c-MYK, ERBB2/NEU, THRA and tumor suppressor genes EGR1 and HDAC3. The listed genes have been shown to be estrogen-responsive, suggesting a possible link between delivery of bio-activated PhIP to the cell nucleus via estrogen receptors and gene-specific PhIP-induced DNA damage, leading to cell transformation. All three tumors showed similar silver staining patterns compared to each other, while they all were different than the control tissue. Subsequent screening of these genes against those from tumors know to be caused by other agents may produce a protein signature unique to PhIP, which can be used as a diagnostic to augment optical and radiation-based detection schemes.

  14. Hydrocarbon toxicity: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tormoehlen, L M; Tekulve, K J; Nañagas, K A

    2014-06-01

    Clinical effects of hydrocarbon exposure have been reported since 1897. These substances are ubiquitous, and their exposures are common. The specific hydrocarbon and route of exposure will determine the clinical effect, and an understanding of this is helpful in the care of the hydrocarbon-exposed patient. To complete a comprehensive review of the literature on hydrocarbon toxicity and summarize the findings. Relevant literature was identified through searches of Medline (PubMed/OVID) and Cochrane Library databases (inclusive of years 1975-2013), as well as from multiple toxicology textbooks. Bibliographies of the identified articles were also reviewed. Search terms included combinations of the following: hydrocarbons, inhalants, encephalopathy, coma, cognitive deficits, inhalant abuse, huffing, sudden sniffing death, toluene, renal tubular acidosis, metabolic acidosis, arrhythmia, dermatitis, and aspiration pneumonitis. All pertinent clinical trials, observational studies, and case reports relevant to hydrocarbon exposure and published in English were reviewed. Chronic, occupational hydrocarbon toxicity was not included. Exposure to hydrocarbons occurs through one of the following routes: inhalation, ingestion with or without aspiration, or dermal exposure. Inhalational abuse is associated with central nervous system depression, metabolic acidosis, and arrhythmia. The exact mechanism of the CNS depression is unknown, but experimental evidence suggests effects on NMDA, dopamine, and GABA receptors. Chronic toluene inhalation causes a non-anion gap metabolic acidosis associated with hypokalemia. Halogenated hydrocarbon abuse can cause a fatal malignant arrhythmia, termed "sudden sniffing death". Individuals who regularly abuse hydrocarbons are more likely to be polysubstance users, exhibit criminal or violent behavior, and develop memory and other cognitive deficits. Heavy, long-term use results in cerebellar dysfunction, encephalopathy, weakness, and dementia

  15. Genotoxic and Cytotoxic Safety Evaluation of Papain (Carica papaya L. Using In Vitro Assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia R. da Silva

    2010-01-01

    This work evaluated the toxic and mutagenic potential of papain and its potential antioxidant activity against induced-H2O2 oxidative stress in Escherichia coli strains. Cytotoxicity assay, Growth inhibition test, WP2-Mutoxitest and Plasmid-DNA treatment, and agarose gel electrophoresis were used to investigate if papain would present any toxic or mutagenic potential as well as if papain would display antioxidant properties. Papain exhibited negative results for all tests. This agent presented an activity protecting cells against H2O2-induced mutagenesis.

  16. Application of frog embryo teratogenesis assay-Xenopus to ecological risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoke, Robert A; Ankley, Gerald T

    2005-10-01

    An expert workshop recently was convened to consider the frog embryo teratogenesis assay-Xenopus (FETAX) as a screening method for identifying the potential developmental toxicity of single chemicals and chemical mixtures. One recommendation from the workshop was that, in order to determine the utility of FETAX for ecological risk assessments, additional consideration of how the assay is conducted is necessary. In addition, a comparative evaluation would be useful of FETAX endpoints (i.e., survival, malformations, growth) versus each other, endpoints from aquatic toxicity tests using more commonly tested species of cladocerans and fish, and tests with other amphibian species. This review provides an evaluation and critique of the current FETAX protocol from two perspectives: Practical considerations relative to conducting the test and sensitivity of the assay (and associated endpoints) compared to tests with other species. Several aspects of the current standard protocol, including test temperature, diet, loading rates, and chemical exposure options, need to be modified to ensure that the assay is robust technically. Evaluation of FETAX data from the open literature indicates that growth is the most sensitive endpoint in the assay, followed by malformations and then survival; unfortunately, the growth endpoint often is not considered or reported in the assay. Comparison of FETAX data with acute toxicity data from tests with other amphibians or traditional aquatic test species indicates FETAX is relatively insensitive. This suggests that environmental risk assessments using acute hazard data from tests with traditional aquatic test species usually would be more protective of native amphibian species than risk assessments that use hazard data from FETAX.

  17. Toxicity of energy drinks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolk, Brian J; Ganetsky, Michael; Babu, Kavita M

    2012-04-01

    'Energy drinks', 'energy shots' and other energy products have exploded in popularity in the past several years; however, their use is not without risk. Caffeine is the main active ingredient in energy drinks, and excessive consumption may acutely cause caffeine intoxication, resulting in tachycardia, vomiting, cardiac arrhythmias, seizures, and death. The effects of chronic high-dose caffeine intake in children and adolescents are unknown. Caffeine may raise blood pressure, disrupt adolescent sleep patterns, exacerbate psychiatric disease, cause physiologic dependence, and increase the risk of subsequent addiction. Coingestion of caffeine and ethanol has been associated with increased risk-taking behaviors, harm to adolescent users, impaired driving, and increased use of other illicit substances. The toxicity of ingredients often present in energy drinks, such as taurine, niacin, and pyridoxine, is less well defined. Recent and significant literature describing adverse events associated with energy drink use are reviewed. Although prior studies have examined the effects of caffeine in adolescents, energy drinks should be considered a novel exposure. The high doses of caffeine, often in combination with ingredients with unknown safety profiles, mandates urgent research on the safety of energy drink use in children and adolescents. Regulation of pediatric energy drink use may be a necessary step once the health effects are further characterized.

  18. Overcoming ammonium toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittsánszky, András; Pilinszky, Katalin; Gyulai, Gábor; Komives, Tamas

    2015-02-01

    Ammonia (ammonium ion under physiological conditions) is one of the key nitrogen sources in cellular amino acid biosynthesis. It is continuously produced in living organisms by a number of biochemical processes, but its accumulation in cells leads to tissue damage. Current knowledge suggests that a few enzymes and transporters are responsible for maintaining the delicate balance of ammonium fluxes in plant tissues. In this study we analyze the data in the scientific literature and the publicly available information on the dozens of biochemical reactions in which endogenous ammonium is produced or consumed, the enzymes that catalyze them, and the enzyme and transporter mutants listed in plant metabolic and genetic databases (Plant Metabolic Network, TAIR, and Genevestigator). Our compiled data show a surprisingly high number of little-studied reactions that might influence cellular ammonium concentrations. The role of ammonium in apoptosis, its relation to oxidative stress, and alterations in ammonium metabolism induced by environmental stress need to be explored in order to develop methods to manage ammonium toxicity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Sediment toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) studies at marine sites suspected of ordnance contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, R S; Nipper, M; Biedenbach, J M; Hooten, R L; Miller, K; Saepoff, S

    2001-10-01

    A sediment quality assessment survey and subsequent toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) study was conducted at several sites in Puget Sound, Washington. The sites were previously suspected of contamination with ordnance compounds. The initial survey employed sea urchin porewater toxicity tests to locate the most toxic stations. Sediments from the most toxic stations were selected for comprehensive chemical analyses. Based on the combined information from the toxicity and chemical data, three adjacent stations in Ostrich Bay were selected for the TIE study. The results of the phase I TIE suggested that organics and metals were primarily responsible for the observed toxicity in the sea urchin fertilization test. In addition to these contaminants, ammonia was also contributing to the toxicity for the sea urchin embryological development test. The phase II TIE study isolated the majority of the toxicity in the fraction containing nonpolar organics with high log K(ow), but chemical analyses failed to identify a compound present at a concentration high enough to be responsible for the observed toxicity. The data suggest that some organic or organometallic contaminant(s) that were not included in the comprehensive suite of chemical analyses caused the observed toxicological responses.

  20. Development and application of a marine sediment porewater toxicity test using algal spores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooten, R. [Texas A and M Univ., Corpus Christi, TX (United States); Carr, R.S. [National Biological Service, Corpus Christi, TX (United States)

    1995-12-31

    An acute pore water toxicity test protocol using germination and growth of marine macroalgae as endpoints was developed to indicate the presence of toxic compounds in marine/estuarine and sediment porewater samples. Zoospores collected from Ulva fasciata and U. lactuca were used as test organisms. Preliminary results with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS, a reference toxicant) indicate that zoospores germination and growth of embryonic gametophytes are as sensitive as the sea urchin fertilization and embryological development toxicity tests. Algal germination and growth data for copper, mercury and other metals will be presented. The results of tests utilizing this algal assay with sediment pore water from contaminated sediments will be compared with more traditional sediment toxicity test methods.

  1. Sky Surveys

    OpenAIRE

    Djorgovski, S. G.; Mahabal, A. A.; Drake, A.J.; Graham, M. J.; C. Donalek

    2012-01-01

    Sky surveys represent a fundamental data basis for astronomy. We use them to map in a systematic way the universe and its constituents, and to discover new types of objects or phenomena. We review the subject, with an emphasis on the wide-field imaging surveys, placing them in a broader scientific and historical context. Surveys are the largest data generators in astronomy, propelled by the advances in information and computation technology, and have transformed the ways in which astronomy is...

  2. Bioluminescence inhibition assay for the detection of hydroxylated polychlorinated biphenyls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teasley Hamorsky, Krystal; Ensor, C Mark; Dikici, Emre; Pasini, Patrizia; Bachas, Leonidas; Daunert, Sylvia

    2012-09-18

    Hydroxylated polychlorinated biphenyls (OH-PCBs) are an important class of contaminants that mainly originate from polychlorinated biphenyl metabolism. They may conceivably be as dangerous and persistent as the parent compounds; most prominently, OH-PCBs are endocrine disruptors. Due to increasing evidence of the presence of OH-PCBs in the environment and in living organisms, including humans, and of their toxicity, methods of detection for OH-PCBs are needed in the environmental and medical fields. Herein, we describe the development and optimization of a protein-based inhibition assay for the quantification of OH-PCBs. Specifically, the photoprotein aequorin was utilized for the detection of OH-PCBs. We hypothesized that OH-PCBs interact with aequorin, and we established that OH-PCBs actually inhibit the bioluminescence of aequorin in a dose-dependent manner. We took advantage of this phenomenon to develop an assay that is capable of detecting a wide variety of OH-PCBs with a range of detection limits, the best detection limit being 11 nM for the compound 2-hydroxy-2',3,4',5',6-pentachorobiphenyl. The viability of this system for the screening of OH-PCBs in spiked biological and environmental samples was also established. We envision the implementation of this novel bioluminescence inhibition assay as a rapid, sensitive, and cost-effective method for monitoring OH-PCBs. Furthermore, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first time aequorin has been employed to detect an analyte by the inhibition of its bioluminescence reaction. Hence, this strategy may prove to be a general approach for the development of a new generation of protein-based inhibition assays.

  3. A naked-eye based strategy for semiquantitative immunochromatographic assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Daohong; Li, Peiwu; Zhang, Qi; Li, Ran; Zhang, Wen; Ding, Xiaoxia; Li, Chang Ming

    2012-08-31

    It is critical to develop a cost-effective quantitative/semiquantitative assay for rapid diagnosis and on-site detection of toxic or harmful substances. Here, a naked-eye based semiquantitative immunochromatographic strip (NSI-strip) was developed, on which three test lines (TLs, TL-I, TL-II and TL-III) were dispensed on a nitrocellulose membrane to form the test zone. Similar as the traditional strip assay for small molecule, the NSI-strip assay was also based on the competitive theory, difference was that the analyte competed three times with the capture reagent for the limited number of antibody binding sites. After the assay, the number of TLs developed in the test zone was inversely proportional to the analyte concentration, thus analyte content levels could be determined by observing the appeared number of TLs. Taking aflatoxin B(1) as the model analyte, visual detection limit of the NSI-strip was 0.06 ng mL(-1) and threshold concentrations for TL-I-III were 0.125, 0.5, and 2.0 ng mL(-1), respectively. Therefore, according to the appeared number of TLs, the following concentration ranges would be detectable by visual examination: 0-0.06 ng mL(-1) (negative samples), and 0.06-0.125 ng mL(-1), 0.125-0.5 ng mL(-1), 0.5-2.0 ng mL(-1) and >2.0 ng mL(-1) (positive samples). That was to say, compared to traditional strips the NSI-strip could offer more parameter information of the target analyte content. In this way, the NSI-strip improved the qualitative presence/absence detection of traditional strips by measuring the content (range) of target analytes semiquantitatively. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Toxicity Assessments of Antimony, Barium, Beryllium, and Manganese for Development of Ecological Soil Screening Levels (ECO-SSL) Using Enchytraeid Reproduction Benchmark Values

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kuperman, Roman

    2002-01-01

    .... This test was selected on the bases of its ability to measure chemical toxicity to ecologically relevant test species during chronic assay, and its inclusion of at least one reproductive component...

  5. Electrode Probes for the Rapid Assay of Seafood Toxicants. Phase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-03-01

    probes can provide rapid analyte determination in complex samples such as blood. For instance, diabetics can now use an electrochemical enzyme...control was incorporated in which there was no aOA/POD; 50 A1 PBS-Tween and 50 p1 of MeOH (45% in aquo ) were incubated for 30 minutes as above. The... complex samples such as fish tissue, urine and blood. 18 Referenoes (1) The Merck Index, loth Edition, M. Windholz, S. Budavari, R.F. Blumetti and E.S

  6. Effect of irradiance spectra on the photoinduced toxicity of three polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamond, S.A.; Mount, D.R.; Burkhard, L.P.; Ankley, G.T.; Makynen, E.A.; Leonard, E.N.

    2000-05-01

    Photoinduced toxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is dependent on the concentration of compounds present and the dose of light received. Of the light present, only those wavelengths absorbed by the compound have the potential to initiate the photochemical events underlying phototoxicity. This suggests that variation in light spectra present in natural waters, arising from variation in dissolved organic carbon composition, is an important determinant of phototoxicity risk in specific, PAH-contaminated waterbodies. To quantify the effect of environmentally realistic variation in light spectra on toxicity, brine shrimp (Artemia salina) assays were conducted under various light spectra and with three PAHs (pyrene, fluoranthene, and anthracene) of known phototoxicity potential. In these spectral assays, the total ultraviolet light present was equivalent; only the spectral characteristics varied. Based on the absorbance spectra of these PAHs, it was predicted that toxicity, quantified using immobilization as the endpoint, would vary significantly among light spectra in pyrene assays, but not in anthracene assays, and that variation in toxicity in fluoranthene assays would be intermediate. The results supported these assumptions. In the pyrene exposures, the glass filter time to 50% population immobilization (IT50) (39.5 min) was 117% longer than the KCr filter IT50 (18.2 min). In the fluoranthene exposures, the glass filter IT50 (49.5 min) was 27% longer than the KCr filter IT50 (39.1 min). In the anthracene exposures, the glass filter IT50 (62.2 min) was not statistically different from the KCr filter IT50 (63.8 min). Comparison of these results with the results of assays conducted under neutral-density filters (that change intensity but not spectral distribution) demonstrate that multiplying spectral intensity by wavelength-specific absorbance accurately predicts relative photoinduced toxicity among the experimental treatments. These results indicate

  7. A mir-231-Regulated Protection Mechanism against the Toxicity of Graphene Oxide in Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ruilong; Ren, Mingxia; Rui, Qi; Wang, Dayong

    2016-08-01

    Recently, several dysregulated microRNAs (miRNAs) have been identified in organisms exposed to graphene oxide (GO). However, their biological functions and mechanisms of the action are still largely unknown. Here, we investigated the molecular mechanism of mir-231 in the regulation of GO toxicity using in vivo assay system of Caenorhabditis elegans. We found that GO exposure inhibited the expression of mir-231::GFP in multiple tissues, in particular in the intestine. mir-231 acted in intestine to regulate the GO toxicity, and overexpression of mir-231 in intestine caused a susceptible property of nematodes to GO toxicity. smk-1 encoding a homologue to mammalian SMEK functioned as a targeted gene for mir-231, and was also involved in the intestinal regulation of GO toxicity. Mutation of smk-1 gene induced a susceptible property to GO toxicity, whereas the intestinal overexpression of smk-1 resulted in a resistant property to GO toxicity. Moreover, mutation of smk-1 gene suppressed the resistant property of mir-231 mutant to GO toxicity. In nematodes, SMK-1 further acted upstream of the transcriptional factor DAF-16/FOXO in insulin signaling pathway to regulate GO toxicity. Therefore, mir-231 may encode a GO-responsive protection mechanism against the GO toxicity by suppressing the function of the SMK-1 - DAF-16 signaling cascade in nematodes.

  8. Compound toxicity screening and structure-activity relationship modeling in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planson, Anne-Gaëlle; Carbonell, Pablo; Paillard, Elodie; Pollet, Nicolas; Faulon, Jean-Loup

    2012-03-01

    Synthetic biology and metabolic engineering are used to develop new strategies for producing valuable compounds ranging from therapeutics to biofuels in engineered microorganisms. When developing methods for high-titer production cells, toxicity is an important element to consider. Indeed the production rate can be limited due to toxic intermediates or accumulation of byproducts of the heterologous biosynthetic pathway of interest. Conversely, highly toxic molecules are desired when designing antimicrobials. Compound toxicity in bacteria plays a major role in metabolic engineering as well as in the development of new antibacterial agents. Here, we screened a diversified chemical library of 166 compounds for toxicity in Escherichia coli. The dataset was built using a clustering algorithm maximizing the chemical diversity in the library. The resulting assay data was used to develop a toxicity predictor that we used to assess the toxicity of metabolites throughout the metabolome. This new tool for predicting toxicity can thus be used for fine-tuning heterologous expression and can be integrated in a computational-framework for metabolic pathway design. Many structure-activity relationship tools have been developed for toxicology studies in eukaryotes [Valerio (2009), Toxicol Appl Pharmacol, 241(3): 356-370], however, to the best of our knowledge we present here the first E. coli toxicity prediction web server based on QSAR models (EcoliTox server: http://www.issb.genopole.fr/∼faulon/EcoliTox.php). Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Cytotoxicity of eight cigarette smoke condensates in three test systems: comparisons between assays and condensates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Patricia A; Li, Albert P; Polzin, Gregory; Roy, Shambhu K

    2010-12-01

    Cytotoxic properties of tobacco smoke are associated with chronic tobacco-related diseases. The cytotoxicity of tobacco smoke can be tested with short-term predictive assays. In this study, we compare eight mainstream cigarette smoke condensates (CSCs) from commercial and experimental cigarettes in three different cytotoxicity assays with unique and overlapping endpoints. The CSCs demonstrated cytotoxicity in all assays. In the multiple cytotoxicity endpoint (MCE) assay with TK-6 cells, the cigarette varieties that had the highest EC50s for reduced cell growth also showed a positive dose-response relationship for necrotic cells. In the IdMOC multiple cell-type co-culture (MCTCC) system, all CSCs reduced the viability of the cells. Low concentrations of some CSCs had a stimulatory effect in lung microvascular endothelial cells and small airway epithelial cells. In the neutral dye assay (NDA), except for a 100% flue-cured tobacco CSC, there was little consistency between CSCs producing morphological evidence of moderate or greater toxicity and the CSCs with the lowest EC50s in the MCE or MCTCC assays. Overall, cigarettes made with flue-cured tobacco were the most cytotoxic across the assays. When results were expressed on a per-mg of nicotine basis, lower tar cigarettes were the most cytotoxic in primary human respiratory cells. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Large Dataset of Acute Oral Toxicity Data Created for Testing ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acute toxicity data is a common requirement for substance registration in the US. Currently only data derived from animal tests are accepted by regulatory agencies, and the standard in vivo tests use lethality as the endpoint. Non-animal alternatives such as in silico models are being developed due to animal welfare and resource considerations. We compiled a large dataset of oral rat LD50 values to assess the predictive performance currently available in silico models. Our dataset combines LD50 values from five different sources: literature data provided by The Dow Chemical Company, REACH data from eChemportal, HSDB (Hazardous Substances Data Bank), RTECS data from Leadscope, and the training set underpinning TEST (Toxicity Estimation Software Tool). Combined these data sources yield 33848 chemical-LD50 pairs (data points), with 23475 unique data points covering 16439 compounds. The entire dataset was loaded into a chemical properties database. All of the compounds were registered in DSSTox and 59.5% have publically available structures. Compounds without a structure in DSSTox are currently having their structures registered. The structural data will be used to evaluate the predictive performance and applicable chemical domains of three QSAR models (TIMES, PROTOX, and TEST). Future work will combine the dataset with information from ToxCast assays, and using random forest modeling, assess whether ToxCast assays are useful in predicting acute oral toxicity. Pre

  11. Oligomerization and toxicity of A{beta} fusion proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caine, Joanne M., E-mail: Jo.Caine@csiro.au [CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering and the Preventive Health Flagship, Parkville, Victoria (Australia); Bharadwaj, Prashant R. [CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering and the Preventive Health Flagship, Parkville, Victoria (Australia); Centre for Excellence for Alzheimer' s Disease Research and Care, School of Exercise, Biomedical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Western Australia (Australia); Sankovich, Sonia E. [CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering and the Preventive Health Flagship, Parkville, Victoria (Australia); Ciccotosto, Giuseppe D. [The Department of Pathology and Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Streltsov, Victor A.; Varghese, Jose [CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering and the Preventive Health Flagship, Parkville, Victoria (Australia)

    2011-06-10

    Highlights: {yields} We expressed amyloid-{beta} (A{beta}) peptide as a soluble maltose binding protein fusion (MBP-A{beta}42 and MBP-A{beta}16). {yields} The full length A{beta} peptide fusion, MBP-A{beta}42, forms oligomeric species as determined by SDS-PAGE gels, gel filtration and DLS. {yields} The MBP-A{beta}42, but not MBP-A{beta}16 or MBP alone, is toxic to both yeast and mammalian cells as determined by toxicity assays. -- Abstract: This study has found that the Maltose binding protein A{beta}42 fusion protein (MBP-A{beta}42) forms soluble oligomers while the shorter MBP-A{beta}16 fusion and control MBP did not. MBP-A{beta}42, but neither MBP-A{beta}16 nor control MBP, was toxic in a dose-dependent manner in both yeast and primary cortical neuronal cells. This study demonstrates the potential utility of MBP-A{beta}42 as a reagent for drug screening assays in yeast and neuronal cell cultures and as a candidate for further A{beta}42 characterization.

  12. Antioxidant Capacity, Cytotoxicity, and Acute Oral Toxicity of Gynura bicolor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wuen Yew Teoh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gynura bicolor (Compositae which is widely used by the locals as natural remedies in folk medicine has limited scientific studies to ensure its efficacy and nontoxicity. The current study reports the total phenolic content, antioxidant capacity, cytotoxicity, and acute oral toxicity of crude methanol and its fractionated extracts (hexane, ethyl acetate, and water of G. bicolor leaves. Five human colon cancer cell lines (HT-29, HCT-15, SW480, Caco-2, and HCT 116, one human breast adenocarcinoma cell line (MCF7, and one human normal colon cell line (CCD-18Co were used to evaluate the cytotoxicity of G. bicolor. The present findings had clearly demonstrated that ethyl acetate extract of G. bicolor with the highest total phenolic content among the extracts showed the strongest antioxidant activity (DPPH radical scavenging assay and metal chelating assay, possessed cytotoxicity, and induced apoptotic and necrotic cell death, especially towards the HCT 116 and HCT-15 colon cancer cells. The acute oral toxicity study indicated that methanol extract of G. bicolor has negligible level of toxicity when administered orally and has been regarded as safe in experimental rats. The findings of the current study clearly established the chemoprevention potential of G. bicolor and thus provide scientific validation on the therapeutic claims of G. bicolor.

  13. A COMPREHENSIVE REVIEW OF TOXIC LEADERSHIP

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-05

    Definitions of Toxic Leadership ...3 Table 1: Definitions of Toxic Leadership ... leadership . However, there are differing explanations as to the cause, solution, and even the definition of toxic leadership . This research contains

  14. National Air Toxic Assessments (NATA) Results

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The National Air Toxics Assessment was conducted by EPA in 2002 to assess air toxics emissions in order to identify and prioritize air toxics, emission source types...

  15. Detailed review of transgenic rodent mutation assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Iain B; Singer, Timothy M; Boucher, Sherri E; Douglas, George R

    2005-09-01

    Induced chromosomal and gene mutations play a role in carcinogenesis and may be involved in the production of birth defects and other disease conditions. While it is widely accepted that in vivo mutation assays are more relevant to the human condition than are in vitro assays, our ability to evaluate mutagenesis in vivo in a broad range of tissues has historically been quite limited. The development of transgenic rodent (TGR) mutation models has given us the ability to detect, quantify, and sequence mutations in a range of somatic and germ cells. This document provides a comprehensive review of the TGR mutation assay literature and assesses the potential use of these assays in a regulatory context. The information is arranged as follows. (1) TGR mutagenicity models and their use for the analysis of gene and chromosomal mutation are fully described. (2) The principles underlying current OECD tests for the assessment of genotoxicity in vitro and in vivo, and also nontransgenic assays available for assessment of gene mutation, are described. (3) All available information pertaining to the conduct of TGR assays and important parameters of assay performance have been tabulated and analyzed. (4) The performance of TGR assays, both in isolation and as part of a battery of in vitro and in vivo short-term genotoxicity tests, in predicting carcinogenicity is described. (5) Recommendations are made regarding the experimental parameters for TGR assays, and the use of TGR assays in a regulatory context.

  16. Biological control of toxic cyanobacteri

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ndlela, Luyanda L

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available and applications • If successful, the biocontrol agents may produce conformational changes to the cyanobacterial toxins or reduced eco-toxicity effects • The laboratory study may give insight into the factors inhibiting the natural balance of predatory... on the eco-toxicity resulting from biocontrol as well as the changes to cyanotoxins, if any. Research Plan The study will be conducted at whole cell level and with specific metabolites and toxins, with eco-toxicity studied at three trophic levels...

  17. Developmental Exposure to Environmental Toxicants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falck, Alison J; Mooney, Sandra; Kapoor, Shiv S; White, Kimberly M R; Bearer, Cynthia; El Metwally, Dina

    2015-10-01

    Children interact with the physical environment differently than adults, and are uniquely susceptible to environmental toxicants. Routes of absorption, distribution, metabolism, and target organ toxicities vary as children grow and develop. This article summarizes the sources of exposure and known adverse effects of toxicants that are ubiquitous in our environment, including tobacco smoke, ethanol, solvents, heavy metals, volatile organic compounds, persistent organic pollutants, and pesticides. Preventive strategies that may be used in counseling children and their families are highlighted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. [Imatinib-induced pulmonary toxicity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo-Esper, Raúd; Morales-Victorino, Neisser

    2009-01-01

    Antineoplasic agent-induced pulmonary toxicity is an important cause of respiratory failure. These novel antineoplastic agents include imatinib mesylate, a protein tyrosine kinase inhibitor that is encoded by the Bcr-Abl gen created by the Philadelphia chromosome abnormality in chronic myeloid leukemia. Pulmonary toxicity of imatinib is directly related to the dose used. The more severe pulmonary manifestations include pleural effusion by water retention and interstitial pneumonitis. We report the first case published in Mexico ofimatinib-induced pulmonary toxicity and its management in the intensive care unit of the Medica Sur Clinic Foundation.

  19. Toxicity of staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 in rabbits.

    OpenAIRE

    de Azavedo, J C; Arbuthnott, J P

    1984-01-01

    Strains of Staphylococcus aureus associated with toxic shock syndrome produce toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST 1), which is lethal to conventional rabbits and acts synergistically with gram-negative lipopolysaccharide. The lethal effect of TSST 1 was examined in specific-pathogen-free rabbits on the basis that these rabbits, being less colonized by gram-negative bacteria, would be less susceptible than conventional animals. Although there was no significant difference in mortality between s...

  20. Toxicity of Uranium Adsorbent Materials using the Microtox Toxicity Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jiyeon [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jeters, Robert T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gill, Gary A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kuo, Li-Jung [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bonheyo, George T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The Marine Sciences Laboratory at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated the toxicity of a diverse range of natural and synthetic materials used to extract uranium from seawater. The uranium adsorbent materials are being developed as part of the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, Fuel Resources Program. The goal of this effort was to identify whether deployment of a farm of these materials into the marine environment would have any toxic effects on marine organisms.

  1. A comparison between two brine shrimp assays to detect in vitro cytotoxicity in marine natural products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carballo, José Luis; Hernández-Inda, Zaira L; Pérez, Pilar; García-Grávalos, María D

    2002-01-01

    Background The brine shrimp lethality assay is considered a useful tool for preliminary assessment of toxicity. It has also been suggested for screening pharmacological activities in plant extracts. However, we think that it is necessary to evaluate the suitability of the brine shrimp methods before they are used as a general bio-assay to test natural marine products for pharmacological activity. Material and Methods The bioactivity of the isopropanolic (2-PrOH) extracts of 14 species of marine invertebrates and 6 species of macroalgae was evaluated with the shrimp lethality assay (lethality assay), as well as with another assay based on the inhibition of hatching of the cyst (hatchability assay). The extracts were also assayed for cytotoxicity against two human cell lines, lung carcinoma A-549 and colon carcinoma HT-29, in order to assess the sensitivity of the shrimp assays to detect cytotoxic activity. Results Two sponges (Hyatella sp, Dysidea sp.), two gorgonians (Pacifigorgia adamsii, Muricea sp.), one tunicate (Polyclinum laxum), and three echinoderms (Holothuria impatiens, Pseudoconus californica and Pharia pyramidata) showed a strong cytostatic (growth inhibition) and cytotoxic effect. The hatchability assay showed a strong activity in 4 of the species active against the two human cell lines tested (Hyatella sp, Dysidea sp., Pacifigorgia adamsii and Muricea sp.), and the lethality assay also showed a high lethality in 4 of them (Pacifigorgia adamsii, Muricea sp., Polyclinum laxum, and Pharia pyramidata). Each bioassay detected activity in 50% of the species that were considered active against the two human cell lines tested. However, the simultaneous use of both bioassays increased the percentage to 75%. Conclusions Our results seem consistent with the correlation previously established between cytotoxicity and brine shrimp lethality in plant extracts. We suggest using both bioassays simultaneously to test natural marine products for pharmacological

  2. Neuraminidase activity provides a practical read-out for a high throughput influenza antiviral screening assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Meng

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The emergence of influenza strains that are resistant to commonly used antivirals has highlighted the need to develop new compounds that target viral gene products or host mechanisms that are essential for effective virus replication. Existing assays to identify potential antiviral compounds often use high throughput screening assays that target specific viral replication steps. To broaden the search for antivirals, cell-based replication assays can be performed, but these are often labor intensive and have limited throughput. Results We have adapted a traditional virus neutralization assay to develop a practical, cell-based, high throughput screening assay. This assay uses viral neuraminidase (NA as a read-out to quantify influenza replication, thereby offering an assay that is both rapid and sensitive. In addition to identification of inhibitors that target either viral or host factors, the assay allows simultaneous evaluation of drug toxicity. Antiviral activity was demonstrated for a number of known influenza inhibitors including amantadine that targets the M2 ion channel, zanamivir that targets NA, ribavirin that targets IMP dehydrogenase, and bis-indolyl maleimide that targets protein kinase A/C. Amantadine-resistant strains were identified by comparing IC50 with that of the wild-type virus. Conclusion Antivirals with specificity for a broad range of targets are easily identified in an accelerated viral inhibition assay that uses NA as a read-out of replication. This assay is suitable for high throughput screening to identify potential antivirals or can be used to identify drug-resistant influenza strains.

  3. Investigation of Water Safety in Non-treated Drinking Water with Trace Toxic Metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Suw Young; Kim, Dae Hong; Lee, Ga Eun

    2013-09-01

    The trace toxic metal copper was assayed using mercury immobilized on a carbon nanotube electrode (MCW), with a graphite counter and a reference electrode. In this study, a macro-scale convection motor was interfaced with a MCW three-electrode system, in which a handmade MCW was optimized using cyclic- and square-wave stripping voltammetry. An analytical electrolyte for tap water was used instead of an expensive acid or base ionic solution. Under these conditions, optimum parameters were 0.09 V amplitude, 40 Hz frequency, 0.01 V incremental potential, and a 60-s accumulation time. A diagnostic working curve was obtained from 50.0 to 350 μg/L. At a constant Cu(II) concentration of 10.0 μg/L, the statistical relative standard deviation was 1.78% (RSD, n = 15), the analytical accumulation time was only 60 s, and the analytical detection limit approached 4.6 μg/L (signal/noise = 3). The results were applied to nontreated drinking water. The content of the analyzed copper using 9.0 and 4.0 μg/L standards were 8.68 μg/L and 3.96 μg/L; statistical values R(2) = 0.9987 and R(2) = 0.9534, respectively. This method is applicable to biological diagnostics or food surveys.

  4. Toxicity of Orimulsion-400 to early life stages of Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus) and mummichog (Fundulus heteroclitus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreau, Monica; Sweezey, Michael J; Lee, Kenneth; Hodson, Peter V; Courtenay, Simon C

    2009-06-01

    The toxicity of Orimulsion-400 (PDVSA-BITOR), an emulsion of 70% bitumen in 30% water, was tested during the embryonic development of Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus) and mummichog (Fundulus heteroclitus) in duplicate experiments. Air injection and different salinities were included in the herring assays to examine their effects on Orimulsion-400 toxicity. Water-accommodated fractions (WAFs) of no. 6 fuel oil were tested in the mummichog assays to compare Orimulsion-400 toxicity with that of a heavy fuel oil. Concentrations of Orimulsion-400 as low as 0.001% (v/v) were harmful to both species. In herring, the more sensitive of the two species, this concentration produced 100% abnormal larvae. Similar abnormalities, including pericardial edema and spinal deformities, the same signs of toxicity caused by heavy fuel oils and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), were produced in both herring and mummichog. Fish exposed to Orimulsion-400 also suffered from increased mortality, reduced heart rates, premature hatch, and reduced lengths compared to control fish. Orimulsion-400 was approximately 300-fold more toxic than the WAFs of no. 6 fuel oil. Salinity had few clear effects on Orimulsion-400 toxicity, but aeration of test solutions greatly reduced toxicity by causing bitumen to coalesce and float. Aeration also removed toxic chemicals such as PAHs. The present study suggests that in the event of a spill, Orimulsion-400 could impair fish recruitment, but that strong wave action would reduce toxicity by accelerating the removal of emulsified bitumen from the water column.

  5. Increased DNA damage in blood cells of rat treated with lead as assessed by comet assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Arif

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available A growing body of evidence suggests that oxidative stress is the key player in the pathogenesis of lead-induced toxicity. The present study investigated lead induced oxidative DNA damage, if any in rat blood cells by alkaline comet assay. Lead was administered intraperitoneally to rats at doses of 25, 50 and 100 mg/kg body weight for 5 days consecutively. Blood collected on day six from sacrificed lead-treated rats was used to assess the extent of DNA damage by comet assay which entailed measurement of comet length, olive tail moment, tail DNA (% and tail length. The results showed that treatment with lead significantly increased DNA damage in a dose-dependent manner. Therefore, our data suggests that lead treatment is associated with oxidative stress-induced DNA damage in rat blood cells which could be used as an early bio-marker of lead-toxicity.

  6. Non-Toxic HAN Monopropellant Propulsion Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Non-toxic monopropellants have been developed that provide better performance than toxic hydrazine. Formulations based on hydroxylammonium nitrate (HAN) have...

  7. Campylobacter colitis: Rare cause of toxic megacolon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Kwok, MBBS

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Toxic megacolon should be considered in a patient with Campylobacter colitis who becomes critically unwell. Despite treatment, toxic megacolon is associated with a significant risk of mortality.

  8. An ultrafiltration assay for lysyl oxidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shackleton, D.R.; Hulmes, D.J. (Univ. of Edinburgh Medical School (England))

    1990-03-01

    A modification of the original microdistillation assay for lysyl oxidase is described in which Amicon C-10 microconcentrators are used to separate, by ultrafiltration, the 3H-labeled products released from a (4,5-3H)-lysine-labeled elastin substrate. Enzyme activity is determined by scintillation counting of the ultrafiltrate, after subtraction of radioactivity released in the presence of beta-aminopropionitrile, a specific inhibitor of the enzyme. Conditions are described which optimize both the sensitivity and the efficient use of substrate. The assay shows linear inhibition of activity in up to 1 M urea; hence, as the enzyme is normally diluted in the assay, samples in 6 M urea can be assayed directly, without prior dialysis, and corrected for partial inhibition. Comparable results are obtained when enzyme activity is assayed by ultrafiltration or microdistillation. The assay is simple and convenient and, by using disposable containers throughout, it eliminates the need for time-consuming decontamination of radioactive glassware.

  9. Development and application of assays for serotonin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gow, I.F.

    1987-01-01

    In this thesis, two assays for serotonin were developed, validated, and used to investigate the relationship between platelet aggregation, serotonin levels and sodium status and serotonin levels and platelet function in patients with cardiovascular disease. A radioimmunoassay (RIA) using an (/sup 125/I)-labelled tracer was developed and validated for the measurement of serotonin in human platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and rat serum. Antisera were raised against N-succinamylserotonin conjugated to bovine albumin and, to improve assay sensitivity, the analyte was made chemically similar to the immunogen by conversion to N-acetylserotonin prior to assay, using the specific amino reagent N-acetoxysuccinimide. An assay for serotonin using high-pressure liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (HPLC-ECD) was developed, and used to validate the RIA. The RIA can be used to assay up to 100 samples/day compared with 10-20/day by the HPLC-ECD assay.

  10. Multicentre comparison of a diagnostic assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waters, Patrick; Reindl, Markus; Saiz, Albert

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Antibodies to cell surface central nervous system proteins help to diagnose conditions which often respond to immunotherapies. The assessment of antibody assays needs to reflect their clinical utility. We report the results of a multicentre study of aquaporin (AQP) 4 antibody (AQP4-Ab......) assays in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSD). METHODS: Coded samples from patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO) or NMOSD (101) and controls (92) were tested at 15 European diagnostic centres using 21 assays including live (n=3) or fixed cell-based assays (n=10), flow cytometry (n=4...... with seronegative NMO/spectrum disorder (SD). On the basis of a combination of clinical phenotype and the highly specific assays, 66 AQP4-Ab seropositive samples were used to establish the sensitivities (51.5-100%) of all 21 assays. The specificities (85.8-100%) were based on 92 control samples and 35 seronegative...

  11. 2011 NATA - Air Toxics Monitors

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset includes annual (2005 - 2013) statistics of measured ambient air toxics concentrations (in micrograms per cubic meter) and associated risk estimates for...

  12. Methylmercury toxicity and functional programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grandjean, Philippe

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: Adverse health effects of developmental toxicants may induce abnormal functional programming that leads to lasting functional deficits. This notion is considered from epidemiological evidence using developmental methylmercury neurotoxicity as an example. MOST IMPORTANT FINDINGS: Accumula...

  13. Contribution of different constituents to the toxicity of the essential oil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The lethal toxicity of the major constituent of the essential oils of Vernonia amygdalina and Xylopia aetiopica, and of selected blends of these against Sitophilus zeamais (Motschulsky) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) was compared with those of the full blends of the essential oils. The compounds were assayed in amounts and ...

  14. Interpreting in vitro developmental toxicity test battery results: The consideration of toxicokinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosgra, S.; Westerhout, J.

    2015-01-01

    In the EU collaborative project ChemScreen an alternative, in vitro assay-based test strategy was developed to screen compounds for reproductive toxicity. A toxicokinetic modeling approach was used to allow quantitative comparison between effective concentrations in the in vitro test battery and

  15. Screening for angiogenic inhibitors in zebrafish to evaluate a predictive model for developmental vascular toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemically-induced vascular toxicity during embryonic development may cause a wide range of adverse effects. To identify putative vascular disrupting chemicals (pVDCs), a predictive signature was constructed from U.S. EPA ToxCast high-throughput screening (HTS) assays that map to...

  16. Real-time Monitoring of Non-specific Toxicity Using a Saccharomyces cerevisiae Reporter System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matti Karp

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Baker’s yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is the simplest and most well-known representative of eukaryotic cells and thus a convenient model organism for evaluating toxic effects in human cells and tissues. Yeast cell sensors are easy to maintain with short generation times, which makes the analytical method of assessing antifungal toxicity cheap and less-time consuming. In this work, the toxicity of test compounds was assessed in bioassays based on bioluminescence inhibition and on traditional growth inhibition on agar plates. The model organism in both tests was a modified S. cerevisiae sensor strain that produces light when provided with D-luciferin in an insect luciferase reporter gene activity assay. The bioluminescence assay showed toxic effects for yeast cell sensor of 5,6-benzo-flavone, rapamycin, nystatin and cycloheximide at concentrations of nM to µM. In addition, arsenic compounds, cadmium chloride, copper sulfate and lead acetate were shown to be potent non-specific inhibitors of the reporter organism described here. The results from a yeast agar diffusion assay correlated with the bioluminescence assay results.

  17. Application of neutron generators for high explosives, toxic agents and fissile material detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrov, V D; Bogolubov, E P; Bochkarev, O V; Korytko, L A; Nazarov, V I; Polkanov, Yu G; Ryzhkov, V I; Khasaev, T O

    2005-01-01

    The portable pulsed neutron generators developed and designed by VNIIA are presented. The neutron methods are good tools for non-destructive assay of dangerous materials. The samples of various systems for the detection of high explosives in luggage, identification of toxic agents in chemical munitions, and also for the prevention of illicit trafficking of fissile elements in passengers' luggage are discussed.

  18. Three Strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens Exhibit Differential Toxicity Against Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Three strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens were tested for toxicity to Drosophila melanogaster in an insect feeding assay. Insect eggs were placed on the surface of a non-nutritive agar plate supplemented with a food source that was non-inoculated or inoculated with P. fluorescens Pf0-1, SBW25, or Pf-...

  19. Evaluation of methods for predicting the toxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reeves, W.; Barhoumi, R.; Burghardt, R.C. [and others] [Texas A & M University, College Station, TX (USA). Dept. of Veterinary Anatomy and Public Health and Department of Civil Engineering

    2001-04-15

    Risk assessments of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon mixtures are hindered by a lack of reliable information on the potency of both mixtures and their individual components. This paper examines methods for approximating the toxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) mixtures. PAHs were isolated from a coal tar and then separated by ring number using HPLC. Five fractions (A-E) were generated, each possessing a unique composition and expected potency. The toxicity of each fraction was measured in the Salmonella/mutagenicity assay and the Chick Embryo Screening Test (CHEST). Their abilities to induce ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase and to inhibit gap junction intercellular communication in rat liver Clone 9 cells were also measured. In the Salmonella/mutagenicity assay, fractions were predicted to have potencies in the order C {gt} E {gt} B {gt} A. Toxic equivalency factors (TEFs) for fractions A-E were in the order E {ge} D {gt} C {gt} B {gt} A. TEF values were 20 652, 20 929, 441, 306 and 74.1 {mu}g of BaP equiv/g, respectively. A lack of agreement between assay-predicted potencies and chemical analysis-predicted potencies was observed with other assays and other methods of calculation. The results demonstrate the limitations of using a single method to predict the toxicity of a complex PAH mixture. 41 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Toxicity of 58 substituted anilines and phenols to algae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and bacteria Vibrio fischeri: comparison with published data and QSARs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aruoja, Villem; Sihtmäe, Mariliis; Dubourguier, Henri-Charles; Kahru, Anne

    2011-09-01

    A congeneric set of 58 substituted anilines and phenols was tested using the 72-h algal growth inhibition assay with Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and 15-min Vibrio fischeri luminescence inhibition assay. The set contained molecules substituted with one, two or three groups chosen from -chloro, -methyl or -ethyl. For 48 compounds there was no REACH-compatible algal toxicity data available before. The experimentally obtained EC50 values (mg L(-1)) for algae ranged from 1.43 (3,4,5-trichloroaniline) to 197 (phenol) and for V. fischeri from 0.37 (2,3,5-trichlorophenol) to 491 (aniline). Only five of the tested 58 chemicals showed inhibitory effect to algae at concentrations >100 mg L(-1), i.e. could be classified as "not harmful", 32 chemicals as "harmful" (10-100 mg L(-1)) and 21 as "toxic" (1-10 mg L(-1)). The occupied para-position tended to increase toxicity whereas most of the ortho-substituted congeners were the least toxic. As a rule, the higher the number of substituents the higher the hydrophobicity and toxicity. However, in case of both assays, the compounds of similar hydrophobicity showed up to 30-fold different toxicities. There were also assay/organism dependent tendencies: phenols were more toxic than anilines in the V. fischeri assay but not in the algal test. The comparison of the experimental toxicity data to the data available from the literature as well as to QSAR predictions showed that toxicity of phenols to algae can be modeled based on hydrophobicity, whereas the toxicity of anilines to algae as well as toxicity of both anilines and phenols to V. fischeri depended on other characteristics in addition to log K(ow). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of using synthetic sea salts when measuring and modeling copper toxicity in saltwater toxicity tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, W Ray; Cotsifas, Jeffrey S; Winter, Anna R; Klinck, Joel S; Smith, D Scott; Playle, Richard C

    2007-05-01

    Synthetic sea salts are often used to adjust the salinity of effluent, ambient, and laboratory water samples to perform toxicity tests with marine and estuarine species. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) provides guidance on salinity adjustment in its saltwater test guidelines. The U.S. EPA suggests using commercial sea salt brands, such as Forty Fathoms (now named Crystal Sea Marinemix, Bioassay Grade), HW Marinemix, or equivalent salts to adjust sample salinity. Toxicity testing laboratories in Canada and the United States were surveyed to determine synthetic sea salt brand preference. The laboratories (n = 27) reported using four brands: Crystal Sea Marinemix (56%), HW Marinemix (22%), Instant Ocean (11%), and Tropic Marin (11%). Saline solutions (30 g/L) of seven synthetic sea salts were analyzed for dissolved copper and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) content. Brands included those listed above plus modified general-purpose salt (modified GP2), Kent Marine, and Red Sea Salt. The synthetic sea salts added from analysis of variance, Tukey, alpha = 0.05, p copper toxicity. However, the measured dissolved copper effective concentration 50% (EC50) for Crystal Sea Marinemix was 9.7 microg Cu/L, similar to other tested sea salts. Analysis indicates that the organic matter in Crystal Sea Marinemix differs considerably from that of natural organic matter. On the basis of consistently adding little DOC and little dissolved copper, GP2 and Kent Marine are the best salts to use.

  2. Sky Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djorgovski, S. George; Mahabal, Ashish; Drake, Andrew; Graham, Matthew; Donalek, Ciro

    Sky surveys represent a fundamental data basis for astronomy. We usethem to map in a systematic way the universe and its constituents andto discover new types of objects or phenomena. We review the subject,with an emphasis on the wide-field, imaging surveys, placing them ina broader scientific and historical context. Surveys are now the largestdata generators in astronomy, propelled by the advances in informationand computation technology, and have transformed the ways in whichastronomy is done. This trend is bound to continue, especially with thenew generation of synoptic sky surveys that cover wide areas of the skyrepeatedly and open a new time domain of discovery. We describe thevariety and the general properties of surveys, illustrated by a number ofexamples, the ways in which they may be quantified and compared, andoffer some figures of merit that can be used to compare their scientificdiscovery potential. Surveys enable a very wide range of science, and that isperhaps their key unifying characteristic. As new domains of the observableparameter space open up thanks to the advances in technology, surveys areoften the initial step in their exploration. Some science can be done withthe survey data alone (or a combination of data from different surveys),and some require a targeted follow-up of potentially interesting sourcesselected from surveys. Surveys can be used to generate large, statisticalsamples of objects that can be studied as populations or as tracers of largerstructures to which they belong. They can be also used to discover orgenerate samples of rare or unusual objects and may lead to discoveriesof some previously unknown types. We discuss a general framework ofparameter spaces that can be used for an assessment and comparison ofdifferent surveys and the strategies for their scientific exploration. As we aremoving into the Petascale regime and beyond, an effective processing andscientific exploitation of such large data sets and data streams pose

  3. A lateral electrophoretic flow diagnostic assay

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, R; Skandarajah, A; Gerver, RE; Neira, HD; Fletcher, DA; Herr, AE

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 The Royal Society of Chemistry. Immunochromatographic assays are a cornerstone tool in disease screening. To complement existing lateral flow assays (based on wicking flow) we introduce a lateral flow format that employs directed electrophoretic transport. The format is termed a "lateral e-flow assay" and is designed to support multiplexed detection using immobilized reaction volumes of capture antigen. To fabricate the lateral e-flow device, we employ mask-based UV photopatterning to ...

  4. A functional assay-based strategy for nanomaterial risk forecasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendren, Christine Ogilvie; Lowry, Gregory V; Unrine, Jason M; Wiesner, Mark R

    2015-12-01

    The study of nanomaterial impacts on environment, health and safety (nanoEHS) has been largely predicated on the assumption that exposure and hazard can be predicted from physical-chemical properties of nanomaterials. This approach is rooted in the view that nanoöbjects essentially resemble chemicals with additional particle-based attributes that must be included among their intrinsic physical-chemical descriptors. With the exception of the trivial case of nanomaterials made from toxic or highly reactive materials, this approach has yielded few actionable guidelines for predicting nanomaterial risk. This article addresses inherent problems in structuring a nanoEHS research strategy based on the goal of predicting outcomes directly from nanomaterial properties, and proposes a framework for organizing data and designing integrated experiments based on functional assays (FAs). FAs are intermediary, semi-empirical measures of processes or functions within a specified system that bridge the gap between nanomaterial properties and potential outcomes in complex systems. The three components of a functional assay are standardized protocols for parameter determination and reporting, a theoretical context for parameter application and reference systems. We propose the identification and adoption of reference systems where FAs may be applied to provide parameter estimates for environmental fate and effects models, as well as benchmarks for comparing the results of FAs and experiments conducted in more complex and varied systems. Surface affinity and dissolution rate are identified as two critical FAs for characterizing nanomaterial behavior in a variety of important systems. The use of these FAs to predict bioaccumulation and toxicity for initial and aged nanomaterials is illustrated for the case of silver nanoparticles and Caenorhabditis elegans. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. TOXIC AND DRUG INDUCED MYOPATHIES

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Although the ?do no harm? dogma of Hippocrates is faithfully followed by all practitioners, drugs used for therapeutic interventions either alone or in combination, may sometimes cause unexpected toxicity to the muscles, resulting in a varying degree of symptomatology, from mild discomfort and inconvenience to permanent damage and disability. The clinician should suspect a toxic myopathy when a patient without a pre-existing muscle disease develops myalgia, fatigue, weakn...

  6. Alternative Models of Developmental and Reproductive Toxicity in Pharmaceutical Risk Assessment and the 3Rs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brannen, Kimberly C; Chapin, Robert E; Jacobs, Abigail C; Green, Maia L

    2016-12-01

    In the pharmaceutical industry, preclinical developmental and reproductive toxicity studies are conducted in laboratory animals in order to predict and prevent adverse effects of drugs on human reproductive health and development. However, these studies require a relatively large number of animals and are usually conducted late in the drug development process. Early, simple, and inexpensive screening assays could facilitate smarter decisions, reductions in animal use, and development of safe drugs. The current state and future needs for alternative models of developmental and reproductive toxicity are reviewed here. The most popular predictive developmental toxicity assays are embryonic stem cells, rodent whole embryo culture, and zebrafish, each of which involves fairly well-developed techniques with demonstrated utility in drug discovery and development. In vitro or ex vivo methods for male and female reproductive toxicity are less established, but there are promising assays available or being developed that may be useful in drug development, especially for elucidating mechanisms or screening backup compounds. While a number of challenges remain, much progress has been made in alternative developmental and reproductive toxicity models to date, and there is a strong collective enthusiasm in the industry to continue moving them forward. Therefore, it appears that these approaches may be widely used in the near future. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute for Laboratory Animal Research 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  7. Evaluation of the toxicity of α-(phenylselanyl) acetophenone in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casaril, Angela M; Martinez, Débora Martins; Ricordi, Vanesssa Gentil; Alves, Diego; Lenardão, Eder João; Schultze, Eduarda; Collares, Tiago; Seixas, Fabiana Kömmling; Savegnago, Lucielli

    2015-12-01

    Selenium is an essential micronutrient with several biological roles in the human body, but supra nutritional consumption can cause toxic effects. The potential deleterious effects of organoselenium compounds are controversial. The compound α-(phenylselanyl) acetophenone (PSAP) exhibits antioxidant, antidepressant-like and glutathione peroxidase-like activity, which makes important the elucidation of any toxic effects. Hence, the present study aims to investigate the in vitro toxicity of PSAP in Chinese Hamster ovary cells (through MTT assay) and analyse its genotoxicity using the comet assay in mice leukocytes after acute or chronic treatments, alongside with biochemical analyses. Our results demonstrate that the oral administration of PSAP in acute (1, 5, 10, 50, 200 mg/kg) and chronic (1, 10, 50, 200 mg/kg) doses did not cause genotoxicity. The compound presented cytotoxic effect in the MTT assay just at 500 μM after 24 h of administration and at 250 and 500 μM after 48 and 72 h of administration. According to biochemical analysis, PSAP presented a minor toxic effect by altering δ-ALA-D activity in liver and catalase activity in kidney at the highest tested concentration. Taking together, these data indicate that PSAP has low toxic effects after chronic administration in mice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Toxicity of Engineered Nanomaterials: A Physicochemical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podila, Ramakrishna; Brown, Jared M.

    2013-01-01

    The global market for nanomaterial-based products was forecasted to reach 100 billion dollars per annum for 2011–2015. Extensive manufacturing and the use of engineered nanomaterials (ENM) have raised concerns regarding their impact on biological response in living organisms, and the environment at large. The fundamental properties of nanomaterials exhibit a complex dependence upon several factors such as their morphology, size, defects, chemical stability, etc. Therefore, it is exceedingly difficult to correlate their biological response with their intricate physicochemical properties. For example, varying toxic response may ensue due to different methods of nanomaterial preparation, dissimilar impurities and defects. In this review, we surveyed the existing literature on the dependence of cytotoxicity on physicochemical properties. We found that ENM size, shape, defect density, physicochemical stability and surface modification to be the main causes that elicit altered physiological response or cytotoxicity. PMID:23129019

  9. Role of Bioadsorbents in Reducing Toxic Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blessy Baby Mathew

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Industrialization and urbanization have led to the release of increasing amounts of heavy metals into the environment. Metal ion contamination of drinking water and waste water is a serious ongoing problem especially with high toxic metals such as lead and cadmium and less toxic metals such as copper and zinc. Several biological materials have attracted many researchers and scientists as they offer both cheap and effective removal of heavy metals from waste water. Therefore it is urgent to study and explore all possible sources of agrobased inexpensive adsorbents for their feasibility in the removal of heavy metals. The objective was to study inexpensive adsorbents like various agricultural wastes such as sugarcane bagasse, rice husk, oil palm shell, coconut shell, and coconut husk in eliminating heavy metals from waste water and their utilization possibilities based on our research and literature survey. It also shows the significance of developing and evaluating new potential biosorbents in the near future with higher adsorption capacity and greater reusable options.

  10. Assessment of sediments from Tiete River - toxicity and trace elements - from Salesopolis to Suzano counties, Sao Paulo, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alegre, Gabriel F.; Borrely, Sueli, E-mail: gabrielfonseca@usp.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Tecnologia das Radiacoes; Nascimento, Thuany M.; Favaro, Deborah I.T., E-mail: defavaro@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Analise por Ativacao Neutronica

    2009-07-01

    In the present study, sediment samples from the Tiete River were evaluated for toxicity and trace metals (5 sampling sites). The studied region includes Salesopolis to Suzano and surroundings, a highly industrialized area. The study involved toxicity evaluation (sediment, elutriate and pore-water) and the distribution of some major, trace and rare earth elements on sediments. Multielemental analysis was carried out by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and total mercury by cold vapor atomic absorption technique (CV AAS). The concentration values obtained for the metals As, Cr, Hg and Zn in the sediment samples were compared to the Canadian Council of Minister of the Environment (CCME) oriented values (TEL and PEL). Regarding toxicity, whole sediments and elutriate fractions were evaluated using chronic assays for Ceriodaphnia dubia, while the pore water was carried out for Vibrio fischeri toxicity assays. These assays followed Brazilian Standardized Methods (ABNT). Whole sediments and elutriate evidenced negative biological effects, even at Salesopolis county, the control site (less impacted area). The worst effects were obtained at Mogi das Cruzes and Suzano counties (sampling stations 3 and 4). The elutriate fractions collected at the same stations showed acute toxicity in two of three samples (C. dubia). When pore water was evaluated, a toxicity gradient which increased as the river flowed through Mogi das Cruzes county was obtained. Regarding toxic metal contents in the sediment samples points 3 and 4 exceeded the TEL oriented values for As, Cr, Hg and Zn and point 4 also exceeded the PEL values for all these elements. (author)

  11. The citotoxicity of calcium hydroxide intracanal dressing by MTT assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanik Zubaidah

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Calcium hydroxide had been used as the intracanal dressing in endodontic treatment due to its high alkaline and high antimicrobial capacity. It also be able to dissolve the necrotic tissue, prevent the root resorbtion and regenerate a new hard tissue. The aim of this study is to identify the concentration of calcium hydroxide that has the lowest citotoxicity. There are 5 groups, each group had 8 samples with different concentration of calcium hydroxide. Group I: 50%, Group II: 55%, Group III: 60%, Group IV: 65% and Group V: 70%. The citotoxicity test by using enzymatic assay of MTT [3-(4.5- dimethylthiazol-2yl ]-2.5 diphenyl tetrazolium bromide, against fibroblast cell (BHK-21. The result of susceptibility test was showed by the citotoxicity detection of the survive cell of fibroblast that was measured spectrophotometrically using 595 nm beam. The data was analyzed using One-Way ANOVA test with significant difference α = 0.05 and subsequently LSD test. The result showed that in concentration 50%, 55%, 60%, 65%, and 70% calcium hydroxide had low toxicity, but calcium hydroxide 60%, had the lowest toxicity.

  12. Organ-on-a-chip for assessing environmental toxicants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Soohee; Yoon, Jeong-Yeol

    2017-06-01

    Man-made xenobiotics, whose potential toxicological effects are not fully understood, are oversaturating the already-contaminated environment. Due to the rate of toxicant accumulation, unmanaged disposal, and unknown adverse effects to the environment and the human population, there is a crucial need to screen for environmental toxicants. Animal models and in vitro models are ineffective models in predicting in vivo responses due to inter-species difference and/or lack of physiologically-relevant 3D tissue environment. Such conventional screening assays possess limitations that prevent dynamic understanding of toxicants and their metabolites produced in the human body. Organ-on-a-chip systems can recapitulate in vivo like environment and subsequently in vivo like responses generating a realistic mock-up of human organs of interest, which can potentially provide human physiology-relevant models for studying environmental toxicology. Feasibility, tunability, and low-maintenance features of organ-on-chips can also make possible to construct an interconnected network of multiple-organs-on-chip toward a realistic human-on-a-chip system. Such interconnected organ-on-a-chip network can be efficiently utilized for toxicological studies by enabling the study of metabolism, collective response, and fate of toxicants through its journey in the human body. Further advancements can address the challenges of this technology, which potentiates high predictive power for environmental toxicology studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. In Vivo Toxicity Studies of Europium Hydroxide Nanorods in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Chitta Ranjan; Abdel Moneim, Soha S.; Wang, Enfeng; Dutta, Shamit; Patra, Sujata; Eshed, Michal; Mukherjee, Priyabrata; Gedanken, Aharon; Shah, Vijay H; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata

    2009-01-01

    Lanthanide nanoparticles and nanorods have been widely used for diagnostic and therapeutic applications in biomedical nanotechnology due to their fluorescence properties and pro-angiogenic to endothelial cells, respectively. Recently, we have demonstrated that europium (III) hydroxide [EuIII(OH)3] nanorods, synthesized by the microwave technique and characterized by several physico-chemical techniques, can be used as pro-angiogenic agents which introduce future therapeutic treatment strategies for severe ischemic heart/limb disease, and peripheral ischemic disease. The toxicity of these inorganic nanorods to endothelial cells was supported by several in vitro assays. To determine the in vivo toxicity, these nanorods were administered to mice through intraperitoneal injection (IP) everyday over a period of seven days in a dose dependent (1.25 to 125 mgKg−1day−1) and time dependent manner (8–60 days). Bio-distribution of europium elements in different organs was analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). Short-term (S-T) and long-term (L-T) toxicity studies (mice sacrificed on day 8 and 60 for S-T and L-T, respectively) show normal blood hematology and serum clinical chemistry with the exception of a slight elevation of liver enzymes. Histological examination of nanorod treated vital organs (liver, kidney, spleen and lungs) showed no or only mild histological changes that indicate mild toxicity at the higher dose of nanorods. PMID:19616569

  14. Toxicity and mutagenic activity of some selected Nigerian plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowemimo, A A; Fakoya, F A; Awopetu, I; Omobuwajo, O R; Adesanya, S A

    2007-09-25

    The toxicity and mutagenic potential of most African plants implicated in the management of cancer have not been investigated. The ethanolic extracts of selected Nigerian plants were subsequently studied using the brine shrimp lethality tests, inhibition of telomerase activity and induction of chromosomal aberrations in vivo in rat lymphocytes. Morinda lucida root bark, Nymphaea lotus whole plant and Garcinia kola root were active in the three test systems. Bryophyllum calycinum whole plant, Annona senegalensis root, Hymenocardia acida stem bark, Erythrophleum suaveolens leaves and Spondiathus preussii stem bark were toxic to brine shrimps and caused chromosomal damage in rat lymphocytes. Ficus exasperata leaves, Chrysophyllum albidum root bark and Hibiscus sabdariffa leaves were non-toxic to all the three test systems. Chenopodium ambrosioides whole plant was non-toxic to brine shrimps and rat lymphocyte chromosomes but showed inhibition in the conventional telomerase assay indicating a possible selectivity for human chromosomes. The result justified the use of the first eight plants and Chenopodium ambrosioides in the management of cancer in south west Nigeria although they appear to be non-selective and their mode of action may be different from plant to plant. All these plants except Chenopodium ambrosioides are also mutagenic and cytotoxic.

  15. Toxicity assessment in marine sediment for the Terra Nova environmental effects monitoring program (1997-2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteway, Sandra A.; Paine, Michael D.; Wells, Trudy A.; DeBlois, Elisabeth M.; Kilgour, Bruce W.; Tracy, Ellen; Crowley, Roger D.; Williams, Urban P.; Janes, G. Gregory

    2014-12-01

    This paper discusses toxicity test results on sediments from the Terra Nova offshore oil development. The Terra Nova Field is located on the Grand Banks approximately 350 km southeast of Newfoundland (Canada). The amphipod (Rhepoxynius abronius) survival and solid phase luminescent bacteria (Vibrio fischeri, or Microtox) assays were conducted on sediment samples collected from approximately 50 stations per program year around Terra Nova during baseline (1997), prior to drilling, and in 2000, 2001, 2002, 2004, 2006, 2008 and 2010 after drilling began. The frequency of toxic responses in the amphipod toxicity test was low. Of the ten stations that were toxic in environmental effects monitoring (EEM) years, only one (station 30(FE)) was toxic in more than one year and could be directly attributed to Terra Nova project activities. In contrast, 65 (18%) of 364 EEM samples were toxic to Microtox. Microtox toxicity in EEM years was not related to distance from Terra Nova drill centres or concentrations of >C10-C21 hydrocarbons or barium, the primary constituents of the synthetic-based drill muds used at Terra Nova. Of the variables tested, fines and strontium levels showed the strongest (positive) correlations with toxicity. Neither fines nor strontium levels were affected by drill cuttings discharge at Terra Nova, except at station 30(FE) (and that station was not toxic to Microtox). Benthic macro-invertebrate abundance, richness and diversity were greater in toxic than in non-toxic sediments. Therefore, Microtox responses indicating toxicity were associated with positive biological responses in the field. This result may have been an indirect function of the increased abundance of most invertebrate taxa in less sandy sediments with higher gravel content, where fines and strontium levels and, consequently, toxicity to Microtox were high; or chemical substances released by biodegradation of organic matter, where invertebrates are abundant, may be toxic to Microtox. Given

  16. Toxicity assessment using different bioassays and microbial biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Sedky H A; Van Ginkel, Steven W; Hussein, Mohamed A M; Abskharon, Romany; Oh, Sang-Eun

    2016-01-01

    Toxicity assessment of water streams, wastewater, and contaminated sediments, is a very important part of environmental pollution monitoring. Evaluation of biological effects using a rapid, sensitive and cost effective method can indicate specific information on ecotoxicity assessment. Recently, different biological assays for toxicity assessment based on higher and lower organisms such as fish, invertebrates, plants and algal cells, and microbial bioassays have been used. This review focuses on microbial biosensors as an analytical device for environmental, food, and biomedical applications. Different techniques which are commonly used in microbial biosensing include amperometry, potentiometry, conductometry, voltammetry, microbial fuel cells, fluorescence, bioluminescence, and colorimetry. Examples of the use of different microbial biosensors in assessing a variety of environments are summarized. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. High throughput assay for evaluation of reactive carbonyl scavenging capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Vidal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Many carbonyl species from either lipid peroxidation or glycoxidation are extremely reactive and can disrupt the function of proteins and enzymes. 4-hydroxynonenal and methylglyoxal are the most abundant and toxic lipid-derived reactive carbonyl species. The presence of these toxics leads to carbonyl stress and cause a significant amount of macromolecular damages in several diseases. Much evidence indicates trapping of reactive carbonyl intermediates may be a useful strategy for inhibiting or decreasing carbonyl stress-associated pathologies. There is no rapid and convenient analytical method available for the assessment of direct carbonyl scavenging capacity, and a very limited number of carbonyl scavengers have been identified to date, their therapeutic potential being highlighted only recently. In this context, we have developed a new and rapid sensitive fluorimetric method for the assessment of reactive carbonyl scavengers without involvement glycoxidation systems. Efficacy of various thiol- and non-thiol-carbonyl scavenger pharmacophores was tested both using this screening assay adapted to 96-well microplates and in cultured cells. The scavenging effects on the formation of Advanced Glycation End-product of Bovine Serum Albumin formed with methylglyoxal, 4-hydroxynonenal and glucose-glycated as molecular models were also examined. Low molecular mass thiols with an α-amino-β-mercaptoethane structure showed the highest degree of inhibitory activity toward both α,β-unsaturated aldehydes and dicarbonyls. Cysteine and cysteamine have the best scavenging ability toward methylglyoxal. WR-1065 which is currently approved for clinical use as a protective agent against radiation and renal toxicity was identified as the best inhibitor of 4-hydroxynonenal.

  18. Direct contact cytotoxicity assays for filter-collected, carbonaceous (soot) nanoparticulate material and observations of lung cell response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, K. F.; Garza, K. M.; Shi, Y.; Murr, L. E.

    A simple, direct contact, cytotoxicity (in vitro) assay has been developed where particulate matter (PM) collected on glass fiber filters was exposed to human epithelial (lung) cells. Carbonaceous (soot) PM included tire, wood, diesel, candle, and variously combusted natural gas PM from a kitchen stove range. Black carbon PM and a commercial multiwall carbon nanotube aggregate PM was also examined in vitro as surrogate materials, and all experimental PM was characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Assay results for 48 h cultures showed toxicity for all carbonaceous PM with various natural gas PM being the most toxic; this was comparable to the toxicity induced by the surrogate PM. Light microscopy examination of affected epithelial cells confirmed the semi-quantitative results. Comparison of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) content and concentration for the carbonaceous PM showed no PAH correlation with relative cell viability (cell death) after 48 h.

  19. Ocular toxicity of authentic lunar dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyers Valerie E

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dust exposure is a well-known occupational hazard for terrestrial workers and astronauts alike and will continue to be a concern as humankind pursues exploration and habitation of objects beyond Earth. Humankind’s limited exploration experience with the Apollo Program indicates that exposure to dust will be unavoidable. Therefore, NASA must assess potential toxicity and recommend appropriate mitigation measures to ensure that explorers are adequately protected. Visual acuity is critical during exploration activities and operations aboard spacecraft. Therefore, the present research was performed to ascertain the ocular toxicity of authentic lunar dust. Methods Small (mean particle diameter = 2.9 ± 1.0 μm, reactive lunar dust particles were produced by grinding bulk dust under ultrapure nitrogen conditions. Chemical reactivity and cytotoxicity testing were performed using the commercially available EpiOcularTM assay. Subsequent in vivo Draize testing utilized a larger size fraction of unground lunar dust that is more relevant to ocular exposures (particles Results In vitro testing indicated minimal irritancy potential based on the time required to reduce cell viability by 50% (ET50. Follow-up testing using the Draize standard protocol confirmed that the lunar dust was minimally irritating. Minor irritation of the upper eyelids was noted at the 1-hour observation point, but these effects resolved within 24 hours. In addition, no corneal scratching was observed using fluorescein stain. Conclusions Low-titanium mare lunar dust is minimally irritating to the eyes and is considered a nuisance dust for ocular exposure. No special precautions are recommended to protect against ocular exposures, but fully shielded goggles may be used if dust becomes a nuisance.

  20. The toxicity data landscape for environmental chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judson, Richard; Richard, Ann; Dix, David J; Houck, Keith; Martin, Matthew; Kavlock, Robert; Dellarco, Vicki; Henry, Tala; Holderman, Todd; Sayre, Philip; Tan, Shirlee; Carpenter, Thomas; Smith, Edwin

    2009-05-01

    Thousands of chemicals are in common use, but only a portion of them have undergone significant toxicologic evaluation, leading to the need to prioritize the remainder for targeted testing. To address this issue, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and other organizations are developing chemical screening and prioritization programs. As part of these efforts, it is important to catalog, from widely dispersed sources, the toxicology information that is available. The main objective of this analysis is to define a list of environmental chemicals that are candidates for the U.S. EPA screening and prioritization process, and to catalog the available toxicology information. We are developing ACToR (Aggregated Computational Toxicology Resource), which combines information for hundreds of thousands of chemicals from > 200 public sources, including the U.S. EPA, National Institutes of Health, Food and Drug Administration, corresponding agencies in Canada, Europe, and Japan, and academic sources. ACToR contains chemical structure information; physical-chemical properties; in vitro assay data; tabular in vivo data; summary toxicology calls (e.g., a statement that a chemical is considered to be a human carcinogen); and links to online toxicology summaries. Here, we use data from ACToR to assess the toxicity data landscape for environmental chemicals. We show results for a set of 9,912 environmental chemicals being considered for analysis as part of the U.S. EPA ToxCast screening and prioritization program. These include high-and medium-production-volume chemicals, pesticide active and inert ingredients, and drinking water contaminants. Approximately two-thirds of these chemicals have at least limited toxicity summaries available. About one-quarter have been assessed in at least one highly curated toxicology evaluation database such as the U.S. EPA Toxicology Reference Database, U.S. EPA Integrated Risk Information System, and the National Toxicology Program.

  1. Survey Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Cleaned and QCd data for the Fishing Effort Survey. Questions on fishing and other out are asked on weather and outdoor activity, including fishing trips. Used for...

  2. Surveying Humaness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Randi; Gad, Christopher

    and development of a large collection of biological and psychological symptoms and psycho-social problems. However, the surveys say nothing about how the information will be of use to the people who answer the procedure or how this scientific intervention will be put to use more specifically within the public......Christopher Gad. Ph.d. Dept. of Information and Media Studies Randi Markussen. Associate Professor, Dept. of Information and Media Studies. rmark@imv.au.dk   Abstract:   Surveying humanness -politics of care improvement   For various reasons we both were subjected to a specific survey procedure...... carried out in a Danish county in order to improve treatment of people who have suffered from long-term illnesses. The surveys concern not only feed back on how people experience their present and past interaction with the social services and health care system; they also ask people to indicate the state...

  3. Surveying Humaness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Randi; Gad, Christopher

    carried out in a Danish county in order to improve treatment of people who have suffered from long-term illnesses. The surveys concern not only feed back on how people experience their present and past interaction with the social services and health care system; they also ask people to indicate the state...... and development of a large collection of biological and psychological symptoms and psycho-social problems. However, the surveys say nothing about how the information will be of use to the people who answer the procedure or how this scientific intervention will be put to use more specifically within the public......Christopher Gad. Ph.d. Dept. of Information and Media Studies Randi Markussen. Associate Professor, Dept. of Information and Media Studies. rmark@imv.au.dk   Abstract:   Surveying humanness -politics of care improvement   For various reasons we both were subjected to a specific survey procedure...

  4. Validation of a Multiparametric, High-Content-Screening Assay for Predictive/Investigative Cytotoxicity: Evidence from Technology Transfer Studies and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Peter James; Edvardsson, Anna

    2017-03-20

    A multiparametric, live-cell, high-content-screening (HCS) cytotoxicity assay was first demonstrated in 2006 ( Arch. Toxicol. 2006 , 80 , 580 - 604 ) to be highly concordant with human hepatotoxicity, including idiosyncratic hepatotoxicities and other target organ toxicities in contrast to historical assays. The success of the assay was attributed to its simultaneous measurement of multiple appropriate "cytobiomarkers": use of human cells with xenometabolic competence for toxicities mediated by metabolites, 72 h exposure to enable expression of slower-acting toxicants, exposure to a wide-range of concentrations from 30- to 100-fold the efficacious concentration, and normalizing the in vitro cytotoxic concentration to an estimate of the in vivo concentration of exposure. An overwhelming volume of evidence has accumulated over the last 10 years to support this approach as necessary in predictive toxicology. Equivalent assays have now been successfully applied in ∼50 studies across a wide variety of toxicants, toxicities, cell types, and disciplines. Review herein of the wider literature on cytotoxicity since the first assay was reported 100 years ago supports the selection of key cytobiomarkers along a final common pathway of cell injury, including cell proliferation, mitochondrial activity, apoptosis, lysosomal mass, oxidative stress, and cell membrane permeability. HCS studies without inclusion of such key cytobiomarkers or without testing to sufficiently high concentration have not been as successful. Furthermore, a subset of the original toxicants has been reanalyzed herein using the original HCS assay and has confirmed their high sensitivities and specificities across locations, HCS technologies, staff, laboratories, and time. A protocol is demonstrated for operational validation of the assay within laboratories to demonstrate proficiency and quality management.

  5. Fluorescent bioassays for toxic metals in milk and yoghurt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddiki Mohammad Shohel

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background From a human health viewpoint, contaminated milk and its products could be a source of long-term exposure to toxic metals. Simple, inexpensive, and on-site assays would enable constant monitoring of their contents. Bioassays that can measure toxic metals in milk or yoghurt might reduce the risk. For this purpose, the green fluorescent protein (GFP-tagged trans factors, ArsR-GFP and CadC-GFP, together with their cis elements were used to develop such bioassays. Results ArsR-GFP or CadC-GFP, which binds either toxic metal or DNA fragment including cis element, was directly mixed with cow’s milk or yoghurt within a neutral pH range. The fluorescence of GFP, which is reflected by the association/dissociation ratio between cis element and trans factor, significantly changed with increasing externally added As (III or Cd (II whereas smaller responses to externally added Pb (II and Zn (II were found. Preparation and dilution of whey fraction at low pH were essential to intrinsic zinc quantification using CadC-GFP. Using the extraction procedure and bioassay, intrinsic Zn (II concentrations ranging from 1.4 to 4.8 mg/l for milk brands and from 1.2 to 2.9 mg/kg for yoghurt brands were determined, which correlated to those determined using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. Conclusions GFP-tagged bacterial trans factors and cis elements can work in the neutralized whole composition and diluted whey fraction of milk and yoghurt. The feature of regulatory elements is advantageous for establishment of simple and rapid assays of toxic metals in dairy products.

  6. Fluorescent bioassays for toxic metals in milk and yoghurt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiki, Mohammad Shohel Rana; Ueda, Shunsaku; Maeda, Isamu

    2012-10-25

    From a human health viewpoint, contaminated milk and its products could be a source of long-term exposure to toxic metals. Simple, inexpensive, and on-site assays would enable constant monitoring of their contents. Bioassays that can measure toxic metals in milk or yoghurt might reduce the risk. For this purpose, the green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged trans factors, ArsR-GFP and CadC-GFP, together with their cis elements were used to develop such bioassays. ArsR-GFP or CadC-GFP, which binds either toxic metal or DNA fragment including cis element, was directly mixed with cow's milk or yoghurt within a neutral pH range. The fluorescence of GFP, which is reflected by the association/dissociation ratio between cis element and trans factor, significantly changed with increasing externally added As (III) or Cd (II) whereas smaller responses to externally added Pb (II) and Zn (II) were found. Preparation and dilution of whey fraction at low pH were essential to intrinsic zinc quantification using CadC-GFP. Using the extraction procedure and bioassay, intrinsic Zn (II) concentrations ranging from 1.4 to 4.8 mg/l for milk brands and from 1.2 to 2.9 mg/kg for yoghurt brands were determined, which correlated to those determined using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. GFP-tagged bacterial trans factors and cis elements can work in the neutralized whole composition and diluted whey fraction of milk and yoghurt. The feature of regulatory elements is advantageous for establishment of simple and rapid assays of toxic metals in dairy products.

  7. Toxic stress and child refugees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, John S

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to describe the phenomenon of toxic stress and its impact on the physical and mental health of child refugees. Almost two decades ago, researchers found that recurring adverse childhood events (ACEs; e.g., physical, psychological, and sexual abuse, neglect, and household dysfunction such as substance abuse, mental illness, and criminal behavior) were associated with a significant increase in serious illnesses during adulthood. Illnesses include heart, lung, and liver disease, cancer, and bone fractures. The scientists reported that experiencing four or more ACEs during childhood significantly increases the risk for toxic stress. Toxic stress is defined as the exposure to extreme, frequent, and persistent adverse events without the presence of a supportive caretaker. There is a paucity of literature related to toxic stress and child refugees. However, it has been clearly established that the prolonged brutal and traumatizing war in Syria is having a profound impact on the physical and mental health of child refugees at a distressing rate. Prevention of toxic stress should be a primary goal of all pediatric healthcare professionals working with child refugees. While this seems daunting given the population, and the seemingly insurmountable stressors they experience, some basic interventions should be considered. Providing basic anticipatory guidance to parents and caregivers of child refugees, to encourage positive parenting and strengthening support networks, will be highly effective in developing the requisite buffers that mitigate the effects of stress and avoid toxic stress. Efforts should also be focused on addressing caregiver stress and improving their ability to provide safe, reliable, and nurturing care that will help to mitigate any stress response experienced by a child. It is critical that greater awareness be placed on the effects of toxic stress on child refugees who are exposed to significant adverse events early in life

  8. Assessment of combined toxicity of heavy metals from industrial wastewaters on Photobacterium phosphoreum T3S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeb, BibiSaima; Ping, Zheng; Mahmood, Qaisar; Lin, Qiu; Pervez, Arshid; Irshad, Muhammad; Bilal, Muhammad; Bhatti, Zulfiqar Ahmad; Shaheen, Shahida

    2017-07-01

    This research work is focusing on the toxicities of heavy metals of industrial origin to anaerobic digestion of the industrial wastewater. Photobacterium phosphoreum T3S was used as an indicator organism. The acute toxicities of heavy metals on P. phosphoreum T3S were assessed during 15-min half inhibitory concentration (IC50) as indicator at pH 5.5-6. Toxicity assays involved the assessment of multicomponent mixtures using TU and MTI approaches. The results of individual toxicity indicated that the toxicity of Cd, Cu and Pb on P. phosphoreum increased with increasing concentrations and there was a linear correlation. The 15-min IC50 values of Cd, Cu and Pb were 0.537, 1.905 and 1.231 mg/L, respectively, and their toxic order was Cd > Pb > Cu. The combined effects of Cd, Cu and Pb were assayed by equivalent concentration mixing method. The results showed that the combined effects of Cd + Cu, Cd + Pb, Cu + Pb, Cd + Cu + Pb were antagonistic, antagonistic and partly additive. The combined effect of three heavy metals was partly additive.

  9. Critical issues with the in vivo comet assay: A report of the comet assay working group in the 6th International Workshop on Genotoxicity Testing (IWGT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speit, Günter; Kojima, Hajime; Burlinson, Brian; Collins, Andrew R; Kasper, Peter; Plappert-Helbig, Ulla; Uno, Yoshifumi; Vasquez, Marie; Beevers, Carol; De Boeck, Marlies; Escobar, Patricia A; Kitamoto, Sachiko; Pant, Kamala; Pfuhler, Stefan; Tanaka, Jin; Levy, Dan D

    2015-05-01

    As a part of the 6th IWGT, an expert working group on the comet assay evaluated critical topics related to the use of the in vivo comet assay in regulatory genotoxicity testing. The areas covered were: identification of the domain of applicability and regulatory acceptance, identification of critical parameters of the protocol and attempts to standardize the assay, experience with combination and integration with other in vivo studies, demonstration of laboratory proficiency, sensitivity and power of the protocol used, use of different tissues, freezing of samples, and choice of appropriate measures of cytotoxicity. The standard protocol detects various types of DNA lesions but it does not detect all types of DNA damage. Modifications of the standard protocol may be used to detect additional types of specific DNA damage (e.g., cross-links, bulky adducts, oxidized bases). In addition, the working group identified critical parameters that should be carefully controlled and described in detail in every published study protocol. In vivo comet assay results are more reliable if they were obtained in laboratories that have demonstrated proficiency. This includes demonstration of adequate response to vehicle controls and an adequate response to a positive control for each tissue being examined. There was a general agreement that freezing of samples is an option but more data are needed in order to establish generally accepted protocols. With regard to tissue toxicity, the working group concluded that cytotoxicity could be a confounder of comet results. It is recommended to look at multiple parameters such as histopathological observations, organ-specific clinical chemistry as well as indicators of tissue inflammation to decide whether compound-specific toxicity might influence the result. The expert working group concluded that the alkaline in vivo comet assay is a mature test for the evaluation of genotoxicity and can be recommended to regulatory agencies for use

  10. National Status and Trends: Bioeffects Program - Biological Effects of Toxic Contaminants in Sediments from Long Island Sound and Environs

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A survey of sediment toxicity was carried out by NOAA's National Status and Trends Program in the coastal bays that surround Long Island Sound in New York and...

  11. National Status and Trends: Bioeffects Program - Magnitude and Extent of Sediment Toxicity in the Hudson-Raritan Estuary

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A survey of the toxicity of sediments was performed by NOAA's National Status and Trends (NSandT) Program throughout the Hudson-Raritan Estuary. The objectives of...

  12. METHODOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF QUANTITATIVE RECEPTOR ASSAYS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SMISTEROVA, J; ENSING, K; DEZEEUW, RA

    Receptor assays occupy a particular position in the methods used in bioanalysis, as they do not exploit the physico-chemical properties of the analyte. These assays make use of the property of the analyte to bind to the specific binding site (receptor) and to competitively replace a labelled ligand

  13. A lateral electrophoretic flow diagnostic assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Robert; Skandarajah, Arunan; Gerver, Rachel E; Neira, Hector D; Fletcher, Daniel A; Herr, Amy E

    2015-03-21

    Immunochromatographic assays are a cornerstone tool in disease screening. To complement existing lateral flow assays (based on wicking flow) we introduce a lateral flow format that employs directed electrophoretic transport. The format is termed a "lateral e-flow assay" and is designed to support multiplexed detection using immobilized reaction volumes of capture antigen. To fabricate the lateral e-flow device, we employ mask-based UV photopatterning to selectively immobilize unmodified capture antigen along the microchannel in a barcode-like pattern. The channel-filling polyacrylamide hydrogel incorporates a photoactive moiety (benzophenone) to immobilize capture antigen to the hydrogel without a priori antigen modification. We report a heterogeneous sandwich assay using low-power electrophoresis to drive biospecimen through the capture antigen barcode. Fluorescence barcode readout is collected via a low-resource appropriate imaging system (CellScope). We characterize lateral e-flow assay performance and demonstrate a serum assay for antibodies to the hepatitis C virus (HCV). In a pilot study, the lateral e-flow assay positively identifies HCV+ human sera in 60 min. The lateral e-flow assay provides a flexible format for conducting multiplexed immunoassays relevant to confirmatory diagnosis in near-patient settings.

  14. A Continuous, Fluorogenic Sirtuin 2 Deacylase Assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galleano, Iacopo; Schiedel, Matthias; Jung, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    and kinetic insight regarding sirtuin inhibitors, it is important to have access to efficient assays. In this work, we report readily synthesized fluorogenic substrates enabling enzyme-economical evaluation of SIRT2 inhibitors in a continuous assay format as well as evaluation of the properties of SIRT2...

  15. Earthworm Comet Assay for Assessing the Risk of Weathered Petroleum Hydrocarbon Contaminated Soils: Need to Look Further than Target Contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadass, Kavitha; Palanisami, Thavamani; Smith, Euan; Mayilswami, Srinithi; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Naidu, Ravi

    2016-11-01

    Earthworm toxicity assays contribute to ecological risk assessment and consequently standard toxicological endpoints, such as mortality and reproduction, are regularly estimated. These endpoints are not enough to better understand the mechanism of toxic pollutants. We employed an additional endpoint in the earthworm Eisenia andrei to estimate the pollutant-induced stress. In this study, comet assay was used as an additional endpoint to evaluate the genotoxicity of weathered hydrocarbon contaminated soils containing 520 to 1450 mg hydrocarbons kg-1 soil. Results showed that significantly higher DNA damage levels (two to sixfold higher) in earthworms exposed to hydrocarbon impacted soils. Interestingly, hydrocarbons levels in the tested soils were well below site-specific screening guideline values. In order to explore the reasons for observed toxicity, the contaminated soils were leached with rainwater and subjected to earthworm tests, including the comet assay, which showed no DNA damage. Soluble hydrocarbon fractions were not found originally in the soils and hence no hydrocarbons leached out during soil leaching. The soil leachate's Electrical Conductivity (EC) decreased from an average of 1665 ± 147 to 204 ± 20 µS cm-1. Decreased EC is due to the loss of sodium, magnesium, calcium, and sulphate. The leachate experiment demonstrated that elevated salinity might cause the toxicity and not the weathered hydrocarbons. Soil leaching removed the toxicity, which is substantiated by the comet assay and soil leachate analysis data. The implication is that earthworm comet assay can be included in future eco (geno) toxicology studies to assess accurately the risk of contaminated soils.

  16. Cytotoxicity screening of 23 engineered nanomaterials using a test matrix of ten cell lines and three different assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Göbbert Christian

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Engineered nanomaterials display unique properties that may have impact on human health, and thus require a reliable evaluation of their potential toxicity. Here, we performed a standardized in vitro screening of 23 engineered nanomaterials. We thoroughly characterized the physicochemical properties of the nanomaterials and adapted three classical in vitro toxicity assays to eliminate nanomaterial interference. Nanomaterial toxicity was assessed in ten representative cell lines. Results Six nanomaterials induced oxidative cell stress while only a single nanomaterial reduced cellular metabolic activity and none of the particles affected cell viability. Results from heterogeneous and chemically identical particles suggested that surface chemistry, surface coating and chemical composition are likely determinants of nanomaterial toxicity. Individual cell lines differed significantly in their response, dependent on the particle type and the toxicity endpoint measured. Conclusion In vitro toxicity of the analyzed engineered nanomaterials cannot be attributed to a defined physicochemical property. Therefore, the accurate identification of nanomaterial cytotoxicity requires a matrix based on a set of sensitive cell lines and in vitro assays measuring different cytotoxicity endpoints.

  17. Comparison of enzyme immunoassay–based assays for environmental Alternaria alternata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Charles; Portnoy, Jay; Sever, Michelle; Arbes, Samuel; Vaughn, Ben; Zeldin, Darryl C.

    2007-01-01

    Background Alternaria alternata–derived allergenic materials are causes of human disease. Several immunoassays exist to quantify these materials. Objective To compare methods for evaluating Alternaria content. Methods Four methods, including 1 monoclonal antibody (MAb)–based assay specific for recombinant Alt a 1, 1 MAb-based assay for chromatographically purified Alt a 1, 1 polyclonal antibody (PAb)–based assay for chromatographically purified Alt a 1, and 1 PAb-based assay for whole Alternaria extract, were evaluated. Environmental samples collected as part of the National Survey of Lead and Allergens in Housing were examined. Alternaria spore counts were determined in dust by observation. Results The MAb-based assay for recombinant Alt a 1 detected Alternaria in few samples (25%); the PAb-based assay for whole Alternaria proteins detected antigen in 97% of the samples. The PAb- and MAb-based assays for purified Alt a 1 detected antigen in 100% of the samples. There was a significant positive correlation between the 2 assays directed against purified Alt a 1. There was a positive correlation between the PAb-based assay for whole Alternaria and the PAb-based assay for Alt a 1. Nearly all the dust samples contained Alternaria spores, and there was a strong positive correlation between counts and all assays. Conclusion Because of the multifaceted nature of Alternaria, the disparities between methods for quantifying Alternaria, the cross-reactivity between fungal allergens, and the documented genetic promiscuity of this fungus, enzyme immunoassays using PAbs against a range of Alternaria proteins will probably produce the most reliable estimation of overall Alternaria exposure in house dust. PMID:17042141

  18. p38 MAPK-SKN-1/Nrf signaling cascade is required for intestinal barrier against graphene oxide toxicity in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yunli; Zhi, Lingtong; Wu, Qiuli; Yu, Yonglin; Sun, Qiqing; Wang, Dayong

    2016-12-01

    Biological barrier plays a crucial role for organisms against the possible toxicity from engineered nanomaterials (ENMs). Graphene oxide (GO) has been proven to cause potential toxicity on organisms. However, the molecular mechanisms for intestinal barrier of animals against GO toxicity are largely unclear. Using in vivo assay system of Caenorhabditis elegans, we found that mutation of genes encoding core p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway caused susceptible property to GO toxicity and enhanced translocation of GO into the body of nematodes. Genetic assays indicated that SKN-1/Nrf functioned downstream of p38 MAPK signaling pathway to regulate GO toxicity and translocation. Transcription factor of SKN-1 could regulate GO toxicity and translocation at least through function of its targeted gene of gst-4 encoding one of phase II detoxification proteins. Moreover, intestine-specific RNA interference (RNAi) assay demonstrated that the p38 MAPK-SKN-1/Nrf signaling cascade could function in intestine to regulate GO toxicity and intestinal permeability in GO exposed nematodes. Therefore, p38 MAPK-SKN-1/Nrf signaling cascade may act as an important molecular basis for intestinal barrier against GO toxicity in organisms. Exposure to GO induced significantly increased expression of genes encoding p38 MAPK-SKN-1/Nrf signaling cascade, which further implies that the identified p38 MAPK-SKN-1/Nrf signaling cascade may encode a protection mechanism for nematodes in intestine to be against GO toxicity.

  19. Towards a systematic assessment of assay interference: Identification of extensively tested compounds with high assay promiscuity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gilberg Erik; Stumpfe Dagmar; Bajorath Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    A large-scale statistical analysis of hit rates of extensively assayed compounds is presented to provide a basis for a further assessment of assay interference potential and multi-target activities...

  20. Antifungal chemical compounds identified using a C. elegans pathogenicity assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Breger

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available There is an urgent need for the development of new antifungal agents. A facile in vivo model that evaluates libraries of chemical compounds could solve some of the main obstacles in current antifungal discovery. We show that Candida albicans, as well as other Candida species, are ingested by Caenorhabditis elegans and establish a persistent lethal infection in the C. elegans intestinal track. Importantly, key components of Candida pathogenesis in mammals, such as filament formation, are also involved in nematode killing. We devised a Candida-mediated C. elegans assay that allows high-throughput in vivo screening of chemical libraries for antifungal activities, while synchronously screening against toxic compounds. The assay is performed in liquid media using standard 96-well plate technology and allows the study of C. albicans in non-planktonic form. A screen of 1,266 compounds with known pharmaceutical activities identified 15 (approximately 1.2% that prolonged survival of C. albicans-infected nematodes and inhibited in vivo filamentation of C. albicans. Two compounds identified in the screen, caffeic acid phenethyl ester, a major active component of honeybee propolis, and the fluoroquinolone agent enoxacin exhibited antifungal activity in a murine model of candidiasis. The whole-animal C. elegans assay may help to study the molecular basis of C. albicans pathogenesis and identify antifungal compounds that most likely would not be identified by in vitro screens that target fungal growth. Compounds identified in the screen that affect the virulence of Candida in vivo can potentially be used as "probe compounds" and may have antifungal activity against other fungi.